WorldWideScience

Sample records for atherosclerosis

  1. Atherosclerosis VII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidge, N.H.; Nestel, P.J.; Flinders Univ., Adelaide

    1986-01-01

    In these proceedings the major themes of the conference have been preserved and comprise epidemiology, lipoproteins, pathogenesis, and clinical, therapeutic and nutritional aspects. The diet-lipidcoronary artery disease hypothesis has been strengthened significantly. Several long-awaited trials, reviewed here, have provided very strong support for the rationale for treating hyperlipidemia. A strategy for the prevention of atherosclerosis was defined at the conference. The genesis of atherosclerosis was shown to be more firmly grounded in the influx of lipoprotein into the arterial wall. The regulation of these processes and the rapid advances made possible by new technology were detailed in several sessions. Important new developments in the clinical area and in pharmacology give promise of greatly improved management of established disease. However, the possibility of mounting large-scale preventive measures in the near future, was given credence in the epidemiology and nutrition workshops. (Auth.)

  2. Inflammasomes and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vallurupalli, MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation plays an important role in atherosclerosis. Inflammasomes play a crucial role in innate immunity, which mediates the body’s response to various pathogens. Of the different types of inflammasomes, NLRP3 has been implicated in atherosclerosis through the production of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-1β and IL-18. This review describes the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in atherosclerosis and discusses potential therapeutic targets in the inflammasome pathway.

  3. Vaccination against atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es, Thomas van

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the predominantly underlying pathology of cardiovascular events, is the consequence of lipid deposition in the arterial wall, mostly as consequence of high levels of serum cholesterol. Treatment of atherosclerosis is mainly focused at the reduction of cholesterol levels by lipid

  4. Phytosterols and atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Malene

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the major cause of premature deaths worldwide. Coronary heart disease is the most common CVD, caused by atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries. Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. WHO has in 2007 listed...... in its “Guidelines for assessment and management of cardiovascular risk” the following risk factors to influence progressive atherosclerosis: hypertension, abnormal blood lipids, diabetes, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity and smoking. Phytosterols (plant sterols and plant stanols) are known...... their blood cholesterol levels. The aim of this Ph.D. project was to investigate the effects of phytosterols on the development of atherosclerosis in the aorta of heterozygous Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits. The main advantage of animal studies to human studies in atherosclerosis research...

  5. Atherosclerosis: Hypotheses and theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Yuryeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article gives basic theories of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, including inflammatory, cholesterol, lipid, lipoprotein, iron ones, as a result of metabolic syndrome, oxidative stress. In spite of carefully and deeply developed and ongoing elaborated pathogenesis theories, the etiological factors of atherosclerosis remain unknown so far. The age-related aspect of the disease is discussed; atherosclerosis is considered to be a childhood-onset disease that manifests itself at a later age. The authors propose an experimental and clinical evidence-based concept of the common etiology of syndromes of atherosclerosis, namely: the body's endogenous intoxication that is permanent or periodically progressive may be a primary cause of altered conformation of different protein molecules with their higher ability to adsorb the trace elements consolidating the structural changes. This change of proteins diminishes their functions and determines their antigenic properties, which is attended by the development of different pathogenic components in relation to the body's individual features.

  6. The Biochemistry of atherosclerosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scanu, Angelo M; Getz, Godfrey S; Wissler, Robert W

    1979-01-01

    In this first full-length review of the biochemical parameters and their part in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the reader will discover a range of coverage concerning basic etiological factors...

  7. Nuclear medicine and atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinzinger, H.; Virgolini, I.

    1990-01-01

    Although the pathomechanisms of atherosclerosis are well known, their radioisotopic monitoring is still in its early childhood. The current radioisotope techniques are of only limited value for contributing to the clinical diagnosis of atherosclerosis. The limited reaction time of cellular blood constituents (platelets, monocytes) with the vascular surface at the injury site makes it very difficult to catch the point of injury. Lipoproteins excellently allow receptor imaging, while vascular monitoring is only of scientific interest at present. Labelling and subsequent imaging of components of the coagulation cascade have not succeeded so far, nor have attempts using unspecific labels such as porphyrin, polyclonal IgG and Fc fragments, for example. Preliminary evidence indicates that radioisotopic techniques may be of great benefit in the future in elucidating functional aspects of the disease, while they do not contribute to examining the stage and extent of atherosclerosis. (orig.)

  8. Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Induces Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Savransky, Vladimir; Nanayakkara, Ashika; Li, Jianguo; Bevans, Shannon; Smith, Philip L.; Rodriguez, Annabelle; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Obstructive sleep apnea, a condition leading to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), is associated with hyperlipidemia, atherosclerosis, and a high cardiovascular risk. A causal link between obstructive sleep apnea and atherosclerosis has not been established.

  9. What Is Atherosclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... builds up in the renal arteries. These arteries supply oxygen-rich blood to your kidneys. Over time, chronic kidney disease causes a slow loss of kidney function. The main function of the kidneys is to remove waste and extra water from the body. Overview The cause of atherosclerosis ...

  10. Alcohol and atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DA LUZ PROTASIO L.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is manifested as coronary artery disease (CAD, ischemic stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Moderate alcohol consumption has been associated with reduction of CAD complications. Apparently, red wine offers more benefits than any other kind of drinks, probably due to flavonoids. Alcohol alters lipoproteins and the coagulation system. The flavonoids induce vascular relaxation by mechanisms that are both dependent and independent of nitric oxide, inhibits many of the cellular reactions associated with atherosclerosis and inflammation, such as endothelial expression of vascular adhesion molecules and release of cytokines from polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Hypertension is also influenced by the alcohol intake. Thus, heavy alcohol intake is almost always associated with systemic hypertension, and hence shall be avoided. In individuals that ingest excess alcohol, there is higher risk of coronary occlusion, arrhythmias, hepatic cirrhosis, upper gastrointestinal cancers, fetal alcohol syndrome, murders, sex crimes, traffic and industrial accidents, robberies, and psychosis. Alcohol is no treatment for atherosclerosis; but it doesn't need to be prohibited for everyone. Thus moderate amounts of alcohol (1-2 drinks/day, especially red wine, may be allowed for those at risk for atherosclerosis complications.

  11. Intracranial atherosclerosis: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenillas, Juan F

    2011-01-01

    The most relevant ideas discussed in this article are described here. Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) represents the most common cause of ischemic stroke worldwide. Its importance in whites may have been underestimated. New technical developments, such as high-resolution MRI, allow direct assessment of the intracranial atherosclerotic plaque, which may have a profound impact on ICAD diagnosis and therapy in the near future. Early detection of ICAD may allow therapeutic intervention while the disease is still asymptomatic. The Barcelonès Nord and Maresme Asymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis Study is presented here. The main prognostic factors that characterize the patients who are at a higher risk for ICAD recurrence are classified and discussed. The best treatment for ICAD remains to be established. The Stenting Versus Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis Study is currently ongoing to address this crucial issue. These and other topics will be discussed at the Fifth International Intracranial Atherosclerosis Conference (Valladolid, Spain, autumn 2011).

  12. Alcohol and atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo Foppa

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Observational studies have attributed a protective effect to alcohol consumption on the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Alcohol intake in the amount of one to two drinks per day results in an estimated 20-40% reduction in cardiovascular events. An additional protective effect, according to major cohort studies, has been attributed to wine, probably due to antioxidant effects and platelet antiaggregation agents. On the other hand, the influence of different patterns of alcohol consumption and environmental factors may explain a great part of the additional effect of wine. Protection may be mediated by modulation of other risk factors, because alcohol increases HDL-C, produces a biphasic response on blood pressure, and modulates the endothelial function, while it neither increases body weight nor impairs glucose-insulin homeostasis. Alcohol may also have a direct effect on atherogenesis. Despite these favorable effects, the current evidence is not enough to justify prescribing alcohol to prevent cardiovascular disease.

  13. Phytosterols and atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Malene

    for decades for their natural ability to reduce cholesterol levels in the blood. In the last decade numerous food products added phytosterol esters have been placed on the market, e.g. yellow fat spread, yoghurt, dressing. The products are being marketed as a natural means for people who want to lower...... or advanced lesion) and quantitatively by stereological methods applied to evaluate the area of the intima and the ratio of intima:media on cross sections from three defined places on the aorta. The biochemical endpoint was the cholesterol content in the inner layer of the entire aorta, which is considered...... than 3% brassicasterol are not accepted on the European market. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of dietary supplementation of RSO derived sterol, with high content of brassicasterols, and stanol esters on the development of atherosclerosis in cholesterol-fed heterozygous WHHL rabbits...

  14. [The receptor theory of atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhoded, V G; Bondarenko, V M; Gintsburg, A L

    2010-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacteria can interact with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and induce atheroma formation. The risk of atherosclerosis is decreased in case of TLR4 mutation. Other bacterial ligands and endogenous ligands of TLRs can also be involved in induction of atherogenesis. The general concept of atherosclerosis pathogentsis is presented. According to this concept atherogenesis can be initiated by some reactions resulting from interaction of exogenous and endogenous microbial ligands with Toll-like receptors.

  15. Nanomedicine highlights in atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karagkiozaki, Varvara

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease and many different approaches have been attempted for its accurate diagnosis and treatment. The disease is induced by a low-grade inflammatory process in the vascular wall, leading through a cascade of events to the eventual formation of atheromatous plaque and arterial stenosis. Different types of cells participate in the process making more difficult to recognize the potential cellular targets within the plaques for their effective treatment. The rise of nanomedicine over the last decade has provided new types of drug delivery nanosystems that are able to be delivered to a specific diseased site of the vessel for imaging while simultaneously act as therapeutic agents. In this paper, a review of the recent advances in nanomedicine that has provided novel insights to the disease diagnosis and treatment will be given in line with different nanotechnology-based approaches to advance the cardiovascular stents. The main complications of bare metal stents such as restenosis and of drug-eluting stents which is the late stent thrombosis are analyzed to comprehend the demand for emerging therapeutic strategies based on nanotechnology.

  16. Nanomedicine highlights in atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karagkiozaki, Varvara, E-mail: vakaragk@physics.auth.gr [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Nanomedicine Group, Laboratory for Thin Films-Nanosystems and Nanometrology (LTFN), Physics Department (Greece)

    2013-04-15

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease and many different approaches have been attempted for its accurate diagnosis and treatment. The disease is induced by a low-grade inflammatory process in the vascular wall, leading through a cascade of events to the eventual formation of atheromatous plaque and arterial stenosis. Different types of cells participate in the process making more difficult to recognize the potential cellular targets within the plaques for their effective treatment. The rise of nanomedicine over the last decade has provided new types of drug delivery nanosystems that are able to be delivered to a specific diseased site of the vessel for imaging while simultaneously act as therapeutic agents. In this paper, a review of the recent advances in nanomedicine that has provided novel insights to the disease diagnosis and treatment will be given in line with different nanotechnology-based approaches to advance the cardiovascular stents. The main complications of bare metal stents such as restenosis and of drug-eluting stents which is the late stent thrombosis are analyzed to comprehend the demand for emerging therapeutic strategies based on nanotechnology.

  17. Proliferating macrophages prevail in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Gwendalyn J

    2013-09-01

    Macrophages accumulate in atherosclerotic lesions during the inflammation that is part of atherosclerosis development and progression. A new study in mice indicates that the accumulation of macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques depends on local macrophage proliferation rather than the recruitment of circulating monocytes.

  18. Innate lymphoid cells in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbertsen, Daniel; Lichtman, Andrew H

    2017-12-05

    The family of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) consisting of NK cells, lymphoid tissue inducer cells and the 'helper'-like ILC subsets ILC1, ILC2 and ILC3 have been shown to have important roles in protection against microbes, regulation of inflammatory diseases and involved in allergic reactions. ILC1s produce IFN-γ upon stimulation with IL-12 and IL-18, ILC2s produce IL-5 and IL-13 responding to IL-33 and IL-25 while ILC3s produce IL-17 and IL-22 after stimulation with IL-23 or IL-1. Although few studies have directly investigated the role for ILCs in atherosclerosis, several studies have investigated transcription factors and cytokines shared by ILCs and T helper cells. In this review we summarize our current understanding of the role of ILC in atherosclerosis and discuss future directions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Atherosclerosis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jednacz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries. Clinical consequences of the atherosclerotic process occur in the adult population, however atherosclerotic process begins in childhood. The classic risk factors for atherosclerosis include obesity, dyslipidaemia, age, gender or family history. In recent years, attention has been drawn to the similarity between atherosclerotic inflammatory processes and inflammatory changes in the course of systemic connective tissue disease, in particular systemic lupus etythematosus (SLE or rheumatoid arthritis (RA. There is also observed the similarity of the pathogenetic background of development of atherosclerosis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are observed in the course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Also homocysteine concentrations, which may play a significant role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, are observed higher in patients with JIA. Some studies revealed higher carotid intima-media thickness (IMT index values in children with JIA. In view of the fact that atherosclerotic process begins as early as in childhood, the introduction of appropriate preventive measures in children is a matter of utmost importance.

  20. [Transdisciplinary Approach for Sarcopenia. Sarcopenia and atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohara, Katsuhiko

    2014-10-01

    Risk factors for sarcopenia, including aging, inflammation, oxidative stress, and sedentary life style, are also known as risks for atherosclerosis. Sarcopenia and atherosclerosis relate each other. We found that sarcopenia, especially sarcopenic visceral obesity in male subjects, was associated with higher arterial stiffness and central blood pressure. We also observed that leptin resistance may underlie the link between sarcopenia, sarcopenic obesity and atherosclerosis. In epidemiological studies, it has been demonstrated sarcopenic indices were associated with cardiovascular death. These findings indicate that sarcopenia could be regarded as risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events.

  1. Oxyradical Stress, Endocannabinoids, and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anberitha T. Matthews

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is responsible for most cardiovascular disease (CVD and is caused by several factors including hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and chronic inflammation. Oxidants and electrophiles have roles in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and the concentrations of these reactive molecules are an important factor in disease initiation and progression. Overactive NADPH oxidase (Nox produces excess superoxide resulting in oxidized macromolecules, which is an important factor in atherogenesis. Although superoxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS have obvious toxic properties, they also have fundamental roles in signaling pathways that enable cells to adapt to stress. In addition to inflammation and ROS, the endocannabinoid system (eCB is also important in atherogenesis. Linkages have been postulated between the eCB system, Nox, oxidative stress, and atherosclerosis. For instance, CB2 receptor-evoked signaling has been shown to upregulate anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative pathways, whereas CB1 signaling appears to induce opposite effects. The second messenger lipid molecule diacylglycerol is implicated in the regulation of Nox activity and diacylglycerol lipase β (DAGLβ is a key biosynthetic enzyme in the biosynthesis eCB ligand 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG. Furthermore, Nrf2 is a vital transcription factor that protects against the cytotoxic effects of both oxidant and electrophile stress. This review will highlight the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS in intracellular signaling and the impact of deregulated ROS-mediated signaling in atherogenesis. In addition, there is also emerging knowledge that the eCB system has an important role in atherogenesis. We will attempt to integrate oxidative stress and the eCB system into a conceptual framework that provides insights into this pathology.

  2. Proinflammatory Status, Genetics and Atherosclerosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poledne, R.; Lorenzová, A.; Stávek, P.; Valenta, Zdeněk; Hubáček, J.; Suchánek, R.; Piťha, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 58, Suppl. 2 (2009), S111-S118 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Program:1M Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : atherosclerosis * inflammation * C-reactive protein * genetics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.430, year: 2009 http://www.biomed.cas.cz/physiolres/pdf/58%20Suppl%202/58_S111.pdf

  3. Cell cycle and apoptosis genes in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, Lianne Simone Mirjam

    2006-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was aimed at identifying the role of cell cycle and apoptosis genes in atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of cardiovascular disease, a disorder occurring in the large and medium-sized arteries of the body. Although in the beginning 90s promising

  4. Regulation of T cell responses in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puijvelde, Gijsbrecht Henricus Maria van

    2007-01-01

    One of the most important characteristics of atherosclerosis is the chronic inflammatory response in which T cells and NKT cells are very important. In this thesis several methods to modulate the activity of these T and NKT cells in atherosclerosis are described. The induction of regulatory T cells

  5. In-Vivo Assessment of Coronary Atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. Rodriguez-Granillo

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIntravascular ultrasound (IVUS) has emerged as a highly accurate tool for the serial assessment of the natural history of coronary atherosclerosis and to evaluate the effect of different conventional and emerging drug therapies on the progression of atherosclerosis. The

  6. Inflammation and immune system interactions in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legein, Bart; Temmerman, Lieve; Biessen, Erik A. L.; Lutgens, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide, accounting for 16.7 million deaths each year. The underlying cause of the majority of CVD is atherosclerosis. In the past, atherosclerosis was considered to be the result of passive lipid accumulation in the vessel wall.

  7. Cytokines in atherosclerosis: an intricate balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boshuizen, M.C.S.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the underlying pathology in the majority of clinical manifestations of cardiovascular diseases, which are nowadays the main global cause of mortality. Atherosclerosis is a lipid-driven chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. This inflammatory response, with cytokines as

  8. Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... usually doesn't cause symptoms until it severely narrows or totally blocks an artery. Many people don't know they have it until they have a medical emergency. A physical exam, imaging, and other diagnostic tests can tell ...

  9. The Progression and Early detection of Subclinical Atherosclerosis (PESA) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio; Jiménez-Borreguero, L Jesús; Peñalvo, José L

    2013-01-01

    The presence of subclinical atherosclerosis is a likely predictor of cardiovascular events; however, factors associated with the early stages and progression of atherosclerosis are poorly defined.......The presence of subclinical atherosclerosis is a likely predictor of cardiovascular events; however, factors associated with the early stages and progression of atherosclerosis are poorly defined....

  10. NMR imaging of human atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toussaint, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognosis of atherosclerosis can no longer be evaluated with morphological parameters only. A description of atherosclerotic plaque composition is necessary to study the mechanisms of plaque rupture, which depends on collagenous cap and lipid core thicknesses. NMR, as a biochemical imaging technique, allows visualization of these components using T1 contrast (mobile lipids), T2 contrast (cap vs. core), spin density (calcifications), diffusion imaging, 1H and 13C spectroscopy. Today, these imaging sequences allow to study in vitro the effects of interventional techniques such as angioplasty or atherectomy. Clinical investigations begin, which will attempt to develop in vivo microscopy and test the ability of NMR to predict plaque rupture. (author). 13 refs., 7 figs

  11. Aging, Atherosclerosis, and IGF-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Yusuke; Sukhanov, Sergiy; Anwar, Asif; Shai, Shaw-Yung

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is an endocrine and autocrine/paracrine growth factor that circulates at high levels in the plasma and is expressed in most cell types. IGF-1 has major effects on development, cell growth and differentiation, and tissue repair. Recent evidence indicates that IGF-1 reduces atherosclerosis burden and improves features of atherosclerotic plaque stability in animal models. Potential mechanisms for this atheroprotective effect include IGF-1–induced reduction in oxidative stress, cell apoptosis, proinflammatory signaling, and endothelial dysfunction. Aging is associated with increased vascular oxidative stress and vascular disease, suggesting that IGF-1 may exert salutary effects on vascular aging processes. In this review, we will provide a comprehensive update on IGF-1's ability to modulate vascular oxidative stress and to limit atherogenesis and the vascular complications of aging. PMID:22491965

  12. Role of parnaparin in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomini, Francesca; Taurone, Samanta; Parnigotto, Pierpaolo; Zamai, Loris; Rodella, Luigi F; Artico, Marco; Rezzani, Rita

    2016-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by a proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and their migration to the intima, which induces thickening of the intima itself, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) inhibits the proliferation of VSMCs. Previous studies have shown that a LMWH, parnaparin (PNP), acts on the processes of atherogenesis and atheroprogression in experimental animal models. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of oxidative stress, inflammation and VSMCs in the regulation of vascular wall homeostasis. We also considered the possibility of restoring vascular pathological changes using PNP treatment. In order to evaluate vascular remodelling in this study we have analysed the morphological changes in aortas of an animal model of atherosclerosis, apolipoprotein E-deficient mice (ApoE-/-) fed with a normal or a western diet without treatment or treated with PNP. We also analysed, by immunohistochemistry, the expression of proteins linked to atherogenesis and atheroprogression - an enzyme involved in oxidative stress, iNOS, examples of inflammatory mediators, such as tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukins 1 and 6 (IL-1 and IL-6), and markers of VSMC changes, in particular plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and thrombospondin-1 (PAI-1 and TSP-1). Our results could suggest that PNP downregulates VSMC proliferation and migration, mediated by PAI-1 and TSP-1, and reduces inflammation and oxidative stress in vessels. These data suggested that LMWH, in particular PNP, could be a theoretically practical tool in the prevention of atherosclerotic vascular modification. © 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2017 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  13. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate and Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatomi, Yutaka

    2018-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a potent lipid mediator that works on five kinds of S1P receptors located on the cell membrane. In the circulation, S1P is distributed to HDL, followed by albumin. Since S1P and HDL share several bioactivities, S1P is believed to be responsible for the pleiotropic effects of HDL. Plasma S1P levels are reportedly lower in subjects with coronary artery disease, suggesting that S1P might be deeply involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In basic experiments, however, S1P appears to possess both pro-atherosclerotic and anti-atherosclerotic properties; for example, S1P possesses anti-apoptosis, anti-inflammation, and vaso-relaxation properties and maintains the barrier function of endothelial cells, while S1P also promotes the egress and activation of lymphocytes and exhibits pro-thrombotic properties. Recently, the mechanism for the biased distribution of S1P on HDL has been elucidated; apolipoprotein M (apoM) carries S1P on HDL. ApoM is also a modulator of S1P, and the metabolism of apoM-containing lipoproteins largely affects the plasma S1P level. Moreover, apoM modulates the biological properties of S1P. S1P bound to albumin exerts both beneficial and harmful effects in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, while S1P bound to apoM strengthens anti-atherosclerotic properties and might weaken the pro-atherosclerotic properties of S1P. Although the detailed mechanisms remain to be elucidated, apoM and S1P might be novel targets for the alleviation of atherosclerotic diseases in the future. PMID:28724841

  14. Stent-assisted angioplasty for intracranial atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Toshinori; Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Hamasaki, Osamu; Sakoda, Katsuaki

    2002-01-01

    We report on two patients with intracranial atherosclerosis of the carotid artery or vertebral artery treated with stent-assisted angioplasty. Both patients have severe intracranial atherosclerosis (>70%) with refractory symptoms despite optimal medical treatment. In both patients, a coronary balloon-expandable stent was successfully placed using a protective balloon technique without procedural complications. The patients were asymptomatic and neurologically intact at a mean clinical follow-up of 13 months. Follow-up angiograms did not show restenosis 3 or 4 months after procedure, respectively. Stent-assisted angioplasty for intracranial atherosclerosis in the elective patient has proven effective, with an acceptable low rate of morbidity and mortality. (orig.)

  15. Mouse models for atherosclerosis and pharmaceutical modifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadelaar, A.S.M.; Kleemann, R.; Verschuren, L.; Vries-van der Weij, J. de; Hoorn, J. van der; Princen, H.M.; Kooistra, T.

    2007-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial highly-complex disease with numerous etiologies that work synergistically to promote lesion development. The ability to develop preventive and ameliorative treatments will depend on animal models that mimic the human subject metabolically and pathophysiologically

  16. A review of Chlamydia pneumoniae and atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Fasting, H; Henneberg, E W

    1999-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterium that causes acute upper and lower respiratory infections. Its distribution is worldwide. Seroepidemiological studies have shown an association between C. pneumoniae and atherosclerosis, and the risk of acute myocardial...

  17. Gender-Related Differences in Atherosclerosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mathur, P.; Ošťádal, Bohuslav; Romeo, F.; Mehta, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 4 (2015), s. 319-327 ISSN 0920-3206 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : atherosclerosis * gender Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 3.189, year: 2015

  18. Immune Response to Lipoproteins in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Samson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease, is characterized by chronic inflammation and altered immune response. Cholesterol is a well-known risk factor associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Elevated serum cholesterol is unique because it can lead to development of atherosclerosis in animals and humans even in the absence of other risk factors. Modifications of low-density lipoproteins mediated by oxidation, enzymatic degradation, and aggregation result in changes in their function and activate both innate and adaptive immune system. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL has been identified as one of the most important autoantigens in atherosclerosis. This escape from self-tolerance is dependent on the formation of oxidized phospholipids. The emerging understanding of the importance of immune responses against oxidized LDL in atherosclerosis has focused attention on the possibility of development of novel therapy for atherosclerosis. This review provides an overview of immune response to lipoproteins and the fascinating possibility of developing an immunomodulatory therapy for atherosclerosis.

  19. Vinpocetine attenuates lipid accumulation and atherosclerosis formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Yujun; Li, Jian-Dong; Yan, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Vinpocetine attenuates hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. •Vinpocetine antagonizes ox-LDL uptake and accumulation in macrophages. •Vinpocetine blocks the induction of ox-LDL receptor LOX-1 in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Atherosclerosis, the major cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, is a chronic arterial disease characterized by lipid deposition and inflammation in the vessel wall. Cholesterol, in low-density lipoprotein (LDL), plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. Recent study indicated that vinpocetine is a potent anti-inflammatory agent. However, its role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis remains unexplored. In the present study, we show that vinpocetine significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesion formation in ApoE knockout mice fed with a high-fat diet. In cultured murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, vinpocetine markedly attenuated oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) uptake and foam cell formation. Moreover, vinpocetine greatly blocked the induction of ox-LDL receptor 1 (LOX-1) in cultured macrophages as well as in the LOX-1 level in atherosclerotic lesions. Taken together, our data reveal a novel role of vinpocetine in reduction of pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, at least partially through suppressing LOX-1 signaling pathway. Given the excellent safety profile of vinpocetine, this study suggests vinpocetine may be a therapeutic candidate for treating atherosclerosis

  20. Oral microbiota in patients with atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fåk, Frida; Tremaroli, Valentina; Bergström, Göran; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2015-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the microbiota may be considered as an environmental factor that contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Periodontal disease has been associated with cardio- and cerebrovascular events, and inflammation in the periodontium is suggested to increase the systemic inflammatory level of the host, which may in turn influence plaque composition and rupture. We previously showed that bacteria from the oral cavity and the gut could be found in atherosclerotic plaques. To elucidate whether the oral microbiota composition differed between patients with asymptomatic and symptomatic atherosclerosis we performed pyrosequencing of the oral microbiota of 92 individuals including patients with asymptomatic and symptomatic atherosclerosis and control individuals without carotid plaques or previous stroke or myocardial infarction. The overall microbial structure was similar in controls and atherosclerosis patients, but patients with symptomatic atherosclerosis had higher relative abundance of Anaeroglobus (mean 0.040% (SD 0.049)) than the control group (0.010% (SD 0.028)) (P = 0.03). Using linear regression analysis, we found that Parvimonas associated positively with uCRP and Capnocytophaga, Catonella and Lactobacillus associated with blood lipid markers. In conclusion, abundance of Anaeroglobus in the oral cavity could be associated with symptomatic atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Vinpocetine attenuates lipid accumulation and atherosclerosis formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yujun [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Li, Jian-Dong [Center for Inflammation, Immunity and Infection, and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Yan, Chen, E-mail: Chen_Yan@urmc.rochester.edu [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Vinpocetine attenuates hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. •Vinpocetine antagonizes ox-LDL uptake and accumulation in macrophages. •Vinpocetine blocks the induction of ox-LDL receptor LOX-1 in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Atherosclerosis, the major cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, is a chronic arterial disease characterized by lipid deposition and inflammation in the vessel wall. Cholesterol, in low-density lipoprotein (LDL), plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. Recent study indicated that vinpocetine is a potent anti-inflammatory agent. However, its role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis remains unexplored. In the present study, we show that vinpocetine significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesion formation in ApoE knockout mice fed with a high-fat diet. In cultured murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, vinpocetine markedly attenuated oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) uptake and foam cell formation. Moreover, vinpocetine greatly blocked the induction of ox-LDL receptor 1 (LOX-1) in cultured macrophages as well as in the LOX-1 level in atherosclerotic lesions. Taken together, our data reveal a novel role of vinpocetine in reduction of pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, at least partially through suppressing LOX-1 signaling pathway. Given the excellent safety profile of vinpocetine, this study suggests vinpocetine may be a therapeutic candidate for treating atherosclerosis.

  2. Carbon monoxide, smoking, and atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrup, P

    1973-10-01

    Studies on the effects of carbon monoxide and smoking on atherosclerosis are reviewed. Nonsmokers do not run the risk of getting significantly elevated carboxyhemoglobin levels from automobile exhaust in the streets, however, they do run the risk of getting elevated carboxyhemoglobin levels from exposure to CO in closed areas such as garages and tunnels. Carboxyhemoglobin levels up to 20 percent may also be found in smokers. The central nervous system seems to be influenced by carboxyhemoglobin concentrations up to 20 percent. The myocardium may also be affected. Experimental work with rabbits exposed to carbon monoxide and cholesterol is described which proved that CO has a damaging effect on arterial walls, leading to increased permeability for various plasma components, to the formation of subendothelial edema, and to increased atheromatosis. The results indicate that the much higher risk of smokers of developing arterial disease in comparison to nonsmokers is mainly due to the inhaled CO in the tobacco smoke and not to nicotine. (Air Pollut. Abstr.)

  3. Noninvasive assessment of preclinical atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen A Lane

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Helen A Lane, Jamie C Smith, J Stephen DaviesDepartment of Endocrinology, University of Wales College of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff, Wales, UKAbstract: Initially considered as a semipermeable barrier separating lumen from vessel wall, the endothelium is now recognised as a complex endocrine organ responsible for a variety of physiological processes vital for vascular homeostasis. These include the regulation of vascular tone, luminal diameter, and blood flow; hemostasis and thrombolysis; platelet and leucocyte vessel-wall interactions; the regulation of vascular permeability; and tissue growth and remodelling. The endothelium modulates arterial stiffness, which precedes overt atherosclerosis and is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events. Unsurprisingly, dysfunction of the endothelium may be considered as an early and potentially reversible step in the process of atherogenesis and numerous methods have been developed to assess endothelial status and large artery stiffness. Methodology includes flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery, assessment of coronary flow reserve, carotid intimamedia thickness, pulse wave analysis, pulse wave velocity, and plethysmography. This review outlines the various modalities, indications, and limitations of available methods to assess arterial dysfunction and vascular risk.Keywords: endothelial function, vascular risk, vascular stiffness

  4. Influence of Erythrocyte Membrane Stability in Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Garrote-Filho, Mario; Bernardino-Neto, Morun; Penha-Silva, Nilson

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to show how an excess of cholesterol in the erythrocyte membrane contributes stochastically to the progression of atherosclerosis, leading to damage in blood rheology and O 2 transport, deposition of cholesterol (from trapped erythrocytes) in an area of intraplaque hemorrhage, and local exacerbation of oxidative stress. Cholesterol contained in the membrane of erythrocytes trapped in an intraplaque hemorrhage contributes to the growth of the necrotic nucleus. There is even a relationship between the amount of cholesterol in the erythrocyte membrane and the severity of atherosclerosis. In addition, the volume variability among erythrocytes, measured by RDW, is predictive of a worsening of this disease. Erythrocytes contribute to the development of atherosclerosis in several ways, especially when trapped in intraplate hemorrhage. These erythrocytes are oxidized and phagocytosed by macrophages. The cholesterol present in the membrane of these erythrocytes subsequently contributes to the growth of the atheroma plaque. In addition, when they rupture, erythrocytes release hemoglobin, which leads to the generation of free radicals. Finally, increased RDW may predict the worsening of atherosclerosis, due to the effects of inflammation and oxidative stress on erythropoiesis and erythrocyte volume. A better understanding of erythrocyte participation in atherosclerosis may contribute to the improvement of the prevention and treatment strategies of this disease.

  5. Cyanotic congenital heart disease and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarp, Julie Bjerre; Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Engstrøm, Thomas; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-06-01

    Improved treatment options in paediatric cardiology and congenital heart surgery have resulted in an ageing population of patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). The risk of acquired heart disease such as atherosclerosis increases with age.Previous studies have speculated whether patients with CCHD are protected against atherosclerosis. Results have shown that the coronary arteries of patients with CCHD are free from plaques and stenosis. Decreased carotid intima-media thickness and low total plasma cholesterol may indicate a reduced risk of later development of atherosclerosis. However, the evidence is still sparse and questionable, and a reasonable explanation for the decreased risk of developing atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD is still missing.This review provides an overview of what is known about the prevalence and potential causes of the reduced risk of atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. ATHEROSCLEROSIS DISEASE: A MULTI-FACTORIAL PATHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcieli da Luz Giroldo1; Arienne Serrano Alves1; Francielle Baptista1

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis or arterial stiffening is a gradual disease that restricts the normal blood flow in different areas of body and maylead to secondary illnesses as myocardial infarction and cerebral stroke. Innumerable factors are related to the development ofatherosclerosis, among them are the dyslipidemia; genetic factors; arterial hypertension; diabetes mellitus; obesity; smoking;lack of exercise; pulmonary infection by Chlamydia and stress. Due to multi-factorial atherosclerosis characteristics,innumerable drugs, with differentiated mechanisms of action, are being elaborated to be used in prevention and control of thisdisease. However, beyond the pharmacological therapy, a balanced diet, physical activity and elimination of risk habits, assmoking, also are need for controlling atherosclerosis progression, as well as for the increase of expectative and quality of life

  7. Osteoprotegerin as a marker of atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosbond, Susanne Elisabeth; Poulsen, Tina Svenstrup; Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Osteoprotegerin (OPG) may be involved in development of atherosclerosis. To evaluate plasma concentrations of OPG in individuals with stable coronary artery disease (CAD), acute coronary syndrome (ACS), peripheral artery disease (PAD) and cerebrovascular disease (CBVD) a syste......Abstract Objective: Osteoprotegerin (OPG) may be involved in development of atherosclerosis. To evaluate plasma concentrations of OPG in individuals with stable coronary artery disease (CAD), acute coronary syndrome (ACS), peripheral artery disease (PAD) and cerebrovascular disease (CBVD...... with clearly defined cohorts qualified for this review. Results: In 11 studies OPG concentrations were elevated. Severity of atherosclerosis was significantly associated with higher OPG concentrations compared to healthy controls. No association between PAD and OPG concentrations was observed. Conclusion: OPG...

  8. Role of gut microbiota in atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Annika Lindskog; Bäckhed, Gert Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    describe three pathways by which microbiota might affect atherogenesis. First, local or distant infections might cause a harmful inflammatory response that aggravates plaque development or triggers plaque rupture. Second, metabolism of cholesterol and lipids by gut microbiota can affect the development...... of atherosclerotic plaques. Third, diet and specific components that are metabolized by gut microbiota can have various effects on atherosclerosis; for example, dietary fibre is beneficial, whereas the bacterial metabolite trimethylamine-N-oxide is considered harmful. Although specific bacterial taxa have been...... associated with atherosclerosis, which is supported by increasing mechanistic evidence, several questions remain to be answered to understand fully how the microbiota contributes to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Such knowledge might pave the way for novel diagnostics and therapeutics based...

  9. Oral microbiota in patients with atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fåk, Frida; Tremaroli, Valentina; Bergström, Göran

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Recent evidence suggests that the microbiota may be considered as an environmental factor that contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Periodontal disease has been associated with cardio- and cerebrovascular events, and inflammation in the periodontium is suggested...... to increase the systemic inflammatory level of the host, which may in turn influence plaque composition and rupture. We previously showed that bacteria from the oral cavity and the gut could be found in atherosclerotic plaques. METHODS: To elucidate whether the oral microbiota composition differed between...... patients with asymptomatic and symptomatic atherosclerosis we performed pyrosequencing of the oral microbiota of 92 individuals including patients with asymptomatic and symptomatic atherosclerosis and control individuals without carotid plaques or previous stroke or myocardial infarction. RESULTS...

  10. Carotid Atherosclerosis and Cognitive Impairment in Nonstroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hong Chen

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Carotid atherosclerosis can be used to predict the risk of cognitive impairment. Furthermore, diagnosing and treating carotid atherosclerosis at early stage might help clinicians prevent and treat vascular cognitive impairment in nonstroke patients.

  11. Function and Therapeutic Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a complicated disorder and largely attributable to dyslipidaemia and chronic inflammation. Despite therapeutic advances over past decades, atherosclerosis remains the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Due to their capability of immunomodulation and tissue regeneration, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have evolved as an attractive therapeutic agent in various diseases including atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidences support the protective role of MSCs in all stages of atherosclerosis. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of MSCs including their characteristics such as molecular markers, tissue distribution, migratory property, immune-modulatory competence, etc. We also summarize MSC functions in animal models of atherosclerosis. MSC transplantation is able to modulate cytokine and chemokine secretion, reduce endothelial dysfunction, promote regulatory T cell function, decrease dyslipidemia, and stabilize vulnerable plaques during atherosclerosis development. In addition, MSCs may migrate to lesions where they develop into functional cells during atherosclerosis formation. Finally, the perspectives of MSCs in clinical atherosclerosis therapy are discussed.

  12. Inherited disorders of HDL metabolism and atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovingh, G Kees; de Groot, E.P.; van der Steeg, Wim; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Hutten, Barbara A; Kuivenhoven, J.A.; Kastelein, John J P

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Genetic disorders of HDL metabolism are rare and, as a result, the assessment of atherosclerosis risk in individuals suffering from these disorders has been difficult. Ultrasound imaging of carotid arteries has provided a tool to assess the risk in hereditary hypo and

  13. Inherited disorders of HDL metabolism and atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovingh, G. Kees; de Groot, Eric; van der Steeg, Wim; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Hutten, Barbara A.; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Kastelein, John J. P.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose of review Genetic disorders of HDL metabolism are rare and, as a result, the assessment of atherosclerosis risk in individuals suffering from these disorders has been difficult. Ultrasound imaging of carotid arteries has provided a tool to assess the risk in hereditary hypo and

  14. Metabonomics-based omics study and atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Duo-jiao; Zhu, Bi-jun; Wang, Xiang-dong

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis results from dyslipidemia and systemic inflammation, associated with the strong metabolism and interaction between diet and disease. Strategies based on the global profiling of metabolism would be important to define the mechanisms involved in pathological alterations. Metabonomics is the quantitative measurement of the dynamic multiparametric metabolic response of living systems to pathophysiological stimuli or genetic modification. Metabonomics has been used in combination w...

  15. Neutrophils in atherosclerosis. A brief overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartwig, H.; Silvestre Roig, C.; Daemen, M.; Lutgens, E.; Soehnlein, O.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammation of the arterial wall and the continuous infiltration of leukocytes into the plaque enhances the progression of the lesion. Because of the scarce detection of neutrophils in atherosclerotic plaques compared to other immune cells, their contribution was

  16. Effects of apolipoprotein M in uremic atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosteen, Markus Høybye; Madsen Svarrer, Eva Martha; Bisgaard, Line Stattau

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Chronic kidney disease is characterized by uremia and causes premature death, partly due to accelerated atherosclerosis. Apolipoprotein (apo) M is a plasma carrier protein for the lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). The Apom-S1P complex associates with HDL, and may contribute...

  17. Cyanotic congenital heart disease and atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Julie Bjerre; Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Improved treatment options in paediatric cardiology and congenital heart surgery have resulted in an ageing population of patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). The risk of acquired heart disease such as atherosclerosis increases with age.Previous studies have speculated whether...

  18. Overview of Atherosclerosis and Chemical Stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Cascio’s presentation at the workshop titled, “titled “Understanding the Combined Effects of Environmental Chemical and Non-Chemical Stressors: Atherosclerosis as a Model” will highlight atherosclerosis’s rapidly growing role as a cause of increa...

  19. Coronary atherosclerosis: Significance of autophagic armour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Mansi; Kaul, Deepak

    2012-09-26

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradation pathway of cellular components such as organelles and long-lived proteins. Though a protective role for autophagy has been established in various patho-physiologic conditions such as cancer, neurodegeneration, aging and heart failure, a growing body of evidence now reveals a protective role for autophagy in atherosclerosis, mainly by removing oxidatively damaged organelles and proteins and also by promoting cholesterol egress from the lipid-laden cells. Recent studies by Razani et al and Liao et al unravel novel pathways that might be involved in autophagic protection and in this commentary we highlight the importance of autophagy in atherosclerosis in the light of these two recent papers.

  20. Atherosclerosis and Nanotechnology: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Jeremy D; Chaddha, Ashish; Bhattacharjee, Somnath; Goonewardena, Sascha N

    2016-02-01

    Over the past several decades, tremendous advances have been made in the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, with shifting demographics and evolving risk factors we now face new challenges that must be met in order to further advance are management of patients with CAD. In parallel with advances in our mechanistic appreciation of CAD and atherosclerosis, nanotechnology approaches have greatly expanded, offering the potential for significant improvements in our diagnostic and therapeutic management of CAD. To realize this potential we must go beyond to recognize new frontiers including knowledge gaps between understanding atherosclerosis to the translation of targeted molecular tools. This review highlights nanotechnology applications for imaging and therapeutic advancements in CAD.

  1. RENAL INVOLVEMENT IN SUBJECTS WITH PERIPHERAL ATHEROSCLEROSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FAWZY, A.; IBRAHIM, S.

    2008-01-01

    Ischemic nephropathy is an important cause of renal failure.Sub-clinical renal function abnormalities may exist in patients with extra renal atherosclerosis and may precede the onset of overt ischemic nephropathy. To assess the impact of extrarenal atherosclerosis on the kidney, the study evaluated renal function in 50 subjects with differing degrees of peripheral atherosclerosis without manifest clinical or laboratory signs of ischemic nephropathy and renovascular hypertension.All laboratory testing including total LDL and HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, ultrasonography with Doppler analysis for the localization of peripheral vascular disease (carotid and lower limb arteries), and non-invasive evaluation of renal function by radionuclide studies of renal plasma flow (MAG3 clearance) and glomerular filtration (DTPA clearance) were determined as well as smoking habit was recorded. By combining sonographic data on arterial tree stenosis (ATS), the subjects were grouped according to the atherosclerotic vascular damage (ATS involvement). The results showed no change in plasma creatinine while DTPA clearance was increased from 91.58±26.53 to 93.47±24.82 ml/min/1.73 m. MAG3 clearance was progressively declined with the severity of vascular damage from 244.86 ± 60.60 to 173.59±58.74 ml/min/1.73 m.Stepwise, multiple regression analysis indicated that MAG3 clearance was best explained by ATS involvement (standardized B coefficient -0.40; P< 0.001), smoking habit (-0.34;P=0.004) and serum LDL-cholesterol (-0.24; P<0.035).It could be concluded that the renal hemodynamic profile in atherosclerotic patients might constitute functional evidence of the silent phase of ischemic renal disease. The findings suggest that renal function should be carefully assessed in patients with extrarenal atherosclerosis, particularly in those with classic cardiovascular risk factors

  2. Cyclodextrin promotes atherosclerosis regression via macrophage reprogramming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmer, Sebastian; Grebe, Alena; Bakke, Siril S

    2016-01-01

    -containing lipoproteins in the subendothelial space causes a local overabundance of free cholesterol. Because cholesterol accumulation and deposition of cholesterol crystals (CCs) trigger a complex inflammatory response, we tested the efficacy of the cyclic oligosaccharide 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (CD), a compound...... of CD as well as for augmented reverse cholesterol transport. Because CD treatment in humans is safe and CD beneficially affects key mechanisms of atherogenesis, it may therefore be used clinically to prevent or treat human atherosclerosis....

  3. Incretin hormones as immunomodulators of atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria eAlonso

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis results from endothelial cell dysfunction and inflammatory processes affecting both macro-and microvasculature which are involved in vascular diabetic complications. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 is an incretin hormone responsible for amplification of insulin secretion when nutrients are given orally as opposed to intravenously and it retains its insulinotropic activity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D. GLP-1 based therapies, such as GLP-1 receptor (R agonists and inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4, an enzyme that degrades endogenous GLP-1 are routinely used to treat patients with T2D. Recent experimental model studies have established that GLP-1R mRNA is widely expressed in several immune cells. Moreover, its activation contributes to the regulation of both thymocyte and peripheral T cells proliferation and is involved in the maintenance of peripheral regulatory T cells. GLP-1 R is also expressed in endothelial and smooth muscle cells. The effect of incretin hormones on atherosclerogenesis have recently been studied in animal models of apolipoprotein E-deficient mice (apo E-/-. These studies have demonstrated that treatment with incretin hormones or related compounds suppresses the progression of atherosclerosis and macrophage infiltration in the arterial wall as well as a marked anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effect on endothelial cells. This effect may have a major impact on the attenuation of atherosclerosis and may help in the design of new therapies for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  4. Atherosclerosis in epilepsy: its causes and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Sherifa A

    2014-12-01

    Evidence from epidemiological, longitudinal, prospective, double-blinded clinical trials as well as case reports documents age-accelerated atherosclerosis with increased carotid artery intima media thickness (CA-IMT) in patients with epilepsy. These findings raise concern regarding their implications for age-accelerated cognitive and behavioral changes in midlife and risk of later age-related cognitive disorders including neurodegenerative processes such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Chronic epilepsy, cerebral atherosclerosis, and age-related cognitive disorders including AD share many clinical manifestations (e.g. characteristic cognitive deficits), risk factors, and structural and pathological brain abnormalities. These shared risk factors include increased CA-IMT, hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), lipid abnormalities, weight gain and obesity, insulin resistance (IR), and high levels of inflammatory and oxidative stresses. The resulting brain structural and pathological abnormalities include decreased volume of the hippocampus, increased cortical thinning of the frontal lobe, ventricular expansion and increased white matter ischemic disease, total brain atrophy, and β-amyloid protein deposition in the brain. The knowledge that age-accelerated atherosclerosis may contribute to age-accelerated cognitive and behavioral abnormalities and structural brain pathologies in patients with chronic epilepsy represents an important research path to pursue future clinical and management considerations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Function of CD147 in atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuiping; Jin, Rong; Zhu, Xiaolei; Yan, Jinchuan; Guohong, Li

    2015-01-01

    CD147, a member of the immunoglobulin super family, is a well-known potent inducer of extracellular matrix metalloproteinases. Studies show that CD147 is upregulated in inflammatory diseases. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the artery wall. Further understanding of the functions of CD147 in atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis may provide a new strategy for preventing and treating cardiovascular disease. In this review, we discuss how CD147 contributes to atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis. PMID:25604960

  6. (-)-anipamil retards atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B F; Mortensen, A; Hansen, J F

    1995-01-01

    Calcium antagonists have been reported to limit atherosclerosis in cholesterol fed rabbits. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the calcium antagonist (-)-anipamil on the spontaneous development of atherosclerosis in homozygote WHHL rabbits. From the age of 7 weeks, three groups...... differences were found in serum lipids (i.e., VLDL, IDL, LDL, HDL) in the study period among the three groups. Plasma anipamil at the end of the study was 0.23 +/- 6, and 202 +/- 19 ng/ml, respectively, in the three treatment groups. The degree of atherosclerosis in the abdominal aorta was significantly lower...... (p atherosclerosis in the abdominal aorta in WHHL rabbits....

  7. Impact of Prediabetic Status on Coronary Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Osamu; Takano, Masamichi; Yamamoto, Masanori; Shirakabe, Akihiro; Kimata, Nakahisa; Inami, Toru; Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Munakata, Ryo; Murakami, Daisuke; Inami, Shigenobu; Okamatsu, Kentaro; Ohba, Takayoshi; Ibuki, Chikao; Hata, Noritake; Seino, Yoshihiko; Mizuno, Kyoichi

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine if prediabetes is associated with atherosclerosis of coronary arteries, we evaluated the degree of coronary atherosclerosis in nondiabetic, prediabetic, and diabetic patients by using coronary angioscopy to identify plaque vulnerability based on yellow color intensity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Sixty-seven patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent angioscopic observation of multiple main-trunk coronary arteries. According to the American Diabetes Association guidelines, patients were divided into nondiabetic (n = 16), prediabetic (n = 28), and diabetic (n = 23) groups. Plaque color grade was defined as 1 (light yellow), 2 (yellow), or 3 (intense yellow) based on angioscopic findings. The number of yellow plaques (NYPs) per vessel and maximum yellow grade (MYG) were compared among the groups. RESULTS Mean NYP and MYG differed significantly between the groups (P = 0.01 and P = 0.047, respectively). These indexes were higher in prediabetic than in nondiabetic patients (P = 0.02 and P = 0.04, respectively), but similar in prediabetic and diabetic patients (P = 0.44 and P = 0.21, respectively). Diabetes and prediabetes were independent predictors of multiple yellow plaques (NYPs ≥2) in multivariate logistic regression analysis (odds ratio [OR] 10.8 [95% CI 2.09–55.6], P = 0.005; and OR 4.13 [95% CI 1.01–17.0], P = 0.049, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Coronary atherosclerosis and plaque vulnerability were more advanced in prediabetic than in nondiabetic patients and comparable between prediabetic and diabetic patients. Slight or mild disorders in glucose metabolism, such as prediabetes, could be a risk factor for CAD, as is diabetes itself. PMID:23223344

  8. [Evolution of pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in phylogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V N

    2014-01-01

    The first atherosclerosis pandemics developed in phylogenesis when animals went out of the ocean, the second coincided with mutations of proteins that transferred zero-cholesterol esters, the third (present-day pandemics) results from disturbed biological function of trophology, abnormally high content of saturated fatty acids and their trans-forms in food, and blockade of bioavailability of polyenic FA (PNFA) for cells. The blood pool of ligand-free lipoproteins, phylogenetically early macrophages are only partly utilized in intima giving rise to atheromatosis. When active absorption of w-3 and w-6 PNFA is blocked, the cells synthesize by way of compensation non-physiological w-9 eicosanoids which creates the basis of pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, pathology ofautocrine regulation, and paracrine humoral regulation of cell communities and the body. A rise in the frequency of non-infectious diseases above 5-7% is regarded as pathology of biological functions and reactions. Non-physiological environmental effects should be neutralized by normalization of tropholgy function, exotrophic biological reaction. Metabolic pandemics may have two outcomes. First: (a) effective reduction to a minimum of infavourable environmental effects, i.e. normalization of the nutritive function, (b) matching it with possibilities of lipoproteins, (c) reduction of morbidity and mortality from atherosclerosis. Second: man continues to develop as in phylogenesis and adapts himself to nonphysiological nutrition. Mortality from infarction and stroke will remain high during the next 40-50 thousand years. Increased content of w-3 PNFA in food without reduction of NAF with blockade of bioavailability will further facilitate atheromatosis. Man should rely on physiological nutrition, there is no reason to rely on hypolipidemic agents. Otherwise, the second outcome awaits the mankind. Tertium non datum.

  9. Probiotics and atherosclerosis – a new challenge?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Yee Kwan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Atherosclerosis is the major cause of cardiovascular disease and stroke, which are among the top 10 leading causes of death worldwide. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs can activate toll-like receptors (TLRs and activate nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB signaling, a central pathway in inflammation, which regulates genes that encode proinflammatory molecules essential in atherogenesis. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS, which is unique to gram negative bacteria, as well as peptidoglycan (PGN, which is found in gram positive bacteria are PAMPS and ligands of TLR4 and TLR2, respectively, both of which are essential in plaque progression in atherosclerosis. Gastrointestinal tract is suggested to be the major site for absorption and translocation of TLR2 and TLR4 stimulants. Inflammation can result in a ‘leaky gut’ that leads to higher bacterial translocation, eventually the accumulation of LPS and PGN would activate TLRs and trigger inflammation through NFκB and promote further systemic complication like atherosclerosis. Probiotics, can protect the intestinal barrier to reduce bacterial translocation and have potential systemic anti-inflammatory properties.To evaluate whether probiotics can help reduce atherosclerotic development using in vivo study.Apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE−/ −  mice were fed on high fat diet alone, with telmisartan (Tel (1 or 5 mg/kg/day, positive controls or with probiotics (VSL#3/LGG with or without Tel (1 mg/kg/day for 12 weeks.Probiotics, Tel, or a combination of both reduced lesion size at the aortic root significantly; VSL#3 reduced serum inflammatory adhesion molecules soluble E- (sE-selectin, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (sVCAM-1, and plaque disrupting factor matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 significantly; probiotics and Tel at 5 mg/kg/day could induce changes in gut microbiota population; the efficiency of lesion reduction seemed

  10. Apolipoprotein E and carotid artery atherosclerosis - The Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slooter, AJC; Bots, ML; Havekes, LM; del Sol, AI; Cruts, M; Grobbee, DE; Hofman, A; Van Broeckhoven, C; Witteman, JCM; van Duijn, CM

    Background and Purpose-Carotid artery atherosclerosis is a strong predictor for future stroke. It is yet unclear whether the apolipoprotein E polymorphism (APOE) is related to atherosclerosis in the carotid arteries. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of APOE in carotid artery

  11. Atherosclerosis: the interplay between lipids and immune cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaftenaar, Frank; Frodermann, Vanessa; Kuiper, Johan; Lutgens, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. The underlying cause of the majority of cardiovascular disease is atherosclerosis. In the past, atherosclerosis was considered to be the result of passive lipid accumulation in the vessel wall. However, today's picture of the

  12. Imaging Macrophage and Hematopoietic Progenitor Proliferation in Atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Yu-Xiang; Calcagno, Claudia; Binderup, Tina

    2015-01-01

    tomography-computed tomography imaging of cell proliferation in atherosclerosis. METHODS AND RESULTS: (18)F-FLT positron emission tomography-computed tomography was performed in mice, rabbits, and humans with atherosclerosis. In apolipoprotein E knock out mice, increased (18)F-FLT signal was observed...

  13. Is there an association between coronary atherosclerosis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Atherosclerotic disease is the most common cause of death in the United States and prostate cancer has the highest incidence among males in the United States. Reports have indicated that atherosclerosis and cancers my share common pathoetiologic and pathogenetic cascades. If atherosclerosis and ...

  14. Diet and Atherosclerosis | Grande | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among the various factors affecting the development of atherosclerosis and its complications, the diet emerges as an important influence. This article reviews the evidence linking diet and atherosclerosis; the relation between serum cholesterol concentration and incidence of coronary heart disease, and the effect of various ...

  15. Mechanisms of foam cell formation in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Melnichenko, Alexandra A; Myasoedova, Veronika A; Grechko, Andrey V; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2017-11-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and cholesterol homeostasis in the peripheral blood is maintained by specialized cells, such as macrophages. Macrophages express a variety of scavenger receptors (SR) that interact with lipoproteins, including SR-A1, CD36, and lectin-like oxLDL receptor-1 (LOX-1). These cells also have several cholesterol transporters, including ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA1, ABCG1, and SR-BI, that are involved in reverse cholesterol transport. Lipids internalized by phagocytosis are transported to late endosomes/lysosomes, where lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) digests cholesteryl esters releasing free cholesterol. Free cholesterol in turn is processed by acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase (ACAT1), an enzyme that transforms cholesterol to cholesteryl esters. The endoplasmic reticulum serves as a depot for maintaining newly synthesized cholesteryl esters that can be processed by neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (NCEH), which generates free cholesterol that can exit via cholesterol transporters. In atherosclerosis, pro-inflammatory stimuli upregulate expression of scavenger receptors, especially LOX-1, and downregulate expression of cholesterol transporters. ACAT1 is also increased, while NCEH expression is reduced. This results in deposition of free and esterified cholesterol in macrophages and generation of foam cells. Moreover, other cell types, such as endothelial (ECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), can also become foam cells. In this review, we discuss known pathways of foam cell formation in atherosclerosis.

  16. Periodontitis as a Risk Factor of Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirina Bartova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, the amount of evidence corroborating an association between dental plaque bacteria and coronary diseases that develop as a result of atherosclerosis has increased. These findings have brought a new aspect to the etiology of the disease. There are several mechanisms by which dental plaque bacteria may initiate or worsen atherosclerotic processes: activation of innate immunity, bacteremia related to dental treatment, and direct involvement of mediators activated by dental plaque and involvement of cytokines and heat shock proteins from dental plaque bacteria. There are common predisposing factors which influence both periodontitis and atherosclerosis. Both diseases can be initiated in early childhood, although the first symptoms may not appear until adulthood. The formation of lipid stripes has been reported in 10-year-old children and the increased prevalence of obesity in children and adolescents is a risk factor contributing to lipid stripes development. Endothelium damage caused by the formation of lipid stripes in early childhood may lead to bacteria penetrating into blood circulation after oral cavity procedures for children as well as for patients with aggressive and chronic periodontitis.

  17. Atherosclerosis risk factors in pigeon squabs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klumpp, S.A.; Clarkson, T.B.

    1986-01-01

    The basis for atherosclerosis susceptibility of White Carneau (WC) and resistance of Show Racer (SR) pigeons is not known. Body weight (BW), total serum cholesterol (TSC), growth of the aorta and replication of endothelial cells of the distal thoracic aorta (lesion prone site) of 1, 2 and 4 week old squabs were studied. Aortic measurements were determined morphometrically, and endothelial cell replication was quantitated by 24-hour 3 H-thymidine labeling and whole-mount SEM autoradiography. From hatching to 4 weeks, BW increased more in WC than SR (22 to 473 gm in WC vs 19 to 416 gm in SR, p 2 ) in WC and 44% (101, 140 and 146 mm 2 ) in SR. Aortic surface area was significantly larger (0 = 0.002) in the 4 week WC than 4 week SR. 3 H-thymidine labeled endothelial cells at 1, 2 and 4 weeks were 783, 387 and 53 in WC and 674, 283 and 27 cells/mm 2 in SR. Endothelial replication in the 4 week WC was twice that of the SR and significantly different between breeds at 2 and 4 weeks (p = 0.04; p = 0.02, respectively). Higher TSC, endothelial cell replication and larger aortic surface area in the WC may be contributing factors to increased atherosclerosis susceptibility

  18. Atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidaemic rabbits. Evaluation by macroscopic, microscopic and biochemical methods and comparison of atherosclerosis variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B F; Mortensen, A; Hansen, J F

    1994-01-01

    estimation of aortic atherosclerosis extent and by biochemical analysis of aortic cholesterol content. No noteworthy atherosclerosis was demonstrated within 19 months in heterozygous rabbits. In homozygous rabbits, atherosclerotic lesions were seen from the age of 4 months and progressed with age. All 19......-month-old rabbits had severe atherosclerotic disease. As much as 64% of the variation in atherosclerosis extent/severity could be explained by serum cholesterol and age. A highly significant correlation between the various methods for quantitation of atherosclerosis extent and/or severity...... was demonstrated, suggesting that quantitative microscopy, macroscopic morphometry and determination of aortic cholesterol content may be equally valid as a measure of atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits and are therefore interchangeable....

  19. Implications of alcoholic cirrhosis in atherosclerosis of autopsied patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Alves Matias da Silveira

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Alcoholism is a major public health problem, which has a high social cost and affects many aspects of human activity. Liver disease is one of the first consequences of alcohol abuse, and steatosis, liver cirrhosis and hepatitis may occur. Other organs are also affected with pathological changes, such as pancreatitis, cardiomyopathies, dyslipidemias and atherosclerosis. Objective: To identify the occurrence and degree of atherosclerosis in alcohol-dependent individuals with liver cirrhosis, observing macroscopic and microscopic changes in lipid and collagen deposits and in the liver. We also aimed to verify the association of lipid and collagen fiber deposits with gender, age and body mass index, and to relate alcoholism, liver cirrhosis and atherosclerosis. Method: We performed a study based on autopsy reports of patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, with analysis of aorta and liver fragments to verify the occurrence and degree of atherosclerosis, as well as collagen contents. Results: Microscopic atherosclerosis was higher in young subjects (early injury and in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis. The macroscopic analysis of atherosclerosis in aortas showed that patients in more advanced age groups presented more severe classifications. Atherosclerosis, both micro and macroscopically, and the percentage of fibrosis in the liver and aorta were more expressive in females. Conclusion: Cirrhotic patients presented a higher percentage of fibrosis and lipidosis, and may represent a group susceptible to the accelerated progression of cardiovascular diseases. Investigative studies contribute to targeting health-promoting interventions, reducing the mortality and costs of treating cardiovascular disease.

  20. Correlation between Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen and Severity of Atherosclerosis

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    Gabriel G. Dorighello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis has been associated with mitochondria dysfunction and damage. Our group demonstrated previously that hypercholesterolemic mice present increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen (mtROS generation in several tissues and low NADPH/NADP+ ratio. Here, we investigated whether spontaneous atherosclerosis in these mice could be modulated by treatments that replenish or spare mitochondrial NADPH, named citrate supplementation, cholesterol synthesis inhibition, or both treatments simultaneously. Robust statistical analyses in pooled group data were performed in order to explain the variation of atherosclerosis lesion areas as related to the classic atherosclerosis risk factors such as plasma lipids, obesity, and oxidative stress, including liver mtROS. Using three distinct statistical tools (univariate correlation, adjusted correlation, and multiple regression with increasing levels of stringency, we identified a novel significant association and a model that reliably predicts the extent of atherosclerosis due to variations in mtROS. Thus, results show that atherosclerosis lesion area is positively and independently correlated with liver mtROS production rates. Based on these findings, we propose that modulation of mitochondrial redox state influences the atherosclerosis extent.

  1. Intranasal immunization with chitosan/pCETP nanoparticles inhibits atherosclerosis in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiying; Yang, Xiaorong; Cai, Danning; Mao, Dan; Wu, Jie; Zong, Li; Liu, Jingjing

    2008-07-04

    In search of a convenient and pain-free route of administration of DNA vaccine against atherosclerosis, the plasmid pCR-X8-HBc-CETP (pCETP) encoding B-cell epitope of cholesteryl ester transfer protein C-terminal fragment displayed by Hepatitis B virus core particle was condensed with chitosan to form chitosan/pCETP nanoparticles. Cholesterol-fed rabbits were then intranasally immunized with the chitosan/pCETP nanoparticles to evaluate antiatherogenic effects. The results showed that significant serum antibodies against CETP were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent analysis and verified by Western blot analysis. The significant anti-CETP IgG lasted for 21 weeks in the rabbits immunized intranasally. Moreover, the atherogenic index was significantly lower compared with the saline control (5.95 versus 2.39, pnanoparticles was 59.2% less than those treated with saline (29.0+/-10.9% versus 71.0+/-14.4%, pintramuscularly injected with pCETP solution (29.0+/-10.9% versus 21.2+/-14.2%, p>0.05). Thus, chitosan/pCETP nanoparticles could significantly attenuate the progression of atherosclerosis by intranasal immunization. The results suggested that intranasal administration could be potentially developed as a vaccination route against atherosclerosis.

  2. Connective tissue diseases and noninvasive evaluation of atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardita G

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Giorgio Ardita, Giacomo Failla, Paolo Maria Finocchiaro, Francesco Mugno, Luigi Attanasio, Salvatore Timineri, Michelangelo Maria Di SalvoCardiovascular Department, Angiology Unit, Ferrarotto Hospital, Catania, ItalyAbstract: Connective tissue diseases (CTDs are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease due to accelerated atherosclerosis. In patients with autoimmune disorders, in addition to traditional risk factors, an immune-mediated inflammatory process of the vasculature seems to contribute to atherogenesis. Several pathogenetic mechanisms have been proposed, including chronic inflammation and immunologic abnormalities, both able to produce vascular damage. Macrovascular atherosclerosis can be noninvasively evaluated by ultrasound measurement of carotid or femoral plaque. Subclinical atherosclerosis can be evaluated by well-established noninvasive techniques which rely on ultrasound detection of carotid intima-media thickness. Flow-mediated vasodilatation and arterial stiffness are considered markers of endothelial dysfunction and subclinical atherosclerosis, respectively, and have been recently found to be impaired early in a wide spectrum of autoimmune diseases. Carotid intima-media thickness turns out to be a leading marker of subclinical atherosclerosis, and many studies recognize its role as a predictor of future vascular events, both in non-CTD individuals and in CTD patients. In rheumatic diseases, flow-mediated dilatation and arterial stiffness prove to be strongly correlated with inflammation, disease damage index, and with subclinical atherosclerosis, although their prognostic role has not yet been conclusively shown. Systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and likely antiphospholipid syndrome are better associated with premature and accelerated atherosclerosis. Inconclusive results were reported in systemic sclerosis.Keywords: rheumatic disease, subclinical atherosclerosis, arterial stiffness

  3. Nutraceuticals as therapeutic agents for atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Joe W E; Williams, Jessica O; Ramji, Dipak P

    2018-05-01

    Atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disorder of medium and large arteries and an underlying cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD), is responsible for a third of all global deaths. Current treatments for CVD, such as optimized statin therapy, are associated with considerable residual risk and several side effects in some patients. The outcome of research on the identification of alternative pharmaceutical agents for the treatment of CVD has been relatively disappointing with many promising leads failing at the clinical level. Nutraceuticals, products from food sources with health benefits beyond their nutritional value, represent promising agents in the prevention of CVD or as an add-on therapy with current treatments. This review will highlight the potential of several nutraceuticals, including polyunsaturated fatty acids, flavonoids and other polyphenols, as anti-CVD therapies based on clinical and pre-clinical mechanism-based studies. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nanotechnology, a new paradigm in atherosclerosis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Giménez, Virna M; Ruiz-Roso, María Belén; Camargo, Alejandra Beatriz; Kassuha, Diego; Manucha, Walter

    Atherosclerosis, a known and prevalent disease, causes progressive deterioration of affected vessels, inducing a blood flow reduction with different complications, and its symptoms usually manifest in advanced stages of the disease. Therefore, the classic therapeutic alternatives are insufficient because the damages are many times irreversible. For this reason, there is a need to implement intelligent forms of drug administration and develop new therapeutic targets that reduce the progression of atherosclerotic lesion. The implementation of new tools for prevention, diagnosis and treatment of this cardiovascular disease is of special interest, focusing our attention on achieving a more effective control of the immune system. Finally, this review highlights the latest knowledge about nanotechnology as a powerful, modern, and promising therapeutic alternative applied to atherosclerotic disease, as well as warning of the potential complications with their use. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Cardiovascular risk scores for coronary atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Murat; Kardesoglu, Ejder; Aparci, Mustafa; Isilak, Zafer; Uz, Omer; Yiginer, Omer; Ozmen, Namik; Cingozbay, Bekir Yilmaz; Uzun, Mehmet; Cebeci, Bekir Sitki

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare frequently used cardiovascular risk scores in predicting the presence of coronary artery disease (CAD) and 3-vessel disease. In 350 consecutive patients (218 men and 132 women) who underwent coronary angiography, the cardiovascular risk level was determined using the Framingham Risk Score (FRS), the Modified Framingham Risk Score (MFRS), the Prospective Cardiovascular Münster (PROCAM) score, and the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE). The area under the curve for receiver operating characteristic curves showed that FRS had more predictive value than the other scores for CAD (area under curve, 0.76, P MFRS, PROCAM, and SCORE) may predict the presence and severity of coronary atherosclerosis.The FRS had better predictive value than the other scores.

