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Sample records for atherosclerosis

  1. Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up inside your arteries. Plaque is a sticky substance ... flow of oxygen-rich blood to your body. Atherosclerosis can lead to serious problems, including Coronary artery ...

  2. Atherosclerosis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherosclerosis is a disease of the arteries in which fatty material is deposited in the vessel wall, ... muscle leads to symptoms such as chest pain. Atherosclerosis shows no symptoms until a complication occurs.

  3. What Causes Atherosclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Atherosclerosis? The exact cause of atherosclerosis isn't known. ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  4. How Is Atherosclerosis Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Atherosclerosis Treated? Treatments for atherosclerosis may include heart-healthy ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  5. How Is Atherosclerosis Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Atherosclerosis Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose atherosclerosis based on ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  6. What Is Atherosclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Atherosclerosis? Español Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque ... problems, including heart attack , stroke , or even death. Atherosclerosis Figure A shows a normal artery with normal ...

  7. Living with Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Atherosclerosis Improved treatments have reduced the number of deaths ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  8. Atherosclerosis and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... After Stroke Inspirational Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Atherosclerosis and Stroke Updated:Oct 24,2016 Excerpted and ... cause difficulty walking and eventually gangrene. Stroke and atherosclerosis There are two types of ischemic stroke caused ...

  9. Atherosclerosis and Physical Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Mamari, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease have been considered as major health problem worldwide. Abnormalities in lipids and lipoprotein metabolism and impairment of endothelial function have been implicated as the main contributing factors in atherosclerosis and its progression. Physical activity has been recognized as a preventive measure for atherosclerosis.

  10. Phytosterols and atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Malene

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the major cause of premature deaths worldwide. Coronary heart disease is the most common CVD, caused by atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries. Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. WHO has in 2007 listed...... in its “Guidelines for assessment and management of cardiovascular risk” the following risk factors to influence progressive atherosclerosis: hypertension, abnormal blood lipids, diabetes, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity and smoking. Phytosterols (plant sterols and plant stanols) are known...... their blood cholesterol levels. The aim of this Ph.D. project was to investigate the effects of phytosterols on the development of atherosclerosis in the aorta of heterozygous Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits. The main advantage of animal studies to human studies in atherosclerosis research...

  11. Histone deacetylases and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xia-xia; Zhou, Tian; Wang, Xin-An; Tong, Xiao-hong; Ding, Jia-wang

    2015-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most common pathological process that leads to cardiovascular diseases, a disease of large- and medium-sized arteries that is characterized by a formation of atherosclerotic plaques consisting of necrotic cores, calcified regions, accumulated modified lipids, smooth muscle cells (SMCs), endothelial cells, leukocytes, and foam cells. Recently, the question about how to suppress the occurrence of atherosclerosis and alleviate the progress of cardiovascular disease becomes the hot topic. Accumulating evidence suggests that histone deacetylases(HDACs) play crucial roles in arteriosclerosis. This review summarizes the effect of HDACs and HDAC inhibitors(HDACi) on the progress of atherosclerosis.

  12. Infection and Atherosclerosis Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Lee Ann; Rosenfeld, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic disease hallmarked by chronic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and lipid accumulation in the vasculature. Although lipid modification and deposition are thought to be a major source of the continuous inflammatory stimulus, a large body of evidence suggests that infectious agents may contribute to atherosclerotic processes. This could occur by either direct effects through infection of vascular cells and/or through indirect effects by induction of cytokine and acute phase reactant proteins by infection at other sites. Multiple bacterial and viral pathogens have been associated with atherosclerosis by seroepidemiological studies, identification of the infectious agent in human atherosclerotic tissue, and experimental studies demonstrating an acceleration of atherosclerosis following infection in animal models of atherosclerosis. This review will focus on those infectious agents for which biological plausibility has been demonstrated in animal models and on the challenges of proving a role of infection in human atherosclerotic disease. PMID:26004263

  13. [Diet and atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, J A; Garcés, C; de Oya, M

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between diet and atherosclerosis is due to the diet influence on lipoprotein composition. However, because of the multifactorial basis of the atherosclerosis, diet components have another potential intervention mechanisms in the atherosclerosis process, such as the influence on other cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, obesity, diabetes) or the influence on the coagulation system and the relationship endothelium-platelets. We will review the effect of diet components on these factors, specially its effects on the haemostasia system, which alteration is responsible for provoking ischemic heart disease. We have to consider that the main objective when treating dyslipidaemias, besides of avoiding acute pancreatitis in cases of strong hypertrigliceridaemia, is to prevent arteriosclerosis development and its clinical manifestations such as ischemic heart disease. Besides, we know that genetic, in addition to provoke familial susceptibility to atherosclerosis, has an essential importance in the response to ambiental factors as diet is.

  14. Who Is at Risk for Atherosclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. Who Is at Risk for Atherosclerosis? The exact cause of atherosclerosis isn't known. ... role in atherosclerosis risk. Other Factors That Affect Atherosclerosis Other factors also may raise your risk for ...

  15. Macrophage Autophagy in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Maiuri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages play crucial roles in atherosclerotic immune responses. Recent investigation into macrophage autophagy (AP in atherosclerosis has demonstrated a novel pathway through which these cells contribute to vascular inflammation. AP is a cellular catabolic process involving the delivery of cytoplasmic contents to the lysosomal machinery for ultimate degradation and recycling. Basal levels of macrophage AP play an essential role in atheroprotection during early atherosclerosis. However, AP becomes dysfunctional in the more advanced stages of the pathology and its deficiency promotes vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, and plaque necrosis. In this paper, we will discuss the role of macrophages and AP in atherosclerosis and the emerging evidence demonstrating the contribution of macrophage AP to vascular pathology. Finally, we will discuss how AP could be targeted for therapeutic utility.

  16. Immune Vasculitis Induced Atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between immune vasculitis and atherosclerosis was studied. The experimental model of weanling rabbits for immune vasculitis was reproduced by intravenous injection of 10 % bovine serum albumin. There were 6 groups: group A, 25 weanling rabbits with immune vasculitis subject to coronary arteriography; group B, 10 normal mature rabbits subject to coronary arteriography; group C, 10 weanling rabbits subject to coronary arteriography; group D, 8 weanling rabbits with vasculitis and cholesterol diet; group E, 8 weanling rabbits receiving single cholesterol diet; group F: 8 weanling rabbits receiving basic diet. Four weeks later, coronary arteriography was performed in groups A, B and C. The rabbits in groups D, E and F were sacrificed for the study of pathological changes in the coronary artery after 12 weeks. The results showed that the dilatation of coronary artery occurred in 6 rabbits of group A, but in groups B and C, no dilatation of coronary artery appeared. In comparison with group E, more severe atherosclerosis occurred in group D, showing the thickened plaque, fibrous sclerosis and atherosclerotic lesion. Percentage of plaques covering aortic intima, incidence of atherosclerosis of small coronary arteries and degree of stenosis of coronary arteries were significantly higher in group D than in group E (P<0.01). No atherosclerosis changes were found in group F. It was concluded that in the acute phase, the serum immune vasculitis can induce the dilatation of coronary artery of some weanling rabbits, and aggravate the formation of atherosclerosis in rabbits fed with cholesterol diet. Immune vasculitis is a new risk factor of atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease.

  17. Alcohol and atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DA LUZ PROTASIO L.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is manifested as coronary artery disease (CAD, ischemic stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Moderate alcohol consumption has been associated with reduction of CAD complications. Apparently, red wine offers more benefits than any other kind of drinks, probably due to flavonoids. Alcohol alters lipoproteins and the coagulation system. The flavonoids induce vascular relaxation by mechanisms that are both dependent and independent of nitric oxide, inhibits many of the cellular reactions associated with atherosclerosis and inflammation, such as endothelial expression of vascular adhesion molecules and release of cytokines from polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Hypertension is also influenced by the alcohol intake. Thus, heavy alcohol intake is almost always associated with systemic hypertension, and hence shall be avoided. In individuals that ingest excess alcohol, there is higher risk of coronary occlusion, arrhythmias, hepatic cirrhosis, upper gastrointestinal cancers, fetal alcohol syndrome, murders, sex crimes, traffic and industrial accidents, robberies, and psychosis. Alcohol is no treatment for atherosclerosis; but it doesn't need to be prohibited for everyone. Thus moderate amounts of alcohol (1-2 drinks/day, especially red wine, may be allowed for those at risk for atherosclerosis complications.

  18. Genetic Susceptibility to Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Kovacic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a complex multifocal arterial disease involving interactions of multiple genetic and environmental factors. Advances in techniques of molecular genetics have revealed that genetic ground significantly influences susceptibility to atherosclerotic vascular diseases. Besides further investigations of monogenetic diseases, candidate genes, genetic polymorphisms, and susceptibility loci associated with atherosclerotic diseases have been identified in recent years, and their number is rapidly increasing. This paper discusses main genetic investigations fields associated with human atherosclerotic vascular diseases. The paper concludes with a discussion of the directions and implications of future genetic research in arteriosclerosis with an emphasis on prospective prediction from an early age of individuals who are predisposed to develop premature atherosclerosis as well as to facilitate the discovery of novel drug targets.

  19. Alcohol and Atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Yinglan; Song Jingyu; Jin Junshuo; Zhong Xiuhong; Ren Xiangshan; Liu Shuangping

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To study the relationship between alcohol and atherosclerosis (AS).Methods The paper reviewed the mechanism of the alcohol leading to AS from four aspects such as the introduction of alcohol and AS, imbalance of oxidationantioxidation system, oxygen free radical (OFR) and endothelium cell (EC) apoptosis, apoptosis and AS.Results Excessive alcohol could lead to imbalance of oxidation-antioxidation system, and increase OFR, in the meanwhile, OFR could lead to EC apoptosis,which could lead to AS.

  20. Blood pressure and atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008412 Association between single nucleotide polymorphisms of matrix metalloproteinase-3 gene and the severity of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with coronary artery disease. WU Naqiong(吴娜琼),et al. Cardiovasc Instit, Fuwai Hosp, Beijing 100037. Chin J Cardiol 2008;36(6):501-505. Objective To investigate the association between the severity of coronary arteries in patients with coronary artery disease and the single nucleotide polymorphisms of MMP-3 gene.

  1. Role of Micronutrients on Subclinical Atherosclerosis Micronutrients in Subclinical Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocyigit, Duygu; Gurses, Kadri Murat; Yalcin, Muhammed Ulvi; Tokgozoglu, Lale

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) leading to coronary heart disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. Nutrition is one of the key factors in the etiology of atherosclerosis. Micronutrient supplements are widely used to prevent many chronic diseases including atherosclerosis. However, scientific evidence regarding this issue is still insufficient and current data on the association of dietary micronutrients and CVD risk is contradictory. Most of the randomized studies have failed to demonstrate beneficial effects of micronutrient supplementation on markers of subclinical atherosclerosis. In this review, role of each micronutrient on subclinical atherosclerosis will be evaluated thoroughly.

  2. B cell subsets in atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather M. Perry

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of heart attacks and strokes, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the artery wall. Immune cells, including lymphocytes modulate atherosclerotic lesion development through interconnected mechanisms. Elegant studies over the past decades have begun to unravel a role for B cells in atherosclerosis. Recent findings provide evidence that B cell effects on atherosclerosis may be subset-dependent. B-1a B cells have been reported to protect from atherosclerosis by secretion of natural IgM antibodies. Conventional B-2 B cells can promote atherosclerosis through less clearly defined mechanism that may involve CD4 T cells. Yet, there may be other populations of B cells within these subsets with different phenotypes altering their impact on atherosclerosis. Additionally, the role of B cell subsets in atherosclerosis may depend on their environmental niche and/or the stage of atherogenesis. This review will highlight key findings in the evolving field of B cells and atherosclerosis and touch on the potential and importance of translating these findings to human disease.

  3. Alcohol and atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo Foppa

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Observational studies have attributed a protective effect to alcohol consumption on the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Alcohol intake in the amount of one to two drinks per day results in an estimated 20-40% reduction in cardiovascular events. An additional protective effect, according to major cohort studies, has been attributed to wine, probably due to antioxidant effects and platelet antiaggregation agents. On the other hand, the influence of different patterns of alcohol consumption and environmental factors may explain a great part of the additional effect of wine. Protection may be mediated by modulation of other risk factors, because alcohol increases HDL-C, produces a biphasic response on blood pressure, and modulates the endothelial function, while it neither increases body weight nor impairs glucose-insulin homeostasis. Alcohol may also have a direct effect on atherogenesis. Despite these favorable effects, the current evidence is not enough to justify prescribing alcohol to prevent cardiovascular disease.

  4. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulkifli Amin

    2016-09-01

    Endothelial dysfunction, sympathetic stimulation, and proinflammatory cytokine modulation caused by OSA play significant role to an atherosclesrotic event. Other risk factors of atherosclerosis like hypertension and diabetes mellitus also associated with OSA. Animal and clinical studies recently showed promising data to prove association between OSA, atherosclerosis, and its risk factors. However, provided data has not showed consistent result. In the future, demand of further research both basic and clinical sciences need to be fulfilled.

  5. How Can Atherosclerosis Be Prevented or Delayed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Atherosclerosis Be Prevented or Delayed? Taking action to control ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  6. Long noncoding RNAs and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian; Ding, Jia-wang; Wang, Xin-an; Zheng, Xia-xia

    2016-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is universally recognized as a chronic lipid-induced inflammation of the vessel wall in response to dyslipidemia and haemodynamic stress involving dysfunction and activation of resident vascular cells as well as infiltration of leukocytes. As members of nonprotein-coding RNAs, the long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are implicated in various biological processes. Accumulating evidences suggest that lncRNAs regulate the function of vascular wall, activation of macrophages, lipid metabolism and immune response. Here, we review the effects of lncRNAs on the progress of atherosclerosis.

  7. Periodontal Innate Immune Mechanisms Relevant to Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a common cardiovascular disease in the United States. The disease is a leading cause of illness and death in the United States. Atherosclerosis is the most common cause for heart attack and stroke. Most commonly, people develop atherosclerosis as a result of diabetes, genetic risk factors, high blood pressure, a high-fat diet, obesity, high blood cholesterol levels, and smoking. However a sizable amount of patients suffering from atherosclerosis do not harbor the classical ...

  8. Intestinal Microbiota Metabolism and Atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Xing Liu; Hai-Tao Niu; Shu-Yang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:This review aimed to summarize the relationship between intestinal microbiota metabolism and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and to propose a novel CVD therapeutic target.Data Sources:This study was based on data obtained from PubMed and EMBASE up to June 30,2015.Articles were selected using the following search temps:"Intestinal microbiota","trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO)","trimethylamine (TMA)","cardiovascular",and "atherosclerosis".Study Selection:Studies were eligible if they present information on intestinal microbiota metabolism and atherosclerosis.Studies on TMA-containing nutrients were also included.Results:A new CVD risk factor,TMAO,was recently identified.It has been observed that several TMA-containing compounds may be catabolized by specific intestinal microbiota,resulting in TMA release.TMA is subsequently converted to TMAO in the liver.Several preliminary studies have linked TMAO to CVD,particularly atherosclerosis;however,the details of this relationship remain unclear.Conclusions:Intestinal microbiota metabolism is associated with atherosclerosis and may represent a promising therapeutic target with respect to CVD management.

  9. Cyclodextrin promotes atherosclerosis regression via macrophage reprogramming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease linked to elevated blood cholesterol concentrations. Despite ongoing advances in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Continuous retention of apolipoprotein B...... that increases cholesterol solubility in preventing and reversing atherosclerosis. We showed that CD treatment of murine atherosclerosis reduced atherosclerotic plaque size and CC load and promoted plaque regression even with a continued cholesterol-rich diet. Mechanistically, CD increased oxysterol production...... of CD as well as for augmented reverse cholesterol transport. Because CD treatment in humans is safe and CD beneficially affects key mechanisms of atherogenesis, it may therefore be used clinically to prevent or treat human atherosclerosis....

  10. [Is regression of atherosclerosis possible?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D; Richard, J L; Emmerich, J; Bruckert, E; Delahaye, F

    1992-10-01

    Experimental studies have shown the regression of atherosclerosis in animals given a cholesterol-rich diet and then given a normal diet or hypolipidemic therapy. Despite favourable results of clinical trials of primary prevention modifying the lipid profile, the concept of atherosclerosis regression in man remains very controversial. The methodological approach is difficult: this is based on angiographic data and requires strict standardisation of angiographic views and reliable quantitative techniques of analysis which are available with image processing. Several methodologically acceptable clinical coronary studies have shown not only stabilisation but also regression of atherosclerotic lesions with reductions of about 25% in total cholesterol levels and of about 40% in LDL cholesterol levels. These reductions were obtained either by drugs as in CLAS (Cholesterol Lowering Atherosclerosis Study), FATS (Familial Atherosclerosis Treatment Study) and SCOR (Specialized Center of Research Intervention Trial), by profound modifications in dietary habits as in the Lifestyle Heart Trial, or by surgery (ileo-caecal bypass) as in POSCH (Program On the Surgical Control of the Hyperlipidemias). On the other hand, trials with non-lipid lowering drugs such as the calcium antagonists (INTACT, MHIS) have not shown significant regression of existing atherosclerotic lesions but only a decrease on the number of new lesions. The clinical benefits of these regression studies are difficult to demonstrate given the limited period of observation, relatively small population numbers and the fact that in some cases the subjects were asymptomatic. The decrease in the number of cardiovascular events therefore seems relatively modest and concerns essentially subjects who were symptomatic initially. The clinical repercussion of studies of prevention involving a single lipid factor is probably partially due to the reduction in progression and anatomical regression of the atherosclerotic plaque

  11. Atherosclerosis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jednacz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries. Clinical consequences of the atherosclerotic process occur in the adult population, however atherosclerotic process begins in childhood. The classic risk factors for atherosclerosis include obesity, dyslipidaemia, age, gender or family history. In recent years, attention has been drawn to the similarity between atherosclerotic inflammatory processes and inflammatory changes in the course of systemic connective tissue disease, in particular systemic lupus etythematosus (SLE or rheumatoid arthritis (RA. There is also observed the similarity of the pathogenetic background of development of atherosclerosis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are observed in the course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Also homocysteine concentrations, which may play a significant role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, are observed higher in patients with JIA. Some studies revealed higher carotid intima-media thickness (IMT index values in children with JIA. In view of the fact that atherosclerotic process begins as early as in childhood, the introduction of appropriate preventive measures in children is a matter of utmost importance.

  12. Immune response to lipoproteins in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Sonia; Mundkur, Lakshmi; Kakkar, Vijay V

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease, is characterized by chronic inflammation and altered immune response. Cholesterol is a well-known risk factor associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Elevated serum cholesterol is unique because it can lead to development of atherosclerosis in animals and humans even in the absence of other risk factors. Modifications of low-density lipoproteins mediated by oxidation, enzymatic degradation, and aggregation result in changes in their function and activate both innate and adaptive immune system. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has been identified as one of the most important autoantigens in atherosclerosis. This escape from self-tolerance is dependent on the formation of oxidized phospholipids. The emerging understanding of the importance of immune responses against oxidized LDL in atherosclerosis has focused attention on the possibility of development of novel therapy for atherosclerosis. This review provides an overview of immune response to lipoproteins and the fascinating possibility of developing an immunomodulatory therapy for atherosclerosis.

  13. Cholesterol-Lowering Atherosclerosis Study (CLAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-12

    Arterial Occlusive Diseases; Cardiovascular Diseases; Carotid Artery Diseases; Cerebral Arteriosclerosis; Cerebrovascular Disorders; Coronary Arteriosclerosis; Coronary Disease; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Ischemia; Atherosclerosis

  14. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atherosclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atherosclerosis? Atherosclerosis usually doesn't cause signs and symptoms ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  15. Oxyradical Stress, Endocannabinoids, and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anberitha T. Matthews

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is responsible for most cardiovascular disease (CVD and is caused by several factors including hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and chronic inflammation. Oxidants and electrophiles have roles in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and the concentrations of these reactive molecules are an important factor in disease initiation and progression. Overactive NADPH oxidase (Nox produces excess superoxide resulting in oxidized macromolecules, which is an important factor in atherogenesis. Although superoxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS have obvious toxic properties, they also have fundamental roles in signaling pathways that enable cells to adapt to stress. In addition to inflammation and ROS, the endocannabinoid system (eCB is also important in atherogenesis. Linkages have been postulated between the eCB system, Nox, oxidative stress, and atherosclerosis. For instance, CB2 receptor-evoked signaling has been shown to upregulate anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative pathways, whereas CB1 signaling appears to induce opposite effects. The second messenger lipid molecule diacylglycerol is implicated in the regulation of Nox activity and diacylglycerol lipase β (DAGLβ is a key biosynthetic enzyme in the biosynthesis eCB ligand 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG. Furthermore, Nrf2 is a vital transcription factor that protects against the cytotoxic effects of both oxidant and electrophile stress. This review will highlight the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS in intracellular signaling and the impact of deregulated ROS-mediated signaling in atherogenesis. In addition, there is also emerging knowledge that the eCB system has an important role in atherogenesis. We will attempt to integrate oxidative stress and the eCB system into a conceptual framework that provides insights into this pathology.

  16. In-Vivo Assessment of Coronary Atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. Rodriguez-Granillo

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIntravascular ultrasound (IVUS) has emerged as a highly accurate tool for the serial assessment of the natural history of coronary atherosclerosis and to evaluate the effect of different conventional and emerging drug therapies on the progression of atherosclerosis. The contemporary a

  17. Cytokines in atherosclerosis: an intricate balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boshuizen, M.C.S.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the underlying pathology in the majority of clinical manifestations of cardiovascular diseases, which are nowadays the main global cause of mortality. Atherosclerosis is a lipid-driven chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. This inflammatory response, with cytokines as

  18. Cyanotic congenital heart disease and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarp, Julie Bjerre; Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Engstrøm, Thomas; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-03-04

    Improved treatment options in paediatric cardiology and congenital heart surgery have resulted in an ageing population of patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). The risk of acquired heart disease such as atherosclerosis increases with age.Previous studies have speculated whether patients with CCHD are protected against atherosclerosis. Results have shown that the coronary arteries of patients with CCHD are free from plaques and stenosis. Decreased carotid intima-media thickness and low total plasma cholesterol may indicate a reduced risk of later development of atherosclerosis. However, the evidence is still sparse and questionable, and a reasonable explanation for the decreased risk of developing atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD is still missing.This review provides an overview of what is known about the prevalence and potential causes of the reduced risk of atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD.

  19. Oral microbiota in patients with atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fåk, Frida; Tremaroli, Valentina; Bergström, Göran

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Recent evidence suggests that the microbiota may be considered as an environmental factor that contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Periodontal disease has been associated with cardio- and cerebrovascular events, and inflammation in the periodontium is suggested...... patients with asymptomatic and symptomatic atherosclerosis we performed pyrosequencing of the oral microbiota of 92 individuals including patients with asymptomatic and symptomatic atherosclerosis and control individuals without carotid plaques or previous stroke or myocardial infarction. RESULTS......: The overall microbial structure was similar in controls and atherosclerosis patients, but patients with symptomatic atherosclerosis had higher relative abundance of Anaeroglobus (mean 0.040% (SD 0.049)) than the control group (0.010% (SD 0.028)) (P = 0.03). Using linear regression analysis, we found...

  20. LXR signaling pathways and atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkin, Anna; Tontonoz, Peter

    2010-01-01

    First discovered as orphan receptors, liver X receptors (LXRs) were subsequently identified as the nuclear receptor target of the cholesterol metabolites, oxysterols.1 There are 2 LXR receptors encoded by distinct genes: LXRα is most highly expressed in the liver, adipose, kidney, adrenal tissues and macrophages, and LXRβ is ubiquitously expressed. Despite differential tissue distribution, these isoforms have 78% homology in their ligand-binding domain and appear to respond to the same endogenous ligands. Work over the past 10 years has shown that the LXR pathway regulates lipid metabolism and inflammation via both the induction and repression of target genes. Given the importance of cholesterol regulation and inflammation in the development of cardiovascular disease, it is not surprising that activation of the LXR pathway attenuates various mechanisms underlying atherosclerotic plaque development.2 In this minireview we will discuss the impact of the LXR pathway on both cholesterol metabolism and atherosclerosis. PMID:20631351

  1. Naringenin and atherosclerosis: a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Ilkay E; Nabavi, Seyed F; Daglia, Maria; Tenore, Gian C; Mansouri, Kowsar; Nabavi, Seyed M

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease mainly caused by deposition of low-density lipoprotein (LD) cholesterol in macrophages of arterial walls. Atherosclerosis leads to heart attacks as well as stroke. Epidemiological studies showed that there is an inverse correlation between fruit and vegetable consumption and the risk of atherosclerosis. The promising effect of high vegetable and fruit containing diet on atherosclerosis is approved by several experimental studies on isolated phytochemicals such as flavonoids. Flavonoids are known to up-regulate endogenous antioxidant system, suppress oxidative and nitrosative stress, decrease macrophage oxidative stress through cellular oxygenase inhibition as well as interaction with several signal transduction pathways and from these ways, have therapeutic effects against atherosclerosis. Naringenin is a well known flavonoid belonging to the chemical class of flavanones. It is especially abundant in citrus fruits, especially grapefruits. A plethora of evidences ascribes to naringenin antiatherosclerotic effects. Naringenin abilities to decrease LDL and triglycerides as well as inhibit glucose uptake; increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL); co-oxidation of NADH; suppress protein oxidation; protect against intercellular adhesion molecule-1(ICAM-1); suppress macrophage inflammation; inhibit leukotriene B4, monocyte adhesion and foam cell formation; induce of HO-1 and G 0/G 1 cell cycle arrest in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and down regulate atherosclerosis related genes are believed to have crucial role in the promising role against atherosclerosis. In the present review, we have summarized the available literature data on the anti-atherosclerotic effects of naringenin and its possible mechanisms of action.

  2. Macrophage plasticity in experimental atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila Khallou-Laschet

    Full Text Available As in human disease, macrophages (MØ are central players in the development and progression of experimental atherosclerosis. In this study we have evaluated the phenotype of MØ associated with progression of atherosclerosis in the apolipoprotein E (ApoE knockout (KO mouse model.We found that bone marrow-derived MØ submitted to M1 and M2 polarization specifically expressed arginase (Arg II and Arg I, respectively. This distinct arginase expression was used to evaluate the frequency and distribution of M1 and M2 MØ in cross-sections of atherosclerotic plaques of ApoE KO mice. Early lesions were infiltrated by Arg I(+ (M2 MØ. This type of MØ favored the proliferation of smooth muscle cells, in vitro. Arg II(+ (M1 MØ appeared and prevailed in lesions of aged ApoE KO mice and lesion progression was correlated with the dominance of M1 over the M2 MØ phenotype. In order to address whether the M2->M1 switch could be due to a phenotypic switch of the infiltrated cells, we performed in vitro repolarization experiments. We found that fully polarized MØ retained their plasticity since they could revert their phenotype. The analysis of the distribution of Arg I- and Arg II-expressing MØ also argued against a recent recruitment of M1 MØ in the lesion. The combined data therefore suggest that the M2->M1 switch observed in vivo is due to a conversion of cells already present in the lesion. Our study suggests that interventional tools able to revert the MØ infiltrate towards the M2 phenotype may exert an atheroprotective action.

  3. The Progression and Early detection of Subclinical Atherosclerosis (PESA) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio; Jiménez-Borreguero, L Jesús; Peñalvo, José L

    2013-01-01

    The presence of subclinical atherosclerosis is a likely predictor of cardiovascular events; however, factors associated with the early stages and progression of atherosclerosis are poorly defined.......The presence of subclinical atherosclerosis is a likely predictor of cardiovascular events; however, factors associated with the early stages and progression of atherosclerosis are poorly defined....

  4. Atherosclerosis: Process, Indicators, Risk Factors and New Hopes

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: Atherosclerosis is the major cause of morbidities and mortalities worldwide. In this study we aimed to review the mechanism of atherosclerosis and its risk factors, focusing on new findings in atherosclerosis markers and its risk factors. Furthermore, the role of antioxidants and medicinal herbs in atherosclerosis and endothelial damage has been discussed and a list of important medicinal plants effective in the treatment and prevention of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis is pre...

  5. Inflammation and immune system interactions in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legein, Bart; Temmerman, Lieve; Biessen, Erik A L; Lutgens, Esther

    2013-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide, accounting for 16.7 million deaths each year. The underlying cause of the majority of CVD is atherosclerosis. In the past, atherosclerosis was considered to be the result of passive lipid accumulation in the vessel wall. Today's picture is far more complex. Atherosclerosis is considered a chronic inflammatory disease that results in the formation of plaques in large and mid-sized arteries. Both cells of the innate and the adaptive immune system play a crucial role in its pathogenesis. By transforming immune cells into pro- and anti-inflammatory chemokine- and cytokine-producing units, and by guiding the interactions between the different immune cells, the immune system decisively influences the propensity of a given plaque to rupture and cause clinical symptoms like myocardial infarction and stroke. In this review, we give an overview on the newest insights in the role of different immune cells and subtypes in atherosclerosis.

  6. Mouse models for atherosclerosis and pharmaceutical modifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadelaar, A.S.M.; Kleemann, R.; Verschuren, L.; Vries-van der Weij, J. de; Hoorn, J. van der; Princen, H.M.; Kooistra, T.

    2007-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial highly-complex disease with numerous etiologies that work synergistically to promote lesion development. The ability to develop preventive and ameliorative treatments will depend on animal models that mimic the human subject metabolically and pathophysiologically

  7. Role of gut microbiota in atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Annika Lindskog; Bäckhed, Gert Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Infections have been linked to the development of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. Findings from the past decade have identified microbial ecosystems residing in different habitats of the human body that contribute to metabolic and cardiovascular-related disorders. In this Review, we...... of atherosclerotic plaques. Third, diet and specific components that are metabolized by gut microbiota can have various effects on atherosclerosis; for example, dietary fibre is beneficial, whereas the bacterial metabolite trimethylamine-N-oxide is considered harmful. Although specific bacterial taxa have been...... associated with atherosclerosis, which is supported by increasing mechanistic evidence, several questions remain to be answered to understand fully how the microbiota contributes to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Such knowledge might pave the way for novel diagnostics and therapeutics based...

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduce Murine Atherosclerosis Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frodermann, Vanessa; van Duijn, Janine; van Pel, Melissa; van Santbrink, Peter J.; Bot, Ilze; Kuiper, Johan; de Jager, Saskia C. A.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have regenerative properties, but recently they were also found to have immunomodulatory capacities. We therefore investigated whether MSCs could reduce atherosclerosis, which is determined by dyslipidaemia and chronic inflammation. We adoptively transferred MSCs into l

  9. Cytokines and Immune Responses in Murine Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusters, Pascal J H; Lutgens, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the vessel wall characterized by activation of the innate immune system, with macrophages as the main players, as well as the adaptive immune system, characterized by a Th1-dominant immune response. Cytokines play a major role in the initiation and regulation of inflammation. In recent years, many studies have investigated the role of these molecules in experimental models of atherosclerosis. While some cytokines such as TNF or IFNγ clearly had atherogenic effects, others such as IL-10 were found to be atheroprotective. However, studies investigating the different cytokines in experimental atherosclerosis revealed that the cytokine system is complex with both disease stage-dependent and site-specific effects. In this review, we strive to provide an overview of the main cytokines involved in atherosclerosis and to shed light on their individual role during atherogenesis.

  10. Environmental carcinogens and mutational pathways in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliero, A; Godschalk, R; Andreassi, M G; Curfs, D; Van Schooten, F J; Izzotti, A

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is associated with DNA damage in both circulating and vessel-wall cells and DNA adducts derived from exposure to environmental mutagens are abundant in atherosclerotic vessels. Environmental chemical carcinogens identified as risk factor for atherosclerosis include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo(a)pyrene, dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, beta-naphthoflavone, pyrene, 3-methylcolanthrene), arsenic, cadmium, 1,3-butadiene, cigarette smoke. Accordingly, polymorphisms of genes encoding for phase I/II metabolic reaction and DNA repair are risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, although their role is negligible as compared to other risk factors. The pathogenic relevance of mutation-related molecular damage in atherosclerosis has been demonstrated in experimental animal models involving the exposure to chemical mutagens. The relevance of mutation-related events in worsening atherosclerosis prognosis has been demonstrated in human clinical studies mainly as referred to mitochondrial DNA damage. Atherosclerosis is characterized by the occurrence of high level of oxidative damage in blood vessel resulting from both endogenous and exogenous sources. Mitochondrial damage is a main endogenous source of oxidative stress whose accumulation causes activation of intrinsic apoptosis through BIRC2 inhibition and cell loss contributing to plaque development and instability. Environmental physical mutagens, including ionizing radiation, are a risk factor for atherosclerosis even at the low exposure dose occurring in case of occupational exposure or the high exposure doses occurring during radiotherapy. Conversely, the role of exciting UV radiation in atherosclerosis is still uncertain. This review summarizes the experimental and clinical evidence supporting the pathogenic role of mutation-related pathway in atherosclerosis examining the underlying molecular mechanisms.

  11. How hyperglycemia promotes atherosclerosis: molecular mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Both type I and type II diabetes are powerful and independent risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, and peripheral arterial disease. Atherosclerosis accounts for virtually 80% of all deaths among diabetic patients. Prolonged exposure to hyperglycemia is now recognized a major factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in diabetes. Hyperglycemia induces a large number of alterations at the cellular level of vascular tissue that potentially accelerate the atheroscl...

  12. Immune Response to Lipoproteins in Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia Samson; Lakshmi Mundkur; Kakkar, Vijay V

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease, is characterized by chronic inflammation and altered immune response. Cholesterol is a well-known risk factor associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Elevated serum cholesterol is unique because it can lead to development of atherosclerosis in animals and humans even in the absence of other risk factors. Modifications of low-density lipoproteins mediated by oxidation, enzymatic degradation, and aggregation re...

  13. Vinpocetine attenuates lipid accumulation and atherosclerosis formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yujun [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Li, Jian-Dong [Center for Inflammation, Immunity and Infection, and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Yan, Chen, E-mail: Chen_Yan@urmc.rochester.edu [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Vinpocetine attenuates hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. •Vinpocetine antagonizes ox-LDL uptake and accumulation in macrophages. •Vinpocetine blocks the induction of ox-LDL receptor LOX-1 in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Atherosclerosis, the major cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, is a chronic arterial disease characterized by lipid deposition and inflammation in the vessel wall. Cholesterol, in low-density lipoprotein (LDL), plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. Recent study indicated that vinpocetine is a potent anti-inflammatory agent. However, its role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis remains unexplored. In the present study, we show that vinpocetine significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesion formation in ApoE knockout mice fed with a high-fat diet. In cultured murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, vinpocetine markedly attenuated oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) uptake and foam cell formation. Moreover, vinpocetine greatly blocked the induction of ox-LDL receptor 1 (LOX-1) in cultured macrophages as well as in the LOX-1 level in atherosclerotic lesions. Taken together, our data reveal a novel role of vinpocetine in reduction of pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, at least partially through suppressing LOX-1 signaling pathway. Given the excellent safety profile of vinpocetine, this study suggests vinpocetine may be a therapeutic candidate for treating atherosclerosis.

  14. Hyperglycemia impairs atherosclerosis regression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Nathalie; Kumar, Nikit; Olivas, Victor R; Eberlé, Delphine; Stephens, Kyle; Raffai, Robert L

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic patients are known to be more susceptible to atherosclerosis and its associated cardiovascular complications. However, the effects of hyperglycemia on atherosclerosis regression remain unclear. We hypothesized that hyperglycemia impairs atherosclerosis regression by modulating the biological function of lesional macrophages. HypoE (Apoe(h/h)Mx1-Cre) mice express low levels of apolipoprotein E (apoE) and develop atherosclerosis when fed a high-fat diet. Atherosclerosis regression occurs in these mice upon plasma lipid lowering induced by a change in diet and the restoration of apoE expression. We examined the morphological characteristics of regressed lesions and assessed the biological function of lesional macrophages isolated with laser-capture microdissection in euglycemic and hyperglycemic HypoE mice. Hyperglycemia induced by streptozotocin treatment impaired lesion size reduction (36% versus 14%) and lipid loss (38% versus 26%) after the reversal of hyperlipidemia. However, decreases in lesional macrophage content and remodeling in both groups of mice were similar. Gene expression analysis revealed that hyperglycemia impaired cholesterol transport by modulating ATP-binding cassette A1, ATP-binding cassette G1, scavenger receptor class B family member (CD36), scavenger receptor class B1, and wound healing pathways in lesional macrophages during atherosclerosis regression. Hyperglycemia impairs both reduction in size and loss of lipids from atherosclerotic lesions upon plasma lipid lowering without significantly affecting the remodeling of the vascular wall.

  15. Periodontal innate immune mechanisms relevant to atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amar, S; Engelke, M

    2015-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is a common cardiovascular disease in the USA where it is a leading cause of illness and death. Atherosclerosis is the most common cause for heart attack and stroke. Most commonly, people develop atherosclerosis as a result of diabetes, genetic risk factors, high blood pressure, a high-fat diet, obesity, high blood cholesterol levels, and smoking. However, a sizable number of patients suffering from atherosclerosis do not harbor the classical risk factors. Ongoing infections have been suggested to play a role in this process. Periodontal disease is perhaps the most common chronic infection in adults with a wide range of clinical variability and severity. Research in the past decade has shed substantial light on both the initiating infectious agents and host immunological responses in periodontal disease. Up to 46% of the general population harbors the microorganism(s) associated with periodontal disease, although many are able to limit the progression of periodontal disease or even clear the organism(s) if infected. In the last decade, several epidemiological studies have found an association between periodontal infection and atherosclerosis. This review focuses on exploring the molecular consequences of infection by pathogens that exacerbate atherosclerosis, with the focus on infections by the periodontal bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis as a running example.

  16. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yutang; Tikellis, Chris; Thomas, Merlin C; Golledge, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a homolog of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) which generates angiotensin II from angiotensin I. ACE, its product angiotensin II and the downstream angiotensin type I receptor are important components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Angiotensin II, the most important component of the RAS, promotes the development of atherosclerosis. The identification of ACE2 in 2000 opened a new chapter of research on the regulation of the RAS. ACE2 degrades pro-atherosclerotic angiotensin II and generates anti-atherosclerotic angiotensin 1-7. In this review, we explored the importance of ACE2 in protecting experimental animals from developing atherosclerosis and its involvement in human atherosclerosis. We also examined the published evidence assessing the importance of ACE2 in different cell types relevant to atherosclerosis and putative underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms linking ACE2 with protection from atherosclerosis. ACE2 shifts the balance from angiotensin II to angiotensin 1-7 inhibiting the progression of atherosclerosis in animal models.

  17. Immune Response to Lipoproteins in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Samson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease, is characterized by chronic inflammation and altered immune response. Cholesterol is a well-known risk factor associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Elevated serum cholesterol is unique because it can lead to development of atherosclerosis in animals and humans even in the absence of other risk factors. Modifications of low-density lipoproteins mediated by oxidation, enzymatic degradation, and aggregation result in changes in their function and activate both innate and adaptive immune system. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL has been identified as one of the most important autoantigens in atherosclerosis. This escape from self-tolerance is dependent on the formation of oxidized phospholipids. The emerging understanding of the importance of immune responses against oxidized LDL in atherosclerosis has focused attention on the possibility of development of novel therapy for atherosclerosis. This review provides an overview of immune response to lipoproteins and the fascinating possibility of developing an immunomodulatory therapy for atherosclerosis.

  18. Noninvasive assessment of preclinical atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen A Lane

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Helen A Lane, Jamie C Smith, J Stephen DaviesDepartment of Endocrinology, University of Wales College of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff, Wales, UKAbstract: Initially considered as a semipermeable barrier separating lumen from vessel wall, the endothelium is now recognised as a complex endocrine organ responsible for a variety of physiological processes vital for vascular homeostasis. These include the regulation of vascular tone, luminal diameter, and blood flow; hemostasis and thrombolysis; platelet and leucocyte vessel-wall interactions; the regulation of vascular permeability; and tissue growth and remodelling. The endothelium modulates arterial stiffness, which precedes overt atherosclerosis and is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events. Unsurprisingly, dysfunction of the endothelium may be considered as an early and potentially reversible step in the process of atherogenesis and numerous methods have been developed to assess endothelial status and large artery stiffness. Methodology includes flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery, assessment of coronary flow reserve, carotid intimamedia thickness, pulse wave analysis, pulse wave velocity, and plethysmography. This review outlines the various modalities, indications, and limitations of available methods to assess arterial dysfunction and vascular risk.Keywords: endothelial function, vascular risk, vascular stiffness

  19. Macrophages, Dendritic Cells, and Regression of Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E. Feig

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the number one cause of death in the Western world. It results from the interaction between modified lipoproteins and monocyte-derived cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, and other cellular elements of the arterial wall. This inflammatory process can ultimately lead to the development of complex lesions, or plaques, that protrude into the arterial lumen. Ultimately, plaque rupture and thrombosis can occur leading to the clinical complications of myocardial infarction or stroke. Although each of the cell types plays roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, in this review, the focus will be primarily on the monocyte derived cells- macrophages and dendritic cells. The roles of these cell types in atherogenesis will be highlighted. Finally, the mechanisms of atherosclerosis regression as it relates to these cells will be discussed.

  20. Atherosclerosis: Process, Indicators, Risk Factors and New Hopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Rafieian-Kopaei

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: The pathogenesis factors involved in atherosclerosis have recently been cleared and the discovery of these factors has brought about new hopes for better prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis.

  1. Subclinical Measures of Atherosclerosis: Genetics and Cardiovascular Risk Prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kavousi (Maryam)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, systematic condition with a long asymptomatic phase. Atherosclerosis develops gradually as a subclinical condition over the life course and eventually becomes clinically apparent as ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disea

  2. Multiethnic Exome-Wide Association Study of Subclinical Atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Natarajan, Pradeep; Bis, Joshua C; Bielak, Lawrence F; Cox, Amanda J; Dörr, Marcus; Feitosa, Mary F; Franceschini, Nora; Guo, Xiuqing; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Isaacs, Aaron; Jhun, Min A; Kavousi, Maryam; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Marioni, Riccardo E; Schminke, Ulf; Stitziel, Nathan O; Tada, Hayato; van Setten, Jessica; Smith, Albert V; Vojinovic, Dina; Yanek, Lisa R; Yao, Jie; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Amin, Najaf; Baber, Usman; Borecki, Ingrid B; Carr, J Jeffrey; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Cupples, L Adrienne; de Jong, Pim A; de Koning, Harry; de Vos, Bob D; Demirkan, Ayse; Fuster, Valentin; Franco, Oscar H; Goodarzi, Mark O; Harris, Tamara B; Heckbert, Susan R; Heiss, Gerardo; Hoffmann, Udo; Hofman, Albert; Išgum, Ivana; Jukema, J Wouter; Kähönen, Mika; Kardia, Sharon L R; Kral, Brian G; Launer, Lenore J; Massaro, Joseph; Mehran, Roxana; Mitchell, Braxton D; Mosley, Thomas H; de Mutsert, Renée; Newman, Anne B; Nguyen, Khanh-Dung; North, Kari E; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Pankow, James S; Peloso, Gina M; Post, Wendy; Province, Michael A; Raffield, Laura M; Raitakari, Olli T; Reilly, Dermot F; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rosendaal, Frits; Sartori, Samantha; Taylor, Kent D; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; Turner, Stephen T; Uitterlinden, André G; Vaidya, Dhananjay; van der Lugt, Aad; Völker, Uwe; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Wassel, Christina L; Weiss, Stefan; Wojczynski, Mary K; Becker, Diane M; Becker, Lewis C; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bowden, Donald W; Deary, Ian J; Dehghan, Abbas; Felix, Stephan B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Lehtimäki, Terho; Mathias, Rasika; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Psaty, Bruce M; Rader, Daniel J; Rotter, Jerome I; Wilson, James G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Völzke, Henry; Kathiresan, Sekar; Peyser, Patricia A; O'Donnell, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -The burden of subclinical atherosclerosis in asymptomatic individuals is heritable and associated with elevated risk of developing clinical coronary heart disease (CHD). We sought to identify genetic variants in protein-coding regions associated with subclinical atherosclerosis and the

  3. [The treatment of atherosclerosis--drug therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, H; Takahashi, Y

    1993-08-01

    Drug treatment against atherosclerosis has been evaluated recently in many epidemiological studies. Lipid Research Clinics Group convincingly reported in a large scale design that anion exchange resin effectively reduced blood cholesterol level and concomitantly decreased the events of coronary heart disease. Subsequently, anion exchange resin with or without combined administration of niacin or statin was found to inhibit the progression of coronary atherosclerotic lesions in FATS, SCOR, CLAS and STARS. Fenofibrate also successfully reduced the coronary artery narrowings. Based on these intervention studies, several hypocholesterolemic agents are definitely effective in the treatment of coronary atherosclerosis.

  4. Possible roles of platelet-derived microparticles in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Ting; Wang, Zi; Hu, Yan-Wei

    2016-05-01

    Platelets and platelet-derived microparticles (PMPs) play important roles in cardiovascular diseases, especially atherosclerosis. Continued research has revealed that PMPs have numerous functions in atherosclerosis, not only in thrombosis formation, but also by induction of inflammation. PMPs also induce formation of foam cells. Recent evidence strongly indicates a significant role of PMPs in atherosclerosis. Here, current research on the function of PMPs in atherosclerosis is reviewed.

  5. Crosstalk between apoptosis and inflammation in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, Marijke Marianne

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis the role of several apoptosis regulating proteins in the development of atherosclerosis and atherosclerotic plaque stability is investigated. Apoptosis of different cell types in atherosclerotic plaques, such as macrophages and smooth muscle cells may inhibit or promote plaque develop

  6. LDL oxidation and extent of coronary atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijver, L.P.L. van de; Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Duyvenvoorde, W. van; Kruijssen, D.A.C.M.; Grobbee, D.E.; Poppel, G. van; Princen, H.M.G.

    1998-01-01

    Accumulated evidence indicates that oxidative modification of LDL plays an important role in the atherogenic process. Therefore, we investigated the relation between coronary atherosclerosis and susceptibility of LDL to oxidation in a case-control study in men between 45 and 80 years of age. Case su

  7. Imaging of coronary atherosclerosis: Intravascular ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.M. Garcia-Garcia (Hector); M.A. Costa (Marco); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAtherosclerosis is the main cause of coronary heart disease, which is today the leading cause of death worldwide and will continue to be the first in the world in 2030. In the formation of atherosclerotic coronary lesions, a critical primary step is the accumulation and oxidation of low-

  8. Inflammation and its echo in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leuven, S.I.

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation plays a major role during all phases of atherogenesis from plaque initiation up to plaque rupture. In this thesis the role of inflammation in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis is examined from different angles. In part I the effect of various pro-inflammatory mediators is examined

  9. Photoacoustic tomography: applications for atherosclerosis imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Gurneet S.; Goergen, Craig J.

    2016-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is a debilitating condition that increases a patient’s risk for intermittent claudication, limb amputation, myocardial infarction, and stroke, thereby causing approximately 50% of deaths in the western world. Current diagnostic imaging techniques, such as ultrasound, digital subtraction angiography, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and optical imaging remain suboptimal for detecting development of early stage plaques. This is largely due to the lack of compositional information, penetration depth, and/or clinical efficiency of these traditional imaging techniques. Photoacoustic imaging has emerged as a promising modality that could address some of these limitations to improve the diagnosis and characterization of atherosclerosis-related diseases. Photoacoustic imaging uses near-infrared light to induce acoustic waves, which can be used to recreate compositional images of tissue. Recent developments in photoacoustic techniques show its potential in noninvasively characterizing atherosclerotic plaques deeper than traditional optical imaging approaches. In this review, we discuss the significance and development of atherosclerosis, current and novel clinical diagnostic methods, and recent works that highlight the potential of photoacoustic imaging for both experimental and clinical studies of atherosclerosis.

  10. Effects of Rosiglitazone on Rabbit Atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qing; WEI Meng; ZHAO Bing-hui

    2008-01-01

    We sought to validate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for documenting the effects of rosiglitazone on rabbit atherosclerosis and the possible mechanism by treatment on the lesions.24 New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into normal group,control group and treatment group.After 4 weeks,all rabbits underwent MRI.After examination,the number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and level of lipid,glucose,nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide anion (O-2.) were measured.MRI demonstrated the regression of atherosclerotic lesions by rosiglitazone which has good correlation with histopathology.Treatment not only increased the level of EPCs and NO,but also raised the ability of inhibition of O-2..MRI is a promising noninvasive technology to detect the effects of therapeutic interventions.Rosiglitazone slows the progression of atherosclerosis that may in part attribute to its improvement of mobilization of EPCs and the reduced oxidative stress.

  11. Connecting the Lines between Hypogonadism and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akl C. Fahed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies show that atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and point to gender differences with ageing males being at highest risk. Atherosclerosis is a complex process that has several risk factors and mediators. Hypogonadism is a commonly undiagnosed disease that has been associated with many of the events, and risk factors leading to atherosclerosis. The mechanistic relations between testosterone levels, atherosclerotic events, and risk factors are poorly understood in many instances, but the links are clear. In this paper, we summarize the research journey that explains the link between hypogonadism, each of the atherosclerotic events, and risk factors. We look into the different areas from which lessons could be learned, including epidemiological studies, animal and laboratory experiments, studies on androgen deprivation therapy patients, and studies on testosterone-treated patients. We finish by providing recommendations for the clinician and needs for future research.

  12. Atherosclerosis and Nanotechnology: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Jeremy D; Chaddha, Ashish; Bhattacharjee, Somnath; Goonewardena, Sascha N

    2016-02-01

    Over the past several decades, tremendous advances have been made in the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, with shifting demographics and evolving risk factors we now face new challenges that must be met in order to further advance are management of patients with CAD. In parallel with advances in our mechanistic appreciation of CAD and atherosclerosis, nanotechnology approaches have greatly expanded, offering the potential for significant improvements in our diagnostic and therapeutic management of CAD. To realize this potential we must go beyond to recognize new frontiers including knowledge gaps between understanding atherosclerosis to the translation of targeted molecular tools. This review highlights nanotechnology applications for imaging and therapeutic advancements in CAD.

  13. Atherosclerosis in elderly patients with renal insufficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sandeep S. Soman

    2005-01-01

    @@ Introduction As people age,cardiovascular structure and function change and this is superimposed on by specific pathophysiologic disease mechanism.In addition to lipid levels,diabetes,sedentary lifestyle,and genetic factors that are known risks for coronary disease,hypertension,and stroke - the quintessential cardiovascular (CV) diseases related to atherosclerosis within our society - advancing age unequivocally confers the major risk.(Fig.1) Mortality due to cardiovascular disease is more than any other disease and creates enormous costs for the health care system.The main underlying problem in cardiovascular disease is atherosclerosis,a process that obstructs major arteries with lipid deposits and cell accumulation.1 Decreased kidney function (estimated GFR<70 mL/min/1.73 m2) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in the general population.2

  14. [About etiology and pathogenesis of atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitruk, S K

    2013-01-01

    On the ground own researches and researches of other authors etiology and pathogenesis of atherosclerosis are proved and refuted existing concept about leading role of disturbance of lipid exchange and atherogenicity of lipoproteins of low and very low density. Established basic etiological factors of damage intima of artery and reason of penetration of lipoproteins in intima after her damage. Is determined that development and progression of atherosclerosis do not depend also from quantitative content of lipoproteins of low density in blood and from normalization of them under influence of drugs. According to our researches atherosclerosis is the polyetiological chronic disease basis of pathogeny which is infringement of blood supply (chronic microcirculatory insufficiency) in arterial wall causing damage of it, and in first place, damage of intima with her most vulnerable microcirculation; inflammation intima hence influence of endogenous and exogenous factors; destruction of antiaggregatic and fibrinolytic properties of intima in places of her damage; formation atherosclerotic plaque with level-by-level imposing of lipoproteins in result of cyclic process of restoration or balance between coagulation and anticoagulation of blood systems.

  15. Emerging role of IL-17 in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuang; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    The IL-23-IL-17 axis is emerging as a critical regulatory system that bridges the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Th17 cells have been linked to the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. However, the role of Th17 cells and IL-17 in various stages of atherogenesis remains poorly understood and is only beginning to be elucidated. While IL-17 is a predominantly proinflammatory cytokine, it has a pleiotropic function and it has been implicated both as an instigator in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory disorders as well as being protective in certain inflammatory disease models. Therefore, it is not surprising that the current literature is conflicting on the role of IL-17 during atherosclerotic lesion development. Various approaches have been used by several groups to discern the involvement of IL-17 in atherosclerosis. While one study found that IL-17 is protective against atherosclerosis, several other recent studies have suggested that IL-17 plays a proatherogenic role. Thus, the function of IL-17 remains controversial and awaits more direct studies to address the issue. In this review, we will highlight all the latest studies involving IL-17 and atherosclerosis, including both clinical and experimental research.

  16. Toll-like receptors and atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerko Barbić

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Toll like receptors (TLR are receptors with major role in activationof immune system by regulating production of chemokinesand cytokines, which makes them important in different types ofinflammatory reactions- bacterial, viral, parasitic, acute, chronicetc. Having in mind that atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatorydisease, it is clear then that TLRs are a group of immune systemactivators, producing specific immune cells. In human atheroscleroticplaque there is a markedly enhanced expression of TLR1,TLR2, and TLR4. TLRs are expressed in adrenal cells, and TLRagonists stimulate the release of steroids from human adrenalgland, as well. TLR2 deficient mice have an impaired steroid releaseduring endotoxemia. TLR9 stimulation leads to a corticosteroneand inflammatory cytokine response. The best characterizedof all is TLR4. Up to date this TLR has a major role in thedevelopment of atherosclerosis. Enhanced expression of hTLR4(human TLR4 in patients with ACS (acute coronary syndromewas associated with elevations of IL-12 and B7-1 expression, astypical downstream effects of TLR4 activation. It is known that acertain gene polymorphism of TLR4 can slow progression of thedisease. Over expression of TLR2 in mice facilitates ventricularremodeling after myocardial infarction. The CAPS study foundcontrary results, when in 3000 patients no connection had beenfound between TLR2 polymorphism (Arg 753 Gln,-16934A/Tand TLR4 polymorphism (D299G, T399I and the process of atherosclerosis.

  17. LDL biochemical modifications: a link between atherosclerosis and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilde Alique

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is an aging disease in which increasing age is a risk factor. Modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL is a well-known risk marker for cardiovascular disease. High-plasma LDL concentrations and modifications, such as oxidation, glycosylation, carbamylation and glycoxidation, have been shown to be proatherogenic experimentally in vitro and in vivo. Atherosclerosis results from alterations to LDL in the arterial wall by reactive oxygen species (ROS. Evidence suggests that common risk factors for atherosclerosis raise the likelihood that free ROS are produced from endothelial cells and other cells. Furthermore, oxidative stress is an important factor in the induction of endothelial senescence. Thus, endothelial damage and cellular senescence are well-established markers for atherosclerosis. This review examines LDL modifications and discusses the mechanisms of the pathology of atherosclerosis due to aging, including endothelial damage and oxidative stress, and the link between aging and atherosclerosis.

  18. LDL biochemical modifications: a link between atherosclerosis and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alique, Matilde; Luna, Carlos; Carracedo, Julia; Ramírez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an aging disease in which increasing age is a risk factor. Modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is a well-known risk marker for cardiovascular disease. High-plasma LDL concentrations and modifications, such as oxidation, glycosylation, carbamylation and glycoxidation, have been shown to be proatherogenic experimentally in vitro and in vivo. Atherosclerosis results from alterations to LDL in the arterial wall by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Evidence suggests that common risk factors for atherosclerosis raise the likelihood that free ROS are produced from endothelial cells and other cells. Furthermore, oxidative stress is an important factor in the induction of endothelial senescence. Thus, endothelial damage and cellular senescence are well-established markers for atherosclerosis. This review examines LDL modifications and discusses the mechanisms of the pathology of atherosclerosis due to aging, including endothelial damage and oxidative stress, and the link between aging and atherosclerosis. PMID:26637360

  19. Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Hypertension, and Their Additive Effects on Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Francesco Damiani; Annapaola Zito; Pierluigi Carratù; Vito Antonio Falcone; Elioda Bega; Pietro Scicchitano; Marco Matteo Ciccone; Onofrio Resta

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims. It is widely accepted that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is independently associated with atherosclerosis. Similar to OSA, hypertension (HTN) is a condition associated with atherosclerosis. However, to date, the impact of the simultaneous presence of OSA and HTN on the risk of atherosclerosis has not been extensively studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the consequences of the coexistence of OSA and HTN on carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and on inflammatory...

  20. The role of the vascular dendritic cell network in atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Alberts-Grill, Noah; Denning, Timothy L.; Rezvan, Amir; Jo, Hanjoong

    2013-01-01

    A complex role has been described for dendritic cells (DCs) in the potentiation and control of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. Resident vascular DCs are found in the intima of atherosclerosis-prone vascular regions exposed to disturbed blood flow patterns. Several phenotypically and functionally distinct vascular DC subsets have been described. The functional heterogeneity of these cells and their contributions to vascular homeostasis, inflammation, and atherosclerosis are only rec...

  1. Function of CD147 in atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuiping; Jin, Rong; Zhu, Xiaolei; Yan, Jinchuan; Li, Guohong

    2015-02-01

    CD147, a member of the immunoglobulin super family, is a well-known potent inducer of extracellular matrix metalloproteinases. Studies show that CD147 is upregulated in inflammatory diseases. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the artery wall. Further understanding of the functions of CD147 in atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis may provide a new strategy for preventing and treating cardiovascular disease. In this review, we discuss how CD147 contributes to atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis.

  2. Study on Atherosclerosis Treated with Theory of Detoxification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Yingchun; Wang Hualiang; Ding Jing

    2006-01-01

    Starting with the contents, classification and pathogenic characteristics of the toxic pathogen and combining the modem medical research on the correlation of atherosclerosis with inflammation and immune reaction,authors have studied and expounded the interrelationship between the toxic pathogen and atherosclerosis.The toxic pathogen affecting the whole pathological process of atherosclerosis is a key factor for the disease to remain lingering and a cause of various cardiocerebrovascular diseases. Detoxification can be used to treat atherosclerosis so as to enhance the toxin-removing ability of the body and resist the damage to the body from the toxic pathogen.

  3. (-)-anipamil retards atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B F; Mortensen, A; Hansen, J F

    1995-01-01

    Calcium antagonists have been reported to limit atherosclerosis in cholesterol fed rabbits. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the calcium antagonist (-)-anipamil on the spontaneous development of atherosclerosis in homozygote WHHL rabbits. From the age of 7 weeks, three groups...... differences were found in serum lipids (i.e., VLDL, IDL, LDL, HDL) in the study period among the three groups. Plasma anipamil at the end of the study was 0.23 +/- 6, and 202 +/- 19 ng/ml, respectively, in the three treatment groups. The degree of atherosclerosis in the abdominal aorta was significantly lower...... (p atherosclerosis in the abdominal aorta in WHHL rabbits....

  4. Sex Steroids Block the Initiation of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftolin, Frederick; Mehr, Holly; Fadiel, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is the main cause of death in men and women. This so-called "hardening of the arteries" results from advanced atherogenesis, the accumulation and death of subendothelial fat-laden macrophages (vascular plaque). The macrophages are attracted as the result of signals from injured vessels recruiting and activating cells to quell the injury by inflammation. Among the recruited cells are circulating monocytes that may be captured by the formation of neural cell adhesion molecule (nCAM) tethers between the monocytes and vascular endothelium; the tethers are dependent on electrostatic binding between distal segments of apposed nCAM molecules. The capture of monocytes is followed by their entry into the subendothelial area as macrophages, many of which will remain and become the fat-laden foam cells in vascular plaque. Neural cell adhesion molecules are subject to sialylation that blocks their electrostatic binding. We showed that estradiol-induced nCAM sialylases are present in vascular endothelial cells and tested whether sex steroid pretreatment of human vascular endothelium could inhibit the capture of monocytes. Using in vitro techniques, pretreatment of human arterial endothelial cells with estradiol, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone and dihydrotestosterone all induced sialylation of endothelial cells and, in a dose-response manner, reduced the capture of monocytes. Steroid hormones are protective against atherogenesis and its sequellae. Sex steroid depletion is associated with atherosclerosis. Based on this knowledge plus our results using sex steroid pretreatment of endothelial cells, we propose that the blockade of the initial step in atherogenesis by sex steroid-induced nCAM sialylation may be crucial to hormonal prevention of atherosclerosis.

  5. Probiotics and atherosclerosis – a new challenge?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Yee Kwan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Atherosclerosis is the major cause of cardiovascular disease and stroke, which are among the top 10 leading causes of death worldwide. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs can activate toll-like receptors (TLRs and activate nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB signaling, a central pathway in inflammation, which regulates genes that encode proinflammatory molecules essential in atherogenesis. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS, which is unique to gram negative bacteria, as well as peptidoglycan (PGN, which is found in gram positive bacteria are PAMPS and ligands of TLR4 and TLR2, respectively, both of which are essential in plaque progression in atherosclerosis. Gastrointestinal tract is suggested to be the major site for absorption and translocation of TLR2 and TLR4 stimulants. Inflammation can result in a ‘leaky gut’ that leads to higher bacterial translocation, eventually the accumulation of LPS and PGN would activate TLRs and trigger inflammation through NFκB and promote further systemic complication like atherosclerosis. Probiotics, can protect the intestinal barrier to reduce bacterial translocation and have potential systemic anti-inflammatory properties.To evaluate whether probiotics can help reduce atherosclerotic development using in vivo study.Apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE−/ −  mice were fed on high fat diet alone, with telmisartan (Tel (1 or 5 mg/kg/day, positive controls or with probiotics (VSL#3/LGG with or without Tel (1 mg/kg/day for 12 weeks.Probiotics, Tel, or a combination of both reduced lesion size at the aortic root significantly; VSL#3 reduced serum inflammatory adhesion molecules soluble E- (sE-selectin, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (sVCAM-1, and plaque disrupting factor matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 significantly; probiotics and Tel at 5 mg/kg/day could induce changes in gut microbiota population; the efficiency of lesion reduction seemed

  6. Atherosclerosis: a chronic inflammatory disease mediated by mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Pio; Shaik-Dasthagirisaeb, Yazdami

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a process that plays an important role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and immune disease, involving multiple cell types, including macrophages, T-lymphocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mast cells. The fundamental damage of atherosclerosis is the atheromatous or fibro-fatty plaque which is a lesion that causes several diseases. In atherosclerosis the innate immune response, which involves macrophages, is initiated by the arterial endothelial cells which respond to modified lipoproteins and lead to Th1 cell subset activation and generation of inflammatory cytokines and chemoattractant chemokines. Other immune cells, such as CD4+ T inflammatory cells, which play a critical role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, and regulatory T cells [Treg], which have a protective effect on the development of atherosclerosis are involved. Considerable evidence indicates that mast cells and their products play a key role in inflammation and atherosclerosis. Activated mast cells can have detrimental effects, provoking matrix degradation, apoptosis, and enhancement as well as recruitment of inflammatory cells, which actively contributes to atherosclerosis and plaque formation. Here we discuss the relationship between atherosclerosis, inflammation and mast cells.

  7. Inflammation in atherosclerosis: Imaging, biomarkers and novel therapeutic opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, D.F.

