WorldWideScience

Sample records for atherogenesis

  1. Biochemical mechanisms underlying atherogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.P.V.L.N. Srinivasa Rao

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis remains one of the major causes of death and premature disability in developed countries. Though atherosclerosis was formerly considered a bland lipid storage disease, substantial advances in basic and experimental sciences have illuminated the role of endothelium, inflammation and immune mechanisms in its pathogenesis. Current concept of atherosclerosis is that of a dynamic and progressive disease arising from in- jury to endothelium, also known as endothelial dysfunction and an inflammatory response to that injury. The lesions of atherosclerosis occur principally in large and medium sized arteries. Atherosclerosis affects various regions of the circulation preferentially and can lead to ischemia of heart, brain or extremities resulting in in- farction.This produces distinct clinical manifestations depending on the vessel involved. Several predisposing factors to cardiovascular diseases such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity, infections act as triggers to the devel- opment of atherosclerosis by causing endothelial dysfunction and/or promoting inflammatory response. The evolution of pathogenetic mechanisms has passed through various directions such as oxidative stress, inflam- mation and immune responses. It is now known that all these are not acting independently but are interrelated and getting unified in the current concept of atherogenesis. The following discussion aims at providing an in- sight into these developments which can help in a better comprehension of the disease and management of its clinical complications

  2. Mechano-pathobiology of atherogenesis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanepps, J Scott; Vorp, David A

    2007-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of mortality in the United States. Atherosclerosis, the primary etiology of cardiovascular disease is hypothesized to be a time-dependent response to arterial injury. Although risk factors for atherosclerosis are systemic in nature, certain arteries (e.g., coronary arteries) are more susceptible to plaque formation than others. The heterogeneous distribution of atherosclerosis in the vasculature is thought to be related to biomechanical factors. A review of the relevant pathological features of atherogenesis and how physiologically-consistent mechanical stimuli can impact those processes supports this notion. However, specific investigations geared toward finding the mechanistic link between mechanical stimuli and early atherogenic processes are required to differentiate those stimuli that facilitate and those that inhibit atherogenesis. Such knowledge is required for intelligent direction in the search for potential targets for clinical intervention. PMID:17612564

  3. Pathophysiological mechanisms of angiogenesis in atherogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučević Danijela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Atherosclerosis is a progressive, multifactorial, diffuse, multisystemic, chronic, inflammatory disease, which is manifested by disorders of vascular, immune and metabolic system. Pathogenesis of this disease is not fully understood. Accordingly, angiogenesis represents a special field of research due to its role in atherogenesis. Steps of Angiogenesis. Angiogenesis is a complex biological process, which requires the precise coordination of its four steps (vasodilatation and permeability, vessel destabilization and matrix degradation, endothelial cell proliferation and migration, and lumen formation and vessel stabilization. Mediators of Angiogenic Process. The process of forming new blood vessels is regulated by a delicate balance between proangiogenic and antiangiogenic molecules. Numerous soluble growth factors and inhibitors, cytokines, proteases, extracellular matrix proteins and adhesion molecules, as well as hypoxia, inflammatory process, shear stress, hypertension and interaction between cells and extracellular matrix strictly control the angiogenic process. Neovascularization is halted due to the downregulation of angiogenic factors or the increase of inhibitors of this process. Tumor Vascularization. In the asymptomatic phase of cancerogenesis, cancer rarely exceeds the diameter of 1-2 millimeters. However, when the metabolic demand increases, it leads to tumor vascularization. In this way, tumor switches to an angiogenic phenotype. The molecular basis of angiogenic switch refers to increased production of angiogenic factors and/or loss of angiogenic inhibitors. Conclusion. The contribution of angiogenic process has become increasingly meaningful in understanding the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175015

  4. Targeted deletions of cyclooxygenase-2 and atherogenesis in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hui, Yiqun; Ricciotti, Emanuela; Crichton, Irene;

    2010-01-01

    -2 in macrophages and T cells (TCs) to atherogenesis. METHODS AND RESULTS: Deletion of macrophage-COX-2 (Mac-COX-2KOs) was attained with LysMCre mice and completely suppressed lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophage prostaglandin (PG) formation and lipopolysaccharide-evoked systemic PG biosynthesis...... by approximately 30%. Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated COX-2 expression was suppressed in polymorphonuclear leukocytes isolated from MacKOs, but PG formation was not even detected in polymorphonuclear leukocyte supernatants from control mice. Atherogenesis was attenuated when MacKOs were crossed into hyperlipidemic...

  5. Age-associated vascular inflammation promotes monocytosis during atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wei; Wong, Christine; Song, Yang; Shen, Hua; Mori, Daniel; Rotllan, Noemi; Price, Nathan; Dobrian, Anca D; Meng, Hailong; Kleinstein, Steven H; Fernandez-Hernando, Carlos; Goldstein, Daniel R

    2016-08-01

    Aging leads to a proinflammatory state within the vasculature without disease, yet whether this inflammatory state occurs during atherogenesis remains unclear. Here, we examined how aging impacts atherosclerosis using Ldlr(-/-) mice, an established murine model of atherosclerosis. We found that aged atherosclerotic Ldlr(-/-) mice exhibited enhanced atherogenesis within the aorta. Aging also led to increased LDL levels, elevated blood pressure on a low-fat diet, and insulin resistance after a high-fat diet (HFD). On a HFD, aging increased a monocytosis in the peripheral blood and enhanced macrophage accumulation within the aorta. When we conducted bone marrow transplant experiments, we found that stromal factors contributed to age-enhanced atherosclerosis. To delineate these stromal factors, we determined that the vasculature exhibited an age-enhanced inflammatory response consisting of elevated production of CCL-2, osteopontin, and IL-6 during atherogenesis. In addition, in vitro cultures showed that aging enhanced the production of osteopontin by vascular smooth muscle cells. Functionally, aged atherosclerotic aortas displayed higher monocyte chemotaxis than young aortas. Hence, our study has revealed that aging induces metabolic dysfunction and enhances vascular inflammation to promote a peripheral monocytosis and macrophage accumulation within the atherosclerotic aorta. PMID:27135421

  6. Stability Analysis of a Reaction-Diffusion System Modeling Atherogenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Ibragimov, Akif

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a linear, asymptotic stability analysis for a reaction-diffusionconvection system modeling atherogenesis, the initiation of atherosclerosis, as an inflammatory instability. Motivated by the disease paradigm articulated by Ross, atherogenesis is viewed as an inflammatory spiral with a positive feedback loop involving key cellular and chemical species interacting and reacting within the intimal layer of muscular arteries. The inflammatory spiral is initiated as an instability from a healthy state which is defined to be an equilibrium state devoid of certain key inflammatory markers. Disease initiation is studied through a linear, asymptotic stability analysis of a healthy equilibrium state. Various theorems are proved, giving conditions on system parameters guaranteeing stability of the health state, and a general framework is developed for constructing perturbations from a healthy state that exhibit blow-up, which are interpreted as corresponding to disease initiation. The analysis reveals key features that arterial geometry, antioxidant levels, and the source of inflammatory components (through coupled third-kind boundary conditions or through body sources) play in disease initiation. © 2010 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  7. The effects of second-hand smoke on biological processes important in atherogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider Matthias; Yao Min; Zafarani Mohammed; Ma Chongze; Bhattacharya Monideepa; Wong Lina S; Yuan Hongwei; Pitas Robert E; Martins-Green Manuela

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death in western societies and cigarette smoke is among the factors that strongly contribute to the development of this disease. The early events in atherogenesis are stimulated on the one hand by cytokines that chemoattract leukocytes and on the other hand by decrease in circulating molecules that protect endothelial cells (ECs) from injury. Here we focus our studies on the effects of "second-hand" smoke on atherogenesis. Methods To...

  8. Estradiol protective role in atherogenesis through LDL structure modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papi, Massimiliano; Brunelli, Roberto; Ciasca, Gabriele; Maiorana, Alessandro; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Palmieri, Valentina; Parasassi, Tiziana; De Spirito, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Relevant physiological functions are exerted by circulating low density lipoprotein (LDL) as well as eventual pathological processes triggering atherogenesis. Modulation of these functions can well be founded on modifications of LDL structure. Given its large dimension, multicomponent organization and strong interactions between the protein apoB-100 and lipids, determining LDL 3D structure remains a challenge. We propose a novel quantitative physical approach to this complex biological problem. We introduce a three-component model, fitted to small angle x-ray scattering data on LDL maintained in physiological conditions, able to achieve a consistent 3D structure. Unexpected features include three distinct protein domains protruding out of a sphere, quite rough in its surface, where several core lipid areas are exposed. All LDL components are affected by 17-β-estradiol (E2) binding to apoB-100. Mostly one of the three protruding protein domains, dramatically reducing its presence on the surface and with a consequent increase of core lipids’ exposure. This result suggests a structural basis for some E2 protecting roles and LDL physiological modifications.

  9. Effects of Atorvastatin on Oxidative Stress Biomarkers and Mitochondrial Morphofunctionality in Hyperfibrinogenemia-Induced Atherogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de la Paz Scribano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Relationship between hyperfibrinogenemia (HF, oxidative stress, and atherogenesis was established. Effect of atorvastatin (Ator was assessed. Wistar male (6 months rats were studied: Ctr, control, without HF induction; Ctr-Ator, without HF treated with atorvastatin; AI, atherogenesis induced, and AI-Ator, atherogenesis induced and treated with atorvastatin. Atherogenesis was induced by daily adrenaline injection (0.1 mL/day/rat for 90 days; treatment started 15 days after induction. Fibrinogen (mg/dL and nitric oxide (NO were measured in plasma (mM and superoxide dismutase (SOD (U/mL in red cell lysate by spectrophotometry. Slices of aorta were analyzed by electron microscopy (EM. ANOVA and chi-square test were used; P<0.05 was established. There were no significant differences between Ctr and Ctr-Atorv in fibrinogen, NO, and SOD values. Comparing Ctr with AI an increase of fibrinogen is observed (P<0.001, but it decreased after administration of atorvastatin in AI-Ator (P<0.001. NO diminished in AI relative to Ctr and increased in AI-Ator (P<0.001. SOD showed an increase in AI and AI-Ator compared to Ctr (P<0.001. EM revealed expansion of intermembrane space and disorganization of crests in AI. In AI-Ator mitochondrial areas and diameters were similar to control. Atorvastatin normalizes HF, stabilizes NO, increases SOD, and produces a partial regression of mitochondrial lesions.

  10. Functional role of CD11c+ monocytes in atherogenesis associated with hypercholesterolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monocyte activation and migration into the arterial wall are key events in atherogenesis associated with hypercholesterolemia. CD11c/CD18, a beta2 integrin expressed on human monocytes and a subset of mouse monocytes, has been shown to play a distinct role in human monocyte adhesion on endothelial c...

  11. Effects of Atorvastatin on Oxidative Stress Biomarkers and Mitochondrial Morphofunctionality in Hyperfibrinogenemia-Induced Atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribano, María de la Paz; Baez, María Del Carmen; Florencia, Becerra; Tarán, Mariana Denise; Franco, Signorini; Balceda, Ariel G; Moya, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    Relationship between hyperfibrinogenemia (HF), oxidative stress, and atherogenesis was established. Effect of atorvastatin (Ator) was assessed. Wistar male (6 months) rats were studied: Ctr, control, without HF induction; Ctr-Ator, without HF treated with atorvastatin; AI, atherogenesis induced, and AI-Ator, atherogenesis induced and treated with atorvastatin. Atherogenesis was induced by daily adrenaline injection (0.1 mL/day/rat) for 90 days; treatment started 15 days after induction. Fibrinogen (mg/dL) and nitric oxide (NO) were measured in plasma (mM) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) (U/mL) in red cell lysate by spectrophotometry. Slices of aorta were analyzed by electron microscopy (EM). ANOVA and chi-square test were used; P < 0.05 was established. There were no significant differences between Ctr and Ctr-Atorv in fibrinogen, NO, and SOD values. Comparing Ctr with AI an increase of fibrinogen is observed (P < 0.001), but it decreased after administration of atorvastatin in AI-Ator (P < 0.001). NO diminished in AI relative to Ctr and increased in AI-Ator (P < 0.001). SOD showed an increase in AI and AI-Ator compared to Ctr (P < 0.001). EM revealed expansion of intermembrane space and disorganization of crests in AI. In AI-Ator mitochondrial areas and diameters were similar to control. Atorvastatin normalizes HF, stabilizes NO, increases SOD, and produces a partial regression of mitochondrial lesions.

  12. Stability Analysis of a Model of Atherogenesis: An Energy Estimate Approach II

    KAUST Repository

    Ibragimov, A. I.

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers modelling atherogenesis, the initiation of atherosclerosis, as an inflammatory instability. Motivated by the disease paradigm articulated by Russell Ross, atherogenesis is viewed as an inflammatory spiral with positive feedback loop involving key cellular and chemical species interacting and reacting within the intimal layer of muscular arteries. The inflammation is modelled through a system of non-linear reaction-diffusion-convection partial differential equations. The inflammatory spiral is initiated as an instability from a healthy state which is defined to be an equilibrium state devoid of certain key inflammatory markers. Disease initiation is studied through a linear, asymptotic stability analysis of a healthy equilibrium state. Various theorems are proved giving conditions on system parameters guaranteeing stability of the health state and conditions on system parameters leading to instability. Among the questions addressed in the analysis is the possible mitigating effect of anti-oxidants upon transition to the inflammatory spiral. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.

  13. Dissociation of atherogenesis from aortic accumulation of lipid hydro(pero)xides in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Witting, Paul; Pettersson, Knut; Östlund-Lindqvist, Ann-Margret; Westerlund, Christer; Wågberg, Maria; Stocker, Roland

    1999-01-01

    Antioxidants can inhibit atherosclerosis, but it is unclear how inhibition of intimal lipid oxidation relates to atherogenesis. Here we tested the effect of probucol and its metabolite bisphenol on aortic lipid (per)oxidation and atherogenesis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits. LDL and aortas from rabbits fed probucol contained bisphenol at concentrations comparable to those in bisphenol-treated animals. Bisphenol treatment increased plasma cholesterol slightly, and plasma a...

  14. The role of complement activation in atherogenesis: the first 40 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaicu, Sonia I; Tatomir, Alexandru; Rus, Violeta; Mekala, Armugam P; Mircea, Petru A; Niculescu, Florin; Rus, Horea

    2016-02-01

    The pathogenesis of atherosclerotic inflammation is a multi-step process defined by the interweaving of excess modified lipid particles, monocyte-macrophages populations, and innate immune and adaptive immunity effectors. A part of innate immunity, the complement system, is an important player in the induction and progression of atherosclerosis. The accumulation of either oxidized or enzymatically modified LDL-bound to C-reactive protein or not-prompts complement activation leading to the assembly of the terminal complement C5b-9 complex in the atherosclerotic lesion. The sublytic C5b-9 assembly leads to the activation and proliferation of smooth muscle and endothelial cells, accompanied by the release of various chemotactic, pro-adhesion, and procoagulant cytokines from these cells. Response gene to complement (RGC)-32, an essential effector of the terminal complement complex C5b-9, also affects atherogenesis, propelling vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration, stimulating endothelial proliferation, and promoting vascular lesion formation. A substantial amount of experimental work has suggested a role for the complement system activation during atherosclerotic plaque formation, with the proximal classical complement pathway seemingly having a protective effect and terminal complement contributing to accelerated atherogenesis. All these data suggest that complement plays an important role in atherogenesis. PMID:26091721

  15. Vitamin A-Deficient Diet Accelerated Atherogenesis in Apolipoprotein E−/− Mice and Dietary β-Carotene Prevents This Consequence

    OpenAIRE

    Noa Zolberg Relevy; Dror Harats; Ayelet Harari; Ami Ben-Amotz; Rafael Bitzur; Ralph Rühl; Aviv Shaish

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin A is involved in regulation of glucose concentrations, lipid metabolism, and inflammation, which are major risk factors for atherogenesis. However, the effect of vitamin A deficiency on atherogenesis has not been investigated. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to examine whether vitamin A deficiency accelerates atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice (apoE−/−). ApoE−/− mice were allocated into the following groups: control, fed vitamin A-containing chow diet; ...

  16. Relationship between expression levels and atherogenesis in scavenger receptor Class B, Type I Transgenics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Yukihiko; Gong, Elaine; Royer, Lori; Cooper, Philip N.; Francone, Omar L; Rubin, Edward M.

    2000-03-15

    Both in vitro and in vivo studies of SR-BI have implicated it as a likely participant in the metabolism of HDL cholesterol. To investigate SR-BI's effect on atherogenesis we examined two lines of SR-BI transgenic mice with high (10-fold increases) and low (2-fold increases) in SR-BI expression in an inbred mouse background hemizygous for a human apo B transgene. Unlike non-HDL cholesterol levels which minimally differed in the various groups of animals, HDL cholesterol levels were inversely related to SR-BI expression. Mice with the low expression SR-BI transgene had a 50% reduction in HDL cholesterol while the high expression SR-BI transgene was associated with two-fold decreases in HDL as well as dramatic alterations in HDL composition and size including the near absence of a-migrating particles as determined by 2-dimensional electrophoresis. The low expression SR-BI/apo B transgenics had more than a two-fold decrease in the development of diet induced fatty streak lesions compared t o the apo B transgenics (4448{+-}1908 {mu}m2/aorta to 10133 {+-} 4035 {mu}m2/aorta; p<0.001), while the high expression SR-BI/apo B transgenics had an atherogenic response similar to that of the apo B transgenics (14692{+-}7238 {mu}m2/aorta) but three-fold greater than the low SR-BI/apo B mice (p<0.001). The prominent anti-atherogenic effect of moderate SR-BI expression provides in vivo support for the hypothesis that HDL functions to inhibit atherogenesis through its interactions with SR-BI in facilitating reverse cholesterol transport. The failure of the high SR-BI/apo B transgenics to have similar or even greater reductions in atherogenesis suggests that the changes resulting from extremely high SR-BI expression including dramatic changes in lipoproteins may have both pro- and anti-atherogenic consequences illustrating the complexity of the relationship between SR-BI and atherogenesis.

  17. Studies on the metabolism and possible mechanisms of atherogenesis of lipoprotein (a)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms of atherogenesis are under intensive clinical and experimental investigation. It is commonly accepted that lipoproteins play a major role in atherogenesis. The results of several clinical studies suggest that lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] represents an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis. In order to obtain information on the physiological and pathological role of LP(a), studies were undertaken to investigate the metabolism, removal sites, and possible atherogenic mechanism of Lp(a). It was found that Lp(a) is not metabolic product of other apoprotein B containing lipoproteins, but appears to be synthesized as a separate lipoprotein. The turnover parameters of Lp(a) resemble those of LDL. Binding studies of Lp(a) with cultured human fibroblasts demonstrated that Lp(a) is bound by the B-E receptor. After binding, Lp(a) is internalized and inhibits cellular cholesterol synthesis. In the presence of dextran sulfate or antibodies to the specific Lp(a) apoprotein or apoprotein B, Lp(a) is avidly taken up by macrophages. A similar mechanism might be responsible for the atherogenic effect of Lp(a). (Author)

  18. The effects of second-hand smoke on biological processes important in atherogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death in western societies and cigarette smoke is among the factors that strongly contribute to the development of this disease. The early events in atherogenesis are stimulated on the one hand by cytokines that chemoattract leukocytes and on the other hand by decrease in circulating molecules that protect endothelial cells (ECs from injury. Here we focus our studies on the effects of "second-hand" smoke on atherogenesis. Methods To perform these studies, a smoking system that closely simulates exposure of humans to second-hand smoke was developed and a mouse model system transgenic for human apoB100 was used. These mice have moderate lipid levels that closely mimic human conditions that lead to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Results "Second-hand" cigarette smoke decreases plasma high density lipoprotein levels in the blood and also decreases the ratios between high density lipoprotein and low density lipoprotein, high density lipoprotein and triglyceride, and high density lipoprotein and total cholesterol. This change in lipid profiles causes not only more lipid accumulation in the aorta but also lipid deposition in many of the smaller vessels of the heart and in hepatocytes. In addition, mice exposed to smoke have increased levels of Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein–1 in circulation and in the heart/aorta tissue, have increased macrophages in the arterial walls, and have decreased levels of adiponectin, an EC-protective protein. Also, cytokine arrays revealed that mice exposed to smoke do not undergo the switch from the pro-inflammatory cytokine profile (that develops when the mice are initially exposed to second-hand smoke to the adaptive response. Furthermore, triglyceride levels increase significantly in the liver of smoke-exposed mice. Conclusion Long-term exposure to "second-hand" smoke creates a state of permanent inflammation and an imbalance in the lipid profile that

  19. Increased proliferation of explanted vascular smooth muscle cells: a marker presaging atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absher, P M; Schneider, D J; Baldor, L C; Russell, J C; Sobel, B E

    1997-06-01

    The JCR:LA-cp homozygous cp/cp corpulent rat is genetically predisposed to develop atherosclerosis evident after 9 and 18 months of age in males and females and to manifest metabolic derangements resembling those seen in type II diabetes in humans (hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia). The present study was undertaken to determine whether vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) explanted from vessels destined to become atherosclerotic later in life exhibit intrinsic properties ex vivo that presage atherogenesis to provide a means for evaluating promptly intervention designed to modify it. SMCs were cultured from aortic explants of JCR:LA-cp corpulent (cp/cp) and lean control (+/+) rats of 4, 5, 6, and 9 months of age. Compared with SMCs from controls, SMCs from cp/cp rats exhibited increased proliferation, higher saturation density, increased augmentation of proliferation in response to selected mitogens and greater adherence to extracellular matrix proteins. The increased proliferative activity ex vivo anteceded by several months the development of atherosclerotic lesions in vivo. Thus, it is a promising marker in assessments of the efficacy of interventions designed to retard or prevent atherosclerosis.

  20. Impaired endothelial nitric oxide bioavailability: a common link between aging, hypertension, and atherogenesis?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Thomas

    2012-01-31

    Endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO) is responsible for maintaining continuous vasodilator tone and for regulating local perfusion and systemic blood pressure. It also has significant antiproliferative effects on vascular smooth muscle and platelet anti-aggregatory effects. Impaired endothelial-dependent (NO mediated) vasorelaxation is observed in most animal and human models of healthy aging. It also occurs in age-associated conditions such as atherosclerosis and hypertension. Such "endotheliopathy" increases vascular risk in older adults. Studies have indicated that pharmacotherapeutic intervention with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme-A reductase inhibitors may improve NO-mediated vasomotor function. This review, evaluates the association between impaired endothelial NO bioavailability, accelerated vascular aging, and the age-associated conditions hypertension and atherogenesis. This is important, because pharmacotherapy aimed at improving endothelial NO bioavailability could modify age-related vascular disease and transform age into a potentially modifiable vascular risk factor, at least in a subpopulation of older adults.

  1. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins induced inflammatory process during atherogenesis with aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbi, Anis; Khalil, Abdelouahed; Douziech, Nadine; Guérard, Karl-Philippe; Fülöp, Tamàs

    2005-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic disease developing through decades with two life-threatening complications: myocardial infarction and stroke. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) produced by oxidative modifications of LDL in the subendothelial space have been demonstrated to be critically involved in atherogenesis through their intensive pro-inflammatory activity. Recently, it was shown that oxLDL have an apoptosis-inducing effect in T cells depending on time and degree of oxidation. The goal of the current study is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the apoptotic-inducing effects of oxLDL on T lymphocytes. T cells of young and elderly subjects were incubated for various periods of time with LDL oxidized to various degrees. The proliferation, the apoptosis, the MAPK ERK1/2 activation and the expression of the Bcl-2 protein family members were measured upon different LDL treatments. Thus, more the LDL are oxidized more they induce apoptosis and this effect is highly accentuated with aging. The oxLDL decrease the activation of the surviving molecule ERK1/2 and modulate the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 towards a pro-apoptotic profile, which is also accentuated with aging. These results partly explain why atherosclerosis is increasing with aging concomitantly to its complications.

  2. Citreoviridin Enhances Atherogenesis in Hypercholesterolemic ApoE-Deficient Mice via Upregulating Inflammation and Endothelial Dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Feng Hou

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory response are early events during initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. In vitro studies have described that CIT markedly upregulates expressions of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 of endothelial cells, which result from NF-κB activation induced by CIT. In order to determine whether it plays a role in atherogenesis in vivo, we conducted the study to investigate the effects of CIT on atherosclerotic plaque development and inflammatory response in apolipoprotein E deficient (apoE-/- mice. Five-week-old apoE-/- mice were fed high-fat diets and treated with CIT for 15 weeks, followed by assay of atherosclerotic lesions. Nitric oxide (NO, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and endothelin-1 (ET-1 were detected in serum. Levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1, VEGF, and ET-1 in plaque areas of artery walls were examined. NF-κB p65 expression and NF-κB activation in aorta also were assessed. CIT treatment significantly augmented atherosclerotic plaques and increased expressions of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, VEGF and ET-1 in aorta. Mechanistic studies showed that activation of NF-κB was significantly elevated by CIT treatment, indicating the effect of CIT on atherosclerosis may be regulated by activation of NF-κB.

  3. Overweight: atherogenesis risk marker in children between 8 and 9 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Sabina Roméu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many significant health problems hold the attention of pediatricians, and even when there is an increased interest on premature atherosclerosis risk factors, it is still a field to be studied. Objectives: To determine differences in the emergence of atherogenesis risk factors in children between 8 and 9 years with normal weight and overweight. Methods: Analytic research, with case control design, developed in three primary schools belonging to the Clinic “Dr. Cecilio Ruiz de Zarate” in Cienfuegos. A group with overweight or obese children was formed and another control group selected by randomized simple sampling with normal weight children. Measurements of weight, height, waist circumference and blood pressure were performed. Parents were surveyed for data about children and family history. In overweight children, glucose and triglycerides were measured. To validate results, Chi-Squared test was used. To compare measurements, Mathn Whitney test was employed. Results: Overweight and obesity were associated with: male sex, with people, sedentary patients, and prenatal antecedents of overweight. 78% of overweight children had values of blood pressure higher than 90 percentile for their sex and height, contrasting with the 26% in normal weight children. Six children were diagnosed with metabolic syndrome.

  4. Arrest functions of the MIF ligand/receptor axes in atherogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine eTillmann

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF has been defined as an important chemokine-like function (CLF chemokine with an essential role in monocyte recruitment and arrest. Adhesion of monocytes to the vessel wall and their transendothelial migration are critical in atherogenesis and many other inflammatory diseases. Chemokines carefully control all steps of the monocyte recruitment process. Those chemokines specialized in controlling arrest are typically immobilized on the endothelial surface, mediating the arrest of rolling monocytes by chemokine receptor-triggered pathways. The chemokine receptor CXCR2 functions as an important arrest receptor on monocytes. An arrest function has been revealed for the bona fide CXCR2 ligands CXCL1 and CXCL8, but genetic studies also suggested that additional arrest chemokines are likely to be involved in atherogenic leukocyte recruitment. While CXCR2 is known to interact with numerous CXC chemokine ligands, the CLF-chemokine MIF, which structurally does not belong to the CXC chemokine sub-family, was surprisingly identified as a non-cognate ligand of CXCR2, responsible for critical arrest functions during the atherogenic process. MIF was originally identified as macrophage migration inhibitory factor, but is now known as a potent inflammatory cytokine with chemokine-like functions including chemotaxis and leukocyte arrest. This review will cover the mechanisms underlying these functions, including MIF’s effects on LFA1 integrin activity and signal transduction, and will discuss the structural similarities between MIF and the bona fide CXCR2 ligand CXCL8 while emphasizing the structural differences. As MIF also interacts with CXCR4, a chemokine receptor implicated in CXCL12-elicited lymphocyte arrest, the arrest potential of the MIF/CXCR4 axis will also be scrutinized as well as the recently identified role of pericyte MIF in attracting leukocytes exiting through venules as part of the pericyte 'motility

  5. A plant-based diet, atherogenesis, and coronary artery disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuso, Phillip; Stoll, Scott R; Li, William W

    2015-01-01

    A plant-based diet is increasingly becoming recognized as a healthier alternative to a diet laden with meat. Atherosclerosis associated with high dietary intake of meat, fat, and carbohydrates remains the leading cause of mortality in the US. This condition results from progressive damage to the endothelial cells lining the vascular system, including the heart, leading to endothelial dysfunction. In addition to genetic factors associated with endothelial dysfunction, many dietary and other lifestyle factors, such as tobacco use, high meat and fat intake, and oxidative stress, are implicated in atherogenesis. Polyphenols derived from dietary plant intake have protective effects on vascular endothelial cells, possibly as antioxidants that prevent the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein. Recently, metabolites of L-carnitine, such as trimethylamine-N-oxide, that result from ingestion of red meat have been identified as a potential predictive marker of coronary artery disease (CAD). Metabolism of L-carnitine by the intestinal microbiome is associated with atherosclerosis in omnivores but not in vegetarians, supporting CAD benefits of a plant-based diet. Trimethylamine-N-oxide may cause atherosclerosis via macrophage activation. We suggest that a shift toward a plant-based diet may confer protective effects against atherosclerotic CAD by increasing endothelial protective factors in the circulation while reducing factors that are injurious to endothelial cells. The relative ratio of protective factors to injurious endothelial exposure may be a novel approach to assessing an objective dietary benefit from a plant-based diet. This review provides a mechanistic perspective of the evidence for protection by a plant-based diet against atherosclerotic CAD. PMID:25431999

  6. Vitamin A-Deficient Diet Accelerated Atherogenesis in Apolipoprotein E−/− Mice and Dietary β-Carotene Prevents This Consequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Zolberg Relevy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin A is involved in regulation of glucose concentrations, lipid metabolism, and inflammation, which are major risk factors for atherogenesis. However, the effect of vitamin A deficiency on atherogenesis has not been investigated. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to examine whether vitamin A deficiency accelerates atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice (apoE−/−. ApoE−/− mice were allocated into the following groups: control, fed vitamin A-containing chow diet; BC, fed chow diet fortified with Dunaliella powder containing βc isomers; VAD, fed vitamin A-deficient diet; and VAD-BC group, fed vitamin A-deficient diet fortified with a Dunaliella powder. Following 15 weeks of treatment, liver retinol concentration had decreased significantly in the VAD group to about 30% that of control group. Vitamin A-deficient diet significantly increased both plasma cholesterol concentrations and the atherosclerotic lesion area at the aortic sinus (+61% compared to the control group. Dietary βc fortification inhibited the elevation in plasma cholesterol and retarded atherogenesis in mice fed the vitamin A-deficient diet. The results imply that dietary vitamin A deficiency should be examined as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and that dietary βc, as a sole source of retinoids, can compensate for vitamin A deficiency.

  7. Vitamin A-Deficient Diet Accelerated Atherogenesis in Apolipoprotein E−/− Mice and Dietary β-Carotene Prevents This Consequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relevy, Noa Zolberg; Harats, Dror; Harari, Ayelet; Ben-Amotz, Ami; Bitzur, Rafael; Rühl, Ralph; Shaish, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin A is involved in regulation of glucose concentrations, lipid metabolism, and inflammation, which are major risk factors for atherogenesis. However, the effect of vitamin A deficiency on atherogenesis has not been investigated. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to examine whether vitamin A deficiency accelerates atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice (apoE−/−). ApoE−/− mice were allocated into the following groups: control, fed vitamin A-containing chow diet; BC, fed chow diet fortified with Dunaliella powder containing βc isomers; VAD, fed vitamin A-deficient diet; and VAD-BC group, fed vitamin A-deficient diet fortified with a Dunaliella powder. Following 15 weeks of treatment, liver retinol concentration had decreased significantly in the VAD group to about 30% that of control group. Vitamin A-deficient diet significantly increased both plasma cholesterol concentrations and the atherosclerotic lesion area at the aortic sinus (+61%) compared to the control group. Dietary βc fortification inhibited the elevation in plasma cholesterol and retarded atherogenesis in mice fed the vitamin A-deficient diet. The results imply that dietary vitamin A deficiency should be examined as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and that dietary βc, as a sole source of retinoids, can compensate for vitamin A deficiency. PMID:25802864

  8. Myeloid Cell Prostaglandin E2 Receptor EP4 Modulates Cytokine Production but Not Atherogenesis in a Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara N Vallerie

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is associated with cardiovascular complications induced by atherosclerosis. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 is often raised in states of inflammation, including diabetes, and regulates inflammatory processes. In myeloid cells, a key cell type in atherosclerosis, PGE2 acts predominately through its Prostaglandin E Receptor 4 (EP4; Ptger4 to modulate inflammation. The effect of PGE2-mediated EP4 signaling specifically in myeloid cells on atherosclerosis in the presence and absence of diabetes is unknown. Because diabetes promotes atherosclerosis through increased arterial myeloid cell accumulation, we generated a myeloid cell-targeted EP4-deficient mouse model (EP4M-/- of T1DM-accelerated atherogenesis to investigate the relationship between myeloid cell EP4, inflammatory phenotypes of myeloid cells, and atherogenesis. Diabetic mice exhibited elevated plasma PGE metabolite levels and elevated Ptger4 mRNA in macrophages, as compared with non-diabetic littermates. PGE2 increased Il6, Il1b, Il23 and Ccr7 mRNA while reducing Tnfa mRNA through EP4 in isolated myeloid cells. Consistently, the stimulatory effect of diabetes on peritoneal macrophage Il6 was mediated by PGE2-EP4, while PGE2-EP4 suppressed the effect of diabetes on Tnfa in these cells. In addition, diabetes exerted effects independent of myeloid cell EP4, including a reduction in macrophage Ccr7 levels and increased early atherogenesis characterized by relative lesional macrophage accumulation. These studies suggest that this mouse model of T1DM is associated with increased myeloid cell PGE2-EP4 signaling, which is required for the stimulatory effect of diabetes on IL-6, markedly blunts the effect of diabetes on TNF-α and does not modulate diabetes-accelerated atherogenesis.

  9. Myeloid Cell Prostaglandin E2 Receptor EP4 Modulates Cytokine Production but Not Atherogenesis in a Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallerie, Sara N.; Kramer, Farah; Barnhart, Shelley; Kanter, Jenny E.; Breyer, Richard M.; Andreasson, Katrin I.; Bornfeldt, Karin E.

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is associated with cardiovascular complications induced by atherosclerosis. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is often raised in states of inflammation, including diabetes, and regulates inflammatory processes. In myeloid cells, a key cell type in atherosclerosis, PGE2 acts predominately through its Prostaglandin E Receptor 4 (EP4; Ptger4) to modulate inflammation. The effect of PGE2-mediated EP4 signaling specifically in myeloid cells on atherosclerosis in the presence and absence of diabetes is unknown. Because diabetes promotes atherosclerosis through increased arterial myeloid cell accumulation, we generated a myeloid cell-targeted EP4-deficient mouse model (EP4M-/-) of T1DM-accelerated atherogenesis to investigate the relationship between myeloid cell EP4, inflammatory phenotypes of myeloid cells, and atherogenesis. Diabetic mice exhibited elevated plasma PGE metabolite levels and elevated Ptger4 mRNA in macrophages, as compared with non-diabetic littermates. PGE2 increased Il6, Il1b, Il23 and Ccr7 mRNA while reducing Tnfa mRNA through EP4 in isolated myeloid cells. Consistently, the stimulatory effect of diabetes on peritoneal macrophage Il6 was mediated by PGE2-EP4, while PGE2-EP4 suppressed the effect of diabetes on Tnfa in these cells. In addition, diabetes exerted effects independent of myeloid cell EP4, including a reduction in macrophage Ccr7 levels and increased early atherogenesis characterized by relative lesional macrophage accumulation. These studies suggest that this mouse model of T1DM is associated with increased myeloid cell PGE2-EP4 signaling, which is required for the stimulatory effect of diabetes on IL-6, markedly blunts the effect of diabetes on TNF-α and does not modulate diabetes-accelerated atherogenesis. PMID:27351842

  10. Augmented atherogenesis in ApoE-null mice co-exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants found as complex mixtures in the environment throughout the world. Therefore, humans are ubiquitously and simultaneously exposed to TCDD and PCBs. TCDD and PCBs alone have been linked to atherosclerosis. However, the effects of interactions or synergism between TCDD and PCBs on atherogenesis are unknown. We investigated the possible enhanced atherogenesis by co-exposure to TCDD and PCBs and the potential mechanism(s) involved in this enhancement. Male ApoE−/− mice were exposed to TCDD (15 μg/kg) and Aroclor1254 (55 mg/kg, a representative mixture of PCBs) alone or in combination by intraperitoneal injection four times over six weeks of duration. Our results showed that mice exposed to TCDD alone, but not Aroclor1254 alone, developed atherosclerotic lesions. Moreover, we found that atherosclerotic disease was exacerbated to the greatest extent in mice co-exposed to TCDD and Aroclor1254. The enhanced lesions correlated with several pro-atherogenic changes, including a marked increase in the accumulation of the platelet-derived chemokine PF4, and the expression of the proinflammatory cytokine MCP-1 and the critical immunity gene-RIG-I. Our data demonstrated that co-exposure to TCDD and Aroclor1254 markedly enhanced atherogenesis in ApoE−/− mice. Significantly, our observations suggest that combined exposure to TCDD and PCBs may be a greater cardiovascular health risk than previously anticipated from individual studies. - Highlights: • Augmented atherogenesis was found in ApoE−/− mice co-exposed to Aroclor1254 and TCDD. • Enhanced expression of PF4, MCP-1 and RIG-I correlated with augmented lesions. • POPs combination may be a greater cardiovascular health risk than individual POPs

  11. Augmented atherogenesis in ApoE-null mice co-exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, Qiuli [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Wang, Jing, E-mail: avaecn@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Huang, Fengchen [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Lv, Xiaowen [Feed Safety Reference Laboratory of Ministry of Agriculture, Feed Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Zhongguancun South Street 12, Beijing 100081 (China); Ma, Min [Laboratory of Biotechnology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Du, Yuguo [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2014-04-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants found as complex mixtures in the environment throughout the world. Therefore, humans are ubiquitously and simultaneously exposed to TCDD and PCBs. TCDD and PCBs alone have been linked to atherosclerosis. However, the effects of interactions or synergism between TCDD and PCBs on atherogenesis are unknown. We investigated the possible enhanced atherogenesis by co-exposure to TCDD and PCBs and the potential mechanism(s) involved in this enhancement. Male ApoE{sup −/−} mice were exposed to TCDD (15 μg/kg) and Aroclor1254 (55 mg/kg, a representative mixture of PCBs) alone or in combination by intraperitoneal injection four times over six weeks of duration. Our results showed that mice exposed to TCDD alone, but not Aroclor1254 alone, developed atherosclerotic lesions. Moreover, we found that atherosclerotic disease was exacerbated to the greatest extent in mice co-exposed to TCDD and Aroclor1254. The enhanced lesions correlated with several pro-atherogenic changes, including a marked increase in the accumulation of the platelet-derived chemokine PF4, and the expression of the proinflammatory cytokine MCP-1 and the critical immunity gene-RIG-I. Our data demonstrated that co-exposure to TCDD and Aroclor1254 markedly enhanced atherogenesis in ApoE{sup −/−} mice. Significantly, our observations suggest that combined exposure to TCDD and PCBs may be a greater cardiovascular health risk than previously anticipated from individual studies. - Highlights: • Augmented atherogenesis was found in ApoE{sup −/−} mice co-exposed to Aroclor1254 and TCDD. • Enhanced expression of PF4, MCP-1 and RIG-I correlated with augmented lesions. • POPs combination may be a greater cardiovascular health risk than individual POPs.