  6. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Diabetic Atherosclerosis: Herbal Medicines as a Potential Therapeutic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinfan Tian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus eventually develop severe coronary atherosclerosis disease. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus increase the risk of cardiovascular disease associated with atherosclerosis. The cellular and molecular mechanisms affecting the incidence of diabetic atherosclerosis are still unclear, as are appropriate strategies for the prevention and treatment of diabetic atherosclerosis. In this review, we discuss progress in the study of herbs as potential therapeutic agents for diabetic atherosclerosis.

  7. Accelerated atherosclerosis in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Leeuw, K.; Kallenberg, Cees; Bijl, Marc; Shoenfeld, Y.; Gershwin, M.E.; Shoenfeld, Y; Gershwin, ME

    2005-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and Wegener's granulomatosis are associated with a significantly increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with age- and sex-matched controls. Many risk factors are involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis,

  8. Local Bone Marrow Renin-Angiotensin System and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz Beyazit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Local hematopoietic bone marrow (BM renin-angiotensin system (RAS affects the growth, production, proliferation differentiation, and function of hematopoietic cells. Angiotensin II (Ang II, the dominant effector peptide of the RAS, regulates cellular growth in a wide variety of tissues in pathobiological states. RAS, especially Ang II and Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R, has considerable proinflammatory and proatherogenic effects on the vessel wall, causing progression of atherosclerosis. Recent investigations, by analyzing several BM chimeric mice whose BM cells were positive or negative for AT1R, disclosed that AT1R in BM cells participates in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Therefore, AT1R blocking not only in vascular cells but also in the BM could be an important therapeutic approach to prevent atherosclerosis. The aim of this paper is to review the function of local BM RAS in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  9. (18)F-FDG PET imaging of murine atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hag, Anne Mette Fisker; Pedersen, Sune Folke; Christoffersen, Christina

    2012-01-01

    To study whether (18)F-FDG can be used for in vivo imaging of atherogenesis by examining the correlation between (18)F-FDG uptake and gene expression of key molecular markers of atherosclerosis in apoE(-/-) mice....

  10. Extracranial cerebral arterial atherosclerosis in Iranian patients suffering ischemic strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Ali Mousavi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To determine the distribution and severity of extracranial carotid arterial atherosclerosis in Iranian patients with ischemic stroke. METHODS: 328 patients with ischemic stroke were included in this study. Doppler ultrasound was used for evaluation of atherosclerosis in extracranial carotid arteries. The NASCET criteria were used to measure carotid stenosis. RESULTS: Ninety of 328 patients (27.4% were found to have atherosclerotic plaques; 40 of these patients were women and 50 were men. Sixty-eight patients (20.7% had artery stenosis <50%, 13 patients (3.95% had 50-70 % artery stenosis and 6 (1.8% had >70% artery stenosis. CONCLUSIONS: Extracranial atherosclerosis is not rare in Iranian patients with ischemic stroke, but most carotid artery lesions were plaques with <50% stenosis. KEY WORDS: Atherosclerosis, ischemic stroke, carotid stenosis.

  11. Recent advances in lipoprotein and atherosclerosis: A nutrigenomic approach

    OpenAIRE

    López, Sergio; Ortega, Almudena; Varela, Lourdes; Bermúdez, Beatriz; Muriana, Francisco JG; Abia, Rocío

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a disease in which multiple factors contribute to the degeneration of the vascular wall. Many risk factors have been identified as having influence on the progression of atherosclerosis among them, the type of diet. Multifactorial interaction among lipoproteins, vascular wall cells, and inflammatory mediators has been recognised as the basis of atherogenesis. Dietary intake affects lipoprotein concentration and composition providing risk or protection at several stages of a...

  12. Implications of alcoholic cirrhosis in atherosclerosis of autopsied patients

    OpenAIRE

    Silveira, Luciano Alves Matias da; Torquato, Bianca Gonçalves Silva; Oliveira, Mariana Silva; Juliano, Guilherme Ribeiro; Oliveira, Lívia Ferreira; Cavellani, Camila Lourencini; Ramalho, Luciana Santos; Espindula, Ana Paula; Teixeira, Vicente de Paula Antunes; Ferraz, Mara Lúcia Fonseca

    2017-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Alcoholism is a major public health problem, which has a high social cost and affects many aspects of human activity. Liver disease is one of the first consequences of alcohol abuse, and steatosis, liver cirrhosis and hepatitis may occur. Other organs are also affected with pathological changes, such as pancreatitis, cardiomyopathies, dyslipidemias and atherosclerosis. Objective: To identify the occurrence and degree of atherosclerosis in alcohol-dependent individuals ...

  13. Life stress and atherosclerosis: a pathway through unhealthy lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainous, Arch G; Everett, Charles J; Diaz, Vanessa A; Player, Marty S; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Smith, Daniel W

    2010-01-01

    To examine the relationship between a general measure of chronic life stress and atherosclerosis among middle aged adults without clinical cardiovascular disease via pathways through unhealthy lifestyle characteristics. We conducted an analysis of The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). The MESA collected in 2000 includes 5,773 participants, aged 45-84. We computed standard regression techniques to examine the relationship between life stress and atherosclerosis as well as path analysis with hypothesized paths from stress to atherosclerosis through unhealthy lifestyle. Our outcome was sub-clinical atherosclerosis measured as presence of coronary artery calcification (CAC). A logistic regression adjusted for potential confounding variables along with the unhealthy lifestyle characteristics of smoking, excessive alcohol use, high caloric intake, sedentary lifestyle, and obesity yielded no significant relationship between chronic life stress (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.80-1.08) and CAC. However, significant indirect pathways between chronic life stress and CAC through smoking (p = .007), and sedentary lifestyle (p = .03) and caloric intake (.002) through obesity were found. These results suggest that life stress is related to atherosclerosis once paths of unhealthy coping behaviors are considered.

  14. Hepatic JAK2 protects against atherosclerosis through circulating IGF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasubramaniyam, Tharini; Schroer, Stephanie A; Li, Angela; Luk, Cynthia T; Shi, Sally Yu; Besla, Rickvinder; Dodington, David W; Metherel, Adam H; Kitson, Alex P; Brunt, Jara J; Lopes, Joshua; Wagner, Kay-Uwe; Bazinet, Richard P; Bendeck, Michelle P; Robbins, Clinton S; Woo, Minna

    2017-07-20

    Atherosclerosis is considered both a metabolic and inflammatory disease; however, the specific tissue and signaling molecules that instigate and propagate this disease remain unclear. The liver is a central site of inflammation and lipid metabolism that is critical for atherosclerosis, and JAK2 is a key mediator of inflammation and, more recently, of hepatic lipid metabolism. However, precise effects of hepatic Jak2 on atherosclerosis remain unknown. We show here that hepatic Jak2 deficiency in atherosclerosis-prone mouse models exhibited accelerated atherosclerosis with increased plaque macrophages and decreased plaque smooth muscle cell content. JAK2's essential role in growth hormone signalling in liver that resulted in reduced IGF-1 with hepatic Jak2 deficiency played a causal role in exacerbating atherosclerosis. As such, restoring IGF-1 either pharmacologically or genetically attenuated atherosclerotic burden. Together, our data show hepatic Jak2 to play a protective role in atherogenesis through actions mediated by circulating IGF-1 and, to our knowledge, provide a novel liver-centric mechanism in atheroprotection.

  15. Macrophage Phenotype and Function in Different Stages of Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabas, Ira; Bornfeldt, Karin E.

    2016-01-01

    The remarkable plasticity and plethora of biological functions performed by macrophages have enticed scientists to study these cells in relation to atherosclerosis for more than 50 years, and major discoveries continue to be made today. It is now understood that macrophages play important roles in all stages of atherosclerosis, from initiation of lesions and lesion expansion, to necrosis leading to rupture and the clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis, to resolution and regression of atherosclerotic lesions. Lesional macrophages are derived primarily from blood monocytes, although recent research has shown that lesional macrophage-like cells can also be derived from smooth muscle cells. Lesional macrophages take on different phenotypes depending on their environment and which intracellular signaling pathways are activated. Rather than a few distinct populations of macrophages, the phenotype of the lesional macrophage is more complex and likely changes during the different phases of atherosclerosis and with the extent of lipid and cholesterol loading, activation by a plethora of receptors, and metabolic state of the cells. These different phenotypes allow the macrophage to engulf lipids, dead cells, and other substances perceived as danger signals; efflux cholesterol to HDL; proliferate and migrate; undergo apoptosis and death; and secrete a large number of inflammatory and pro-resolving molecules. This review article, part of the Compendium on Atherosclerosis, discusses recent advances in our understanding of lesional macrophage phenotype and function in different stages of atherosclerosis. With the increasing understanding of the roles of lesional macrophages, new research areas and treatment strategies are beginning to emerge. PMID:26892964

  16. Nitric oxide bioavailability dysfunction involves in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing-Yi; Ye, Zi-Xin; Wang, Xiu-Fen; Chang, Jian; Yang, Mei-Wen; Zhong, Hua-Hua; Hong, Fen-Fang; Yang, Shu-Long

    2018-01-01

    The pathological characteristics of atherosclerosis (AS) include lipid accumulation, fibrosis formation and atherosclerotic plaque produced in artery intima, which leads to vascular sclerosis, lumen stenosis and irritates the ischemic changes of corresponding organs. Endothelial dysfunction was closely associated with AS. Nitric oxide (NO) is a multifunctional signaling molecule involved in the maintenance of metabolic and cardiovascular homeostasis. NO is also a potent endogenous vasodilator and enters for the key processes that suppresses the formation vascular lesion even AS. NO bioavailability indicates the production and utilization of endothelial NO in organisms, its decrease is related to oxidative stress, lipid infiltration, the expressions of some inflammatory factors and the alteration of vascular tone, which plays an important role in endothelial dysfunction. The enhancement of arginase activity and the increase in asymmetric dimethylarginine and hyperhomocysteinemia levels all contribute to AS by intervening NO bioavailability in human beings. Diabetes mellitus, obesity, chronic kidney disease and smoking, etc., also participate in AS by influencing NO bioavailability and NO level. Here, we reviewed the relationship between NO bioavailability and AS according the newest literatures. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Noninvasive Diagnostic Technique in Stenotic Coronary Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Vasilyev

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the sensitivity and specificity of combined stress echocardiography (EchoCG using dipyri-damole and dobutamine in diagnosing and defining the extent of stenotic coronary lesions in coronary heart disease (CHD in a group of critically ill patients who are unable to perform a physical exercise.Materials and methods: the study included 57 male patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome who underwent stress EchoCG using dipyridamole in high doses in combination with dobutamine, as well as coronary angiography.Results: stress EchoCG could bring up to the diagnostic criteria in all the patients, of whom 9 patients were found at coronary angiography to have no coronary lesion, 34 and 14 patients had one- and many-vessel lesions, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of combined stress EchoCG were significantly higher than those of EchoCG used in the diagnosis of CHD.Conclusion: stress EchoCG using dipyridamole in combination with dobutamine is a highly informative safe noninvasive technique for diagnosing CHD, its helps to identify patients with atypical acute coronary syndrome and to form a group of patients to be subject to urgent coronarography and angiosurgical intervention. The pattern of segmental contractile disorders at the height of exercise during combined stress Echo-CG makes it possible to define the site of stenotic coronary atherosclerosis with 97.3% sensitivity and to diagnose many-vessel lesion with 100% sensitivity and 100%specificity.

  18. Molecular Imaging of Inflammation in Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildgruber, Moritz; Swirski, Filip K.; Zernecke, Alma

    2013-01-01

    Acute rupture of vulnerable plaques frequently leads to myocardial infarction and stroke. Within the last decades, several cellular and molecular players have been identified that promote atherosclerotic lesion formation, maturation and plaque rupture. It is now widely recognized that inflammation of the vessel wall and distinct leukocyte subsets are involved throughout all phases of atherosclerotic lesion development. The mechanisms that render a stable plaque unstable and prone to rupture, however, remain unknown and the identification of the vulnerable plaque remains a major challenge in cardiovascular medicine. Imaging technologies used in the clinic offer minimal information about the underlying biology and potential risk for rupture. New imaging technologies are therefore being developed, and in the preclinical setting have enabled new and dynamic insights into the vessel wall for a better understanding of this complex disease. Molecular imaging has the potential to track biological processes, such as the activity of cellular and molecular biomarkers in vivo and over time. Similarly, novel imaging technologies specifically detect effects of therapies that aim to stabilize vulnerable plaques and silence vascular inflammation. Here we will review the potential of established and new molecular imaging technologies in the setting of atherosclerosis, and discuss the cumbersome steps required for translating molecular imaging approaches into the clinic. PMID:24312156

  19. Heme oxygenase-1, oxidation, inflammation and atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus A Araujo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory process of the vascular wall characterized by the infiltration of lipids and inflammatory cells. Oxidative modifications of infiltrating low density lipoproteins and induction of oxidative stress play a major role in lipid retention in the vascular wall, uptake by macrophages and generation of foam cells, a hallmark of this disorder. The vasculature has a plethora of protective resources against oxidation and inflammation, many of them regulated by the Nrf2 transcription factor. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is a Nrf2-regulated gene that plays a critical role in the prevention of vascular inflammation. It is the inducible isoform of heme oxygenase, responsible for the oxidative cleavage of heme groups leading to the generation of biliverdin, carbon monoxide and release of ferrous iron. HO-1 has important antioxidant, antiinflammatory, antiapoptotic, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory effects in vascular cells, most of which play a significant role in the protection against atherogenesis. HO-1 may also be an important feature in macrophage differentiation and polarization to certain subtypes. The biological effects of HO-1 are largely attributable to its enzymatic activity, which can be conceived as a system with three arms of action, corresponding to its three enzymatic byproducts. HO-1 mediated vascular protection may be due to a combination of systemic and vascular local effects. It is usually expressed at low levels but can be highly upregulated in the presence of several proatherogenic stimuli. The HO-1 system is amenable for use in the development of new therapies, some of them currently under experimental and clinical trials. Interestingly, in contrast to the HO-1 antiatherogenic actions, the expression of its transcriptional regulator Nrf2 leads to proatherogenic effects instead. This article reviews the evidence that supports the antiatherogenic role of HO-1, potential pathways and mechanisms mediating

  20. High prevalence of COPD in atherosclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuleta I

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Izabela Tuleta, Tarik Farrag, Laura Busse, Carmen Pizarro, Christian Schaefer, Simon Pingel, Georg Nickenig, Dirk Skowasch, Nadjib Schahab Department of Internal Medicine II – Cardiology, Pulmonology and Angiology, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany Abstract: Atherosclerosis and COPD are both systemic inflammatory diseases that may influence each other. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of COPD in patients with cerebral and/or peripheral artery disease and to assess factors associated with the presence of COPD. Following the diagnosis of cerebral and/or peripheral artery disease by means of duplex sonography, 166 consecutive patients underwent body plethysmography with capillary blood gas analysis. Thereafter, blood tests with determination of different parameters such as lipid profile, inflammatory and coagulation markers were conducted in remaining 136 patients who fulfilled inclusion criteria of the study. Thirty-six out of 136 patients suffered from COPD, mostly in early stages of the disease. Residual volume indicating emphysema was increased (162.9%±55.9% vs 124.5%±37.0%, p<0.05 and diffusion capacity was decreased (55.1%±19.5% vs 75.3%±18.6%, p<0.05 in COPD patients vs non-COPD group. In capillary blood gas analysis, COPD patients had lower partial pressure of oxygen (70.9±11.5 vs 75.2±11.0 mmHg, p<0.05 and higher partial pressure of carbon dioxide (36.8±7.5 vs 34.4±4.4 mmHg, p<0.05 compared with non-COPD individuals. Presence of COPD was associated with predominance of diabetes mellitus, interleukin-8-related systemic neutrophilic inflammation and anemia. In conclusion, COPD is highly prevalent in patients with atherosclerotic artery disease. Keywords: cerebral artery disease, peripheral artery disease, lung function, capillary blood gas, diabetes mellitus, inflammation, interleukin-8, anemia

  1. Radiation-induced carotid artery atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gujral, Dorothy M.; Chahal, Navtej; Senior, Roxy; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Carotid arteries frequently receive significant doses of radiation as collateral structures in the treatment of malignant diseases. Vascular injury following treatment may result in carotid artery stenosis (CAS) and increased risk of stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA). This systematic review examines the effect of radiotherapy (RT) on the carotid arteries, looking at the incidence of stroke in patients receiving neck radiotherapy. In addition, we consider possible surrogate endpoints such as CAS and carotid intima-medial thickness (CIMT) and summarise the evidence for radiation-induced carotid atherosclerosis. Materials and methods: From 853 references, 34 articles met the criteria for inclusion in this systematic review. These papers described 9 studies investigating the incidence of stroke/TIA in irradiated patients, 11 looking at CAS, and 14 examining CIMT. Results: The majority of studies utilised suboptimally-matched controls for each endpoint. The relative risk of stroke in irradiated patients ranged from 1.12 in patients with breast cancer to 5.6 in patients treated for head and neck cancer. The prevalence of CAS was increased by 16–55%, with the more modest increase seen in a study using matched controls. CIMT was increased in irradiated carotid arteries by 18–40%. Only two matched-control studies demonstrated a significant increase in CIMT of 36% and 22% (p = 0.003 and <0.001, respectively). Early prospective data demonstrated a significant increase in CIMT in irradiated arteries at 1 and 2 years after RT (p < 0.001 and <0.01, respectively). Conclusions: The incidence of stroke was significantly increased in patients receiving RT to the neck. There was a consistent difference in CAS and CIMT between irradiated and unirradiated carotid arteries. Future studies should optimise control groups

  2. RIP3-dependent necrosis induced inflammation exacerbates atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Lingjun, E-mail: menglingjun@nibs.ac.cn [College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); National Institute of Biological Sciences, Beijing 102206 (China); Jin, Wei [Institute for Immunology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Yuhui [Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, Health Science Center, Peking University, Beijing 100191 (China); Huang, Huanwei; Li, Jia; Zhang, Cai [National Institute of Biological Sciences, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2016-04-29

    Atherothrombotic vascular disease is already the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Atherosclerosis shares features with diseases caused by chronic inflammation. More attention should concentrates on the innate immunity effect atherosclerosis progress. RIP3 (receptor-interacting protein kinase 3) act through the transcription factor named Nr4a3 (Nuclear orphan receptors) to regulate cytokine production. Deletion RIP3 decreases IL-1α production. Injection of anti-IL-1α antibody protects against the progress of atherosclerosis in ApoE −/− mice. RIP3 as a molecular switch in necrosis, controls macrophage necrotic death caused inflammation. Inhibiting necrosis will certainly reduce atherosclerosis through limit inflammation. Necrotic cell death caused systemic inflammation exacerbated cardiovascular disease. Inhibition of necrosis may yield novel therapeutic targets for treatment in years to come. - Highlights: • RIP3 regulate the Nr4a3 to control cytokine production. • Deletion RIP3 decreases IL-1a production. • Injection anti-IL-1a antibody protects against the progress of atherosclerosis. • RIP3 controls macrophage necrotic dead caused inflammation.

  3. Frequency of Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Brazilian HIV-Infected Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmazo, Péricles Sidnei; Bazan, Silméia Garcia Zanati; Shiraishi, Flávio Gobbis; Bazan, Rodrigo; Okoshi, Katashi; Hueb, João Carlos

    2018-04-09

    AIDS as well as atherosclerosis are important public health problems. The longer survival among HIV-infected is associated with increased number of cardiovascular events in this population, and this association is not fully understood. To identify the frequency of subclinical atherosclerosis in HIV-infected patients compared to control subjects; to analyze associations between atherosclerosis and clinical and laboratory variables, cardiovascular risk factors, and the Framingham coronary heart disease risk score (FCRS). Prospective cross-sectional case-control study assessing the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis in 264 HIV-infected patients and 279 controls. Clinical evaluation included ultrasound examination of the carotid arteries, arterial stiffness by pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx), laboratory analysis of peripheral blood, and cardiovascular risk according to FCRS criteria. The significance level adopted in the statistical analysis was p media thickness was higher in the HIV group than in controls (p media thickness, was not associated with carotid plaque frequency, and did not alter the mechanical characteristics of the arterial system (PWV and AIx). HIV-infected patients are at increased risk of atherosclerosis in association with classical cardiovascular risk factors. Treatment with protease inhibitors does not promote functional changes in the arteries, and shows no association with increased frequency of atherosclerotic plaques in carotid arteries. The FCRS may be inappropriate for this population.

  4. Suppression of atherosclerosis by synthetic REV-ERB agonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitaula, Sadichha [Department of Molecular Therapeutics, The Scripps Research Institute, Jupiter, FL 33458 (United States); Billon, Cyrielle [Department of Pharmacological & Physiological Science, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63104 (United States); Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A. [Department of Molecular Therapeutics, The Scripps Research Institute, Jupiter, FL 33458 (United States); Burris, Thomas P., E-mail: burristp@slu.edu [Department of Pharmacological & Physiological Science, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63104 (United States)

    2015-05-08

    The nuclear receptors for heme, REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, play important roles in the regulation of metabolism and inflammation. Recently it was demonstrated that reduced REV-ERBα expression in hematopoetic cells in LDL receptor null mice led to increased atherosclerosis. We sought to determine if synthetic REV-ERB agonists that we have developed might have the ability to suppress atherosclerosis in this model. A previously characterized synthetic REV-ERB agonist, SR9009, was used to determine if activation of REV-ERB activity would affect atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice. Atherosclerotic plaque size was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in mice administered SR9009 (100 mg/kg) for seven weeks compared to control mice (n = 10 per group). SR9009 treatment of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages (BMDM) reduced the polarization of BMDMs to proinflammatory M1 macrophage while increasing the polarization of BMDMs to anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results suggest that pharmacological targeting of REV-ERBs may be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Synthetic REV-ERB agonist treatment reduced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB decreased M1 macrophage polarization. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB increased M2 macrophage polarization.

  5. RIP3-dependent necrosis induced inflammation exacerbates atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Lingjun; Jin, Wei; Wang, Yuhui; Huang, Huanwei; Li, Jia; Zhang, Cai

    2016-01-01

    Atherothrombotic vascular disease is already the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Atherosclerosis shares features with diseases caused by chronic inflammation. More attention should concentrates on the innate immunity effect atherosclerosis progress. RIP3 (receptor-interacting protein kinase 3) act through the transcription factor named Nr4a3 (Nuclear orphan receptors) to regulate cytokine production. Deletion RIP3 decreases IL-1α production. Injection of anti-IL-1α antibody protects against the progress of atherosclerosis in ApoE −/− mice. RIP3 as a molecular switch in necrosis, controls macrophage necrotic death caused inflammation. Inhibiting necrosis will certainly reduce atherosclerosis through limit inflammation. Necrotic cell death caused systemic inflammation exacerbated cardiovascular disease. Inhibition of necrosis may yield novel therapeutic targets for treatment in years to come. - Highlights: • RIP3 regulate the Nr4a3 to control cytokine production. • Deletion RIP3 decreases IL-1a production. • Injection anti-IL-1a antibody protects against the progress of atherosclerosis. • RIP3 controls macrophage necrotic dead caused inflammation.

  6. Insulin decreases atherosclerosis by inducing endothelin receptor B expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Kyoungmin; Mima, Akira; Li, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) insulin resistance and dysfunction, caused by diabetes, accelerates atherosclerosis. It is unknown whether specifically enhancing EC-targeted insulin action can decrease atherosclerosis in diabetes. Accordingly, overexpressing insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1...... induction of NO action, which increases endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) expression and intracellular [Ca(2+)]. Using the mice with knockin mutation of eNOS, which had Ser1176 mutated to alanine (AKI), deleting the only known mechanism for insulin to activate eNOS/NO pathway, we observed that IRS1...... overexpression in the endothelia of Aki/ApoE(-/-) mice significantly decreased atherosclerosis. Interestingly, endothelial EDNRB expression was selectively reduced in intima of arteries from diabetic patients and rodents. However, endothelial EDNRB expression was upregulated by insulin via P13K/Akt pathway...

  7. Redox balance and blood elemental levels in atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napoleao, P. [Centro de Biologia Ambiental and Departamento de Biologia Animal, Faculdade de Ciencias de Lisboa, C2, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal) and Laboratorio de Feixes de Ioes, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. no 10, 2685-953 Sacavem (Portugal)]. E-mail: pnapoleao@itn.pt; Lopes, P.A. [Centro de Biologia Ambiental and Departamento de Biologia Animal, Faculdade de Ciencias de Lisboa, C2, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Santos, M. [Centro de Quimica e Bioquimica and Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica, Faculdade de Ciencias de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Steghens, J.-P. [Federation de Biochimie, Hopital Edouard Herriot, 3 Place d' Arsonval, 69437 03 Lyon (France); Viegas-Crespo, A.M. [Centro de Biologia Ambiental and Departamento de Biologia Animal, Faculdade de Ciencias de Lisboa, C2, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Pinheiro, T. [Laboratorio de Feixes de Ioes, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. no 10, 2685-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Egas Moniz, 1700 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2006-08-15

    Oxidation of lipids and proteins represents a causative event for atherogenesis, which can be opposed by antioxidant activity. Elements, such as, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se can be involved in both mechanisms. Thus, evaluation of blood elemental levels, easily detected by PIXE, and of redox parameters may be useful in assessing the risk of atherosclerosis. A group of stable patients suffering from atherosclerosis, was matched with a cohort of normo-tensive and -lipidemic volunteers. Although no major discrepancies were observed for trace elemental levels in blood, increased concentrations of K and Ca were found in atherosclerotic group. Patients presented enhance levels of antioxidant ({alpha}-tocopherol) and decreased of protein oxidation (protein carbonyls), while for the lipid oxidation marker (malondialdehyde) no variation was observed. This study contributes to a better understanding of atherosclerosis development and its relationship with blood elemental levels, and set basis for further clinical trials with pathological groups in acute phase.

  8. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, Wang; Chaoshu, Tang; Hongfang, Jin; Junbao, Du

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, complex, and progressive pathological process in large and medium sized arteries. The exact mechanism of this process remains unclear. Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), a novel gasotransmitter, was confirmed as playing a major role in the pathogenesis of many cardiovascular diseases. It plays a role in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and apoptosis, participates in the progress of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHCY), inhibits atherogenic modification of LDL, interferes with vascular calcification, intervenes with platelet function, and there are interactions between H 2 S and inflammatory processes. The role of H 2 S in atherosclerotic pathogenesis highlights the mysteries of atherosclerosis and inspires the search for innovative therapeutic strategies. Here, we review the studies to date that have considered the role of H 2 S in atherosclerosis.

  9. Atherosclerosis in familial lines of pigeons fed exogenous cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, N M; Brown, R V; Middleton, C C

    1975-01-01

    Exogenous cholesterol was fed to F1 pigeons of high and low serum cholesterol differentiated lines of White Carneau and Racing Homer pigeons that had previously been developed by selection and positive assortive mating. The serum cholesterol response of the various high and low lines was dependent upon the breed and the amount of cholesterol in the diet. Racing Homer pigeons were found to be more resistant to aortic atherosclerosis and more susceptible to coronary atherosclerosis than White Carneau pigeons. Data from necropsy examinations showed significant differences in both aortic and coronary atherosclerosis between lines within the White Carneau breed, but no differences between lines of the Racing Homer breed. Mean organ weights for the 4 lines of pigeons were reported.

  10. Macrophages and Their Role in Atherosclerosis: Pathophysiology and Transcriptome Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri V. Bobryshev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis can be regarded as a chronic inflammatory state, in which macrophages play different and important roles. Phagocytic proinflammatory cells populate growing atherosclerotic lesions, where they actively participate in cholesterol accumulation. Moreover, macrophages promote formation of complicated and unstable plaques by maintaining proinflammatory microenvironment. At the same time, anti-inflammatory macrophages contribute to tissue repair and remodelling and plaque stabilization. Macrophages therefore represent attractive targets for development of antiatherosclerotic therapy, which can aim to reduce monocyte recruitment to the lesion site, inhibit proinflammatory macrophages, or stimulate anti-inflammatory responses and cholesterol efflux. More studies are needed, however, to create a comprehensive classification of different macrophage phenotypes and to define their roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge on macrophage diversity, activation, and plasticity in atherosclerosis and describe macrophage-based cellular tests for evaluation of potential antiatherosclerotic substances.

  11. Circumflex coronary artery with aberrant origin and atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozcan, E.; Bozlar, U.; Celik, T.; Tasar, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Circumflex (Cx) coronary artery congenital anomaly is reported to be less than 1% incidence. Coronary arteries with aberrant origin are more likely to have atherosclerosis according to some published literatures. Objectives and tasks: In this study we aim to present computed tomography (CT) angiography findings of a patient, who has Cx artery with aberrant origin and atherosclerotic. Materials and methods: 57-year-old woman without any symptoms who has risk factors to atherosclerosis was referred to our clinic for coronary CT angiography. Results: In CT angiography; we detected Cx coronary artery with aberrant origin (right sinus of valsalva) and retroaortic course. Also we saw intimal irregularities and calcified plaque causing severe narrowing in the proximal segment of artery. Right coronary and left anterior descendant arteries had mild atherosclerosis. Conclusion: Coroner CT angiography, which allows multiplanar imaging with high resolution, is an effective diagnostic tool for coronary artery disease, like not only congenital anomalies but also acquired atherosclerotic disease

  12. Nanomedicine for the prevention, treatment and imaging of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psarros, Costas; Lee, Regent; Margaritis, Marios; Antoniades, Charalambos

    2012-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries, with an increasing prevalence due to an aging population. The pathology underpinning CVD is atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory state involving the arterial wall. Accumulation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) laden macrophages in the arterial wall and their subsequent transformation into foam cells lead to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Progression of atherosclerotic lesions may gradually lead to plaque related complications and clinically manifest as acute vascular syndromes including acute myocardial or cerebral ischemia. Nanotechnology offers emerging therapeutic strategies, which may have advantage overclassical treatments for atherosclerosis. In this review, we present the potential applications of nanotechnology toward prevention, identification and treatment of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Arterial scleroproteins in atherosclerosis and hypertension (Experimental studies)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurukova, Ts.; Georgiev, P.

    1979-01-01

    The authors studied the neosynthesis of fiber protein (scleroproteins) in the aorta of rats with genetic hypertension and with experimental atherosclerosis following application of 3 H-proline and 3 H-lysine and subsequent determination of radioactivity of the collagen and elastic fractions of the aortic wall. There was a great increase in incorporation of labelled collagen and elastin precursors in the aorta of hypertensive and atherosclerotic animals, in comparison with the control rats - a manifestation of incresed ''de novo'' synthesis of fiber proteins in rats with these arterial diseases. Furthermore, the increased collagenosis dominated over that of elastogenesis. The irregular activation of the biosynthesis of both scleroproteins in hypertensive rats and in rats with atherosclerosis caused remodelling of the macromolecular structure of the arterial wall with predominance of collagen over the remaining hypertension components and progression of atherosclerosis. (author) (author)

  14. Endothelial activation, endothelial dysfunction and premature atherosclerosis in systemic autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, M

    Atherosclerosis may be considered an inflammatory disease characterised by the development of atherosclerotic plaques and ischaemic cardiovascular events. Increased prevalence of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality due to (premature) atherosclerosis has been observed in patients with autoimmune

  15. Asymmetrical distribution of atherosclerosis in the carotid artery: identical patterns across age, race, and gender

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tajik, Parvin; Meijer, Rudy; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Peters, Sanne A. E.; Kastelein, John J.; Visseren, Frank J.; Crouse, John R.; Palmer, Mike K.; Raichlen, Joel S.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Bots, Michiel L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Small autopsy studies and clinical practice indicated that carotid atherosclerosis develops in an asymmetrical helical pattern coinciding with regions of low shear stress. We investigated the distribution of carotid atherosclerosis as determined by maximum carotid intima-media thickness

  16. Torcetrapib does not reduce atherosclerosis beyond atorvastatin and induces more proinflammatory lesions than atorvastatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, W. de; Vries-van der Weij, J. de; Hoorn, J.W.A. van der; Gautier, T.; Hoogt, C.C. van der; Westerterp, M.; Romijn, J.A.; Jukema, J.W.; Havekes, L.M.; Princen, H.M.G.; Rensen, P.C.N.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND - Although cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibition is regarded as a promising strategy to reduce atherosclerosis by increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the CETP inhibitor torcetrapib given in addition to atorvastatin had no effect on atherosclerosis and even

  17. Torcetrapib does not reduce atherosclerosis beyond atorvastatin and induces more proinflammatory lesions than atorvastatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Willeke; de Vries-van der Weij, Jitske; van der Hoorn, José W. A.; Gautier, Thomas; van der Hoogt, Caroline C.; Westerterp, Marit; Romijn, Johannes A.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Havekes, Louis M.; Princen, Hans M. G.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.

    2008-01-01

    Although cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibition is regarded as a promising strategy to reduce atherosclerosis by increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the CETP inhibitor torcetrapib given in addition to atorvastatin had no effect on atherosclerosis and even increased

  18. A pilot study into measurements of markers of atherosclerosis in periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leivadaros, E; van der Velden, U; Bizzarro, S; ten Heggeler, JMAG; Gerdes, VEA; Hoek, FJ; Nagy, TOM; Scholma, J; Bakker, SJL; Gans, ROB; ten Cate, H; Loos, BG

    Background: Periodontitis may be a possible risk factor for atherosclerosis. The current pilot study explored arterial wall thickness and other variables associated with atherosclerosis in healthy subjects with and without periodontitis. Methods: Patients with moderate (N = 34) and severe

  19. Effect of uremia on HDL composition, vascular inflammation, and atherosclerosis in wild-type mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Christian A; Bro, Susanne; Bartels, Emil D

    2007-01-01

    Wild-type mice normally do not develop atherosclerosis, unless fed cholic acid. Uremia is proinflammatory and increases atherosclerosis 6- to 10-fold in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. This study examined the effect of uremia on lipoproteins, vascular inflammation, and atherosclerosis in wild...... in cholic acid-fed sham mice. The results suggest that moderate uremia neither induces aortic inflammation nor atherosclerosis in C57BL/6J mice despite increased LDL/HDL cholesterol ratio and altered HDL composition....

  20. Increased YKL-40 expression in patients with carotid atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Axel Gottlieb; Rathcke, C.N.; Skjelland, M.

    2010-01-01

    atherosclerosis and 20 healthy controls. Carotid expression of YKL-40 was examined by real time RT-PCR in 57 of the patients. Regulation and effect of YKL-40 were examined in THP-1 monocytes. Results: Our main findings were: (1) serum YKL-40 levels were significantly elevated in patients with carotid...... atherosclerosis, with particularly high levels in those with symptomatic disease; (2) patients with recent ischemic symptoms (within 2 months) had higher YKL-40 mRNA levels in carotid plaque than other patients; (3) in vitro, the beta-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol, toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4...

  1. Management of radiation-induced accelerated carotid atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loftus, C.M.; Biller, J.; Hart, M.N.; Cornell, S.H.; Hiratzka, L.F.

    1987-01-01

    Patients with long survival following cervical irradiation are at risk for accelerated carotid atherosclerosis. The neurologic presentation in these patients mimics naturally occurring atheromatous disease, but patients often present at younger ages and with less concurrent coronary or systemic vascular disease. Hypercholesterolemia also contributes to this accelerated arteriosclerosis. Angiographic findings in this disorder include disproportionate involvement of the distal common carotid artery and unusually long carotid lesions. Pathologic findings include destruction of the internal elastic lamina and replacement of the normal intima and media with fibrous tissue. This article describes two surgical patients with radiation-induced accelerated carotid atherosclerosis who typify the presentation and characteristics of this disease

  2. [¹⁸F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET imaging of atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Björn Alexander; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2015-01-01

    [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET ((18)FDG PET) imaging has emerged as a promising tool for assessment of atherosclerosis. By targeting atherosclerotic plaque glycolysis, a marker for plaque inflammation and hypoxia, (18)FDG PET can assess plaque vulnerability and potentially predict risk...... of atherosclerosis-related disease, such as stroke and myocardial infarction. With excellent reproducibility, (18)FDG PET can be a surrogate end point in clinical drug trials, improving trial efficiency. This article summarizes key findings in the literature, discusses limitations of (18)FDG PET imaging...

  3. Lutein and atherosclerosis: Belfast versus Toulouse revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, A N; Thurnham, D I

    2017-01-01

    have been due to the effects of concurrent high concentrations of plasma lutein on the immune system and complement in particular. Other carotenoids may exert similar antioxidant effects but we and others found no differences in antioxidant nutrients between subjects in Toulouse and Belfast or between subjects with asymptomatic markers of atherosclerosis and controls. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Targeting the adaptive immune system: new strategies in the treatment of atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarzycka, Barbara; Nicolaes, Gerry A. F.; Lutgens, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a lipid-driven chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. Current treatment of atherosclerosis is focused on limiting its risk factors, such as hyperlipidemia or hypertension. However, treatments that target the inflammatory nature of atherosclerosis are still under

  5. Relationship Between Lifelong Exercise Volume and Coronary Atherosclerosis in Athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aengevaeren, Vincent L; Mosterd, Arend; Braber, Thijs L; Prakken, Niek H J; Doevendans, Pieter A; Grobbee, Diederick E; Thompson, Paul D; Eijsvogels, Thijs M H; Velthuis, Birgitta K

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Higher levels of physical activity are associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular events. Nevertheless, there is debate on the dose-esponse relationship of exercise and cardiovascular disease outcomes and whether high volumes of exercise may accelerate coronary atherosclerosis. We

  6. Insulin resistance and atherosclerosis : the role of visceral fat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gast, K.B.

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to unravel relationships between obesity, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and atherosclerosis. It is well-established that patients with type 2 diabetes have a 2- to 3-fold increased risk of cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether insulin resistance

  7. Oxidation of LDL and extent of peripheral atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijver, L.P.L. van de; Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Duyvenvoorde, W. van; Kruijssen, D.A.C.M.; Grobbee, D.E.; Poppel, G. van; Princen, H.M.G.

    1999-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated for oxidative modification of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) to play an important role in the atherogenic process. Therefore, we investigated the relation between susceptibility of LDL to oxidation and risk of peripheral atherosclerosis among 249 men between 45 and 80 years

  8. Ageing induced vascular smooth muscle cell senescence in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uryga, Anna K; Bennett, Martin R

    2016-04-15

    Atherosclerosis is a disease of ageing in that its incidence and prevalence increase with age. However, atherosclerosis is also associated with biological ageing, manifest by a number of typical hallmarks of ageing in the atherosclerotic plaque. Thus, accelerated biological ageing may be superimposed on the effects of chronological ageing in atherosclerosis. Tissue ageing is seen in all cells that comprise the plaque, but particularly in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Hallmarks of ageing include evidence of cell senescence, DNA damage (including telomere attrition), mitochondrial dysfunction, a pro-inflammatory secretory phenotype, defects in proteostasis, epigenetic changes, deregulated nutrient sensing, and exhaustion of progenitor cells. In this model, initial damage to DNA (genomic, telomeric, mitochondrial and epigenetic changes) results in a number of cellular responses (cellular senescence, deregulated nutrient sensing and defects in proteostasis). Ultimately, ongoing damage and attempts at repair by continued proliferation overwhelm reparative capacity, causing loss of specialised cell functions, cell death and inflammation. This review summarises the evidence for accelerated biological ageing in atherosclerosis, the functional consequences of cell ageing on cells comprising the plaque, and the causal role that VSMC senescence plays in atherogenesis. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  9. Epigenetic pathways in macrophages emerge as novel targets in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neele, Annette E.; van den Bossche, Jan; Hoeksema, Marten A.; de Winther, Menno P. J.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a lipid-driven chronic inflammatory disorder. Monocytes and macrophages are key immune cells in the development of disease and clinical outcome. It is becoming increasingly clear that epigenetic pathways govern many aspects of monocyte and macrophage differentiation and

  10. Inflammatory markers and extent and progression of early atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willeit, Peter; Thompson, Simon G; Agewall, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Large-scale epidemiological evidence on the role of inflammation in early atherosclerosis, assessed by carotid ultrasound, is lacking. We aimed to quantify cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of inflammatory markers with common-carotid-artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT)...

  11. Genomic Analysis of Circulating Cells: A Window into Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ju-Gyeong; Patino, Willmar D.; Matoba, Satoaki; Hwang, Paul M.

    2006-01-01

    Translational studies using genomic techniques in cardiovascular diseases are still in their infancy. Access to disease-associated cardiovascular tissues from patients has been a major impediment to progress in contrast to the diagnostic advances made by oncologists using gene expression on readily available tumor samples. Nonetheless, progress is being made for atherosclerosis by carefully designed experiments using diseased tissue or surrogate specimens. This review details the rationale and findings of a study using freshly isolated blood mononuclear cells from patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy due to atherosclerotic stenosis and from matched normal subjects. Using this cardiovascular tissue surrogate, the mRNA levels of the Finkel-Biskis-Jinkins osteosarcoma (FOS) gene in circulating monocytes were found to correlate with atherosclerosis severity in patients, and with HMG CoA reductase inhibitor (statin) therapy in normal subjects. The major finding of this investigation is discussed in relation to observations from other human atherosclerosis gene expression studies. These distinct studies converge to demonstrate the unequivocal importance of inflammation in atherosclerosis. Although the clinical utility of the specific findings remains open, the identification of similar genes by different investigations serves to validate their reports. They also provide us with insights into pathogenesis that may impact future translational applications. PMID:16781950

  12. Increased LDL susceptibility to oxidation accelerates future carotid artery atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoki Toshinari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We analyzed the causal relationship between LDL susceptibility to oxidation and the development of new carotid artery atherosclerosis over a period of 5 years. We previously described the determinants related to a risk of cardiovascular changes determined in a Japanese population participating in the Niigata Study, which is an ongoing epidemiological investigation of the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Methods We selected 394 individuals (169 males and 225 females who underwent a second carotid artery ultrasonographic examination in 2001 - 2002 for the present study. The susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was determined as the photometric absorbance and electrophoretic mobility of samples that had been collected in 1996 - 1997. The measurements were compared with ultrasonographic findings obtained in 2001 - 2002. Results The multivariate-adjusted model showed that age (odds ratio (OR, 1.034; 95% confidence interval (95%CI, 1.010 - 1.059, HbA1c (OR, 1.477; 95%CI, 0.980 - 2.225, and photometric O/N (OR, 2.012; 95%CI, 1.000 - 4.051 were significant variables that could independently predict the risk of new carotid artery atherosclerosis. Conclusion The susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was a significant parameter that could predict new carotid artery atherosclerosis over a 5-year period, and higher susceptibility was associated with a higher incidence of new carotid artery atherosclerosis.

  13. Control of Atherosclerosis Regression by PRMT2 in Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Macrophage Dysfunction in Obesity , Diabetes and Atherosclerosis Time Commitment: 3.0 Cal Months Supporting Agency: NHLBI Grants Officer: John Diggs...Project Goals: This sub-project focuses on the kinetics of the macrophage population in atherosclerotic plaques in a mouse model of psychological

  14. Intra‑operative grading of coronary artery atherosclerosis associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Atherosclerosis is one of the common causes of morbidity and mortality, in postmenopausal women. Homocysteine, a sulfur‑containing amino acid product of methionine metabolism, may play an important role in the development of cardiovascular diseases. This study was designed to evaluate the relationship ...

  15. Histomorphological features of atherosclerosis in the left anterior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pattern of coronary artery atherosclerosis is valuable in informing mitigation strategies for coronary heart disease. Histomorphological data on this disease among Africans living in Sub Saharan Africa are, however, scarce. The left anterior descending is one of the most commonly afflicted arteries. This study, therefore ...

  16. Atherosclerosis and Nutrition with Special Reference to Populations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Severe atherosclerosis and its sequelae-coronary heart disease, cerebral vascular disease, and peripheral vascular disease-share major responsibility for half the mortality rate in affluent Western populations. In Africa, particularly South Africa, a study of the extent and severity of lesions is particularly interesting because of ...

  17. Atherosclerosis and Nutrition with Special Reference to Populations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Severe atherosclerosis and its sequelae-coronary heart disease, cerebral ... the different population groups in various stages of tran- sition. ... 'These data show how emotional challenges may produce conspicuous .... and coronary arteries of White men. ... evidence of left ventricular hypertrophy, and glucose in- tolerance ...

  18. The role of risk factors in the development of atherosclerosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frohlich, J.; Dobiášová, Milada; Lear, S.; Lee, K. W. J.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 5 (2001), s. 401-440 ISSN 1040-8363 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV306/96/K220 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : FERHDL * atherosclerosis * new/emerging risk factors Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 3.931, year: 2001

  19. Human Low Density Lipoprotein as a Vehicle of Atherosclerosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low-density lipoproteins have been sufficiently established as an important precursor of atherosclerosis. The actual mechanism is still unclear, and the current technique of using radioisotopes has clinical limitation. However, the current study techniques or methods excellently elucidate the functional aspects of ...

  20. Premature atherosclerosis after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Sadurska

    2018-03-01

    Survivors of childhood ALL in the examined group demonstrated elevated concentrations of selected new biomarkers and increased IMT values, compared to controls, which may confirm the occurrence of endothelial injuries in blood vessels. This study indicates that subjects treated for childhood malignancy are at a higher risk of prematurely developing atherosclerosis.

  1. The biology of atherosclerosis: general paradigms and distinct pathogenic mechanisms among HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Janet; Plutzky, Jorge

    2012-06-01

    Complications of atherosclerosis, including myocardial infarction and stroke, are the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Recent data strongly implicate cardiovascular death as a contributor to mortality among patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, with evidence suggesting increased incidence of atherosclerosis among these patients. Therefore, greater understanding of atherosclerotic mechanisms and how these responses may be similar or distinct in HIV-infected patients is needed. Key concepts in atherosclerosis are reviewed, including the evidence that inflammation and abnormal metabolism are major drivers of atherosclerosis, and connected to the current literature regarding atherosclerosis in the context of HIV.

  2. Coronary atherosclerosis in medico-legal autopsy cases

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    VN Prasad

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coronary atherosclerosis is the major cause of death worldwide. Lifestyle and habits are the major contributory factor in the development of coronary atherosclerosis. Materials and Methods: This is an autopsy-based study in which 45 autopsy cases were randomly selected for study. Proximal one third of all three epicardial coronary arteries (LAD, LCX and RCA were dissected out for study and serial sections were made and stained with H&E method and under the light microscope. Atherosclerosis was graded according to American heart association classification. The risk factors (cigarette smoking, hypertension, diabetes, alcohol consumption, age, sex were also correlated with the grade of atherosclerosis. Results: Seventy-Eight percent of American Heart Association classification grade V lesions were seen in > 70 yrs of age. Almost all cases of > 70 yrs of age had American Heart Association classification grade > IV lesions. Out of all grade IV lesions, 88.9% was seen in male while only 11.1% in female. Similarly out of all grade V lesions, 77.8% was seen in male while 22.2% in female. LAD showed maximum involvement by higher grade lesion, followed by LCX and RCA. American Heart Association classification grade > IV in LAD, LCX and RCA was seen in 25(55.6%, 5(11.1%, and 3(6.7% cases respectively. Conclusion: Higher grade lesion occurs in advancing age. Various cardiovascular risk factors were significantly associated with higher grade of lesions. The multiple risk factors had a synergistic effect on the progression of coronary atherosclerosis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v4i8.11492 Journal of Pathology of Nepal; Vol.4,No8(2014 607-611

  3. Improved animal models for testing gene therapy for atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Liang; Zhang, Jingwan; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Flynn, Rowan; Dichek, David A

    2014-04-01

    Gene therapy delivered to the blood vessel wall could augment current therapies for atherosclerosis, including systemic drug therapy and stenting. However, identification of clinically useful vectors and effective therapeutic transgenes remains at the preclinical stage. Identification of effective vectors and transgenes would be accelerated by availability of animal models that allow practical and expeditious testing of vessel-wall-directed gene therapy. Such models would include humanlike lesions that develop rapidly in vessels that are amenable to efficient gene delivery. Moreover, because human atherosclerosis develops in normal vessels, gene therapy that prevents atherosclerosis is most logically tested in relatively normal arteries. Similarly, gene therapy that causes atherosclerosis regression requires gene delivery to an existing lesion. Here we report development of three new rabbit models for testing vessel-wall-directed gene therapy that either prevents or reverses atherosclerosis. Carotid artery intimal lesions in these new models develop within 2-7 months after initiation of a high-fat diet and are 20-80 times larger than lesions in a model we described previously. Individual models allow generation of lesions that are relatively rich in either macrophages or smooth muscle cells, permitting testing of gene therapy strategies targeted at either cell type. Two of the models include gene delivery to essentially normal arteries and will be useful for identifying strategies that prevent lesion development. The third model generates lesions rapidly in vector-naïve animals and can be used for testing gene therapy that promotes lesion regression. These models are optimized for testing helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd)-mediated gene therapy; however, they could be easily adapted for testing of other vectors or of different types of molecular therapies, delivered directly to the blood vessel wall. Our data also supports the promise of HDAd to deliver long

  4. Concept of Atherosclerosis Velocity: Is It a Better Measure of Cardiovascular Risk?

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    Seyyed Mohammad Reza Kazemi-Bajestani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In most cases atherosclerosis is the underlying cause of vascular diseases, including heart disease and stroke. It is believed that endothelial injury is the earliest change in the artery wall and that this precedes the formation of lesions of atherosclerosis. Recent developments in the field of atherosclerosis have led to a renewed interest in the recognition of the parameter of time in the atherosclerosis process. We believe that the factors determining the time-dependent rate of atherosclerosis progression are important, and it is in this context that we wish to propose for the first time the term “atherosclerosis velocity”. In this review article, we summarize the existing evidence regarding atherosclerosis velocity and discuss the importance of this issue.

  5. [Chronic mild inflammation links obesity, metabolic syndrome, atherosclerosis and diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andel, M; Polák, J; Kraml, P; Dlouhý, P; Stich, V

    2009-01-01

    Chronic low grade inflammation is relatively new concept in metabolic medicine. This concept describes the relations between the inflammation and adipose tissue, insulin resistence, atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Macrophages and lymphocytes deposed in adipose tissue produce proinflammatory cytokines which directly or through the CRP liver secretion are targeting endothelial cells, hepatocytes and beta cells of Langerhans islets of pancreas. The dysfunction of these cells follows often further disturbances and in case of beta cells - the cell death. The connection between the adipose tissue insulin resistence, atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes was earlier described with endocrine and metabolic descriptors. The concept of chronic low grade inflammation creates also another description of multilateral connections in metabolic syndome. The salicylates and the drugs related to them seem to have some glucose lowering properties. The recent development in the field ofchronic low grade inflammation represents also certain therapeutic hope for antiinflammatory intervention in type 2 diabetes.

  6. Platelets and their chemokines in atherosclerosis – clinical applications

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    Philipp evon Hundelshausen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The concept of platelets as important players in the process of atherogenesis has become increasingly accepted due to accumulating experimental and clinical evidence. Despite the progress in understanding the molecular details of atherosclerosis, particularly by using animal models, the inflammatory and thrombotic roles of activated platelet s especially in the human system remain difficult to dissect, as often only the complications of atherosclerosis i.e. stroke and myocardial infarction are definable but not the plaque burden.Platelet indices including platelet count and mean platelet volume and soluble mediators released by activated platelets are associated with atherosclerosis. The chemokine CXCL4 has multiple atherogenic activities e.g. altering the differentiation of T cells and macrophages by inhibiting neutrophil and monocyte apoptosis and by increasing the uptake of oxLDL and synergizing with CCL5. CCL5 is released and deposited on endothelium by activated platelets thereby triggering atherogenic monocyte recruitment, which can be attenuated by blocking the corresponding chemokine receptor CCR5. Atheroprotective and plaque stabilizing properties are attributed to CXCL12, which plays an important role in regenerative processes by attracting progenitor cells. Its release from luminal attached platelets accelerates endothelial healing after injury. Platelet surface molecules GPIIb/IIIa, GP1bα, P-selectin, JAM-A and the CD40/CD40L dyade are crucially involved in the interaction with endothelial cells, leukocytes and matrix molecules affecting atherogenesis. Beyond the effects on the arterial inflammatory infiltrate, platelets affect cholesterol metabolism by binding, modifying and endocytosing LDL particles via their scavenger receptors and contribute to the formation of lipid laden macrophages. Current medical therapies for the prevention of atherosclerotic therapies enable the elucidation of mechanisms linking platelets to inflammation

  7. Natural killer T cells in lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Getz, Godfrey S; VanderLaan, Paul A; Reardon, Catherine A

    2011-01-01

    Cells of both the innate and adaptive immune system participate in the development of atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disorder of medium and large arteries. Natural killer T (NKT) cells express surface markers characteristic of natural killer cells and conventional T cells and bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems. The development and activation of NKT cells is dependent upon CD1d, a MHC-class I-type molecule that presents lipids, especially glycolipids to the TCR on NKT cells...

  8. Role of diabetes, hypertension, and cigarette smoking on atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mathur, Ram K.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperosmolar food causes atherosclerosis. Hyperosmolal food hypothesis encompasses all the factors involved under one heading and, that is, the generation of heat in the body. The involvement of cigarette smoking is obvious. High glycemic index food and diabetes result in high levels of blood glucose, which raises the core body temperature. The ingestion of hyperosmolal salt, glucose, and amino acids singularly or synergistically raise the core body temperature, forcing abdominal aorta to for...

  9. Melanocortin 1 Receptor Deficiency Promotes Atherosclerosis in Apolipoprotein E-/- Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinne, Petteri; Kadiri, James J; Velasco-Delgado, Mauricio; Nuutinen, Salla; Viitala, Miro; Hollmén, Maija; Rami, Martina; Savontaus, Eriika; Steffens, Sabine

    2018-02-01

    The MC1-R (melanocortin 1 receptor) is expressed by monocytes and macrophages where it mediates anti-inflammatory actions. MC1-R also protects against macrophage foam cell formation primarily by promoting cholesterol efflux through the ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily A member 1) and ABCG1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily G member 1). In this study, we aimed to investigate whether global deficiency in MC1-R signaling affects the development of atherosclerosis. Apoe -/- (apolipoprotein E deficient) mice were crossed with recessive yellow (Mc1r e/e ) mice carrying dysfunctional MC1-R and fed a high-fat diet to induce atherosclerosis. Apoe -/- Mc1r e/e mice developed significantly larger atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic sinus and in the whole aorta compared with Apoe -/- controls. In terms of plaque composition, MC1-R deficiency was associated with less collagen and smooth muscle cells and increased necrotic core, indicative of more vulnerable lesions. These changes were accompanied by reduced Abca1 and Abcg1 expression in the aorta. Furthermore, Apoe -/- Mc1r e/e mice showed a defect in bile acid metabolism that aggravated high-fat diet-induced hypercholesterolemia and hepatic lipid accumulation. Flow cytometric analysis of leukocyte profile revealed that dysfunctional MC1-R enhanced arterial accumulation of classical Ly6C high monocytes and macrophages, effects that were evident in mice fed a normal chow diet but not under high-fat diet conditions. In support of enhanced arterial recruitment of Ly6C high monocytes, these cells had increased expression of L-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1. The present study highlights the importance of MC1-R in the development of atherosclerosis. Deficiency in MC1-R signaling exacerbates atherosclerosis by disturbing cholesterol handling and by increasing arterial monocyte accumulation. © 2017 The Authors.

  10. IL-25 inhibits atherosclerosis development in apolipoprotein E deficient mice.

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    Polyxeni T Mantani

    Full Text Available IL-25 has been implicated in the initiation of type 2 immunity and in the protection against autoimmune inflammatory diseases. Recent studies have identified the novel innate lymphoid type 2 cells (ILC2s as an IL-25 target cell population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if IL-25 has any influence on atherosclerosis development in mice.Administration of 1 μg IL-25 per day for one week to atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein (apoE deficient mice, had limited effect on the frequency of T cell populations, but resulted in a large expansion of ILC2s in the spleen. The expansion was accompanied by increased levels of anti-phosphorylcholine (PC natural IgM antibodies in plasma and elevated levels of IL-5 in plasma and spleen. Transfer of ILC2s to apoE deficient mice elevated the natural antibody-producing B1a cell population in the spleen. Treatment of apoE/Rag-1 deficient mice with IL-25 was also associated with extensive expansion of splenic ILC2s and increased plasma IL-5, suggesting ILC2s to be the source of IL-5. Administration of IL-25 in IL-5 deficient mice resulted in an expanded ILC2 population, but did not stimulate generation of anti-PC IgM, indicating that IL-5 is not required for ILC2 expansion but for the downstream production of natural antibodies. Additionally, administration of 1 μg IL-25 per day for 4 weeks in apoE deficient mice reduced atherosclerosis in the aorta both during initiation and progression of the disease.The present findings demonstrate that IL-25 has a protective role in atherosclerosis mediated by innate responses, including ILC2 expansion, increased IL-5 secretion, B1a expansion and natural anti-PC IgM generation, rather than adaptive Th2 responses.

  11. Subclinical coronary atherosclerosis and neighbourhood deprivation in an urban region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragano, Nico; Hoffmann, Barbara; Stang, Andreas; Moebus, Susanne; Verde, Pablo E.; Weyers, Simone; Moehlenkamp, Stefan; Schmermund, Axel; Mann, Klaus; Joeckel, Karl-Heinz; Erbel, Raimund; Siegrist, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Inhabitants of deprived neighbourhoods are at higher risk of coronary heart disease. In this study we investigate the hypothesis that social inequalities at neighbourhood level become already manifest in subclinical coronary atherosclerosis, as defined by electron-beam computed tomography derived measures. Coronary artery calcification was assessed as a marker of atherosclerosis in a population based sample of 4301 men and women (45-75 years) without a history of coronary heart disease. Participants lived in three adjacent cities in Germany and were examined between 2000 and 2003 as part of the Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study. Individual level data was combined with neighbourhood level information about unemployment, welfare and living space per inhabitant. This dataset was analysed with descriptive and multilevel regression methods. An association between neighbourhood deprivation and subclinical coronary calcification was observed. After adjustment for age and individual socioeconomic status male inhabitants of high unemployment neighbourhoods had an odds ratio of 1.45 (1.11, 1.96) of exhibiting a high calcification score (>75th percentile) compared to men living in low unemployment areas. The respective odds for women was 1.29 (0.97, 1.70). Additional explorative analyses suggest that clustering of unhealthy lifestyles in deprived neighbourhoods contributes to the observed association. In conclusion, findings suggest that certain neighbourhood characteristics promote the emergence of coronary atherosclerosis. This might point to a pathway from neighbourhood deprivation to manifest coronary heart disease

  12. Biomarkers of Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Patients with Autoimmune Disorders

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    Elisabetta Profumo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is accelerated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and psoriatic arthritis (PsA. We investigated a possible association of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDLs, nitric oxide (NO, 3-nitrotyrosine, vitamin A, vitamin E, and β-carotene serum levels with subclinical atherosclerosis in RA and PsA. By the use of ELISA, we observed higher ox-LDL levels in patients with intima-media thickness (IMT > 1 than in patients with IMT ≤ 1 and a negative correlation between NO levels and IMT values. By the use of high-performance liquid chromatography, we determined higher levels of vitamin A in patients with PsA and IMT ≤ 1 than in controls and lower levels of β-carotene in patients with RA and PsA than in controls. β-carotene concentrations were negatively correlated to the duration of disease in RA. Our study confirms that ox-LDLs and NO may be markers of accelerated atherosclerosis in RA and PsA whereas vitamins seem to be associated only to the presence of the autoimmune disorders.

  13. Curcumin analog L3 alleviates diabetic atherosclerosis by multiple effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bin; Yang, Liu; Wen, Caixia; Huang, Xiuwang; Xu, Chenxia; Lee, Kuan-Han; Xu, Jianhua

    2016-03-15

    L3, an analog of curcumin, is a compound isolated from a traditional Chinese medicine Turmeric. In this paper, we aims to explore the efficacy of L3 on diabetic atherosclerosis and the related mechanism. The effect of L3 was studied on glucose and lipid metabolism, antioxidant status, atherosclerosis-related indexes and pathological changes of main organs in the mice model of diabetes induced by streptozotocin and high-fat diet. The results showed that L3 treatment could meliorate dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia, reduce oxidative stress, enhance the activity of antioxidases, increase the nitric oxide level in plasma and aortic arch, decrease the production of reactive oxygen species in pancreas and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 expression in aortic arch, and meliorate the fatty and atherosclerotic degeneration in aortic arch, thereby preventing the development of diabetes and its complications. These results suggested that L3 can alleviate the diabetic atherosclerosis by multiple effects. This study provided scientific basis for the further research and clinical application of L3. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Protective role for properdin in progression of experimental murine atherosclerosis.

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    Tanja Steiner

    Full Text Available Genetic, dietary and immune factors contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in humans and mice. Complement activation is an integral part of the innate immune defence but also shapes cellular responses and influences directly triglyceride synthesis. Deficiency of Factor B of the alternative pathway (AP of complement is beneficial in LDLR(-/- mice fed a high fat diet. The serum glycoprotein properdin is a key positive regulator of the AP but has not been studied in experimental atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis was assessed after feeding low fat (LFD or high fat (HFD Western type diets to newly generated LDLR(-/- Properdin(KO (LDLR(-/-P(KO and LDLR-/-PWT mice. Lipids, lymphocytes and monocytes were similar among genotypes, genders and diets. Complement C3, but not C3adesarg, levels were enhanced in LDLR(-/-P(KO mice regardless of diet type or gender. Non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA were decreased in male LDLR(-/-P(KO fed a HFD compared with controls. All mice showed significant atherosclerotic burden in aortae and at aortic roots but male LDLR(-/- mice fed a LFD were affected to the greatest extent by the absence of properdin. The protective effect of properdin expression was overwhelmed in both genders of LDLR(-/-mice when fed a HFD. We conclude that properdin plays an unexpectedly beneficial role in the development and progression of early atherosclerotic lesions.

  15. Prediabetes is not a risk factor for subclinical coronary atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gyung-Min; Cho, Young-Rak; Lee, Seung-Whan; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Won, Ki-Bum; Ann, Soe Hee; Kim, Yong-Giun; Kim, Shin-Jae; Roh, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Young-Hak; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kang, Joon-Won; Lim, Tae-Hwan; Jung, Chang Hee; Koh, Eun Hee; Lee, Woo Je; Kim, Min-Seon; Lee, Ki-Up; Park, Joong-Yeol; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Choe, Jaewon; Lee, Sang-Gon

    2017-09-15

    There are limited data regarding the influence of glycemic status on the risk of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis on coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) in asymptomatic individuals. We analyzed 6434 asymptomatic individuals who underwent CCTA. The degree and extent of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis were assessed by CCTA, and ≥50% diameter stenosis was defined as significant. Of study participants, 2197 (34.1%), 3122 (48.5%), and 1115 (17.3%) were categorized as normal, prediabetic and diabetic individuals, respectively. Compared with normal individuals, there were no statistically differences in the adjusted odds ratios of prediabetic individuals for significant coronary artery stenosis (0.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80-1.22, p=0.888), any plaque (0.96, 95% CI 0.86-1.07, p=0.483), calcified plaque (0.90, 95% CI 0.79-1.01, p=0.080), non-calcified plaque (1.02, 95% CI 0.88-1.17, p=0.803), and mixed plaque (1.00, 95% CI 0.82-1.22, p=0.983). However, adjusted odds ratios for significant coronary artery stenosis (1.71, 95% CI 1.34-2.19, pprediabetic individuals were not associated with an increased risk of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Aterosclerose experimental em coelhos Experimental atherosclerosis in rabbits

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    Waleska C. Dornas

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerosas pesquisas têm sido realizadas utilizando modelos experimentais para estudar o desenvolvimento da aterosclerose com dieta induzindo hiperlipidemia. Devido ao fato de que coelhos são muito sensíveis a dietas ricas em colesterol e acumulam grandes quantidades no plasma, a utilização destes animais como modelo experimental para avaliar o desenvolvimento de aterosclerose é de grande relevância, trazendo informação sobre fatores que contribuem para progressão e regressão aplicadas a situações humanas. Sendo assim, nessa revisão a função aterogênica do colesterol é mostrada em trabalhos que incluem o coelho como modelo experimental, uma vez que este animal tornou-se o mais popular modelo experimental de aterosclerose.Many researches have been conducted in experimental models in order to study the development of atherosclerosis from hyperlipidemia-inducing diets. Since rabbits are very sensitive to cholesterol-rich diets and accumulate large amounts of cholesterol in their plasma, their use as experimental models to evaluate the development of atherosclerosis is highly relevant and brings information on factors that contribute to the progression and regression of this condition that can be applied to humans. As such, this review includes studies on the atherogenic function of cholesterol based on rabbits as the experimental model, since they have become the most largely used experimental model of atherosclerosis.

  17. Food and nutrition in the prevention of atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Kamila Wojarska

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the most frequent cause of hospitalization (15% and death (46% in Poland, as well as worldwide (31%, by reason of strenuous activity in the field of preventative healthcare in all age groups has to be taken. Preventative nutrition of atherosclerosis predicts mostly intake restriction of food containing: fatty acids, cholesterol, salt, monosaccharides and animal protein, while increasing intake of vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidant substances. Eating habits and nutritional status of women who are planning pregnancy have a crucial impact on its course, development of the fetus and children’s health in later years of their life. For all of cardiac patients well balanced diet is advised. In preventative care of Cardiovascular Disease it is advised to apply the diet given by a certified dietician and adjusted to fit patient’s needs. It is to remember, that besides a good diet, an important therapeutic factor of the patients with atherosclerosis is physical activity. Cardiovascular disease is a serious concern in Poland, as well as worldwide. Eating habits are playing a big role in pathogenesis and prevention of atherosclerosis.

  18. Effect of ascorbic acid on prevention of hypercholesterolemia induced atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S; Ray, R; Snehlata; Das, N; Srivastava, L M

    2006-04-01

    The notion that oxidation of lipids and propagation of free radicals may contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is supported by a large body of evidence. To circumvent the damage caused by oxygen free radicals, antioxidants are needed which provide the much needed neutralization of free radical by allowing the pairing of electrons. In this study we have investigated the effect of ascorbic acid, a water soluble antioxidant on the development of hypercholesterolemia induced atherosclerosis in rabbits. Rabbits were made hypercholesterolemic and atherosclerotic by feeding 100 mg cholesterol/day. Different doses of ascorbic acid were administered to these rabbits. Low dose of ascorbic acid (0.5 mg/100 g body weight/day) did not have any significant effect on the percent of total area covered by atherosclerotic plaque. However, ascorbic acid when fed at a higher dose (15 mg/100 g body weight/day) was highly effective in reducing the atherogenecity. With this dose the percent of total surface area covered by atherosclerotic plaque was significantly less (p ascorbic acid may have great promise in the prevention of hypercholesterolemia induced atherosclerosis.