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality is caused by atherosclerosis. Although many patients with atherosclerosis never develop any symptoms, clinical manifestations can vary between acute life-threatening situations to chronic minor complaints. Over the past decades, inf

  8. Multiethnic Exome-Wide Association Study of Subclinical Atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Natarajan, Pradeep; Bis, Joshua C.; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Cox, Amanda J.; Dorr, Marcus; Feitosa, Mary F.; Franceschini, Nora; Guo, Xiuqing; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Isaacs, Aaron; Jhun, Min A.; Kavousi, Maryam; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Schminke, Ulf; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Tada, Hayato; van Setten, Jessica; Smith, Albert V.; Vojinovic, Dina; Yanek, Lisa R.; Yao, Jie; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Amin, Najaf; Baber, Usman; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Cupples, L. Adrienne; de Jong, Pim A.; de Koning, Harry; de Vos, Bob D.; Demirkan, Ayse; Fuster, Valentin; Franco, Oscar H.; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Harris, Tamara B.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Heiss, Gerardo; Hoffmann, Udo; Hofman, Albert; Isgum, Ivana; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kahonen, Mika; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Kral, Brian G.; Launer, Lenore J.; Massaro, Joe; Mehran, Roxana; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Jr, Thomas H. Mosley; de Mutsert, Renee; Newman, Anne B.; Nguyen, Khanh-dung; North, Kari E.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Pankow, James S.; Peloso, Gina M.; Post, Wendy; Province, Michael A.; Raffield, Laura M.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Reilly, Dermot F.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rosendaal, Frits; Sartori, Samantha; Taylor, Kent D.; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; Turner, Stephen T.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Vaidya, Dhananjay; van der Lugt, Aad; Volker, Uwe; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Wassel, Christina L.; Weiss, Stefan; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Becker, Diane M.; Becker, Lewis C.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bowden, Donald W.; Deary, Ian J.; Dehghan, Abbas; Felix, Stephan B.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Lehtimaki, Terho; Mathias, Rasika; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rader, Daniel J.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Wilson, James G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Volzke, Henry; Kathiresan, Sekar; Peyser, Patricia A.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Background-The burden of subclinical atherosclerosis in asymptomatic individuals is heritable and associated with elevated risk of developing clinical coronary heart disease. We sought to identify genetic variants in protein-coding regions associated with subclinical atherosclerosis and the risk of

  9. Molecular imaging of atherosclerosis in translational medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrone-Filardi, Pasquale; Costanzo, Pierluigi; Marciano, Caterina; Vassallo, Enrico; Marsico, Fabio; Ruggiero, Donatella; Petretta, Maria Piera; Chiariello, Massimo [University Federico II, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular and Immunological Sciences, Naples (Italy); Dellegrottaglie, Santo [University Federico II, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular and Immunological Sciences, Naples (Italy); Mount Sinai Medical Center, Z. and M.A. Wiener Cardiovascular Institute and M.-J. and H.R. Kravis Center for Cardiovascular Health, New York, NY (United States); Rudd, James H.F. [University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Naples (Italy); SDN Foundation, Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, Naples (Italy)

    2011-05-15

    Functional characterization of atherosclerosis is a promising application of molecular imaging. Radionuclide-based techniques for molecular imaging in the large arteries (e.g. aorta and carotids), along with ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have been studied both experimentally and in clinical studies. Technical factors including cardiac and respiratory motion, low spatial resolution and partial volume effects mean that noninvasive molecular imaging of atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries is not ready for prime time. Positron emission tomography imaging with fluorodeoxyglucose can measure vascular inflammation in the large arteries with high reproducibility, and signal change in response to anti-inflammatory therapy has been described. MRI has proven of value for quantifying carotid artery inflammation when iron oxide nanoparticles are used as a contrast agent. Macrophage accumulation of the iron particles allows regression of inflammation to be measured with drug therapy. Similarly, contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging is also being evaluated for functional characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. For all of these techniques, however, large-scale clinical trials are mandatory to define the prognostic importance of the imaging signals in terms of risk of future vascular events. (orig.)

  10. Endothelial dysfunction: the early predictor of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudau, Mashudu; Genis, Amanda; Lochner, Amanda; Strijdom, Hans

    2012-05-01

    Since the discovery in the 1980s that nitric oxide (NO) is in fact the elusive endothelium-derived relaxing factor, it has become evident that NO is not only a major cardiovascular signalling molecule, but that changes in its bioavailability are crucial in determining whether atherosclerosis will develop or not. Sustained high levels of harmful circulating stimuli associated with cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes mellitus elicit responses in endothelial cells that appear sequentially, namely endothelial cell activation and endothelial dysfunction (ED). ED, characterised by reduced NO bioavailability, is now recognised by many as an early, reversible precursor of atherosclerosis. The pathogenesis of ED is multifactorial; however, oxidative stress appears to be the common underlying cellular mechanism in the ensuing loss of vaso-active, inflammatory, haemostatic and redox homeostasis in the body's vascular system. The role of ED as a pathophysiological link between early endothelial cell changes associated with cardiovascular risk factors and the development of ischaemic heart disease is of importance to basic scientists and clinicians alike.

  11. Periodontitis as a Risk Factor of Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirina Bartova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, the amount of evidence corroborating an association between dental plaque bacteria and coronary diseases that develop as a result of atherosclerosis has increased. These findings have brought a new aspect to the etiology of the disease. There are several mechanisms by which dental plaque bacteria may initiate or worsen atherosclerotic processes: activation of innate immunity, bacteremia related to dental treatment, and direct involvement of mediators activated by dental plaque and involvement of cytokines and heat shock proteins from dental plaque bacteria. There are common predisposing factors which influence both periodontitis and atherosclerosis. Both diseases can be initiated in early childhood, although the first symptoms may not appear until adulthood. The formation of lipid stripes has been reported in 10-year-old children and the increased prevalence of obesity in children and adolescents is a risk factor contributing to lipid stripes development. Endothelium damage caused by the formation of lipid stripes in early childhood may lead to bacteria penetrating into blood circulation after oral cavity procedures for children as well as for patients with aggressive and chronic periodontitis.

  12. Environmental factors influencing the development of atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Brodziak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to present an overview of recent findings on the environmental and behavioral factors influencing the development of atherosclerosis. The authors primarily concentrated on deliberations of possibile main causes of the damage of the endothelium. At the same time the following pathogenic mechanisms as cellular dysfunction, inflammation and coagulation disorders have been enumerated. The links between the state of the vascular endothelium and life style have been emphasized. It is also important to note that the primary causes of the endothelial damage should be traced as originally suggested many years ago viewing such factors as anger, hostility, aggression, impulsiveness and depression but with a new approach. The authors supplement the comments, on the environmental factors influencing the development of atherosclerosis, with basic data on family predisposition to the development of this disease. They highlight that current genetic research have not determined genes responsible for atheroscelosis. According to the authors the considerations and conclusions presented in this overview are important for the educational purposes related to the most frequent disease process resulting in many diseases in medical disciplines.

  13. The relationship between atherosclerosis and pulmonary emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučević Danijela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The etiopathogenesis of atherosclerosis and subsequent pulmonary emphysema has not been fully elucidated. Experimental Studies Foam cells are of great importance in the development of these diseases. It is known that local cytokine secretion and modification of native lipoprotein particles, which are internalized by the vascular and alveolar macrophages via the scavenger receptors on the surfaces of these cells, lead to the formation of foam cells. Thus, the exacerbation of local inflammatory process in the vascular and lung tissue ensues due to a generation of reactive oxygen species, resulting in further lipoprotein modification and cytokine production. Accumulating evidence suggests that oxidants may facilitate the inflammatory response by impairing antiprotease function, directly attacking vascular and lung matrix proteins and by inactivating enzymes involved in elastin synthesis and vascular and lung repair. Clinical Studies Cigarette smoke is recognized as a rich source of oxidants. Nearly 90% of all patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are smokers. The process of atherogenesis is also influenced by tobacco smoke. Conclusion The role of vascular and alveolar macrophages has become increasingly important in understanding the development of atherosclerosis and resulting pulmonary emphysema.[Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175015

  14. Imaging Macrophage and Hematopoietic Progenitor Proliferation in Atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Yu-Xiang; Calcagno, Claudia; Binderup, Tina

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: Local plaque macrophage proliferation and monocyte production in hematopoietic organs promote progression of atherosclerosis. Therefore, noninvasive imaging of proliferation could serve as a biomarker and monitor therapeutic intervention. OBJECTIVE: To explore (18)F-FLT positron emission...... tomography-computed tomography imaging of cell proliferation in atherosclerosis. METHODS AND RESULTS: (18)F-FLT positron emission tomography-computed tomography was performed in mice, rabbits, and humans with atherosclerosis. In apolipoprotein E knock out mice, increased (18)F-FLT signal was observed...... with atherosclerosis, (18)F-FLT signal significantly increased in the inflamed carotid artery and in the aorta. CONCLUSIONS: (18)F-FLT positron emission tomography imaging may serve as an imaging biomarker for cell proliferation in plaque and hematopoietic activity in individuals with atherosclerosis....

  15. Atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidaemic rabbits. Evaluation by macroscopic, microscopic and biochemical methods and comparison of atherosclerosis variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B F; Mortensen, A; Hansen, J F

    1994-01-01

    estimation of aortic atherosclerosis extent and by biochemical analysis of aortic cholesterol content. No noteworthy atherosclerosis was demonstrated within 19 months in heterozygous rabbits. In homozygous rabbits, atherosclerotic lesions were seen from the age of 4 months and progressed with age. All 19......-month-old rabbits had severe atherosclerotic disease. As much as 64% of the variation in atherosclerosis extent/severity could be explained by serum cholesterol and age. A highly significant correlation between the various methods for quantitation of atherosclerosis extent and/or severity...... was demonstrated, suggesting that quantitative microscopy, macroscopic morphometry and determination of aortic cholesterol content may be equally valid as a measure of atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits and are therefore interchangeable....

  16. [Calcified aortic valve disease: association with atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Rocío; Mangas, Alipio; Gómez, Francisco

    2011-05-14

    Calcified aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a prevalent condition, affecting 25% of people older than 65 years. CAVD and atherosclerosis share common risk factors and pathogenic mechanisms. Nevertheless, they present different pathologic lesions. The main factors involved in the pathogenesis of CAVD are genetic predisposition, the process of valvular calcification, deposition of lipoproteins, and chronic inflammation. Studies have suggested a potential benefit from early treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-II receptor blockers, and particularly with statins. Observational studies on risk factors for the CAVD, and randomized clinical trials on primary and secondary prevention in subjects with high risk for the disease, would be necessary to improve the clinical management of CAVD.

  17. A review of Chlamydia pneumoniae and atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Fasting, H; Henneberg, E W;

    1999-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterium that causes acute upper and lower respiratory infections. Its distribution is worldwide. Seroepidemiological studies have shown an association between C. pneumoniae and atherosclerosis, and the risk of acute myocardial infar...... individuals who are or are not infected with C. pneumoniae. The latter are needed in order to clarify the impact of the presence of C. pneumoniae and to avoid indiscriminate use of antimicrobials....... of viable organisms. However, the pathogenicity is unknown, and the significance of detecting the organism is unresolved. In two minor controlled clinical trials, patients with ischaemic heart disease were randomised into antibiotic-treated and placebo groups. Both trials showed a significant reduction...

  18. Autophagy: An Exposing Therapeutic Target in Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yun; Lu, Shan; Zhou, Ping; Ai, Qi-Di; Sun, Gui-Bo; Sun, Xiao-Bo

    2016-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process whereby the cytoplasmic contents of a cell are sequestered within autophagosomes through a lysosome-dependent pathway. Increasing evidence shows that this process is of great importance in a wide range of diseases, including atherosclerosis (AS). Autophagy can be modulated in advanced AS plaques by cytokines, reactive lipids, lipopolysaccharides, advanced glycation end products, and microRNAs. Autophagy exerts both protective and detrimental functions in vascular disorders. However, despite an increasing interest in autophagy, it remains an underestimated and overlooked phenomenon in AS. Therefore, the precise role of autophagy and its relationship with apoptosis need to be described. This review highlights recent findings on the autophagy activities and signaling pathways in endothelial cells, macrophages, and smooth muscle cells that are accompanied by apoptosis in AS. We conclude with recent studies on autophagy modulation as a new therapeutic approach to treat AS.

  19. [Cholesterol and atherosclerosis. Historical considerations and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zárate, Arturo; Manuel-Apolinar, Leticia; Basurto, Lourdes; De la Chesnaye, Elsa; Saldívar, Iván

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is a precursor of steroid hormones and an essential component of the cell membrane, however, altered regulation of the synthesis, absorption and excretion of cholesterol predispose to cardiovascular diseases of atherosclerotic origin. Despite, the recognition of historical events for 200 years, starting with Michel Chevreul naming «cholesterol»; later on, Lobstein coining the term atherosclerosis and Marchand introducing it, Anichkov identifying cholesterol in atheromatous plaque, and Brown and Goldstein discovering LDL receptor; as well as the emerging of different drugs, such as fibrates, statins and cetrapibs this decade, promising to increase HDL and the most recent ezetimibe and anti-PCSK9 to inhibit the degradation of LDL receptor, however morbidity has not been reduced in cardiovascular disease.

  20. Chlamydia pneumoniae and Atherosclerosis: The End?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LE Nicolle

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of the Journal, Patrick et al (pages 298-300 report on the results of a pilot study testing the hypothesis that seropositivity to Chlamydia pneumoniae together with a specific bacteriophage protein is associated with first-episode myocardial infarction or unstable angina. The study evolved from an earlier report suggesting that C pneumoniae with phage seropositivity was strongly associated with the presence of abdominal aortic aneurysm. The phage association suggested a potential explanation for some of the variability in previous studies exploring C pneumoniae as a cause for atherosclerosis (ie, only selected strains of C pneumoniae were pathogenic. Patrick et al found no significant association or trend, and the authors concluded that the negative findings in their pilot study did not support further studies to address this potential association.

  1. Ventilatory chaos is impaired in carotid atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Mangin

    Full Text Available Ventilatory chaos is strongly linked to the activity of central pattern generators, alone or influenced by respiratory or cardiovascular afferents. We hypothesized that carotid atherosclerosis should alter ventilatory chaos through baroreflex and autonomic nervous system dysfunctions. Chaotic dynamics of inspiratory flow was prospectively evaluated in 75 subjects undergoing carotid ultrasonography: 27 with severe carotid stenosis (>70%, 23 with moderate stenosis (<70%, and 25 controls. Chaos was characterized by the noise titration method, the correlation dimension and the largest Lyapunov exponent. Baroreflex sensitivity was estimated in the frequency domain. In the control group, 92% of the time series exhibit nonlinear deterministic chaos with positive noise limit, whereas only 68% had a positive noise limit value in the stenoses groups. Ventilatory chaos was impaired in the groups with carotid stenoses, with significant parallel decrease in the noise limit value, correlation dimension and largest Lyapunov exponent, as compared to controls. In multiple regression models, the percentage of carotid stenosis was the best in predicting the correlation dimension (p<0.001, adjusted R(2: 0.35 and largest Lyapunov exponent (p<0.001, adjusted R(2: 0.6. Baroreflex sensitivity also predicted the correlation dimension values (p = 0.05, and the LLE (p = 0.08. Plaque removal after carotid surgery reversed the loss of ventilatory complexity. To conclude, ventilatory chaos is impaired in carotid atherosclerosis. These findings depend on the severity of the stenosis, its localization, plaque surface and morphology features, and is independently associated with baroreflex sensitivity reduction. These findings should help to understand the determinants of ventilatory complexity and breathing control in pathological conditions.

  2. Adiponectin and Atherosclerosis in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick H. Dessein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we examined the potential impact of adiponectin on carotid ultrasound determined atherosclerosis in 210 (119 black and 91 white RA patients in mixed regression models. Total adiponectin concentrations were smaller in patients with compared to those without the metabolic syndrome (MetS defined waist criterion (median (range = 6.47 (1.23–34.54 versus 8.38 (0.82–85.30 ng/mL, P=0.02, resp.; both total and high molecular weight (HMW adiponectin concentrations were larger in patients with compared to those without joint deformities (7.97 (0.82–85.30 and 3.51 (0.01–35.40 versus 5.36 (1.29–19.49 and 2.34 (0.01–19.49 ng/mL, P=0.003 and 0.02, resp.. Total and HMW adiponectin concentrations were associated with carotid artery plaque in patients with MetS waist (odds ratio (95% CI = 0.87 (0.76–0.99 and 0.92 (0.85–0.99 per 1-standard deviation increment, P=0.02 for both and those without joint deformities (odds ratio (95% CI = 0.94 (0.88–0.99 and 0.94 (0.89–0.99, P=0.03 for both. Plaque prevalence was lower in patients without compared to those with joint deformities (23.4% versus 42.6, P=0.004 in multivariable analysis. In RA patients with abdominal obesity or no clinically evident joint damage, adiponectin concentrations are reduced but nevertheless associated with decreased carotid atherosclerosis.

  3. Effect of age on aortic atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael A. Chen; Miwa Kawakubo; Patrick M. Colletti; Dongxiang Xu; Laurie LaBree Dustin; Robert Detrano; Stanley P Azen; Nathan D. Wong; Xue-Qiao Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the association of atherosclerosis burden in the survivors of an asymptomatic elderly cohort study and its relationship to other coronary risk factors (specifically, age) by evaluating aortic atherosclerotic wall burden by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods A total of 312 participants in an ongoing observational cohort study underwent cardiac and descending thoracic aorta imaging by MRI. Maximum wall thickness was measured and the mean wall thickness calculated. Wall/outer wall ratio was used as a normalized wall index (NWI) adjusted for artery size difference among participants. Percent wall volume (PWV) was calculated as NWI × 100. Results In this asymptomatic cohort (mean age: 76 years), the mean (SD) aortic wall area and wall thickness were 222 ± 45 mm2 and 2.7 ± 0.4 mm, respectively. Maximum wall thickness was 3.4 ± 0.6 mm, and PWV was 32% ± 4%. Women appeared to have smaller wall area, but after correcting for their smaller artery size, had significantly higher PWV than men (P = 0.03). Older age was associated with larger wall area (P = 0.04 for trend) with similar PWVs. However, there were no statistically significant associations between standard risk factors, Framingham global risk, or metabolic syndrome status, therapy for cholesterol or hypertension, coronary or aortic calcium score, and the aortic wall burden. Aortic calcification was associated with coronary calcification. Conclusions Asymptomatic elderly in this cohort had a greater descending thoracic aortic wall volume that correlated with age, and women had a significantly increased PWV compared to men. In these survivors, the atherosclerotic aortic wall burden was not significantly associated with traditional risk factors or with coronary or aortic calcium scores or coronary calcium progression. Results suggest that age, or as yet unidentified risk factor(s), may be responsible for the increase in atherosclerosis.

  4. Connective tissue diseases and noninvasive evaluation of atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardita G

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Giorgio Ardita, Giacomo Failla, Paolo Maria Finocchiaro, Francesco Mugno, Luigi Attanasio, Salvatore Timineri, Michelangelo Maria Di SalvoCardiovascular Department, Angiology Unit, Ferrarotto Hospital, Catania, ItalyAbstract: Connective tissue diseases (CTDs are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease due to accelerated atherosclerosis. In patients with autoimmune disorders, in addition to traditional risk factors, an immune-mediated inflammatory process of the vasculature seems to contribute to atherogenesis. Several pathogenetic mechanisms have been proposed, including chronic inflammation and immunologic abnormalities, both able to produce vascular damage. Macrovascular atherosclerosis can be noninvasively evaluated by ultrasound measurement of carotid or femoral plaque. Subclinical atherosclerosis can be evaluated by well-established noninvasive techniques which rely on ultrasound detection of carotid intima-media thickness. Flow-mediated vasodilatation and arterial stiffness are considered markers of endothelial dysfunction and subclinical atherosclerosis, respectively, and have been recently found to be impaired early in a wide spectrum of autoimmune diseases. Carotid intima-media thickness turns out to be a leading marker of subclinical atherosclerosis, and many studies recognize its role as a predictor of future vascular events, both in non-CTD individuals and in CTD patients. In rheumatic diseases, flow-mediated dilatation and arterial stiffness prove to be strongly correlated with inflammation, disease damage index, and with subclinical atherosclerosis, although their prognostic role has not yet been conclusively shown. Systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and likely antiphospholipid syndrome are better associated with premature and accelerated atherosclerosis. Inconclusive results were reported in systemic sclerosis.Keywords: rheumatic disease, subclinical atherosclerosis, arterial stiffness

  5. Inflammatory and Autoimmune Reactions in Atherosclerosis and Vaccine Design Informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Jan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the leading pathological contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide. As its complex pathogenesis has been gradually unwoven, the regime of treatments and therapies has increased with still much ground to cover. Active research in the past decade has attempted to develop antiatherosclerosis vaccines with some positive results. Nevertheless, it remains to develop a vaccine against atherosclerosis with high affinity, specificity, efficiency, and minimal undesirable pathology. In this review, we explore vaccine development against atherosclerosis by interpolating a number of novel findings in the fields of vascular biology, immunology, and bioinformatics. With recent technological breakthroughs, vaccine development affords precision in specifying the nature of the desired immune response—useful when addressing a disease as complex as atherosclerosis with a manifold of inflammatory and autoimmune components. Moreover, our exploration of available bioinformatic tools for epitope-based vaccine design provides a method to avoid expenditure of excess time or resources.

  6. RIP3-dependent necrosis induced inflammation exacerbates atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingjun; Jin, Wei; Wang, Yuhui; Huang, Huanwei; Li, Jia; Zhang, Cai

    2016-04-29

    Atherothrombotic vascular disease is already the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Atherosclerosis shares features with diseases caused by chronic inflammation. More attention should concentrates on the innate immunity effect atherosclerosis progress. RIP3 (receptor-interacting protein kinase 3) act through the transcription factor named Nr4a3 (Nuclear orphan receptors) to regulate cytokine production. Deletion RIP3 decreases IL-1α production. Injection of anti-IL-1α antibody protects against the progress of atherosclerosis in ApoE -/- mice. RIP3 as a molecular switch in necrosis, controls macrophage necrotic death caused inflammation. Inhibiting necrosis will certainly reduce atherosclerosis through limit inflammation. Necrotic cell death caused systemic inflammation exacerbated cardiovascular disease. Inhibition of necrosis may yield novel therapeutic targets for treatment in years to come.

  7. [¹⁸F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET imaging of atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Björn Alexander; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2015-01-01

    [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET ((18)FDG PET) imaging has emerged as a promising tool for assessment of atherosclerosis. By targeting atherosclerotic plaque glycolysis, a marker for plaque inflammation and hypoxia, (18)FDG PET can assess plaque vulnerability and potentially predict risk of atheros......[(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET ((18)FDG PET) imaging has emerged as a promising tool for assessment of atherosclerosis. By targeting atherosclerotic plaque glycolysis, a marker for plaque inflammation and hypoxia, (18)FDG PET can assess plaque vulnerability and potentially predict risk...... of atherosclerosis-related disease, such as stroke and myocardial infarction. With excellent reproducibility, (18)FDG PET can be a surrogate end point in clinical drug trials, improving trial efficiency. This article summarizes key findings in the literature, discusses limitations of (18)FDG PET imaging...... of atherosclerosis, and reports recommendations to optimize imaging protocols....

  8. MicroRNA-33 in atherosclerosis etiology and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wu-Jun; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Guo-Jun; Fu, Yuchang; Zhang, Da-Wei; Zhu, Hai-Bo; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2013-04-01

    MicroRNAs are a group of endogenous, small non-coding RNA molecules that can induce translation repression of target genes within metazoan cells by specific base pairing with the mRNA of target genes. Recently, microRNA-33 has been discovered as a key regulator in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. This review highlights the impact of microRNA-33-mediated regulation in the major cardiometabolic risk factors of atherosclerosis including lipid metabolism (HDL biogenesis and cholesterol homeostasis, fatty acid, phospholipid and triglyceride, bile acids metabolism), inflammatory response, insulin signaling and glucose/energy homeostasis, cell cycle progression and proliferation, and myeloid cell differentiation. Understanding the etiology and pathophysiology of microRNA-33 in atherosclerosis may provide basic knowledge for the development of novel therapeutic targets for ameliorating atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease.

  9. Risk Analysis on Uric Acid Resulting in Carotid Atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖敏; 李河; 郭兰; 石美铃; 麦劲壮

    2004-01-01

    Objectives To explore the risk of uric acid (UA) resulting in carotid atherosclerosis. Methods With a cross sectional study, 643 subjects (aged 41-83 yrs, male 552 and female 91)were surveyed in 1999 in Guangdong Province, China.The main research variables were uric acid (UA), occurrence and the size of carotid artery plaque. Results There was no statistical significance between the UA means of plaque occurrence and no-occurrence groups (t=0.60, df=242, P=0.5495). It seemed UA was not a possible risk factor of carotid atherosclerosis (OR=1.060, P=-0.8448>0.05, n=244) based on the logistic regression analysis. Conclusions Our results are not consistent with serum UA being an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease (CHD). It is necessary to do more research to learn the risk degree of UA during the progress of atherosclerosis/CHD.

  10. Insulin decreases atherosclerosis by inducing endothelin receptor B expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Kyoungmin; Mima, Akira; Li, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) insulin resistance and dysfunction, caused by diabetes, accelerates atherosclerosis. It is unknown whether specifically enhancing EC-targeted insulin action can decrease atherosclerosis in diabetes. Accordingly, overexpressing insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1......) in the endothelia of Apoe(-/-) mice (Irs1/Apoe(-/-)) increased insulin signaling and function in the aorta. Atherosclerosis was significantly reduced in Irs1/ApoE(-/-) mice on diet-induced hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. The mechanism of insulin's enhanced antiatherogenic actions in EC was related to remarkable...... overexpression in the endothelia of Aki/ApoE(-/-) mice significantly decreased atherosclerosis. Interestingly, endothelial EDNRB expression was selectively reduced in intima of arteries from diabetic patients and rodents. However, endothelial EDNRB expression was upregulated by insulin via P13K/Akt pathway...

  11. Toll-Like Receptors, Their Ligands, and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad P. Hodgkinson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a disease characterized by inflammation in the arterial wall. Atherogenesis is dependent on the innate immune response involving activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs and the expression of inflammatory proteins. TLRs, which recognize various pathogen-associated molecular patterns, are expressed in various cell types within the atherosclerotic plaque. Microbial agents are associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis and this is, in part, due to activation of TLRs. Recently considerable evidence has been provided suggesting that endogenous proteins promote atherosclerosis by binding to TLRs. In this review, we describe the role of TLRs in atherosclerosis with particular emphasis on those atherogenic endogenous proteins that have been implicated as TLR ligands.

  12. Factor VIII deficiency does not protect against atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biere-Rafi, S.; Tuinenburg, A.; Haak, B.W.; Peters, M.; Huijgen, R.; de Groot, E.; Verhamme, P.; Peerlinck, K.; Visseren, F.L.J.; Kruip, M.J.H.A.; Laros-van Gorkom, B.A.P.; Gerdes, V.E.A.; Buller, H.R.; Schutgens, R.E.G.; Kamphuisen, P.W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary. Background: Hemophilia A patients have a lower cardiovascular mortality rate than the general population. Whether this protection is caused by hypocoagulability or decreased atherogenesis is unclear. Objectives: To evaluate atherosclerosis and endothelial function in hemophilia A patients w

  13. T Lymphocyte Autoreactivity in Inflammatory Mechanisms Regulating Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Profumo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis has been clearly demonstrated to be a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. Both cells of the innate and the acquired immune system, particularly monocytes and T lymphocytes, are implicated in the atherogenic process, producing different cytokines with pro- and anti-inflammatory effects. The majority of pathogenic T cells involved in atherosclerosis are of the Th1 profile, that has been correlated positively with coronary artery disease. Many studies conducted to evaluate the molecular factors responsible for the activation of T cells have demonstrated that the main antigenic targets in atherosclerosis are modified endogenous structures. These self-molecules activate autoimmune reactions mainly characterized by the production of Th1 cytokines, thus sustaining the inflammatory mechanisms involved in endothelial dysfunction and plaque development. In this paper we will summarize the different T-cell subsets involved in atherosclerosis and the best characterized autoantigens involved in cardiovascular inflammation.

  14. Baroreflex dysfunction promotes the induction of atherosclerosis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-junCAI; Chao-yuMIAO; He-huiXIE; Ding-fengSU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To testify the hypothesis that arterial baroreflex dysfunction promotes the induction of atherosclerosis. METHODSAND RESULTS: Experiment 1 : The baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was measured in 30 SD rats in conscious state with a computerized blood pressure monitoring system. Four weeks later, the rats were fed with a high-cholesterol diet for 8-week duration to induce atherosclerosis. The hearts and aortae were removed for pathological examination and the scores of coronary and aortic

  15. Inflammatory markers and extent and progression of early atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willeit, Peter; Thompson, Simon G; Agewall, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Large-scale epidemiological evidence on the role of inflammation in early atherosclerosis, assessed by carotid ultrasound, is lacking. We aimed to quantify cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of inflammatory markers with common-carotid-artery intima-media thickness (CCA...... in its assessment within a limited time period. Our findings for 'inflammatory load' suggest important combined effects of the three inflammatory markers on early atherosclerosis....

  16. (18)F-FDG PET imaging of murine atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hag, Anne Mette Fisker; Pedersen, Sune Folke; Christoffersen, Christina

    2012-01-01

    To study whether (18)F-FDG can be used for in vivo imaging of atherogenesis by examining the correlation between (18)F-FDG uptake and gene expression of key molecular markers of atherosclerosis in apoE(-/-) mice.......To study whether (18)F-FDG can be used for in vivo imaging of atherogenesis by examining the correlation between (18)F-FDG uptake and gene expression of key molecular markers of atherosclerosis in apoE(-/-) mice....

  17. Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Hypertension, and Their Additive Effects on Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Francesco Damiani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. It is widely accepted that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is independently associated with atherosclerosis. Similar to OSA, hypertension (HTN is a condition associated with atherosclerosis. However, to date, the impact of the simultaneous presence of OSA and HTN on the risk of atherosclerosis has not been extensively studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the consequences of the coexistence of OSA and HTN on carotid intima-media thickness (IMT and on inflammatory markers of atherosclerosis (such as interleukin- [IL-] 6 and pentraxin- [PTX-] 3. Methods. The study design allowed us to define 4 groups: (1 controls (n=30; (2 OSA patients without HTN (n=30; (3 HTN patients without OSA (n=30; (4 patients with OSA and HTN (n=30. In the morning after portable monitoring (between 7 am and 8 am, blood samples were collected, and carotid IMT was measured. Results. Carotid IMT, IL-6, and PTX-3 in OSA normotensive patients and in non-OSA HTN subjects were significantly higher compared to control subjects; in addition, in OSA hypertensive patients they were significantly increased compared to OSA normotensive, non-OSA HTN, or control subjects. Conclusions. OSA and HTN have an additive role in the progression of carotid atherosclerosis and in blood levels of inflammatory markers for atherosclerosis, such as interleukin-6 and pentraxin-3.

  18. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibition in atherosclerosis and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roycik, M D; Myers, J S; Newcomer, R G; Sang, Q-X A

    2013-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of tightly regulated, zinc-dependent proteases that degrade extracellular matrix (ECM), cell surface, and intracellular proteins. Vascular remodeling, whether as a function of normal physiology or as a consequence of a myriad of pathological processes, requires degradation of the ECM. Thus, the expression and activity of many MMPs are up-regulated in numerous conditions affecting the vasculature and often exacerbate vascular dysfunction. A growing body of evidence supports the rationale of using MMP inhibitors for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, stroke, and chronic vascular dementia. This manuscript will examine promising targets for MMP inhibition in atherosclerosis and stroke, reviewing findings in preclinical animal models and human patient studies. Strategies for MMP inhibition have progressed beyond chelating the catalytic zinc to functional blocking antibodies and peptides that target either the active site or exosites of the enzyme. While the inhibition of MMP activity presents a rational therapeutic avenue, the multiplicity of roles for MMPs and the non-selective nature of MMP inhibitors that cause unintended side-effects hinder full realization of MMP inhibition as therapy for vascular disease. For optimal therapeutic effects to be realized, specific targets for MMP inhibition in these pathologies must first be identified and then attacked by potent and selective agents during the most appropriate timepoint.

  19. Is Sudden Hearing Loss Associated with Atherosclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajati, Mohsen; Azarpajooh, Mahmoud Reza; Mouhebati, Mohsen; Nasrollahi, Mostafa; Salehi, Maryam; Khadivi, Ehsan; Nourizadeh, Navid; Hashemi, Firoozeh; Bakhshaee, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Sudden sensorineural hearing-loss (SSNHL) patients constitute approximately 2–3% of referrals to ear, nose and throat (ENT) clinics. Several predisposing factors have been proposed for this condition; one of which is vascular disorders and perfusion compromise. In this research the atherosclerotic changes and their known risk factors are studied in SSNHL patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty SSNHL patients and 30 controls were evaluated with regard to cardiovascular risks including history, heart examination, blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, electrocardiogram, blood sugar, triglycerides, cholesterol, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HSCRP); also, carotid artery color Doppler study was undertaken to measure intima media thickness(IMT). Results: IMT and HSCRP showed an increased risk in the case group compared with the controls (P= 0.005 & P=0.001). However, waist circumference, history of smoking, fasting blood sugar, lipid profile, and electrocardiogram revealed no significant difference between the two groups. Interestingly, blood pressure and body mass index were higher in the controls in this study. Conclusion: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss may be associated with subclinical atherosclerosis. PMID:27429947

  20. Oxidative stress in atherosclerosis and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankin, V Z; Lisina, M O; Arzamastseva, N E; Konovalova, G G; Nedosugova, L V; Kaminnyi, A I; Tikhaze, A K; Ageev, F T; Kukharchuk, V V; Belenkov, Yu N

    2005-07-01

    We measured the content of lipid peroxides in plasma LDL from patients with chronic CHD not accompanied by hypercholesterolemia; CHD and hypercholesterolemia; type 2 diabetes mellitus and decompensation of carbohydrate metabolism; and CHD, circulatory insufficiency, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (without hypercholesterolemia). The content of lipid peroxides in LDL isolated from blood plasma by differential ultracentrifugation in a density gradient was estimated by a highly specific method with modifications (reagent Fe(2+) xylene orange and triphenylphosphine as a reducing agent for organic peroxides). The content of lipid peroxides in LDL from patients was much higher than in controls (patients without coronary heart disease and diabetes). Hypercholesterolemia and diabetes can be considered as factors promoting LDL oxidation in vivo. Our results suggest that stimulation of lipid peroxidation in low-density lipoproteins during hypercholesterolemia and diabetes is associated with strong autooxidation of cholesterol and glucose during oxidative and carbonyl (aldehyde) stress, respectively. These data illustrate a possible mechanism of the progression of atherosclerosis in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  1. Is Sudden Hearing Loss Associated with Atherosclerosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Rajati

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sudden sensorineural hearing-loss (SSNHL patients constitute approximately 2–3% of referrals to ear, nose and throat (ENT clinics. Several predisposing factors have been proposed for this condition; one of which is vascular disorders and perfusion compromise. In this research the atherosclerotic changes and their known risk factors are studied in SSNHL patients.   Materials and Methods: Thirty SSNHL patients and 30 controls were evaluated with regard to cardiovascular risks including history, heart examination, blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, electrocardiogram, blood sugar, triglycerides, cholesterol, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HSCRP; also, carotid artery color Doppler study was undertaken to measure intima media thickness(IMT.   Results: IMT and HSCRP showed an increased risk in the case group compared with the controls (P= 0.005 & P=0.001. However, waist circumference, history of smoking, fasting blood sugar, lipid profile, and electrocardiogram revealed no significant difference between the two groups. Interestingly, blood pressure and body mass index were higher in the controls in this study.   Conclusion:  Sudden sensorineural hearing loss may be associated with subclinical atherosclerosis.

  2. Research Advances of Atherosclerosis in Translational Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zhuo-xin; DENG Rong; PI Min; YU Hai-bo

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (ASCVD) are defined as a series of diseases caused by atherosclerosis (AS), including coronary heart disease (CHD), myocardial infarction (MI), stable or unstable angina pectoris, revascularization of coronary artery or other arteries, stroke, transient cerebral ischemic onset or atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease. AS has common pathological basis with ASCVD as it is a general arterial regressive disease of human beings. With the industrialization progression, AS morbidity increases annually and it also leads to coronary atherosclerotic heart disease, cerebral stroke and peripheral artery stenosed occlusion or dilation, thus becoming the main cause for high disability and mortality. The main purpose of translational medicine is to break the intrinsic barrier between basic medicine with drug research and development as well as clinical and public healthcare, and establish a direct connection between them. It is also can rapidly transform basic research results to new clinical preventive and therapeutic methods. This study mainly reviewed AS from the aspect of translational medicine, aiming to provide a reliable basis for the prevention and treatment of AS.

  3. Noninvasive indicators of atherosclerosis in subclinical hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Dogu Kilic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular system is rich in thyroid hormone receptors and is one of the major sites of action for thyroid hormones. However, the effect of subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH on atherosclerosis has not been cleared yet. Materials and Methods: SCH is defined as high thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH levels in the presence of normal serum T4 and T3 levels. A total of 32 patients with SCH and 29 controls were included in the study. Carotid intima-media thickness, flow-mediated dilatation, and aortic distensibility were compared between the groups. Results: FMD was lower in patients with SCH than in controls. GTN-induced vasodilatation was similar in the patients with SCH and controls. There was no statistically significant difference between the patients with SCH and controls with respect to CIMT and aortic distensibility. Conclusion: SCH is associated with endothelial dysfunction as established by FMD. Inconsistent results of CIMT and aortic stiffness can be explained by these parameters being measures of structural changes whereas FMD is a dynamic measure that reflects the impact of both acute and chronic influences on endothelial function.

  4. Atherosclerosis: from biology to pharmacological treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Graziano Riccioni; Valeriana Sblendorio

    2012-01-01

    A recent explosion in the amount of cardiovascular risk has swept across the globe. Primary prevention is the preferred method to lower cardiovascular risk. Lowering the prevalence of obesity is the most urgent matter, and is pleiotropic since it affects blood pressure, lipid profiles, glucose metabolism, inflammation, and atherothrombotic disease progression. Given the current obstacles, success of primary prevention remains uncertain. At the same time, the consequences of delay and inaction will inevitably be disastrous, and the sense of urgency mounts. Pathological and epidemiological data confirm that atherosclerosis begins in early childhood, and advances seamlessly and inexorably throughout life. Risk factors in childhood are similar to those in adults, and track between stages of life. When indicated, aggressive treatment should begin at the earliest indication, and be continued for many years. For those patients at intermediate risk according to global risk scores, C-reactive protein, coronary artery calcium, and carotid intima-media thickness are available for further stratification. Using statins for primary prevention is recommended by guidelines, is prevalent, but remains under prescribed. Statin drugs are unrivaled, evidence-based, major weapons to lower cardiovascular risk. Even when low density lipoprotein cholesterol targets are attained, over half of patients continue to have disease progression and clinical events. Though clinical evidence is incomplete, altering or raising the blood high density lipoprotein cholesterol level continues to be pursued. The aim of this review is to point out the attention of key aspects of vulnerable plaques regarding their pathogenesis and treatment.

  5. Genomic correlates of atherosclerosis in ancient humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Albert; Wann, L Samuel; Thompson, Randall C; Keller, Andreas; Maixner, Frank; Allam, Adel H; Finch, Caleb E; Frohlich, Bruno; Kaplan, Hillard; Lombardi, Guido P; Sutherland, M Linda; Sutherland, James D; Watson, Lucia; Cox, Samantha L; Miyamoto, Michael I; Narula, Jagat; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Thomas, Gregory S; Krause, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Paleogenetics offers a unique opportunity to study human evolution, population dynamics, and disease evolution in situ. Although histologic and computed x-ray tomographic investigations of ancient mummies have clearly shown that atherosclerosis has been present in humans for more than 5,000 years, limited data are available on the presence of genetic predisposition for cardiovascular disease in ancient human populations. In a previous whole-genome study of the Tyrolean Iceman, a 5,300-year-old glacier mummy from the Alps, an increased risk for coronary heart disease was detected. The Iceman's genome revealed several single nucleotide polymorphisms that are linked with cardiovascular disease in genome-wide association studies. Future genetic studies of ancient humans from various geographic origins and time periods have the potential to provide more insights into the presence and possible changes of genetic risk factors in our ancestors. The study of ancient humans and a better understanding of the interaction between environmental and genetic influences on the development of heart diseases may lead to a more effective prevention and treatment of the most common cause of death in the modern world.

  6. Hostility, Anger and Risk of Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Masoudnia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The previous researches about the etiology of coronary artery atherosclerosis have accentuated on clinical and medical risk factors, such as cigarette smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, positive family background, myocardial ischemia history in family, atherogenic diet, increase of A lipoprotein, inflammatory factors such as increase of cross-reactive protein and so on. Although factors in behavioral medicine are recognized as an independent risk factor in coronary artery atherosclerosis, few researches have been done on hostility and anger. The aim of this study was to determine the difference between normal people(Control group and people with coronary artery atherosclerosis(Case group with regards to hostility and anger. Methods: This study was performed as a case-control design. Data was collected from seventy-seven patients with coronary artery atherosclerosis who had referred to Afshar Hospital Professional Heart Clinic in Yazd city and seventy-eight normal people were used as control. Two groups completed the Buss and Perry Aggression Questionnaire(BPAQ to measure their hostility and anger. Results: The results of the analysis showed that there was a statistically significant difference regarding hostility(p<.05 and anger(p<.001 between the two groups. Hierarchical multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the sociodemographic and clinical variables(step 1 explained 35.5 % to 47.4%, while hostility and anger(step 2 explained 6.7% to 9% of the variance in incidence of coronary artery atherosclerosis. Conclusion: Hostility and anger are strong risk factors for coronary artery atherosclerosis or CAD in Iran. Therefore, in order to decrease the incidence rate of coronary artery atherosclerosis in Iran, alongside medical interventions, attention should also be paid towards behavioral interventions in order to modify hostile and angrily behavior.

  7. Immune mechanisms in atherosclerosis, especially in diabetes type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frostegård, Johan

    2013-10-29

    Atherosclerosis and ensuing cardiovascular disease (CVD) are major complications of diabetes type 2. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory condition involving immunocompetent cells of different types present in the lesions. Even though inflammation and immune activation may be more pronounced in atherosclerosis in diabetes type 2, there does not appear to be any major differences between diabetics and non-diabetics. Similar factors are thus implicated in atherosclerosis-associated immune activation in both groups. The cause of immune activation is not known and different mutually non-exclusive possibilities exist. Oxidized and/or enzymatically modified forms of low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) and dead cells are present in atherosclerotic plaques. OxLDL could play a role, being pro-inflammatory and immunostimulatory as it activates T-cells and is cytotoxic at higher concentrations. Inflammatory phospholipids in OxLDL are implicated, with phosphorylcholine (PC) as one of the exposed antigens. Antibodies against PC (anti-PC) are anti-atherogenic in mouse studies, and anti-PC is negatively associated with development of atherosclerosis and CVD in humans. Bacteria and virus have been discussed as potential causes of immune activation, but it has been difficult to find direct evidence supporting this hypothesis, and antibiotic trials in humans have been negative or inconclusive. Heat shock proteins (HSP) could be one major target for atherogenic immune reactions. More direct causes of plaque rupture include cytokines such as interleukin 1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and also lipid mediators as leukotrienes. In addition, in diabetes, hyperglycemia and oxidative stress appear to accelerate the development of atherosclerosis, one mechanism could be via promotion of immune reactions. To prove that immune reactions are causative of atherosclerosis and CVD, further studies with immune-modulatory treatments are needed.

  8. Apolipoprotein E gene polymorphisms as risk factors for carotid atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zurnić Irena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Atherosclerosis is still the leading cause of death in Western world. Development of atherosclerotic plaque involves accumulation of inflammatory cells, lipids, smooth muscle cells and extracellular matrix proteins in the intima of the vascular wall. Apolipoprotein E participates in the transport of exogenous cholesterol, endogenouly synthesized lipids and triglycerides in the organism. Apolipoprotein E gene has been identified as one of the candidate genes for atherosclerosis. Previous studies in different populations have clearly implicated apolipoprotein E genetic variation (ε polymorphisms as a major modulator of low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Data considering apolipoprotein E polymorphisms in relation to carotid atherosclerosis gave results that are not in full compliance. The aim of present study was to investigate the apolipoprotein E polymorphisms in association with carotid plaque presence, apolipoprotein E and lipid serum levels in patients with carotid atherosclerosis from Serbia. Methods. The study group enrolled 495 participants: 285 controls and 210 consecutive patients with carotid atherosclerosis who underwent carotid endarterectomy. Genotyping of apolipoprotein E polymorphisms were done using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism methods. Results. Patients had significantly decreased frequency of the ε2 allele compared to controls. Patients who carry at least one ε2 allele had a significantly higher level of serum apolipoprotein E and significantly lower low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels compared to those who do not carry this allele. Conclusion. Our results suggest protective effect of apolipoprotein E ε2 allele on susceptibility for carotid plaque presence as well as low density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering effect in Serbian patients with carotid atherosclerosis. Further research of multiple gene and environmental factors that contribute to the

  9. MicroRNAs in Lipid Metabolism and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNA are mediators of post-transcriptional gene expression that likely regulate most biological pathways and networks. The study of miRNAs is a rapidly emerging field; recent findings have revealed a significant role for miRNAs in atherosclerosis and lipoprotein metabolism. CONTENT: Results from recent studies demonstrated a role for miRNAs in endothelial integrity, macrophage inflammatory response to oxidized low-density lipoprotein, vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and cholesterol synthesis. These mechanisms are all vital to the initiation and proliferation of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. The importance of miRNAs has recently been recognized in cardiovascular sciences and miRNAs will likely become an integral part of our fundamental comprehension of atherosclerosis and lipoprotein metabolism. The extensive impact of miRNA mediated gene regulation and the relative ease of in vivo applicable modifications highlight the enormous potential of miRNA-based therapeutics in cardiovascular diseases. SUMMARY: miRNA studies in the field of lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis are in their infancy, and thus there is tremendous opportunity for discovery in this understudied area. The ability to target miRNAs in vivo through delivery of miRNA-mimics to enhance miRNA function, or antimiRNAs which inhibit miRNAs, has opened new avenues for the development of therapeutics for dyslipidemias and atherosclerosis, offers a unique approach to treating disease by modulating entire biological pathways. These exciting findings support the development of miRNA antagonists as potential therapeutics for the treatment of dyslipidaemia,atherosclerosis and related metabolic diseases. KEYWORDS: atherosclerosis, lipoprotein, HDL, miRNA.

  10. Ultrasound screening of multifocal atherosclerosis: markers for coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lachezar Grozdinski; Mario Stankev; Alexander Doganov

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objective The frequency of multifocal atherosclerosis (MFA) in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) has not been thoroughly studied. The purpose of our study was to perform ultrasound screening for MFA in patients with coronary atherosclerosis and make evaluation of the sensitivity and significance of different atherosclerosis markers. Methods Using Color Dupplex Ultrasound (CDU), we studied 32 clinically healthy persons and 87 patients of the city of B with clinical data for CHD where we also performed coronarography. Results In patients with coronary atherosclerosis we found high frequency of carotid atherosclerosis (93%) and peripheral artery disease (PAD) (81%). We established verifiable thickening of the intima-media (IMT) of the common carotid artery (CCA) and common femoral artery (CFA) in patients with CHD. There is a correlation between the frequency of carotid and femoral stenoses and CHD proven by coronarography. Patients with CHD had a high relative risk to develop carotid (RR = 5) and peripheral atherosclerosis (RR=3.5) and high frequency of asymptomatic stenoses and thromboses of the internal carotid artery (86.9%) and femoral artery (78.3%), as well as aneurisms of the abdominal aorta (8.1%). Markers for CAD with high sensitivity were the atherosclerotic plaques of ICA (0.93) and CFA (0.81) as well as IMT of the CFA (0.84). Conclusions MFA are common among patients with CHD. Ultrasound diagnosis is the method of choice for simultaneous non-invasive screening of carotid, peripheral and MFA and provides sensitive markers for coronary atherosclerosis. The most sensitive and specific markers for CHD are the combination of the IMT and atherosclerotic plaques of CCA, ICA and CFA (100% sensitivity and 0.92 specificity).

  11. Heme oxygenase-1, oxidation, inflammation and atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus A Araujo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory process of the vascular wall characterized by the infiltration of lipids and inflammatory cells. Oxidative modifications of infiltrating low density lipoproteins and induction of oxidative stress play a major role in lipid retention in the vascular wall, uptake by macrophages and generation of foam cells, a hallmark of this disorder. The vasculature has a plethora of protective resources against oxidation and inflammation, many of them regulated by the Nrf2 transcription factor. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is a Nrf2-regulated gene that plays a critical role in the prevention of vascular inflammation. It is the inducible isoform of heme oxygenase, responsible for the oxidative cleavage of heme groups leading to the generation of biliverdin, carbon monoxide and release of ferrous iron. HO-1 has important antioxidant, antiinflammatory, antiapoptotic, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory effects in vascular cells, most of which play a significant role in the protection against atherogenesis. HO-1 may also be an important feature in macrophage differentiation and polarization to certain subtypes. The biological effects of HO-1 are largely attributable to its enzymatic activity, which can be conceived as a system with three arms of action, corresponding to its three enzymatic byproducts. HO-1 mediated vascular protection may be due to a combination of systemic and vascular local effects. It is usually expressed at low levels but can be highly upregulated in the presence of several proatherogenic stimuli. The HO-1 system is amenable for use in the development of new therapies, some of them currently under experimental and clinical trials. Interestingly, in contrast to the HO-1 antiatherogenic actions, the expression of its transcriptional regulator Nrf2 leads to proatherogenic effects instead. This article reviews the evidence that supports the antiatherogenic role of HO-1, potential pathways and mechanisms mediating

  12. Yindanxinnaotong, a Chinese compound medicine, synergistically attenuates atherosclerosis progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Long; Pan, Guo-feng; Zhang, Xiao-dong; Wang, Jian-lu; Wang, Wan-dan; Zhang, Jian-yong; Wang, Hui; Liang, Ri-xin; Sun, Xiao-bo

    2015-07-21

    Yindanxinnaotong (YD), a traditional Chinese medicine, has been introduced to clinical medicine for more than a decade, while its pharmacological properties are still not to be well addressed. This report aimed to explore the anti-atherosclerosis properties and underlying mechanisms of YD. We initially performed a computational prediction based on a network pharmacology simulation, which clued YD exerted synergistically anti-atherosclerosis properties by vascular endothelium protection, lipid-lowering, anti-inflammation, and anti-oxidation. These outcomes were then validated in atherosclerosis rats. The experiments provided evidences indicating YD's contribution in this study included, (1) significantly reduced the severity of atherosclerosis, inhibited reconstruction of the artery wall and regulated the lipid profile; (2) enhanced antioxidant power, strengthened the activity of antioxidant enzymes, and decreased malondialdhyde levels; (3) significantly increased the viability of umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to oxidative stress due to pretreatment with YD; (4) significantly reduced the level of pro-inflammatory cytokines; (5) significantly down-regulated NF-kB/p65 and up-regulated IkB in the YD-treated groups. Overall, these results demonstrated that YD intervention relieves atherosclerosis through regulating lipids, reducing lipid particle deposition in the endothelial layer of artery, enhancing antioxidant power, and repressing inflammation activity by inhibiting the nuclear factor-kappa B signal pathway.

  13. Interleukin 27 inhibits atherosclerosis via immunoregulation of macrophages in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirase, Tetsuaki; Hara, Hiromitsu; Miyazaki, Yoshiyuki; Ide, Noriko; Nishimoto-Hazuku, Ai; Fujimoto, Hirokazu; Saris, Christiaan J M; Yoshida, Hiroki; Node, Koichi

    2013-08-01

    Chronic inflammation in arterial wall that is driven by immune cells and cytokines plays pivotal roles in the development of atherosclerosis. Interleukin 27 (IL-27) is a member of the IL-12 family of cytokines that consists of IL-27p28 and Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 3 (EBI3) and has anti-inflammatory properties that regulate T cell polarization and cytokine production. IL-27-deficient (Ldlr-/-Ebi3-/-) and IL-27 receptor-deficient (Ldlr-/-WSX-1-/-) Ldlr-/- mice were generated and fed with a high-cholesterol diet to induce atherosclerosis. Roles of bone marrow-derived cells in vivo and macrophages in vitro were studied using bone marrow reconstitution by transplantation and cultured peritoneal macrophages, respectively. We demonstrate that mice lacking IL-27 or IL-27 receptor are more susceptible to atherosclerosis compared with wild type due to enhanced accumulation and activation of macrophages in arterial walls. The number of circulating proinflammatory Ly6C(hi) monocytes showed no significant difference between wild-type mice and mice lacking IL-27 or IL-27 receptor. Administration of IL-27 suppressed the development of atherosclerosis in vivo and macrophage activation in vitro that was indicated by increased uptake of modified low-density lipoprotein and augmented production of proinflammatory cytokines. These findings define a novel inhibitory role for IL-27 in atherosclerosis that regulates macrophage activation in mice.

  14. Probucol alleviates atherosclerosis and improves high density lipoprotein function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Jian-Kai

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Probucol is a unique hypolipidemic agent that decreases high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C. However, it is not definite that whether probucol hinders the progression of atherosclerosis by improving HDL function. Methods Eighteen New Zealand White rabbits were randomly divided into the control, atherosclerosis and probucol groups. Control group were fed a regular diet; the atherosclerosis group received a high fat diet, and the probucol group received the high fat diet plus probucol. Hepatocytes and peritoneal macrophages were isolated for [3H] labeled cholesterol efflux rates and expression of ABCA1 and SR-B1 at gene and protein levels; venous blood was collected for serum paraoxonase 1, myeloperoxidase activity and lipid analysis. Aorta were prepared for morphologic and immunohistochemical analysis after 12 weeks. Results Compared to the atherosclerosis group, the paraoxonase 1 activity, cholesterol efflux rates, expression of ABCA1 and SR-BI in hepatocytes and peritoneal macrophages, and the level of ABCA1 and SR-BI in aortic lesions were remarkably improved in the probucol group, But the serum HDL cholesterol concentration, myeloperoxidase activity, the IMT and the percentage plaque area of aorta were significantly decreased. Conclusion Probucol alleviated atherosclerosis by improving HDL function. The mechanisms include accelerating the process of reverse cholesterol transport, improving the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant functions.

  15. [Prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis in a cohort of Mexico City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Saldaña, J; Cantú Brito, C; Sosa Espinosa, P; Reynoso Marenco, M T; Zuckermann Foullón, D; Barinagarrementería Aldatz, F

    1998-01-01

    In order to investigate the prevalence of atherosclerosis in Mexico, high resolution ultrasound and color Doppler flow imaging of carotid arteries were carried out in a group of participants in CUPA project, a cohort study started in 1989 among persons 60 years and older living permanently in a high rise in México City. Imaging studies included identification of 4 atherosclerosis related abnormalities: 1) intima media thickness; 2) kinkings and tortuousness; 3) non-stenosing plaques; and 4) significant carotid stenosis (> 50%). Analysis of 198 Doppler ultrasonographic studies in 56 males and 142 females showed an overall prevalence of atherosclerosis related lesions of 65.6%, with increasing frequency by age groups: 33% in younger than 65 year-old, 71% in 65-74 years, and up to 88% in the 75 years and older group. The prevalence of high grade stenosis was low (6%) whereas the overall frequency of non-stenosing plaques and intima-media thickness was higher than 60%. Intima-media thickness was more common in males while non-stenosing plaques and high grade stenosis were more frequent in females. However, there were not significant differences among women and men when atherosclerotic lesions were analyzed by age groups. This is the first report on the prevalence of atherosclerosis in a Mexican population using ultrasonography. Findings of the investigation document the high prevalence of atherosclerosis among elderly resident in Mexico City.

  16. Suppression of atherosclerosis by synthetic REV-ERB agonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitaula, Sadichha [Department of Molecular Therapeutics, The Scripps Research Institute, Jupiter, FL 33458 (United States); Billon, Cyrielle [Department of Pharmacological & Physiological Science, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63104 (United States); Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A. [Department of Molecular Therapeutics, The Scripps Research Institute, Jupiter, FL 33458 (United States); Burris, Thomas P., E-mail: burristp@slu.edu [Department of Pharmacological & Physiological Science, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63104 (United States)

    2015-05-08

    The nuclear receptors for heme, REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, play important roles in the regulation of metabolism and inflammation. Recently it was demonstrated that reduced REV-ERBα expression in hematopoetic cells in LDL receptor null mice led to increased atherosclerosis. We sought to determine if synthetic REV-ERB agonists that we have developed might have the ability to suppress atherosclerosis in this model. A previously characterized synthetic REV-ERB agonist, SR9009, was used to determine if activation of REV-ERB activity would affect atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice. Atherosclerotic plaque size was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in mice administered SR9009 (100 mg/kg) for seven weeks compared to control mice (n = 10 per group). SR9009 treatment of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages (BMDM) reduced the polarization of BMDMs to proinflammatory M1 macrophage while increasing the polarization of BMDMs to anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results suggest that pharmacological targeting of REV-ERBs may be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Synthetic REV-ERB agonist treatment reduced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB decreased M1 macrophage polarization. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB increased M2 macrophage polarization.

  17. Vascular wall shear stress in zebrafish model of early atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woorak; Seo, Eunseok; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-11-01

    Although atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease, the role of hemodynamic force has strong influence on the outbreak of the disease. Low and oscillating wall shear stress (WSS) is associated with the incidence of atherosclerosis. Many researchers have investigated relationships between WSS and the occurrence of atherosclerosis using in vitro and in vivo models. However, these models possess technological limitations in mimicking real biophysiological conditions and monitoring the temporal progression of atherosclerosis. In this study, a hypercholesterolaemic zebrafish model was established as a novel model to resolve these technical limitations. WSS in blood vessels of 15 days post-fertilisation zebrafish was measured using a micro PIV technique, and the spatial distribution of lipids inside blood vessels was quantitatively visualized using a confocal microscopy. As a result, lipids are mainly deposited in the regions of low WSS. The oscillating WSS is not induced by blood flows in the zebrafish disease model. The present hypercholesterolaemic zebrafish model would be useful for understanding the effect of WSS on the early stage of atherosclerosis. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) under a Grant funded by the Korean government (MSIP) (No. 2008-0061991).

  18. Iron and hepcidin as risk factors in atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galesloot, Tessel E; Janss, Luc L; Burgess, Stephen;

    2015-01-01

    -wide association meta-analysis on iron status, and assessed associations of individual SNPs and quartiles of a multi-SNP score with NIMA. Quartile 4 versus quartile 1 of the multi-SNP score showed directionally consistent associations with the hypothesized direction of effect for all NIMA in women, indicating...... that increased body iron status is a risk factor for atherosclerosis in women. We observed no single SNP associations that fit the hypothesized directions of effect between iron and NIMA, except for rs651007, associated with decreased ferritin concentration and decreased atherosclerosis risk. Two of six NIMA......-related SNPs showed association with the ratio hepcidin/ferritin, suggesting that an increased hepcidin/ferritin ratio increases atherosclerosis risk. Genomic correlations were close to zero, except for hepcidin and ferritin with ABI at rest [-0.27 (SE 0.34) and -0.22 (SE 0.35), respectively] and ABI after...

  19. Nanomedicine for the prevention, treatment and imaging of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psarros, Costas; Lee, Regent; Margaritis, Marios; Antoniades, Charalambos

    2012-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries, with an increasing prevalence due to an aging population. The pathology underpinning CVD is atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory state involving the arterial wall. Accumulation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) laden macrophages in the arterial wall and their subsequent transformation into foam cells lead to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Progression of atherosclerotic lesions may gradually lead to plaque related complications and clinically manifest as acute vascular syndromes including acute myocardial or cerebral ischemia. Nanotechnology offers emerging therapeutic strategies, which may have advantage overclassical treatments for atherosclerosis. In this review, we present the potential applications of nanotechnology toward prevention, identification and treatment of atherosclerosis.

  20. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Wang [Department of Pediatrics, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Chaoshu, Tang [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Health Sciences Center, Peking University, Beijing 100034 (China); Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Medicine, Ministry of Education (China); Hongfang, Jin, E-mail: jinhongfang51@126.com [Department of Pediatrics, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Junbao, Du, E-mail: junbaodu1@126.com [Department of Pediatrics, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China)

    2010-05-28

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, complex, and progressive pathological process in large and medium sized arteries. The exact mechanism of this process remains unclear. Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a novel gasotransmitter, was confirmed as playing a major role in the pathogenesis of many cardiovascular diseases. It plays a role in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and apoptosis, participates in the progress of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHCY), inhibits atherogenic modification of LDL, interferes with vascular calcification, intervenes with platelet function, and there are interactions between H{sub 2}S and inflammatory processes. The role of H{sub 2}S in atherosclerotic pathogenesis highlights the mysteries of atherosclerosis and inspires the search for innovative therapeutic strategies. Here, we review the studies to date that have considered the role of H{sub 2}S in atherosclerosis.

  1. IL-35: a potential target for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Lin, Ying-Zhong; Shi, Ying; Ji, Qing-Wei

    2013-10-01

    The imbalance of anti- inflammatory/pro-inflammatory cytokines plays an important role in the process of atherosclerosis. IL-35 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine comprising the p35 subunit of IL-12 and the subunit Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) -induced gene 3(EBI3). Accumulating evidence showed that IL-35 up-regulates the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines, induces the generation of CD4 + regulatory T cells, inhibits CD4 + effector T cells response and other target cells activity, and reduces the progression of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In addition, it has been found that Ebi3 and p35 strongly coexpressed in human advanced lesions. Therefore, we hypothesize that IL-35 may become a novel target for the treatment of atherosclerosis. Further studies are required to investigate the precise effect and the signaling pathway of IL-35 in atherosclerosis process.

  2. Role of Helicobacter pylori infection in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajesh; Vijayvergiya; Ramalingam; Vadivelu

    2015-01-01

    Though a century old hypothesis, infection as a cause for atherosclerosis is still a debatable issue. Epidemiological and clinical studies had shown a possible association but inhomogeneity in the study population and study methods along with potential confounders have yielded conflicting results. Infection triggers a chronic inflammatory state which along with other mechanisms such as dyslipidemia, hyper-homocysteinemia, hypercoagulability, impaired glucose metabolism and endothelial dysfunction, contribute in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Studies have shown a positive relations between Cytotoxic associated gene-A positive strains of Helicobacter pylori and vascular diseases such as coronary artery disease and stroke. Infection mediated genetic modulation is a new emerging theory in this regard. Further large scale studies on infection and atherosclerosis focusing on multiple pathogenetic mechanisms may help in refining our knowledge in this aspect.

  3. Relationship between leukocyte count and angiographical characteristics of coronary atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    En-zhi JIA; Zhi-jian YANG; Biao YUAN; Xiao-ling ZANG; Rong-hu WANG; Tie-bing ZHU; Lian-sheng WANG; Bo CHEN; Wen-zhu MA

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To explore the relationship between differential leucocyte count and coronary atherosclerosis. Methods: The study population consisted of 507 consecutive patients (376 male and 131 female) who underwent coronary angiography for suspected or known coronary atherosclerosis. The patients' smoking and drinking habits were investigated, and anthropometric measurements, serum measurements, and hematological measurements were conducted for every patient.The severity of coronary atherosclerosis was defined by using Gensini' s score system. One-way ANOVA, Spearman's correlation analysis, and multivariate stepwise linear regression analysis were employed to explore the relationship between differential leucocyte count and coronary atherosclerosis. Results: Oneway ANOVA indicated that the diastolic blood pressure, glucose, urea, creatinine,leukocyte count, neutrophil count, monocyte count, hemoglobin, and platelet count differed among the groups according to Gensini's score, the tertile values of which were used as cutoff points. Spearman's correlation analysis suggested that Gensini's score was significantly correlated with age, diastolic blood pressure,glucose, urea, creatinine, leukocyte count, neutrophil count, monocyte count,hemoglobin, and erythrocyte count, respectively. Multivariate stepwise linear regression analysis show that neutrophil count (β=0.247, P=0.000), age (β=0.141,P=0.001), glucose (β=0.173, P=0.000), creatinine (β=0.088, P=0.063), hemoglobin (β=-0.168, P=0.013) and sex (men were coded as 1 and women were coded as 2;β=-0.121, P=0.012) were significantly independently associated with the Gensini's score. Conclusion: The independent association of neutrophil count with the angiographical characteristics of coronary atherosclerosis, as estimated by Gensini's score, strongly suggests that granulocytosis may play a role in the development of coronary atherosclerosis.