  12. Combination of spices and herbal extract restores macrophage foam cell migration and abrogates the athero-inflammatory signalling cascade of atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimgulkar, Chetan; Ghosh, Sudip; Sankar, Anand B; Uday, Kumar P; Surekha, M V; Madhusudhanachary, P; Annapurna, B R; Raghu, P; Bharatraj, Dinesh Kumar

    2015-09-01

    The trapping of lipid-laden macrophages in the arterial intima is a critical but reversible step in atherogenesis. However, information about possible treatments for this condition is lacking. Here, we hypothesized that combining the polyphenol-rich fractions (PHC) of commonly consumed spices (Allium sativum L (Liliaceae), Zingiber officinale R (Zingiberaceae), Curcuma longa L (Zingiberaceae)) and herbs (Terminalia arjuna (R) W & A (Combretaceae) and Cyperus rotundus L (Cyperaceae)) prevents foam cell formation and atherogenesis. Using an in vitro foam cell formation assay, we found that PHC significantly inhibited lipid-laden macrophage foam cell formation compared to the depleted polyphenol fraction of PHC (F-PHC). We further observed that PHC attenuated the LDL and LPS induced CD36, p-FAK and PPAR-γ protein expression in macrophages and increased their migration. NK-κB-DNA interaction, TNF-α, ROS generation, and MMP9 and MMP2 protein expression were suppressed in PHC-treated macrophages. The anti-atherosclerotic activity of PHC was investigated in a high fat- and cholesterol-fed rabbit model. The inhibition of foam cell deposition within the aortic intima and atheroma formation confirmed the atheroprotective activity of PHC. Therefore, we conclude that the armoury of polyphenols in PHC attenuates the CD36 signalling cascade-mediated foam cell formation, enhances the migration of these cells and prevents atherogenesis.

  13. Combination of spices and herbal extract restores macrophage foam cell migration and abrogates the athero-inflammatory signalling cascade of atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimgulkar, Chetan; Ghosh, Sudip; Sankar, Anand B; Uday, Kumar P; Surekha, M V; Madhusudhanachary, P; Annapurna, B R; Raghu, P; Bharatraj, Dinesh Kumar

    2015-09-01

    The trapping of lipid-laden macrophages in the arterial intima is a critical but reversible step in atherogenesis. However, information about possible treatments for this condition is lacking. Here, we hypothesized that combining the polyphenol-rich fractions (PHC) of commonly consumed spices (Allium sativum L (Liliaceae), Zingiber officinale R (Zingiberaceae), Curcuma longa L (Zingiberaceae)) and herbs (Terminalia arjuna (R) W & A (Combretaceae) and Cyperus rotundus L (Cyperaceae)) prevents foam cell formation and atherogenesis. Using an in vitro foam cell formation assay, we found that PHC significantly inhibited lipid-laden macrophage foam cell formation compared to the depleted polyphenol fraction of PHC (F-PHC). We further observed that PHC attenuated the LDL and LPS induced CD36, p-FAK and PPAR-γ protein expression in macrophages and increased their migration. NK-κB-DNA interaction, TNF-α, ROS generation, and MMP9 and MMP2 protein expression were suppressed in PHC-treated macrophages. The anti-atherosclerotic activity of PHC was investigated in a high fat- and cholesterol-fed rabbit model. The inhibition of foam cell deposition within the aortic intima and atheroma formation confirmed the atheroprotective activity of PHC. Therefore, we conclude that the armoury of polyphenols in PHC attenuates the CD36 signalling cascade-mediated foam cell formation, enhances the migration of these cells and prevents atherogenesis. PMID:25869517

  14. Plaque of atherosclerosis in aorta: review on atherogenesis, formation of plaque, clinical significance, methods of imaging and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a certain consensus in the literature that the earliest stage of atherogenesis is characterized by the accumulation of spongy cells in the region of the intimal artery. Risk factors such as arterial hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, male gender and advanced age predispose a person to the formation of plaques in the coronaries and aorta. A greater number of acute coronary events as well as strokes have been observed in people with these risk factors. Strokes are the third cause of death in the USA, with about 40% of the cases being of cryptogenic origin. Since 1989 the atheroma plaques which develop in the thoracic aorta have been considered to be responsible for cerebral and peripheral strokes which were previously considered cryptogenic because imaging techniques such as electrocardiogram transesophageal, computerized tomogram, nuclear magnetic angio-resonance have visualized and characterized the lesions with plaques of arteriosclerosis in the thoracic aorta. The authors of this article made a systematic review in the PUBMED about arteriosclerosis in the aorta and its diagnostic methods. This review includes the physiopathology of the formation of atheroma to the aorta and its consequences, diagnostic methods such as echo transesophageal, computerized tomogram and angio resonance, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each method of identification of the lesions. An analysis of the clinical significance of the size, form and location of the atheroma plaques in the thoracic aorta were made based on clinical studies, as well as their treatment with anticoagulants, antiplatelet and drugs to reduce cholesterol. (author)

  15. Atorvastatin attenuates p-cresyl sulfate-induced atherogenesis and plaque instability in ApoE knockout mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hui; Chen, Yanjia; Zhu, Jinzhou; Ni, Jingwei; Sun, Jiateng; Zhang, Ruiyan

    2016-01-01

    p-cresyl sulfate (PCS) is a protein-bound uremic toxin retained in the blood of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) As atherosclerosis is a primary cardiovascular complication for patients with CKD, the aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying the aggravation of atherosclerosis by PCS. In addition, the effect of atorvastatin was assessed in reversing the effects of PCS. PCS was revealed to promote the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Following treatment with atorvastatin, apolipoprotein E knockout mice demonstrated a reduction in PCS-induced atherogenesis and plaque vulnerability. In addition, atorvastatin decreased the protein expression levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1, and the interaction between leukocytes and endothelia. The plasma lipid profiles of mice were not significantly affected by gavage of low-dose atorvastatin. The results of the present study indicate that PCS promotes plaque growth and instability by enhancing leukocyte-endothelium interaction, and that these effects may be attenuated by atorvastatin treatment. PMID:27574007

  16. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein contributes to atherogenesis via co-activation of macrophages and mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Chen

    Full Text Available Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL is a risk factor for atherosclerosis, due to its role in endothelial dysfunction and foam cell formation. Tissue-resident cells such as macrophages and mast cells release inflammatory mediators upon activation that in turn cause endothelial activation and monocyte adhesion. Two of these mediators are tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, produced by macrophages, and histamine, produced by mast cells. Static and microfluidic flow experiments were conducted to determine the number of adherent monocytes on vascular endothelium activated by supernatants of oxLDL-treated macrophages and mast cells or directly by oxLDL. The expression of adhesion molecules on activated endothelial cells and the concentration of TNF-α and histamine in the supernatants were measured by flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. A low dose of oxLDL (8 μg/ml, below the threshold for the clinical presentation of coronary artery disease, was sufficient to activate both macrophages and mast cells and synergistically increase monocyte-endothelium adhesion via released TNF-α and histamine. The direct exposure of endothelial cells to a much higher dose of oxLDL (80 μg/ml had less effect on monocyte adhesion than the indirect activation via oxLDL-treated macrophages and mast cells. The results of this work indicate that the co-activation of macrophages and mast cells by oxLDL is an important mechanism for the endothelial dysfunction and atherogenesis. The observed synergistic effect suggests that both macrophages and mast cells play a significant role in early stages of atherosclerosis. Allergic patients with a lipid-rich diet may be at high risk for cardiovascular events due to high concentration of low-density lipoprotein and histamine in arterial vessel walls.

  17. Sphingosine signaling and atherogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Cang-bao; Hansen-Schwartz, Jacob; Edvinsson, Lars

    2004-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) has diverse biological functions acting inside cells as a second messenger to regulate cell proliferation and survival, and extracellularly, as a ligand for a group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) named the endothelial differentiation gene (EDG) family. Five......+ mobilization, and expression of adhesion molecules. The formation of an atherosclerotic lesion occurs through activation of cellular events that include monocyte adhesion to the endothelium and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation. Thus, S1P signaling may play an important role...

  18. C-Peptide and Atherogenesis: C-Peptide as a Mediator of Lesion Development in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaus Marx

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with insulin resistance and early type 2 diabetes exhibit an increased propensity to develop a diffuse and extensive pattern of arteriosclerosis. Typically, these patients show increased levels of C-peptide and over the last years various groups examined the effect of C-peptide in vascular cells as well as its potential role in lesion development. While some studies demonstrated beneficial effects of C-peptide, for example, by showing an inhibition of smooth muscle cell proliferation, others suggested proatherogenic mechanisms in patients with type 2 diabetes. Among them, C-peptide may facilitate the recruitment of inflammatory cells into early lesions and promote lesion progression by inducing smooth muscle cell proliferation. The following review will summarize the effects of C-peptide in vascular cells and discuss the potential role of C-peptide in atherogenesis in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  19. Genetic polymorphism of glutathion S-transferase P1 (GSTP1 Ile105Val and susceptibility to atherogenesis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grubiša Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the characteristics of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is the state of persistent oxidative stress (OS that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diseases such is atherosclerosis mainly through chronic hyperglycemia that stimulates production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and increases OS. Glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1 is a member of the cytosolic GST superfamily. It plays an important role in neutralizing OS as an enzyme. Also, it participates in regulation of stress signaling and protects cells against apoptosis via its noncatalytic ligand-binding activity. GSTP1 Ile105Val functional polymorphism influences protein catalytic activity and stability and the aim of this study was to determine whether this gene variation influences susceptibility to atherogenesis in T2DM patients. A total of 240 individuals (140 patients with T2DM, accompanied with clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis, and 100 healthy controls were included in this study. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood cells and genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP analysis. We obtained no statistically significant differences in the distribution of alleles and genotypes between cases and controls (P>0.05 but association between Ile/Val (OR=0.6, 95%CI=0.35-1.05, P=0.08 and Val/Val (OR=0.45, 95%CI=0.18-1.11, P=0.08 genotypes and disease approached significance (P=0.08. Our results indicated that a larger study group is needed to establish the true relationship between potentialiy protective allele Val and the disease, and to determine the influence of other GSTP1 polymorphisms on atherogenesis in T2DM patients. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175075

  20. The Opposite Associations of Lycopene and Body Fat Mass with HumoralImmunity in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Possible Role in Atherogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirang R. Neyestani

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the possible effects of lycopene at physiological dosage and body fat mass on the humoral immune response in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM.A total of 35 patients with Typ2 diabetes mellitus from both sexes aged 54±9 yrs from the Iranian Diabetes Society were introduced into a double blind placebo controlled clinical trial conducted for 2 months. After a 2-week lycopene free diet washout period, patients were allocated to either lycopene supplementation group (10mg/d (n=16 or placebo age- and sex matched group (n=19 for 8 weeks.Patients were instructed to keep their diets and physical activities as unchanged as possible.Lycopene supplements increased serum lycopene levels (pand nutrients did not change in either groups, the ratio of total antioxidant capacity tomalondialdehyde increased significantly in the lycopene group (p=0.007. There was an inversecorrelation between serum levels of lycopene and those of IgG (r= -0.338, p=0.008. On the contrary, changes of serum levels of lycopene directly correlated with those of IgM (r=0.466, p=0.005. Interestingly, changes of the amount of fat mass correlated directly with those of serum IgG (r=0.415, p=0.044 but inversely with of serum IgM (r= -0.469, p=0.021.While truncal fat might promote adaptive humoral immunity, lycopene probably by inhibitingMDA-LDL formation might attenuate T cell dependent adaptive (pro-atherogenic humoral immune response. These findings may have preventive implications in long term diabetic complications, notably atherogenesis.

  1. Transcription and translation of human F11R gene are required for an initial step of atherogenesis induced by inflammatory cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornecki Elizabeth

    2011-06-01

    of F11R in ECs is required for the adhesion of platelets to inflamed ECs. Because platelet adhesion to an inflamed endothelium is crucial for plaque formation in non-denuded blood vessels, we conclude that the de-novo translation of F11R is a crucial early step in the initiation of atherogenesis, leading to atherosclerosis, heart attacks and stroke.

  2. Minireview: adiposity, inflammation, and atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Christopher J; Law, Ronald E; Hsueh, Willa A

    2003-06-01

    Adipose tissue is a dynamic endocrine organ that secretes a number of factors that are increasingly recognized to contribute to systemic and vascular inflammation. Several of these factors, collectively referred to as adipokines, have now been shown regulate, directly or indirectly, a number of the processes that contribute to the development of atherosclerosis, including hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance, and vascular remodeling. Several adipokines are preferentially expressed in visceral adipose tissue, and the secretion of proinflammatory adipokines is elevated with increasing adiposity. Not surprisingly, approaches that reduce adipose tissue depots, including surgical fat removal, exercise, and reduced caloric intake, improve proinflammatory adipokine levels and reduce the severity of their resultant pathologies. Systemic adipokine levels can also be favorably altered by treatment with several of the existing drug classes used to treat insulin resistance, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia. Greater understanding of adipokine regulation, however, should result in the design of improved treatment strategies to control disease states associated with increase adiposity, an important outcome in view of the growing worldwide epidemic of obesity. PMID:12746274

  3. Plaque of atherosclerosis in aorta: review on atherogenesis, formation of plaque, clinical significance, methods of imaging and treatment; Placa de aterosclerose em aorta: revisao sobre aterogenese, formacao de placa, significado clinco, metodos de imagens e tratamento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furtado, Rogerio Gomes; Nunes, Colandy G. de Oliveira; Rassi Junior, Luis; Melato, Luciano Henrique; Turco, Fabio de Paula; Borges, Moises Marcos, E-mail: rogerinhofurtado@gmail.com [Centro de Diagnostico por Imagem (CDI), Goiania, GO (Brazil); Sara, Leonardo [Instituto do Coracao (InCor/FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-04-15

    There is a certain consensus in the literature that the earliest stage of atherogenesis is characterized by the accumulation of spongy cells in the region of the intimal artery. Risk factors such as arterial hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, male gender and advanced age predispose a person to the formation of plaques in the coronaries and aorta. A greater number of acute coronary events as well as strokes have been observed in people with these risk factors. Strokes are the third cause of death in the USA, with about 40% of the cases being of cryptogenic origin. Since 1989 the atheroma plaques which develop in the thoracic aorta have been considered to be responsible for cerebral and peripheral strokes which were previously considered cryptogenic because imaging techniques such as electrocardiogram transesophageal, computerized tomogram, nuclear magnetic angio-resonance have visualized and characterized the lesions with plaques of arteriosclerosis in the thoracic aorta. The authors of this article made a systematic review in the PUBMED about arteriosclerosis in the aorta and its diagnostic methods. This review includes the physiopathology of the formation of atheroma to the aorta and its consequences, diagnostic methods such as echo transesophageal, computerized tomogram and angio resonance, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each method of identification of the lesions. An analysis of the clinical significance of the size, form and location of the atheroma plaques in the thoracic aorta were made based on clinical studies, as well as their treatment with anticoagulants, antiplatelet and drugs to reduce cholesterol. (author)

  4. Magnesium deficiency upregulates sphingomyelinases in cardiovascular tissues and cells: cross-talk among proto-oncogenes, Mg(2+), NF-κB and ceramide and their potential relationships to resistant hypertension, atherogenesis and cardiac failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altura, Burton M; Shah, Nilank C; Shah, Gatha J; Li, Wenyan; Zhang, Aimin; Zheng, Tao; Li, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Perez-Albela, Jose Luis; Altura, Bella T

    2013-01-01

    drug-resistant hypertension, atherogenesis, and difficult-to-treat forms of cardiac failure.

  5. The Dynamics of Oxidized LDL during Atherogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Itabe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence indicates that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL is a useful marker for cardiovascular disease. The uptake of OxLDL by scavenger receptors leads to the accumulation of cholesterol within the foam cells of atherosclerotic lesions. OxLDL has many stimulatory effects on vascular cells, and the presence of OxLDL in circulating blood has been established. According to the classical hypothesis, OxLDL accumulates in the atherosclerotic lesions over a long duration, leading to advanced lesions. However, recent studies on time-course changes of OxLDL in vivo raised a possibility that OxLDL can be transferred between the lesions and the circulation. In this paper, the in vivo dynamics of OxLDL are discussed.

  6. 瑞舒伐他汀对糖尿病大鼠早期动脉粥样硬化形成的影响%Inhibition of Early Atherogenesis by Rosuvastatin in Male Rats with Diabetes Mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭淑丽; 陈作元; 李姗; 李霞

    2011-01-01

    目的:观察他汀类调脂药物瑞舒伐他汀(Rosuvastatin)对2型糖尿病(type2 diabetes mellitus,T2DM)大鼠早期动脉粥样硬化形成的影响,并探讨其可能的机制.方法:将45只雄性SD大鼠随机分为正常对照组(NC组)、2型糖尿病组(DM组)、2型糖尿病瑞舒伐他汀治疗组(DR组),每组15只.以喂高糖高脂饮食方法建立SD大鼠糖尿病模型,DM组、DR组给予高糖高脂饮食1个月后腹腔注射25mg/kg链脲佐菌素;NC组给予普通饮食,注射枸橼酸缓冲液作为对照.在此基础上,DR组给予瑞舒伐他汀5mg/(kg·d)灌胃,NC组、DM组给予生理盐水灌胃.16周后测定各组大鼠总胆固醇(TC)、三酰甘油(TG)、低密度脂蛋白胆固醇(LDL-C)水平与稳态血糖(BG)、稳态胰岛素(PGI)浓度,用免疫组化法检测主动脉血管壁白细胞分化抗原40(cluster of differentiation 40,CD40)及基质金属蛋白酶-2(MMP-2)、激活蛋白-1(activator protein-1,AP-1)的表达水平.结果:DM组、DR组TC、TG、LDL-C与BG水平较NC组均显著升高(F=33.71~426.05,q=5.26~40.82,P<0.01),但2组间各指标比较差异无显著性(P>0.05).DR组CD40、MMP-2、AP-1表达水平和浸润的单核细胞数明显低于DM组(F=36.86~716.82,q=8.59~37.86,P<0.05),DR组主动脉内皮损伤明显轻于DM组.结论:瑞舒伐他汀能抑制CD40、MMP-2、AP-1表达和单核细胞浸润,防止早期AS形成.%Objective: To investigate the effects of rosuvastatin on early atherogenesis in male rats with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus,and to explore the mechanism of them. Methods: Forty-five male SD rats were randomly and equally divided into three groups: control group (NC group), DM group and rosuvastatin group (DR group). High fat and high glucose diet were given to establish the DM rat model. The rats in DM and DR group were fed with high-glucose and high fat diet for one month ,and were injected with streptozotocin (25mg/kg) intraperitoneally. The rats in NC group were fed with full diet

  7. Aterogênese em artéria ilíaca comum de suínos submetidos à homocisteinemia induzida pela ingestão de metionina Atherogenesis in swine iliac artery with homocystinemia induced by methionine ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Henrique Gil França

    2006-03-01

    . Blood samples were collected for analyses of total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL and homocysteine concentrations. The animals were submitted to arteriography to evaluate the patency of iliac arteries and then sacrificed. The iliac artery segment was removed for histological analysis. RESULTS: All animals survived the procedure, and there were no significant changes in total cholesterol, triglycerides and HDL concentrations in both groups. Microscopic examinations of the control group did not show pathological changes and was similar in all analyses. In the group receiving the methionine diet, the plaques were formed by foamy macrophages, but smooth muscle cells, cholesterol crystals or inflammatory cells were not seen. The tunica media had the internal elastic lamina intact. In the control group, there was no change in homocysteine levels during the experiment. In the methionine group, there was an increase in plasma homocysteine levels, with an average value of 59.80 µmol/l after 30 days with a methionine-rich diet. CONCLUSION: Homocystinemia induced by methionine causes atherogenesis in the swine iliac artery.

  8. Overweight: atherogenesis risk marker in children between 8 and 9 years Exceso de peso: Factor Trazador de Riesgo Aterogénico en Niños de 8 a 9 Años

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Apolinaire Pennini

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many significant health problems hold the attention of pediatricians, and even when there is an increased interest on premature atherosclerosis risk factors, it is still a field to be studied. Objectives: To determine differences in the emergence of atherogenesis risk factors in children between 8 and 9 years with normal weight and overweight. Methods: Analytic research, with case control design, developed in three primary schools belonging to the Clinic “Dr. Cecilio Ruiz de Zarate” in Cienfuegos. A group with overweight or obese children was formed and another control group selected by randomized simple sampling with normal weight children. Measurements of weight, height, waist circumference and blood pressure were performed. Parents were surveyed for data about children and family history. In overweight children, glucose and triglycerides were measured. To validate results, Chi-Squared test was used. To compare measurements, Mathn Whitney test was employed. Results: Overweight and obesity were associated with: male sex, with people, sedentary patients, and prenatal antecedents of overweight. 78% of overweight children had values of blood pressure higher than 90 percentile for their sex and height, contrasting with the 26% in normal weight children. Six children were diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. Introducción: Existe

  9. Possible mechanism for accelerated atherogenesis in male versus female rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietary fat and cholesterol enter the circulation as chylomicrons. They are removed from the circulation by attachment to lipoprotein lipase located on the endothelial surfaces. As the result of lipoprotein lipase action, chylomicrons are partially hydrolyzed and then reenter the circulation as remnants, which are rapidly cleared by the liver. We investigated the fate of 3H-retinol- and 14C-cholesterol-labeled chylomicrons injected into male and female rats. The disappearance curves of chylomicrons from the circulation were not significantly different in males and females, which suggests that translocation from plasma to endothelium is similar for both sexes. However, in male rats, the dwell time of chylomicrons on the endothelium was significantly prolonged. At 10 and 20 minutes after chylomicron injection, more label was found in the livers of female than male rats. The opposite was true for hearts. Male hearts contained significantly more endothelium-bound chylomicrons when compared with female hearts. This increase in dwell time may allow greater cholesterol deposition in the endothelium of male rats. The more rapid processing of chylomicrons was associated with a 300% greater postheparin lipoprotein lipase in female rats, which suggests a greater enzyme density at chylomicron attachment points on endothelium

  10. Role of marginal vitamin C deficiency in atherogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frikke-Schmidt, Henriette Rønne; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2009-01-01

    yet general antioxidant properties. However, growing epidemiological, clinical and experimental evidence now suggests a more specific role of ascorbate in vasomotion and in the prevention of atherosclerosis. For example, in contrast to most other biological antioxidants, administration of vitamin C...

  11. [Lipoprotein (a)--a mysterious factor in atherogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelaković, Bojan; Laganović, Mario; Kuzmanić, Dusko

    2002-01-01

    Etiopathogenesis of arterial hypertension and coronary disease involves interaction of numerous exogenous factors which determine the clinical course and therapeutic response in genetically predisposed individuals. The role of numerous cardiovascular risk factors has been reevaluated during the past few years, yet some unresolved issues and gaps still remain. One of the still insufficiently studied factors is lipoprotein (a) [Lp (a)] which belongs to a subclass of LDL lipoproteins. Its important component is apolipoprotein (a) which is structurally similar to plasminogen. This characteristic can be followed through evolution and is probably crucial for its physiologic but also pathophysiologic role. Actually, through its competition with plasminogen, Lp (a) interferes with the process of fibrinolysis and may contribute to tissue healing and restoration but also support and accelerate atherothrombotic process. Lp (a) concentration is stable and genetically determined in an individual and the indication that persons with elevated levels are permanently exposed to increased risk is supported by the data on twofold incidence of myocardial infarction in mothers of children with highest Lp (a) concentrations. Apart from competing with plasminogen via apolipoprotein (a), Lp (a) increases the activity of inhibitors of plasminogen-I activator and reduces the activity of transforming growth factor-beta. This results both in the absence of fibrinolysis and promotion of migration and proliferation of media smooth muscle cells, which are important in the onset of atherosclerotic process. Lp (a) binds to elastin via apolipoprotein B, resulting in oxidation and facilitated entry into macrophages and their transition into the so-called foam cells, also an important sign of early atherosclerosis. Although many pathophysiologic processes by which Lp (a) contributes to atherosclerosis have also been confirmed by animal experiments as well as by the presence of histologic evidence, clinical significance of elevated Lp (a) concentration is still questionable. However, results of prospective studies and metaanalyses were published few months ago and identified decisively Lp (a) as a factor that increases cardiovascular risk primarily in patients in whom other risk factors were also present. According to currently prevailing attitude, routine determination of Lp (a) is not justified and, according to most authors, its determination is useful in patients who had a cardiovascular incident at the age under 55 years, in those with recurrent coronary stenosis, or those with positive family history of such incidents. As Lp (a) is genetically determined, its detection in the early stages of essential hypertension might be a useful prognostic marker but a period of observation is still necessary for correct selection of hypertensive patients. Apart from the observation that hormone replacement therapy significantly decreases the Lp (a) level, there is currently no information on the effectiveness of either dietary or drug therapy. Due to Lp (a) antifibrotic effects, small aspirin doses may be beneficial to these patients, as well as B complex vitamins since hyperhomocysteinemia enhances atherogenicity of Lp (a). Therapeutic approach to patient with increased Lp (a) levels is currently based on as strict regulation of arterial pressure, glycemia and other dislipidemias as possible. In the present clinical practice, the elevated level of this lipoprotein indicates a patients with elevated cardiovascular risk, regardless of the fact whether Lp (a) is only a marker or an active factor of pathophysiologic process. Increased Lp (a) concentration may refer to the need for therapy, frequent monitoring and determination of even stricter aims for these individuals by selecting metabolically neutral and best tolerated drugs.

  12. Effects of valsartan on oxidative stress and the atherogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈钧; 王琳; 陈欣; 卜军; 刘念; 阮燕菲

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the therapy effect of valsartan on oxidative stress and the formation of atherosclerosis of rabbit.Methods:An atherosclerotic rabbit model was established by feeding high cholesterol diet supplemented by bovine serum albumin injection bolus.The rabbits were randomly divided into the control,model,and valsartan treated group,six rabbits in each group.Blood samples were collected at the end of 8 weeks for examination of serum lipid levels and MDA levels; the aortas were harvested for histological morphometry analysis,vascular cell adhesion molecule-1(VCAM-1)immunohistochemical analysis and in situ superoxide detection to reflect the activity of NAD(P)H oxidase.Results:Rabbits fed with high cholesterol diet showed higher serum lipids levels than those fed with normal diet(P<0.01).Treatment with valsartan(10 mg/kg per day)did not alter serum lipids levels.But the serum MDA level and ratio of lesion to intima area reduced significantly compared with model group(P < 0.05).The expression of VCAM-1 decreased significantly in the valsartan treated group than in the model group(P < 0.05).In addition,in situ superoxide detection also show the markedly reduction of superoxide as a result of valsartan treatment.Conclusion:These results indicate that the valsartan treatment can reducethe atherosclerotic progression,the mechanisms of which may include the inhibiting the NAD(P)H oxidase activity to produce superoxide and the downregulating the expression of redox sensitive genes in the downstream,such as VCAM-1.

  13. Modulation of growth control mechanisms critical to atherogenesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, R.M.L.

    1992-01-01

    The principal lesion characteristic of atherosclerosis is the plaque. This lesion mainly consists of smooth muscle cells, connective matrix and large amounts of extracellular lipids. Smooth muscle cell hyperplasia is an integral event in atherosclerotic plaque formation and the resultant occlusion o

  14. 阿托伐他汀通过 RXRα介导的抗氧化应激效应抑制高脂喂养糖尿病 ApoE-/-小鼠动脉粥样硬化的形成%Atorvastatin inhibits atherogenesis by RXRα-mediated depressing oxida-tive stress in STZ-induced diabetic ApoE-/-mice with fat-rich diet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林晓燕; 林秋平; 许昌声; 宁若冰; 祝江; 林金秀; 柴大军

    2014-01-01

    protein and ROS in blood and thoracic aorta homogenates were higher in STZ-ApoE-/-group than those in ApoE-/-group (P<0.05).(3) Compared with STZ-ApoE-/-group, the plaque areas of the thoracic aorta in STZ-ApoE-/-+Atorv group were reduced [(217.47 ±24.56) μm2 vs (314.13 ±35.72) μm2, P<0.05].The levels of blood glucose , LDL-C, TC, HDL-C and TG showed no significant difference between the 2 groups.Thoracic aorta gp91phox protein level and ROS production in blood and thoracic aorta homogenates were lower in STZ -ApoE-/-+Atorv group than those in STZ-ApoE-/-group (P<0.05).(4) High glucose-induced increases in NADPH oxidase activity and gp91phox expression were significantly inhibited by atorvastatin (10-6 mol/L) in HUVECs.The inhibitory effects of atorvasta-tin on high glucose-induced ROS production and NADPH oxidase activation were largely impaired when the cells were trans -fected with RXRαsiRNA.However , the effect of atorvastatin was significantly strengthened when RXRαwas over-expressed in the HUVECs transfected with RXRαplasmid.CONCLUSION: Atorvastatin inhibits atherogenesis by depressing high glucose-induced oxidative stress in diabetic ApoE-/-mice with fat-rich diet.The anti-oxidative stress effect of atorvastatin is mediated by RXRα.%目的:观察阿托伐他汀( Atorv)对链脲佐菌素( STZ)诱导的糖尿病高脂喂养载脂蛋白E敲除( apolipoprotein E knockout , ApoE-/-)小鼠动脉粥样硬化的影响,探讨阿托伐他汀在糖尿病合并高脂饮食条件下对抗动脉粥样硬化的机制。方法:C57小鼠8只作为对照,34只高脂喂养的ApoE-/-小鼠随机分为3组:ApoE-/-组、STZ-ApoE-/-组和STZ-ApoE-/-+Atorv组。 STZ腹腔注射建立糖尿病动物模型,测定小鼠空腹血糖、血脂水平, HE染色图像分析测定胸主动脉斑块面积;免疫杂交检测主动脉及细胞内NADPH氧化酶亚基gp91phox蛋白水平;Fenton反应Griess显色法测定血清及胸主动

  15. Stability Analysis of a Model of Atherogenesis: An Energy Estimate Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Ibragimov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a disease of the vasculature that is characterized by chronic inflammation and the accumulation of lipids and apoptotic cells in the walls of large arteries. This disease results in plaque growth in an infected artery typically leading to occlusion of the artery. Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of human mortality in the US, much of Europe, and parts of Asia. In a previous work, we introduced a mathematical model of the biochemical aspects of the disease, in particular the inflammatory response of macrophages in the presence of chemoattractants and modified low density lipoproteins. Herein, we consider the onset of a lesion as resulting from an instability in an equilibrium configuration of cells and chemical species. We derive an appropriate norm by taking an energy estimate approach and present stability criteria. A bio-physical analysis of the mathematical results is presented.

  16. Augmented atherogenesis in LDL receptor deficient mice lacking both macrophage ABCA1 and ApoE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Lammers

    Full Text Available AIM: ABCA1 protects against atherosclerosis by facilitating cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells in the arterial wall to extracellular apolipoprotein (apo A-I. In contrast to apoA-I, apoE is secreted by macrophages and can, like apoA-I, induce ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux. Yet, the combined effect of macrophage ABCA1 and apoE on lesion development is unexplored. METHODS AND RESULTS: LDL receptor knockout (KO mice were transplanted with bone marrow from ABCA1/apoE double KO (dKO mice, their respective single KO's, and wild-type (WT controls and were challenged with a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet for 9 weeks. In vitro cholesterol efflux experiments showed no differences between ABCA1 KO and dKO macrophages. The serum non-HDL/HDL ratio in dKO transplanted mice was 1.7-fold and 2.4-fold (p<0.01 increased compared to WT and ABCA1 KO transplanted mice, respectively. The atherosclerotic lesion area in dKO transplanted animals (650±94×10(3 µm(2, however, was 1.9-fold (p<0.01 and 1.6-fold (p<0.01 increased compared to single knockouts (ABCA1 KO: 341±20×10(3 µm(2; apoE KO: 402±78×10(3 µm(2, respectively and 3.1-fold increased (p<0.001 compared to WT (211±20×10(3 µm(2. When normalized for serum cholesterol exposure, macrophage ABCA1 and apoE independently protected against atherosclerotic lesion development (p<0.001. Moreover, hepatic expression levels of TNFα and IL-6 were highly induced in dKO transplanted animals (3.0-fold; p<0.05, and 4.3-fold; p<0.001, respectively. In agreement, serum IL-6 levels were also enhanced in ABCA1 KO transplanted mice (p<0.05 and even further enhanced in dKO transplanted animals (3.1-fold as compared to ABCA1 KO transplanted animals; p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Combined deletion of macrophage ABCA1 and apoE results in a defect in cholesterol efflux and, compared to ABCA1 KO transplanted mice, elevated serum total cholesterol levels. Importantly, these mice also suffer from enhanced systemic and hepatic inflammation, together resulting in the observed augmented atherosclerotic lesion development.

  17. Dehydroepiandrosterone anti-atherogenesis effect is not via its conversion to estrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heng-hui CHENG; Xiao-jing HU; Qiu-rong RUAN

    2009-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted to demonstrate the anti-atherosclerotic effect of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and to investigate its possible mechanisms and whether this effect is related to its conversion to estrogen. Methods: Forty male New Zealand White rabbits aged 3 months were divided into 5 groups (n=8 per group) and fed dif-ferent diets for 10 weeks. Serum lipid levels, the area of atherosclerotic lesions and the mRNA levels of monocyte chemoat-tractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in aortic lesions were measured. Then cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) stimulated by oxidized low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (ox-LDL) were treated by DHEA. The gene and protein expression levels of MCP-1 and VCAM-1 in VSMCs was detected. The plasmid with or with-out the gene of cytochrome P450 aromatase (CYP19) was transient transfected into cultured VSMCs respectively. Twenty hours later, the cells were stimulated with ox-LDL and DHEA. Results: DHEA could obviously decrease the area of atherosclerotic lesions and the expressions of MCP-1 and VCAM-1 in aortic lesions. But all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) which was reported would limit restenosis after balloon angioplasty had no visible synergistic effect with DHEA. DHEA could also reduce ox-LDL-induced MCP-1 and VCAM-1 expression in un-transfected or transfected VSMCs. Conclusion: The anti-atherosclerotic effect of DHEA had nothing to do with the catalysis of cytochrome P450 aromatase (CYP19), or was not related to its conversion to estrogen.

  18. Differences in Hypercholesterolemia and Atherogenesis Induced by Common Androgen Deprivation Therapies in Male Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Christian Bo; Mortensen, Martin Bødtker; Koechling, Wolfgang;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of prostate cancer often involves androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor agonists, GnRH receptor antagonists, or orchiectomy. ADT may increase the rate of cardiovascular disease events, but recent clinical studies suggested......, augmented hypercholesterolemia, changed body, thymus, and spleen weights, and increased atherosclerosis in the aortic root. No direct effects of the drugs were detectable on cytokine secretion from murine bone marrow-derived macrophages or on splenocyte proliferation. CONCLUSIONS: No differences...... in the development of atherosclerosis were detected among groups of intact Apoe-deficient mice treated with different types of ADT. A pro-atherogenic, possibly cholesterol-mediated, effect of leuprolide was seen in orchiectomized mice that might be relevant for understanding the potential cardiovascular risk...

  19. Role of plasma intermediate and low density lipoproteins in early atherogenesis in hyperlipidemic swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyperlipidemic (HL) diet induced early atherosclerotic lesions in the distal abdominal aorta of swine consist mostly of smooth muscle cells and arise in normally occurring intimal cell masses (ICM). In an earlier study of swine fed HL diets either with butter (BT) or corn oil (CO), we found differences in intimal proliferative responses defined by number of nuclear profiles in intima per cross section (Np/Cx) that could not be accounted for entirely by differences in serum cholesterol levels. The recent study with 11 swine (five BT and six CO) was designed to see if some lipoprotein constituents might better explain intimal proliferative responses. At three mo, lipids and proteins of lipoprotein fractions were determined. At four mo, swine were sacrificed and lesion areas, Np/Cx and tritiated thymidine labeling indices were determined in distal abdominal aorta. Based on Np/Cx, seven swine were high proliferative responders (five BT and two CO) and four were low responders (four CO). IDL levels were 6-fold greater in high responders. LDL, VLDL and HDL were not different between high and low responders. For all swine, IDL-cholesterol correlated with Np/Cx; LDL-cholesterol correlated with Np/Cx among high responders

  20. The Association between some Incidental Factors and Biochemical Parameters Linked to Atherogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was conducted to assess the role played by some factors including age, residence location, diet, hypertension and job pattern, as incidental factors in the atherogenic process, on the lipid, lipoprotein, homocysteine, vitamin B 12 and folic acid in apparently healthy Egyptian males. Sera from one hundred and forty six apparently healthy male volunteers were analyzed for total cholesterol, triglycerides, high density Iipoproteins cholesterol (HDL-c), low density lipoproteins cholesterol (LDL-c), apolipoprotein A. (Apo At), apolipoprotein B ( Apo B ) and homocysteine, in addition to vitamin BI2 and folic acid. Data from the present study showed that middle aged individuals (over 40 years), urban volunteers, butter users, volunteers experiencing mental work and hypertensives experienced increased lipid fractions when compared to their counterparts. The data also showed the lack of an effect of the previous factors on serum homocysteine, folic acid or vitamin B12. In view of the previous findings, it may be concluded that factors such as: age, urban residence, butter consumption, hypertension and intellectual work may contribute to the etiology of atherosclerosis through their impact on serum lipid fractions. Serum homocysteine and related vitamins B12 and folic acid seem to be unmodified by these factors

  1. Simulation of Molecular Signaling in Blood Vessels: Software Design and Application to Atherogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Felicetti, Luca; Femminella, Mauro; Reali, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a software platform, named BiNS2, able to simulate diffusion-based molecular communications with drift inside blood vessels. The contribution of the paper is twofold. First a detailed description of the simulator is given, under the software engineering point of view, by highlighting the innovations and optimizations introduced. Their introduction into the previous version of the BiNS simulator was needed to provide to functions for simulating molecular signaling and commu...