  19. Reduction of mouse atherosclerosis by urokinase inhibition or with a limited-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Jie Hong; Touch, Phanith; Zhang, Jingwan

    2015-01-01

    -accelerated atherosclerosis) to investigate whether systemic inhibition of proteolytic activity of uPA or a subset of MMPs can reduce protease-induced atherosclerosis and aortic dilation. METHODS AND RESULTS: SR-uPA mice were fed a high-fat diet for 10 weeks and treated either with an antibody inhibiting mouse uPA (mU1...... surface lesion coverage. Several lines of evidence identified MMP-13 as a mediator of uPA-induced aortic MMP activity. CONCLUSIONS: Pharmacological inhibition of either uPA or selected MMPs decreased atherosclerosis in SR-uPA mice. uPA inhibition decreased aortic dilation. Differential effects of both...... agents on aortic root vs. distal aortic atherosclerosis suggest prevention of atherosclerosis progression vs. initiation. Systemic inhibition of uPA or a subset of MMPs shows promise for treating atherosclerosis....

  20. Periodontal disease and carotid atherosclerosis: A meta-analysis of 17,330 participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xian-Tao; Leng, Wei-Dong; Lam, Yat-Yin; Yan, Bryan P; Wei, Xue-Mei; Weng, Hong; Kwong, Joey S W

    2016-01-15

    The association between periodontal disease and carotid atherosclerosis has been evaluated primarily in single-center studies, and whether periodontal disease is an independent risk factor of carotid atherosclerosis remains uncertain. This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the association between periodontal disease and carotid atherosclerosis. We searched PubMed and Embase for relevant observational studies up to February 20, 2015. Two authors independently extracted data from included studies, and odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for overall and subgroup meta-analyses. Statistical heterogeneity was assessed by the chi-squared test (Pperiodontal disease was associated with carotid atherosclerosis (OR: 1.27, 95% CI: 1.14-1.41; Pperiodontal disease was associated with carotid atherosclerosis; however, further large-scale, well-conducted clinical studies are needed to explore the precise risk of developing carotid atherosclerosis in patients with periodontal disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Relationship between Chlamydia pneumonia and helicobacter pylori with atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ali Pooria

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pooria A1, Maasoomi M2, Rafiee E3, Rezaee M4, Sabzi F5, Hossain Zadegan H6, Salehi M7, Mozaffari P8 1. Assistant Professor, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences 2. Professor, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, 3. Assistant Professor, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Department of Pathology 4. Associate Professor, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences 5. Assistant Professor, Department of Statistics, Faculty of Health, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences 6. Assistant Professor, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences 7. Bsc in Nursing, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences 8. Instructor, Department of Nursing, Faculty of Nursing and midwifery, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences Abstract Background: Atherosclerosis is the most common cause of deaths in the developed countries and causes one million mortalities per year in the USA. Smoking, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidemia, stress, and low activity are known to be the causes of atherosclerosis. The objective of this study is to confirm the relationship between chlamydia pneumonia (Cpn, as well as helicobacter pylori (Hp and atherosclerosis. Materials and methods: In this analytical case-control study two groups of patients were studied. The first group including 30 patients over 30 years old with coronary artery disease were operated using coronary artery bypass graft. The control group included 30 persons assessed with angiography and having normal coronary arteries. The data were collected and analyzed using statistical methods. Results: The two groups were similar in terms of IgA and IgG anti-Cpn, and IgG anti- Hp but they were statistically different concerning IgA anti-Hp which had more positive cases in the case group in comparison with the

  2. Atherosclerosis profile and incidence of cardiovascular events: a population-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bullano Michael F

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atherosclerosis is a chronic progressive disease often presenting as clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD events. This study evaluated the characteristics of individuals with a diagnosis of atherosclerosis and estimated the incidence of CVD events to assist in the early identification of high-risk individuals. Methods Respondents to the US SHIELD baseline survey were followed for 2 years to observe incident self-reported CVD. Respondents had subclinical atherosclerosis if they reported a diagnosis of narrow or blocked arteries/carotid artery disease without a past clinical CVD event (heart attack, stroke or revascularization. Characteristics of those with atherosclerosis and incident CVD were compared with those who did not report atherosclerosis at baseline but had CVD in the following 2 years using chi-square tests. Logistic regression model identified characteristics associated with atherosclerosis and incident events. Results Of 17,640 respondents, 488 (2.8% reported having subclinical atherosclerosis at baseline. Subclinical atherosclerosis was associated with age, male gender, dyslipidemia, circulation problems, hypertension, past smoker, and a cholesterol test in past year (OR = 2.2 [all p Conclusion Self-report of subclinical atherosclerosis identified an extremely high-risk group with a >25% risk of a CVD event in the next 2 years. These characteristics may be useful for identifying individuals for more aggressive diagnostic and therapeutic efforts.

  3. [25 year experience with using surgical correction of dislipidemia in treatment of patients with atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedov, V M; Mirchuk, K K; Sedletskiĭ, Iu I

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of results of using partial ileoshunting for the treatment of dislipidemia in 159 patients with atherosclerosis has shown that operation of partial ileoshunting has an obligatory, pronounced and lifelong lipidcorrecting effect. An antiatherogenic effect of the operation of partial ileoshunting is manifested as the improvement of the clinical course of the disease caused by atherosclerosis, by less number of thrombotic complications of atherosclerosis and less lethality from cardio-vascular diseases. At a longer follow-up period, the efficiency of partial ileoshunting as a means of secondary prophylactics of atherosclerosis is confirmed but in case of liquidation after operation of dislipoproteidemia.

  4. Atherosclerosis induced by arsenic in drinking water in rats through altering lipid metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Tain-Junn; Chuu, Jiunn-Jye; Chang, Chia-Yu; Tsai, Wan-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Jung; Guo, How-Ran

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic in drinking water is a global environmental health problem, and the exposure may increase cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases mortalities, most likely through causing atherosclerosis. However, the mechanism of atherosclerosis formation after arsenic exposure is still unclear. To study the mechanism of atherosclerosis formation after arsenic exposure and explore the role of high cholesterol diet (HCD) in this process, we fed spontaneous hypertensive rats and Wistar Kyoto rats with basal diet or HCD and provided with them drinking water containing arsenic at different ages and orders for 20 consecutive weeks. We measured high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol, triglycerides, heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70), and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) at predetermined intervals and determined expressions of cholesteryl ester transfer protein-1 (CETP-1) and liver X receptor β (LXRβ) in the liver. Atherosclerosis was determined by examining the aorta with hematoxylin and eosin stain. After 20 weeks, we found arsenic, alone or combined with HCD, may promote atherosclerosis formation with transient increases in HSP 70 and hs-CRP. Early combination exposure decreased the HDL-C/LDL-C ratio without changing the levels of total cholesterol and triglyceride until 30 weeks old. Both CETP-1 and LXRβ activities were suppressed, most significantly in early combination exposure. In conclusion, arsenic exposure may induce atherosclerosis through modifying reverse cholesterol transport in cholesterol metabolism and suppressing LXRβ and CEPT-1 expressions. For decreasing atherosclerosis related mortality associated with arsenic, preventing exposure from environmental sources in early life is an important element. - Highlights: → Arsenic causes cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases through atherosclerosis. → Arsenic may promote atherosclerosis with transient increase in HSP 70 and hs

  5. Effect of tocotrienol on aortic atherosclerosis in diabetic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiani, M.R.B.; Butt, S.A.; Ahmed, T.

    2015-01-01

    Effect of tocotrienol on aortic atherosclerosis in diabetic mice To study the histomorphological effect of tocotrienol on aortic atherosclerosis in diabetic mice having high fat diet. Study Design: Lab based randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Army Medical College, Rawalpindi and National Institute of Health, Islamabad from November 2009 to June 2010. Material and Methods: Forty five female BALB/c mice were randomly divided into three groups. The diabetic mice model was established by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) 40 mg/kg body weight. Group A was given normal laboratory diet, group B high fat diet and group C was given tocotrienol along with high fat diet for 32 weeks. At the end of experiment the mice were sacrificed. The hearts of animals were dissected out and ascending aortae were taken out. The specimen was fixed in 10% formol calcium and processed for paraffin embedding. Five micrometer thick sections were made for haematoxylin and eosin, and Verhoeff's staining. After staining, histomorphologic changes in slides were noted. Results: In contrast to group A, atheroscelrosis developed in groups B and C. Statistically significant atherosclerotic changes were found in the aortae of diabetic mice in group B when compared to group A. On comparison of group A to C, atherosclerotic changes were statistically insignificant. However when group B was compared with group C, the aortic atherosclerotic changes decreased significantly in group C. Conclusion: In diabetics with high fat diet intake, there is an increase in development of atherosclerosis in aorta which can be reduced by tocotrienol. (author)

  6. Periodontal Disease-Induced Atherosclerosis and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Kurita-Ochiai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is a highly prevalent disorder affecting up to 80% of the global population. Recent epidemiological studies have shown an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease, as oxidative stress plays an important role in chronic inflammatory diseases such as periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms by which periodontopathic bacteria cause chronic inflammation through the enhancement of oxidative stress and accelerate cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, we comment on the antioxidative activity of catechin in atherosclerosis accelerated by periodontitis.

  7. Data on atherosclerosis specific antibody conjugation to nanoemulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Prévot

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article present data related to the publication entitled “Iron oxide core oil-in-water nanoemulsion as tracer for atherosclerosis MPI and MRI imaging” (Prévot et al., 2017 [1]. Herein we describe the engineering in the baculovirus-insect cell system and purification processes of the human scFv-Fc TEG4-2C antibody, specific of platelets within the atheroma plaque. For molecular targeting purpose, atheroma specific antibody was conjugated to nanoemulsions (NEs using a heterobifunctional linker (DSPE-PEG-maleimide. Atheroma labelling was assayed by immunochemistry on arterial sections from rabbits.

  8. Prevalence and long-term clinical significance of intracranial atherosclerosis after ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovesen, Christian; Abild, Annemette; Christensen, Anders Fogh

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence and long-term risk associated with intracranial atherosclerosis identified during routine evaluation.......We investigated the prevalence and long-term risk associated with intracranial atherosclerosis identified during routine evaluation....

  9. Depressive and anxiety disorders and risk of subclinical atherosclerosis Findings from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seldenrijk, Adrie; Vogelzangs, Nicole; van Hout, Hein P. J.; van Marwijk, Harm W. J.; Diamant, Michaela; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    Objective: Current evidence regarding the association between psychopathology and subclinical atherosclerosis show inconsistent results. The present study examined whether subclinical atherosclerosis was more prevalent in a large cohort of persons with depressive or anxiety disorders as compared to

  10. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced apoptotic dendritic cells as a novel therapy for atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frodermann, Vanessa; van Puijvelde, Gijs H M; Wierts, Laura; Lagraauw, H Maxime; Foks, Amanda C; van Santbrink, Peter J; Bot, Ilze; Kuiper, Johan; de Jager, Saskia C A

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of immune responses may form a powerful approach to treat atherosclerosis. It was shown that clearance of apoptotic cells results in tolerance induction to cleared Ags by dendritic cells (DCs); however, this seems impaired in atherosclerosis because Ag-specific tolerance is lacking. This

  11. Modulation of genes involved in inflammation and cell death in atherosclerosis-susceptible mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadelaar, Anna Susanne Maria

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis we focus on atherosclerosis as the main cause of cardiovascular disease. Since inflammation and cell death are important processes in the onset and progression of atherosclerosis, we investigate the role of several genes involved in inflammation and cell death in the vessel wall and

  12. Torcetrapib does not reduce atherosclerosis beyond atorvastatin and induces more proinflammatory lesions than atorvastatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Willeke; de Vries-van der Weij, Jitske; van der Hoorn, Jose W. A.; Gautier, Thomas; van der Hoogt, Caroline C.; Westerterp, Marit; Romijn, Johannes A.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Havekes, Louis M.; Princen, Hans M. G.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.

    2008-01-01

    Background-Although cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibition is regarded as a promising strategy to reduce atherosclerosis by increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the CETP inhibitor torcetrapib given in addition to atorvastatin had no effect on atherosclerosis and even

  13. Prevalence, Vascular Distribution, and Multiterritorial Extent of Subclinical Atherosclerosis in a Middle-Aged Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Friera, Leticia; Peñalvo, José L; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    age, 45.8 years; 63% male) to evaluate the systemic extent of atherosclerosis in the carotid, abdominal aortic, and iliofemoral territories by 2-/3-dimensional ultrasound and coronary artery calcification by computed tomography. The extent of subclinical atherosclerosis, defined as presence of plaque...

  14. Associations between vitamin D status and atherosclerosis among Inuit in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjødesen, Camilla U; Jørgensen, Marit E; Bjerregaard, Peter

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Low levels of vitamin D are suspected to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis among Inuit in Greenland, and to evaluate the association with vitamin D status. We hypo...

  15. Progression and regression of atherosclerosis in APOE3-Leiden transgenic mice : An immunohistochemical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijbels, M.J.J.; Cammen, M. van der; Laan, L.J.W. van der; Emeis, J.J.; Havekes, L.M.; Hofker, M.H.; Kraal, G.

    1999-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E3-Leiden (APOE3-Leiden) transgenic mice develop hyperlipidemia and are highly susceptible to diet-induced atherosclerosis. We have studied the progression and regression of atherosclerosis using immunohistochemistry. Female transgenic mice were fed a moderate fat diet to study

  16. Risk factors for atherosclerosis - can they be used to identify the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk factors are often used in preventive care programmes to identify the patient at particular risk for developing atherosclerosis. Risk factors for atherosclerosis have also been shown to be linked to the presence of the disease at a given time, a fact that may be helpful when screening for additional atherosclerotic disease in ...

  17. Models and Analysis of Atherosclerosis, Restenosis, and Aneurysm Formation in the Mouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waard, Vivian; Gijbels, Marion J. J.; Lutgens, Esther; de Winther, Menno P. J.; de Vries, Carlie J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is considered a chronic inflammatory condition of the vessel wall and involves a high chronic concentration of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in blood. In humans, restenosis develops after intravascular interventions such as angioplasty and stent placement to treat atherosclerosis,

  18. A pilot study into measurements of markers of atherosclerosis in periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leivadaros, Efstratios; van der Velden, Ubele; Bizzarro, Sergio; ten Heggeler, Johanna M. A. G.; Gerdes, Victor E. A.; Hoek, Frans J.; Nagy, Thomas O. M.; Scholma, Jose; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Gans, Rijk O. B.; ten Cate, Hugo; Loos, Bruno G.

    2005-01-01

    Periodontitis may be a possible risk factor for atherosclerosis. The current pilot study explored arterial wall thickness and other variables associated with atherosclerosis in healthy subjects with and without periodontitis. Patients with moderate (N = 34) and severe periodontitis (N = 15) and

  19. White Matter Lesions, Carotid and Coronary Atherosclerosis in Late-Onset Depression and Healthy Controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devantier, Torben Albert; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Poulsen, Mikael Kjær

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral white matter lesions (WMLs) are more common in individuals with late-onset or late-life depression. It has been proposed that carotid atherosclerosis may predispose to WMLs by inducing cerebral hypoperfusion. This hemodynamic effect of carotid atherosclerosis could be importa...

  20. Predictors of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in rheumatoid arthritis in Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inderjeet Verma

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: In the present study, FMD and CIMT were impaired in RA, indicating endothelial dysfunction and accelerated atherosclerosis respectively. CRP, TNF-α, serum nitrite, DAS-28 and depleted EPC population predicted endothelial dysfunction. Age, IL-6, HDL, LDL and depleted EPC population predicted accelerated atherosclerosis.

  1. Atherosclerosis and liver inflammation induced by increased dietary cholesterol intake: A combined transcriptomics and metabolomics analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleemann, R.; Verschuren, L.; Erk, M.J. van; Nikolsky, Y.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Verheij, E.R.; Smilde, A.K.; Hendriks, H.F.J.; Zadelaar, A.S.M.; Smith, G.J.; Kaznacheev, V.; Nikolskaya, T.; Melnikov, A.; Hurt-Camejo, E.; Greef, J. van der; Ommen, B. van; Kooistra, T.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Increased dietary cholesterol intake is associated with atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis development requires a lipid and an inflammatory component. It is unclear where and how the inflammatory component develops. To assess the role of the liver in the evolution of inflammation, we

  2. Small animal positron emission tomography imaging and in vivo studies of atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hag, Anne Mette Fisker; Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Pedersen, Sune Folke

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a growing health challenge globally, and despite our knowledge of the disease has increased over the last couple of decades, many unanswered questions remain. As molecular imaging can be used to visualize, characterize and measure biological processes at the molecular and cellu...... knowledge obtained from in vivo positron emission tomography studies of atherosclerosis performed in small animals....

  3. Identifying novel genes for atherosclerosis through mouse-human comparative genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, XS; Ishimori, N; Korstanje, R; Rollins, J; Paigen, B

    Susceptibility to atherosclerosis is determined by both environmental and genetic factors. Its genetic determinants have been studied by use of quantitative- trait - locus ( QTL) analysis. So far, 21 atherosclerosis QTLs have been identified in the mouse: 7 in a high- fat - diet model only, 9 in a

  4. Biological signatures of asymptomatic extra- and intracranial atherosclerosis: the Barcelona-AsIA (Asymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cancio, Elena; Galán, Amparo; Dorado, Laura; Jiménez, Marta; Hernández, María; Millán, Mónica; Reverté, Silvia; Suñol, Anna; Barallat, Jaume; Massuet, Anna; Alzamora, Maria Teresa; Dávalos, Antonio; Arenillas, Juan Francisco

    2012-10-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) remains a challenge for stroke primary and secondary prevention. Molecular pathways involved in the development of ICAD from its asymptomatic stages are largely unknown. In our population-based study, we aimed to compare the risk factor and biomarker profiles associated with intracranial and extracranial asymptomatic cerebral atherosclerosis. The Asymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis (AsIA) study cohort includes a random sample population of 933 white subjects >50 years with a moderate to high vascular risk (based on REGICOR score) and without a history of stroke (64% males; mean age, 66 years). Carotid and intracranial atherosclerosis were screened by cervical and transcranial color-coded Duplex ultrasound, being moderate to severe stenoses confirmed by MR angiography. We registered clinical and anthropometric data and created a biobank with blood samples at baseline. A panel of biomarkers involved in atherothrombogenesis was determined: C-reactive protein, asymmetric-dimethylarginine, resistin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Insulin resistance was quantified by Homeostasis Model Assessment index. After multinomial regression analyses, male sex, hypertension, smoking, and alcoholic habits were independent risk factors of isolated extracranial atherosclerotic disease. Diabetes and metabolic syndrome conferred a higher risk for ICAD than for extracranial atherosclerotic disease. Moreover, metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance were independent risk factors of moderate to severe ICAD but were not risk factors of moderate to severe extracranial atherosclerotic disease. Regarding biomarkers, asymmetric-dimethylarginine was independently associated with isolated ICAD and resistin with combined ICAD-extracranial atherosclerotic disease. Our findings show distinct clinical and biological profiles in subclinical ICAD and extracranial atherosclerotic disease. Insulin resistance emerged as an important molecular

  5. Coronary, Carotid, and Lower-extremity Atherosclerosis and Their Interrelationship in Danish Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kay, Susan Due; Poulsen, Mikael Kjaer; Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Atherosclerosis is highly prevalent among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but has been demonstrated predominantly in non-European SLE cohorts and few investigations have included more than 1 imaging modality. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of atherosclerosis...... regression model, age (p Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC; p = 0.008) were significant independent risk factors for atherosclerosis at any vascular territory. CONCLUSION: Atherosclerosis is highly prevalent among Danish patients with SLE...

  6. Circulating Endothelial Microparticles: A Key Hallmark of Atherosclerosis Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshav Raj Paudel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The levels of circulating microparticles (MPs are raised in various cardiovascular diseases. Their increased level in plasma is regarded as a biomarker of alteration in vascular function. The prominent MPs present in blood are endothelial microparticles (EMPs described as complex submicron (0.1 to 1.0 μm vesicles like structure, released in response to endothelium cell activation or apoptosis. EMPs possess both physiological and pathological effects and may promote oxidative stress and vascular inflammation. EMPs release is triggered by inducer like angiotensin II, lipopolysaccharide, and hydrogen peroxide leading to the progression of atherosclerosis. However, there are multiple physiological pathways for EMPs generation like NADPH oxidase derived endothelial ROS formation, Rho kinase pathway, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Endothelial dysfunction is a key initiating event in atherosclerotic plaque formation. Atheroemboli, resulting from ruptured carotid plaques, is a major cause of stroke. Increasing evidence suggests that EMPs play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, acting as a marker of damage, either exacerbating disease progression or triggering a repair response. In this regard, it has been suggested that EMPs have the potential to act as biomarkers of disease status. This review aims to provide updated information of EMPs in relation to atherosclerosis pathogenesis.

  7. A clinically applicable adjuvant for an atherosclerosis vaccine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobiyama, Kouji; Vassallo, Melanie; Mitzi, Jessica; Winkels, Holger; Pei, Hong; Kimura, Takayuki; Miller, Jacqueline; Wolf, Dennis; Ley, Klaus

    2018-06-22

    Vaccination with MHC-II-restricted peptides from Apolipoprotein B (ApoB) with complete and incomplete Freund's adjuvant (CFA/IFA) is known to protect mice from atherosclerosis. This vaccination induces antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2c antibody responses and a robust CD4 T cell response in lymph nodes. However, CFA/IFA cannot be used in humans. To find a clinically applicable adjuvant, we tested the effect of vaccinating Apoe-deficient mice with ApoB peptide P6 (TGAYSNASSTESASY). In a broad screening experiment, Addavax, a squalene oil similar to MF59, was the only adjuvant that showed similar efficacy as CFA/IFA. This was confirmed in a confirmation experiment for both the aortic arch and whole aorta analyzed by en face analysis after atherosclerotic lesion staining. Mechanistically, restimulated peritoneal cells from mice immunized with P6 in Addavax released significant amounts of IL-10. Unlike P6 in CFA/IFA, vaccination with P6 in Addavax did not induce any detectable IgG1 or IgG2c antibodies to P6. These data suggest that squalene-based adjuvants such as MF59 are good candidate adjuvants for developing a clinically effective atherosclerosis vaccine. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Citrus Flavonoids as Regulators of Lipoprotein Metabolism and Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvihill, Erin E; Burke, Amy C; Huff, Murray W

    2016-07-17

    Citrus flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds with significant biological properties. This review summarizes recent advances in understanding the ability of citrus flavonoids to modulate lipid metabolism, other metabolic parameters related to the metabolic syndrome, and atherosclerosis. Citrus flavonoids, including naringenin, hesperitin, nobiletin, and tangeretin, have emerged as potential therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic dysregulation. Epidemiological studies reveal an association between the intake of citrus flavonoid-containing foods and a decreased incidence of cardiovascular disease. Studies in cell culture and animal models, as well as a limited number of clinical studies, reveal the lipid-lowering, insulin-sensitizing, antihypertensive, and anti-inflammatory properties of citrus flavonoids. In animal models, supplementation of rodent diets with citrus flavonoids prevents hepatic steatosis, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance primarily through inhibition of hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increased fatty acid oxidation. Citrus flavonoids blunt the inflammatory response in metabolically important tissues including liver, adipose, kidney, and the aorta. The mechanisms underlying flavonoid-induced metabolic regulation have not been completely established, although several potential targets have been identified. In mouse models, citrus flavonoids show marked suppression of atherogenesis through improved metabolic parameters as well as through direct impact on the vessel wall. Recent studies support a role for citrus flavonoids in the treatment of dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis, obesity, and atherosclerosis. Larger human studies examining dose, bioavailability, efficacy, and safety are required to promote the development of these promising therapeutic agents.

  9. Smoking and atherosclerosis: mechanisms of disease and new therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siasos, Gerasimos; Tsigkou, Vasiliki; Kokkou, Eleni; Oikonomou, Evangelos; Vavuranakis, Manolis; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Verveniotis, Alexis; Limperi, Maria; Genimata, Vasiliki; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    It has been clear that at least 1 billion adults worldwide are smokers and at least 700 million children are passive smokers at home. Smoking exerts a detrimental effect to many organ systems and is responsible for illnesses such as lung cancer, pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cancer of head and neck, cancer of the urinary and gastrointestinal tract, periodontal disease, cataract and arthritis. Additionally, smoking is an important modifiable risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease such as coronary artery disease, stable angina, acute coronary syndromes, sudden death, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, congestive heart failure, erectile dysfunction and aortic aneurysms via initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. A variety of studies has proved that cigarette smoking induces oxidative stress, vascular inflammation, platelet coagulation, vascular dysfunction and impairs serum lipid pro-file in both current and chronic smokers, active and passive smokers and results in detrimental effects on the cardiovascular system. The aim of this review is to depict the physical and biochemical properties of cigarette smoke and, furthermore, elucidate the main pathophysiological mechanisms of cigarette-induced atherosclerosis and overview the new therapeutic approaches for smoking cessation and augmentation of cardiovascular health.

  10. Telomere Length and the Cancer-Atherosclerosis Trade-Off.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivka C Stone

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern humans, the longest-living terrestrial mammals, display short telomeres and repressed telomerase activity in somatic tissues compared with most short-living small mammals. The dual trait of short telomeres and repressed telomerase might render humans relatively resistant to cancer compared with short-living small mammals. However, the trade-off for cancer resistance is ostensibly increased age-related degenerative diseases, principally in the form of atherosclerosis. In this communication, we discuss (a the genetics of human telomere length, a highly heritable complex trait that is influenced by genetic ancestry, sex, and paternal age at conception, (b how cancer might have played a role in the evolution of telomere biology across mammals, (c evidence that in modern humans telomere length is a determinant (rather than only a biomarker of cancer and atherosclerosis, and (d the potential influence of relatively recent evolutionary forces in fashioning the variation in telomere length across and within populations, and their likely lasting impact on major diseases in humans. Finally, we propose venues for future research on human telomere genetics in the context of its potential role in shaping the modern human lifespan.

  11. Subclinical thyroid dysfunction and risk of carotid atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosu Kim

    Full Text Available The effect of subclinical thyroid dysfunction on vascular atherosclerosis remains uncertain. The objective of this study was to elucidate the association between sustained subclinical thyroid dysfunction and carotid plaques, which are an early surrogate marker of systemic atherosclerosis.The study included 21,342 adults with consistent thyroid hormonal status on serial thyroid function tests (TFTs and carotid artery duplex ultrasonography at a health screening center between 2007 and 2014. The effect of subclinical thyroid dysfunction on baseline carotid plaques and newly developed carotid plaques during 5-year follow-up was determined by logistic regression analyses and GEE (Generalized Estimating Equations, respectively.Carotid plaques were more common in the subclinical hypothyroidism (55.6% than the euthyroidism (47.8% at baseline. However, in multivariable analysis, thyroid status was not a significant risk for the carotid plaques at baseline. Instead, traditional cardiovascular risk factors, such as age (P <0.001, systolic blood pressure (P = 0.023, fasting blood glucose (P = 0.030, and creatinine (P = 0.012 were associated with baseline carotid plaques in subclinical hypothyroidism. In longitudinal analyses of subjects who were followed up for more than 5 years, there was no significant difference in the cumulative incidence of new carotid plaques according to time between subjects with subclinical hypothyroidism and those with euthyroidism (P = 0.392.Sustained subclinical thyroid dysfunction did not affect the baseline or development of carotid plaques in healthy individuals.

  12. Aortic smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis in relation to atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, I.J.

    1989-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PG) are implicated in atherogenesis by their effects on tissue permeability and cell proliferation and their interaction with plasma low density lipoproteins. Using the pigeon model in which an atherosclerosis-susceptible (WC) and -resistant (SR) breed can be compared, PG synthesis by cultured aortic smooth muscle cells was examined by the use of [ 35 S]-sodium sulfate and [ 3 H]-serine or [ 3 H]-glucosamine as labeling precursors. In both SR and WC cells, the majority of newly synthesized PG were secreted into the media. Chondroitin sulfate (CS) PG and dermatan sulfate (DS) PG were the major PG produced. Total PG production was consistently lower in WC compared to SR cultures due in part to reduce PG synthesis but also to degradation of newly synthesized PG. Since increased DS-PG accompanines atherosclerosis progression, experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that macrophages modulate smooth muscle cell metabolism to cause increase DS-PG production. Cultured WC aortic smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1 and the production of PG examined. Increasing concentration of conditioned media from both types of macrophages caused increased incorporation of 35 S-sulfate into secreted PG, but no change in cell-associated PG. Lipopolysaccharide activation of P388D1 cells enhanced the effect

  13. Wine, alcohol and atherosclerosis: clinical evidences and mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.L. da Luz

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease which may cause obstructions of the coronary, cerebral and peripheral arteries. It is typically multifactorial, most often dependent on risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, smoking, hypertension, sedentarism, and obesity. It is the single main cause of death in most developed countries due to myocardial infarction, angina, sudden death, and heart failure. Several epidemiological studies suggest that moderate alcohol intake, especially red wine, decrease cardiac mortality due to atherosclerosis. The alcohol effect is described by a J curve, suggesting that moderate drinkers may benefit while abstainers and heavy drinkers are at higher risk. Experimental studies indicate that most beneficial effects of drinking are attributable to flavonoids that are present in red wine, purple grape juice and several fruits and vegetables. The mechanisms include antiplatelet actions, increases in high-density lipoprotein, antioxidation, reduced endothelin-1 production, and increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression which causes augmented nitric oxide production by endothelial cells. These findings lead to the concept that moderate red wine drinking, in the absence of contraindications, may be beneficial to patients who are at risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular events. Moreover, a diet based on fruits and vegetables containing flavonoids may be even more beneficial.

  14. Advanced Imaging of Intracranial Atherosclerosis: Lessons from Interventional Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davor Pavlin-Premrl

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial atherosclerosis is a major cause of ischemic stroke. Patients with a high degree of stenosis have a significant rate of stroke despite medical therapy. Two randomized trials of stenting have failed to show benefit. Improving periprocedural complication rates and patient selection may improve stenting outcomes. Fractional flow reserve (FFR, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS, and optical coherence tomography (OCT are intravascular imaging techniques employed to improve patient selection and stent placement in interventional cardiology. FFR has been shown to improve cardiovascular outcomes when used in patient selection for intervention. Studies of FFR in intracranial atherosclerosis show that the measure may predict which plaques lead to stroke. IVUS is used in cardiology to quantify stenosis and assist with stent placement. Comparisons with histology show that it can reliably characterize plaques. Several case reports of IVUS in intracranial arteries show the technique to be feasible and indicate it may improve stent placement. Plaque characteristics on IVUS may help identify vulnerable plaques. In interventional cardiology, OCT provides excellent visualization of vessel geometry and is useful periprocedurally. Images reliably identify thin-capped fibroatheromas and other plaque features. Case reports indicate that OCT is safe for use in intracranial arteries. OCT can be used to identify perforator vessels and so may be useful in avoiding perforator strokes, a common complication of stenting. Plaque characteristics on OCT may be useful in patient selection.

  15. Trajectories of neighborhood poverty and associations with subclinical atherosclerosis and associated risk factors: the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Emily T; Diez Roux, Ana V; Carnethon, Mercedes; Lutsey, Pamela L; Ni, Hanyu; O'Meara, Ellen S

    2010-05-15

    The authors used data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and latent trajectory class modeling to determine patterns of neighborhood poverty over 20 years (1980-2000 residential history questionnaires were geocoded and linked to US Census data). Using these patterns, the authors examined 1) whether trajectories of neighborhood poverty were associated with differences in the amount of subclinical atherosclerosis (common carotid intimal-media thickness) and 2) associated risk factors (body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, current smoking) at baseline (January 2000-August 2002). The authors found evidence of 5 stable trajectory groups with differing levels of neighborhood poverty ( approximately 6%, 12%, 20%, 30%, and 45%) and 1 group with 29% poverty in 1980 and approximately 11% in 2000. Mostly for women, higher cumulative neighborhood poverty was generally significantly associated with worse cardiovascular outcomes. Trends generally persisted after adjustment for adulthood socioeconomic position and race/ethnicity, although they were no longer statistically significant. Among women who had moved during the 20 years, the long-term measure had stronger associations with outcomes (except smoking) than a single, contemporaneous measure. Results indicate that cumulative 20-year exposure to neighborhood poverty is associated with greater cardiovascular risk for women. In residentially mobile populations, single-point-in-time measures underestimate long-term effects.

  16. Effects of intra-abdominal sepsis on atherosclerosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaynar, Ata Murat; Yende, Sachin; Zhu, Lin; Frederick, Daniel R; Chambers, Robin; Burton, Christine L; Carter, Melinda; Stolz, Donna Beer; Agostini, Brittani; Gregory, Alyssa D; Nagarajan, Shanmugam; Shapiro, Steven D; Angus, Derek C

    2014-09-03

    Sepsis and other infections are associated with late cardiovascular events. Although persistent inflammation is implicated, a causal relationship has not been established. We tested whether sepsis causes vascular inflammation and accelerates atherosclerosis. We performed prospective, randomized animal studies at a university research laboratory involving adult male ApoE-deficient (ApoE-/-) and young C57B/L6 wild-type (WT) mice. In the primary study conducted to determine whether sepsis accelerates atherosclerosis, we fed ApoE-/- mice (N = 46) an atherogenic diet for 4 months and then performed cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), followed by antibiotic therapy and fluid resuscitation or a sham operation. We followed mice for up to an additional 5 months and assessed atheroma in the descending aorta and root of the aorta. We also exposed 32 young WT mice to CLP or sham operation and followed them for 5 days to determine the effects of sepsis on vascular inflammation. ApoE-/- mice that underwent CLP had reduced activity during the first 14 days (38% reduction compared to sham; P < 0.001) and sustained weight loss compared to the sham-operated mice (-6% versus +9% change in weight after CLP or sham surgery to 5 months; P < 0.001). Despite their weight loss, CLP mice had increased atheroma (46% by 3 months and 41% increase in aortic surface area by 5 months; P = 0.03 and P = 0.004, respectively) with increased macrophage infiltration into atheroma as assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy (0.52 relative fluorescence units (rfu) versus 0.97 rfu; P = 0.04). At 5 months, peritoneal cultures were negative; however, CLP mice had elevated serum levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-10 (each at P < 0.05). WT mice that underwent CLP had increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 in the aortic lumen versus sham at 24 hours (P = 0.01) that persisted at 120 hours (P = 0.006). Inflammatory and adhesion genes (tumor necrosis factor α, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2

  17. [Homocystein serum levels and lipid parameters in children with atherosclerosis risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierakowska-Fijałek, Anna; Kaczmarek, Piotr; Pokoca, Lech; Smorag, Ireneusz; Wosik-Erenbek, Marzenna; Baj, Zbigniew

    2007-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is a disease of adult patients, however, it begins in childhood and progresses from fatty streaks to raised lesions in arteries in adolescence and young adults. Clinical manifestation of atherosclerosis in adulthood depends on the risk factors such as: lipid disorders, obesity, hypertension, smoking habits and family history of CHD. High serum homocysteine concentration is increasingly recognised as a new risk factor for atherosclerosis and other vascular diseases. Atherogenic effect of homocystein is related to cytotoxin action on the endothelial cells and their function. The aim of this study was to estimate relations between the homocysteine serum concentration and the lipid levels in children with atherosclerosis risk factors. The study was carried out on 48 children with atherosclerosis risk factors. The control group consisted of 25 healthy childrens. Total cholesterol (TC), Triglycerides (TG), HDL-C, LDL-C were determined by enzymatic method. Concentration of homocysteine was estimated by immunoenzymatic method (ELISA). Obesity, lipid disorders, and hypertension were the most frequent risk factors in the investigated children. Statistically significant higher concentration of TC, LDL-C, TG and lower HDL-C were observed in children with atherosclerosis risk factors. No significant differences in homocystein concentration were observed in the investigated groups, but homocystein concentration was significantly higher in group of children with atherosclerosis risk factors. We observed that increased number of the risk factors is followed by high homocystein concentration in the serum.

  18. A review of plant-based compounds and medicinal plants effective on atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnoosh Sedighi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is one of the most important cardiovascular diseases that involve vessels through the development of fatty streaks and plaques. Plant-based compounds can help treat or prevent atherosclerosis through affecting the involved factors. The main purpose of this review article is to investigate and introduce medicinal plants and their potential activities regarding antioxidant properties, effective on lipids level and development of plaque, atherosclerosis, and progression of atherosclerosis as well as the development of cardiovascular disease and ischemia. To search for the relevant articles indexed in Information Sciences Institute, PubMed, Scientific Information Database, IranMedex, and Scopus between 1980 and 2013, with further emphasis on those indexed from 2004 to 2015, we used these search terms: atherosclerosis, antioxidant, cholesterol, inflammation, and the medicinal plants below. Then, the articles with inclusion criteria were used in the final analysis of the findings. Plant-based active compounds, including phenols, flavonoids, and antioxidants, can be effective on atherosclerosis predisposing factors and hence in preventing this disease and associated harmful complications, especially through reducing cholesterol, preventing increase in free radicals, and ultimately decreasing vascular plaque and vascular resistance. Hence, medicinal plants can contribute to treating atherosclerosis and preventing its progression through reducing cholesterolemia, free radicals, inflammation, vascular resistance, and certain enzymes. They, alone or in combination with hypocholesterolemic drugs, can therefore be useful for patients with hyperlipidemia and its complications.

  19. Osteocalcin expression by circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with coronary atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gössl, Mario; Mödder, Ulrike I; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Lerman, Amir; Khosla, Sundeep

    2008-10-14

    This study was designed to test whether patients with coronary atherosclerosis have increases in circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) expressing an osteogenic phenotype. Increasing evidence indicates a link between bone and the vasculature, and bone marrow and circulating osteogenic cells have been identified by staining for the osteoblastic marker, osteocalcin (OCN). Endothelial progenitor cells contribute to vascular repair, but repair of vascular injury may result in calcification. Using cell surface markers (CD34, CD133, kinase insert domain receptor [KDR]) to identify EPCs, we examined whether patients with coronary atherosclerosis had increases in the percentage of EPCs expressing OCN. We studied 72 patients undergoing invasive coronary assessment: control patients (normal coronary arteries and no endothelial dysfunction, n = 21) versus 2 groups with coronary atherosclerosis-early coronary atherosclerosis (normal coronary arteries but with endothelial dysfunction, n = 22) and late coronary atherosclerosis (severe, multivessel coronary artery disease, n = 29). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were analyzed using flow cytometry. Compared with control patients, patients with early or late coronary atherosclerosis had significant increases (approximately 2-fold) in the percentage of CD34+/KDR+ and CD34+/CD133+/KDR+ cells costaining for OCN. Even larger increases were noted in the early and late coronary atherosclerosis patients in the percentage of CD34+/CD133-/KDR+ cells costaining for OCN (5- and 2-fold, p < 0.001 and 0.05, respectively). A higher percentage of EPCs express OCN in patients with coronary atherosclerosis compared with subjects with normal endothelial function and no structural coronary artery disease. These findings have potential implications for the mechanisms of vascular calcification and for the development of novel markers for coronary atherosclerosis.

  20. Recent advances in lipoprotein and atherosclerosis: A nutrigenomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López, Sergio

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a disease in which multiple factors contribute to the degeneration of the vascular wall. Many risk factors have been identified as having influence on the progression of atherosclerosis among them, the type of diet. Multifactorial interaction among lipoproteins, vascular wall cells, and inflammatory mediators has been recognised as the basis of atherogenesis. Dietary intake affects lipoprotein concentration and composition providing risk or protection at several stages of atherosclerosis. More intriguingly, it has been demonstrated that the extent to which each lipid or lipoprotein is associated with cardiovascular disease depends on the time to last meal; thus, postprandial lipoproteins, main lipoproteins in blood after a high-fat meal, have been shown to strongly influence atherogenesis. As a complex biological process, the full cellular and molecular characterization of atherosclerosis derived by diet, calls for application of the newly developing “omics” techniques of analysis. This review will considered recent studies using high-throughput technologies and a nutrigenomic approach to reveal the patho-physiological effects that the fasting and postprandial lipoproteins may exert on the vascular wall.La aterosclerosis es una enfermedad en la que múltiples factores, entre los que se encuentra la dieta, contribuyen a la degradación de la pared vascular. En la etiología de la aterogénesis son determinantes las lipoproteínas plasmáticas y los distintos tipos celulares de la pared vascular, incluyendo una respuesta inflamatoria. La ingesta de alimentos afecta la concentración y composición de las lipoproteínas, ejerciendo un papel de riesgo o protector durante las diferentes etapas del proceso aterosclerótico. Es importante destacar que la naturaleza de las lipoproteínas y por lo tanto su papel en la enfermedad cardiovascular, también depende del tiempo transcurrido entre comidas. Por ejemplo, las lipoprote

  1. Is zinc deficiency a risk factor for atherosclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, John H; Kwun, In-Sook

    2004-02-01

    The development of atherosclerosis is influenced by genetic, lifestyle and nutritional risk factors. Zn and metallothionein deficiency can enhance oxidative-stress-related signalling processes in endothelial cells, and since changes in available plasma Zn may affect the Zn status of the endothelium, Zn deficiency could be a risk factor for IHD. Although the association of Zn with many proteins is essential for their function, three key signalling processes are highlighted as being principal targets for the effect of Zn deficiency: the activation of NF-kappaB, the activation of caspase enzymes and the signalling of NO. The need to develop a reliable indicator of Zn status is critical to any epidemiological approach for studying the relationship between Zn status and disease incidence. Studies using appropriate animal models and investigating how the plasma Zn pool influences endothelial intracellular labile Zn would be helpful in appreciating the importance of Zn deficiency in atherogenesis.

  2. [Optimization of organizational approaches to management of patients with atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarash, L S; Barbarash, O L; Artamonova, G V; Sumin, A N

    2014-01-01

    Despite undoubted achievements of modern cardiology in prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, cardiologists, neurologists, and vascular surgeons are still facing severe stenotic atherosclerotic lesions in different vascular regions, both symptomatic and asymptomatic. As a rule hemodynamically significant stenoses of different locations are found after development of acute vascular events. In this regard, active detection of arterial stenoses localized in different areas just at primary contact of patients presenting with symptoms of ischemia of various locations with care providers appears to be crucial. Further monitoring of these stenoses is also important. The article is dedicated to innovative organizational approaches to provision of healthcare to patients suffering from circulatory system diseases that have contributed to improvement of demographic situation in Kuzbass.

  3. Atherosclerosis of the carotid artery: evaluation by magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildy, K S; Yuan, C; Tsuruda, J S; Ferguson, M S; Wen, N; Subramaniam, D S; Strandness, D E

    1996-01-01

    Carotid artery atherosclerotic plaques (APs) can lead to brain ischemia, an event shown to correlate with both the degree of stenosis and the composition of the AP. Currently, accurate estimates of stenosis can be obtained by either x-ray angiography or three-dimensional time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Our purpose was to determine whether three-dimensional TOF MRA images could also provide information on plaque location, morphology, and composition. Seven pre-endarterectomy patients underwent three-dimensional TOF MRA. After endarterectomy, plaque histology was evaluated. Three-dimensional TOF MRA images contained sufficient soft tissue contrast to differentiate the plaques from the surrounding tissues in all cases. Estimation of plaque morphology had 80% correlation with histology. Finally, intraplaque hemorrhage and calcification were deplicted as regions of moderately high and very low intensity, respectively. These preliminary results suggest that three-dimensional TOF MRA may be useful in studying the development and progression of carotid atherosclerosis.

  4. Epigenetic regulation of vascular smooth muscle cell function in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Hannes M; Kahles, Florian K; Bruemmer, Dennis

    2013-04-01

    Epigenetics involve heritable and acquired changes in gene transcription that occur independently of the DNA sequence. Epigenetic mechanisms constitute a hierarchic upper-level of transcriptional control through complex modifications of chromosomal components and nuclear structures. These modifications include, for example, DNA methylation or post-translational modifications of core histones; they are mediated by various chromatin-modifying enzymes; and ultimately they define the accessibility of a transcriptional complex to its target DNA. Integrating epigenetic mechanisms into the pathophysiologic concept of complex and multifactorial diseases such as atherosclerosis may significantly enhance our understanding of related mechanisms and provide promising therapeutic approaches. Although still in its infancy, intriguing scientific progress has begun to elucidate the role of epigenetic mechanisms in vascular biology, particularly in the control of smooth muscle cell phenotypes. In this review, we will summarize epigenetic pathways in smooth muscle cells, focusing on mechanisms involved in the regulation of vascular remodeling.

  5. Homocystein and carotid atherosclerosis in chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubomirova, M; Tzoncheva, A; Petrova, J; Kiperova, B

    2007-10-01

    Since total homocysteine (Hcy) is markedly elevated in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF), it has been presented as potential factor contributing to the high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in CRF. The aim of the study was to examine the significance of elevated Hcy and other cardiovascular risk factors for carotid atherosclerosis in patients with CRF. Fifty six patients 16-M, 40-F, average age 58+/-14.55, creatinine clearance 39.19+/-10.11 ml/min were examined. In addition, 20 control healthy subjects were examined. The association of Hcy levels and classic risk factors for atherosclerosis with common carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) was examined. B-mode ultrasound measurement of carotid IMT was performed in 56 hypertensive pts with CRF (glomerular filtration rate>20 ml/min and 0.05). Significant predictors for IMT were age (r=0.358, p<0.04), duration of hypertension (r=0.395, p=0.023), diabetes duration (r=0.343, p<0.02), as well as duration of CRF (r=0.324, p<0.006). There was a negative correlation between IMT and glomerular filtration rate assessed by creatinine clearance (r=-0.303, p<0.003). Renal function, described by creatinine clearance was the strongest determinant for Hcy levels (r=-0.332, p<0.008). Increased IMT was estimated in pts with CRF compared to healthy controls (0.74+/-0.10 vs 0.59+/-0.10, p<0.001). We found association between Hcy and carotid IMT ( r=0.344, p<0.015). No consistent association was found between IMT and other specific for CRF cardiovascular risk factors. The study suggests that patients with mild renal failure have increased IMT of the common carotid artery and that elevated plasma Hcy level in CRF is associated with carotid intima- media thickening.

  6. Toll-Like Receptor-2 Mediates Diet and/or Pathogen Associated Atherosclerosis: Proteomic Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Madan, Monika; Amar, Salomon

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating evidence implicates a fundamental link between the immune system and atherosclerosis. Toll-like receptors are principal sensors of the innate immune system. Here we report an assessment of the role of the TLR2 pathway in atherosclerosis associated with a high-fat diet and/or bacteria in ApoE(+/-) mice.To explore the role of TLR2 in inflammation- and infection-associated atherosclerosis, 10 week-old ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/+), ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/-) and ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(-/-) mice were fed eit...

  7. Significantly increased risk of carotid atherosclerosis with arsenic exposure and polymorphisms in arsenic metabolism genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Lien, Li-Ming; Chung, Wen-Ting; Hsieh, Fang-I; Hsieh, Pei-Fan; Wu, Meei-Maan; Tseng, Hung-Pin; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2011-01-01

    Individual susceptibility to arsenic-induced carotid atherosclerosis might be associated with genetic variations in arsenic metabolism. The purpose of this study is to explore the interaction effect on risk of carotid atherosclerosis between arsenic exposure and risk genotypes of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), arsenic (+3) methyltransferase (As3MT), and glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) and omega 2 (GSTO2). A community-based case-control study was conducted in northeastern Taiwan to investigate the arsenic metabolic-related genetic susceptibility to carotid atherosclerosis. In total, 863 subjects, who had been genotyped and for whom the severity of carotid atherosclerosis had been determined, were included in the present study. Individual well water was collected and arsenic concentration determined using hydride generation combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The result showed that a significant dose-response trend (P=0.04) of carotid atherosclerosis risk associated with increasing arsenic concentration. Non-significant association between genetic polymorphisms of PNP Gly51Ser, Pro57Pro, As3MT Met287Thr, GSTO1 Ala140Asp, and GSTO2 A-183G and the risk for development of carotid atherosclerosis were observed. However, the significant interaction effect on carotid atherosclerosis risk was found for arsenic exposure (>50 μg/l) and the haplotypes of PNP (p=0.0115). A marked elevated risk of carotid atherosclerosis was observed in subjects with arsenic exposure of >50 μg/l in drinking water and those who carried the PNP A-T haplotype and at least either of the As3MT risk polymorphism or GSTO risk haplotypes (OR, 6.43; 95% CI, 1.79-23.19). In conclusion, arsenic metabolic genes, PNP, As3MT, and GSTO, may exacerbate the formation of atherosclerosis in individuals with high levels of arsenic concentration in well water (>50 μg/l). - Highlights: →Arsenic metabolic genes might be associated with carotid atherosclerosis. → A case

  8. Therapeutic implications of chemokine-mediated pathways in atherosclerosis: realistic perspectives and utopias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolakis, Stavros; Amanatidou, Virginia; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2010-09-01

    Current perspectives on the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis strongly support the involvement of inflammatory mediators in the establishment and progression of atherosclerostic lesions. Chemokine-mediated mechanisms are potent regulators of such processes by orchestrating the interactions of inflammatory cellular components of the peripheral blood with cellular components of the arterial wall. The increasing evidence supporting the role of chemokine pathways in atherosclerosis renders chemokine ligands and their receptors potential therapeutic targets. In the following review, we aim to highlight the special structural and functional features of chemokines and their receptors in respect to their roles in atherosclerosis, and examine to what extent available data can be applied in disease management practices.

  9. Significantly increased risk of carotid atherosclerosis with arsenic exposure and polymorphisms in arsenic metabolism genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Yi-Chen [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wusing St., Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Lien, Li-Ming [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Neurology, Shin Kong WHS Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chung, Wen-Ting [Department of Neurology, Wanfang Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Fang-I; Hsieh, Pei-Fan [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wusing St., Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Wu, Meei-Maan [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wusing St., Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Basic Medicine, College of Medicine, Fu-Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Hung-Pin [Department of Neurology, Lotung Poh-Ai Hospital, I-Lan, Taiwan (China); Chiou, Hung-Yi, E-mail: hychiou@tmu.edu.tw [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wusing St., Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chien-Jen [Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2011-08-15

    Individual susceptibility to arsenic-induced carotid atherosclerosis might be associated with genetic variations in arsenic metabolism. The purpose of this study is to explore the interaction effect on risk of carotid atherosclerosis between arsenic exposure and risk genotypes of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), arsenic (+3) methyltransferase (As3MT), and glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) and omega 2 (GSTO2). A community-based case-control study was conducted in northeastern Taiwan to investigate the arsenic metabolic-related genetic susceptibility to carotid atherosclerosis. In total, 863 subjects, who had been genotyped and for whom the severity of carotid atherosclerosis had been determined, were included in the present study. Individual well water was collected and arsenic concentration determined using hydride generation combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The result showed that a significant dose-response trend (P=0.04) of carotid atherosclerosis risk associated with increasing arsenic concentration. Non-significant association between genetic polymorphisms of PNP Gly51Ser, Pro57Pro, As3MT Met287Thr, GSTO1 Ala140Asp, and GSTO2 A-183G and the risk for development of carotid atherosclerosis were observed. However, the significant interaction effect on carotid atherosclerosis risk was found for arsenic exposure (>50 {mu}g/l) and the haplotypes of PNP (p=0.0115). A marked elevated risk of carotid atherosclerosis was observed in subjects with arsenic exposure of >50 {mu}g/l in drinking water and those who carried the PNP A-T haplotype and at least either of the As3MT risk polymorphism or GSTO risk haplotypes (OR, 6.43; 95% CI, 1.79-23.19). In conclusion, arsenic metabolic genes, PNP, As3MT, and GSTO, may exacerbate the formation of atherosclerosis in individuals with high levels of arsenic concentration in well water (>50 {mu}g/l). - Highlights: {yields}Arsenic metabolic genes might be associated with carotid atherosclerosis. {yields

  10. Factors of health in the protection against death and cardiovascular disease among adults with subclinical atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    While cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention traditionally emphasizes risk-factor control, recent evidence also supports the promotion of "health-factors" associated with cardiovascular wellness. However, whether such health-factors exist among adults with advanced subclinical atherosclerosis is un...

  11. Genetic and Pharmacological Inhibition of TREM-1 Limits the Development of Experimental Atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joffre, Jeremie; Potteaux, Stephane; Zeboudj, Lynda; Boufenzer, Amir; Laurans, Ludivine; Esposito, Bruno; Vandestienne, Marie; de Jager, SCA; Henique, Carole; Zlatanova, Ivana; Taleb, Soraya; Bruneval, Patrick; Tedgui, Alain; Mallat, Ziad; Gibot, Sebastien; Ait-Oufella, Hafid

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Innate immune responses activated through myeloid cells contribute to the initiation, progression, and complications of atherosclerosis in experimental models. However, the critical upstream pathways that link innate immune activation to foam cell formation are still poorly identified.

  12. Basic mechanisms in intracranial large-artery atherosclerosis: advances and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenillas, Juan F; Alvarez-Sabín, José

    2005-01-01

    Intracranial large-artery atherosclerosis is a major cause of ischemic stroke worldwide. Patients affected by this disease are at a high risk of suffering recurrent ischemic events despite antithrombotic therapy. Progression and a greater extent of intracranial atherosclerosis imply a higher risk for recurrence. Studies performed by our group in patients with symptomatic intracranial large-artery atherosclerosis have shown that: (1) C-reactive protein predicts its progression and recurrence, suggesting that inflammation may play a deleterious role in this condition; (2) a high level of the anti-angiogenic endostatin is also associated with a progressive and recurrent intracranial atherosclerosis, which might support a beneficial role for angiogenesis in this group of patients; and (3) elevated lipoprotein(a) concentration and diabetes mellitus characterize those patients with a higher number of intracranial stenoses. 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel

  13. Contrasting effect of fish oil supplementation on the development of atherosclerosis in murine models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zampolli, Antonella; Bysted, Anette; Leth, Torben

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Increased fish oil intake is associated with protection against coronary heart disease and sudden death, while effects on atherosclerosis are controversial. We explored the effects of supplementing fish oil (rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, PUFA) or corn oil (rich in n-6 PUFA......) in two different models of atherosclerosis. Methods and Results: Sixty-three low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (LDLR-/-) mice and sixty-nine apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE(-/-)) mice were fed diets without supplementations or supplemented with either 1% fish oil or 1% corn oil. In apo......E(-/-) mice, neither fish oil nor corn oil had any major impact on plasma lipids or atherosclerosis. In LDLR-/- mice, conversely, the fish oil and the corn oil group had lower levels of LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides and had lesser atherosclerosis in the aortic root and in the entire aorta (P

  14. Association between the surfactant protein D (SFTPD) gene and subclinical carotid artery atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Grith L; Bladbjerg, Else Marie; Steffensen, Rudi

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a defense collectin with inflammation-modulating properties. SP-D deficiency inhibits atherosclerosis in vivo, and the circulatory SP-D levels have been previously associated with cardiovascular disease mortality. We hypothesized that plasma SP-D (p......SP-D) and SP-D gene (SFTPD) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are risk factors for atherosclerosis. METHODS: We evaluated individuals who were all 60 years old and participated in The Glostrup Population Study. Subclinical atherosclerosis was diagnosed based on the ultrasonographic measurement of intima......: The results do not support that pSP-D levels influence the development of subclinical atherosclerosis. However, the SFTPD SNP data support previous observations from animal studies that SP-D plays a role in the etiology of atherosclerotic disease development. The nominal significant effects are likely...

  15. Links between cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis in postmenopausal women: serum lipids or atherosclerosis per se?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Y Z; Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Alexandersen, P

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological observations suggest links between osteoporosis and risk of acute cardiovascular events and vice versa. Whether the two clinical conditions are linked by common pathogenic factors or atherosclerosis per se remains incompletely understood. We investigated whether serum lipids...

  16. [Potential protective role of nitric oxide and Hsp70 linked to functional foods in the atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Alejandra B; Manucha, Walter

    Atherosclerosis, one of the main pathologic entities considered epidemic and a worldwide public health problem, is currently under constant review as regards its basic determining mechanisms and therapeutic possibilities. In this regard, all patients afflicted with the disease exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation. Interestingly, nitric oxide - a known vasoactive messenger gas - has been closely related to the inflammatory, oxidative and mitochondrial dysfunctional process that characterizes atherosclerosis. In addition, it has recently been demonstrated that alterations in the bioavailability of nitric oxide would induce the expression of heat shock proteins. This agrees with the use of functional foods as a strategy to prevent both vascular aging and the development of atherosclerosis. Finally, a greater knowledge regarding the mechanisms implied in the development of atherosclerosis will enable proposing new and possible hygiene, health and therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Kidney Measures with Diabetes and Hypertension on Cardiovascular Disease : The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexander, Nadine; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Sang, Yingying; Ballew, Shoshana; Mahmoodi, Bakhtawar K.; Astor, Brad C.; Coresh, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Background: Whether the association of chronic kidney disease (CKD) with cardiovascular risk differs based on diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HTN) status remains unanswered. Methods: We investigated 11,050 participants from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (fourth examination

  18. Atherosclerosis in chronic hepatitis C virus patients with and without liver cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Abd El-Khalik Barakat

    2017-06-01

    The echocardiographic assessment of EpFT and the carotid Doppler assessment of CIMT may provide appropriate and simple screening markers for subclinical atherosclerosis and cardiovascular risk in chronic HCV patients with and without cirrhosis.

  19. Murine Norovirus 4 (MNV-4 Infections Trigger Various Effects on Atherosclerosis Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafeezul Mohamed

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Murine norovirus (MNV infection can cause morbidity and mortality to immune compromised mice, especially colonies in research laboratory. MNV also can infect and propagates in macrophages and dendritic cells which trigger atherosclerosis development through the accumulation of these cells followed by the formation of foam cells. Recently, MNV-4 infection was associated with an increase in aortic sinus lesion size in LDLR (low-density lipoprotein receptor and ApoE (Apolipoprotein E deficient mice, both are well established mouse models for atherosclerosis research. Therefore, this review is intended to summarize the impacts of MNV infection in these two mouse models of atherosclerosis. The findings from all the related studies are important in understanding the fundamental effect of MNV infection on atherosclerosis development. In addition, this information could provide insight to researchers on the evaluation to eliminate MNV infection in research facility to avoid any unintended effect in their research, particularly in-vivo studies involving mice.

  20. Imaging Atherosclerosis with Hybrid Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of atherosclerosis could potentially move patient management towards individualized triage, treatment, and followup. The newly introduced combined positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system could emerge as a key player in this context. Both...

  1. Effects of catechins and caffeine on the development of atherosclerosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Litong; Nagai, Izumi; Gao, Ying; Matsushima, Yoshibumi; Kawai, Yoshichika; Sayama, Kazutoshi

    2017-10-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the diseases related to metabolic syndrome which is caused by obesity. Previous reports have shown that green tea and its components have anti-obesity effect. We examined whether catechins and caffeine can prevent the development of atherosclerosis by oral administration, singly or in combination to the atherosclerosis model mice. Results demonstrated that the number of atherosclerotic regions in the aorta was significantly reduced by the combined treatment, and the atherosclerotic area was also improved. Serum HDL-C increased by caffeine single treatment, but no effect on the TG and TC by any treatments. Moreover, ECG illuviated to atheromatous lesions in aorta and the illuviation was enhanced by caffeine. The mRNA expression levels of LOX-1 and TNF-α showed a tendency to suppress by the combined treatment. These results indicated that the combined administration of catechins and caffeine has the inhibitory effect on the development of atherosclerosis in mice.

  2. Abdominal adiposity largely explains associations between insulin resistance, hyperglycemia and subclinical atherosclerosis: the NEO study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gast, K.B.; Smit, J.W.A.; Heijer, M. den; Middeldorp, S.; Rippe, R.C.; Cessie, S. le; Koning, E.J. de; Jukema, J.W.; Rabelink, T.J.; Roos, A. de; Rosendaal, F.R.; Mutsert, R. de; Assendelft, P.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The relative importance of insulin resistance and hyperglycemia to the development of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Furthermore, adiposity may be responsible for observed associations. Our aim was to study the relative contributions of adiposity, insulin resistance and hyperglycemia to

  3. Abdominal adiposity largely explains associations between insulin resistance, hyperglycemia and subclinical atherosclerosis: the NEO study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gast, Karin B.; Smit, Johannes W. A.; den Heijer, Martin; Middeldorp, Saskia; Rippe, Ralph C. A.; le Cessie, Saskia; de Koning, Eelco J. P.; Jukema, J. W.; Rabelink, Ton J.; de Roos, Albert; Rosendaal, Frits R.; de Mutsert, Renée; Rosendaal, F. R.; de Mutsert, R.; Rabelink, T. J.; Smit, J. W. A.; Romijn, J. A.; Rabe, K. F.; de Roos, A.; le Cessie, S.; Hiemstra, P. S.; Kloppenburg, M.; Huizinga, T. W. J.; Pijl, H.; Tamsma, J. T.; de Koning, E. J. P.; Assendelft, W. J. J.; Reitsma, P. H.; van Dijk, K. Willems; de Vries, A. P. J.; Lamb, H. J.; Jazet, I. M.; Dekkers, O. M.; Biermasz, N. R.; Cobbaert, C. M.; Heijer, M. den; Dekker, J. M.; Penninx, B. W.

    2013-01-01

    The relative importance of insulin resistance and hyperglycemia to the development of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Furthermore, adiposity may be responsible for observed associations. Our aim was to study the relative contributions of adiposity, insulin resistance and hyperglycemia to

  4. Disruption of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 in macrophages decreases chemokine gene expression and atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ai, Ding; Jiang, Hongfeng; Westerterp, Marit; Murphy, Andrew J.; Wang, Mi; Ganda, Anjali; Abramowicz, Sandra; Welch, Carrie; Almazan, Felicidad; Zhu, Yi; Miller, Yury I.; Tall, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitor, rapamycin, has been shown to decrease atherosclerosis, even while increasing plasma low-density lipoprotein levels. This suggests an antiatherogenic effect possibly mediated by the modulation of inflammatory responses in atherosclerotic plaques.

  5. A study of the association of acanthosis nigricans with subclinical atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Guevara-Gutiérrez

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Acanthosis nigricans is a skin marker for metabolic disturbances and is also associated with carotid atherosclerosis, a finding which is not well documented. We propose that individuals with acanthosis nigricans should be routinely evaluated for these cardiovascular risks.

  6. Premature subclinical atherosclerosis in children and young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Anna-Helene; Fuhlbrigge, Robert C; Karup Pedersen, Freddy

    2016-01-01

    Many studies show that Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is associated with early subclinical signs of atherosclerosis. Chronic inflammation per se may be an important driver but other known risk factors, such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin insensitivity, a physically inactive lifestyle...

  7. Inflammatory therapeutic targets in coronary atherosclerosis – from molecular biology to clinical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian eLinden

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death worldwide. Over the past two decades, it has been clearly recognized that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. Accumulating data from animal experiments have supported this hypothesis, however, clinical applications making use of this knowledge remain scarce. In spite of optimal interventional and medical therapy, the risk for recurrent myocardial infarction remains by about 20% over three years after acute coronary syndromes, novel therapies to prevent atherogenesis or treat atherosclerosis are urgently needed. This review summarizes selected potential molecu-lar inflammatory targets that may be of clinical relevance. We also review recent and ongoing clinical trails that target inflammatory processes aiming at preventing adverse cardiovascular events. Overall, it seems surprising that translation of basic science into clinical practice has not been a great success. In conclusion, we propose to focus on specific efforts that promote translational science in order to improve outcome and prognosis of patients suffering from atherosclerosis.

  8. Increased Cardiovascular Events and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: 1 Year Prospective Single Centre Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Ruscitti

    Full Text Available Several studies showed the close relationship between Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA and cerebro-cardiovascular events (CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis during the course of RA and we evaluated the possible role of both traditional cardiovascular (CV and disease related risk factors to predict the occurrence of new CVEs and the onset of subclinical atherosclerosis.We designed a single centre, bias-adjusted, prospective, observational study to investigate, in a homogeneous subset of RA patients, the occurrence of new onset of CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis. Statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the role of traditional CV and disease-related risk factors to predict the occurrence of new CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis.We enrolled 347 RA patients prospectively followed for 12 months. An increased percentage of patients experienced CVEs, developed subclinical atherosclerosis and was affected by systemic arterial hypertension (SAH, type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome (MS, at the end of follow up. Our analysis showed that the insurgence of both SAH and MS, during the follow up, the older age, the CVE familiarity and the lack of clinical response, were associated with a significantly increased risk to experience CVEs and to develop subclinical atherosclerosis.Our study quantifies the increased expected risk for CVEs in a cohort of RA patients prospectively followed for 1 year. The occurrence of both new CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis in RA patients may be explained by inflammatory burden as well as traditional CV risk factors.

  9. Endothelium Protective Function of Statins in Men and Women with Coronary Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    M. V. Klimushina; N. G. Gumanova; A. Ju. Gorshkov; N. E. Gavrilova; V. A. Metel'skaja; S. A. Boytsov

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To study the relationship between serum endothelin levels and lipid-lowering therapy in patients with confirmed coronary atherosclerosis.Material and methods. Patients (n=447; 320 men and 127 women; mean age 62.7±8.8 years) with coronary atherosclerosis, confirmed by coronary angiography, were included into the study. Serum endothelin levels were assessed by enzyme immunoassay (ELISA).Results. Negative correlation between the statins receiving and serum endothelin level was found in men ...

  10. Atherosclerosis across 4000 years of human history: the Horus study of four ancient populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Randall C; Allam, Adel H; Lombardi, Guido P; Wann, L Samuel; Sutherland, M Linda; Sutherland, James D; Soliman, Muhammad Al-Tohamy; Frohlich, Bruno; Mininberg, David T; Monge, Janet M; Vallodolid, Clide M; Cox, Samantha L; Abd el-Maksoud, Gomaa; Badr, Ibrahim; Miyamoto, Michael I; el-Halim Nur el-Din, Abd; Narula, Jagat; Finch, Caleb E; Thomas, Gregory S

    2013-04-06

    Atherosclerosis is thought to be a disease of modern human beings and related to contemporary lifestyles. However, its prevalence before the modern era is unknown. We aimed to evaluate preindustrial populations for atherosclerosis. We obtained whole body CT scans of 137 mummies from four different geographical regions or populations spanning more than 4000 years. Individuals from ancient Egypt, ancient Peru, the Ancestral Puebloans of southwest America, and the Unangan of the Aleutian Islands were imaged. Atherosclerosis was regarded as definite if a calcified plaque was seen in the wall of an artery and probable if calcifications were seen along the expected course of an artery. Probable or definite atherosclerosis was noted in 47 (34%) of 137 mummies and in all four geographical populations: 29 (38%) of 76 ancient Egyptians, 13 (25%) of 51 ancient Peruvians, two (40%) of five Ancestral Puebloans, and three (60%) of five Unangan hunter gatherers (p=NS). Atherosclerosis was present in the aorta in 28 (20%) mummies, iliac or femoral arteries in 25 (18%), popliteal or tibial arteries in 25 (18%), carotid arteries in 17 (12%), and coronary arteries in six (4%). Of the five vascular beds examined, atherosclerosis was present in one to two beds in 34 (25%) mummies, in three to four beds in 11 (8%), and in all five vascular beds in two (1%). Age at time of death was positively correlated with atherosclerosis (mean age at death was 43 [SD 10] years for mummies with atherosclerosis vs 32 [15] years for those without; phuman beings raises the possibility of a more basic predisposition to the disease. National Endowment for the Humanities, Paleocardiology Foundation, The National Bank of Egypt, Siemens, and St Luke's Hospital Foundation of Kansas City. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Liraglutide Reduces Both Atherosclerosis and Kidney Inflammation in Moderately Uremic LDLr-/- Mice.