  4. 75 FR 62544 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; Comment Request; the Atherosclerosis... and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. Proposed Collection: Title: The Atherosclerosis Risk...

  5. Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Atherosclerosis: Recent Data and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehanna, Emile; Hamik, Anne; Josephson, Richard A

    2016-05-01

    Historically, the relationship between exercise and the cardiovascular system was viewed as unidirectional, with a disease resulting in exercise limitation and hazard. This article reviews and explores the bidirectional nature, delineating the effects, generally positive, on the cardiovascular system and atherosclerosis. Exercise augments eNOS, affects redox potential, and favorably affects mediators of atherosclerosis including lipids, glucose homeostasis, and inflammation. There are direct effects on the vasculature as well as indirect benefits related to exercise-induced changes in body composition and skeletal muscle. Application of aerobic exercise to specific populations is described, with the hope that this knowledge will move the science forward and improve individual patient outcome.

  6. Stanniocalcin-2 overexpression reduces atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Lasse B; Conover, Cheryl A; Bjørklund, Martin M;

    2016-01-01

    lesion development. We then used adeno-associated virus-mediated expression of STC2 to increase the fraction of PAPP-A present in the inhibited state and found that it decreased the development of atherosclerosis by 47% (P = 0.0005) in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice challenged with a Western type diet...... compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first to suggest the involvement of STC2 in regulating PAPP-A activity during the development of atherosclerosis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that lesion development can be inhibited in an experimental model by driving the balance towards inhibited PAPP-A....

  7. Cardiovascular disease due to accelerated atherosclerosis in systemic vasculitides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen Tervaert, Jan Willem

    2013-02-01

    Patients with different forms of systemic vasculitis experience long-term morbidity and mortality caused by cardiovascular disease due to premature atherosclerosis. Epidemiologic reports of patients with GCA suggest that long-term mortality in this disease is not increased compared with the general population of the same age. The risk of a stroke, however, in particular in the vertebrobasilar territory, is increased. In addition, the occurrence of aortic aneurysmal disease and aortic dissection is also clearly increased in GCA. Mortality due to ischaemic heart disease, however, is not increased. In Takayasu arteritis accelerated atherosclerosis has been clearly documented both clinically and in autopsy reports. Atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid artery may be present in the carotid arteries especially in patients with a documented history of arteritis involving the carotid artery. It is controversial whether Kawasaki disease is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis. Young adults with a history of Kawasaki disease may have abnormal brachial artery reactivity, increased carotid IMT values and increased arterial stiffness. At autopsy examinations of KD patients, however, no significant atherosclerotic lesions are detected and carotid IMT measurements were found to be clearly different from those in young adults with familiar hypercholesterolaemia, suggesting that the remodeling process in KD is different from atherosclerosis. In ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV), an increased mortality as a consequence of cardiovascular disease is well-documented. In these patients the relative risk for coronary heart disease is two- to fourfold that in control subjects. In addition, a similar relative risk has been found for stroke. Diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, abdominal obesity (metabolic syndrome), impaired renal function, persistent proteinuria and increased production of C-reactive protein are common risk factors for premature atherosclerosis in patients with

  8. Increased YKL-40 expression in patients with carotid atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Annika E; Rathcke, Camilla N; Skjelland, Mona

    2010-01-01

    atherosclerosis and 20 healthy controls. Carotid expression of YKL-40 was examined by real time RT-PCR in 57 of the patients. Regulation and effect of YKL-40 were examined in THP-1 monocytes. RESULTS: Our main findings were: (1) serum YKL-40 levels were significantly elevated in patients with carotid...... atherosclerosis, with particularly high levels in those with symptomatic disease; (2) patients with recent ischemic symptoms (within 2 months) had higher YKL-40 mRNA levels in carotid plaque than other patients; (3) in vitro, the beta-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol, toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4...

  9. Increased YKL-40 expression in patients with carotid atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Axel Gottlieb; Rathcke, C.N.; Skjelland, M.

    2010-01-01

    atherosclerosis and 20 healthy controls. Carotid expression of YKL-40 was examined by real time RT-PCR in 57 of the patients. Regulation and effect of YKL-40 were examined in THP-1 monocytes. Results: Our main findings were: (1) serum YKL-40 levels were significantly elevated in patients with carotid...... atherosclerosis, with particularly high levels in those with symptomatic disease; (2) patients with recent ischemic symptoms (within 2 months) had higher YKL-40 mRNA levels in carotid plaque than other patients; (3) in vitro, the beta-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol, toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4...

  10. Fetal programming of atherosclerosis: possible role of the mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Line; Levy, Emile; Bouity-Voubou, Maurice; Delvin, Edgard

    2010-04-01

    Growing evidence indicates that being small size at birth from malnutrition is associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D), metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Atherosclerosis is common to these aforementioned disorders, and oxidative stress and chronic inflammation are now considered as initiating events in its development, with endothelial cell dysfunction being an early, fundamental step. According to the fetal programming hypothesis, growth-restricted neonates exposed to placental insufficiency exhibit endothelial cell dysfunction very early in life that later on predisposes them to atherosclerosis. Although many investigations have reported early alterations in vascular function in children and adolescents with low birth weight, the mechanisms of such fetal programming of atherosclerosis remain largely unknown. Experimental studies have demonstrated that low birth weight infants are prenatally subjected to conditions of oxidative stress and inflammation that might be involved in the later occurrence of atherosclerosis. Arterial endothelial dysfunction has been encountered in term infants, children and young adults with low birth weight. The loss of appropriate endothelium function with decreased nitric oxide production or activity, manifested as impaired vasodilatation, is considered a basic step in atherosclerosis development and progression. Several lines of evidence indicate that mitochondrial damage is central to this process and that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may act as a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it is well-accepted that the mitochondria are a major source of chronic ROS production under physiological conditions. On the other hand, it is known that ROS generation damages lipids, proteins and mitochondrial DNA, leading to dysregulated mitochondrial function. Elevated mitochondrial ROS production is associated with endothelial cell dysfunction as well as vascular smooth muscle cell

  11. Effect of uremia on HDL composition, vascular inflammation, and atherosclerosis in wild-type mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Christian A; Bro, Susanne; Bartels, Emil D

    2007-01-01

    Wild-type mice normally do not develop atherosclerosis, unless fed cholic acid. Uremia is proinflammatory and increases atherosclerosis 6- to 10-fold in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. This study examined the effect of uremia on lipoproteins, vascular inflammation, and atherosclerosis in wild...... in cholic acid-fed sham mice. The results suggest that moderate uremia neither induces aortic inflammation nor atherosclerosis in C57BL/6J mice despite increased LDL/HDL cholesterol ratio and altered HDL composition....

  12. DMPD: Toll-like receptors in atherosclerosis. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18031244 Toll-like receptors in atherosclerosis. Tobias PS, Curtiss LK. Biochem Soc... Trans. 2007 Dec;35(Pt 6):1453-5. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Toll-like receptors in atherosclerosis.... PubmedID 18031244 Title Toll-like receptors in atherosclerosis. Authors Tobias PS, Curtiss LK. Publication

  13. 75 FR 46945 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-04

    ... Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event Surveillance SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of... Budget (OMB) for review and approval. Proposed Collection: Title: Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis... and progression of subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD)-- that is, atherosclerosis and other...

  14. 78 FR 77138 - Proposed Collection; 60-day Comment Request: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-20

    ... Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC) Summary: In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c) (2... days of the date of this publication. Proposed Collection: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities... primary objectives of the study are to: (1) investigate factors associated with both atherosclerosis...

  15. Increased LDL susceptibility to oxidation accelerates future carotid artery atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoki Toshinari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We analyzed the causal relationship between LDL susceptibility to oxidation and the development of new carotid artery atherosclerosis over a period of 5 years. We previously described the determinants related to a risk of cardiovascular changes determined in a Japanese population participating in the Niigata Study, which is an ongoing epidemiological investigation of the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Methods We selected 394 individuals (169 males and 225 females who underwent a second carotid artery ultrasonographic examination in 2001 - 2002 for the present study. The susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was determined as the photometric absorbance and electrophoretic mobility of samples that had been collected in 1996 - 1997. The measurements were compared with ultrasonographic findings obtained in 2001 - 2002. Results The multivariate-adjusted model showed that age (odds ratio (OR, 1.034; 95% confidence interval (95%CI, 1.010 - 1.059, HbA1c (OR, 1.477; 95%CI, 0.980 - 2.225, and photometric O/N (OR, 2.012; 95%CI, 1.000 - 4.051 were significant variables that could independently predict the risk of new carotid artery atherosclerosis. Conclusion The susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was a significant parameter that could predict new carotid artery atherosclerosis over a 5-year period, and higher susceptibility was associated with a higher incidence of new carotid artery atherosclerosis.

  16. The Role of Atherosclerosis, Hormones and Genes in Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hollander (Monika)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes the relation between atherosclerosis, hormones and genetic factors in relation to the risk of stroke. The results are based on the Rotterdam Study, a large population based cohort study among 7,983 persons aged 55 years or older. A total of 7,721 persons were free f

  17. Imaging Techniques for Diagnosis of Thoracic Aortic Atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen Klomp, W.W.; Brandon Bravo Bruinsma, G.J.; Hof, van 't A.W.; Grandjean, J.G.; Nierich, A.P.

    2016-01-01

    The most severe complications after cardiac surgery are neurological complications including stroke which is often caused by emboli merging from atherosclerosis in the ascending aorta to the brain. Information about the thoracic aorta is crucial in reducing the embolization risk for both surgical op

  18. Cell signaling by reactive nitrogen and oxygen species in atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R. P.; Moellering, D.; Murphy-Ullrich, J.; Jo, H.; Beckman, J. S.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    The production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species has been implicated in atherosclerosis principally as means of damaging low-density lipoprotein that in turn initiates the accumulation of cholesterol in macrophages. The diversity of novel oxidative modifications to lipids and proteins recently identified in atherosclerotic lesions has revealed surprising complexity in the mechanisms of oxidative damage and their potential role in atherosclerosis. Oxidative or nitrosative stress does not completely consume intracellular antioxidants leading to cell death as previously thought. Rather, oxidative and nitrosative stress have a more subtle impact on the atherogenic process by modulating intracellular signaling pathways in vascular tissues to affect inflammatory cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Furthermore, cellular responses can affect the production of nitric oxide, which in turn can strongly influence the nature of oxidative modifications occurring in atherosclerosis. The dynamic interactions between endogenous low concentrations of oxidants or reactive nitrogen species with intracellular signaling pathways may have a general role in processes affecting wound healing to apoptosis, which can provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  19. Atherosclerosis induced by diabetogenic diet in New Zealand white rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To observe the effects of diabetogenic (high fat high sucrose, lacking choleserol) diet on atherogenesis in New Zealand white rabbits. Two groups of New Zealand white rabbits received regular rabbit chow (the normal control), or high fat high sucrose diet for 4 months. The levels of plasma total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, and glucose were investigated, the areas of fatty streak of the aortae were measured after staining with Sodan IV, and the aortic, coronary specimens were observed with light and electron microscopies. The plasma glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol were increased significantly by high fat high sucrose feeding. At the end of 4 months, the early charateristics of atherosclerosis were present in the animals' vascular specimens. Our findings suggest that high fat high sucrose feeding can induce hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia and atherosclerosis in New Zealand white rabbits, and this could be a potential animal model for studying the mechanisms of diabetes-accelerated atherosclerosis. This study raised a question: What is the mechanism by which high fat high sucrose feeding induces atherosclerosis?. The related hypothesis was given in this article.

  20. Lipids, atherosclerosis and CVD risk: is CRP an innocent bystander?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, B G; Zacho, J

    2009-01-01

    exclude that genetically elevated CRP cause CVD. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that elevated CRP per se does not cause CVD; however, inflammation per se possibly contributes to CVD. Elevated CRP levels more likely is a marker for the extent of atherosclerosis or for the inflammatory activity...

  1. Venous Thrombosis and Atherosclerosis is There a link

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU MIN-JUAN; LiU Ze-lin

    2008-01-01

    @@ Venous thrombosis and arterial thrombotic disorders have long been viewed as separate pathophysiological entities, partly as a result of the obvious anatomical differences, as well as their distinct clinical presentations. Recently, the potential association between venous thromboembolism(VTE) and atherosclerosis was described for the first time in 2003. Subsequently, numerous investigations have addressed the topic.

  2. A Role of the Bile Salt Receptor FXR in Atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, Jurre; Herrema, Hilde; Groen, Albert K.; Kuipers, Folkert

    2010-01-01

    This study reviews current insights into the role of bile salts and bile salt receptors on the progression and regression of atherosclerosis. Bile salts have emerged as important modifiers of lipid and energy metabolism. At the molecular level, bile salts regulate lipid and energy homeostasis mainly

  3. Fibrinogen and atherosclerosis: A study in transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, J.; Maas, A.; Rezaee, F.; Havekes, L.; Verheijen, J.; Gijbels, M.; Haverkate, F.

    1997-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease that is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Recent epidemiological studies have shown that the combination of elevated VLDL/LDL concentrations and elevated fibrinogen levels results in a strong increase of the risk for cardiovascular dise

  4. Fibrinogen and atherosclerosis: A study in transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, J.; Havekes, L.; Verheijen, J.; Gijbels, M.; Haverkate, F.

    1996-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease that is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Recent epidemiological studies have shown that the combination of elevated VLDL/LDL concentrations and elevated fibrinogen levels results in a strong increase of the risk for cardiovascular dise

  5. Brown fat activation reduces hypercholesterolaemia and protects from atherosclerosis development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berbeé, J.F.P.; Boon, M.R.; Khedoe, P.P.S.J.; Bartelt, A.; Schlein, C.; Worthmann, A.; Kooijman, S.; Hoeke, G.; Mol, I.M.; John, C.; Jung, C.; Vazirpanah, N.; Brouwers, L.P.J.; Gordts, P.L.S.M.; Esko, J.D.; Hiemstra, P.S.; Havekes, L.M.; Scheja, L.; Heeren, J.; Rensen, P.C.N.

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) combusts high amounts of fatty acids, thereby lowering plasma triglyceride levels and reducing obesity. However, the precise role of BAT in plasma cholesterol metabolism and atherosclerosis development remains unclear. Here we show that BAT activation by b3-adrenergic rece

  6. Proteomic identification of proteins in exosomes of patients with atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Mei; QUAN Jing; ZHANG Heng; DING Qian-qian; XIANG Meng; MENG Dan; SUN Ning; CHEN Si-feng

    2016-01-01

    AIM:Atherosclerosis primarily involved systemic arteries .Luminal surface , a monolayer of endothelial cells , of artery directly exposes to blood and is susceptible to active substances in the blood .Exosomes contain significantly amount of proteins and RNAs .Ex-osomes can be good and bad for cells , depending on their component .Thus, exosomes may contribute to atherosclerosis by affecting endothelial cells .This study analyzed the relationship of exosome proteins and atherosclerosis .METHODS: Fifty-six patients and healthy subjects were recruited and divided into two comparisons:healthy subjects vs atherosclerosis ( HS vs AS) , and hypertension vs hypertension plus atherosclerosis ( HT vs HT+AS) .Serum exosomes were decoded by protein mass spectrometry .The protein profile and function were analyzed by gene ontology ( GO) .RESULTS:It was found that five child terms repeatedly appeared in “response to stimulus” and “immune system process” of BP of the two categories ( HS vs AS and AS vs HT+AS):“positive regulation of innate immune response”,“immune response-activating signal transduction”,”activation of innate immune response”,“innate immune re-sponse-activating signal transduction” and “innate immune response activating cell surface receptor signaling pathway ”.Two child terms repeatedly showed in “binding” of MF of the two categories:“antigen binding” and “enzyme binding”.Two proteins, PSMA6 and PSMA7, were repeatedly shown in the two categories .CONCLUSION:GO analysis was utilized for structure hierarchy “tree” to illustrate these proteins involved in various terms in BP , CC and MF.The PPI analysis supplied proteins which may play potentially im-portant roles in AS process .Innate immune system and blood coagulation pathway contribute to AS formation .The proteins, PSMA6, PSMA7 and Annexin A2, may can be the new target proteins for prevention and treatment of AS .

  7. Improved animal models for testing gene therapy for atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Liang; Zhang, Jingwan; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Flynn, Rowan; Dichek, David A

    2014-04-01

    Gene therapy delivered to the blood vessel wall could augment current therapies for atherosclerosis, including systemic drug therapy and stenting. However, identification of clinically useful vectors and effective therapeutic transgenes remains at the preclinical stage. Identification of effective vectors and transgenes would be accelerated by availability of animal models that allow practical and expeditious testing of vessel-wall-directed gene therapy. Such models would include humanlike lesions that develop rapidly in vessels that are amenable to efficient gene delivery. Moreover, because human atherosclerosis develops in normal vessels, gene therapy that prevents atherosclerosis is most logically tested in relatively normal arteries. Similarly, gene therapy that causes atherosclerosis regression requires gene delivery to an existing lesion. Here we report development of three new rabbit models for testing vessel-wall-directed gene therapy that either prevents or reverses atherosclerosis. Carotid artery intimal lesions in these new models develop within 2-7 months after initiation of a high-fat diet and are 20-80 times larger than lesions in a model we described previously. Individual models allow generation of lesions that are relatively rich in either macrophages or smooth muscle cells, permitting testing of gene therapy strategies targeted at either cell type. Two of the models include gene delivery to essentially normal arteries and will be useful for identifying strategies that prevent lesion development. The third model generates lesions rapidly in vector-naïve animals and can be used for testing gene therapy that promotes lesion regression. These models are optimized for testing helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd)-mediated gene therapy; however, they could be easily adapted for testing of other vectors or of different types of molecular therapies, delivered directly to the blood vessel wall. Our data also supports the promise of HDAd to deliver long

  8. Expansion of CD25+ Innate Lymphoid Cells Reduces Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbertsen, Daniel; Foks, Amanda C.; Alberts-Grill, Noah; Kuperwaser, Felicia; Chen, Tao; Lederer, James A.; Jarolim, Petr; Grabie, Nir; Lichtman, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a newly discovered subset of immune cells that promote tissue homeostasis and protect against pathogens. ILCs produce cytokines also produced by T lymphocytes that have been shown to affect atherosclerosis, but the influence of ILCs on atherosclerosis has not been explored. Approach and Results We demonstrate that CD25+ ILCs that produce type 2 cytokines (ILC2s) are present in the aorta of atherosclerotic immunodeficient ldlr−/−rag1−/− mice. To investigate the role of ILCs in atherosclerosis, ldlr−/−rag1−/− mice were concurrently fed an atherogenic diet and treated with either ILC-depleting anti-CD90.2 antibodies or with IL-2/anti-IL-2 complexes that expand CD25+ ILCs. Lesion development was not affected by anti-CD90.2 treatment, but was reduced in IL-2/anti-IL-2 -treated mice. These IL-2 treated mice had reduced VLDL cholesterol and increased triglycerides compared to controls and reduced apolipoprotein B100 gene expression in the liver. IL-2/anti-IL-2 treatment caused expansion of ILC2s in aorta and other tissues, elevated levels of IL-5, systemic eosinophila and hepatic eosinophilic inflammation. Blockade of IL-5 reversed the IL-2-complex-induced eosinophilia but did not change lesion size. Conclusions This study demonstrates that expansion of CD25-expressing ILCs by IL-2/anti-IL-2 complexes leads to a reduction in VLDL cholesterol and atherosclerosis. Global depletion of ILCs by anti-CD90.2 did not significantly affect lesion size indicating that different ILC subsets may have divergent effects on atherosclerosis. PMID:26494229

  9. Strong correlation between early stage atherosclerosis and electromechanical coupling of aorta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X. Y.; Yan, F.; Niu, L. L.; Chen, Q. N.; Zheng, H. R.; Li, J. Y.

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is the underlying cause of cardiovascular diseases that are responsible for many deaths in the world, and the early diagnosis of atherosclerosis is highly desirable. The existing imaging methods, however, are not capable of detecting the early stage of atherosclerosis development due to their limited spatial resolution. Using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), we show that the piezoelectric response of an aortic wall increases as atherosclerosis advances, while the stiffness of the aorta shows a less evident correlation with atherosclerosis. Furthermore, we show that there is strong correlation between the coercive electric field necessary to switch the polarity of the artery and the development of atherosclerosis. Thus by measuring the electromechanical coupling of the aortic wall, it is possible to probe atherosclerosis at the early stage of its development, not only improving the spatial resolution by orders of magnitude, but also providing comprehensive quantitative information on the biomechanical properties of the artery.

  10. The Impact of Organokines on Insulin Resistance, Inflammation, and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Mook Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Immoderate energy intake, a sedentary lifestyle, and aging have contributed to the increased prevalence of obesity, sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. There is an urgent need for the development of novel pharmacological interventions that can target excessive fat accumulation and decreased muscle mass and/or strength. Adipokines, bioactive molecules derived from adipose tissue, are involved in the regulation of appetite and satiety, inflammation, energy expenditure, insulin resistance and secretion, glucose and lipid metabolism, and atherosclerosis. Recently, there is emerging evidence that skeletal muscle and the liver also function as endocrine organs that secrete myokines and hepatokines, respectively. Novel discoveries and research into these organokines (adipokines, myokines, and hepatokines may lead to the development of promising biomarkers and therapeutics for cardiometabolic disease. In this review, I summarize recent data on these organokines and focus on the role of adipokines, myokines, and hepatokines in the regulation of insulin resistance, inflammation, and atherosclerosis.

  11. Mutations of mitochondrial genome in patients with carotid atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita A Sazonova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available With aim of detection the spectrum of mitochondrial DNA mutations in patients with carotid atherosclerosis from Moscow Region, we used a Roche 454 high-throughput sequencing of the whole mitochondrial genome. We have found that the presence of a number of homoplasmic mitochondrial DNA mutations in genes of 16S ribosomal RNA, subunits 2, 4 and 5 NADH dehydrogenase, subunits 1 and 2 cytochrome C oxidase, subunit 6 ATP-synthase, tRNA- Leu 2 and cytochrome B differed between conventionally healthy participants of the study and patients with carotid atherosclerosis. We also found heteroplasmic mutations, including insertions one or several nucleotides, that occurred more frequently in mitochondrial DNA of conventionally healthy participants of the study or patients with atherosclerotic lesions.

  12. [Morphological manifestations of systemic atherosclerosis found in fundus (experimental study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzinskaia, M V; Fedorov, A A; Pliukhova, A A; Voevodina, T M; Balatskaia, N V

    2013-01-01

    Results of angiography and morphology of 32 eyes (16 chinchilla rabbits) with experimental atherosclerosis are presented. N.N. Anichkov and S.S. Khalatova experimental hypercholesterolemia model (1912) was used. The animals were divided into the following groups: initial and advanced atherosclerosis, control group, follow-up 3 and 6 months. After 3 months progressive reduction of perfused retinal vessels and early degenerative changes of neurons and photoreceptors were found. In 6 months these changes became more significant and generalized. Due to ongoing small vessel reduction blood flow went to the major vessels and changed its distribution followed by ischemia of adjacent retina. No changes in choriocapillary layer and retinal pigment epithelium were found in any of groups studied.

  13. Novel anti-inflammatory therapies for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Razi; Spagnoli, Vincent; Tardif, Jean-Claude; L'Allier, Philippe L

    2015-06-01

    The underlying role of inflammation in atherosclerosis has been characterized. However, current treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD) predominantly consists of targeted reductions in serum lipoprotein levels rather than combating the deleterious effects of acute and chronic inflammation. Vascular inflammation acts by a number of different molecular and cellular pathways to contribute to atherogenesis. Over the last decades, both basic studies and clinical trials have provided evidence for the potential benefits of treatment of inflammation in CAD. During this period, development of pharmacotherapies directed towards inflammation in atherosclerosis has accelerated quickly. This review will highlight specific therapies targeting interleukin-1β (IL-1β), P-selectin and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO). It will also aim to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of serpin administration, colchicine and intravenous HDL-directed treatment of CAD. We summarize the mechanistic rationale and evidence for these novel anti-inflammatory treatments at both the experimental and clinical levels.

  14. Large animal models of atherosclerosis--new tools for persistent problems in cardiovascular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, J; Al-Mashhadi, R H; Sørensen, C B; Bentzon, J F

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease and ischaemic stroke caused by atherosclerosis are leading causes of illness and death worldwide. Small animal models have provided insight into the fundamental mechanisms driving early atherosclerosis, but it is increasingly clear that new strategies and research tools are needed to translate these discoveries into improved prevention and treatment of symptomatic atherosclerosis in humans. Key challenges include better understanding of processes in late atherosclerosis, factors affecting atherosclerosis in the coronary bed, and the development of reliable imaging biomarker tools for risk stratification and monitoring of drug effects in humans. Efficient large animal models of atherosclerosis may help tackle these problems. Recent years have seen tremendous advances in gene-editing tools for large animals. This has made it possible to create gene-modified minipigs that develop atherosclerosis with many similarities to humans in terms of predilection for lesion sites and histopathology. Together with existing porcine models of atherosclerosis that are based on spontaneous mutations or severe diabetes, such models open new avenues for translational research in atherosclerosis. In this review, we discuss the merits of different animal models of atherosclerosis and give examples of important research problems where porcine models could prove pivotal for progress.

  15. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, endothelial lipase and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Undurti N

    2005-03-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL), a new member of the lipase gene family, was recently cloned and has been shown to have a significant role in modulating the concentrations of plasma high-density lipoprotein levels (HDL). EL is closely related to lipoprotein and hepatic lipases both in structure and function. It is primarily synthesized by endothelial cells, functions at the cell surface, and shows phospholipase A1 activity. Overexpression of EL decreases HDL cholesterol levels whereas blocking its action increases concentrations of HDL cholesterol. Pro-inflammatory cytokines suppress plasma HDL cholesterol concentrations by enhancing the activity of EL. On the other hand, physical exercise and fish oil (a rich source of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid) suppress the activity of EL and this, in turn, enhances the plasma concentrations of HDL cholesterol. Thus, EL plays a critical role in the regulation of plasma HDL cholesterol concentrations and thus modulates the development and progression of atherosclerosis. The expression and actions of EL in specific endothelial cells determines the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis locally explaining the patchy nature of atheroma seen, especially, in coronary arteries. Both HDL cholesterol and EPA and DHA enhance endothelial nitric oxide (eNO) and prostacyclin (PGI2) synthesis, which are known to prevent atherosclerosis. On the other hand, pro-inflammatory cytokines augment free radical generation, which are known to inactivate eNO and PGI2. Thus, interactions between EL, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and the ability of endothelial cells to generate NO and PGI2 and neutralize the actions of free radicals may play a critical role in atherosclerosis.

  16. EGCG attenuates atherosclerosis through the Jagged-1/Notch pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jianguo; Huang, Fang; Yi, Yuhong; Yin, Liang; Peng, Daoquan

    2016-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most common cause of cardiovascular diseases worldwide. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is a particularly important risk factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence has indicated that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG; a catechin found in the popular beverage, greent tea) protects against ox-LDL-induced atherosclerosis. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, ox-LDL (100 mg/l) induced damage to, and the apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by reducing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and promoting inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression; these effects were abrogated by the addition of 50 µM EGCG. Furthermore, ox-LDL rapidly activated the membrane translocation of p22phox, and altered the protein expression of Jagged-1 and Notch pathway-related proteins [Math1, hairy and enhancer of split (HES)1 and HES5]; these effects were also prevented by pre-treatment with 50 µM EGCG. In addition, Jagged-1 played a significant role in the EGCG-mediated protection against ox-LDL-induced apoptosis and ox-LDL‑diminished cell adhesion in the HUVECs. Finally, EGCG inhibited high-fat diet (HFD)-induced atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout (ApoE-KO) mice through the Jagged-1/Notch pathway. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that 50 µM EGCG protects against ox-LDL-induced endothelial dysfunction through the Jagged-1/Notch signaling pathway. Moreover, our data provide insight into the possible molecular mechanisms through which EGCG attenuates ox-LDL‑induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

  17. Bisphenol A exposure enhances atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Fang

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is an environmental endocrine disrupter. Excess exposure to BPA may increase susceptibility to many metabolic disorders, but it is unclear whether BPA exposure has any adverse effects on the development of atherosclerosis. To determine whether there are such effects, we investigated the response of Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL rabbits to 400-µg/kg BPA per day, administered orally by gavage, over the course of 12 weeks and compared aortic and coronary atherosclerosis in these rabbits to the vehicle group using histological and morphometric methods. In addition, serum BPA, cytokines levels and plasma lipids as well as pathologic changes in liver, adipose and heart were analyzed. Moreover, we treated human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs with different doses of BPA to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in BPA action(s. BPA treatment did not change the plasma lipids and body weights of the WHHL rabbits; however, the gross atherosclerotic lesion area in the aortic arch was increased by 57% compared to the vehicle group. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed marked increases in advanced lesions (37% accompanied by smooth muscle cells (60% but no significant changes in the numbers of macrophages. With regard to coronary atherosclerosis, incidents of coronary stenosis increased by 11% and smooth muscle cells increased by 73% compared to the vehicle group. Furthermore, BPA-treated WHHL rabbits showed increased adipose accumulation and hepatic and myocardial injuries accompanied by up-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and inflammatory and lipid metabolism markers in livers. Treatment with BPA also induced the expression of ER stress and inflammation related genes in cultured HUVECs. These results demonstrate for the first time that BPA exposure may increase susceptibility to atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits.

  18. Review: the physiological and computational approaches for atherosclerosis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wuchen; Lee, Yugyung; Lee, Chi H

    2013-09-01

    The cardiovascular disease has long been an issue that causes severe loss in population, especially those conditions associated with arterial malfunction, being attributable to atherosclerosis and subsequent thrombotic formation. This article reviews the physiological mechanisms that underline the transition from plaque formation in atherosclerotic process to platelet aggregation and eventually thrombosis. The physiological and computational approaches, such as percutaneous coronary intervention and stent design modeling, to detect, evaluate and mitigate this malicious progression were also discussed.

  19. Inflammation, oxidative stress and renin angiotensin system in atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazim; Husain; Wilfredo; Hernandez; Rais; A; Ansari; Leon; Ferder

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with cardiovascular dysfunction including myocardial infarction, unstable angina, sudden cardiac death, stroke and peripheral thromboses. It has been predicted that atherosclerosis will be the primary cause of death in the world by 2020. Atherogenesis is initiated by endothelial injury due to oxidative stress associated with cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cigarette smoking, dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. The impairment of the endothelium associated with cardiovascular risk factors creates an imbalance between vasodilating and vasoconstricting factors, in particular, an increase in angiotensin Ⅱ(Ang Ⅱ) and a decrease in nitric oxide. The renin-angiotensin system(RAS), and its primary mediator Ang Ⅱ, also have a direct influence on the progression of the atherosclerotic process via effects on endothelial function, inflammation, fibrinolytic balance, and plaque stability. Anti-inflammatory agents [statins, secretory phospholipase A2 inhibitor, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 inhibitor, 5-lipoxygenase activating protein, chemokine motif ligand-2, C-C chemokine motif receptor 2 pathway inhibitors, methotrexate, IL-1 pathway inhibitor and RAS inhibitors(angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors)], Ang Ⅱ receptor blockers and ranin inhibitors may slow inflammatory processes and disease progression. Several studies in human using anti-inflammatory agents and RAS inhibitors revealed vascular benefits and reduced progression of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with stable angina pectoris; decreased vascular inflammatory markers, improved common carotid intima-media thickness and plaque volume in patients with diagnosed atherosclerosis. Recent preclinical studies have demonstrated therapeutic efficacy of vitamin D analogs paricalcitol in Apo E-deficient atherosclerotic mice.

  20. Biomarkers of Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Patients with Autoimmune Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Profumo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is accelerated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and psoriatic arthritis (PsA. We investigated a possible association of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDLs, nitric oxide (NO, 3-nitrotyrosine, vitamin A, vitamin E, and β-carotene serum levels with subclinical atherosclerosis in RA and PsA. By the use of ELISA, we observed higher ox-LDL levels in patients with intima-media thickness (IMT > 1 than in patients with IMT ≤ 1 and a negative correlation between NO levels and IMT values. By the use of high-performance liquid chromatography, we determined higher levels of vitamin A in patients with PsA and IMT ≤ 1 than in controls and lower levels of β-carotene in patients with RA and PsA than in controls. β-carotene concentrations were negatively correlated to the duration of disease in RA. Our study confirms that ox-LDLs and NO may be markers of accelerated atherosclerosis in RA and PsA whereas vitamins seem to be associated only to the presence of the autoimmune disorders.

  1. Aterosclerose experimental em coelhos Experimental atherosclerosis in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleska C. Dornas

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerosas pesquisas têm sido realizadas utilizando modelos experimentais para estudar o desenvolvimento da aterosclerose com dieta induzindo hiperlipidemia. Devido ao fato de que coelhos são muito sensíveis a dietas ricas em colesterol e acumulam grandes quantidades no plasma, a utilização destes animais como modelo experimental para avaliar o desenvolvimento de aterosclerose é de grande relevância, trazendo informação sobre fatores que contribuem para progressão e regressão aplicadas a situações humanas. Sendo assim, nessa revisão a função aterogênica do colesterol é mostrada em trabalhos que incluem o coelho como modelo experimental, uma vez que este animal tornou-se o mais popular modelo experimental de aterosclerose.Many researches have been conducted in experimental models in order to study the development of atherosclerosis from hyperlipidemia-inducing diets. Since rabbits are very sensitive to cholesterol-rich diets and accumulate large amounts of cholesterol in their plasma, their use as experimental models to evaluate the development of atherosclerosis is highly relevant and brings information on factors that contribute to the progression and regression of this condition that can be applied to humans. As such, this review includes studies on the atherogenic function of cholesterol based on rabbits as the experimental model, since they have become the most largely used experimental model of atherosclerosis.

  2. Roles of oxidative stress and redox regulation in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Takahito; Hirose, Makoto; Kageyama, Kan

    2009-10-01

    Oxidative stress is believed to be a cause of aging and cardiovascular disorders. In response to inflam-mation or endothelial cell injury, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is enhanced in vascular cells. These changes contribute to the initiation of atherosclerosis. Vascular cells possess anti-oxidant systems to protect against oxidative stress, in addition to the redox system. The redox status of pro-tein thiols is important for cellular functions. The Akt signaling pathway exerts effects on survival and apoptosis, and is regulated by the glutathione (GSH)/glutaredoxin (GRX)-dependent redox sys-tem. Sex hormones such as estrogens protect against oxidative stress by protecting the Akt signaling pathway but the physiological role of the extracellular GSH/GRX system has not been clarified, although found an increase in the levels of S-glutathionylated serum proteins in patients with athero-sclerosis obliterans. The results suggested that impaired serum redox potential is a marker of the development vascular dysfunction and estrogen has a possible role in the prevention of atherosclerosis.

  3. Lipoprotein(a) accelerates atherosclerosis in uremic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Tanja X; McCormick, Sally P; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2010-01-01

    lipoprotein-associated OxPL. Thus, Lp(a) may be particularly atherogenic in a uremic setting. We therefore investigated whether transgenic (Tg) expression of human Lp(a) increases atherosclerosis in uremic mice. Moderate uremia was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy (NX) in Tg mice with expression of human apo(a) (n...... = 19), human apoB-100 (n = 20), or human apo(a) + human apoB [Lp(a)] (n = 15), and in wild-type (WT) controls (n = 21). The uremic mice received a high-fat diet, and aortic atherosclerosis was examined 35 weeks later. LDL-cholesterol was increased in apoB-Tg and Lp(a)-Tg mice, but it was normal in apo...... with both apo(a) and Lp(a). In conclusion, expression of apo(a) or Lp(a) increased uremia-induced atherosclerosis. Binding of OxPL on apo(a) and Lp(a) may contribute to the atherogenicity of Lp(a) in uremia....

  4. DNA modifications in atherosclerosis: from the past to the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghini, Andrea; Cervelli, Tiziana; Galli, Alvaro; Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2013-10-01

    The role of DNA damage in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis has been extensively investigated in recent decades. There is now clear that oxidative stress is an important inducer of both DNA damage and telomere attrition which, in turn, can gives rise to genome instability and vascular senescence. This review discusses the role of the DNA damage response, including the key DNA repair pathways (base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining), deregulated cell cycle and apoptosis in atherosclerosis. We also highlight emerging evidence suggesting that epigenetic changes (DNA methylation and microRNA-mediated mechanisms), not associated with alterations in DNA sequences, may play a critical role in the regulation of the DNA damage response. Nevertheless, further investigation is still required to better understand the complexity of DNA repair and DNA damage response in atherosclerosis, making this topic an exciting and promising field for future investigation. Unraveling these molecular mechanisms provide the rationale for the development of novel efficient therapies to combat the vascular aging process.

  5. Readapting the adaptive immune response - therapeutic strategies for atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Andrew P; Mallat, Ziad

    2017-01-04

    Cardiovascular diseases remain a major global health issue, with the development of atherosclerosis as a major underlying cause. Our treatment of cardiovascular disease has improved greatly over the past three decades, but much remains to be done reduce disease burden. Current priorities include reducing atherosclerosis advancement to clinically significant stages and preventing plaque rupture or erosion. Inflammation and involvement of the adaptive immune system influences all these aspects and therefore is one focus for future therapeutic development. The atherosclerotic vascular wall is now recognized to be invaded from both sides (arterial lumen and adventitia), for better or worse, by the adaptive immune system. Atherosclerosis is also affected at several stages by adaptive immune responses, overall providing many opportunities to target these responses and to reduce disease progression. Protective influences that may be defective in diseased individuals include humoral responses to modified LDL and regulatory T cell responses. There are many strategies in development to boost these pathways in humans, including vaccine-based therapies. The effects of various existing adaptive immune targeting therapies, such as blocking critical co-stimulatory pathways or B cell depletion, on cardiovascular disease are beginning to emerge with important consequences for both autoimmune disease patients and the potential for wider use of such therapies. Entering the translation phase for adaptive immune targeting therapies is an exciting and promising prospect.

  6. The atherosclerosis burden score (ABS): a convenient ultrasound-based score of peripheral atherosclerosis for coronary artery disease prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerly, Patrick; Marquès-Vidal, Pedro; Owlya, Reza; Eeckhout, Eric; Kappenberger, Lukas; Darioli, Roger; Depairon, Michèle

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasonographic detection of subclinical atherosclerosis improves cardiovascular risk stratification, but uncertainty persists about the most discriminative method to apply. In this study, we found that the "atherosclerosis burden score (ABS)", a novel straightforward ultrasonographic score that sums the number of carotid and femoral arterial bifurcations with plaques, significantly outperformed common carotid intima-media thickness, carotid mean/maximal thickness, and carotid/femoral plaque scores for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) (receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve area under the curve (AUC) = 0.79; P = 0.027 to ABS was also more correlated with CAD extension (R = 0.55; P ABS was weakly correlated with the European Society of Cardiology chart risk categories (R(2) = 0.21), indicating that ABS provided information beyond usual cardiovascular risk factor-based risk stratification. Pending prospective studies on hard cardiovascular endpoints, ABS appears as a promising tool in primary prevention.

  7. Atherosclerosis, cholesterol, nutrition, and statins – a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebbers, Jan-Olaf

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis, which causes approximately half of all deaths of adults over age 60 in industrialized nations, is a pandemic among inappropriately nourished and/or physically hypoactive children, adolescents, and adults world wide. Although nowadays statins are widely prescribed to middle age and elderly adults with high blood lipid levels as pharmacological prevention for the late complications of atherosclerosis, from a critical point of view statins seem not to solve the problem, especially when compared with certain natural ingredients of our nutrition like micronutrients as alternative strategy. Statin ingestion is associated with lowering of serum cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein concentrations; some prospective studies have shown statistical associations with subsequent modest reduction of mortality from cardiovascular disease. However, specific biochemical pathways and pharmacological roles of statins in prevention of atherosclerosis, if any, are unknown. Moreover, there have been no systematic cost-benefit analyses of life-style prophylaxis versus statin prophylaxis versus combined life-style plus statin prophylaxis versus neither life-style nor statin prophylaxis for clinically significant complications of cardiovascular diseases in the elderly. Further, in the trials of effectiveness statins were not compared with management of nutrition, which is the most appropriate alternative intervention. Such studies seem to be important, as the ever increasing world population, especially in developing countries, now demand expensive statins, which may be unaffordable for mitigating the pandemic. Studies of this kind are necessary to identify more precisely those patients for whom cardiovascular benefits will outweigh the risks and costs of the statin treatment in comparison with nutritional interventions. Against the background of the current pathogenetic concept of atherogenesis some of its possible risk factors, particularly the

  8. Detailed analysis of association between common single nucleotide polymorphisms and subclinical atherosclerosis: The Multi-ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Jose D; Manichaikul, Ani; Wang, Xin-Qun; Rich, Stephen S; Rotter, Jerome I; Post, Wendy S; Polak, Joseph F; Budoff, Matthew J; Bluemke, David A

    2016-06-01

    Previously identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genome wide association studies (GWAS) of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in participants of mostly European descent were tested for association with subclinical cardiovascular disease (sCVD), coronary artery calcium score (CAC) and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). The data in this data in brief article correspond to the article Common Genetic Variants and Subclinical Atherosclerosis: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis [1]. This article includes the demographic information of the participants analyzed in the article as well as graphical displays and data tables of the association of the selected SNPs with CAC and of the meta-analysis across ethnicities of the association of CIMT-c (common carotid), CIMT-I (internal carotid), CAC-d (CAC as dichotomous variable with CAC>0) and CAC-c (CAC as continuous variable, the log of the raw CAC score plus one) and CVD. The data tables corresponding to the 9p21 fine mapping experiment as well as the power calculations referenced in the article are also included.

  9. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) does not slow the progression of subclinical atherosclerosis in SLE over 2 years

    OpenAIRE

    KIANI, ADNAN N.; Magder, Laurence S.; Petri, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Accelerated atherosclerosis is a major cause of mortality in SLE. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) has been shown to suppress growth factor-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells in animal models. We hypothesized that MMF might modify the inflammatory component of atherosclerosis in SLE. We examined the effect of MMF on atherosclerosis as measured by changes in carotid intima–media thickness (IMT) or coronary artery calcium (CAC) over 2 years. CAC and carotid IMT wer...

  10. Atherosclerosis associated with pericardial effusion in a central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilliger, Lionel; Lemberger, Karin; Chai, Norin; Bourgeois, Aude; Charpentier, Maud

    2010-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is a common disease in pet birds, particularly in psittacines, and is frequently found when performing postmortem examinations on adult and old dogs, in which it is mainly associated with endocrine diseases, such as hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus. However, atherosclerosis is poorly documented in reptiles and consequently poorly understood. In the current case report, atherosclerosis and pericardial effusion were diagnosed in a 2-year-old male central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) based on ultrasound visualization, necropsy, and histologic examination.

  11. Atherosclerosis profile and incidence of cardiovascular events: a population-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bullano Michael F

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atherosclerosis is a chronic progressive disease often presenting as clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD events. This study evaluated the characteristics of individuals with a diagnosis of atherosclerosis and estimated the incidence of CVD events to assist in the early identification of high-risk individuals. Methods Respondents to the US SHIELD baseline survey were followed for 2 years to observe incident self-reported CVD. Respondents had subclinical atherosclerosis if they reported a diagnosis of narrow or blocked arteries/carotid artery disease without a past clinical CVD event (heart attack, stroke or revascularization. Characteristics of those with atherosclerosis and incident CVD were compared with those who did not report atherosclerosis at baseline but had CVD in the following 2 years using chi-square tests. Logistic regression model identified characteristics associated with atherosclerosis and incident events. Results Of 17,640 respondents, 488 (2.8% reported having subclinical atherosclerosis at baseline. Subclinical atherosclerosis was associated with age, male gender, dyslipidemia, circulation problems, hypertension, past smoker, and a cholesterol test in past year (OR = 2.2 [all p Conclusion Self-report of subclinical atherosclerosis identified an extremely high-risk group with a >25% risk of a CVD event in the next 2 years. These characteristics may be useful for identifying individuals for more aggressive diagnostic and therapeutic efforts.

  12. The pigeon (Columba livia) model of spontaneous atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J L; Smith, S C; Taylor, R L

    2014-11-01

    Multiple animal models have been employed to study human atherosclerosis, the principal cause of mortality in the United States. Each model has individual advantages related to specific pathologies. Initiation, the earliest disease phase, is best modeled by the White Carneau (WC-As) pigeon. Atherosclerosis develops spontaneously in the WC-As without either external manipulation or known risk factors. Furthermore, susceptibility is caused by a single gene defect inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The Show Racer (SR-Ar) pigeon is resistant to atherosclerosis. Breed differences in the biochemistry and metabolism of celiac foci cells have been described. For example, WC-As have lower oxidative metabolism but higher amounts of chondroitin-6-sulfate and nonesterified fatty acids compared with SR-Ar. Gene expression in aortic smooth muscle cells was compared between breeds using representational difference analysis and microarray analysis. Energy metabolism and cellular phenotype were the chief gene expression differences. Glycolysis and synthetic cell types were related to the WC-As but oxidative metabolism and contractile cell types were related to the SR-Ar. Rosiglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, blocked RNA binding motif (RBMS1) expression in WC-As cells. The drug may act through the c-myc oncogene as RBMS1 is a c-myc target. Proteomic tests of aortic smooth muscle cells supported greater glycosylation in the WC-As and a transforming growth factor β effect in SR-Ar. Unoxidized fatty acids build up in WC-As cells because of their metabolic deficiency, ultimately preventing the contractile phenotype in these cells. The single gene responsible for the disease is likely regulatory in nature.

  13. Experimental diet-induced atherosclerosis in Quaker parrots (Myiopsitta monachus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufrère, H; Nevarez, J G; Wakamatsu, N; Clubb, S; Cray, C; Tully, T N

    2013-11-01

    Spontaneous atherosclerosis is common in psittaciformes, and clinical signs associated with flow-limiting stenosis are encountered in pet birds. Nevertheless, a psittacine model of atherosclerosis has not been developed for research investigations. Sixteen captive-bred Quaker parrots (Myiopsitta monachus) were used in this study. While 4 control birds were fed a maintenance diet, 12 other birds were fed an atherogenic diet composed of 1% cholesterol controlling for a calorie-to-protein ratio for periods ranging from 2 to 8 months. The birds were euthanized at the end of their respective food trial period. Histopathology, transmission electron microscopy, and cholesterol measurement were performed on the ascending aorta and brachiocephalic and pulmonary arteries. Plasma lipoproteins, cholesterol, and triglycerides were also measured on a monthly basis. Significant atherosclerotic lesions were induced within 2 months and advanced atherosclerotic lesions within 4 to 6 months. The advanced lesions were histologically similar to naturally occurring lesions identified in the same parrot species with a lipid core and a fibrous cap. Ultrastructurally, there were extracellular lipid, foam cell, and endothelial changes. Arterial cholesterol content increased linearly over time. Plasma cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) significantly increased over time by an average of 5- and 15-fold, respectively, with a shift from high-density lipoprotein to LDL as the main plasma lipoprotein. Quaker parrots also exhibited high plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity that increased, although not significantly, over time. This experiment demonstrates that in Quaker parrots fed 1% cholesterol, advanced atherosclerosis can be induced relatively quickly, and lesions resemble those found in other avian models and humans.

  14. The occurrence of dental caries is associated with atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Glodny

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have suggested that marginal periodontitis is a risk factor for developing atherosclerosis. The objective of this study was to determine whether caries may also be associated with atherosclerosis. METHODS: The computed tomography data sets of 292 consecutive patients, 137 women and 155 men with a mean age of 54.1±17.3 years, were analyzed. Caries were quantified based on the number of decayed surfaces of all the teeth, and periodontitis was quantified on the basis of the horizontal bone loss in the jaw. The presence of chronic apical periodontitis (CAP was assessed, and the aortic atherosclerotic burden was quantified using a calcium scoring method. RESULTS: The patients with <1 caries surfaces/tooth had a lower atherosclerotic burden (0.13±0.61 mL than patients with ≥1 caries surfaces/tooth. The atherosclerotic burden was greater in patients with a higher number of lesions with pulpal involvement and more teeth with chronic apical periodontitis. In the logistical regression models, age (Wald 49.3, number of caries per tooth (Wald 26.4, periodontitis (Wald 8.6, and male gender (Wald 11 were found to be independent risk factors for atherosclerosis. In the linear regression analyses, age and the number of decayed surfaces per tooth were identified as influencing factors associated with a higher atherosclerotic burden, and the number of restorations per tooth was associated with a lower atherosclerotic burden. CONCLUSION: Dental caries, pulpal caries, and chronic apical periodontitis are associated positively, while restorations are associated inversely, with aortic atherosclerotic burden. Prospective studies are required to confirm these observations and answer the question of possible causality.

  15. STAT4 deficiency reduces the development of atherosclerosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavie-Moghadam, Parésa L; Gjurich, Breanne N; Jabeen, Rukhsana; Krishnamurthy, Purna; Kaplan, Mark H; Dobrian, Anca D; Nadler, Jerry L; Galkina, Elena V

    2015-11-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory process that leads to plaque formation in large and medium sized vessels. T helper 1 (Th1) cells constitute the majority of plaque infiltrating pro-atherogenic T cells and are induced via IFNγ-dependent activation of T-box (Tbet) and/or IL-12-dependent activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4). We thus aimed to define a role for STAT4 in atherosclerosis. STAT4-deficiency resulted in a ∼71% reduction (p atherosclerosis (∼31%, p < 0.01) in western diet fed Stat4(-/-)Apoe(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, reduced atherogenesis in Stat4(-/-)Apoe(-/-) mice was not due to attenuated IFNγ production in vivo by Th1 cells, suggesting an at least partially IFNγ-independent pro-atherogenic role of STAT4. STAT4 is expressed in T cells, but also detected in macrophages (MΦs). Stat4(-/-)Apoe(-/-)in vitro differentiated M1 or M2 MΦs had reduced cytokine production compare to Apoe(-/-) M1 and M2 MΦs that was accompanied by reduced induction of CD69, I-A(b), and CD86 in response to LPS stimulation. Stat4(-/-)Apoe(-/-) MΦs expressed attenuated levels of CCR2 and demonstrated reduced migration toward CCL2 in a transwell assay. Importantly, the percentage of aortic CD11b(+)F4/80(+)Ly6C(hi) MΦs was reduced in Stat4(-/-)Apoe(-/-) vs Apoe(-/-) mice. Thus, this study identifies for the first time a pro-atherogenic role of STAT4 that is at least partially independent of Th1 cell-derived IFNγ, and primarily involving the modulation of MΦ responses.

  16. Periodontal Disease-Induced Atherosclerosis and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Kurita-Ochiai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is a highly prevalent disorder affecting up to 80% of the global population. Recent epidemiological studies have shown an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease, as oxidative stress plays an important role in chronic inflammatory diseases such as periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms by which periodontopathic bacteria cause chronic inflammation through the enhancement of oxidative stress and accelerate cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, we comment on the antioxidative activity of catechin in atherosclerosis accelerated by periodontitis.

  17. Premature atherosclerosis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Yong; YE Yi-cong; LUO Ling; QIU Zhi-feng; HAN Yang; LI Xiao-meng; FANG Quan; ZHANG Shu-yang; LI Tai-sheng

    2010-01-01

    Background Increased risk of atherosclerosis has been reported in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)infection since highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has come into use. However, there is no clear evidence of premature atherosclerosis in Chinese HIV-infected patients. Our study was designed to determine the relationship between HIV infection and atherosclerosis in Chinese HIV-infected patients.Methods One hundred and forty-five patients were enrolled in this study. These included 82 HIV-infected patients (41HAART-treated and 41 antiretroviral therapy (ART) naive patients) and 43 HIV-negative control subjects. Data on traditional cardiovascular risk factors, HIV infection parameters, and treatment regimens were collected. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) was determined using a pulse pressure analyzer to evaluate the function of the arterial wall as an indicator of atherosclerotic vascular damage.Results A higher PWV ((1358.3±117.8) cm/s vs. (1270.2±189.2) cm/s, P=0.010) was found in ART na(i)ve HIV-infected patients compared with control subjects. However, HAART treated patients had lower PWV compared to ART na(i)ve patients ((1283.8±181.4) cm/s vs. (1358.0±117.8) cm/s, P=0.033). Multiple regression analysis revealed that age (B=5.218, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.420-9.016, P=0.008), current smoking (B=-74.671, 95% CI -147.003 to -2.339, P=0.043) and HAART (92.7% patients on a protease inhibitor-free regimen) (B=-169.169, 95% CI-272.508 to -65.831, P=0.010) were associated with reduced PWV in HIV-infected patients.Conclusions Reduced PWV in HIV-infected Chinese patients indicates that they are more likely to develop arterial wall stiffness, possibly by atherosclerosis. A protease inhibitor-free regime may be protective for arterial wall of HIV infected patients.

  18. Prevalence and long-term clinical significance of intracranial atherosclerosis after ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovesen, Christian; Abild, Annemette; Christensen, Anders Fogh

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence and long-term risk associated with intracranial atherosclerosis identified during routine evaluation.......We investigated the prevalence and long-term risk associated with intracranial atherosclerosis identified during routine evaluation....

  19. Depressive and anxiety disorders and risk of subclinical atherosclerosis Findings from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seldenrijk, Adrie; Vogelzangs, Nicole; van Hout, Hein P. J.; van Marwijk, Harm W. J.; Diamant, Michaela; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Current evidence regarding the association between psychopathology and subclinical atherosclerosis show inconsistent results. The present study examined whether subclinical atherosclerosis was more prevalent in a large cohort of persons with depressive or anxiety disorders as compared to

  20. Prevention of Coronary Atherosclerosis: The Role of a College Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, Ralph A.; Greenland, Philip

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the concept of behavioral risk factors for atherosclerosis which become entrenched in adolescence or young adulthood. Evidence favoring intervention in the adolescent years and a screening program at the University of Rochester Health Service are described. A preliminary strategy for prevention of atherosclerosis on campus is…

  1. Experimental atherosclerosis in rabbits on diets with milk fat and different proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermus, R.J.J.

    1975-01-01

    In this thesis the literature about the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis has been reviewed. The various risk indicators for atherosclerosis are discussed and related to the theory about atherogenesis. A review of the influence of milk fat constituents and dietary proteins on serum lipids and atherosc

  2. Serum Resistin Level and Progression of Atherosclerosis during Glucocorticoid Therapy for Systemic Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Nahoko; Masuoka, Shotaro; Kusunoki, Natsuko; Nanki, Toshihiro; Kawai, Shinichi

    2016-09-16

    Adipokines are important regulators of several processes, including inflammation and atherosclerosis. In patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, atherosclerosis is accelerated with higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We prospectively investigated the association of adipokines and glucocorticoid therapy with progression of premature atherosclerosis in 38 patients starting glucocorticoid therapy for systemic autoimmune diseases. To detect premature atherosclerosis, carotid ultrasonography was performed at initiation of glucocorticoid therapy and after a mean three-year follow-up period. The ankle-brachial pressure index and cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) were measured. Serum adipokine levels were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Twenty-three patients (60.5%) had carotid artery plaque at baseline. The carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) increased significantly during follow-up. Glucocorticoids reduced the serum resistin level, while increasing serum leptin and high molecular weight-adiponectin. There was slower progression of atherosclerosis (carotid IMT and CAVI) at follow-up in patients with greater reduction of serum resistin and with higher cumulative prednisolone dose. In conclusion, progression of premature atherosclerosis occurred at an early stage of systemic autoimmune diseases before initiation of glucocorticoid therapy. Since resistin, an inflammation and atherosclerosis related adipokine, is reduced by glucocorticoids, glucocortidoid therapy may not accelerate atherosclerosis in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases.

  3. Atherosclerosis and ischemic cardiomyopathy in a captive, adult red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrubsole-Cockwill, Alana; Wojnarowicz, Chris; Parker, Dennilyn

    2008-09-01

    An adult, male, captive red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) of at least 19 years of age presented in dorsal recumbency. The hawk was nonresponsive, and despite initial supportive care, died shortly after presentation. Gross postmortem revealed no abnormal findings. Histologic examination demonstrated atherosclerosis and ischemic cardiomyopathy. This is the first reported case of atherosclerosis in a red-tailed hawk.

  4. Fibrinogen and P-selectin expression in atherosclerosis model of Sprague Dawley rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Bi-rong; PAN Ying; ZHAI Zhi-min

    2011-01-01

    Background Platelet P-selectin plays an important role in inflammation and contributes to thrombosis and hemostasis.Fibrinogen may take part in inflammation,thrombosis,and hemostasis via enhancement of platelet P-selectin expression.This study aimed to discover the correlation between them in atherosclerosis model of Sprague Dawley (SD) rat.Methods Diet-induced atherosclerosis SD rats were adopted as experimental models.The blood from the common abdominal aorta of the rats was obtained to measure the biochemical characteristics and for the check of flow cytometry.Then the aortas were separated carefully,taken out,put into 10% (w/v) neutral formalin for later use.Then fibrinogen and P-selectin expression were detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry.Results SD rats were induced to atherosclerosis model by high fat diet and vitamin D2 injected.It was discovered that the binding of fibrinogen and the expression of P-selectin on the platelet increase in atherosclerosis model (Group H)than in that in the control group (Group Z),there were closely interrelated.High levels of fibrinogen and P-selectin express on the artery of atherosclerosis rat model.Conclusions Fibrinogen and P-selectin are concerned with atherosclerosis.Fibrinogen can interact with P-selectin in order to contribute to the development of atherosclerosis,high levels of fibrinogen and P-selectin can be regarded as risk factors for markers of atherosclerosis.

  5. The complement system and toll-like receptors as integrated players in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovland, Anders; Jonasson, Lena; Garred, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    of innate immunity. The complement system and toll-like receptors (TLRs), and the crosstalk between them, may be of particular interest both with respect to pathogenesis and as therapeutic targets in atherosclerosis. Animal studies indicate that inhibition of C3a and C5a reduces atherosclerosis. In humans...

  6. Atherosclerosis and liver inflammation induced by increased dietary cholesterol intake: A combined transcriptomics and metabolomics analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleemann, R.; Verschuren, L.; Erk, M.J. van; Nikolsky, Y.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Verheij, E.R.; Smilde, A.K.; Hendriks, H.F.J.; Zadelaar, A.S.M.; Smith, G.J.; Kaznacheev, V.; Nikolskaya, T.; Melnikov, A.; Hurt-Camejo, E.; Greef, J. van der; Ommen, B. van; Kooistra, T.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Increased dietary cholesterol intake is associated with atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis development requires a lipid and an inflammatory component. It is unclear where and how the inflammatory component develops. To assess the role of the liver in the evolution of inflammation, we treat

  7. Induction of atherosclerosis in mice and hamsters without germline genetic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørklund, Martin Mæng; Hollensen, Anne Kruse; Hagensen, Mette Kallestrup;

    2014-01-01

    of this approach for creating atherosclerosis models also in nonmurine species was demonstrated by inducing hypercholesterolemia and early atherosclerosis in Golden Syrian hamsters. CONCLUSIONS: Single injections of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9-encoding recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors...

  8. Atherosclerosis--an immune disease: The Anitschkov Lecture 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Göran K

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease. This article reviews the emergence of this concept from studies of patients and their lesions, experimental animal models, and epidemiological cohorts. Immunohistochemical studies identified immune cells and mediators and provided evidence for inflammatory activation in the atherosclerotic lesion. In parallel, cell culture studies demonstrated the capacity of vascular cells to interact with immune cells. Subsequent studies of clinical and epidemiological materials have identified inflammatory markers and immunoregulatory genes as contributors of risk for myocardial infarction and stroke. Finally, experiments using gene-targeted mice have provided mechanistic understanding of the disease process. It is now thought that the atherosclerotic process is initiated when low-density lipoproteins accumulate in the intima, activate the endothelium, and promote recruitment of monocytes and T cells. Monocytes differentiate into macrophages, internalize modified lipoproteins, and end up as foam cells. T cells in lesions recognize local antigens and mount T helper-1 responses that contribute to local inflammation and plaque growth. This atherogenic pathway is counterbalanced by anti-inflammatory signals provided by regulatory immunity. Intensified inflammatory activation may lead to local proteolysis, plaque rupture, thrombus formation, ischemia and infarction. Novel therapeutic opportunities may emerge from understanding the role of inflammation in atherosclerosis.

  9. Putative targeting of matrix metalloproteinase-8 in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shu

    2015-03-01

    There is compelling evidence indicating that some members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family play important roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and related vascular and cardiac conditions such as atherosclerotic plaque rupture leading to myocardial infarction, heart failure after myocardial infarction, neointima formation following angioplasty, and abdominal aortic aneurysm. Studies have shown that administration of MMP inhibitors can deter some of these conditions in experimental animal models, but few pertinent human clinical trials have been reported to date. Clinical studies of broad-spectrum MMP inhibitors in cancers and arthritis, however, have reported considerable side effects that are likely to be related to the lack of selectivity of these inhibitors. Since different members of the MMP family can have divergent and even opposing functions, it is believed that selective MMP inhibitors that specifically target particular MMPs that are key in the disease pathogenesis will likely have greater efficacy and less adverse effects. In recent years there has been accumulating evidence indicating an important role of MMP8 in atherosclerosis and the associated conditions mentioned above. This article will review findings from studies examining MMP8 in relation to these conditions and discuss rationale of targeting MMP8 as a potential therapeutic strategy.

  10. Dialysis modalities as risk factors in the development of atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjanović Tatjana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Atherosclerosis is a major risk factor for increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in dialysis patients. First clinical symptoms are usually associated with initial atherosclerotic changes of blood vessels. The aim of this study was ultrasound evaluation of intimae media thickness (IMT of carotid arteries in dialysis patients and its correlation with certain risk factors. Patients and methods IMT was measured in 45 dialysis patients with no signs of cardiovascular diseases:15 continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD patients, 30 haemodialysis (HD patients and in 20 healthy controls. IMT was correlated with certain risk factors for atherosclerosis (general parameters - age, gender, duration of dialysis cause of renal diseases, parameters of nutrition, parameters of calcium and phosphorus metabolism, lipid parameters, blood pressure and smoking. Results The mean carotid artery IMT was significantly higher in dialysis patients than in the control group (p<0.05. In addition, the mean IMT was statistically significantly higher in PD than in HD patients (p<0.05. In CAPD patients there was a significant correlation between IMT and total and LDL cholesterol. In the second group (HD patients IMT was significantly correlated with diastolic blood pressure, BMI and smoking. Conclusion Although atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease may not manifest in dialysis patients, IMT of carotid arteries significantly increases. Major risk factors affecting IMT are lipid disturbances in patients on peritoneal dialysis and hypertension, obesity and smoking in HD patients.

  11. Circulating Endothelial Microparticles: A Key Hallmark of Atherosclerosis Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshav Raj Paudel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The levels of circulating microparticles (MPs are raised in various cardiovascular diseases. Their increased level in plasma is regarded as a biomarker of alteration in vascular function. The prominent MPs present in blood are endothelial microparticles (EMPs described as complex submicron (0.1 to 1.0 μm vesicles like structure, released in response to endothelium cell activation or apoptosis. EMPs possess both physiological and pathological effects and may promote oxidative stress and vascular inflammation. EMPs release is triggered by inducer like angiotensin II, lipopolysaccharide, and hydrogen peroxide leading to the progression of atherosclerosis. However, there are multiple physiological pathways for EMPs generation like NADPH oxidase derived endothelial ROS formation, Rho kinase pathway, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Endothelial dysfunction is a key initiating event in atherosclerotic plaque formation. Atheroemboli, resulting from ruptured carotid plaques, is a major cause of stroke. Increasing evidence suggests that EMPs play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, acting as a marker of damage, either exacerbating disease progression or triggering a repair response. In this regard, it has been suggested that EMPs have the potential to act as biomarkers of disease status. This review aims to provide updated information of EMPs in relation to atherosclerosis pathogenesis.