  2. Spirulina platensis and phycocyanobilin activate atheroprotective heme oxygenase-1: a possible implication for atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasky, Zbynek; Zemankova, Lenka; Nemeckova, Ivana; Rathouska, Jana; Wong, Ronald J; Muchova, Lucie; Subhanova, Iva; Vanikova, Jana; Vanova, Katerina; Vitek, Libor; Nachtigal, Petr

    2013-11-01

    Spirulina platensis, a water blue-green alga, has been associated with potent biological effects, which might have important relevance in atheroprotection. We investigated whether S. platensis or phycocyanobilin (PCB), its tetrapyrrolic chromophore, can activate atheroprotective heme oxygenase-1 (Hmox1), a key enzyme in the heme catabolic pathway responsible for generation of a potent antioxidant bilirubin, in endothelial cells and in a mouse model of atherosclerosis. In vitro experiments were performed on EA.hy926 endothelial cells exposed to extracts of S. platensis or PCB. In vivo studies were performed on ApoE-deficient mice fed a cholesterol diet and S. platensis. The effect of these treatments on Hmox1, as well as other markers of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, was then investigated. Both S. platensis and PCB markedly upregulated Hmox1 in vitro, and a substantial overexpression of Hmox1 was found in aortic atherosclerotic lesions of ApoE-deficient mice fed S. platensis. In addition, S. platensis treatment led to a significant increase in Hmox1 promoter activity in the spleens of Hmox-luc transgenic mice. Furthermore, both S. platensis and PCB were able to modulate important markers of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, such as eNOS, p22 NADPH oxidase subunit, and/or VCAM-1. Both S. platensis and PCB activate atheroprotective HMOX1 in endothelial cells and S. platensis increased the expression of Hmox1 in aortic atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE-deficient mice, and also in Hmox-luc transgenic mice beyond the lipid lowering effect. Therefore, activation of HMOX1 and the heme catabolic pathway may represent an important mechanism of this food supplement for the reduction of atherosclerotic disease. PMID:24056745

  3. Ursodeoxycholic acid impairs atherogenesis and promotes plaque regression by cholesterol crystal dissolution in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Niklas; Grebe, Alena; Kerksiek, Anja; Lütjohann, Dieter; Werner, Nikos; Nickenig, Georg; Latz, Eicke; Zimmer, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease driven primarily by a continuous retention of cholesterol within the subendothelial space where it precipitates to form cholesterol crystals (CC). These CC trigger a complex inflammatory response through activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and promote lesion development. Here we examined whether increasing cholesterol solubility with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) affects vascular CC formation and ultimately atherosclerotic lesion development. UDCA mediated intracellular CC dissolution in macrophages and reduced IL-1β production. In ApoE(-/-) mice, UDCA treatment not only impaired atherosclerotic plaque development but also mediated regression of established vascular lesions. Importantly, mice treated with UDCA had decreased CC-depositions in atherosclerotic plaques compared to controls. Together, our data demonstrate that UDCA impaired CC and NLRP3 dependent inflammation by increasing cholesterol solubility and diminished atherosclerosis in mice. PMID:27416761

  4. Regulatory metabolites of vitamin E and their putative relevance for atherogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wallert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin E is likely the most important antioxidant in the human diet and α-tocopherol is the most active isomer. α-Tocopherol exhibits anti-oxidative capacity in vitro, and inhibits oxidation of LDL. Beside this, α-tocopherol shows anti-inflammatory activity and modulates expression of proteins involved in uptake, transport and degradation of tocopherols, as well as the uptake, storage and export of lipids such as cholesterol. Despite promising anti-atherogenic features in vitro, vitamin E failed to be atheroprotective in clinical trials in humans. Recent studies highlight the importance of long-chain metabolites of α-tocopherol, which are formed as catabolic intermediate products in the liver and occur in human plasma. These metabolites modulate inflammatory processes and macrophage foam cell formation via mechanisms different than that of their metabolic precursor α-tocopherol and at lower concentrations. Here we summarize the controversial role of vitamin E as a preventive agent against atherosclerosis and point the attention to recent findings that highlight a role of these long-chain metabolites of vitamin E as a proposed new class of regulatory metabolites. We speculate that the metabolites contribute to physiological as well as pathophysiological processes.

  5. Humoral response towards high density lipoprotein : a new mechanism for atherogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Batuca, Joana Rita

    2014-01-01

    RESUMO:Aterosclerose é uma das principais causas de morbilidade e mortalidade no mundo ocidental. É responsável, direta ou indiretamente, pela maior percentagem de gastos com a saúde na maioria dos países europeus. A “teoria lipídica” da aterosclerose, que se baseia na dislipidemia como causa primária para a doença vascular tem algumas implicações práticas importantes: permite a definição de linhas de orientação e protocolos simples e ainda estabelece alvos terapêuticos que podem ser atin...

  6. Circulating levels of human salusin-β, a potent hemodynamic and atherogenesis regulator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumi Fujimoto

    Full Text Available Using bioinformatics analysis, we previously identified salusin-β, an endogenous bioactive peptide with diverse physiological activities. Salusin-β is abundantly expressed in the neuroendocrine system and in systemic endocrine cells/macrophages. Salusin-β acutely regulates hemodynamics and chronically induces atherosclerosis, but its unique physicochemical characteristics to tightly adhere to all types of plastic and glassware have prevented elucidation of its precise pathophysiological role. To quantitate plasma total salusin-β concentrations, we produced rabbit and chicken polyclonal antibodies against the C- and N-terminal end sequences, circumvented its sticky nature, and successfully established a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Salusin-β was abundantly present in the plasma of healthy volunteers, ranging from 1.9 to 6.6 nmol/L. Reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography analysis showed that a single immunoreactive salusin-β peak coincided with synthetic authentic salusin-β. Plasma salusin-β concentrations were unaffected by postural changes and by potent vasopressin release stimuli, such as hypertonic saline infusion or smoking. However, salusin-β concentrations showed significant circadian variation; concentrations were high during the daytime and reached the lowest concentrations in the early morning. Plasma salusin-β levels in subjects with diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, and cerebrovascular disease showed distinctly higher levels than healthy controls. Patients with panhypopituitarism combined with complete central diabetes insipidus also showed significantly higher plasma salusin-β levels. Therefore, the ELISA system developed in this study will be useful for evaluating circulating total salusin-β levels and for confirming the presence of authentic salusin-β in human plasma. The obtained results suggest a limited contribution of the neuroendocrine system to peripheral total salusin-β concentrations and a role for plasma total salusin-β concentrations as an indicator of systemic vascular diseases.

  7. Liarozole, an Inhibitor of Retinoic Acid Metabolism, Retarded Atherogenesis in LDLR-/- Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zolberg Relevy, Noa; Harari, Ayelet; Kamari, Yehuda; Harats, Dror; Shaish, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Liarozole is a Retinoic Acid Metabolism Blocking Agent (RAMBA). As retinoic acid (RA) and its precursor, beta-carotene (BC), have been shown to inhibit atherosclerosis development in mouse models, in the present study we investigated whether liarozole can mimic the anti-atherogenic effect of RA. We demonstrate, by using the LDL receptor-knockout mouse model fed a high-fat diet, that liarozole significantly reduces by 50% the aortic sinus atherosclerotic lesion area.    

  8. Dietary cladode powder from wild type and domesticated Opuntia species reduces atherogenesis in apoE knock-out mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoby-Salom, Sandra; Guéraud, Françoise; Camaré, Caroline; de la Rosa, Ana-Paulina Barba; Rossignol, Michel; Santos Díaz, María del Socorro; Salvayre, Robert; Negre-Salvayre, Anne

    2016-03-01

    Dietary intake of Opuntia species may prevent the development of cardiovascular diseases. The present study was designed to characterize the biological antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of Opuntia species and to investigate whether Opuntia cladodes prevent the development of atherosclerosis in vivo, in apoE(-)KO mice. The effects of the two Opuntia species, the wild Opuntia streptacantha and the domesticated Opuntia ficus-indica, were tested on the generation of intra- and extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and kinetics of the LDL oxidation by murine CRL2181 endothelial cells and on the subsequent inflammatory signaling leading to the adhesion of monocytes on the activated endothelium and the formation of foam cells. Opuntia species blocked the extracellular ROS (superoxide anion) generation and LDL oxidation by CRL2181, as well as the intracellular ROS rise and signaling evoked by the oxidized LDL, including the nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NFκB, the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 adhesion molecules, and the adhesion of monocytes to CRL2181. In vivo, Opuntia significantly reduced the formation of atherosclerotic lesions and the accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal adducts in the vascular wall of apoE-KO mice, indicating that Opuntia cladodes prevent lipid oxidation in the vascular wall. In conclusion, wild and domesticated Opuntia species exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic properties which emphasize their nutritional benefit for preventing cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26704378

  9. Thalidomide influences atherogenesis in aortas of ApoE(-/-)/LDLR (-/-) double knockout mice: a nano-CT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampschulte, Marian; Gunkel, Irina; Stieger, Philipp; Sedding, Daniel G; Brinkmann, Anne; Ritman, Erik L; Krombach, Gabriele A; Langheinrich, Alexander C

    2014-04-01

    Plaque progression in atherosclerosis is closely connected to angiogenesis due to vasa vasorum (VV) growth. Objective of this study was to determine the unknown long-term effect of thalidomide on adventitial VV neovascularization and plaque progression using nano-focussed computed tomography (nano-CT). Proliferation and migration assays in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) measured number of viable cells after incubation with thalidomide. Male ApoE(-/-)/LDLR(-/-) (AL) mice (n = 5) received a thalidomide containing western diet (WD) over 29 weeks. Another five male AL mice (WD without thalidomide) served as control group. Descending aortas were scanned with nano-CT at (1.5 μm)(3) isotropic voxel size. Number and area of adventitial VV as well as plaque cross sectional area were measured. Results were complemented by histology. Thalidomide inhibited proliferation and migration of HCAEC dose-dependently. VV neovascularization decreased in number per cross section (7.66 ± 0.301 vs. 8.62 ± 0.164, p thalidomide (0.57 ± 0.0187 vs. 0.803 ± 0.0148 mm(2), p thalidomide. Therefore, nano-CT can be considered as a new method to detect therapeutic effects in experimental models of atherosclerosis.

  10. The prolactin receptor is expressed in macrophages within human carotid atherosclerotic plaques: a role for prolactin in atherogenesis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Reuwer; M. van Eijk; F. Houttuijn-Bloemendaal; C. van der Loos; N. Claessen; P. Teeling; J.J. Kastelein; J. Hamann; V. Goffin; J. von der Thüsen; M. Twickler; J. Aten

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerotic vascular disease is the consequence of a chronic inflammatory process, and prolactin has been shown to be a component of the inflammatory response. Additionally, recent studies indicate that prolactin contributes to an atherogenic phenotype. We hypothesized that this may be the resul

  11. Chlamydial virulence determinants in atherogenesis: the role of chlamydial lipopolysaccharide and heat shock protein 60 in macrophage-lipoprotein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalayoglu, M V; Indrawati; Morrison, R P; Morrison, S G; Yuan, Y; Byrne, G I

    2000-06-01

    Data from a spectrum of epidemiologic, pathologic, and animal model studies show that Chlamydia pneumoniae infection is associated with coronary artery disease, but it is not clear how the organism may initiate or promote atherosclerosis. It is postulated that C. pneumoniae triggers key atherogenic events through specific virulence determinants. C. pneumoniae induces mononuclear phagocyte foam cell formation by chlamydial lipopolysaccharide (cLPS) and low-density lipoprotein oxidation by chlamydial hsp60 (chsp60). Thus, different chlamydial components may promote distinct events implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. Data implicating cLPS and chsp60 in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis are discussed and novel approaches are presented for attempting to elucidate how these putative virulence determinants signal mononuclear phagocytes to modulate lipoprotein influx and modification.

  12. Developmental Exposure to Second-Hand Smoke Increases Adult Atherogenesis and Alters Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Deletions in apoE−/− Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Fetterman, Jessica L.; Melissa Pompilius; Westbrook, David G.; Dale Uyeminami; Jamelle Brown; Pinkerton, Kent E.; Ballinger, Scott W.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. While many studies have focused upon the effects of adult second-hand smoke exposure on cardiovascular disease development, disease development occurs over decades and is likely influenced by childhood exposure. The impacts of in utero versus neonatal second-hand smoke exposure on adult atherosclerotic disease development are not known. The objective of the current study was to determine the effects of in...

  13. Composition evaluation of the tallow and meat fatty acids of the cattle and determining their atherogenesis and thrombogenesisindexes in South Khorasan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Malekaneh

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: It was found that the sum of trans and stearic fatty acids was more in tallow. The hypocholesterolemic fatty acids levels were higher in the meat in the whole province. The cattle’s meat had lower atherogenetic and thrombogenetic properties compared with the animals’ fat.The consumed cattle’s meat and fat in the province appear to have a proper condition.

  14. Tiaozhi Tongmai Granules reduce atherogenesis and promote the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 in rabbit atherosclerotic plaque macrophages and the liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Sun

    2014-07-01

    Conclusions: Tiaozhi Tongmai Granules appear to have an anti-atherogenic effect that is most likely mediated by simultaneously upregulating the protein expression of ABCA1 in rabbit atherosclerotic plaque macrophages and in the liver.

  15. Chronic treatment with nitric oxide-releasing aspirin reduces plasma low-density lipoprotein oxidation and oxidative stress, arterial oxidation-specific epitopes, and atherogenesis in hypercholesterolemic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Claudio; Ackah, Eric; de Nigris, Filomena; Del Soldato, Piero; D'Armiento, Francesco P.; Crimi, Ettore; Condorelli, Mario; Sessa, William C.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of chronic treatment with nitric oxide-containing aspirin (NO-aspirin, NCX-4016) in comparison with regular aspirin or placebo on the development of a chronic disease such as atherosclerosis were investigated in hypercholesterolemic low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor-deficient mice. Male mice were assigned randomly to receive in a volume of 10 ml/kg either placebo (n = 10), 30 mg/kg/day NO-aspirin (n = 10), or 18 mg/kg/day of regular aspirin (n = 10). After 12 weeks of treatment, the computer-assisted imaging analysis revealed that NO-aspirin reduced the aortic cumulative lesion area by 39.8 ± 12.3% compared with that of the placebo (P < 0.001). Regular aspirin did not reduce significantly aortic lesions (−5.1 ± 2.3%) compared with the placebo [P = 0.867, not significant (NS)]. Furthermore, NO-aspirin reduced significantly plasma LDL oxidation compared with aspirin and placebo, as shown by the significant reduction of malondialdehyde content (P < 0.001) as well as by the prolongation of lag-time (P < 0.01). Similarly, systemic oxidative stress, measured by plasma isoprostanes, was significantly reduced by treatment with NCX-4016 (P < 0.05). More importantly, mice treated with NO-aspirin revealed by immunohistochemical analysis of aortic serial sections a significant decrease in the intimal presence of oxidation-specific epitopes of oxLDL (E06 monoclonal antibody, P < 0.01), and macrophages–derived foam cells (F4/80 monoclonal antibody, P < 0.05), compared with placebo or aspirin. These data indicate that enhanced NO release by chronic treatment with the NO-containing aspirin has antiatherosclerotic and antioxidant effects in the arterial wall of hypercholesterolemic mice. PMID:12209007

  16. Studies of cholesterol and bile acid metabolism, and early atherogenesis in hamsters fed GT16-239, a novel bile acid sequestrant (BAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T A; Nicolosi, R J; Rogers, E J; Sacchiero, R; Goldberg, D J

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of GT16-239, an alkylated, cross-linked poly(allylamine) bile acid sequestrant with cholestyramine on cholesterol and bile acid metabolism, and early aortic atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic male F1B Golden Syrian hamsters. In this controlled study, 42 hamsters were divided into six groups and were fed a chow-based hypercholesterolemic diet supplemented with a 10% oil blend (55% coconut/45% corn), 0.1% cholesterol (w/w) (control) and either 0.9 or 1.2% cholestyramine or 0.2, 0.4 or 0.6% GT16-239 for 13 weeks. Laboratory analyses included evaluating plasma lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, hepatic HMG-CoA reductase and 7 alpha-hydroxylase activities, fecal excretion of bile acids and neutral sterols, hepatic cholesterol concentrations, and early atherosclerosis (aortic fatty streak area). Relative to the control diet, the 0.6% GT16-239 versus the 1.2% cholestyramine significantly inhibited the elevation of plasma lipoprotein total cholesterol (TC) (-69% vs -40%), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) (-49% vs -30%), and non-HDL-C (-81 vs -48%) concentrations; increased the activities of both HMG-CoA reductase (1492% vs 62%) and 7 alpha-hydroxylase (175% vs 86%); lowered the concentration of hepatic cholesteryl ester (-94% vs -59%); increased fecal cholesterol concentration (+28% vs -10%); and decreased aortic fatty streak area (-100% vs -86%). Unexpected findings of this comparison were increased fecal concentrations of cholic acid (533%) and chenodeoxycholic acid (400%) and the reduction in lithocholic acid (-50%) in the 0.6% GT16-239 compared to the 1.2% cholestyramine group. In summary, GT16-239 had a greater impact on cholesterol metabolism and early atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic hamsters than cholestyramine.

  17. Chronic over-expression of heat shock protein 27 attenuates atherogenesis and enhances plaque remodeling: a combined histological and mechanical assessment of aortic lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles M Cuerrier

    Full Text Available AIMS: Expression of Heat Shock Protein-27 (HSP27 is reduced in human coronary atherosclerosis. Over-expression of HSP27 is protective against the early formation of lesions in atherosclerosis-prone apoE(-/- mice (apoE(-/-HSP27(o/e - however, only in females. We now seek to determine if chronic HSP27 over-expression is protective in a model of advanced atherosclerosis in both male and female apoE(-/- mice. METHODS AND RESULTS: After 12 weeks on a high fat diet, serum HSP27 levels rose more than 16-fold in male and female apoE(-/-HSP27(o/e mice, although females had higher levels than males. Relative to apoE(-/- mice, female apoE(-/-HSP27(o/e mice showed reductions in aortic lesion area of 35% for en face and 30% for cross-sectional sinus tissue sections - with the same parameters reduced by 21% and 24% in male cohorts; respectively. Aortic plaques from apoE(-/-HSP27(o/e mice showed almost 50% reductions in the area occupied by cholesterol clefts and free cholesterol, with fewer macrophages and reduced apoptosis but greater intimal smooth muscle cell and collagen content. The analysis of the aortic mechanical properties showed increased vessel stiffness in apoE(-/-HSP27(o/e mice (41% in female, 34% in male compare to apoE(-/- counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic over-expression of HSP27 is atheroprotective in both sexes and coincides with reductions in lesion cholesterol accumulation as well as favorable plaque remodeling. These data provide new clues as to how HSP27 may improve not only the composition of atherosclerotic lesions but potentially their stability and resilience to plaque rupture.

  18. The action of peroxyl radicals, powerful deleterious reagents, explains why neither cholesterol nor saturated fatty acids cause atherogenesis and age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiteller, Gerhard; Afzal, Mohammad

    2014-11-10

    Cells respond to alterations in their membrane structure by activating hydrolytic enzymes. Thus, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are liberated. Free PUFAs react with molecular oxygen to give lipid hydroperoxide molecules (LOOHs). In case of severe cell injury, this physiological reaction switches to the generation of lipid peroxide radicals (LOO(·)). These radicals can attack nearly all biomolecules such as lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, nucleic acids and enzymes, impairing their biological functions. Identical cell responses are triggered by manipulation of food, for example, heating/grilling and particularly homogenization, representing cell injury. Cholesterol as well as diets rich in saturated fat have been postulated to accelerate the risk of atherosclerosis while food rich in unsaturated fatty acids has been claimed to lower this risk. However, the fact is that LOO(·) radicals generated from PUFAs can oxidize cholesterol to toxic cholesterol oxides, simulating a reduction in cholesterol level. In this review it is shown how active LOO(·) radicals interact with biomolecules at a speed transcending usual molecule-molecule reactions by several orders of magnitude. Here, it is explained how functional groups are fundamentally transformed by an attack of LOO(·) with an obliteration of essential biomolecules leading to pathological conditions. A serious reconsideration of the health and diet guidelines is required. PMID:25318456

  19. Interaction of OX-LDL and monocytes-macrophages promote atherogenesis%OX-LDL与单核巨噬细胞相互作用促进动脉粥样硬化形成

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张良; 韩丹; 赵诗萌; 吴红敏

    2013-01-01

    目的 单核-巨噬细胞在动脉粥样硬化(AS)发病过程中的作用日益受到关注,但泡沫化过程中细胞内脂质变化情况的研究报道尚不多见.方法 一次性密度梯度超速离心分离LDL制成ox-LDL,动态观察小鼠巨噬细胞内脂质成分和细胞形态的变化.结果 纯化的LDL纯度可达92.39%.细胞形态学观察细胞内红色脂质颗粒增多,电镜显示细胞核周围包含染色质,胞浆稀少含有大量的核糖体,线粒体丰富.随浓度的增加LDL组及OX-LDL组细胞内TC、FC、CE均明显增加.结论 OX-LDL同单核巨噬细胞相互作用可使动脉壁局部形成AS病变的特征病理性细胞.OX-LDL较LDL更易使单核巨噬细胞形成泡沫细胞.高浓度的OX-LDL可以导致细胞膜结构的损伤.%Objective There is growing concern about the role of monocytes-macrophages in the progression of atherosclerosis (AS). However, the mechanism of lipid changes in those cells in the foaming process is not fully clear. Methods LDL was isolated by density-gradient centrifugation and to make Ox-LDL. The changes of lipid composition and cellular morphology of the rat macrophages were dynamically observed. Results The purity of separated LDL reached 92. 39% . Increased amount of red lipid droplets in the macrophages were observed. Electron microscopy showed the presence of perinuclear chromatin, numerous mitochondria and ribosomes in the sparse cytoplasm. In the LDL group, TC, FC, and CE were all increased along with the increasing LDL concentration. Similar results were observed in the Ox-LDL group. Conclusions Interaction of Ox-LDL and monocytes-macrophages may promote the formation of characteristic pathologic cells of AS nature in the arterial wall. OX-LDL is more easy than LDL to promote the changes of monocytes/ macrophages into foam cells. High concentration of OX-LDL can lead to cell membrane damages.

  20. 自身抗原在动脉粥样硬化形成中作用的研究进展%Research progress on the function of autoantigens in atherogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙喜娟; 关秀茹

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis(AS),a multifactorial inflammatory disease, has been considered as an immtme-mediated process. Immune system has been recognized as an important causitive component of atherosclerotic inflammation. Epidemiological studies demonstrated that atherosclerosis was accelerated in several autoimmune and rheumatic diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus(SLE)and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Studies showed several potential autoantigens, such as oxLDL, HSP65/60 and β2-GPI, are important in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. These studies many contribute to the development of new approaches in the prevention and treatment of atheroaclerosis.%动脉粥样硬化(AS)是一种由免疫介导的、多因素参与的炎症性疾病。流行病学调查显示,在一些自身免疫性疾病中AS有所加剧,例如系统性红斑狼疮(SLE)和抗磷脂综合征。通过研究认为,几个潜在的自身抗原,如氧化低密度脂蛋白、热休克蛋白65/60和β2糖蛋白Ⅰ在AS的发生和发展中发挥着重要作用。这些新的认识,为人们找到了预防和治疗AS的新靶点。

  1. Clinical chemistry of atherosclerosis : Contribution to apolipoprotein-E analysis, public Health and nutricion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Dineke Aletta Johanna

    1999-01-01

    Chapter 1 is meant as a general introduction to atherosclerosis and the ensuing coronary artery disease (CAD). It gives special attention to atherogenesis, lipoprotein metabolism and nutritional factors. The chapter opens with the presentation of an integrated model of atherogenesis with a central r

  2. Curcumin modulation of high fat diet-induced atherosclerosis and steatohepatosis in LDL receptor deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consuming curcumin may benefit health by modulating lipid metabolism and suppressing atherogenesis. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP-4/aP2) and CD36 expression are key factors in lipid accumulation in macrophages and foam cell formation in atherogenesis. Our earlier observations suggest that curcum...

  3. ELEVATED CIRCULATING LEVELS OF MACROPHAGE MIGRATION INHIBITORY FACTOR IN POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    González, Frank; ROTE, Neal S.; Minium, Judi; Weaver, Amy L.; Kirwan, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) have chronic low level inflammation which can increase the risk of atherogenesis. We evaluated the status of circulating macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a proinflammatory cytokine involved in atherogenesis, in women with PCOS and weight-matched controls. Two-way analysis of variance models adjusted for age were fit to evaluate the effect of PCOS status (PCOS vs. controls) and weight-class (obese vs. lean) on MIF and other parameters. M...

  4. (18)F-FDG PET imaging of murine atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hag, Anne Mette Fisker; Pedersen, Sune Folke; Christoffersen, Christina;

    2012-01-01

    To study whether (18)F-FDG can be used for in vivo imaging of atherogenesis by examining the correlation between (18)F-FDG uptake and gene expression of key molecular markers of atherosclerosis in apoE(-/-) mice.......To study whether (18)F-FDG can be used for in vivo imaging of atherogenesis by examining the correlation between (18)F-FDG uptake and gene expression of key molecular markers of atherosclerosis in apoE(-/-) mice....

  5. C242T Polymorphism in CYBA Gene (p22phox and Risk of Coronary Artery Disease in a Population of Caucasian Italians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Nasti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: specific polymorphisms of genes regulating intracellular redox balance and oxidative stress are related to atherogenesis. Some studies have identified a relationship between progression of atherosclerosis and C242T mutation in CYBA gene coding for p22phox, a subunit of the NADH/NADPH oxidase system.

  6. Continuous reduction of plasma paraoxonase activity with increasing dialysis vintage in hemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henning, Bernhard F; Holzhausen, Helge; Tepel, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Plasma paraoxonase (PON) is an enzyme that hydrolyzes organic phosphate and aromatic carboxylic acid esters. Reduced activity is associated with early events of atherogenesis. The relevance of PON phenotypes is not well characterized in hemodialysis patients. In a cross-sectional study we measure...... dialysis vintage (P...

  7. No effect of consumption of green and black tea on plasma lipid and antioxidant levels and on LDL Oxidation in smokers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Princen, H.M.G.; Duyvenvoorde, W. van; Buytenhek, R.; Blonk, C.; Tijburg, L.B.M.; Langius, J.A.E.; Meinders, A.E.; Pijl, H.

    1998-01-01

    Intake of flavonoids is associated with a reduced cardiovascular risk. Oxidation of LDL is a major step in atherogenesis, and antioxidants may protect LDL from oxidation. Because tea is an important source of flavonoids which are strong antioxidants, we have assessed in a randomized, placebo-control

  8. Recombinant human erythropoietin suppresses endothelial cell apoptosis and reduces the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2 proteins in the aortas of apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, Jeffrey S.; Zhao, Ying; Yung, Raymond; Desai, Anjali

    2011-01-01

    Recent clinical trials have raised concern that therapy with recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) may increase cardiovascular disease risk, event rate, and mortality. Endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis has been implicated in both atherogenesis as well as in the destabilization and rupture of atheromatous plaques.

  9. Identification and quantification of diadenosine polyphosphate concentrations in human plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jankowski, Joachim; Jankowski, Vera; Laufer, Udo;

    2003-01-01

    Diadenosine polyphosphates have been demonstrated to be involved in the control of vascular tone as well as the growth of vascular smooth muscle cells and hence, possibly, in atherogenesis. In this study we investigated the question of whether diadenosine polyphosphates are present in human plasm...

  10. Experimental atherosclerosis in rabbits on diets with milk fat and different proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermus, R.J.J.

    1975-01-01

    In this thesis the literature about the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis has been reviewed. The various risk indicators for atherosclerosis are discussed and related to the theory about atherogenesis. A review of the influence of milk fat constituents and dietary proteins on serum lipids and atherosc

  11. Chemokine Receptor 7 Knockout Attenuates Atherosclerotic Plaque Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luchtefeld, Maren; Grothusen, Christina; Gagalick, Andreas; Jagavelu, Kumaravelu; Schuett, Harald; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Pabst, Oliver; Grote, Karsten; Drexler, Helmut; Foerster, Reinhold; Schieffer, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Background-Atherosclerosis is a systemic inflammatory disease characterized by the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. Both innate immunity and adaptive immunity contribute to atherogenesis, but the mode of interaction is poorly understood. Chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) is critically involved in the

  12. Different effects of anthocyanins and phenolic acids from wild blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) on monocytes adhesion to endothelial cells in a TNF-α stimulated proinflammatory environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Bo', Cristian; Roursgaard, Martin; Porrini, Marisa;

    2016-01-01

    Scope: Monocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium is a crucial step in the early stages of atherogenesis. This study aims to investigate the capacity of an anthocyanin (ACN) and phenolic acid (PA) rich fraction (RF) of a wild blueberry, single ACNs (cyanidin, malvidin, delphinidin) and related...

  13. Effect of darapladib on major coronary events after an acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Donoghue, Michelle L; Braunwald, Eugene; White, Harvey D;

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) has been hypothesized to be involved in atherogenesis through pathways related to inflammation. Darapladib is an oral, selective inhibitor of the Lp-PLA2 enzyme. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of darapladib in patients ...

  14. High-density lipoprotein loses its anti-inflammatory capacity by accumulation of pro-inflammatory-serum amyloid A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toelle, Markus; Huang, Tao; Schuchardt, Mirjam; Jankowski, Vera; Pruefer, Nicole; Jankowski, Joachim; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Zidek, Walter; van der Giet, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Aims High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is known to have potent anti-inflammatory properties. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 is an important pro-inflammatory cytokine in early atherogenesis. There is evidence that HDL can lose its protective function during inflammatory disease. In patients with end

  15. Accumulation of myeloperoxidase-positive neutrophils in atherosclerotic lesions in LDLR-/- mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Marcella; Gijbels, Marion J. J.; Duijvestijn, Adriaan; Smook, Marjan; van de Gaar, Marie Jose; Heeringa, Peter; de Winther, Menno P. J.; Tervaert, Jan Willem Cohen

    2008-01-01

    Objective-Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease in which the immune system plays an important role. Neutrophils have not been thoroughly studied in the context of atherogenesis. Here, we investigated neutrophils in the development of murine atherosclerotic lesions. Methods and Results-LD

  16. Important role for bone marrow-derived cholesteryl ester transfer protein in lipoprotein cholesterol redistribution and atherosclerotic lesion development in LDL receptor knockout mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Eck, Miranda; Ye, Dan; Hildebrand, Reeni B.; Kruijt, J. Kar; de Haan, Willeke; Hoekstra, Menno; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Ehnholm, Christian; Jauhiainen, Matti; Van Berkel, Theo J. C.

    2007-01-01

    Abundant amounts of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) are found in macrophage-derived foam cells in the arterial wall, but its function in atherogenesis is unknown. To investigate the role of macrophage CETP in atherosclerosis, LDL receptor knockout mice were transplanted with bone marrow fr

  17. Coronary artery calcification in hemophilia A: No evidence for a protective effect of factor VIII deficiency on atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuinenburg, A.; Rutten, A.; Kavousi, M.; Leebeek, F.W.G.; Ypma, P.F.; Laros-Van Gorkom, B.A.P.; Nijziel, M.R.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Mauser-Bunschoten, E.P.; Roosendaal, G.; Biesma, D.H.; Van Der Lugt A., [No Value; Hofman, A.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Bots, M.L.; Schutgens, R.E.G.

    2011-01-01

    Mortality due to ischemic heart disease is lower in hemophilia patients when compared to the general male population. As coagulation plays a role in the inflammatory pathways involved in atherogenesis, we investigated whether the clotting factor deficiency protects hemophilia patients from developin

  18. Mannose-Binding Lectin Deficiency Is Associated with Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vengen, Inga Thorsen; Madsen, Hans O; Garred, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins activate the complement cascade, which is involved in atherogenesis. Based on a pilot study, we hypothesized that functional polymorphisms in the MBL gene (MBL2) leading to dysfunctional protein are related to development of myocardial infarction (MI...

  19. Neil3-dependent base excision repair regulates lipid metabolism and prevents atherosclerosis in Apoe-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarpengland, Tonje; Holm, Sverre; Scheffler, Katja;

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative DNA damage accumulates in atherosclerosis. Recently, we showed that a genetic variant in the human DNA repair enzyme NEIL3 was associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction. Here, we explored the role of Neil3/NEIL3 in atherogenesis by both...

  20. Thrombin inhibition by dabigatran attenuates atherosclerosis in ApoE deficient mice

    OpenAIRE

    Pingel, Simon; Tiyerili, Vedat; Mueller, Jens; Werner, Nikos; Nickenig, Georg; Mueller, Cornelius

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by endothelial cell damage, infiltration, proliferation and accumulation of macrophages, lymphocytes and transformed vascular smooth muscle cells within the vascular wall and procoagulation processes involving activation of plasmatic coagulation events and platelets. Numerous studies suggested a close interaction between thrombin action and atherogenesis, but possibly underlying mechanisms are multiple and specific t...

  1. Clinical impact of vasomotor function assessment and the role of ACE-inhibitors and statins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselbergs, FW; van der Harst, P; Jessurun, GAJ; Tio, RA; van Gilst, WH

    2005-01-01

    Impaired endothelial function is recognised as one of the earliest events of atherogenesis. Endothelium-dependent vasomotion has been the principal method to assess endothelial function. In this article, we will discuss the clinical value of the different techniques to evaluate endothelium-dependent

  2. Macrophage specific overexpression of the human macrophage scavenger receptor in transgenic mice, using a 180-kb yeast artificial chromosome, leads to enhanced foam cell formation of isolated peritoneal macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winther, M.P.J. de; Dijk, K.W. van; Vlijmen, B.J.M. van; Gijbels, M.J.J.; Heus, J.J.; Wijers, E.R.; Bos, A.C. van den; Breuer, M.; Frants, R.R.; Havekes, L.M.; Hofker, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    Macrophage scavenger receptors class A (MSR) are thought to play an important role in atherogenesis by mediating the unrestricted uptake of modified lipoproteins by macrophages in the vessel wall leading to foam cell formation. To investigate the in vivo role of the MSR in this process, a transgenic

  3. Fatty Acid binding protein 4 is associated with carotid atherosclerosis and outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Sverre; Ueland, Thor; Dahl, Tuva B;

    2011-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) has been shown to play an important role in macrophage cholesterol trafficking and associated inflammation. To further elucidate the role of FABP4 in atherogenesis in humans, we examined the regulation of FABP4 in carotid atherosclerosis and ischemic stroke....

  4. Diabetes with poor glycaemic control does not promote atherosclerosis in genetically modified hypercholesterolaemic minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Mashhadi, Rozh H; Bjørklund, Martin M; Mortensen, Martin B;

    2015-01-01

    atherogenesis in a novel pig model of atherosclerosis, the D374Y-PCSK9 (+) transgenic minipig. METHODS: Nineteen minipigs were fed a cholesterol-enriched, high-fat diet; ten of these pigs were injected with streptozotocin to generate a model of diabetes. Restricted feeding was implemented to control the pigs......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, but whether there is a direct and independent role for impaired glucose control in atherogenesis remains uncertain. We investigated whether diabetes with poor glycaemic control would accelerate......' weight gain and cholesterol intake. After 49 weeks of high-fat feeding, the major arteries were harvested for a detailed analysis of the plaque burden and histological plaque type. RESULTS: Stable hyperglycaemia was achieved in the diabetic minipigs, while the plasma total and LDL...

  5. Treating dyslipidemias: is inflammation the missing link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoutsidakis, Nikolaos; Deftereos, Spyridon; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Manolis, Antonis S; Bouras, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    Low-grade chronic inflammation is now being held as an important process in the development of atherosclerosis, with new links between dyslipidemia and inflammation being constantly found. While most studies aim to discover inflammatory pathways leading from dyslipidemia to atherogenesis, there is evidence that inflammation can also act in reverse, altering lipid metabolism in unfavorable ways, possibly creating a vicious cycle of inflammationdyslipidemia- inflammation. This is highly relevant for the search of novel therapeutic targets. In this review, after a brief account of the inflammatory mechanisms leading from dyslipidemia to atherogenesis, we focus on what is currently known about the ways inflammation can impair lipid metabolism and whether anti-inflammatory therapies could have a role in dyslipidemia management.

  6. An ex-vivo model for evaluating bioenergetics in aortic rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle P. Feeley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of death worldwide and it exhibits a greatly increasing incidence proportional to aging. Atherosclerosis is a chronic condition of arterial hardening resulting in restriction of oxygen delivery and blood flow to the heart. Relationships between mitochondrial DNA damage, oxidant production, and early atherogenesis have been recently established and it is likely that aspects of atherosclerotic risk are metabolic in nature. Here we present a novel method through which mitochondrial bioenergetics can be assessed from whole aorta tissue. This method does not require mitochondrial isolation or cell culture and it allows for multiple technical replicates and expedient measurement. This procedure facilitates quantitative bioenergetic analysis and can provide great utility in better understanding the link between mitochondria, metabolism, and atherogenesis.

  7. [CHARACTERISTIC OF ALTERATIONS OF ARTERIES IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE AND CHRONIC HEPATITIS C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guliaev, N I; Kuznetsov, V V; Poltareĭko, D S; Qleksiuk, I B; Gordienko, A V; Barsukov, A V

    2015-01-01

    The article presents an assessment of degree and type of atherosclerosis of coronary and non-coronary vessels in old patients with ischemic heart disease associated with chronic viral hepatitis C (VHC), the incidence of myocardial infarction and the possibility of participation chronic VHC in atherogenesis. Patients with ischemic heart disease have correlation of atherosclerosis of arteries with age, hypercholesterinemia. Patients without chronic VHC more often give a higher risk of myocardial infarction, especially in early period (1-1,5 years) of onset of ischemic heart disease clinical implications. Patients with ischemic heart disease associated with chronic viral hepatitis C more often have generalized alterations in vessels, multifocal type of alteration. So, participation of VHC in atherogenesis is most probably connected with maintenance of chronic immune inflammation in vascular endothelium.