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    Line S Bisgaard

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD leads to uremia. CKD is characterized by a gradual increase in kidney fibrosis and loss of kidney function, which is associated with a progressive increase in risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular death. To prevent progression of both kidney fibrosis and atherosclerosis in uremic settings, insight into new treatment options with effects on both parameters is warranted. The GLP-1 analogue liraglutide improves glucose homeostasis, and is approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes. Animal studies suggest that GLP-1 also dampens inflammation and atherosclerosis. Our aim was to examine effects of liraglutide on kidney fibrosis and atherosclerosis in a mouse model of moderate uremia (5/6 nephrectomy (NX. Uremic (n = 29 and sham-operated (n = 14 atherosclerosis-prone low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice were treated with liraglutide (1000 μg/kg, s.c. once daily or vehicle for 13 weeks. As expected, uremia increased aortic atherosclerosis. In the remnant kidneys from NX mice, flow cytometry revealed an increase in the number of monocyte-like cells (CD68+F4/80-, CD4+, and CD8+ T-cells, suggesting that moderate uremia induced kidney inflammation. Furthermore, markers of fibrosis (i.e. Col1a1 and Col3a1 were upregulated, and histological examinations showed increased glomerular diameter in NX mice. Importantly, liraglutide treatment attenuated atherosclerosis (~40%, p < 0.05 and reduced kidney inflammation in NX mice. There was no effect of liraglutide on expression of fibrosis markers and/or kidney histology. This study suggests that liraglutide has beneficial effects in a mouse model of moderate uremia by reducing atherosclerosis and attenuating kidney inflammation.

  12. The Prebiotic Inulin Aggravates Accelerated Atherosclerosis in Hypercholesterolemic APOE*3-Leiden Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa R. Hoving; Margreet R. de Vries; Rob C. M. de Jong; Saeed Katiraei; Amanda Pronk; Paul H. A. Quax; Vanessa van Harmelen; Ko Willems van Dijk

    2018-01-01

    The prebiotic inulin has proven effective at lowering inflammation and plasma lipid levels. As atherosclerosis is provoked by both inflammation and hyperlipidemia, we aimed to determine the effect of inulin supplementation on atherosclerosis development in hypercholesterolemic APOE*3-Leiden (E3L) mice. Male E3L mice were fed a high-cholesterol (1%) diet, supplemented with or without 10% inulin for 5 weeks. At week 3, a non-constrictive cuff was placed around the right femoral artery to induce...

  13. A Role of RIP3-Mediated Macrophage Necrosis in Atherosclerosis Development

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Juan; Li, Hanjie; Yang, Min; Ren, Junming; Huang, Zhe; Han, Felicia; Huang, Jian; Ma, Jianhui; Zhang, Duanwu; Zhang, Zhirong; Wu, Jianfeng; Huang, Deli; Qiao, Muzhen; Jin, Guanghui; Wu, Qiao

    2013-01-01

    Necrotic death of macrophages has long been known to be present in atherosclerotic lesions but has not been studied. We examined the role of receptor interacting protein (RIP) 3, a mediator of necrotic cell death, in atherosclerosis and found that RIP3−/−;Ldlr−/− mice were no different from RIP3+/+;Ldlr−/− mice in early atherosclerosis but had significant reduction in advanced atherosclerotic lesions. Similar results were observed in Apoe−/− background mice. Bone marrow transplantation reveal...

  14. Hematocrit is associated with carotid atherosclerosis in men but not in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irace, Concetta; Ciamei, Monica; Crivaro, Andrea; Fiaschi, Elio; Madia, Angela; Cortese, Claudio; Gnasso, Agostino

    2003-06-01

    It is known that blood and plasma viscosities are associated with clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis, though evidence is not conclusive particularly in women. To verify whether hematocrit and blood and plasma viscosities are independently associated with carotid atherosclerosis and whether their measurement can improve the definition of the global coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Eight hundred and ninety-two participants in a cardiovascular disease prevention campaign were examined with regard to conventional CHD risk factors (age, blood pressure, lipids, glucose, body mass index, waist/hip ratio, cigarette smoking and diabetes), hematocrit and blood and plasma viscosities. According to the degree of carotid atherosclerosis, investigated by echo-Doppler, participants were divided in three groups: those without atherosclerosis, those with a low degree of atherosclerosis and those with a high degree of atherosclerosis. In men, age, blood pressure, intima-media thickness (IMT), hematocrit (47.4+/-3.7%, 47.8+/-3.7%, 48.4+/-3.7%, Pviscosity (4.69+/-0.51 cP, 4.77+/-0.55 cP, 4.82+/-0.51 cP, P=0.05) increased with increasing degree of carotid atherosclerosis. In women, age, blood pressure, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, IMT and plasma viscosity (1.42+/-0.12 cP, 1.44+/-0.11 cP, 1.46+/-0.13 cP, Pviscosity was no longer different in the three groups. In discriminant analysis, hematocrit, among the hemorheological variables investigated, was independently associated with carotid score in men (F=3.66, Pviscosities were significantly associated with carotid score in women. These findings suggest that in men, both hematocrit and blood viscosity are related to carotid atherosclerosis but hematocrit would appear to have an independent effect over and above that mediated by viscosity.

  15. The Biology of Atherosclerosis: General Paradigms and Distinct Pathogenic Mechanisms Among HIV-Infected Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Janet; Plutzky, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Complications of atherosclerosis, including myocardial infarction and stroke, are the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Recent data strongly implicate cardiovascular death as a contributor to mortality among patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, with evidence suggesting increased incidence of atherosclerosis among these patients. Therefore, greater understanding of atherosclerotic mechanisms and how these responses may be similar or distinct in HIV-infecte...

  16. The Prebiotic Inulin Aggravates Accelerated Atherosclerosis in Hypercholesterolemic APOE*3-Leiden Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoving, Lisa R; de Vries, Margreet R; de Jong, Rob C M; Katiraei, Saeed; Pronk, Amanda; Quax, Paul H A; van Harmelen, Vanessa; Willems van Dijk, Ko

    2018-02-03

    The prebiotic inulin has proven effective at lowering inflammation and plasma lipid levels. As atherosclerosis is provoked by both inflammation and hyperlipidemia, we aimed to determine the effect of inulin supplementation on atherosclerosis development in hypercholesterolemic APOE*3-Leiden ( E3L ) mice. Male E3L mice were fed a high-cholesterol (1%) diet, supplemented with or without 10% inulin for 5 weeks. At week 3, a non-constrictive cuff was placed around the right femoral artery to induce accelerated atherosclerosis. At week 5, vascular pathology was determined by lesion thickness, vascular remodeling, and lesion composition. Throughout the study, plasma lipids were measured and in week 5, blood monocyte subtypes were determined using flow cytometry analysis. In contrast to our hypothesis, inulin exacerbated atherosclerosis development, characterized by increased lesion formation and outward vascular remodeling. The lesions showed increased number of macrophages, smooth muscle cells, and collagen content. No effects on blood monocyte composition were found. Inulin significantly increased plasma total cholesterol levels and total cholesterol exposure. In conclusion, inulin aggravated accelerated atherosclerosis development in hypercholesterolemic E3L mice, accompanied by adverse lesion composition and outward remodeling. This process was not accompanied by differences in blood monocyte composition, suggesting that the aggravated atherosclerosis development was driven by increased plasma cholesterol.

  17. The Prebiotic Inulin Aggravates Accelerated Atherosclerosis in Hypercholesterolemic APOE*3-Leiden Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa R. Hoving

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The prebiotic inulin has proven effective at lowering inflammation and plasma lipid levels. As atherosclerosis is provoked by both inflammation and hyperlipidemia, we aimed to determine the effect of inulin supplementation on atherosclerosis development in hypercholesterolemic APOE*3-Leiden (E3L mice. Male E3L mice were fed a high-cholesterol (1% diet, supplemented with or without 10% inulin for 5 weeks. At week 3, a non-constrictive cuff was placed around the right femoral artery to induce accelerated atherosclerosis. At week 5, vascular pathology was determined by lesion thickness, vascular remodeling, and lesion composition. Throughout the study, plasma lipids were measured and in week 5, blood monocyte subtypes were determined using flow cytometry analysis. In contrast to our hypothesis, inulin exacerbated atherosclerosis development, characterized by increased lesion formation and outward vascular remodeling. The lesions showed increased number of macrophages, smooth muscle cells, and collagen content. No effects on blood monocyte composition were found. Inulin significantly increased plasma total cholesterol levels and total cholesterol exposure. In conclusion, inulin aggravated accelerated atherosclerosis development in hypercholesterolemic E3L mice, accompanied by adverse lesion composition and outward remodeling. This process was not accompanied by differences in blood monocyte composition, suggesting that the aggravated atherosclerosis development was driven by increased plasma cholesterol.

  18. Relationship Between Lifelong Exercise Volume and Coronary Atherosclerosis in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aengevaeren, Vincent L; Mosterd, Arend; Braber, Thijs L; Prakken, Niek H J; Doevendans, Pieter A; Grobbee, Diederick E; Thompson, Paul D; Eijsvogels, Thijs M H; Velthuis, Birgitta K

    2017-07-11

    Higher levels of physical activity are associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular events. Nevertheless, there is debate on the dose-response relationship of exercise and cardiovascular disease outcomes and whether high volumes of exercise may accelerate coronary atherosclerosis. We aimed to determine the relationship between lifelong exercise volumes and coronary atherosclerosis. Middle-aged men engaged in competitive or recreational leisure sports underwent a noncontrast and contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan to assess coronary artery calcification (CAC) and plaque characteristics. Participants reported lifelong exercise history patterns. Exercise volumes were multiplied by metabolic equivalent of task (MET) scores to calculate MET-minutes per week. Participants' activity was categorized as 2000 MET-min/wk. A total of 284 men (age, 55±7 years) were included. CAC was present in 150 of 284 participants (53%) with a median CAC score of 35.8 (interquartile range, 9.3-145.8). Athletes with a lifelong exercise volume >2000 MET-min/wk (n=75) had a significantly higher CAC score (9.4 [interquartile range, 0-60.9] versus 0 [interquartile range, 0-43.5]; P =0.02) and prevalence of CAC (68%; adjusted odds ratio [OR adjusted ]=3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-6.6) and plaque (77%; OR adjusted =3.3; 95% CI, 1.6-7.1) compared with exercise (≥9 MET) was associated with CAC (OR adjusted =1.47; 95% CI, 1.14-1.91) and plaque (OR adjusted =1.56; 95% CI, 1.17-2.08). Among participants with CAC>0, there was no difference in CAC score ( P =0.20), area ( P =0.21), density ( P =0.25), and regions of interest ( P =0.20) across exercise volume groups. Among participants with plaque, the most active group (>2000 MET-min/wk) had a lower prevalence of mixed plaques (48% versus 69%; OR adjusted =0.35; 95% CI, 0.15-0.85) and more often had only calcified plaques (38% versus 16%; OR adjusted =3.57; 95% CI, 1.28-9.97) compared with the least active group (2000 MET

  19. Evaluation of risk of atherosclerosis in Indian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Deepa; Chiplonkar, Shashi; Khadilkar, Anuradha; Kinare, Arun; Khadilkar, Vaman; Divate, Uma

    2013-05-01

    To investigate interrelationship of arterial measurements with metabolic syndrome (MS) components and zinc status in apparently healthy Indian adults. Anthropometry and biochemical data were recorded in 110 men and 139 women (25-50 yr). Carotid Intima media thickness (CIMT), stiffness (beta), pulse wave velocity (PWV), elasticity modulus (Ep), and arterial compliance (AC) of the right carotid artery were evaluated ultrasonically. According to definition of MS, subjects were categorized as MS-1, MS-2, MS-3. Further, normal and MS subjects were divided as zinc sufficient and deficient. In all, 12.1% subjects had 3 risk factors for MS. Mean CIMT, beta, Ep and PWV were significantly higher by 6%, 11.6%, 29.5% and 12.4% in subjects with MS than normal (p < 0.05). AC showed significant decline in MS subjects by only 3% than normal (p < 0.05). Serum zinc was inversely correlated with beta, Ep and PWV in both the genders in subjects with MS (p < 0.05). A synergistic effect of serum zinc deficiency with MS further envisages the elevated risk of arterial stiffness. Risk of atherosclerosis is marked by increase in stiffness parameters even in presence of a single MS risk and zinc deficiency may further aggravate the risk indicating need for early diagnosis.

  20. Gout in Older Adults: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Bridget Teevan; Köttgen, Anna; Law, Andrew; Grams, Morgan; Baer, Alan N.; Coresh, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is unclear whether traditional and genetic risk factors in middle age predict the onset of gout in older age. Methods: We studied the incidence of gout in older adults using the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study, a prospective U.S. population–based cohort of middle-aged adults enrolled between 1987 and 1989 with ongoing follow-up. A genetic urate score was formed from common urate-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms for eight genes. The adjusted hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval of incident gout by traditional and genetic risk factors in middle age were estimated using a Cox proportional hazards model. Results: The cumulative incidence from middle age to age 65 was 8.6% in men and 2.5% in women; by age 75 the cumulative incidence was 11.8% and 5.0%. In middle age, increased adiposity, beer intake, protein intake, smoking status, hypertension, diuretic use, and kidney function (but not sex) were associated with an increased gout risk in older age. In addition, a 100 µmol/L increase in genetic urate score was associated with a 3.29-fold (95% confidence interval: 1.63–6.63) increased gout risk in older age. Conclusions: These findings suggest that traditional and genetic risk factors in middle age may be useful for identifying those at risk of gout in older age. PMID:26714568

  1. Chronic skin inflammation accelerates macrophage cholesterol crystal formation and atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Qimin; Sanda, Gregory E.; Dey, Amit K.; Teague, Heather L.; Sorokin, Alexander V.; Dagur, Pradeep K.; Silverman, Joanna I.; Harrington, Charlotte L.; Rodante, Justin A.; Rose, Shawn M.; Varghese, Nevin J.; Belur, Agastya D.; Goyal, Aditya; Gelfand, Joel M.; Springer, Danielle A.; Bleck, Christopher K.E.; Thomas, Crystal L.; Yu, Zu-Xi; Winge, Mårten C.G.; Kruth, Howard S.; Marinkovich, M. Peter; Joshi, Aditya A.; Playford, Martin P.; Mehta, Nehal N.

    2018-01-01

    Inflammation is critical to atherogenesis. Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that accelerates atherosclerosis in humans and provides a compelling model to understand potential pathways linking these diseases. A murine model capturing the vascular and metabolic diseases in psoriasis would accelerate our understanding and provide a platform to test emerging therapies. We aimed to characterize a new murine model of skin inflammation (Rac1V12) from a cardiovascular standpoint to identify novel atherosclerotic signaling pathways modulated in chronic skin inflammation. The RacV12 psoriasis mouse resembled the human disease state, including presence of systemic inflammation, dyslipidemia, and cardiometabolic dysfunction. Psoriasis macrophages had a proatherosclerotic phenotype with increased lipid uptake and foam cell formation, and also showed a 6-fold increase in cholesterol crystal formation. We generated a triple-genetic K14-RacV12–/+/Srb1–/–/ApoER61H/H mouse and confirmed psoriasis accelerates atherogenesis (~7-fold increase). Finally, we noted a 60% reduction in superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) expression in human psoriasis macrophages. When SOD2 activity was restored in macrophages, their proatherogenic phenotype reversed. We demonstrate that the K14-RacV12 murine model captures the cardiometabolic dysfunction and accelerates vascular disease observed in chronic inflammation and that skin inflammation induces a proatherosclerotic macrophage phenotype with impaired SOD2 function, which associated with accelerated atherogenesis. PMID:29321372

  2. Osteoprotegerin as a Marker of Atherosclerosis in Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areti Augoulea

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the principal cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD and has many risk factors, among which is diabetes. Osteoprotegerin (OPG is a soluble glycoprotein, involved in bone metabolism. OPG is also found in other tissues, and studies have shown that it is expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells. OPG has been implicated in various inflammations and also has been linked to diabetes mellitus. Increased serum OPG levels were found in patients with diabetes and poor glycemic control. Furthermore, prepubertal children with type 1 diabetes have significantly increased OPG levels. Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL is not found in the vasculature in normal conditions, but may appear in calcifying areas. OPG and RANKL are important regulators of mineral metabolism in both bone and vascular tissues. Few data are available on the relationship between plasma OPG/RANKL levels and endothelial dysfunction as assessed using noninvasive methods like ultrasound indexes, neither in the general population nor, more specifically, in diabetic patients. The aim of our review study was to investigate, based on the existing data, these interrelationships in order to identify a means of predicting, via noninvasive methods, later development of endothelial dysfunction and vascular complications in diabetic patients.

  3. Subclinical atherosclerosis in obese adolescents with normal left ventricular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Wahab, Amina M; Atwa, Hoda A; El-Eraky, Azza Z; El-Aziz, Mohamed A

    2011-09-01

    To assess the impact of obesity on carotid intima media thickness and left ventricular (LV) mass in obese adolescents. The study included 52 obese adolescents (mean age 14.16+/-2.64 years) and 52 healthy adolescents who served as a control group (mean age 12+/-2.3 years), who were attended the outpatient clinic at Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismailia, Egypt. The study population was submitted for medical history, clinical examination, laboratory investigations (fasting blood sugar and lipid profile), and echocardiographic examination of LV mass and dimensions. Assessment of carotid intima-media thickness was carried out by using carotid duplex. All children had normal LV function. Obese adolescents had a significant increase in total cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL-C, and low HDL-C compared to the control group. Also, there was a significant increase in blood pressure, carotid intima media thickness, LV mass, and LV mass index. There was a significant correlation between BMI and dyslipidemia, blood pressure, carotid intima/media thickness, LV mass, and posterior wall thickness. Carotid intima-media thickness had a significant correlation with increased LDL-C and low HDL-C, blood pressure, LV mass, and posterior wall thickness. Obesity in childhood and adolescents is associated with subclinical atherosclerosis. Although obese children had no LV dysfunction, yet there are LV structure changes.

  4. The Interaction Between IGF-1, Atherosclerosis and Vascular Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Yusuke; Quevedo, Henry C.; Tiwari, Summit; Sukhanov, Sergiy; Shai, Shaw-Yung; Anwar, Asif; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    The process of vascular aging encompasses alterations in the function of endothelial (EC) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) via oxidation, inflammation, cell senescence and epigenetic modifications, increasing the probability of atherosclerosis. Aged vessels exhibit decreased endothelial antithrombogenic properties, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and inflammatory signaling, increased migration of VSMCs to the subintimal space, impaired angiogenesis and increased elastin degradation. The key initiating step in atherogenesis is subendothelial accumulation of apolipoprotein-B containing low density lipoproteins resulting in activation of endothelial cells and recruitment of monocytes. Activated endothelial cells secrete “chemokines” that interact with cognate chemokine receptors on monocytes and promote directional migration. Recruitment of immune cells establishes a pro-inflammatory status, further causing elevated oxidative stress, which in turn triggers a series of events including apoptotic or necrotic death of vascular and non-vascular cells. Increased oxidative stress is also considered to be a key factor in mechanisms of aging-associated changes in tissue integrity and function. Experimental evidence indicates that insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) exerts anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and pro-survival effects on the vasculature, reducing atherosclerotic plaque burden and promoting features of atherosclerotic plaque stability. PMID:24943302

  5. HDL-mimetic PLGA nanoparticle to target atherosclerosis plaque macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L; Fay, Francois; Lobatto, Mark E; Tang, Jun; Ouimet, Mireille; Kim, YongTae; van der Staay, Susanne E M; van Rijs, Sarian M; Priem, Bram; Zhang, Liangfang; Fisher, Edward A; Moore, Kathryn J; Langer, Robert; Fayad, Zahi A; Mulder, Willem J M

    2015-03-18

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a natural nanoparticle that exhibits an intrinsic affinity for atherosclerotic plaque macrophages. Its natural targeting capability as well as the option to incorporate lipophilic payloads, e.g., imaging or therapeutic components, in both the hydrophobic core and the phospholipid corona make the HDL platform an attractive nanocarrier. To realize controlled release properties, we developed a hybrid polymer/HDL nanoparticle composed of a lipid/apolipoprotein coating that encapsulates a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core. This novel HDL-like nanoparticle (PLGA-HDL) displayed natural HDL characteristics, including preferential uptake by macrophages and a good cholesterol efflux capacity, combined with a typical PLGA nanoparticle slow release profile. In vivo studies carried out with an ApoE knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis showed clear accumulation of PLGA-HDL nanoparticles in atherosclerotic plaques, which colocalized with plaque macrophages. This biomimetic platform integrates the targeting capacity of HDL biomimetic nanoparticles with the characteristic versatility of PLGA-based nanocarriers.

  6. Multifocal atherosclerosis in patient after acute first degree radiation sickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metlyaeva N.A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: assessment the heavy psychosomatic and all-somatic cardiovascular and cerebrovascular pathology of patient, transferred an acute I degree radiation sickness, from the general evenly gamma-beta radiation. Conclusions. The subdepressive and disturbing-depressive syndrome of patient, transferred an acute radiation sickness (ARS of I degree, from the general evenly gamma-beta radiation, was independent risk factor of development of multifocal atherosclerosis; Features of development of all-somatic and psychosomatic pathology of patient are based on a combination of genetic prerequisites, environment influences (the stress caused by accident on the ChNPP and social factors, influencing on him during a course of life, especially during early socialization. Thus at development of psychosomatic frustration the combination of feature of the mental reaction connected with the personal characteristic and special relationship between mental (stress and physiological (somatic by aspects of reaction which led to metabolism violation, to aging, decrease in adaptation opportunities of an organism and development age — dependent pathology took place.

  7. Decreased naive and increased memory CD4(+ T cells are associated with subclinical atherosclerosis: the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.

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    Nels C Olson

    Full Text Available Adaptive immunity has been implicated in atherosclerosis in animal models and small clinical studies. Whether chronic immune activation is associated with atherosclerosis in otherwise healthy individuals remains underexplored. We hypothesized that activation of adaptive immune responses, as reflected by higher proportions of circulating CD4(+ memory cells and lower proportions of naive cells, would be associated with subclinical atherosclerosis.We examined cross-sectional relationships of circulating CD4(+ naive and memory T cells with biomarkers of inflammation, serologies, and subclinical atherosclerosis in 912 participants of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA. Circulating CD4(+ naive cells were higher in women than men and decreased with age (all p-values <0.0001. European-Americans had higher levels of naive cells and lower levels of memory cells compared with African-Americans and Hispanic-Americans (all p-values ≤0.0005. Lower naive/higher memory cells were associated with interleukin-6 levels. In multivariate models, cytomegalovirus (CMV and H. Pylori titers were strongly associated with higher memory and lower naive cells (all p-values <0.05. Higher memory cells were associated with coronary artery calcification (CAC level in the overall population [β-Coefficient (95% confidence interval (CI  = 0.20 (0.03, 0.37]. Memory and naive (inversely cells were associated with common carotid artery intimal media thickness (CC IMT in European-Americans [memory: β =  0.02 (0.006, 0.04; naive: β = -0.02 (-0.004, -0.03].These results demonstrate that the degree of chronic adaptive immune activation is associated with both CAC and CC IMT in otherwise healthy individuals, consistent with the known role of CD4(+ T cells, and with innate immunity (inflammation, in atherosclerosis. These data are also consistent with the hypothesis that immunosenescence accelerates chronic diseases by putting a greater burden on the innate

  8. Impact of Hydroxychloroquine on Atherosclerosis and Vascular Stiffness in the Presence of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh M Shukla

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the largest cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD and end-stage kidney disease, with nearly half of all deaths attributed to cardiovascular disease. Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ, an anti-inflammatory drug, has been shown to have multiple pleiotropic actions relevant to atherosclerosis. We conducted a proof-of-efficacy study to evaluate the effects of hydroxychloroquine in an animal model of atherosclerosis in ApoE knockout mice with and without chronic kidney disease. Forty male, 6-week-old mice were divided into four groups in a 2 x 2 design: sham placebo group; sham treatment group; CKD placebo group; and CKD treatment group. CKD was induced by a two-step surgical procedure. All mice received a high-fat diet through the study duration and were sacrificed after 16 weeks of therapy. Mice were monitored with ante-mortem ultrasonic echography (AUE for atherosclerosis and vascular stiffness and with post-mortem histology studies for atherosclerosis. Therapy with HCQ significantly reduced the severity of atherosclerosis in CKD mice and sham treated mice. HCQ reduced the area of aortic atherosclerosis on en face examination by approximately 60% in HCQ treated groups compared to the non-treated groups. Additionally, therapy with HCQ resulted in significant reduction in vascular endothelial dysfunction with improvement in vascular elasticity and flow patterns and better-preserved vascular wall thickness across multiple vascular beds. More importantly, we found that presence of CKD had no mitigating effect on HCQ's anti-atherosclerotic and vasculoprotective effects. These beneficial effects were not due to any significant effect of HCQ on inflammation, renal function, or lipid profile at the end of 16 weeks of therapy. This study, which demonstrates structural and functional protection against atherosclerosis by HCQ, provides a rationale to evaluate its use in CKD patients. Further studies

  9. The population-based Barcelona-Asymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis Study (ASIA: rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pera Guillem

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-artery intracranial atherosclerosis may be the most frequent cause of ischemic stroke worldwide. Traditional approaches have attempted to target the disease when it is already symptomatic. However, early detection of intracranial atherosclerosis may allow therapeutic intervention while the disease is still asymptomatic. The prevalence and natural history of asymptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis in Caucasians remain unclear. The aims of the Barcelona-ASymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis (ASIA study are (1 to determine the prevalence of ASIA in a moderate-high vascular risk population, (2 to study its prognostic impact on the risk of suffering future major ischemic events, and (3 to identify predictors of the development, progression and clinical expression of this condition. Methods/Design Cross-over and cohort, population-based study. A randomly selected representative sample of 1,503 subjects with a mild-moderate-high vascular risk (as defined by a REGICOR score ≥ 5% and with neither a history of cerebrovascular nor ischemic heart disease will be studied. At baseline, all individuals will undergo extracranial and transcranial Color-Coded Duplex (TCCD ultrasound examinations to detect presence and severity of extra and intracranial atherosclerosis. Intracranial stenoses will be assessed by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA. Clinical and demographic variables will be recorded and blood samples will be drawn to investigate clinical, biological and genetic factors associated with the presence of ASIA. A long-term clinical and sonographic follow-up will be conducted thereafter to identify predictors of disease progression and of incident vascular events. Discussion The Barcelona-ASIA is a population-based study aiming to evaluate the prevalence and clinical importance of asymptomatic intracranial large-artery atherosclerosis in Caucasians. The ASIA project may provide a unique scientific resource to better

  10. The population-based Barcelona-Asymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis Study (ASIA): rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cancio, Elena; Dorado, Laura; Millán, Mónica; Reverté, Silvia; Suñol, Anna; Massuet, Anna; Mataró, María; Galán, Amparo; Alzamora, Maite; Pera, Guillem; Torán, Pere; Dávalos, Antoni; Arenillas, Juan F

    2011-02-17

    Large-artery intracranial atherosclerosis may be the most frequent cause of ischemic stroke worldwide. Traditional approaches have attempted to target the disease when it is already symptomatic. However, early detection of intracranial atherosclerosis may allow therapeutic intervention while the disease is still asymptomatic. The prevalence and natural history of asymptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis in Caucasians remain unclear. The aims of the Barcelona-ASymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis (ASIA) study are (1) to determine the prevalence of ASIA in a moderate-high vascular risk population, (2) to study its prognostic impact on the risk of suffering future major ischemic events, and (3) to identify predictors of the development, progression and clinical expression of this condition. Cross-over and cohort, population-based study. A randomly selected representative sample of 1,503 subjects with a mild-moderate-high vascular risk (as defined by a REGICOR score ≥ 5%) and with neither a history of cerebrovascular nor ischemic heart disease will be studied. At baseline, all individuals will undergo extracranial and transcranial Color-Coded Duplex (TCCD) ultrasound examinations to detect presence and severity of extra and intracranial atherosclerosis. Intracranial stenoses will be assessed by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Clinical and demographic variables will be recorded and blood samples will be drawn to investigate clinical, biological and genetic factors associated with the presence of ASIA. A long-term clinical and sonographic follow-up will be conducted thereafter to identify predictors of disease progression and of incident vascular events. The Barcelona-ASIA is a population-based study aiming to evaluate the prevalence and clinical importance of asymptomatic intracranial large-artery atherosclerosis in Caucasians. The ASIA project may provide a unique scientific resource to better understand the dynamics of intracranial atherosclerosis from

  11. Factors associated with accelerated subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with spondyloarthritis without overt cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giollo, Alessandro; Dalbeni, Andrea; Cioffi, Giovanni; Ognibeni, Federica; Gatti, Davide; Idolazzi, Luca; Orsolini, Giovanni; Minuz, Pietro; Rossini, Maurizio; Fava, Cristiano; Viapiana, Ombretta

    2017-11-01

    Data on the progression of atherosclerosis in spondyloarthritis (SpA) are scarce, despite a high burden of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The aim of this study was to identify the predictors of an accelerated subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with SpA. Study participants were 66 patients free of CVD classified according to ASAS criteria. The patients were evaluated at baseline and after 13.5 ± 3.6 months. Ultrasound measurements of carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and distensibility coefficient (cDC) were used to assess the extent of subclinical atherosclerosis. cIMT progression rate was calculated dividing the cIMT change by the time between the scans. Accelerated atherosclerosis was defined as the top cIMT progression rate quartile. At baseline, the mean Framingham Risk Score was 14 ± 11%. At follow-up, cIMT increased in 39 patients (59%; mean difference 0.01 ± 0.10; p = 0.334). Mean cIMT progression rate was 0.01 mm/year (95% CI - 0.02 to 0.03). cDC was unchanged at follow-up. Patients with accelerated atherosclerosis (n = 16) had significantly higher serum creatinine and lower glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at baseline. In multiple logistic regression, only eGFR and the presence of syndesmophytes were associated with an accelerated atherosclerosis, independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. In patients with SpA without overt CV disease, a decrease in renal function and radiographic damage are conditions associated with the development of subclinical accelerated atherosclerosis. Longitudinal assessment of cIMT could be useful to better evaluate the individual CV risk of these patients improving their prognostic stratification.

  12. MicroRNA-30c Mimic Mitigates Hypercholesterolemia and Atherosclerosis in Mice*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Sara; Pan, Xiaoyue; Peck, Bailey C. E.; Iqbal, Jahangir; Sethupathy, Praveen; Hussain, M. Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    High plasma cholesterol levels are a major risk factor for atherosclerosis. Plasma cholesterol can be reduced by inhibiting lipoprotein production; however, this is associated with steatosis. Previously we showed that lentivirally mediated hepatic expression of microRNA-30c (miR-30c) reduced hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in mice without causing hepatosteatosis. Because viral therapy would be formidable, we examined whether a miR-30c mimic can be used to mitigate hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis without inducing steatosis. Delivery of a miR-30c mimic to the liver diminished diet-induced hypercholesterolemia in C57BL/6J mice. Reductions in plasma cholesterol levels were significantly correlated with increases in hepatic miR-30c levels. Long term dose escalation studies showed that miR-30c mimic caused sustained reductions in plasma cholesterol with no obvious side effects. Furthermore, miR-30c mimic significantly reduced hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis in Apoe−/− mice. Mechanistic studies showed that miR-30c mimic had no effect on LDL clearance but reduced lipoprotein production by down-regulating microsomal triglyceride transfer protein expression. MiR-30c had no effect on fatty acid oxidation but reduced lipid synthesis. Additionally, whole transcriptome analysis revealed that miR-30c mimic significantly down-regulated hepatic lipid synthesis pathways. Therefore, miR-30c lowers plasma cholesterol and mitigates atherosclerosis by reducing microsomal triglyceride transfer protein expression and lipoprotein production and avoids steatosis by diminishing lipid syntheses. It mitigates atherosclerosis most likely by reducing lipoprotein production and plasma cholesterol. These findings establish that increasing hepatic miR-30c levels is a viable treatment option for reducing hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:27365390

  13. MicroRNA-30c Mimic Mitigates Hypercholesterolemia and Atherosclerosis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Sara; Pan, Xiaoyue; Peck, Bailey C E; Iqbal, Jahangir; Sethupathy, Praveen; Hussain, M Mahmood

    2016-08-26

    High plasma cholesterol levels are a major risk factor for atherosclerosis. Plasma cholesterol can be reduced by inhibiting lipoprotein production; however, this is associated with steatosis. Previously we showed that lentivirally mediated hepatic expression of microRNA-30c (miR-30c) reduced hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in mice without causing hepatosteatosis. Because viral therapy would be formidable, we examined whether a miR-30c mimic can be used to mitigate hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis without inducing steatosis. Delivery of a miR-30c mimic to the liver diminished diet-induced hypercholesterolemia in C57BL/6J mice. Reductions in plasma cholesterol levels were significantly correlated with increases in hepatic miR-30c levels. Long term dose escalation studies showed that miR-30c mimic caused sustained reductions in plasma cholesterol with no obvious side effects. Furthermore, miR-30c mimic significantly reduced hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis in Apoe(-/-) mice. Mechanistic studies showed that miR-30c mimic had no effect on LDL clearance but reduced lipoprotein production by down-regulating microsomal triglyceride transfer protein expression. MiR-30c had no effect on fatty acid oxidation but reduced lipid synthesis. Additionally, whole transcriptome analysis revealed that miR-30c mimic significantly down-regulated hepatic lipid synthesis pathways. Therefore, miR-30c lowers plasma cholesterol and mitigates atherosclerosis by reducing microsomal triglyceride transfer protein expression and lipoprotein production and avoids steatosis by diminishing lipid syntheses. It mitigates atherosclerosis most likely by reducing lipoprotein production and plasma cholesterol. These findings establish that increasing hepatic miR-30c levels is a viable treatment option for reducing hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Kefiran reduces atherosclerosis in rabbits fed a high cholesterol diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Masashi; Ishii, Itsuko; Inoue, Chika; Akisato, Yoshie; Watanabe, Kenta; Hosoyama, Saori; Toida, Toshihiko; Ariyoshi, Noritaka; Kitada, Mitsukazu

    2010-09-30

    Kefiran is an exopolysaccharide produced by Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens, and has been proposed to have many health-promoting properties. We investigated the antiatherogenic effect of kefiran on rabbits fed a high-cholesterol diet. Male New Zealand White rabbits were fed a 0.5% cholesterol diet without (control group, n = 7) or with kefiran (kefiran group, n = 8) for eight weeks. The aorta was analyzed by histochemistry and atherosclerotic lesions were quantified. Lipids and sugars in serum were measured. Foam cell formation of RAW264.7 by βVLDL derived from both groups of rabbits was also investigated. Cholesterol, triglyceride and phospholipids levels of serum and lipoprotein fractions were not significantly different between these groups. Atherosclerotic lesions of the aorta in the kefiran group were statistically lower than those of the control group, with marked differences in the abdominal aorta. T-lymphocytes were not detectable in the aorta of the kefiran group. Cholesterol contents in stools were almost identical in both groups. Cholesterol content in the liver of the kefiran group was statistically lower than in the control group. Galactose content of βVLDL derived from the kefiran group was higher, and the lipid peroxidation level was much lower than in the control group. RAW264.7 macrophages treated with βVLDL from the kefiran group showed a more spherical shape and accumulated statistically lower cholesterol than macrophages treated with βVLDL from the control group. Orally derived kefiran is absorbed in the blood. Kefiran prevents the onset and development of atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic rabbits by anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant actions.

  15. Gout in Older Adults: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Bridget Teevan; Köttgen, Anna; Law, Andrew; Grams, Morgan; Baer, Alan N; Coresh, Josef; McAdams-DeMarco, Mara A

    2016-04-01

    It is unclear whether traditional and genetic risk factors in middle age predict the onset of gout in older age. We studied the incidence of gout in older adults using the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study, a prospective U.S. population-based cohort of middle-aged adults enrolled between 1987 and 1989 with ongoing follow-up. A genetic urate score was formed from common urate-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms for eight genes. The adjusted hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval of incident gout by traditional and genetic risk factors in middle age were estimated using a Cox proportional hazards model. The cumulative incidence from middle age to age 65 was 8.6% in men and 2.5% in women; by age 75 the cumulative incidence was 11.8% and 5.0%. In middle age, increased adiposity, beer intake, protein intake, smoking status, hypertension, diuretic use, and kidney function (but not sex) were associated with an increased gout risk in older age. In addition, a 100 µmol/L increase in genetic urate score was associated with a 3.29-fold (95% confidence interval: 1.63-6.63) increased gout risk in older age. These findings suggest that traditional and genetic risk factors in middle age may be useful for identifying those at risk of gout in older age. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Coronary atherosclerosis in sudden cardiac death: An autopsy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of ischemic heart disease (IHD has markedly increased in India over the past few years. Considering the variations in racial, dietary and lifestyle patterns in our population, it is essential to study the biology of coronary atherosclerosis in our patients. Vulnerable plaques have a large number of foam cells, extracellular lipid, thin fibrous caps and clusters of inflammatory cells and are more prone to rupture. These plaques are nourished by the microvessels arising from the vasa vasorum of the blood vessels and by lumen-derived microvessels through the fibrous cap. This autopsy study was designed to analyse the coronary arterial tree in cases of sudden cardiac death, classify coronary atherosclerotic plaques and to assess the factors contributing to vulnerability of the plaques including inflammation, calcification and microvascular density. Materials and Methods: Seven cases of sudden cardiac death were included in the study. The hearts were perfusion-fixed and the coronary arteries along with their main branches were dissected and studied. The location of the plaques, type of plaques, presence of inflammation and calcification were assessed. The cap thickness and microvessel density per 1000um 2 were assessed. The statistical significance was estimated. Results and Conclusions: Extensive high-grade coronary atherosclerotic disease was seen in all sudden cardiac death cases. Majority of the plaques were vulnerable. High-grade inflammation was seen in most of the vulnerable and ruptured plaques. All the ruptured plaques were uncalcified indicating that calcification probably stabilizes the plaques and protects against rupture. Increased microvessel density was noted in ruptured plaques compared to vulnerable plaques. However, it was not statistically significant.

  17. PCSK9 inhibitors in the current management of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whayne, Thomas F

    The history of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) in medical science is fascinating and the evolution of knowledge of its function has resulted in new medications of major importance for the cardiovascular (CV) patient. PCSK9 functions as a negative control or feedback for the cell surface receptors for low-density lipoprotein including its component of cholesterol (LDL-C). The initial and key findings were that different abnormalities of PCSK9 can result in an increase or a decrease of LDL-C because of more or less suppression of cell surface receptors. These observations gave hints and awoke interest that it might be possible to prepare monoclonal antibodies to PCSK9 and decrease its activity, after which there should be more active LDL-C cell receptors. The rest is a fascinating story that currently has resulted in two PCSK9 inhibitors, alirocumab and evolocumab, which, on average, decrease LDL-C approximately 50%. Nevertheless, if there are no contraindications, statins remain the standard of prevention for the high-risk CV patient and this includes both secondary and primary prevention. The new inhibitors are for the patient that does not attain the desired target for LDL-C reduction while taking a maximum statin dose or who does not tolerate any statin dose whatsoever. Atherosclerosis can be considered a metabolic disease and the clinician needs to realize this and think more and more of CV prevention. These inhibitors can contribute to both the stabilization and regression of atherosclerotic plaques and thereby avoid or delay major adverse cardiac events. (United States). Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  18. Age, gender and hypertension as major risk factors in development of subclinical atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajla Rahimić Ćatić

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intima-media thickness (IMT measurement of the common carotid artery (CCA is considered as useful indicator of carotid atherosclerosis. Early detection of atherosclerosis and its associated risk factors is important to prevent stroke and heart diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate which risk factors are better determinants of subclinical atherosclerosis, measured by common carotidartery intima media thickness (CCA-IMT.Methods: A total of 74 subjects were randomly selected in this cross – sectional study. Information on the patient’s medical history and laboratory fi ndings were obtained from their clinical records. Risk factors relevant to this study were age, gender, cigarette smoking status, diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Ultrasound scanning of carotid arteries was performed with a 7,5 MHz linear array transducer (GE Voluson730 pro. The highest value of six common carotid artery measurements was taken as the fi nal IMT. Increased CCA-IMT was defi ned when it was > 1 mm.Results: Our data demonstrated higher CCA-IMT values in male patients compared with female patients. Increased CCA-IMT was the most closely related to age (PConclusion: Age, gender and hypertension are the most important risk factors in development of carotid atherosclerosis. Early detection of atherosclerosis among high-risk populations is important in order to prevent stroke and heart diseases, which are leading causes of death worldwide.

  19. Early Onset Intrauterine Growth Restriction in a Mouse Model of Gestational Hypercholesterolemia and Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busso, Dolores; Mascareño, Lilian; Salas, Francisca; Berkowitz, Loni; Santander, Nicolás; Quiroz, Alonso; Amigo, Ludwig; Valdés, Gloria; Rigotti, Attilio

    2014-01-01

    The susceptibility to develop atherosclerosis is increased by intrauterine growth restriction and prenatal exposure to maternal hypercholesterolemia. Here, we studied whether mouse gestational hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis affected fetal development and growth at different stages of gestation. Female LDLR KO mice fed a proatherogenic, high cholesterol (HC) diet for 3 weeks before conception and during pregnancy exhibited a significant increase in non-HDL cholesterol and developed atherosclerosis. At embryonic days 12.5 (E12.5), E15.5, and E18.5, maternal gestational hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis were associated to a 22–24% reduction in male and female fetal weight without alterations in fetal number/litter or morphology nor placental weight or structure. Feeding the HC diet exclusively at the periconceptional period did not alter fetal growth, suggesting that maternal hypercholesterolemia affected fetal weight only after implantation. Vitamin E supplementation (1,000 UI of α-tocopherol/kg) of HC-fed females did not change the mean weight of E18.5 fetuses but reduced the percentage of fetuses exhibiting body weights below the 10th percentile of weight (HC: 90% vs. HC/VitE: 68%). In conclusion, our results showed that maternal gestational hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis in mice were associated to early onset fetal growth restriction and that dietary vitamin E supplementation had a beneficial impact on this condition. PMID:25295255

  20. C-reactive protein in relation to early atherosclerosis and periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakob, Maha; Meurman, Jukka H; Jogestrand, Tomas; Nowak, Jacek; Söder, Per-Östen; Söder, Birgitta

    2012-02-01

    Periodontitis may affect atherosclerosis via the chronic inflammation. We investigated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in relation to early vascular atherosclerotic changes in non-symptomatic subjects with and without long-term periodontitis. Carotid ultrasonography with calculation of common carotid artery intima-media area (cIMA) was performed, and hsCRP and atherosclerosis risk factors were analysed in randomly chosen 93 patients with periodontitis and 41 controls. The relationship between hsCRP, cIMA and atherosclerosis risk factors was evaluated with multiple logistic regression analysis. Women displayed lower hsCRP (p periodontitis, cIMA values were higher than in controls. Periodontitis appeared to be a major predictor for increased cIMA (odds ratio, 3.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-12.26). Neither of these factors was significantly associated with hsCRP which thus appeared not sensitive enough to be a marker for periodontitis or atherosclerosis. Hence, irrespective of low hsCRP levels, periodontitis appeared to increase the risk for atherosclerosis.

  1. A quantitative approach of abdominal aortic atherosclerosis with x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiromi; Kubota, Kazuo; Ito, Kengo; Ono, Shuichi; Matsuzawa, Taiju

    1983-01-01

    Currently epidemiologic studies of aortic atherosclerosis are most commonly done by the conventional roentgenological or pathological methods before and after death respectively. Pathological method is difficult and only possible after death. Roentgenological method is simple and useful before death, but its inability to evaluate atherosclerosis in a constant manner is serious drawback. A simple and quantitative method for epidemiological and clinical study of atherosclerosis has been needed. It this study, we examined the usefulness of Calcification Index (C.I.) caliculated from CT films for the evaluation of abdominal aortic atherosclerosis. We analysed 42 patients (32 males, 10 females). They recieved abdominal CT examination and died within a year. First, we got C.I. from their CT films. Then we got Surface Involved (S.I.) of atherosclerotic lesion from their autopsied abdominal aorta with pathological observation. The correlation coefficient between C.I. and S.I. was 0.83 (p<0.001). So we may use C.I. for the evaluation of abdominal aortic atherosclerosis. (author)

  2. Gender-Specific Association of Desacylated Ghrelin with Subclinical Atherosclerosis in the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Michela; Gortan Cappellari, Gianluca; Semolic, Annamaria; Burekovic, Ismet; Fonda, Maurizio; Cattin, Luigi; Barazzoni, Rocco

    2017-07-01

    Ghrelin, a gastric hormone with pleiotropic effects modulates vascular function and may influence atherosclerosis. Plasma ghrelin is reduced in the metabolic syndrome (MS), which is also characterized by early atherosclerosis. Ghrelin circulates in acylated (AG) and desacylated (DAG) forms. Their relative impact and that of gender on subclinical atherosclerosis in MS is unknown. To investigate potential associations of total, AG and DAG with carotid atherosclerosis and with gender in the MS. Plasma total ghrelin, AG, DAG and carotid artery IMT (cIMT) were measured in 46 MS patients (NCEP-ATP III criteria, 22M/24F). Compared with males, females had higher (p ghrelin nor AG and DAG were associated with cIMT in all MS patients nor in the male subgroup. In females, a negative (p ghrelin and AG. In multivariate modeling, DAG remained negatively (p <0.05) associated with cIMT after adjusting for plasma glucose and cardiovascular risk factors. These data indicate a negative independent association between DAG and cIMT in middle-aged women with the MS and suggest a gender-specific modulatory function of DAG in the development of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Transcriptional profiling uncovers a network of cholesterol-responsive atherosclerosis target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefin Skogsberg

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the well-documented effects of plasma lipid lowering regimes halting atherosclerosis lesion development and reducing morbidity and mortality of coronary artery disease and stroke, the transcriptional response in the atherosclerotic lesion mediating these beneficial effects has not yet been carefully investigated. We performed transcriptional profiling at 10-week intervals in atherosclerosis-prone mice with human-like hypercholesterolemia and a genetic switch to lower plasma lipoproteins (Ldlr(-/-Apo(100/100Mttp(flox/flox Mx1-Cre. Atherosclerotic lesions progressed slowly at first, then expanded rapidly, and plateaued after advanced lesions formed. Analysis of lesion expression profiles indicated that accumulation of lipid-poor macrophages reached a point that led to the rapid expansion phase with accelerated foam-cell formation and inflammation, an interpretation supported by lesion histology. Genetic lowering of plasma cholesterol (e.g., lipoproteins at this point all together prevented the formation of advanced plaques and parallel transcriptional profiling of the atherosclerotic arterial wall identified 37 cholesterol-responsive genes mediating this effect. Validation by siRNA-inhibition in macrophages incubated with acetylated-LDL revealed a network of eight cholesterol-responsive atherosclerosis genes regulating cholesterol-ester accumulation. Taken together, we have identified a network of atherosclerosis genes that in response to plasma cholesterol-lowering prevents the formation of advanced plaques. This network should be of interest for the development of novel atherosclerosis therapies.

  4. [The impact of electronic cigarettes usage on the endothelial function and the progression of atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knura, Miłosz; Dragon, Jonasz; Łabuzek, Krzysztof; Okopień, Bogusław

    2018-01-23

    The exponetial growth in popularity of electronic cigarettes in the world markets intensifies the debate about their health effects. The smoking of traditional tabacoo products is a factor associated with the endothelium damage and progression of atherosclerosis. The elimination of the combustion process in electronic cigarettes allows to conclude that they are less harmful to a vascular endothelium than traditional tobacco products. E-cigarette aerosol contains many compounds that have an influence on initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Nicotine protherogenic action is not fully explained. On one hand, nicotine modifies metabolic pathways leading to atherosclerosis, whereas epidemiological studies do not show an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in the population using nicotine replacement therapy or snuff. Acrolein, formaldehyde and the ultrafine particles generated during e-liquid heating have an impact on initiation and progression of atherosclerosis, but their level is lower than that of tobacco smoke. In order to assess accurately the longterm effects of e-cigarettes, it is necessary to conduct epidemiological studies measuring the effects of using e-cigarettes. It is claimed that the use of electronic cigarettes has a potential impact on the development of atherosclerosis, but is significantly lower than that of traditional cigarettes.

  5. Association between diabetic retinopathy and subclinical atherosclerosis in China: Results from a community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Teng, Xiangyu; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Ruifeng; Liu, Wei

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the association of diabetic retinopathy with subclinical atherosclerosis in middle-aged and elderly Chinese with type 2 diabetes. A cross-sectional community-based study was performed among 1607 patients aged 40 years or older in Shanghai. Non-mydriatic digital fundus photography examination was used in diabetic retinopathy detection. Presence of elevated carotid intima-media thickness or carotid plaque was defined as subclinical atherosclerosis. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 15.1% in total patients. Patients with diabetic retinopathy were more likely to have elevated carotid intima-media thickness, carotid plaque and subclinical atherosclerosis than those without diabetic retinopathy (37.9% vs 30.7%, 57.6% vs 49.6% and 64.6% vs 57.1%, respectively). The presence of diabetic retinopathy was significantly associated with increased odds of subclinical atherosclerosis (odds ratio = 1.93, 95% confidence interval = 1.03-3.60) after full adjustments. The presence of diabetic retinopathy was significantly associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in middle-aged and elderly patients with type 2 diabetics in China. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Liraglutide Reduces Both Atherosclerosis and Kidney Inflammation in Moderately Uremic LDLr-/- Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Line S; Bosteen, Markus H; Fink, Lisbeth N

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to uremia. CKD is characterized by a gradual increase in kidney fibrosis and loss of kidney function, which is associated with a progressive increase in risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular death. To prevent progression of both kidney fibrosis and atherosc......Chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to uremia. CKD is characterized by a gradual increase in kidney fibrosis and loss of kidney function, which is associated with a progressive increase in risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular death. To prevent progression of both kidney fibrosis...... aim was to examine effects of liraglutide on kidney fibrosis and atherosclerosis in a mouse model of moderate uremia (5/6 nephrectomy (NX)). Uremic (n = 29) and sham-operated (n = 14) atherosclerosis-prone low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice were treated with liraglutide (1000 μg/kg, s.......c. once daily) or vehicle for 13 weeks. As expected, uremia increased aortic atherosclerosis. In the remnant kidneys from NX mice, flow cytometry revealed an increase in the number of monocyte-like cells (CD68+F4/80-), CD4+, and CD8+ T-cells, suggesting that moderate uremia induced kidney inflammation...

  7. Regulation of the renin–angiotensin system in coronary atherosclerosis: A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadan A Hammoud

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ramadan A Hammoud, Christopher S Vaccari, Sameer H Nagamia, Bobby V KhanEmory University School of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Grady Memorial Hospital Vascular Research Laboratory, Atlanta, Georgia, USAAbstract: Activation of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS is significant in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease and specifically coronary atherosclerosis. There is strong evidence that the RAS has effects on the mechanisms of action of atherosclerosis, including fibrinolytic balance, endothelial function, and plaque stability. Pharmacological inhibition of the renin angiotensin system includes angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, and renin inhibitors. These agents have clinical benefits in reducing morbidity and mortality in the management of hypertension. In addition, ACE inhibitors and ARBs have shown to be effective in the management of congestive heart failure and acute myocardial infarction. This review article discusses the biochemical and molecular mechanisms involving the RAS in coronary atherosclerosis as well as the effects of RAS inhibition in clinical studies involving coronary atherosclerosis.Keywords: angiotensin II, atherosclerosis, endothelium, inflammation, vasculature

  8. Potential Mechanisms Linking Atherosclerosis and Increased Cardiovascular Risk in COPD: Focus On Sirtuins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbi, Graziamaria; Bianco, Andrea; Turchiarelli, Viviana; Cellurale, Michele; Fatica, Federica; Daniele, Aurora; Mazzarella, Gennaro; Ferrara, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    The development of atherosclerosis is a multi-step process, at least in part controlled by the vascular endothelium function. Observations in humans and experimental models of atherosclerosis have identified monocyte recruitment as an early event in atherogenesis. Chronic inflammation is associated with ageing and its related diseases (e.g., atherosclerosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Recently it has been discovered that Sirtuins (NAD+-dependent deacetylases) represent a pivotal regulator of longevity and health. They appear to have a prominent role in vascular biology and regulate aspects of age-dependent atherosclerosis. Many studies demonstrate that SIRT1 exhibits anti-inflammatory properties in vitro (e.g., fatty acid-induced inflammation), in vivo (e.g., atherosclerosis, sustainment of normal immune function in knock-out mice) and in clinical studies (e.g., patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Because of a significant reduction of SIRT1 in rodent lungs exposed to cigarette smoke and in lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), activation of SIRT1 may be a potential target for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy. We review the inflammatory mechanisms involved in COPD-CVD coexistence and the potential role of SIRT1 in the regulation of these systems. PMID:23774840

  9. The Multifaceted Uses and Therapeutic Advantages of Nanoparticles for Atherosclerosis Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiStasio, Nicholas; Lehoux, Stephanie; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tabrizian, Maryam

    2018-05-08

    Nanoparticles are uniquely suited for the study and development of potential therapies against atherosclerosis by virtue of their size, fine-tunable properties, and ability to incorporate therapies and/or imaging modalities. Furthermore, nanoparticles can be specifically targeted to the atherosclerotic plaque, evading off-target effects and/or associated cytotoxicity. There has been a wealth of knowledge available concerning the use of nanotechnologies in cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis, in particular in animal models, but with a major focus on imaging agents. In fact, roughly 60% of articles from an initial search for this review included examples of imaging applications of nanoparticles. Thus, this review focuses on experimental therapy interventions applied to and observed in animal models. Particular emphasis is placed on how nanoparticle materials and properties allow researchers to learn a great deal about atherosclerosis. The objective of this review was to provide an update for nanoparticle use in imaging and drug delivery studies and to illustrate how nanoparticles can be used for sensing and modelling, for studying fundamental biological mechanisms, and for the delivery of biotherapeutics such as proteins, peptides, nucleic acids, and even cells all with the goal of attenuating atherosclerosis. Furthermore, the various atherosclerosis processes targeted mainly for imaging studies have been summarized in the hopes of inspiring new and exciting targeted therapeutic and/or imaging strategies.

  10. Protective Effects of Hydroxychloroquine against Accelerated Atherosclerosis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauli, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality are a challenge in management of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Higher risk of CV disease in SLE patients is mostly related to accelerated atherosclerosis. Nevertheless, high prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors in SLE patients does not fully explain the increased CV risk. Despite the pathological bases of accelerated atherosclerosis are not fully understood, it is thought that this process is driven by the complex interplay between SLE and atherosclerosis pathogenesis. Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is a cornerstone in treatment of SLE patients and has been thought to exert a broad spectrum of beneficial effects on disease activity, prevention of damage accrual, and mortality. Furthermore, HCQ is thought to protect against accelerated atherosclerosis targeting toll-like receptor signaling, cytokine production, T-cell and monocyte activation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction. HCQ was also described to have beneficial effects on traditional CV risk factors, such as dyslipidemia and diabetes. In conclusion, despite lacking randomized controlled trials unambiguously proving the protection of HCQ against accelerated atherosclerosis and incidence of CV events in SLE patients, evidence analyzed in this review is in favor of its beneficial effect. PMID:29670462

  11. [Age-related macular degeneration as a local manifestation of atherosclerosis - a novel insight into pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machalińska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible visual impairment and disability among the elderly in developed countries. There is compelling evidence that atherosclerosis and age-related macular degeneration share a similar pathogenic process. The association between atherosclerosis and age-related macular degeneration has been inferred from histological, biochemical and epidemiological studies. Many published data indicate that drusen are similar in molecular composition to plaques in atherosclerosis. Furthermore, a great body of evidence has emerged over the past decade that implicates the chronic inflammatory processes in the pathogenesis and progression of both disorders. We speculate that vascular atherosclerosis and age-related macular degeneration may represent different manifestations of the same disease induced by a pathologic tissue response to the damage caused by oxidative stress and local ischemia. In this review, we characterise in detail a strong association between age-related macular degeneration and atherosclerosis development, and we postulate the hypothesis that age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of a systemic disease. This provides a new approach for understanding the aspects of pathogenesis and might improve the prevention and treatment of both diseases which both result from ageing of the human body.

  12. Telomerase Activation in Atherosclerosis and Induction of Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Expression by Inflammatory Stimuli in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizard, Florence; Heywood, Elizabeth B.; Findeisen, Hannes M.; Zhao, Yue; Jones, Karrie L.; Cudejko, Cèline; Post, Ginell R.; Staels, Bart; Bruemmer, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Objective Telomerase serves as a critical regulator of tissue renewal. Although telomerase activity is inducible in response to various environmental cues, it remains unknown whether telomerase is activated during the inflammatory remodeling underlying atherosclerosis formation. To address this question, we investigated in the present study the regulation of telomerase in macrophages and during atherosclerosis development in LDL-receptor-deficient mice. Methods and Results We demonstrate that inflammatory stimuli activate telomerase in macrophages by inducing the expression of the catalytic subunit telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). Reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays identified a previously unrecognized NF-κB response element in the TERT promoter, to which NF-κB is recruited during inflammation. Inhibition of NF-κB signaling completely abolished the induction of TERT expression, characterizing TERT as a bona fide NF-κB target gene. Furthermore, functional experiments revealed that TERT-deficiency results in a senescent cell phenotype. Finally, we demonstrate high levels of TERT expression in macrophages of human atherosclerotic lesions and establish that telomerase is activated during atherosclerosis development in LDL-receptor-deficient mice. Conclusion These results characterize TERT as a previously unrecognized NF-κB target gene in macrophages and demonstrate that telomerase is activated during atherosclerosis. This induction of TERT expression prevents macrophage senescence and may have important implications for the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:21106948

  13. Heat Shock Proteins: Pathogenic Role in Atherosclerosis and Potential Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arman Kilic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (HSPs are a highly conserved group of proteins that are constitutively expressed and function as molecular chaperones, aiding in protein folding and preventing the accumulation of misfolded proteins. In the arterial wall, HSPs have a protective role under normal physiologic conditions. In disease states, however, HSPs expressed on the vascular endothelial cell surface can act as targets for detrimental autoimmunity due to their highly conserved sequences. Developing therapeutic strategies for atherosclerosis based on HSPs is challenged by the need to balance such physiologic and pathologic roles of these proteins. This paper summarizes the role of HSPs in normal vascular wall processes as well as in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. The potential implications of HSPs in clinical therapies for atherosclerosis are also discussed.

  14. Olive oil and postprandial hyperlipidemia: implications for atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montserrat-de la Paz, Sergio; Bermudez, Beatriz; Cardelo, Magdalena P; Lopez, Sergio; Abia, Rocio; Muriana, Francisco J G

    2016-12-07

    Olive oil is the primary source of fat in the Mediterranean diet, which is associated with a significant improvement in health status, as measured by reduced mortality from several chronic diseases. The current pandemic of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes is intimately associated with an atherogenic dyslipidemic phenotype. The core components of the dyslipidemia of the metabolic syndrome, which most likely initiate atherosclerosis, are the "lipid triad" consisting of high plasma triglycerides, low levels of high-density lipoproteins, and a preponderance of small, dense low-density lipoproteins at fasting. However, postprandial (non-fasting) TGs (postprandial hyperlipidemia) are also recognized as an important component for atherosclerosis. Herein, the purpose of this review was to provide an update on the effects and mechanisms related to olive oil on postprandial hyperlipidemia and its implications for the onset and progression of atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome.

  15. Transendothelial exchange of low-density lipoprotein is unaffected by the presence of severe atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Karen; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Jensen, Trine Krogsgaard

    2004-01-01

    intravenously (i.v.), and the 1-h fractional escape rates (FER(LDL) and FER(alb)) were taken as indices of transendothelial exchange. RESULTS: Patients with coronary or peripheral atherosclerosis had FER(LDL) similar to that of controls [4.3 (3.5-5.1) and 3.2 (2.3-4.1) versus 4.2 (3.7-4.7)%/h; P>0.05], even...... after adjustment for LDL distribution volume (DV(LDL)). In contrast, diabetes patients had significantly higher FER(LDL) than controls [5.2 (4.6-5.7) versus 4.2 (3.7-4.7)%/h; P..., FER(alb) was not elevated in patients with coronary atherosclerosis, possibly elevated in patients with peripheral atherosclerosis, but was elevated in diabetes patients. There was a tight positive correlation between FER(LDL) and FER(alb) in all groups of patients and controls. CONCLUSION...

  16. Endometriosis and atherosclerosis: what we already know and what we have yet to discover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Luca; D'Onofrio, Ferruccio; Flore, Roberto; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Santoliquido, Angelo

    2015-09-01

    The possible association between endometriosis and atherosclerosis represents an emerging topic in the field of women's health. In this Clinical Opinion paper, we analyze this theme focusing on the pathogenetic mechanisms of both diseases, deeply discussing about what is already known about this association and producing starting points about what we consider suitable to research in the near future with regard to cardiovascular involvement in women affected by endometriosis. We have identified 5 reports specifically carried out to investigate the relationship between atherosclerosis and endometriosis; these studies show the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis in women affected by endometriosis, susceptible of regression after surgical removal of endometriosis, with a possible prognostic relevance for variations of cardiovascular risk in these women. However, to date, no studies in literature have been carried out to investigate the real incidence of cardiovascular events in women with endometriosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional promoter variant in zinc finger protein 202 predicts severe atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frikke-Schmidt, R.; Nordestgaard, Børge; Grande, Peer

    2008-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to test the hypotheses that single nucleotide polymorphisms ( SNPs), in zinc finger protein 202 ( ZNF202), predict severe atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease ( IHD). Background ZNF202 is a transcriptional repressor controlling promoter elements in genes...... involved in vascular maintenance and lipid metabolism. Methods We first determined genotype association for 9 ZNF202 SNPs with severe atherosclerosis ( ankle brachial index >0.7 vs. ...,998 controls. Finally, we determined whether g. -660A>G altered transcriptional activity of the ZNF202 promoter in vitro. Results Cross-sectionally, ZNF202 g. -660 GG versus AA homozygosity predicted an odds ratio for severe atherosclerosis of 2.01 ( 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.34 to 3.01). Prospectively...

  18. [Screening for atherosclerosis to prevent cardiovascular risk : a pro-contra debate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanchen, David; Genest, Jacques

    2018-02-28

    Detecting atherosclerosis using imaging techniques is the subject of intense debate in the scientific community. Among the arguments in favor of screening, a better identification or better stratification of cardiovascular risk is mentioned, compared to cardiovascular risk scores based solely on traditional risk factors, such as blood pressure or cholesterol levels. Imaging techniques are also used to monitor the progression of atherosclerosis among patients using lipid-lowering or antihypertensive drugs in primary prevention. However, several experts in recent years have challenged the clinical utility of these imaging techniques in asymptomatic adults. This article proposes a debate « for or against » to describe the main arguments for or against the use of imaging for screening for atherosclerosis.

  19. Site-Specific Antioxidative Therapy for Prevention of Atherosclerosis and Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Otani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress has been implicated in pathophysiology of aging and age-associated disease. Antioxidative medicine has become a practice for prevention of atherosclerosis. However, limited success in preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD in individuals with atherosclerosis using general antioxidants has prompted us to develop a novel antioxidative strategy to prevent atherosclerosis. Reducing visceral adipose tissue by calorie restriction (CR and regular endurance exercise represents a causative therapy for ameliorating oxidative stress. Some of the recently emerging drugs used for the treatment of CVD may be assigned as site-specific antioxidants. CR and exercise mimetic agents are the choice for individuals who are difficult to continue CR and exercise. Better understanding of molecular and cellular biology of redox signaling will pave the way for more effective antioxidative medicine for prevention of CVD and prolongation of healthy life span.

  20. A rabbit model of atherosclerosis at carotid artery: MRI visualization and histopathological characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Zhan-Long; Teng, Gao-Jun; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Hong-Ying; Cao, Ai-Hong; Ni, Yicheng

    2008-01-01

    To induce a rabbit model of atherosclerosis at carotid artery, to visualize the lesion evolution with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to characterize the lesion types by histopathology. Atherosclerosis at the right common carotid artery (RCCA) was induced in 23 rabbits by high-lipid diet following balloon catheter injury to the endothelium. The rabbits were examined in vivo with a 1.5-T MRI and randomly divided into three groups of 6 weeks (n=6), 12 weeks (n=8) and 15 weeks (n=9) for postmortem histopathology. The lesions on both MRI and histology were categorized according to the American Heart Association (AHA) classifications of atherosclerosis. Type I and type II of atherosclerotic changes were detected at week 6, i.e., nearly normal signal intensity (SI) of the injured RCCA wall without stenosis on MRI, but with subendothelial inflammatory infiltration and proliferation of smooth muscle cells on histopathology. At week 12, 75.0% and 62.5% of type III changes were encountered on MRI and histopathology respectively with thicker injured RCCA wall of increased SI on T 1 -weighted and proton density (PD)-weighted MRI and microscopically a higher degree of plaque formation. At week 15, carotid atherosclerosis became more advanced, i.e., type IV and type V in 55.6% and 22.2% of the lesions with MRI and 55.6% and 33.3% of the lesions with histopathology, respectively. Statistical analysis revealed a significant agreement (p<0.05) between the MRI and histological findings for lesion classification (r=0.96). A rabbit model of carotid artery atherosclerosis has been successfully induced and noninvasively visualized. The atherosclerotic plaque formation evolved from type I to type V with time, which could be monitored with 1.5-T MRI and confirmed with histomorphology. This experimental setting can be applied in preclinical research on atherosclerosis. (orig.)