  12. Update on medical management of dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginter, E; Simko, V

    2013-01-01

    Scientific achievements revealing the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis resulted in the second half of the 20th century in major improvement in prevention and therapy of cardiovascular disorders (CVD). Essential became the understanding of a critical pathogenetic role of the low-density lipoproteins (LDL), mainly their oxidized form (oxLDL) and also the protective potential of the high-density lipoproteins (HDL). CVD is now regarded to be an inflammatory disease in which a systemic inflammatory reaction is combined with an accumulation of immune cells in atherosclerotic plaques. Higher intake of antioxidants in fruit and vegetable, life style modifications, cessation of smoking, physical exercise and introduction of medications that lower LDL and promote HDL (statins, niacin and fibrates) resulted in a substantial decline of the killer effect of unmanaged CVD. In the United Kingdom the male CVD mortality declined between 1970 and 2009 from 700 to 200 deaths per 100,000. In France, CVD mortality in the middle age population (25-64 years) is now responsible for death in only 15 % men and in 11 % women. Unfortunately, in many parts of the world CVD mortality remains a prominent population scourge. Recent discoveries, especially on the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) and antisense compounds used in addition to established anti-atherogenic medications, promise further gains in the fight against atherosclerosis (Fig. 4, Ref. 54).

  13. Protective role of heme oxygenase-1 against inflammation in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, William

    2011-06-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the metabolism of free heme into equimolar amounts of ferrous iron, carbon monoxide (CO), and biliverdin. Biliverdin is subsequently converted to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. HO-1 has recently been identified as a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of vascular inflammatory disease, including atherosclerosis. HO-1 represses inflammation by removing the pro-inflammatory molecule heme and by generating CO and the bile pigments, biliverdin and bilirubin. These HO-1 reaction products are capable of blocking innate and adaptive immune responses by modifying the activation, differentiation, maturation, and/or polarization of numerous immune cells, including endothelial cells, monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells, T lymphocytes, mast cells, and platelets. These cellular actions by CO and bile pigments result in diminished leukocyte recruitment and infiltration, and pro-inflammatory mediator production within atherosclerotic lesions. This review highlights the mechanisms by which HO-1 suppresses vascular inflammation in atherosclerosis, and explores possible therapeutic modalities by which HO-1 and its reaction products can be employed to ameliorate vascular inflammatory disease.

  14. Smooth muscle FGF/TGFβ cross talk regulates atherosclerosis progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Yu; Qin, Lingfeng; Li, Guangxin; Tellides, George; Simons, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The conversion of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from contractile to proliferative phenotype is thought to play an important role in atherosclerosis. However, the contribution of this process to plaque growth has never been fully defined. In this study, we show that activation of SMC TGFβ signaling, achieved by suppression of SMC fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling input, induces their conversion to a contractile phenotype and dramatically reduces atherosclerotic plaque size. The FGF/TGFβ signaling cross talk was observed in vitro and in vivo In vitro, inhibition of FGF signaling increased TGFβ activity, thereby promoting smooth muscle differentiation and decreasing proliferation. In vivo, smooth muscle-specific knockout of an FGF receptor adaptor Frs2α led to a profound inhibition of atherosclerotic plaque growth when these animals were crossed on Apoe(-/-) background and subjected to a high-fat diet. In particular, there was a significant reduction in plaque cellularity, increase in fibrous cap area, and decrease in necrotic core size. In agreement with these findings, examination of human coronary arteries with various degrees of atherosclerosis revealed a strong correlation between the activation of FGF signaling, loss of TGFβ activity, and increased disease severity. These results identify SMC FGF/TGFβ signaling cross talk as an important regulator of SMC phenotype switch and document a major contribution of medial SMC proliferation to atherosclerotic plaque growth.

  15. Wine, alcohol and atherosclerosis: clinical evidences and mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.L. da Luz

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease which may cause obstructions of the coronary, cerebral and peripheral arteries. It is typically multifactorial, most often dependent on risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, smoking, hypertension, sedentarism, and obesity. It is the single main cause of death in most developed countries due to myocardial infarction, angina, sudden death, and heart failure. Several epidemiological studies suggest that moderate alcohol intake, especially red wine, decrease cardiac mortality due to atherosclerosis. The alcohol effect is described by a J curve, suggesting that moderate drinkers may benefit while abstainers and heavy drinkers are at higher risk. Experimental studies indicate that most beneficial effects of drinking are attributable to flavonoids that are present in red wine, purple grape juice and several fruits and vegetables. The mechanisms include antiplatelet actions, increases in high-density lipoprotein, antioxidation, reduced endothelin-1 production, and increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression which causes augmented nitric oxide production by endothelial cells. These findings lead to the concept that moderate red wine drinking, in the absence of contraindications, may be beneficial to patients who are at risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular events. Moreover, a diet based on fruits and vegetables containing flavonoids may be even more beneficial.

  16. Coronary, Carotid, and Lower-extremity Atherosclerosis and Their Interrelationship in Danish Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kay, Susan Due; Poulsen, Mikael Kjaer; Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Atherosclerosis is highly prevalent among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but has been demonstrated predominantly in non-European SLE cohorts and few investigations have included more than 1 imaging modality. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of atherosclerosis...... regression model, age (p Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC; p = 0.008) were significant independent risk factors for atherosclerosis at any vascular territory. CONCLUSION: Atherosclerosis is highly prevalent among Danish patients with SLE...

  17. Prevalence, Vascular Distribution, and Multiterritorial Extent of Subclinical Atherosclerosis in a Middle-Aged Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Friera, Leticia; Peñalvo, José L; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data are limited on the presence, distribution, and extent of subclinical atherosclerosis in middle-aged populations. METHODS AND RESULTS: The PESA (Progression of Early Subclinical Atherosclerosis) study prospectively enrolled 4184 asymptomatic participants 40 to 54 years of age (mean...... age, 45.8 years; 63% male) to evaluate the systemic extent of atherosclerosis in the carotid, abdominal aortic, and iliofemoral territories by 2-/3-dimensional ultrasound and coronary artery calcification by computed tomography. The extent of subclinical atherosclerosis, defined as presence of plaque...... or coronary artery calcification ≥1, was classified as focal (1 site affected), intermediate (2-3 sites), or generalized (4-6 sites) after exploration of each vascular site (right/left carotids, aorta, right/left iliofemorals, and coronary arteries). Subclinical atherosclerosis was present in 63...

  18. 75 FR 63488 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event Surveillance SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D... Collection: Title: Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event Surveillance. Type of Information... disease (CVD)-- that is, atherosclerosis and other forms of CVD that have not produced signs and...

  19. Ambient air pollution and the progression of atherosclerosis in adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nino Künzli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cross-sectional studies suggest an association between exposure to ambient air pollution and atherosclerosis. We investigated the association between outdoor air quality and progression of subclinical atherosclerosis (common carotid artery intima-media thickness, CIMT. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined data from five double-blind randomized trials that assessed effects of various treatments on the change in CIMT. The trials were conducted in the Los Angeles area. Spatial models and land-use data were used to estimate the home outdoor mean concentration of particulate matter up to 2.5 micrometer in diameter (PM2.5, and to classify residence by proximity to traffic-related pollution (within 100 m of highways. PM2.5 and traffic proximity were positively associated with CIMT progression. Adjusted coefficients were larger than crude associations, not sensitive to modelling specifications, and statistically significant for highway proximity while of borderline significance for PM2.5 (P = 0.08. Annual CIMT progression among those living within 100 m of a highway was accelerated (5.5 micrometers/yr [95%CI: 0.13-10.79; p = 0.04] or more than twice the population mean progression. For PM2.5, coefficients were positive as well, reaching statistical significance in the socially disadvantaged; in subjects reporting lipid lowering treatment at baseline; among participants receiving on-trial treatments; and among the pool of four out of the five trials. CONCLUSION: Consistent with cross-sectional findings and animal studies, this is the first study to report an association between exposure to air pollution and the progression of atherosclerosis--indicated with CIMT change--in humans. Ostensibly, our results suggest that air pollution may contribute to the acceleration of cardiovascular disease development--the main causes of morbidity and mortality in many countries. However, the heterogeneity of the volunteering populations across the

  20. Cathepsins and cystatin C in atherosclerosis and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafarge, Jean-Charles; Naour, Nadia; Clément, Karine; Guerre-Millo, Michèle

    2010-11-01

    Given the increasing prevalence of human obesity worldwide, there is an urgent need for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms linking obesity to metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Our knowledge is nevertheless limited regarding molecules linking adipose tissue to downstream complications. The importance of cathepsins was brought to light in this context. Through a large scale transcriptomic analysis, our group recently identified the gene encoding cathepsin S as one of the most deregulated gene in the adipose tissue of obese subjects and positively correlated with body mass index. Other members of the cathepsin family are expressed in the adipose tissue, including cathepsin K and cathepsin L. Given their implication in atherogenesis, these proteases could participate into the well established deleterious relationship between enlarged adipose tissue and increased cardiovascular risk. Here, we review the clinical and experimental evidence relevant to the role of cathepsins K, L and S and their most abundant endogenous inhibitor, cystatin C, in atherosclerosis and in obesity.

  1. Implications of chemokines, chemokine receptors, and inflammatory lipids in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolin, Johannes; Maghazachi, Azzam A

    2014-04-01

    Chemokines are a diverse group of molecules with important implications for the development of solid tissues and normal function of the immune system. However, change of the conditions for such a complex system can have important and dangerous consequences leading to diseases. The specific implications of the various chemokines in diseases have been elucidated in the last few years, prompting hope of manipulating this system for therapy or prevention of diseases. On the other hand, inflammatory lipids are biologically active molecules with crucial impacts on the function of various cell types, including immune cells in health and disease. Here, we describe how these lipids affect the chemokine system and how they interact with chemokines to shape chronic inflammation in the case of atherosclerosis.

  2. AIP1-mediated stress signaling in atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiqin; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Ji, Weidong; Min, Wang

    2015-05-01

    AIP1 (ASK1-interacting protein-1; encoded by the DAB2IP gene), a signaling scaffolding protein, is abundantly expressed in vascular endothelial cells (EC). While it was initially discovered as an apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)-interacting protein, AIP1 broadly suppresses inflammatory responses triggered by cytokines and stresses such as TNF, LPS, VEGF, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in EC (therefore, AIP1 is an anti-inflammatory protein). Human genome-wide association study (GWAS) has identified DAB2IP gene variants conferring susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases. Consistently, a global or vascular EC-specific deletion of DAB2IP in mice strongly enhances inflammatory responses and exacerbates atherosclerosis and graft arteriosclerosis progression in mouse models. Mechanisms for AIP1 function and regulation associated with human cardiovascular diseases need further investigations.

  3. Dynamic Aspects of Macrophage Polarizationduring Atherosclerosis Progression and Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael ePeled

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well recognized that macrophages in many contexts in vitro and in vivo display a spectrum of inflammatory features and functional properties. A convenient system to group together different subsets of macrophages has been the M1(inflammatory/M2(anti-inflammatory classification. In addition to other sites of inflammation, it is now established that atherosclerotic plaques contain both M1 and M2 macrophages. We review results made possible by a number of recent mouse models of atherosclerotic regression that, taken with other literature, have shown the M1/M2 balance in plaques to be dynamic, with M1 predominating in disease progression and M2 in regression. The regulation of the macrophage phenotype in plaques and the functional consequences of the M1 and M2 states in atherosclerosis will also be discussed.

  4. Recent advances in lipoprotein and atherosclerosis: A nutrigenomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López, Sergio

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a disease in which multiple factors contribute to the degeneration of the vascular wall. Many risk factors have been identified as having influence on the progression of atherosclerosis among them, the type of diet. Multifactorial interaction among lipoproteins, vascular wall cells, and inflammatory mediators has been recognised as the basis of atherogenesis. Dietary intake affects lipoprotein concentration and composition providing risk or protection at several stages of atherosclerosis. More intriguingly, it has been demonstrated that the extent to which each lipid or lipoprotein is associated with cardiovascular disease depends on the time to last meal; thus, postprandial lipoproteins, main lipoproteins in blood after a high-fat meal, have been shown to strongly influence atherogenesis. As a complex biological process, the full cellular and molecular characterization of atherosclerosis derived by diet, calls for application of the newly developing “omics” techniques of analysis. This review will considered recent studies using high-throughput technologies and a nutrigenomic approach to reveal the patho-physiological effects that the fasting and postprandial lipoproteins may exert on the vascular wall.La aterosclerosis es una enfermedad en la que múltiples factores, entre los que se encuentra la dieta, contribuyen a la degradación de la pared vascular. En la etiología de la aterogénesis son determinantes las lipoproteínas plasmáticas y los distintos tipos celulares de la pared vascular, incluyendo una respuesta inflamatoria. La ingesta de alimentos afecta la concentración y composición de las lipoproteínas, ejerciendo un papel de riesgo o protector durante las diferentes etapas del proceso aterosclerótico. Es importante destacar que la naturaleza de las lipoproteínas y por lo tanto su papel en la enfermedad cardiovascular, también depende del tiempo transcurrido entre comidas. Por ejemplo, las lipoprote

  5. Study of androgen and atherosclerosis in old-age male

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yun-mei; LV Xue-ying; HUANG Wei-dong; XU Zhe-rong; WU Ling-jiao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To observe the difference of androgen and inflammatory cytokines level in atherosclerosis and analyse their relations. Method: Both carotid arteries and arteries of lower extremity were subjected to ultrasonic examination by Doppler's method. Those with much atheromatous plaque formation were ranged into case group, and those with normal result formed control group. Total, free testosterone and estradiol were assayed by radioimmunoassay. C reactive protein (CRP) was assayed by nepheloturbidity. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-8 (IL-8), Interleukin-10 (IL-10), Interleukin- 18 (IL- 18), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule- 1 (sICAM- 1) and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule- 1 (sVCAM- 1)were assayed by ELISA. The mean difference between two groups and the correlation between free testosterone and cytokines were analysed. Results: Free testosterone was (6.337±3.371) pg/L in case group and (11.375±4.733) pg/L in control group, P<0.01.No differences were found in total testosterone and estradiol. CRP was (27.294±10.238) mg/L in case group and (12.843±6.318)mg/L in control group, P<0.01. IL-6 was (41.700±31.385) pg/L in case group and (25.396±20.772) pg/L in control group, P<0.05.IL-8 was (89.249±58.357) pg/L in case group and (67.873±31.227) pg/L in control group, P<0.05. sICAM-1 was (470.491±134.078) pg/L in case group and (368.487±97.183) pg/L in control group, P<0.01. sVCAM-1 was (537.808±213.172)pg/L in case group and (457.275±157.273) pg/L in control group, P<0.05. There were no differences in TNF-α, IL-10 and IL-18.Correlation analysis showed that FT (free testosterone) had negative correlation with CRP, IL-6 and sICAM-1. Among them FT had well correlation with CRP, correlation index was -0.678. Conclusion: Free testosterone was in negative correlation with atherosclerosis in old-age male. Free testosterone may have the role of anti-atherosclerosis, and this effect was not achieved

  6. Is hepcidin-25 a predictor of atherosclerosis in hemodialysis patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kali, Alaaddin; Yayar, Ozlem; Erdogan, Bulent; Eser, Baris; Buyukbakkal, Mehmet; Ercan, Zafer; Merhametsiz, Ozgur; Haspulat, Ayhan; Gök Oğuz, Ebru; Canbakan, Basol; Ayli, Mehmet D

    2016-04-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in hemodialysis patients. Iron accumulation in arterial wall macrophages is increased in atherosclerotic lesions. Hepcidin is a key hepatic hormone regulating iron balance. It inhibits iron release from macrophages and iron absorption from enterocytes by binding and inactivating the cellular iron exporter ferroportin. The aim of this study is to investigate the relation of hepcidin-25, iron parameters, and atherosclerosis measured by carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) in hemodialysis patients. Eighty-two hemodialysis patients were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Predialysis blood samples were centrifuged at 1500 g and 4°C for 10 minutes and stored at -80°C for the measurement of hepcidin-25. DRG hepcidin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit was used for the measurement of hepcidin-25. Ultrasonographical B-mode imaging of bilateral carotid arteries was performed with a high-resolution real-time ultrasonography (Mindray DC7). Mean age of the study population was 57.90 ± 16.08 years and 43.9% were men. Total study population was grouped into two according to median value of hepcidin-25. There was no difference between groups with respect to age, dialysis vintage, and C-reactive protein. CIMT was found to be statistically significantly higher in low hepcidin-25 group. In correlation analysis, CIMT was found to be correlated with age (P < 0.01, R = 0.33) and hepcidin-25 (P < 0.01, R = 0.46). In linear regression analysis, age (β = 0.31) and hepcidin-25 (β = 0.44) were found to be the determinants of CIMT in hemodialysis patients. Our results implicate that hepcidin may take part in pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease in hemodialysis patients.

  7. Subclinical atherosclerosis in gouty arthritis patients: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çukurova, Selçuk; Pamuk, Ömer Nuri; Ünlü, Ercüment; Pamuk, Gülsüm Emel; Çakir, Necati

    2012-06-01

    We evaluated the incidence of subclinical atherosclerosis and associated factors in our gouty arthritis patients. We included 55 gouty arthritis patients diagnosed at our center within the last 4 years. The control group included 41 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 34 patients with asymptomatic hyperuricemia (AHU). Atherosclerotic risk factors were determined in all subjects. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and the presence of plaques were evaluated by B-mode ultrasonography. The carotid IMT in gouty arthritis patients (0.730 ± 0.19) was significantly higher than in AHU subjects (0.616 ± 0.12) (P = 0.004) and tended to be higher than the RA group (0.669 ± 0.17) (P = 0.1). Atheromatous plaques were significantly more frequent in gouty arthritis patients (16 cases, 29.1%) than in RA patients (5 cases, 12.2%) and AHU subjects (3 cases, 8.8%) (P values, 0.05 and 0.023). Gout patients with plaques were older (P = 0.006) and tended to have tophi more frequently (P = 0.06). Logistic regression analysis showed that age (OR: 1.3, 95% CI: 1.02-1.54) and the presence of tophi (OR: 12.5, 95% CI: 1.2-140) were independent risk factors for the presence of plaques. Gouty arthritis bears a higher risk of atherosclerosis than both RA and AHU.

  8. Plasma cholesterol-induced lesion networks activated before regression of early, mature, and advanced atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkegren, Johan L M; Hägg, Sara; Talukdar, Husain A; Foroughi Asl, Hassan; Jain, Rajeev K; Cedergren, Cecilia; Shang, Ming-Mei; Rossignoli, Aránzazu; Takolander, Rabbe; Melander, Olle; Hamsten, Anders; Michoel, Tom; Skogsberg, Josefin

    2014-02-01

    Plasma cholesterol lowering (PCL) slows and sometimes prevents progression of atherosclerosis and may even lead to regression. Little is known about how molecular processes in the atherosclerotic arterial wall respond to PCL and modify responses to atherosclerosis regression. We studied atherosclerosis regression and global gene expression responses to PCL (≥80%) and to atherosclerosis regression itself in early, mature, and advanced lesions. In atherosclerotic aortic wall from Ldlr(-/-)Apob (100/100) Mttp (flox/flox)Mx1-Cre mice, atherosclerosis regressed after PCL regardless of lesion stage. However, near-complete regression was observed only in mice with early lesions; mice with mature and advanced lesions were left with regression-resistant, relatively unstable plaque remnants. Atherosclerosis genes responding to PCL before regression, unlike those responding to the regression itself, were enriched in inherited risk for coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, indicating causality. Inference of transcription factor (TF) regulatory networks of these PCL-responsive gene sets revealed largely different networks in early, mature, and advanced lesions. In early lesions, PPARG was identified as a specific master regulator of the PCL-responsive atherosclerosis TF-regulatory network, whereas in mature and advanced lesions, the specific master regulators were MLL5 and SRSF10/XRN2, respectively. In a THP-1 foam cell model of atherosclerosis regression, siRNA targeting of these master regulators activated the time-point-specific TF-regulatory networks and altered the accumulation of cholesterol esters. We conclude that PCL leads to complete atherosclerosis regression only in mice with early lesions. Identified master regulators and related PCL-responsive TF-regulatory networks will be interesting targets to enhance PCL-mediated regression of mature and advanced atherosclerotic lesions.

  9. Plasma Cholesterol–Induced Lesion Networks Activated before Regression of Early, Mature, and Advanced Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkegren, Johan L. M.; Hägg, Sara; Jain, Rajeev K.; Cedergren, Cecilia; Shang, Ming-Mei; Rossignoli, Aránzazu; Takolander, Rabbe; Melander, Olle; Hamsten, Anders; Michoel, Tom; Skogsberg, Josefin

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cholesterol lowering (PCL) slows and sometimes prevents progression of atherosclerosis and may even lead to regression. Little is known about how molecular processes in the atherosclerotic arterial wall respond to PCL and modify responses to atherosclerosis regression. We studied atherosclerosis regression and global gene expression responses to PCL (≥80%) and to atherosclerosis regression itself in early, mature, and advanced lesions. In atherosclerotic aortic wall from Ldlr−/−Apob 100/100 Mttp flox/floxMx1-Cre mice, atherosclerosis regressed after PCL regardless of lesion stage. However, near-complete regression was observed only in mice with early lesions; mice with mature and advanced lesions were left with regression-resistant, relatively unstable plaque remnants. Atherosclerosis genes responding to PCL before regression, unlike those responding to the regression itself, were enriched in inherited risk for coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, indicating causality. Inference of transcription factor (TF) regulatory networks of these PCL-responsive gene sets revealed largely different networks in early, mature, and advanced lesions. In early lesions, PPARG was identified as a specific master regulator of the PCL-responsive atherosclerosis TF-regulatory network, whereas in mature and advanced lesions, the specific master regulators were MLL5 and SRSF10/XRN2, respectively. In a THP-1 foam cell model of atherosclerosis regression, siRNA targeting of these master regulators activated the time-point-specific TF-regulatory networks and altered the accumulation of cholesterol esters. We conclude that PCL leads to complete atherosclerosis regression only in mice with early lesions. Identified master regulators and related PCL-responsive TF-regulatory networks will be interesting targets to enhance PCL-mediated regression of mature and advanced atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:24586211

  10. Plasma cholesterol-induced lesion networks activated before regression of early, mature, and advanced atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan L M Björkegren

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cholesterol lowering (PCL slows and sometimes prevents progression of atherosclerosis and may even lead to regression. Little is known about how molecular processes in the atherosclerotic arterial wall respond to PCL and modify responses to atherosclerosis regression. We studied atherosclerosis regression and global gene expression responses to PCL (≥80% and to atherosclerosis regression itself in early, mature, and advanced lesions. In atherosclerotic aortic wall from Ldlr(-/-Apob (100/100 Mttp (flox/floxMx1-Cre mice, atherosclerosis regressed after PCL regardless of lesion stage. However, near-complete regression was observed only in mice with early lesions; mice with mature and advanced lesions were left with regression-resistant, relatively unstable plaque remnants. Atherosclerosis genes responding to PCL before regression, unlike those responding to the regression itself, were enriched in inherited risk for coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, indicating causality. Inference of transcription factor (TF regulatory networks of these PCL-responsive gene sets revealed largely different networks in early, mature, and advanced lesions. In early lesions, PPARG was identified as a specific master regulator of the PCL-responsive atherosclerosis TF-regulatory network, whereas in mature and advanced lesions, the specific master regulators were MLL5 and SRSF10/XRN2, respectively. In a THP-1 foam cell model of atherosclerosis regression, siRNA targeting of these master regulators activated the time-point-specific TF-regulatory networks and altered the accumulation of cholesterol esters. We conclude that PCL leads to complete atherosclerosis regression only in mice with early lesions. Identified master regulators and related PCL-responsive TF-regulatory networks will be interesting targets to enhance PCL-mediated regression of mature and advanced atherosclerotic lesions.

  11. Innate immunity, Toll-like receptors, and atherosclerosis: mouse models and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Arditi, Moshe

    2009-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and aberrant lipid metabolism represent hallmarks of atherosclerosis. Innate immunity critically depends upon Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling. Recent data directly implicate signalling by TLR4 and TLR2 in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The role that TLRs play in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis can be assessed by using several animal models, which provide a double genetic deficiency in TLRs and molecules implicated in the lipid metabolism, such as ApoE or LDL receptor. Furthermore, a more recent technique, such as the bone marrow transplantation (BMT), can be a useful and straightforward method to elucidate the role of stromal versus hematopoietic cells in the acceleration of the atheroma.

  12. Significantly increased risk of carotid atherosclerosis with arsenic exposure and polymorphisms in arsenic metabolism genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Yi-Chen [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wusing St., Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Lien, Li-Ming [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Neurology, Shin Kong WHS Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chung, Wen-Ting [Department of Neurology, Wanfang Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Fang-I; Hsieh, Pei-Fan [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wusing St., Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Wu, Meei-Maan [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wusing St., Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Basic Medicine, College of Medicine, Fu-Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Hung-Pin [Department of Neurology, Lotung Poh-Ai Hospital, I-Lan, Taiwan (China); Chiou, Hung-Yi, E-mail: hychiou@tmu.edu.tw [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wusing St., Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chien-Jen [Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2011-08-15

    Individual susceptibility to arsenic-induced carotid atherosclerosis might be associated with genetic variations in arsenic metabolism. The purpose of this study is to explore the interaction effect on risk of carotid atherosclerosis between arsenic exposure and risk genotypes of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), arsenic (+3) methyltransferase (As3MT), and glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) and omega 2 (GSTO2). A community-based case-control study was conducted in northeastern Taiwan to investigate the arsenic metabolic-related genetic susceptibility to carotid atherosclerosis. In total, 863 subjects, who had been genotyped and for whom the severity of carotid atherosclerosis had been determined, were included in the present study. Individual well water was collected and arsenic concentration determined using hydride generation combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The result showed that a significant dose-response trend (P=0.04) of carotid atherosclerosis risk associated with increasing arsenic concentration. Non-significant association between genetic polymorphisms of PNP Gly51Ser, Pro57Pro, As3MT Met287Thr, GSTO1 Ala140Asp, and GSTO2 A-183G and the risk for development of carotid atherosclerosis were observed. However, the significant interaction effect on carotid atherosclerosis risk was found for arsenic exposure (>50 {mu}g/l) and the haplotypes of PNP (p=0.0115). A marked elevated risk of carotid atherosclerosis was observed in subjects with arsenic exposure of >50 {mu}g/l in drinking water and those who carried the PNP A-T haplotype and at least either of the As3MT risk polymorphism or GSTO risk haplotypes (OR, 6.43; 95% CI, 1.79-23.19). In conclusion, arsenic metabolic genes, PNP, As3MT, and GSTO, may exacerbate the formation of atherosclerosis in individuals with high levels of arsenic concentration in well water (>50 {mu}g/l). - Highlights: {yields}Arsenic metabolic genes might be associated with carotid atherosclerosis. {yields

  13. Decreased Renal Function Is a Risk Factor for Subclinical Coronary Atherosclerosis in Korean Postmenopausal Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Bo Hyon; Chon, Seung Joo; Cho, Si Hyun; Choi, Young Sik; Lee, Byung Seok

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Decreased renal function is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Our study was planned to verify the association of decreased renal function and subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 251 Korean postmenopausal women who visited the health promotion center for a routine health checkup. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was used to show renal function, which was estimated by calculated using the Cockcroft-Gault (CG) and the modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) formulas. Coronary atherosclerosis was assessed by 64-row multidetector computed tomography. Results Women with reduced eGFR (menopausal hormone therapy before atherosclerosis development. PMID:28119897

  14. New aspects on the metabolic role of intestinal microbiota in the development of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosos, Ioannis; Tavridou, Anna; Kolios, George

    2015-04-01

    Gut microbiota remains a very interesting, yet largely unexplored ecosystem inside the human organism. The importance of this ecosystem for the physiology and the pathophysiology of the organism is being slowly unraveled. Recent studies reveal a connection between intestinal microbiota and atherosclerosis development. It seems that alterations in the function and composition of this bacterial population lead through complex mechanisms to a high risk for atherosclerosis. Although these mechanisms remain largely unknown, published studies show that microbiota can lead to atherosclerosis either by augmenting known risk factors or via other, more "direct" mechanisms. This review article summarizes the available literature regarding this matter.

  15. Imaging Atherosclerosis with Hybrid Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of atherosclerosis could potentially move patient management towards individualized triage, treatment, and followup. The newly introduced combined positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system could emerge as a key player in this context. Both ...

  16. Association between the surfactant protein D (SFTPD) gene and subclinical carotid artery atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Grith L; Bladbjerg, Else Marie; Steffensen, Rudi;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a defense collectin with inflammation-modulating properties. SP-D deficiency inhibits atherosclerosis in vivo, and the circulatory SP-D levels have been previously associated with cardiovascular disease mortality. We hypothesized that plasma SP-D (p......SP-D) and SP-D gene (SFTPD) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are risk factors for atherosclerosis. METHODS: We evaluated individuals who were all 60 years old and participated in The Glostrup Population Study. Subclinical atherosclerosis was diagnosed based on the ultrasonographic measurement of intima......: The results do not support that pSP-D levels influence the development of subclinical atherosclerosis. However, the SFTPD SNP data support previous observations from animal studies that SP-D plays a role in the etiology of atherosclerotic disease development. The nominal significant effects are likely...

  17. Porcine Models of Accelerated Coronary Atherosclerosis: Role of Diabetes Mellitus and Hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damir Hamamdzic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models of atherosclerosis have proven to be an invaluable asset in understanding the pathogenesis of the disease. However, large animal models may be needed in order to assess novel therapeutic approaches to the treatment of atherosclerosis. Porcine models of coronary and peripheral atherosclerosis offer several advantages over rodent models, including similar anatomical size to humans, as well as genetic expression and development of high-risk atherosclerotic lesions which are similar to humans. Here we review the four models of porcine atherosclerosis, including the diabetic/hypercholesterolemic model, Rapacz-familial hypercholesterolemia pig, the (PCSK9 gain-of-function mutant pig model, and the Ossabaw miniature pig model of metabolic syndrome. All four models reliably represent features of human vascular disease.

  18. Subclinical heart failure in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a consequence of chronic inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamada S Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Our findings indicate the presence of subclinical heart failure in these patients. JIA patients with subclinical atherosclerosis, with systemic disease, and with active disease are at greatest risk of developing subclinical heart failure.

  19. Blood pressure, atherosclerosis, and the incidence of age-related maculopathy: the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Leeuwen (Redmer); M.K. Ikram (Kamran); J.R. Vingerling (Hans); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); P.T.V.M. de Jong (Paulus); A. Hofman (Albert)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: To determine whether blood pressure and subclinical atherosclerosis are associated with incident age-related maculopathy (ARM). METHODS: The study was performed within the Rotterdam Study, a population-based, prospective cohort study in Rotterdam, The Netherlan

  20. Testing the Role of Myeloid Cell Glucose Flux in Inflammation and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Nishizawa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory activation of myeloid cells is accompanied by increased glycolysis, which is required for the surge in cytokine production. Although in vitro studies suggest that increased macrophage glucose metabolism is sufficient for cytokine induction, the proinflammatory effects of increased myeloid cell glucose flux in vivo and the impact on atherosclerosis, a major complication of diabetes, are unknown. We therefore tested the hypothesis that increased glucose uptake in myeloid cells stimulates cytokine production and atherosclerosis. Overexpression of the glucose transporter GLUT1 in myeloid cells caused increased glycolysis and flux through the pentose phosphate pathway but did not induce cytokines. Moreover, myeloid-cell-specific overexpression of GLUT1 in LDL receptor-deficient mice was ineffective in promoting atherosclerosis. Thus, increased glucose flux is insufficient for inflammatory myeloid cell activation and atherogenesis. If glucose promotes atherosclerosis by increasing cellular glucose flux, myeloid cells do not appear to be the key targets.

  1. 2015 Russell Ross Memorial Lecture in Vascular Biology: Protective Autoimmunity in Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. It is accompanied by an autoimmune response against apolipoprotein B-100, the core protein of low-density lipoprotein, which manifests as CD4 T cell and antibody responses. To assess the role of the autoimmune response in atherosclerosis, the nature of the CD4 T cell response against apolipoprotein B-100 was studied with and without vaccination with major histocompatibility complex-II-restricted apolipoprotein B-100 peptides. The immunologic basis of autoimmunity in atherosclerosis is discussed in the framework of theories of adaptive immunity. Older vaccination approaches are also discussed. Vaccinating Apoe(-/-) mice with major histocompatibility complex-II-restricted apolipoprotein B-100 peptides reduces atheroma burden in the aorta by ≈40%. The protective mechanism likely includes secretion of interleukin-10. Protective autoimmunity limits atherosclerosis in mice and suggests potential for developing preventative and therapeutic vaccines for humans.

  2. 10-Year Study Links Faster Progression of Atherosclerosis to Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis Air Pollution Study (MESA Air) was the first U.S. research study to measure directly how long-term exposure to air pollution contributes to the development of heart disease.

  3. Links between cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis in postmenopausal women: serum lipids or atherosclerosis per se?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Y Z; Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Alexandersen, P

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological observations suggest links between osteoporosis and risk of acute cardiovascular events and vice versa. Whether the two clinical conditions are linked by common pathogenic factors or atherosclerosis per se remains incompletely understood. We investigated whether serum lipids...

  4. Transendothelial exchange of low-density lipoprotein is unaffected by the presence of severe atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Karen; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Jensen, Trine Krogsgaard

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that transendothelial exchange of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is influenced by the presence of severe atherosclerosis; we previously found this exchange elevated in diabetes patients. METHODS: By an in vivo isotope method, we compared transendothelial LDL...... exchange in 24 patients with angiographically verified coronary atherosclerosis, 11 patients with angiographically verified peripheral atherosclerosis, 60 patients with diabetes, and in 42 controls. Autologous 131-iodinated LDL ((131)I-LDL) and 125-iodinated albumin ((125)I-albumin) were injected...... intravenously (i.v.), and the 1-h fractional escape rates (FER(LDL) and FER(alb)) were taken as indices of transendothelial exchange. RESULTS: Patients with coronary or peripheral atherosclerosis had FER(LDL) similar to that of controls [4.3 (3.5-5.1) and 3.2 (2.3-4.1) versus 4.2 (3.7-4.7)%/h; P>0.05], even...

  5. Stress-induced cardiac autonomic reactivity and preclinical atherosclerosis: does arterial elasticity modify the association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumaeva, Nadja; Hintsanen, Mirka; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Merjonen, Päivi; Elovainio, Marko; Hintsa, Taina; Juonala, Markus; Kähönen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli T; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa

    2015-01-01

    The effect of acute mental stress on atherosclerosis can be estimated using arterial elasticity measured by carotid artery distensibility (Cdist). We examined the interactive effect of acute stress-induced cardiac reactivity and Cdist to preclinical atherosclerosis assessed by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in 58 healthy adults aged 24-39 years participated in the epidemiological Young Finns Study. Cdist and IMT were measured ultrasonographically. Impedance electrocardiography was used to measure acute mental stress-induced cardiac autonomic responses: heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia and pre-ejection period after the mental arithmetic and the public speaking tasks. Interactions between HR reactivity and Cdist in relation to preclinical atherosclerosis were found. The results imply that elevated HR reactivity to acute mental stress is related to less atherosclerosis among healthy participants with higher arterial elasticity. Possibly, increased cardiac reactivity in response to challenging tasks is an adaptive reaction related to better cardiovascular health.

  6. Kidney Measures with Diabetes and Hypertension on Cardiovascular Disease : The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexander, Nadine; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Sang, Yingying; Ballew, Shoshana; Mahmoodi, Bakhtawar K.; Astor, Brad C.; Coresh, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Background: Whether the association of chronic kidney disease (CKD) with cardiovascular risk differs based on diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HTN) status remains unanswered. Methods: We investigated 11,050 participants from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (fourth examination (

  7. Contrasting effect of fish oil supplementation on the development of atherosclerosis in murine models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zampolli, Antonella; Bysted, Anette; Leth, Torben;

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Increased fish oil intake is associated with protection against coronary heart disease and sudden death, while effects on atherosclerosis are controversial. We explored the effects of supplementing fish oil (rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, PUFA) or corn oil (rich in n-6 PUFA......) in two different models of atherosclerosis. Methods and Results: Sixty-three low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (LDLR-/-) mice and sixty-nine apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE(-/-)) mice were fed diets without supplementations or supplemented with either 1% fish oil or 1% corn oil. In apo......E(-/-) mice, neither fish oil nor corn oil had any major impact on plasma lipids or atherosclerosis. In LDLR-/- mice, conversely, the fish oil and the corn oil group had lower levels of LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides and had lesser atherosclerosis in the aortic root and in the entire aorta (P

  8. The role of peptide hormones (adiponectin, leptin, insulin in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Smetnev

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Currently, cardiovascular diseases (CVD remain the main problem in the world and in Russia in particular. The study of the causes and progression of atherosclerosis is a critical moment in the fight against CVD. Adipose tissue and processes that occur in it attracts attention in recent years. The important role of adipose tissue as an endocrine and immune organ is revealed as well as its participation in the development of the inflammatory process. This leads to the development of initial manifestations of atherosclerosis a precursor of many metabolic disorders and CVD. Particular attention causes adipokines regulatory peptide hormones in the adipose tissue, as well as insulin, due to its close relationship with the adipose tissue and especially with adiponectin and leptin. Recent data on the role of adiponectin, leptin and insulin in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in order to identify new potential targets among peptide hormones for the treatment of atherosclerosis are presented. 

  9. Prevention of atherosclerosis in patients living with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferruccio De Lorenzo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Ferruccio De Lorenzo1, Marta Boffito1, Sophie Collot-Teixeira2, Brian Gazzard1, John L McGregor2,3, Kevin Shotliff2, Han Xiao41General Medicine and Prevention of Vascular Disorders, Beta Cell Diabetes Centre and St Stephen’s AIDS Trust, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 2Kings College London, Cardiovascular Division, London, UK; 3INSERM U970, PARC Hôpital Européen George Pompidou, Paris, France; 4Cardiology Department, Homerton University Hospital NHS, London, UKInvestigational product: Rosuvastatin (Crestor®; Astra Zeneca.Active ingredients: Rosuvastatin (5 mg.Study title: Prevention of Atherosclerosis in Patients Living with HIV.Phase of study: Phase III.Aims: Primary aim:• To assess whether rosuvastatin therapy could slow the progression of the carotid intima-media thickness (C-IMT; as measured by the change in the mean IMT of the near and far walls of the distal common carotid arteries over 2 years in HIV-infected patients (HIV-IP.Secondary aims:• To assess whether rosuvastatin therapy could reduce highly sensitive C reactive protein (hs-CRP inflammatory marker that is increased in HIV-IP.• To assess the effect of rosuvastatin therapy on serum lipid levels (total cholesterol [TC], low-density lipoprotein [LDL] cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein [HDL] cholesterol and triglycerides [TG] and apolipoproteins (APO A1, APO B and APO B/A1.• To assess the safety of rosuvastatin in HIV-IP through the evaluation of clinical laboratory analyses (liver function tests and creatine kinase and adverse events (AEs.Study design: Two-year randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study.Planned sample size: 320 HIV-IP.Summary of eligibility criteria: HIV-IP who are aged between 30 and 60 years, with a CD4 count. greater than 200 cells/mm3. Patients must be stable on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART for at least 12 months and have a 10-year CVD risk of less than 20% (using the

  10. Role and significance of polyunsaturated fatty acids in nutrition in prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ristić Vanja I.; Ristić Gordana N.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction Hyperlipoproteinemia is a key factor in development of atherosclerosis, whereas regression of atherosclerosis mostly depends on decreasing the plasma level of total and LDL-cholesterol. Many studies have reported the hypocholesterolemic effect of linolenic acid. Types of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) Linoleic and α-linolenic acids are essential fatty acids. The main sources of linoleic acid are vegetable seeds and of α-linolenic acid - green parts of plants. α-linolenic acid...

  11. Moderate beer consumption does not change early or mature atherosclerosis in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco-Vaca Francisco; Ribas Vicent; Calpe-Berdiel Laura; Escolà-Gil Joan

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Although the consumption of wine in particular has been associated with a lower risk of atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease, systematic reviews differ as to the relative protective effect of beer, wine and spirits. Two previous studies showed that red wine reduces fatty streak formation (early atherosclerosis) but not mature atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein (apo) E-deficient (apoE-/-) mice. Aim of the study To determine whether a moderate beer intake would affect earl...

  12. Comparison of Predictive Value of Cardiometabolic Indices for Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Chinese Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Xu; Fang-fang Zeng; Li-ping He; Wen-hua Ling; Wei-qing Chen; Yu-ming Chen

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Metabolic disturbances are well-known risk factors for atherosclerosis, but it remains unclear which cardiometabolic components are the predominant determinants. This study aimed to compare and identify the key determinants of carotid atherosclerosis in asymptomatic middle-aged and elderly Chinese. Methods A community-based cross-sectional study including 3,162 apparently healthy residents aged 37–75 years was performed from July 2008 to June 2010 in Guangzhou, China. Carotid arter...

  13. Increased Cardiovascular Events and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: 1 Year Prospective Single Centre Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscitti, Piero; Cipriani, Paola; Masedu, Francesco; Romano, Silvio; Berardicurti, Onorina; Liakouli, Vasiliki; Carubbi, Francesco; Di Benedetto, Paola; Alvaro, Saverio; Penco, Maria; Valenti, Marco; Giacomelli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Several studies showed the close relationship between Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and cerebro-cardiovascular events (CVEs) and subclinical atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis during the course of RA and we evaluated the possible role of both traditional cardiovascular (CV) and disease related risk factors to predict the occurrence of new CVEs and the onset of subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods We designed a single centre, bias-adjusted, prospective, observational study to investigate, in a homogeneous subset of RA patients, the occurrence of new onset of CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis. Statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the role of traditional CV and disease-related risk factors to predict the occurrence of new CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis. Results We enrolled 347 RA patients prospectively followed for 12 months. An increased percentage of patients experienced CVEs, developed subclinical atherosclerosis and was affected by systemic arterial hypertension (SAH), type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome (MS), at the end of follow up. Our analysis showed that the insurgence of both SAH and MS, during the follow up, the older age, the CVE familiarity and the lack of clinical response, were associated with a significantly increased risk to experience CVEs and to develop subclinical atherosclerosis. Conclusions Our study quantifies the increased expected risk for CVEs in a cohort of RA patients prospectively followed for 1 year. The occurrence of both new CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis in RA patients may be explained by inflammatory burden as well as traditional CV risk factors. PMID:28103312

  14. [Atherosclerosis--progression by nonspecific activation of the immune system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, Hans-Anton; Sagban, Tolga Atilla; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2002-04-15

    Atherogenesis is a disease of middle-sized and large-caliber blood vessels that can be divided into three major phases. The initial lesions of early atherosclerosis are characterized by the adhesion and subendothelial emigration of blood-borne monocytes, which differentiate into macrophages and provide the morphologic basis for the formation of foam cells and fatty streak lesions. These lesions are found in most children and teenagers in industrialized nations. The next key event in atherogenesis is the proliferation of smooth muscle cells within the intima and media, resulting in the gradual compromise of the vessel lumen. Myofibroblastic cells also contribute to lesion growth through the production of excessive amounts of extracellular matrix. Such lesions are clinically silent unless progression to the next phase continues: the lesions degenerate, forming a mostly necrotic "lipid core" consisting of extracellular lipid, cholesterol crystals, inflammatory cells and necrotic debris. A fibrous cap is formed which prevents the interaction of blood cells, particularly of platelets with the highly proaggregatory material found in the lipid core. However, continuous inflammatory activity and/or heightened mechanical stress (i.e., in hypertension) tends to weaken the fibrous caps. Eventually, plaque rupture ensues, platelets aggregate, and the lesions become clinically manifest in such dramatic events as myocardial infarction, stroke, or mesenteric ischemia. Research into lesion formation and progression is limited by the fact that lesions develop in silence over many decades and that animal models only incompletely model the situation in humans. Most currently debated concepts accept the "response to injury" hypothesis formulated by the late Russell Ross and the multi-factorial nature of atherogenesis. The discussion today circles around the relative contributions of low density lipoproteins (oxidized or enzymatically modified LDL?), the immune response (adaptive or

  15. Spontaneous Atherosclerosis in Free-Living Pigeons in Mosul Area, Iraq

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    Hahfidh I. Al-Sadi* and Ashraf K. Abdullah

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate for the first time the prevalence and pathology of spontaneous atherosclerosis in free – living pigeons in Mosul, Iraq. A hundred apparently healthy, 1-1.5 year old both sex pigeons of local breed free – living used. Effects of factors such as weight, sex, age and health status on prevalence of the condition were also studied. Prevalence of naturally occurring atherosclerosis was 10%. Grossly, the heart was hypertrophied and of firm consistency, aorta and coronary arteries were prominent and cordlike with thickened walls. Microscopically, lipid – laden "foam cells" were seen throughout the thickened tunica media and intima. Damage of the elastic lamellae and hypertrophy of the smooth muscle cells were also noted. Spontaneous atherosclerosis occurred more frequently in old pigeons. No effect was found for sex, weight, and health status of the pigeons on prevalence and pathology of spontaneous atherosclerosis. It was concluded that spontaneous atherosclerosis is fairly common in local pigeons and it occurred more commonly in old pigeons. Sex, weight, and health status of the pigeons did not constitute risk factors for the occurrence of spontaneous atherosclerosis.

  16. ADMA/SDMA in Elderly Subjects with Asymptomatic Carotid Atherosclerosis: Values and Site-Specific Association

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    Graziano Riccioni

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA is an endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitor known as a mediator of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Circulating ADMA levels are correlated with cardiovascular risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperhomocysteinemia, age and smoking. We assessed the relationship between ADMA values and site-specific association of asymptomatic carotid atherosclerosis (intima-media thickness (CIMT and plaque in elderly subjects. One hundred and eighty subjects underwent a complete history and physical examination, determination of serum chemistries and ADMA levels, and carotid ultrasound investigation (CUI. All subjects had no acute or chronic symptoms of carotid atherosclerosis. Statistical analyses showed that high plasma levels of ADMA/SDMA were positively correlated to carotid atherosclerosis (CIMT and plaque (p < 0.001, with significant site-specific association. Total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides and C-reactive protein plasma concentrations were significantly associated with asymptomatic carotid atherosclerosis (p < 0.001. High serum concentrations of ADMA and SDMA were associated with carotid atherosclerotic lesions as measured by CIMT ad plaque and may represent a new marker of asymptomatic carotid atherosclerosis in elderly subjects.

  17. Preclinical mouse models and methods for the discovery of the causes and treatments of atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewing, Bernd; Fisher, Edward A

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death in the Western world. Despite huge advances in understanding its pathophysiological mechanisms, current treatment is mostly based on ‘traditional’ risk factors. The introduction of statins more than 20 years ago reduced morbidity and mortality of atherosclerosis by 30%, leaving a residual cardiovascular risk. Therefore, efforts continue toward the development of novel therapies that can be added to established treatments. Besides targeting dyslipidemia, recent focus has been put on preventing or resolving inflammatory processes involved in atherosclerosis. Areas covered The article discusses therapeutic and diagnostic targets in atherosclerosis and how they can be discovered and studied in preclinical animal models. The roles of immune cells, specifically macrophages and monocytes, in plaque inflammation are discussed. The article also describes current preclinical models of atherosclerosis, specifically the mouse, study designs (for progression and regression studies), basic and advanced methods of analysis of atherosclerotic lesions, and discusses the challenges of translating the findings to humans. Expert opinion Advances in genomics, proteomics, lipidomics and the development of high-throughput screening techniques help to improve our understanding of atherosclerosis disease mechanisms immensely and facilitate the discovery of new diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Preclinical studies in animals are still indispensable to uncover pathways involved in atherosclerotic disease and to evaluate novel drug targets. The translation of these targets, however, from animal studies to humans remains challenging. There is a strong need for novel biomarkers that can be used to prove the concept of a new target in humans. PMID:22468952

  18. Relation between preclinical atherosclerosis and venous thromboembolism in patients with thrombophilias - longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auzký, O; Dembovská, R; Mrázková, J; Nováková, Š; Pagáčová, L; Piťha, J

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical atherosclerosis may represent a risk factor for venous thromboembolism (VTE). In longitudinal study we followed longitudinally 96 patients (32 men) with thrombophilias with (n=51) and without (n=45) history of VTE. In both groups we studied the changes of preclinical atherosclerosis at peripherally located arteries detected by ultrasound. In addition, we assessed changes in selected risk factors of atherosclerosis. During the mean follow-up of 56.0+/-7.62 months we did not find significant change in preclinical atherosclerosis defined as Belcaro score in either group (-3 % in the VTE group vs 0 % in non VTE group). Significant increase in body mass index (1.03+/-1.98 kg*m(-2), resp. 1.21+/-1.67 kg*m(-2), p<0.01) and non-significant increase in systolic blood pressure were detected in both groups. Waist circumference increased significantly only in patients without VTE (4.11+/-7.84 cm, p<0.05). No differences in changes of risk factors under study between both groups were detected. In summary, patients with thrombophilia and history of VTE showed no evidence of greater progression of atherosclerosis or increase in traditional risk factors of atherosclerosis than patients with thrombophilia without history of VTE. Unfavorable changes of body mass index, waist circumference and systolic blood pressure were detected in both groups during study period.

  19. Atherosclerosis of the descending aorta predicts cardiovascular events: a transesophageal echocardiography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havasi Kálmán

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Previous studies have shown that atherosclerosis of the descending aorta detected by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE is a good marker of coexisting coronary artery disease. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether the presence of atherosclerosis on the descending aorta during TEE has any prognostic impact in predicting cardiovascular events. Material and Methods The study group consisted of 238 consecutive in-hospital patients referred for TEE testing (135 males, 103 females, mean age 58 +/- 11 years with a follow up of 24 months. The atherosclerotic lesions of the descending aorta were scored from 0 (no atherosclerosis to 3 (plaque >5 mm and/or "complex" plaque with ulcerated or mobile parts. Results Atherosclerosis was observed in 102 patients, (grade 3 in 16, and grade 2 in 86 patients whereas 136 patients only had an intimal thickening or normal intimal surface. There were 57 cardiovascular events in the follow-up period. The number of events was higher in the 102 patients with (n = 34 than in the 136 patients without atherosclerosis (n = 23, p =2 (HR 2.4, CI 1.0–5.5 predicted hard cardiovascular events. Conclusion Atherosclerosis of the descending aorta observed during transesophageal echocardiography is a useful predictor of cardiovascular events.

  20. Liraglutide Reduces Both Atherosclerosis and Kidney Inflammation in Moderately Uremic LDLr-/- Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Line S; Bosteen, Markus H; Fink, Lisbeth N

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to uremia. CKD is characterized by a gradual increase in kidney fibrosis and loss of kidney function, which is associated with a progressive increase in risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular death. To prevent progression of both kidney fibrosis and atherosc......Chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to uremia. CKD is characterized by a gradual increase in kidney fibrosis and loss of kidney function, which is associated with a progressive increase in risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular death. To prevent progression of both kidney fibrosis...... and atherosclerosis in uremic settings, insight into new treatment options with effects on both parameters is warranted. The GLP-1 analogue liraglutide improves glucose homeostasis, and is approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes. Animal studies suggest that GLP-1 also dampens inflammation and atherosclerosis. Our...... aim was to examine effects of liraglutide on kidney fibrosis and atherosclerosis in a mouse model of moderate uremia (5/6 nephrectomy (NX)). Uremic (n = 29) and sham-operated (n = 14) atherosclerosis-prone low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice were treated with liraglutide (1000 μg/kg, s...

  1. Chronic intermittent hypoxia induces atherosclerosis by NF-κB-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, D; Fang, G; Mao, S-Z; Ye, X; Liu, G; Gong, Y; Liu, S F

    2012-11-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) causes atherosclerosis in mice fed a high cholesterol diet (HCD). The mechanisms by which CIH promotes atherosclerosis are incompletely understood. This study defined the mechanistic role of NF-κB pathway in CIH+HCD induced atherosclerosis. Wild type (WT) and mice deficient in the p50 subunit of NF-κB (p50-KO) were fed normal chow diet (ND) or HCD, and exposed to sham or CIH. Atherosclerotic lesions on the en face aortic preparation and cross-sections of aortic root were examined. In WT mice, neither CIH nor HCD exposure alone caused, but CIH+HCD caused evident atherosclerotic lesions on both preparations after 20weeks of exposure. WT mice on ND and exposed to CIH for 35.6weeks did not develop atherosclerotic lesions. P50 gene deletion diminished CIH+HCD induced NF-κB activation and abolished CIH+HCD induced atherosclerosis. P50 gene deletion inhibited vascular wall inflammation, reduced hepatic TNF-α level, attenuated the elevation in serum cholesterol level and diminished macrophage foam cell formation induced by CIH+HCD exposure. These results demonstrate that inhibition of NF-κB activation abrogates the activation of three major atherogenic mechanisms associated with an abolition of CIH+HCD induced atherosclerosis. NF-κB may be a central common pathway through which CIH+HCD exposure activates multiple atherogenic mechanisms, leading to atherosclerosis.

  2. Multifocal atherosclerosis in patient after acute first degree radiation sickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metlyaeva N.A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: assessment the heavy psychosomatic and all-somatic cardiovascular and cerebrovascular pathology of patient, transferred an acute I degree radiation sickness, from the general evenly gamma-beta radiation. Conclusions. The subdepressive and disturbing-depressive syndrome of patient, transferred an acute radiation sickness (ARS of I degree, from the general evenly gamma-beta radiation, was independent risk factor of development of multifocal atherosclerosis; Features of development of all-somatic and psychosomatic pathology of patient are based on a combination of genetic prerequisites, environment influences (the stress caused by accident on the ChNPP and social factors, influencing on him during a course of life, especially during early socialization. Thus at development of psychosomatic frustration the combination of feature of the mental reaction connected with the personal characteristic and special relationship between mental (stress and physiological (somatic by aspects of reaction which led to metabolism violation, to aging, decrease in adaptation opportunities of an organism and development age — dependent pathology took place.

  3. Blood flow dynamics, atherosclerosis and bypass graft failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langille, B L; Ojha, M

    1997-05-01

    Atherosclerosis occurs at reproducible sites in the arterial tree and intimal proliferation that leads to bypass graft occlusion also show a well-defined focal distribution. These observations have led to the hypothesis that local blood flow conditions, especially low or fluctuating shear stresses, are important in the development of both disorders. Basic research using both cell culture and animal models has revealed that endothelial cell biology is very sensitive to local shear stresses and rapid progress is being made in characterizing how endothelial cells transduce shear stress. Endothelial sensitivity to shear stress affects control of hemostasis, leukocyte adherence and transmigration, growth factor production, vasomotor responses, endothelial repair and arterial wall remodeling, all of which can be expected to influence development of vascular pathologies. Also, substantial progress has been made in characterizing complex local hemodynamics at relevant arterial sites; however, further progress is needed in this area, as well as in the extrapolation of advances in basic vascular biology to human vascular disease. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:111-118). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  4. The Potential Effect of Puerarin in Preventing Atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱庆磊; 何爱霞; 韩慧蓉; 吕欣然; 王士雯

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To study the activity of Puerarin (Pue) in scavenging oxygen free radical(OFR) and its inhibitory effect on the oxidative modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL). Methods:Riboflavin-light system was used to generate superoxide anion, and Fenton reaction to generate hydroxylfree radical to study the activity of Pue in scavenging OFR. Hydrogen peroxide-induced hemolysis wasused to study the effect of Pue on erythrocyte hemolysis and malondialdehyde (MDA) production. And ul-traviolet ray and cupric sulfate were used to cause the oxidative modification of LDL for studying the inhib-itory effect of Pue on LDL oxidative modification. Results: (1) Pue could, at concentration of 0.01-1.0mmol/L, scavenge superoxide anion radical and at concentration of 7.5-75μmol/L scavenge hydroxyl rad-ical in a concentration dependent manner. (2) Pue could, at concentration of 0.1-10 mmol/L, inhibit sig-nificantly oxidative hemolysis and MDA production of erythrocyte induced by hydrogen peroxide. (3) Pueof 0.01-1.0 mmol/L could inhibit the oxidative modification of LDL in a concentration dependent man-ner. Conclusion: Pue has an anti-peroxidation effect and shows a potential effect in preventing atherosclero-sis.

  5. Dubin-Johnson syndrome coinciding with colon cancer and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sticova, Eva; Elleder, Milan; Hulkova, Helena; Luksan, Ondrej; Sauer, Martin; Wunschova-Moudra, Irena; Novotny, Jan; Jirsa, Milan

    2013-02-14

    Hyperbilirubinemia has been presumed to prevent the process of atherogenesis and cancerogenesis mainly by decreasing oxidative stress. Dubin-Johnson syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive, inherited disorder characterized by biphasic, predominantly conjugated hyperbilirubinemia with no progression to end-stage liver disease. The molecular basis in Dubin-Johnson syndrome is absence or deficiency of human canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter MRP2/cMOAT caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutation(s) in ABCC2 located on chromosome 10q24. Clinical onset of the syndrome is most often seen in the late teens or early adulthood. In this report, we describe a case of previously unrecognized Dubin-Johnson syndrome caused by two novel pathogenic mutations (c.2360_2366delCCCTGTC and c.3258+1G>A), coinciding with cholestatic liver disease in an 82-year-old male patient. The patient, suffering from advanced atherosclerosis with serious involvement of coronary arteries, developed colorectal cancer with nodal metastases. The subsequent findings do not support the protective role of Dubin-Johnson type hyperbilirubinemia.

  6. [Glycation of extracellular matrix proteins and its role in atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzan, Aleksandra; Chwiłkowska, Agnieszka; Kobielarz, Magdalena; Pezowicz, Celina; Gamian, Andrzej

    2012-10-29

    Glycation consists in formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) during non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. This review is focused mainly on glycation of collagen and its role in acceleration of vascular disease. Collagen is an extracellular matrix protein characterized by unique structure forming fibrils with great anti-tensile and anti-breaking strength. The protein builds the connective tissue and is responsible for biomechanical properties of blood vessels. It is reported that higher content of glycated collagen correlates with lower elasticity and greater toughness of the vessel walls and, as a consequence, a faster rate of atherosclerosis development. Numerous mechanisms connected with AGE formation are involved in atherogenesis, among others: receptor-mediated production of free radicals, triggering an inflammatory process, activation of leukocytes and thrombocytes, facilitation of LDL binding, change in level of growth factors, adhesion molecules, MMP and some other proteins' expression. The coverages allow the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent or slow down the pathological processes connected with glycation of collagen and other proteins in the artery wall. The main strategies are based on limitation of exogenous AGE, consumption of products which contain rutin, treatment with drugs which inhibit AGE formation, such as pyridoxamine, and chemicals which are able to cleave already formed AGE protein-protein crosslinks, such as ALT-711.

  7. Fluorescence spectroscopic detection of early injury-induced atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Alexandra; Perk, Masis; Wen, Yue; Smith, Carol

    1992-08-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy has been used for the detection of advanced atherosclerotic lesions. Angioplasty balloon-mediated injury was examined spectroscopically in order to assess the sensitivity of fluorescence spectroscopy for detection of early atherosclerosis. Abdominal aortic balloon angioplasty was performed via femoral artery cutdown in nine White Leghorn roosters (five normal, four atherogenic diet). Roosters were sacrificed at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 week intervals. Fluorescence emission spectra (n equals 114) were recorded from each aortic section (XeCl excimer laser, 308 nm, 1.5 - 2.0 mJ/pulse, 5 Hz). Changes in normalized fluorescence emission intensity were correlated with selected sections of histology. All balloon-injured segments showed intimal fibrous proliferation. For intimal thickness measuring > 70 (mu) , fluorescence emission intensity was decreased at 440 - 460 nm (p Lesions complicated by thrombus also had lower fluorescence emission at 425 - 450 nm when compared to histologically normal aorta (p muscular (abdominal) aorta (p muscular abdominal aorta.

  8. Engagement of specific innate immune signaling pathways during Porphyromonas gingivalis induced chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Frank C; Ukai, Takashi; Genco, Caroline A

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a group of pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptors, which play an important role in innate immune signaling in response to microbial infection. It has been demonstrated that TLRs are differentially up regulated in response to microbial infection and chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. The expression of TLRs are markedly augmented in human atherosclerotic lesions and this occurs preferentially by endothelial cells and macrophages in areas infiltrated with inflammatory cells. Furthermore polymorphisms in the human gene encoding one TLR receptor (TLR4) which attenuates receptor signaling and diminishes the inflammatory response to gram-negative pathogens, is associated with low levels of certain circulating mediators of inflammation and a decreased risk for atherosclerosis in humans. Recent advances have established a fundamental role for inflammation in mediating all stages of atherosclerosis. However, the triggers that initiate and sustain the inflammatory process have not been definitively identified. Although definitive proof of a role of infection contributing to atherogenesis is lacking, multiple investigations have demonstrated that infectious agents evoke cellular and molecular changes supportive of such a role. Evidence in humans suggesting that periodontal infection predisposes to atherosclerosis is derived from studies demonstrating that the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis resides in the wall of atherosclerotic vessels and seroepidemiological studies demonstrating an association between pathogen-specific IgG antibodies and atherosclerosis. Our recent work with P. gingivalis has demonstrated the effectiveness of specific intervention strategies (immunization) in the prevention of pathogen-accelerated atherosclerosis. We have also established that the inflammatory signaling pathways that P. gingivalis utilizes is dependent on the cell type and this specificity clearly influences innate

  9. Nanostructure of Human Aortic Intima in Atherosclerosis (A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Golubev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the nanostructure of human aortic intima in atherosclerosis and demonstrate the poten tial effect of Niodex on cholesterol plaques.Materials and methods. Samples of intima were taken from those parts of aorta, where different stages of atherosclerotic chages were obvious. Aortic samples were incubated in a solution containing cyclodextrins. A solution of NIODEX, a propylene glycol ester of betacyclodextrin, was used in the study. A layer of aortic intima was formed on the glass slide surface with polylysine. The samples were placed into the working area of an atomicforce microscope (Integra Prima, NTMDT, Russian Federation, and their surfaces were scanned. The number of imaging points was 512; and the imaging regions were as follows: 100100 μm, 20002000 nm.Results. Classification of nanosurface objects was performed and typical fragments (craters, ridges, and trabecular fibers were identified, and quantitative assessment of their sizes was carried out. 27 fragments were identified as growing cholesterol plaques. 16 of them measuring 900—1200 nm were identified near ridges, and 11 near craters (600—1050 nm. Niodex caused destruction of lipid spots and smoothing of the intima surface. More than a half of the 27 identified objects (15 demostrated a 30% and more decrease in size (median 340—400 nm. A 10—15% decrease was registered in 7 fragments; in the remaining 5 fragments, the decrease in the lesion size was less than 10%.Conclusion. Raw data permit to suppose that the effect of Niodex on the aortic intima results in decceleartion and decreased intensity of atherosclerotic plaque growth on the intima fragments.

  10. Coronary atherosclerosis in sudden cardiac death: An autopsy study

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    Sudha M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of ischemic heart disease (IHD has markedly increased in India over the past few years. Considering the variations in racial, dietary and lifestyle patterns in our population, it is essential to study the biology of coronary atherosclerosis in our patients. Vulnerable plaques have a large number of foam cells, extracellular lipid, thin fibrous caps and clusters of inflammatory cells and are more prone to rupture. These plaques are nourished by the microvessels arising from the vasa vasorum of the blood vessels and by lumen-derived microvessels through the fibrous cap. This autopsy study was designed to analyse the coronary arterial tree in cases of sudden cardiac death, classify coronary atherosclerotic plaques and to assess the factors contributing to vulnerability of the plaques including inflammation, calcification and microvascular density. Materials and Methods: Seven cases of sudden cardiac death were included in the study. The hearts were perfusion-fixed and the coronary arteries along with their main branches were dissected and studied. The location of the plaques, type of plaques, presence of inflammation and calcification were assessed. The cap thickness and microvessel density per 1000um 2 were assessed. The statistical significance was estimated. Results and Conclusions: Extensive high-grade coronary atherosclerotic disease was seen in all sudden cardiac death cases. Majority of the plaques were vulnerable. High-grade inflammation was seen in most of the vulnerable and ruptured plaques. All the ruptured plaques were uncalcified indicating that calcification probably stabilizes the plaques and protects against rupture. Increased microvessel density was noted in ruptured plaques compared to vulnerable plaques. However, it was not statistically significant.