  8. Ethanolic Extract of Vitis thunbergii Exhibits Lipid Lowering Properties via Modulation of the AMPK-ACC Pathway in Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hsu Pan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitis thunbergii (VT is a wild grape that has been shown to provide various cardioprotective effects. The present study was designed to examine whether a VT extract could reduce serum lipid levels and prevent atherogenesis in a hypercholesterolemic rabbit model. At the end of an 8-week study, our results showed that a VT extract supplement markedly suppressed the serum levels of cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein, reduced lipid accumulation in liver tissues, and limited aortic fatty streaks. Our findings suggest that the VT extract activated AMPK (5′-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase with subsequent inhibition of the activation of ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Our results suggest that this VT extract could be further developed as a potential lipid-lowering agent and as a natural health food to prevent atherogenesis.

  9. Imaging Leukocyte Adhesion to the Vascular Endothelium at High Intraluminal Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Michell, Danielle L.; Andrews, Karen L.; Woollard, Kevin J.; Chin-Dusting, Jaye P F

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, hypertension is reported to be in approximately a quarter of the population and is the leading biomedical risk factor for mortality worldwide. In the vasculature hypertension is associated with endothelial dysfunction and increased inflammation leading to atherosclerosis and various disease states such as chronic kidney disease2, stroke3 and heart failure4. An initial step in vascular inflammation leading to atherogenesis is the adhesion cascade which involves the rolling, tetherin...

  10. Lysophosphatidic acid effects on atherosclerosis and thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Mei-Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has been found to accumulate in high concentrations in atherosclerotic lesions. LPA is a bioactive phospholipid produced by activated platelets and formed during the oxidation of LDL. Accumulating evidence suggests that this lipid mediator may serve as an important risk factor for development of atherosclerosis and thrombosis. The role of LPA in atherogenesis is supported by the evidence that LPA: stimulates endothelial cells to produce adhesion molecules and chemo...

  11. Lipids, inflammation, and the Renin-Angiotensin System

    OpenAIRE

    van der Harst, Pim

    2006-01-01

    Summary and Future Perspectives Impaired endothelial function is recognized as one of the earliest events of atherogenesis.1, 2 In Part I, chapter 1, we discussed the clinical value of the different techniques to evaluate endothelium-dependent vasomotor function. We also reviewed the efficacy of both angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors on improving vascular function. Despite the extensive experimental evidence and some clinical trials studies using qu...

  12. Genetic Markers of Cardiovascular Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Rodríguez-Rodríguez; Raquel López-Mejías; Mercedes García-Bermúdez; Carlos González-Juanatey; Miguel A. González-Gay; Javier Martín

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) disease is the most common cause of premature mortality in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is the result of an accelerated atherosclerotic process. Both RA and atherosclerosis are complex polygenic diseases. Besides traditional CV risk factors and chronic inflammation, a number of studies have confirmed the role of genetic factors in the development of the atherogenesis observed in RA. In this regard, besides a strong association between the HLA-DRB1∗04 shared ...

  13. The lp13.3 genomic region -rs599839- is associated with endothelial dysfunction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    López-Mejias, Raquel; González-Juanatey, C.; García-Bermúdez, M.; S. Castañeda; Blanco, Ricardo; Miranda-Filloy, J. A.; Llorca, Javier; Martín, J.; González-Gay, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and high risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease. Since genome-wide association studies demonstrated association between rs599839 polymorphism and coronary artery disease, in the present study we assessed the potential association of this polymorphism with endothelial dysfunction, an early step in atherogenesis. Methods: A total of 128 RA patients without history of CV event...

  14. Pomegranate Protection against Cardiovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Aviram; Mira Rosenblat

    2012-01-01

    The current paper summarizes the antioxidative and antiatherogenic effects of pomegranate polyphenols on serum lipoproteins and on arterial macrophages (two major components of the atherosclerotic lesion), using both in vitro and in vivo humans and mice models. Pomegranate juice and its by-products substantially reduced macrophage cholesterol and oxidized lipids accumulation, and foam cell formation (the hallmark of early atherogenesis), leading to attenuation of atherosclerosis development, ...

  15. Apolipoprotein B of low-density lipoprotein impairs nitric oxide-mediated endothelium-dependent relaxation in rat mesenteric arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yaping; Zhang, Wei; Edvinsson, Lars;

    2014-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B (ApoB) of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) causes endothelial dysfunction in the initial stage of atherogenesis. The present study was designed to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms involved. Rat mesenteric arteries were organ cultured in the presence of different concentra......B of LDL impairs vasodilation with damaging the endothelium and attenuating the NO-mediated endothelium-dependent relaxation, which might associate with lipid peroxidation and contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease....

  16. Regulation of Lipoprotein(a) by interleukin-6 in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Nike

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is still the leading cause of death in the western world in men and women. There are several factors such as visceral obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance and atherogenic dyslipidemia which substantially contribute to a risk of cardiovascular death. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) molecules initiate early atherogenesis. One of the most atherogenic lipoproteins is lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], which consists of a LDL-like particle and apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)]. However, ci...

  17. The Relationship Between Chronic Inflammation and Glucidic-Lipidic Profile Disorders in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Tarța I.D.; Căldăraru Carmen Denise; Gliga Mirela; Huțanu Adina; Bajko Z; Carașca E; Dogaru G.A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic inflammation has a proven role in atherogenesis, lipid profile parameters being related to cytokine production. In kidney transplant recipients, interleukin 6 (IL-6) is significantly associated with graft-related outcomes and also alterations of cholesterol and triglyceride metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between chronic inflammation and glucidic-lipidic metabolism disorders in a group of patients with kidney transplantation as renal...

  18. Effect of Zinc and Nitric Oxide on Monocyte Adhesion to Endothelial Cells under Shear Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sungmun; Eskin, Suzanne G.; Shah, Ankit K.; Schildmeyer, Lisa A.; McIntire, Larry V.

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the effect of zinc on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under different shear stress regimens, which may trigger atherogenesis. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were exposed to steady shear stress (15 dynes/cm2 or 1 dyne/cm2) or reversing shear stress (time average 1 dyne/cm2) for 24 hours. In all shear stress regimes, zinc deficiency enhanced THP-1 cell adhesion, while heparinase III reduced monocyte adhesion following reversing shear stress exposure. Unlike o...

  19. Adiponectin Actions in the Cardiovascular System

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins, Teresa A.; Ouchi, Noriyuki; Shibata, Rei; Walsh, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Obesity is strongly associated with the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Levels of the hormone adiponectin are downregulated in obese individuals, and several experimental studies show that adiponectin protects against the development of various obesity-related metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Adiponectin exhibits favorable effects on atherogenesis, endothelial function, and vascular remodeling by modulation of signaling cascades in cells of the...

  20. A Case of Severe Carotid Stenosis in a Patient with Familial Hypercholesterolemia without Significant Coronary Artery Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Aurélio Lima Barros; Hygor Ferreira-Fernandes; Ingrid Cristina Rêgo Barros; Adriel Rêgo Barbosa; Giovanny Rebouças Pinto

    2014-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an inherited metabolic disorder characterized by elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in the blood. In its heterozygous form, it occurs in 1 in 500 individuals in the general population. It is an important contributor to the early onset of coronary artery disease (CAD), accounting for 5–10% of cases of cardiovascular events in people younger than 50 years. Atherogenesis triggered by hypercholesterolemia generally progresses faster in the co...

  1. Macrophage phenotype modulation by CXCL4 in vascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Albert Gleissner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During atherogenesis, blood monocytes transmigrate into the subendothelial space and differentiate towards macrophages and foam cells. The major driver of this differentiation process is macrophage colony-stimulation factor (M-CSF. M-CSF-induced macrophages are important promoters of atherogenesis as demonstrated in M-CSF and M-CSF receptor knock out mice. However, M-CSF is not the only relevant promoter of macrophage differentiation. The platelet chemokine CXCL4 prevents monocyte apoptosis and promotes macrophage differentiation in vitro. It is secreted from activated platelets and has effects on various cell types relevant in atherogenesis. Knocking out the Pf4 gene coding for CXCL4 in Apoe-/- mice leads to reduced atherogenesis. Thus, it seems likely that CXC4-induced macrophages may have specific pro-atherogenic capacities. We have studied CXC4-induced differentiation of human macrophages using gene chips, systems biology and functional in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Our data indicate that CXCL4-induced macrophages are distinct from both their M-CSF-induced counterparts and other known macrophage polarizations like M1 macrophages (induced by LPS and interferon-gamma or M2 macrophages (induced by interleukin-4. CXCL4-induced macrophages have distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics, e.g. the complete loss of the hemoglobin-haptoglobin (Hb-Hp scavenger receptor CD163 which is necessary for effective hemoglobin clearance after plaque hemorrhage. Lack of CD163 is accompanied by the inability to upregulate the atheroprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 in response to Hb-Hp complexes.This review covers the current knowledge about CXCL4-induced macrophages, which based on their unique properties we have suggested to call these macrophages M4. CXCL4 may represent an important driver of macrophage heterogeneity within atherosclerotic lesions. Further dissecting its effects on macrophage differentiation may help to identify novel

  2. Role and Function of MicroRNAs in Extracellular Vesicles in Cardiovascular Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Philipp Pfeifer; Nikos Werner; Felix Jansen

    2015-01-01

    Intercellular communication mediated by extracellular vesicles is crucial for preserving vascular integrity and in the development of cardiovascular disease. Extracellular vesicles consist of apoptotic bodies, microvesicles, and exosomes that can be found in almost every fluid compartment of the body like blood, saliva, and urine. In the recent years, a lot of reports came up suggesting that major cardiovascular and metabolic pathologies like atherogenesis, heart failure, or diabetes are high...

  3. Influence of glycated low density lipoprotein on the proliferation,expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1,von Willebrand factor of human umbilical endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Jun; LIU Hui-ying; ZHANG Xiu-zhen; LEI Tao

    2009-01-01

    @@ Diabetes mellitus known as its macro-and microangiopathy has caused thousands of mortality per year.Recent researches showed that hyperglycemia,advanced glycation end products(AGEs)and some other factors acted on the process of atherogenesis.AGEs can combine with receptors of AGEs(RAGEs),which exist on the vascular endothelium,smooth muscle cells,macrophage,lymphocyte and so on.

  4. MicroRNA-155 promotes atherosclerosis by repressing Bcl6 in macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Nazari-Jahantigh, Maliheh; Wei, Yuanyuan; Noels, Heidi; Akhtar, Shamima; Zhou, Zhe; Koenen, Rory R.; Heyll, Kathrin; Gremse, Felix; Kiessling, Fabian; Grommes, Jochen; Weber, Christian; Schober, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques drive inflammatory responses, degrade lipoproteins, and phagocytose dead cells. MicroRNAs (miRs) control the differentiation and activity of macrophages by regulating the signaling of key transcription factors. However, the functional role of macrophage-related miRs in the immune response during atherogenesis is unknown. Here, we report that miR-155 is specifically expressed in atherosclerotic plaques and proinflammatory macrophages, where it was induced...

  5. Regulation of MicroRNA-155 in Atherosclerotic Inflammatory Responses by Targeting MAP3K10

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jianhua; Chen, Ting; Yang, Lin; Li, Zhoubin; Wong, Mei Mei; Zheng, Xiaoye; Pan, Xiaoping; Zhang, Li; Yan, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Aims Accumulating evidence suggest that numerous microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation, as well as various diseases that accompany inflammatory responses. Inflammation is known to be a major contributor to atherogenesis. Previous studies provide promising evidence in support of the role of miRNAs in cardiovascular disease. However, mechanistic data on these small molecules in atherosclerosis (AS) are still missing. The present study aims...

  6. Plasma antibodies to heat shock protein 60 and heat shock protein 70 are associated with increased risk of electrocardiograph abnormalities in automobile workers exposed to noise

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Jing; Yang, Miao; Yao, Huiling; Zheng, Jianru; Yang, Qiaoling; Chen, Sheng; Wei, Qingyi; Tanguay, Robert M.; Wu, Tangchun

    2005-01-01

    In the living and working environment, stressful factors, such as noise, can cause health problems including cardiovascular diseases and noise-induced hearing loss. Some heat shock proteins (Hsps) play an important role in protecting cardiac cells against ischemic injury, and antibodies against these Hsps are associated with the development and prognosis of atherogenesis, coronary heart disease, and hypertension. Whether the presence of such antibodies is associated with abnormal electrocardi...

  7. Molecular mechanisms regulating expression and function of transcription regulator "inhibitor of differentiation 3"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert Wai-sui LIM; Jin-mei WU

    2005-01-01

    The transcription factor antagonist inhibitor of differentiation 3 (Id3) has been implicated in many diverse developmental, physiological and pathophysiological processes. Its expression and function is subjected to many levels of complex regulation. This review summarizes the current understanding of these mechanisms and describes how they might be related to the diverse functions that have been attributed to the Id3 protein. Detailed understanding of these mechanisms should provide insights towards the development of therapeutic approaches to various diseases, including cancer and atherogenesis.

  8. Development of small molecule non-peptide formyl peptide receptor (FPR) ligands and molecular modeling of their recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Schepetkin I.A.; Klebnikov A.I.; Giovannoni M.P.; Kirpotina L.N.; Cilibrizzi A.; Quinn M.T.

    2014-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) expressed on a variety of cell types. These receptors play an important role in the regulation of inflammatory reactions and sensing cellular damage. They have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases, cataract formation, and atherogenesis. Thus, FPR ligands, both agonists and antagonists, may represent novel therapeutics for modulating host defense and innate immu...

  9. Oxyradical Stress, Endocannabinoids, and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anberitha T. Matthews

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is responsible for most cardiovascular disease (CVD and is caused by several factors including hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and chronic inflammation. Oxidants and electrophiles have roles in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and the concentrations of these reactive molecules are an important factor in disease initiation and progression. Overactive NADPH oxidase (Nox produces excess superoxide resulting in oxidized macromolecules, which is an important factor in atherogenesis. Although superoxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS have obvious toxic properties, they also have fundamental roles in signaling pathways that enable cells to adapt to stress. In addition to inflammation and ROS, the endocannabinoid system (eCB is also important in atherogenesis. Linkages have been postulated between the eCB system, Nox, oxidative stress, and atherosclerosis. For instance, CB2 receptor-evoked signaling has been shown to upregulate anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative pathways, whereas CB1 signaling appears to induce opposite effects. The second messenger lipid molecule diacylglycerol is implicated in the regulation of Nox activity and diacylglycerol lipase β (DAGLβ is a key biosynthetic enzyme in the biosynthesis eCB ligand 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG. Furthermore, Nrf2 is a vital transcription factor that protects against the cytotoxic effects of both oxidant and electrophile stress. This review will highlight the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS in intracellular signaling and the impact of deregulated ROS-mediated signaling in atherogenesis. In addition, there is also emerging knowledge that the eCB system has an important role in atherogenesis. We will attempt to integrate oxidative stress and the eCB system into a conceptual framework that provides insights into this pathology.

  10. Protective effects of trilinolein extracted from Panax notoginseng against cardiovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul CHAN; G Neil THOMAS; Brian TOMLINSON

    2002-01-01

    Trilinolein is a triacylglycerol purified from a commonly used traditional Chinese medicine Panax notoginseng.Trilinolein has been reported to provide a number of beneficial effects including reducing thrombogenicity and arrhythmias and increasing erythrocyte deformability. Additionally, trilinolein has been reported to be an antioxidant,which can counteract free radical damage associated with atherogenesis, and myocardial damage seen with ischaemia and reperfusion. These pharmacologic effects may explain the perceived benefits derived from treating circulatory disorders with the herb over the centuries.

  11. Human oxidation-specific antibodies reduce foam cell formation and atherosclerosis progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsimikas, Sotirios; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Hartvigsen, Karsten;

    2011-01-01

    We sought to assess the in vivo importance of scavenger receptor (SR)-mediated uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) in atherogenesis and to test the efficacy of human antibody IK17-Fab or IK17 single-chain Fv fragment (IK17-scFv), which lacks immunologic properties of intact antibod...... antibodies other than the ability to inhibit uptake of OxLDL by macrophages, to inhibit atherosclerosis....

  12. Alterations in aortic antioxidant components in an experimental model of atherosclerosis: a time-course study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, David V; Nichols, Cathleen R; Hoekstra, Kenneth A; Garnett, Maureen E; Cheng, Kimberly M

    2003-10-01

    Antioxidant component alterations in the aorta during atherogenesis were examined in atherosclerosis-susceptible (SUS) Japanese quail fed a cholesterol-supplemented (0.5% w/w) diet. Birds fed a non-supplemented diet provided information on the effects of aging on endogenous antioxidants. One hundred adult SUS males were used. Birds were sacrificed after 0, 4, 8 and 12 weeks on the diets and were examined for plaque development and corresponding antioxidant component alterations in aorta and myocardium. With aging, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was increased in both tissues, whereas aortic glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity and myocardial glutathione reductase (GRd) activity decreased. Myocardial ascorbate levels increased with aging, with a reciprocal decrease in myocardial tocopherol levels. Following 4 weeks of cholesterol supplementation, aortic GRd decreased, SOD activity increased, but activities of GPx and catalase were unchanged. This same qualitative pattern of antioxidant enzyme changes was also found in myocardium. Thus, although aortic antioxidant enzyme changes produced by cholesterol feeding and aging showed some similarities, the early phase of atherogenesis does not simply reflect accelerated aging. In the late stages of atherogenesis, SOD activity returned to baseline, but other antioxidant enzymes remained unaltered from levels characterizing the early phase of lesion development. There was no detectable functional coupling between changes in GPx and GRd, nor between SOD (which produces hydrogen peroxide) and GPx or catalase (which utilize hydrogen peroxide as substrate). Previously reported alterations in erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme components during atherogenesis in quail were not predictive of changes in the corresponding enzymes in the aorta and myocardium. PMID:14577593

  13. The Effect of EDTA and Garlic Extract Combination on Plasma Lipids, Lipoporteins, and Fatty Streaks in Cholesterol Fed Male Rabbit Aorta

    OpenAIRE

    Sharifi, M. R.; S Javdan; M FESHARAKI

    2004-01-01

    Background: Garlic extract is used in treatment of hypercholesterolemia, although its efficacy isn’t exactly clear. There is a little information about mechanism of garlic effect on plasma lipids. By intervention of garlic in atherogenesis process it has been shown that it has a protective effect against cardiovascular disease. On the other hand, it has been shown that EDTA (Ethylene Diamin Tetra Acetic Acid) improves blood flow and decreases the vascular atherosclerotic symptoms. Methods: Th...

  14. No associations of Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric atrophy with plasma total homocysteine in Japanese

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Itou, Yasuyuki Goto, Takaaki Kondo, Kazuko Nishio, Sayo Kawai, Yoshiko Ishida, Mariko Naito, Nobuyuki Hamajima

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection might be a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Since the bacterium has not been isolated from atherosclerotic lesions, a direct role in atherogenesis is not plausible. We examined associations of plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) and serum folate, independent risk factors for atherosclerosis, with H. pylori infection and subsequent gastric atrophy among 174 patients (78 males and 96 females) aged 20 to 73 years, who visi...

  15. Advances in immune-modulating therapies to treat atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Chyu, Kuang-Yuh; Prediman K Shah

    2014-01-01

    In addition to hypercholesterolemia, innate and adaptive immune mechanisms play a critical role in atherogenesis, thus making immune-modulation therapy a potentially attractive way of managing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. These immune-modulation strategies include both active and passive immunization and confer beneficial reduction in atherosclerosis. Preclinical studies have demonstrated promising results and we review current knowledge on the complex role of the immune system and...

  16. ABCC6 : a new player in cellular cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism?

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzaj, Patricia; Kuhn, Joachim; Dabisch-Ruthe, Mareike; Faust, Isabel; Götting, Christian; Knabbe, Cornelius; Hendig, Doris

    2014-01-01

    Background Dysregulations in cholesterol and lipid metabolism have been linked to human diseases like hypercholesterolemia, atherosclerosis or the metabolic syndrome. Many ABC transporters are involved in trafficking of metabolites derived from these pathways. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), an autosomal-recessive disease caused by ABCC6 mutations, is characterized by atherogenesis and soft tissue calcification. Methods In this study we investigated the regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis ...

  17. ADIPOQ, ADIPOR1, and ADIPOR2 Polymorphisms in Relation to Serum Adiponectin Levels and Body Mass Index in Black and White Women

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah S Cohen; Gammon, Marilie D.; North, Kari E; Millikan, Robert C.; Lange, Ethan M.; Williams, Scott M.; Zheng, Wei; Cai, Qiuyin; Long, Jirong; SMITH, JEFFREY R.; Signorello, Lisa B.; William J Blot; Charles E Matthews

    2011-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipose-secreted protein with influence on several physiologic pathways including those related to insulin sensitivity, inflammation, and atherogenesis. Adiponectin levels are highly heritable and several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in adiponectin-related genes (ADIPOQ, ADIPOR1, ADIPOR2) have been examined in relation to circulating adiponectin levels and obesity phenotypes, but despite differences in adiponectin levels and obesity prevalence by race, few studies ...

  18. Animal Models of Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Godfrey S Getz; Reardon, Catherine A

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that is the underlying cause of most cardiovascular disease. Both cells of the vessel wall and cells of the immune system participate in atherogenesis. This process is heavily influenced by plasma lipoproteins, genetics and the hemodynamics of the blood flow in the artery. A variety of small and large animal models have been used to study the atherogenic process. No model is ideal as each has its own advantages and limitations with respect to...

  19. 老化抑制遺伝子klothoと血管病態(Agingと疾患,シンポジウム,東京女子医科大学学会第64回総会)

    OpenAIRE

    永井, 良三; NAGAI, Ryozo

    1999-01-01

    It has been well recognized that patients with major coronary risk factors develop atherosclerosis in a higher frequency, but there are many atherosclerotic patients without these risk factors, suggesting the presence of other unknown risk factors regulating development of atherosclerosis. It has been known that the most important risk factor for atherosclerosis is "aging" to whatever extent the major risk factors are involved in atherogenesis. We recently identified the klotho gene as a poss...

  20. 9-cis -carotene Inhibits Atherosclerosis Development in Female LDLR-/- Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Noa Zolberg Relevy; Ralph Rühl; Ayelet Harari; Itamar Grosskopf; Iris Barshack; Ami Ben-Amotz; Uri Nir; Hugo Gottlieb; Yehuda Kamari; Dror Harats; Aviv Shaish

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several epidemiological studies have shown that diets rich in carotenoids are associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. However, administration of synthetic all-trans -carotene was reported to have no effect on cardiovascular disease. We previously showed that the 9-cis -carotene-rich powder of the alga Dunaliella bardawil inhibits atherogenesis and reduces plasma non-HDL cholesterol levels in mice. Context and purpose of this study: We sought to study...

  1. Influences of a-tocopherol on cholesterol metabolism and fatty streak development in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice fed an atherogenic diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peluzio M.C.G.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the role of oxidized lipoproteins is well known in atherogenesis, the role of vitamin E supplementation is still controversial. There is also little information about cholesterol metabolism (hepatic concentration and fecal excretion in the new models of atherosclerosis. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of moderate vitamin E supplementation on cholesterol metabolism and atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E (apo E-deficient mice. Apo E-deficient mice were fed an atherogenic diet containing 40 or 400 mg/kg of alpha-tocopherol acetate for 6 weeks. Total cholesterol in serum and liver and 3-OH-alpha-sterols in feces, and fecal excretion of bile acids were determined and histological analyses of aortic lesion were performed. A vitamin E-rich diet did not affect body weight, food intake or serum cholesterol. Serum and hepatic concentrations of cholesterol as well as sterol concentration in feces were similar in both groups. However, when compared to controls, the alpha-tocopherol-treated mice showed a reduction of about 60% in the atherosclerotic lesions when both the sum of lesion areas and the average of the largest lesion area were considered. These results demonstrate that supplementation of moderate doses of alpha-tocopherol was able to slow atherogenesis in apo E-deficient mice and to reduce atherogenic lipoproteins without modifying the hepatic pool or fecal excretion of cholesterol and bile acids.

  2. 9-cis -carotene Inhibits Atherosclerosis Development in Female LDLR-/- Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Zolberg Relevy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several epidemiological studies have shown that diets rich in carotenoids are associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. However, administration of synthetic all-trans -carotene was reported to have no effect on cardiovascular disease. We previously showed that the 9-cis -carotene-rich powder of the alga Dunaliella bardawil inhibits atherogenesis and reduces plasma non-HDL cholesterol levels in mice. Context and purpose of this study: We sought to study whether isolated 9-cis -carotene inhibits atherogenesis in a murine model of atherosclerosis. Results: Twelve-week-old female LDL receptor knockout mice (LDLR-/- were pretreated for 2 weeks with regular chow diet fortified with the alga Dunaliella powder, 9-cis β-carotene isomer, all-trans β-carotene isomer, or 9-cis retinoic acid, followed by 10 weeks of a high-fat diet with the same fortifications. In contrast to Dunaliella, 9-cis β-carotene did not inhibit the high fat dietinduced elevation of plasma cholesterol. In addition, diet fortification with Dunaliella powder, β-carotene isomers, or 9-cis retinoic acid did not change the plasma retinol or retinoic acid levels.Nevertheless, 9-cis β-carotene significantly inhibited atherogenesis compared to the control mice (39% reduction. Conclusions: The results suggest that 9-cis β-carotene should be considered as an antiatherogenic agent in the human diet

  3. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M.; Brown, Robert J., E-mail: rbrown@mun.ca

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Lipoprotein hydrolysis products were produced by lipoprotein lipase. • Hydrolysis products lowers expression of macrophage cholesterol transporters. • Hydrolysis products reduces expression of select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products lowers cholesterol transporters and select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products reduces cholesterol efflux from macrophages. - Abstract: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL.

  4. Paraoxonase 1 polymorphism Q192R affects the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha in healthy males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimbach Gerald

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human paraoxonase 1 (PON1 is an HDL-associated enzyme with anti-oxidant/anti-inflammatory properties that has been suggested to play an important protective role against coronary heart diseases and underlying atherogenesis. The common PON1 Q192R polymorphism (rs662, A>G, a glutamine to arginine substitution at amino acid residue 192, has been analyzed in numerous association studies as a genetic marker for coronary heart diseases, however, with controversial results. Findings To get a better understanding about the pathophysiological function of PON1, we analyzed the relationships between the Q192R polymorphism, serum paraoxonase activity and serum biomarkers important for atherogenesis. Genotyping a cohort of 49 healthy German males for the Q192R polymorphism revealed an allele distribution of 0.74 and 0.26 for the Q and R allele, respectively, typical for Caucasian populations. Presence of the R192 allele was found to be associated with a significantly increased paraoxonase enzyme activity of 187.8 ± 11.4 U/l in comparison to the QQ192 genotype with 60.5 ± 4.9 U/l. No significant differences among the genotypes were found for blood pressure, asymmetric dimethylarginine, LDL, HDL, triglycerides, and cholesterol. As expected, MIP-2 alpha a cytokine rather not related to atherosclerosis is not affected by the PON1 polymorphism. In contrast to that, the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha is enhanced in R192 carriers (163.8 ± 24.7 pg/ml vs 94.7 ± 3.2 pg/ml in QQ192 carriers. Conclusions Our findings support the hypothesis that the common PON1 R192 allele may be a genetic risk factor for atherogenesis by inducing chronic low-grade inflammation.

  5. Characterization of ASC-2 as an antiatherogenic transcriptional coactivator of liver X receptors in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Geun Hyang; Park, Keunhee; Yeom, Seon-Yong; Lee, Kyung Jin; Kim, Gukhan; Ko, Jesang; Rhee, Dong-Kwon; Kim, Young Hoon; Lee, Hye Kyung; Kim, Hae Won; Oh, Goo Taeg; Lee, Ki-Up; Lee, Jae W; Kim, Seung-Whan

    2009-07-01

    Activating signal cointegrator-2 (ASC-2) functions as a transcriptional coactivator of many nuclear receptors and also plays important roles in the physiology of the liver and pancreas by interacting with liver X receptors (LXRs), which antagonize the development of atherosclerosis. This study was undertaken to establish the specific function of ASC-2 in macrophages and atherogenesis. Intriguingly, ASC-2 was more highly expressed in macrophages than in the liver and pancreas. To inhibit LXR-specific activity of ASC-2, we used DN2, which contains the C-terminal LXXLL motif of ASC-2 and thereby acts as an LXR-specific, dominant-negative mutant of ASC-2. In DN2-overexpressing transgenic macrophages, cellular cholesterol content was higher and cholesterol efflux lower than in control macrophages. DN2 reduced LXR ligand-dependent increases in the levels of ABCA1, ABCG1, and apolipoprotein E (apoE) transcripts as well as the activity of luciferase reporters driven by the LXR response elements (LXREs) of ABCA1, ABCG1, and apoE genes. These inhibitory effects of DN2 were reversed by overexpression of ASC-2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that ASC-2 was recruited to the LXREs of the ABCA1, ABCG1, and apoE genes in a ligand-dependent manner and that DN2 interfered with the recruitment of ASC-2 to these LXREs. Furthermore, low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-null mice receiving bone marrow transplantation from DN2-transgenic mice showed accelerated atherogenesis when administered a high-fat diet. Taken together, these results indicate that suppression of the LXR-specific activity of ASC-2 results in both defective cholesterol metabolism in macrophages and accelerated atherogenesis, suggesting that ASC-2 is an antiatherogenic coactivator of LXRs in macrophages.

  6. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Lipoprotein hydrolysis products were produced by lipoprotein lipase. • Hydrolysis products lowers expression of macrophage cholesterol transporters. • Hydrolysis products reduces expression of select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products lowers cholesterol transporters and select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products reduces cholesterol efflux from macrophages. - Abstract: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL

  7. Involvement of Signaling Molecules on Na+/H+ Exchanger-1 Activity in Human Monocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Sarigianni, Maria; Tsapas, Apostolos; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Kaloyianni, Martha; Koliakos, George; Paletas, Konstantinos

    2010-01-01

    Background: Sodium/hydrogen exchanger-1 (NHE-1) contributes to maintaining intracellular pH (pHi). We assessed the effect of glucose, insulin, leptin and adrenaline on NHE-1 activity in human monocytes in vitro. These cells play a role in atherogenesis and disturbances in the hormones evaluated are associated with obesity and diabetes. Methods and Results: Monocytes were isolated from 16 healthy obese and 10 lean healthy subjects. NHE-1 activity was estimated by measuring pHi with a fluoresce...

  8. A report on the trace element investigations in relation to cardio-vascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc, copper and molybdenum has both beneficial and harmful effects to the health of an individual. It has been found that zinc has a protective action against hypertension, while copper maintains the elasticity of the blood vessels, and at the same time, an increase in copper can also enhance atherogenesis. In this investigation, amounts of the said trace elements have been determined in ten normal male subjects who met accidental death. The normal values obtained in these subjects were compared to the mean values of their trace elements obtained from patients who died of ischaemic heart diseases

  9. Atheroprotective immunization with malondialdehyde-modified LDL is hapten specific and dependent on advanced MDA adducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonen, Ayelet; Hansen, Lotte; Turner, William W;

    2014-01-01

    Immunization with homologous malondialdehyde (MDA)-modified LDL (MDA-LDL) leads to atheroprotection in experimental models supporting the concept that a vaccine to oxidation-specific epitopes (OSEs) of oxidized LDL could limit atherogenesis. However, modification of human LDL with OSE to use...... as an immunogen would be impractical for generalized use. Furthermore, when MDA is used to modify LDL, a wide variety of related MDA adducts are formed, both simple and more complex. To define the relevant epitopes that would reproduce the atheroprotective effects of immunization with MDA-LDL, we sought...

  10. Potential cell-specific functions of CXCR4 in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Christian; Döring, Yvonne; Noels, Heidi

    2016-05-10

    The chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 form an important axis contributing to cellular functions in homeostasis and disease. In addition, the atypical CXCL12 receptor CXCR7 may shape the availability and function of CXCL12. Further to their role through progenitor cell mobilization, CXCL12 and CXCR4 may affect native atherogenesis by modifying atherosclerosis-relevant cellular functions. This short review intends to provide a concise summary of current knowledge with regards to cell-specific functions of CXCL12 and its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7 with potential implications for the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:25586789

  11. OX40-OX40L Interaction Promotes Proliferation and Activation of Lymphocytes via NFATc1 in ApoE-Deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Jinchuan Yan; Hongling Su; Liangjie Xu; Cuiping Wang

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our previous studies have shown that OX40-OX40L interaction regulates the expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells c1(NFATc1) in ApoE(-/-) mice during atherogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether OX40-OX40L interaction promotes Th cell activation via NFATc1 in ApoE(-/-) mice. METHODS AND RESULTS: The lymphocytes isolated from spleen of ApoE (-/-) mice were cultured with anti-CD3 mAb in the presence or absence of anti-OX40 or anti-OX40L antibodies. The e...

  12. Effects of adenoidectomy on markers of endothelial function and inflammation in normal-weight and overweight prepubescent children with sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Kelishadi

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: The findings of the study demonstrated that irrespective of the weight status, children with OSA had increased levels of the endothelial function and inflammation markers, which improved after OSA treatment by adenoidectomy. This might be a form of confirmatory evidence on the onset of atherogenesis from the early stages of the life, and the role of inflammation in the process. The reversibility of endothelial dysfunction after improvement of OSA underscores the importance of primordial and primary prevention of chronic diseases from the early stages of the life.

  13. A novel approach to the assessment of vascular endothelial function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathasivam, S; Siddiqui, Z; Greenwald, S [Pathology Group, Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom); Phababpha, S; Sengmeuan, P; Detchaporn, P; Kukongviriyapan, U, E-mail: s.e.greenwald@qmul.ac.uk [Department of Physiology, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen (Thailand)

    2011-08-17

    Impaired endothelial function (EF) is associated with atherogenesis, and its quantitative assessment has prognostic value. Currently, methods based on assessing flow-mediated dilation (FMD) are technically difficult and expensive. We tested a novel way of assessing EF by measuring the time difference between pulses arriving at the middle fingers of each hand (f-f{Delta}T), whilst FMD is induced in one arm. We compared f-f{Delta}T with standard methods in healthy and diseased subjects. Our findings suggest that the proposed simple and inexpensive technique gives comparable results and has the potential to qualitatively assess EF in the clinical setting, although further work is required.

  14. Wnt signaling in cardiovascular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinou, K; Christodoulides, C; Antoniades, C; Koutsilieris, M

    2012-12-01

    Wnt signaling pathways play a key role in cardiac development, angiogenesis, and cardiac hypertrophy; emerging evidence suggests that they are also involved in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Specifically, an important role for Wnts has been described in the regulation of endothelial inflammation, vascular calcification, and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. Wnt signaling also induces monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells and is crucial for the regulation of vascular smooth-muscle cell (VSMC) behavior. We discuss how the Wnt pathways are implicated in vascular biology and outline the role of Wnt signaling in atherosclerosis. Dissecting Wnt pathways involved in atherogenesis and cardiovascular disease may provide crucial insights into novel mechanisms with therapeutic potential for atherosclerosis.

  15. Diet serum cholesterol and coronary diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narindar Nath

    1961-07-01

    Full Text Available The probable sequence of events leading to atherosclerotic disease of the coronary artery and heart attack are briefly described. Blood cholesterol as a casual agent in atherosclerosis and how blood cholesterol can be modified are discussed. The effects of various dietary components particularly quality and quantity of fat and protein on the blood cholesterol concentration are discussed and it is emphasized that more work needs to be done to ascertain the role of individual components of the diet and their relative importance in atherogenesis.

  16. Study of effects of metformin on C-reactive protein level in Type-2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niteshkumar C. Gamit

    2015-02-01

    Conclusions: Treatment with 3 months metformin monotherapy for newly diagnosed Type-2 DM has shown a significant decrease in high-sensitivity-CRP level in Type 2 diabetes. This positive effect may be because of the decreased in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and other mediators, including adhesion molecules, suggests that these processes may contribute to atherogenesis because atherosclerosis is also an inflammatory condition. However, this effect is probably dependent on improving glycemic control. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(1.000: 46-50

  17. Proteomic analysis of aorta and protective effects of grape seed procyanidin B2 in db/db mice reveal a critical role of milk fat globule epidermal growth factor-8 in diabetic arterial damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis is one of the major complications of type 2 diabetic patients (T2DM, leading to morbidity and mortality. Grape seed procyanidin B2 (GSPB2 has demonstrated protective effect against atherosclerosis, which is believed to be, at least in part, a result of its antioxidative effects. The aim of this study is to identify the target protein of GSPB2 responsible for the protective effect against atherosclerosis in patients with DM. METHODS AND RESULTS: GSPB2 (30 mg/kg body weight/day were administrated to db/db mice for 10 weeks. Proteomics of the aorta extracts by iTRAQ analysis was obtained from db/db mice. The results showed that expression of 557 proteins were either up- or down-regulated in the aorta of diabetic mice. Among those proteins, 139 proteins were normalized by GSPB2 to the levels comparable to those in control mice. Among the proteins regulated by GSPB2, the milk fat globule epidermal growth factor-8 (MFG-E8 was found to be increased in serum level in T2DM patients; the serum level of MFG-E8 was positively correlated with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CF-PWV. Inhibition of MFG-E8 by RNA interference significantly suppressed whereas exogenous recombinant MFG-E8 administration exacerbated atherogenesis the db/db mice. To gain more insights into the mechanism of action of MFG-E8, we investigated the effects of MFG-E8 on the signal pathway involving the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1. Treatment with recombinant MFG-E8 led to increased whereas inhibition of MFG-E8 to decreased expression of MCP-1 and phosphorylation of ERK1/2. CONCLUSION: Our data suggests that MFG-E8 plays an important role in atherogenesis in diabetes through both ERK and MCP-1 signaling pathways. GSPB2, a well-studied antioxidant, significantly inhibited the arterial wall changes favoring atherogenesis in db/db mice by down-regulating MFG-E8 expression in aorta and its serum level

  18. Relationship between regulatory T cells subsets and lipid profile in dyslipidemic patients: a longitudinal study during atorvastatin treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Guasti, Luigina; Maresca, Andrea Maria; Schembri, Laura; Rasini, Emanuela; Dentali, Francesco; Squizzato, Alessandro; Klersy, Catherine; Robustelli Test, Laura; Mongiardi, Christian; Campiotti, Leonardo; Ageno, Walter; Grandi, Anna Maria; Cosentino, Marco; Marino, Franca

    2016-01-01

    Background The CD4+ T-lymphocytes and their subtype CD4 + CD25highFoxP3+ regulatory T cells are receiving growing interest as major regulators of atherogenesis. We sought to investigate 1) whether the CD4 + cell subsets were expressed differently in dyslipidemic patients (Pts) and healthy subjects (HS) and 2) whether atorvastatin treatment could be associated in-vivo and in-vitro with cell changes in expression and functional response. Methods CD4+ subsets frequency (CD4 + CD25highFoxP3+, CD4...