  1. An alternative method for quantifying coronary artery calcification: the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, C Jason; Budoff, Matthew J; Kaufman, Joel D; Kronmal, Richard A; Brown, Elizabeth R

    2012-07-02

    Extent of atherosclerosis measured by amount of coronary artery calcium (CAC) in computed tomography (CT) has been traditionally assessed using thresholded scoring methods, such as the Agatston score (AS). These thresholded scores have value in clinical prediction, but important information might exist below the threshold, which would have important advantages for understanding genetic, environmental, and other risk factors in atherosclerosis. We developed a semi-automated threshold-free scoring method, the spatially weighted calcium score (SWCS) for CAC in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Chest CT scans were obtained from 6814 participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). The SWCS and the AS were calculated for each of the scans. Cox proportional hazards models and linear regression models were used to evaluate the associations of the scores with CHD events and CHD risk factors. CHD risk factors were summarized using a linear predictor. Among all participants and participants with AS > 0, the SWCS and AS both showed similar strongly significant associations with CHD events (hazard ratios, 1.23 and 1.19 per doubling of SWCS and AS; 95% CI, 1.16 to 1.30 and 1.14 to 1.26) and CHD risk factors (slopes, 0.178 and 0.164; 95% CI, 0.162 to 0.195 and 0.149 to 0.179). Even among participants with AS = 0, an increase in the SWCS was still significantly associated with established CHD risk factors (slope, 0.181; 95% CI, 0.138 to 0.224). The SWCS appeared to be predictive of CHD events even in participants with AS = 0, though those events were rare as expected. The SWCS provides a valid, continuous measure of CAC suitable for quantifying the extent of atherosclerosis without a threshold, which will be useful for examining novel genetic and environmental risk factors for atherosclerosis.

  2. An alternative method for quantifying coronary artery calcification: the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis (MESA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang C

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extent of atherosclerosis measured by amount of coronary artery calcium (CAC in computed tomography (CT has been traditionally assessed using thresholded scoring methods, such as the Agatston score (AS. These thresholded scores have value in clinical prediction, but important information might exist below the threshold, which would have important advantages for understanding genetic, environmental, and other risk factors in atherosclerosis. We developed a semi-automated threshold-free scoring method, the spatially weighted calcium score (SWCS for CAC in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA. Methods Chest CT scans were obtained from 6814 participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA. The SWCS and the AS were calculated for each of the scans. Cox proportional hazards models and linear regression models were used to evaluate the associations of the scores with CHD events and CHD risk factors. CHD risk factors were summarized using a linear predictor. Results Among all participants and participants with AS > 0, the SWCS and AS both showed similar strongly significant associations with CHD events (hazard ratios, 1.23 and 1.19 per doubling of SWCS and AS; 95% CI, 1.16 to 1.30 and 1.14 to 1.26 and CHD risk factors (slopes, 0.178 and 0.164; 95% CI, 0.162 to 0.195 and 0.149 to 0.179. Even among participants with AS = 0, an increase in the SWCS was still significantly associated with established CHD risk factors (slope, 0.181; 95% CI, 0.138 to 0.224. The SWCS appeared to be predictive of CHD events even in participants with AS = 0, though those events were rare as expected. Conclusions The SWCS provides a valid, continuous measure of CAC suitable for quantifying the extent of atherosclerosis without a threshold, which will be useful for examining novel genetic and environmental risk factors for atherosclerosis.

  3. Relationship of Hypertension to Coronary Atherosclerosis and Cardiac Events in Patients With Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Rine; Baskaran, Lohendran; Gransar, Heidi; Budoff, Matthew J; Achenbach, Stephan; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Cademartiri, Filippo; Callister, Tracy Q; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha; Chow, Benjamin J W; DeLago, Augustin; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Joerg; Cury, Ricardo; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Kim, Yong-Jin; Leipsic, Jonathon; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Maffei, Erica; Raff, Gilbert; Shaw, Leslee J; Villines, Todd C; Dunning, Allison; Marques, Hugo; Pontone, Gianluca; Andreini, Daniele; Rubinshtein, Ronen; Bax, Jeroen; Jones, Erica; Hindoyan, Niree; Gomez, Millie; Lin, Fay Y; Min, James K; Berman, Daniel S

    2017-08-01

    Hypertension is an atherosclerosis factor and is associated with cardiovascular risk. We investigated the relationship between hypertension and the presence, extent, and severity of coronary atherosclerosis in coronary computed tomographic angiography and cardiac events risk. Of 17 181 patients enrolled in the CONFIRM registry (Coronary CT Angiography Evaluation for Clinical Outcomes: An International Multicenter Registry) who underwent ≥64-detector row coronary computed tomographic angiography, we identified 14 803 patients without known coronary artery disease. Of these, 1434 hypertensive patients were matched to 1434 patients without hypertension. Major adverse cardiac events risk of hypertension and non-hypertensive patients was evaluated with Cox proportional hazards models. The prognostic associations between hypertension and no-hypertension with increasing degree of coronary stenosis severity (nonobstructive or obstructive ≥50%) and extent of coronary artery disease (segment involvement score of 1-5, >5) was also assessed. Hypertension patients less commonly had no coronary atherosclerosis and more commonly had nonobstructive and 1-, 2-, and 3-vessel disease than the no-hypertension group. During a mean follow-up of 5.2±1.2 years, 180 patients experienced cardiac events, with 104 (2.0%) occurring in the hypertension group and 76 (1.5%) occurring in the no-hypertension group (hazard ratios, 1.4; 95% confidence intervals, 1.0-1.9). Compared with no-hypertension patients without coronary atherosclerosis, hypertension patients with no coronary atherosclerosis and obstructive coronary disease tended to have higher risk of cardiac events. Similar trends were observed with respect to extent of coronary artery disease. Compared with no-hypertension patients, hypertensive patients have increased presence, extent, and severity of coronary atherosclerosis and tend to have an increase in major adverse cardiac events. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Comparison of osteoprotegerin to traditional atherosclerotic risk factors and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein for diagnosis of atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogelvang, Rasmus; Pedersen, Sune Holm; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the main cause of cardiovascular disease, but the extent of atherosclerosis in individual patients is difficult to estimate. A biomarker of the atherosclerotic burden would be very valuable. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association of plasma osteoprotegerin ...

  5. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein decreases high-density lipoprotein and severely aggravates atherosclerosis in APOE*3-Leiden mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, M.; Hoogt, C.C. van der; Haan, W. de; Offerman, E.H.; Dallinga-Thie, G.M.; Jukema, J.W.; Havekes, L.M.; Rensen, P.C.N.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - The role of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in the development of atherosclerosis is still undergoing debate. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of human CETP expression on atherosclerosis in APOE*3-Leiden (E3L) mice with a humanized lipoprotein profile. METHODS AND RESULTS -

  6. Enhanced susceptibility of low-density lipoproteins to oxidation in coronary bypass patients with progression of atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijke, Y.B. de; Verwey, H.F.; Vogelezang, C.J.M.; Velde, E.A. van der; Princen, H.M.G.; Laarse, A. van der; Bruschke, A.V.G.; Berkel, T.J.C. van

    1995-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) may play a causal role in atherosclerosis. In this study we analyzed whether the severity of progression of coronary atherosclerosis is related to the susceptibility of LDL to oxidative modification. On the basis of repeated coronary angiography, 28

  7. Long Term Follow Up of Celiac Disease—Is Atherosclerosis a Problem?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rybak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a lifelong condition and it often involves impaired nutrition, wide spectrum of symptoms and it requires constant dietetic treatment. The impact of the gluten-free diet on patients’ nutritional status and on the other biochemical parameters is being widely investigated. In this article we looked into particular risk factors that might lead to increased prevalence of atherosclerosis in CD patients, including nutritional status, gluten-free diet, lipids profile and concomitant disease—type 1 diabetes mellitus. Here, we present the current data and research on these risk factors of atherosclerosis with respect to celiac disease.

  8. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α Expression in Macrophages Promotes Development of Atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Annemarie Aarup; Pedersen, Tanja X; Junker, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    transplanted with bone marrow from mice with HIF-1α deficiency in the myeloid cells or control bone marrow. The HIF-1α deficiency in myeloid cells reduced atherosclerosis in aorta of the Ldlr(-/-) recipient mice by ≈72% (P=0.006).In vitro, HIF-1α-deficient macrophages displayed decreased differentiation...... to proinflammatory M1 macrophages and reduced expression of inflammatory genes. HIF-1α deficiency also affected glucose uptake, apoptosis, and migratory abilities of the macrophages. CONCLUSIONS: HIF-1α expression in macrophages affects their intrinsic inflammatory profile and promotes development of atherosclerosis....

  9. The monocytic lineage specific soluble CD163 is a plasma marker of coronary atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aristoteli, Lina Panayiota; Møller, Holger Jon; Bailey, Brian

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CD163 is a monocyte-macrophage lineage specific scavenger receptor that mediates the uptake and clearance of haptoglobin-haemoglobin complexes, and soluble CD163 (sCD163) is also present in plasma. As atherosclerosis involves infiltration by monocyte-derived macrophages, we investigated...... whether sCD163 may act as a marker of coronary atherosclerosis (CAD). METHODS AND RESULTS: Clinical features were identified and plasma was collected from 147 consecutive patients presenting for coronary angiography. Patients were classified as having CAD+, or being free of CAD- haemodynamically...

  10. [Macrophage activation in atherosclerosis. Message 1: Activation of macrophages normally and in atherosclerotic lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, N G; Kornienko, V Y; Karagodin, V P; Orekhov, A N

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play important role in initiation and progression of inflammation in atherosclerosis. Plaque macrophages were shown to exhibit a phenotypic range that is intermediate between two extremes, M1 (proinflammatory) and M2 (anti-inflammatory). Indeed, in atherosclerosis, macrophages demonstrate phenotypic plasticity to rapidly adjust to changing microenvironmental conditions. In plaque macrophages demonstrate different phenotypes, and besides macrophage phenotypes could be changed. Phenotypes M1, M2, M4, Mhem, HA-mac, M(Hb) u Mox are described in the article. Ability of macrophages change their phenotype also considered.

  11. Ultraviolet-Visible and Fluorescence Spectroscopy Techniques Are Important Diagnostic Tools during the Progression of Atherosclerosis: Diet Zinc Supplementation Retarded or Delayed Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhalim, Mohamed Anwar K.; Moussa, Sherif A. Abdelmottaleb; AL-Mohy, Yanallah Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Background. In this study, we examined whether UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy techniques detect the progression of atherosclerosis in serum of rabbits fed on high-cholesterol diet (HCD) and HCD supplemented with zinc (HCD + Zn) compared with the control. Methods. The control rabbits group was fed on 100 g/day of normal diet. The HCD group was fed on Purina Certified Rabbit Chow supplemented with 1.0% cholesterol plus 1.0% olive oil (100 g/day) for the same period. The HCD + Zn group was fed on normal Purina Certified Rabbit Chow plus 1.0% cholesterol and 1.0% olive oil supplemented with 470 ppm Zn for the same feeding period. UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy and biochemistry in Rabbit's blood serum and blood hematology were measured in Rabbit's blood. Results. We found that the fluorescent peak of HCD shifted toward UV-visible wavelength compared with the control using fluorescent excitation of serum at 192 nm. In addition, they showed that supplementation of zinc (350 ppm) restored the fluorescent peak closely to the control. By using UV-visible spectroscopy approach, we found that the peak absorbance of HCD (about 280 nm) was higher than that of control and that zinc supplementation seemed to decrease the absorbance. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy techniques can be applied as noninvasive techniques on a sample blood serum for diagnosing or detecting the progression of atherosclerosis. The Zn supplementation to rabbits fed on HCD delays or retards the progression of atherosclerosis. Inducing anemia in rabbits fed on HCD delays the progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:24350281

  12. Rationale and protocol of a trial for prevention of diabetic atherosclerosis by using antiplatelet drugs: study of Diabetic Atherosclerosis Prevention by Cilostazol (DAPC study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawamori Ryuzo

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary treatment of arteriosclerosis may be applicable for the primary prevention of atherosclerosis in diabetic patients. This prospective, 2-year follow-up study was designed to determine the efficacy and safety of antiplatelet therapy in the prevention of atherosclerosis of diabetic subjects. Methods Patients with type 2 diabetes and arteriosclerosis obliterans from the Eastern Asian countries were registered online and randomly assigned either to the aspirin group (81–100 mg/day or the cilostazol group (100–200 mg/day in this international, 2-year, prospective follow-up interventional study. Results The primary study endpoint was changes in right and left maximum intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery. Secondary endpoints include changes in right and left maximum intima-media thickness of the internal carotid artery; semiquantitative evaluation of cerebral infarction by magnetic resonance imaging; cardiovascular events including sudden death, stroke, transient cerebral ischemic attacks, acute myocardial infarction, angina, and progression of arteriosclerosis obliterans; overall death; withdrawal; and change in ankle-brachial pressure index. Conclusion This is the first study to use an online system that was developed in Asian countries for pooling data from an international clinical trial. These findings are expected to help in the prevention of diabetic atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease.

  13. Modulation of ambient temperature promotes inflammation and initiates atherosclerosis in wild type C57BL/6 mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Giles

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Obesity and obesity-associated inflammation is central to a variety of end-organ sequelae including atherosclerosis, a leading cause of death worldwide. Although mouse models have provided important insights into the immunopathogenesis of various diseases, modeling atherosclerosis in mice has proven difficult. Specifically, wild-type (WT mice are resistant to developing atherosclerosis, while commonly used genetically modified mouse models of atherosclerosis are poor mimics of human disease. The lack of a physiologically relevant experimental model of atherosclerosis has hindered the understanding of mechanisms regulating disease development and progression as well as the development of translational therapies. Recent evidence suggests that housing mice within their thermoneutral zone profoundly alters murine physiology, including both metabolic and immune processes. We hypothesized that thermoneutral housing would allow for augmentation of atherosclerosis induction and progression in mice. Methods: ApoE−/− and WT mice were housed at either standard (TS or thermoneutral (TN temperatures and fed either a chow or obesogenic “Western” diet. Analysis included quantification of (i obesity and obesity-associated downstream sequelae, (ii the development and progression of atherosclerosis, and (iii inflammatory gene expression pathways related to atherosclerosis. Results: Housing mice at TN, in combination with an obesogenic “Western” diet, profoundly augmented obesity development, exacerbated atherosclerosis in ApoE−/− mice, and initiated atherosclerosis development in WT mice. This increased disease burden was associated with altered lipid profiles, including cholesterol levels and fractions, and increased aortic plaque size. In addition to the mild induction of atherosclerosis, we similarly observed increased levels of aortic and white adipose tissue inflammation and increased circulating immune cell expression of pathways

  14. Migraine and subclinical atherosclerosis in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart, Alessandra C; Santos, Itamar S; Bittencourt, Márcio S; Lotufo, Paulo A; Benseñor, Isabela M

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between migraine and coronary heart disease (CHD) remains controversial. We aimed to investigate the association of subclinical atherosclerosis and migraine with or without aura compared to a non-migraine subgroup (reference) in a large Brazilian multicentric cohort study, the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). Migraine diagnostic was based on International Headache Society criteria, and aura symptoms were validated by a medical doctor in a sub-sample of the ELSA-Brasil, who also underwent coronary artery calcium score (CAC) and carotid intima-media thickness (C-IMT) evaluations. Subclinical atherosclerosis indexes (CAC and C-IMT) were analyzed as dependent variables and migraine (all, with aura, without aura) as an independent variable in the linear and multinomial logistic regression models adjusted for possible confounders. Of 3217 ELSA participants free from CVD at baseline, we found a migraine frequency of 11.9% (5.1% with aura and 6.8% without aura). Overall, migraineurs were mostly women, younger and had lower frequency of CV risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes and low HDL-cholesterol, compared to non-migraineurs. The strongest inverse correlation between migraine and subclinical atherosclerosis was verified with CAC score. However, all associations lost their significance after multivariate adjustment. In this cross-sectional evaluation of the ELSA study, migraine was not associated with subclinical atherosclerosis, regardless of aura symptoms. © International Headache Society 2015.

  15. Dual roles of heparanase in vascular calcification associated with human carotid atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldi, S.; Eriksson, L.; Kronqvist, M.

    2017-01-01

    Vascular intimal calcification is a hallmark of advanced atherosclerosis and an active process akin to bone remodeling. Heparanase (HPSE) is an endo-β-glucuronidase, which cleaves glycosaminoglycan chains of heparan sulfate proteoglycans. The role of heparanase in osteogenesis and bone remodeling...

  16. The multi-functionality of CD40L and its receptor CD40 in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lievens, Dirk; Eijgelaar, Wouter J.; Biessen, Erik A. L.; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.; Lutgens, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Disrupting the CD40-CD40L co-stimulatory pathway reduces atherosclerosis and induces a stable atherosclerotic plaque phenotype that is low in inflammation and high in fibrosis. Therefore, inhibition of the CD40-CD40L pathway is an attractive therapeutic target to reduce clinical complications of

  17. Vitamin E supplementation and atherosclerosis : epidemiological studies in elderly and smokers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waart, de F.

    2000-01-01

    The antioxidant vitamin E may have beneficial effects on several indicators of human health. We studied the impact on atherosclerosis, immune response and total mortality in smokers and elderly people, who are at risk for increased oxidative stress. Vitamin E may exert its effect on

  18. Hazard identification of particulate matter on vasomotor dysfunction and progression of atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Mikkelsen, Lone; Vesterdal, Lise Kristine

    2011-01-01

    and inflammatory pathways. We have assessed the effect of exposure to particulate matter on progression of atherosclerosis and vasomotor function in humans, animals, and ex vivo experimental systems. The type of particles that have been tested in these systems encompass TiO(2), carbon black, fullerene C(60...... of particulate matter....

  19. Dietary patterns, biomarkers of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular and all-cause mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijtsma, F.P.C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary belonging to the thesis entitled ‘Dietary patterns, biomarkers of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular and all-cause mortality’

    The long history of epidemiologic studies on diet and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has traditionally relied on analysis of specific nutrients

  20. High cumulative insulin exposure: a risk factor of atherosclerosis in type 1 diabetes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muis, Marian J.; Bots, Michiel L.; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Hoogma, Roel P. L. M.; Hoekstra, Joost B. L.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Stolk, Ronald P.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Since insulin therapy might have an atherogenic effect, we studied the relationship between cumulative insulin dose and atherosclerosis in type 1 diabetes. We have focused on patients with type 1 diabetes instead of type 2 diabetes to minimise the effect of insulin resistance as a

  1. The cathelicidin protein CRAMP is a potential atherosclerosis self-antigen in ApoE(-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M Mihailovic

    Full Text Available Auto-immunity is believed to contribute to inflammation in atherosclerosis. The antimicrobial peptide LL-37, a fragment of the cathelicidin protein precursor hCAP18, was previously identified as an autoantigen in psoriasis. Given the reported link between psoriasis and coronary artery disease, the biological relevance of the autoantigen to atherosclerosis was tested in vitro using a truncated (t form of the mouse homolog of hCAP18, CRAMP, on splenocytes from athero-prone ApoE(-/- mice. Stimulation with tCRAMP resulted in increased CD8+ T cells with Central Memory and Effector Memory phenotypes in ApoE(-/- mice, differentially activated by feeding with normal chow or high fat diet. Immunization of ApoE(-/- with different doses of the shortened peptide (Cramp resulted in differential outcomes with a lower dose reducing atherosclerosis whereas a higher dose exacerbating the disease with increased neutrophil infiltration of the atherosclerotic plaques. Low dose Cramp immunization also resulted in increased splenic CD8+ T cell degranulation and reduced CD11b+CD11c+ conventional dendritic cells (cDCs, whereas high dose increased CD11b+CD11c+ cDCs. Our results identified CRAMP, the mouse homolog of hCAP-18, as a potential self-antigen involved in the immune response to atherosclerosis in the ApoE(-/- mouse model.

  2. Low-Dose Radiation Exposure and Atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitchel, R. E. J.; Hasu, M.; Bugden, M.; Wyatt, H.; Little, M. P.; Gola, A.; Hildebrandt, G.; Priest, N. D.; Whitman, S. C.

    The hypothesis that single low-dose exposures (0.025-0.5 Gy) to low-LET radiation given at either high (about 150 mGy/min) or low (1 mGy/min) dose rate would promote aortic atherosclerosis was tested in female C57BL/6J mice genetically predisposed to this disease (ApoE(-/-)). Mice were exposed

  3. Abnormalities of blood platelets in rabbits with dietary hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazoyer, E.; Dalal, K.; Carpenter, D.; Brennan, K.; Yee, T.; Mazoyer, B.; Leven, R.; Ebbe, S.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary results are reported from observations of rabbits that were fed a high cholesterol diet to induce atherosclerosis. The purpose of the project was to develop an animal model that would be appropriate to use in the imaging of vascular lesions by positron emission tomography or other techniques

  4. A semantically-aided architecture for a web-based monitoring system for carotid atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolias, Vassileios D; Stamou, Giorgos; Golemati, Spyretta; Stoitsis, Giannis; Gkekas, Christos D; Liapis, Christos D; Nikita, Konstantina S

    2015-08-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease and its clinical diagnosis depends on the evaluation of heterogeneous clinical data, such as imaging exams, biochemical tests and the patient's clinical history. The lack of interoperability between Health Information Systems (HIS) does not allow the physicians to acquire all the necessary data for the diagnostic process. In this paper, a semantically-aided architecture is proposed for a web-based monitoring system for carotid atherosclerosis that is able to gather and unify heterogeneous data with the use of an ontology and to create a common interface for data access enhancing the interoperability of HIS. The architecture is based on an application ontology of carotid atherosclerosis that is used to (a) integrate heterogeneous data sources on the basis of semantic representation and ontological reasoning and (b) access the critical information using SPARQL query rewriting and ontology-based data access services. The architecture was tested over a carotid atherosclerosis dataset consisting of the imaging exams and the clinical profile of 233 patients, using a set of complex queries, constructed by the physicians. The proposed architecture was evaluated with respect to the complexity of the queries that the physicians could make and the retrieval speed. The proposed architecture gave promising results in terms of interoperability, data integration of heterogeneous sources with an ontological way and expanded capabilities of query and retrieval in HIS.

  5. ACE inhibition with perindopril and biomarkers of atherosclerosis and thrombosis : Results from the PERTINENT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceconi, C.; Fox, K.M.; Remme, W.J.; Simoons, M.L.; Deckers, J.W.; Bertrand, M.; Parrinello, G.; Kluft, C.; Blann, A.; Cokkinos, D.; Ferrari, R.

    2009-01-01

    The PERTINENT study measured biomarkers of atherosclerosis and thrombosis in a stable coronary artery disease population from EUROPA receiving ACE inhibition with perindopril 8 mg/day or placebo. Biomarkers of inflammation, C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha

  6. Nanoparticles containing a liver X receptor agonist inhibit inflammation and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Qing; Even-Or, Orli; Xu, Xiaoyang; van Rosmalen, Mariska; Lim, Lucas; Gadde, Suresh; Farokhzad, Omid C; Fisher, Edward A

    2015-01-28

    Liver X receptor (LXR) signaling pathways regulate lipid metabolism and inflammation, which has generated widespread interest in developing synthetic LXR agonists as potential therapeutics for the management of atherosclerosis. In this study, it is demonstrated that nanoparticles (NPs) containing the synthetic LXR agonist GW3965 (NP-LXR) exert anti-inflammatory effects and inhibit the development of atherosclerosis without causing hepatic steatosis. These NPs are engineered through self-assembly of a biodegradable diblock poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG) copolymer. NP-LXR is significantly more effective than free GW3965 at inducing LXR-target gene expression and suppressing inflammatory factors in macrophages in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, the NPs elicit negligible lipogenic gene stimulation in the liver. Using the Ldlr (-/-) mouse model of atherosclerosis, abundant colocalization of fluorescently labeled NPs within plaque macrophages following systemic administration is seen. Notably, six intravenous injections of NP-LXR over 2 weeks markedly reduce the CD68-positive cell (macrophage) content of plaques (by 50%) without increasing total cholesterol or triglycerides in the liver and plasma. Together, these findings identify GW3965-encapsulated PLGA-b-PEG NPs as a promising nanotherapeutic approach to combat atherosclerosis, providing the benefits of LXR agonists without their adverse effects on hepatic and plasma lipid metabolism. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Enhanced base excision repair capacity in carotid atherosclerosis may protect nuclear DNA but not mitochondrial DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarpengland, Tonje; B. Dahl, Tuva; Skjelland, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Lesional and systemic oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, potentially leading to accumulation of DNA base lesions within atherosclerotic plaques. Although base excision repair (BER) is a major pathway counteracting oxidative DNA damage, our knowledge on BER...

  8. Pentosan polysulfate inhibits atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits: differential modulation of metalloproteinase-2 and -9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupia, Enrico; Zheng, Feng; Grosjean, Fabrizio; Tack, Ivan; Doublier, Sophie; Elliot, Sharon J; Vlassara, Helen; Striker, Gary E

    2012-02-01

    Pentosan polysulfate (PPS), a heparinoid compound essentially devoid of anticoagulant activity, modulates cell growth and decreases inflammation. We investigated the effect of PPS on the progression of established atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits. After severe atherosclerosis developed on an atherogenic diet, WHHL rabbits were treated with oral PPS or tap water for 1 month. The aortic intima-to-media ratio and macrophage infiltration were reduced, plaque collagen content was increased, and plaque fibrous caps were preserved by PPS treatment. Plasma lipid levels and post-heparin hepatic lipase activity remained unchanged. However, net collagenolytic activity in aortic extracts was decreased, and the levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) activity were increased by PPS. Moreover, PPS treatment decreased tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-stimulated proinflammatory responses, in particular activation of nuclear factor-κB and p38, and activation of MMPs in macrophages. In conclusion, oral PPS treatment prevents progression of established atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits. This effect may be partially mediated by increased MMP-2 and TIMP activities in the aortic wall and reduced TNFα-stimulated inflammation and MMP activation in macrophages. Thus, PPS may be a useful agent in inhibiting the progression of atherosclerosis.

  9. Hypertension and other Risk Factors of Atherosclerosis in the Czech Population

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomečková, Marie; Grünfeldová, H.; Peleška, Jan; Hanuš, P.; Marušiaková, Miriam

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 25, Suppl. 2 (2007), S 353-S 353 ISSN 0952-1178. [European Meeting on Hypertension /17./. 15.06.2007-19.06.2007, Milan] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : atherosclerosis * risk factors * hypertension Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  10. Risk of atherosclerosis in general Czech population is very high - preventive examinations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomečková, Marie; Grünfeldová, H.; Peleška, Jan; Hanuš, P.; Martinková, Patrícia

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 14, suppl 1 (2007), S66-S66 ISSN 1741-8267. [EuroPrevent Congress. 19.04.2007-21.04.2007, Madrid] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : risk of atherosclerosis * preventive examinations * general population Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  11. Nitro-fatty acids reduce atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rudolph, T.K.; Rudolph, V.; Edreira, M.M.; Cole, M.P.; Bonacci, G.; Schopfer, F.J.; Woodcock, S.R.; Franek, A.; Pekarová, Michaela; Khoo, N.K.H.; Hasty, A.H.; Baldus, S.; Freeman, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 5 (2010), s. 938-945 ISSN 1079-5642 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : nitro-fatty acids * atherosclerosis * foam cells Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 7.215, year: 2010

  12. Aspirin and the risk of cardiovascular events in atherosclerosis patients with and without prior ischemic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavry, Anthony A; Elgendy, Islam Y; Elbez, Yedid; Mahmoud, Ahmed N; Sorbets, Emmanuel; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2017-09-01

    The benefit of aspirin among patients with stable atherosclerosis without a prior ischemic event is not well defined. Aspirin would be of benefit in outpatients with atherosclerosis with prior ischemic events, but not in those without ischemic events. Subjects from the Reduction of Atherothrombosis for Continued Health registry were divided according to prior ischemic event (n =21 724) vs stable atherosclerosis, but no prior ischemic event (n = 11 872). Analyses were propensity score matched. Aspirin use was updated at each clinic visit and considered as a time-varying covariate. The primary outcome was the first occurrence of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. In the group with a prior ischemic event, aspirin use was associated with a marginally lower risk of the primary outcome at a median of 41 months (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.65-1.01, P = 0.06). In the group without a prior ischemic event, aspirin use was not associated with a lower risk of the primary outcome at a median of 36 months (HR: 1.03, 95% CI: 0.73-1.45, P = 0.86). In this observational analysis of outpatients with stable atherosclerosis, aspirin was marginally beneficial among patients with a prior ischemic event; however, there was no apparent benefit among those with no prior ischemic event. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. HMGB1 in vascular diseases : Its role in vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Souza, A. W. S.; Westra, J.; Limburg, P. C.; Bijl, M.; Kallenberg, C. G. M.

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear protein high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of several vascular diseases such as systemic vasculitis and atherosclerosis. In systemic vasculitides including ANCA-associated vasculitis and Kawasaki disease, serum HMGB1 levels are higher

  14. High cumulative insulin exposure : a risk factor of atherosclerosis in type 1 diabetes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muis, MJ; Bots, ML; Bilo, HJG; Hoogma, RPLM; Hoekstra, JBL; Grobbee, DE; Stolk, RP

    Background: Since insulin therapy might have an atherogenic effect, we studied the relationship between cumulative insulin dose and atherosclerosis in type 1 diabetes. We have focused on patients with type 1 diabetes instead of type 2 diabetes to minimise the effect of insulin resistance as a

  15. Functional blockage of EMMPRIN ameliorates atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Yang, Li-xia; Guo, Rui-wei; Zhu, Guo-Fu; Shi, Yan-Kun; Wang, Xian-mei; Qi, Feng; Guo, Chuan-ming; Ye, Jin-shan; Yang, Zhi-hua; Liang, Xing

    2013-10-09

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), a 58-kDa cell surface glycoprotein, has been identified as a key receptor for transmitting cellular signals mediating metalloproteinase activities, as well as inflammation and oxidative stress. Clinical evidence has revealed that EMMPRIN is expressed in human atherosclerotic plaque; however, the relationship between EMMPRIN and atherosclerosis is unclear. To evaluate the functional role of EMMPRIN in atherosclerosis, we treated apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice with an EMMPRIN function-blocking antibody. EMMPRIN was found to be up-regulated in ApoE(-/-) mice fed a 12-week high-fat diet in contrast to 12 weeks of normal diet. Administration of a function-blocking EMMPRIN antibody (100 μg, twice per week for 4 weeks) to ApoE(-/-) mice, starting after 12 weeks of high-fat diet feeding caused attenuated and more stable atherosclerotic lesions, less reactive oxygen stress generation on plaque, as well as down-regulation of circulating interleukin-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 in ApoE(-/-) mice. The benefit of EMMPRIN functional blockage was associated with reduced metalloproteinases proteolytic activity, which delayed the circulating monocyte transmigrating into atherosclerotic lesions. EMMPRIN antibody intervention ameliorated atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) mice by the down-regulation of metalloproteinase activity, suggesting that EMMPRIN may be a viable therapeutic target in atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Raman spectroscopy imaging reveals interplay between atherosclerosis and medial calcification in the human aorta

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Amanda Y. F.; Bergholt, Mads S.; St-Pierre, Jean-Philippe; Kit-Anan, Worrapong; Pence, Isaac J.; Chester, Adrian H.; Yacoub, Magdi H.; Bertazzo, Sergio; Stevens, Molly M.

    2017-01-01

    Medial calcification in the human aorta accumulates during aging and is known to be aggravated in several diseases. Atherosclerosis, another major cause of cardiovascular calcification, shares some common aggravators. However, the mechanisms of cardiovascular calcification remain poorly understood. To elucidate the relationship between medial aortic calcification and atherosclerosis, we characterized the cross-sectional distributions of the predominant minerals in aortic tissue, apatite and whitlockite, and the associated extracellular matrix. We also compared the cellular changes between atherosclerotic and nonatherosclerotic human aortic tissues. This was achieved through the development of Raman spectroscopy imaging methods that adapted algorithms to distinguish between the major biomolecules present within these tissues. We present a relationship between apatite, cholesterol, and triglyceride in atherosclerosis, with the relative amount of all molecules concurrently increased in the atherosclerotic plaque. Further, the increase in apatite was disproportionately large in relation to whitlockite in the aortic media directly underlying a plaque, indicating that apatite is more pathologically significant in atherosclerosis-aggravated medial calcification. We also discovered a reduction of β-carotene in the whole aortic intima, including a plaque in atherosclerotic aortic tissues compared to nonatherosclerotic tissues. This unprecedented biomolecular characterization of the aortic tissue furthers our understanding of pathological and physiological cardiovascular calcification events in humans. PMID:29226241

  17. Disrupting functional interactions between platelet chemokines inhibits atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koenen, Rory R; von Hundelshausen, Philipp; Nesmelova, Irina V

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by chronic inflammation of the arterial wall due to chemokine-driven mononuclear cell recruitment. Activated platelets can synergize with chemokines to exacerbate atherogenesis; for example, by deposition of the chemokines platelet factor-4 (PF4, also known as CXC...

  18. Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy May Play a Role in Pathogenesis of Atherosclerosis in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malá, Š.; Potočková, V.; Hoskovcová, L.; Pithová, P.; Brabec, Marek; Kulhánková, J.; Keil, R.; Riedlbauchová, L.; Brož, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 134, December (2017), s. 139-144 ISSN 0168-8227 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : autonomic neuropathy * diabetes mellitus * intima media thickness * atherosclerosis * heart rate variability Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research OBOR OECD: Statistics and probability Impact factor: 3.639, year: 2016

  19. Suppressive impact of anethum graveolens consumption on biochemical risk factors of atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbubeh Setorki

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: A. graveolens might have some protective values against atherosclerosis and that it significantly affects some biochemical risk factors of this disease. Our findings also confirm the potential harmful effects of oxidized fats and the importance of dietary polyphenols in the meal.

  20. Links between cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis in postmenopausal women: serum lipids or atherosclerosis per se?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Y Z; Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Alexandersen, P

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological observations suggest links between osteoporosis and risk of acute cardiovascular events and vice versa. Whether the two clinical conditions are linked by common pathogenic factors or atherosclerosis per se remains incompletely understood. We investigated whether serum lipids...... and polymorphism in the ApoE gene modifying serum lipids could be a biological linkage....

  1. Endothelial GPR124 Exaggerates the Pathogenesis of Atherosclerosis by Activating Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Mei Gong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Endothelial cell dysfunction is the principal pathological process underlying atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. G protein-coupled receptor 124 (GPR124, an orphan receptor in the adhesion GPCR subfamily, promotes angiogenesis in the brain. In the present study, we explored the role of endothelial GPR124 in the development and progression of atherosclerosis in adult mice. Methods: Using tetracycline-inducible transgenic systems, we generated mice expressing GPR124 specifically under control of the Tie-2 promoter. The animal model of atherosclerosis was constructed by intravenously injecting AAV-PCSK9DY into tetracycline-regulated mice and feeding the mice a high-fat diet for 16 consecutive weeks. Biochemical analysis and immunohistochemistry methods were used to address the role and mechanism of GPR124 in the pathological process of atherosclerosis. Results: Higher TC (total cholesterol and LDL-C (low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in serum and greater lipid deposition in the aortic sinus were found in atherosclerotic mice with GPR124 overexpression, coincident with the elevated proliferation of smooth muscle cells. We observed an elevation of ONOO- in the aortic sinus in this model by using immunofluorescence, and the experiments showed that the specific overexpression of GPR124 in the endothelium induced the up-regulation of CD68, NLRP3 and caspase-1 levels in the aortic sinus. Conclusion: The above results indicate that manipulating GPR124 in the endothelium may contribute to delayed pathological progression of atherosclerosis.

  2. Agent Based Modeling of Atherosclerosis: A Concrete Help in Personalized Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Francesco; Cincotti, Alessandro; Motta, Alfredo; Pennisi, Marzio

    Atherosclerosis, a pathology affecting arterial blood vessels, is one of most common diseases of the developed countries. We present studies on the increased atherosclerosis risk using an agent based model of atherogenesis that has been previously validated using clinical data. It is well known that the major risk in atherosclerosis is the persistent high level of low density lipoprotein (LDL) concentration. However, it is not known if short period of high LDL concentration can cause irreversible damage and if reduction of the LDL concentration (either by life style or drug) can drastically or partially reduce the already acquired risk. We simulated four different clinical situations in a large set of virtual patients (200 per clinical scenario). In the first one the patients lifestyle maintains the concentration of LDL in a no risk range. This is the control case simulation. The second case is represented by patients having high level of LDL with a delay to apply appropriate treatments; The third scenario is characterized by patients with high LDL levels treated with specific drugs like statins. Finally we simulated patients that are characterized by several oxidative events (smoke, sedentary life style, assumption of alcoholic drinks and so on so forth) that effective increase the risk of LDL oxidation. Those preliminary results obviously need to be clinically investigated. It is clear, however, that SimAthero has the power to concretely help medical doctors and clinicians in choosing personalized treatments for the prevention of the atherosclerosis damages.

  3. 75 FR 46945 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-04

    ... disease (CVD)-- that is, atherosclerosis and other forms of CVD that have not produced signs and symptoms... backgrounds and provide information for studies on new interventions to prevent CVD. The aspects of the study that concern direct participant evaluation received a clinical exemption from OMB clearance (CE-99-11...

  4. Moderate-and-vigorous physical activity from adolescence to adulthood and subclinical atherosclerosis in adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Grøntved, Anders; Kristensen, Peter Lund

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the independent associations between mean exposure to or the change in moderate-and-vigorous physical activity (PA) from adolescence to adulthood and subclinical atherosclerosis in adulthood. METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study among Danish boys and girls (N=277...

  5. Activation of TRPV1 reduces vascular lipid accumulation and attenuates atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Liqun; Zhong, Jian; Zhao, Zhigang

    2011-01-01

    Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channels may affect lipid storage and the cellular inflammatory response. Now, we tested the hypothesis that activation of TRPV1 channels attenuates atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E knockout mice (ApoE(-/-)) but not Apo...

  6. Monocyte gene expression in childhood obesity is associated with obesity and complexity of atherosclerosis in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keustermans, G C; Kofink, Daniel; Eikendal, A.L.; de Jager, W.; Meerding, J.; Nuboer, R.; Waltenberger, J.; Kraaijeveld, A.O.; Jukema, J Wouter; Sels, J.W.; Garssen, J; Prakken, Berent J.; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Kalkhoven, E.; Hoefer, Imo E.; Pasterkamp, G.; Schipper, Henk S

    2017-01-01

    Childhood obesity coincides with increased numbers of circulating classical CD14++CD16- and intermediate CD14++CD16+ monocytes. Monocytes are key players in the development and exacerbation of atherosclerosis, which prompts the question as to whether the monocytosis in childhood obesity contributes

  7. Risk factors of atherosclerosis and clinical and morphological comparisons in systemic vasculitides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Aleksandrovich Strizhakov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the incidence rates of angina, myocardial infarction (MI, stroke, and the frequency of endovascular interventions in patients with systemic vasculitides, and the incidence rate of atherosclerosis according to autopsy data. Subjects and methods. Three hundred and twenty-one patients with systemic vasculitides: Wegener's granulomatosis (n = 138, Takayasu's arteritis (n = 79, polyarteritis nodosum (n = 55, and Churg-Strauss syndrome (n = 49 were examined; 55 autopsies were analyzed in patients with the above diseases. Results. Fifty-one (15.6% of the 321 patients were diagnosed as having cardiovascular diseases (CVD: angina pectoris (7.1% and MI (3.1% and endovascular interventions (0.9%. The risk of cardiovascular events was found to be associated with traditional risk factors, such as male gender and age. Arterial hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, and increased serum creatinine were more frequently detected in the CVD group that showed no significant differences from the non-CVD group. According to autopsy results, atherosclerosis was identified in the patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (52%, Takayasu's arteritis (50%, polyarteritis nodosum (52.6%, and Churg-Strauss syndrome (57.1%. Conclusion. CVD and atherosclerosis are common in systemic vasculitides, which requires the traditional risk factors of atherosclerosis to be actively corrected.

  8. BMD PREDICTION OF DEATH IS ENCAPSULATED BY THE MORPHOLOGICAL ATHEROSCLEROSIS CALCIFICATION DISTRIBUTION (MACD) INDEX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganz, Melanie; Nielsen, Mads; Karsdal, Morten

    2009-01-01

    .3±0.3 years and of which CVD, cancer, and all cause deaths were recorded. The spine BMD and aortic calcification markers, AC24 and the recently proposed Morphological Atherosclerosis Calcification Distribution (MACD) index, were quantified from DXA scans and lateral X-rays respectively. The MACD...

  9. Efficacy of bioactive compounds from extra virgin olive oil to modulate atherosclerosis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou-Bonafonte, José M; Arnal, Carmen; Navarro, María A; Osada, Jesús

    2012-07-01

    As olive oil is the main source of calories in the Mediterranean diet, a great deal of research has been devoted to characterizing its role in atherosclerosis. Virgin olive oil is an oily matrix that contains hydrocarbons, mainly squalene; triterpenes such as uvaol, erythrodiol, oleanolic, and maslinic acid; phytosterols; and a wide range of phenolic compounds comprising simple phenols, flavonoids, secoiridoids, and lignans. In this review, we analyze the studies dealing with atherosclerosis and olive oil in several species. A protective role of virgin olive oil against atherosclerosis has been shown in ApoE-deficient mice and hamsters. In the former animal, sex, dose, and dietary cholesterol are modulators of the outcome. Contradictory findings have been reported for rabbits, a circumstance that could be due to the profusion of experimental designs, differing in terms of doses and animal strains, as well as sources of olive oils. This role has yet to be fully validated in humans. Minor components of olive oil have been shown to be involved in atherosclerosis protection. Nevertheless, evidence of the potential of isolated compounds or the right combination of them to achieve the antiatherosclerotic effect of virgin olive oil is inconclusive and will undoubtedly require further experimental support. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. IGF-1 has plaque-stabilizing effects in atherosclerosis by altering vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von der Thüsen, Jan H.; Borensztajn, Keren S.; Moimas, Silvia; van Heiningen, Sandra; Teeling, Peter; van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Biessen, Erik A. L.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling is important for the maintenance of plaque stability in atherosclerosis due to its effects on vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) phenotype. To investigate this hypothesis, we studied the effects of the highly inflammatory milieu of the atherosclerotic

  11. A case of primary hypothyroidism causing central nervous system atherosclerosis in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, Shauna L; Poma, Roberto; Stalker, Margaret J; Allen, Dana G

    2008-08-01

    A 2-year-old, castrated male, Australian shepherd was presented with a history of chronic mild ataxia, obesity, and lethargy. The dog was treated with levothyroxine, but the ataxia worsened. Cranial nerve abnormalities developed and the dog was euthanized. Postmortem examination revealed marked thyroid gland atrophy and widespread, severe central nervous system atherosclerosis.

  12. Anti-Inflammatory and Immunomodulatory Mechanism of Tanshinone IIA for Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tanshinone IIA (Tan II A is widely used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases as an active component of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. It has been demonstrated to have pleiotropic effects for atherosclerosis. From the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory mechanism perspective, this paper reviewed major progresses of Tan IIA in antiatherosclerosis research, including immune cells, antigens, cytokines, and cell signaling pathways.

  13. Polyphenols and Oxidative Stress in Atherosclerosis-Related Ischemic Heart Disease and Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Good nutrition could maintain health and life. Polyphenols are common nutrient mainly derived from fruits, vegetables, tea, coffee, cocoa, mushrooms, beverages, and traditional medicinal herbs. They are potential substances against oxidative-related diseases, for example, cardiovascular disease, specifically, atherosclerosis-related ischemic heart disease and stroke, which are health and economic problems recognized worldwide. In this study, we reviewed the risk factors for atherosclerosis, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, obesity, and cigarette smoking as well as the antioxidative activity of polyphenols, which could prevent the pathology of atherosclerosis, including endothelial dysfunction, low-density lipoprotein oxidation, vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, inflammatory process by monocytes, macrophages or T lymphocytes, and platelet aggregation. The strong radical-scavenging properties of polyphenols would exhibit antioxidative and anti-inflammation effects. Polyphenols reduce ROS production by inhibiting oxidases, reducing the production of superoxide, inhibiting OxLDL formation, suppressing VSMC proliferation and migration, reducing platelet aggregation, and improving mitochondrial oxidative stress. Polyphenol consumption also inhibits the development of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. Despite the numerous in vivo and in vitro studies, more advanced clinical trials are necessary to confirm the efficacy of polyphenols in the treatment of atherosclerosis-related vascular diseases.

  14. Evaluation of carotid intima-media thickness in children with migraine: a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyrazoglu, Hatice Gamze; Vurdem, Umit Erkan; Arslan, Alev; Uytun, Salih

    2016-10-01

    Migraine is a commonly seen neurovascular disorder during childhood. Inflammation induced by the activation of cytokines and neuropeptides is implied in its pathophysiology. There is an association between inflammation and atherosclerosis in patients with migraine. In addition, there is a strong correlation between early atherosclerotic wall lesions and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT). The study population consisted of 57 migraine patients aged 5-17 years, as well as 47 healthy children who served as the control group. Those migraine patients who were not receiving any medications at the interictal period were compared to healthy controls in terms of their measured lipid levels, thyroid function, vitamin B12 levels, serum iron levels, iron binding capacity, complete blood count, C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) scores, which may comprise risk factors for atherosclerosis. When children in the migraine and control groups were compared in terms of those risk factors that are known to be related to vascular changes, no significant differences were found. However, a significant difference was detected in CIMT values (P < 0.05). Atherosclerosis commences in childhood, and there is a long period of time before the onset of ischemic symptoms occurs. In children with migraine, an evaluation of CIMT can be used as a non-invasive imaging modality to detect atherosclerosis, which develops in the context of chronic inflammation. In this way, measures to reduce morbidity and mortality, which may result from cardiovascular diseases, can be implemented.

  15. Differences in atherosclerosis according to area level socioeconomic deprivation: cross sectional, population based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deans, Kevin A.; Bezlyak, Vladimir; Ford, Ian; Batty, G. David; Burns, Harry; Cavanagh, Jonathan; de Groot, Eric; McGinty, Agnes; Millar, Keith; Shiels, Paul G.; Tannahill, Carol; Velupillai, Yoga N.; Sattar, Naveed; Packard, Chris J.

    2009-01-01

    To examine the relation between area level social deprivation and ultrasound markers of atherosclerosis (common carotid intima-media thickness and plaque score), and to determine whether any differences can be explained by "classic" (currently recognised) or "emerging" (novel) cardiovascular risk

  16. Transgenic mouse models to study the role of the macrophage scavenger receptor class A in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winther, M. P.; Gijbels, M. J.; van Dijk, K. W.; Havekes, L. M.; Hofker, M. H.

    2000-01-01

    Several in vivo studies have been performed on the role of the macrophage scavenger receptor class A (SR-A) in atherosclerosis using SR-A knockout mice. The results indicate both an antiatherogenic and a proatherogenic role of SR-A, depending on the nature of the animal model serving as the

  17. Hypocoagulability does not protect against atherosclerosis in hemophilia A patients with obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biere-Rafi, S.; Tuinenburg, A.; Haak, B.; Peters, M.; De Groot, E.; Verhamme, P.; Peerlinck, K.; Visseren, F.; Kruip, M.; Gorkom, B.L.-V.; Buller, H.; Gerdes, V.; Schutgens, R.; Kamphuisen, P.

    Introduction: Hemophilia A patients have a 50% lower cardiovascular mortality than the general population. Whether this is caused by less atherosclerosis due to hypocoagulability is unclear. We assessed whether hemophilia A patients with obesity, a major atherosclerotic risk factor, have a lower

  18. Hemoglobin and atherosclerosis in patients with manifest arterial disease. The SMART-study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, J. M.; Wangge, G.; Graaf, Y. van der; Bots, M. L.; Grobbee, D. E.; Algra, A.

    2006-01-01

    Decreased hemoglobin levels are known to be associated with an increased risk of coronary mortality and morbidity. This is largely thought to result from the development of left ventricular hypertrophy. Similar remodeling mechanisms of the vessel wall that may result in atherosclerosis are likely to

  19. The role of oxidative stress and NADPH oxidase in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Bryk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS play a key role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The main mechanisms which are involved are low-density lipoprotein oxidative modification, inactivation of nitric oxide and modulation of redox-sensitive signaling pathways. ROS contribute to several aspects of atherosclerosis including endothelial cell dysfunction, monocyte/macrophage recruitment and activation, stimulation of inflammation, and inducing smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation. NADPH oxidase is the main source of ROS in the vasculature. This enzyme consists of a membrane-bound heterodimer of gp91phox and p22phox, cytosolic regulatory subunits p47phox, p67phox and p40phox, and small GTP-binding proteins rac1 and rac 2. Seven distinct isoforms of this enzyme have been identified, of which four (NOX1, 2, 4 and 5 may have cardiovascular function. In this paper, we review the current state of knowledge concerning the role of oxidative stress and NOX enzymes in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Moreover, we analyze the experimental studies that explore the relationship between the NOX family and atherosclerosis.

  20. The Ossabaw pig as a model for diet induced atherosclerosis and statin responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background and Objectives: The Ossabaw pig has been established as a model for obesity, metabolic syndrome, atherosclerosis and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, when fed an extreme diet (high trans fat and fructose) in caloric excess. To increase the translational nature of this model, we determined i...

  1. The effect of frequent whole blood donation on ferritin, hepcidin, and subclinical atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peffer, K.; Heijer, M. den; Holewijn, S.; Graaf, J. de; Swinkels, D.W.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Atsma, F.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Iron catalyzes the formation of free radicals, which could lead to damaged vascular walls and subsequent atherosclerosis. Blood donation decreases iron stores and can thus decrease cardiovascular risk. Even within blood donors, differences in stored iron are observed. This study

  2. Citrullus lanatus `Sentinel' (Watermelon) Extract Reduces Atherosclerosis in LDL Receptor Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poduri, Aruna; Rateri, Debra L.; Saha, Shubin K.; Saha, Sibu; Daugherty, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus or C. lanatus) has many potentially bioactive compounds including citrulline, which may influence atherosclerosis. In this study, we determined the effects of C. lanatus, provided as an extract of the cultivar `sentinel', on hypercholesterolemia-induced atherosclerosis in mice. Male LDL receptor deficient mice at 8 weeks old were given either C. lanatus `sentinel' extract (2% vol/vol; n=10) or a mixture of matching carbohydrates (2% vol/vol; n=8) as the control in drinking water, while fed a saturated fat-enriched diet for 12 weeks ad libitum. Mice consuming C. lanatus `sentinel' extract had significantly increased plasma citrulline concentrations. Systolic blood pressure was comparable between the two groups. Consumption of C. lanatus `sentinel' extract led to lower body weight and fat mass without influencing lean mass. There were no differences in food and water intake, and urine output between the two groups. C. lanatus `sentinel' extract administration decreased plasma cholesterol concentrations that were attributed to reductions of intermediate/low density lipoprotein cholesterol. Plasma concentrations of MCP-1 and IFN-γ were decreased and IL-10 increased in mice consuming C. lanatus `sentinel' extract. Intake of C. lanatus `sentinel' extract resulted in reductions of atherosclerosis in both aortic arch and thoracic regions. In conclusion, consumption of C. lanatus `sentinel' extract led to reduced body weight gain, decreased plasma cholesterol concentrations, improved homeostasis of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and attenuated development of atherosclerosis without affecting systolic blood pressure in hypercholesterolemic mice. PMID:22902326

  3. Estrogen, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease in women : epidemiological studies on menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.C.D. Westendorp (Iris)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractA therosclerosis, the principal cause of ischemic heart disease, stroke and peripheral arterial disease, is the fllost important cause of morbidity and Inortality in Western countries. Atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease are diseases of the elderly. Demographic data predict that

  4. NASH and atherosclerosis are two aspects of a shared disease : Central role for macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bieghs, Veerle; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Hofker, Marten H.; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit

    Macrophage infiltration into the atherosclerotic lesion is known to play a central role in the initiation of atherosclerosis. In contrast, the role of macrophages during the etiology of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has been considered to be merely a late consequence of steatosis. However,

  5. Rabbit models for the study of human atherosclerosis: from pathophysiological mechanisms to translational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianglin; Kitajima, Shuji; Watanabe, Teruo; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Jifeng; Liu, Enqi; Chen, Y Eugene

    2015-02-01

    Laboratory animal models play an important role in the study of human diseases. Using appropriate animals is critical not only for basic research but also for the development of therapeutics and diagnostic tools. Rabbits are widely used for the study of human atherosclerosis. Because rabbits have a unique feature of lipoprotein metabolism (like humans but unlike rodents) and are sensitive to a cholesterol diet, rabbit models have not only provided many insights into the pathogenesis and development of human atherosclerosis but also made a great contribution to translational research. In fact, rabbit was the first animal model used for studying human atherosclerosis, more than a century ago. Currently, three types of rabbit model are commonly used for the study of human atherosclerosis and lipid metabolism: (1) cholesterol-fed rabbits, (2) Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits, analogous to human familial hypercholesterolemia due to genetic deficiency of LDL receptors, and (3) genetically modified (transgenic and knock-out) rabbits. Despite their importance, compared with the mouse, the most widely used laboratory animal model nowadays, the use of rabbit models is still limited. In this review, we focus on the features of rabbit lipoprotein metabolism and pathology of atherosclerotic lesions that make it the optimal model for human atherosclerotic disease, especially for the translational medicine. For the sake of clarity, the review is not an attempt to be completely inclusive, but instead attempts to summarize substantial information concisely and provide a guideline for experiments using rabbits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Machine Learning Methods for Knowledge Discovery in Medical Data on Atherosclerosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Serrano, J.I.; Tomečková, Marie; Zvárová, Jana

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 1, - (2006), s. 6-33 ISSN 1801-5603 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : knowledge discovery * supervised machine learning * biomedical data mining * risk factors of atherosclerosis Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  7. Platelet CD40L mediates thrombotic and inflammatory processes in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lievens, Dirk; Zernecke, Alma; Seijkens, Tom; Soehnlein, Oliver; Beckers, Linda; Munnix, Imke C. A.; Wijnands, Erwin; Goossens, Pieter; van Kruchten, Roger; Thevissen, Larissa; Boon, Louis; Flavell, Richard A.; Noelle, Randolph J.; Gerdes, Norbert; Biessen, Erik A.; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.; Weber, Christian; Lutgens, Esther

    2010-01-01

    CD40 ligand (CD40L), identified as a costimulatory molecule expressed on T cells, is also expressed and functional on platelets. We investigated the thrombotic and inflammatory contributions of platelet CD40L in atherosclerosis. Although CD40L-deficient (Cd40l(-/-)) platelets exhibited impaired

  8. The Neuropeptide Substance P Mediates Adventitial Mast Cell Activation and Induces Intraplaque Hemorrhage in Advanced Atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, Ilze; de Jager, Saskia C. A.; Bot, Martine; van Heiningen, Sandra H.; de Groot, Paul; Veldhuizen, Roel W.; van Berkel, Theo J. C.; von der Thüsen, Jan H.; Biessen, Erik A. L.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Although we and others have recently shown that mast cells play an important role in plaque progression and destabilization, the nature of the actual trigger for (peri) vascular mast cell activation during atherosclerosis is still unresolved. Objective: In this study, we confirm that

  9. Clinical chemistry of atherosclerosis : Contribution to apolipoprotein-E analysis, public Health and nutricion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Dineke Aletta Johanna

    1999-01-01

    Chapter 1 is meant as a general introduction to atherosclerosis and the ensuing coronary artery disease (CAD). It gives special attention to atherogenesis, lipoprotein metabolism and nutritional factors. The chapter opens with the presentation of an integrated model of atherogenesis with a central

  10. Toll-like receptor-2 mediates diet and/or pathogen associated atherosclerosis: proteomic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Monika; Amar, Salomon

    2008-09-12

    Accumulating evidence implicates a fundamental link between the immune system and atherosclerosis. Toll-like receptors are principal sensors of the innate immune system. Here we report an assessment of the role of the TLR2 pathway in atherosclerosis associated with a high-fat diet and/or bacteria in ApoE(+/-) mice. To explore the role of TLR2 in inflammation- and infection-associated atherosclerosis, 10 week-old ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/+), ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/-) and ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(-/-) mice were fed either a high fat diet or a regular chow diet. All mice were inoculated intravenously, once per week for 24 consecutive weeks, with 50 microl live Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g) (10(7) CFU) or vehicle (normal saline). Animals were euthanized 24 weeks after the first inoculation. ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/+) mice showed a significant increase in atheromatous lesions in proximal aorta and aortic tree compared to ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/-) and ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(-/-) mice for all diet conditions. They also displayed profound changes in plaque composition, as evidenced by increased macrophage infiltration and apoptosis, increased lipid content, and decreased smooth muscle cell mass, all reflecting an unstable plaque phenotype. SAA levels from ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/+) mice were significantly higher than from ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/-) and ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(-/-) mice. Serum cytokine analysis revealed increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/+) mice compared to ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/-) and TLR2(-/-) mice, irrespective of diet or bacterial challenge. ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/+) mice injected weekly for 24 weeks with FSL-1 (a TLR2 agonist) also demonstrated significant increases in atherosclerotic lesions, SAA and serum cytokine levels compared to ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(-/-) mice under same treatment condition. Finally, mass-spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) of aortic samples analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis differential display, identified 6 proteins upregulated greater than 2-fold in ApoE(+/-)-TLR2(+/+) mice

  11. Toll-like receptor-2 mediates diet and/or pathogen associated atherosclerosis: proteomic findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Madan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence implicates a fundamental link between the immune system and atherosclerosis. Toll-like receptors are principal sensors of the innate immune system. Here we report an assessment of the role of the TLR2 pathway in atherosclerosis associated with a high-fat diet and/or bacteria in ApoE(+/- mice.To explore the role of TLR2 in inflammation- and infection-associated atherosclerosis, 10 week-old ApoE(+/--TLR2(+/+, ApoE(+/--TLR2(+/- and ApoE(+/--TLR2(-/- mice were fed either a high fat diet or a regular chow diet. All mice were inoculated intravenously, once per week for 24 consecutive weeks, with 50 microl live Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g (10(7 CFU or vehicle (normal saline. Animals were euthanized 24 weeks after the first inoculation. ApoE(+/--TLR2(+/+ mice showed a significant increase in atheromatous lesions in proximal aorta and aortic tree compared to ApoE(+/--TLR2(+/- and ApoE(+/--TLR2(-/- mice for all diet conditions. They also displayed profound changes in plaque composition, as evidenced by increased macrophage infiltration and apoptosis, increased lipid content, and decreased smooth muscle cell mass, all reflecting an unstable plaque phenotype. SAA levels from ApoE(+/--TLR2(+/+ mice were significantly higher than from ApoE(+/--TLR2(+/- and ApoE(+/--TLR2(-/- mice. Serum cytokine analysis revealed increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in ApoE(+/--TLR2(+/+ mice compared to ApoE(+/--TLR2(+/- and TLR2(-/- mice, irrespective of diet or bacterial challenge. ApoE(+/--TLR2(+/+ mice injected weekly for 24 weeks with FSL-1 (a TLR2 agonist also demonstrated significant increases in atherosclerotic lesions, SAA and serum cytokine levels compared to ApoE(+/--TLR2(-/- mice under same treatment condition. Finally, mass-spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS of aortic samples analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis differential display, identified 6 proteins upregulated greater than 2-fold in ApoE(+/--TLR2(+/+ mice fed the high fat

  12. [Psychosocial factors as predictors of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events: contribution from animal models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboni, Paolo; Alboni, Marco

    2006-11-01

    Conventional risk factors (abnormal lipids, hypertension, etc.) are independent predictors of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events; however, these factors are not specific since about half patients with acute myocardial infarction paradoxically result at low cardiovascular risk. Recent prospective studies provide convincing evidence that some psychosocial factors are independent predictors of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events, as well. Psychosocial factors that promote atherosclerosis can be divided into two general categories: chronic stressors, including social isolation/low social support and work stress (subordination without job control) and emotional factors, including affective disorders such as depression, severe anxiety and hostility/anger. The emotional factors, such as the chronic stressors, activate the biological mechanisms of chronic stress: increased activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, sympathetic system and inflammation processes, which have atherogenic effects, and an increase in blood coagulation. In spite of the amount of published data, psychosocial factors receive little attention in the medical setting. About 30 years ago, Kuller defined the criteria for a causal relation between a risk factor and atherosclerosis and cardiac events. The first of these criteria states that experimental research should demonstrate that any new factor would increase the extent of atherosclerosis or its complications in suitable animal models. We carried out a bibliographic research in order to investigate whether the results of the studies dealing with animal examination and experimentation support the psychosocial factors as predictors of atherosclerosis. Contributions related to some of the psychosocial factors such as social isolation, subordination and hostility/anger have been found. In these studies atherosclerotic extension has been evaluated at necroscopy; however, the incidence of cardiovascular events has not been

  13. NT-proBNP levels, atherosclerosis and vascular function in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria: peripheral reactive hyperaemia index but not NT-proBNP is an independent predictor of coronary atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhard, Henrik; Wiinberg, Niels; Hansen, Peter R

    2011-01-01

    for atherosclerosis is unclear. We examined the interrelationship between P-NT-proBNP, presence of atherosclerosis and/or vascular dysfunction in the coronary, carotid and peripheral arteries in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria that received intensive multifactorial treatment. METHODS...... AND RESULTS: P-NT-proBNP was measured in 200 asymptomatic type 2 patients without known cardiac disease that received intensive multifactorial treatment for CV risk reduction. Patients were examined for coronary, carotid and peripheral atherosclerosis, as defined by coronary calcium score=400, carotid intima...

  14. Magnetic Nanoparticles Conjugated with Peptides Derived from Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 as a Tool for Targeting Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Wei Kao

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial inflammatory disease that may progress silently for long period, and it is also widely accepted as the main cause of cardiovascular diseases. To prevent atherosclerotic plaques from generating, imaging early molecular markers and quantifying the extent of disease progression are desired. During inflammation, circulating monocytes leave the bloodstream and migrate into incipient lipid accumulation in the artery wall, following conditioning by local growth factors and proinflammatory cytokines; therefore, monocyte accumulation in the arterial wall can be observed in fatty streaks, rupture-prone plaques, and experimental atherosclerosis. In this work, we synthesized monocyte-targeting iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs, which were incorporated with the peptides derived from the chemokine receptor C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2-binding motif of monocytes chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 as a diagnostic tool for potential atherosclerosis. MCP-1-motif MNPs co-localized with monocytes in in vitro fluorescence imaging. In addition, with MNPs injection in ApoE knockout mice (ApoE KO mice, the well-characterized animal model of atherosclerosis, MNPs were found in specific organs or regions which had monocytes accumulation, especially the aorta of atherosclerosis model mice, through in vivo imaging system (IVIS imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We also performed Oil Red O staining and Prussian Blue staining to confirm the co-localization of MCP-1-motif MNPs and atherosclerosis. The results showed the promising potential of MCP-1-motif MNPs as a diagnostic agent of atherosclerosis.

  15. Potential role of proteasome on c-jun related signaling in hypercholesterolemia induced atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdi Sozen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis and its complications are major causes of death all over the world. One of the major risks of atherosclerosis is hypercholesterolemia. During atherosclerosis, oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL regulates CD36-mediated activation of c-jun amino terminal kinase-1 (JNK1 and modulates matrix metalloproteinase (MMP induction which stimulates inflammation with an invasion of monocytes. Additionally, inhibition of proteasome leads to an accumulation of c-jun and phosphorylated c-jun and activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1 related increase of MMP expression. We have previously reported a significant increase in cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36 mRNA levels in hypercholesterolemic rabbits and shown that vitamin E treatment prevented the cholesterol induced increase in CD36 mRNA expression. In the present study, our aim is to identify the signaling molecules/transcription factors involved in the progression of atherosclerosis following CD36 activation in an in vivo model of hypercholesterolemic (induced by 2% cholesterol containing diet rabbits. In this direction, proteasomal activities by fluorometry and c-jun, phospo c-jun, JNK1, MMP-9 expressions by quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting were tested in aortic tissues. The effects of vitamin E on these changes were also investigated in this model. As a result, c-jun was phosphorylated following decreased proteasomal degradation in hypercholesterolemic group. MMP-9 expression was also increased in cholesterol group rabbits contributing to the development of atherosclerosis. In addition, vitamin E showed its effect by decreasing MMP-9 levels and phosphorylation of c-jun.

  16. Vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis is an early trigger for hypothyroid atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Xu, Tian-Ying; Guan, Yun-Feng; Zhao, Yan; Li, Zhi-Yong; Lan, Xiao-Hong; Wang, Xia; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Kang, Zhi-Min; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2014-06-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is an initial and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) apoptosis, a later step of atherosclerosis. Hypothyroidism accelerates atherosclerosis. However, the early events responsible for this pro-atherosclerotic effect are unclear. Rats were resistant to induction of atherosclerosis by high cholesterol diet alone, but became susceptible in hypothyroid state achieved by administration of propylthiouracil (PTU) for 6 weeks. VSMC dysfunction and apoptosis were obvious within 1 week after PTU treatment, without signs of endothelial dysfunction. This early VSMC damage was caused by hypothyroidism but not the high cholesterol diet. In ApoE knockout mice, PTU-induced hypothyroidism triggered early VSMC apoptosis, increased oxidative stress, and accelerated atherosclerosis development. Thyroid hormone supplementation (T4, 10, or 50 μg/kg) prevented atherogenic phenotypes in hypothyroid rats and mice. In rats, thyroidectomy caused severe hypothyroidism 5 days after operation, which also led to rapid VSMC dysfunction and apoptosis. In vitro studies did not show a direct toxic effect of PTU on VSMCs. In contrast, thyroid hormone (T3, 0.75 μg/L plus T4, 50 nmol/L) exerted a direct protection against VSMC apoptosis, which was reduced by knockdown of TRα1, rather than TRβ1 and TRβ2 receptors. TRα1-mediated inhibition of apoptotic signalling of JNKs and caspase-3 contributed to the anti-apoptotic action of thyroid hormone. These findings provide an in vivo example for VSMC apoptosis as an early trigger of hypothyroidism-associated atherosclerosis, and reveal activation of TRα1 receptors to prevent VSMC apoptosis as a therapeutic strategy in this disease. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Short-term changes in arterial inflammation predict long-term changes in atherosclerosis progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Philip [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiology Division and Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); McMaster University, Population Health Research Institute, Department of Medicine, and Department of Radiology, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Ishai, Amorina; Tawakol, Ahmed [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiology Division and Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); Mani, Venkatesh [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute and Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Kallend, David [The Medicines Company, Parsippany, NJ (United States); Rudd, James H.F. [University of Cambridge, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Fayad, Zahi A. [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute and Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Hess CSM Building Floor TMII, Rm S1-104, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute and Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-01-15

    It remains unclear whether changes in arterial wall inflammation are associated with subsequent changes in the rate of structural progression of atherosclerosis. In this sub-study of the dal-PLAQUE clinical trial, multi-modal imaging was performed using 18-fludeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET, at 0 and 6 months) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, at 0 and 24 months). The primary objective was to determine whether increasing FDG uptake at 6 months predicted atherosclerosis progression on MRI at 2 years. Arterial inflammation was measured by the carotid FDG target-to-background ratio (TBR), and atherosclerotic plaque progression was defined as the percentage change in carotid mean wall area (MWA) and mean wall thickness (MWT) on MRI between baseline and 24 months. A total of 42 participants were included in this sub-study. The mean age of the population was 62.5 years, and 12 (28.6 %) were women. In participants with (vs. without) any increase in arterial inflammation over 6 months, the long-term changes in both MWT (% change MWT: 17.49 % vs. 1.74 %, p = 0.038) and MWA (% change MWA: 25.50 % vs. 3.59 %, p = 0.027) were significantly greater. Results remained significant after adjusting for clinical and biochemical covariates. Individuals with no increase in arterial inflammation over 6 months had no significant structural progression of atherosclerosis over 24 months as measured by MWT (p = 0.616) or MWA (p = 0.373). Short-term changes in arterial inflammation are associated with long-term structural atherosclerosis progression. These data support the concept that therapies that reduce arterial inflammation may attenuate or halt progression of atherosclerosis. (orig.)