  11. Differentially expressed microRNAs at different stages of atherosclerosis in ApoE-deficient mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAN Zhen; YAO Chen; LI Zi-lun; TENG Yuan; LI Wen; WANG Jin-song; YE Cai-sheng

    2013-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of cardiovascular disease,carotid artery disease,and peripheral vascular disease.However,it is hard to obtain human arterial tissue at different stages of atherosclerosis for a systematic study.The ApoE-deficient (ApoE 1-) mice predictably develop spontaneous atherosclerotic plaques with numerous features similar to the human lesions and contain nearly the entire spectrum of lesions observed during atherogenesis in humans.MicroRNA expression profiles at different stages of atherosclerosis in ApoE-deficient mice were screened to find out the differentially expressed microRNAs.Methods ApoE-deficient mice were euthanized at 4,8,and 20 weeks of age and divided into three groups according to the three time points,including groups A4 (fed a Western-type diet for 0 week),A8 (fed a Western-type diet for 4 weeks),and A20 (fed a Western-type diet for 16 weeks).Atherosclerotic lesions were analyzed.Fifteen aortas were collected and combined into three pools (five aortas in one pool) in each group.MicroRNA microarray analysis was replicated thrice in each group.The threshold of fold change ≥2.0 was used to screen up or down-regulated microRNAs.Differentially expressed microRNAs were subsequently verified with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.Those increasingly up or down-regulated microRNAs during the progression of atherosclerosis were selected.Results Atherosclerotic lesions first appeared in the aortic arch in group A8.Severe atherosclerotic lesions were observed in group A20.In group A8,seven MicroRNAs were up-regulated while two were down-regulated.In group A20,15 microRNAs were up-regulated while two were down-regulated.miR-34a-Sp and miR-497-5p were increasingly up-regulated,while miR-434-3p was progressively down-regulated when atherosclerosis progressed.Conclusions In this study,we described that microRNAs are differentially expressed at different stages of atherosclerosis in ApoE-deficient mice

  12. Obesity, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia as risk factors for atherosclerosis leading to ischemic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooy, Mia-Jeanne; Pretorius, E

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a widespread disease of the arterial system that is generated by injury to the vasculature due to hypercholesterolemia, hypertension and inflammatory diseases. In the current review, we discuss the role of different risk factors, including obesity, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia in atherosclerosis, which may ultimately lead to either cardiovascular or cerebral complication. Inflammation plays a pivotal role in conjunction with obesity, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia in the etiology of atherosclerosis. We discuss the role of inflammation with regards to reactive oxygen species (ROS) linked to the specific risk factors. The role of nitric oxide (NO) in conjunction with ROS is also important. Correlations of inflammatory cytokines and their functions in the mentioned risk factors are also discussed. The risk factors may ultimately lead to ischemic events, including transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction. Importantly, it seems as if there is a combination of pathophysiological triggers that may eventually result in atherosclerosis. Therefore, atherosclerosis is not the result of only one risk factor, but a combination of various physiological processes such as homeostasis and the inflammatory response. Ultimately, each patient's risk profile is unique and determines their immediate risk for acute thrombotic events or lethal ischemia.

  13. Association of Early Atherosclerosis with Vascular Wall Shear Stress in Hypercholesterolemic Zebrafish.

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    Sang Joon Lee

    Full Text Available Although atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease, the role of hemodynamic information has become more important. Low and oscillating wall shear stress (WSS that changes its direction is associated with the early stage of atherosclerosis. Several in vitro and in vivo models were proposed to reveal the relation between the WSS and the early atherosclerosis. However, these models possess technical limitations in mimicking real physiological conditions and monitoring the developmental course of the early atherosclerosis. In this study, a hypercholesterolaemic zebrafish model is proposed as a novel experimental model to resolve these limitations. Zebrafish larvae are optically transparent, which enables temporal observation of pathological variations under in vivo condition. WSS in blood vessels of 15 days post-fertilisation zebrafish was measured using a micro particle image velocimetry (PIV technique, and spatial distribution of lipid deposition inside the model was quantitatively investigated after feeding high cholesterol diet for 10 days. Lipids were mainly deposited in blood vessel of low WSS. The oscillating WSS was not induced by the blood flows in zebrafish models. The present hypercholesterolaemic zebrafish would be used as a potentially useful model for in vivo study about the effects of low WSS in the early atherosclerosis.

  14. Transcriptional profiling uncovers a network of cholesterol-responsive atherosclerosis target genes.

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    Josefin Skogsberg

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the well-documented effects of plasma lipid lowering regimes halting atherosclerosis lesion development and reducing morbidity and mortality of coronary artery disease and stroke, the transcriptional response in the atherosclerotic lesion mediating these beneficial effects has not yet been carefully investigated. We performed transcriptional profiling at 10-week intervals in atherosclerosis-prone mice with human-like hypercholesterolemia and a genetic switch to lower plasma lipoproteins (Ldlr(-/-Apo(100/100Mttp(flox/flox Mx1-Cre. Atherosclerotic lesions progressed slowly at first, then expanded rapidly, and plateaued after advanced lesions formed. Analysis of lesion expression profiles indicated that accumulation of lipid-poor macrophages reached a point that led to the rapid expansion phase with accelerated foam-cell formation and inflammation, an interpretation supported by lesion histology. Genetic lowering of plasma cholesterol (e.g., lipoproteins at this point all together prevented the formation of advanced plaques and parallel transcriptional profiling of the atherosclerotic arterial wall identified 37 cholesterol-responsive genes mediating this effect. Validation by siRNA-inhibition in macrophages incubated with acetylated-LDL revealed a network of eight cholesterol-responsive atherosclerosis genes regulating cholesterol-ester accumulation. Taken together, we have identified a network of atherosclerosis genes that in response to plasma cholesterol-lowering prevents the formation of advanced plaques. This network should be of interest for the development of novel atherosclerosis therapies.

  15. Leishmania major Self-Limited Infection Increases Blood Cholesterol and Promotes Atherosclerosis Development

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    Luciana R. Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania major infection of resistant mice causes a self-limited lesion characterized by macrophage activation and a Th1 proinflammatory response. Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease involving hypercholesterolemia and macrophage activation. In this study, we evaluated the influence of L. major infection on the development of atherosclerosis using atherosclerosis-susceptible apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE KO mice. After 6 weeks of infection, apoE KO mice exhibited reduced footpad swelling and parasitemia similar to C57BL/6 controls, confirming that both strains are resistant to infection with L. major. L. major-infected mice had increased plasma cholesterol levels and reduced triacylglycerols. With regard to atherosclerosis, noninfected mice developed only fatty streak lesions, while the infected mice presented with advanced lesions containing a necrotic core and an abundant inflammatory infiltrate. CD36 expression was increased in the aortic valve of the infected mice, indicating increased macrophage activation. In conclusion, L. major infection, although localized and self-limited in resistant apoE KO mice, has a detrimental effect on the blood lipid profile, increases the inflammatory cell migration to atherosclerotic lesions, and promotes atherogenesis. These effects are consequences of the stimulation of the immune system by L. major, which promotes the inflammatory components of atherosclerosis, which are primarily the parasite-activated macrophages.

  16. Age, gender and hypertension as major risk factors in development of subclinical atherosclerosis

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    Ajla Rahimić Ćatić

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intima-media thickness (IMT measurement of the common carotid artery (CCA is considered as useful indicator of carotid atherosclerosis. Early detection of atherosclerosis and its associated risk factors is important to prevent stroke and heart diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate which risk factors are better determinants of subclinical atherosclerosis, measured by common carotidartery intima media thickness (CCA-IMT.Methods: A total of 74 subjects were randomly selected in this cross – sectional study. Information on the patient’s medical history and laboratory fi ndings were obtained from their clinical records. Risk factors relevant to this study were age, gender, cigarette smoking status, diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Ultrasound scanning of carotid arteries was performed with a 7,5 MHz linear array transducer (GE Voluson730 pro. The highest value of six common carotid artery measurements was taken as the fi nal IMT. Increased CCA-IMT was defi ned when it was > 1 mm.Results: Our data demonstrated higher CCA-IMT values in male patients compared with female patients. Increased CCA-IMT was the most closely related to age (PConclusion: Age, gender and hypertension are the most important risk factors in development of carotid atherosclerosis. Early detection of atherosclerosis among high-risk populations is important in order to prevent stroke and heart diseases, which are leading causes of death worldwide.

  17. Increased plasma levels of Lp(a) enhance the development of coronary atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ying; XU Hong; ZHOU Qin; WANG Chang-yuan; LIU Yan-xia; LU Yuan-yuan; FAN Jiang-lin; SUN Hui-jun

    2008-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that increased plasma levels of Lp(a) may enhance the development of atherosclerosis in the setting of hypercholesterolemia. Methods The plasma Lp(a) was analyzed by SDS-PAGE Western blotting and quantitated using specific ELISA kits. Plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol were determined using Wako assay kits. The left coronary artery was used for the evaluation of coronary atherosclerosis (stenosis %). For quantitative study of the lesions in coronary atherosclerosis, hematoxylin- eosin and Elastica - van Gieson staining were used. To study cellular components ( SMC vs. macrophages) and Lp(a) deposits in the lesions, immunohistochemical staining was performed and then image analysis system was used. Results Plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides, or HDL-C were not significantly different between transgenic (Trg) and nontransgenic (nonTrg) rabbits. Trg rabbits had 200 % increase in coronary stenosis caused by atherosclerosis. The lesions of Trg WHHL rabbits contained more SMCs and less macrophage than those of nonTrg WHHL rabbits. Conclusions The results suggest that increased plasma levels of Lp(a) enhance the development of coronary atherosclerosis.

  18. Analysis on Homocysteine's Risk to Atherosclerosis and Its Correlations with Serum Lipids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李河; 郭兰; 肖敏; 陈铁峰; 吴书林; 余细勇; 石美铃; 董太明; 刘小清; 黄平; 李义和

    2004-01-01

    Objectives To explore the homocysteine's risk to atherosclerosis and its correlations with serum lipids TG,TG and HDL-C. Methods With a cross sectional study, 490 subjects (aged 41-86 yrs, male 420 and female 70) were surveyed in 1999 in Guangdong Province, China. The main research variables were homocysteine (Hcy) and the serum lipids total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG),high-density lipoprotein cholesterol(HDL-C). Results Hcy was a possible risk factor resulting in atherosclerosis (OR=l.15, 0.05 <P <0.10, n=108) with Logistic regression analysis. There is no correlation or much lower degree correlation between Hey and the serum lipids group of TC, TG, HDL-C. The canonical correlation coefficient between V1 and W1 was R1,Can =0.12(0.05<P<0.10, n=490, V1=Hcy, W1= - 0.9446 * TC + 0.1588 * TG + 0.6009 * HDL-C). Conclusions It is possible that Hcy is a risk factor to atherosclerosis and is independent of serum lipids group or has much lower correlation with it. It is necessary to do more research to explore the risk degree of Hcy inducing atherosclerosis and whether are there are bigger correlations or higher independence between Hcy and other risk factors during the progress of atherosclerosis.

  19. Correlation between Serum Level of Adiponectin and Severity of Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Juan; Zhou Shuxian; Xue Shengneng; Zhang Yuling; Fang Chang; Luo Niansang

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the correlation between serum level of adiponectin and severity of coronary artery atherosclerosis. Methods Coronary angiographies were performed and serum levels of adiponectin were measured in 88 patients with suspected coronary heart disease (CHD). Patients were divided into groups according to the coronary angiographies and Gensini's scores of coronary artery atherosclerosis. The serum levels of adiponectin were compared in different groups, and multiple regressions were used to analyze the correlation factors of adiponectin. Results ①Serum adiponectin concentration in CHD group [ 7.1 mg/L(2.4 ~21.1 mg/L) ] was decreased as compared with that in control group [ 11.6 mg/L(4.4 ~ 28.2 mg/L),P<0.01 ]; ②The serum levels of adiponectin fell while the Gensini' s scores of coronary artery atherosclerosis increased ( P<0.05, P<0.01 ); ③Serum level of adiponectin was positively correlated with the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, while negatively correlated with the Gensini' s score of coronary artery atherosclerosis and triglyceride (P<0.01 ). Conclusions Serum adiponectin concentration was decreased in patients with CHD.Low serum levels of adiponectin reflected the severity of coronary artery atherosclerosis. Adiponectin was a protective factor of cardiovascular system.

  20. Regulation of the renin–angiotensin system in coronary atherosclerosis: A review of the literature

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    Ramadan A Hammoud

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ramadan A Hammoud, Christopher S Vaccari, Sameer H Nagamia, Bobby V KhanEmory University School of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Grady Memorial Hospital Vascular Research Laboratory, Atlanta, Georgia, USAAbstract: Activation of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS is significant in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease and specifically coronary atherosclerosis. There is strong evidence that the RAS has effects on the mechanisms of action of atherosclerosis, including fibrinolytic balance, endothelial function, and plaque stability. Pharmacological inhibition of the renin angiotensin system includes angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, and renin inhibitors. These agents have clinical benefits in reducing morbidity and mortality in the management of hypertension. In addition, ACE inhibitors and ARBs have shown to be effective in the management of congestive heart failure and acute myocardial infarction. This review article discusses the biochemical and molecular mechanisms involving the RAS in coronary atherosclerosis as well as the effects of RAS inhibition in clinical studies involving coronary atherosclerosis.Keywords: angiotensin II, atherosclerosis, endothelium, inflammation, vasculature

  1. Treg/Th17 balance in stable CAD patients with different stages of coronary atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potekhina, Alexandra V; Pylaeva, Ekaterina; Provatorov, Sergey; Ruleva, Natalya; Masenko, Valery; Noeva, Elena; Krasnikova, Tatiana; Arefieva, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Immune processes play a significant role in atherosclerosis plaque progression. Regulatory T cells and T helpers 17 were shown to possess anti- and pro-atherogenic activity, respectively. We aimed to investigate the balance of circulating Treg and Th17 in stable angina patients with different stages of coronary atherosclerosis. Methods. Treg, Th17 and Th1 cell frequencies were studied in 117 patients via direct immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry. Group 1 had intact coronary arteries. Group 2 and Group 3 had undergone previous coronary stenting; in Group 2 no coronary atherosclerosis progression was found, in Group 3 patients had disease progression in non-invaded coronary arteries. Group 4 had severe coronary atherosclerosis. Results. The frequencies of CD4+CD25highCD127low, CD4+foxp3+, and CD4+IL10 + T cells were decreased, and CD4+IL17 + T cells frequencies were increased in group 4 vs. 1. Treg/Th17 ratios were declined in groups 3 and 4 vs. groups 1 and 2. IL-10 level was lower while hsCRP and sCD25 levels were higher in group 4 vs. 1. Conclusion. We assume that the imbalance in pro- and anti-inflammatory/atherogenic lymphocyte subpopulations is associated with atherosclerosis progression.

  2. [Age-related macular degeneration as a local manifestation of atherosclerosis - a novel insight into pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machalińska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible visual impairment and disability among the elderly in developed countries. There is compelling evidence that atherosclerosis and age-related macular degeneration share a similar pathogenic process. The association between atherosclerosis and age-related macular degeneration has been inferred from histological, biochemical and epidemiological studies. Many published data indicate that drusen are similar in molecular composition to plaques in atherosclerosis. Furthermore, a great body of evidence has emerged over the past decade that implicates the chronic inflammatory processes in the pathogenesis and progression of both disorders. We speculate that vascular atherosclerosis and age-related macular degeneration may represent different manifestations of the same disease induced by a pathologic tissue response to the damage caused by oxidative stress and local ischemia. In this review, we characterise in detail a strong association between age-related macular degeneration and atherosclerosis development, and we postulate the hypothesis that age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of a systemic disease. This provides a new approach for understanding the aspects of pathogenesis and might improve the prevention and treatment of both diseases which both result from ageing of the human body.

  3. Immune dysregulation mediated by the oral microbiome: potential link to chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, C; Kramer, C; Genco, C A

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an inflammatory disorder characterized by the progressive formation of plaque in coronary arteries, termed atherosclerosis. It is a multifactorial disease that is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Although a number of risk factors have been associated with disease progression, the underlying inflammatory mechanisms contributing to atherosclerosis remain to be fully delineated. Within the last decade, the potential role for infection in inflammatory plaque progression has received considerable interest. Microbial pathogens associated with periodontal disease have been of particular interest due to the high levels of bacteremia that are observed after routine dental procedures and every day oral activities, such as tooth brushing. Here, we explore the potential mechanisms that may explain how periodontal pathogens either directly or indirectly elicit immune dysregulation and consequently progressive inflammation manifested as atherosclerosis. Periodontal pathogens have been shown to contribute directly to atherosclerosis by disrupting endothelial cell function, one of the earliest indicators of cardiovascular disease. Oral infection is thought to indirectly induce elevated production of inflammatory mediators in the systemic circulation. Recently, a number of studies have been conducted focusing on how disruption of the gut microbiome influences the systemic production of proinflammatory cytokines and consequently exacerbation of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. It is clear that the immune mechanisms leading to atherosclerotic plaque progression, by oral infection, are complex. Understanding the immune pathways leading to disease progression is essential for the future development of anti-inflammatory therapies for this chronic disease.

  4. Echium Oil Reduces Atherosclerosis in apoB100-only LDLrKO Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Lolita M.; Boudyguina, Elena; Wilson, Martha D.; Parks, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The anti-atherogenic and hypotriglyceridemic properties of fish oil are attributed to its enrichment in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5, n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6, n-3). Echium oil contains stearidonic acid (SDA; 18:4, n-3), which is metabolized to EPA in humans and mice, resulting in decreased plasma triglycerides. Objective We used apoB100 only, LDLrKO mice to investigate whether echium oil reduces atherosclerosis. Methods Mice were fed palm, echium, or fish oil-containing diets for 16 weeks and plasma lipids, lipoproteins, and atherosclerosis were measured. Results Compared to palm oil, echium oil feeding resulted in significantly less plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels, and atherosclerosis, comparable to that of fish oil. Conclusion This is the first report that echium oil is anti-atherogenic, suggesting that it may be a botanical alternative to fish oil for atheroprotection. PMID:22100249

  5. Serum uric acid is a risk factor for large-artery atherosclerosis cerebral infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianjun Guo; Qingyu Shen; Jie Li; Xiaoming Rong; Ying Peng; Yamei Tang

    2011-01-01

    Using the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) classification for acute ischemic stroke, 371 patients with either acute large-artery atherosclerosis or small-artery occlusion cerebral infarction were recruited to investigate the potential impact of elevated serum uric acid on cerebrovascular disorders. The results showed that patients who have suffered from large-artery atherosclerosis, relative to small-artery occlusion patients, were characterized by elevated serum uric acid but reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Logistic regression showed that elevated uric acid and lower triglyceride levels were the main risk factors for patients with large-artery atherosclerosis. The findings of this study suggest that hyperuricemia may be a risk factor for stroke.

  6. A new piece in the puzzling effect of n-3 fatty acids on atherosclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goff, Wilfried

    2014-08-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (n-3) FA are reported to be protective against cardiovascular disease (CVD), notably through their beneficial action on atherosclerosis development. In this context dietary intake of long-chain marine eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is recommended and randomised trials largely support that EPA and DHA intake is associated with a reduction of CVD. However, mechanisms governing the atheroprotective action of n-3 FA are still unclear and numerous studies using mouse models conducted so far do not allow to reach a precise view of the cellular and molecular effects of n-3 FA on atherosclerosis. In the current issue of Atherosclerosis, Chang et al. provide important new information on the anti-atherogenic properties of n-3 FA by analysing the incremental replacement of saturated FA by pure fish oil as a source of EPA and DHA in Ldlr(-/-) mice fed a high fat/high cholesterol diet.

  7. Disrupting functional interactions between platelet chemokines inhibits atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koenen, RR; Hundelshausen, P; Nesmelova, IV

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by chronic inflammation of the arterial wall due to chemokine-driven mononuclear cell recruitment. Activated platelets can synergize with chemokines to exacerbate atherogenesis; for example, by deposition of the chemokines platelet factor-4 (PF4, also known as CXCL4...... and by enhanced monocyte arrest resulting from CCL5-CXCL4 interactions. The CCL5 antagonist Met-RANTES reduces diet-induced atherosclerosis; however, CCL5 antagonism may not be therapeutically feasible, as suggested by studies using Ccl5-deficient mice which imply that direct CCL5 blockade would severely...... monocyte recruitment and reducing atherosclerosis without the aforementioned side effects. These results establish the in vivo relevance of chemokine heteromers and show the potential of targeting heteromer formation to achieve therapeutic effects...

  8. Imaging Atherosclerosis with Hybrid Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of atherosclerosis could potentially move patient management towards individualized triage, treatment, and followup. The newly introduced combined positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system could emerge as a key player in this context. Both...... PET and MRI have previously been used for imaging plaque morphology and function: however, the combination of the two methods may offer new synergistic opportunities. Here, we will give a short summary of current relevant clinical applications of PET and MRI in the setting of atherosclerosis....... Additionally, our initial experiences with simultaneous PET/MRI for atherosclerosis imaging are presented. Finally, future potential vascular applications exploiting the unique combination of PET and MRI will be discussed....

  9. Inhibitory effect of the paraoxonase gene on the formation of rabbit coronary atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Bai; Hui Zhou; Xin-Hong Yang; Hua-Fen Liu; Yan-Yan Meng

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect on the inhibition of coronary atherosclerosis hardening of the paraoxonase gene (PON-1) which transfected to the rabbit epicardial adipose tissue. Methods:Rabbit coronary atherosclerosis model was established by high-fat feeding, liposome-encapsulated recombinant plasmid pEGFP-PON-1 50 μL was injected to the rabbit pericardial cavity, and was harvested 4 weeks after transfection. Results: The epicardial fat transfected PON-1 gene had effect on the high lipid level. It significantly increased expression of PON-1 in peripheral arterial vascular tissue (P<0.05); and significantly reduced total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (P<0.05), and the thickness ratio of coronary artery intima/media (P <0.05). Conclusions: The injection of the PON-1 gene in the pericardial cavity can effectively suppress the formation of coronary atherosclerosis.

  10. Enhanced base excision repair capacity in carotid atherosclerosis may protect nuclear DNA but not mitochondrial DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarpengland, Tonje; B. Dahl, Tuva; Skjelland, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Lesional and systemic oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, potentially leading to accumulation of DNA base lesions within atherosclerotic plaques. Although base excision repair (BER) is a major pathway counteracting oxidative DNA damage, our knowledge on BER...... and accumulation of DNA base lesions in clinical atherosclerosis is scarce. Here, we evaluated the transcriptional profile of a wide spectrum of BER components as well as DNA damage accumulation in atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic arteries. BER gene expression levels were analyzed in 162 carotid plaques, 8...... genes in atherosclerosis may contribute to lesional nuclear DNA stability but appears insufficient to maintain mtDNA integrity, potentially influencing mitochondrial function in cells within the atherosclerotic lesion....

  11. Future non-invasive imaging to detect vascular plaque instability and subclinical non-obstructive atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arnon Blum; Menachem Nahir

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis underlies the major causes of death in the Western World. Our main goal is to detect early changes of atherosclerosis and to identify subjects at highest cardiovascular risk that may aid in the development of prevention approaches and better management that will decrease cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The new methods that are of interest include the advanced vascular ultrasound methods, the infra red and near infra red imaging techniques, the EndoPat device that reflects peripheral arterial tone, the electron beam computed tomography, the magnetic resonance imaging, and the molecular imaging techniques. In this review we will focus on the future of advanced imaging techniques that are being developed to detect early (pre-clinical) development of atherosclerosis.

  12. Visceral adipose tissue as a source of inflammation and promoter of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexopoulos, Nikolaos; Katritsis, Demosthenes; Raggi, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    The current epidemic of obesity with the associated increasing incidence of insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis affecting a large proportion of the North American and Western populations, has generated a strong interest in the potential role of visceral adipose tissue in the development of atherosclerosis and its complications. The intra-abdominal and epicardial space are two compartments that contain visceral adipose tissue with a similar embryological origin. These visceral fats are highly inflamed in obese patients, patients with the metabolic syndrome and in those with established coronary artery disease; additionally they are capable of secreting large quantities of pro-inflammatory cytokines and free fatty acids. There is accumulating evidence to support a direct involvement of these regional adipose tissue deposits in the development of atherosclerosis and its complicating events, as will be reviewed in this article.

  13. Modelling atherosclerosis by proteomics: Molecular changes in the ascending aortas of cholesterol-fed rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingshu; Jüllig, Mia; Middleditch, Martin J; Cooper, Garth J S

    2015-09-01

    The cholesterol-fed rabbit is commonly used as a model to study the vascular effects of hypercholesterolemia and resulting atherosclerotic lesions. Here we undertook a proteomic case-control investigation of ascending aortas from male New Zealand White rabbits after 10 weeks on a high-cholesterol (2% w/w) diet (HCD, n = 5) or control diet (n = 5), in order to determine the changes in response to the HCD. Histology confirmed intimal thickening in the HCD group consistent with atherosclerosis, and LC-MS/MS analysis of individually-obtained ascending aortic extracts labelled with isobaric (iTRAQ) tags enabled the identification and quantitation of 453 unique proteins above the 1% false discovery rate threshold. Of 67 proteins showing significant differences in relative abundance (p atherosclerosis. This and additional novel observations merit further investigation as these perturbations may play important and as yet undiscovered roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in rabbits as well as humans.

  14. CTHRSSVVC Peptide as a Possible Early Molecular Imaging Target for Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rosemeire A.; Giordano, Ricardo J.; Gutierrez, Paulo S.; Rocha, Viviane Z.; Rudnicki, Martina; Kee, Patrick; Abdalla, Dulcinéia S. P.; Puech-Leão, Pedro; Caramelli, Bruno; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata; Meneghetti, José C.; Marques, Fabio L. N.; Khoobchandani, Menka; Katti, Kattesh V.; Lugão, Ademar B.; Kalil, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our work was to select phages displaying peptides capable of binding to vascular markers present in human atheroma, and validate their capacity to target the vascular markers in vitro and in low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLr−/−) mouse model of atherosclerosis. By peptide fingerprinting on human atherosclerotic tissues, we selected and isolated four different peptides sequences, which bind to atherosclerotic lesions and share significant similarity to known human proteins with prominent roles in atherosclerosis. The CTHRSSVVC-phage peptide displayed the strongest reactivity with human carotid atherosclerotic lesions (p 95% yield as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), to validate the binding of the peptide in atherosclerotic plaque specimens. The results supported our hypothesis that CTHRSSVVC peptide has a remarkable sequence for the development of theranostics approaches in the treatment of atherosclerosis and other diseases. PMID:27563889

  15. Functional promoter variant in zinc finger protein 202 predicts severe atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frikke-Schmidt, R.; Nordestgaard, Børge; Grande, Peer

    2008-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to test the hypotheses that single nucleotide polymorphisms ( SNPs), in zinc finger protein 202 ( ZNF202), predict severe atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease ( IHD). Background ZNF202 is a transcriptional repressor controlling promoter elements in genes......,998 controls. Finally, we determined whether g. -660A>G altered transcriptional activity of the ZNF202 promoter in vitro. Results Cross-sectionally, ZNF202 g. -660 GG versus AA homozygosity predicted an odds ratio for severe atherosclerosis of 2.01 ( 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.34 to 3.01). Prospectively...... were highly correlated with g. -660A>G, also predicted risk of severe atherosclerosis and IHD. Finally, ZNF202 g. -660G versus g. -660A was associated with a 60% reduction in transcriptional activity in vitro, whereas none of the 2 correlated SNPs were predicted to be functional. Conclusions...

  16. Recent Advances in Targeted, Self-Assembling Nanoparticles to Address Vascular Damage Due to Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun Ji; Tirrell, Matthew

    2015-11-18

    Self-assembling nanoparticles functionalized with targeting moieties have significant potential for atherosclerosis nanomedicine. While self-assembly allows the easy construction (and degradation) of nanoparticles with therapeutic or diagnostic functionality, or both, the targeting agent can direct them to a specific molecular marker within a given stage of the disease. Therefore, supramolecular nanoparticles have been investigated in the last decade as molecular imaging agents or explored as nanocarriers that can decrease the systemic toxicity of drugs by producing accumulation predominantly in specific tissues of interest. In this Progress Report, the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and the damage caused to vascular tissue are described, as well as the current diagnostic and treatment options. An overview of targeted strategies using self-assembling nanoparticles is provided, including liposomes, high density lipoproteins, protein cages, micelles, proticles, and perfluorocarbon nanoparticles. Finally, an overview is given of current challenges, limitations, and future applications for personalized medicine in the context of atherosclerosis of self-assembling nanoparticles.

  17. Antibodies against electronegative LDL inhibit atherosclerosis in LDLr-/- mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.M. Grosso

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the effect of antibodies against electronegative low-density lipoprotein LDL(- on atherogenesis, five groups of LDL low receptor-deficient (LDLr-/- mice (6 per group were immunized with the following antibodies (100 µg each: mouse anti-LDL(- monoclonal IgG2b, rabbit anti-LDL(- polyclonal IgG or its Fab fragments and mouse irrelevant monoclonal IgG and non-immunized controls. Antibodies were administered intravenously one week before starting the hypercholesterolemic diet (1.25% cholesterol and then every week for 21 days. The passive immunization with anti-LDL(- monoclonal IgG2b, polyclonal antibody and its derived Fab significantly reduced the cross-sectional area of atherosclerotic lesions at the aortic root of LDLr-/- mice (28.8 ± 9.7, 67.3 ± 17.02, 56.9 ± 8.02 µm² (mean ± SD, respectively compared to control (124.9 ± 13.2 µm². Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 protein expression, quantified by the KS300 image-analyzing software, on endothelium and the number of macrophages in the intima was also decreased in aortas of mice treated with anti-LDL(- monoclonal antibody (3.5 ± 0.70 per field x 10 compared to controls (21.5 ± 3.5 per field x 10. Furthermore, immunization with the monoclonal antibody decreased the concentration of LDL(- in blood plasma (immunized: 1.0 ± 1.4; control: 20.5 ± 3.5 RLU, the amount of cholesterol oxides in plasma (immunized: 4.7 ± 2.7; control: 15.0 ± 2.0 pg COx/mg cholesterol and liver (immunized: 2.3 ± 1.5; control: 30.0 ± 26.0 pg COx/mg cholesterol, and the hepatic content of lipid hydroperoxides (immunized: 0.30 ± 0.020; control: 0.38 ± 0.15 ng/mg protein. In conclusion, antibodies against electronegative LDL administered intravenously may play a protective role in atherosclerosis.

  18. Risk factors for accelerated atherosclerosis in young women with hyperprolactinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medic-Stojanoska, Milica; Icin, Tijana; Pletikosic, Ivana; Bajkin, Ivana; Novakovic-Paro, Jovanka; Stokic, Edita; Spasic, Dragan T; Kovacev-Zavisic, Branka; Abenavoli, Ludovico

    2015-04-01

    Prolactin is a metabolic hormone. The hypothesis is that hyperprolactinemia can cause metabolic and inflammatory changes which are associated with accelerated atherosclerotic process, but the treatment of hyperprolactinemia with dopamine agonists, leads to reversibility of these processes. The first aim of this study was to determine whether hyperprolactinemia in premenopausal women is accompanied with the increase in body mass index (BMI), changes in body composition, lipid disturbances, the presence of inflammation and changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure as risk factors for the development of early atherosclerosis. The second aim was to know whether the therapy of hyperprolactinemia and prolactin normalization lead to improvement of the observed parameters. Twenty female patients with prolactinomas, before and during treatment with dopamine agonists and 16 healthy controls were evaluated. Prolactin, BMI, total body fat, free fat mass, total body water, total cholesterol, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and fibrinogen as well as systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured at baseline and during the therapy. Hyperprolactinemic patients had pathologic and significantly higher levels of prolactin (PRL) than the controls (p=0.000). The BMI, body fat, total body water (TBW), total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL were in normal range and higher in the patients than in the controls. HDL was lower in hyperprolactinemic females than controls. The difference was significant only for body fat (fat % p=0.006; fat kg p=0.009). Fibrinogen was slightly increased in patients compared with the controls. Hyperprolactinemic patients had normal, but increased levels of systolic and diastolic blood pressure compared with the controls. The difference with border significance was found in diastolic blood pressure (p=0.065). The correlation of PRL with all the observed parameters was positive apart from HDL, but relatively

  19. Experimental Animal Models Evaluating the Causal Role of Lipoprotein(a) in Atherosclerosis and Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeang, Calvin; Cotter, Bruno; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2016-02-01

    Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], comprised of apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] and a low-density lipoprotein-like particle, is a genetically determined, causal risk factor for cardiovascular disease and calcific aortic valve stenosis. Lp(a) is the major plasma lipoprotein carrier of oxidized phospholipids, is pro-inflammatory, inhibits plasminogen activation, and promotes smooth muscle cell proliferation, as defined mostly through in vitro studies. Although Lp(a) is not expressed in commonly studied laboratory animals, mouse and rabbit models transgenic for Lp(a) and apo(a) have been developed to address their pathogenicity in vivo. These models have provided significant insights into the pathophysiology of Lp(a), particularly in understanding the mechanisms of Lp(a) in mediating atherosclerosis. Studies in Lp(a)-transgenic mouse models have demonstrated that apo(a) is retained in atheromas and suggest that it promotes fatty streak formation. Furthermore, rabbit models have shown that Lp(a) promotes atherosclerosis and vascular calcification. However, many of these models have limitations. Mouse models need to be transgenic for both apo(a) and human apolipoprotein B-100 since apo(a) does not covalently associated with mouse apoB to form Lp(a). In established mouse and rabbit models of atherosclerosis, Lp(a) levels are low, generally model whereas over 40 isoforms exist in humans. Mouse models should also ideally be studied in an LDL receptor negative background for atherosclerosis studies, as mice don't develop sufficiently elevated plasma cholesterol to study atherosclerosis in detail. With recent data that cardiovascular disease and calcific aortic valve stenosis is causally mediated by the LPA gene, development of optimized Lp(a)-transgenic animal models will provide an opportunity to further understand the mechanistic role of Lp(a) in atherosclerosis and aortic stenosis and provide a platform to test novel therapies for cardiovascular disease.

  20. Apolipoprotein A-I and A-I mimetic peptides: a role in atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getz GS

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Godfrey S Getz, Catherine A ReardonThe University of Chicago, Department of Pathology, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Cardiovascular disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the westernized world. Atherosclerosis is the underlying cause of most cardiovascular diseases. Atherosclerosis is a slowly evolving chronic inflammatory disorder involving the intima of large and medium sized arteries that is initiated in response to high plasma lipid levels, especially LDL. Cells of both the innate and adaptive immunity are involved in this chronic inflammation. Although high plasma LDL levels are a major contributor to most stages of the evolution of atherosclerosis, HDL and its major protein apoA-I possess properties that attenuate and may even reverse atherosclerosis. Two major functions are the ability to induce the efflux of cholesterol from cells, particularly lipid-loaded macrophages, in the artery wall for transfer to the liver, a process referred to as reverse cholesterol transport, and the ability to attenuate the pro-inflammatory properties of LDL. The removal of cellular cholesterol from lipid-loaded macrophages may also be anti-inflammatory. One of the most promising therapies to enhance the anti-atherogenic, anti-inflammatory properties of HDL is apoA-I mimetic peptides. Several of these peptides have been shown to promote cellular cholesterol efflux, attenuate the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages, and to attenuate the pro-inflammatory properties of LDL. This latter effect may be related to their high affinity for oxidized lipids present in LDL. This review discusses the functional properties of the peptides and their effect on experimental atherosclerosis and the results of initial clinical studies in humans.Keywords: apoA-I, mimetic peptides, HDL, anti-inflammatory, atherosclerosis

  1. The association between coronary calcification assessed by electron beam computed tomography and measures of extracoronary atherosclerosis - The Rotterdam Coronary Calcification Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, HHS; Vliegenthart, R; Hak, AE; del Sol, AI; Hofman, A; Oudkerk, M; Witteman, JCM

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The present study was designed to examine the associations of coronary calcification assessed by electron beam computed tomography (CT) with measures of extracoronary atherosclerosis. BACKGROUND Although measures of extracoronary atherosclerosis have been used to predict coronary events,

  2. Interactions between inflammation and lipid metabolism: Relevance for efficacy of anti-inflammatory drugs in the treatment of atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepen, J.A. van; Berbée, J.F.P.; Havekes, L.M.; Rensen, P.C.N.

    2013-01-01

    Dyslipidemia and inflammation are well known causal risk factors the development of atherosclerosis. The interplay between lipid metabolism and inflammation at multiple levels in metabolic active tissues may exacerbate the development of atherosclerosis, and will be discussed in this review. Cholest

  3. Association of carotid artery intima-media thickness with complex aortic atherosclerosis in patients with recent stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasseas, Panayotis; Brilakis, Emmanouil S; Leybishkis, Biana; Cohen, Marc; Sokil, Alexis B; Wolf, Nelson; Dorn, Rose Lee; Roberts, Andrew; VanDecker, William

    2002-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether carotid intima-media thickness can predict complex aortic atherosclerosis. A retrospective review was conducted of 64 consecutive patients who underwent transesophageal echocardiography and carotid ultrasonography for evaluation of recent ischemic stroke at MCP Hahnemann University, Medical College of Pennsylvania Hospital between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 1999. The mean age was 65+/-14 years and 59% of the patients were women. Thirty-nine patients (61%) had carotid atherosclerosis (defined as an intima-media thickness > or =1 mm) and seven patients (11%) had complex aortic atherosclerosis (defined as the presence of protruding atheroma > or =4 mm thick, mobile atherosclerotic debris, or plaque ulceration in any aortic segment by transesophageal echocardiography). Compared to patients without complex aortic atherosclerosis, patients with complex aortic atherosclerosis were more likely to have hypercholesterolemia (19% vs 57%, p = 0.05) and a carotid intima-media thickness of 2 mm or greater (35% vs 86%, p = 0.02). A carotid intima-media thickness of 2 mm or more had 86% sensitivity, 65% specificity, 23% positive predictive value, 97% negative predictive value, 2.5 positive likelihood ratio, and 0.22 negative likelihood ratio for the diagnosis of complex aortic atherosclerosis. Carotid intimamedia thickness measurement can be used to noninvasively estimate the probability of complex aortic atherosclerosis. A carotid intima-media thickness less than 2 mm makes complex aortic atherosclerosis very unlikely.

  4. Design and development of nanomedicines to treat atherosclerosis: A cross platform head-to-head theranostic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alaarg, Amr; Perez Medina, Carlos; Tang, Jun; Fay, Francois; Zhao, Yiming; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda; Reiner, Thomas; Fayad, Zahi A.; Kok, Robbert J.; Metselaar, Josbert M.; Mulder, Willem J.; Storm, G

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the large arteries and a leading cause of death worldwide. Macrophages are key players in the progression of atherosclerosis and are a compelling target for disease management [1]. Statins, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, exhibit anti-in

  5. Skin autofluorescence, a non-invasive marker for AGE accumulation, is associated with the degree of atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Dekker, Martijn A. M.; Zwiers, Marjan; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; de Vos, Lisanne C.; Smit, Andries J.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Lefrandt, Johan; Mulder, Douwe J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) may be involved in the development of atherosclerosis, beyond diabetes and renal disease. Skin autofluorescence (AF) is a non-invasive marker for AGEs. We examined whether skin AF is increased in (subclinical) atherosclerosis and associated with th

  6. Impaired LDL Receptor-Related Protein 1 Translocation Correlates with Improved Dyslipidemia and Atherosclerosis in apoE-Deficient Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordts, Philip L S M; Bartelt, Alexander; Nilsson, Stefan K;

    2012-01-01

    Determination of the in vivo significance of LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) dysfunction on lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis development in absence of its main ligand apoE.......Determination of the in vivo significance of LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) dysfunction on lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis development in absence of its main ligand apoE....

  7. Enhanced susceptibility of low-density lipoproteins to oxidation in coronary bypass patients with progression of atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijke, Y.B. de; Verwey, H.F.; Vogelezang, C.J.M.; Velde, E.A. van der; Princen, H.M.G.; Laarse, A. van der; Bruschke, A.V.G.; Berkel, T.J.C. van

    1995-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) may play a causal role in atherosclerosis. In this study we analyzed whether the severity of progression of coronary atherosclerosis is related to the susceptibility of LDL to oxidative modification. On the basis of repeated coronary angiography, 28 coronar

  8. A Systematic Literature Review of the Association of Lipoprotein(a) and Autoimmune Diseases and Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Missala, I.; Kassner, U.; Steinhagen-Thiessen, E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the association of lipoprotein(a) and atherosclerosis-related autoimmune diseases, to provide information on possible pathophysiologic mechanisms, and to give recommendations for Lp(a) determination and therapeutic options. Methods. We performed a systematic review of English language citations referring to the keywords “Lp(a)” AND “autoimmune disease” AND “atherosclerosis,” “Lp(a)” AND “immune system” OR “antiphospholipid (Hughes) syndrome (APS)” OR “rheumatoid arth...

  9. The monocytic lineage specific soluble CD163 is a plasma marker of coronary atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aristoteli, Lina Panayiota; Møller, Holger Jon; Bailey, Brian;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CD163 is a monocyte-macrophage lineage specific scavenger receptor that mediates the uptake and clearance of haptoglobin-haemoglobin complexes, and soluble CD163 (sCD163) is also present in plasma. As atherosclerosis involves infiltration by monocyte-derived macrophages, we investigated...... whether sCD163 may act as a marker of coronary atherosclerosis (CAD). METHODS AND RESULTS: Clinical features were identified and plasma was collected from 147 consecutive patients presenting for coronary angiography. Patients were classified as having CAD+, or being free of CAD- haemodynamically...

  10. Diabetes with poor glycaemic control does not promote atherosclerosis in genetically modified hypercholesterolaemic minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Mashhadi, Rozh H; Bjørklund, Martin M; Mortensen, Martin B;

    2015-01-01

    -cholesterol and creatinine levels were unaffected. Diabetes failed to increase atherosclerosis in any of the vessels examined. The plaque burden in the aorta and right coronary artery was comparable between the groups, and was even reduced in the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary and iliofemoral arteries...... with no alterations in plasma cholesterol or creatinine concentrations did not augment the plaque burden or promote the development of more advanced lesions in this large-animal model of human-like atherosclerosis. This is consistent with clinical studies in patients with type 1 diabetes, indicating...

  11. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α Expression in Macrophages Promotes Development of Atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Annemarie Aarup; Pedersen, Tanja X; Junker, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    transplanted with bone marrow from mice with HIF-1α deficiency in the myeloid cells or control bone marrow. The HIF-1α deficiency in myeloid cells reduced atherosclerosis in aorta of the Ldlr(-/-) recipient mice by ≈72% (P=0.006).In vitro, HIF-1α-deficient macrophages displayed decreased differentiation...... to proinflammatory M1 macrophages and reduced expression of inflammatory genes. HIF-1α deficiency also affected glucose uptake, apoptosis, and migratory abilities of the macrophages. CONCLUSIONS: HIF-1α expression in macrophages affects their intrinsic inflammatory profile and promotes development of atherosclerosis....

  12. Novel function of histamine signaling in hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis: Histamine H1 receptors protect and H2 receptors accelerate atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Sohsuke; Wang, Ke-Yong; Tanimoto, Akihide; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki

    2015-02-01

    Histamine is not only essential for acute inflammatory reactions, but it also participates in a chronic inflammatory disorder. We generated apolipoprotein E (apoE) and histamine receptors (HHRs), including the major H1 and H2 receptors (HH1R, HH2R) double knockout mice (DKO) to clarify the role of HHRs in hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis, in which apoE-KO and DKO mice were fed a high cholesterol diet. We found that pronounced hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerotic progression occurred in HH1R/apoE-DKO mice, but in HH2R/apoE-DKO mice less atherosclerosis, despite pro-atherogenic serum cholesterol levels compared with apoE-KO mice. Furthermore, the increased expressions of scavenger receptors (SRs), such as SR-A, CD36 and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1), nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) or liver X receptor (LXR)-related inflammatory signaling factors, were consistent with the pro-atherogenic phenotype of HH2R/apoE-DKO mice. We hypothesize that histamine/HH1R and HH2R signaling has conflicting innate functions, inflammatory/atherogenic and anti-inflammatory/anti-atherogenic actions, and that there are innate links between histamine signaling and hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis, independently of serum cholesterol metabolism. Specific histamine signaling blockers, in particular, HH2R blockers, are a possible novel therapeutic target for hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis.

  13. Clinical chemistry of atherosclerosis : Contribution to apolipoprotein-E analysis, public Health and nutricion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Dineke Aletta Johanna

    1999-01-01

    Chapter 1 is meant as a general introduction to atherosclerosis and the ensuing coronary artery disease (CAD). It gives special attention to atherogenesis, lipoprotein metabolism and nutritional factors. The chapter opens with the presentation of an integrated model of atherogenesis with a central r

  14. Pentosan polysulfate inhibits atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits: differential modulation of metalloproteinase-2 and -9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupia, Enrico; Zheng, Feng; Grosjean, Fabrizio; Tack, Ivan; Doublier, Sophie; Elliot, Sharon J; Vlassara, Helen; Striker, Gary E

    2012-02-01

    Pentosan polysulfate (PPS), a heparinoid compound essentially devoid of anticoagulant activity, modulates cell growth and decreases inflammation. We investigated the effect of PPS on the progression of established atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits. After severe atherosclerosis developed on an atherogenic diet, WHHL rabbits were treated with oral PPS or tap water for 1 month. The aortic intima-to-media ratio and macrophage infiltration were reduced, plaque collagen content was increased, and plaque fibrous caps were preserved by PPS treatment. Plasma lipid levels and post-heparin hepatic lipase activity remained unchanged. However, net collagenolytic activity in aortic extracts was decreased, and the levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) activity were increased by PPS. Moreover, PPS treatment decreased tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-stimulated proinflammatory responses, in particular activation of nuclear factor-κB and p38, and activation of MMPs in macrophages. In conclusion, oral PPS treatment prevents progression of established atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits. This effect may be partially mediated by increased MMP-2 and TIMP activities in the aortic wall and reduced TNFα-stimulated inflammation and MMP activation in macrophages. Thus, PPS may be a useful agent in inhibiting the progression of atherosclerosis.

  15. [Role of measurement of fractional flow reserve in coronary artery atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopylovi, F Yu; Bykova, A A; Vasilevsky, Yu V; Simakov, S S

    2015-01-01

    The paper considers coronary flow in health and coronary flow autoregulation in health and disease. It gives basic methods used to estimate coronary flow reserve in patients with coronary atherosclerosis. The physiological bases for determining fractional flow reserve are presented. Clinical trials investigating the use of fractional flow reserve in patients with coronary heart disease are analyzed.

  16. Breast arterial calcification on mammogram: correlation with carotid arterial atherosclerosis on ultrasonogram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Nam Ju; Suh, Jung Ho [School of Medicine, Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hyung [College of Medicine, KonYang Univ., Nonsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the incidence of breast arterial calcification in Korean women, and to determine its association with systemic diseases and carotid arterial atherosclerosis. One thousand seven hundred and thirteen female subjects who underwent mammography at a health care center between May 1999 and May 2000 were included in this study. Of the total, 172 were found to have breast arterial calcification, and were classified according to age. The coincidence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia was examined in both the subject group and the control group selected on the same age basis. To investigate the presence and degree of carotid atherosclerosis, sonographic imaging was performed and the findings were compared between the two groups. The incidence of breast arterial calcification showed statistically significant differences according to age, with a higher incidence in older patients (p<0.05). However, there was no statistical difference in the incidence of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes mellitus between groups. Carotid atherosclerosis was subjects more prevalent among subjects than in the control group (p<0.05), though there was no statistically significant difference in the degree of luminal stenosis. The most common pathologic cause of breast arterial calcification is arteriosclerosis. Breast arterial calcification is demonstrated at mammography, along with other clinical risk factors for atherosclerosis or coincidental neurologic symptoms. We stress that further evaluation of the carotid artery is necessary.

  17. Dietary patterns, biomarkers of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular and all-cause mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijtsma, F.P.C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary belonging to the thesis entitled ‘Dietary patterns, biomarkers of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular and all-cause mortality’ The long history of epidemiologic studies on diet and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has traditionally relied on analysis of specific nutrient

  18. Arterial heparan sulfate is negatively associated with hyperglycemia and atherosclerosis in diabetic monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litwak Kenneth N

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arterial proteoglycans are implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis by their ability to trap plasma lipoproteins in the arterial wall and by their influence on cellular migration, adhesion and proliferation. In addition, data have suggested an anti-atherogenic role for heparan sulfate proteoglycans and a pro-atherogenic role for dermatan sulfate proteoglycans. Using a non-human primate model for human diabetes, studies examined diabetes-induced changes in arterial proteoglycans that may increase susceptibility to atherosclerosis. Methods Control (n = 7 and streptozotocin-induced diabetic (n = 8 cynomolgous monkeys were assessed for hyperglycemia by measurement of plasma glycated hemoglobin (GHb. Thoracic aortas obtained at necropsy, were extracted with 4 M guanidine HCL and proteoglycans were measured as hexuronic acid. Atherosclerosis was measured by enzymatic analysis of extracted tissue cholesterol. Glycosaminoglycan chains of arterial proteoglycans were released with papain, separated by agarose electrophoresis and analysed by scanning densitometry. Results Tissue cholesterol was positively associated with hexuronic acid content in diabetic arteries (r = .82, p Conclusions These data implicate hyperglycemia induced modifications in arterial proteoglycans that may promote atherosclerosis.

  19. A Systematic Literature Review of the Association of Lipoprotein(a and Autoimmune Diseases and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Missala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the association of lipoprotein(a and atherosclerosis-related autoimmune diseases, to provide information on possible pathophysiologic mechanisms, and to give recommendations for Lp(a determination and therapeutic options. Methods. We performed a systematic review of English language citations referring to the keywords “Lp(a” AND “autoimmune disease” AND “atherosclerosis,” “Lp(a” AND “immune system” OR “antiphospholipid (Hughes syndrome (APS” OR “rheumatoid arthritis” OR “Sjögren’s syndrome” OR “systemic lupus erythematosus” OR “systemic sclerosis” OR “systemic vasculitis” published between 1991 and 2011 using Medline database. Results. 22 out of 65 found articles were identified as relevant. Lp(a association was highest in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, followed by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, moderate in APS and lowest in systemic sclerosis (SSc. There was no association found between Lp(a and systemic vasculitis or Sjögren’s syndrome. Conclusion. Immune reactions are highly relevant in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, and patients with specific autoimmune diseases are at high risk for CVD. Elevated Lp(a is an important risk factor for premature atherosclerosis and high Lp(a levels are also associated with autoimmune diseases. Anti-Lp(a-antibodies might be a possible explanation. Therapeutic approaches thus far include niacin, Lp(a-apheresis, farnesoid x-receptor-agonists, and CETP-inhibitors being currently under investigation.

  20. Angiographic distribution of lower extremity atherosclerosis in patients with and without diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Feen, C; Neijens, FS; Kanters, SDJM; Mali, WRTM; Stolk, RP; Banga, JD

    2002-01-01

    Aims To determine differences in the anatomic site of atherosclerosis in the lower extremity between patients with and patients without diabetes. Design Cross-sectional study of patients who underwent angiography of both legs because of symptoms of intermittent claudication, rest and/or night pain,

  1. Suppressive impact of anethum graveolens consumption on biochemical risk factors of atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbubeh Setorki

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: A. graveolens might have some protective values against atherosclerosis and that it significantly affects some biochemical risk factors of this disease. Our findings also confirm the potential harmful effects of oxidized fats and the importance of dietary polyphenols in the meal.

  2. Early atherosclerosis and vascular inflammation in mice with diet-induced type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, E D; Bang, C A; Nielsen, L B

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity and type 2 diabetes increase the risk of atherosclerosis. It is unknown to what extent this reflects direct effects on the arterial wall or secondary effects of hyperlipidaemia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The effect of obesity and type 2 diabetes on the development of atherosclero......BACKGROUND: Obesity and type 2 diabetes increase the risk of atherosclerosis. It is unknown to what extent this reflects direct effects on the arterial wall or secondary effects of hyperlipidaemia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The effect of obesity and type 2 diabetes on the development...... of atherosclerosis and inflammation, in the absence or presence of hyperlipidaemia, was assed in wild-type (n = 36) and human apolipoprotein B (apoB) transgenic mice (n = 27) that were fed normal chow or 60% fat for 12 months. RESULTS: Fat-feeding caused obesity, glucose intolerance and elevated plasma leptin...... atherosclerosis in the absence of dyslipidaemia, and that even a moderate level of LDL-C markedly augments this effect....

  3. Compound K Attenuates the Development of Atherosclerosis in ApoE−/− Mice via LXRα Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atherosclerosis is a fundamental pathological process responded to some serious cardiovascular events. Although the cholesterol-lowering drugs are widely prescribed for atherosclerosis therapy, it is still the leading cause of death in the developed world. Here we measured the effects of compound K in atherosclerosis formation and investigated the probably mechanisms of the anti-antherosclerosis roles of compound K. Methods: We treated the atherosclerotic model animals (apoE−/− mice on western diet with compound K and measured the size of atherosclerotic lesions, inflammatory cytokine levels and serum lipid profile. Peritoneal macrophages were collected in vitro for the foam cell and inflammasome experiments. Results: Our results show that treatment with compound K dose-dependently attenuates the formation of atherosclerotic plaques by 55% through activation of reverse cholesterol transport pathway, reduction of systemic inflammatory cytokines and inhibition of local inflammasome activity. Compound K increases the cholesterol efflux of macrophage-derived foam cells, and reduces the inflammasome activity in cholesterol crystal stimulated macrophages. The activation of LXRα may contribute to the athero-protective effects of compound K. Conclusion: These observations provide evidence for an athero-protective effect of compound K via LXRα activation, and support its further evaluation as a potential effective modulator for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis.

  4. The HDL hypothesis : does high-density lipoprotein protect from atherosclerosis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergeer, Menno; Holleboom, Adriaan G; Kastelein, John J P; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert

    2010-01-01

    There is unequivocal evidence of an inverse association between plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations and the risk of cardiovascular disease, a finding that has led to the hypothesis that HDL protects from atherosclerosis. This review details the experimental evidence for

  5. Rabbit models for the study of human atherosclerosis: from pathophysiological mechanisms to translational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianglin; Kitajima, Shuji; Watanabe, Teruo; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Jifeng; Liu, Enqi; Chen, Y Eugene

    2015-02-01

    Laboratory animal models play an important role in the study of human diseases. Using appropriate animals is critical not only for basic research but also for the development of therapeutics and diagnostic tools. Rabbits are widely used for the study of human atherosclerosis. Because rabbits have a unique feature of lipoprotein metabolism (like humans but unlike rodents) and are sensitive to a cholesterol diet, rabbit models have not only provided many insights into the pathogenesis and development of human atherosclerosis but also made a great contribution to translational research. In fact, rabbit was the first animal model used for studying human atherosclerosis, more than a century ago. Currently, three types of rabbit model are commonly used for the study of human atherosclerosis and lipid metabolism: (1) cholesterol-fed rabbits, (2) Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits, analogous to human familial hypercholesterolemia due to genetic deficiency of LDL receptors, and (3) genetically modified (transgenic and knock-out) rabbits. Despite their importance, compared with the mouse, the most widely used laboratory animal model nowadays, the use of rabbit models is still limited. In this review, we focus on the features of rabbit lipoprotein metabolism and pathology of atherosclerotic lesions that make it the optimal model for human atherosclerotic disease, especially for the translational medicine. For the sake of clarity, the review is not an attempt to be completely inclusive, but instead attempts to summarize substantial information concisely and provide a guideline for experiments using rabbits.

  6. A minipig model of high-fat/high-sucrose diet-induced diabetes and atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Shoumin; Yin, Weidong; Wang, Zongbao; Kusunoki, Masataka; Lian, Xin; Koike, Tomonari; Fan, Jianglin; Zhang, Qiuju

    2004-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a major risk factor of the development of atherosclerosis in humans. However, studies examining mechanisms underlying diabetes-accelerated atherosclerosis have been limited by the lack of suitable humanoid animal models. Pigs have a cardiovascular system that is very similar to that of humans and is useful as a model for human physiology and pathophysiology. In this study, we established a new miniature pig model for studying dyslipidaemia and atherosclerosis in diabetes. Chinese Guizhou minipigs were fed a normal control diet or a high-fat/high-sucrose diet (HFSD) for 6 months. Plasma total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), insulin and glucose were quantified at monthly intervals. The induction of insulin resistance and dysfunction of the pancreatic β-cell were assessed by oral glucose tolerance test and insulin sensitivity test. The aortic fatty streak lesions were quantified following lipid staining with Sudan IV. During the feeding period, mild high plasma TC and TG were induced. At the end of 6 months, in HFSD-fed animals, the adipocytes were hypertrophic, fat deposit in the liver was observed, loss of pancreatic β-cells was observed, and the aortic fatty streak lesions were clearly present in the animals' aortas. Our study established that miniature pigs that were fed a HFSD without adding dietary cholesterol developed insulin resistance, mild diabetes and atherosclerotic lesions. HFSD-fed miniature pigs may be good animal models for research on the treatment of diabetic dyslipidaemia complicated with atherosclerosis. PMID:15312127

  7. Measurement of arterial wall thickness as a surrogate marker for atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, E; Hovingh, GK; Wiegman, A; Duriez, P; Smit, AJ; Fruchart, JC; Kastelein, JJP

    2004-01-01

    Large observational studies and atherosclerosis regression trials of lipid-modifying pharmacotherapy have established that intima-media thickness of the carotid and femoral arteries, as measured noninvasively by B-mode ultrasound, is a valid surrogate marker for the progression of atherosclerotic di

  8. Increased Th9 cells and IL-9 levels accelerate disease progression in experimental atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Ming, Tingting; Wang, Yuanmin; Ding, Shaowei; Hu, Chaojie; Zhang, Cuiping; Cao, Qi; Wang, Yiping

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is the number one killer in developed countries, and currently considered a chronic inflammatory disease. The central role of T cells in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is well documented. However, little is known about the newly described T cell subset-Th9 cells and their role in AS pathogenesis. Here, the amounts of Th9 cells as well as their key transcription factors and relevant cytokines during atherosclerosis were assessed in ApoE-/- mice and age-matched C57BL/6J mice. Significantly increased Th9 cell number, Th9 related cytokine (IL-9), and key transcription factor (PU.1) were found in ApoE-/- mice compared with age-matched C57BL/6J mice. Additionally, treatment with rIL-9 accelerated atherosclerotic development, which was attenuated by anti-IL-9 antibodies. These data suggested that both Th9 cells and related IL-9 play key roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and antibodies against these antigens offer a novel therapeutic approach in AS treatment.

  9. Anti-Inflammatory and Immunomodulatory Mechanism of Tanshinone IIA for Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tanshinone IIA (Tan II A is widely used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases as an active component of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. It has been demonstrated to have pleiotropic effects for atherosclerosis. From the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory mechanism perspective, this paper reviewed major progresses of Tan IIA in antiatherosclerosis research, including immune cells, antigens, cytokines, and cell signaling pathways.

  10. Association between metabolic syndrome and subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in asymptomatic adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullo, Iftikhar J; Cassidy, Andrea E; Peyser, Patricia A; Turner, Stephen T; Sheedy, Patrick F; Bielak, Lawrence F

    2004-12-15

    Metabolic syndrome was associated with the presence and quantity of coronary artery calcium, a marker of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis, in 1,129 asymptomatic adults, ages 20 to 79 years, from a community-based study. The association was independent of 10-year risk of coronary heart disease based on the Framingham risk score.

  11. Longitudinal study on premature atherosclerosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, Karina; Smit, Andries J.; de Groot, Eric; van Roon, Arie M.; Kallenberg, Cees G.; Bijl, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To determine risk factors of accelerated atherosclerosis and progression of intima-media thickness (IMT) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods: 74 SLE patients, age ranging from 13 to 69 years, and 74 age- and sex-matched controls were included. IMT of the common c

  12. Transgenic mouse models to study the role of APOE in hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofker, M.H.; Vlijmen, B.J.M. van; Havekes, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    Transgenic technologies have provided a series of very useful mouse models to study hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. Normally, mice carry cholesterol mainly in the high density lipoprotein (HDL) sized lipoproteins, and have low density lipoprotein (LDL) and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) cho

  13. Hypocoagulability does not protect against atherosclerosis in hemophilia A patients with obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biere-Rafi, S.; Tuinenburg, A.; Haak, B.; Peters, M.; De Groot, E.; Verhamme, P.; Peerlinck, K.; Visseren, F.; Kruip, M.; Gorkom, B.L.-V.; Buller, H.; Gerdes, V.; Schutgens, R.; Kamphuisen, P.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Hemophilia A patients have a 50% lower cardiovascular mortality than the general population. Whether this is caused by less atherosclerosis due to hypocoagulability is unclear. We assessed whether hemophilia A patients with obesity, a major atherosclerotic risk factor, have a lower pre

  14. Modern issue on the role of microorganisms in the induction and the development of atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kupryushin AS

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available More than 70 literature sources are presented and analyzed in the work. Data sources are devoted to the connection between infection and development of atherosclerotic changes. It has been found out that the infection and the presence of pathogenic microorganisms influence the progression of atherosclerosis.

  15. Significance of epicardial fat in the diagnosis of coronary atherosclerosis before heart valve surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna de Zayas Galguera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Epicardial fat has been shown to be related not only with clinical atherosclerosis, but also with subclinical atherosclerosis.Objective: To determine the significance of epicardial fat in the diagnosis of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with valvular heart disease.Method: The study included 62 patients scheduled for valve replacement surgery who had previously undergone invasive coronary angiography. Before surgery, epicardial fat measurement was performed by echocardiogram. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were determined, as well as the validity index and likelihood ratios for positive and negative tests.Results: 88.7% of patients with heart valve disease had no lesions in the coronary arteries. The most relevant parameters obtained from the measurement of epicardial fat were 78% sensitivity and 93% negative predictive value, and a ratio of positive and negative likelihood of 2.23 and 0.34 respectively.Conclusions: The group of patients with significant coronary lesions showed higher levels of epicardial fat than the group without coronary lesions. It confirms the diagnostic validity of this test for the detection of coronary atherosclerosis in the study patients.

  16. Paraoxonase genotype, LDL-oxidation and carotid atherosclerosis in male life-long smokers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Himbergen, van T.; Roest, M.; Waart, de F.; Voorbij, H.; Tits, van L.; Stalenhoef, A.