  19. Unveiling LOX-1 receptor interplay with nanotopography: mechanotransduction and atherosclerosis onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Rienzo, Carmine; Jacchetti, Emanuela; Cardarelli, Francesco; Bizzarri, Ranieri; Beltram, Fabio; Cecchini, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Lectin-like ox-LDL receptors (LOX-1) play a crucial role in the ox-LDL-induced pathological transformation of vessel-wall components, a crucial early step in atherogenesis. LOX-1 dynamics is quantitatively investigated in human endothelial cells (HUVECs) exposed to environmental nanotopographies. We demonstrate distinct nanotopography-induced cell phenotypes, characterized by different morphology, LOX-1 diffusivity and oligomerization state: HUVECs on flat surfaces exhibit the behavior found in pro-atherogenic conditions, while growth on nanogratings can interfere with LOX-1 dynamics and lead to a behavior characteristic of normal, non-pathological conditions.

  20. Primary and Secondary Prevention of Acute Coronary Syndromes: The Role of the Statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantis, Evangelos; Troupis, Theodoros; Mazarakis, Antonios; Kyriakos, Giorgos; Troupis, Georgios; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    Poor prognosis is strongly associated with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) and, even though a number of treatment strategies are available, the incidence of subsequent serious complications after an acute event is still high. Statins are hypolipidemic factors and recent studies have demonstrated that they have a protective role during the process of atherogenesis and that they reduce mortality caused by cardiovascular diseases. This review tries to reveal the function of the statins as a component of the primary and secondary action of acute coronary syndrome and to describe the lifestyle changes that have the same effect as the use of statins.

  1. Role of gut microbiota in the modulation of atherosclerosis-associated immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitry A Chistiakov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and metabolic abnormalities are linked to each other. At present, pathogenic inflammatory response was recognized as a major player in metabolic diseases. In humans, intestinal microflora could significantly influence the development of metabolic diseases including atherosclerosis. Commensal bacteria were shown to activate inflammatory pathways through altering lipid metabolism in adipocytes, macrophages, and vascular cells, inducing insulin resistance, and producing trimethylamine-N-oxide. However, gut microbiota could also play the atheroprotective role associated with anthocyanin metabolism and administration of probiotics and their components. Here, we review the mechanisms by which the gut microbiota may influence atherogenesis.

  2. Inflammation, lipid metabolism dysfunction, and hypertension: Active research fields in atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular disease in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Kai; TANG ChaoKe

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death in China [1].With advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of atherosclerosis vascular inflammation,lipid metabolism dysfunction,and hypertension are regarded as the main pathogenetic pathways of both early atherogenesis and advanced plaque rupture [2,3].Currently,much attention is being paid to the control of these pathways,which offers the potential for development of novel therapeutic approaches in the treatment of cardiovascular disease in China.

  3. OxLDL induced p53-dependent apoptosis by activating p38MAPK and PKCδ signaling pathways in J774A.1 macrophage cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Dear Editor,The sub-endothelial retention of lipoproteins is one of the key events that trigger the atherosclerosis process.Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles trapped within the arterial wall are prone to progressive oxidation by monocytes/macrophages.Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) is present in atherosclerotic lesions,and has been suggested to play a significant role in atherogenesis (Nishi et al.,2002).The pathophysiology of atherosclerosis involves both apoptosis and proliferation at different stages of the vessel lesion.In advanced atherosclerotic plaques,up to 50% of the apoptotic cells are macrophages,which may promote core expansion and plaque instability (Tabas et al.,2009).

  4. Cyclodextrin promotes atherosclerosis regression via macrophage reprogramming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmer, Sebastian; Grebe, Alena; Bakke, Siril S;

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease linked to elevated blood cholesterol concentrations. Despite ongoing advances in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Continuous retention of apolipoprotein B...... that increases cholesterol solubility in preventing and reversing atherosclerosis. We showed that CD treatment of murine atherosclerosis reduced atherosclerotic plaque size and CC load and promoted plaque regression even with a continued cholesterol-rich diet. Mechanistically, CD increased oxysterol production...... of CD as well as for augmented reverse cholesterol transport. Because CD treatment in humans is safe and CD beneficially affects key mechanisms of atherogenesis, it may therefore be used clinically to prevent or treat human atherosclerosis....

  5. The effects of hypercholestrolemia on rabbit platelets: Functional and biochemical alterations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental evidence points to hypercholesterolemia as an important risk factor for atherosclerosis and related occlusive vascular disorders. In spite of considerable support implicating cholesterol, the mechanism of its effect on this group of disorders is not entirely clear. Accumulation of fat and cholesterol in the platelets could influence the development of the initial fatty atheromatous lesions in human beings and animals. Since platelets may have a critical role in atherogenesis, we have examined the mechanisms underlying the relationship among platelets, cholesterol, phospholipid metabolism, and platelet function in rabbits fed diets supplemented with cholesterol (1% and 0.5%) and peanut oil (4% and 2%) 1 tab

  6. Imaging coronary artery disease and the myocardial ischemic cascade: clinical principles and scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renker, Matthias; Baumann, Stefan; Rier, Jeremy; Ebersberger, Ullrich; Fuller, Stephen R; Batalis, Nicholas I; Schoepf, U Joseph; Chiaramida, Salvatore A

    2015-03-01

    On a subcellular level, atherogenesis is characterized by the translocation of proatherogenic lipoproteins into the arterial wall. An inflammatory response involving complex repair mechanisms subsequently causes maladaptive vascular changes resulting in coronary stenosis or occlusion. The chronology of the underlying processes occurring from atherosclerosis to myocardial ischemia affect the selection and interpretation of diagnostic testing. An understanding of the ischemic cascade, atherosclerosis, coronary remodeling, plaque morphology, and their relationship to clinical syndromes is essential in determining which diagnostic modalities are useful in clinical practice.

  7. Using recombinant CD74 protein to inhibit the activity of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-xinSHAN; Xi-yongYU; Qiu-xiongLIN; Yong-hengFU

    2005-01-01

    AIM Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, including arthritis, glomerulonephritis, Gram-positive and Gram-negative sepsis, and atherogenesis. Recent studies showed that CD74(antigen-associated invariant chain Ⅱ) is a high-affinity membrane-binding protein for MIF. The purpose of the present study was to express the recombinant human CD74 in E. coli and inhibit the activity of MIF by using recombinant CD74 in vitro.

  8. Complementary Roles for Scavenger Receptor A and CD36 of Human Monocyte–derived Macrophages in Adhesion to Surfaces Coated with Oxidized Low-Density Lipoproteins and in Secretion of H2O2

    OpenAIRE

    Maxeiner, Horst; Husemann, Jens; Thomas, Christian A.; Loike, John D.; Khoury, Joseph El; Silverstein, Samuel C

    1998-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is considered one of the principal effectors of atherogenesis. To explore mechanisms by which oxLDL affects human mononuclear phagocytes, we incubated these cells in medium containing oxLDL, acetylated LDL (acLDL), or native LDL, or on surfaces coated with these native and modified lipoproteins. The presence of soluble oxLDL, acLDL, or native LDL in the medium did not stimulate H2O2 secretion by macrophages. In contrast, macrophages adherent to surface...

  9. C-peptide promotes lesion development in a mouse model of arteriosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasic, Dusica; Marx, Nikolaus; Sukhova, Galina; Bach, Helga; Durst, Renate; Grüb, Miriam; Hausauer, Angelina; Hombach, Vinzenz; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Walcher, Daniel

    2012-04-01

    Patients with insulin resistance and early type 2 diabetes exhibit an increased propensity to develop a diffuse and extensive pattern of arteriosclerosis. Typically, these patients show elevated serum levels of the proinsulin cleavage product C-peptide and immunohistochemical data from our group revealed C-peptide deposition in early lesions of these individuals. Moreover, in vitro studies suggest that C-peptide could promote atherogenesis. This study examined whether C-peptide promotes vascular inflammation and lesion development in a mouse model of arteriosclerosis. ApoE-deficient mice on a high fat diet were treated with C-peptide or control injections for 12 weeks and the effect on lesion size and plaque composition was analysed. C-peptide treatment significantly increased C-peptide blood levels by 4.8-fold without having an effect on glucose or insulin levels, nor on the lipid profile. In these mice, C-peptide deposition in atherosclerotic plaques was significantly increased compared with controls. Moreover, lesions of C-peptide-treated mice contained significantly more macrophages (1.6 ± 0.3% versus 0.7 ± 0.2% positive area; P arteriosclerosis support the hypothesis that C-peptide may have an active role in atherogenesis in patients with diabetes and insulin resistance.

  10. Effect of LDL concentration polarization on the uptake of LDL by human endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells co-cultured

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zufeng Ding; Yubo Fan; Xiaoyan Deng

    2009-01-01

    To substantiate our hypothesis that concentration polarization of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) plays an important role in the localization of atherogenesis, we investigated the effects of wall shear stress and water fdtration rate (or perfusion pressure) on the luminal surface LDL concentration (cw) and the LDL uptake by human vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells co-cultured on a permeable membrane using a parallel-plate flow chamber technique and a flow cyto-metry method. The results indicated that the uptake of fluorescent labeled LDL (DiI-LDL) by the co-cultured cells was positively correlated with cw in a non-linear fashion. When cw was low, the uptake increased very sharply with increasing cw. Then the increase became gradual and the uptake was seemingly leveled out when cw reached beyond 160 μg/ml. The present study therefore has provided further experimental evidence that concentration polarization may occur in the arterial system and have a positive correlation with the uptake of LDLs by the arterial wall, which gives support to our hypothesis regarding the localization of atherogenesis.

  11. Chemokines and their receptors in Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vorst, Emiel P C; Döring, Yvonne; Weber, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease of the medium- and large-sized arteries, is the main underlying cause of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) most often leading to a myocardial infarction or stroke. However, atherosclerosis can also develop without this clinical manifestation. The pathophysiology of atherosclerosis is very complex and consists of many cells and molecules interacting with each other. Over the last years, chemokines (small 8-12 kDa cytokines with chemotactic properties) have been identified as key players in atherogenesis. However, this remains a very active and dynamic field of research. Here, we will give an overview of the current knowledge about the involvement of chemokines in all phases of atherosclerotic lesion development. Furthermore, we will focus on two chemokines that recently have been associated with atherogenesis, CXCL12, and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Both chemokines play a crucial role in leukocyte recruitment and arrest, a critical step in atherosclerosis development. MIF has shown to be a more pro-inflammatory and thus pro-atherogenic chemokine, instead CXCL12 seems to have a more protective function. However, results about this protective role are still quite debatable. Future research will further elucidate the precise role of these chemokines in atherosclerosis and determine the potential of chemokine-based therapies. PMID:26175090

  12.  Kynurenic acid – a new tool in the treatment of hiperhomocysteinemia and its consequences?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Nowicka-Stążka

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available  Atherosclerosis together with its cardiovascular consequences is the most common and significant cause of death, particularly in highly developed countries. The process of atherogenesis begins as soon as in childhood and depends on classical risk factors. Atherosclerosis also results from a chronic inflammatory-immune process which takes place in the vascular walls. Furthermore, it has been known for a number of years that the development of atherosclerotic lesions is closely connected with the concentration of homocysteine in serum. Homocysteine is a sulfur amino acid originating from methionine.An increased concentration of homocysteine in blood harmfully influences blood vessels, leading to a higher risk of ischemic heart disease and stroke. Since tackling classical atherosclerosis risk factors is not efficient enough when it comes to protecting the cardiovascular system from diseases, new substances possessing anti-atherogenic properties, especially endogenous ones, are sought.Recently, researchers have paid attention to a connection between homocysteine and an endogenous tryptophan derivative, kynurenic acid. Recently, it was revealed that kynurenic acid counteracts the harmful effects of homocysteine on endothelium cells in vitro. The hypothesis assuming homocysteine-kynurenate interplay suggests the existence of a new mechanism of atherogenesis and gives us an opportunity to use this knowledge in both prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Cryptotanshinone inhibits TNF-α-induced early atherogenic events in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Zuraini; Ng, Chin Theng; Fong, Lai Yen; Bakar, Nurul Ain Abu; Hussain, Nor Hayuti Mohd; Ang, Kok Pian; Ee, Gwendoline Cheng Lian; Hakim, Muhammad Nazrul

    2016-05-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Salvia miltiorrhiza (danshen) is a traditional Chinese medicine that has been effectively used to treat cardiovascular disease. Cryptotanshinone (CTS), a major lipophilic compound isolated from S. miltiorrhiza, has been reported to possess cardioprotective effects. However, the anti-atherogenic effects of CTS, particularly on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced endothelial cell activation, are still unclear. This study aimed to determine the effect of CTS on TNF-α-induced increased endothelial permeability, monocyte adhesion, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (sVCAM-1), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and impaired nitric oxide production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), all of which are early events occurring in atherogenesis. We showed that CTS significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced increased endothelial permeability, monocyte adhesion, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1 and MCP-1, and restored nitric oxide production. These observations suggest that CTS possesses anti-inflammatory properties and could be a promising treatment for the prevention of cytokine-induced early atherogenesis. PMID:26732386

  14. Effects of cyclodextrins on the structure of LDL and its susceptibility to copper-induced oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Meiying; Gan, Chaoye; Shao, Wenxiang; Zhou, Xing; Chen, Yong

    2016-08-25

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) have long been widely used as drug/food carriers and were recently developed as drugs for the treatment of diseases (e.g. Niemann-Pick C1 and cancers). It is unknown whether cyclodextrins may influence the structure of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), its susceptibility to oxidation, and atherogenesis. In this study, four widely used cyclodextrins including α-CD, γ-CD, and two derivatives of β-CD (HPβCD and MβCD) were recruited. Interestingly, agarose gel electrophoresis (staining lipid and protein components of LDL with Sudan Black B and Coomassie brilliant blue, respectively but simultaneously) shows that cyclodextrins at relatively high concentrations caused disappearance of the LDL band and/or appearance of an additional protein-free lipid band, implying that cyclodextrins at relatively high concentrations can induce significant electrophoresis-detectable lipid depletion of LDL. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) detected that MβCD (as a representative of cyclodextrins) induced size decrease of LDL particles in a dose-dependent manner, further confirming the lipid depletion effects of cyclodextrins. Moreover, the data from agarose gel electrophoresis, conjugated diene formation, MDA production, and amino group blockage of copper-oxidized LDL show that cyclodextrins can impair LDL susceptibility to oxidation. It implies that cyclodextrins probably help to inhibit atherogenesis by lowering LDL oxidation.

  15. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced expression of adhesion molecules in human endothelial cells by the saponins derived from roots of Platycodon grandiflorum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhesion molecules play an important role in the development of atherogenesis and are produced by endothelial cells after being stimulated with various inflammatory cytokines. This study examined the effect of saponins that were isolated from the roots of Platycodon grandiflorum A. DC (Campanulaceae), Changkil saponins (CKS), on the cytokine-induced monocyte/human endothelial cell interaction, which is a crucial early event in atherogenesis. CKS significantly inhibited the TNFα-induced increase in monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells as well as decreased the protein and mRNA expression levels of vascular adhesion molecule-1 and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 on endothelial cells. Furthermore, CKS significantly inhibited the TNFα-induced production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of NF-κB by preventing IκB degradation and inhibiting IκB kinase activity. Overall, CKS has anti-atherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory activity, which is least in part the result of it reducing the cytokine-induced endothelial adhesion to monocytes by inhibiting intracellular ROS production, NF-κB activation, and cell adhesion molecule expression in endothelial cells

  16. Adipose tissue deficiency results in severe hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in the low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengyu; Gao, Mingming; Liao, Jiawei; Qi, Yanfei; Du, Ximing; Wang, Yuhui; Li, Ling; Liu, George; Yang, Hongyuan

    2016-05-01

    Adipose tissue can store over 50% of whole-body cholesterol; however, the physiological role of adipose tissue in cholesterol metabolism and atherogenesis has not been directly assessed. Here, we examined lipoprotein metabolism and atherogenesis in a unique mouse model of severe lipodystrophy: the Seipin(-/-) mice, and also in mice deficient in both low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr) and Seipin: the Ldlr(-/-)Seipin(-/-) mice. Plasma cholesterol was moderately increased in the Seipin(-/-) mice when fed an atherogenic diet. Strikingly, plasma cholesterol reached ~6000 mg/dl in the Seipin(-/-)Ldlr(-/-) mice on an atherogenic diet, as compared to ~1000 mg/dl in the Ldlr(-/-) mice on the same diet. The Seipin(-/-)Ldlr(-/-) mice also developed spontaneous atherosclerosis on chow diet and severe atherosclerosis on an atherogenic diet. Rosiglitazone treatment significantly reduced the hypercholesterolemia of the Seipin(-/-)Ldlr(-/-) mice, and also alleviated the severity of atherosclerosis. Our results provide direct evidence, for the first time, that the adipose tissue plays a critical role in the clearance of plasma cholesterol. Our results also reveal a previously unappreciated strong link between adipose tissue and LDLR in plasma cholesterol metabolism.

  17. α-Defensins Induce a Post-translational Modification of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) That Promotes Atherosclerosis at Normal Levels of Plasma Cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Fanne, Rami; Maraga, Emad; Abd-Elrahman, Ihab; Hankin, Aviel; Blum, Galia; Abdeen, Suhair; Hijazi, Nuha; Cines, Douglas B; Higazi, Abd Al-Roof

    2016-02-01

    Approximately one-half of the patients who develop clinical atherosclerosis have normal or only modest elevations in plasma lipids, indicating that additional mechanisms contribute to pathogenesis. In view of increasing evidence that inflammation contributes to atherogenesis, we studied the effect of human neutrophil α-defensins on low density lipoprotein (LDL) trafficking, metabolism, vascular deposition, and atherogenesis using transgenic mice expressing human α-defensins in their polymorphonuclear leukocytes (Def(+/+)). Accelerated Def(+/+) mice developed α-defensin·LDL complexes that accelerate the clearance of LDL from the circulation accompanied by enhanced vascular deposition and retention of LDL, induction of endothelial cathepsins, increased endothelial permeability to LDL, and the development of lipid streaks in the aortic roots when fed a regular diet and at normal plasma levels of LDL. Transplantation of bone marrow from Def(+/+) to WT mice increased LDL clearance, increased vascular permeability, and increased vascular deposition of LDL, whereas transplantation of WT bone marrow to Def(+/+) mice prevented these outcomes. The same outcome was obtained by treating Def(+/+) mice with colchicine to inhibit the release of α-defensins. These studies identify a potential new link between inflammation and the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:26518877

  18. Myeloid Deletion of α1AMPK Exacerbates Atherosclerosis in LDL Receptor Knockout (LDLRKO) Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qiang; Cui, Xin; Wu, Rui; Zha, Lin; Wang, Xianfeng; Parks, John S; Yu, Liqing; Shi, Hang; Xue, Bingzhong

    2016-06-01

    Macrophage inflammation marks all stages of atherogenesis, and AMPK is a regulator of macrophage inflammation. We therefore generated myeloid α1AMPK knockout (MAKO) mice on the LDL receptor knockout (LDLRKO) background to investigate whether myeloid deletion of α1AMPK exacerbates atherosclerosis. When fed an atherogenic diet, MAKO/LDLRKO mice displayed exacerbated atherosclerosis compared with LDLRKO mice. To determine the underlying pathophysiological pathways, we characterized macrophage inflammation/chemotaxis and lipid/cholesterol metabolism in MAKO/LDLRKO mice. Myeloid deletion of α1AMPK increased macrophage inflammatory gene expression and enhanced macrophage migration and adhesion to endothelial cells. Remarkably, MAKO/LDLRKO mice also displayed higher composition of circulating chemotaxically active Ly-6C(high) monocytes, enhanced atherosclerotic plaque chemokine expression, and monocyte recruitment into plaques, leading to increased atherosclerotic plaque macrophage content and inflammation. MAKO/LDLRKO mice also exhibited higher plasma LDL and VLDL cholesterol content, increased circulating apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels, and higher liver apoB expression. We conclude that macrophage α1AMPK deficiency promotes atherogenesis in LDLRKO mice and is associated with enhanced macrophage inflammation and hypercholesterolemia and that macrophage α1AMPK may serve as a therapeutic target for prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:26822081

  19. Activated human mast cells induce LOX-1-specific scavenger receptor expression in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervi Alanne-Kinnunen

    Full Text Available Activated mast cells in atherosclerotic lesions degranulate and release bioactive compounds capable of regulating atherogenesis. Here we examined the ability of activated human primary mast cells to regulate the expression of the major scavenger receptors in cultured human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs.Components released by immunologically activated human primary mast cells induced a transient expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1 mRNA in HMDMs, while the expression of two other scavenger receptors, MSR1 and CD36, remained unaffected. The LOX-1-inducing secretory components were identified as histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1, which exhibited a synergistic effect on LOX-1 mRNA expression. Histamine induced a transient expression of LOX-1 protein. Mast cell -induced increase in LOX-1 expression was not associated with increased uptake of oxidized LDL by the macrophages.Mast cell-derived histamine, TNF-α, and TGF-β1 act in concert to induce a transient increase in LOX-1 expression in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. The LOX-1-inducing activity potentially endows mast cells a hitherto unrecognized role in the regulation of innate immune reactions in atherogenesis.

  20. Antiatherogenic activity of extracts of Argania spinosa L. pericarp: beneficial effects on lipid peroxidation and cholesterol homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrougui, Hicham; Cherki, Mounia; Koumbadinga, Geremy Abdull; Isabelle, Maxim; Douville, Jasmin; Spino, Claude; Khalil, Abdelouahed

    2007-09-01

    Prevention of lipoprotein oxidation by natural compounds may prevent atherosclerosis via reducing early atherogenesis. In this study, we investigated for the first time the beneficial properties of methanolic extract of argania pericarp (MEAP) towards atherogenesis by protecting human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) against oxidation while promoting high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-mediated cholesterol efflux. By measuring the formation of malondialdehyde (MDA) and conjugated diene as well as the lag phase and the progression rate of lipid peroxidation, the MEAP was found to possess an inhibitory effect. In addition, MEAP reduced the rate of disappearance of alpha-tocopherol as well as the apoB electrophoretic mobility in a dose-dependent manner. These effects are related to the free radical scavenging and copper-chelating effects of MEAP. In terms of cell viability, MEAP has shown a cytotoxic effect (0-40 microg/mL). Incubation of 3H-cholesterol-loaded J774 macrophages with HDL in the presence of increasing concentrations of MEAP enhanced HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux independently of ABCA1 receptor pathways. Our findings suggest that argania seed pericarp provides a source of natural antioxidants that inhibit LDL oxidation and enhance cholesterol efflux and thus can prevent development of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:18066138

  1. Enhanced External Counterpulsation Inducing Arterial Hemodynamic Variations and Its Chronic Effect on Endothelial Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Jian-hang; WU Gui-fu; ZHENG Zhen-sheng; DAI Gang; FENG Ming-zhe

    2014-01-01

    To make clear the precise hemodynamic mechanism underlying the anti-atherogenesis benefit of enhanced external couterpulsation(EECP) treatment, and to investigate the proper role of some important hemodynamic factors during the atherosclerotic progress, a comprehensive study combining long-term animal experiment and numerical solving was conducted in this paper. An experimentally induced hypercholesterolemic porcine model was developed and the chronic EECP intervention was subjected. Basic hemodynamic measurement was performed in vivo, as well as the arterial endothelial samples were extracted for physiological examination. Meanwhile, a numerical model was introduced to solve the complex hemodynamic factors such as WSS and OSI. The results show that EECP treatment resulted in significant increase of the instant levels of arterial WSS, blood pressure, and OSI. During EECP treatment, the instant OSI level of the common carotid arteries over cardiac cycles raised to a mean value of 8.58 ×10-2 ±2.13 ×10-2. Meanwhile, the chronic intervention of EECP treatment significantly reduced the atherosclerotic lesions in abdominal aortas and the endothelial cellular adherence. The present study suggests that the unique blood flow pattern induced by EECP treatment and the augmentation of WSS level in cardiac cycles may be the most important hemodynamic mechanism that contribute to its anti-atherogenesis effect. And as one of the indices that cause great concern in current hemodynamic study, OSI may not play a key role during the initiation of atherosclerosis.

  2. Inhibition of autophagy ameliorates atherogenic inflammation by augmenting apigenin-induced macrophage apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qun; Zeng, Ping; Liu, Yuanliang; Wen, Ge; Fu, Xiuqiong; Sun, Xuegang

    2015-07-01

    Increasing evidences showed that the survival of macrophages promotes atherogenesis. Macrophage apoptosis in the early phase of atherosclerotic process negatively regulates the progression of atherosclerotic lesions. We demonstrated that a natural anti-oxidant apigenin could ameliorate atherogenesis in ApoE(-/-) mice. It reduced the number of foam cells and decreased the serum levels of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and IL-6. Our results showed that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) led to the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Apigenin-induced apoptosis and downregulated the secretion of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β. It is further supported by the use of zVAD, a pan-caspase inhibitor, demonstrating that apigenin lowered cytokine profile through induction of macrophage apoptosis. Moreover, apigenin-induced Atg5/Atg7-dependent autophagy in macrophages pretreated with oxLDL. Results illustrated that autophagy inhibition increased apigenin-induced apoptosis through activation of Bax. The present findings suggest that oxLDL maintained the survival of macrophages and activated the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines to initiate atherosclerosis. Apigenin-induced apoptosis of lipid-laden macrophages and resolved inflammation to ameliorate atherosclerosis. In conclusion, combination of apigenin with autophagy inhibition may be a promising strategy to induce foam cell apoptosis and subdue atherogenic cytokines.

  3. Atheroprotection through SYK inhibition fails in established disease when local macrophage proliferation dominates lesion progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindau, Alexandra; Härdtner, Carmen; Hergeth, Sonja P; Blanz, Kelly Daryll; Dufner, Bianca; Hoppe, Natalie; Anto-Michel, Nathaly; Kornemann, Jan; Zou, Jiadai; Gerhardt, Louisa M S; Heidt, Timo; Willecke, Florian; Geis, Serjosha; Stachon, Peter; Wolf, Dennis; Libby, Peter; Swirski, Filip K; Robbins, Clinton S; McPheat, William; Hawley, Shaun; Braddock, Martin; Gilsbach, Ralf; Hein, Lutz; von zur Mühlen, Constantin; Bode, Christoph; Zirlik, Andreas; Hilgendorf, Ingo

    2016-03-01

    Macrophages in the arterial intima sustain chronic inflammation during atherogenesis. Under hypercholesterolemic conditions murine Ly6C(high) monocytes surge in the blood and spleen, infiltrate nascent atherosclerotic plaques, and differentiate into macrophages that proliferate locally as disease progresses. Spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) may participate in downstream signaling of various receptors that mediate these processes. We tested the effect of the SYK inhibitor fostamatinib on hypercholesterolemia-associated myelopoiesis and plaque formation in Apoe(-/-) mice during early and established atherosclerosis. Mice consuming a high cholesterol diet supplemented with fostamatinib for 8 weeks developed less atherosclerosis. Histologic and flow cytometric analysis of aortic tissue showed that fostamatinib reduced the content of Ly6C(high) monocytes and macrophages. SYK inhibition limited Ly6C(high) monocytosis through interference with GM-CSF/IL-3 stimulated myelopoiesis, attenuated cell adhesion to the intimal surface, and blocked M-CSF stimulated monocyte to macrophage differentiation. In Apoe(-/-) mice with established atherosclerosis, however, fostamatinib treatment did not limit macrophage accumulation or lesion progression despite a significant reduction in blood monocyte counts, as lesional macrophages continued to proliferate. Thus, inhibition of hypercholesterolemia-associated monocytosis, monocyte infiltration, and differentiation by SYK antagonism attenuates early atherogenesis but not established disease when local macrophage proliferation dominates lesion progression.

  4. Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection and cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajnish Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial vascular inflammatory process; however, the inciting cause for inflammation remains unclear. Two decades ago, Chlamydophila pneumoniae (formerly Chlamydia pneumoniae infection was proposed as a putative etiologic agent. We performed a PubMed search using the keywords Chlamydia and atherosclerosis in a Boolean query to identify published studies on C. pneumoniae and its role in atherogenesis, and to understand research interest in this topic. We found 1,652 published articles on this topic between 1991 and 2011. We analyzed relevant published studies and found various serological, molecular, and animal modeling studies in the early period. Encouraged by positive results from these studies, more than a dozen antibiotic clinical-trials were subsequently conducted, which did not find clinical benefits of anti-Chlamydophila drug therapy. While many researchers believe that the organism is still important, negative clinical trials had a similar impact on overall research interest. With many novel mechanisms identified for atherogenesis, there is a need for newer paradigms in Chlamydophila-atherosclerosis research.

  5. Low-Density Lipoprotein Modified by Myeloperoxidase in Inflammatory Pathways and Clinical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Delporte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL has a key role in atherogenesis. Among the different models of oxidation that have been studied, the one using myeloperoxidase (MPO is thought to be more physiopathologically relevant. Apolipoprotein B-100 is the unique protein of LDL and is the major target of MPO. Furthermore, MPO rapidly adsorbs at the surface of LDL, promoting oxidation of amino acid residues and formation of oxidized lipoproteins that are commonly named Mox-LDL. The latter is not recognized by the LDL receptor and is accumulated by macrophages. In the context of atherogenesis, Mox-LDL accumulates in macrophages leading to foam cell formation. Furthermore, Mox-LDL seems to have specific effects and triggers inflammation. Indeed, those oxidized lipoproteins activate endothelial cells and monocytes/macrophages and induce proinflammatory molecules such as TNFα and IL-8. Mox-LDL may also inhibit fibrinolysis mediated via endothelial cells and consecutively increase the risk of thrombus formation. Finally, Mox-LDL has been involved in the physiopathology of several diseases linked to atherosclerosis such as kidney failure and consequent hemodialysis therapy, erectile dysfunction, and sleep restriction. All these issues show that the investigations of MPO-dependent LDL oxidation are of importance to better understand the inflammatory context of atherosclerosis.

  6. Development of a Patient-Specific Multi-Scale Model to Understand Atherosclerosis and Calcification Locations: Comparison with In vivo Data in an Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimohammadi, Mona; Pichardo-Almarza, Cesar; Agu, Obiekezie; Díaz-Zuccarini, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification results in stiffening of the aorta and is associated with hypertension and atherosclerosis. Atherogenesis is a complex, multifactorial, and systemic process; the result of a number of factors, each operating simultaneously at several spatial and temporal scales. The ability to predict sites of atherogenesis would be of great use to clinicians in order to improve diagnostic and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a mathematical model as a tool to understand why atherosclerotic plaque and calcifications occur in specific locations. This model is then used to analyze vascular calcification and atherosclerotic areas in an aortic dissection patient using a mechanistic, multi-scale modeling approach, coupling patient-specific, fluid-structure interaction simulations with a model of endothelial mechanotransduction. A number of hemodynamic factors based on state-of-the-art literature are used as inputs to the endothelial permeability model, in order to investigate plaque and calcification distributions, which are compared with clinical imaging data. A significantly improved correlation between elevated hydraulic conductivity or volume flux and the presence of calcification and plaques was achieved by using a shear index comprising both mean and oscillatory shear components (HOLMES) and a non-Newtonian viscosity model as inputs, as compared to widely used hemodynamic indicators. The proposed approach shows promise as a predictive tool. The improvements obtained using the combined biomechanical/biochemical modeling approach highlight the benefits of mechanistic modeling as a powerful tool to understand complex phenomena and provides insight into the relative importance of key hemodynamic parameters. PMID:27445834

  7. Inflammation in coronary artery diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jian-jun

    2011-01-01

    The concept that atherosclerosis is an inflammation has been increasingly recognized,and subsequently resulted in great interest in revealing the inflammatory nature of the atherosclerotic process.More recently,a large body of evidence has supported the idea that inflammatory mechanisms play a pivotal role throughout all phases of atherogenesis,from endothelial dysfunction and the formation of fatty streaks to plaque destabilization and the acute coronary events due to vulnerable plaque rupture.Indeed,although triggers and pathways of inflammation are probably multiple and vary in different clinical entities of atherosclerotic disorders,an imbalance between anti-inflammatory mechanisms and pro-inflammatory factors will result in an atherosclerotic progression.Vascular endothelial dysfunction and lipoprotein retention into the arterial intima have been reported as the earliest events in atherogenesis with which inflammation is linked.Inflammatory has also been extended to the disorders of coronary microvasculature,and associated with special subsets of coronary artery disease such as silent myocardial ischemia,myocardial ischemia-reperfusion,cardiac syndrome X,variant angina,coronary artery ectasia,coronary calcification and in-stent restenosis.Inflammatory biomarkers,originally studied to better understand the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis,have generated increasing interest among researches and clinicians.The identification of inflammatory biomarkers and cellular/molecular pathways in atherosclerotic disease represent important goals in cardiovascular disease research,in particular with respect of the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent or reverse atherosclerotic diseases.

  8. Mulberry leaf aqueous fractions inhibit TNF-alpha-induced nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation and lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) expression in vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Yusuke; Kume, Noriaki; Arai, Hidenori; Hayashida, Kazutaka; Inui-Hayashida, Atsuko; Minami, Manabu; Mukai, Eri; Toyohara, Masako; Harauma, Akiko; Murayama, Toshinori; Kita, Toru; Hara, Saburo; Kamei, Kaeko; Yokode, Masayuki

    2007-07-01

    Mulberry (Morus Alba L., family Moraceae) leaf extracts have various biological effects including inhibition of oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), which is the major cause of atherosclerosis. Endothelial dysfunction elicited by oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL) has been implicated in atherogenesis. Lectin-like Ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), a cell-surface receptor for atherogenic Ox-LDL, appears to mediate Ox-LDL-induced inflammation, which may be crucial in atherogenesis. Previous studies revealed that expression of LOX-1 is highly inducible by proinflammatory stimuli, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Therefore, we examined whether mulberry leaf aqueous fractions inhibit LOX-1 expression induced by proinflammatory stimuli. Pretreatment of cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) with mulberry leaf aqueous fractions inhibited TNF-alpha- and LPS-induced expression of LOX-1 at both protein and mRNA levels in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, mulberry leaf aqueous fractions did not affect TGF-beta-induced LOX-1 expression. Furthermore, mulberry leaf aqueous fractions inhibited TNF-alpha-induced activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and phosphorylation of inhibitory factor of NF-kappaB-alpha (IkappaB-alpha) in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion. Thus, mulberry leaf aqueous fractions suppress TNF-alpha- and LPS-induced LOX-1 gene expression, by inhibiting NF-kappaB activation.

  9. Recent advances in lipoprotein and atherosclerosis: nutrigenomic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, S.; Ortega, A.; Varela, L.; Bermudez, B.; Muriana, F. J. G.; Abaia, R.

    2009-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a disease in which multiple factors contribute to the degeneration of the vascular wall. Many risk factors have been identified as having influence on the progression of atherosclerosis among them, the type of diet. Multifactorial interaction among lipoproteins, vascular wall cells, and inflammatory mediators has been recognised as the basis of atherogenesis. Dietary intake affects lipoprotein concentration and composition providing risk or protection at several stages of atherosclerosis. More intriguingly, it has been demonstrated that the extent to which each lipid or lipoprotein is associated with cardiovascular disease depends on the time to last meal; thus, postprandial lipoproteins, main lipoproteins in blood after a high-fat meal, have been shown to strongly influence atherogenesis. As a complex biological process, the full cellular and molecular characterization of atherosclerosis derived by diet, calls for application of the newly developing omics techniques of analysis. This review will considered recent studies using high-throughput technologies and a nutrigenomic approach to reveal the patho-physiological effects that the fasting and postprandial lipoproteins may exert on the vascular wall. (Author) 55 refs.

  10. Effects of cyclodextrins on the structure of LDL and its susceptibility to copper-induced oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Meiying; Gan, Chaoye; Shao, Wenxiang; Zhou, Xing; Chen, Yong

    2016-08-25

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) have long been widely used as drug/food carriers and were recently developed as drugs for the treatment of diseases (e.g. Niemann-Pick C1 and cancers). It is unknown whether cyclodextrins may influence the structure of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), its susceptibility to oxidation, and atherogenesis. In this study, four widely used cyclodextrins including α-CD, γ-CD, and two derivatives of β-CD (HPβCD and MβCD) were recruited. Interestingly, agarose gel electrophoresis (staining lipid and protein components of LDL with Sudan Black B and Coomassie brilliant blue, respectively but simultaneously) shows that cyclodextrins at relatively high concentrations caused disappearance of the LDL band and/or appearance of an additional protein-free lipid band, implying that cyclodextrins at relatively high concentrations can induce significant electrophoresis-detectable lipid depletion of LDL. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) detected that MβCD (as a representative of cyclodextrins) induced size decrease of LDL particles in a dose-dependent manner, further confirming the lipid depletion effects of cyclodextrins. Moreover, the data from agarose gel electrophoresis, conjugated diene formation, MDA production, and amino group blockage of copper-oxidized LDL show that cyclodextrins can impair LDL susceptibility to oxidation. It implies that cyclodextrins probably help to inhibit atherogenesis by lowering LDL oxidation. PMID:27140842

  11. Study of Interleukin-1ß in Essential Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda A. Hassan ,Amal Ahmed Mokhar,Adila M.Gad, Amal Abdel Aleem

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The observation of increased blood interleukin 1ß levels in subjects with hypertension is a finding that raises the hypothesis that the immune mechanisms may be involved in the atherogenic cascade . Our aim in this study was to investigate the possible interrelations between blood pressure, lipid profile and IL-1ß to clarify the possible participation of this cytokine in the cascade phenomena presented during the process of essential hypertension (EH such as atherogenesis. 28 hypertensive patients and 10 healthy volunteers served as control matched for age and sex were included. IL-1ß (enzyme immunoassay, total cholesterol , triglycerides, high and low density lipoprotein cholesterol were estimated. Significant elevation of IL- 1ß in hypertensive patients in comparison to the control was found with positive correlation between IL- 1ß and diastolic. Systolic and the mean Blood pressure r=0.16, 0.046 and 0.28 respectively . Also the study showed positive correlation between IL-1ß and body mass index (r=0.42, serum cholesterol and LDL cholesterol and negative one with TG while no correlation was found with HDL cholesterol TG. Elevated IL-1ß levels in subjects with EH may be related causally to the role of immunologic mechanisms in the development of EH and even to the atherogenic cascade.Thus we can suggest that the presence of high levels of IL-1ß may be an additional risk factor for atherogenesis in patients with EH

  12. Redox balance and blood elemental levels in atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoleão, P.; Lopes, P. A.; Santos, M.; Steghens, J.-P.; Viegas-Crespo, A. M.; Pinheiro, T.