  18. Osteocalcin, Vascular Calcification, and Atherosclerosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie A. Millar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundOsteocalcin (OC is an intriguing hormone, concomitantly being the most abundant non-collagenous peptide found in the mineralized matrix of bone, and expanding the endocrine function of the skeleton with far-reaching extra-osseous effects. A new line of enquiry between OC and vascular calcification has emerged in response to observations that the mechanism of vascular calcification resembles that of bone mineralisation. To date, studies have reported mixed results. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to identify any association between OC and vascular calcification and atherosclerosis.Methods and resultsDatabases were searched for original, peer reviewed human studies. A total of 1,453 articles were retrieved, of which 46 met the eligibility criteria. Overall 26 positive, 17 negative, and 29 neutral relationships were reported for assessments between OC (either concentration in blood, presence of OC-positive cells, or histological staining for OC and extent of calcification or atherosclerosis. Studies that measured OC-positive cells or histological staining for OC reported positive relationships (11 studies. A higher percentage of Asian studies found a negative relationship (36% in contrast to European studies (6%. Studies examining carboxylated and undercarboxylated forms of OC in the blood failed to report consistent results. The meta-analysis found no significant difference between OC concentration in the blood between patients with “atherosclerosis” and control (p = 0.13, n = 1,197.ConclusionNo definitive association was determined between OC and vascular calcification or atherosclerosis; however, the presence of OC-positive cells and histological staining had a consistent positive correlation with calcification or atherosclerosis. The review highlighted several themes, which may influence OC within differing populations leading to inconclusive results. Large, longitudinal studies are required to further

  19. Intracranial atherosclerosis is associated with progression of neurological deficit in subcortical stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallevi, Hen; Chernyshev, Oleg Y; El Khoury, Ramy; Soileau, Michael J; Walker, Kyle C; Grotta, James C; Savitz, Sean I

    2012-01-01

    Progression of neurological deficit (PND) is a frequent complication of acute subcortical ischemic stroke (SCS). The role of intracranial atherosclerosis (IAS) in PND is controversial. Our goal was to evaluate IAS on admission, as predictor of PND in SCS patients. SCS patients were identified from our prospective database from 2004 to 2008. Clinical and laboratory data were collected from charts, and radiographic data from original radiographs. The proximal intracranial arteries were graded as patent, irregular, stenotic, or occlusion. IAS was defined as irregularity or stenosis. PND was defined as a change in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale >1 point. Two hundred and two SCS patients were identified. In 14%, PND occurred at a median of 2 days from onset. Univariate analysis by infarct location showed the following to be associated with PND: for anterior circulation infarcts (centrum semiovale/basal ganglia), M1 atherosclerosis (p = 0.042); for posterior circulation infarcts, vertebral artery atherosclerosis (p = 0.018). For both groups, we found a non-significant association with age (p = 0.2) and HbA1c levels (p = 0.095). No association was found with admission glucose levels. Multivariate analysis showed the following association with PND: for anterior circulation infarcts, M1 atherosclerosis (OR 4.7; 95% CI 1.2-18.8; p = 0.03); for pontine infarcts, vertebral artery atherosclerosis (OR 5.8; 95% CI 1.1-29.4; p = 0.033). There was an increase in PND likelihood with an increasing number of atherosclerotic vessels. In our cohort of SCS patients, PND was associated with IAS of the responsible vessels. These results suggest a role for IAS in the pathogenesis of PNF in SCS patients. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Relation of ABO blood groups to the severity of coronary atherosclerosis: an Gensini score assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ping; Luo, Song-Hui; Li, Xiao-Lin; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Xu, Rui-Xia; Li, Sha; Dong, Qian; Liu, Geng; Chen, Juan; Zeng, Rui-Xiang; Li, Jian-Jun

    2014-12-01

    Although the study on the relationship between ABO blood groups and coronary atherosclerosis has a long history, few data is available regarding ABO to severity of coronary atherosclerosis in a large cohort study. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the relation of the ABO blood groups to the severity of coronary atherosclerosis assessed by Gensini score (GS) in a large Chinese cohort undergoing coronary angiography. A total of 2919 consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography were enrolled, and their baseline characteristics and ABO blood groups were collected. The GS was calculated as 1st tertile (0-10), 2nd tertile (11-36), 3rd tertile (>36) according to angiographic results. The relation of the ABO blood groups to GS was investigated. The frequency of blood group A was significantly higher in the upper GS tertiles (24.4% vs. 28.2% vs. 29.5%, p = 0.032). Multivariable linear regression analysis revealed that blood group A was independently associated with GS (β = 0.043, p = 0.017). Likewise, multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that group A remained significantly associated with mid-high GS (OR = 1.44, 95% CI 1.16-1.80, p = 0.001), and the group O was showed as a protective factor (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.65-0.92, p = 0.004). In this large Chinese cohort study, the data indicated that there was an association between ABO blood groups and the severity of coronary atherosclerosis. Moreover, the blood group A was an independent risk factor for serious coronary atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Detection of subclinical atherosclerosis in asymptomatic subjects using ultrasound radiofrequency-tracking technology.

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    Lili Niu

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic and systemic disease and its developmental process involves the synergism of multiple risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, obesity and smoking. The diagnosis of subclinical atherosclerosis is essential for strategic guidance towards suitable treatments and efficient prevention against acute cardiovascular events. This study employed ultrasound radiofrequency (RF tracking technology to characterize human carotid arteries in vivo in terms of intima-media thickness (IMT and artery stiffness, and evaluated the statistical correlation between carotid IMT and stiffness, and the number of risk factors for atherosclerosis.A total of 160 asymptomatic subjects were enrolled. Ultrasound RF-tracking technology was employed to acquire carotid IMT and stiffness parameters: maximum IMT ((MAXIMT, RF Quality IMT ((RFQIMT, distensibility coefficient (DC, compliance coefficient (CC, αindex, β index and local pulse wave velocity (PWVβ. The subjects were categorized in four groups in terms of the number of risk factors: 'zero', 'single', 'double', and 'multiple', and statistical analyses of carotid IMT and stiffness parameters were performed between these different groups.The subjects (n = 145 with (MAXIMT smaller than 1.0 mm matched the IMT criteria for non-atherosclerosis and were named as NA-subjects. Spearman's rho correlation analysis of the whole group and the NA-subjects both showed that (MAXIMT correlated positively with (RFQIMT, α, β, and PWVβ, and negatively with DC and CC (p<0.01. The analysis of covariance of NA-subjects showed significant differences between subjects with and without risk factors, and also showed significant differences between the 'zero', 'single', 'double', and 'multiple' groups.The carotid IMT and stiffness parameters obtained by the ultrasound RF-tracking technology were demonstrated to possess significant statistical correlation with the number of risk factors from 160

  2. Age, gender and hypertension as major risk factors in development of subclinical atherosclerosis

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    Ajla Rahimić Ćatić

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intima-media thickness (IMT measurement of the common carotid artery (CCA is considered as useful indicator of carotid atherosclerosis. Early detection of atherosclerosis and its associated risk factors is important to prevent stroke and heart diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate which risk factors are better determinants of subclinical atherosclerosis, measured by common carotidartery intima media thickness (CCA-IMT.Methods: A total of 74 subjects were randomly selected in this cross – sectional study. Information on the patient’s medical history and laboratory fi ndings were obtained from their clinical records. Risk factors relevant to this study were age, gender, cigarette smoking status, diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Ultrasound scanning of carotid arteries was performed with a 7,5 MHz linear array transducer (GE Voluson730 pro. The highest value of six common carotid artery measurements was taken as the fi nal IMT. Increased CCA-IMT was defi ned when it was > 1 mm.Results: Our data demonstrated higher CCA-IMT values in male patients compared with female patients. Increased CCA-IMT was the most closely related to age (P<0.001, followed by systolic blood pressure (P=0.001, diastolic blood pressure (P=0.003 and glucose blood level (P=0.048.Conclusion: Age, gender and hypertension are the most important risk factors in development of carotid atherosclerosis. Early detection of atherosclerosis among high-risk populations is important in order to prevent stroke and heart diseases, which are leading causes of death worldwide.

  3. Apocynin suppresses the progression of atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice by inactivation of macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Takeshi; Ishii, Norio; Fukuda, Kazuki; Senokuchi, Takafumi; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Tatsuya; Taketa, Kayo; Kawasaki, Shuji; Hanatani, Satoko; Takeya, Motohiro; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Araki, Eiichi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We examined the anti-athrogenic effect of apocynin in atherosclerotic model mice. ► Apocynin prevented atherosclerotic lesion formation. ► Apocynin suppressed ROS production in aorta and in macrophages. ► Apocynin suppressed cytokine expression and cell proliferation in macrophages. ► Apocynin may be beneficial compound for the prevention of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other proinflammatory substances by macrophages plays an important role in atherogenesis. Apocynin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-acetophenone), which is well known as a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, has anti-inflammatory effects including suppression of the generation of ROS. However, the suppressive effects of apocynin on the progression of atherosclerosis are not clearly understood. Thus, we investigated anti-atherosclerotic effects of apocynin using apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE –/– ) mice in vivo and in mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. In atherosclerosis-prone apoE –/– mice, apocynin suppressed the progression of atherosclerosis, decreased 4-hydroxynonenal-positive area in atherosclerotic lesions, and mRNA expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in aorta. In mouse peritoneal macrophages, apocynin suppressed the Ox-LDL-induced ROS generation, mRNA expression of MCP-1, IL-6 and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and cell proliferation. Moreover, immunohistochemical studies revealed that apocynin decreased the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions of apoE –/– mice. These results suggested that apocynin suppressed the formation of atherosclerotic lesions, at least in part, by inactivation of macrophages. Therefore, apocynin may be a potential therapeutic material to prevent the progression of atherosclerosis

  4. Apocynin suppresses the progression of atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice by inactivation of macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Hiroyuki [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Matsumura, Takeshi, E-mail: takeshim@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Ishii, Norio; Fukuda, Kazuki; Senokuchi, Takafumi; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Tatsuya; Taketa, Kayo; Kawasaki, Shuji; Hanatani, Satoko [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Takeya, Motohiro [Department of Cell Pathology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Nishikawa, Takeshi; Araki, Eiichi [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan)

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► We examined the anti-athrogenic effect of apocynin in atherosclerotic model mice. ► Apocynin prevented atherosclerotic lesion formation. ► Apocynin suppressed ROS production in aorta and in macrophages. ► Apocynin suppressed cytokine expression and cell proliferation in macrophages. ► Apocynin may be beneficial compound for the prevention of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other proinflammatory substances by macrophages plays an important role in atherogenesis. Apocynin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-acetophenone), which is well known as a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, has anti-inflammatory effects including suppression of the generation of ROS. However, the suppressive effects of apocynin on the progression of atherosclerosis are not clearly understood. Thus, we investigated anti-atherosclerotic effects of apocynin using apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE{sup –/–}) mice in vivo and in mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. In atherosclerosis-prone apoE{sup –/–} mice, apocynin suppressed the progression of atherosclerosis, decreased 4-hydroxynonenal-positive area in atherosclerotic lesions, and mRNA expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in aorta. In mouse peritoneal macrophages, apocynin suppressed the Ox-LDL-induced ROS generation, mRNA expression of MCP-1, IL-6 and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and cell proliferation. Moreover, immunohistochemical studies revealed that apocynin decreased the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions of apoE{sup –/–} mice. These results suggested that apocynin suppressed the formation of atherosclerotic lesions, at least in part, by inactivation of macrophages. Therefore, apocynin may be a potential therapeutic material to prevent the progression of atherosclerosis.

  5. Lower zinc bioavailability may be related to higher risk of subclinical atherosclerosis in Korean adults.

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    Su Kyoung Jung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is a proposed link between dietary zinc intake and atherosclerosis, but this relationship remains unclear. Phytate may contribute to this relationship by influencing zinc bioavailability. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between zinc bioavailability and subclinical atherosclerosis in healthy Korean adults. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The present cross-sectional analysis used baseline data from the Korean multi-Rural Communities Cohort Study (MRCohort, which is a part of The Korean Genome Epidemiology Study (KoGES. A total of 5,532 subjects (2,116 men and 3,416 women aged 40 years and older were recruited from rural communities in South Korea between 2005 and 2010. Phytate:zinc molar ratio, estimated from a food-based food frequency questionnaire (FFQ of 106 food items, was used to determine zinc bioavailability, and carotid intima media thickness (cIMT and pulse wave velocity (PWV were measured to calculate the subclinical atherosclerotic index. RESULTS: We found that phytate:zinc molar ratio is positively related to cIMT in men. A higher phytate:zinc molar ratio was significantly related to an increased risk of atherosclerosis in men, defined as the 80(th percentile value of cIMT (5(th vs. 1(st quintile, OR = 2.11, 95% CI 1.42-3.15, P for trend = 0.0009, and especially in elderly men (5(th vs. 1(st quintile, OR = 2.58, 95% CI 1.52-4.37, P for trend = 0.0021. We found a positive relationship between phytate:zinc molar ratio and atherosclerosis risk among women aged 65 years or younger. Phytate:zinc molar ratio was not found to be related to PWV. CONCLUSIONS: Lower zinc bioavailability may be related to higher atherosclerosis risk.

  6. Short-term changes in arterial inflammation predict long-term changes in atherosclerosis progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Philip; Ishai, Amorina; Tawakol, Ahmed; Mani, Venkatesh; Kallend, David; Rudd, James H.F.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2017-01-01

    It remains unclear whether changes in arterial wall inflammation are associated with subsequent changes in the rate of structural progression of atherosclerosis. In this sub-study of the dal-PLAQUE clinical trial, multi-modal imaging was performed using 18-fludeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET, at 0 and 6 months) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, at 0 and 24 months). The primary objective was to determine whether increasing FDG uptake at 6 months predicted atherosclerosis progression on MRI at 2 years. Arterial inflammation was measured by the carotid FDG target-to-background ratio (TBR), and atherosclerotic plaque progression was defined as the percentage change in carotid mean wall area (MWA) and mean wall thickness (MWT) on MRI between baseline and 24 months. A total of 42 participants were included in this sub-study. The mean age of the population was 62.5 years, and 12 (28.6 %) were women. In participants with (vs. without) any increase in arterial inflammation over 6 months, the long-term changes in both MWT (% change MWT: 17.49 % vs. 1.74 %, p = 0.038) and MWA (% change MWA: 25.50 % vs. 3.59 %, p = 0.027) were significantly greater. Results remained significant after adjusting for clinical and biochemical covariates. Individuals with no increase in arterial inflammation over 6 months had no significant structural progression of atherosclerosis over 24 months as measured by MWT (p = 0.616) or MWA (p = 0.373). Short-term changes in arterial inflammation are associated with long-term structural atherosclerosis progression. These data support the concept that therapies that reduce arterial inflammation may attenuate or halt progression of atherosclerosis. (orig.)

  7. Risk of carotid atherosclerosis associated with genetic polymorphisms of apolipoprotein E and inflammatory genes among arsenic exposed residents in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Y.-C.; Hsieh, F.-I; Lien, L.-M.; Chou, Y.-L.; Chiou, H.-Y.; Chen, C.-J.

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic had been reported to be associated with carotid atherosclerosis. However, there were few studies to evaluate the association between the susceptible gene of lipid metabolism and inflammation and carotid atherosclerosis among arsenic exposure residents. The aim of the study was to investigate the associations between the genetic polymorphisms of APOE and MCP-1 and the risk of carotid atherosclerosis among residents of Lanyang Basin in Taiwan which was a newly confirmed arsenic-endemic area. In total, 479 residents who had been genotyped of these two genes and examined the severity of carotid atherosclerosis were included in this study. The study subjects with carotid intima media thickness (IMT) ≥ 1.0 mm or with the observable plaque in the extracranial carotid artery were diagnosed as carotid atherosclerosis. A significantly age- and gender-adjusted odds ratio of 2.0 for the development of carotid atherosclerosis was observed in study subjects with ε4 allele of APOE than those without ε4 allele. Compared with study subjects who carried wild genotypes of APOE and MCP-1, those with both risk genotypes of APOE and MCP-1 had 2.5-fold risk of carotid atherosclerosis after adjustment for age and gender, revealing a significant dose-response relationship between number of risk genotypes of these genes and risk of carotid atherosclerosis. Additionally, study subjects with two risk genotypes of APOE and MCP-1 and either had ingested well water contained arsenic level > 10 μg/L or had arsenic exposure > 0.22 mg/L-year would have strikingly highest risk of 10.3-fold and 15.7-fold, respectively, for the development carotid atherosclerosis, showing significant joint effect of arsenic exposure and risk genotypes of APOE and MCP-1

  8. Follicular B Cells Promote Atherosclerosis via T Cell-Mediated Differentiation Into Plasma Cells and Secreting Pathogenic Immunoglobulin G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Christopher; Liu, Yu-Han; Kanellakis, Peter; Kallies, Axel; Li, Yi; Cao, Anh; Hosseini, Hamid; Tipping, Peter; Toh, Ban-Hock; Bobik, Alex; Kyaw, Tin

    2018-05-01

    B cells promote or protect development of atherosclerosis. In this study, we examined the role of MHCII (major histocompatibility II), CD40 (cluster of differentiation 40), and Blimp-1 (B-lymphocyte-induced maturation protein) expression by follicular B (FO B) cells in development of atherosclerosis together with the effects of IgG purified from atherosclerotic mice. Using mixed chimeric Ldlr -/- mice whose B cells are deficient in MHCII or CD40, we demonstrate that these molecules are critical for the proatherogenic actions of FO B cells. During development of atherosclerosis, these deficiencies affected T-B cell interactions, germinal center B cells, plasma cells, and IgG. As FO B cells differentiating into plasma cells require Blimp-1, we also assessed its role in the development of atherosclerosis. Blimp-1-deficient B cells greatly attenuated atherosclerosis and immunoglobulin-including IgG production, preventing IgG accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions; Blimp-1 deletion also attenuated lesion proinflammatory cytokines, apoptotic cell numbers, and necrotic core. To determine the importance of IgG for atherosclerosis, we purified IgG from atherosclerotic mice. Their transfer but not IgG from nonatherosclerotic mice into Ldlr -/- mice whose B cells are Blimp-1-deficient increased atherosclerosis; transfer was associated with IgG accumulating in atherosclerotic lesions, increased lesion inflammatory cytokines, apoptotic cell numbers, and necrotic core size. The mechanism by which FO B cells promote atherosclerosis is highly dependent on their expression of MHCII, CD40, and Blimp-1. FO B cell differentiation into IgG-producing plasma cells also is critical for their proatherogenic actions. Targeting B-T cell interactions and pathogenic IgG may provide novel therapeutic strategies to prevent atherosclerosis and its adverse cardiovascular complications. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. A Study of Carotid Intimomedial Thickness as a Primary Marker of Atherosclerosis in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

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    Shivani Patel

    2016-01-01

    RA is a chronic disease associatedd with chronic subclinical inflammation. In view of the consequentr high risk of atherosclerosis seen in these patients CIMT may serve as an early surrogate marker of atherosclerosis. We can identify these high risk subgroups of patients with a simple, reliable, inexpensive, and non-invasive bedside carotid Doppler sonogram even in resource poor countries such as India. In our view physicians should be vigilant to identify and screen regularly for atherosclerosis with CIMT in RA patients, so that prompt early management can prevent the cardiovascular complications.

  10. Increased activity of vascular adenosine deaminase in atherosclerosis and therapeutic potential of its inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutryb-Zajac, Barbara; Mateuszuk, Lukasz; Zukowska, Paulina; Jasztal, Agnieszka; Zabielska, Magdalena A; Toczek, Marta; Jablonska, Patrycja; Zakrzewska, Agnieszka; Sitek, Barbara; Rogowski, Jan; Lango, Romuald; Slominska, Ewa M; Chlopicki, Stefan; Smolenski, Ryszard T

    2016-11-01

    Extracellular nucleotides and adenosine that are formed or degraded by membrane-bound ecto-enzymes could affect atherosclerosis by regulating the inflammation and thrombosis. This study aimed to evaluate a relation between ecto-enzymes that convert extracellular adenosine triphosphate to adenine dinucleotide phosphate, adenosine monophosphate, adenosine, and inosine on the surface of the vessel wall with the severity or progression of experimental and clinical atherosclerosis. Furthermore, we tested whether the inhibition of adenosine deaminase will block the development of experimental atherosclerosis. Vascular activities of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1, ecto-5'-nucleotidase, and ecto-adenosine deaminase (eADA) were measured in aortas of apolipoprotein E-/- low density lipoprotein receptor (ApoE-/-LDLR-/-) and wild-type mice as well as in human aortas. Plaques were analysed in the entire aorta, aortic root, and brachiocephalic artery by Oil-Red O and Orcein Martius Scarlet Blue staining and vascular accumulation of macrophages. The cellular location of ecto-enzymes was analysed by immunofluorescence. The effect of eADA inhibition on atherosclerosis progression was studied by a 2-month deoxycoformycin treatment of ApoE-/-LDLR-/- mice. The vascular eADA activity prominently increased in ApoE-/-LDLR-/- mice when compared with wild type already at the age of 1 month and progressed along atherosclerosis development, reaching a 10-fold difference at 10 months. The activity of eADA correlated with atherosclerotic changes in human aortas. High abundance of eADA in atherosclerotic vessels originated from activated endothelial cells and macrophages. There were no changes in ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1 activity, whereas ecto-5'-nucleotidase was moderately decreased in ApoE-/-LDLR-/- mice. Deoxycoformycin treatment attenuated plaque development in aortic root and brachiocephalic artery of ApoE-/-LDLR-/- mice, suppressed vascular

  11. Effects of Antisense Oligonucleotides against C-Reactive Protein on the Development of Atherosclerosis in WHHL Rabbits

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    Qi Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP are closely associated with cardiovascular diseases, but whether CRP is directly involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is still under debate. Many controversial and contradictory results using transgenic mice and rabbits have been published but it is also unclear whether CRP lowering can be used for the treatment of atherosclerosis. In the current study, we examined the effects of the rabbit CRP antisense oligonucleotides (ASO on the development of atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits. CRP ASO treatment led to a significant reduction of plasma CRP levels; however, both aortic and coronary atherosclerotic lesions were not significantly changed compared to those of control WHHL rabbits. These results suggest that inhibition of plasma CRP does not affect the development of atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits.

  12. Voluntary wheel running increases bile acid as well as cholesterol excretion and decreases atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meissner, Maxi; Lombardo, Elisa; Havinga, Rick; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Kuipers, Folkert; Groen, Albert K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Regular physical activity decreases the risk for atherosclerosis but underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We questioned whether voluntary wheel running provokes specific modulations in cholesterol turnover that translate into a decreased atherosclerotic burden in

  13. Data in support of dyslipidemia-associated alterations in B cell subpopulations frequency and phenotype during experimental atherosclerosis

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    Héctor Rincón-Arévalo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in the world, atherosclerosis being its main underlying disease. Information about the role of B cells during atherosclerotic process is scarce, but both proatherogenic and atheroprotective properties have been described in the immunopathology of this disease. Frequency and phenotype of B cell subpopulations were studied in wild type and apolipoprotein-E-deficient (apoE−/− mice fed or not with high-fat diet (HFD, by flow cytometry. Here, we provide the information about the materials, methods, analysis and additional information related to our study published in Atherosclerosis (DOI: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2015.12.022, article reference: ATH14410 [1]. The data contained in this article shows and supports that mice with advanced atherosclerosis have a variety of alterations in frequency and phenotype of B cell subsets, most of which associated with dyslipidemia.

  14. Prevalence, Impact, and Predictive Value of Detecting Subclinical Coronary and Carotid Atherosclerosis in Asymptomatic Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baber, Usman; Mehran, Roxana; Sartori, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although recent studies suggest that measuring coronary artery calcification (CAC) may be superior to indirect atherosclerotic markers in predicting cardiac risk, there are limited data evaluating imaging-based biomarkers that directly quantify atherosclerosis in different vascular beds...

  15. Data in support of dyslipidemia-associated alterations in B cell subpopulations frequency and phenotype during experimental atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón-Arévalo, Héctor; Castaño, Diana; Villa-Pulgarín, Janny; Rojas, Mauricio; Vásquez, Gloria; Correa, Luis A.; Ramírez-Pineda, José R.; Yassin, Lina M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in the world, atherosclerosis being its main underlying disease. Information about the role of B cells during atherosclerotic process is scarce, but both proatherogenic and atheroprotective properties have been described in the immunopathology of this disease. Frequency and phenotype of B cell subpopulations were studied in wild type and apolipoprotein-E-deficient (apoE−/−) mice fed or not with high-fat diet (HFD), by flow cytometry. Here, we provide the information about the materials, methods, analysis and additional information related to our study published in Atherosclerosis (DOI: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2015.12.022, article reference: ATH14410) [1]. The data contained in this article shows and supports that mice with advanced atherosclerosis have a variety of alterations in frequency and phenotype of B cell subsets, most of which associated with dyslipidemia. PMID:27081674

  16. Ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein, and central augmentation index to identify individuals with severe atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Nikolaj; Sillesen, Henrik; Prescott, Eva

    2006-01-01

    We examined the ability of ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein and central augmentation index to identify individuals in the general population with severe atherosclerosis, diagnosed as those with ischaemic cardiovascular disease.......We examined the ability of ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein and central augmentation index to identify individuals in the general population with severe atherosclerosis, diagnosed as those with ischaemic cardiovascular disease....

  17. Attenuation of diet-induced atherosclerosis in rabbits with a highly selective 15-lipoxygenase inhibitor lacking significant antioxidant properties

    OpenAIRE

    Sendobry, Sandra M; Cornicelli, Joseph A; Welch, Kathryn; Bocan, Thomas; Tait, Bradley; Trivedi, Bharat K; Colbry, Norman; Dyer, Richard D; Feinmark, Steven J; Daugherty, Alan

    1997-01-01

    15-Lipoxygenase (15-LO) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis because of its localization in lesions and the many biological activities exhibited by its products. To provide further evidence for a role of 15-LO, the effects of PD 146176 on the development of atherosclerosis in cholesterol-fed rabbits were assessed. This novel drug is a specific inhibitor of the enzyme in vitro and lacks significant non specific antioxidant properties.PD 146176 inhibited rabbit reticulocyt...

  18. CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells reduce atherosclerosis in apoE(−/−) mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jianchang; Dimayuga, Paul C.; Zhao, Xiaoning; Yano, Juliana; Lio, Wai Man; Trinidad, Portia; Honjo, Tomoyuki; Cercek, Bojan; Shah, Prediman K.; Chyu, Kuang-Yuh, E-mail: Chyuk@cshs.org

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •The role of a sub-population of CD8{sup +} T cells with suppressor functions was investigated in atherosclerosis. •CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells from adult apoE(−/−) mice had phenotype characteristics of T suppressor cells. •These CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells reduced CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation and CD8{sup +} cytotoxic activity in vitro. •Adoptive transfer of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells significantly reduced atherosclerosis. •CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells have a suppressive function in atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Background: It is increasingly evident that CD8{sup +} T cells are involved in atherosclerosis but the specific subtypes have yet to be defined. CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells exert suppressive effects on immune signaling and modulate experimental autoimmune disorders but their role in atherosclerosis remains to be determined. The phenotype and functional role of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells in experimental atherosclerosis were investigated in this study. Methods and results: CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells were observed in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE(−/−) mice fed hypercholesterolemic diet. Characterization by flow cytometric analysis and functional evaluation using a CFSE-based proliferation assays revealed a suppressive phenotype and function of splenic CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells from apoE(−/−) mice. Depletion of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} from total CD8{sup +} T cells rendered higher cytolytic activity of the remaining CD8{sup +}CD25{sup −} T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells into apoE(−/−) mice suppressed the proliferation of splenic CD4{sup +} T cells and significantly reduced atherosclerosis in recipient mice. Conclusions: Our study has identified an athero-protective role for CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells in experimental atherosclerosis.

  19. Effect of plasma homocysteine level and urinary monomethylarsonic acid on the risk of arsenic-associated carotid atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, M.-M.; Chiou, H.-Y.; Hsueh, Y.-M.; Hong, C.-T.; Su, C.-L.; Chang, S.-F.; Huang, W.-L.; Wang, H.-T.; Wang, Y.-H.; Hsieh, Y.-C.; Chen, C.-J.

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic-contaminated well water has been shown to increase the risk of atherosclerosis. Because of involving S-adenosylmethionine, homocysteine may modify the risk by interfering with the biomethylation of ingested arsenic. In this study, we assessed the effect of plasma homocysteine level and urinary monomethylarsonic acid (MMA V ) on the risk of atherosclerosis associated with arsenic. In total, 163 patients with carotid atherosclerosis and 163 controls were studied. Lifetime cumulative arsenic exposure from well water for study subjects was measured as index of arsenic exposure. Homocysteine level was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Proportion of MMA V (MMA%) was calculated by dividing with total arsenic species in urine, including arsenite, arsenate, MMA V , and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA V ). Results of multiple linear regression analysis show a positive correlation of plasma homocysteine levels to the cumulative arsenic exposure after controlling for atherosclerosis status and nutritional factors (P < 0.05). This correlation, however, did not change substantially the effect of arsenic exposure on the risk of atherosclerosis as analyzed in a subsequent logistic regression model. Logistic regression analyses also show that elevated plasma homocysteine levels did not confer an independent risk for developing atherosclerosis in the study population. However, the risk of having atherosclerosis was increased to 5.4-fold (95% CI, 2.0-15.0) for the study subjects with high MMA% (≥16.5%) and high homocysteine levels (≥12.7 μmol/l) as compared to those with low MMA% (<9.9%) and low homocysteine levels (<12.7 μmol/l). Elevated homocysteinemia may exacerbate the formation of atherosclerosis related to arsenic exposure in individuals with high levels of MMA% in urine

  20. Stanol esters attenuate the aggravating effect of dietary cholesterol on atherosclerosis in homozygous Watanabe rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Malene; Husche, Constanze; Pilegaard, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    Plant stanols are marketed as natural means to lower blood cholesterol in humans; hence the effect on combined familial hyperlipidemia is not known. The objective was to investigate the effect of stanol esters on blood lipids and aortic atherosclerosis in homozygous WHHL rabbits challenged...... with dietary cholesterol. A total of 36 rabbits, 6 weeks of age, with initial plasma cholesterol of 22.5 mmol/L were assigned to two treatment groups fed a standard rabbit chow with 1 g/kg cholesterol or this diet added 34 g/kg stanol ester, respectively, for 16 weeks. Plasma cholesterol was measured initially...... and at termination, also in lipoproteins. Aortic atherosclerosis was evaluated as cholesterol content and area covered by plaque. Plasma cholesterol was not significantly different between the groups at termination (35.7 mmol/L vs. 35.5 mmol/L). A significant increase in LDL was seen (13.1 mmol/L vs. 16.5 mmol...

  1. Suppressive effects of cacao polyphenols on the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Midori; Baba, Seigo

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies in humans have shown that the cacao polyphenols, (-)-epicatechin and its oligomers, prevent in vitro and ex vivo low-density lipoprotein oxidation mediated by free radical generators and metal ions and also reduce plasma LDL-cholesterol levels. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of cacao polyphenols on the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (-/-) mice. Mice aged 8 weeks (n = 90) were randomized into three groups, and fed either normal mouse chow (controls) or chow supplemented with 0.25 or 0.40 % cacao polyphenols for 16 weeks. The mean plaque area in cross-sections of the brachiocephalic trunk was measured and found to be lower in the 0.25 % cacao polyphenol group than in the control group (p cacao polyphenol group (p cacao polyphenols inhibit the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (-/-) mice by reducing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses.

  2. Intracranial atherosclerosis and inflammation: Lessons from the East and the West

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F Arenillas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial atherosclerosis (ICAS is a major cause of ischemic stroke worldwide. Patients affected by this disease have a high risk of suffering further ischemic strokes and other major vascular events despite the best medical therapy available. However, identification of factors that characterize a high-risk ICAS patient is a clinical problem that is yet to be solved. Inflammation is known to play a crucial role in all the stages of atherosclerosis affecting extracranial arterial beds but its role in ICAS is not firmly established. Circulating inflammatory biomarkers may represent a valuable tool to assess the importance of systemic and local (intraplaque inflammation in ICAS pathogenesis. In this article, we have reviewed studies with inflammatory biomarkers performed in symptomatic and asymptomatic ICAS patients published in the recent literature. Their findings strongly support the hypothesis that inflammation determines the risk of progression and complication of symptomatic ICAS.

  3. Imaging pathobiology of carotid atherosclerosis with ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat, Umar; Usman, Ammara; Gillard, Jonathan H

    2017-07-01

    To provide brief overview of the developments regarding use of ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide in imaging pathobiology of carotid atherosclerosis. MRI is a promising technique capable of providing morphological and functional information about atheromatous plaques. MRI using iron oxide particles, called ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles, allows detection of macrophages in atherosclerotic tissue. Ferumoxytol has emerged as a new USPIO agent, which has an excellent safety profile. Based on the macrophage-selective properties of ferumoxytol, there is increasing number of recent reports suggesting its effectiveness to detect pathological inflammation. USPIO particles allow magnetic resonance detection of macrophages in atherosclerotic tissue. Ferumoxytol has emerged as a new USPIO agent, with an excellent safety profile. This has the potential to be used for MRI of the pathobiology of atherosclerosis.

  4. Distinct Functions of Specialized Dendritic Cell Subsets in Atherosclerosis and the Road Ahead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Zernecke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic vascular disease is modulated by immune mechanisms. Dendritic cells (DCs and T cells are present within atherosclerotic lesions and function as central players in the initiation and modulation of adaptive immune responses. In previous years, we have studied the functional contribution of distinct DC subsets in disease development, namely, that of CCL17-expressing DCs as well as that of plasmacytoid DCs that play specialized roles in disease development. This review focuses on important findings gathered in these studies and dissects the multifaceted contribution of CCL17-expressing DCs and pDCs to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Furthermore, an outlook on future challenges faced when studying DCs in this detrimental disease are provided, and hurdles that will need to be overcome in order to enable a better understanding of the contribution of DCs to atherogenesis are discussed, a prerequisite for their therapeutic targeting in atherosclerosis.

  5. Diabetes with poor glycaemic control does not promote atherosclerosis in genetically modified hypercholesterolaemic minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Mashhadi, Rozh H; Bjørklund, Martin M; Mortensen, Martin B

    2015-01-01

    atherogenesis in a novel pig model of atherosclerosis, the D374Y-PCSK9 (+) transgenic minipig. METHODS: Nineteen minipigs were fed a cholesterol-enriched, high-fat diet; ten of these pigs were injected with streptozotocin to generate a model of diabetes. Restricted feeding was implemented to control the pigs......' weight gain and cholesterol intake. After 49 weeks of high-fat feeding, the major arteries were harvested for a detailed analysis of the plaque burden and histological plaque type. RESULTS: Stable hyperglycaemia was achieved in the diabetic minipigs, while the plasma total and LDL......-cholesterol and creatinine levels were unaffected. Diabetes failed to increase atherosclerosis in any of the vessels examined. The plaque burden in the aorta and right coronary artery was comparable between the groups, and was even reduced in the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary and iliofemoral arteries...

  6. Similarities between pre-eclampsia and atherosclerosis: a protective effect of physical exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belo, Luís; Santos-Silva, Alice; Quintanilha, Alexandre; Rebelo, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE), a characteristic hypertensive disorder of human pregnancy and a leading cause of maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity worldwide, shares some similarities with atherosclerosis, namely the involvement of oxidative stress and of endothelial dysfunction in their pathophysiologies, the presence of similar typical lesions and of common risk factors. Although it is widely accepted that regular physical exercise protects against cardiovascular events, few studies have addressed the impact of physical activity in reducing PE risk. In this paper, similarities between atherosclerosis and PE, involving pathogenic mechanisms, are described. This paper also reviews the studies performed until now that evaluated the impact of regular physical exercise (prenataly or during pregnancy) in reducing risk of PE. The potential mechanisms underlying physical activity as a prophylactic approach of PE, as observed with cardiovascular diseases, are discussed.

  7. MicroRNAs and atherosclerosis: new actors for an old movie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santovito, D; Mezzetti, A; Cipollone, F

    2012-11-01

    To date, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, short, non-coding RNA sequences able to regulate gene expression principally at the post-transcriptional level. Initially, they were thought to be involved only in developmental timing of worms. Their involvement in human biology was recently discovered and many studies have been performed to demonstrate the role of miRNA in human cancer. Since the first observation in 2005 of their implication in cardiac biology, many studies have demonstrated their role in the genetic modulation of cardiovascular development and in cardiovascular diseases such as cardial remodeling and heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias, cardiac ischaemia, cardiac fibrosis, atherosclerosis and stroke. Thus, the aim of this review is to describe the role of miRNA in atherosclerosis development and evolution and to individuate their role as potential therapeutic target. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Induction of atherosclerosis in mice and hamsters without germline genetic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørklund, Martin Mæng; Hollensen, Anne Kruse; Hagensen, Mette Kallestrup

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE: Atherosclerosis can be achieved in animals by germline genetic engineering, leading to hypercholesterolemia, but such models are constrained to few species and strains, and they are difficult to combine with other powerful techniques involving genetic manipulation or variation. OBJECTIVE......: To develop a method for induction of atherosclerosis without germline genetic engineering. METHODS AND RESULTS: Recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors were engineered to encode gain-of-function proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 mutants, and mice were given a single intravenous vector...... injection followed by high-fat diet feeding. Plasma proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 and total cholesterol increased rapidly and were maintained at high levels, and after 12 weeks, mice had atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta. Histology of the aortic root showed progression of lesions...

  9. Equisetum sylvaticum base reduces atherosclerosis risk factors in rats fed a high-fat diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-He Lin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We identify an Equisetum sylvaticum alkaloid (ESA derived from E. hyemale, which has robust antihyperlipidemic effects in rats fed a high-fat diet. ESA was isolated from E. hyemale and identified by IR, 13C NMR and 1H NMR. Rats were induced to hyperlipidemia and subjected to ESA treatment. In hyperlipidemic model, fed with a high-fat diet, the blood levels of TC, TG and LDL-C were increased. The administration of ESA (20 or 40 mg/kg to those rats significantly improved the HDL-C level and reduced the levels of TC, TG, LDL-C. The atherosclerosis index and atherosclerosis risk of these rats were significantly reduced by ESA. In addition, the administration of ESA in rats increased the activity of SOD and decreased the level of MDA. These results reveal the antihyperlipidemic and anti-oxidative effects of ESA in vivo.

  10. Animal models of surgically manipulated flow velocities to study shear stress-induced atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Leah C; Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Xing, Ruoyu; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Van der Heiden, Kim

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial tree that develops at predisposed sites, coinciding with locations that are exposed to low or oscillating shear stress. Manipulating flow velocity, and concomitantly shear stress, has proven adequate to promote endothelial activation and subsequent plaque formation in animals. In this article, we will give an overview of the animal models that have been designed to study the causal relationship between shear stress and atherosclerosis by surgically manipulating blood flow velocity profiles. These surgically manipulated models include arteriovenous fistulas, vascular grafts, arterial ligation, and perivascular devices. We review these models of manipulated blood flow velocity from an engineering and biological perspective, focusing on the shear stress profiles they induce and the vascular pathology that is observed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Macrophage-mediated proteolytic remodeling of the extracellular matrix in atherosclerosis results in neoepitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt-Arkil, Helene; Barascuk, Natasha; Register, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    in almost all stages of atherosclerosis, by both initiating atherosclerotic plaques and degrading them through the secretion of proteolytic enzymes leading to rupture. This review summarizes the literature on the role of macrophages and their proteolytic activity on proteins in the extracellular matrix (ECM......) of the atherosclerotic plaque with a view to suggest a novel approach for identification of vulnerable plaques and turnover by the use of a new type of biomarker. The PubMed database was searched using the terms macrophages, foam cells, atherosclerosis, CVD, ECM remodeling, biomarker, neoepitope, matrix...... of the constituents of the ECM of the atherosclerotic plaque. At present it is not clear which proteases play pivotal roles at distinct stages of pathogenesis, rather that the combined proteolytic potential with some proteases at early stages and other at later stages may result in plaque rupture. This macrophage...

  12. Increased Hepatic Expression of Endothelial Lipase Inhibits Cholesterol Diet-Induced Hypercholesterolemia and Atherosclerosis in Transgenic Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuan; Nishijima, Kazutoshi; Kitajima, Shuji; Niimi, Manabu; Yan, Haizhao; Chen, Yajie; Ning, Bo; Matsuhisa, Fumikazu; Liu, Enqi; Zhang, Jifeng; Chen, Y Eugene; Fan, Jianglin

    2017-07-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) is a key determinant in plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. However, functional roles of EL on the development of atherosclerosis have not been clarified. We investigated whether hepatic expression of EL affects plasma lipoprotein metabolism and cholesterol diet-induced atherosclerosis. We generated transgenic (Tg) rabbits expressing the human EL gene in the liver and then examined the effects of EL expression on plasma lipids and lipoproteins and compared the susceptibility of Tg rabbits with cholesterol diet-induced atherosclerosis with non-Tg littermates. On a chow diet, hepatic expression of human EL in Tg rabbits led to remarkable reductions in plasma levels of total cholesterol, phospholipids, and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol compared with non-Tg controls. On a cholesterol-rich diet for 16 weeks, Tg rabbits exhibited significantly lower hypercholesterolemia and less atherosclerosis than non-Tg littermates. In Tg rabbits, gross lesion area of aortic atherosclerosis was reduced by 52%, and the lesions were characterized by fewer macrophages and smooth muscle cells compared with non-Tg littermates. Increased hepatic expression of EL attenuates cholesterol diet-induced hypercholesterolemia and protects against atherosclerosis. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Normal LDL-Cholesterol Levels Are Associated With Subclinical Atherosclerosis in the Absence of Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Friera, Leticia; Fuster, Valentín; López-Melgar, Beatriz; Oliva, Belén; García-Ruiz, José M; Mendiguren, José; Bueno, Héctor; Pocock, Stuart; Ibáñez, Borja; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio; Sanz, Javier

    2017-12-19

    Absence of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) is traditionally considered low risk for atherosclerosis; however, individuals without CVRFs, as currently defined, still have events. This study sought to identify predictors of subclinical atherosclerosis in CVRF-free individuals. Participants from the PESA (Progression of Early Subclinical Atherosclerosis) study (n = 4,184) without conventional CVRFs were evaluated (n = 1,779; 45.0 ± 4.1 years, 50.3% women). CVRF freedom was defined as no current smoking and untreated blood pressure cholesterol cholesterol (LDL-C) cholesterol ≥40 mg/dl. A subgroup with optimal CVRFs (n = 740) was also defined as having blood pressure cholesterol LDL-C was independently associated with atherosclerosis presence and extent, in both the CVRF-free and CVRF-optimal groups (odds ratio [×10 mg/dl]: 1.14 to 1.18; p LDL-C, even at levels currently considered normal, is independently associated with the presence and extent of early systemic atherosclerosis in the absence of major CVRFs. These findings support more effective LDL-C lowering for primordial prevention, even in individuals conventionally considered at optimal risk. (Progression of Early Subclinical Atherosclerosis [PESA] Study; NCT01410318). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Markers of insulin resistance and carotid atherosclerosis. A comparison of the homeostasis model assessment and triglyceride glucose index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irace, C; Carallo, C; Scavelli, F B; De Franceschi, M S; Esposito, T; Tripolino, C; Gnasso, A

    2013-07-01

    The present investigation was designed to test the association between carotid atherosclerosis and two simple markers of insulin resistance, i.e. HOMA-Index and TyG-Index. The study was performed in two different cohorts. In the first cohort, 330 individuals were enrolled. Blood pressure, lipids, glucose, waist and cigarette smoking were evaluated. HOMA-IR and TyG-Index were calculated as markers of prevalent hepatic and muscular insulin resistance respectively. Carotid atherosclerosis was assessed by Doppler ultrasonography. The association between cardiovascular risk factors, markers of insulin resistance and carotid atherosclerosis was assessed by multiple logistic regression analyses. In the second cohort, limited to the evaluation of TyG-Index, 1432 subjects were studied. In the first cohort, TyG-Index was significantly associated with carotid atherosclerosis in a model including age, sex, diabetes, cigarette smoking and LDL cholesterol, while HOMA-IR was not. When components of metabolic syndrome were added to the model as dichotomous variables (absent/present), TyG-Index retained its predictive power. The same result was obtained when the metabolic syndrome was added to the model (absence/presence). The association between TyG-Index and carotid atherosclerosis was confirmed in the second cohort. The present findings suggest that TyG-Index is better associated with carotid atherosclerosis than HOMA-IR. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. PPARα activation differently affects microparticle content in atherosclerotic lesions and liver of a mouse model of atherosclerosis and NASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Morgane; Leroyer, Aurélie S; Majd, Zouher; Lalloyer, Fanny; Vallez, Emmanuelle; Bantubungi, Kadiombo; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Delerive, Philippe; Boulanger, Chantal M; Staels, Bart; Tailleux, Anne

    2011-09-01

    Atherosclerosis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are complex pathologies characterized by lipid accumulation, chronic inflammation and extensive tissue remodelling. Microparticles (MPs), small membrane vesicles produced by activated and apoptotic cells, might not only be biomarkers, but also functional actors in these pathologies. The apoE2-KI mouse is a model of atherosclerosis and NAFLD. Activation of the nuclear receptor PPARα decreases atherosclerosis and components of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in the apoE2-KI mouse. (1) To determine whether MPs are present in atherosclerotic lesions, liver and plasma during atherosclerosis and NASH progression in apoE2-KI mice, and (2) to study whether PPARα activation modulates MP concentrations. ApoE2-KI mice were fed a Western diet to induce atherosclerosis and NASH. MPs were isolated from atherosclerotic lesions, liver and blood and quantified by flow cytometry. An increase of MPs was observed in the atherosclerotic lesions and in the liver of apoE2-KI mice upon Western diet feeding. PPARα activation with fenofibrate decreased MP levels in the atherosclerotic lesions in a PPARα-dependent manner, but did not influence MP concentrations in the liver. Here we report that MPs are present in atherosclerotic lesions and in the liver of apoE2-KI mice. Their concentration increased during atherosclerosis and NASH development. PPARα activation differentially modulates MP levels in a tissue-specific manner. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Smoking, Smoking Cessation, and Measures of Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Multiple Vascular Beds in Japanese Men

    OpenAIRE

    Hisamatsu, Takashi; Miura, Katsuyuki; Arima, Hisatomi; Kadota, Aya; Kadowaki, Sayaka; Torii, Sayuki; Suzuki, Sentaro; Miyagawa, Naoko; Sato, Atsushi; Yamazoe, Masahiro; Fujiyoshi, Akira; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Murata, Kiyoshi; Abbott, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Smoking is an overwhelming, but preventable, risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD), although smoking prevalence remains high in developed and developing countries in East Asia. Methods and Results In a population?based sample of 1019 Japanese men aged 40 to 79?years, without CVD, we examined cross?sectional associations of smoking status, cumulative pack?years, daily consumption, and time since cessation, with subclinical atherosclerosis at 4 anatomically distinct vascular ...

  17. Pathophysiological effects of radiation on atherosclerosis development and progression, and the incidence of cardiovascular complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basavaraju, Sekhara Rao; Easterly, Clay E.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation therapy while important in the management of several diseases, is implicated in the causation of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular complications. Cancer and atherosclerosis go through the same stages of initiation, promotion, and complication, beginning with a mutation in a single cell. Clinical observations before the 1960s lead to the belief that the heart is relatively resistant to the doses of radiation used in radiotherapy. Subsequently, it was discovered that the heart is sensitive to radiation and many cardiac structures may be damaged by radiation exposure. A significantly higher risk of death due to ischemic heart disease has been reported for patients treated with radiation for Hodgkin's disease and breast cancer. Certain cytokines and growth factors, such as TGF-β1 and IL-1 β, may stimulate radiation-induced endothelial proliferation, fibroblast proliferation, collagen deposition, and fibrosis leading to advanced lesions of atherosclerosis. The treatment for radiation-induced ischemic heart disease includes conventional pharmacological therapy, balloon angioplasty, and bypass surgery. Endovascular irradiation has been shown to be effective in reducing restenosis-like response to balloon-catheter injury in animal models. Caution must be exercised when radiation therapy is combined with doxorubicin because there appears to be a synergistic toxic effect on the myocardium. Damage to endothelial cells is a central event in the pathogenesis of damage to the coronary arteries. Certain growth factors that interfere with the apoptotic pathway may provide new therapeutic strategies for reducing the risk of radiation-induced damage to the heart. Exposure to low level occupational or environmental radiation appears to pose no undue risk of atherosclerosis development or cardiovascular mortality. But, other radiation-induced processes such as the bystander effects, abscopal effects, hormesis, and individual variations in radiosensitivity may be

  18. Baldness and myocardial infarction in men: the atherosclerosis risk in communities study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahar, Eyal; Heiss, Gerardo; Rosamond, Wayne D; Szklo, Moyses

    2008-03-15

    Because hair loss may be a surrogate measure of androgenic activity-possibly a determinant of coronary atherosclerosis-several studies have explored the presence and magnitude of an association between male pattern baldness and myocardial infarction (MI). In particular, vertex baldness, but not frontal baldness alone, was strongly associated with incident MI in a large, hospital-based, case-control study. The authors examined these associations in a cross-sectional sample of 5,056 men aged 52-75 years, of whom 767 had a history of MI. The sample was derived from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study (1987-1998). As compared with a baldness-free reference group, the estimated odds ratios for prevalent MI from a multivariable model were 1.28 (frontal baldness), 1.02 (mild vertex baldness), 1.40 (moderate vertex baldness), and 1.18 (severe vertex baldness). Other regression models have yielded similar results, including the absence of a monotonic "dose-response relation" between the extent of vertex baldness and prevalent MI. The authors also examined the relation of baldness pattern to carotid intimal-medial thickness, a measure of atherosclerosis, among those who were free of clinical cardiovascular disease. The estimated mean differences in carotid intimal-medial thickness between groups of men with various types of baldness and their baldness-free counterparts were all close to zero. The results of this study suggest that male pattern baldness is not a surrogate measure of an important risk factor for myocardial infarction or asymptomatic atherosclerosis.

  19. Inhibition of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT suppresses accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna V Zetterqvist

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY: Diabetic patients have a much more widespread and aggressive form of atherosclerosis and therefore, higher risk for myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease and stroke, but the molecular mechanisms leading to accelerated damage are still unclear. Recently, we showed that hyperglycemia activates the transcription factor NFAT in the arterial wall, inducing the expression of the pro-atherosclerotic protein osteopontin. Here we investigate whether NFAT activation may be a link between diabetes and atherogenesis. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetes in apolipoprotein E(-/- mice resulted in 2.2 fold increased aortic atherosclerosis and enhanced pro-inflammatory burden, as evidenced by elevated blood monocytes, endothelial activation- and inflammatory markers in aorta, and pro-inflammatory cytokines in plasma. In vivo treatment with the NFAT blocker A-285222 for 4 weeks completely inhibited the diabetes-induced aggravation of atherosclerosis, having no effect in non-diabetic mice. STZ-treated mice exhibited hyperglycemia and higher plasma cholesterol and triglycerides, but these were unaffected by A-285222. NFAT-dependent transcriptional activity was examined in aorta, spleen, thymus, brain, heart, liver and kidney, but only augmented in the aorta of diabetic mice. A-285222 completely blocked this diabetes-driven NFAT activation, but had no impact on the other organs or on splenocyte proliferation or cytokine secretion, ruling out systemic immunosuppression as the mechanism behind reduced atherosclerosis. Instead, NFAT inhibition effectively reduced IL-6, osteopontin, monocyte chemotactic protein 1, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, CD68 and tissue factor expression in the arterial wall and lowered plasma IL-6 in diabetic mice. CONCLUSIONS: Targeting NFAT signaling may be a novel and attractive approach for the treatment of diabetic macrovascular complications.

  20. Evaluation of the C-reactive protein serum levels in periodontitis patients with or without atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakare, Kaustubh S; Deo, Vikas; Bhongade, Manohar L

    2010-01-01

    Several studies suggested an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease (CVD). C- reactive protein is elevated in periodontitis patients and has been found to be a predictor of increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Since, CRP is known to play a role in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the serum levels of CRP in periodontitis patients with or without atherosclerosis. A total of 45 patients, 15 chronic periodontitis patients with atherosclerosis (Group A), 15 chronic periodontitis patients with no history of any systemic disease (Group B), and 15 clinically healthy individuals with no history of periodontal or systemic disease (Group C) within age range of 30 to 55 years were selected for the study. PI, PBI, PPD, CAL and radiographic marginal alveolar bone level were assessed in all the three groups. CRP levels were assessed with 'Turbi-latex' kit using turbidimetric analysis. The mean CAL recorded was 4.9mm in group A, 4.6mm in group B and 1.9 mm in group C. The mean radiographic marginal bone level was 45 to 50% in group A, 45 to 50% in group B and 90 to 95% in group C. Mean serum C-reactive protein level was significantly higher in group A (8.9 mg/l), as compared to group B (4.9 mg/l) as well as group C (0.9 mg/l). Within the limits of this study it was concluded that periodontitis may add to the inflammatory burden of the individual and may result in increased risk of atherosclerosis based on serum C-reactive protein concentrations.

  1. Evaluation of Selected Atherosclerosis Risk Factors in Women with Subclinical Hypothyroidism Treated with L-Thyroxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamarczuk-Janczyszyn, Maria; Zdrojowy-Wełna, Aleksandra; Rogala, Natalia; Zatońska, Katarzyna; Bednarek-Tupikowska, Grażyna

    2016-01-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is a common endocrine disorder, probably increasing cardiovascular (CV) risk. However, the relation between SCH and atherosclerosis risk factors remains unclear. The aim of the study was to evaluate selected atherosclerosis risk factors in women with SCH in comparison to a group of healthy women and women with overt hypothyroidism, as well as to investigate the influence of L-thyroxine replacement on those risk factors. The study group consisted of 187 obese women aged between 50 and 70 years: 100 women with SCH, 45 women with overt hypothyroidism and 42 women with TSH level in reference ranges. Anthropometric parameters were evaluated. Laboratory tests included thyroid hormones concentrations, lipid profile with apolipoproteins, CRP, homocysteine. Atherosclerotic indexes were calculated: LDL C/HDL C ratio, apoA1/apoB ratio and Castelli risk index. Women with hypothyroidism were given L-thyroxine treatment and after 6 months in euthyroidism the evaluation was repeated. Total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides concentrations as well as LDL-C/HDL-C ratio and Castelli index were higher in SCH than in controls and decreased after L-thyroxin substitution. All of the calculated atherosclerosis indexes showed significant positive correlations with TSH concentration in SCH group. Also in this group the systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased significantly after treatment. Dyslipidemia in obese SCH women is not severe, but if untreated for many years, it may lead to atherosclerosis. Substitution therapy improves the lipid profile, changing the relations between protective and proatherogenic fractions of serum lipids, and optimises blood pressure.

  2. Walking speed and subclinical atherosclerosis in healthy older adults: the Whitehall II study

    OpenAIRE

    Hamer, M.; Kivimaki, M.; Lahiri, A.; Yerramasu, A.; Deanfield, J. E.; Marmot, M. G.; Steptoe, A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Extended walking speed is a predictor of incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) in older individuals, but the ability of an objective short-distance walking speed test to stratify the severity of preclinical conditions remains unclear. This study examined whether performance in an 8-ft walking speed test is associated with metabolic risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis.Design Cross-sectional.Setting Epidemiological cohort.Participants 530 adults (aged 63 +/- 6 years, 50.3% ma...

  3. Walking speed and subclinical atherosclerosis in healthy older adults: the Whitehall II study

    OpenAIRE

    Hamer, Mark; Kivimaki, Mika; Lahiri, Avijit; Yerramasu, Ajay; Deanfield, John E; Marmot, Michael G; Steptoe, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Objective Extended walking speed is a predictor of incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) in older individuals, but the ability of an objective short-distance walking speed test to stratify the severity of preclinical conditions remains unclear. This study examined whether performance in an 8-ft walking speed test is associated with metabolic risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Epidemiological cohort. Participants 530 adults (aged 63?6?years, 50.3% mal...

  4. Intracranial angioplasty and stenting for cerebral atherosclerosis: new treatments for stroke are needed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashida, Randall T. [San Francisco Medical Center, Division of Interventional Neurovascular Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Meyers, Philip M. [Columbia University, The Neurological Institute, New York Presbyterian Hospitals, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is a common cause of stroke. Recent technological developments offer improved methods for endovascular revascularization of symptomatic and asymptomatic cerebral artery stenosis. Identification of appropriate patients remains a diagnostic challenge, and our knowledge about the natural history of the disease remains limited. At this time, patients with significant intracranial stenosis should receive counseling on the benefits and risks of revascularization therapy. Ultimately, determination of which patients should undergo revascularization procedures will require carefully planned, randomized clinical trials. (orig.)

  5. Studi Penentuan Kecepatan Aliran Darah dan Frekuensi Terimaan Pasien Atherosclerosis Menggunakan USG Color Doppler

    OpenAIRE

    Mulyani, Emba

    2014-01-01

    Jurnal Fisika Medik Studi Penentuan Kecepatan Aliran Darah dan Frekuensi Terimaan Pasien Atherosclerosis Menggunakan USG Color Doppler Mulyani H211 08 507 Pembimbing Utama Sri Dewi Astuty Ilyas,Ssi, Msi Nip.19750513 199903 2 001 Pembimbing Pertama Dahlang Tahir, Msi, Ph.D Nip.19750907 200003 1 001 ABSTRACT Research about Study of determination blood speed of current and freq uency give patient atherosclero sis uses plane USG Color Doppler had be...

  6. MicroRNAs as Potential Mediators for Cigarette Smoking Induced Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Yokoyama

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Smoking increases the risk of atherosclerosis-related events, such as myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. Recent studies have examined the expression levels of altered microRNAs (miRNAs in various diseases. The profiles of tissue miRNAs can be potentially used in diagnosis or prognosis. However, there are limited studies on miRNAs following exposure to cigarette smoke (CS. The present study was designed to dissect the effects and cellular/molecular mechanisms of CS-induced atherosclerogenesis. Apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE KO mice were exposed to CS for five days a week for two months at low (two puffs/min for 40 min/day or high dose (two puffs/min for 120 min/day. We measured the area of atherosclerotic plaques in the aorta, representing the expression of miRNAs after the exposure period. Two-month exposure to the high dose of CS significantly increased the plaque area in aortic arch, and significantly upregulated the expression of atherosclerotic markers (VCAM-1, ICAM-1, MCP1, p22phox, and gp91phox. Exposure to the high dose of CS also significantly upregulated the miRNA-155 level in the aortic tissues of ApoE KO mice. Moreover, the expression level of miR-126 tended to be downregulated and that of miR-21 tended to be upregulated in ApoE KO mice exposed to the high dose of CS, albeit statistically insignificant. The results suggest that CS induces atherosclerosis through increased vascular inflammation and NADPH oxidase expression and also emphasize the importance of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of CS-induced atherosclerosis. Our findings provide evidence for miRNAs as potential mediators of inflammation and atherosclerosis induced by CS.

  7. [Placental atherosclerosis and markers of endothelial dysfunction in infants born to mothers with gestational diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Morales, Cruz Mónica; Brito Zurita, Olga Rosa; González Heredia, Ricardo; Cruz López, Miguel; Méndez Padrón, Araceli; Matute Briseño, Juan Antonio

    2016-08-05

    The pathophysiology of gestational diabetes itself causes hyperstimulation of adipose tissue and of the placenta cells increasing the production of inflammatory cytokines, which cause changes in the tissues exposed such as the placenta and foetus. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare metabolic markers and endothelial dysfunction in umbilical cord blood, as well as to determine the presence of atherosclerosis in the placentas of newborn infants of patients with gestational diabetes and in patients with normally progressing pregnancies. An analytical cross-sectional study was carried out in 84 patients, obtaining data such as age, smoking and weight gain in pregnancy; the gestational age of the newborns was determined by Capurro, and their weight and destination subsequent to birth, the placentas were also collected in order to look for atherosclerosis through histological studies and glucose, insulin, VLDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides, cholesterol, fibrinogen, PCR and markers of endothelial dysfunction (adiponectin, VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and IL-6) were determined in blood samples obtained from the umbilical cord. Placental atherosclerosis presented in 28.94% of the group with gestational diabetes compared to 10.52% of the group with normally progressing pregnancies (P=.044); differences were found in glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, fibrinogen, HOMA-IR, PCR-us, HDL-C, not in VLDL-C. Twenty-one point five percent of the newborns of the gestational diabetes patients required hospitalization, against 5.2% in the control group, Pregnancies that involve diabetes have higher proportion of atherosclerosis, hospitalization of the newborn, insulin resistance, as well as elevation of markers associated with inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in umbilical cord blood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Moderate beer consumption does not change early or mature atherosclerosis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanco-Vaca Francisco

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the consumption of wine in particular has been associated with a lower risk of atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease, systematic reviews differ as to the relative protective effect of beer, wine and spirits. Two previous studies showed that red wine reduces fatty streak formation (early atherosclerosis but not mature atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein (apo E-deficient (apoE-/- mice. Aim of the study To determine whether a moderate beer intake would affect early and mature atherosclerotic lesion formation using control C57BL/6 and apoE-/- mice, respectively, as models. Methods Control C57BL/6 and apoE-/- mice were randomized to receive either water, ethanol, mild beer, dark beer or ethanol-free beer. The level of beer was designed to approximate the alcohol intake currently believed to be beneficial in reducing human vascular risk. Control C57BL/6 mice were fed a Western diet for 24 weeks, and apoE-/- mice a chow diet for 12 weeks. At the end of the trial period, mice were euthanized and atherosclerotic lesions quantified. Plasma lipid concentrations were also measured. Results The amount of atherosclerosis and average number of lesions in the proximal aortic region did not differ among groups in control C57BL/6 mice (p = 0.32 and p = 0.29, respectively and apoE-/- mice (p = 0.19 and p = 0.59, respectively. No consistent differences were observed in plasma lipid and lipoprotein concentrations among water, ethanol and beer groups. Conclusions Moderate beer consumption does not change the development of early or mature atherosclerosis in mice. Our findings do not support the hypothesis of an anti-atherogenic effect of beer. Other potential protective actions of moderate beer consumption such as plaque stabilization, a reduction in plaque intrinsic thrombogenicity, or a reduction in the systemic propensity to thrombosis, remain to be studied.

  9. Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin Attenuates the Development of Atherosclerosis in ApoE−/− Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kunwu; Zhu, Pengfei; Dong, Qian; Zhong, Yucheng; Zhu, Zhengfeng; Lin, Yingzhong; Huang, Ying; Meng, Kai; Ji, Qingwei; Yi, Guiwen; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Bangwei; Mao, Yi; Cheng, Peng; Zhao, Xiaoqi; Mao, Xiaobo; Zeng, Qiutang

    2013-01-01

    Background Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a cytokine with multiple effects on the body. For one thing, TSLP induces Th2 immunoreaction and facilitates allergic reaction; for another, it promotes the differentiation of naturally occurring CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (nTregs) and maintains immune tolerance. However, the exact role of TSLP in atherosclerosis remains unknown. Methods and Results In vitro, we examined the phenotype of TSLP‐conditioned bone marrow dendritic cells (TSLP‐DCs) of apolipoprotein E–deficient (ApoE−/−) mice and their capacity to induce the differentiation of Tregs. Our results indicated that TSLP‐DCs obtained the characteristics of tolerogenic dendritic cells and increased a generation of CD4+ latency‐associated peptide (LAP)+ Tregs and nTregs when cocultured with naive T cells. In addition, the functional relevance of TSLP and TSLP‐DCs in the development of atherosclerosis was also determined. Interestingly, we found that TSLP was almost absent in cardiovascular tissue of ApoE−/− mice, and TSLP administration increased the levels of antioxidized low‐density lipoprotein IgM and IgG1, but decreased the levels of IgG2a in plasma. Furthermore, mice treated with TSLP and TSLP‐DCs developed significantly fewer (32.6% and 28.2%, respectively) atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic root compared with controls, along with increased numbers of CD4+LAP+ Tregs and nTregs in the spleen and decreased inflammation in the aorta, which could be abrogated by anti‐TGF‐β antibody. Conclusions Our results revealed a protective role for TSLP in atherosclerosis that is possibly mediated by reestablishing a tolerogenic immune response, which may represent a novel possibility for treatment or prevention of atherosclerosis. PMID:23985377

  10. Clinical evaluation of atherosclerosis and mechanical properties of the thoracic aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saiki, Atsushi

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate the aortic wall atherosclerosis, X-ray CT and ECG gated radionuclide angiography were performed in 25 subjects. They were classified into 17 normotensive group (N) and 8 hypertensive group (HT). The time-activity curve was generated using radionuclide angiography in the portion of the thoracic aorta. The aortic wall distensibility was expressed as 100ΔV/V 0 / PP, where ΔV was difference between maximum and minimum (V 0 ) counts of the aorta, and PP was pulse pressure. The degree of the aortic wall atherosclerosis was evaluated by X-ray CT. The aortic wall CT-score was calculated from the CT-scores measured whithin the region of interest of the other margin of the aorta and of the background by X-ray CT. There was a significant correlation between aortic wall CT-score and systolic blood pressure (r=0.59, p<0.01) or aortic wall distensibility (r=-0.74, p<0.01)), but no correlation existed between aortic wall CT-score and diastolic blood pressure (r=0.11, p:NS). The aortic wall distensibility was higher and the aortic wall CT-score was lower in N-group than in HT-group, whereas there was no difference of the radius of the aorta between both groups. These results suggest that the aortic wall atherosclerosis advanced progressively in hypertensive patients and systolic blood pressure was a good predictor of the degree of the aortic atherosclerosis. (author)

  11. Human oxidation-specific antibodies reduce foam cell formation and atherosclerosis progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsimikas, Sotirios; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Hartvigsen, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    We sought to assess the in vivo importance of scavenger receptor (SR)-mediated uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) in atherogenesis and to test the efficacy of human antibody IK17-Fab or IK17 single-chain Fv fragment (IK17-scFv), which lacks immunologic properties of intact antibod...... antibodies other than the ability to inhibit uptake of OxLDL by macrophages, to inhibit atherosclerosis....