    2004-01-01

    Paraoxonase (PON-1) is a high-density lipoprotein (HDL) associated enzyme that hydrolyzes lipid peroxides in vitro , which may therefore protect against the onset of atherosclerosis. Heavy smokers are more exposed to oxidative stress and hence at high-risk for oxidative modification of LDL. Our hypo

  17. Exendin-4 decreases liver inflammation and atherosclerosis development simultaneously by reducing macrophage infiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.; Parlevliet, E.T.; Geerling, J.J.; Tuin, S.J.L. van der; Zhang, H.; Bieghs, V.; Jawad, A.H.M.; Shiri-Sverdlov, R.; Bot, I.; Jager, S.C.A. de; Havekes, L.M.; Romijn, J.A.; Willems Van Dijk, K.; Rensen, P.C.N.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The aetiology of inflammation in the liver and vessel wall, leading to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and atherosclerosis, respectively, shares common mechanisms including macrophage infiltration. To treat both disorders simultaneously, it is highly important to tackle t

  18. Localizing role of hemodynamics in atherosclerosis in several human vertebrobasilar junction geometries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravensbergen, J; Ravensbergen, JW; Krijger, JKB; Hillen, B; Hoogstraten, HW

    1998-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a common finding in the vertebrobasilar junction and in the basilar artery. Several theories try to link the process of atherogenesis with the forces exerted by the flowing blood. An attractive relation has been found between the locations in vessels at which atherosclerotic plaqu

  19. Effects of a novel pharmacologic inhibitor of myeloperoxidase in a mouse atherosclerosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cuiqing; Desikan, Rajagopal; Ying, Zhekang; Gushchina, Liubov; Kampfrath, Thomas; Deiuliis, Jeffrey; Wang, Aixia; Xu, Xiaohua; Zhong, Jixin; Rao, Xiaoquan; Sun, Qinghua; Maiseyeu, Andrei; Parthasarathy, Sampath; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress play fundamental roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Myeloperoxidase has been extensively implicated as a key mediator of inflammatory and redox-dependent processes in atherosclerosis. However, the effect of synthetic myeloperoxidase inhibitors on atherosclerosis has been insufficiently studied. In this study, ApoE(-/-) mice were randomized to low- and high-dose INV-315 groups for 16 weeks on high-fat diet. INV-315 resulted in reduced plaque burden and improved endothelial function in response to acetylcholine. These effects occurred without adverse events or changes in body weight or blood pressure. INV-315 treatment resulted in a decrease in iNOS gene expression, superoxide production and nitrotyrosine content in the aorta. Circulating IL-6 and inflammatory CD11b(+)/Ly6G(low)/7/4(hi) monocytes were significantly decreased in response to INV-315 treatment. Acute pretreatment with INV-315 blocked TNFα-mediated leukocyte adhesion in cremasteric venules and inhibited myeloperoxidase activity. Cholesterol efflux was significantly increased by high-dose INV-315 via ex-vivo reverse cholesterol transport assays. Our results suggest that myeloperoxidase inhibition may exert anti-atherosclerotic effects via inhibition of oxidative stress and enhancement of cholesterol efflux. These findings demonstrate a role for pharmacologic modulation of myeloperoxidase in atherosclerosis.

  20. [Scavenger receptor CD36: its expression, regulation, and role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Part I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuliczkowska-Płaksej, Justyna; Bednarek-Tupikowska, Grazyna; Płaksej, Rafał; Filus, Alicja

    2006-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a progressive pathological process based on endothelial dysfunction and chronic inflammation. Monocytes, macrophages, and modified lipoproteins, especially oxidized LDLs (oxLDLs), play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Monocytes evolve into macrophages in the vascular wall and then accumulate oxLDLs, forming foam cells. OxLDLs are toxic and activate foam cells, stimulate the replication of macrophages and their migration into atherosclerotic plaque, and increase the expression of metaloproteinases. Macrophages bind oxLDLs through many types of receptors, among them scavenger receptors. One of these is CD36, a membrane glycoprotein expressed by endothelial cells, adipocytes, smooth and skeletal muscle cells, cardiomiocytes, platelets, monocytes, and macrophages. CD36 recognizes and binds many ligands, such as oxLDLs, long-chain fatty acids, collagen, thrombospondin 1, apoptotic cells, anionic phospholipids, and Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes. CD36 is involved in many processes, e.g. inner immune system responses, removal of apoptotic cells and Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes, and the transport of long-chain fatty acids, and it also mediates collagen and thrombospondin action. Recent reports indicate that CD36 may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. An animal model revealed that lack of CD36 expression restrains atheroslerosis. Increased expression of CD36 was shown in atheroslerotic plaque and damaged vascular tissue. Contradictory data about the effects of antiatherosclerotic drugs on CD36 expression indicate the necessity for further investigation of the role of CD36 in the development of atherosclerosis.

  1. Relation between type A behavior pattern and the extent of coronary atherosclerosis in Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimasu, Kouichi; Washio, Masakazu; Tokunaga, Shoji; Tanaka, Keitaro; Liu, Ying; Kodama, Hiroko; Arai, Hidekazu; Koyanagi, Samon; Hiyamuta, Koji; Doi, Yoshitaka; Kawano, Tomoki; Nakagaki, Osamu; Takada, Kazuyuki; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Nii, Takanobu; Shirai, Kazuyuki; Ideishi, Munehito; Arakawa, Kikuo; Mohri, Masahiro; Takeshita, Akira

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the relation of Type A behavior pattern and its components to angiographically documented coronary atherosclerosis in 198 Japanese women. A questionnaire-based interview elicited psychosocial and other factors. Type A behavior pattern was measured by 12 questions. Significant coronary stenosis was defined when a 75% or greater luminal narrowing occurred at one or more major coronary arteries or 50% or greater narrowing occurred at the left main artery. Gensini's score also was calculated. Logistic regression analysis was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals with adjustment for traditional coronary risk factors and the presence of a job. Global Type A behavior pattern showed no material association with the severity of coronary atherosclerosis assessed by both Gensini's score and the presence of significant coronary stenosis. However, its subcomponents, enthusiasm and competitiveness, were positively related to the severity of coronary atherosclerosis, whereas self-confidence and perfectionism were negatively related. These findings suggest overall a null association between global Type A and coronary atherosclerosis as well as the presence of toxic or beneficial components of Type A behaviors in Japanese women.

  2. LDL oxidative modification and carotid atherosclerosis : Results of a multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyyssonen, K.; Kurl, S.; Karppi, J.; Nurmi, T.; Baldassarre, D.; Veglia, F.; Rauramaa, R.; de Faire, U.; Hamsten, A.; Smit, A. J.; Mannarino, E.; Humphries, S. E.; Giral, P.; Grossi, E.; Tremoli, E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Serum LDL conjugated diene concentration is a marker of oxidative modification of LDL. We investigated the relationship between LDL conjugated dienes and cross-sectional subclinical atherosclerosis assessed by carotid IMT in high-risk subjects of a multicenter study. Methods: Serum LDL co

  3. Monocyte-targeting supramolecular micellar assemblies: a molecular diagnostic tool for atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun Ji; Mlinar, Laurie B; Nord, Kathryn; Sugimoto, Matthew J; Wonder, Emily; Alenghat, Francis J; Fang, Yun; Tirrell, Matthew

    2015-02-18

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial inflammatory disease that can progress silently for decades and result in myocardial infarction, stroke, and death. Diagnostic imaging technologies have made great strides to define the degree of atherosclerotic plaque burden through the severity of arterial stenosis. However, current technologies cannot differentiate more lethal "vulnerable plaques," and are not sensitive enough for preventive medicine. Imaging early molecular markers and quantifying the extent of disease progression continues to be a major challenge in the field. To this end, monocyte-targeting, peptide amphiphile micelles (PAMs) are engineered through the incorporation of the chemokine receptor CCR2-binding motif of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and MCP-1 PAMs are evaluated preclinically as diagnostic tools for atherosclerosis. Monocyte-targeting is desirable as the influx of monocytes is a marker of early lesions, accumulation of monocytes is linked to atherosclerosis progression, and rupture-prone plaques have higher numbers of monocytes. MCP-1 PAMs bind to monocytes in vitro, and MCP-1 PAMs detect and discriminate between early- and late-stage atherosclerotic aortas. Moreover, MCP-1 PAMs are found to be eliminated via renal clearance and the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) without adverse side effects. Thus, MCP-1 PAMs are a promising new class of diagnostic agents capable of monitoring the progression of atherosclerosis.

  4. NASH and atherosclerosis are two aspects of a shared disease : Central role for macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bieghs, Veerle; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Hofker, Marten H.; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage infiltration into the atherosclerotic lesion is known to play a central role in the initiation of atherosclerosis. In contrast, the role of macrophages during the etiology of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has been considered to be merely a late consequence of steatosis. However, re

  5. Advanced glycation end products and the absence of premature atherosclerosis in glycogen storage disease Ia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hollander, N. C.; Mulder, Douwe J.; Graaff, R.; Thorpe, S. R.; Baynes, J. W.; Smit, Gerrit; Smit, Andries

    2007-01-01

    Introducton: Despite their unfavourable cardiovascular risk profile, patients with glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD Ia) do not develop premature atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that this paradox might be related to a decreased formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) resulting from

  6. Reduction of mouse atherosclerosis by urokinase inhibition or with a limited-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Jie Hong; Touch, Phanith; Zhang, Jingwan;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Elevated activity of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and MMPs in human arteries is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis, aneurysms, and plaque rupture. We used Apoe-null mice with macrophage-specific uPA overexpression (SR-uPA mice; a well-characterized model of protease-accele...

  7. Deleting myeloid IL-10 receptor signalling attenuates atherosclerosis in LDLR-/- mice by altering intestinal cholesterol fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoger, J. Lauran; Boshuizen, Marieke C. S.; Brufau, Gemma; Gijbels, Marion J. J.; Wolfe, Ine M. J.; van der Velden, Saskia; Pottgens, Chantal C. H.; Vergouwe, Monique N.; Wijnands, Erwin; Beckers, Linda; Goossens, Pieter; Kerksiek, Anja; Havinga, Rick; Muller, Werner; Luetjohann, Dieter; Groen, Albert K.; de Winther, Menno P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory responses and cholesterol homeostasis are interconnected in atherogenesis. Interleukin (IL)-10 is an important anti-inflammatory cytokine, known to suppress atherosclerosis development. However, the specific cell types responsible for the atheroprotective effects of IL-10 remain to be d

  8. ABC-transporters and lipid transfer proteins : important players in macrophage cholesterol homeostasis and atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Local modulation of macrophage cholesterol metabolism in the arterial wall and systemic regulation of lipoprotein metabolism (LDL-lowering and/or HDL-raising) are both attractive targets for future drug design for the prevention of atherosclerosis. As described in this thesis, bone marrow transplant

  9. Links between cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis in postmenopausal women: serum lipids or atherosclerosis per se?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Y Z; Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Alexandersen, P

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological observations suggest links between osteoporosis and risk of acute cardiovascular events and vice versa. Whether the two clinical conditions are linked by common pathogenic factors or atherosclerosis per se remains incompletely understood. We investigated whether serum lipids...... and polymorphism in the ApoE gene modifying serum lipids could be a biological linkage....

  10. Carotid atherosclerosis in depression and anxiety : Associations for age of depression onset

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seldenrijk, Adrie; Van Hout, Hein P. J.; van Marwijk, Harm W. J.; de Groot, Eric; Gort, Johan; Rustemeijer, Cees; Diamant, Michaela; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Mental health and cardiovascular disease have been associated, whereas the temporal course and underlying mechanisms are still incompletely understood. Our aims were to examine the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis in subjects with depressive or anxiety disorder, also taking into ac

  11. Low-Dose Radiation Exposure and Atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitchel, R. E. J.; Hasu, M.; Bugden, M.; Wyatt, H.; Little, M. P.; Gola, A.; Hildebrandt, G.; Priest, N. D.; Whitman, S. C.

    2011-01-01

    The hypothesis that single low-dose exposures (0.025-0.5 Gy) to low-LET radiation given at either high (about 150 mGy/min) or low (1 mGy/min) dose rate would promote aortic atherosclerosis was tested in female C57BL/6J mice genetically predisposed to this disease (ApoE(-/-)). Mice were exposed eithe

  12. CTHRSSVVC Peptide as a Possible Early Molecular Imaging Target for Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemeire A. Silva

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our work was to select phages displaying peptides capable of binding to vascular markers present in human atheroma, and validate their capacity to target the vascular markers in vitro and in low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLr−/− mouse model of atherosclerosis. By peptide fingerprinting on human atherosclerotic tissues, we selected and isolated four different peptides sequences, which bind to atherosclerotic lesions and share significant similarity to known human proteins with prominent roles in atherosclerosis. The CTHRSSVVC-phage peptide displayed the strongest reactivity with human carotid atherosclerotic lesions (p < 0.05, when compared to tissues from normal carotid arteries. This peptide sequence shares similarity to a sequence present in the fifth scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR domain of CD163, which appeared to bind to CD163, and subsequently, was internalized by macrophages. Moreover, the CTHRSSVVC-phage targets atherosclerotic lesions of a low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLr−/− mouse model of atherosclerosis in vivo to High-Fat diet group versus Control group. Tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-CTHRSSVVC peptide (DOTA-CTHRSSVVC was synthesized and labeled with 111InCl3 in >95% yield as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, to validate the binding of the peptide in atherosclerotic plaque specimens. The results supported our hypothesis that CTHRSSVVC peptide has a remarkable sequence for the development of theranostics approaches in the treatment of atherosclerosis and other diseases.

  13. Sociodemographic correlates of cognition in the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis (MESA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective was to describe the methodology utilized to evaluate cognitive function in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) and to present preliminary results by age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Cross-sectional measurements of a prospective observational cohort. Residents of 6 U.S. commun...

  14. Activation of TRPV1 reduces vascular lipid accumulation and attenuates atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Liqun; Zhong, Jian; Zhao, Zhigang

    2011-01-01

    Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channels may affect lipid storage and the cellular inflammatory response. Now, we tested the hypothesis that activation of TRPV1 channels attenuates atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E knockout mice (ApoE(-/-)) but not Apo...

  15. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 expression in coronary atherosclerosis plaque of sudden coronary death patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯相平

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) in coronary atherosclerosis plaque of sudden coronary death (SCD) patients and the relationship between MCP-1 expression and SCD. Methods Autopsy heart samples (n=90) collected during 2001 - 2003 were divided to SCD group (n=

  16. Altered Metabolism of LDL in the Arterial Wall Precedes Atherosclerosis Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Emil D.; Christoffersen, Christina; Lindholm, Marie W.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Plasma cholesterol lowering is beneficial in patients with atherosclerosis. However, it is unknown how it affects entry and degradation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles in the lesioned arterial wall. Objective: We studied the effect of lipid-lowering therapy on LDL permeability...

  17. BMD PREDICTION OF DEATH IS ENCAPSULATED BY THE MORPHOLOGICAL ATHEROSCLEROSIS CALCIFICATION DISTRIBUTION (MACD) INDEX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganz, Melanie; Nielsen, Mads; Karsdal, Morten

    2009-01-01

    .3±0.3 years and of which CVD, cancer, and all cause deaths were recorded. The spine BMD and aortic calcification markers, AC24 and the recently proposed Morphological Atherosclerosis Calcification Distribution (MACD) index, were quantified from DXA scans and lateral X-rays respectively. The MACD...

  18. Moderate-and-vigorous physical activity from adolescence to adulthood and subclinical atherosclerosis in adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Grøntved, Anders; Kristensen, Peter Lund

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the independent associations between mean exposure to or the change in moderate-and-vigorous physical activity (PA) from adolescence to adulthood and subclinical atherosclerosis in adulthood. METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study among Danish boys and girls (N=277...

  19. Mechanism linking atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes: increased expression of scavenger receptor CD36 in monocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-mei; ZHANG Xiao-lian; ZHOU Xin; LI Dong; GU Jin-gang; WU Juan-juan

    2005-01-01

    Background We investigated the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in diabetes, and detected the expression of scavenger receptor CD36 in monocytes in patients with type 2 diabetes.Methods According to the criteria by WHO, diabetic patients were classified into two groups: well controlled diabetic patients (WCP) and poorly controlled diabetic patients (PCP). The expression of CD36 protein and mRNA were evaluated by flow cytometry and reversal transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Plasma levels of accumulution of oxidized LDL (oxLDL) were directly measured by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method.Results Flow cytometry and RT-PCR showed that the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of CD36 in monocyte and CD36 mRNA were significantly higher in the PCP and WCP in comparison with healthy controls (P0.05). The concentrations of plasma oxLDL were higher in the PCP group compared to WCP and control group (P0.05). In the WCP and PCP groups, oxLDL levels were higher in patients with diabetic atherosclerosis than those without diabetic atherosclerosis (P<0.05).Conclusions The increased expression of scavenger receptor CD36 may be one of the mechanism of accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetic. The poorly controlled diabetes patients are at higher risk for the vascular complications than the well controlled diabetic patients.

  20. Appropriateness of the hamster as a model to study diet-induced atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden-Syrian hamsters have been used as an animal model to assess diet-induced atherosclerosis since the early 1980s. Advantages appeared to include a low rate of endogenous cholesterol synthesis, receptor-mediated uptake of LDL cholesterol, cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity, hepatic apo...

  1. The magic and mystery of microRNA-27 in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wu-Jun; Yin, Kai; Zhao, Guo-Jun; Fu, Yu-Chang; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2012-06-01

    Atherosclerosis (As) is now widely appreciated to represent a chronic inflammatory reaction of the vascular wall in response to dyslipidemia and endothelial distress involving the inflammatory recruitment of leukocytes and the activation of resident vascular cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of endogenous, small (~22 nucleotides in length) non-coding RNA molecules, which function specifically by base pairing with mRNA of genes, thereby induce translation repressions of the genes within metazoan cells. Recently, the function of miR-27, one of the miRNAs, in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis has been identified. In vivo and in vitro studies suggest that miR-27 may serve as a diagnostic and prognostic marker for atherosclerosis. More recently, studies have identified important roles for miR-27 in angiogenesis, adipogenesis, inflammation, lipid metabolism, oxidative stress, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, etc. In this review, we focus on the role of miR-27 in the development of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques, potential as a disease biomarker and novel therapeutic target in atherosclerosis.

  2. The complement system and toll-like receptors as integrated players in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, Anders; Jonasson, Lena; Garred, Peter; Yndestad, Arne; Aukrust, Pål; Lappegård, Knut T; Espevik, Terje; Mollnes, Tom E

    2015-08-01

    Despite recent medical advances, atherosclerosis is a global burden accounting for numerous deaths and hospital admissions. Immune-mediated inflammation is a major component of the atherosclerotic process, but earlier research focus on adaptive immunity has gradually switched towards the role of innate immunity. The complement system and toll-like receptors (TLRs), and the crosstalk between them, may be of particular interest both with respect to pathogenesis and as therapeutic targets in atherosclerosis. Animal studies indicate that inhibition of C3a and C5a reduces atherosclerosis. In humans modified LDL-cholesterol activate complement and TLRs leading to downstream inflammation, and histopathological studies indicate that the innate immune system is present in atherosclerotic lesions. Moreover, clinical studies have demonstrated that both complement and TLRs are upregulated in atherosclerotic diseases, although interventional trials have this far been disappointing. However, based on recent research showing an intimate interplay between complement and TLRs we propose a model in which combined inhibition of both complement and TLRs may represent a potent anti-inflammatory therapeutic approach to reduce atherosclerosis.

  3. Dyslipidemia-associated alterations in B cell subpopulation frequency and phenotype during experimental atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón-Arévalo, Héctor; Castaño, Diana; Villa-Pulgarín, Janny; Rojas, Mauricio; Vásquez, Gloria; Correa, Luis A; Ramírez-Pineda, José R; Yassin, Lina M

    2016-04-01

    Lymphocytes, the cellular effectors of adaptive immunity, are involved in the chronic inflammatory process known as atherosclerosis. Proatherogenic and atheroprotective properties have been ascribed to B cells. However, information regarding the role of B cells during atherosclerosis is scarce. Both the frequency and the phenotype of B cell subpopulations were studied by flow cytometry in wild type and apolipoprotein-E-deficient (apoE(-/-)) mice fed a high-fat (HFD) or control diet. Whereas the proportion of follicular cells was decreased, transitional 1-like cells were increased in mice with advanced atherosclerotic lesions (apoE(-/-) HFD). B cells in atherosclerotic mice were more activated, indicated by their higher surface expression of CD80, CD86, CD40 and CD95 and increased serum IgG1 levels. In the aorta, a decreased frequency of B cells was observed in mice with advanced atherosclerosis. Low expression of CD19 was observed on B cells from the spleen, aorta and lymph nodes of apoE(-/-) HFD mice. This alteration correlated with serum levels of IgG1 and cholesterol. A reduction in CD19 expression was induced in splenic cells from young apoE(-/-) mice cultured with lipemic serum. These results show that mice with advanced atherosclerosis display a variety of alterations in the frequency and phenotype of B lymphocytes, most of which are associated with dyslipidemia.

  4. Genetic Architecture of Atherosclerosis in Mice: A Systems Genetics Analysis of Common Inbred Strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Bennett

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Common forms of atherosclerosis involve multiple genetic and environmental factors. While human genome-wide association studies have identified numerous loci contributing to coronary artery disease and its risk factors, these studies are unable to control environmental factors or examine detailed molecular traits in relevant tissues. We now report a study of natural variations contributing to atherosclerosis and related traits in over 100 inbred strains of mice from the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel (HMDP. The mice were made hyperlipidemic by transgenic expression of human apolipoprotein E-Leiden (APOE-Leiden and human cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP. The mice were examined for lesion size and morphology as well as plasma lipid, insulin and glucose levels, and blood cell profiles. A subset of mice was studied for plasma levels of metabolites and cytokines. We also measured global transcript levels in aorta and liver. Finally, the uptake of acetylated LDL by macrophages from HMDP mice was quantitatively examined. Loci contributing to the traits were mapped using association analysis, and relationships among traits were examined using correlation and statistical modeling. A number of conclusions emerged. First, relationships among atherosclerosis and the risk factors in mice resemble those found in humans. Second, a number of trait-loci were identified, including some overlapping with previous human and mouse studies. Third, gene expression data enabled enrichment analysis of pathways contributing to atherosclerosis and prioritization of candidate genes at associated loci in both mice and humans. Fourth, the data provided a number of mechanistic inferences; for example, we detected no association between macrophage uptake of acetylated LDL and atherosclerosis. Fifth, broad sense heritability for atherosclerosis was much larger than narrow sense heritability, indicating an important role for gene-by-gene interactions. Sixth, stepwise linear

  5. The possible role of the ubiquitin proteasome system in the development of atherosclerosis in diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    sasso Ferdinando

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have reviewed the impact of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS on atherosclerosis progression of diabetic patients. A puzzle of many pieces of evidence suggests that UPS, in addition to its role in the removal of damaged proteins, is involved in a number of biological processes including inflammation, proliferation and apoptosis, all of which constitute important characteristics of atherosclerosis. From what can be gathered from the very few studies on the UPS in diabetic cardiovascular diseases published so far, the system seems to be functionally active to a different extent in the initiation, progression, and complication stage of atherosclerosis in the diabetic people. Further evidence for this theory, however, has to be given, for instance by specifically targeted antagonism of the UPS. Nonetheless, this hypothesis may help us understand why diverse therapeutic interventions, which have in common the ability to reduce ubiquitin-proteasome activity, can impede or delay the onset of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD. People with type 2 diabetes are disproportionately affected by CVD, compared with those without diabetes 1. The prevalence, incidence, and mortality from all forms of CVD (myocardial infarction, cerebro-vascular disease and congestive heart failure are strikingly increased in persons with diabetes compared with those withoutdiabetes 2. Furthermore, diabetic patients have not benefited by the advances in the management of obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension that have resulted in a decrease in mortality for coronary heart disease (CHD patients without diabetes 3. Nevertheless, these risk factors do not fully explain the excess risk for CHD associated with diabetes 45. Thus, the determinants of progression of atherosclerosis in persons with diabetes must be elucidated. Beyond the major risk factors, several studies have demonstrated that such factors, strictly related to diabetes, as insulin

  6. The Relationship of Plasma miR-29a and Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein with Atherosclerosis

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    Yu-Qing Huang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory condition associated with a variety of vascular diseases. Previous studies showed that both miR-29a and oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL were vital in the development of atherosclerosis. However, the relationship between miR-29a and ox-LDL remains unknown. This study was designed to investigate the association of miR-29a and ox-LDL and to test whether circulating miR-29a and ox-LDL levels could predict atherosclerosis. Methods: In 170 participants, plasma levels of miR-29a were assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR while plasma ox-LDL levels were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA kits. The relationship between miR-29a level and ox-LDL and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT was assessed using the Spearman correlation coefficient and multiple liner regression. Results: Compared with the normal cIMT group, the increased cIMT group had higher levels of ox-LDL (0.47 ± 0.08 vs 0.29 ± 0.06 ng/ml, p = 0.003 and miR-29a (32.93 ± 4.26 vs 26.37 ± 1.04, p p p Conclusion: Increased miR-29a and ox-LDL levels were associated with an early stage of atherosclerosis, and the combination of miR-29a and ox-LDL offered better predictive values for atherosclerosis than either alone.

  7. Lower zinc bioavailability may be related to higher risk of subclinical atherosclerosis in Korean adults.

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    Su Kyoung Jung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is a proposed link between dietary zinc intake and atherosclerosis, but this relationship remains unclear. Phytate may contribute to this relationship by influencing zinc bioavailability. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between zinc bioavailability and subclinical atherosclerosis in healthy Korean adults. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The present cross-sectional analysis used baseline data from the Korean multi-Rural Communities Cohort Study (MRCohort, which is a part of The Korean Genome Epidemiology Study (KoGES. A total of 5,532 subjects (2,116 men and 3,416 women aged 40 years and older were recruited from rural communities in South Korea between 2005 and 2010. Phytate:zinc molar ratio, estimated from a food-based food frequency questionnaire (FFQ of 106 food items, was used to determine zinc bioavailability, and carotid intima media thickness (cIMT and pulse wave velocity (PWV were measured to calculate the subclinical atherosclerotic index. RESULTS: We found that phytate:zinc molar ratio is positively related to cIMT in men. A higher phytate:zinc molar ratio was significantly related to an increased risk of atherosclerosis in men, defined as the 80(th percentile value of cIMT (5(th vs. 1(st quintile, OR = 2.11, 95% CI 1.42-3.15, P for trend = 0.0009, and especially in elderly men (5(th vs. 1(st quintile, OR = 2.58, 95% CI 1.52-4.37, P for trend = 0.0021. We found a positive relationship between phytate:zinc molar ratio and atherosclerosis risk among women aged 65 years or younger. Phytate:zinc molar ratio was not found to be related to PWV. CONCLUSIONS: Lower zinc bioavailability may be related to higher atherosclerosis risk.

  8. Apocynin suppresses the progression of atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice by inactivation of macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Hiroyuki [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Matsumura, Takeshi, E-mail: takeshim@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Ishii, Norio; Fukuda, Kazuki; Senokuchi, Takafumi; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Tatsuya; Taketa, Kayo; Kawasaki, Shuji; Hanatani, Satoko [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Takeya, Motohiro [Department of Cell Pathology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Nishikawa, Takeshi; Araki, Eiichi [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan)

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► We examined the anti-athrogenic effect of apocynin in atherosclerotic model mice. ► Apocynin prevented atherosclerotic lesion formation. ► Apocynin suppressed ROS production in aorta and in macrophages. ► Apocynin suppressed cytokine expression and cell proliferation in macrophages. ► Apocynin may be beneficial compound for the prevention of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other proinflammatory substances by macrophages plays an important role in atherogenesis. Apocynin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-acetophenone), which is well known as a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, has anti-inflammatory effects including suppression of the generation of ROS. However, the suppressive effects of apocynin on the progression of atherosclerosis are not clearly understood. Thus, we investigated anti-atherosclerotic effects of apocynin using apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE{sup –/–}) mice in vivo and in mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. In atherosclerosis-prone apoE{sup –/–} mice, apocynin suppressed the progression of atherosclerosis, decreased 4-hydroxynonenal-positive area in atherosclerotic lesions, and mRNA expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in aorta. In mouse peritoneal macrophages, apocynin suppressed the Ox-LDL-induced ROS generation, mRNA expression of MCP-1, IL-6 and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and cell proliferation. Moreover, immunohistochemical studies revealed that apocynin decreased the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions of apoE{sup –/–} mice. These results suggested that apocynin suppressed the formation of atherosclerotic lesions, at least in part, by inactivation of macrophages. Therefore, apocynin may be a potential therapeutic material to prevent the progression of atherosclerosis.

  9. Excess exposure to insulin is the primary cause of insulin resistance and its associated atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenhong; Ning, Jie; Yang, Xuefeng; Liu, Zhenqi

    2011-11-01

    The main goal of this review is to provide more specific and effective targets for prevention and treatment of insulin resistance and associated atherosclerosis. Modern technologies and medicine have vastly improved human health and prolonged the average life span of humans primarily by eliminating various premature deaths and infectious diseases. The modern technologies have also provided us abundant food and convenient transportation tools such as cars. As a result, more people are becoming overfed and sedentary. People are generally ingesting more calories than their bodies' need, leading to the so-called "positive energy imbalance", which is inseparable from the development of insulin resistance and its associated atherosclerosis. A direct consequence of insulin resistance is hyperinsulinemia. The current general view is that insulin is not functional properly in the presence of insulin resistance. Thus, the role of insulin itself in the development of insulin resistance and associated atherosclerosis has not been recognized. We have recently observed that the basal level of insulin signaling is increased in the presence of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. In this review, we will explain how the increased basal insulin signaling contributes to the development of insulin resistance and associated atherosclerosis. We will first explain how insulin causes insulin resistance through two arbitrary stages (before and after the presence of obvious insulin resistance), and, then, explain how the excess exposure to insulin and the relative insulin insufficiency contributes to the atherosclerotic diseases. We propose that blockade of the excess insulin signaling is a viable approach to prevent and/or reverse insulin resistance and its associated atherosclerosis.

  10. Study on the Prevalence and Corelation of Carotid Atherosclerosis in Stroke Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Hua; Wang Yongjun; Yah Zhenying

    2000-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence and severity of carotid atherosclerosis in stroke patients and the risk factors of carotid atherosclerosis. Methods Two hundred fifty-one ischemic stroke patients,46 ccrcbral hemorrhagc patients and 96 control subjects were entercd into this study. Sonographic assessment of the extracranial carotid arteries was performed in all patients. Diametcr. IMT, plaques and percentage ratio of lumen stenosis were observcd. Results (1)The prevalence of carotid plaqucs was prominent in stroke patients than the control subjects(63.0%vs 36.5%). (2)The prevalencc of lumen stenosis>50% in ischemic stroke patients was higher than the cerebral hemorrhage patients and control subjects (15.6% vs 4.3%. 2.1%).(3) The prevalence of severe carotid artery stcnosis(>75%) was promincnt in aged 61~70 years old patients.(4)Our data revealed 30% of the cortical infarction subgroup, 17.5%of the subcortical infarction subgroup, 17% of the lacunar infarction subgroup,8% of the vcrtibral-basilar artery infarction subgroup.2.8% of thc CT normal subgroup possessed carotid stcnosis >50%. (5)Age, diabetes mellitus and ApoAl(inversely) were independent predictors of the extracranial carotid atherosclcrosis. Discusssion (Ⅰ)There is close relation between extracraniai carotid atherosclerosis and ischemic cerebrovascular disease.(2)The extent of serious carotid artery stcnosis in aged patients was lower.(3)Thc severity of extracranial carotid artery atherosclerosis was prominent in patients with conical infarction. Conclusion There is a high prevalence of extracranial carotid atherosclerosis in Chinese stroke patients.

  11. Short-term changes in arterial inflammation predict long-term changes in atherosclerosis progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Philip [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiology Division and Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); McMaster University, Population Health Research Institute, Department of Medicine, and Department of Radiology, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Ishai, Amorina; Tawakol, Ahmed [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiology Division and Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); Mani, Venkatesh [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute and Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Kallend, David [The Medicines Company, Parsippany, NJ (United States); Rudd, James H.F. [University of Cambridge, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Fayad, Zahi A. [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute and Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Hess CSM Building Floor TMII, Rm S1-104, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute and Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-01-15

    It remains unclear whether changes in arterial wall inflammation are associated with subsequent changes in the rate of structural progression of atherosclerosis. In this sub-study of the dal-PLAQUE clinical trial, multi-modal imaging was performed using 18-fludeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET, at 0 and 6 months) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, at 0 and 24 months). The primary objective was to determine whether increasing FDG uptake at 6 months predicted atherosclerosis progression on MRI at 2 years. Arterial inflammation was measured by the carotid FDG target-to-background ratio (TBR), and atherosclerotic plaque progression was defined as the percentage change in carotid mean wall area (MWA) and mean wall thickness (MWT) on MRI between baseline and 24 months. A total of 42 participants were included in this sub-study. The mean age of the population was 62.5 years, and 12 (28.6 %) were women. In participants with (vs. without) any increase in arterial inflammation over 6 months, the long-term changes in both MWT (% change MWT: 17.49 % vs. 1.74 %, p = 0.038) and MWA (% change MWA: 25.50 % vs. 3.59 %, p = 0.027) were significantly greater. Results remained significant after adjusting for clinical and biochemical covariates. Individuals with no increase in arterial inflammation over 6 months had no significant structural progression of atherosclerosis over 24 months as measured by MWT (p = 0.616) or MWA (p = 0.373). Short-term changes in arterial inflammation are associated with long-term structural atherosclerosis progression. These data support the concept that therapies that reduce arterial inflammation may attenuate or halt progression of atherosclerosis. (orig.)

  12. The Fatty Acid Composition of Blood Plasma and Arterial Wall in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Osipenko

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the fatty acid balance in the blood plasma, in the fragments of the intact vessels and the vessels showing signs of atherosclerosis.Material and Methods: The article presents the results of the examination of the blood plasma samples of patients with coronary heart disease and coronary atherosclerosis. The control group consisted of 16 healthy individuals. Also, the fragments of the abdominal aorta and the common carotid artery with varying degrees of atherosclerotic lesions were studied. Fatty acid analysis was conducted using capillary gas-liquid chromatography. Results: A reduction in the relative linoleic acid level with an increase in almost all the saturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated dihomo-γ-linolenic acid in the plasma was noted in patients with coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis. The relationships between certain fatty acids in patients with atherosclerosis and myocardial ischemia showed changes. In patients with atherosclerosis, a marked imbalance was observed between the monounsaturated and correspondingly the saturated fatty acids (with the same number of carbon atoms in the abdominal aorta with significant atherosclerotic lesions, as well as in the intact common carotid arteries. These disorders are probably related to the relatively low content of the linoleic acid in the blood plasma. The reasons for the increased activity of the fatty acid synthase in vessels with significant atherosclerotic lesions are described. It is concluded that most of the fatty acids of the plaque were formed due to the synthetic processes in the smooth muscle cells, and not as a result of their intake from the blood plasma.

  13. NT-proBNP levels, atherosclerosis and vascular function in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria: peripheral reactive hyperaemia index but not NT-proBNP is an independent predictor of coronary atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhard, Henrik; Wiinberg, Niels; Hansen, Peter R

    2011-01-01

    for atherosclerosis is unclear. We examined the interrelationship between P-NT-proBNP, presence of atherosclerosis and/or vascular dysfunction in the coronary, carotid and peripheral arteries in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria that received intensive multifactorial treatment. METHODS...... AND RESULTS: P-NT-proBNP was measured in 200 asymptomatic type 2 patients without known cardiac disease that received intensive multifactorial treatment for CV risk reduction. Patients were examined for coronary, carotid and peripheral atherosclerosis, as defined by coronary calcium score=400, carotid intima...

  14. NT-proBNP levels, atherosclerosis and vascular function in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria: peripheral reactive hyperaemia index but not NT-proBNP is an independent predictor of coronary atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhard, Henrik; Wiinberg, Niels; Hansen, Peter R

    2011-01-01

    for atherosclerosis is unclear. We examined the interrelationship between P-NT-proBNP, presence of atherosclerosis and/or vascular dysfunction in the coronary, carotid and peripheral arteries in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria that received intensive multifactorial treatment. METHODS...... AND RESULTS: P-NT-proBNP was measured in 200 asymptomatic type 2 patients without known cardiac disease that received intensive multifactorial treatment for CV risk reduction. Patients were examined for coronary, carotid and peripheral atherosclerosis, as defined by coronary calcium score≥400, carotid intima...

  15. Association between serum vitamin D levels and subclinical coronary atherosclerosis and plaque burden/composition in young adult population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seckin Satilmis

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that low 25-OH vitamin D 25(OHD concentrations may increase the risk of several cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, obesity, myocardial infarction, heart failure and cardiovascular mortality. Recent studies suggested a possible relationship between vitamin D deficiency and increased carotid intima-media wall thickness and vascular calcification. We hypothesized that low 25(OHD may be associated with coronary atherosclerosis and coronary plaque burden and composition, and investigated the relationship between serum vitamin D levels and coronary atherosclerosis, plaque burden or structure, in young adult patients by using dual-source 128x2 slice coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA. We included 98 patients with coronary atherosclerosis and 110, age and gender matched, subjects with normal findings on CCTA examinations. Patients with subclinical atherosclerosis had significantly higher serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, hs-CRP, uric acid, HbA1c and creatinine levels and lower serum 25(OHD levels in comparison with controls. There was no significant correlation between 25(OHD and plaque morphology. There was also a positive relationship between 25(OHD and plaque burden of coronary atherosclerosis. In multivariate analysis, coronary atherosclerosis was associated high hs-CRP (adjusted OR: 2.832, uric acid (adjusted OR: 3.671 and low 25(OHD (adjusted OR: 0.689. Low levels of 25(OHD were associated with coronary atherosclerosis and plaque burden, but there was no significant correlation between 25(OHD and plaque morphology.

  16. Protective role for TLR4 signaling in atherosclerosis progression as revealed by infection with a common oral pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Chie; Papadopoulos, George; Gudino, Cynthia V; Weinberg, Ellen O; Barth, Kenneth R; Madrigal, Andrés G; Chen, Yang; Ning, Hua; LaValley, Michael; Gibson, Frank C; Hamilton, James A; Genco, Caroline A

    2012-10-01

    Clinical and epidemiological studies have implicated chronic infections in the development of atherosclerosis. It has been proposed that common mechanisms of signaling via TLRs link stimulation by multiple pathogens to atherosclerosis. However, how pathogen-specific stimulation of TLR4 contributes to atherosclerosis progression remains poorly understood. In this study, atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein-E null (ApoE(-/-)) and TLR4-deficient (ApoE(-/-)TLR4(-/-)) mice were orally infected with the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. ApoE(-/-)TLR4(-/-) mice were markedly more susceptible to atherosclerosis after oral infection with P. gingivalis. Using live animal imaging, we demonstrate that enhanced lesion progression occurs progressively and was increasingly evident with advancing age. Immunohistochemical analysis of lesions from ApoE(-/-)TLR4(-/-) mice revealed an increased inflammatory cell infiltrate composed primarily of macrophages and IL-17 effector T cells (Th17), a subset linked with chronic inflammation. Furthermore, enhanced atherosclerosis in TLR4-deficient mice was associated with impaired development of Th1 immunity and regulatory T cell infiltration. In vitro studies suggest that the mechanism of TLR4-mediated protective immunity may be orchestrated by dendritic cell IL-12 and IL-10, which are prototypic Th1 and regulatory T cell polarizing cytokines. We demonstrate an atheroprotective role for TLR4 in response to infection with the oral pathogen P. gingivalis. Our results point to a role for pathogen-specific TLR signaling in chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis.

  17. Features of metabolic disorders in the patients with diseases associated with atherosclerosis, on the background of functional bile outflow abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Gorbacheva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of evaluation of the pathogenetic relationship between atherosclerosis and functional abnormalities of the bile outflow. The main group included 54 patients with cardiovascular pathology and biliary dyskinesia. The group of comparison consisted of 20 patients with chronic coronary artery disease. The results suggest that the functional bile outflow abnormality is a risk factor of atherosclerosis progression leading to hypercholesterolemia and dyslipidemia, and should be considered in the development of integrated approaches to prevention and treatment of the diseases caused by atherosclerosis.

  18. ULTRASONOGRAPHIC ASSESSMENT OF COMMON CAROTID ARTERY ATHEROSCLEROSIS IN PATIENTS OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

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    Jayakumar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (R.A. have a marked increase in Carotid Atherosclerosis independent of traditional risk factors like family history of myocardial infarction in first degree male relatives younger than 55 years of age or first degree female relatives younger than 65 years of age, smoking, hypertension (D efined as blood pressure of 140/90 mm hg or higher, diabetes mellitus and fasting serum cholesterol levels including age. Chronic inflammation and possibly disease severity and duration are atherogenic in Rheumatoid Arthritis patients. Preclinical disease may also be identified by using ultrasonography to determine carotid intimal - media thickness, an indirect measure of atherosclerosis. The common carotid artery Intima media thickness in Rheumatoid Arthritis patients is positively associated with disease duration, Early Rheumatoid Arthritis (D uration less or = 1 year is associated with lesser Intima media thickness than was Rheumatoid Arthritis of longer duration. Increased carotid artery Intima media thickness and the presence of carotid plaque are associated with markers of systemic inflammation in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and in healthy subjects. OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY: To determine preclinical atherosclerosis occurring prematurely in patients of Rheumatoid Arthritis by ultrasonograhic measurement Common Carotid Artery Intima media thickness and to evaluate the risk factors associated with arterial intima media thickness in patient of Rheumatoid Arthritis. RESULTS: In RA patients, common carotid artery IMT was significantly higher when compared to healthy controls (0.65 ± 0.06 v/s 0.57 ± 0.049 and was significantly associated with the duration of RA, swollen joint count and erosive changes on hand x - ray independently of other confounding variables. CONCLUSION: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have a marked increase in carotid atherosclerosis independent of traditional risk factors

  19. Data in support of dyslipidemia-associated alterations in B cell subpopulations frequency and phenotype during experimental atherosclerosis

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    Héctor Rincón-Arévalo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in the world, atherosclerosis being its main underlying disease. Information about the role of B cells during atherosclerotic process is scarce, but both proatherogenic and atheroprotective properties have been described in the immunopathology of this disease. Frequency and phenotype of B cell subpopulations were studied in wild type and apolipoprotein-E-deficient (apoE−/− mice fed or not with high-fat diet (HFD, by flow cytometry. Here, we provide the information about the materials, methods, analysis and additional information related to our study published in Atherosclerosis (DOI: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2015.12.022, article reference: ATH14410 [1]. The data contained in this article shows and supports that mice with advanced atherosclerosis have a variety of alterations in frequency and phenotype of B cell subsets, most of which associated with dyslipidemia.

  20. Immunity and early atherosclerosis in the course of systemic lupus erythematosus, mixed connective tissue disease and antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haładyj, Ewa; Paradowska-Gorycka, Agnieszka; Felis-Giemza, Anna; Olesińska, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries associated with various risk factors that promote lipid abnormalities, development and progression of atherosclerotic lesions, plaque rupture, and vascular thrombosis. Atherosclerosis is accelerated in autoimmune diseases. Non-invasive investigations showed increased intima-media thickness (IMT), carotid plaque, and coronary artery calcifications in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus and mixed connective tissue disease compared to controls. The balance between the proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines allows the immune equilibrium to be maintained. In autoimmune diseases the prevalence of proinflammatory factors leads to premature atherosclerosis. This review presents complementary knowledge on innate and adaptive immunity, cytokines and the role of inflammasomes in progression of early atherosclerosis.

  1. Data in support of dyslipidemia-associated alterations in B cell subpopulations frequency and phenotype during experimental atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón-Arévalo, Héctor; Castaño, Diana; Villa-Pulgarín, Janny; Rojas, Mauricio; Vásquez, Gloria; Correa, Luis A.; Ramírez-Pineda, José R.; Yassin, Lina M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in the world, atherosclerosis being its main underlying disease. Information about the role of B cells during atherosclerotic process is scarce, but both proatherogenic and atheroprotective properties have been described in the immunopathology of this disease. Frequency and phenotype of B cell subpopulations were studied in wild type and apolipoprotein-E-deficient (apoE−/−) mice fed or not with high-fat diet (HFD), by flow cytometry. Here, we provide the information about the materials, methods, analysis and additional information related to our study published in Atherosclerosis (DOI: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2015.12.022, article reference: ATH14410) [1]. The data contained in this article shows and supports that mice with advanced atherosclerosis have a variety of alterations in frequency and phenotype of B cell subsets, most of which associated with dyslipidemia. PMID:27081674

  2. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), inflammation, and endothelial progenitor cells-New mechanistic insights of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Arnon

    2014-01-01

    Statins have been shown to favorably affect the prognosis of patients with risk factors to atherosclerosis-both as a primary and a secondary prevention. The beneficial effects observed with statin therapy are not merely related to changes in lipid profile but also are due to a positive effect on vascular inflammation and on immune-modulation of T lymphocytes and endothelial progenitor stem cells (EPCs). This dual effect has been demonstrated mainly in clinical trials where a change in endothelial function was observed within hours, much earlier than the effects of statins on the lipid profile (weeks). Based on all the knowledge that we have today questions were raised as to the mechanistic pathways that may explain the process of atherosclerosis and through this pathway to find better solutions and therapies to prevent and fight atherosclerosis. Our review will focus on the new updates in the field of inflammation and stem cells in vascular biology-in relation with atherosclerosis.

  3. Immunity and early atherosclerosis in the course of systemic lupus erythematosus, mixed connective tissue disease and antiphospholipid syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowska-Gorycka, Agnieszka; Felis-Giemza, Anna; Olesińska, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries associated with various risk factors that promote lipid abnormalities, development and progression of atherosclerotic lesions, plaque rupture, and vascular thrombosis. Atherosclerosis is accelerated in autoimmune diseases. Non-invasive investigations showed increased intima-media thickness (IMT), carotid plaque, and coronary artery calcifications in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus and mixed connective tissue disease compared to controls. The balance between the proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines allows the immune equilibrium to be maintained. In autoimmune diseases the prevalence of proinflammatory factors leads to premature atherosclerosis. This review presents complementary knowledge on innate and adaptive immunity, cytokines and the role of inflammasomes in progression of early atherosclerosis. PMID:27826173

  4. Skin autofluorescence, a non-invasive marker for AGE accumulation, is associated with the degree of atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn A M den Dekker

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs may be involved in the development of atherosclerosis, beyond diabetes and renal disease. Skin autofluorescence (AF is a non-invasive marker for AGEs. We examined whether skin AF is increased in (subclinical atherosclerosis and associated with the degree of atherosclerosis independent of diabetes and renal function. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 223 patients referred for primary (n = 163 or secondary (n = 60 prevention between 2006 and 2012 was performed. Skin AF was measured using the AGE-Reader. Ultrasonography was used to assess plaques in carotid and femoral arteries and computed tomography for the calculation of the coronary artery calcium score (CACS; in primary prevention only. Primary prevention patients were divided into a group with subclinical atherosclerosis defined as >1 plaque or CACS>100 (n = 67; age 53 year [interquartile range 48-56]; 49% male and without (controls; 96; 43 [38-51]; 55%. Secondary prevention were patients with peripheral arterial disease (60; 64 [58-70]; 73%. RESULTS: Skin AF was higher in subclinical and clinical atherosclerosis compared with controls (skin AF 2.11 [interquartile range 1.83-2.46] and 2.71 [2.15-3.27] vs. 1.87 [1.68-2.12] respectively; P = 0.005 and <0.001. In a multivariate analysis, the association of skin AF with the atherosclerosis categories was independent of age, sex, diabetes, presence of the metabolic syndrome, Framingham Risk Score, and renal function. Skin AF correlated with most cardiovascular risk factors, Framingham risk score, and IMT and CACS. CONCLUSIONS: Skin AF is increased in documented subclinical and clinical atherosclerosis, independent of known risk factors such as diabetes and renal disease. These data suggest that AGEs may be associated with the burden of atherosclerosis and warrant a prospective study to investigate its clinical usability as a risk assessment tool for primary prevention.

  5. Ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein, and central augmentation index to identify individuals with severe atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Nikolaj; Sillesen, Henrik; Prescott, Eva;

    2006-01-01

    We examined the ability of ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein and central augmentation index to identify individuals in the general population with severe atherosclerosis, diagnosed as those with ischaemic cardiovascular disease.......We examined the ability of ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein and central augmentation index to identify individuals in the general population with severe atherosclerosis, diagnosed as those with ischaemic cardiovascular disease....

  6. Reduction of Risk Factor Coagulation Oxidative Apolipoprotein and Development of Atherosclerosis by Apple Cider Vinegar in Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Apple cider vinegar is an antioxidant compound and it has many medical uses. In this research we have investigated effects of apple cider vinegar on some risk factors of atherosclerosis and on the development of atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic rabbit. Methods: Thirty two male New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into four groups: normal diet group high cholesterol diet group (%1cholesterol) %1 cholesterol with 5ml apple cider vinegar group and %1 cholesterol with 10...

  7. CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells reduce atherosclerosis in apoE(−/−) mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jianchang; Dimayuga, Paul C.; Zhao, Xiaoning; Yano, Juliana; Lio, Wai Man; Trinidad, Portia; Honjo, Tomoyuki; Cercek, Bojan; Shah, Prediman K.; Chyu, Kuang-Yuh, E-mail: Chyuk@cshs.org

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •The role of a sub-population of CD8{sup +} T cells with suppressor functions was investigated in atherosclerosis. •CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells from adult apoE(−/−) mice had phenotype characteristics of T suppressor cells. •These CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells reduced CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation and CD8{sup +} cytotoxic activity in vitro. •Adoptive transfer of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells significantly reduced atherosclerosis. •CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells have a suppressive function in atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Background: It is increasingly evident that CD8{sup +} T cells are involved in atherosclerosis but the specific subtypes have yet to be defined. CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells exert suppressive effects on immune signaling and modulate experimental autoimmune disorders but their role in atherosclerosis remains to be determined. The phenotype and functional role of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells in experimental atherosclerosis were investigated in this study. Methods and results: CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells were observed in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE(−/−) mice fed hypercholesterolemic diet. Characterization by flow cytometric analysis and functional evaluation using a CFSE-based proliferation assays revealed a suppressive phenotype and function of splenic CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells from apoE(−/−) mice. Depletion of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} from total CD8{sup +} T cells rendered higher cytolytic activity of the remaining CD8{sup +}CD25{sup −} T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells into apoE(−/−) mice suppressed the proliferation of splenic CD4{sup +} T cells and significantly reduced atherosclerosis in recipient mice. Conclusions: Our study has identified an athero-protective role for CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells in experimental atherosclerosis.

  8. Impact of local flow haemodynamics on atherosclerosis in coronary artery bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadis, Antonios P; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Joner, Michael; Giannoglou, George D; Virmani, Renu; Chatzizisis, Yiannis S

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery bifurcations are susceptible to atherosclerosis as a result of the unique local flow patterns and the subsequent endothelial shear stress (ESS) environment that are conducive to the development of plaques. Along the lateral walls of the main vessel and side branches, a distinct flow pattern is observed with local low and oscillatory ESS, while high ESS develops at the flow divider (carina). Histopathologic studies have shown that the distribution of plaque at bifurcation regions is related to the local ESS patterns. The local ESS profile also influences the outcome of percutaneous coronary interventions in bifurcation lesions. A variety of invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities have enabled 3D reconstruction of coronary bifurcations and thereby detailed local ESS assessment by computational fluid dynamics. Highly effective strategies for treatment and ultimately prevention of atherosclerosis in coronary bifurcations are anticipated with the use of advanced imaging and computational fluid dynamic techniques.

  9. The activated endocannabinoid system in atherosclerosis: driving force or protective mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, Sabine; Pacher, Pal

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and its major acute complications, myocardial infarction and stroke, are the leading causes of death and morbidity worldwide. Despite major advances in cardiovascular intervention and healthcare, improving preventive care and treatment remains a continuous mission for cardiovascular research. Within the last 10 to 15 years, the endocannabinoid system has emerged as an important lipid signaling system involved in many biological processes. Growing evidence suggests that an overactive endocannabinoid-CB1 receptor signaling promotes the development of cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. This prompted an increasing interest in studying the role of the endocannabinoid system in atherosclerosis. As opposed to the detrimental actions of CB1 signaling, the endocannabinoid-CB2 receptor axis exhibits an anti-inflammatory and atheroprotective role. We will review recent findings from experimental and clinical studies aimed at understanding the complex actions of endocannabinoid signaling in cardiovascular disease. This is followed by an outlook on emerging targets for possible therapeutic intervention.

  10. Stanol esters attenuate the aggravating effect of dietary cholesterol on atherosclerosis in homozygous Watanabe rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Malene; Husche, Constanze; Pilegaard, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    Plant stanols are marketed as natural means to lower blood cholesterol in humans; hence the effect on combined familial hyperlipidemia is not known. The objective was to investigate the effect of stanol esters on blood lipids and aortic atherosclerosis in homozygous WHHL rabbits challenged...... with dietary cholesterol. A total of 36 rabbits, 6 weeks of age, with initial plasma cholesterol of 22.5 mmol/L were assigned to two treatment groups fed a standard rabbit chow with 1 g/kg cholesterol or this diet added 34 g/kg stanol ester, respectively, for 16 weeks. Plasma cholesterol was measured initially...... and at termination, also in lipoproteins. Aortic atherosclerosis was evaluated as cholesterol content and area covered by plaque. Plasma cholesterol was not significantly different between the groups at termination (35.7 mmol/L vs. 35.5 mmol/L). A significant increase in LDL was seen (13.1 mmol/L vs. 16.5 mmol...

  11. Suppressive effects of cacao polyphenols on the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Midori; Baba, Seigo

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies in humans have shown that the cacao polyphenols, (-)-epicatechin and its oligomers, prevent in vitro and ex vivo low-density lipoprotein oxidation mediated by free radical generators and metal ions and also reduce plasma LDL-cholesterol levels. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of cacao polyphenols on the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (-/-) mice. Mice aged 8 weeks (n = 90) were randomized into three groups, and fed either normal mouse chow (controls) or chow supplemented with 0.25 or 0.40 % cacao polyphenols for 16 weeks. The mean plaque area in cross-sections of the brachiocephalic trunk was measured and found to be lower in the 0.25 % cacao polyphenol group than in the control group (p cacao polyphenol group (p cacao polyphenols inhibit the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (-/-) mice by reducing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses.

  12. Vector flow imaging of the ascending aorta. Are systolic backflow and atherosclerosis related?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    In the ascending aorta, atherosclerotic plaque formation, which is a risk factor for cerebrovascular events, most often occurs along the inner curvature. Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease, but the predilection site for the aortic vessel degradation is probably flow dependent. To better...... understand the aortic flow and especially the complex flow patterns, the ascending aorta was scanned intraoperatively in patients undergoing heart surgery using the angle-independent vector velocity ultrasound method Transverse Oscillation (TO). The primary aim of the study was to analyze systolic backflow...... on the ascending aorta in long axis view. The presence of systolic backflow, visualized with TO, was correlated to aortic atherosclerosis, to systolic velocities obtained with transesophageal echocardiography and cardiac output obtained with pulmonary artery catheter thermodilution, to gender, age, aortic diameter...

  13. DENTAL INFECTIONS AND THE ATHEROSCLEROSIS RISK IN A SUBPOPULATION OF SOUTH ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Andrei ILIESCU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease and chronic apical periodontitis are considered risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. This cross-sectional study, performed in a subpopulation living in the South area of Romania, investigated the association between the afore-mentioned oral lesions and atherosclerosis. The research was focused on common carotid artery intima-media wall thickness IMT and dislipidemia, in a batch of 30 hypertensive subjects, age 41-50. Over 40% of the patients diagnosed with periodontal disease and/or chronic apical periodontitis developed subclinical atherosclerosis. Associated dyslipidemia to an increased IMT over 0.9 mm in subjects affected by periodontal disease or combined lesions with chronic apical periodontitis might be considered a strong predictor of future cardiovascular events.

  14. Association Between Kidney Dysfunction and Carotid Atherosclerosis in Community-Based Older Adults in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiang; Fang, Xianghua; Hua, Yang; Tang, Zhe; Ji, Xunming; Guan, Shaochen; Wu, Xiaoguang; Liu, Hongjun; Liu, Beibei; Wang, Chunxiu; Zhang, Zhongying

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the association between kidney dysfunction and carotid atherosclerosis in community-based older adults. This study consisted of 1257 participants, aged 55 years and older and free of cardiovascular disease. Kidney dysfunction was classified as mild, moderate, and severe (estimated glomerular filtration rate, 45-59, 30-44, and kidney function (P kidney dysfunction was significantly associated with CCA-IMT thickening (CCA-IMT ≥1.0 mm; odds ratio [OR] 1.52; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16-1.99) compared to normal kidney function. A significantly increased presence of heterogeneous plaque was observed in relation to decreased kidney function (P for trend = .011), that is, even a mild kidney dysfunction was a potential independent risk factor for heterogeneous plaque (OR 1.43; 95% CI 1.04-1.98). Mild kidney dysfunction may be a predictor of early or accelerated carotid atherosclerosis in older adults.

  15. Zinc deficiency in chronic kidney disease: is there a relationship with adipose tissue and atherosclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Julie Calixto; Torres, João Paulo Machado; Fouque, Denis; Mafra, Denise

    2010-06-01

    Cardiovascular complications caused by an accelerated atherosclerotic disease consist the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). These patients present multiple atherosclerotic risk factors, considered traditional, as well as nontraditional risk factors such as inflammation and oxidative stress. These complications are also seen in obesity, in which endothelial dysfunction is one of the early stages of atherosclerosis. The impact of trace metal deficiencies on this process is not well studied in patients with CKD and in obese people, although the influence of trace elements depletion, particularly zinc (Zn), may have significant clinical implications. This brief review describes the functions of Zn as well as the respective role of this trace element in atherosclerosis processes, with a particular emphasis on obese patients with chronic kidney disease.

  16. Decreased natural killer cell activity is associated with atherosclerosis in elderly humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruunsgaard, H.; Pedersen, Agnes Nadelmann; Schroll, M.;

    2001-01-01

    of elderly humans. It was tested if the potential of natural cytotoxicity in the blood (evaluated as an index including cytotoxicity per NK cell and the number of circulating NK cells) was preserved in 174 81-yearold humans versus 91 young controls and if NK cell mediated immunity was associated with age......-related inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. Elderly people had decreased cytotoxicity per NK cell in short-term but not in long-term assays. Ca2+ independent cytotoxicity was unaltered, and NK cells maintained their cytotoxic responses to interleukin-2 and interferon-alpha signals. The decreased...... cytotoxicity per NK cell was not completely counteracted by increased circulating numbers of NK cells in the blood. Elderly people with severe medical disorders had low numbers of circulating NK cells. Furthermore, elderly people with atherosclerosis had low cytotoxicity per NK cell and a high number...

  17. Atherosclerosis in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice fed cholesterol and soybean oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Alicja; Olsen, P.; Frandsen, H.

    1999-01-01

    In order to study aortic atherosclerosis and atherosclerotic response to dietary cholesterol and soybean oil in homozygous LDLR-/- mice, the 16 weeks old animals were randomized in 4 groups either fed standard diet (no cholesterol added, group I, 12 male and 12 female), standard diet added 0.......9 +/- 0.07 (group III), 32.6 +/-0.1 (group IV), and of females 6.9 +/- 2.7 (group I) and 31.7 +/- 4.4 (group II). No apparent difference in plasma triglyceride levels was observed between the groups of either sexes. Aortic atherosclerosis (ratio intima/media) in males was 0.17 +/- 0.09 (SD) (group I), 0...

  18. Association between atherosclerosis and female lung cancer--a Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Lene; Prescott, Eva; Gyntelberg, Finn

    2003-01-01

    identified 2261 1-year survivors of atherosclerotic diseases through 1977 and 1993, while 26150 of the study subjects had no record of an atherosclerotic diagnosis. After linkage to the Danish Cancer Registry associations between atherosclerosis and cancer were analysed for each sex separately by means...... risk of male lung cancer, RR=1.12 (95% CI: 0.77-1.64), or other smoking-related cancers in either sex was observed after multivariate adjustment. Atherosclerosis did not predict non-smoking-related cancers in general in either men, RR=0.91 (95% CI 0.69-1.20), or women, RR=0.93 (95% CI: 0.64-1.35). We...

  19. Intimal pericytes as the second line of immune defence in atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ekaterina; A; Ivanova; Yuri; V; Bobryshev; Alexander; N; Orekhov

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation plays an essential role in the development of atherosclerosis. The initiation and growth of atherosclerotic plaques is accompanied by recruitment of inflammatory and precursor cells from the bloodstream and their differentiation towards pro-inflammatory phenotypes. This process is orchestrated by the production of a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Human arterial intima consists of structurally distinct leaflets, with a proteoglycan-rich layer lying immediately below the endothelial lining. Recent studies reveal the important role of stellate pericyte-like cells(intimal pericytes) populating the proteoglycan-rich layer in the development of atherosclerosis. During the pathologic process, intimal pericytes may participate in the recruitment of inflammatory cells by producing signalling molecules and play a role in the antigen presentation. Intimal pericytes are also involved in lipid accumulation and the formation of foam cells. This review focuses on the role of pericytelike cells in the development of atherosclerotic lesions.

  20. Distinct Functions of Specialized Dendritic Cell Subsets in Atherosclerosis and the Road Ahead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Zernecke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic vascular disease is modulated by immune mechanisms. Dendritic cells (DCs and T cells are present within atherosclerotic lesions and function as central players in the initiation and modulation of adaptive immune responses. In previous years, we have studied the functional contribution of distinct DC subsets in disease development, namely, that of CCL17-expressing DCs as well as that of plasmacytoid DCs that play specialized roles in disease development. This review focuses on important findings gathered in these studies and dissects the multifaceted contribution of CCL17-expressing DCs and pDCs to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Furthermore, an outlook on future challenges faced when studying DCs in this detrimental disease are provided, and hurdles that will need to be overcome in order to enable a better understanding of the contribution of DCs to atherogenesis are discussed, a prerequisite for their therapeutic targeting in atherosclerosis.

  1. Animal models of surgically manipulated flow velocities to study shear stress-induced atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Leah C; Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Xing, Ruoyu; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Van der Heiden, Kim

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial tree that develops at predisposed sites, coinciding with locations that are exposed to low or oscillating shear stress. Manipulating flow velocity, and concomitantly shear stress, has proven adequate to promote endothelial activation and subsequent plaque formation in animals. In this article, we will give an overview of the animal models that have been designed to study the causal relationship between shear stress and atherosclerosis by surgically manipulating blood flow velocity profiles. These surgically manipulated models include arteriovenous fistulas, vascular grafts, arterial ligation, and perivascular devices. We review these models of manipulated blood flow velocity from an engineering and biological perspective, focusing on the shear stress profiles they induce and the vascular pathology that is observed.

  2. Predictors of mortality in dialysis patients: Association between malnutrition, inflammation and atherosclerosis (Mia syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Introduction Numerous recent studies have shown increased comorbidity and mortality in dialysis patients with malnutrition. Protein-energy malnutrition with muscle wasting occurs in a large proportion of patients with chronic renal failure and is, in addition to atherosclerosis, a strong risk factor for mortality in patients undergoing dialysis. Malnutrition is also associated with increased cardiovascular mortality in dialysis patients. Pathogenic factors of malnutrition in dialysis patients...

  3. Effects of aspirin on atherosclerosis and the cyclooxygenase-2 expression in atherosclerotic rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yi; WANG Qi-zhang; TANG Bing-shan; ZUO Yan-fang; LI Fang-ming; JIANG Xin; WANG Ling; MA Ke-fu

    2006-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is a complex vascular inflammatory disease. Aspirin is a mainstay in the prevention of vascular complications of atherosclerosis. In this study, the effectiveness of aspirin in suppressing atherosclerosis and the inflammation process was evaluated in rabbits fed with a high fat diet.Methods Eighteen male New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into 3 groups: control group, untreated cholesterol-fed group, aspirin treated cholesterol-fed group, which were fed for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks, the aorta was harvested for pathologic morphology observation. Immunohistochemical analysis of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), macrophage and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) was performed. The statistical analysis was performed by the statistical program SPSS 10.0.Results The aorta plaque/intima size (P/I) by pathologic morphology observation was 0%, (59.6± 13.7)% and (36.3± 16.5)% in the control, untreated cholesterol-fed group and aspirin treated group, respectively. The maximum plaque thickness, the degree of artery stenosis and the proportion of the intimal circumference occupied by atheroma of the 3 groups were significantly different from each other (P<0.01). The expression of COX-2 and macrophage in plaque of the aspirin treated group were decreased compared with that in untreated cholesterol-fed group. However, no difference was found in the expression of VSMC between the aspirin treated and the untreated cholesterol-fed group.Conclusion The mechanism of atherosclerosis suppression by aspirin in cholesterol-fed rabbits is related to the inhibition of COX-2 expression together with the reduced inflammation followed by, but not related to the hypolipidemic effects.