    2006-08-01

    Oxidation of lipids and proteins represents a causative event for atherogenesis, which can be opposed by antioxidant activity. Elements, such as, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se can be involved in both mechanisms. Thus, evaluation of blood elemental levels, easily detected by PIXE, and of redox parameters may be useful in assessing the risk of atherosclerosis. A group of stable patients suffering from atherosclerosis, was matched with a cohort of normo-tensive and -lipidemic volunteers. Although no major discrepancies were observed for trace elemental levels in blood, increased concentrations of K and Ca were found in atherosclerotic group. Patients presented enhance levels of antioxidant (α-tocopherol) and decreased of protein oxidation (protein carbonyls), while for the lipid oxidation marker (malondialdehyde) no variation was observed. This study contributes to a better understanding of atherosclerosis development and its relationship with blood elemental levels, and set basis for further clinical trials with pathological groups in acute phase.

  13. Immune and vascular dysfunction in diabetic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A S; Antonsen, E L

    2016-07-01

    The diminished capacity for wound healing in patients with diabetes contributes to morbidity through ulceration and recurrent infections, loss of function and decreased workplace productivity, increased hospitalisation rates, and rising health-care costs. These are due to diabetes' effects on signalling molecules, cellular cascades, different cell populations, and the vasculature. The function of multiple immune system components including cellular response, blood factors, and vascular tone are all negatively impacted by diabetes. The purpose of this paper is to review the current understanding of immune and vascular dysfunction contributing to impaired wound healing mechanisms in the diabetic population. Normal wound healing mechanisms are reviewed followed by diabetic aberrations to immune and inflammatory function and atherogenesis and angiopathy. PMID:27410470

  14. Oxygen transfer in human carotid artery bifurcation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.G.Zhang; Y.B.Fan; X.Y.Deng

    2007-01-01

    Arterial bifurcations are places where blood flow may be disturbed and slow recirculation flow may occur.To reveal the correlation between local oxygen transfer and atherogenesis, a finite element method was employed to simulate the blood flow and the oxygen transfer in the human carotid artery bifurcation. Under steady-state flow conditions, the numerical simulation demonstrated a variation in local oxygen transfer at the bifurcation, showing that the convective condition in the disturbed flow region may produce uneven local oxygen transfer at the blood/wall interface.The disturbed blood flow with formation of slow eddies in the carotid sinus resulted in a depression in oxygen supply to the arterial wall at the entry of the sinus, which in turn may lead to an atherogenic response of the arterial wall, and contribute to the development of atherosclerotic stenosis there.

  15. Economics of health and mortality special feature: race, infection, and arteriosclerosis in the past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Dora L; Helmchen, Lorens A; Wilson, Sven

    2007-08-14

    We document racial trends in chronic conditions among older men between 1910 and 2004. The 1910 black arteriosclerosis rate was six times higher than the white 2004 rate and more than two times higher than the 2004 black rate. We argue that blacks' greater lifelong burden of infection led to high arteriosclerosis rates in 1910. Infectious disease, especially respiratory infections at older ages and rheumatic fever and syphilis at younger ages, predicted arteriosclerosis in 1910, suggesting that arteriosclerosis has an infectious cause. Additional risk factors for arteriosclerosis were being born in the second relative to the fourth quarter, consistent with studies implying that atherogenesis begins in utero, and a low body mass index, consistent with an infectious disease origin of arteriosclerosis.

  16. High density lipoproteins and atherosclerosis: emerging aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Federica Sala; Alberico Luigi Catapano; Giuseppe Danilo Norata

    2012-01-01

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) promote the efflux of excess cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver for excretion. This ability is responsible for the most relevant anti-atherogenic effect of HDL. The ability of HDL to promote cholesterol efflux results also in the modulation of a series of responses in the immune cells involved in atherosclerosis, including monocyte-macrophages, B and T lymphocytes.Furthermore, during inflammation, the composition of this class of lipoproteins varies to a large extent, thus promoting the formation of dysfunctional HDL. The aim of this review is to discuss the emerging role of HDL in modulating the activity of immune cells and immune-inflammatory mediators during atherogenesis.

  17. Mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Atkeson

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Amy Atkeson, Sanja JelicDivision of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NYAbstract: Endothelial activation and inflammation are important mediators of accelerated atherogenesis and consequent increased cardiovascular morbidity in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Repetitive episodes of hypoxia/reoxygenation associated with transient cessation of breathing during sleep in OSA resemble ischemia/reperfusion injury and may be the main culprit underlying endothelial dysfunction in OSA. Additional factors such as repetitive arousals resulting in sleep fragmentation and deprivation and individual genetic suseptibility to vascular manifestations of OSA contribute to impaired endothelial function in OSA. The present review focuses on possible mechanisms that underlie endothelial activation and inflammation in OSA.Keywords: endothelial, obstructive sleep apnea, inflammation, dysfunction

  18. DEGENERATIVE AORTIC STENOSIS: PATHOGENESIS AND NEW PRINCIPLES OF TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Andropova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To reveal of markers of inflammation and progression of calcification in patients with degenerative aortic stenosis (DAS. Material and methods. A single-stage study was done in 85 patients with degenerative calcification of aortic valve (42 patients with DAS and 43 patients without DAS. The techniques for assessing the severity of aortic valve calcification included ultrasonic diagnostics and multislice spiral computed tomography. Markers of inflammation and lipid profile were investigated.    Results. Higher blood levels of total holesterol and holesterol of low density lipoprotein were revealed in patients with DAS in comparison with patients without DAS. They also had higher levels of inflammation markers: C-reactive protein and interleukin-6. There were significant correlations between DAS severity, lipid metabolism disturbances and inflammation markers. Conclusion. Atherogenesis and inflammation may have pathogenic influence on progression of aortic valve calcification and DAS development by lipid infiltration and endothelium cells damage.

  19. ANGPTL4 deficiency in haematopoietic cells promotes monocyte expansion and atherosclerosis progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Binod; Rotllan, Noemi; Araldi, Elisa; Ramírez, Cristina M.; He, Shun; Chousterman, Benjamin G.; Fenn, Ashley M.; Wanschel, Amarylis; Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Warrier, Nikhil; Martín-Ventura, Jose L.; Swirski, Filip K.; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    Lipid accumulation in macrophages has profound effects on macrophage gene expression and contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we report that angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is the most highly upregulated gene in foamy macrophages and it's absence in haematopoietic cells results in larger atherosclerotic plaques, characterized by bigger necrotic core areas and increased macrophage apoptosis. Furthermore, hyperlipidemic mice deficient in haematopoietic ANGPTL4 have higher blood leukocyte counts, which is associated with an increase in the common myeloid progenitor (CMP) population. ANGPTL4-deficient CMPs have higher lipid raft content, are more proliferative and less apoptotic compared with the wild-type (WT) CMPs. Finally, we observe that ANGPTL4 deficiency in macrophages promotes foam cell formation by enhancing CD36 expression and reducing ABCA1 localization in the cell surface. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that haematopoietic ANGPTL4 deficiency increases atherogenesis through regulating myeloid progenitor cell expansion and differentiation, foam cell formation and vascular inflammation.

  20. Continuous reduction of plasma paraoxonase activity with increasing dialysis vintage in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Bernhard F; Holzhausen, Helge; Tepel, Martin

    2010-12-01

    Plasma paraoxonase (PON) is an enzyme that hydrolyzes organic phosphate and aromatic carboxylic acid esters. Reduced activity is associated with early events of atherogenesis. The relevance of PON phenotypes is not well characterized in hemodialysis patients. In a cross-sectional study we measured PON activity in 377 hemodialysis patients photometrically using the substrates 4-nitrophenylacetate and phenylacetate. The PON ratio was calculated from 4-nitrophenylacetate-derived activity divided by phenylacetate-derived activity. Frequency distribution of the PON ratio showed three different PON phenotypes. 74% of hemodialysis patients showed PON phenotype 1, 21% PON phenotype 2, and 5% PON phenotype 3. Compared to hemodialysis patients with PON 1, patients with PON 2 or 3 showed higher conversion rates for 4-nitrophenylacetate. We observed a significant reduction of PON ratio with increasing dialysis vintage (Pvintage. In conclusion, plasma PON ratio significantly declines with increasing dialysis vintage.

  1. A new approach to determining the rates of recruitment of circulating leukocytes into tissues: Application to the measurement of leukocyte recruitment into atherosclerotic lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Daniel; Khoo, John C.; Glass, Christopher K.; Palinski, Wulf; Almazan, Felicidad

    1997-01-01

    Recruitment of circulating monocytes into the artery wall is an important feature of early atherogenesis. In vitro studies have identified a number of adhesion molecules and chemokines that may control this process but very little work has been done to evaluate their relative importance in vivo, in part because there have been no methods available of sufficient sensitivity and reliability. This paper proposes a new approach in which advantage is taken of naturally occurring or transgenically induced mutations to “mark” donor cells and to follow their fate in recipient animals using highly sensitive PCR methods. The feasibility of the approach is demonstrated by preliminary studies of monocyte recruitment into atherosclerotic lesions. However, the method should in principle be applicable to the study of any of the circulating leukocytes and their rate of entry into any tissue or tissues of interest. PMID:9108101

  2. Myeloperoxidase-Dependent LDL Modifications in Bloodstream Are Mainly Predicted by Angiotensin II, Adiponectin, and Myeloperoxidase Activity: A Cross-Sectional Study in Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Zouaoui Boudjeltia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paradigm of atherogenesis proposes that low density lipoproteins (LDLs are trapped in subendothelial space of the vascular wall where they are oxidized. Previously, we showed that oxidation is not restricted to the subendothelial location. Myeloperoxidase (MPO, an enzyme secreted by neutrophils and macrophages, can modify LDL (Mox-LDL at the surface of endothelial cells. In addition we observed that the activation of the endothelial cells by angiotensin II amplifies this process. We suggested that induction of the NADPH oxidase complex was a major step in the oxidative process. Based on these data, we asked whether there was an independent association, in 121 patients, between NADPH oxidase modulators, such as angiotensin II, adiponectin, and levels of circulating Mox-LDL. Our observations suggest that the combination of blood angiotensin II, MPO activity, and adiponectin explains, at least partially, serum Mox-LDL levels.

  3. Pomegranate peel polyphenols inhibit lipid accumulation and enhance cholesterol efflux in raw264.7 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shengjuan; Li, Jianke; Wang, Lifang; Wu, Xiaoxia

    2016-07-13

    Macrophage cholesterol accumulation and foam cell formation are the hallmarks of early atherogenesis. Many plant polyphenols have been shown to inhibit macrophage foam cell formation and the development of atherosclerotic lesions. However, the effect of pomegranate peel polyphenols on foam cells remains unclear. In this study, the potential atheroprotective actions of pomegranate peel polyphenols on cholesterol accumulation and outflow in raw264.7 macrophages, and the mechanisms, were investigated. The results showed that the pomegranate peel polyphenols reduced ox-LDL internalization to diminish foam cell formation, as measured by oil-red O staining in raw264.7 macrophages, which may be due to decreasing the macrophage CD36 protein expression and not SR-A. In addition, pomegranate peel polyphenols promoted apoA-1-mediated macrophage cholesterol efflux by up-regulating ABCA1 and LXRα at the mRNA and protein levels, independently of ABCG1 and PPARγ. PMID:27334099

  4. Effect of blood flow parameters on flow patterns at arterial bifurcations--studies in models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepsch, D W

    1990-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions are found primarily at arterial bends and bifurcations. Flow disturbances at these anatomic sites play a major role in atherogenesis. How hemodynamic factors such as vessel geometry, the pulsatile nature of blood flow, vessel wall elasticity and the non-Newtonian flow behavior of blood influence the flow field at these sites must be clarified. We have performed fundamental studies using a birefringent solution in a simplified rigid 90 degree T-bifurcation and pulsatile flow. The velocity distribution was measured with a laser Doppler anemometer. Flow in an elastic abdominal aorta model has been visualized using magnetic resonance imaging. In both flow studies, zones with negative velocity were found. These model measurements demonstrate that no flow parameter can be neglected. Further detailed studies are necessary to examine the interaction between fluid dynamic and cellular surface properties. PMID:2404201

  5. Syndrom-Pathogen Effect of Ozone Therapy and Nauheim Baths on Patients with Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena I. Sycheva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite different theories of atherogenesis, pathogenesis of this disease is, foremost, associated with the lipid storage disease, blood rheological properties, lipid peroxidation. Microcirculation disorders have significant role for pathogenesis of many illnesses, primarily, cardiovascular. Among possible reasons of increased risk of their pathway are the increase in the activity of sympathetic neurovegetative system, psychoemotional tension emergion. Application of ‘gas’ therapy methods, such as ozone therapy and carbon dioxide in the form of Nauheim baths is one of the prospect trends in preventive treatment. The obtained results of these methods application in the course of resort treatment showed positive dynamics for homeostasis indicants. They can serve as an indication for the use of carbon dioxide and, especially, ozone therapy for multifactor preventive treatment of patients with cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Nestin(+) cells direct inflammatory cell migration in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Toro, Raquel; Chèvre, Raphael; Rodríguez, Cristina; Ordóñez, Antonio; Martínez-González, José; Andrés, Vicente; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading death cause. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells participate in atherogenesis, but it is unclear whether other mesenchymal cells contribute to this process. Bone marrow (BM) nestin(+) cells cooperate with endothelial cells in directing monocyte egress to bloodstream in response to infections. However, it remains unknown whether nestin(+) cells regulate inflammatory cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Here, we show that nestin(+) cells direct inflammatory cell migration during chronic inflammation. In Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout mice fed with high-fat diet, BM nestin(+) cells regulate the egress of inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils. In the aorta, nestin(+) stromal cells increase ∼30 times and contribute to the atheroma plaque. Mcp1 deletion in nestin(+) cells-but not in endothelial cells only- increases circulating inflammatory cells, but decreases their aortic infiltration, delaying atheroma plaque formation and aortic valve calcification. Therefore, nestin expression marks cells that regulate inflammatory cell migration during atherosclerosis. PMID:27586429

  7. Toll-Like Receptors, Their Ligands, and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad P. Hodgkinson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a disease characterized by inflammation in the arterial wall. Atherogenesis is dependent on the innate immune response involving activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs and the expression of inflammatory proteins. TLRs, which recognize various pathogen-associated molecular patterns, are expressed in various cell types within the atherosclerotic plaque. Microbial agents are associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis and this is, in part, due to activation of TLRs. Recently considerable evidence has been provided suggesting that endogenous proteins promote atherosclerosis by binding to TLRs. In this review, we describe the role of TLRs in atherosclerosis with particular emphasis on those atherogenic endogenous proteins that have been implicated as TLR ligands.

  8. In silico analyses of metagenomes from human atherosclerotic plaque samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, Suparna; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; Alhede, Morten;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Through several observational and mechanistic studies, microbial infection is known to promote cardiovascular disease. Direct infection of the vessel wall, along with the cardiovascular risk factors, is hypothesized to play a key role in the atherogenesis by promoting an inflammatory...... response leading to endothelial dysfunction and generating a proatherogenic and prothrombotic environment ultimately leading to clinical manifestations of cardiovascular disease, e.g., acute myocardial infarction or stroke. There are many reports of microbial DNA isolation and even a few studies of viable...... a challenge. RESULTS: To investigate microbiome diversity within human atherosclerotic tissue samples, we employed high-throughput metagenomic analysis on: (1) atherosclerotic plaques obtained from a group of patients who underwent endarterectomy due to recent transient cerebral ischemia or stroke. (2...

  9. Alcohol and atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo Foppa

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Observational studies have attributed a protective effect to alcohol consumption on the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Alcohol intake in the amount of one to two drinks per day results in an estimated 20-40% reduction in cardiovascular events. An additional protective effect, according to major cohort studies, has been attributed to wine, probably due to antioxidant effects and platelet antiaggregation agents. On the other hand, the influence of different patterns of alcohol consumption and environmental factors may explain a great part of the additional effect of wine. Protection may be mediated by modulation of other risk factors, because alcohol increases HDL-C, produces a biphasic response on blood pressure, and modulates the endothelial function, while it neither increases body weight nor impairs glucose-insulin homeostasis. Alcohol may also have a direct effect on atherogenesis. Despite these favorable effects, the current evidence is not enough to justify prescribing alcohol to prevent cardiovascular disease.

  10. Apolipoprotein B levels, APOB alleles, and risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease in the general population, a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B is a key component in lipid metabolism. Subendothelial retention of apolipoprotein B containing lipoproteins is a necessary initiating event in atherogenesis, and high plasma levels of apolipoprotein B is a risk factor for atherosclerosis, whereas low levels may provide protection...... capturing the entire variation in APOB cannot be identified, and thus most polymorphisms must be evaluated separately in association studies; (3) APOB mutations and polymorphisms are associated with a range of apolipoprotein B and LDL cholesterol levels, although the magnitude of effect sizes of common....... The present review examines, with focus on general population studies, apolipoprotein B levels as a predictor of ischemic cardiovascular disease, as well as the association of mutations and polymorphisms in APOB with plasma apolipoprotein B levels, and risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease. The studies can...

  11. Serum paraoxonase activity and protein thiols in patients with hyperlipidemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mungli Prakash; Jeevan K Shetty; Sudeshna Tripathy; Pannuri Vikram; Manish Verma

    2009-01-01

    Objective: In the present study we evaluated the paraoxonase activity and protein thiols level in south Indian population with newly diagnosed hyperlipidemia. Methods: The study was conducted on 55 newly diagnosed hyperlipidemic pa-tients and 57 healthy controls. Serum paraoxonase activity and protein thiols were estimated by spectrophotometeric method and lipid profile by enzymatic kinetic assay method. Results: Serum paraoxonase activity, protein thiols and high density lipoprotein levels were low and total cholesterol, triglycerides and low density lipoprutein levels were high in patients with hyperlipidemia compared to healthy controls ( P < 0.01 ). Serum paranxonase activity correlated positively with protein thiols and high density lipoprotein (P<0.01). Conclusion: Decreased paraoxonase activity and protein thiols were found in patients with hyperlipi-demia. This may indicate the susceptibility of this population to accelerated atherogenesis and protein oxidation.

  12. CD47-blocking antibodies restore phagocytosis and prevent atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Yoko; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; McKenna, Kelly; Civelek, Mete; Lusis, Aldons Jake; Miller, Clint L; Direnzo, Daniel; Nanda, Vivek; Ye, Jianqin; Connolly, Andrew J; Schadt, Eric E; Quertermous, Thomas; Betancur, Paola; Maegdefessel, Lars; Matic, Ljubica Perisic; Hedin, Ulf; Weissman, Irving L; Leeper, Nicholas J

    2016-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is the disease process that underlies heart attack and stroke. Advanced lesions at risk of rupture are characterized by the pathological accumulation of diseased vascular cells and apoptotic cellular debris. Why these cells are not cleared remains unknown. Here we show that atherogenesis is associated with upregulation of CD47, a key anti-phagocytic molecule that is known to render malignant cells resistant to programmed cell removal, or 'efferocytosis'. We find that administration of CD47-blocking antibodies reverses this defect in efferocytosis, normalizes the clearance of diseased vascular tissue, and ameliorates atherosclerosis in multiple mouse models. Mechanistic studies implicate the pro-atherosclerotic factor TNF-α as a fundamental driver of impaired programmed cell removal, explaining why this process is compromised in vascular disease. Similar to recent observations in cancer, impaired efferocytosis appears to play a pathogenic role in cardiovascular disease, but is not a fixed defect and may represent a novel therapeutic target. PMID:27437576

  13. A Case of Severe Carotid Stenosis in a Patient with Familial Hypercholesterolemia without Significant Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Aurélio Lima Barros

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH is an inherited metabolic disorder characterized by elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in the blood. In its heterozygous form, it occurs in 1 in 500 individuals in the general population. It is an important contributor to the early onset of coronary artery disease (CAD, accounting for 5–10% of cases of cardiovascular events in people younger than 50 years. Atherogenesis triggered by hypercholesterolemia generally progresses faster in the coronary arteries, followed by the subsequent involvement of other arteries such as the carotids. Thus, symptoms of CAD commonly appear before the onset of significant carotid stenosis. Herein, we report the case of a patient with untreated FH who had severe carotid atherosclerosis at the age of 46 years but had no evidence of significant CAD.

  14. Regional gene expression of LOX-1, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 in aorta of HIV-1 transgenic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hag, Anne Mette Fisker; Kristoffersen, Ulrik Sloth; Pedersen, Sune Folke;

    2009-01-01

    endpoints, studies in animal models could be attractive alternatives. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated gene expression of lectin-like oxidized-low-density-lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in HIV-1...... transgenic (HIV-1Tg) rats; these genes are all thought to play important roles in early atherogenesis. Furthermore, the plasma level of sICAM-1 was measured. We found that gene expressions of LOX-1 and VCAM-1 were higher in the aortic arch of HIV-1Tg rats compared to controls. Also, the level of sICAM-1...... was elevated in the HIV-1Tg rats compared to controls, but the ICAM-1 gene expression profile did not show any differences between the groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HIV-1Tg rats have gene expression patterns indicating endothelial dysfunction and accelerated atherosclerosis in aorta, suggesting that HIV...

  15. [Secondary dyslipidemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargová, V; Pytliak, M; Mechírová, V

    2012-03-01

    Dyslipidemias rank among the most important preventabile factors of atherogenesis and its progression. This topic is increasingly being discussed as e.g. more than 50% of Slovak population die on atherosclerotic complications. According to etiology we distinguish primary dyslipidemias with strictly genetic background and secondary ones with origin in other disease or pathological state. Secondary dyslipidemias accompany various diseases, from common (endocrinopathies, renal diseases etc) to rare ones (thesaurismosis etc.) and represents one of symptoms of these diseases. Apart from particular clinical follow up of diagnosed dysipidemias, basic screening and secondary causes as well as treatment due to updated guidelines is recuired. In this review we present the most frequent dyslipidemias of clinical practice.

  16. Testing the Role of Myeloid Cell Glucose Flux in Inflammation and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Nishizawa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory activation of myeloid cells is accompanied by increased glycolysis, which is required for the surge in cytokine production. Although in vitro studies suggest that increased macrophage glucose metabolism is sufficient for cytokine induction, the proinflammatory effects of increased myeloid cell glucose flux in vivo and the impact on atherosclerosis, a major complication of diabetes, are unknown. We therefore tested the hypothesis that increased glucose uptake in myeloid cells stimulates cytokine production and atherosclerosis. Overexpression of the glucose transporter GLUT1 in myeloid cells caused increased glycolysis and flux through the pentose phosphate pathway but did not induce cytokines. Moreover, myeloid-cell-specific overexpression of GLUT1 in LDL receptor-deficient mice was ineffective in promoting atherosclerosis. Thus, increased glucose flux is insufficient for inflammatory myeloid cell activation and atherogenesis. If glucose promotes atherosclerosis by increasing cellular glucose flux, myeloid cells do not appear to be the key targets.

  17. Role and Function of MicroRNAs in Extracellular Vesicles in Cardiovascular Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Pfeifer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular communication mediated by extracellular vesicles is crucial for preserving vascular integrity and in the development of cardiovascular disease. Extracellular vesicles consist of apoptotic bodies, microvesicles, and exosomes that can be found in almost every fluid compartment of the body like blood, saliva, and urine. In the recent years, a lot of reports came up suggesting that major cardiovascular and metabolic pathologies like atherogenesis, heart failure, or diabetes are highly influenced by transfer of microRNAs via extracellular vesicles leading to altered protein expression and phenotypes of recipient cells. The following review will summarize the fast developing field of intercellular signaling in cardiovascular biology by microRNA-containing extracellular vesicles.

  18. Effect of Losmapimod on Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients Hospitalized With Acute Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Donoghue, Michelle L; Glaser, Ruchira; Cavender, Matthew A;

    2016-01-01

    attenuates inflammation and may improve outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of losmapimod on cardiovascular outcomes in patients hospitalized with an acute myocardial infarction. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS: LATITUDE-TIMI 60, a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel......IMPORTANCE: p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-stimulated inflammation is implicated in atherogenesis, plaque destabilization, and maladaptive processes in myocardial infarction (MI). Pilot data in a phase 2 trial in non-ST elevation MI indicated that the p38 MAPK inhibitor losmapimod...... potentially eligible for enrollment if they had been hospitalized with an acute MI and had at least 1 additional predictor of cardiovascular risk. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were randomized to either twice-daily losmapimod (7.5 mg; n = 1738) or matching placebo (n = 1765) on a background of guideline...

  19. Role of RANKL-RANK/Osteoprotegerin Pathway in Cardiovascular and Bone Disease Associated with HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelesidis, Theodoros; Currier, Judith S.; Yang, Otto O.; Brown, Todd T

    2016-01-01

    Patients with HIV-1 infection often develop multiple complications and comorbidities, including osteoporosis and atherosclerosis. The receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B/receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand/osteoprotegerin axis has been identified as a possible common link between osteoporosis and vascular diseases. Since the discovery of this axis, much has been learned about its role in controlling skeletal biology and less about its role in the context of vascular biology. However, the exact role of the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand/osteoprotegerin axis in HIV infection is not completely understood. In this review we examine the mechanisms by which inflammation and immune dysregulation in HIV-1 infection may impact bone turnover and atherogenesis through perturbations in the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B/receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand/osteoprotegerin axis. PMID:25102334

  20. Cathepsins and cystatin C in atherosclerosis and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafarge, Jean-Charles; Naour, Nadia; Clément, Karine; Guerre-Millo, Michèle

    2010-11-01

    Given the increasing prevalence of human obesity worldwide, there is an urgent need for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms linking obesity to metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Our knowledge is nevertheless limited regarding molecules linking adipose tissue to downstream complications. The importance of cathepsins was brought to light in this context. Through a large scale transcriptomic analysis, our group recently identified the gene encoding cathepsin S as one of the most deregulated gene in the adipose tissue of obese subjects and positively correlated with body mass index. Other members of the cathepsin family are expressed in the adipose tissue, including cathepsin K and cathepsin L. Given their implication in atherogenesis, these proteases could participate into the well established deleterious relationship between enlarged adipose tissue and increased cardiovascular risk. Here, we review the clinical and experimental evidence relevant to the role of cathepsins K, L and S and their most abundant endogenous inhibitor, cystatin C, in atherosclerosis and in obesity.

  1. Redox balance and blood elemental levels in atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napoleao, P. [Centro de Biologia Ambiental and Departamento de Biologia Animal, Faculdade de Ciencias de Lisboa, C2, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal) and Laboratorio de Feixes de Ioes, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. no 10, 2685-953 Sacavem (Portugal)]. E-mail: pnapoleao@itn.pt; Lopes, P.A. [Centro de Biologia Ambiental and Departamento de Biologia Animal, Faculdade de Ciencias de Lisboa, C2, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Santos, M. [Centro de Quimica e Bioquimica and Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica, Faculdade de Ciencias de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Steghens, J.-P. [Federation de Biochimie, Hopital Edouard Herriot, 3 Place d' Arsonval, 69437 03 Lyon (France); Viegas-Crespo, A.M. [Centro de Biologia Ambiental and Departamento de Biologia Animal, Faculdade de Ciencias de Lisboa, C2, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Pinheiro, T. [Laboratorio de Feixes de Ioes, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, E.N. no 10, 2685-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Egas Moniz, 1700 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2006-08-15

    Oxidation of lipids and proteins represents a causative event for atherogenesis, which can be opposed by antioxidant activity. Elements, such as, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se can be involved in both mechanisms. Thus, evaluation of blood elemental levels, easily detected by PIXE, and of redox parameters may be useful in assessing the risk of atherosclerosis. A group of stable patients suffering from atherosclerosis, was matched with a cohort of normo-tensive and -lipidemic volunteers. Although no major discrepancies were observed for trace elemental levels in blood, increased concentrations of K and Ca were found in atherosclerotic group. Patients presented enhance levels of antioxidant ({alpha}-tocopherol) and decreased of protein oxidation (protein carbonyls), while for the lipid oxidation marker (malondialdehyde) no variation was observed. This study contributes to a better understanding of atherosclerosis development and its relationship with blood elemental levels, and set basis for further clinical trials with pathological groups in acute phase.

  2. Disrupting functional interactions between platelet chemokines inhibits atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koenen, RR; Hundelshausen, P; Nesmelova, IV;

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by chronic inflammation of the arterial wall due to chemokine-driven mononuclear cell recruitment. Activated platelets can synergize with chemokines to exacerbate atherogenesis; for example, by deposition of the chemokines platelet factor-4 (PF4, also known as CXCL4...... and by enhanced monocyte arrest resulting from CCL5-CXCL4 interactions. The CCL5 antagonist Met-RANTES reduces diet-induced atherosclerosis; however, CCL5 antagonism may not be therapeutically feasible, as suggested by studies using Ccl5-deficient mice which imply that direct CCL5 blockade would severely...... monocyte recruitment and reducing atherosclerosis without the aforementioned side effects. These results establish the in vivo relevance of chemokine heteromers and show the potential of targeting heteromer formation to achieve therapeutic effects...

  3. Distinct Functions of Specialized Dendritic Cell Subsets in Atherosclerosis and the Road Ahead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Zernecke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic vascular disease is modulated by immune mechanisms. Dendritic cells (DCs and T cells are present within atherosclerotic lesions and function as central players in the initiation and modulation of adaptive immune responses. In previous years, we have studied the functional contribution of distinct DC subsets in disease development, namely, that of CCL17-expressing DCs as well as that of plasmacytoid DCs that play specialized roles in disease development. This review focuses on important findings gathered in these studies and dissects the multifaceted contribution of CCL17-expressing DCs and pDCs to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Furthermore, an outlook on future challenges faced when studying DCs in this detrimental disease are provided, and hurdles that will need to be overcome in order to enable a better understanding of the contribution of DCs to atherogenesis are discussed, a prerequisite for their therapeutic targeting in atherosclerosis.

  4. Novel anti-inflammatory therapies for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Razi; Spagnoli, Vincent; Tardif, Jean-Claude; L'Allier, Philippe L

    2015-06-01

    The underlying role of inflammation in atherosclerosis has been characterized. However, current treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD) predominantly consists of targeted reductions in serum lipoprotein levels rather than combating the deleterious effects of acute and chronic inflammation. Vascular inflammation acts by a number of different molecular and cellular pathways to contribute to atherogenesis. Over the last decades, both basic studies and clinical trials have provided evidence for the potential benefits of treatment of inflammation in CAD. During this period, development of pharmacotherapies directed towards inflammation in atherosclerosis has accelerated quickly. This review will highlight specific therapies targeting interleukin-1β (IL-1β), P-selectin and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO). It will also aim to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of serpin administration, colchicine and intravenous HDL-directed treatment of CAD. We summarize the mechanistic rationale and evidence for these novel anti-inflammatory treatments at both the experimental and clinical levels.

  5. Estimation of Seasonal Efficiency of Sochi Resort Climate Therapy by Means of Psychologic Testing of Patients with Cardiometabolic Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina N. Sorochinskaya

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are major reasons for population mortality in majority of countries, including Russia. Metabolic syndrome is considered to be one of the main pathologic states, leading to enhancement of atherogenesis, ischemic heart diseases and cerebrovascular diseases. Physical methods, including resort treatment play great role in metabolic syndrome prevention and treatment. Climate therapy depends on resort climate and season and is a major component of resort treatment. Psychological testing showed that combined resort treatment, using climate therapy of patients with stable effort angina at Sochi Health-resort is more efficient in autumn and of patients with metabolic syndrome in summer. The findings have been confirmed by clinic-functional indicators.

  6. Surfactant protein D is proatherogenic in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Grith L; Madsen, Jens; Kejling, Karin;

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an important innate immune defense molecule that mediates clearance of pathogens and modulates the inflammatory response. Moreover, SP-D is involved in lipid homeostasis, and pulmonary accumulation of phospholipids has previously been observed in SP-D-deficient (Spd......-/-) mice. Atherogenesis involves both inflammation and lipid deposition, and we investigated the role of SP-D in the development of atherosclerosis. SP-D synthesis was localized to vascular endothelial cells. Atherosclerotic lesion areas were 5.6-fold smaller in the aortic roots in Spd-/- mice compared...... with wild-type C57BL/6N mice on an atherogenic diet. HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) was significantly elevated in Spd-/- mice. Treatment of Spd-/- mice with a recombinant fragment of human SP-D resulted in decreases of HDL-C (21%) as well as total cholesterol (26%), and LDL cholesterol (28%). Plasma TNF...

  7. Oxidised LDL up-regulate CD36 expression by the Nrf2 pathway in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Archivio, Massimo; Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Filesi, Carmela; Varì, Rosaria; Maggiorella, Maria Teresa; Sernicola, Leonardo; Santangelo, Carmela; Giovannini, Claudio; Masella, Roberta

    2008-06-25

    The effect of oxLDL on CD36 expression has been assessed in preadipocytes induced to differentiate. Novel evidence is provided that oxLDL induce a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-independent CD36 overexpression, by up-regulating nuclear factor erythroid 2 (NF-E2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2). The nuclear translocation of Nrf2 appeared to depend on PKC pathway activation. In adipocytes, the CD36 up-regulation may indicate a compensation mechanism to meet the demand of excess oxLDL and oxidised lipids in blood, reducing the risk of atherogenesis. Besides strengthening the hypothesis that oxLDL can contribute to the onset of insulin-resistance, data herein presented highlight the significance of oxLDL-induced CD36 overexpression within the cellular defence response. PMID:18514070

  8. Homocysteine and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCully, Kilmer S

    2015-03-01

    The homocysteine theory of arteriosclerosis was discovered by study of arteriosclerotic plaques occurring in homocystinuria, a disease caused by deficiencies of cystathionine synthase, methionine synthase or methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. According to the homocysteine theory, metabolic and nutritional abnormalities leading to elevation of plasma homocysteine cause atherosclerosis in the general population without these rare enzymatic abnormalities. Through studies of metabolism of homocysteine thiolactone, the anhydride of homocysteine, in cell cultures from homocystinuric children, the pathway for synthesis of sulfate was found to be dependent upon thioretinamide, the amide formed from retinoic acid and homocysteine thiolactone. Two molecules of thioretinamide form the complex thioretinaco with cobalamin, and oxidative phosphorylation is catalyzed by reduction of oxygen, which is bound to thioretinaco ozonide, by electrons from electron transport particles. Atherogenesis is attributed to formation of aggregates of homocysteinylated lipoproteins with microorganisms, which obstruct the vasa vasorum during formation of arterial vulnerable plaques. PMID:25653125

  9. Inflammatory therapeutic targets in coronary atherosclerosis – from molecular biology to clinical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian eLinden

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death worldwide. Over the past two decades, it has been clearly recognized that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. Accumulating data from animal experiments have supported this hypothesis, however, clinical applications making use of this knowledge remain scarce. In spite of optimal interventional and medical therapy, the risk for recurrent myocardial infarction remains by about 20% over three years after acute coronary syndromes, novel therapies to prevent atherogenesis or treat atherosclerosis are urgently needed. This review summarizes selected potential molecu-lar inflammatory targets that may be of clinical relevance. We also review recent and ongoing clinical trails that target inflammatory processes aiming at preventing adverse cardiovascular events. Overall, it seems surprising that translation of basic science into clinical practice has not been a great success. In conclusion, we propose to focus on specific efforts that promote translational science in order to improve outcome and prognosis of patients suffering from atherosclerosis.

  10. Atherogenic Factors and Their Epigenetic Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Z. Fernandez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypercholesterolemia, homocysteine, oxidative stress, and hyperglycemia have been recognized as the major risk factors for atherogenesis. Their impact on the physiology and biochemistry of vascular cells has been widely demonstrated for the last century. However, the recent discovery of the role of epigenetics in human disease has opened up a new field in the study of atherogenic factors. Thus, epigenetic tags in endothelial, smooth muscle, and immune cells seem to be differentially affected by similar atherogenic stimuli. This paper summarizes some recent works on expression of histone-modifying enzymes and DNA methylation directly linked to the presence of risk factors that could lead to the development or prevention of the atherosclerotic process.

  11. Potential Benefits of Flaxseed in Health and Disease - A Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraj Madhusudhan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Flaxseed has been known since the Stone Ages. Originating in Mesopotamia, it has long history of use in India and was a commonly used food before World War II. Flaxseed cultivation and popularity declined after the fall of Rome and gradually forgotten until 1990s. Flaxseed oil, lignan precursors and its mucilage have many potential uses in the prevention or treatment of disease as a nutraceutical (drug. Due to several health benefits dietary flaxseed is a valuable strategy to limit several life-style diseases including hormone-responsive tumor, cholesterol-induced atherogenesis as well as abnormalities in endothelialdependent vasorelaxation. As this insightful rediscovery shows, current nutritional understanding provides an excellent opportunity to reintroduce this important food to the world.

  12. Influence of virtual intervention and blood rheology on mass transfer through thoracic aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yu; Chen, Ming; Xiong, Guanglei; Chen, Jie

    2015-09-18

    Computational fluid dynamics tools have been used to investigate blood flow through the human thoracic aortic models with aneurysm before and after virtual stent graft operation. The impact of blood rheology and aortic geometry on the wall shear stress (WSS), luminal surface low-density lipoproteins (LDL) concentration, and oxygen flux along the arterial wall is investigated. The stent graft at the aneurysm has significant effects on WSS and mass transport in blood flow. Due to the low flow rate, Newtonian blood assumption generally under-estimates the WSS. The non-Newtonian blood rheology play an important role in the LDL transport as well as oxygen transport. It is found that WSS alone is insufficient to correctly predict the location with high risk of atherogenesis. The results suggest that WSS, luminal surface LDL concentration, and the oxygen flux on the wall have to be considered together to evaluate the performance of virtual operation.

  13. [Osteoporosis and aterosclerosis--is there any pathogenetic association?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zofková, I

    2007-01-01

    Fundamental cytokine regulating remodelation of the skeleton is receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL). RANKL is counter regulated by soluble receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG). While RANKL activates osteoclastic bone resorption, the OPG stimulates bone formation. RANKL/OPG system (TRANCE axis) is activated in favour of RANKL in estrogen deficiency, inflammation, bone malignancies and during the treatment with glucocorticoids. TRANCE axis is functional also in other tissues including vessel wall, where dysbalance with superiority of RANKL leads to atherogenesis. Molecules blocking RANKL (specific antibodies and OPG) are potential drugs for treatment of osteoporosis, atherosclerosis, inflammation diseases, myeloma or osteolytic bone metastases. This review is focused on pathogenetic role of TRANCE axis in the development of osteoporosis and atherosclerosis and on its use in diagnosis and treatment of both degenerative diseases.