  12. MicroRNA-181b Controls Atherosclerosis and Aneurysms Through Regulation of TIMP-3 and Elastin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gregoli, Karina; Mohamad Anuar, Nur Najmi; Bianco, Rosaria; White, Stephen J; Newby, Andrew C; George, Sarah J; Johnson, Jason L

    2017-01-06

    Atherosclerosis and aneurysms are leading causes of mortality worldwide. MicroRNAs (miRs) are key determinants of gene and protein expression, and atypical miR expression has been associated with many cardiovascular diseases; although their contributory role to atherosclerotic plaque and abdominal aortic aneurysm stability are poorly understood. To investigate whether miR-181b regulates tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 expression and affects atherosclerosis and aneurysms. Here, we demonstrate that miR-181b was overexpressed in symptomatic human atherosclerotic plaques and abdominal aortic aneurysms and correlated with decreased expression of predicted miR-181b targets, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3, and elastin. Using the well-characterized mouse atherosclerosis models of Apoe - /- and Ldlr -/- , we observed that in vivo administration of locked nucleic acid anti-miR-181b retarded both the development and the progression of atherosclerotic plaques. Systemic delivery of anti-miR-181b in angiotensin II-infused Apoe -/- and Ldlr -/- mice attenuated aneurysm formation and progression within the ascending, thoracic, and abdominal aorta. Moreover, miR-181b inhibition greatly increased elastin and collagen expression, promoting a fibrotic response and subsequent stabilization of existing plaques and aneurysms. We determined that miR-181b negatively regulates macrophage tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 expression and vascular smooth muscle cell elastin production, both important factors in maintaining atherosclerotic plaque and aneurysm stability. Validation studies in Timp3 -/- mice confirmed that the beneficial effects afforded by miR-181b inhibition are largely tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 dependent, while also revealing an additional protective effect through elevating elastin synthesis. Our findings suggest that the management of miR-181b and its target genes provides therapeutic potential for limiting the progression of

  13. Neuropeptide Y gene polymorphisms confer risk of early-onset atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svati H Shah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide Y (NPY is a strong candidate gene for coronary artery disease (CAD. We have previously identified genetic linkage to familial CAD in the genomic region of NPY. We performed follow-up genetic, biostatistical, and functional analysis of NPY in early-onset CAD. In familial CAD (GENECARD, N = 420 families, we found increased microsatellite linkage to chromosome 7p14 (OSA LOD = 4.2, p = 0.004 in 97 earliest age-of-onset families. Tagged NPY SNPs demonstrated linkage to CAD of a 6-SNP block (LOD = 1.58-2.72, family-based association of this block with CAD (p = 0.02, and stronger linkage to CAD in the earliest age-of-onset families. Association of this 6-SNP block with CAD was validated in: (a 556 non-familial early-onset CAD cases and 256 controls (OR 1.46-1.65, p = 0.01-0.05, showing stronger association in youngest cases (OR 1.84-2.20, p = 0.0004-0.09; and (b GENECARD probands versus non-familial controls (OR 1.79-2.06, p = 0.003-0.02. A promoter SNP (rs16147 within this 6-SNP block was associated with higher plasma NPY levels (p = 0.04. To assess a causal role of NPY in atherosclerosis, we applied the NPY1-receptor-antagonist BIBP-3226 adventitially to endothelium-denuded carotid arteries of apolipoprotein E-deficient mice; treatment reduced atherosclerotic neointimal area by 50% (p = 0.03. Thus, NPY variants associate with atherosclerosis in two independent datasets (with strong age-of-onset effects and show allele-specific expression with NPY levels, while NPY receptor antagonism reduces atherosclerosis in mice. We conclude that NPY contributes to atherosclerosis pathogenesis.

  14. Changes in expression of proteasome in rats at different stages of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismawati; Oenzil, Fadil; Yanwirasti; Yerizel, Eti

    2016-06-01

    It has been suggested that proteasome system has a role in initiation, progression, and complication stages of atherosclerosis. Although there is still controversy, there has been no research that compares the expression of proteasome in tissue and serum at each of these stages. This study aimed to investigated the expression of proteasome at different stages of atherosclerosis using rat model. We measured the expression of aortic proteasome by immunohistochemical analyses and were then analyzed using ImageJ software for percentage of area and integrated density. We used Photoshop version 3.0 to analyze aortic proteasome expression as a comparison. We measured serum proteasome expression by enzyme linked immunosorbents assays. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare mean value of percentage of area and serum proteasome. Analysis of variance test was used to compare mean value of integrated density. Correlation test between vascular proteasome expression and serum proteasome expression was made using Spearman test. A P-value of 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Compared with normal, percentage of area was higher in initiation, progression, and complication. Compared with normal, integrated density was higher in initiation and further higher in progression and complication. Data from Image J is similar with data from Photoshop. Serum proteasome expression was higher in initiation compared with normal, and further higher in progression and complication. It was concluded that there were different vascular proteasome expression and serum proteasome expression at the stages of atherosclerosis. These results may be used in research into new marker and therapeutic target in atherosclerosis.

  15. Association of Television Viewing Time with Body Composition and Calcified Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Singapore Chinese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ei Ei Khaing Nang

    Full Text Available Sedentary behavior such as television viewing may be an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease. However, few studies have assessed the impact of television viewing time on coronary artery calcification and it remains unclear how body fat contributes to this relationship. The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between television viewing time and subclinical atherosclerosis and whether effects on visceral or subcutaneous fat may mediate any associations observed.This was a cross-sectional study of 398 Chinese participants (192 men and 206 women from Singapore prospective study. Participants were free from known cardiovascular diseases and underwent interview, health screening, computed tomography scans of coronary arteries and abdomen. Spearman's correlation was used to test the correlation between television viewing time, physical activity, body composition and abdominal fat distribution. The association between television viewing time and subclinical atherosclerosis was assessed by multiple logistic regression analysis.In men, television viewing time was significantly correlated with higher body fat mass index, percent body fat, subcutaneous and visceral fat. These associations were in the same direction, but weaker and not statistically significant in women. Television viewing time (hours/day was associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in men (odds ratio: 1.41, 95% CI: 1.03-1.93 but no significant association was observed in women (odds ratio: 0.88, 95% CI: 0.59-1.31 after adjusting for potential socio-demographic and lifestyle confounders. Further adjustments for biological factors did not affect these associations.Television viewing time was associated with greater adiposity and higher subcutaneous and visceral fat in men. TV viewing time was also associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in men and the potential mechanisms underlying this association require further investigation.

  16. Appraisal of different ultrasonography indices in patients with carotid artery atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Rafati, Mehravar; Havaee, Elham; Moladoust, Hassan; Sehhati, Mohammadreza

    2017-01-01

    In this study a semi-automated image-processing based method was designed in which the parameters such as intima-media thickness (IMT), resistive index (RI), pulsatility index (PI), dicrotic notch index (DNI), and mean wavelet entropy (MWE) were evaluated in B-mode and Doppler ultrasound in patients presenting with carotid artery atherosclerosis. In a cross-sectional design, 144 men were divided into four groups of control, mild, moderate and severe stenosis subjects. In all individuals, far ...

  17. Relationship between inter-arm blood pressure difference and severity of coronary atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Se-Jun; Son, Jung-Woo; Park, Sang-Min; Choi, Hyun-Hee; Hong, Kyung-Soon

    2017-08-01

    A greater inter-arm blood pressure difference (IABPD) is associated with atherosclerosis, but its association with coronary artery disease is unknown. We investigated the relationship between IABPD and coronary atherosclerosis. We retrospectively reviewed blood pressure (BP) data that was measured simultaneously in both arms of patients who underwent initial coronary angiography. Coronary atherosclerosis was assessed using the Gensini score, based on quantitative coronary angiography findings. To adjust for the effect of baseline BP, the percentages of systolic IABPD to higher mean BP (cIABPD sys ), diastolic IABPD to higher mean BP (cIABPD dia ), and mean IABPD to higher mean BP (cIABPD mean ) were calculated as BP-adjusted IABPDs. We examined the records of 816 patients (516 males, mean age: 65.5 ± 11.8 years). The mean Gensini score was 33.4 ± 30.4, and the median was 25. All cIAPBDs had positive correlations with the Gensini score (cIABPD sys : r = 0.208, p < 0.001; cIABPD dia : r = 0.123, p < 0.001; cIABPD mean : r = 0.120, p = 0.001). Multiple regression analysis indicated that cIABPD sys was associated with the Gensini score, independently of age, gender, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia (B = 0.031, p < 0.001). The BP-adjusted IABPD parameters are related to the severity of coronary artery disease. Further studies should investigate the use of the IABPD to improve management of coronary atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Are air pollution and traffic noise independently associated with atherosclerosis: the Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kälsch, Hagen; Hennig, Frauke; Moebus, Susanne; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Dragano, Nico; Jakobs, Hermann; Memmesheimer, Michael; Erbel, Raimund; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Hoffmann, Barbara

    2014-04-01

    Living close to high traffic has been linked to subclinical atherosclerosis, however it is not clear, whether fine particulate matter (PM) air pollution or noise, two important traffic-related exposures, are responsible for the association. We investigate the independent associations of long-term exposure to fine PM and road traffic noise with thoracic aortic calcification (TAC), a reliable measure of subclinical atherosclerosis. We used baseline data (2000-2003) from the German Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study, a population-based cohort of 4814 randomly selected participants. We assessed residential long-term exposure to PM with a chemistry transport model, and to road traffic noise using façade levels from noise models as weighted 24 h mean noise (Lden) and night-time noise (Lnight). Thoracic aortic calcification was quantified from non-contrast enhanced electron beam computed tomography. We used multiple linear regression to estimate associations of environmental exposures with ln(TAC+1), adjusting for each other, individual, and neighbourhood characteristics. In 4238 participants (mean age 60 years, 49.9% male), PM2.5 (aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 µm) and Lnight are both associated with an increasing TAC-burden of 18.1% (95% CI: 6.6; 30.9%) per 2.4 µg/m(3) PM2.5 and 3.9% (95% CI 0.0; 8.0%) per 5dB(A) Lnight, respectively, in the full model and after mutual adjustment. We did not observe effect measure modification of the PM2.5 association by Lnight or vice versa. Long-term exposure to fine PM and night-time traffic noise are both independently associated with subclinical atherosclerosis and may both contribute to the association of traffic proximity with atherosclerosis.

  19. Macrophage mitochondrial oxidative stress promotes atherosclerosis and nuclear factor-κB-mediated inflammation in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Gary Z; Rabinovitch, Peter S; Tabas, Ira

    2014-01-31

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress (mitoOS) has been shown to correlate with the progression of human atherosclerosis. However, definitive cell type-specific causation studies in vivo are lacking, and the molecular mechanisms of potential proatherogenic effects remain to be determined. Our aims were to assess the importance of macrophage mitoOS in atherogenesis and to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms. We first validated Western diet-fed Ldlr(-/-) mice as a model of human mitoOS-atherosclerosis association by showing that non-nuclear oxidative DNA damage, a marker of mitoOS in lesional macrophages, correlates with aortic root lesion development. To investigate the importance of macrophage mitoOS, we used a genetic engineering strategy in which the OS suppressor catalase was ectopically expressed in mitochondria (mCAT) in macrophages. MitoOS in lesional macrophages was successfully suppressed in these mice, and this led to a significant reduction in aortic root lesional area. The mCAT lesions had less monocyte-derived cells, less Ly6c(hi) monocyte infiltration into lesions, and lower levels of monocyte chemotactic protein-1. The decrease in lesional monocyte chemotactic protein-1 was associated with the suppression of other markers of inflammation and with decreased phosphorylation of RelA (NF-κB p65), indicating decreased activation of the proinflammatory NF-κB pathway. Using models of mitoOS in cultured macrophages, we showed that mCAT suppressed monocyte chemotactic protein-1 expression by decreasing the activation of the IκB-kinase β-RelA NF-κB pathway. MitoOS in lesional macrophages amplifies atherosclerotic lesion development by promoting NF-κB-mediated entry of monocytes and other inflammatory processes. In view of the mitoOS-atherosclerosis link in human atheromata, these findings reveal a potentially new therapeutic target to prevent the progression of atherosclerosis.

  20. Intracranial angioplasty and stenting for cerebral atherosclerosis: new treatments for stroke are needed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashida, Randall T.; Meyers, Philip M.

    2006-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is a common cause of stroke. Recent technological developments offer improved methods for endovascular revascularization of symptomatic and asymptomatic cerebral artery stenosis. Identification of appropriate patients remains a diagnostic challenge, and our knowledge about the natural history of the disease remains limited. At this time, patients with significant intracranial stenosis should receive counseling on the benefits and risks of revascularization therapy. Ultimately, determination of which patients should undergo revascularization procedures will require carefully planned, randomized clinical trials. (orig.)

  1. Traveling Wave Solutions of Reaction-Diffusion Equations Arising in Atherosclerosis Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narcisa Apreutesei

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this short review article, two atherosclerosis models are presented, one as a scalar equation and the other one as a system of two equations. They are given in terms of reaction-diffusion equations in an infinite strip with nonlinear boundary conditions. The existence of traveling wave solutions is studied for these models. The monostable and bistable cases are introduced and analyzed.

  2. Intranasal delivery of E-selectin reduces atherosclerosis in ApoE-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhui Li

    Full Text Available Mucosal tolerance to E-selectin prevents stroke and protects against ischemic brain damage in experimental models of stroke studying healthy animals or spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rats. A reduction in inflammation and neural damage was associated with immunomodulatory or "tolerogenic" responses to E-selectin. The purpose of the current study on ApoE deficient mice is to assess the capacity of this stroke prevention innovation to influence atherosclerosis, a major underlying cause for ischemic strokes; human E-selectin is being translated as a potential clinical prevention strategy for secondary stroke. Female ApoE-/- mice received intranasal delivery of E-selectin prior to (pre-tolerization or simultaneously with initiation of a high-fat diet. After 7 weeks on the high-fat diet, lipid lesions in the aorta, serum triglycerides, and total cholesterol were assessed as markers of atherosclerosis development. We also assessed E-selectin-specific antibodies and cytokine responses, in addition to inflammatory responses that included macrophage infiltration of the aorta and altered gene expression profiles of aortic mRNA. Intranasal delivery of E-selectin prior to initiation of high-fat chow decreased atherosclerosis, serum total cholesterol, and expression of the leucocyte chemoattractant CCL21 that is typically upregulated in atherosclerotic lesions of ApoE-/- mice. This response was associated with the induction of E-selectin specific cells producing the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-10 and immunosuppressive antibody isotypes. Intranasal administration of E-selectin generates E-selectin specific immune responses that are immunosuppressive in nature and can ameliorate atherosclerosis, a major risk factor for ischemic stroke. These results provide additional preclinical support for the potential of induction of mucosal tolerance to E-selectin to prevent stroke.

  3. Noninvasive ultrasound molecular imaging of the effect of statins on endothelial inflammatory phenotype in early atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Khanicheh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Inflammatory changes on the endothelium are responsible for leukocyte recruitment to plaques in atherosclerosis. Noninvasive assessment of treatment-effects on endothelial inflammation may be of use for managing medical therapy and developing novel therapies. We hypothesized that molecular imaging of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 with contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEU could assess treatment effects on endothelial phenotype in early atherosclerosis. METHODS: Mice with atherosclerosis produced by gene deletion of the LDL-receptor and Apobec-1-editing protein were studied. At 12 weeks of age, mice received 8 weeks of regular chow or atorvastatin-enriched chow (10 mg/kg/day. At 20 weeks, CEU molecular imaging for aortic endothelial VCAM-1 expression was performed with VCAM-1-targeted (MB(VCAM and control microbubbles (MB(Ctr. Aortic wall thickness was assessed with high frequency ultrasound. Histology, immunohistology and Western blot were used to assess plaque burden and VCAM-1 expression. RESULTS: Plaque burden was reduced on histology, and VCAM-1 was reduced on Western blot by atorvastatin, which corresponded to less endothelial expression of VCAM-1 on immunohistology. High frequency ultrasound did not detect differences in aortic wall thickness between groups. In contrast, CEU molecular imaging demonstrated selective signal enhancement for MB(VCAM in non-treated animals (MB(VCAM 2±0.3 vs MB(Ctr 0.7±0.2, p<0.01, but not in statin-treated animals (MB(VCAM 0.8±0.2 vs MB(Ctr 1.0±0.2, p = ns; p<0.01 for the effect of statin on MB(VCAM signal. CONCLUSIONS: Non-invasive CEU molecular imaging detects the effects of anti-inflammatory treatment on endothelial inflammation in early atherosclerosis. This easily accessible, low-cost technique may be useful in assessing treatment effects in preclinical research and in patients.

  4. Citrullus lanatus 'sentinel' (watermelon) extract reduces atherosclerosis in LDL receptor-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poduri, Aruna; Rateri, Debra L; Saha, Shubin K; Saha, Sibu; Daugherty, Alan

    2013-05-01

    Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus or C. lanatus) has many potentially bioactive compounds including citrulline, which may influence atherosclerosis. In this study, we determined the effects of C. lanatus, provided as an extract of the cultivar 'sentinel,' on hypercholesterolemia-induced atherosclerosis in mice. Male low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice at 8 weeks old were given either C. lanatus 'sentinel' extract (2% vol/vol; n=10) or a mixture of matching carbohydrates (2% vol/vol; n=8) as the control in drinking water while being fed a saturated fat-enriched diet for 12 weeks ad libitum. Mice consuming C. lanatus 'sentinel' extract had significantly increased plasma citrulline concentrations. Systolic blood pressure was comparable between the two groups. Consumption of C. lanatus 'sentinel' extract led to lower body weight and fat mass without influencing lean mass. There were no differences in food and water intake and in urine output between the two groups. C. lanatus 'sentinel' extract administration decreased plasma cholesterol concentrations that were attributed to reductions of intermediate-/low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Plasma concentrations of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interferon-gamma were decreased and those of interleukin-10 were increased in mice consuming C. lanatus 'sentinel' extract. Intake of C. lanatus 'sentinel' extract resulted in reductions of atherosclerosis in both aortic arch and thoracic regions. In conclusion, consumption of C. lanatus 'sentinel' extract led to reduced body weight gain, decreased plasma cholesterol concentrations, improved homeostasis of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and attenuated development of atherosclerosis without affecting systolic blood pressure in hypercholesterolemic mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The impact of splenectomy on human coronary artery atherosclerosis and vascular macrophage distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Stone, James R

    Splenectomy can potentially impact atherosclerosis through multiple mechanisms including altered lipid homeostasis, increased coagulation, and altered macrophage recruitment to the plaque. In patients, splenectomy has been associated with increased rates of coronary artery events, while in experimental mice, splenectomy causes increased atherosclerosis but reduces systemic monocyte supply. In this study, the direct impact of splenectomy on human coronary artery atherosclerotic plaque severity and macrophage content was investigated. Coronary artery atherosclerotic plaque severity was determined at autopsy in 18 long-term (≥10 years) splenectomy patients and 90 matched control patients. Coronary artery macrophage content was evaluated in mild atherosclerotic plaques of 11 mid- to long-term (≥1 year) splenectomy patients and 11 matched control patients. Splenectomy was associated with reduced coronary artery atherosclerosis (P=.03). The association was most pronounced for the subgroup of patients who had undergone splenectomy 20 years or more prior to death (P=.02). There was no difference in the density of macrophages in the plaque, media, or adventitia upon comparing splenectomy and control patients. In the control group, there was no correlation between the macrophage densities in the three arterial layers. However, in the splenectomy patients, there was a strong correlation in the macrophage densities across the plaque, media, and adventitia (P≤.0002), with resulting slopes that were significantly greater than seen in the control patients (P=.0007-.011). These findings indicate that, in humans, splenectomy is associated with lower coronary artery atherosclerotic plaque severity and altered coronary artery macrophage distribution. These results suggest that the spleen can modulate the recruitment of macrophages into human coronary arteries and the progression of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Is the Use of Fullerene in Photodynamic Therapy Effective for Atherosclerosis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitta, Norihisa; Seko, Ayumi; Sonoda, Akinaga; Ohta, Shinichi; Tanaka, Toyohiko; Takahashi, Masashi; Murata, Kiyoshi; Takemura, Shizuki; Sakamoto, Tsutomu; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate Fullerene as a therapeutic photosensitizer in the treatment of atherosclerosis. An atherosclerotic experimental rabbit model was prepared by causing intimal injury to bilateral external iliac arteries using balloon expansion. In four atherosclerotic rabbits and one normal rabbit, polyethylene glycol-modified Fullerene (Fullerene-PEG) was infused into the left external iliac artery and illuminated by light emitting diode (LED), while the right external iliac artery was only illuminated by LED. Two weeks later, the histological findings for each iliac artery were evaluated quantitatively and comparisons were made among atherosclerotic Fullerene+LED artery (n = 4), atherosclerotic light artery (n = 4), normal Fullerene+LED artery (n = 1), and normal light artery (n = 1). An additional two atherosclerotic rabbits were studied by fluorescence microscopy, after Fullerene-PEG-Cy5 complex infusion into the left external iliac artery, for evaluation of Fullerene-PEG incorporated within the atherosclerotic lesions. The degree of atherosclerosis in the atherosclerotic Fullerene+LED artery was significantly (p < 0.05) more severe than that in the atherosclerotic LED artery. No pathological change was observed in normal Fullerene+LED and LED arteries. In addition, strong accumulation of Fullerene-PEG-Cy5 complex within the plaque of the left iliac artery of the two rabbits was demonstrated, in contrast to no accumulation in the right iliac artery. We conclude that infusion of a high concentration of Fullerene-PEG followed by photo-illumination resulted not in a suppression of atherosclerosis but in a progression of atherosclerosis in experimental rabbit models. However, this intervention showed no adverse effects on the normal iliac artery

  7. Association of Television Viewing Time with Body Composition and Calcified Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Singapore Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nang, Ei Ei Khaing; van Dam, Rob M; Tan, Chuen Seng; Mueller-Riemenschneider, Falk; Lim, Yi Ting; Ong, Kai Zhi; Ee, Siqing; Lee, Jeannette; Tai, E Shyong

    2015-01-01

    Sedentary behavior such as television viewing may be an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease. However, few studies have assessed the impact of television viewing time on coronary artery calcification and it remains unclear how body fat contributes to this relationship. The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between television viewing time and subclinical atherosclerosis and whether effects on visceral or subcutaneous fat may mediate any associations observed. This was a cross-sectional study of 398 Chinese participants (192 men and 206 women) from Singapore prospective study. Participants were free from known cardiovascular diseases and underwent interview, health screening, computed tomography scans of coronary arteries and abdomen. Spearman's correlation was used to test the correlation between television viewing time, physical activity, body composition and abdominal fat distribution. The association between television viewing time and subclinical atherosclerosis was assessed by multiple logistic regression analysis. In men, television viewing time was significantly correlated with higher body fat mass index, percent body fat, subcutaneous and visceral fat. These associations were in the same direction, but weaker and not statistically significant in women. Television viewing time (hours/day) was associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in men (odds ratio: 1.41, 95% CI: 1.03-1.93) but no significant association was observed in women (odds ratio: 0.88, 95% CI: 0.59-1.31) after adjusting for potential socio-demographic and lifestyle confounders. Further adjustments for biological factors did not affect these associations. Television viewing time was associated with greater adiposity and higher subcutaneous and visceral fat in men. TV viewing time was also associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in men and the potential mechanisms underlying this association require further investigation.

  8. "Gum bug, leave my heart alone!"--epidemiologic and mechanistic evidence linking periodontal infections and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebschull, M; Demmer, R T; Papapanou, P N

    2010-09-01

    Evidence from epidemiologic studies suggests that periodontal infections are independently associated with subclinical and clinical atherosclerotic vascular disease. Although the strength of the reported associations is modest, the consistency of the data across diverse populations and a variety of exposure and outcome variables suggests that the findings are not spurious or attributable only to the effects of confounders. Analysis of limited data from interventional studies suggests that periodontal treatment generally results in favorable effects on subclinical markers of atherosclerosis, although such analysis also indicates considerable heterogeneity in responses. Experimental mechanistic in vitro and in vivo studies have established the plausibility of a link between periodontal infections and atherogenesis, and have identified biological pathways by which these effects may be mediated. However, the utilized models are mostly mono-infections of host cells by a limited number of 'model' periodontal pathogens, and therefore may not adequately portray human periodontitis as a polymicrobial, biofilm-mediated disease. Future research must identify in vivo pathways in humans that may (i) lead to periodontitis-induced atherogenesis, or (ii) result in treatment-induced reduction of atherosclerosis risk. Data from these studies will be essential for determining whether periodontal interventions have a role in the primary or secondary prevention of atherosclerosis.

  9. Sudden death related to advanced coronary atherosclerosis in mini-pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsson, L.; Lundholm, L.; Wingren, G.

    1984-01-01

    Advanced coronary atherosclerosis was produced in 30 mini-pigs by a combination of a hypercholesterolaemic diet and X-irradiation to the precordial region. Within 11-25 weeks after the irradiation, 13 of the 30 animals died a sudden death probably caused by coronary atherosclerosis. The contents of free and ester-bound cholesterol in the right coronary artery were significantly higher in the animals which died spontaneously than in surviving animals. In an untreated group of 12 animals 7 died whereas in a group treated with β-pyridylcarbinol only 1 out of 5 died. In the coronary arteries, the contents of both free and ester-bound cholesterol were significantly lower in the β-pyridylcarbinol-treated animals. In a sulfinpyrazontreated group 3 out of 8, and in a metoprolol-treated group 2 out of 5 animals died. None of these drugs reduced the accumulation of cholesterol in the coronary arteries. The rate of sudden death was 26 +- 6% (P<0.05) lower in the combined group of treated animals than in the untreated ones. By regular ECG recordings, signs which could predict the fatal outcome of the experiment were looked for. Although depressed ST segments were present before death in a few animals, this was not a regular phenomenon. It is concluded that advanced coronary atherosclerosis in mini-pigs often leads to sudden death and that this animal model seems suitable for testing the potential therapeutic effects of drugs. (author)

  10. Feasibility study on RI biochip Application to detection of risk factors of atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Kyong Cheol; Choi, Mi Hee; Park, Sang Hyun; Cho, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Ki Teak

    2009-01-01

    Microarrays can be used to screen thousands of binding events in a parallel and high throughput fashion and are of major importance in discase diagnosis and drug discovery. The use of radioisotope is conventionally regarded as one of the most sensitive detection methods. Atherosclerosis is a common disorder affecting arterial blood vessels. It happens when fat, cholesterol, and other substances made in the arterial blood vessels form a hard substances called plaque. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A 2 (Lp-PLA 2 ), a phospholipase A 2 enzyme, is used as a marker for cardiac disease. The detection of Lp-PLA 2 was accomplished by using radioactive [ 3 H-acetyl] PAF as a substrate and a feasibility study on RI biochip application to detection of Lp-PLA 2 , a risk factors of atherosclerosis was performed. Inhibitive activity of a native plant extract was also determined by using the RI biochip. It was found to be applicable to a high-throughput screening of inhibitors for developing atherosclerosis therapeutic agents

  11. Is serum Klotho protective against atherosclerosis in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keles, Nursen; Dogan, Burcu; Kalcik, Macit; Caliskan, Mustafa; Keles, Necibe Nur; Aksu, Feyza; Bulut, Mustafa; Kostek, Osman; Isbilen, Banu; Yilmaz, Yusuf; Oguz, Aytekin

    2016-01-01

    Klotho deficiency is associated with several metabolic disorders. Two dimensional (2D) longitudinal strain (LS) of left ventricle (LV), carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT), flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of brachial artery and epicardial fat thickness (EFT) have been reported to be early predictors of atherosclerosis. We aimed to investigate the relationship between serum Klotho levels and these early predictors of atherosclerosis in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). The study included 45 type 1 diabetic patients and 35 controls. Serum Klotho levels were determined by ELISA method. The patient group was also divided into two subgroups according to serum Klotho levels: high (HK) and low Klotho (LK) groups. EFT, CIMT and FMD were measured according to appropriate recommendations. Speckle tracking analysis was performed using the Echopac software. The patient group had significantly lower serum Klotho (p=0.001), FMD (p1) and LS of LV (p1) values, but larger EFT (p1) and CIMT (p1) values than controls. LK subgroup had also significantly lower FMD (p1) and LS of LV (p1) but larger EFT (p=0.002) and CIMT (p1) values than HK subgroup. Serum Klotho may have a protective effect against atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction in type 1 DM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The role of T and B cells in human atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammirati, E; Moroni, F; Magnoni, M; Camici, P G

    2015-02-01

    Far from being merely a passive cholesterol accumulation within the arterial wall, the development of atherosclerosis is currently known to imply both inflammation and immune effector mechanisms. Adaptive immunity has been implicated in the process of disease initiation and progression interwined with traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Although the body of knowledge regarding the correlation between atherosclerosis and immunity in humans is growing rapidly, a relevant proportion of it derives from studies carried out in animal models of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, while the mouse is a well-suited model, the results obtained therein are not fully transferrable to the human setting due to intrinsic genomic and environmental differences. In the present review, we will discuss mainly human findings, obtained either by examination of post-mortem and surgical atherosclerotic material or through the analysis of the immunological profile of peripheral blood cells. In particular, we will discuss the findings supporting a pro-atherogenic role of T cell subsets, such as effector memory T cells or the potential protective function of regulatory T cells. Recent studies suggest that traditional T cell-driven B2 cell responses appear to be atherogenic, while innate B1 cells appear to exert a protective action through the secretion of naturally occurring antibodies. The insights into the immune pathogenesis of atherosclerosis can provide new targets in the quest for novel therapeutic targets to abate CVD morbidity and mortality. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  13. Oxidative stress and triglycerides as predictors of subclinical atherosclerosis in prediabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aubaidy, Hayder A; Jelinek, Herbert F

    2014-03-01

    The role of triglycerides in early preclinical atherosclerosis is controversial. Antioxidant markers may be associated with triglyceride levels in early preclinical atherosclerosis especially when fasting plasma glucose is raised. This cross-sectional study included 127 participants attending the Diabetes Screening Clinic, Charles Sturt University, Australia. Serum 8-hydroxy-2-deoxy-guanosine (8-OHdG) was significantly greater in the impaired fasting glucose (IFG) group compared with the control group (536.7 pg/ml ± 249.8 versus 171.4 pg/ml ± 96.9, respectively). The increase in 8-OHdG was associated with a mildly non-significant elevation in low-density lipoprotein level (3.2 ± 1.1 mmol/l) and a poor level of high-density lipoprotein (1.31 ± 0.3 mmol/l) in the IFG group. However, a significant increase in triglycerides (1.6 ± 0.97 mmol/l; P triglycerides in the absence of significant changes in reduced GSH and normal levels of cholesterol in the IFG cohort, suggesting that oxidative stress may be present and indicative of subclinical atherosclerosis.

  14. Antiatherosclerotic and Cardioprotective Potential of Acacia senegal Seeds in Diet-Induced Atherosclerosis in Rabbits

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    Heera Ram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acacia senegal L. (Fabaceae seeds are essential ingredient of “Pachkutta,” a specific Rajasthani traditional food. The present study explored antiatherosclerotic and cardioprotective potential of Acacia senegal seed extract, if any, in hypercholesterolemic diet-induced atherosclerosis in rabbits. Atherosclerosis in rabbits was induced by feeding normal diet supplemented with oral administration of cholesterol (500 mg/kg body weight/day mixed with coconut oil for 15 days. Circulating total cholesterol (TC, HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C, LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C, triglycerides, and VLDL-cholesterol (VLDL-C levels; atherogenic index (AI; cardiac lipid peroxidation (LPO; planimetric studies of aortal wall; and histopathological studies of heart, aorta, kidney, and liver were performed. Apart from reduced atherosclerotic plaques in aorta (6.34±0.72 and increased lumen volume (51.65±3.66, administration with ethanolic extract of Acacia senegal seeds (500 mg/kg/day, p.o. for 45 days to atherosclerotic rabbits significantly lowered serum TC, LDL-C, triglyceride, and VLDL-C levels and atherogenic index as compared to control. Atherogenic diet-induced cardiac LPO and histopathological abnormalities in aorta wall, heart, kidney, and liver were reverted to normalcy by Acacia senegal seed extract administration. The findings of the present study reveal that Acacia senegal seed extract ameliorated diet-induced atherosclerosis and could be considered as lead in the development of novel therapeutics.

  15. Atorvastatin Improves Inflammatory Response in Atherosclerosis by Upregulating the Expression of GARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoqi; Liu, Yuzhou; Zhong, Yucheng; Liu, Bo; Yu, Kunwu; Shi, Huairui; Zhu, Ruirui; Meng, Kai; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Bangwei

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells play an important role in the progression of atherosclerosis. GARP is a newly biological membrane molecule existed on activated Tregs, which is related to the release of TGF-β. The antiatherosclerosis effects of statins partly depend on their multiple immune modulatory potencies. In this paper, we present that atorvastatin could upregulate the expression of GARP and TGF-β in CD4+ T cells and increase the numbers of CD4+LAP+ and CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in ApoE−/− mice. Also, we indicate that atorvastatin promotes the aggregation of GARP+ and Foxp3+ cells and secretory of the TGF-β1 in atherosclerotic plaques. Furthermore, we prove that atorvastatin could delay the procession of atherosclerosis and improve the stability of atherosclerotic plaques. Interestingly, we report that inhibition of GARP distinctly inhibits the anti-inflammatory effects of atorvastatin. We conclude that atorvastatin improves the inflammatory response in atherosclerosis partly by upregulating the expression of GARP on regulatory T cells. PMID:26063978

  16. Determining the relationship between atherosclerosis and periodontopathogenic microorganisms in chronic periodontitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozoglan, Alihan; Ertugrul, Abdullah Seckin; Taspınar, Mehmet; Yuzbasioglu, Betul

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between atherosclerosis and periodontopathogenic microorganisms in chronic periodontitis patients following periodontal treatment. A total of 40 patients were included in the study. 20 of these patients diagnosed with atherosclerosis and chronic periodontitis formed the test group. The remaining 20 patients were systemically healthy patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis and formed the control group. All patients had nonsurgical periodontal treatment. The periodontopathogenic microorganism levels were determined at baseline and at 6 months in microbial dental plaque samples and WBC, LDL, HDL, PLT, fibrinogen, creatinine and hs-CRP levels were determined by blood samples. Statistically significant reduction has been achieved in clinical periodontal parameters following non-surgical periodontal treatment in test and control groups. Following periodontal treatment, WBC, LDL, PLT, fibrinogen, creatinine and hs-CRP levels significantly decreased and HDL levels significantly increased in both test and control groups. Similarly, the periodontopathogenic microorganism levels significantly decreased following periodontal treatment in the test and control groups. A statistically significant positive correlation has been determined between the periodontopathogenic microorganism levels and WBC, LDL, PLT, fibrinogen, creatinine, and hs-CRP levels in the test group. The association between hs-CRP, WBC, LDL, PLT, fibrinogen, creatinine, and the amount of periodontopathogenic microorganisms indicates the possibility that periodontal treatment could decrease the risk atherosclerosis. More studies must be conducted in order for these results to be supported.

  17. Identification of Key Pathways and Genes in Advanced Coronary Atherosclerosis Using Bioinformatics Analysis

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    Xiaowen Tan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Coronary artery atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease. This study aimed to identify the key changes of gene expression between early and advanced carotid atherosclerotic plaque in human. Methods. Gene expression dataset GSE28829 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO, including 16 advanced and 13 early stage atherosclerotic plaque samples from human carotid. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs were analyzed. Results. 42,450 genes were obtained from the dataset. Top 100 up- and downregulated DEGs were listed. Functional enrichment analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG identification were performed. The result of functional and pathway enrichment analysis indicted that the immune system process played a critical role in the progression of carotid atherosclerotic plaque. Protein-protein interaction (PPI networks were performed either. Top 10 hub genes were identified from PPI network and top 6 modules were inferred. These genes were mainly involved in chemokine signaling pathway, cell cycle, B cell receptor signaling pathway, focal adhesion, and regulation of actin cytoskeleton. Conclusion. The present study indicated that analysis of DEGs would make a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of atherosclerosis development and they might be used as molecular targets and diagnostic biomarkers for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

  18. Hypercholesterolemia Tunes Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells for Inflammation and Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaojuan; Feng, Yingmei

    2016-07-19

    As the pathological basis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), atherosclerosis is featured as a chronic inflammation. Hypercholesterolemia is an independent risk factor for CVD. Accumulated studies have shown that hypercholesterolemia is associated with myeloid cell expansion, which stimulates innate and adaptive immune responses, strengthens inflammation, and accelerates atherosclerosis progression. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) in bone marrow (BM) expresses a panel of lipoprotein receptors to control cholesterol homeostasis. Deficiency of these receptors abrogates cellular cholesterol efflux, resulting in HSPC proliferation and differentiation in hypercholesterolemic mice. Reduction of the cholesterol level in the lipid rafts by infusion of reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (HDL) or its major apolipoprotein, apoA-I, reverses hypercholesterolemia-induced HSPC expansion. Apart from impaired cholesterol metabolism, inhibition of reactive oxygen species production suppresses HSPC activation and leukocytosis. These data indicate that the mechanisms underlying the effects of hypercholesterolemia on HSPC proliferation and differentiation could be multifaceted. Furthermore, dyslipidemia also regulates HSPC-neighboring cells, resulting in HSPC mobilization. In the article, we review how hypercholesterolemia evokes HSPC activation and mobilization directly or via its modification of BM microenvironment. We hope this review will bring light to finding key molecules to control HSPC expansion, inflammation, and atherosclerosis for the treatment of CVD.

  19. A Role of RIP3-Mediated Macrophage Necrosis in Atherosclerosis Development

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    Juan Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotic death of macrophages has long been known to be present in atherosclerotic lesions but has not been studied. We examined the role of receptor interacting protein (RIP 3, a mediator of necrotic cell death, in atherosclerosis and found that RIP3−/−;Ldlr−/− mice were no different from RIP3+/+;Ldlr−/− mice in early atherosclerosis but had significant reduction in advanced atherosclerotic lesions. Similar results were observed in Apoe−/− background mice. Bone marrow transplantation revealed that loss of RIP3 expression from bone-marrow-derived cells is responsible for the reduced disease progression. While no difference was found in apoptosis between RIP3−/−;Ldlr−/− and RIP3+/+;Ldlr−/− mice, electron microscopy revealed a significant reduction of macrophage primary necrosis in the advanced lesions of RIP3−/− mice. In vitro cellular studies showed that RIP3 deletion had no effect on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL-induced macrophage apoptosis, but prevented macrophage primary necrosis occurring in response to oxidized LDL under caspase inhibition or RIP3 overexpression conditions. RIP3-dependent necrosis is not postapoptotic, and the increased primary necrosis in advanced atherosclerotic lesions most likely resulted from the increase of RIP3 expression. Our data demonstrate that primary necrosis of macrophages is proatherogenic during advanced atherosclerosis development.

  20. Correlation of serum homocysteine levels with nerve injury and atherosclerosis in patients with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gai-Zhuang Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the correlation of serum homocysteine levels with nerve injury and atherosclerosis in patients with stroke. Methods: Patients who were diagnosed with ischemic stroke in our hospital between January 2014 and December 2016 were selected and then divided into moderate-severe stenosis group (C group, mild stenosis group (B group and no stenosis group (A group according to carotid artery ultrasonography; healthy volunteers who received physical examination during the same period were chosen as control group. The serum levels of homocysteine, nerve injury indexes and atherosclerosis indexes were detected. Results: Serum Hcy, S100B, NSE, UCH-L1, GFAP, FGF23, CD36, ox-LDL, MMP8 and MMP9 levels of C group, B group and A group were significantly higher than those of control group, and the severer the carotid stenosis, the higher the serum S100B, NSE, UCHL1, GFAP, FGF23, CD36, ox-LDL, MMP8 and MMP9 levels; serum S100B, NSE, UCHL1, GFAP, FGF23, CD36, ox-LDL, MMP8 and MMP9 levels in stoke patients with high Hcy were significantly higher than those of patients with normal Hcy. Conclusions: Serum homocysteine levels increase in patients with stroke and are closely related to the nerve injury and atherosclerosis.

  1. Sudden death related to advanced coronary atherosclerosis in mini-pigs. Influence of some drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsson, L.; Lundholm, L.; Wingren, G. (Department of Pharmacology, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping, Sweden)

    1984-01-01

    Advanced coronary atherosclerosis was produced in 30 mini-pigs by a combination of a hypercholesterolaemic diet and X-irradiation to the precordial region. Within 11-25 weeks after the irradiation, 13 of the 30 animals died a sudden death probably caused by coronary atherosclerosis. The contents of free and ester-bound cholesterol in the right coronary artery were significantly higher in the animals which died spontaneously than in surviving animals. In an untreated group of 12 animals 7 died whereas in a group treated with ..beta..-pyridylcarbinol only 1 out of 5 died. In the coronary arteries, the contents of both free and ester-bound cholesterol were significantly lower in the ..beta..-pyridylcarbinol-treated animals. In a sulfinpyrazontreated group 3 out of 8, and in a metoprolol-treated group 2 out of 5 animals died. None of these drugs reduced the accumulation of cholesterol in the coronary arteries. The rate of sudden death was 26 +- 6% (P<0.05) lower in the combined group of treated animals than in the untreated ones. By regular ECG recordings, signs which could predict the fatal outcome of the experiment were looked for. Although depressed ST segments were present before death in a few animals, this was not a regular phenomenon. It is concluded that advanced coronary atherosclerosis in mini-pigs often leads to sudden death and that this animal model seems suitable for testing the potential therapeutic effects of drugs.

  2. Animal model of atherosclerosis using rabbit experimentally induced by combination of X-ray and hypercholesterolemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Tomotoshi; Sawai, Takashi; Okuma, Tsuneo; Mori, Shozo

    1995-01-01

    An attempt was made to prepare an animal model of atherosclerosis similar to human lesions. The experimental animals were male Japanese white rabbits weighting about 2 kg. Hypercholesterolemia was experimentally induced by giving a 1% cholesterol diet. Four weeks later, a single dose of 45 Gy was delivered to the femur to produce vascular changes. Soon after irradiation, immunohistochemical examination revealed the adhesion and invasion of macrophages to endothelial cells, followed by accumulation of foam cells and thickness of the intimal plaques. Three months after irradiation, these thickened plaques became fibrotic, calcified, and necrotic. The tunica media was thinned and the internal elastic lamella was destroyed. Irradiated arteries exhibited not only severe narrowing of the lumen but also aneurysmal dilation and the lesions of the irradiated arteries resembled human atherosclerosis. In conclusion, the atherosclerotic model produced by combining experimental hypercholesterolemia and X-ray irradiaiton may serve as a useful model for studies on atherosclerosis because it can be prepared with no need of complicated or time-consuming procedures. (N.K.)

  3. Detection of Marek's disease virus DNA in Japanese quail susceptible to atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrzak, R.; Shih, J.C.H.

    1986-01-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) was demonstrated as an etiological agent which causes atherosclerosis in the chicken. Since herpes viruses are ubiquitous, incidences of viral atherogenesis in humans and other animals were speculated. In this laboratory, the atherosclerosis susceptible (SUS) and resistant (RES) Japanese quail were developed as the animal model for atherosclerosis research. The susceptibility of the animal might be due to an infection of MDV or a related quail herpes virus (QHV). An initial attempt to isolate viruses from quail and an agar gel precipitin test for MDC were not positive. A DNA hybridization technique was used to determine whether the MDC-DNA existed in the quail cell. The gene library of MDV EcoRl DNA fragments was used to prepare the DNA probe, labeled with [ 32 P] by nick translation. Dot hybridizations were carried out by mixing the MDV-DNA probe with DNAs isolated from quail tissues. A high stringent condition was used. From this experiment it was found that the tissues from the SUS quail were hybridization positive, but most of them from RES quail were negative. When aortas were compared, the severe atherosclerotic had a strong hybridization (3-4 cop. of genome/cell) whereas the others hybridized moderately (1 cop./cell). It was concluded that genes from MDV or a QHV indeed existed in Japanese quail

  4. Immunoproteasome subunit ß5i/LMP7-deficiency in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewing, Bernd; Ludwig, Antje; Dan, Cristian; Pötzsch, Max; Hannemann, Carmen; Petry, Andreas; Lauer, Dilyara; Görlach, Agnes; Kaschina, Elena; Müller, Dominik N; Baumann, Gert; Stangl, Verena; Stangl, Karl; Wilck, Nicola

    2017-10-17

    Management of protein homeostasis by the ubiquitin-proteasome system is critical for atherosclerosis development. Recent studies showed controversial results on the role of immunoproteasome (IP) subunit β5i/LMP7 in maintenance of protein homeostasis under cytokine induced oxidative stress. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of β5i/LMP7-deficiency on the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis as a chronic inflammatory, immune cell driven disease. LDLR -/- LMP7 -/- and LDLR -/- mice were fed a Western-type diet for either 6 or 24 weeks to induce early and advanced stage atherosclerosis, respectively. Lesion burden was similar between genotypes in both stages. Macrophage content and abundance of polyubiquitin conjugates in aortic root plaques were unaltered by β5i/LMP7-deficiency. In vitro experiments using bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) showed that β5i/LMP7-deficiency did not influence macrophage polarization or accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins and cell survival upon hydrogen peroxide and interferon-γ treatment. Analyses of proteasome core particle composition by Western blot revealed incorporation of standard proteasome subunits in β5i/LMP7-deficient BMDM and spleen. Chymotrypsin-, trypsin- and caspase-like activities assessed by using short fluorogenic peptides in BMDM whole cell lysates were similar in both genotypes. Taken together, deficiency of IP subunit β5i/LMP7 does not disturb protein homeostasis and does not aggravate atherogenesis in LDLR -/- mice.

  5. A novel lamin A/C mutation in a Dutch family with premature atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weterings, A A W; van Rijsingen, I A W; Plomp, A S; Zwinderman, A H; Lekanne Deprez, R H; Mannens, M M; van den Bergh Weerman, M A; van der Wal, A C; Pinto-Sietsma, S J

    2013-07-01

    We report a novel lamin A/C (LMNA) mutation, p.Glu223Lys, in a family with extensive atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus and steatosis hepatis. Sequence analysis of LMNA (using Alamut version 2.2), co-segregation analysis, electron microscopy, extensive phenotypic evaluation of the mutation carriers and literature comparison were used to determine the loss of function of this mutation. The father of three siblings died at the age of 45 years. The three siblings and the brother and sister of the father were referred to the cardiovascular genetics department, because of the premature atherosclerosis and dysmorphic characteristics observed in the father at autopsy. The novel LMNA mutation, p.Glu223Lys, was identified in the proband and his two sons. Clinical evaluation revealed atherosclerosis, insulin resistance and hypertension in the proband and dyslipidemia and hepatic steatosis in all the patients with the mutation. Based on the facts that in silico analysis predicts a possibly pathogenic mutation, the mutation co-segregates with the disease, only fibroblasts from mutation carriers show nuclear blebbing and a similar phenotype was reported to be due to missense mutations in LMNA we conclude that we deal with a pathogenic mutation. We conclude that the phenotype is similar to Dunnigan-type familial partial lipodystrophy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Association of insomnia and short sleep duration with atherosclerosis risk in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazaki, Chie; Noda, Akiko; Koike, Yasuo; Yamada, Sumio; Murohara, Toyoaki; Ozaki, Norio

    2012-11-01

    Short sleep duration is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, although a relationship with atherosclerosis in the elderly remains unclear. Eighty-six volunteers aged ≥65 years (mean, 73.6 ± 4.9 years) were evaluated for insomnia. Total sleep time (TST) and sleep efficiency were measured by actigraphy. Subjective symptoms were assessed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Atherosclerosis was evaluated using ultrasonographic measurements of carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). IMT was significantly greater and sleep efficiency was significantly lower in subjects with TST ≤5 h than those with TST >7 h (1.3 ± 0.5 vs. 0.9 ± 0.3 mm; P = 0.009; 91.0 ± 6.0 vs. 81.6 ± 11.3%, P = 0.03, respectively). IMT was also significantly greater in the insomnia group than the noninsomnia group (1.3 ± 0.5 vs. 1.1 ± 0.4 mm; P = 0.03). IMT was significantly correlated with systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and TST (SBP: r = 0.49, P insomnia were associated with atherosclerosis risk leading to cardiovascular disease in the elderly.

  7. Coronary atherosclerosis and adverse outcomes in patients with recent-onset atrial fibrillation and troponin rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Alberto; Angeli, Elena; Scorpiniti, Margherita; Alesi, Andrea; Trausi, Federica; Lazzeretti, Delia; Padeletti, Luigi; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between troponin and atrial fibrillation (AF) without acute coronary syndrome is still unclear. We sought to investigate the presence of coronary atherosclerosis and adverse outcomes in patients with AF. Consecutive patients with recent-onset AF and without severe comorbidities were enrolled between 2004 and 2013. Patients with a troponin rise or with adverse outcomes were considered for coronary angiography and revascularization when "critical" stenosis (≥70%) was recognized. Propensity score matching was performed to adjust for baseline characteristics; after matching, no differences existed between the groups of patients with or without troponin rise. The primary end point was the composite of acute coronary syndrome, revascularization, and cardiac death at 1- and 12-month follow-ups. Of 3627 patients enrolled, 3541 completed the study; 202 (6%) showed troponin rise; and 91 (3%), an adverse outcome. In the entire cohort, on multivariate analysis, the odds ratio for the occurrence of the primary end point of troponin rise was 14 (95% confidence interval [CI], 10-23; Prise was 10 (CI, 4-22; Prise achieved the primary end point in 38 (19%) and 43 (1%) patients, respectively (Prise showed higher prevalence of coronary atherosclerosis and adverse cardiac events. Stroke per se did not succeed in justifying the high morbidity. Thus, beyond stroke, coronary atherosclerosis might have a pivotal role in poor outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of total reversible cysteine oxidation in an atherosclerosis model using a modified biotin switch assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ru; Huang, Jiqing; Kast, Juergen

    2015-05-01

    Oxidative stress due to the imbalance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the resulting reversible cysteine oxidation (CysOX) are involved in the early proatherogenic aspect of atherosclerosis. Given that the corresponding redox signaling pathways are still unclear, a modified biotin switch assay was developed to quantify the reversible CysOX in an atherosclerosis model established by using a monocytic cell line treated with platelet releasate. The accumulation of ROS was observed in the model system and validated in human primary monocytes. Through the application of the modified biotin switch assay, we obtained the first reversible CysOX proteome for this model. A total of 75 peptides, corresponding to 53 proteins, were quantified with oxidative modification. The bioinformatics analysis of these CysOX-containing proteins highlighted biological processes including glycolysis, cytoskeleton arrangement, and redox regulation. Moreover, the reversible oxidation of three glycolysis enzymes was observed using this method, and the regulation influence was verified by an enzyme activity assay. NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibition treatment, in conjunction with the modified biotin switch method, was used to evaluate the global CysOX status. In conclusion, this versatile modified biotin switch assay provides an approach for the quantification of all reversible CysOX and for the study of redox signaling in atherosclerosis as well as in diseases in other biological systems.

  9. Changes of lysosomes in the earliest stages of the development of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobryshev, Yuri V; Shchelkunova, Tatyana A; Morozov, Ivan A; Rubtsov, Petr M; Sobenin, Igor A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Smirnov, Alexander N

    2013-05-01

    One of hypotheses of atherosclerosis is based on a presumption that the zones prone to the development of atherosclerosis contain lysosomes which are characterized by enzyme deficiency and thus, are unable to dispose of lipoproteins. The present study was undertaken to investigate the characteristics and changes of lysosomes in the earliest stages of the development of atherosclerosis. Electron microscopic immunocytochemistry revealed that there were certain changes in the distribution of CD68 antigen in lysosomes along the 'normal intima-initial lesion-fatty streak' sequence. There were no significant changes found in the key mRNAs encoding for the components of endosome/lysosome compartment in initial atherosclerotic lesions, but in fatty streaks, the contents of EEA1 and Rab5a mRNAs were found to be diminished while the contents of CD68 and p62 mRNAs were increased, compared with the intact tissue. The study reinforces a view that changes occurring in lysosomes play a role in atherogenesis from the very earlier stages of the disease. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. [Association between IGF system and PAPP-A in coronary atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro-Macías, Alfonso Eduardo; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Mena-Burciaga, Victoria Michelle; Gutiérrez-Leonard, Hugo; Lara-Padilla, Eleazar; Abarca-Rojano, Edgar; Fierro-Almanzán, Alfonso Edmundo

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a condition that involves multiple pathophysiological mechanisms and whose knowledge has not been fully elucidated. Often, scientific advances on the atherogenic pathophysiology generate that molecules not previously considered in the scene of this disease, were attributed actions on the onset or progression of it. A representative example is the study of a new mechanism involved in the atherogenic process, consisting of the association between the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A). Insulin-like growth factor system is a family of peptides that include 3 peptide hormones, 4 transmembrane receptors and 6 binding proteins. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is the main ligand of the IGF system involved in coronary atherosclerosis. IGF-1 exerts its effects via activation of the IGF-1R receptor on vascular smooth muscle cells or macrophages. In vascular smooth muscle cells promotes migration and prevents apoptosis which increases plaque stability while in macrophages reduces reverse cholesterol transport leading to the formation of foam cells. Regulation of IGF-1 endothelial bioavailability is carried out by IGFBP proteases, mainly by PAPP-A. In this review, we address the mechanisms between IGF system and PAPP-A in atherosclerosis with emphasis on molecular effects on vascular smooth muscle cells and macrophages. Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. Serum carotenoids reduce progression of early atherosclerosis in the carotid artery wall among Eastern Finnish men.

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    Jouni Karppi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several previous epidemiologic studies have shown that high blood levels of carotenoids may be protective against early atherosclerosis, but results have been inconsistent. We assessed the association between atherosclerotic progression, measured by intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery wall, and serum levels of carotenoids. METHODS: We studied the effect of carotenoids on progression of early atherosclerosis in a population-based study. The association between concentrations of serum carotenoids, and intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery wall was explored in 840 middle-aged men (aged 46-65 years from Eastern Finland. Ultrasonography of the common carotid arteries were performed at baseline and 7-year follow-up. Serum levels of carotenoids were analyzed at baseline. Changes in mean and maximum intima media thickness of carotid artery wall were related to baseline serum carotenoid levels in covariance analyses adjusted for covariates. RESULTS: In a covariance analysis with adjustment for age, ultrasound sonographer, maximum intima media thickness, examination year, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, smoking, physical activity, serum LDL cholesterol, family history of coronary heart disease, antihypertensive medication and serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein, 7-year change in maximum intima media thickness was inversely associated with lycopene (p = 0.005, α-carotene (p = 0.002 and β-carotene (p = 0.019, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The present study shows that high serum concentrations of carotenoids may be protective against early atherosclerosis.

  12. The effectiveness of chemical carcinogens to induce atherosclerosis in the white carneau pigeon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revis, N.W.; Bull, R.; Laurie, D.; Schiller, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    The frequency of atherosclerotic lesions of the abdominal aorta has been reported to increase significantly in chickens exposed to benzo(a)pyrene and 7,12-dimethylbenz(a,h)anthracene. The present studies were performed to determine in another experimental model frequently used in atherosclerotic studies (i.e. White Carneau Pigeons) whether these and other chemical carcinogens enhance atherosclerosis. The induction and enhancement of atherosclerotic lesions were observed in pigeons treated with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a,h)anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene and 3-methylcholanthrene. The number and size of plaques in the aorta were frequently greater in pigeons treated with the higher concentrations (i.e. 100 mg/kg) of these 3 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Benzo(e)pyrene and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol were ineffective in the induction or enhancement of atherosclerosis in the pigeons. The results of the present and previous studies suggest that the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (excluding benzo(e)pyrene) may be the only potential atherogens in avian atherosclerosis. This relationship may be associated with how these hydrocarbons are transported in the plasma (i.e. by lipoproteins) as demonstrated by the present distribution studies (author)

  13. Prevention of atherosclerosis by specific AT1-receptor blockade with candesartan cilexetil

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    Vasilios Papademetriou

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Several studies indicate that blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS can prevent atherosclerosis and vascular events, but the precise mechanisms involved are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of the AT 1-receptor blocker, candesartan, in the prevention of atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidaemic (WHHL rabbits and also the effect of AT1-receptor blockade in the uptake of oxidised LDL by macrophage cell cultures. In the first set of experiments, 12 WHHL rabbits were randomly assigned to three groups: placebo, atenolol 5 mg/kg daily or candesartan 2 mg/kg daily for six months. Compared with controls and atenolol-treated rabbits, candesartan treatment resulted in a significant 50—60% reduction of atherosclerotic plaque formation and a 66% reduction in cholesterol accumulation in the thoracic aorta.Studies in macrophage cultures indicated that candesartan prevented uptake of oxidised LDL-(oxLDL-cholesterol by cultured macrophages. Candesartan inhibited the uptake of oxLDL in a dose-dependent manner, reaching a maximum inhibition of 70% at concentrations of 5.6 µg/ml. Further studies in other animal models and well-designed trials in humans are warranted to further explore the role of AT1-receptor blockade in the prevention of atherosclerosis.

  14. The Establishment and Characteristics of Rat Model of Atherosclerosis Induced by Hyperuricemia

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    Zhen Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have identified hyperuricemia as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanism whereby hyperuricemia causes atherosclerosis remains unclear. The objective of the study was to establish a new rat model of hyperuricemia-induced atherosclerosis. Wistar-Kyoto rats were randomly allocated to either a normal diet (ND, high-fat diet (HFD, or high-adenine diet (HAD, followed by sacrifice 4, 8, or 12 weeks later. Serum uric acid and lipid levels were analyzed, pathologic changes in the aorta were observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining, and mRNA expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Serum uric acid and TC were significantly increased in the HAD group at 4 weeks compared with the ND group, but there was no significant difference in serum uric acid between the ND and HFD groups. Aorta calcification occurred earlier and was more severe in the HAD group, compared with the HFD group. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen, monocyte chemotactic factor-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 mRNA levels were increased in the HFD and HAD groups compared with the ND group. This new animal model will be a useful tool for investigating the mechanisms responsible for hyperuricemia-induced atherosclerosis.

  15. CURRENT APPROACHES TO EVALUATION OF THE MULTIVESSEL CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROSIS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

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    D. N. Perutsky

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the validity of stress echocardiography by fractional reserve blood flow (FFR as the reference method in detection of coronary arteries requiring revascularization, as well as to optimize the determination of the functional significance of coronary artery lesions in patients with multivessel coronary atherosclerosis. Material and methods. Patients (n=36 with stable angina class 2-3 with multivessel coronary atherosclerosis were included into the study. Stress echocardiography with dobutamine or exercise test (treadmill was performed in all patients. Selective coronary angiography with subsequent evaluation of FFR was carried out in patients with a positive result of stress echocardiography. Totally 108 arteries (87 with stenosing atherosclerosis were assessed.  Results. According to coronary angiography bi-vessel and three-vessel damages were revealed in 21 (58% and 15 (42% patients, respectively. Method of stress echocardiography as compared with FFR shown sensitivity — 58%, specificity — 95%, positive predictive value — 87%, positive predictive value of a negative result — 17%. Method of coronary angiography (as a method to detect significant stenosis by visual assessment of coronary artery as compared with FFR demonstrated sensitivity 100%, specificity — 30%, positive predictive value — 42%. Conclusion. Stress echocardiography for noninvasive patient examination improves the accuracy of determination for the need and extent of revascularization.

  16. Role of the Vasa Vasorum and Vascular Resident Stem Cells in Atherosclerosis

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    Jun-ichi Kawabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is considered an “inside-out” response, that begins with the dysfunction of intimal endothelial cells and leads to neointimal plaque formation. The adventitia of large blood vessels has been recognized as an active part of the vessel wall that is involved in the process of atherosclerosis. There are characteristic changes in the adventitial vasa vasorum that are associated with the development of atheromatous plaques. However, whether vasa vasorum plays a causative or merely reactive role in the atherosclerotic process is not completely clear. Recent studies report that the vascular wall contains a number of stem/progenitor cells that may contribute to vascular remodeling. Microvessels serve as the vascular niche that maintains the resident stem/progenitor cells of the tissue. Therefore, the vasa vasorum may contribute to vascular remodeling through not only its conventional function as a blood conducting tube, but also its new conceptual function as a stem cell reservoir. This brief review highlights the recent advances contributing to our understanding of the role of the adventitial vasa vasorum in the atherosclerosis and discusses new concept that involves vascular-resident factors, the vasa vasorum and its associated vascular-resident stem cells, in the atherosclerotic process.

  17. Non-proinflammatory and responsive nanoplatforms for targeted treatment of atherosclerosis.

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    Dou, Yin; Chen, Yue; Zhang, Xiangjun; Xu, Xiaoqiu; Chen, Yidan; Guo, Jiawei; Zhang, Dinglin; Wang, Ruibing; Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianxiang

    2017-10-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of many fatal cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Whereas nanomedicines are promising for targeted therapy of atherosclerosis, great challenges remain in development of effective, safe, and translational nanotherapies for its treatment. Herein we hypothesize that non-proinflammatory nanomaterials sensitive to low pH or high reactive oxygen species (ROS) may serve as effective platforms for triggerable delivery of anti-atherosclerotic therapeutics in cellular and tissue microenvironments of inflammation. To demonstrate this hypothesis, an acid-labile material of acetalated β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) (Ac-bCD) and a ROS-sensitive β-CD material (Ox-bCD) were separately synthesized by chemical modification of β-CD, which were formed into responsive nanoparticles (NPs). Ac-bCD NP was rapidly hydrolyzed in mildly acidic buffers, while hydrolysis of Ox-bCD NP was selectively accelerated by H 2 O 2 . Using an anti-atherosclerotic drug rapamycin (RAP), we found stimuli-responsive release of therapeutic molecules from Ac-bCD and Ox-bCD nanotherapies. Compared with non-responsive poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-based NP, Ac-bCD and Ox-bCD NPs showed negligible inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. By endocytosis in cells and intracellularly releasing cargo molecules in macrophages, responsive nanotherapies effectively inhibited macrophage proliferation and suppressed foam cell formation. After intraperitoneal (i.p.) delivery in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE -/- ) mice, fluorescence imaging showed accumulation of NPs in atherosclerotic plaques. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that the lymphatic translocation mediated by neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages may contribute to atherosclerosis targeting of i.p. administered NPs, in addition to targeting via the leaky blood vessels. Correspondingly, i.p. treatment with different nanotherapies afforded desirable efficacies. Particularly, both pH and ROS

  18. Rate of atherosclerosis progression in ApoE-/- mice long after discontinuation of cola beverage drinking.

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    Matilde Otero-Losada

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to evaluate the effect of cola beverages drinking on atherosclerosisand test the hypothesis whether cola beverages consumption at early life stages might affect the development and progression of atherosclerosis later in life. ApoE-/- C57BL/6J mice (8 week-old were randomized in 3 groups (n = 20 each according to free accessto water (W, sucrose sweetened carbonated cola drink(C or aspartame-acesulfame K sweetened carbonated 'light' cola drink (Lfor the next 8 weeks. Drinking treatment was ended by switching C and L groups to drinking water. Four mice per group and time were sequentially euthanized: before treatment (8 weeks-old, at the end of treatment (16 weeks-old and after treatment discontinuation (20 weeks-old, 24 weeks-old, 30 week-old mice. Aortic roots and livers were harvested, processed for histology and serial cross-sections were stained. Aortic plaque area was analyzed and plaque/media-ratio was calculated. Early consumption of cola drinks accelerated atherosclerotic plaque progression favoring the interaction between macrophages and myofibroblasts, without the participation of either T lymphocytes or proliferative activity. Plaque/media-ratio varied according to drink treatment (F2,54 = 3.433, p<0.04 and mice age (F4,54 = 5.009, p<0.03 and was higher in C and L groups compared with age-matched W group (p<0.05 at 16 weeks and 20 weeks, p<0.01 at 24 weeks and 30 weeks. Natural evolution of atherosclerosis in ApoE-/- mice (W group evidenced atherosclerosis acceleration in parallel with a rapid increase in liver inflammation around the 20 weeks of age. Cola drinking within the 8-16 weeks of age accelerated atherosclerosis progression in ApoE-/- mice favoring aortic plaque enlargement (inward remodeling over media thinning all over the study time. Data suggest that cola drinking at early life stages may predispose to atherosclerosis progression later in life in ApoE-/- mice.