  4. Microparticle-Induced Coagulation Relates to Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Horn

    Full Text Available Circulating microparticles (MPs derived from endothelial cells and blood cells bear procoagulant activity and promote thrombin generation. Thrombin exerts proinflammatory effects mediating the progression of atherosclerosis. Aortic valve stenosis may represent an atherosclerosis-like process involving both the aortic valve and the vascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate whether MP-induced thrombin generation is related to coronary atherosclerosis and aortic valve calcification.In a cross-sectional study of 55 patients with severe aortic valve stenosis, we assessed the coronary calcification score (CAC as indicator of total coronary atherosclerosis burden, and aortic valve calcification (AVC by computed tomography. Thrombin-antithrombin complex (TATc levels were measured as a marker for thrombin formation. Circulating MPs were characterized by flow cytometry according to the expression of established surface antigens and by measuring MP-induced thrombin generation.Patients with CAC score below the median were classified as patients with low CAC, patients with CAC Score above the median as high CAC. In patients with high CAC compared to patients with low CAC we detected higher levels of TATc, platelet-derived MPs (PMPs, endothelial-derived MPs (EMPs and MP-induced thrombin generation. Increased level of PMPs and MP-induced thrombin generation were independent predictors for the severity of CAC. In contrast, AVC Score did not differ between patients with high and low CAC and did neither correlate with MPs levels nor with MP-induced thrombin generation.In patients with severe aortic valve stenosis MP-induced thrombin generation was independently associated with the severity of CAC but not AVC indicating different pathomechanisms involved in coronary artery and aortic valve calcification.

  5. Baldness and myocardial infarction in men: the atherosclerosis risk in communities study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahar, Eyal; Heiss, Gerardo; Rosamond, Wayne D; Szklo, Moyses

    2008-03-15

    Because hair loss may be a surrogate measure of androgenic activity-possibly a determinant of coronary atherosclerosis-several studies have explored the presence and magnitude of an association between male pattern baldness and myocardial infarction (MI). In particular, vertex baldness, but not frontal baldness alone, was strongly associated with incident MI in a large, hospital-based, case-control study. The authors examined these associations in a cross-sectional sample of 5,056 men aged 52-75 years, of whom 767 had a history of MI. The sample was derived from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study (1987-1998). As compared with a baldness-free reference group, the estimated odds ratios for prevalent MI from a multivariable model were 1.28 (frontal baldness), 1.02 (mild vertex baldness), 1.40 (moderate vertex baldness), and 1.18 (severe vertex baldness). Other regression models have yielded similar results, including the absence of a monotonic "dose-response relation" between the extent of vertex baldness and prevalent MI. The authors also examined the relation of baldness pattern to carotid intimal-medial thickness, a measure of atherosclerosis, among those who were free of clinical cardiovascular disease. The estimated mean differences in carotid intimal-medial thickness between groups of men with various types of baldness and their baldness-free counterparts were all close to zero. The results of this study suggest that male pattern baldness is not a surrogate measure of an important risk factor for myocardial infarction or asymptomatic atherosclerosis.

  6. Subclinical atherosclerosis in northern and southern China:the Chinese paradox

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Huang; Stanley P Azen; Robert C Detrano; Yang-Feng Wu; Xiao-Qing Liu; Ding Ding; Lian-Cheng Zhao; Bin Lu; Man Li; Nathan D Wong; Laurie D Dustin

    2011-01-01

    Background The incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) is higher in Northern than that in Southern China ,however differences in traditional CHD risk factors do not fully explain this.No study has examined the differences in subclinical atherosclerosis that may help explain the differences in incidence. This study examined these differences in subclinical atherosclerosis using coronary computed tomography(CT]for calcification between the Northern and Southern China.Methods.We selected a random sample of participants in a large multi-center ongoing epidemiologic study for coronary calcium scanning in one northern city (North) (Beijing,n=49) and in two southern cities (South) (Shanghai,n=50,and Guangzhou,n=50).Participants firm the three field centers (mean age 67 years) underwent coronary risk factor evaluation and cardiac CT scanning for coronary calcium measurement using the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis scanning protocol.Results Adjusted log-transformed coronary artery calcium score in North China (Beijing) was 3.1±0.4 and in South China (Shanghai and Guangzhou) was 2.2±0.3 (P=0.04).Mean calcium score for the northern city of Beijing was three times higher thanthat of the southern city of Guangzhou (P=0.01) and 2.5 times higher than for the southern city of Shanghai (P = 0.03).Conclusions The extent of subclinical atherosclerosis is significantly higher in the northern city of Beijing than that in the two southern cities of Guangzhou and Shanghai,even after adjusting for standard cardiac risk factors.This finding suggests that standard risk factors do not fully explain north south differences in clinical CHD incidence.

  7. Neuropeptide Y gene polymorphisms confer risk of early-onset atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svati H Shah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide Y (NPY is a strong candidate gene for coronary artery disease (CAD. We have previously identified genetic linkage to familial CAD in the genomic region of NPY. We performed follow-up genetic, biostatistical, and functional analysis of NPY in early-onset CAD. In familial CAD (GENECARD, N = 420 families, we found increased microsatellite linkage to chromosome 7p14 (OSA LOD = 4.2, p = 0.004 in 97 earliest age-of-onset families. Tagged NPY SNPs demonstrated linkage to CAD of a 6-SNP block (LOD = 1.58-2.72, family-based association of this block with CAD (p = 0.02, and stronger linkage to CAD in the earliest age-of-onset families. Association of this 6-SNP block with CAD was validated in: (a 556 non-familial early-onset CAD cases and 256 controls (OR 1.46-1.65, p = 0.01-0.05, showing stronger association in youngest cases (OR 1.84-2.20, p = 0.0004-0.09; and (b GENECARD probands versus non-familial controls (OR 1.79-2.06, p = 0.003-0.02. A promoter SNP (rs16147 within this 6-SNP block was associated with higher plasma NPY levels (p = 0.04. To assess a causal role of NPY in atherosclerosis, we applied the NPY1-receptor-antagonist BIBP-3226 adventitially to endothelium-denuded carotid arteries of apolipoprotein E-deficient mice; treatment reduced atherosclerotic neointimal area by 50% (p = 0.03. Thus, NPY variants associate with atherosclerosis in two independent datasets (with strong age-of-onset effects and show allele-specific expression with NPY levels, while NPY receptor antagonism reduces atherosclerosis in mice. We conclude that NPY contributes to atherosclerosis pathogenesis.

  8. Particulate matter and atherosclerosis: role of particle size, composition and oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Air Pollution has been associated with significant adverse health effects leading to increased morbidity and mortality. Cumulative epidemiological and experimental data have shown that exposure to air pollutants lead to increased cardiovascular ischemic events and enhanced atherosclerosis. It appears that these associations are much stronger with the air particulate matter (PM) component and that in urban areas, the smaller particles could be more pathogenic, as a result of their gre...

  9. Relationship between serum adiopocyte fatty acid binding protein and atherosclerosis in chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴晶

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of serum adiopocyte fatty acid binding protein(A-FABP)in chronic kidney disease(CKD)and the role that A-FABP plays in CKD with atherosclerosis.Methods A total of 138 patients with CKD and 20 health control volunteers(HC)were involved in this study.The levels of serum AFABP,free fatty acid(FFA),interleukin-6(IL-6),

  10. Protective effects of Arctium lappa L. root extracts (AREs) on high fat diet induced quail atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was designed to evaluate the protective effects of Arctium lappa L. root extracts (AREs) from different extraction methods (aqueous, ethanol, chloroform and flavone) on atherosclerosis. Methods Quails (Coturnix coturnix) were subjected to high fat diet, with or without one of the four different AREs or positive control simvastatin. Blood samples were collected before treatment, after 4.5 weeks or ten weeks to assess lipid profile (Levels of total cholesterol (TC), Triacy...

  11. A Pathological Study of the Epidemiology of Atherosclerosis in Mexico City

    OpenAIRE

    Joel Rodríguez-Saldaña; Marcela Rodriguez-Flores; Carlos Cantú-Brito; Jesús Aguirre-Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To examine the frequency and patterns of association of cardiovascular risk factors with atherosclerosis in five different arterial territories at post-mortem in Mexico City. Methods. We obtained five arterial territories arteries (circle of Willis, coronary, carotid, renal, and aorta) of 185 men and women 0 to 90 years of age who underwent autopsy at the Medical Forensic Service of Mexico City. We determined the prevalence and extent of atherosclerotic lesions by histopathology ac...

  12. Human oxidation-specific antibodies reduce foam cell formation and atherosclerosis progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsimikas, Sotirios; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Hartvigsen, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    We sought to assess the in vivo importance of scavenger receptor (SR)-mediated uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) in atherogenesis and to test the efficacy of human antibody IK17-Fab or IK17 single-chain Fv fragment (IK17-scFv), which lacks immunologic properties of intact antibod...... antibodies other than the ability to inhibit uptake of OxLDL by macrophages, to inhibit atherosclerosis....

  13. Traveling Wave Solutions of Reaction-Diffusion Equations Arising in Atherosclerosis Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narcisa Apreutesei

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this short review article, two atherosclerosis models are presented, one as a scalar equation and the other one as a system of two equations. They are given in terms of reaction-diffusion equations in an infinite strip with nonlinear boundary conditions. The existence of traveling wave solutions is studied for these models. The monostable and bistable cases are introduced and analyzed.

  14. Intracranial angioplasty and stenting for cerebral atherosclerosis: new treatments for stroke are needed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashida, Randall T. [San Francisco Medical Center, Division of Interventional Neurovascular Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Meyers, Philip M. [Columbia University, The Neurological Institute, New York Presbyterian Hospitals, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is a common cause of stroke. Recent technological developments offer improved methods for endovascular revascularization of symptomatic and asymptomatic cerebral artery stenosis. Identification of appropriate patients remains a diagnostic challenge, and our knowledge about the natural history of the disease remains limited. At this time, patients with significant intracranial stenosis should receive counseling on the benefits and risks of revascularization therapy. Ultimately, determination of which patients should undergo revascularization procedures will require carefully planned, randomized clinical trials. (orig.)

  15. Low heart-type fatty acid binding protein level during aging may protect down syndrome people against atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vianello Elena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aging is considered an important independent risk factor for atherosclerosis. Down syndrome people (DS display an accelerated aging process compared to healthy subjects, anyway they are relatively resistant to developing atherosclerosis. The mechanisms involved in such protective effect are not well known. Since heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP is a protein involved in the transport of fatty acids and it has been recently correlated with the presence of atherosclerosis, we aimed to measure H-FABP level both in DS and in healthy subjects during aging to evaluate the association between this molecule, aging and atherosclerosis. Findings We quantified plasmatic H-FABP level in three groups of male DS and age-matched healthy subjects (children, age 2–14 years; adults, age 20–50 years; elderly, > 60 years using a biochip array analyzer. We observed that aging is associated with increased H-FABP level in healthy subjects but not in DS which display both the same protein level in the different ages of life and have also lower level compared to their age-matched healthy subjects. Conclusion Reduced H-FABP level during aging in DS may play a protective role against atherosclerosis. The potential involvement of H-FABP in the relationship between aging, atherosclerosis and development of coronary artery disease needs further investigations.

  16. Marked Acceleration of Atherosclerosis following Lactobacillus casei induced Coronary Arteritis in a Mouse Model of Kawasaki Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuang; Lee, Young Ho; Crother, Timothy R.; Fishbein, Michael; Zhang, Wenxuan; Yilmaz, Atilla; Shimada, Kenichi; Schulte, Danica J; Lehman, Thomas J.A.; Shah, Prediman K.; Arditi, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate if Lactobacillus casei cell wall extract (LCWE)-induced Kawasaki Disease (KD) accelerates atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice. Method and Resuslts Apoe−/− or Ldlr−/− mice were injected with LCWE (KD mice) or PBS, fed high fat diet for 8 weeks, and atherosclerotic lesions in aortic sinuses (AS), arch (AC) and whole aorta were assessed. KD mice had larger, more complex aortic lesions with abundant collagen, and both extracellular and intracellular lipid and foam cells, compared to lesions in control mice despite similar cholesterol levels. Both Apoe−/− KD and Ldlr−/− KD mice showed dramatic acceleration in atherosclerosis vs. controls, with increases in en face aortic atherosclerosis and plaque size in both the AS and AC plaques. Accelerated atherosclerosis was associated with increased circulating IL-12p40, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and increased macrophage, DC, and T cell recruitment in lesions. Furthermore, daily injections of the IL-1Ra, which inhibits LCWE induced KD vasculitis, prevented the acceleration of atherosclerosis. Conclusions Our results suggest an important pathophysiologic link between coronary arteritis/vasculitis in the KD mouse model and subsequent atherosclerotic acceleration, supporting the concept that a similar relation may also be present in KD patients. These results also suggest that KD in childhood may predispose to accelerated and early atherosclerosis as adults. PMID:22628430

  17. Pathogen-mediated inflammatory atherosclerosis is mediated in part via Toll-like receptor 2-induced inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Chie; Madrigal, Andres G; Liu, Xinyan; Ukai, Takashi; Goswami, Sulip; Gudino, Cynthia V; Gibson, Frank C; Genco, Caroline A

    2010-01-01

    Studies in humans have established that polymorphisms in genes encoding the innate immune Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are associated with inflammatory atherosclerosis. In hyperlipidemic mice, TLR2 and TLR4 have been reported to contribute to atherosclerosis progression. Human and mouse studies support a role for the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis in atherosclerosis, although the mechanisms by which this pathogen stimulates inflammatory atherosclerosis via innate immune system activation is not known. Using a genetically defined apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mouse model we demonstrate that pathogen-mediated inflammatory atherosclerosis occurs via both TLR2-dependent and TLR2-independent mechanisms. P. gingivalis infection in mice possessing functional TLR2 induced the accumulation of macrophages as well as inflammatory mediators including CD40, IFN-gamma and the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1 beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in atherosclerotic lesions. The expression of these inflammatory mediators was reduced in atherosclerotic lesions from P. gingivalis-infected TLR2-deficient (TLR2(-/-)) mice. These studies provide a mechanistic link between an innate immune receptor and pathogen-accelerated atherosclerosis by a clinically and biologically relevant bacterial pathogen.

  18. Water-Soluble Components of Sesame Oil Reduce Inflammation and Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhulu, Chandrakala Aluganti; Selvarajan, Krithika; Burge, Kathryn Young; Litvinov, Dmitry; Sengupta, Bhaswati; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerosis, a major form of cardiovascular disease, is now recognized as a chronic inflammatory disease. Nonpharmacological means of treating chronic diseases have gained attention recently. We previously reported that sesame oil aqueous extract (SOAE) has anti-inflammatory properties, both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we have investigated the antiatherosclerotic properties of SOAE, and the mechanisms, through genes and inflammatory markers, by which SOAE might modulate atherosclerosis. Low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) knockout female mice were fed with either a high-fat (HF) diet or an HF diet supplemented with SOAE. Plasma lipids and atherosclerotic lesions were quantified after 3 months of feeding. Plasma samples were used for global cytokine array. RNA was extracted from both liver tissue and the aorta, and used for gene analysis. The high-fat diet supplemented with SOAE significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesions, plasma cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol levels in LDL-R(-/-) mice. Plasma inflammatory cytokines were reduced in the SOAE diet-fed animals, but not significantly, demonstrating potential anti-inflammatory properties of SOAE. Gene analysis showed the HF diet supplemented with SOAE reduced gene expression involved in inflammation and induced genes involved in cholesterol metabolism and reverse cholesterol transport, an anti-inflammatory process. Our studies suggest that a SOAE-enriched diet could be an effective nonpharmacological treatment for atherosclerosis by controlling inflammation and regulating lipid metabolism.

  19. Protectors or Traitors: The Roles of PON2 and PON3 in Atherosclerosis and Cancer

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    Ines Witte

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer and atherosclerosis are major causes of death in western societies. Deregulated cell death is common to both diseases, with significant contribution of inflammatory processes and oxidative stress. These two form a vicious cycle and regulate cell death pathways in either direction. This raises interest in antioxidative systems. The human enzymes paraoxonase-2 (PON2 and PON3 are intracellular enzymes with established antioxidative effects and protective functions against atherosclerosis. Underlying molecular mechanisms, however, remained elusive until recently. Novel findings revealed that both enzymes locate to mitochondrial membranes where they interact with coenzyme Q10 and diminish oxidative stress. As a result, ROS-triggered mitochondrial apoptosis and cell death are reduced. From a cardiovascular standpoint, this is beneficial given that enhanced loss of vascular cells and macrophage death forms the basis for atherosclerotic plaque development. However, the same function has now been shown to raise chemotherapeutic resistance in several cancer cells. Intriguingly, PON2 as well as PON3 are frequently found upregulated in tumor samples. Here we review studies reporting PON2/PON3 deregulations in cancer, summarize most recent findings on their anti-oxidative and antiapoptotic mechanisms, and discuss how this could be used in putative future therapies to target atherosclerosis and cancer.

  20. Apolipoprotein E4 domain interaction accelerates diet-induced atherosclerosis in hypomorphic Arg-61 Apoe mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlé, Delphine; Kim, Roy Y.; Luk, Fu Sang; de Mochel, Nabora Soledad Reyes; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Olivas, Victor R.; Kumar, Nikit; Posada, Jessica M.; Birkeland, Andrew C.; Rapp, Joseph H.; Raffai, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Apolipoprotein (apo) E4 is an established risk factor for atherosclerosis, but the structural components underlying this association remain unclear. ApoE4 is characterized by two biophysical properties: domain interaction and molten globule state. Substituting Arg-61 for Thr-61 in mouse apoE introduces domain interaction without molten globule state, allowing us to delineate potential pro-atherogenic effects of domain interaction in vivo. Methods and Results We studied atherosclerosis susceptibility of hypomorphic Apoe mice expressing either Thr-61 or Arg-61 apoE (ApoeTh/h or ApoeRh/h mice). On a chow diet, both mouse models were normo-lipidemic with similar levels of plasma apoE and lipoproteins. However, on a high cholesterol diet, ApoeRh/h mice displayed increased levels of total plasma cholesterol and VLDL as well as larger atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic root, arch and descending aorta compared to ApoeTh/h mice. In addition, evidence of cellular dysfunction was identified in peritoneal ApoeRh/h macrophages which released lower amounts of apoE in culture medium and displayed increased expression of MHC class II molecules. Conclusions These data indicate that domain interaction mediates pro-atherogenic effects of apoE4 in part by modulating lipoprotein metabolism and macrophage biology. Pharmaceutical targeting of domain interaction could lead to new treatments for atherosclerosis in apoE4 individuals. PMID:22441102

  1. Can an Antibiotic (Macrolide) Prevent Chlamydia pneumoniae-Induced Atherosclerosis in a Rabbit Model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Ignatius W.; Chiu, Brian; Viira, Esther; Jang, Dan; Fong, Michael W.; Peeling, Rosanna; Mahony, James B.

    1999-01-01

    There is increasing data implicating Chlamydia pneumoniae in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and antibiotics may theoretically be useful to prevent secondary vascular complications. Three groups of New Zealand White specific-pathogen-free rabbits, fed cholesterol-free chow, were inoculated via the nasopharynx on three occasions, 2 weeks apart, with C. pneumoniae. Group I (n = 23) rabbits were untreated; group II (n = 24) rabbits were treated with azithromycin at 30 mg/kg of body weight daily for 3 days and then once every 6 days, starting 5 days after first inoculation and continuing until sacrifice (early treatment); and group III (n = 24) rabbits were treated with the same dose of azithromycin but initiated 2 weeks after the last inoculation. All animals were sacrificed at 10 to 11 weeks after initial inoculation and examined for signs of atherosclerosis of the aorta. Eight (34.8%) untreated rabbits developed early signs of atherosclerosis, whereas only one (4.2%) in the early-treatment group had such signs (P = 0.02). However, eight rabbits (33.3%) of the delayed-treatment group had atherosclerotic changes of the aorta and no significant reduction compared to untreated rabbits. Early treatment of C. pneumoniae-infected rabbits with azithromycin was highly effective (87%) in preventing atherosclerotic changes, but delayed treatment was ineffective. It is possible that longer or more aggressive antibiotic treatment may be needed to reverse preformed lesions or that antibiotics may not be of value once lesions have formed. PMID:10548582

  2. Identification of total reversible cysteine oxidation in an atherosclerosis model using a modified biotin switch assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ru; Huang, Jiqing; Kast, Juergen

    2015-05-01

    Oxidative stress due to the imbalance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the resulting reversible cysteine oxidation (CysOX) are involved in the early proatherogenic aspect of atherosclerosis. Given that the corresponding redox signaling pathways are still unclear, a modified biotin switch assay was developed to quantify the reversible CysOX in an atherosclerosis model established by using a monocytic cell line treated with platelet releasate. The accumulation of ROS was observed in the model system and validated in human primary monocytes. Through the application of the modified biotin switch assay, we obtained the first reversible CysOX proteome for this model. A total of 75 peptides, corresponding to 53 proteins, were quantified with oxidative modification. The bioinformatics analysis of these CysOX-containing proteins highlighted biological processes including glycolysis, cytoskeleton arrangement, and redox regulation. Moreover, the reversible oxidation of three glycolysis enzymes was observed using this method, and the regulation influence was verified by an enzyme activity assay. NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibition treatment, in conjunction with the modified biotin switch method, was used to evaluate the global CysOX status. In conclusion, this versatile modified biotin switch assay provides an approach for the quantification of all reversible CysOX and for the study of redox signaling in atherosclerosis as well as in diseases in other biological systems.

  3. Association of periodontitis with rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis: Novel paradigms in etiopathogeneses and management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soory, Mena

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing documentation of a link between inflammatory periodontal disease affecting the supporting structure of teeth, rheumatoid arthritis, and coronary artery disease. Periodontitis is initiated predominantly by Gram-negative bacteria and progresses as a consequence of the host inflammatory response to periodontal pathogens. Lipopolysaccharide, a cell wall constituent stimulates the production of inflammatory cytokines via the activation of signaling pathways perpetuating inflammatory pathogenesis in a cyclical manner in susceptible individuals; with an element of autoimmune stimulation, not dissimilar to the sequential events seen in RA. Periodontitis, also implicated as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, promotes mechanisms for atherosclerosis by enhancing an imbalance in systemic inflammatory mediators; more direct mechanisms attributed to microbial products are also implicated in both RA and atherogenesis. Severe periodontal disease characterized by clinical and radiographic parameters has been associated with ischemic stroke risk, significant levels of C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A, amongst others common to both periodontitis and atherosclerosis. Existing data supports the hypothesis that persistent localized infection in periodontitis may influence systemic levels of inflammatory markers and pose a risk for RA and atherosclerosis. A common nucleus of activity in their pathogeneses provides novel paradigms of therapeutic targeting for reciprocal benefit.

  4. Pycnogenol attenuates atherosclerosis by regulating lipid metabolism through the TLR4-NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong; Wang, Jing; Qiao, Chenhui; Ma, Ning; Liu, Donghai; Zhang, Weihua

    2015-10-23

    Atherosclerosis is a leading cause of death worldwide and is characterized by lipid-laden foam cell formation. Recently, pycnogenol (PYC) has drawn much attention because of its prominent effect on cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, its protective effect against atherosclerosis and the underlying mechanism remains undefined. Here PYC treatment reduced areas of plaque and lipid deposition in atherosclerotic mice, concomitant with decreases in total cholesterol and triglyceride levels and increases in HDL cholesterol levels, indicating a potential antiatherosclerotic effect of PYC through the regulation of lipid levels. Additionally, PYC preconditioning markedly decreased foam cell formation and lipid accumulation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human THP-1 monocytes. A mechanistic analysis indicated that PYC decreased the lipid-related protein expression of adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) and adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP/aP2) in a dose-dependent manner. Further analysis confirmed that PYC attenuated LPS-induced lipid droplet formation via ADRP and ALBP expression through the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway, because pretreatment with anti-TLR4 antibody or a specific inhibitor of NF-κB (PDTC) strikingly mitigated the LPS-induced increase in ADRP and ALBP. Together, our results provide insight into the ability of PYC to attenuate bacterial infection-triggered pathological processes associated with atherosclerosis. Thus PYC may be a potential lead compound for the future development of antiatherosclerotic CVD therapy.

  5. Antiatherosclerotic and Cardioprotective Potential of Acacia senegal Seeds in Diet-Induced Atherosclerosis in Rabbits

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    Heera Ram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acacia senegal L. (Fabaceae seeds are essential ingredient of “Pachkutta,” a specific Rajasthani traditional food. The present study explored antiatherosclerotic and cardioprotective potential of Acacia senegal seed extract, if any, in hypercholesterolemic diet-induced atherosclerosis in rabbits. Atherosclerosis in rabbits was induced by feeding normal diet supplemented with oral administration of cholesterol (500 mg/kg body weight/day mixed with coconut oil for 15 days. Circulating total cholesterol (TC, HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C, LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C, triglycerides, and VLDL-cholesterol (VLDL-C levels; atherogenic index (AI; cardiac lipid peroxidation (LPO; planimetric studies of aortal wall; and histopathological studies of heart, aorta, kidney, and liver were performed. Apart from reduced atherosclerotic plaques in aorta (6.34±0.72 and increased lumen volume (51.65±3.66, administration with ethanolic extract of Acacia senegal seeds (500 mg/kg/day, p.o. for 45 days to atherosclerotic rabbits significantly lowered serum TC, LDL-C, triglyceride, and VLDL-C levels and atherogenic index as compared to control. Atherogenic diet-induced cardiac LPO and histopathological abnormalities in aorta wall, heart, kidney, and liver were reverted to normalcy by Acacia senegal seed extract administration. The findings of the present study reveal that Acacia senegal seed extract ameliorated diet-induced atherosclerosis and could be considered as lead in the development of novel therapeutics.

  6. Effects of Losartan on expression of connexins at the early stage of atherosclerosis in rabbits

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    Li-ming Ruan, Wei Cai, Jun-zhu Chen, Jin-feng Duan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to investigate effects of Losartan on expression of connexin 40 and 43 (Cx40 and Cx43, in arteries at the early stage of atherosclerosis in a rabbit model. Methods: A total of 28 male New Zealand white rabbits were divided into following groups: control group, high fat diet group, and Losartan group (10 mg/kg/day. Losartan was administrated in food for two weeks. Iliac arteries were obtained for immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, Western blot, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results: Transmission electron microscopy revealed abundant gap junctions between neointimal smooth muscle cells (SMCs, which were markedly reduced by treatment. RT-PCR and Western blot assay showed that the mRNA and protein expression of Cx40 and Cx43 were elevated in the neointimal area at the early stage of atherosclerosis. The mRNA and protein expression of Cx43 were significantly down-regulated by losartan treatment but those of Cx40 were not markedly changed. Conclusion: Cx40 and Cx43 in the neointimal SMCs were up-regulated at the early stage of atherosclerosis. Losartan (an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor could reduce neointima proliferation and down-regulate the elevated protein expression of Cx43, suggesting the rennin-angiotensin system (RAS plays an important role in the remodeling of gap junction between ventricular myocytes under pathological conditions.

  7. Sudden death related to advanced coronary atherosclerosis in mini-pigs. Influence of some drugs

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    Jacobsson, L.; Lundholm, L.; Wingren, G. (Department of Pharmacology, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping, Sweden)

    1984-01-01

    Advanced coronary atherosclerosis was produced in 30 mini-pigs by a combination of a hypercholesterolaemic diet and X-irradiation to the precordial region. Within 11-25 weeks after the irradiation, 13 of the 30 animals died a sudden death probably caused by coronary atherosclerosis. The contents of free and ester-bound cholesterol in the right coronary artery were significantly higher in the animals which died spontaneously than in surviving animals. In an untreated group of 12 animals 7 died whereas in a group treated with ..beta..-pyridylcarbinol only 1 out of 5 died. In the coronary arteries, the contents of both free and ester-bound cholesterol were significantly lower in the ..beta..-pyridylcarbinol-treated animals. In a sulfinpyrazontreated group 3 out of 8, and in a metoprolol-treated group 2 out of 5 animals died. None of these drugs reduced the accumulation of cholesterol in the coronary arteries. The rate of sudden death was 26 +- 6% (P<0.05) lower in the combined group of treated animals than in the untreated ones. By regular ECG recordings, signs which could predict the fatal outcome of the experiment were looked for. Although depressed ST segments were present before death in a few animals, this was not a regular phenomenon. It is concluded that advanced coronary atherosclerosis in mini-pigs often leads to sudden death and that this animal model seems suitable for testing the potential therapeutic effects of drugs.

  8. Correlation between the levels of circulating adhesion molecules and atherosclerosis in type-2 diabetic normotensive patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Robles, Hilda; Serrano, Alberto Maceda; Lozano-Nuevo, Jose Juan; Escalante-Acosta, Bruno Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a common feature in type-2 diabetic patients and is associated with inflammation, increased levels of circulating soluble adhesion molecules and atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the levels of circulating soluble adhesion molecules and the degree of atherosclerosis in normotensive type-2 diabetic patients. Results: We found significant correlations between ICAM-1 (r = 0.69, p < 0.001 95% IC 0.65 to 0.82) and VCAM-1 (r = 0.4, p < 0.03, 95% IC 0.65 to 0.82) levels and maximal carotid artery intimal-medial thickness, whereas no correlation was observed with E-selectin. Methods: We studied 30 normotensive type-2 diabetic patients in whom VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin were measured by ELISA. Additionally, the intimal-medial thickness of both the common and internal carotid arteries was measured (B-mode ultrasound). The levels of circulating adhesion molecules and maximal carotid artery intimal-medial thicknesses were correlated using the Spearman correlation coefficient test. Statistical analysis was performed with ANOVA. Conclusion: Our results suggest that ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 are markers associated, and correlated with the degree of atherosclerosis in normotensive type-2 diabetic patients. PMID:19717975

  9. A Pathological Study of the Epidemiology of Atherosclerosis in Mexico City

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    Joel Rodríguez-Saldaña

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine the frequency and patterns of association of cardiovascular risk factors with atherosclerosis in five different arterial territories at post-mortem in Mexico City. Methods. We obtained five arterial territories arteries (circle of Willis, coronary, carotid, renal, and aorta of 185 men and women 0 to 90 years of age who underwent autopsy at the Medical Forensic Service of Mexico City. We determined the prevalence and extent of atherosclerotic lesions by histopathology according to the classification of the American Heart Association as early (types I–III and advanced (types IV–VI, and according to the degree of stenosis and correlated with cardiovascular risk factors. Results. Atherosclerotic lesions were identified in at least one arterial territory in 181 subjects (97.8%, with involvement of two ore more territories in 178 subjects (92.2%. Advanced lesions were observed in 36% and 67% of subjects under 15 and between 16 and 35 years, respectively. Any degree of atherosclerosis was associated with the presence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, overweight, obesity, and smoking, and to a greater extent with the presence of two or more risk factors (P<0.001. However, emerging and advanced athersoclerosis was observed in 53% and 20% people with no risk factors. Conclusions. The study shows a high prevalence of atherosclerosis in all age groups and both sexes. There is considerable development of atherosclerotic disease in subjects without known risk factors.

  10. MicroRNAs and atherosclerosis%微小RNA与动脉粥样硬化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    化定超; 闫晓光; 郭庚; 鲁晨阳

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most important cause of ischemic stroke. microRNAs can play an important role in the lipid metabolism, vascular inflammatory response, angiogenesis, as wel as smooth muscle cel proliferation and phenotypic conversion, etc. by regulating the functions of vascular endothelial cel s, vascular smooth muscle cel s, and mononuclear macrophages. It is closely associated with the occurrence and development of atherosclerosis. This article mainly reviews the regulatory effect of microRNAs on lipid metabolism and vascular inflammatory response in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.%动脉粥样硬化是缺血性卒中最主要的病因。微小RNA能通过调控血管内皮细胞、血管平滑肌细胞以及单核巨噬细胞等的功能,在脂质代谢、血管炎性反应、新生血管形成以及平滑肌细胞增生和表型转换等方面发挥重要作用,与动脉粥样硬化的发生和发展密切相关。文章主要就微小RNA对动脉粥样硬化发病机制中脂质代谢和血管炎性反应的调节作用进行综述。

  11. A Role of RIP3-Mediated Macrophage Necrosis in Atherosclerosis Development

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    Juan Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotic death of macrophages has long been known to be present in atherosclerotic lesions but has not been studied. We examined the role of receptor interacting protein (RIP 3, a mediator of necrotic cell death, in atherosclerosis and found that RIP3−/−;Ldlr−/− mice were no different from RIP3+/+;Ldlr−/− mice in early atherosclerosis but had significant reduction in advanced atherosclerotic lesions. Similar results were observed in Apoe−/− background mice. Bone marrow transplantation revealed that loss of RIP3 expression from bone-marrow-derived cells is responsible for the reduced disease progression. While no difference was found in apoptosis between RIP3−/−;Ldlr−/− and RIP3+/+;Ldlr−/− mice, electron microscopy revealed a significant reduction of macrophage primary necrosis in the advanced lesions of RIP3−/− mice. In vitro cellular studies showed that RIP3 deletion had no effect on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL-induced macrophage apoptosis, but prevented macrophage primary necrosis occurring in response to oxidized LDL under caspase inhibition or RIP3 overexpression conditions. RIP3-dependent necrosis is not postapoptotic, and the increased primary necrosis in advanced atherosclerotic lesions most likely resulted from the increase of RIP3 expression. Our data demonstrate that primary necrosis of macrophages is proatherogenic during advanced atherosclerosis development.

  12. Serum carotenoids reduce progression of early atherosclerosis in the carotid artery wall among Eastern Finnish men.

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    Jouni Karppi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several previous epidemiologic studies have shown that high blood levels of carotenoids may be protective against early atherosclerosis, but results have been inconsistent. We assessed the association between atherosclerotic progression, measured by intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery wall, and serum levels of carotenoids. METHODS: We studied the effect of carotenoids on progression of early atherosclerosis in a population-based study. The association between concentrations of serum carotenoids, and intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery wall was explored in 840 middle-aged men (aged 46-65 years from Eastern Finland. Ultrasonography of the common carotid arteries were performed at baseline and 7-year follow-up. Serum levels of carotenoids were analyzed at baseline. Changes in mean and maximum intima media thickness of carotid artery wall were related to baseline serum carotenoid levels in covariance analyses adjusted for covariates. RESULTS: In a covariance analysis with adjustment for age, ultrasound sonographer, maximum intima media thickness, examination year, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, smoking, physical activity, serum LDL cholesterol, family history of coronary heart disease, antihypertensive medication and serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein, 7-year change in maximum intima media thickness was inversely associated with lycopene (p = 0.005, α-carotene (p = 0.002 and β-carotene (p = 0.019, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The present study shows that high serum concentrations of carotenoids may be protective against early atherosclerosis.

  13. [Association between IGF system and PAPP-A in coronary atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro-Macías, Alfonso Eduardo; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Mena-Burciaga, Victoria Michelle; Gutiérrez-Leonard, Hugo; Lara-Padilla, Eleazar; Abarca-Rojano, Edgar; Fierro-Almanzán, Alfonso Edmundo

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a condition that involves multiple pathophysiological mechanisms and whose knowledge has not been fully elucidated. Often, scientific advances on the atherogenic pathophysiology generate that molecules not previously considered in the scene of this disease, were attributed actions on the onset or progression of it. A representative example is the study of a new mechanism involved in the atherogenic process, consisting of the association between the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A). Insulin-like growth factor system is a family of peptides that include 3 peptide hormones, 4 transmembrane receptors and 6 binding proteins. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is the main ligand of the IGF system involved in coronary atherosclerosis. IGF-1 exerts its effects via activation of the IGF-1R receptor on vascular smooth muscle cells or macrophages. In vascular smooth muscle cells promotes migration and prevents apoptosis which increases plaque stability while in macrophages reduces reverse cholesterol transport leading to the formation of foam cells. Regulation of IGF-1 endothelial bioavailability is carried out by IGFBP proteases, mainly by PAPP-A. In this review, we address the mechanisms between IGF system and PAPP-A in atherosclerosis with emphasis on molecular effects on vascular smooth muscle cells and macrophages.

  14. A pathological study of the epidemiology of atherosclerosis in Mexico city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Saldaña, Joel; Rodriguez-Flores, Marcela; Cantú-Brito, Carlos; Aguirre-Garcia, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To examine the frequency and patterns of association of cardiovascular risk factors with atherosclerosis in five different arterial territories at post-mortem in Mexico City. Methods. We obtained five arterial territories arteries (circle of Willis, coronary, carotid, renal, and aorta) of 185 men and women 0 to 90 years of age who underwent autopsy at the Medical Forensic Service of Mexico City. We determined the prevalence and extent of atherosclerotic lesions by histopathology according to the classification of the American Heart Association as early (types I-III) and advanced (types IV-VI), and according to the degree of stenosis and correlated with cardiovascular risk factors. Results. Atherosclerotic lesions were identified in at least one arterial territory in 181 subjects (97.8%), with involvement of two ore more territories in 178 subjects (92.2%). Advanced lesions were observed in 36% and 67% of subjects under 15 and between 16 and 35 years, respectively. Any degree of atherosclerosis was associated with the presence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, overweight, obesity, and smoking, and to a greater extent with the presence of two or more risk factors (P atherosclerosis in all age groups and both sexes. There is considerable development of atherosclerotic disease in subjects without known risk factors.

  15. Targeted disruption of LDLR causes hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis in Yucatan miniature pigs.

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    Bryan T Davis

    Full Text Available Recent progress in engineering the genomes of large animals has spurred increased interest in developing better animal models for diseases where current options are inadequate. Here, we report the creation of Yucatan miniature pigs with targeted disruptions of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR gene in an effort to provide an improved large animal model of familial hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. Yucatan miniature pigs are well established as translational research models because of similarities to humans in physiology, anatomy, genetics, and size. Using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene targeting and somatic cell nuclear transfer, male and female LDLR+/- pigs were generated. Subsequent breeding of heterozygotes produced LDLR-/- pigs. When fed a standard swine diet (low fat, no cholesterol, LDLR+/- pigs exhibited a moderate, but consistent increase in total and LDL cholesterol, while LDLR-/- pigs had considerably elevated levels. This severe hypercholesterolemia in homozygote animals resulted in atherosclerotic lesions in the coronary arteries and abdominal aorta that resemble human atherosclerosis. These phenotypes were more severe and developed over a shorter time when fed a diet containing natural sources of fat and cholesterol. LDLR-targeted Yucatan miniature pigs offer several advantages over existing large animal models including size, consistency, availability, and versatility. This new model of cardiovascular disease could be an important resource for developing and testing novel detection and treatment strategies for coronary and aortic atherosclerosis and its complications.

  16. Coronary atherosclerosis is already ongoing in pre-diabeticstatus: Insight from intravascular imaging modalities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Osamu Kurihara; Masamichi Takano; Yoshihiko Seino; Wataru Shimizu; Kyoichi Mizuno

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a powerful risk factor of coronaryartery disease (CAD), leading to death and disability.In recent years, given the accumulating evidence thatprediabetes is also related to increasing risk of CADincluding cardiovascular events, a new guideline hasbeen proposed for the treatment of blood cholesterolfor primary prevention of cardiovascular events. Thisguideline recommends aggressive lipid-lowering statintherapy for primary prevention in diabetes and otherpatients. The ultimate goal of patient managementis to inhibit progression of systemic atherosclerosisand prevent fatal cardiovascular events such as acutecoronary syndrome (ACS). Because disruption ofatherosclerotic coronary plaques is a trigger of ACS,the high-risk atheroma is called a vulnerable plaque.Several types of novel diagnostic imaging technologieshave been developed for identifying the characteristicsof coronary atherosclerosis before the onset of ACS,especially vulnerable plaques. According to coronaryangioscopic evaluation, atherosclerosis severity andplaque vulnerability were more advanced in prediabeticthan in nondiabetic patients and comparable to thatin diabetic patients. In addition, pharmacologicalintervention by statin therapy changed plaque color andcomplexity, and the dynamic changes in plaque featuresare considered plaque stabilization. In this article, wereview the findings of atherosclerosis in prediabetes,detected by intravascular imaging modalities, and thetherapeutic implications.

  17. Prevention of atherosclerosis by specific AT1-receptor blockade with candesartan cilexetil

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    Vasilios Papademetriou

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Several studies indicate that blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS can prevent atherosclerosis and vascular events, but the precise mechanisms involved are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of the AT 1-receptor blocker, candesartan, in the prevention of atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidaemic (WHHL rabbits and also the effect of AT1-receptor blockade in the uptake of oxidised LDL by macrophage cell cultures. In the first set of experiments, 12 WHHL rabbits were randomly assigned to three groups: placebo, atenolol 5 mg/kg daily or candesartan 2 mg/kg daily for six months. Compared with controls and atenolol-treated rabbits, candesartan treatment resulted in a significant 50—60% reduction of atherosclerotic plaque formation and a 66% reduction in cholesterol accumulation in the thoracic aorta.Studies in macrophage cultures indicated that candesartan prevented uptake of oxidised LDL-(oxLDL-cholesterol by cultured macrophages. Candesartan inhibited the uptake of oxLDL in a dose-dependent manner, reaching a maximum inhibition of 70% at concentrations of 5.6 µg/ml. Further studies in other animal models and well-designed trials in humans are warranted to further explore the role of AT1-receptor blockade in the prevention of atherosclerosis.

  18. Role of the Vasa Vasorum and Vascular Resident Stem Cells in Atherosclerosis

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    Jun-ichi Kawabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is considered an “inside-out” response, that begins with the dysfunction of intimal endothelial cells and leads to neointimal plaque formation. The adventitia of large blood vessels has been recognized as an active part of the vessel wall that is involved in the process of atherosclerosis. There are characteristic changes in the adventitial vasa vasorum that are associated with the development of atheromatous plaques. However, whether vasa vasorum plays a causative or merely reactive role in the atherosclerotic process is not completely clear. Recent studies report that the vascular wall contains a number of stem/progenitor cells that may contribute to vascular remodeling. Microvessels serve as the vascular niche that maintains the resident stem/progenitor cells of the tissue. Therefore, the vasa vasorum may contribute to vascular remodeling through not only its conventional function as a blood conducting tube, but also its new conceptual function as a stem cell reservoir. This brief review highlights the recent advances contributing to our understanding of the role of the adventitial vasa vasorum in the atherosclerosis and discusses new concept that involves vascular-resident factors, the vasa vasorum and its associated vascular-resident stem cells, in the atherosclerotic process.

  19. Gender-based differences in the relationship between fatty liver disease and atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Lim, Chae-Wan; Lee, Jae hyuk; Park, Hyung-Bok; Suh, Yongsung; Cho, Yoon-Hyeong; Choi, Tae-Young; Hwang, Eui-Seok; Cho, Deok-Kyu; Kim, Hyun-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Carotid intima–media thickness (CIMT) is a surrogate of subclinical atherosclerosis. Fatty liver disease is also linked to increased risk of cardiovascular events. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between fatty liver disease and CIMT according to gender. Methods Patients who had undergone carotid and abdominal ultrasound between June 2011 and December 2013 were retrospectively evaluated. The differences between the CIMT values measured in the common carotid artery and the prevalence of carotid plaque in patients with fatty liver disease and those with normal livers were investigated. Results Out of a total of 1 121 patients, the men had more fatty liver disease than the women. The mean CIMT of the men was significantly higher than that of the women, and the men had more plaque than the women. The women with fatty liver disease had a significantly higher mean CIMT value and more plaque than the women with normal livers. The differences between the men with fatty liver and those with normal livers in mean CIMT values and in the prevalence of plaque were not significant. In the women, multivariate analysis showed that fatty liver disease was independently associated with subclinical atherosclerosis [adjusted hazards ratio (HR) 1.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.007–2.697, p = 0.047]. Conclusions The men had more fatty liver disease, carotid plaque and higher CIMT values than the women. Fatty liver disease was a useful predictor of atherosclerosis, especially for the female study patients. PMID:26972662

  20. Targeted disruption of LDLR causes hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis in Yucatan miniature pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bryan T; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Rohret, Judy A; Struzynski, Jason T; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Bellinger, Dwight A; Rohret, Frank A; Nichols, Timothy C; Rogers, Christopher S

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in engineering the genomes of large animals has spurred increased interest in developing better animal models for diseases where current options are inadequate. Here, we report the creation of Yucatan miniature pigs with targeted disruptions of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene in an effort to provide an improved large animal model of familial hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. Yucatan miniature pigs are well established as translational research models because of similarities to humans in physiology, anatomy, genetics, and size. Using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene targeting and somatic cell nuclear transfer, male and female LDLR+/- pigs were generated. Subsequent breeding of heterozygotes produced LDLR-/- pigs. When fed a standard swine diet (low fat, no cholesterol), LDLR+/- pigs exhibited a moderate, but consistent increase in total and LDL cholesterol, while LDLR-/- pigs had considerably elevated levels. This severe hypercholesterolemia in homozygote animals resulted in atherosclerotic lesions in the coronary arteries and abdominal aorta that resemble human atherosclerosis. These phenotypes were more severe and developed over a shorter time when fed a diet containing natural sources of fat and cholesterol. LDLR-targeted Yucatan miniature pigs offer several advantages over existing large animal models including size, consistency, availability, and versatility. This new model of cardiovascular disease could be an important resource for developing and testing novel detection and treatment strategies for coronary and aortic atherosclerosis and its complications.

  1. Selective endothelial overexpression of arginase II induces endothelial dysfunction and hypertension and enhances atherosclerosis in mice.

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    Boris L Vaisman

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disorders associated with endothelial dysfunction, such as atherosclerosis, have decreased nitric oxide (NO bioavailability. Arginase in the vasculature can compete with eNOS for L-arginine and has been implicated in atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of endothelial-specific elevation of arginase II expression on endothelial function and the development of atherosclerosis.Transgenic mice on a C57BL/6 background with endothelial-specific overexpression of human arginase II (hArgII gene under the control of the Tie2 promoter were produced. The hArgII mice had elevated tissue arginase activity except in liver and in resident peritoneal macrophages, confirming endothelial specificity of the transgene. Using small-vessel myography, aorta from these mice exhibited endothelial dysfunction when compared to their non-transgenic littermate controls. The blood pressure of the hArgII mice was 17% higher than their littermate controls and, when crossed with apoE -/- mice, hArgII mice had increased aortic atherosclerotic lesions.We conclude that overexpression of arginase II in the endothelium is detrimental to the cardiovascular system.

  2. Disrupting functional interactions between platelet chemokines inhibits atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice.

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    Koenen, Rory R; von Hundelshausen, Philipp; Nesmelova, Irina V; Zernecke, Alma; Liehn, Elisa A; Sarabi, Alisina; Kramp, Birgit K; Piccinini, Anna M; Paludan, Søren R; Kowalska, M Anna; Kungl, Andreas J; Hackeng, Tilman M; Mayo, Kevin H; Weber, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by chronic inflammation of the arterial wall due to chemokine-driven mononuclear cell recruitment. Activated platelets can synergize with chemokines to exacerbate atherogenesis; for example, by deposition of the chemokines platelet factor-4 (PF4, also known as CXCL4) and RANTES (CCL5), triggering monocyte arrest on inflamed endothelium. Homo-oligomerization is required for the recruitment functions of CCL5, and chemokine heteromerization has more recently emerged as an additional regulatory mechanism, as evidenced by a mutual modulation of CXCL8 and CXCL4 activities and by enhanced monocyte arrest resulting from CCL5-CXCL4 interactions. The CCL5 antagonist Met-RANTES reduces diet-induced atherosclerosis; however, CCL5 antagonism may not be therapeutically feasible, as suggested by studies using Ccl5-deficient mice which imply that direct CCL5 blockade would severely compromise systemic immune responses, delay macrophage-mediated viral clearance and impair normal T cell functions. Here we determined structural features of CCL5-CXCL4 heteromers and designed stable peptide inhibitors that specifically disrupt proinflammatory CCL5-CXCL4 interactions, thereby attenuating monocyte recruitment and reducing atherosclerosis without the aforementioned side effects. These results establish the in vivo relevance of chemokine heteromers and show the potential of targeting heteromer formation to achieve therapeutic effects.

  3. Diagonal ear lobe crease and atherosclerosis: a review of the medical literature and dental implications.

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    Friedlander, Arthur H; López-López, José; Velasco-Ortega, Eugenio

    2012-01-01

    In Spain a significant number of individuals die from atherosclerotic disease of the coronary and carotid arteries without having classic risk factors and prodomal symptoms. The diagonal ear lobe crease (DELC) has been characterized in the medical literature as a surrogate marker which can identify high risk patients having occult atherosclerosis. This topic however has not been examined in either the medical or dental literature emanating from Spain. The majority of clinical, angiography and postmortem reports support the premise that DELC is a valuable extravascular physical sign able to distinguish some patients at risk of succumbing to atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries. A minority of studies have however failed to support this hypothesis. More recently reports using B mode ultrasound have also linked DELC to atherosclerosis of the carotid artery and another report has related DELC to the presence of calcified carotid artery atheromas on panoramic radiographs. DELC is readily visible during head and neck cancer screening examinations. In conjunction with the patient's medical history, vital signs, and panoramic radiograph, the DELC may assist in atherosclerotic risk.

  4. Association of NAFLD with subclinical atherosclerosis and coronary-artery disease: meta-analysis

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    Javier Ampuero

    Full Text Available Background: Recent studies have associated non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, using tests of subclinical atherosclerosis. Aim: To evaluate the influence of NAFLD on subclinical atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease (CAD. Methods: We reviewed Pubmed and EMBASE. According to inclusion and exclusion criteria, we selected 14 studies and were classified in two groups. Ten studies aimed the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis and four studies the presence of coronary artery disease. To assess subclinical atherosclerosis, we selected studies with pathological carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT and with presence of carotid plaques. We considered coronary artery disease when patients showed at least 50 % stenosis at one or more major coronary arteries. NAFLD was assessed by ultrasound (US and liver biopsy. Results: NAFLD showed a higher prevalence of pathological CIMT [35.1 % (351/999 vs. 21.8 % (207/948; p < 0.0001], with OR 2.04 (95 % CI: 1.65-2.51. Similarly, the presence of carotid plaques was higher in NAFLD diagnosed by US [34.2 % (101/295 vs. 12.9 % (51/394; p < 0.0001] [OR 2.82 (95 % CI: 1.87-4.27] and diagnosed by liver biopsy [64.8 % (70/108 vs. 31.3 % (59/188; p < 0.0001] [OR 4.41 (95 % CI: 2.63-7.40]. On the other hand, four studies assessed CAD in patients underwent coronary angiogram. Subjects with NAFLD showed 80.4 % (492/612 of CAD, while it was detected in 60.7 % (356/586 (p < 0.0001 in patients without NAFLD. Therefore, NAFLD was associated with a remarkably higher likelihood of CAD, using random effects model [OR 3.31 (95 % CI: 2.21-4.95] or fixed effects model [OR 3.13 (95 % CI: 2.36-4.16]. Conclusions: NAFLD increases the risk of subclinical atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease. The right management of these patients could modify the natural history both liver and cardiovascular disease.

  5. Rate of atherosclerosis progression in ApoE-/- mice long after discontinuation of cola beverage drinking.

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    Matilde Otero-Losada

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to evaluate the effect of cola beverages drinking on atherosclerosisand test the hypothesis whether cola beverages consumption at early life stages might affect the development and progression of atherosclerosis later in life. ApoE-/- C57BL/6J mice (8 week-old were randomized in 3 groups (n = 20 each according to free accessto water (W, sucrose sweetened carbonated cola drink(C or aspartame-acesulfame K sweetened carbonated 'light' cola drink (Lfor the next 8 weeks. Drinking treatment was ended by switching C and L groups to drinking water. Four mice per group and time were sequentially euthanized: before treatment (8 weeks-old, at the end of treatment (16 weeks-old and after treatment discontinuation (20 weeks-old, 24 weeks-old, 30 week-old mice. Aortic roots and livers were harvested, processed for histology and serial cross-sections were stained. Aortic plaque area was analyzed and plaque/media-ratio was calculated. Early consumption of cola drinks accelerated atherosclerotic plaque progression favoring the interaction between macrophages and myofibroblasts, without the participation of either T lymphocytes or proliferative activity. Plaque/media-ratio varied according to drink treatment (F2,54 = 3.433, p<0.04 and mice age (F4,54 = 5.009, p<0.03 and was higher in C and L groups compared with age-matched W group (p<0.05 at 16 weeks and 20 weeks, p<0.01 at 24 weeks and 30 weeks. Natural evolution of atherosclerosis in ApoE-/- mice (W group evidenced atherosclerosis acceleration in parallel with a rapid increase in liver inflammation around the 20 weeks of age. Cola drinking within the 8-16 weeks of age accelerated atherosclerosis progression in ApoE-/- mice favoring aortic plaque enlargement (inward remodeling over media thinning all over the study time. Data suggest that cola drinking at early life stages may predispose to atherosclerosis progression later in life in ApoE-/- mice.

  6. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) does not slow the progression of subclinical atherosclerosis in SLE over 2 years.

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    Kiani, Adnan N; Magder, Laurence S; Petri, Michelle

    2012-09-01

    Accelerated atherosclerosis is a major cause of mortality in SLE. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) has been shown to suppress growth factor-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells in animal models. We hypothesized that MMF might modify the inflammatory component of atherosclerosis in SLE. We examined the effect of MMF on atherosclerosis as measured by changes in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) or coronary artery calcium (CAC) over 2 years. CAC and carotid IMT were measured at baseline and 2 years later in a cohort of 187 patients with SLE. The cohort was 91% women, 59% Caucasian, and 35% African-American, with a mean age of 45 ± 11 years. Of these, 12.5% (n = 25) received MMF during follow-up. The daily dose ranged from 500 to 3,000 mg/day, and duration ranged from 84 days to the entire 2 years. We divided MMF users into three groups: low exposure (MMF (MMF: 1.17-1.28, low MMF: 1.02-1.13, high MMF: 1.44-1.61, and any MMF: 1.21-1.34 log-Agatston units. Compared to no MMF, there was no statistically different change between the three groups (p = 0.99, 0.87, and 0.91). Similarly, mean carotid IMT increased in all four groups: no MMF: 0.58-0.66, low MMF: 0.55-0.60, high MMF: 0.56-0.71, and any MMF: 0.56-0.66. We then adjusted for statin use, lupus nephritis, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, cholesterol, and age during the 2-year follow-up. The association between MMF exposure and change in CAC or carotid IMT was not statistically significant (p = 0.63 for CAC, and p = 0.085 for carotid IMT). There was no evidence that MMF slowed or decreased the progression of atherosclerosis as measured by carotid IMT or CAC. Because the number of patients taking MMF was only twenty-five, larger studies for longer time periods are needed to explore any effect of MMF on subclinical atherosclerosis in SLE.

  7. Optimal therapeutic strategy for treating patients with hypertension and atherosclerosis: focus on olmesartan medoxomil

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    Mason

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available R Preston MasonCardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, and Elucida Research, Beverly, MA, USAAbstract: Cardiovascular (CV disease is a major factor in mortality rates around the world and contributes to more than one-third of deaths in the US. The underlying cause of CV disease is atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory process that is clinically manifested as coronary artery disease, carotid artery disease, or peripheral artery disease. It has been predicted that atherosclerosis will be the primary cause of death in the world by 2020. Consequently, developing a treatment regimen that can slow or even reverse the atherosclerotic process is imperative. Atherogenesis is initiated by endothelial injury due to oxidative stress associated with CV risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cigarette smoking, dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Since the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS plays a key role in vascular inflammatory responses, hypertension treatment with RAAS-blocking agents (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors [ACEIs] and angiotensin II receptor blockers [ARBs] may slow inflammatory processes and disease progression. Reduced nitric oxide (NO bioavailability has an important role in the process of endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. Therefore, agents that increase NO and decrease oxidative stress, such as ARBs and ACEIs, may interfere with atherosclerosis. Studies show that angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonism with an ARB improves endothelial function and reduces atherogenesis. In patients with hypertension, the ARB olmesartan medoxomil provides effective blood pressure lowering, with inflammatory marker studies demonstrating significant RAAS suppression. Several prospective, randomized studies show vascular benefits with olmesartan medoxomil: reduced progression of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with stable angina pectoris

  8. The association between "hypertriglyceridemic waist" and sub-clinical atherosclerosis in a multiethnic population: a cross-sectional study

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    2014-01-01

    Background "Hypertriglyceridemic waist" (HTGW) phenotype, an inexpensive early screening tool for detection of individuals at risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease was found to be associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in various patient populations such as those with diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and those infected with human immunodeficiency virus. However, less is known regarding an association between HTGW and subclinical atherosclerosis in the apparently healthy, multiethnic population. Therefore, the aim of the study was to explore the association between HTGW and sub-clinical atherosclerosis in an apparently healthy, multiethnic population; and to investigate whether the effect of HTGW on sub-clinical atherosclerosis persists over and above the traditional atherosclerosis risk factors. Methods We studied 809 individuals of Aboriginal, Chinese, European and South Asian origin who were assessed for indices of sub-clinical atherosclerosis (intima-media thickness (IMT), total area and presence of carotid plaques), socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics, anthropometrics, lipids, glucose, blood pressure, and family history of cardiovascular disease. Results We found that, compared to individuals without HTGW and after adjusting for age, ethnicity, smoking, and physical activity; men and women with HTGW had a significantly higher: IMT (men: B (95%CI = 0.084 (0.037, 1.133), p < 0.001; women: B (95%CI) = 0.041 (0.006, 0.077), p = 0.020); and total area (men: B (95%CI = 0.202 (0.058, 0.366), p = 0.005; women: B (95%CI) = 0.115 (0.006, 0.235), p = 0.037). The association between HTGW waist and presence of plaques was significant for men (OR (95%CI) = 1.904 (1.040, 3.486), p = 0.037 vs. men without HTGW), but not for women (p = 0.284). Once analyses were adjusted for additional, traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis, the effect of HTGW on sub-clinical atherosclerosis was no

  9. BAFF receptor mAb treatment ameliorates development and progression of atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic ApoE(-/- mice.

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    Tin Kyaw

    Full Text Available AIMS: Option to attenuate atherosclerosis by depleting B2 cells is currently limited to anti-CD20 antibodies which deplete all B-cell subtypes. In the present study we evaluated the capacity of a monoclonal antibody to B cell activating factor-receptor (BAFFR to selectively deplete atherogenic B2 cells to prevent both development and progression of atherosclerosis in the ApoE(-/- mouse. METHODS AND RESULTS: To determine whether the BAFFR antibody prevents atherosclerosis development, we treated ApoE(-/- mice with the antibody while feeding them a high fat diet (HFD for 8 weeks. Mature CD93(- CD19(+ B2 cells were reduced by treatment, spleen B-cell zones disrupted and spleen CD20 mRNA expression decreased while B1a cells and non-B cells were spared. Atherosclerosis was ameliorated in the hyperlipidemic mice and CD19(+ B cells, CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells were reduced in atherosclerotic lesions. Expressions of proinflammatory cytokines, IL1β, TNFα, and IFNγ in the lesions were also reduced, while MCP1, MIF and VCAM-1 expressions were unaffected. Plasma immunoglobulins were reduced, but MDA-oxLDL specific antibodies were unaffected. To determine whether anti-BAFFR antibody ameliorates progression of atherosclerosis, we first fed ApoE(-/- mice a HFD for 6 weeks, and then instigated anti-BAFFR antibody treatment for a further 6 week-HFD. CD93(- CD19(+ B2 cells were selectively decreased and atherosclerotic lesions were reduced by this treatment. CONCLUSION: Anti-BAFFR monoclonal antibody selectively depletes mature B2 cells while sparing B1a cells, disrupts spleen B-cell zones and ameliorates atherosclerosis development and progression in hyperlipidemic ApoE(-/- mice. Our findings have potential for clinical translation to manage atherosclerosis-based cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Prenatal stress enhances severity of atherosclerosis in the adult apolipoprotein E-deficient mouse offspring via inflammatory pathways.

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    Ho, H; Lhotak, S; Solano, M E; Karimi, K; Pincus, M K; Austin, R C; Arck, P

    2013-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease and stroke. Endothelial cell dysfunctions are early events in atherosclerosis, resulting in the recruitment of circulating monocytes. The immune system can elicit an inflammatory response toward the atherosclerotic lesion, thereby accelerating lesion growth. Risk factors for atherosclerosis include hypertension, smoking, stress perception or low birth weight. As prenatal stress challenge decreases the birth weight and affects the offspring's postnatal immune response, we aimed to investigate whether prenatal stress contributes to the development of atherosclerosis in mice. Syngenic pregnant apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE-/-) dams were exposed to sound stress on gestation days 12.5 and 14.5. The presence and size of atherosclerotic plaques in the offspring at the age of 15 weeks was evaluated by histomorphology, accompanied by flow cytometric analysis of the frequency and phenotype of monocytes/macrophages and regulatory T (Treg) cells in the blood. Further, cytokine secretion of peripheral blood lymphocytes was analyzed. In response to prenatal stress challenge, an increased frequency of large atherosclerotic plaques was detectable in apoE-/- offspring, which was particularly profound in females. Prenatal stress also resulted in alterations of the offspring's immune response, such as a decreased frequency of Treg cells in blood, alterations of macrophage populations in blood and an increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines. We provide novel evidence that prenatally stressed adult offspring show an increased severity of atherosclerosis. As Treg cells are key players in dampening inflammation, the observed increase in atherosclerosis may be due to the lack of Treg cell frequency. Future interdisciplinary research is urgently required to understand the developmental origin of prenatal stress-induced atherosclerosis. The availability of our model may facilitate and foster such research endeavors.

  11. Dietary phosphorus, blood pressure, and incidence of hypertension in the atherosclerosis risk in communities study and the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Alvaro; Nettleton, Jennifer A; Ix, Joachim H; de Boer, Ian H; Folsom, Aaron R; Bidulescu, Aurelian; Kestenbaum, Bryan R; Chambless, Lloyd E; Jacobs, David R

    2010-03-01

    Greater phosphorus intake has been associated with lower levels of blood pressure in cross-sectional studies. This association, however, has not been assessed prospectively. We studied 13 444 participants from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities cohort and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, with diet assessed at baseline using validated food frequency questionnaires. Blood pressure and use of antihypertensive medication were determined at baseline and during follow-up visits. Compared with individuals in the lowest quintile of phosphorus intake at baseline, those in the highest quintile had lower baseline systolic and diastolic blood pressures after adjustment for dietary and nondietary confounders (-2.0 mm Hg [95% CI: -3.6 to -0.5], P for trend=0.01; and -0.6 [95% CI: -1.6 to +0.3], P for trend=0.20, respectively). During an average 6.2 years of follow-up, 3345 cases of hypertension were identified. Phosphorus intake was associated with the risk of hypertension (hazard ratio: 0.80 [95% CI: 0.80 to 1.00], comparing extreme quintiles; P for trend=0.02) after adjustment for nondietary factors but not after additional adjustment for dietary variables (hazard ratio: 1.01 [95% CI: 0.82 to 1.23], P for trend=0.88). Phosphorus from dairy products but not from other sources was associated with lower baseline blood pressure and reduced risk of incident hypertension. Hazard ratios (95% CIs) comparing extreme quintiles were 0.86 (0.76 to 0.97; P for trend=0.01) for phosphorus from dairy foods and 1.04 (0.93 to 1.17; P for trend=0.48) for phosphorus from other foods. These findings could indicate an effect of phosphorus in conjunction with other dairy constituents or of dairy itself without involvement of phosphorus.