  14. Glycation of high-density lipoprotein in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jia-teng; SHEN Ying; L(U) An-kang; LU Lin; SHEN Wei-feng

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether glycation of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) increases cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus by altering its anti-atherogenic property.Data sources Data cited in this review were obtained mainly from Pubmed and Medline in English from 2000 to 2013,with keywords "glycation","HDL",and "atherosclerosis".Study selection Articles regarding glycation of HDL and its role in atherogenesis in both humans and experimental animal models were identified,retrieved and reviewed.Results Glycation alters the structure of HDL and its associated enzymes,resulting in an impairment of atheroprotective functionality and increased risks for cardiovascular events in type 2 diabetic patients.Conclusion Glycation of HDL exerts a deleterious effect on the development of cardiovascular complications in diabetes.

  15. Oxidized Cholesteryl Esters and Phospholipids in Zebrafish Larvae Fed a High Cholesterol Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Longhou; Harkewicz, Richard; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Wiesner, Philipp; Choi, Soo-Ho; Almazan, Felicidad; Pattison, Jennifer; Deer, Elena; Sayaphupha, Tiffany; Dennis, Edward A.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Miller, Yury I.

    2010-01-01

    A novel hypercholesterolemic zebrafish model has been developed to study early events of atherogenesis. This model utilizes optically transparent zebrafish larvae, fed a high cholesterol diet (HCD), to monitor processes of vascular inflammation in live animals. Because lipoprotein oxidation is an important factor in the development of atherosclerosis, in this study, we characterized the oxidized lipid milieu in HCD-fed zebrafish larvae. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we show that feeding an HCD for only 2 weeks resulted in up to 70-fold increases in specific oxidized cholesteryl esters, identical to those present in human minimally oxidized LDL and in murine atherosclerotic lesions. The levels of oxidized phospholipids, such as 1-palmitoyl-2-oxovaleroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and of various lysophosphatidylcholines were also significantly elevated. Moreover, lipoproteins isolated from homogenates of HCD-fed larvae induced cell spreading as well as ERK1/2, Akt, and JNK phosphorylation in murine macrophages. Removal of apoB-containing lipoproteins from the zebrafish homogenates with an anti-human LDL antibody, as well as reducing lipid hydroperoxides with ebselen, resulted in inhibition of macrophage activation. The TLR4 deficiency in murine macrophages prevented their activation with zebrafish lipoproteins. Using biotinylated homogenates of HCD-fed larvae, we demonstrated that their components bound to murine macrophages, and this binding was effectively competed by minimally oxidized LDL but not by native LDL. These data provide evidence that molecular lipid determinants of proatherogenic macrophage phenotypes are present in large quantities in hypercholesterolemic zebrafish larvae and support the use of the HCD-fed zebrafish as a valuable model to study early events of atherogenesis. PMID:20710028

  16. Endothelial ATP-binding cassette G1 in mouse endothelium protects against hemodynamic-induced atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shanshan; Wang, Jiaxing; Zhang, Xu; Shi, Ying; Li, Bochuan; Bao, Qiankun; Pang, Wei; Ai, Ding; Zhu, Yi; He, Jinlong

    2016-08-19

    Activated vascular endothelium inflammation under persistent hyperlipidemia is the initial step of atherogenesis. ATP-binding cassette G1 (ABCG1) is a crucial factor maintaining sterol and lipid homeostasis by transporting cholesterol efflux to high-density lipoprotein. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of ABCG1 in endothelial inflammation activation during early-stage atherogenesis in mice and the underlying mechanisms. Endothelial cell (EC)-specific ABCG1 transgenic (EC-ABCG1-Tg) mice were generated and cross-bred with low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice. After a 4-week Western-type diet, the mice were sacrificed for assessing atherosclerosis. Human umbilical vein ECs were treated with different flows, and ABCG1 was adenovirally overexpressed to investigate the mechanism in vitro. Compared with Ldlr(-/-) mouse aortas, EC-ABCG1-Tg/Ldlr(-/-) aortas showed decreased early-stage lesions. Furthermore, the lesion area in the EC-ABCG1-Tg/Ldlr(-/-) mouse aortic arch but not thoracic aorta was significantly reduced, which suggests a protective role of ABCG1 under atheroprone flow. In vitro, overexpression of ABCG1 attenuated EC activation caused by oscillatory shear stress. Overexpression of ABCG1 blunted cholesterol-activated ECs in vitro. In exploring the mechanisms of ABCG1 attenuating endothelial inflammation, we found that ABCG1 inhibited oscillatory flow-activated nuclear factor kappa B and NLRP3 inflammasome in ECs. ABCG1 may play a protective role in early-stage atherosclerosis by reducing endothelial activation induced by oscillatory shear stress via suppressing the inflammatory response. PMID:27297110

  17. Stimulatory interactions between human coronary smooth muscle cells and dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Paccosi

    Full Text Available Despite inflammatory and immune mechanisms participating to atherogenesis and dendritic cells (DCs driving immune and non-immune tissue injury response, the interactions between DCs and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs possibly relevant to vascular pathology including atherogenesis are still unclear. To address this issue, immature DCs (iDCs generated from CD14+ cells isolated from healthy donors were matured either with cytokines (mDCs, or co-cultured (ccDCs with human coronary artery VSMCs (CASMCs using transwell chambers. Co-culture induced DC immunophenotypical and functional maturation similar to cytokines, as demonstrated by flow cytometry and mixed lymphocyte reaction. In turn, factors from mDCs and ccDCs induced CASMC migration. MCP-1 and TNFα, secreted from DCs, and IL-6 and MCP-1, secreted from CASMCs, were primarily involved. mDCs adhesion to CASMCs was enhanced by CASMC pre-treatment with IFNγ and TNFα ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were involved, since the expression of specific mRNAs for these molecules increased and adhesion was inhibited by neutralizing antibodies to the counter-receptors CD11c and CD18. Adhesion was also inhibited by CASMC pre-treatment with the HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitor atorvastatin and the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone, which suggests a further mechanism for the anti-inflammatory action of these drugs. Adhesion of DCs to VSMCs was shown also in vivo in rat carotid 7 to 21 days after crush and incision injury. The findings indicate that DCs and VSMCs can interact with reciprocal stimulation, possibly leading to perpetuate inflammation and vascular wall remodelling, and that the interaction is enhanced by a cytokine-rich inflammatory environment and down-regulated by HMGCoA-reductase inhibitors and PPARγ agonists.

  18. Knockdown of GSK3β increases basal autophagy and AMPK signalling in nutrient-laden human aortic endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikel, Karen A.; Cacicedo, José M.; Ruderman, Neil B.; Ido, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    High concentrations of glucose and palmitate increase endothelial cell inflammation and apoptosis, events that often precede atherogenesis. They may do so by decreasing basal autophagy and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity, although the mechanisms by which this occurs are not clear. Decreased function of the lysosome, an organelle required for autophagy and AMPK, have been associated with hyperactivity of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). To determine whether GSK3β affects nutrient-induced changes in autophagy and AMPK activity, we used a primary human aortic endothelial cell (HAEC) model of type 2 diabetes that we had previously characterized with impaired AMPK activity and autophagy [Weikel et al. (2015) Am. J. Phys. Cell Physiol. 308, C249–C263]. Presently, we found that incubation of HAECs with excess nutrients (25 mM glucose and 0.4 mM palmitate) increased GSK3β activity and impaired lysosome acidification. Suppression of GSK3β in these cells by treatment with a chemical inhibitor or overexpression of kinase-dead GSK3β attenuated these lysosomal changes. Under control and excess nutrient conditions, knockdown of GSK3β increased autophagosome formation, forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) activity and AMPK signalling and decreased Akt signalling. Similar changes in autophagy, AMPK and Akt signalling were observed in aortas from mice treated with the GSK3β inhibitor CHIR 99021. Thus, increasing basal autophagy and AMPK activity by inhibiting GSK3β may be an effective strategy in the setting of hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia for restoring endothelial cell health and reducing atherogenesis. PMID:27534430

  19. P2Y6 receptor potentiates pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages and exhibits differential roles in atherosclerotic lesion development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo A Garcia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: P2Y(6, a purinergic receptor for UDP, is enriched in atherosclerotic lesions and is implicated in pro-inflammatory responses of key vascular cell types and macrophages. Evidence for its involvement in atherogenesis, however, has been lacking. Here we use cell-based studies and three murine models of atherogenesis to evaluate the impact of P2Y(6 deficiency on atherosclerosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cell-based studies in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, which lack functional P2Y(6 receptors, showed that exogenous expression of P2Y(6 induces a robust, receptor- and agonist-dependent secretion of inflammatory mediators IL-8, IL-6, MCP-1 and GRO1. P2Y(6-mediated inflammatory responses were also observed, albeit to a lesser extent, in macrophages endogenously expressing P2Y(6 and in acute peritonitis models of inflammation. To evaluate the role of P2Y(6 in atherosclerotic lesion development, we used P2Y(6-deficient mice in three mouse models of atherosclerosis. A 43% reduction in aortic arch plaque was observed in high fat-fed LDLR knockout mice lacking P2Y(6 receptors in bone marrow-derived cells. In contrast, no effect on lesion development was observed in fat-fed whole body P2Y(6xLDLR double knockout mice. Interestingly, in a model of enhanced vascular inflammation using angiotensin II, P2Y(6 deficiency enhanced formation of aneurysms and exhibited a trend towards increased atherosclerosis in the aorta of LDLR knockout mice. CONCLUSIONS: P2Y(6 receptor augments pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages and exhibits a pro-atherogenic role in hematopoietic cells. However, the overall impact of whole body P2Y(6 deficiency on atherosclerosis appears to be modest and could reflect additional roles of P2Y(6 in vascular disease pathophysiologies, such as aneurysm formation.

  20. Microarray Analysis of Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Responses to Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Minta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggest a causal role of bacterial and viral infections in atherogenesis. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS has been shown to stimulate resting vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC with the production of inflammatory cytokines and modulation of quiescent cells to the proliferative and synthetic phenotype. To comprehensively identify biologically important genes associated with LPS-induced SMC phenotype modulation, we compared the transcriptomes of quiescent human coronary artery SMC and cells treated with LPS for 4 and 22 h. The SMCs responded robustly to LPS treatment by the differential regulation of several genes involved in chromatin remodeling, transcription regulation, translation, signal transduction, metabolism, host defense, cell proliferation, apoptosis, matrix formation, adhesion and motility and suggest that the induction of clusters of genes involved in cell proliferation, migration and ECM production may be the main force that drives the LPS-induced phenotypic modulation of SMC rather than the differential expression of a single gene or a few genes. An interesting observation was the early and dramatic induction of four tightly clustered interferon-induced genes with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFIT1, 2, 4, 5. siRNA knock-down of IFIT1 in SMC was found to be associated with a remarkable up-regulation of TP53, CDKN1A and FOS, suggesting that IFIT1 may play a role in cell proliferation. Our data provide a comprehensive list of genes involved in LPS biology and underscore the important role of LPS in SMC activation and phenotype modulation which is a pivotal event in the onset of atherogenesis.

  1. Significant reduction of the antiatherogenic effect of estrogen by long-term inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis in cholesterol-clamped rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, P; Korsgaard, N; Shalmi, M; Andersen, H L; Hougaard, P; Skouby, S O; Stender, S

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the plasma lipid-independent antiatherogenic effect of estrogen and levormeloxifene, a partial estrogen receptor agonist. 85 rabbits were ovariectomized and balloon-injured in the middle thoracic aorta. The rabbits were fed a cholesterol-enriched diet supplemented with 17beta-estradiol, levormeloxifene, or placebo, either alone, or together with 160 microg/ml NG-nitro- -arginine methyl ester (-NAME), an NO synthase inhibitor, in their drinking water for 12 wk. Plasma cholesterol was maintained at 25-30 mmol/liter by individualized cholesterol feeding. In the undamaged aorta, the extent of atherosclerosis in the estrogen group was only one-third that in the placebo group. Simultaneous administration of -NAME, however, significantly reduced the antiatherogenic effect of estrogen (P < 0.01). There was no significant difference between the placebo group given -NAME and the group treated with placebo alone. At the previously endothelium-denuded site, estrogen had no effect on atherosclerosis development, whereas -NAME combined with estrogen significantly increased atherogenesis (P < 0.05). The effects of levormeloxifene were almost similar to those of estrogen. Active vascular concentrations of -NAME were demonstrated in an additional study, in which maximal aortic/coronary endothelium-dependent relaxation was significantly inhibited in rabbits given -NAME. Thus, in this study a considerable part of the plasma lipid-independent antiatherogenic effect of estrogen was mediated through its effect on endothelial NO in cholesterol-fed rabbits. The results for levormeloxifene suggest a common mechanism of action for estrogen and partial estrogen receptor agonists on atherogenesis. PMID:9259581

  2. Genetic and pharmacological modifications of thrombin formation in apolipoprotein e-deficient mice determine atherosclerosis severity and atherothrombosis onset in a neutrophil-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian I Borissoff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Variations in the blood coagulation activity, determined genetically or by medication, may alter atherosclerotic plaque progression, by influencing pleiotropic effects of coagulation proteases. Published experimental studies have yielded contradictory findings on the role of hypercoagulability in atherogenesis. We therefore sought to address this matter by extensively investigating the in vivo significance of genetic alterations and pharmacologic inhibition of thrombin formation for the onset and progression of atherosclerosis, and plaque phenotype determination. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated transgenic atherosclerosis-prone mice with diminished coagulant or hypercoagulable phenotype and employed two distinct models of atherosclerosis. Gene-targeted 50% reduction in prothrombin (FII(-/WT:ApoE(-/- was remarkably effective in limiting disease compared to control ApoE(-/- mice, associated with significant qualitative benefits, including diminished leukocyte infiltration, altered collagen and vascular smooth muscle cell content. Genetically-imposed hypercoagulability in TM(Pro/Pro:ApoE(-/- mice resulted in severe atherosclerosis, plaque vulnerability and spontaneous atherothrombosis. Hypercoagulability was associated with a pronounced neutrophilia, neutrophil hyper-reactivity, markedly increased oxidative stress, neutrophil intraplaque infiltration and apoptosis. Administration of either the synthetic specific thrombin inhibitor Dabigatran etexilate, or recombinant activated protein C (APC, counteracted the pro-inflammatory and pro-atherogenic phenotype of pro-thrombotic TM(Pro/Pro:ApoE(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We provide new evidence highlighting the importance of neutrophils in the coagulation-inflammation interplay during atherogenesis. Our findings reveal that thrombin-mediated proteolysis is an unexpectedly powerful determinant of atherosclerosis in multiple distinct settings. These studies suggest that

  3. EPAS1/HIF-2 alpha-mediated downregulation of tissue factor pathway inhibitor leads to a pro-thrombotic potential in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavik, Benedicte; Espada, Sandra; Cui, Xue Yan; Iversen, Nina; Holm, Sverre; Mowinkel, Marie-Christine; Halvorsen, Bente; Skretting, Grethe; Sandset, Per Morten

    2016-04-01

    Neovascularization and hemorrhaging are evident in advanced atherosclerotic plaques due to hypoxic conditions, and mediate the accumulation of metabolic substrates, inflammatory cells, lipids, and other blood born factors inside the plaque. Tissue factor (TF) pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is mainly expressed by endothelial cells and is the endogenous inhibitor of the coagulation activator TF, which together with the downstream product thrombin can drive plaque progression and atherogenesis. We aimed to investigate the effect of hypoxic conditions on endothelial cell expression and activity of TFPI and TF that are important in coagulation initiation. Hypoxia was induced in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells using chemicals or 1% oxygen tension, and mRNA and protein expressions were measured using qRT-PCR, ELISA, and Western blot analysis. Microscopy of fluorescence-labeled cells was used to visualize cell-associated TFPI. Cell-surface factor Xa (FXa) activity was measured using a two-stage chromogenic substrate method. We found that hypoxia reduced the TFPI mRNA and protein levels and increased the TF mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner. The effect on TFPI was apparent on all the protein pools of TFPI, i.e., secreted TFPI, cell-surface associated TFPI, and intracellular TFPI, and seemed to be dependent upon hypoxia inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α). An increase in FXa activity was also observed on the endothelial cell surface, reflecting an increase in pro-thrombotic potential of the cells. Our findings indicate that hypoxic conditions may enhance the pro-coagulant activity of endothelial cells, which may promote atherogenesis in addition to clinical events and thus the severity of atherosclerotic disorders. PMID:26826018

  4. Cardiovascular Protective Effects of Adjunctive Alternative Medicine (Salvia miltiorrhiza and Pueraria lobata in High-Risk Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Woo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hypertension in association with diabetes (DM, renal impairment (RI, and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH increases the risk of future cardiovascular events. We hypothesize, traditional herbal medicines Danshen and Gegen (D&G have beneficial effects on atherogenesis in these high-risk hypertensive subjects. Subjects and Methods. 90 asymptomatic hypertensive subjects associated with LVH (63.3%, DM (62.2%, or RI (30% were randomized to receive D&G herbal capsules 1 gm/day, 2 gm/day, or identical placebo capsules in double-blind and parallel fashion for 12 months. Brachial flow-mediated dilation (endothelium-dependent dilation, FMD and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT were measured by ultrasound. All data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences in Windows 16.0. Results. Their mean age was 55±8 years, and 74.4% were male. After 12 months of adjunctive therapies and compared with baseline, there were no significant changes in blood pressure, heart rate, hematological, glucose, and creatinine profiles in both placebo and D&G groups. FMD improved significantly during D&G (P=0.0001 and less so after placebo treatment (P=0.001. There was a mild but significant decrease in carotid IMT after D&G (P<0.001 but no significant changes after placebo. A trend of better improvement in FMD after higher versus lower D&G dosages was seen. D&G were well tolerated, with no significant adverse events or blood biochemistry changes. Conclusion. D&G adjunctive treatment was well tolerated and significantly improved atherogenesis in high-risk hypertensive patients, with potential in primary atherosclerosis prevention.

  5. Monocytic MKP-1 is a Sensor of the Metabolic Environment and Regulates Function and Phenotypic Fate of Monocyte-Derived Macrophages in Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong Seok; Tavakoli, Sina; Piefer, Leigh Ann; Nguyen, Huynh Nga; Asmis, Reto

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes promotes the S-glutathionylation, inactivation and subsequent degradation of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) in blood monocytes, and hematopoietic MKP-1-deficiency in atherosclerosis-prone mice accelerates atherosclerotic lesion formation, but the underlying mechanisms were not known. Our aim was to determine the mechanisms through which MKP-1 deficiency in monocytes and macrophages promotes atherogenesis. Transplantation of MKP-1-deficient bone marrow into LDL-R−/− (MKP-1LeuKO) mice accelerated high-fat diet (HFD)-induced atherosclerotic lesion formation. After 12 weeks of HFD feeding, MKP-1LeuKO mice showed increased lesion size in both the aortic root (1.2-fold) and the aorta (1.6-fold), despite reduced plasma cholesterol levels. Macrophage content was increased in lesions of MKP-1LeuKO mice compared to mice that received wildtype bone marrow. After only 6 weeks on a HFD, in vivo chemotactic activity of monocytes was already significantly increased in MKP-1LeuKO mice. MKP-1 deficiency in monocytes and macrophages promotes and accelerates atherosclerotic lesion formation by hyper-sensitizing monocytes to chemokine-induced recruitment, predisposing macrophages to M1 polarization, decreased autophagy and oxysterol-induced cell death whereas overexpression of MKP-1 protects macrophages against metabolic stress-induced dysfunction. MKP-1 serves as a master-regulator of macrophage phenotype and function and its dysregulation by metabolic stress may be a major contributor to atherogenesis and the progression of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27670844

  6. MDA-5 activation by cytoplasmic double-stranded RNA impairs endothelial function and aggravates atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asdonk, Tobias; Steinmetz, Martin; Krogmann, Alexander; Ströcker, Christine; Lahrmann, Catharina; Motz, Inga; Paul-Krahe, Kathrin; Flender, Anna; Schmitz, Theresa; Barchet, Winfried; Hartmann, Gunther; Nickenig, Georg; Zimmer, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the relevance of viral nucleic acid immunorecognition by pattern recognition receptors in atherogenesis. Melanoma differentiation associated gene 5 (MDA-5) belongs to the intracellular retinoic acid inducible gene-I like receptors and its activation promotes pro-inflammatory mechanisms. Here, we studied the effect of MDA-5 stimulation in vascular biology. To gain insights into MDA-5 dependent effects on endothelial function, cultured human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) were transfected with the synthetic MDA-5 agonist polyIC (long double-stranded RNA). Human coronary endothelial cell expressed MDA-5 and reacted with receptor up-regulation upon stimulation. Reactive oxygen species formation, apoptosis and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines was enhanced, whereas migration was significantly reduced in response to MDA-5 stimulation. To test these effects in vivo, wild-type mice were transfected with 32.5 μg polyIC/JetPEI or polyA/JetPEI as control every other day for 7 days. In polyIC-treated wild-type mice, endothelium-dependent vasodilation and re-endothelialization was significantly impaired, vascular oxidative stress significantly increased and circulating endothelial microparticles and circulating endothelial progenitor cells significantly elevated compared to controls. Importantly, these effects could be abrogated by MDA-5 deficiency in vivo. Finally, chronic MDA-5 stimulation in Apolipoprotein E/toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) double(-) deficient (ApoE(-/-) /TLR3(-/-) ) mice-enhanced atherosclerotic plaque formation. This study demonstrates that MDA-5 stimulation leads to endothelial dysfunction, and has the potential to aggravate atherosclerotic plaque burden in murine atherosclerosis. Thus, the spectrum of relevant innate immune receptors in vascular diseases and atherogenesis might not be restricted to TLRs but also encompasses the group of RLRs including MDA-5. PMID:27130701

  7. BR 08-3 MANAGEMENT OF DYSLIPIDEMIA IN HYPERTENSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthusamy, V V

    2016-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease burden is increasing all over the world. The diagnosis of hypertension is considered when a person has persistently elevated BP (Systolic BP more than 140 mmHg and/or Diastolic BP more than 90 mmHg). Dyslipidemia denotes abnormal levels of lipids in the blood (Total Cholesterol >200 mg%, Low density lipoprotein (LDL) >100 mg%, Triglycerides (TGL) >150 mg% and High density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol had a similar risk.RAAS promotes atherogenesis. Angiotensin II promotes atherogenesis through stimulation AT1 receptor, which increases lipid uptake in cells, vasoconstriction and free radical production to foster both hypertension and atherosclerosis. Hypertension damages vascular endothelium through altered shear stress and oxidative stress resulting in increased synthesis of collagen and fibronectin, reduced nitric oxide-dependent vascular relaxation and increased permeability to lipoproteins. Hypertension is also associated with up regulation of lipid oxidation enzymes. Hypertension is clearly associated with vascular endothelium (prothrombotic and pro inflammatory). Oxidative stress and vascular inflammation are increased in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Reduction of both results in the reversal of vascular inflammation.LDL is a major cause of endothelial dysfunction. Microalbuminuria is identified in hypertensive patients and it is also associated with lipid abnormalities including high levels of LDL and TGL, low levels of HDL and elevated levels of LP(a). Today CVD prevention is focussed on treating hypertension with the lowering LDL (40 mg in men) and lowering TGL(<150 mg%). In ALLHAT trial, 10,000 patients were given pravastatin 40 mg daily. At the end of 5 years, only 16.7% reduction in LDL was noted. In ASCOT-LLA trial, intensive therapy lipid lowering was recommended along with Antihypertensive therapy. ACEIs, ARBs, Aldosterone antagonists and Nebivolol improve endothelial function and reduce BP. Statin treatment happens

  8. Bone marrow-specific knock-in of a non-activatable Ikkα kinase mutant influences haematopoiesis but not atherosclerosis in Apoe-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathricia V Tilstam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ikkα kinase, a subunit of the NF-κB-activating IKK complex, has emerged as an important regulator of inflammatory gene expression. However, the role of Ikkα-mediated phosphorylation in haematopoiesis and atherogenesis remains unexplored. In this study, we investigated the effect of a bone marrow (BM-specific activation-resistant Ikkα mutant knock-in on haematopoiesis and atherosclerosis in mice. METHODS AND RESULTS: Apolipoprotein E (Apoe-deficient mice were transplanted with BM carrying an activation-resistant Ikkα gene (Ikkα(AA/AAApoe(-/- or with Ikkα(+/+Apoe(-/- BM as control and were fed a high-cholesterol diet for 8 or 13 weeks. Interestingly, haematopoietic profiling by flow cytometry revealed a significant decrease in B-cells, regulatory T-cells and effector memory T-cells in Ikkα(AA/AAApoe(-/- BM-chimeras, whereas the naive T-cell population was increased. Surprisingly, no differences were observed in the size, stage or cellular composition of atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta and aortic root of Ikkα(AA/AAApoe(-/- vs Ikkα(+/+Apoe(-/- BM-transplanted mice, as shown by histological and immunofluorescent stainings. Necrotic core sizes, apoptosis, and intracellular lipid deposits in aortic root lesions were unaltered. In vitro, BM-derived macrophages from Ikkα(AA/AAApoe(-/- vs Ikkα(+/+Apoe(-/- mice did not show significant differences in the uptake of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL, and, with the exception of Il-12, the secretion of inflammatory proteins in conditions of Tnf-α or oxLDL stimulation was not significantly altered. Furthermore, serum levels of inflammatory proteins as measured with a cytokine bead array were comparable. CONCLUSION: Our data reveal an important and previously unrecognized role of haematopoietic Ikkα kinase activation in the homeostasis of B-cells and regulatory T-cells. However, transplantation of Ikkα(AA mutant BM did not affect atherosclerosis in Apoe(-/- mice. This

  9. Humic acid in drinking well water induces inflammation through reactive oxygen species generation and activation of nuclear factor-κB/activator protein-1 signaling pathways: A possible role in atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hseu, You-Cheng [Department of Cosmeceutics, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, TX 77030 (United States); Senthil Kumar, K.J. [Department of Cosmeceutics, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chih-Sheng; Cho, Hsin-Ju; Lin, Shu-Wei; Shen, Pei-Chun [Institute of Nutrition, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Lin, Cheng-Wen [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Lu, Fung-Jou [Institute of Medicine, Chun Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China); Yang, Hsin-Ling, E-mail: hlyang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Institute of Nutrition, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, TX 77030 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Humic acid (HA) has been implicated as one of the etiological factors in the peripheral vasculopathy of blackfoot disease (BFD) in Taiwan. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of BFD are not well defined. In this study, we used an in vitro and in vivo model, in which HA (25–200 μg/mL) activated macrophages to produce pro-inflammatory molecules by activating their transcriptional factors. HA exposure induced NO and PGE{sub 2} production followed by induction of iNOS and COX-2 through NF-κB/AP-1 transactivation in macrophages. In addition, the production of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased by HA. Moreover, HA-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression were down-regulated by the NF-κB and AP-1 inhibitors pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and Tanshinone, respectively. Furthermore, generations of ROS and nitrotyrosine, as well as activation of the AKT and MAPKs signaling cascades were observed after HA exposure. Specifically, HA-induced NF-κB activation was mediated by ROS and AKT, and that HA-induced AP-1 activation was mediated by JNK and ERK. Notably, HA-mediated AKT, JNK, and ERK activation was ROS-independent. The inflammatory potential of HA was correlated with increased expression of HO-1 and Nrf2. Furthermore, an in vivo study confirms that mice exposed to HA, the serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner. This report marks the first confirmation that environmental exposure of HA induces inflammation in macrophages, which may be one of the main causes of early atherogenesis in blackfoot disease. - Highlights: • Humic acid (HA) induce pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators in macrophages. • HA-induced inflammation is mediated by ROS and NF-κB/AP-1 signaling pathways. • The inflammatory potential of HA correlated with activation of Nrf2/HO-1 genes. • HA exposure to mice increased pro-inflammatory cytokines production in vivo. • HA may be one of the main causes of early

  10. CARMA3: A novel scaffold protein in regulation of NF-κB activation and diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    CARD recruited membrane associated protein 3 (CARMA3) is a novel scaffold protein. It belongs to the CARMA protein family, and is known to activate nuclear factor (NF)- κB. However, it is still unknown which receptor functions upstream of CARMA3 to trigger NF-κB activation. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that CARMA3 serves as an indispensable adaptor protein in NF-κB signaling under some G protein-coupled receptors (GP- CRs), such as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor and angiotensin (Ang) Ⅱ receptor. Mechanistically, CARMA3 recruits its essential downstream molecules Bcl10 and MALT1 to form the CBM (CARMA3-Bcl10-MALT1) signalosome whereby it triggers NF-κB activation. GPCRs and NF-κB play pivotal roles in the regulation of various cellular functions, therefore, aberrant regulation of the GPCR/NF-κB signaling axis leads to the development of many types of diseases, such as cancer and atherogenesis. Recently, the GPCR/CARMA3/NF-κB signaling axis has been confirmed in these specific diseases and it plays crucial roles in the pathogenesis of disease progression. In ovarian cancer cell lines, knockdown of CARMA3 abolishes LPA receptor-induced NF-κB activation, and reduces LPA-induced ovarian cancer invasion. In vascular smooth cells, downregulation of CARMA3 substantially impairs Ang-Ⅱ-receptor-induced NF-κB activation, and in vivo studies have confirmed that Bcl10- deficient mice are protected from developing Ang-Ⅱ-receptor-induced atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysms. In this review, we summarize the biology of CARMA3, describe the role of the GPCR/CARMA3/NF-κB signaling axis in ovarian cancer and atherogenesis, and speculate about the potential roles of this signaling axis in other types of cancer and diseases. With a significant increase in the identification of LPA- and Ang-Ⅱ-like ligands, such as endothelin-1, which also activates NF-κB via CARMA3 and contributes to the development of many diseases, CARMA3 is emerging as a novel

  11. Practical strategies for modulating foam cell formation and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uitz, Elisabeth; Bahadori, Babak; McCarty, Mark F; Moghadasian, Mohammed H

    2014-10-16

    Although high density lipoprotein (HDL)-mediated reverse cholesterol transport is crucial to the prevention and reversal of atheroma, a recent meta-analysis makes evident that current pharmaceutical strategies for modulating HDL cholesterol levels lower cardiovascular risk only to the extent that they concurrently decrease low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. This corresponds well with findings of a recent Mendelian randomization analysis, in which genetic polymorphisms associated with HDL cholesterol but no other known cardiovascular risk factors failed to predict risk for myocardial infarction. Although it is still seems appropriate to search for therapies that could improve the efficiency with which HDL particles induce reverse cholesterol transport, targeting HDL cholesterol levels per se with current measures appears to be futile. It may therefore be more promising to promote reverse cholesterol transport with agents that directly target foam cells. Macrophage expression of the cholesterol transport proteins adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter A1, adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter G1, and scavenger receptor class B member 1 is transcriptionally up-regulated by activated liver X receptors (LXR), whereas nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB antagonizes their expression. Taurine, which inhibits atherogenesis in rodent studies, has just been discovered to act as a weak agonist for LXRalpha. Conversely, it may be possible to oppose NF-kappaB activation in macrophages with a range of measures. Induction of heme oxygenase-1, which can be attained with phase 2 inducer phytochemicals such as lipoic acid and green tea catechins, promotes reverse cholesterol transport in macrophages and inhibits atherogenesis in rodents, likely due to, in large part, NF-kappaB antagonism. Inhibition of macrophage nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity with the spirulina-derived bilirubin-mimetic phycocyanobilin may also oppose

  12. Serum TC/HDL-C,TG/HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C in predicting the risk of myocardial infarction in normolipidae-mic patients in South Asia:A case-control study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arun Kumar; Ramiah Sivakanesan

    2008-01-01

    Dyslipidemia the major cause of atherosclerosis are suggested to act synergistically with non-lipid risk factors to increase atherogenesis.Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)is the main therapeutic target in the pre-vention of CVD.Increased triglycerides (TG)and decreased high-density lipoprotein (LDL-C)are considered to be a major risk factor for the development of insulin resistant and metabolic syndrome.Although the TG/HDL-C ratio has been used in recent studies as a clinical indicator for insulin resistance,results were inconsis-tent.The TG/HDL-C ratio is also widely used to assess the lipid atherogenesis.How ever the utility of this rate for predicting coronary heart disease (CHD)risk is not clear.We encountered myocardial infarct patients with normal serum lipid concentration so this study was undertaken to evaluate the usefulness of these lipid ratios in predicting CHD risk in normolipidemic AMI patients and to compare the results with healthy subjects.The aim of the present study was to evaluate serum TC/HDL-C,TG/HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C in myocardial infarct subjects with normal lipid profile.To study this,lipid profile was determined in 165 normolipidemic acute myo-cardial infarction patients and 165 age/sex-matched controls.Total cholesterol,triglycerides,and HDL-cho-lesterol were analyzed enzymatically using kits obtained from Randox Laboratories Limited,Crumlin,UK. Plasma LDL-cholesterol was determined from the values of total cholesterol and HDL- cholesterol using the friedwalds formula.The values were expressed as means ± standard deviation (SD)and data from patients and controls was compared using students't'-test.The results and conclusion of the study were:Total cholester-ol,TC:HDL-C ratio,triglycerides,LDL-cholesterol,LDL:HDL-C ratio were higher in MI patients (p<0. 001).HDL-C concentration was significantly lower in MI patients than controls (p<0.001).Higher ratio of TC/HDL-C,TG/HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C was observed in AMI patients compared

  13. Effect of apolipoprotein M on high density lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis in low density lipoprotein receptor knock-out mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Christina; Jauhiainen, Matti; Moser, Markus;

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the role of apoM in high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism and atherogenesis, we generated human apoM transgenic (apoM-Tg) and apoM-deficient (apoM(-/-)) mice. Plasma apoM was predominantly associated with 10-12-nm alpha-migrating HDL particles. Human apoM overexpression (11-fold......) increased plasma cholesterol concentration by 13-22%, whereas apoM deficiency decreased it by 17-21%. The size and charge of apoA-I-containing HDL in plasma were not changed in apoM-Tg or apoM(-/-) mice. However, in plasma incubated at 37 degrees C, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase-dependent conversion...... of alpha- to pre-alpha-migrating HDL was delayed in apoM-Tg mice. Moreover, lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase-independent generation of pre-beta-migrating apoA-I-containing particles in plasma was increased in apoM-Tg mice (4.2 +/- 1.1%, p = 0.06) and decreased in apoM(-/-) mice (0.5 +/- 0.3%, p = 0...

  14. Apple Peel Supplemented Diet Reduces Parameters of Metabolic Syndrome and Atherogenic Progression in ApoE−/− Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jaime; Donoso, Wendy; Sandoval, Nathalie; Reyes, María; Gonzalez, Priscila; Gajardo, Monica; Morales, Erik; Neira, Amalia; Razmilic, Iván; Yuri, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) represent about 30% of all causes of death worldwide. The development of CVD is related in many cases with the previous existence of metabolic syndrome (MS). It is known that apple consumption has a cardiovascular protecting effect, containing phenolic compounds with antioxidant effect, which are concentrated in the fruit peel. The objective of this study was to test the effect of apple peel consumption in a murine model of MS and apoE−/− mice. Apple supplemented diets reduced the biochemical parameters (glycaemia, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, ureic nitrogen, triglycerides, insulin, and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA)) of MS model in CF1 mice significantly. The model apoE−/− mouse was used to evaluate the capacity of the apple peel to revert the progression of the atherogenesis. FD with HAP reverts cholesterol significantly and slows down the progression of the plate diminishing the cholesterol accumulation area. With these results, it can be concluded that the consumption of apple peel reduces several MS parameters and the atherogenic progression in mice. PMID:26075004

  15. C242T Polymorphism in CYBA Gene (p22phox) and Risk of Coronary Artery Disease in a Population of Caucasian Italians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasti, Sabina; Spallarossa, Paolo; Altieri, Paola; Garibaldi, Silvano; Fabbi, Patrizia; Polito, Luisa; Bacino, Luca; Brunelli, Michele; Brunelli, Claudio; Barsotti, Antonio; Ghigliotti, Giorgio

    2006-01-01

    Background: specific polymorphisms of genes regulating intracellular redox balance and oxidative stress are related to atherogenesis. Some studies have identified a relationship between progression of atherosclerosis and C242T mutation in CYBA gene coding for p22phox, a subunit of the NADH/NADPH oxidase system. Design: we investigated whether the C242T nucleotide transition is associated with the presence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in a population of 494 Caucasian Italians undergoing coronary angiography to diagnose the cause of chest pain. Results: the frequency of the T mutant allele that we found in 276 patients with angiographically documented CAD was significantly higher compared to what we observed in 218 subjects with normal coronary arteries (Controls) (respectively: 0.400 and 0.332, p < 0.01). The prevalence of the T allele was even stronger when we compared: 1) early onset (age ≤55) vs late onset (age ≥65) single-vessel CAD patients (respectively: 0.75 and 0.48, p < 0.05), and 2) the subgroup of CAD patients with at least one ≥98% stenosis in a coronary vessel vs those with no ≥98% stenosis in a coronary vessel (respectively: 0.425 and 0.365, p < 0.05). Conclusions: these results support the increased risk of developing early CAD and of having rapid progression of coronary stenosis in subjects carrying the C242T nucleotide transition among the Italian population. PMID:16788250

  16. Osteoprotegerin in Chronic Kidney Disease: Associations with Vascular Damage and Cardiovascular Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Mahmut Ilker; Siriopol, Dimitrie; Saglam, Mutlu; Unal, Hilmi Umut; Karaman, Murat; Gezer, Mustafa; Kilinc, Ali; Eyileten, Tayfun; Guler, Ahmet Kerem; Aydin, İbrahim; Vural, Abdulgaffar; Oguz, Yusuf; Covic, Adrian; Ortiz, Alberto; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-08-01

    Vascular injury and dysfunction contribute to cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a soluble member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily that has been linked to atherogenesis and endothelial dysfunction. Elevated circulating OPG levels predict future cardiovascular events (CVE). Our aim was to evaluate the determinants of circulating OPG levels, to investigate the relationship between OPG and markers of vascular damage and to test whether OPG improves risk stratification for future CVE beyond traditional and renal-specific risk factors in a CKD population. 291 patients with CKD stage 1-5 not on dialysis were included in the study. In the multivariate analysis, OPG was a significant predictor for flow-mediated dilatation, but not for carotid intima media thickness levels. During follow-up (median 36 months, IQR = 32-42 months), 87 patients had CVE. In the Cox survival analysis, OPG levels were independently associated with CVE even after adjustment for traditional and renal-specific cardiovascular risk factors. The addition of OPG to a model based on commonly used cardiovascular factors significantly improved the reclassification abilities of the model for predicting CVE. We show for the first time that OPG improves risk stratification for CVE in a non-dialysis CKD population, above and beyond a model with established traditional and renal-specific cardiovascular risk factors, including estimated glomerular filtration rate and fibroblast growth factor 23. PMID:27016924

  17. Immune dysregulation accelerates atherosclerosis and modulates plaque composition in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanic, Aleksandar K.; Stein, Charles M.; Morgan, Adam C.; Fazio, Sergio; Linton, MacRae F.; Wakeland, Edward K.; Olsen, Nancy J.; Major, Amy S.