  19. Associations Between Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Inflammation, and Progression of Carotid Atherosclerosis Among Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingg, Sarah; Collet, Tinh-Hai; Locatelli, Isabella; Nanchen, David; Depairon, Michèle; Bovet, Pascal; Cornuz, Jacques; Rodondi, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    The high risk of cardiovascular events in smokers requires adequate control of other cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) to curtail atherosclerosis progression. However, it is unclear which CVRFs have the most influence on atherosclerosis progression in smokers. In 260 smokers aged 40-70 included in a smoking cessation trial, we analyzed the association between traditional CVRFs, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), smoking cessation and 3-year progression of carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT, assessed by repeated ultrasound measurements) in a longitudinal multivariate model. Participants (mean age 52 years, 47% women) had a mean smoking duration of 32 years with a median daily consumption of 20 cigarettes. Baseline CIMT was 1185 μm (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1082-1287) and increased by 93 μm (95% CI: 25-161) and 108 μm (95% CI: 33-183) after 1 and 3 years, respectively. Age, male sex, daily cigarette consumption, systolic blood pressure (SBP), but neither low-density lipoprotein cholesterol nor hs-CRP, were independently associated with baseline CIMT (all P ≤ .05). Baseline SBP, but neither low-density lipoprotein cholesterol nor hs-CRP, was associated with 3-year atherosclerosis progression (P = .01 at 3 years). The higher the SBP at baseline, the steeper was the CIMT increase over 3-year follow-up. We found an increase of 26 μm per each 10-mmHg raise in SBP at 1 year and an increase of 39 μm per each 10 mmHg raise in SBP at 3 years. Due to insufficient statistical power, we could not exclude an effect of smoking abstinence on CIMT progression. Control of blood pressure may be an important factor to limit atherosclerosis progression in smokers, besides support for smoking cessation. Among 260 smokers aged 40-70 years with a mean smoking duration of 32 years, baseline SBP was associated with atherosclerosis progression over 3 years, as measured by CIMT (P = .01 at 3 years), independently of smoking variables and other CVRFs. The higher the

  20. Tofacitinib ameliorates atherosclerosis and reduces foam cell formation in apoE deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zaicun; Wang, Shumei; Wang, Zunzhe; Yun, Tiantian; Wang, Chenchen; Wang, Huating

    2017-08-19

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory cardiovascular disease with high mortality worldwide. Tofacitinib (CP-690,550), an oral small-molecule Janus kinase inhibitor, has been shown to be effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune encephalomyelitis and ulcerative colitis. However, its protective effect against atherosclerosis remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of Tofacitinib on atherogenic diet (ATD)-induced atherosclerosis using apolipoprotein E deficient (apoE-/-) mice. Atherosclerosis-prone apoE-/- mice were fed with ATD and treated with or without Tofacitinib through intragastrical administration (10 mg kg -1 day -1 ) for 8 weeks. Our results showed that Tofacitinib did not change plasma lipids, while significantly reduced the levels of plasma pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α. It also significantly attenuated atherosclerotic plaque lesion in the aortic root and macrophages contained in plaque as shown with Mac2 immuno-staining. Peritoneal macrophages (PMC) were separated from apoE-/- mice fed with 8-week ATD, and then subjected to inflammation tests. Flow cytometry analysis of F4/80 and CD206 and mRNA levels of M1 and M2 macrophages markers showed that M1 macrophages decreased while M2 macrophages increased in Tofacitinib treated group. Expressions of other inflammatory genes also indicated an anti-inflammatory status in mice treated with Tofacitinib. Ox-LDL was used to induce foam cell formation from PMC in wild type mice, and the results displayed a reduced formation of foam cells and decreased inflammation in mice with Tofacitinib administration (1 μM). The mRNA and protein levels of ATP binding cassette subfamily A member 1 (ABCA1), a key gene involved in cholesterol efflux, remarkably increased, while it was absence of alterations in scavenger receptors expression. Therefore, we demonstrated that Tofacitinib could attenuate atherosclerosis and foam cells formation by

  1. The Association of Circulating MiR-29b and Interleukin-6 with Subclinical Atherosclerosis

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    Yu-qing Huang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Although it is widely acknowledged that atherosclerosis is mainly a chronic inflammatory process, in which both miR-29b and interleukin-6 (IL-6 play multifaceted roles, the association between miR-29b and IL-6 remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to explore the relationship between miR-29b and IL-6 and to test whether circulating levels of miR-29b and IL-6 could predict atherosclerosis. Methods: A total of 170 participants were divided into two groups according to carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT: study group (CIMT ≥ 0.9mm and control group (CIMT < 0.9mm. Levels of circulating miR-29b and IL-6 were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, respectively. The association of miR-29b and IL-6 levels with CIMT was assessed using Spearman correlation analysis and multiple linear regression analysis. Results: The study group showed higher miR-29b levels (31.61 ± 3.05 vs. 27.91 ± 1.71 Ct, p < 0.001 and IL-6 levels (3.40 ± 0.67 vs. 2.99 ± 0.37 pg/ml, p < 0.001, compared with the control group. CIMT was positively correlated with miR-29b (r = 0.587, p < 0.001 and IL-6 (r = 0.410, p < 0.001, and miR-29b levels were also correlated with IL-6 (r = 0.242, p = 0.001. Multiple linear regression analysis also showed that CIMT was positively correlated with miR-29b and IL-6. After adjustment for age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol and C-reactive protein, CIMT was still closely correlated with miR-29b and IL-6. The combination of miR-29b and IL-6 (AUC = 0.901, p < 0.001 offered a better predictive index for atherosclerosis than either miR-29b (AUC = 0.867, p < 0.001 or IL-6 (AUC = 0.747, p < 0.001 alone. Conclusion: Circulating levels of miR-29b and IL-6 may be independently correlated with subclinical atherosclerosis, and may serve as novel biomarkers for the identification of atherosclerosis.

  2. Differential mRNA expression of seven genes involved in cholesterol metabolism and transport in the liver of atherosclerosis-susceptible and -resistant Japanese quail strains

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    Li Xinrui

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two atherosclerosis-susceptible and -resistant Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica strains obtained by divergent selection are commonly used as models to study atherosclerosis, but no genetic characterization of their phenotypic differences has been reported so far. Our objective was to examine possible differences in the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism and transport in the liver between these two strains and to evaluate the value of this model to analyze the gene system affecting cholesterol metabolism and transport. Methods A factorial study with both strains (atherosclerosis-susceptible versus atherosclerosis-resistant and two diets (control versus cholesterol was carried out. The mRNA concentrations of four genes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis (HMGCR, FDFT1, SQLE and DHCR7 and three genes in cholesterol transport (ABCG5, ABCG8 and APOA1 were assayed using real-time quantitative PCR. Plasma lipids were also assayed. Results Expression of ABCG5 (control diet and ABCG8 (regardless of dietary treatment and expression of HMGCR, FDFT1 and SQLE (regardless of dietary treatment were significantly higher in the atherosclerosis-resistant than in the atherosclerosis-susceptible strain. Plasma triglyceride and LDL levels, and LDL/HDL ratio were significantly higher in the atherosclerosis-susceptible than in the atherosclerosis-resistant strain fed the cholesterol diet. In the atherosclerosis-susceptible strain, ABCG5 expression regressed significantly and positively on plasma LDL level, whereas DHCR7 and SQLE expression regressed significantly and negatively on plasma triglyceride level. Conclusions Our results provide support for the hypothesis that the atherosclerosis-resistant strain metabolizes and excretes cholesterol faster than the atherosclerosis-susceptible strain. We have also demonstrated that these quail strains are a useful model to study cholesterol metabolism and transport in relation with

  3. [Estimation of relation between homocysteine concentration and selected lipid parameters and adhesion molecules concentration in children with atherosclerosis risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierakowska-Fijałek, Anna; Baj, Zbigniew; Kaczmarek, Piotr; Stepień, Mariusz; Rysz, Jacek

    2008-10-01

    Atherosclerosis begins in childhood. At present among numerous risk factors of atherosclerosis the role of hiperhomocysteinemia in development of cardiovascular heart disease is taken under consideration. Atherogenic effect of homocystein is related to its cytotoxin action, conducting to endothelial dysfunction and damage. It is correlated with increase of the lipid levels in the blood serum and change of expression of the soluble forms of adhesion molecules. The aim of this study was to estimate relations between the homocystein serum concentration, expression of the selected adhesion molecules and the lipid levels in the blood serum in children with atherosclerosis risk factors. The group consisted of 670 children, 76 of them had atherosclerosis risk factors. In further examination 48 children have taken a part, whose parents were agreed for theirs participation in the program. The comparative group composed of 25 children without the risk factors. We determined total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), LDL cholesterol fraction (LDL-C), HDL cholesterol fraction (HDL-C), serum homocysteine concentration (Hcy), the expression of the soluble forms of adhesion molecules (sCAM): sP-selectin and sVCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1). Obesity, hypertension and lipid disorders in the shape of higher concentration of TC, LDL-C, TG and lower HDL-C were the most frequent risk factors in the investigated children. No significant differences in serum homocysteine concentration were observed between the investigated groups. However, its concentration was significantly higher in children with two atherosclerosis risk factors. No significant differences in expression of s-VCAM-1 were observed in the investigated groups, concentration of sP-selectin was significantly higher in children with atherosclerosis risk factors (phomocysteine and chosen adhesion molecules in children with atherosclerosis risk factors might potentially constitute the marker of early

  4. Atherosclerosis-Driven Treg Plasticity Results in Formation of a Dysfunctional Subset of Plastic IFNγ+ Th1/Tregs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Matthew J; Filipowicz, Adam R; Waseem, Tayab C; McGary, Christopher M; Crow, Kevin J; Magilnick, Nathaniel; Boldin, Mark; Lundberg, Patric S; Galkina, Elena V

    2016-11-11

    Forkhead box P3 + T regulatory cells (Tregs) are key players in maintaining immune homeostasis. Evidence suggests that Tregs respond to environmental cues to permit or suppress inflammation. In atherosclerosis, Th1-driven inflammation affects Treg homeostasis, but the mechanisms governing this phenomenon are unclear. Here, we address whether atherosclerosis impacts Treg plasticity and functionality in Apoe - /- mice, and what effect Treg plasticity might have on the pathology of atherosclerosis. We demonstrate that atherosclerosis promotes Treg plasticity, resulting in the reduction of CXCR3 + Tregs and the accumulation of an intermediate Th1-like interferon (IFN)-γ + CCR5 + Treg subset (Th1/Tregs) within the aorta. Importantly, Th1/Tregs arise in atherosclerosis from bona fide Tregs, rather than from T-effector cells. We show that Th1/Tregs recovered from atherosclerotic mice are dysfunctional in suppression assays. Using an adoptive transfer system and plasticity-prone Mir146a -/- Tregs, we demonstrate that elevated IFNγ + Mir146a -/- Th1/Tregs are unable to adequately reduce atherosclerosis, arterial Th1, or macrophage content within Apoe -/- mice, in comparison to Mir146a +/+ Tregs. Finally, via single-cell RNA-sequencing and real-time -polymerase chain reaction, we show that Th1/Tregs possess a unique transcriptional phenotype characterized by coexpression of Treg and Th1 lineage genes and a downregulation of Treg-related genes, including Ikzf2, Ikzf4, Tigit, Lilrb4, and Il10. In addition, an ingenuity pathway analysis further implicates IFNγ, IFNα, interleukin-2, interleukin-7, CTLA-4 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4), T-cell receptor, and Csnk2b-related pathways in regulating Treg plasticity. Atherosclerosis drives Treg plasticity, resulting in the accumulation of dysfunctional IFNγ + Th1/Tregs that may permit further arterial inflammation and atherogenesis. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Visualization of atherosclerosis as detected by coronary artery calcium and carotid intima-media thickness reveals significant atherosclerosis in a cross-sectional study of psoriasis patients in a tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santilli, S; Kast, D R; Grozdev, I; Cao, L; Feig, R L; Golden, J B; Debanne, S M; Gilkeson, R C; Orringer, C E; McCormick, T S; Ward, N L; Cooper, K D; Korman, N J

    2016-07-22

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin and joints that may also have systemic inflammatory effects, including the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Multiple epidemiologic studies have demonstrated increased rates of CVD in psoriasis patients, although a causal link has not been established. A growing body of evidence suggests that sub-clinical systemic inflammation may develop in psoriasis patients, even from a young age. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of atherosclerosis and identify specific clinical risk factors associated with early vascular inflammation. We conducted a cross-sectional study of a tertiary care cohort of psoriasis patients using coronary artery calcium (CAC) score and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) to detect atherosclerosis, along with high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) to measure inflammation. Psoriasis patients and controls were recruited from our tertiary care dermatology clinic. Presence of atherosclerosis was defined using validated numeric values within CAC and CIMT imaging. Descriptive data comparing groups was analyzed using Welch's t test and Pearson Chi square tests. Logistic regression was used to analyze clinical factors associated with atherosclerosis, and linear regression to evaluate the relationship between psoriasis and hsCRP. 296 patients were enrolled, with 283 (207 psoriatic and 76 controls) having all data for the hsCRP and atherosclerosis analysis. Atherosclerosis was found in 67.6 % of psoriasis subjects versus 52.6 % of controls; Psoriasis patients were found to have a 2.67-fold higher odds of having atherosclerosis compared to controls [95 % CI (1.2, 5.92); p = 0.016], after adjusting for age, gender, race, BMI, smoking, HDL and hsCRP. In addition, a non-significant trend was found between HsCRP and psoriasis severity, as measured by PASI, PGA, or BSA, again after adjusting for confounders. A tertiary care cohort of psoriasis patients have a high prevalence of early

  6. [Prevalence and risk factors of extra-coronary artery disease in patients with diabetes which confirmed atherosclerosis of coronary arteries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracheva, S A; Biragova, M S; Glazunova, A M; Klefortova, I I; Melkozerov, K V; Shamkhalova, M Sh; Dzhavelidze, M I; Soldatova, T V; Il'in, A V; Deev, A D; Shestakova, M V; Tugeeva, E F; Buziashvili, Iu I

    2014-01-01

    To assess prevalence and risk factors of extra-coronary artery disease (peripheral artery (PA) disease (D) of lower extremities (LE), brachiocephalic arterial (BCA) stenosis (S), renal arterial (RA) S in type 1 and 2 (T1 and T2) diabetes (D) patients (P) with confirmed atherosclerosis of coronary arteries (CA). 100 P (48 with T2D, 18 with T1D, 34 without diabetes - PWD), with hemodynamically significant atherosclerosis of CA confirmed by coronary angiography. All patients underwent duplex ultrasonography of PA LE, BCA, RA. Other studies included assessment of clinical characteristics and measurement of the following parameters: profibrogenic cytokines (transforming growth factor [TGF] beta1, matrix metalloproteinase 9 [MMP9], monocyte chemotactic protein-1 [MCP-1], regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted [RANTES), markers of endothelial dysfunction (von Willebrand factor [VWF], homocystein [HCYST], plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 [PAI-1], vascular cell adhesion molecule [VCAM], soluble intercellular adhesion molecules-1 [sICAM], vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], asymmetric dimethylarginine [ADMAD, N-terminal fragment of pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro BNP), fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23), and fibrinogen. Portions of P with multivessel CA disease were similar in all three groups (T1D - 88.9, T2D - 85.5, WD - 82.3%). Coexistence of atherosclerosis in 2 or more vascular beds was identified in 85.3% of T2D and in 50% of WD P (p = 0.005). In T1D group 61.1 and 11.1% of P had atherosclerosis in 2 and 3 vascular beds, respectively. Levels of profibrogenic cytokines and factors of endothelial activation (RANTES, MMP-9, PAI-I, VCAM, sICAM, ADMA) were significantly higher in P with diabetes vs P WD. P with diabetes and multifocal atherosclerosis demonstrated significant increases of CRP, fibrinogen, NT-proBNP, VWF, PAI-1, ADMA, sICAM, and decrease of GFR compared with P with atherosclerosis in 1 vascular bed. Logistic regression

  7. A Rabbit Model for Testing Helper-Dependent Adenovirus-Mediated Gene Therapy for Vein Graft Atherosclerosis

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    Lianxiang Bi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery bypass vein grafts are a mainstay of therapy for human atherosclerosis. Unfortunately, the long-term patency of vein grafts is limited by accelerated atherosclerosis. Gene therapy, directed at the vein graft wall, is a promising approach for preventing vein graft atherosclerosis. Because helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd efficiently transduces grafted veins and confers long-term transgene expression, HDAd is an excellent candidate for delivery of vein graft-targeted gene therapy. We developed a model of vein graft atherosclerosis in fat-fed rabbits and demonstrated long-term (≥20 weeks persistence of HDAd genomes after graft transduction. This model enables quantitation of vein graft hemodynamics, wall structure, lipid accumulation, cellularity, vector persistence, and inflammatory markers on a single graft. Time-course experiments identified 12 weeks after transduction as an optimal time to measure efficacy of gene therapy on the critical variables of lipid and macrophage accumulation. We also used chow-fed rabbits to test whether HDAd infusion in vein grafts promotes intimal growth and inflammation. HDAd did not increase intimal growth, but had moderate—yet significant—pro-inflammatory effects. The vein graft atherosclerosis model will be useful for testing HDAd-mediated gene therapy; however, pro-inflammatory effects of HdAd remain a concern in developing HDAd as a therapy for vein graft disease.

  8. A Rabbit Model for Testing Helper-Dependent Adenovirus-Mediated Gene Therapy for Vein Graft Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Lianxiang; Wacker, Bradley K; Bueren, Emma; Ham, Ervin; Dronadula, Nagadhara; Dichek, David A

    2017-12-15

    Coronary artery bypass vein grafts are a mainstay of therapy for human atherosclerosis. Unfortunately, the long-term patency of vein grafts is limited by accelerated atherosclerosis. Gene therapy, directed at the vein graft wall, is a promising approach for preventing vein graft atherosclerosis. Because helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd) efficiently transduces grafted veins and confers long-term transgene expression, HDAd is an excellent candidate for delivery of vein graft-targeted gene therapy. We developed a model of vein graft atherosclerosis in fat-fed rabbits and demonstrated long-term (≥20 weeks) persistence of HDAd genomes after graft transduction. This model enables quantitation of vein graft hemodynamics, wall structure, lipid accumulation, cellularity, vector persistence, and inflammatory markers on a single graft. Time-course experiments identified 12 weeks after transduction as an optimal time to measure efficacy of gene therapy on the critical variables of lipid and macrophage accumulation. We also used chow-fed rabbits to test whether HDAd infusion in vein grafts promotes intimal growth and inflammation. HDAd did not increase intimal growth, but had moderate-yet significant-pro-inflammatory effects. The vein graft atherosclerosis model will be useful for testing HDAd-mediated gene therapy; however, pro-inflammatory effects of HdAd remain a concern in developing HDAd as a therapy for vein graft disease.

  9. Potential Biomarkers of Insulin Resistance and Atherosclerosis in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifah Intan Qhadijah Syed Ikmal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with coronary artery disease have become a major public health concern. The occurrence of insulin resistance accompanied with endothelial dysfunction worsens the state of atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. The combination of insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction leads to coronary artery disease and ischemic heart disease complications. A recognized biological marker, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, has been used widely to assess the progression of atherosclerosis and inflammation. Along with coronary arterial damage and inflammatory processes, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein is considered as an essential atherosclerosis marker in patients with cardiovascular disease, but not as an insulin resistance marker in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. A new biological marker that can act as a reliable indicator of both the exact state of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis is required to facilitate optimal health management of diabetic patients. Malfunctioning of insulin mechanism and endothelial dysfunction leads to innate immune activation and released several biological markers into circulation. This review examines potential biological markers, YKL-40, alpha-hydroxybutyrate, soluble CD36, leptin, resistin, interleukin-18, retinol binding protein-4, and chemerin, as they may play significant roles in insulin resistance and atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with coronary artery disease.

  10. Parity and carotid atherosclerosis in men and women: insights into the roles of childbearing and child-rearing.

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    Skilton, Michael R; Sérusclat, André; Begg, Lisa M; Moulin, Philippe; Bonnet, Fabrice

    2009-04-01

    Parity appears to be associated with carotid atherosclerosis in women aged 45 years and older. Studying this association among younger women and men may provide insight into whether this association relates predominantly to childbearing or child-rearing. The association between parity and carotid atherosclerosis (intima-media thickness and presence of plaques) was assessed in a cohort consisting of 750 women and 1164 men, all with at least one traditional cardiovascular risk factor, aged 18 to 80 years of age. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors were also assessed, and the Framingham Risk Score calculated. In age-adjusted analyses, the number of children was associated with adiposity, fasting glucose, 2-hour glucose, Framingham risk score, and carotid atherosclerosis in women, but not in men. Multivariate linear regression models indicate that the prevalence of plaques was increased by 15% (95% CI, 2 to 29) per child among women, and 0% (95% CI, -10 to 11) among men, after adjustment for age, socioeconomic and lifestyle factors (including waist circumference). The association between parity and carotid intima-media thickness was similar in younger and older women (P(Heterogeneity)=0.20). A higher number of children is associated with increased carotid atherosclerosis in both younger and older women, but not among men. These findings indicate that childbearing, but not child-rearing, may be a risk factor for atherosclerosis, and suggest the potential importance of considering the number of children when assessing the level of cardiovascular risk in women.

  11. Uric Acid, Metabolic Syndrome and Atherosclerosis: The Chicken or the Egg, Which Comes First?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pergola, Giovanni; Cortese, Francesca; Termine, Gaetano; Meliota, Giovanni; Carbonara, Rossella; Masiello, Michele; Cortese, Anna M; Silvestris, Francesco; Caccavo, Domenico; Ciccone, Marco Matteo

    2018-01-01

    A great debate in literature exists nowadays on the role of uric acid as a marker of cardiovascular and metabolic organ damage or a risk factor for cardiovascular and metabolic disease. The study aimed to determine the relationship among serum uric acid and metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis, by means of carotid intima media-thickness, in a cohort of 811 otherwise healthy overweight/obese subjects, without overt atherosclerosis not using any kind of drug. Uric acid levels were positively related to male gender, waist circumference, BMI, systolic and diastolic pressure levels, fasting insulin, fasting glucose, HOMA-IR, triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, the presence of metabolic syndrome and the number of the components of metabolic syndrome and negatively related to HDL cholesterol levels. No correlation was found between uric acid and carotid intima media thickness. At the multiple regression analysis, only waist circumference and triglycerides (positively) and HDL-cholesterol (negatively) maintained an independent association with uric acid as dependent variable, while age, female gender and uric acid showed a significant independent association with metabolic syndrome as dependent variable. Moreover, the analysis of the odd ratios showed that the risk of developing metabolic syndrome was consistent with uric acid levels ranging from 3 mg/dl to 8 mg/dl. The presence of metabolic syndrome does not seem to provide hyperuricemia. By contrast, higher serum uric acid level may predict the risk of metabolic syndrome. Moreover, our results suggest that uric acid cannot be considered a risk factor for early atherosclerosis, at least when assessed using carotid ultrasound. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Vascular wall proteoglycan synthesis and structure as a target for the prevention of atherosclerosis

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    Peter J Little

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Peter J Little1, 2, 3, Mandy L. Ballinger1, Narin Osman1,31Cell Biology of Diabetes Laboratory, Baker Heart Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia; Monash University, Departments of 2Medicine and 3Immunology, Central and Eastern Clinical School, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, AustraliaAbstract: Atherosclerosis is the underlying pathology of most cardiovascular disease and it represents the major cause of premature death in modern societies. Current therapies target risk factors being hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and hyperglycemia when diabetes is present however the maximum efficacy of these strategies is often 30% or less. Areas of vascular biology that may lead to the development of a complementary vascular wall directed therapy are: inflammation, oxidation, endothelial dysfunction, diabetes-specific factors —hyperglycemia and advanced glycation endproducts and lipid retention by vascular matrix specifically proteoglycans. The major structural features of proteoglycans that determine low-density lipoprotein (LDL binding are the length and sulfation pattern on the glycosaminoglycan (GAG chains. Emerging data discussed in this review indicates that these structural properties are subject to considerable regulation by vasoactive substances possibly using novel signaling pathways. For example, GAG elongation stimulated by platelet-derived growth factor is not blocked by the receptor tyrosine kinase antagonist, genistein suggesting that there may be a previously unknown signaling pathway involved in this response. Thus, modifying proteoglycan synthesis and structure may represent a prime target to prevent LDL binding and entrapment in the vessel wall and thus prevent the development and progression of atherosclerosis.Keywords: proteoglycans, signaling, lipoproteins, atherosclerosis

  13. Assessment of subclinical atherosclerosis in ankylosing spondylitis: correlations with disease activity indices

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    F.M. Perrotta

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate atherosclerosis in ankylosing spondylitis (AS through the assessment of morphological and functional measures of subclinical atherosclerosis. Twenty patients [M/F=12/8, age (median/range 43.5/28-69 years; disease duration (median/range 9.7/1-36 years] with AS classified according to modified New York criteria and twenty age and sex related healthy controls with negative past medical history for cardiovascular events were enrolled in the study. In all patients and controls, the intima-media thickness (IMT of common carotid artery, carotid bulb and internal carotid artery, and the flow-mediated dilatation (FMD of non-dominant arm brachial artery were determined, using a sonographic probe Esaote GPX (Genoa, Italy. Furthermore, we assess the main disease activity and disability indices [bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index, ankylosing spondylitis disease activity score-eritrosedimentation rate (ASDAS-ESR, ASDAS-C-reactive protein (CRP, bath ankylosing spondylitis metrology index, bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index and acute phase reactants. Plasmatic values of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, triglyceride and homocysteine were carried out in all twenty patients. IMT at carotid bulb was significant higher in patients than in controls (0.67 mm vs 0.54 mm; P=0.03. FMD did not statistically differ between patients and controls (12.5% vs 15%; P>0.05. We found a correlation between IMT at carotid bulb and ESR (rho 0.43; P=0.04. No correlation was found between FMD and disease activity and disability indices. This study showed that in AS patients, without risk factors for cardiovascular disease, carotid bulb IMT, morphological index of subclinical atherosclerosis, is higher than in controls.

  14. Deficiency of ABCA1 and ABCG1 in Macrophages Increases Inflammation and Accelerates Atherosclerosis in Mice

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    Westerterp, Marit; Murphy, Andrew J.; Wang, Mi; Pagler, Tamara A.; Vengrenyuk, Yuliya; Kappus, Mojdeh S.; Gorman, Darren J.; Nagareddy, Prabhakara R.; Zhu, Xuewei; Abramowicz, Sandra; Parks, John S.; Welch, Carrie; Fisher, Edward A.; Wang, Nan; Yvan-Charvet, Laurent; Tall, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Plasma HDL levels are inversely correlated with atherosclerosis. Although it is widely assumed that this is due to the ability of HDL to promote cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells, direct experimental support for this hypothesis is lacking. Objective To assess the role of macrophage cholesterol efflux pathways in atherogenesis. Methods and Results We developed MAC-ABCDKO mice with efficient deletion of the ATP Binding Cassette Transporters A1 and G1 (ABCA1 and ABCG1) in macrophages but not in hematopoietic stem or progenitor populations. MAC-ABCDKO bone marrow (BM) was transplanted into Ldlr-/- recipients. On the chow diet, these mice had similar plasma cholesterol and blood monocyte levels but increased atherosclerosis compared to controls. On the Western type diet (WTD), MAC-ABCDKO BM transplanted Ldlr-/- mice had disproportionate atherosclerosis, considering they also had lower VLDL/LDL cholesterol levels than controls. ABCA1/G1 deficient macrophages in lesions showed increased inflammatory gene expression. Unexpectedly, WTD-fed MAC-ABCDKO BM transplanted Ldlr-/- mice displayed monocytosis and neutrophilia in the absence of HSPC proliferation. Mechanistic studies revealed increased expression of M-CSF and G-CSF in splenic macrophage foam cells, driving BM monocyte and neutrophil production. Conclusion These studies 1) show that macrophage deficiency of ABCA1/G1 is pro-atherogenic likely by promoting plaque inflammation and 2) uncover a novel positive feedback loop in which cholesterol-laden splenic macrophages signal BM progenitors to produce monocytes, with suppression by macrophage cholesterol efflux pathways. PMID:23572498

  15. Polyunsaturated fats, carbohydrates and carotid disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Carotid MRI study.

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    Dearborn, Jennifer L; Qiao, Ye; Guallar, Eliseo; Steffen, Lyn M; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Zhang, Yiyi; Wasserman, Bruce A

    2016-08-01

    Carbohydrates and fat intake have both been linked to development of atherosclerosis. We examined associations between glycemic index (GI) and fat intake with carotid atherosclerosis. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) cohort enrolled participants during the period 1987-1989 and the Carotid MRI sub-study occurred between 2004 and 2006 (1672 participants attending both visits). Measures of carbohydrate quality (usual GI), fat intake (total, polyunsaturated and saturated) and overall dietary quality index (DASH Diet Score) were derived from a 66-item food frequency questionnaire administered at baseline. Trained readers measured lipid core presence and maximum wall thickness. Using multivariate logistic regression, we determined the odds of lipid core presence by quintile (Q) of energy-adjusted dietary components. Restricted cubic spline models were used to examine non-linear associations between dietary components and maximum wall thickness. Mean daily polyunsaturated fat intake was 5 g (SD 1.4). GI and polyunsaturated fat intake had a nonlinear relationship with maximum wall thickness. Low (1-4 g) and high (6-12 g) polyunsaturated fat intake were associated with a statistically significant decreased odds of lipid core presence compared to intake in a majority of participants (OR Q5 vs. Q2-4: 0.64, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.98; OR Q1 vs. Q2-4: 0.64, 95% CI 0.42, 0.96), however, the association with lipid core was attenuated by adjustment for maximum wall thickness, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes. GI and polyunsaturated fat intake were not associated with high-risk plaque features, such as lipid core presence, independent of traditional vascular risk factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Particulate matter and atherosclerosis: a bibliometric analysis of original research articles published in 1973–2014

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    Feifei Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested that exposure to particulate air pollution may promote progression of atherosclerosis. Methods In the present study, the characteristics and trends of the research field of particulate matter (PM and atherosclerosis were analyzed using bibliometric indicators. Bibliometric analysis was based on original papers obtained from PubMed/MEDLINE search results (from 1973 to 2014 using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH terms. A fully-detailed search strategy was employed, and articles were imported into the Thomson Data Analyzer (TDA software. Results The visualizing network of the collaborative researchers was analyzed by Ucinet 6 software. Main research topics and future focuses were explored by co-word and cluster analysis. The characteristics of these research articles were summarized. The number of published articles has increased from five for the period 1973–1978 to 89 for the period 2009–2014. Tobacco smoke pollution, smoke and air PM were the most studied targets in this research field. Coronary disease was the top health outcome posed by PM exposure. The aorta and endothelium vascular were the principal locations of atherosclerotic lesions, which were enhanced by PM exposure. Oxidative stress and inflammation were of special concern in the current mechanistic research system. The top high-frequency MeSH terms were clustered, and four popular topics were further presented. Conclusion Based on the quantitative analysis of bibliographic information and MeSH terms, we were able to define the study characteristics and popular topics in the field of PM and atherosclerosis. Our analysis would provide a comprehensive background reference for researchers in this field of study.

  17. Subclinical atherosclerosis in young patients with rheumatoid arthritis and low disease activity

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    F. Ragni Alunni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is an increasing body of evidence suggesting that subjects with rheumatoid arthritis (RA are characterized by acceleration of atherosclerotic process of arterial wall. However, all investigations performed so far to evaluate subclinical atherosclerosis in RA included subjects without selection for age and degree of disease activity that may represent confounding factors in such an evaluation. Objectives: To verify signs of accelerated subclinical atherosclerosis in young subject suffering from RA but with low disease activity. Methods: Thirty-two patients with RA and 28 age- and sex-matched control subjects with non-inflammatory rheumatic diseases were enrolled. Inclusion criteria were age less than 60 and low disease activity with score £3.2 according to DAS28, while subjects with traditional risk factors for and/or overt cardiovascular disease were ruled out from the study. Both patients and controls underwent evaluation of carotid and femoral artery intima-media thickness by ultrasounds. Results: Patients had higher intima-media thickness than controls of all the sites evaluated at carodit artery level, whereas there were no differences at the comparison of the superficial and common femoral artery wall. At the univariate analysis, a positive correlation between LDL cholesterol levels and intima-media thickness at the carotid bifurcation was found. Conclusions: Young patients with RA and low disease activity have acceleration of atherosclerosis development as shown by increased intima-media thickness of carotid artery with respect to subjects without inflammatory rheumatic disease. It is conceivable that the organic damage of arterial wall could be the result of persistent endothelial dysfunction induced by chronic inflammation and immune dysregulation which characterize RA.

  18. Sleep duration is significantly associated with carotid artery atherosclerosis incidence in a Japanese population.

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    Abe, Tsueko; Aoki, Toshinari; Yata, Syogo; Okada, Masahiko

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies have indicated that sleep duration is associated with total mortality in a U-shaped fashion. The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between self-reported sleep duration and carotid artery atherosclerosis in a Japanese population. In 2009-2010, a total of 2498 participants (1195 men, 1303 women; age range, 23-92 years) were recruited from members of a Japanese community receiving annual health check-up at a local health center who agreed to participate in the study. Exclusion criteria were as follows: age <40 or ≥85 years; and more than one missing value from either laboratory data or questionnaire responses. A total of 2214 participants were entered into the study. Carotid artery arteriosclerosis was evaluated ultrasonographically and quantified as intima-medial thickness (IMT). The presence of carotid artery atherosclerosis was defined as IMT≥1.2 mm. Sleep durations were compared with IMT measurements after controlling for confounding factors such as age, sex, lipid profile, fasting plasma glucose, hemoglobin A1c, blood pressure, alcohol intake, and smoking habit. Sleep duration ≥7 h correlated significantly with the incidence of IMT≥1.2 m when compared with a sleep duration of 6 h (multivariate-adjusted odds ratio, 1.263; 95% confidence interval, 1.031-1.546, P=0.024). Shorter sleep duration ≤5 h did not correlate significantly with the risk compared with a sleep duration of 6 h. Long sleep duration (≥7 h) correlated significantly with the incidence of carotid artery atherosclerosis compared with a sleep duration of 6 h, but shorter sleep duration did not. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Silent myocardial ischemia in patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis: associated factors.

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    Arenillas, Juan F; Candell-Riera, Jaume; Romero-Farina, Guillermo; Molina, Carlos A; Chacón, Pilar; Aguadé-Bruix, Santiago; Montaner, Joan; de León, Gustavo; Castell-Conesa, Joan; Alvarez-Sabín, José

    2005-06-01

    Optimization of coronary risk evaluation in stroke patients has been encouraged. The relationship between symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis and occult coronary artery disease (CAD) has not been evaluated sufficiently. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of silent myocardial ischemia in patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis and to identify factors associated with its presence. From 186 first-ever transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke patients with intracranial stenoses, 65 fulfilled selection criteria, including angiographic confirmation of a symptomatic atherosclerotic stenosis and absence of known CAD. All patients underwent a maximal-stress myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], C-reactive protein, and homocysteine (Hcy) levels were determined before SPECT. Stress-rest SPECT detected reversible myocardial perfusion defects in 34 (52%) patients. Vascular risk factors associated with a pathologic SPECT were hypercholesterolemia (P=0.045), presence of >2 risk factors (P=0.004) and high Lp(a) (P=0.023) and Hcy levels (P=0.018). Ninety percent of patients with high Lp(a) and Hcy levels had a positive SPECT. Existence of a stenosed intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA; odds ratio [OR], 7.22, 2.07 to 25.23; P=0.002) and location of the symptomatic stenosis in vertebrobasilar arteries (OR, 4.89, 1.19 to 20.12; P=0.027) were independently associated with silent myocardial ischemia after adjustment by age, sex, and risk factors. More than 50% of the patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis and not overt CAD show myocardial perfusion defects on stress-rest SPECT. Stenosed intracranial ICA, symptomatic vertebrobasilar stenosis and presence of high Lp(a) and Hcy levels may characterize the patients at a higher risk for occult CAD.

  20. Leukocyte Overexpression of Intracellular NAMPT Attenuates Atherosclerosis by Regulating PPARγ-Dependent Monocyte Differentiation and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Beatriz; Dahl, Tuva Borresdatter; Medina, Indira; Groeneweg, Mathijs; Holm, Sverre; Montserrat-de la Paz, Sergio; Rousch, Mat; Otten, Jeroen; Herias, Veronica; Varela, Lourdes M; Ranheim, Trine; Yndestad, Arne; Ortega-Gomez, Almudena; Abia, Rocio; Nagy, Laszlo; Aukrust, Pal; Muriana, Francisco J G; Halvorsen, Bente; Biessen, Erik Anna Leonardus

    2017-06-01

    Extracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (eNAMPT) mediates inflammatory and potentially proatherogenic effects, whereas the role of intracellular NAMPT (iNAMPT), the rate limiting enzyme in the salvage pathway of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) + generation, in atherogenesis is largely unknown. Here we investigated the effects of iNAMPT overexpression in leukocytes on inflammation and atherosclerosis. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice with hematopoietic overexpression of human iNAMPT (iNAMPT hi ), on a western type diet, showed attenuated plaque burden with features of lesion stabilization. This anti-atherogenic effect was caused by improved resistance of macrophages to apoptosis by attenuated chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2-dependent monocyte chemotaxis and by skewing macrophage polarization toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype. The iNAMPT hi phenotype was almost fully reversed by treatment with the NAMPT inhibitor FK866, indicating that iNAMPT catalytic activity is instrumental in the atheroprotection. Importantly, iNAMPT overexpression did not induce any increase in eNAMPT, and eNAMPT had no effect on chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 expression and promoted an inflammatory M1 phenotype in macrophages. The iNAMPT-mediated effects at least partly involved sirtuin 1-dependent molecular crosstalk of NAMPT and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. Finally, iNAMPT and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ showed a strong correlation in human atherosclerotic, but not healthy arteries, hinting to a relevance of iNAMPT/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ pathway also in human carotid atherosclerosis. This study highlights the functional dichotomy of intracellular versus extracellular NAMPT, and unveils a critical role for the iNAMPT-peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ axis in atherosclerosis. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Chronic intermittent hypoxia induces atherosclerosis via activation of adipose angiopoietin-like 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drager, Luciano F; Yao, Qiaoling; Hernandez, Karen L; Shin, Mi-Kyung; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Gay, Jason; Sussan, Thomas E; Jun, Jonathan C; Myers, Allen C; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Schwartz, Alan R; Halberg, Nils; Scherer, Philipp E; Semenza, Gregg L; Powell, David R; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2013-07-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a risk factor for dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis, which have been attributed to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH). Intermittent hypoxia inhibits a key enzyme of lipoprotein clearance, lipoprotein lipase, and up-regulates a lipoprotein lipase inhibitor, angiopoietin-like 4 (Angptl4), in adipose tissue. The effects and mechanisms of Angptl4 up-regulation in sleep apnea are unknown. To examine whether CIH induces dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis by increasing adipose Angptl4 via hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). ApoE(-/-) mice were exposed to intermittent hypoxia or air for 4 weeks while being treated with Angptl4-neutralizing antibody or vehicle. In vehicle-treated mice, hypoxia increased adipose Angptl4 levels, inhibited adipose lipoprotein lipase, increased fasting levels of plasma triglycerides and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and increased the size of atherosclerotic plaques. The effects of CIH were abolished by the antibody. Hypoxia-induced increases in plasma fasting triglycerides and adipose Angptl4 were not observed in mice with germline heterozygosity for a HIF-1α knockout allele. Transgenic overexpression of HIF-1α in adipose tissue led to dyslipidemia and increased levels of adipose Angptl4. In cultured adipocytes, constitutive expression of HIF-1α increased Angptl4 levels, which was abolished by siRNA. Finally, in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery, the severity of nocturnal hypoxemia predicted Angptl4 levels in subcutaneous adipose tissue. HIF-1-mediated increase in adipose Angptl4 and the ensuing lipoprotein lipase inactivation may contribute to atherosclerosis in patients with sleep apnea.

  2. Impacts of fresh lime juice and peel on atherosclerosis progression in an animal model

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    Maryam Boshtam

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The main protective role of antioxidants in the progression of atherosclerosis has been shown in some studies. Therefore, this project evaluated the effects of Citrus aurantifolia (Christm juice and peel on antioxidant activity and atherosclerosis progression in rabbits receiving a hypercholesterolemic diet. METHODS: Forty white New Zealand male rabbits were randomly allocated to four groups. All groups were on hypercholesterolemic diet for two months. While the first group was considered as the hypercholesterolemic control, groups 2 and 3 (intervention groups received 5 ml/day lime juice and 1 g/day dried lime peel powder, respectively. Group 4 was fed a normal diet (normal control. Before and after the study, weight was measured and a fasting blood specimen was taken from the rabbits. Serum lipids analyses and antioxidant activity evaluations were then performed. The rabbits’ aorta and coronary arteries were separated and the presence of fatty streaks was studied. RESULTS: Comparing to the hypercholesterolemic control group (-25.2 ± 7.0, only the plasma total antioxidant capacity change was significantly more in rabbits supplemented with lime juice (16.3 ± 14.7 and peel (8.6 ± 7.1 (P = 0.008. The presence of fatty streaks in coronary arteries and aorta of the intervention groups [juice (0.2 ± 0.01; peel (0.0 ± 0.00] was significantly decreased compared to the hypercholesterolemic control group (1.2 ± 0.4 (P < 0.001. CONCLUSION: Based on our findings, Citrus aurantifolia peel and juice increase plasma antioxidant capacity in rabbits, and can thus prevent or decelerate the process of atherogenesis. However, lime peel is more effective than lime juice.   Keywords: Animal, Atherosclerosis, Atherogenic Diet, Fatty Streak, Intervention, Lime    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA

  3. Asymptomatic cervicocerebral atherosclerosis, intracranial vascular resistance and cognition: the AsIA-neuropsychology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Olóriz, Jorge; López-Cancio, Elena; Arenillas, Juan F; Hernández, María; Jiménez, Marta; Dorado, Laura; Barrios, Maite; Soriano-Raya, Juan José; Miralbell, Júlia; Cáceres, Cynthia; Forés, Rosa; Pera, Guillem; Dávalos, Antoni; Mataró, Maria

    2013-10-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis has emerged as a relevant contributor to cognitive impairment and dementia whereas the role of intracranial stenosis and vascular resistance in cognition remains unknown. This study aims to assess the association of asymptomatic cervicocerebral atherosclerosis and intracranial vascular resistance with cognitive performance in a large dementia-free population. The Barcelona-AsIA (Asymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis) Neuropsychology Study included 747 Caucasian subjects older than 50 with a moderate-high vascular risk (assessed by REGICOR score) and without history of neither symptomatic vascular disease nor dementia. Extracranial and transcranial color-coded duplex ultrasound examination was performed to assess carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), presence of carotid plaques (ECAD group), intracranial stenosis (ICAD group), and middle cerebral artery pulsatility index (MCA-PI) as a measure of intracranial vascular resistance. Neuropsychological assessment included tests in three cognitive domains: visuospatial skills and speed, verbal memory and verbal fluency. In univariate analyses, carotid IMT, ECAD and MCA-PI were associated with lower performance in almost all cognitive domains, and ICAD was associated with poor performance in some visuospatial and verbal cognitive tests. After adjustment for age, sex, vascular risk score, years of education and depressive symptoms, ECAD remained associated with poor performance in the three cognitive domains and elevated MCA-PI with worse performance in visuospatial skills and speed. Carotid plaques and increased intracranial vascular resistance are independently associated with low cognitive functioning in Caucasian stroke and dementia-free subjects. We failed to find an independent association of intracranial large vessel stenosis with cognitive performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of total glucosides from paeony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall) roots on experimental atherosclerosis in rats.

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    Li, Jing; Chen, Chang Xun; Shen, Yun Hui

    2011-05-17

    Total glucosides of paeony (TGP), compounds extracted from the roots of Paeonia lactiflora Pall, have been used as an anti-inflammatory drug for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in China. Inflammation plays a critical role in the development of atherosclerotic vascular disease. Risk of cardiovascular diseases is significantly higher in patients with RA than in normal population. It has a great significance to study the effects of TGP on atherosclerosis. To investigate the effects of TGP on atherosclerosis induced by excessive administration of vitamin D and cholesterol in rats and study the mechanisms involved. Atherosclerosis was induced by excessive administration of vitamin D and cholesterol in rats. TGP was intragastrically administered for 15 weeks. The serum concentrations of total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) were measured by automatic biochemistry analyzer. Apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) and apolipoprotein B (ApoB) were determined by immunoturbidimetry method, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. The morphological changes of aorta were observed with optical microscopy. Compared to controls, TGP significantly lowered the serum level of TC, TG, LDL-C, ApoB, TNF-alpha, IL-6 and CRP, increased the ratios of HDL-C/LDL-C and ApoA1/ApoB, decreased the intima-media thickness (IMT) of abdominal aortal wall and improved the morphological change of the aorta. TGP may attenuate the development of atherosclerotic disease. The beneficial effects are associated with its lowering blood lipids and inhibiting the expression of inflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. TAP1-deficiency does not alter atherosclerosis development in Apoe-/- mice.

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    Daniel Kolbus

    Full Text Available Antigen presenting cells (APC have the ability to present both extra-cellular and intra-cellular antigens via MHC class I molecules to CD8(+ T cells. The cross presentation of extra-cellular antigens is reduced in mice with deficient Antigen Peptide Transporter 1 (TAP1-dependent MHC class I antigen presentation, and these mice are characterized by a diminished CD8(+ T cell population. We have recently reported an increased activation of CD8(+ T cells in hypercholesterolemic Apoe(-/- mice. Therefore, this study included TAP1-deficient Apoe(-/- mice (Apoe(-/-Tap1(-/- to test the atherogenicity of CD8(+ T cells and TAP1-dependent cross presentation in a hypercholesterolemic environment. As expected the CD8(+ T cell numbers were low in Apoe(-/-Tap1(-/- mice in comparison to Apoe(-/- mice, constituting ~1% of the lymphocyte population. In spite of this there were no differences in the extent of atherosclerosis as assessed by en face Oil Red O staining of the aorta and cross-sections of the aortic root between Apoe(-/-Tap1(-/- and Apoe(-/- mice. Moreover, no differences were detected in lesion infiltration of macrophages or CD3(+ T cells in Apoe(-/-Tap1(-/- compared to Apoe(-/- mice. The CD3(+CD4(+ T cell fraction was increased in Apoe(-/-Tap1(-/- mice, suggesting a compensation for the decreased CD8(+ T cell population. Interestingly, the fraction of CD8(+ effector memory T cells was increased but this appeared to have little impact on the atherosclerosis development.In conclusion, Apoe(-/-Tap1(-/- mice develop atherosclerosis equal to Apoe(-/- mice, indicating a minor role for CD8(+ T cells and TAP1-dependent antigen presentation in the disease process.

  6. Association of chemerin mRNA expression in human epicardial adipose tissue with coronary atherosclerosis

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    Wang Linjie

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growing evidence suggests that epicardial adipose tissue (EAT may play a key role in the pathogenesis and development of coronary artery disease (CAD by producing several inflammatory adipokines. Chemerin, a novel adipokine, has been reported to be involved in regulating immune responses and glucolipid metabolism. Given these properties, chemerin may provide an interesting link between obesity, inflammation and atherosclerosis. In this study, we sought to determine the relationship of chemerin expression in EAT and the severity of coronary atherosclerosis in Han Chinese patients. Methods Serums and adipose tissue biopsies (epicardial and thoracic subcutaneous were obtained from CAD (n = 37 and NCAD (n = 16 patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Gensini score was used to assess the severity of CAD. Serum levels of chemerin, adiponectin and insulin were measured by ELISA. Chemerin protein expression in adipose tissue was detected by immunohistochemistry. The mRNA levels of chemerin, chemR23, adiponectin and TNF-alpha in adipose tissue were detected by RT-PCR. Results We found that EAT of CAD group showed significantly higher levels of chemerin and TNF-alpha mRNA, and significantly lower level of adiponectin mRNA than that of NCAD patients. In CAD group, significantly higher levels of chemerin mRNA and protein were observed in EAT than in paired subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT, whereas such significant difference was not found in NCAD group. Chemerin mRNA expression in EAT was positively correlated with Gensini score (r = 0.365, P P P P P P P > 0.05. Conclusions The expressions of chemerin mRNA and protein are significantly higher in EAT from patients with CAD in Han Chinese patients. Furthermore, the severity of coronary atherosclerosis is positive correlated with the level of chemerin mRNA in EAT rather than its circulating level.

  7. Intake of antioxidants and B vitamins is inversely associated with ischemic stroke and cerebral atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Hansaem; Hwang, Ji-Yun; Yun, Jin A; Kim, Ji-Myung; Song, Tae-Jin; Chang, Namsoo; Kim, Yong-Jae

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES This study was conducted to examine relationships between dietary habits and intakes of antioxidants and B vitamins and the risk of ischemic stroke, and to compare dietary factors according to the presence of cerebral artery atherosclerosis and stroke subtypes. SUBJECTS/METHODS A total of 147 patients and 144 control subjects were recruited consecutively in the metropolitan area of Seoul, Korea. Sixty participants each in the case and control groups were included in analyses after 1:1 frequency matching. In addition, 117 acute ischemic stroke patients were classified into subtypes according to the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) guidelines. Dietary intake was measured using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire composed of 111 food items and plasma lipid and homocysteine levels were analyzed. RESULTS When compared with control subjects, stroke patients had unfavorable dietary behaviors and lower intakes of fruits (73.1 ± 83.2 g vs. 230.9 ± 202.1 g, P < 0.001), vegetables (221.1 ± 209.0 g vs. 561.7 ± 306.6 g, P < 0.001), and antioxidants, including vitamins C, E, B6, β-carotene, and folate. The intakes of fruits, vegetables, vitamin C, and folate were inversely associated with the risk of ischemic stroke after adjusting for confounding factors. Intakes of vegetables, vitamins C, B6, B12, and folate per 1,000 kcal were lower in ischemic stroke with cerebral atherosclerosis than in those without. Overall vitamin B12 intake per 1,000 kcal differed according to the TOAST classification (P = 0.004), but no differences among groups existed based on the post-hoc test. CONCLUSIONS When compared with control subjects, ischemic stroke patients, particularly those with cerebral atherosclerosis, had unfavorable dietary intake, which may have contributed to the development of ischemic stroke. These results indicate that proper dietary recommendations are important for the prevention of ischemic stroke. PMID:27698959

  8. Does high C-reactive protein concentration increase atherosclerosis? The Whitehall II Study.

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    Mika Kivimäki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP, a marker of systemic inflammation, is associated with risk of coronary events and sub-clinical measures of atherosclerosis. Evidence in support of this link being causal would include an association robust to adjustments for confounders (multivariable standard regression analysis and the association of CRP gene polymorphisms with atherosclerosis (Mendelian randomization analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We genotyped 3 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs [+1444T>C (rs1130864; +2303G>A (rs1205 and +4899T>G (rs 3093077] in the CRP gene and assessed CRP and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT, a structural marker of atherosclerosis, in 4941 men and women aged 50-74 (mean 61 years (the Whitehall II Study. The 4 major haplotypes from the SNPs were consistently associated with CRP level, but not with other risk factors that might confound the association between CRP and CIMT. CRP, assessed both at mean age 49 and at mean age 61, was associated both with CIMT in age and sex adjusted standard regression analyses and with potential confounding factors. However, the association of CRP with CIMT attenuated to the null with adjustment for confounding factors in both prospective and cross-sectional analyses. When examined using genetic variants as the instrument for serum CRP, there was no inferred association between CRP and CIMT. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Both multivariable standard regression analysis and Mendelian randomization analysis suggest that the association of CRP with carotid atheroma indexed by CIMT may not be causal.

  9. Selected atherosclerosis risk factors in youth aged 13–15 years 

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    Agnieszka Michalska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:The high frequency of cases of circulatory system conditions in Europe and other countries around the world requires scientific research to define risk factors of early atherosclerotic changes. The aim of the present study was to define which students are at danger of developing atherosclerosis by means of measuring cholesterol and triglyceride levels in blood as well as defining the correlation between atherosclerosis risk factors and arterial blood pressure, physical fitness and efficiency of the subjects.Material/Methods:The research covered 167 students of Public Junior High School ¹1 in Biala Podlaska aged 13–15 years. Accutrend GCT was employed to define the levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides in the screen test. Those students who were found to have increased values of biochemical parameters of capillary blood were subjected to additional blood tests aiming to define complete lipid profile of venous blood. The blood pressure in subjects was tested three times. The Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity (MVPA test, suggested by American authors, was employed to define physical activity in subjects. EUROFIT was employed to define physical efficiency.Results:Among the 167 subjects there were found 42 students (25.1�20whose lipid level in capillary blood proved to be increased. Full lipid profile tests proved that 16 students (9.6�20had increased blood lipid levels; those subjects constituted the risk group. Subjects in the risk group were characterized by lower levels of physical activity and physical efficiency compared to subjects with normal blood lipid level. Moreover, the frequency of hypertension was greater in risk group subjects compared to subjects with normal blood lipid levels.Inferences:Students diagnosed with atherosclerosis risk factors require observation and early prophylactics by adopting habits of healthy physical activity.

  10. The degree of coronary atherosclerosis as a marker of insulin resistance in non-diabetics

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    Parapid Biljana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The metabolic syndrome and its influence on coronary artery disease development and progression remains in focus of international research debates, while insulin resistance, which represents its core, is the key component of hypertension, dyslipidaemias, glucose intolerance and obesity. Objective. The aim of this study was to establish relationship between basal glucose and insulin levels, insulin sensitivity and lipid panel and the degree of coronary atherosclerosis in nondiabetic patients. Methods. The coronary angiograms were evaluated for the presence of significant stenosis, insulin sensitivity was assessed using the intravenous glucose tolerance test with a minimal model according to Bergman, while baseline glucose (G0, insulin (I0 and lipid panel measurements (TC, HDL, LDL, TG were taken after a 12-hour fasting. Results. The protocol encompassed 40 patients (19 men and 21 women treated at the Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of the Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade. All were non-diabetics who were divided into 3 groups based on their angios: Group A (6 patients, 15%, with no significant stenosis, Group B (18 patients, 45%, with a single-vessel disease and Group C (16 patients, 40%, with multi-vessel disease. Presence of lower insulin sensitivity, higher I0 and TC in the group of patients with a more severe degree of coronary atherosclerosis (insulin sensitivity: F=4.279, p=0.023, A vs. C p=0.012, B vs. C p=0.038; I0: F=3.461 p=0.042, A vs. B p=0.045, A vs. C p=0.013; TC: F=2.572, p=0.09, while no significant difference was found for G0, LDL, HDL and TG. Conclusion. Baseline insulinaemia, more precisely, fasting hyperinsulinaemia could be a good predictor of significant coronary atherosclerosis in non-diabetic patients, which enables a more elegant cardiometabolic risk assessment in the setting of everyday clinical practice.

  11. The role of shear stress and arteriogenesis in maintaining vascular homeostasis and preventing cerebral atherosclerosis

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    David Della-Morte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shear stress (SS is a biomechanical force that is determined by blood flow, vessel geometry, and fluid viscosity. Although a wide range of known vascular risk factors promote development of atherosclerosis, atherosclerotic changes occur predominately at specific sites within the arterial tree, suggesting a critical role for local factors within the vasculature. Atherosclerotic lesions develop predominantly at branches, bends, and bifurcations in the arterial tree because these sites are exposed to low or disturbed blood flow and low SS. Low SS predisposes arteries to atherosclerosis by causing endothelial dysfunction. A natural system of preexisting cerebral collateral arteries protects against ischemia by bypassing sites of arterial occlusion through a mechanism of arteriogenesis. The main trigger for arteriogenesis is impaired vascular homeostasis (VH in response to local changes in SS induced by ischemia. VH is a critical process for maintaining the physiological function of cerebral circulation. It is regulated through a complex biological system of blood flow hemodynamic and physiological responses to flow changes. Restoration of VH by increasing arteriogenesis and SS may provide a novel therapeutic target for stroke, especially in the elderly, who are more prone to VH impairment. In this review article, we discuss the mechanisms and structures necessary to maintain VH in brain circulation, the role of SS, and risk factors leading to atherosclerosis, including the effects of aging. We also discuss arteriogenesis as an adaptive and protective process in response to ischemic injury, the imaging techniques currently available to evaluate arterogenesis such as magnetic resonance imaging/positron emission tomography (MRI/PET, and the potential therapeutic approaches against ischemic injury that target arteriogenesis.

  12. Early atherosclerosis and vascular inflammation in mice with diet-induced type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, E D; Bang, C A; Nielsen, L B

    2009-01-01

    and the median lesion area was 8.0 times higher than in fat-fed wild-type mice (P = 0.001). Intracellular adhesion molecule-1 staining of the aortic endothelium was most pronounced in the fat-fed apoB transgenic mice. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that diet-induced type 2 diabetes causes early......BACKGROUND: Obesity and type 2 diabetes increase the risk of atherosclerosis. It is unknown to what extent this reflects direct effects on the arterial wall or secondary effects of hyperlipidaemia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The effect of obesity and type 2 diabetes on the development...

  13. Endothelial Lipase Concentrations Are Increased in Metabolic Syndrome and Associated with Coronary Atherosclerosis.

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    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endothelial lipase (EL, a new member of the lipase family, has been shown to modulate high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C metabolism and atherosclerosis in mouse models. We hypothesized that EL concentrations would be associated with decreased HDL-C and increased atherosclerosis in humans. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Healthy individuals with a family history of premature coronary heart disease (n = 858 were recruited as part of the Study of the Inherited Risk of Atherosclerosis. Blood was drawn in the fasting state before and, in a subgroup (n = 510, after administration of a single dose of intravenous heparin. Plasma lipids were measured enzymatically, lipoprotein subclasses were assessed by nuclear magnetic resonance, and coronary artery calcification (CAC was quantified by electron beam computed tomography. Plasma EL mass was measured using a newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Median EL mass in pre-heparin plasma was 442 (interquartile range = 324-617 ng/ml. Median post-heparin mass was approximately 3-fold higher, 1,313 (888-1,927 ng/ml. The correlation between pre-heparin EL mass and post-heparin EL mass was 0.46 (p < 0.001. EL mass concentrations in both pre- and post-heparin plasma significantly correlated with all NCEP ATPIII-defined metabolic syndrome factors: waist circumference (r = 0.28 and 0.22, respectively, p < 0.001 for each, blood pressure (r = 0.18 and 0.24, p < 0.001 for each, triglycerides (r = 0.22, p < 0.001; and 0.13, p = 0.004, HDL cholesterol (r = -0.11, p = 0.002; and -0.18, p < 0.001, and fasting glucose (r = 0.11 and 0.16, p = 0.001 for both. EL mass in both routine (odds ratio [OR] = 1.67, p = 0.01 and post-heparin (OR = 2.42, p = 0.003 plasma was associated with CAC as determined by ordinal regression after adjustment for age, gender, waist circumference, vasoactive medications, hormone replacement therapy (women, and established cardiovascular risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: We report, to our knowledge

  14. ACAT inhibition and progression of carotid atherosclerosis in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia: the CAPTIVATE randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuwese, Marijn C; de Groot, Eric; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Trip, Mieke D; Ose, Leiv; Maritz, Frans J; Basart, Dick C G; Kastelein, John J P; Habib, Rafik; Davidson, Michael H; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Schwocho, Lee R; Stein, Evan A

    2009-03-18

    Inhibition of acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), an intracellular enzyme involved in cholesterol accumulation, with pactimibe was developed to assist in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of pactimibe in inhibition of atherosclerosis. A prospective, randomized, stratified, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (Carotid Atherosclerosis Progression Trial Investigating Vascular ACAT Inhibition Treatment Effects [CAPTIVATE]) of 892 patients heterozygous for familial hypercholesterolemia conducted at 40 lipid clinics in the United States, Canada, Europe, South Africa, and Israel between February 1, 2004, and December 31, 2005. Study was terminated on October 26, 2005. Participants received either 100 mg/d of pactimibe (n = 443) or matching placebo (n = 438), in addition to standard lipid-lowering therapy. Carotid atherosclerosis, assessed by ultrasound carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), at baseline, 12, 18, and 24 months. Maximum CIMT was the primary end point and mean CIMT the secondary end point. Because pactimibe failed to show efficacy in the intravascular coronary ultrasound ACTIVATE study, the CAPTIVATE study was terminated prematurely after a follow-up of 15 months. After 6 months of treatment with pactimibe, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased by 7.3% (SD, 23%) compared with 1.4% (SD, 28%) in the placebo group (P = .001). The carotid ultrasonographic scans of the 716 patients with at least 2 scans and obtained at least 40 weeks apart were analyzed. Maximum CIMT measurements did not show a pactimibe treatment effect (difference, 0.004 mm; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.023 to 0.015 mm; P = .64); however, the less variable mean CIMT measurement revealed an increase of 0.014 mm (95% CI, -0.027 to 0.000 mm; P = .04) in patients administered pactimibe vs placebo. Major cardiovascular events (cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, and stroke) occurred more often in patients administered

  15. Lessons Learned from the ECML/PKDD Discovery Challenge on the Atherosclerosis Risk Factors Data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Berka, Petr; Rauch, Jan; Tomečková, Marie

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 3 (2007), s. 329-344 ISSN 1335-9150 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014; GA ČR GA201/05/0325 Grant - others:GA VŠE(CZ) 25/05 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : atherosclerosis risk * data mining * discovery challenge Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 0.349, year: 2007 http://www.cai.sk/ojs/index.php/cai/article/view/313

  16. Non-obstructive carotid atherosclerosis and patent foramen ovale in young adults with cryptogenic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffre, A; Guidolin, B; Ruidavets, J-B; Nasr, N; Larrue, V

    2017-05-01

    Up to 50% of ischaemic strokes in young adults are classified as cryptogenic despite extensive work-up. We sought to evaluate the prevalence of non-obstructive carotid atherosclerosis (NOCA) and its association with patent foramen ovale (PFO) in young adults with cryptogenic stroke (CS). Patients aged 18-54 years, consecutively treated for first-ever CS in an academic stroke service, were included. NOCA was assessed using carotid ultrasound examination and was defined as carotid plaque with young adults with CS. NOCA is negatively associated with PFO. Detecting NOCA is an important component of stroke investigation in young adults. © 2017 EAN.

  17. Reporting standards for angioplasty and stent-assisted angioplasty for intracranial atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, H Christian; Meyers, Philip M; Higashida, Randall T; Derdeyn, Colin P; Lavine, Sean D; Nesbit, Gary M; Sacks, David; Rasmussen, Peter; Wechsler, Lawrence R

    2010-12-01

    Intracranial cerebral atherosclerosis causes ischemic stroke in a significant number of patients. Technological advances over the past 10 years have enabled endovascular treatment of intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis. The number of patients treated with angioplasty or stent-assisted angioplasty for this condition is increasing. Given the lack of universally accepted definitions, the goal of this document is to provide consensus recommendations for reporting standards, terminology, and written definitions when reporting clinical and radiological evaluation, technique, and outcome of endovascular treatment using angioplasty or stent-assisted angioplasty for stenotic and occlusive intracranial atherosclerosis. This article was written under the auspices of Joint Writing Group of the Technology Assessment Committee, Society of Neurolnterventional Surgery, Society of Interventional Radiology; Joint Section on Cerebro-vascular Neurosurgery of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and Congress of Neurological Surgeons; and the Section of Stroke and Interventional Neurology of the American Academy of Neurology. A computerized search of the National Library of Medicine database of literature (PubMed) from January 1997 to December 2007 was conducted with the goal to identify published endovascular cerebrovascular interventional data in stenotic intracranial atherosclerosis that could be used as benchmarks for quality assessment. We sought to identify those risk adjustment variables that affect the likelihood of success and complications. This document offers the rationale for different clinical and technical considerations that may be important during the design of clinical trials for endovascular treatment of intracranial stenotic and occlusive atherosclerosis. Included in this guidance document are suggestions for uniform reporting standards for such trials. These definitions and standards are primarily intended for research purposes; however, they should

  18. Endothelin-1 overexpression exacerbates atherosclerosis and induces aortic aneurysms in apolipoprotein E knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Melissa W; Mian, Muhammad Oneeb Rehman; Barhoumi, Tlili; Rehman, Asia; Mann, Koren; Paradis, Pierre; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2013-10-01

    Endothelin (ET)-1 plays a role in vascular reactive oxygen species production and inflammation. ET-1 has been implicated in human atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. ET-1 overexpression exacerbates high-fat diet-induced atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E(-/-) (Apoe(-/-)) mice. ET-1-induced reactive oxygen species and inflammation may contribute to atherosclerosis progression and AAA development. Eight-week-old male wild-type mice, transgenic mice overexpressing ET-1 selectively in endothelium (eET-1), Apoe(-/-) mice, and eET-1/Apoe(-/-) mice were fed high-fat diet for 8 weeks. eET-1/Apoe(-/-) had a 45% reduction in plasma high-density lipoprotein (P<0.05) and presented ≥ 2-fold more aortic atherosclerotic lesions compared with Apoe(-/-) (P<0.01). AAAs were detected only in eET-1/Apoe(-/-) (8/21; P<0.05). Reactive oxygen species production was increased ≥ 2-fold in perivascular fat, media, or atherosclerotic lesions in the ascending aorta and AAAs of eET-1/Apoe(-/-) compared with Apoe(-/-) (P<0.05). Monocyte/macrophage infiltration was enhanced ≥ 2.5-fold in perivascular fat of ascending aorta and AAAs in eET-1/Apoe(-/-) compared with Apoe(-/-) (P<0.05). CD4(+) T cells were detected almost exclusively in perivascular fat (3/6) and atherosclerotic lesions (5/6) in ascending aorta of eET-1/Apoe(-/-) (P<0.05). The percentage of spleen proinflammatory Ly-6C(hi) monocytes was enhanced 26% by ET-1 overexpression in Apoe(-/-) (P<0.05), and matrix metalloproteinase-2 was increased 2-fold in plaques of eET-1/Apoe(-/-) (P<0.05) compared with Apoe(-/-). ET-1 plays a role in progression of atherosclerosis and AAA formation by decreasing high-density lipoprotein, and increasing oxidative stress, inflammatory cell infiltration, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 in perivascular fat, vascular wall, and atherosclerotic lesions.

  19. Plasma Lipoprotein-associated Phospholipase A2 in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome and Carotid Atherosclerosis

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    Mao Yong-jun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2 is a recently identified and potentially useful plasma biomarker for cardiovascular and atherosclerotic diseases. However, the correlation between the Lp-PLA2 activity and carotid atherosclerosis remains poorly investigated in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS. The present study aimed to evaluate the potential role of Lp-PLA2 as a comprehensive marker of metabolic syndrome in individuals with and without carotid atherosclerosis. Methods We documented 118 consecutive patients with MetS and 70 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects served as controls. The patients were further divided into two groups: 39 with carotid plaques and 79 without carotid plaques to elucidate the influence of Lp-PLA2 on carotid atherosclerosis. The plasma Lp-PLA2 activity was measured by using ELISA method and carotid intimal-media thickness (IMT was performed by ultrasound in all participants. Results Lp-PLA2 activity was significantly increased in MetS subgroups when compared with controls, and was higher in patients with carotid plaques than those without plaques (P 2 was obtained between patients with three and four disorders of metabolic syndrome (P P = 0.029, LDL-cholesterol (β = 0.401, P = 0.000 and waist-hip ratio (β = 0.410, P = 0.000 emerged as significant and independent determinants of Lp-PLA2 activity. Multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed that LDL-cholesterol (β = 0.309, P = 0.000, systolic blood pressure (β = 0.322, P = 0.002 and age (β = 0.235, P = 0.007 significantly correlated with max IMT, and Lp-PLA2 was not an independent predictor for carotid IMT. Conclusions Lp-PLA2 may be a modulating factor for carotid IMT via age and LDL-cholesterol, not independent predictor in the pathophysiological process of carotid atherosclerosis in patients with MetS.

  20. Characterization of atherosclerosis by histochemical and immunohistochemical methods in African grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus) and Amazon parrots (Amazona spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Cornelia; Schmidt, Volker; Cramer, Kerstin; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Dorrestein, Gerry M

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize atherosclerotic changes in African grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus) and Amazon parrots (Amazona spp.) by histochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Samples of the aorta ascendens and trunci brachiocephalici from 62 African grey parrots and 35 Amazon parrots were stained by hematoxylin and eosin and Elastica van Gieson for grading of atherosclerosis in these birds. Four different stages were differentiated. The incidence of atherosclerosis in the examined parrots was 91.9% in African grey parrots and 91.4% in Amazon parrots. To evaluate the pathogenesis in birds, immunohistochemical methods were performed to demonstrate lymphocytes, macrophages, smooth muscle cells, and chondroitin sulfate. According to the missing lymphocytes and macrophages and the absence of invasion and proliferation of smooth muscle cells in each atherosclerotic stage, "response-to-injury hypothesis" seems inapplicable in parrots. Additionally, we found alterations of vitally important organs (heart, lungs) significantly correlated with atherosclerosis of the aorta ascendens.