  12. Potential Biomarkers of Insulin Resistance and Atherosclerosis in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

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    Sharifah Intan Qhadijah Syed Ikmal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with coronary artery disease have become a major public health concern. The occurrence of insulin resistance accompanied with endothelial dysfunction worsens the state of atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. The combination of insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction leads to coronary artery disease and ischemic heart disease complications. A recognized biological marker, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, has been used widely to assess the progression of atherosclerosis and inflammation. Along with coronary arterial damage and inflammatory processes, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein is considered as an essential atherosclerosis marker in patients with cardiovascular disease, but not as an insulin resistance marker in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. A new biological marker that can act as a reliable indicator of both the exact state of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis is required to facilitate optimal health management of diabetic patients. Malfunctioning of insulin mechanism and endothelial dysfunction leads to innate immune activation and released several biological markers into circulation. This review examines potential biological markers, YKL-40, alpha-hydroxybutyrate, soluble CD36, leptin, resistin, interleukin-18, retinol binding protein-4, and chemerin, as they may play significant roles in insulin resistance and atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with coronary artery disease.

  13. Site-specific influence of polyunsaturated fatty acids on atherosclerosis in immune incompetent LDL receptor deficient mice.

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    Reardon, Catherine A; Blachowicz, Lydia; Gupta, Gaorav; Lukens, John; Nissenbaum, Michael; Getz, Godfrey S

    2006-08-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are thought to influence plasma lipid levels, atherosclerosis, and the immune system. In this study, we fed male LDL receptor deficient (LDLR(-/-)) mice and immune incompetent LDLR(-/-) RAG2(-/-) mice diets containing predominantly saturated fats (milk fat) or PUFA (safflower oil) to determine if the response to diet was influenced by immune status. Relative to milk fat diet, plasma lipid and VLDL levels in both the LDLR(-/-) and LDLR(-/-) RAG2(-/-) mice fed safflower oil diet were lower, suggesting that the primary effect of PUFA on plasma lipids was not due to its inhibition of the immune system. Neither diet nor immune status influenced hepatic triglyceride production and post-heparin lipase activity, suggesting that the differences in triglyceride levels are due to differences in rates of catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. While both diets promoted atherogenesis, both aortic root and innominate artery atherosclerosis in LDLR(-/-) mice was less in safflower oil fed animals. In contrast, a site-specific effect of PUFA was observed in the immune incompetent LDLR(-/-) RAG2(-/-). In these mice, aortic root atherosclerosis, but not innominate artery atherosclerosis, was less in PUFA fed animal. These results suggest that PUFA and the immune system may influence innominate artery atherosclerosis by some overlapping mechanisms.

  14. Berberine promotes the development of atherosclerosis and foam cell formation by inducing scavenger receptor A expression in macrophage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Li; Wenqi Yao; Xiudan Zheng; Kan Liao

    2009-01-01

    Berberine is identified to lower the serum cholesterol level in human and hamster through the induction of low density lipoproteins (LDL) receptor in hepatic cells. To evaluate its potential in preventing atherosclerosis, the effect of berberine on atherosclerosis development in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE-/-) mice was investigated, in apoE-/-mice, berberine induced in vivo foam cell formation and promoted atherosclerosis development. The foam cell for-mation induced by berberine was also observed in mouse RAW264.7 cells, as well as in mouse and human primary macrophages. By inducing scavenger receptor A (SR-A) expression in macrophages, berberine increased the uptake of modified LDL (DiO-Ac-LDL). Berberine-induced SR-A expression was also observed in macrophage foam cells in vivo and in the cells at atherosclerotic lesion. Analysis in RAW264.7 cells indicated that berberine induced SR-A ex-pression by suppressing PTEN expression, which led to sustained Akt activation. Our results suggest that to evaluate the potential of a cholesterol-reducing compound in alleviating atherosclerosis, its effect on the cells involved in ath-erosclerosis development, such as macrophages, should also be considered. Promotion of foam cell formation could counter-balance the beneficial effect of lowering serum cholesterol.

  15. Regulations of the key mediators in inflammation and atherosclerosis by Aspirin in human macrophages

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    Zhang Li

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although its role to prevent secondary cardiovascular complications has been well established, how acetyl salicylic acid (ASA, aspirin regulates certain key molecules in the atherogenesis is still not known. Considering the role of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 to destabilize the atherosclerotic plaques, the roles of the scavenger receptor class BI (SR-BI and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1 to promote cholesterol efflux in the foam cells at the plaques, and the role of NF-κB in the overall inflammation related to the atherosclerosis, we addressed whether these molecules are all related to a common mechanism that may be regulated by acetyl salicylic acid. We investigated the effect of ASA to regulate the expressions and activities of these molecules in THP-1 macrophages. Our results showed that ASA inhibited MMP-9 mRNA expression, and caused the decrease in the MMP-9 activities from the cell culture supernatants. In addition, it inhibited the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 subunit, thus the activity of this inflammatory molecule. On the contrary, acetyl salicylic acid induced the expressions of ABCA1 and SR-BI, two molecules known to reduce the progression of atherosclerosis, at both mRNA and protein levels. It also stimulated the cholesterol efflux out of macrophages. These data suggest that acetyl salicylic acid may alleviate symptoms of atherosclerosis by two potential mechanisms: maintaining the plaque stability via inhibiting activities of inflammatory molecules MMP-9 and NF-κB, and increasing the cholesterol efflux through inducing expressions of ABCA1 and SR-BI.

  16. Leukocyte TLR5 deficiency inhibits atherosclerosis by reduced macrophage recruitment and defective T-cell responsiveness

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    Ellenbroek, Guilielmus H.J.M.; van Puijvelde, Gijs H.M.; Anas, Adam A.; Bot, Martine; Asbach, Miriam; Schoneveld, Arjan; van Santbrink, Peter J.; Foks, Amanda C.; Timmers, Leo; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Hoefer, Imo E.; van der Poll, Tom; Kuiper, Johan; de Jager, Saskia C.A.

    2017-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) provide a critical link between innate and adaptive immunity, both important players in atherosclerosis. Since evidence for the role of TLR5 is lacking, we aimed to establish this in the immune axis of atherosclerosis. We assessed the effect of the TLR5-specific ligand Flagellin on macrophage maturation and T-cell polarisation. Next, we generated TLR5−/−LDLr−/− chimeras to study the effect of hematopoietic TLR5 deficiency on atherosclerosis formation. Flagellin stimulation did not influence wildtype or TLR5−/− macrophage maturation. Only in wildtype macrophages, Flagellin exposure increased MCP-1 and IL6 expression. Flagellin alone reduced T-helper 1 proliferation, which was completely overruled in the presence of T-cell receptor activation. In vivo, hematopoietic TLR5 deficiency attenuated atherosclerotic lesion formation by ≈25% (1030*103 ± 63*103 vs. 792*103 ± 61*103 μm2; p = 0.013) and decreased macrophage area (81.3 ± 12.0 vs. 44.2 ± 6.6 μm2; p = 0.011). In TLR5−/− chimeric mice, we observed lower IL6 plasma levels (36.4 ± 5.6 vs. 15.1 ± 2.2 pg/mL; p = 0.003), lower (activated) splenic CD4+ T-cell content (32.3 ± 2.1 vs. 21.0 ± 1.2%; p = 0.0018), accompanied by impaired T-cell proliferative responses. In conclusion, hematopoietic TLR5 deficiency inhibits atherosclerotic lesion formation by attenuated macrophage accumulation and defective T-cell responsiveness. PMID:28202909

  17. Selected atherosclerosis risk factors in youth aged 13–15 years 

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    Agnieszka Michalska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:The high frequency of cases of circulatory system conditions in Europe and other countries around the world requires scientific research to define risk factors of early atherosclerotic changes. The aim of the present study was to define which students are at danger of developing atherosclerosis by means of measuring cholesterol and triglyceride levels in blood as well as defining the correlation between atherosclerosis risk factors and arterial blood pressure, physical fitness and efficiency of the subjects.Material/Methods:The research covered 167 students of Public Junior High School ¹1 in Biala Podlaska aged 13–15 years. Accutrend GCT was employed to define the levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides in the screen test. Those students who were found to have increased values of biochemical parameters of capillary blood were subjected to additional blood tests aiming to define complete lipid profile of venous blood. The blood pressure in subjects was tested three times. The Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity (MVPA test, suggested by American authors, was employed to define physical activity in subjects. EUROFIT was employed to define physical efficiency.Results:Among the 167 subjects there were found 42 students (25.1�20whose lipid level in capillary blood proved to be increased. Full lipid profile tests proved that 16 students (9.6�20had increased blood lipid levels; those subjects constituted the risk group. Subjects in the risk group were characterized by lower levels of physical activity and physical efficiency compared to subjects with normal blood lipid level. Moreover, the frequency of hypertension was greater in risk group subjects compared to subjects with normal blood lipid levels.Inferences:Students diagnosed with atherosclerosis risk factors require observation and early prophylactics by adopting habits of healthy physical activity.

  18. Clopidogrel significantly lowers the development of atherosclerosis in ApoE-deficient mice in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Christian; Gebhardt, Julia; Ramsperger-Gleixner, Martina; Jacobi, Johannes; Weyand, Michael; Ensminger, Stephan M

    2016-05-01

    The anti-platelet drug clopidogrel has been shown to modulate adhesion molecule and cytokine expression, both playing an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of clopidogrel on the development and progression of atherosclerosis. ApoE(-/-) mice fed an atherogenic diet (cholesterol: 1 %) for 6 months received a daily dose of clopidogrel (1 mg/kg) by i.p. injection. Anti-platelet treatment was started immediately in one experimental group, and in another group clopidogrel was started 2 month after beginning of the atherogenic diet. Blood was analysed at days 30, 60 and 120 to monitor the lipid profile. After 6 months the aortic arch and brachiocephalic artery were analysed by Sudan IV staining for plaque size and by morphometry for luminal occlusion. Serum levels of various adhesion molecules were investigated by ELISA and the cellular infiltrate was analysed by immunofluorescence. After daily treatment with 1 mg/kg clopidogrel mice showed a significant reduction of atherosclerotic lesions in the thoracic aorta and within cross sections of the aortic arch [plaque formation 55.2 % (clopidogrel/start) vs. 76.5 % (untreated control) n = 8, P clopidogrel P-/E-selectin levels and cytokine levels of MCP-1 and PDGFβ were significantly reduced as compared to controls. The cellular infiltrate showed significantly reduced macrophage and T-cell infiltration in clopidogrel-treated animals. These results show that clopidogrel can effectively delay the development and progression of 'de-novo' atherosclerosis. However, once atherosclerotic lesions were already present, anti-platelet treatment alone did not result in reverse remodelling of these lesions.

  19. The interaction of estrogen and CSE/H2S pathway in the development of atherosclerosis.

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    Li, Hongzhu; Mani, Sarathi; Wu, Lingyun; Fu, Ming; Shuang, Tian; Xu, Changqing; Wang, Rui

    2017-03-01

    Both estrogen and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) have been shown to inhibit the development of atherosclerosis. We previously reported that cystathionine γ-lyase knockout (CSE-KO) male mice develop atherosclerosis earlier than male wild-type (WT) mice. The present study investigated the interaction of CSE/H2S pathway and estrogen on the development of atherosclerosis in female mice. Plasma estrogen levels were significantly lower in female CSE-KO mice than in female WT mice. NaHS treatment had no effect on plasma estrogen levels in both WT and CSE-KO female mice. After CSE-KO and WT female mice were fed with atherogenic diet for 12 wk, plasma lipid levels were significantly increased and triglyceride levels decreased compared with those of control diet-fed mice. Atherogenic diet induced more atherosclerotic lesion, oxidative stress, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and NF-κB in CSE-KO mice than in WT mice. Estrogen treatment of atherogenic diet-fed WT mice attenuated hypercholesterolemia, oxidative stress, ICAM-1 expression, and NF-κB in WT mice but not in atherogenic diet-fed CSE-KO mice. Furthermore, H2S production in both the liver and vascular tissues was enhanced by estrogen in WT mice but not in CSE-KO mice. It is concluded that the antiatherosclerotic effect of estrogen is mediated by CSE-generated H2S. This study provides new insights into the interaction of H2S and estrogen signaling pathways on the regulation of cardiovascular functions.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Female cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE)-knockout mice have significantly lower plasma estrogen levels and more severe early atherosclerotic lesion than female wild-type mice. H2S production in liver and vascular tissues is enhanced by estrogen via its stimulatory effect on CSE activity. The antiatherosclerotic effect of estrogen is mediated by CSE-generated H2S.

  20. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Deficiency Attenuates the Development of Atherosclerosis in Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soro-Paavonen, Aino; Watson, Anna M.D.; Li, Jiaze; Paavonen, Karri; Koitka, Audrey; Calkin, Anna C.; Barit, David; Coughlan, Melinda T.; Drew, Brian G.; Lancaster, Graeme I.; Thomas, Merlin; Forbes, Josephine M.; Nawroth, Peter P.; Bierhaus, Angelika; Cooper, Mark E.; Jandeleit-Dahm, Karin A.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in diabetic vasculature is considered to be a key mediator of atherogenesis. This study examines the effects of deletion of RAGE on the development of atherosclerosis in the diabetic apoE−/− model of accelerated atherosclerosis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—ApoE−/− and RAGE−/−/apoE−/− double knockout mice were rendered diabetic with streptozotocin and followed for 20 weeks, at which time plaque accumulation was assessed by en face analysis. RESULTS—Although diabetic apoE−/− mice showed increased plaque accumulation (14.9 ± 1.7%), diabetic RAGE−/−/apoE−/− mice had significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque area (4.9 ± 0.4%) to levels not significantly different from control apoE−/− mice (4.3 ± 0.4%). These beneficial effects on the vasculature were associated with attenuation of leukocyte recruitment; decreased expression of proinflammatory mediators, including the nuclear factor-κB subunit p65, VCAM-1, and MCP-1; and reduced oxidative stress, as reflected by staining for nitrotyrosine and reduced expression of various NADPH oxidase subunits, gp91phox, p47phox, and rac-1. Both RAGE and RAGE ligands, including S100A8/A9, high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), and the advanced glycation end product (AGE) carboxymethyllysine were increased in plaques from diabetic apoE−/− mice. Furthermore, the accumulation of AGEs and other ligands to RAGE was reduced in diabetic RAGE−/−/apoE−/− mice. CONCLUSIONS—This study provides evidence for RAGE playing a central role in the development of accelerated atherosclerosis associated with diabetes. These findings emphasize the potential utility of strategies targeting RAGE activation in the prevention and treatment of diabetic macrovascular complications. PMID:18511846

  1. Bacterial Communities Associated with Atherosclerotic Plaques from Russian Individuals with Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziganshina, Elvira E; Sharifullina, Dilyara M; Lozhkin, Andrey P; Khayrullin, Rustem N; Ignatyev, Igor M; Ziganshin, Ayrat M

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is considered a chronic disease of the arterial wall and is the major cause of severe disease and death among individuals all over the world. Some recent studies have established the presence of bacteria in atherosclerotic plaque samples and suggested their possible contribution to the development of cardiovascular disease. The main objective of this preliminary pilot study was to better understand the bacterial diversity and abundance in human atherosclerotic plaques derived from common carotid arteries of individuals with atherosclerosis (Russian nationwide group) and contribute towards the further identification of a main group of atherosclerotic plaque bacteria by 454 pyrosequencing their 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) genes. The applied approach enabled the detection of bacterial DNA in all atherosclerotic plaques. We found that distinct members of the order Burkholderiales were present at high levels in all atherosclerotic plaques obtained from patients with atherosclerosis with the genus Curvibacter being predominant in all plaque samples. Moreover, unclassified Burkholderiales as well as members of the genera Propionibacterium and Ralstonia were typically the most significant taxa for all atherosclerotic plaques. Other genera such as Burkholderia, Corynebacterium and Sediminibacterium as well as unclassified Comamonadaceae, Oxalobacteraceae, Rhodospirillaceae, Bradyrhizobiaceae and Burkholderiaceae were always found but at low relative abundances of the total 16S rRNA gene population derived from all samples. Also, we found that some bacteria found in plaque samples correlated with some clinical parameters, including total cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase and fibrinogen levels. Finally, our study indicates that some bacterial agents at least partially may be involved in affecting the development of cardiovascular disease through different mechanisms.

  2. Assessment of subclinical atherosclerosis in ankylosing spondylitis: correlations with disease activity indices

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    F.M. Perrotta

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate atherosclerosis in ankylosing spondylitis (AS through the assessment of morphological and functional measures of subclinical atherosclerosis. Twenty patients [M/F=12/8, age (median/range 43.5/28-69 years; disease duration (median/range 9.7/1-36 years] with AS classified according to modified New York criteria and twenty age and sex related healthy controls with negative past medical history for cardiovascular events were enrolled in the study. In all patients and controls, the intima-media thickness (IMT of common carotid artery, carotid bulb and internal carotid artery, and the flow-mediated dilatation (FMD of non-dominant arm brachial artery were determined, using a sonographic probe Esaote GPX (Genoa, Italy. Furthermore, we assess the main disease activity and disability indices [bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index, ankylosing spondylitis disease activity score-eritrosedimentation rate (ASDAS-ESR, ASDAS-C-reactive protein (CRP, bath ankylosing spondylitis metrology index, bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index and acute phase reactants. Plasmatic values of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, triglyceride and homocysteine were carried out in all twenty patients. IMT at carotid bulb was significant higher in patients than in controls (0.67 mm vs 0.54 mm; P=0.03. FMD did not statistically differ between patients and controls (12.5% vs 15%; P>0.05. We found a correlation between IMT at carotid bulb and ESR (rho 0.43; P=0.04. No correlation was found between FMD and disease activity and disability indices. This study showed that in AS patients, without risk factors for cardiovascular disease, carotid bulb IMT, morphological index of subclinical atherosclerosis, is higher than in controls.

  3. Fish oil increases atherosclerosis and hepatic steatosis, although decreases serum cholesterol in Wistar rat

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    Minoo M-Shirazi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is known that fish oil consumption decreases incidence of cardiovascular disease. However, some studies showed that it increases atherosclerosis as it does not get completely metabolized by the liver. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of fish oil on aortic atherosclerosis, hepatic steatosis and serum lipids in rats. Methods: Twenty pregnant Wistar rats were fed with a fish oil-containing diet or standard diet (containing soy bean oil during pregnancy and lactation and the pups were weaned onto the same diet. Fasting blood samples, hepatic and aortic specimens were taken from pups on day 70 postnatal. Data were analyzed with SPSS software, using t-test, Mann-Whitney test and Spearman correlation coefficient. Values of p < 0.05 were considered significant. Results: Medians for fatty streak in aorta of fish oil fed and soy bean oil fed pups were 1.00 and 0.00, respectively, and P value was 0.042. Also, medians for ductular cell hyperplasia of liver in fish oil fed and soy bean oil fed pups were 1.00 and 0.00, respectively, and P value was 0.014. Total cholesterol in pups fed with fish oil was 52.20 mg/dl and in pups fed with soy bean oil was 83.90 mg/dl (p < 0.00 and for low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C values were 8.79 mg/dl and 13.16 mg/dl, respectively (p = 0.031. Conclusions: According to the results of the present study, a diet which provided 15.9% of energy from fish oil as the only source of dietary fat, induced aortic atherosclerosis as well as hepatic steatosis in Wistar rat, although it decreased total cholesterol and LDL-C.

  4. The degree of coronary atherosclerosis as a marker of insulin resistance in non-diabetics

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    Parapid Biljana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The metabolic syndrome and its influence on coronary artery disease development and progression remains in focus of international research debates, while insulin resistance, which represents its core, is the key component of hypertension, dyslipidaemias, glucose intolerance and obesity. Objective. The aim of this study was to establish relationship between basal glucose and insulin levels, insulin sensitivity and lipid panel and the degree of coronary atherosclerosis in nondiabetic patients. Methods. The coronary angiograms were evaluated for the presence of significant stenosis, insulin sensitivity was assessed using the intravenous glucose tolerance test with a minimal model according to Bergman, while baseline glucose (G0, insulin (I0 and lipid panel measurements (TC, HDL, LDL, TG were taken after a 12-hour fasting. Results. The protocol encompassed 40 patients (19 men and 21 women treated at the Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of the Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade. All were non-diabetics who were divided into 3 groups based on their angios: Group A (6 patients, 15%, with no significant stenosis, Group B (18 patients, 45%, with a single-vessel disease and Group C (16 patients, 40%, with multi-vessel disease. Presence of lower insulin sensitivity, higher I0 and TC in the group of patients with a more severe degree of coronary atherosclerosis (insulin sensitivity: F=4.279, p=0.023, A vs. C p=0.012, B vs. C p=0.038; I0: F=3.461 p=0.042, A vs. B p=0.045, A vs. C p=0.013; TC: F=2.572, p=0.09, while no significant difference was found for G0, LDL, HDL and TG. Conclusion. Baseline insulinaemia, more precisely, fasting hyperinsulinaemia could be a good predictor of significant coronary atherosclerosis in non-diabetic patients, which enables a more elegant cardiometabolic risk assessment in the setting of everyday clinical practice.

  5. Effect of probucol on vascular remodeling due to atherosclerosis in rabbits: an intravascular ultrasound study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ting-ting; XIE Yi; GUO Yuan; TIAN Hong-bo; ZHANG Jian-ning; PENG Jie; ZHANG Yun

    2011-01-01

    Background Probucol is known to reduce the development of atherosclerotic lesions, but its impact on vascular remodeling associated with de novo atherosclerosis is incompletely understood. We therefore examined the effect of probucol on vascular remodeling in a rabbit model of established atherosclerosis.Methods Aortic atherosclerosis was induced by a combination of endothelial injury and 10 weeks' atherogenic diet. Animals were then randomized to receive the foregoing diet without or with 1% (wt/wt) probucol for 16 weeks. At the end of week 26, in vivo intravascular ultrasound, pathological, immunohistochemical and gene expression studies were performed.Results Probucol significantly decreased vessel cross-sectional area, plaque area and plaque burden without effect on lumen area. More negative remodeling and less positive remodeling occurred in the abdominal aortas of probucol group than the control group (56% vs. 21%, 18% vs. 54%, respectively, both P<0.01). In addition, the probucol group showed a smaller mean remodeling index relative to the control group (0.93 ± 0.13 vs. 1.05 ±0.16, P<0.01). Furthermore, probucol treatment decreased macrophage infiltration, inhibited apoptosis of cells within plaques, and reduced the production of matrix metalloproteinases-2, -9, cathepsin K and cathepsin S (all P<0.01).Conclusions These findings suggest that probucol may attenuate the enlargement of atherosclerotic vessel walls and be associated with a negative remodeling pattern without affecting the lumen size. This effect may involve inhibition of extracellular matrix degradation and prevention of apoptosis in atherosclerotic plaques.

  6. Levels of soluble adhesion molecules in patients with various clinical presentations of coronary atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hui-he; SHENG Zheng-qiang; WANG Yi; ZHANG Li

    2010-01-01

    Background Adhesion molecules play an important role in the development and progression of coronary atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to compare concentrations of soluble forms of adhesion molecules in patients with different clinical presentations of coronary artery disease (CAD).Methods One hundred and twenty-eight patients with CAD were divided into three groups; the first group was acute myocardial infarction group (AMI group, n=45), the second group was unstable angina pectoris group (UAP group, n=48),the third group was stable angina pectoris group (SAP group, n=35). We compared them with patients with normal coronary arteries (control group, n=31). The serum levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), E-selectin and P-selectin were measured in all subjects.Results The serum level of VCAM-1 in the AMI group was significantly higher than in the UAP, SAP and control groups (P <0.01). The level in the UAP group was significantly higher than the SAP group and control group (P <0.01) and the level in the SAP group was significantly higher than in the control group (P <0.01). The serum ICAM-1 level was significantly elevated in the AMI, UAP and SAP groups as compared to the control group (P <0.01). The levels of serum E-selectin and P-selectin in the AMI and UAP groups were significantly higher than in the SAP and control groups (P<0.01).Conclusions Increased levels of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, E-selectin and P-selectin, as markers of inflammation, showed the importance of inflammatory processes in the development of atherosclerosis and clinical expression of CAD. Soluble ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin and P-selectin concentrations are useful indicators of the presence of atherosclerosis and the severity of CAD clinical presentation.

  7. Graphical modeling of gene expression in monocytes suggests molecular mechanisms explaining increased atherosclerosis in smokers.

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    Ricardo A Verdugo

    Full Text Available Smoking is a risk factor for atherosclerosis with reported widespread effects on gene expression in circulating blood cells. We hypothesized that a molecular signature mediating the relation between smoking and atherosclerosis may be found in the transcriptome of circulating monocytes. Genome-wide expression profiles and counts of atherosclerotic plaques in carotid arteries were collected in 248 smokers and 688 non-smokers from the general population. Patterns of co-expressed genes were identified by Independent Component Analysis (ICA and network structure of the pattern-specific gene modules was inferred by the PC-algorithm. A likelihood-based causality test was implemented to select patterns that fit models containing a path "smoking→gene expression→plaques". Robustness of the causal inference was assessed by bootstrapping. At a FDR ≤0.10, 3,368 genes were associated to smoking or plaques, of which 93% were associated to smoking only. SASH1 showed the strongest association to smoking and PPARG the strongest association to plaques. Twenty-nine gene patterns were identified by ICA. Modules containing SASH1 and PPARG did not show evidence for the "smoking→gene expression→plaques" causality model. Conversely, three modules had good support for causal effects and exhibited a network topology consistent with gene expression mediating the relation between smoking and plaques. The network with the strongest support for causal effects was connected to plaques through SLC39A8, a gene with known association to HDL-cholesterol and cellular uptake of cadmium from tobacco, while smoking was directly connected to GAS6, a gene reported to have anti-inflammatory effects in atherosclerosis and to be up-regulated in the placenta of women smoking during pregnancy. Our analysis of the transcriptome of monocytes recovered genes relevant for association to smoking and atherosclerosis, and connected genes that before, were only studied in separate contexts

  8. M1- and M2-type macrophage responses are predictive of adverse outcomes in human atherosclerosis

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    Monica De Gaetano

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease caused by endothelial injury, lipid deposition and oxidative stress. This progressive disease can be converted into an acute clinical event by plaque rupture and thrombosis. In the context of atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, macrophages uniquely possess a dual functionality, regulating lipid accumulation and metabolism and sustaining the chronic inflammatory response, two of the most well documented pathways associated with the pathogenesis of the disease. Macrophages are heterogeneous cell populations and it is hypothesized that, during the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, macrophages in the developing plaque can switch from a pro-inflammatory (MΦ1 to an anti-inflammatory (MΦ2 phenotype and vice versa, depending on the microenvironment. The aim of this study was to identify changes in macrophage subpopulations in the progression of human atherosclerotic disease. Established atherosclerotic plaques from symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with existing coronary artery disease undergoing carotid endarterectomy were recruited to the study. Comprehensive histological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to quantify the cellular content and macrophage subsets of atherosclerotic lesion. In parallel, expression of MΦ1 and MΦ2 macrophage markers were analysed by real time-PCR and Western blot analysis.Gross analysis and histological staining demonstrated that symptomatic plaques presented greater haemorrhagic activity and the internal carotid was the most diseased segment, based on the predominant prevalence of fibrotic and necrotic tissue, calcifications and haemorrhagic events. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that both MΦ1 and MΦ2 macrophages are present in human plaques. However, MΦ2 macrophages are localised to more stable locations within the lesion. Importantly, gene and protein expression analysis of MΦ1/ MΦ2 markers evidenced that MΦ1

  9. Correlation of arterial stiffness index with carotid atherosclerosis in patients with primary hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Hua Cai; Li-Min Li; Xue-Min Wang; Cui-Qing Sun; Hai-Wei Zhao; Hui Wang; Rui-Chao Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore the correlation of arterial stiffness index with carotid atherosclerosis in patients with primary hypertension.Methods:A total of 86 patients with primary hypertension who were admitted in our hospital from January, 2013 to September, 2015 were included in the study, and divided into the carotid atherosclerosis group (IMT≥0.9 mm, with plaque being detected) and the pure hypertension group (normal IMT) according to the carotid artery color Doppler ultrasound results. According to the ambulatory blood pressure monitoring results, the carotid atherosclerosis group was divided into the low BPV (7.02-9.57) group and the high BPV (>9.57-14.29) group. The non-invasive ambulatory blood pressure monitoring apparatus was used for 24 h blood pressure monitoring, measuring time in the daytime: 6:00-21:59, measuring one time every 30 min; measuring time in the nighttime: 22:00-5:59, measuring one time every 60 min. The dSBP, dDBP, nSBP, nDBP, 24 h SBP, and 24 h DBP were recorded. BPV was expressed as 24 h SCV and 24 h DCV.Results:The dSBP, nSBP, 24 h SBP, 24 h DBP, and 24 h SCV in the carotid atherosclerosis group were significantly higher than those in the pure hypertension group, while the comparison of dDBP, nDBP, and 24 h DCV between the two groups was not statistically significant. The common carotid artery and external carotid artery IMT, and the mean IMT in the high BPV group were significantly higher than those in the low BPV group, and the number of carotid plaques being detected was significantly greater than that in the low BPV group.Conclusions:BPV is involved in the arterial functional and structural changes, resulting in the target organ damage. Detection of carotid IMT is of great significance in evaluating the early vascular damage and predicting the cardiovascular events; therefore, BPV monitoring should be strengthened during the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension.

  10. Role of gut microbiota in the modulation of atherosclerosis-associated immune response

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    Dimitry A Chistiakov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and metabolic abnormalities are linked to each other. At present, pathogenic inflammatory response was recognized as a major player in metabolic diseases. In humans, intestinal microflora could significantly influence the development of metabolic diseases including atherosclerosis. Commensal bacteria were shown to activate inflammatory pathways through altering lipid metabolism in adipocytes, macrophages, and vascular cells, inducing insulin resistance, and producing trimethylamine-N-oxide. However, gut microbiota could also play the atheroprotective role associated with anthocyanin metabolism and administration of probiotics and their components. Here, we review the mechanisms by which the gut microbiota may influence atherogenesis.

  11. ASSOCIATION OF POSTPRANDIAL HYPERTRIGLYCERIDEMIA AND CAROTID ATHEROSCLEROSIS IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DM

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    Suresh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The dyslipidemia that accompanies type 2 diabetes plays an important role in the pathogenesis of accelerated atherosclerosis. Several studies have proved that in type 2 diabetes, elevated triglyceride levels may be a better predictor of Ischemic heart disease (IHD than elevated LDL cholesterol levels. Although triglyceride levels are generally increased in the postprandial periods, the association between postprandial triglyceride levels and atherosclerosis has not been investigated in diabetic patients. The carotid intima media thickness (CIMT is increased in patients with postprandial hypertriglyceridemia despite normal fasting triglyceride levels. So to investigate the role of postprandial hypertriglyceridemia in early atherosclerosis there is a need to correlate between postprandial triglyceride levels and carotid intima media thickness values. METHODS: This is a comparative study in which 50 patients of Diabetes mellitus type 2 >1 year duration of age 35-75 years were included. Carotid artery Doppler was done by B-mode ultrasound using a 7.5 MHZ transducer with annular array ultrasound imaging system. Blood samples were obtained after an overnight fast and blood samples were taken again 4 hrs after the meal. OBSERVATIONS AND RESULTS: The study population (Type 2 diabetics is divided into 3 groups based on fasting and postprandial triglyceride levels. NORMO-NORMAL (NN GROUP: This group consists of subjects with normal fasting triglyceride level (≤150 mgs/dl and normal postprandial triglyceride levels (≤200 mgs/dl. NORMO-HYPER (NH GROUP: This group consists of subjects with normal fasting triglyceride level (≤150 mgs/dl and elevated postprandial triglyceride levels (>200 mgs/dl. HYPER – HYPER (HH GROUP: This group consists of subjects with elevated fasting triglyceride level (>150mgs/dl and elevated postprandial triglyceride levels (>200 mgs/dl. CONCLUSION: Postprandial hypertriglyceridemia, despite normal fasting triglyceride levels

  12. Endothelial lipase concentrations are increased in metabolic syndrome and associated with coronary atherosclerosis.

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    Karen O Badellino

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endothelial lipase (EL, a new member of the lipase family, has been shown to modulate high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C metabolism and atherosclerosis in mouse models. We hypothesized that EL concentrations would be associated with decreased HDL-C and increased atherosclerosis in humans. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Healthy individuals with a family history of premature coronary heart disease (n = 858 were recruited as part of the Study of the Inherited Risk of Atherosclerosis. Blood was drawn in the fasting state before and, in a subgroup (n = 510, after administration of a single dose of intravenous heparin. Plasma lipids were measured enzymatically, lipoprotein subclasses were assessed by nuclear magnetic resonance, and coronary artery calcification (CAC was quantified by electron beam computed tomography. Plasma EL mass was measured using a newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Median EL mass in pre-heparin plasma was 442 (interquartile range = 324-617 ng/ml. Median post-heparin mass was approximately 3-fold higher, 1,313 (888-1,927 ng/ml. The correlation between pre-heparin EL mass and post-heparin EL mass was 0.46 (p < 0.001. EL mass concentrations in both pre- and post-heparin plasma significantly correlated with all NCEP ATPIII-defined metabolic syndrome factors: waist circumference (r = 0.28 and 0.22, respectively, p < 0.001 for each, blood pressure (r = 0.18 and 0.24, p < 0.001 for each, triglycerides (r = 0.22, p < 0.001; and 0.13, p = 0.004, HDL cholesterol (r = -0.11, p = 0.002; and -0.18, p < 0.001, and fasting glucose (r = 0.11 and 0.16, p = 0.001 for both. EL mass in both routine (odds ratio [OR] = 1.67, p = 0.01 and post-heparin (OR = 2.42, p = 0.003 plasma was associated with CAC as determined by ordinal regression after adjustment for age, gender, waist circumference, vasoactive medications, hormone replacement therapy (women, and established cardiovascular risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: We report, to our knowledge

  13. White Matter Lesions, Carotid and Coronary Atherosclerosis in Late-Onset Depression and Healthy Controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devantier, Torben Albert; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Poulsen, Mikael Kjær

    2016-01-01

    for the formation of WMLs in depression. METHODS: The case-control study included 29 patients with late-onset major depressive disorder and 27 controls matched for sex, age, and tobacco use. WML volume, carotid intima-media thickness, and coronary plaque volume were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging...... between carotid intima-media thickness and WML volume was, however, similar in patients and controls. CONCLUSIONS: In older persons aged between 50 and 70 years, WMLs do not seem to be a part of generalized atherosclerotic disease, but seem to be dependent on atherosclerosis in the carotid arteries...

  14. Small animal positron emission tomography imaging and in vivo studies of atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hag, Anne Mette Fisker; Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Pedersen, Sune Folke

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a growing health challenge globally, and despite our knowledge of the disease has increased over the last couple of decades, many unanswered questions remain. As molecular imaging can be used to visualize, characterize and measure biological processes at the molecular...... and cellular levels in living systems, this technology represents an opportunity to investigate some of these questions in vivo. In addition, molecular imaging may be translated into clinical use and eventually pave the way for more personalized treatment regimes in patients. Here, we review the current...

  15. Aortic arch and intra-/extracranial cerebral arterial atherosclerosis in patients suffering acute ischemic strokes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭毅; 姜昕; 陈实; 张少文; 赵宏文; 吴瑛

    2003-01-01

    Objective To determine the distribution of aortic arch and intra/extracranial cerebral arterial atherosclerosis in Chinese patients who had suffered acute ischemic strokes. Methods Eighty-nine patients with acute ischemic strokes were included in this study. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) was used to evaluate potential sources of embolisms in the aortic arch and in the heart; duplex ultrasound was used for the carotid artery; and intracranial Doppler (TCD) imaging was used for the middle cerebral artery (MCA), anterior cerebral artery (ACA), posterior cerebral artery (PCA), and basilar artery (BA). An atherosclerotic lesion in the aortic arch was defined as normal (0); mild plaque (1); moderate plaque (2); and protruding plaque or mobile plaque (3). A lesion in the carotid artery was considered a plaque if the maximal carotid plaque thickness was 1.2 mm. TCD results were deemed abnormal if flow velocity was either greater or lower than normal, and, in the case of the MCA, if an asymmetry index above 21% was measured. Results Of the 89 patients, 52 (58.43%) patients showed evidence of aortic arch atherosclerosis (AAA), including 11 (12.36%) patients graded mild, 18 (20.22%) patients graded moderate, and 23 (25.84%) patients graded severe. Of the 23 patients with severe AAA, AAA was determined to be an important potential embolic source in 14 patients. Forty-nine (50.56%) patients had carotid arterial plaques (CAPs). The incidence of carotid plaques was higher among patients with AAA than among patients without AAA (71.15% vs 21.62%, OR=3.291, 95% CI=1.740-6.225, P<0.001). TCD abnormalities affecting the MCA were found in 54 (60.67%) patients. Differences in incidence of TCD abnormalities between patients with AAA and without AAA (69.23% vs 48.65%) were not significant (OR=1.423, 95% CI=0.976-2.076, P=0.05). There was a higher incidence of AAA in older, male patients with a history of diabetes and smoking. Conclusions AAA is an important potential source of

  16. Plasma Lipoprotein-associated Phospholipase A2 in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome and Carotid Atherosclerosis

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    Mao Yong-jun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2 is a recently identified and potentially useful plasma biomarker for cardiovascular and atherosclerotic diseases. However, the correlation between the Lp-PLA2 activity and carotid atherosclerosis remains poorly investigated in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS. The present study aimed to evaluate the potential role of Lp-PLA2 as a comprehensive marker of metabolic syndrome in individuals with and without carotid atherosclerosis. Methods We documented 118 consecutive patients with MetS and 70 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects served as controls. The patients were further divided into two groups: 39 with carotid plaques and 79 without carotid plaques to elucidate the influence of Lp-PLA2 on carotid atherosclerosis. The plasma Lp-PLA2 activity was measured by using ELISA method and carotid intimal-media thickness (IMT was performed by ultrasound in all participants. Results Lp-PLA2 activity was significantly increased in MetS subgroups when compared with controls, and was higher in patients with carotid plaques than those without plaques (P 2 was obtained between patients with three and four disorders of metabolic syndrome (P P = 0.029, LDL-cholesterol (β = 0.401, P = 0.000 and waist-hip ratio (β = 0.410, P = 0.000 emerged as significant and independent determinants of Lp-PLA2 activity. Multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed that LDL-cholesterol (β = 0.309, P = 0.000, systolic blood pressure (β = 0.322, P = 0.002 and age (β = 0.235, P = 0.007 significantly correlated with max IMT, and Lp-PLA2 was not an independent predictor for carotid IMT. Conclusions Lp-PLA2 may be a modulating factor for carotid IMT via age and LDL-cholesterol, not independent predictor in the pathophysiological process of carotid atherosclerosis in patients with MetS.

  17. Increased systemic and local interleukin 9 levels in patients with carotid and coronary atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Gregersen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that involves a range of inflammatory mediators. Although interleukin (IL-9 has been related to inflammation, there are at present no data on its role in atherosclerosis. Here we have examined IL-9 and IL-9 receptor (IL-9R systemically and locally in patients with coronary and carotid atherosclerosis. METHODS: Plasma IL-9 was quantified by enzyme immunoassay and multiplex technology. IL-9 and IL-9R mRNA were quantified by real-time RT-PCR, and their localization within the lesion was assessed by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: THE MAIN FINDINGS WERE: (i Patients with carotid atherosclerosis had significantly raised IL-9 plasma levels compared with healthy controls (n = 28, with no differences between asymptomatic (n = 56 and symptomatic (n = 88 patients. (ii On admission, patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI (n = 42 had markedly raised IL-9 plasma levels which gradually declined during the first week post-MI. (iii T cells and monocytes from patients with unstable angina (n = 17 had increased mRNA levels of IL-9 as compared with controls (n = 11. (iv Carotid plaques (n = 68 showed increased mRNA levels of IL-9 and IL-9R compared to non-atherosclerotic vessels (n = 10. Co-localization to T cells (IL-9 and IL-9R and macrophages (IL-9 were shown by immunohistochemistry. (v IL-9 increased IL-17 release in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with unstable angina (n = 5 and healthy controls (n = 5 with a particularly enhancing effect in cells from the patient group. CONCLUSION: Our findings show increased IL-9 levels in different atherosclerotic disorders both systemically and within the lesion, suggesting a role for the IL-9/IL-9R axis in the atherosclerotic process, potentially involving IL-17 mediated mechanisms. However, the functional consequences of these findings should be further investigated.

  18. Establishment of a uremic apolipoprotein E knockout mouse model to explore the mechanism of uremic atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Objective To establish a uremic apoE-/-mouse model to observe serum biochemical parameters and features of aortic root atherosclerosis (AS) in the model. Methods A uremic model was induced surgically in apoE-/- mice:electrocautery of the right kidney at 8 weeks of age and nephrectomy (NX) of the left one 2 weeks later. Control mice were sham-operated. Two weeks after NX,renal functions were detected in the uremic and control mice to evaluate the efficiency of the model. After 10 weeks of NX,blood samples we...

  19. Unraveling the environmental and genetic interactions in atherosclerosis: Central role of the gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Org, Elin; Mehrabian, Margarete; Lusis, Aldons J

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have convincingly linked gut microbiota to traits relevant to atherosclerosis, such as insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and inflammation, and have revealed novel disease pathways involving microbe-derived metabolites. These results have important implications for understanding how environmental and genetic factors act together to influence cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Thus, dietary constituents are not only absorbed and metabolized by the host but they also perturb the gut microbiota, which in turn influence host metabolism and inflammation. It also appears that host genetics helps to shape the gut microbiota community. Here, we discuss challenges in understanding these interactions and the role they play in CVD.

  20. Endothelial Lipase Concentrations Are Increased in Metabolic Syndrome and Associated with Coronary Atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endothelial lipase (EL, a new member of the lipase family, has been shown to modulate high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C metabolism and atherosclerosis in mouse models. We hypothesized that EL concentrations would be associated with decreased HDL-C and increased atherosclerosis in humans. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Healthy individuals with a family history of premature coronary heart disease (n = 858 were recruited as part of the Study of the Inherited Risk of Atherosclerosis. Blood was drawn in the fasting state before and, in a subgroup (n = 510, after administration of a single dose of intravenous heparin. Plasma lipids were measured enzymatically, lipoprotein subclasses were assessed by nuclear magnetic resonance, and coronary artery calcification (CAC was quantified by electron beam computed tomography. Plasma EL mass was measured using a newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Median EL mass in pre-heparin plasma was 442 (interquartile range = 324-617 ng/ml. Median post-heparin mass was approximately 3-fold higher, 1,313 (888-1,927 ng/ml. The correlation between pre-heparin EL mass and post-heparin EL mass was 0.46 (p < 0.001. EL mass concentrations in both pre- and post-heparin plasma significantly correlated with all NCEP ATPIII-defined metabolic syndrome factors: waist circumference (r = 0.28 and 0.22, respectively, p < 0.001 for each, blood pressure (r = 0.18 and 0.24, p < 0.001 for each, triglycerides (r = 0.22, p < 0.001; and 0.13, p = 0.004, HDL cholesterol (r = -0.11, p = 0.002; and -0.18, p < 0.001, and fasting glucose (r = 0.11 and 0.16, p = 0.001 for both. EL mass in both routine (odds ratio [OR] = 1.67, p = 0.01 and post-heparin (OR = 2.42, p = 0.003 plasma was associated with CAC as determined by ordinal regression after adjustment for age, gender, waist circumference, vasoactive medications, hormone replacement therapy (women, and established cardiovascular risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: We report, to our knowledge

  1. Differential effects of dietary sodium intake on blood pressure and atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hong; Wu, Congqing; Howatt, Deborah A; Balakrishnan, Anju; Charnigo, Richard J; Cassis, Lisa A; Daugherty, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The amount of dietary sodium intake regulates the renin angiotensin system (RAS) and blood pressure, both of which play critical roles in atherosclerosis. However, there are conflicting findings regarding the effects of dietary sodium intake on atherosclerosis. This study applied a broad range of dietary sodium concentrations to determine the concomitant effects of dietary sodium intake on the RAS, blood pressure, and atherosclerosis in mice. Eight-week-old male low-density lipoprotein receptor -/- mice were fed a saturated fat-enriched diet containing selected sodium concentrations (Na 0.01%, 0.1%, or 2% w/w) for 12 weeks. Mice in these three groups were all hypercholesterolemic, although mice fed Na 0.01% and Na 0.1% had higher plasma cholesterol concentrations than mice fed Na 2%. Mice fed Na 0.01% had greater abundances of renal renin mRNA than those fed Na 0.1% and 2%. Plasma renin concentrations were higher in mice fed Na 0.01% (14.2 ± 1.7 ng/ml/30 min) than those fed Na 0.1% or 2% (6.2 ± 0.6 and 5.8 ± 1.6 ng/ml per 30 min, respectively). However, systolic blood pressure at 12 weeks was higher in mice fed Na 2% (138 ± 3 mm Hg) than those fed Na 0.01% and 0.1% (129 ± 3 and 128 ± 4 mmHg, respectively). In contrast, mice fed Na 0.01% (0.17 ± 0.02 mm(2)) had larger atherosclerotic lesion areas in aortic roots than those fed Na 2% (0.09 ± 0.01 mm(2)), whereas lesion areas in mice fed Na 0.1% (0.12 ± 0.02 mm(2)) were intermediate between and not significantly different from those in Na 0.01% and Na 2% groups. In conclusion, while high dietary sodium intake led to higher systolic blood pressure, low dietary sodium intake augmented atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice.

  2. Cardiorenal consequences of atherosclerosis and statins therapy: from the past to the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buemi, Michele; Aloisi, Carmela; Fulvio, Floccari; Caccamo, Chiara; Cavallaro, Emanuela; Crascì, Eleonora; Criseo, Manila; Corica, Francesco; Frisina, Nicola

    2005-01-01

    Complications from atherosclerosis cause most deaths in western countries, and their incidence appears to be markedly increasing in developing countries, thus suggesting a correlation that is directly proportional to social progress. In recent years, the different branches of medical research, from studies on vascular disease to those on lipid and glucose metabolism, and also clinical research on coronary, carotid and peripheral artery diseases, epidemiologic and pharmacologic research, have concentrated on these diseases with the common aim of reducing the incidence of cardiovascular diseases, and mortality. Scientific progress has greatly improved our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the progression of cardiovascular disease, and efforts in this discipline now appear more necessary than ever.

  3. Characterization of atherosclerosis by histochemical and immunohistochemical methods in African grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus) and Amazon parrots (Amazona spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Cornelia; Schmidt, Volker; Cramer, Kerstin; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Dorrestein, Gerry M

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize atherosclerotic changes in African grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus) and Amazon parrots (Amazona spp.) by histochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Samples of the aorta ascendens and trunci brachiocephalici from 62 African grey parrots and 35 Amazon parrots were stained by hematoxylin and eosin and Elastica van Gieson for grading of atherosclerosis in these birds. Four different stages were differentiated. The incidence of atherosclerosis in the examined parrots was 91.9% in African grey parrots and 91.4% in Amazon parrots. To evaluate the pathogenesis in birds, immunohistochemical methods were performed to demonstrate lymphocytes, macrophages, smooth muscle cells, and chondroitin sulfate. According to the missing lymphocytes and macrophages and the absence of invasion and proliferation of smooth muscle cells in each atherosclerotic stage, "response-to-injury hypothesis" seems inapplicable in parrots. Additionally, we found alterations of vitally important organs (heart, lungs) significantly correlated with atherosclerosis of the aorta ascendens.

  4. A tale of two plaques: convergent mechanisms of T-cell-mediated inflammation in psoriasis and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, April W; Voyles, Stephanie V; Armstrong, Ehrin J; Fuller, Erin N; Rutledge, John C

    2011-07-01

    Psoriasis and atherosclerosis are diseases in which effector T lymphocytes such as Helper T cells type 1 (Th1) and 17 (Th17) play integral roles in disease pathogenesis and progression. Regulatory T cells (Treg) also exert clinically important anti-inflammatory effects that are pathologically altered in psoriasis and atherosclerosis. We review the immunological pathways involving Th1, Th17 and Treg cells that are common to psoriasis and atherosclerosis. These shared pathways provide the basis for mechanisms that may explain the epidemiologic observation that patients with psoriasis have an increased risk of heart disease. Improved understanding of these pathways will guide future experiments and may lead to the development of therapeutics that prevent or treat cardiovascular complications in patients with psoriasis.

  5. [Relationship between subclinical atherosclerosis, blood pressure, and lipid profile in obese children and adolescents: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, Juliana; Silva, Larissa Rosa da; Moser, Deise; Leite, Neiva

    2013-02-01

    The present study aimed to systematically review the literature about intima-media thickness (IMT), blood pressure (BP), and lipid profile (LP) in obese and non-obese children and adolescents. The search was carried out in electronic databases (PubMed, Bireme, and Elsevier ScienceDirect) between 2000-2010. The following keywords, in English, were used: "obesity", "adolescents", "atherosclerosis" and "child", using two combinations: obesity+child+atherosclerosis and obesity+adolescents+atherosclerosis. The electronic search resulted in 3,211 manuscripts. After analysis of the inclusion criteria, 13 papers were selected. Of these, two studies showed significant correlation between IMT and the variables BP, LDL, and triglycerides. In other studies, no significant correlations were found. There is a wide methodological variability across the studies. However, obese children and adolescents had higher values of IMT, BP, and LP.

  6. Atherosclerosis and vasomotor dysfunction in arteries of animals after exposure to combustion-derived particulate matter or nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Christophersen, Daniel Vest; Raun Jacobsen, Nicklas

    2016-01-01

    air, diesel exhaust and certain nanomaterials on atherosclerosis and vasomotor function in animals have been assessed. The majority of studies have used pulmonary exposure by inhalation or instillation, although there are some studies on non-pulmonary routes such as the gastrointestinal tract. Airway...... exposure to air pollution particles and nanomaterials is associated with similar effects on atherosclerosis progression, augmented vasoconstriction and blunted vasorelaxation responses in arteries, whereas exposure to diesel exhaust is associated with lower responses. At present, there is no convincing...... for these vascular effects to occur. Furthermore, there is inconsistent evidence with regard to altered plasma lipid profile and systemic inflammation as a key step in vasomotor dysfunction and progression of atherosclerosis in PM-exposed animals. In summary, the results show that certain nanomaterials, including Ti...

  7. A novel photoacoustic nanoprobe of ICG@PEG-Ag2S for atherosclerosis targeting and imaging in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chenxin; Zhang, Yejun; Li, Zhen; Li, Chunyan; Wang, Qiangbin

    2016-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major cause of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases that have high mortality and disability rates. Because of its unclear pathogenic mechanism and heterogeneous distribution feature, it is still a big challenge to achieve precise diagnosis and therapy of atherosclerosis at its early stage in vivo. Herein, we fabricated a new ICG@PEG-Ag2S nanoprobe by a simple self-assembly of DT-Ag2S QDs, amphipathic C18/PEG polymer molecules and ICG. The ICG@PEG-Ag2S nanoprobe showed relatively long blood retention and was selectively accumulated in the region of atherosclerotic plaque due to the lipophilicity of the C18 chain to the atherosclerosis microenvironment, and thus the atherosclerosis was real-time monitored by high contrast-enhanced photoacoustic (PA) imaging of ICG. Combining the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and high spatial resolution fluorescence imaging of Ag2S QDs in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II) and related histological assessment in vitro, the feasibility of this new nanoprobe for atherosclerosis targeting in an Apoe-/- mouse model was verified. Additionally, hemolysis and coagulation assays of the ICG@PEG-Ag2S revealed its decent hemocompatibility and no histological changes were observed in the main organs of the mouse. Such a simple, multifunctional nanoprobe for targeting and PA imaging of atherosclerosis will have a great potential for future clinical applications.Atherosclerosis is a major cause of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases that have high mortality and disability rates. Because of its unclear pathogenic mechanism and heterogeneous distribution feature, it is still a big challenge to achieve precise diagnosis and therapy of atherosclerosis at its early stage in vivo. Herein, we fabricated a new ICG@PEG-Ag2S nanoprobe by a simple self-assembly of DT-Ag2S QDs, amphipathic C18/PEG polymer molecules and ICG. The ICG@PEG-Ag2S nanoprobe showed relatively long blood retention and was selectively

  8. Common polymorphisms in CYP2C9, subclinical atherosclerosis and risk of ischemic vascular disease in 52,000 individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur-Knudsen, D; Bojesen, S E; Nordestgaard, B G

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) enzymes metabolize warfarin and arachidonic acid. We hypothesized that the CYP2C9(*)2 (rs.1799853) and CYP2C9(*)3 (rs.1057910) polymorphisms with decreased enzyme activity affect risk of subclinical atherosclerosis (reduced ankle brachial index and increased C...... of follow-up; the Copenhagen General Population Study, a cross-sectional study including 21 629 participants; and the Copenhagen Ischemic Heart Disease Study, a case-control study including 5082 cases and 14 904 controls. CYP2C9 carriers versus noncarriers did not associate with subclinical atherosclerosis......% power. In conclusion, in three independent studies totaling more than 52 000 individuals, we found no association between CYP2C9(*)2 and CYP2C9(*)3 polymorphisms and risk of subclinical atherosclerosis, ischemic vascular disease or death after ischemic heart disease....

  9. Very low levels of HDL cholesterol and atherosclerosis, a variable relationship – a review of LCAT deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savel J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Julia Savel,1,2 Marianne Lafitte,1 Yann Pucheu,1,3 Vincent Pradeau,1 Antoine Tabarin,2,3 Thierry Couffinhal1,3,41Centre d'Exploration, de Prévention et de Traitement de l'Athérosclérose, Hôpital Cardiologique, 2Service d'endocrinologie, CHU Bordeaux, Université Bordeaux Segalen, Bordeaux, France; 3Université de Bordeaux Adaptation cardiovasculaire à l'ischémie, 4INSERM, Adaptation cardiovasculaire à l'ischémie, U1034, Pessac, FranceAbstract: A number of epidemiological and clinical studies have demonstrated that plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL level is a strong inverse predictor of cardiovascular events. HDL is believed to retard the formation of atherosclerotic lesions by removing excess cholesterol from cells and preventing endothelial dysfunction. Lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT plays a central role in the formation and maturation of HDL, and in the intravascular stage of reverse cholesterol transport: a major mechanism by which HDL modulates the development and progression of atherosclerosis. A defect in LCAT function would be expected to enhance atherosclerosis, by interfering with the reverse cholesterol transport step. As such, one would expect to find more atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events in LCAT-deficient patients. But this relationship is not always evident. In this review, we describe contradictory reports in the literature about cardiovascular risks in this patient population. We discuss the paradoxical finding of severe HDL deficiency and an absence of subclinical atherosclerosis in LCAT-deficient patients, which has been used to reject the hypothesis that HDL level is important in the protection against atherosclerosis. Furthermore, to illustrate this paradoxical finding, we present a case study of one patient, referred for evaluation of global cardiovascular risk in the presence of a low HDL cholesterol level, who was diagnosed with LCAT gene mutations.Keywords: atherosclerosis, LCAT function

  10. Göttingen minipig model of diet-induced atherosclerosis: influence of mild streptozotocin-induced diabetes on lesion severity and markers of inflammation evaluated in obese, obese and diabetic, and lean control animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, Trine Pagh; Kirk, Rikke Kaae; Christoffersen, Berit Østergaard;

    2015-01-01

    From a pharmacological perspective, readily-available, well-characterized animal models of cardiovascular disease, including relevant in vivo markers of atherosclerosis are important for evaluation of novel drug candidates. Furthermore, considering the impact of diabetes mellitus on atherosclerosis...

  11. The use of rabbits in atherosclerosis research. Diet and drug intervention in different rabbit models exposed to selected dietary fats and the calcium antagonist (-)-anipamil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Alicja

    Laboratory animal models play an important role in atherosclerosis research. One of the most popular laboratory animal species in this field of research is the rabbit. The rabbit fulfils most of the criteria for an animal model for human atherosclerosis. Three rabbit models were established...

  12. Cytosolic triglycerides and oxidative stress in central obesity : the missing link between excessive atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, and beta-cell failure?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, SJL; IJzerman, RG; Teerlink, T; Westerhoff, HV; Gans, ROB; Heine, RJ

    2000-01-01

    Central obesity is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here we present a hypothesis that may explain the excess atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction and progressive beta-cell failure. Central obesity is associated with increased cytosolic tr

  13. The angiotensin II type 2 receptor agonist Compound 21 is protective in experimental diabetes-associated atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chow, Bryna S M; Koulis, Christine; Krishnaswamy, Pooja;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Angiotensin II is well-recognised to be a key mediator in driving the pathological events of diabetes-associated atherosclerosis via signalling through its angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) subtype. However, its actions via the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) subtype...... are still poorly understood. This study is the first to investigate the role of the novel selective AT2R agonist, Compound 21 (C21) in an experimental model of diabetes-associated atherosclerosis (DAA). METHODS: Streptozotocin-induced diabetic Apoe-knockout mice were treated with vehicle (0.1 mol/l citrate...

  14. Sustained activation of XBP1 splicing leads to endothelial apoptosis and atherosclerosis development in response to disturbed flow

    OpenAIRE

    L. ZENG; Zampetaki, A.; Margariti, A.; Pepe, A. E.; Alam, S.; MARTIN, D; Xiao, Q; Wang, W; Jin, Z.-G.; Cockerill, G.; MORI, K; Li, Y.-s. J.; Hu, Y.; Chien, S.; Xu, Q.

    2009-01-01

    X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) is a key signal transducer in endoplasmic reticulum stress response, and its potential role in the atherosclerosis development is unknown. This study aims to explore the impact of XBP1 on maintaining endothelial integrity related to atherosclerosis and to delineate the underlying mechanism. We found that XBP1 was highly expressed at branch points and areas of atherosclerotic lesions in the arteries of ApoE−/− mice, which was related to the severity of lesion dev...

  15. Inflammation, lipid metabolism dysfunction, and hypertension: Active research fields in atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular disease in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Kai; TANG ChaoKe

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death in China [1].With advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of atherosclerosis vascular inflammation,lipid metabolism dysfunction,and hypertension are regarded as the main pathogenetic pathways of both early atherogenesis and advanced plaque rupture [2,3].Currently,much attention is being paid to the control of these pathways,which offers the potential for development of novel therapeutic approaches in the treatment of cardiovascular disease in China.

  16. Long-term activation of the innate immune system in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Anette; Bekkering, Siroon; Latz, Eicke; Riksen, Niels P

    2016-08-01

    Efforts to reverse the pathologic consequences of vulnerable plaques are often stymied by the complex treatment resistant pro-inflammatory environment within the plaque. This suggests that pro-atherogenic stimuli, such as LDL cholesterol and high fat diets may impart longer lived signals on (innate) immune cells that persist even after reversing the pro-atherogenic stimuli. Recently, a series of studies challenged the traditional immunological paradigm that innate immune cells cannot display memory characteristics. Epigenetic reprogramming in these myeloid cell subsets, after exposure to certain stimuli, has been shown to alter the expression of genes upon re-exposure. This phenomenon has been termed trained innate immunity or innate immune memory. The changed responses of 'trained' innate immune cells can confer nonspecific protection against secondary infections, suggesting that innate immune memory has likely evolved as an ancient mechanism to protect against pathogens. However, dysregulated processes of immunological imprinting mediated by trained innate immunity may also be detrimental under certain conditions as the resulting exaggerated immune responses could contribute to autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Pro-atherogenic stimuli most likely cause epigenetic modifications that persist for prolonged time periods even after the initial stimulus has been removed. In this review we discuss the concept of trained innate immunity in the context of a hyperlipidemic environment and atherosclerosis. According to this idea the epigenome of myeloid (progenitor) cells is presumably modified for prolonged periods of time, which, in turn, could evoke a condition of continuous immune cell over-activation.

  17. Emotional intelligence and coronary atherosclerosis: exploratory study using the Trait Meta-Mood Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Suárez-Bagnasco

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction There are no prior studies that assess emotional intelligence in asymptomatic adults with coronary atherosclerosis. Aim The purpose of this study is to explore associations between emotional intelligence in asymptomatic adults with and without coronary atherosclerotic lesions. Design and method Cross-sectional design. The sample consisted of 100 asymptomatic 30 to 80 year-old adults that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria and who underwent coronary multislice computed tomography. Coronary atherosclerosis was shown by 64-channel multislice computed tomography. Emotional intelligence was assessed by applying the Trait Meta-Mood Scale. Results The sample was composed of 73% men and 27% women. Fifty-one percent had coronary atherosclerotic lesions, 78% had scores below the reference values for both Clarity and Repair. Seventy-nine percent had scores above the reference values for Attention. Statistically significant associations were found between the presence of coronary atherosclerotic lesion and: a emotional attention, chi-square: 0.302, p=0.043, b emotional clarity, chi-square: -0.312, p=0.040, b emotional regulation, chi-square: -0.313, p=0.040. Conclusions: People with coronary atherosclerotic lesions showed an excessive tendency to focus on their own feelings and higher levels of rumination, together with lower ability to identify, distinguish and describe their emotions. Likewise, they have lower ability to reduce or eliminate negative emotions and to increase or maintain the intensity of positive emotions.

  18. Fructose Metabolism and Relation to Atherosclerosis, Type 2 Diabetes, and Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Kolderup

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A high intake of sugars has been linked to diet-induced health problems. The fructose content in sugars consumed may also affect health, although the extent to which fructose has a particularly significant negative impact on health remains controversial. The aim of this narrative review is to describe the body’s fructose management and to discuss the role of fructose as a risk factor for atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, and obesity. Despite some positive effects of fructose, such as high relative sweetness, high thermogenic effect, and low glycaemic index, a high intake of fructose, particularly when combined with glucose, can, to a larger extent than a similar glucose intake, lead to metabolic changes in the liver. Increased de novo lipogenesis (DNL, and thus altered blood lipid profile, seems to be the most prominent change. More studies with realistic consumption levels of fructose are needed, but current literature does not indicate that a normal consumption of fructose (approximately 50–60 g/day increases the risk of atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, or obesity more than consumption of other sugars. However, a high intake of fructose, particularly if combined with a high energy intake in the form of glucose/starch, may have negative health effects via DNL.

  19. Selected thrombosis and atherosclerosis risk factors in children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Bieniaś

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to evaluate selected thrombosis and atherosclerosis risk factors in children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS at three  stages of the disease (I – in acute phase before steroid therapy, II – during steroid therapy after resolution of proteinuria, III – in remission after completion of steroid therapy.In all children, serum total homocysteine, lipoprotein (a, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides levels were measured at three stages of the disease. Plasma antithrombin III, fibrinogen and D-dimer levels were also determined.  At all stages of INS, the serum t-HCY levels were similar and significantly higher than in controls.  Serum lipoprotein (a level, plasma antithrombin III, fibrinogen and D-dimer levels were significantly higher at stage I than at stages II, III and controls.In conclusion, children with INS are at high risk of thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Keywords: Idiopathic nephrotic syndrome, Homocysteine, Lipoprotein (a, Antithrombin III, fibrinogen, D-dimer

  20. The Role of Hypertriglyceridemia in the Development of Atherosclerosis and Endothelial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saki Matsumoto

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A hereditary postprandial hypertriglyceridemic rabbit (PHT rabbit is a new dyslipidemic model showing remarkably high plasma triglycerides with only limited elevation of plasma total cholesterol. In PHT rabbits, plasma triglyceride was markedly elevated postprandially compared with healthy Japanese white (JW rabbits. In physiological experiments, the ring preparation of the thoracic aorta was suspended in an organ bath filled with modified Krebs-Henseleit solution, and the developed tension was recorded. Endothelial function was evaluated by acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation in each preparation with intact endothelium. The acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation was diminished in PHT compared with JW rabbits, suggesting endothelial dysfunction in PHT rabbits. Histological examination was carried out in adipose tissue, liver and aorta. They were fixed in formaldehyde and embedded in paraffin. The tissues were sliced (4 μm and stained using hematoxylin-eosin solution. In the adipose tissue, the visceral fat accumulated, and the size of adipose cells was enlarged in PHT rabbits. The liver of the PHT rabbit was fatty and degenerated. In aorta, increased intimal thickness was observed, suggesting the progression of atherosclerosis in the PHT rabbit. This study suggests the important role of postprandial hypertriglyceridemia in atherosclerosis. By using PHT rabbits, the effects of hypertriglyceridemia on health and diseases could be evaluated precisely.