    2006-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have accelerated atherosclerosis. The underlying mechanisms are poorly understood, and investigations have been hampered by the absence of animal models that reflect the human condition of generalized atherosclerosis and lupus. We addressed this problem by transferring lupus susceptibility to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-deficient (LDLr−/−) mice, an established model of atherosclerosis, creating radiation chimeras with NZM2410-derived, lupus-susceptible, B6.Sle1.2.3 congenic or C57BL/6 control donors (LDLr.Sle and LDLr.B6, respectively). LDLr.Sle mice developed a lupus-like disease characterized by production of double-stranded DNA autoantibodies and renal disease. When fed a Western-type diet, LDLr.Sle chimeras had increased mortality and atherosclerotic lesions. The plaques of LDLr.Sle mice were highly inflammatory and contained more CD3+ T cells than controls. LDLr.Sle mice also had increased activation of CD4+ T and B cells and significantly higher antibody to oxidized LDL and cardiolipin. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that the lupus-susceptible immune system enhances atherogenesis and modulates plaque composition. PMID:16636270

  18. Rosiglitazone inhibits expression of acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 in THP-1 macrophages induced by advanced glycation end-products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Qihong; Xu Qiang; Zhang Hong; Si Liangyi

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of rosiglitazone, a synthetic ligand of peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), on the expression of acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) in phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-pretreated THP-1 cells after the inducement of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Methods: After THP-1 cells were cultured in the presence of 0.1 umol/L PMA for 72 h to induce phagocytic differentiation, the obtained THP-1 macrophages were treated with rosiglitazone for 4 h at different concentrations (1,5 or 10 μmol/L) and then exposed to AGEs-modified bovine serum albumin (AGEs-BSA) for 24 h at a concentration of 200 mg/L. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis were performed to detect the mRNA and protein expressions of ACAT-1 respectively. Results: Administration of AGEs-BSA (200 mg/L) into the THP-1 macrophages resulted in up-regulation of ACAT-1 at mRNA and protein levels when compared with the expressions in macrophages incubated with serum-free RPM11640. Pretreatment of rosiglitazone inhibited significantly the increased expression of ACAT-1 induced by AGEs-BSA in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusion: PPARγ activation by rosiglitazone down-regulates ACAT-1 expression induced by AGEs in THP-1 macrophages, which might provide a new way for treating atherogenesis in diabetic patients.

  19. POSSIBLE ROLE OF MITOCHONDRIAL GENOME MUTATIONS IN CORONARY HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Egorova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are not only the major producers of adenosine triphosphate, but also an endogenous source of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrialdysfunction plays a key role in the trigger and progression of atherosclerotic lesion. Impaired function in the mitochondria due to their elevated level of oxidized oxygen species, the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA damages, and the exhaustion of respiratory chains induces dysfunction and apoptosis in the endothelial cells; activation of matrix metalloproteinases; growth of vascular smooth muscle cells and their migration into the intima; expression of adhesion molecules, and oxidation of low-density lipoproteins. Mitochondrial dysfunction may be an important unifying mechanism that accounts for the atherogenic effect of major cardiovascular risk factors. Small clinical pilot studies have shown an association of different mitochondrial genome mutations with atherosclerotic lesion in the artery. Taking into account the available data on the possible role of mitochondria in atherogenesis, novel drugs are now being designed to affect mitochondrial function.

  20. Antithrombotic lipid minor constituents from vegetable oils. Comparison between olive oils and others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karantonis, Haralabos C; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi; Demopoulos, Constantinos A

    2002-02-27

    Many epidemiological studies suggest that vegetable oils and especially olive oil present a protective effect against atherosclerosis. In this study, total lipids (TL) of Greek olive oils and seed oils of four kinds, namely, soybean, corn, sunflower, and sesame oil, were separated into total polar lipids (TPL) and total neutral lipids (TNL) via a novel extraction procedure. TPL and TNL of olive oil were fractionated by HPLC for further study. Each lipid fraction from HPLC separation along with TL, TPL, and TNL lipid samples from oils were tested in vitro for their capacity to induce or to inhibit washed rabbit platelet aggregation. Comparison between olive and seed oils supports the superiority of olive oil as high levels of platelet activating factor (PAF) antagonists have been detected, mainly in TPL. In addition, the structure of the most active fraction from olive oil was elucidated, as a glycerol-glycolipid. Because it has already been reported that PAF plays a pivotal role in atherogenesis, the existence of PAF agonists and antagonists in vegetable oils may explain their protective role against atherosclerosis.

  1. Noninvasive assessment of preclinical atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen A Lane

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Helen A Lane, Jamie C Smith, J Stephen DaviesDepartment of Endocrinology, University of Wales College of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff, Wales, UKAbstract: Initially considered as a semipermeable barrier separating lumen from vessel wall, the endothelium is now recognised as a complex endocrine organ responsible for a variety of physiological processes vital for vascular homeostasis. These include the regulation of vascular tone, luminal diameter, and blood flow; hemostasis and thrombolysis; platelet and leucocyte vessel-wall interactions; the regulation of vascular permeability; and tissue growth and remodelling. The endothelium modulates arterial stiffness, which precedes overt atherosclerosis and is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events. Unsurprisingly, dysfunction of the endothelium may be considered as an early and potentially reversible step in the process of atherogenesis and numerous methods have been developed to assess endothelial status and large artery stiffness. Methodology includes flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery, assessment of coronary flow reserve, carotid intimamedia thickness, pulse wave analysis, pulse wave velocity, and plethysmography. This review outlines the various modalities, indications, and limitations of available methods to assess arterial dysfunction and vascular risk.Keywords: endothelial function, vascular risk, vascular stiffness

  2. Biophysical and Biochemical Outcomes of Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection Promotes Pro-atherogenic Matrix Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evani, Shankar J; Dallo, Shatha F; Ramasubramanian, Anand K

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies support the hypothesis that infectious agents may be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Chlamydia pneumoniae is strongly implicated in atherosclerosis, but the precise role has been underestimated and poorly understood due to the complexity of the disease process. In this work, we test the hypothesis that C. pneumoniae-infected macrophages lodged in the subendothelial matrix contribute to atherogenesis through pro-inflammatory factors and by cell-matrix interactions. To test this hypothesis, we used a 3D infection model with freshly isolated PBMC infected with live C. pneumoniae and chlamydial antigens encapsulated in a collagen matrix, and analyzed the inflammatory responses over 7 days. We observed that infection significantly upregulates the secretion of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, MCP-1, MMP, oxidative stress, transendothelial permeability, and LDL uptake. We also observed that infected macrophages form clusters, and substantially modify the microstructure and mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix to an atherogenic phenotype. Together, our data demonstrates that C. pneumoniae-infection drives a low-grade, sustained inflammation that may predispose in the transformation to atherosclerotic foci. PMID:27582738

  3. Disruption of mTORC1 in Macrophages Decreases Chemokine Gene Expression and Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Ding; Jiang, Hongfeng; Westerterp, Marit; Murphy, Andrew J.; Wang, Mi; Ganda, Anjali; Abramowicz, Sandra; Welch, Carrie; Almazan, Felicidad; Zhu, Yi; Miller, Yury I; Tall, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibitor, rapamycin, has been shown to decrease atherosclerosis, even while increasing plasma LDL levels. This suggests an anti-atherogenic effect possibly mediated by modulation of inflammatory responses in atherosclerotic plaques. Objective To assess the role of macrophage mTORC1 in atherogenesis. Methods and Results We transplanted bone marrow from mice in which a key mTORC1 adaptor, Raptor, was deleted in macrophages by Cre/loxP recombination (Mac-RapKO mice) into Ldlr-/- mice and then fed them the Western-type diet (WTD). Atherosclerotic lesions from Mac-RapKO mice showed decreased infiltration of macrophages, lesion size and chemokine gene expression compared with control mice. Treatment of macrophages with minimally modified LDL (mmLDL) resulted in increased levels of chemokine mRNAs and STAT3 phosphorylation; these effects were reduced in Mac-RapKO macrophages. While wild-type and Mac-RapKO macrophages showed similar STAT3 phosphorylation on Tyr705, Mac-RapKO macrophages showed decreased STAT3 Ser727 phosphorylation in response to mmLDL treatment and decreased Ccl2 promoter binding of STAT3. Conclusions The results demonstrate cross-talk between nutritionally-induced mTORC1 signaling and mmLDL-mediated inflammatory signaling via combinatorial phosphorylation of STAT3 in macrophages, leading to increased STAT3 activity on the CCL2 (MCP-1)promoter with pro-atherogenic consequences. PMID:24687132

  4. Development and application of a nonradioactive binding assay of oxidized low-density lipoprotein to macrophage scavenger receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, Erica N.; Boullier, Agnès; Almazan, Felicidad; Binder, Christoph J.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Hartvigsen, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play a key role in atherogenesis in part through excessive uptake of oxidized LDL (OxLDL) via scavenger receptors. Binding of OxLDL to macrophages has traditionally been assessed using radiolabeled OxLDL. To allow more efficient and convenient measurements, we developed a nonradioactive binding assay in which biotinylated OxLDL (Bt-OxLDL) is added to macrophages in 96-well microtiter culture plates under various conditions and the extent of binding is determined using solid phase chemiluminescent immunoassay techniques. As examples, we show that Bt-OxLDL displayed high and saturable binding to macrophages in contrast to Bt-LDL, which showed very low binding. In competition assays, unlabeled OxLDL and the anti-OxLDL monoclonal antibody E06 inhibited Bt-OxLDL binding to macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. Specific binding of Bt-OxLDL to ApoE/SR-A/CD36 triple knockout macrophages was reduced by 80% as compared with binding to macrophages from ApoE knockout mice. Binding of Bt-OxLDL to CD36 transfected COS-7 cells showed enhanced saturable binding compared with mock-transfected cells. This assay avoids the use of radioactivity and uses small amounts of materials. It can be used to study binding of OxLDL to macrophages and factors that influence this binding. The techniques described should be readily adaptable to study of other ligands, receptors, and cell types. PMID:23997238

  5. Genetic Markers of Cardiovascular Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Rodríguez-Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular (CV disease is the most common cause of premature mortality in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. It is the result of an accelerated atherosclerotic process. Both RA and atherosclerosis are complex polygenic diseases. Besides traditional CV risk factors and chronic inflammation, a number of studies have confirmed the role of genetic factors in the development of the atherogenesis observed in RA. In this regard, besides a strong association between the HLA-DRB1*04 shared epitope alleles and both endothelial dysfunction, an early step in the atherosclerotic process, and clinically evident CV disease, other polymorphisms belonging to genes implicated in inflammatory and metabolic pathways, located inside and outside the HLA region, such as the 308 variant (G>A, rs1800629 of the TNFA locus, the rs1801131 polymorphism (A>C; position + 1298 of the MTHFR locus, or a deletion of 32 base pairs on the CCR5 gene, seem to be associated with the risk of CV disease in patients with RA. Despite considerable effort to decipher the genetic basis of CV disease in RA, further studies are required to better establish the genetic influence in the increased risk of CV events observed in patients with RA.

  6. 6-Shogaol Protects against Oxidized LDL-Induced Endothelial Injruries by Inhibiting Oxidized LDL-Evoked LOX-1 Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun kai Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial dysfunction and oxLDL are believed to be early and critical events in atherogenesis. 6-Shogaol is the major bioactive compound present in Zingiber officinale and possesses the anti-atherosclerotic effect. However, the mechanisms remain poorly understood. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of 6-shogaol on oxLDL-induced Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs injuries and its possible molecular mechanisms. Hence, we studied the effects of 6-shogaol on cell apoptosis, cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS, NF-κB activation, Bcl-2 expression, and caspase -3, -8, -9 activities. In addition, E-selectin, MCP-1, and ICAM-1 were determined by ELISA. Our study show that oxLDL increased LOX-1 expression, ROS levels, NF-κB, caspases-9 and -3 activation and decreased Bcl-2 expression in HUVECs. These alterations were attenuated by 6-shogaol. Cotreatment with 6-shogaol and siRNA of LOX-1 synergistically reduced oxLDL-induced caspases -9, -3 activities and cell apoptosis. Overexpression of LOX-1 attenuated the protection by 6-shogaol and suppressed the effects of 6-shogaol on oxLDL-induced oxidative stress. In addition, oxLDL enhanced the activation of NF-κB and expression of adhesion molecules. Pretreatment with 6-shogaol, however, exerted significant cytoprotective effects in all events. Our data indicate that 6-shogaol might be a potential natural antiapoptotic agent for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

  7. Histopathological changes due to the effect of selenium in experimental cockerels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A.A Latheef

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Selenium usually acts as an antioxidant at optimal levels in the body and increased levels are toxic. In this study an attempt was made to evaluate the effect of an optimum dose (0.14 mg of selenium on histopathological changes in experimental hypercholesterolemia in cockerels. Methods: The effect of selenium (0.14 mg was investigated on histopathological changes in four tissues namely liver, kidney, heart, and descending aorta in cockerel animal model. Animals were either fed with stock diet (group C, stock diet with cholesterol (group CH, stock diet with selenium (group Se, stock diet, selenium and cholesterol (group CH+Se for six months. Animals were sacrified and the tissues were isolated and subjected to histopathological study. Results: Xanthochromatic collections in liver were observed in group CH; hydropic degeneration in group Se and lobular disarray, hydropic degeneration and kuppfer cell hyperplasia in group CH+Se were observed. In kidney, mild mononuclear infiltration was observed in interstitium in groups CH, Se and CH+Se. myocyte disruption, and mononuclear infiltration in group CH and c0 H+Se, and disruption of muscle bundles with vascular congestion in group Se were observed. Smooth muscle proliferation in the media of blood vessel was observed in groups CH, Se and CH+Se. Interpretation & conclusions: The results of the present study suggested that the optimum dose of (140 ΅g/day feeding induced atherogenesis by inflammation and smooth muscle proliferation in cockerels with experimentally induced hypercholesterolaemia.

  8. Dual activation of the bile acid nuclear receptor FXR and G-protein-coupled receptor TGR5 protects mice against atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinobu Miyazaki-Anzai

    Full Text Available Bile acid signaling is a critical regulator of glucose and energy metabolism, mainly through the nuclear receptor FXR and the G protein-coupled receptor TGR. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether dual activation of FXR and TGR5 plays a significant role in the prevention of atherosclerosis progression. To evaluate the effects of bile acid signaling in atherogenesis, ApoE-/- mice and LDLR-/- mice were treated with an FXR/TGR5 dual agonist (INT-767. INT-767 treatment drastically reduced serum cholesterol levels. INT-767 treatment significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque formation in both ApoE-/- and LDLR-/- mice. INT-767 decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the aortas of ApoE-/- mice through the inactivation of NF-κB. In addition, J774 macrophages treated with INT-767 had significantly lower levels of active NF-κB, resulting in cytokine production in response to LPS through a PKA dependent mechanism. This study demonstrates that concurrent activation of FXR and TGR5 attenuates atherosclerosis by reducing both circulating lipids and inflammation.

  9. Dietary Inflammatory Index and Incidence of Cardiovascular Disease in the SUN Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramallal, Raúl; Toledo, Estefanía; Martínez-González, Miguel A.; Hernández-Hernández, Aitor; García-Arellano, Ana; Shivappa, Nitin; Hébert, James R.; Ruiz-Canela, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background Diet is known to play a key role in atherogenesis and in the development of cardiovascular events. Dietary factors may mediate these processes acting as potential modulators of inflammation. Potential Links between inflammatory properties of diet and the occurrence of cardiovascular events have not been tested previously. Objective We aimed to assess the association between the dietary inflammatory index (DII), a method to assess the inflammatory potential of the diet, and incident cardiovascular disease. Methods In the prospective, dynamic SUN cohort, 18,794 middle-aged, Spanish university graduates were followed up for 8.9 years (median). A validated 136-item food-frequency questionnaire was used to calculate the DII. The DII is based on scientific evidence about the relationship between diet and inflammatory biomarkers (C-reactive protein, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α). Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between the DII and incident cardiovascular disease (myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death). Results The risk for cardiovascular events progressively increased with each increasing quartile of DII (ptrend = 0.017). The multivariable-adjusted HR for participants in the highest (most pro-inflammatory) vs. the lowest quartile of the DII was 2.03 (95% CI 1.06–3.88). Conclusions A pro-inflammatory diet was associated with a significantly higher risk for developing cardiovascular events. PMID:26340022

  10. Emphysema is associated with increased inflammation in lungs of atherosclerosis-prone mice by cigarette smoke: implications in comorbidities of COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Hongwei

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is associated with numerous vascular effects including endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness and atherogenesis. It is also known that a decline in lung function is associated with increased cardiovascular comorbidity in smokers. The mechanism of this cardiopulmonary dual risk by cigarette smoke (CS is not known. We studied the molecular mechanisms involved in development of emphysema in atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/- mice in response to CS exposure. Methods Adult male and female wild-type (WT mice of genetic background C57BL/6J and ApoE-/- mice were exposed to CS, and lung inflammatory responses, oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation products, mechanical properties as well as airspace enlargement were assessed. Results and Discussion The lungs of ApoE-/- mice showed augmented inflammatory response and increased oxidative stress with development of distal airspace enlargement which was accompanied with decline in lung function. Interestingly, the levels and activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-9 and MMP-12 were increased, whereas the level of eNOS was decreased in lungs of CS-exposed ApoE-/- mice as compared to air-exposed ApoE-/- mice or CS-exposed WT mice. Conclusion These findings suggest that CS causes premature emphysema and a decline of lung function in mice susceptible to cardiovascular abnormalities via abnormal lung inflammation, increased oxidative stress and alterations in levels of MMPs and eNOS.

  11. Native low density lipoprotein promotes lipid raft formation in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jian; Ping, Ling-Yan; Duong, Duc M; Gao, Xiao-Yan; He, Chun-Yan; Wei, Lei; Wu, Jun-Zhu

    2016-03-01

    Oxidized low‑density lipoprotein (LDL) has an important role in atherogenesis; however, the mechanisms underlying cell‑mediated LDL oxidation remain to be elucidated. The present study investigated whether native‑LDL induced lipid raft formation, in order to gain further insight into LDL oxidation. Confocal microscopic analysis revealed that lipid rafts were aggregated or clustered in the membrane, which were colocalized with myeloperoxidase (MPO) upon native LDL stimulation; however, in the presence of methyl‑β‑cyclodextrin (MβCD), LDL‑stimulated aggregation, translocation, and colocalization of lipid rafts components was abolished.. In addition, lipid raft disruptors MβCD and filipin decreased malondialdehyde expression levels. Density gradient centrifugation coupled to label‑free quantitative proteomic analysis identified 1,449 individual proteins, of which 203 were significantly upregulated following native‑LDL stimulation. Functional classification of the proteins identified in the lipid rafts revealed that the expression levels of translocation proteins were upregulated. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that native‑LDL induced lipid raft clustering in macrophages, and the expression levels of several proteins were altered in the stimulated macrophages, which provided novel insights into the mechanism underlying LDL oxidation.

  12. Arginase activities and global arginine bioavailability in wild-type and ApoE-deficient mice: responses to high fat and high cholesterol diets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Erdely

    Full Text Available Increased catabolism of arginine by arginase is increasingly viewed as an important pathophysiological factor in cardiovascular disease, including atherosclerosis induced by high cholesterol diets. Whereas previous studies have focused primarily on effects of high cholesterol diets on arginase expression and arginine metabolism in specific blood vessels, there is no information regarding the impact of lipid diets on arginase activity or arginine bioavailability at a systemic level. We, therefore, evaluated the effects of high fat (HF and high fat-high cholesterol (HC diets on arginase activity in plasma and tissues and on global arginine bioavailability (defined as the ratio of plasma arginine to ornithine + citrulline in apoE(-/- and wild-type C57BL/6J mice. HC and HF diets led to reduced global arginine bioavailability in both strains. The HC diet resulted in significantly elevated plasma arginase in both strains, but the HF diet increased plasma arginase only in apoE(-/- mice. Elevated plasma arginase activity correlated closely with increased alanine aminotransferase levels, indicating that liver damage was primarily responsible for elevated plasma arginase. The HC diet, which promotes atherogenesis, also resulted in increased arginase activity and expression of the type II isozyme of arginase in multiple tissues of apoE(-/- mice only. These results raise the possibility that systemic changes in arginase activity and global arginine bioavailability may be contributing factors in the initiation and/or progression of cardiovascular disease.

  13. A regime map for secondary flow structures under physiological and multi-harmonic inflow through a bent tube model for curved arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Shannon M.; Caldwell, Kirin; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2012-11-01

    Secondary flow structures are known to affect wall shear stress, which is closely related to atherogenesis and drug particle deposition. A regime map provides a framework to examine phase-wise variations in secondary flow structures under physiological and multi-harmonic inflow waveforms under conditions of a fixed Womersley number (4.2) and curvature ratio (1/7). Experimental PIV data were acquired at the 90-degree location in a 180-degree curved test section of a bent tube model for curved arteries using a blood analog working fluid. Coherent structure detection was performed using a continuous wavelet transform algorithm (PIVlet 1.2) and further analysis was carried out by grouping similar secondary flow structures at a fixed secondary Reynolds numbers. Phase-locked, planar vorticity fields over one period of inflow waveform revealed size, structure and strength similarities in secondary flow morphologies during the acceleration and deceleration phases. The utility of the new regime map lies in the a priori identification of pulsatile secondary flow structures, eliminating the need for exhaustive experimentation or computing, requiring only flow rate measurements that are easily acquired under clinical conditions. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant No. CBET-0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  14. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilkin Zindancı

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder in which proinflammatory cytokines including IL-6 and TNF-α increase both locally and systematically. It is thought that chronic inflammation results in metabolic diseases and proinflammatory cytokines give rise to the development of atherogenesis, peripheral insulin resistance, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with psoriasis vulgaris. Methods. Study consisted of 115 plaque-type psoriasis patients and 140 healthy individuals. Data including body weight, height, waist circumference, body-mass index, and arterial blood pressure were collected. Fasting blood glucose, triglyceride, and HDL levels were determined. International Diabetes Federation Criteria for Metabolic Syndrome and Insulin Resistance were used for evaluating patients with metabolic syndrome and diabetes. Results. Compared to the control group, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension were found to be higher in psoriasis patients. Metabolic syndrome was increased by 3-folds in psoriasis patients and was more prevalent in women than in men. It was determined that the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was higher in psoriasis patients after the age of 40. Metabolic syndrome was not related to smoking, severity of psoriasis, and duration of disease. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that psoriasis preconditions occurrence of a group of diseases such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome. For this reason, patients with psoriasis should be treated early and they should be followed with respect to metabolic diseases.

  15. Coffee polyphenols protect human plasma from postprandial carbonyl modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirota, Roman; Gorelik, Shlomit; Harris, Raviv; Kohen, Ron; Kanner, Joseph

    2013-05-01

    The antioxidant capability of coffee polyphenols to inhibit red-meat lipid peroxidation in stomach medium and absorption into blood of malondialdehyde (MDA) in humans was studied. Roasted-ground coffee polyphenols that were found to inhibit lipid peroxidation in stomach medium are 2- to 5-fold more efficient antioxidant than those found in instant coffee. Human plasma from ten volunteers analyzed after a meal of red-meat cutlets (250 g) revealed a rapid accumulation of MDA. The accumulation of MDA in human plasma modified low-density lipoprotein is known to trigger atherogenesis. Consumption of 200 mL roasted coffee by ten volunteers during a meal of red-meat cutlets, resulted after 2 and 4 h in the inhibition by 80 and 50%, respectively, of postprandial plasma MDA absorption. The results obtained in vitro simulated stomach model on MDA accumulation were predictive for the amount of MDA absorbed into circulating human plasma, in vivo. Timing the consumption of coffee during the meals may make it a very active functional food.

  16. The effect of a spatially heterogeneous transmural water flux on concentration polarization of low density lipoprotein in arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Peter E; Sherwin, Spencer J; Weinberg, Peter D

    2009-04-22

    Uptake of low density lipoprotein (LDL) by the arterial wall is likely to play a key role in atherogenesis. A particular process that may cause vascular scale heterogeneity in the rate of transendothelial LDL transport is the formation of a flow-dependent LDL concentration polarization layer on the luminal surface of the arterial endothelium. In this study, the effect of a spatially heterogeneous transmural water flux (that traverses the endothelium only via interendothelial cell clefts) on such concentration polarization is investigated numerically. Unlike in previous investigations, realistic intercellular cleft dimensions are used here and several values of LDL diffusivity are considered. Particular attention is paid to the spatially averaged LDL concentration adjacent to different regions of the endothelial surface, as such measures may be relevant to the rate of transendothelial LDL transport. It is demonstrated in principle that a heterogeneous transmural water flux can act to enhance such measures, and cause them to develop a shear dependence (in addition to that caused by vascular scale flow features, affecting the overall degree of LDL concentration polarization). However, it is shown that this enhancement and additional shear dependence are likely to be negligible for a physiologically realistic transmural flux velocity of 0.0439 mum s(-1) and an LDL diffusivity (in blood plasma) of 28.67 mum(2) s(-1). Hence, the results imply that vascular scale studies of LDL concentration polarization are justified in ignoring the effect of a spatially heterogeneous transmural water flux.

  17. Blood flow characteristics in the aortic arch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Mihaiescu, Mihai; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Backeljauw, Philippe; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2012-11-01

    The purpose with this study is to investigate the flow characteristics of blood in the aortic arch. Cardiovascular diseases are associated with specific locations in the arterial tree. Considering atherogenesis, it is claimed that the Wall Shear Stress (WSS) along with its temporal and spatial gradients play an important role in the development of the disease. The WSS is determined by the local flow characteristics, that in turn depends on the geometry as well as the rheological properties of blood. In this numerical work, the time dependent fluid flow during the entire cardiac cycle is fully resolved. The Quemada model is applied to account for the non-Newtonian properties of blood, an empirical model valid for different Red Blood Cell loading. Data obtained through Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging have been used in order to reconstruct geometries of the the aortic arch. Here, three different geometries are studied out of which two display malformations that can be found in patients having the genetic disorder Turner's syndrome. The simulations show a highly complex flow with regions of secondary flow that is enhanced for the diseased aortas. The financial support from the Swedish Research Council (VR) and the Sweden-America Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Systemic Redox Imbalance in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltsatou, Antonia; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Sakkas, Giorgos K.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience imbalance between oxygen reactive species (ROS) production and antioxidant defenses leading to cell and tissue damage. However, it remains unclear at which stage of renal insufficiency the redox imbalance becomes more profound. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an update on recent advances in our understanding of how the redox status changes in the progression of renal disease from predialysis stages 1 to 4 to end stage 5 and whether the various treatments and dialysis modalities influence the redox balance. A systematic review was conducted searching PubMed and Scopus by using the Cochrane and PRISMA guidelines. In total, thirty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Even from an early stage, imbalance in redox status is evident and as the kidney function worsens it becomes more profound. Hemodialysis therapy per se seems to negatively influence the redox status by the elevation of lipid peroxidation markers, protein carbonylation, and impairing erythrocyte antioxidant defense. However, other dialysis modalities do not so far appear to confer advantages. Supplementation with antioxidants might assist and should be considered as an early intervention to halt premature atherogenesis development at an early stage of CKD. PMID:27563376

  19. Testing of serum atherogenicity in cell cultures: questionable data published

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei V. Jargin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In a large series of studies was reported that culturing of smooth muscle cells with serum from atherosclerosis patients caused intracellular lipid accumulation, while serum from healthy controls had no such effect. Cultures were used for evaluation of antiatherogenic drugs. Numerous substances were reported to lower serum atherogenicity: statins, trapidil, calcium antagonists, garlic derivatives etc. On the contrary, beta-blockers, phenothiazines and oral hypoglycemics were reported to be pro-atherogenic. Known antiatherogenic agents can influence lipid metabolism and cholesterol synthesis, intestinal absorption or endothelium-related mechanisms. All these targets are absent in cell monocultures. Inflammatory factors, addressed by some antiatherogenic drugs, are also not reproduced. In vivo, relationship between cholesterol uptake by cells and atherogenesis must be inverse rather than direct: in familial hypercholesterolemia, inefficient clearance of LDL-cholesterol by cells predisposes to atherosclerosis. Accordingly, if a pharmacological agent reduces cholesterol uptake by cells in vitro, it should be expected to elevate cholesterol in vivo. Validity of clinical recommendations, based on serum atherogenicity testing in cell monocultures, is therefore questionable. These considerations pertain also to the drugs developed on the basis of the cell culture experiments.

  20. Systemic Redox Imbalance in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulianiti, Konstantina P; Kaltsatou, Antonia; Mitrou, Georgia I; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Maridaki, Maria; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Sakkas, Giorgos K; Karatzaferi, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience imbalance between oxygen reactive species (ROS) production and antioxidant defenses leading to cell and tissue damage. However, it remains unclear at which stage of renal insufficiency the redox imbalance becomes more profound. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an update on recent advances in our understanding of how the redox status changes in the progression of renal disease from predialysis stages 1 to 4 to end stage 5 and whether the various treatments and dialysis modalities influence the redox balance. A systematic review was conducted searching PubMed and Scopus by using the Cochrane and PRISMA guidelines. In total, thirty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Even from an early stage, imbalance in redox status is evident and as the kidney function worsens it becomes more profound. Hemodialysis therapy per se seems to negatively influence the redox status by the elevation of lipid peroxidation markers, protein carbonylation, and impairing erythrocyte antioxidant defense. However, other dialysis modalities do not so far appear to confer advantages. Supplementation with antioxidants might assist and should be considered as an early intervention to halt premature atherogenesis development at an early stage of CKD. PMID:27563376

  1. Oxidation-labile subfraction of human plasma low density lipoprotein isolated by ion-exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimano, H; Yamada, N; Ishibashi, S; Mokuno, H; Mori, N; Gotoda, T; Harada, K; Akanuma, Y; Murase, T; Yazaki, Y

    1991-05-01

    We isolated subfractions of human plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) using ion-exchange chromatography. Plasma LDL from normolipidemic subjects were applied to a DEAE Sepharose 6B column. After elution of the bulk of LDL at 150 mM NaCl (the major fraction), the residual LDL was eluted at 500 mM NaCl and designated as the minor fraction. The minor fraction, only less than 1% of total LDL, tended to be somewhat similar in certain properties to oxidized LDL, e.g., an increased negative charge, higher protein/cholesterol ratio, and a higher flotation density than native LDL. These results were consistent with data reported by Avogaro et al. (1988. Arteriosclerosis. 8: 79-87). However, assays of 125I-labeled LDL binding activity for LDL receptors equal to that of the major fraction. Incorporation of [14C]oleate into cholesteryl ester [acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity] in mouse peritoneal macrophages incubated with the minor fraction was only slightly greater than that with the major fraction. Incubation of the minor fraction with 0.5 microM Cu2+ caused a remarkable stimulation of ACAT activity, while stimulation by the major fraction required incubation with 5 microM Cu2+, suggesting that the minor fraction was relatively labile to oxidation. The minor but definite presence of a plasma LDL subfraction more negative and susceptible to oxidation implicates the possibility of its association with atherogenesis. PMID:2072039

  2. Actual position of interleukin(IL)-33 in atherosclerosis and heart failure: Great Expectations or En attendant Godot?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunes, P; Mandak, J; Holubcova, Z; Kolackova, M; Krejsek, J

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerosis has been recognized as an inflammatory/autoimmune disease. The long-standing low-grade inflammation which fuels its development is primarily focused on the components of the vessel wall. Originally, inflammation in atherogenesis was supposed to be driven by the pro-inflammatory Th1 cellular and cytokine immune response. On the basis of accumulating evidence, this view has been re-evaluated to include the Th17/Th1 axis which is shared by most diseases of sterile inflammation. The anti-inflammatory Th2 cellular and cytokine immune response is initiated concomitantly with the former two, the latter dampening their harmful reactions which culminate in full-blown atherosclerosis. Interleukin-33, a novel member of the IL-1 cytokine superfamily, was suggested to take part in the anti-atherogenic response by mediating the Th1-to-Th2 switch of the immune reactions. However, IL-33 is a multifaceted mediator with both pro- and anti-inflammatory activities, also called a "dual factor" or a "Janus face" interleukin. IL-33 occurs both in an extracellular (cytokine-like) and in a nuclear-bound (transcription factor-like) form, each of them performing distinct activities of their own. This review article presents the latest data relevant to IL-33's role in atherosclerosis and cardiac diseases as perceived by a cardiologist and a cardiac surgeon.

  3. Cardiovascular physiology of androgens and androgen testosterone therapy in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Shanhong; Komesaroff, Paul A; Sudhir, Krishnankutty

    2009-03-01

    Women before menopause are at relatively lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with age-matched men and after menopause this gender advantage disappears. Androgen has been known to be an independent factor contributing to the higher male susceptibility to CVD, through adverse effects on lipids, blood pressure, and glucose metabolism. High androgen levels also contribute to CVD development in women with polycystic ovary syndrome as well as androgen abusing athletes and body builders. On the other hand, decline in androgen levels, as a result of ageing in men, is associated with hypertension, diabetes and atherosclerosis. Postmenopausal women, particularly those with oophorectomy are generally in low levels of sex hormones and androgen insufficiency is independently associated with the higher incidence of atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women. Androgen testosterone therapy (ATT) has been commonly used to improve well-being and libido in aging men with low androgen levels. The therapy has been demonstrated also to effectively reduce atherogenesis in these people. The use of ATT in postmenopausal women has increased in recent years and to date, however, the cardiovascular benefits of such therapy in these women remain uncertain. This review focuses on research regarding the impact of endogenous androgens and ATT on the cardiovascular physiology and CVD development in postmenopausal women.

  4. Roles of lysophosphatidic acid in cardiovascular physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Susan S; Cheng, Hsin-Yuan; Miriyala, Sumitra; Panchatcharam, Manikandan; Morris, Andrew J

    2008-09-01

    The bioactive lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) exerts a range of effects on the cardiovasculature that suggest a role in a variety of critical cardiovascular functions and clinically important cardiovascular diseases. LPA is an activator of platelets from a majority of human donors identifying a possible role as a regulator of acute thrombosis and platelet function in atherogenesis and vascular injury responses. Of particular interest in this context, LPA is an effective phenotypic modulator of vascular smooth muscle cells promoting the de-differentiation, proliferation and migration of these cells that are required for the development of intimal hyperplasia. Exogenous administration of LPA results in acute and systemic changes in blood pressure in different animal species, suggesting a role for LPA in both normal blood pressure regulation and hypertension. Advances in our understanding of the molecular machinery responsible for the synthesis, actions and inactivation of LPA now promise to provide the tools required to define the role of LPA in cardiovascular physiology and disease. In this review we discuss aspects of LPA signaling in the cardiovasculature focusing on recent advances and attempting to highlight presently unresolved issues and promising avenues for further investigation.

  5. Effect of Vitamins A, C, and E Supplementation in the Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome in Albino Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Bilbis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and metabolic syndrome increase the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Oxidative stress seems to be involved in the path physiology of cardiovascular complications of metabolic syndrome. In this study we investigated the effects of vitamins A, C, and E in the management of metabolic syndrome traits condition in albino rats fed with high salt diet. The rats were placed on 8% NaCl diet for 5 weeks and then supplemented with these vitamins for additional 4 weeks in the presence of salt diet. Supplementation with vitamins significantly (P<0.01 decreased blood pressure of the rats as compared with the control. Supplementation also significantly (P<0.05 reduced serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and total antioxidant status as compared with untreated group. The percentage protection of the supplemented groups against atherogenesis indicated 55.50±3.75%. Percentage weight gain indicated significant positive correlation with triglyceride, insulin resistance, and malondialdehyde while total antioxidant status and nitric oxide showed significant negative correlation. Salt diet significantly (P<0.05 induced features of metabolic syndrome. The result, therefore, indicated strong relationship between obesity and metabolic syndrome and underscores the role of these vitamins in the management of metabolic syndrome.

  6. High-density lipoproteincholesterol, reverse cholesterol transport, and cardiovascular risk: a tale of genetics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Cimmino

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol deposition plays a central role in atherogenesis. The accumulation of lipid material is the result of an imbalance between the influx and efflux of cholesterol within the arterial wall. High levels of plasma low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol are considered the major mechanism responsible for the influx and accumulation of cholesterol in the arterial wall, while high-density lipoprotein (HDL- cholesterol seems responsible for its efflux. The mechanism by which cholesterol is removed from extra-hepatic organs and delivered to the liver for its catabolism and excretion is called reverse cholesterol transport (RCT. Epidemiological evidence has associated high levels of HDL-cholesterol/ApoA-I with protection against atherosclerotic disease, but the ultimate mechanism(s responsible for the beneficial effect is not well established. HDLs are synthesized by the liver and small intestine and released to the circulation as a lipid-poor HDL (nascent HDL, mostly formed by ApoA-I and phospholipids. Through their metabolic maturation, HDLs interact with the ABCA1 receptor in the macrophage surface increasing their lipid content by taking phospholipids and cholesterol from macrophages becoming mature HDL. The cholesterol of the HDLs is transported to the liver, via the scavenger receptor class B, type I, for further metabolization and excretion to the intestines in the form of bile acids and cholesterol, completing the process of RCT. It is clear that an inherited mutation or acquired abnormality in any of the key players in RCT mat affect the atherosclerotic process.

  7. Coronary leukocyte activation in relation to progression of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Marijke A; Alipour, Arash; Birnie, Erwin; Westzaan, Andrew; van Santen, Selvetta; van der Zwan, Ellen; Liem, Anho H; van der Meulen, Noëlle; Cabezas, Manuel Castro

    2016-03-01

    Leukocyte activation has been linked to atherogenesis, but there is little in vivo evidence for its role in the progression of atherosclerosis. We evaluated the predictive value for progression of coronary artery disease (CAD) of leukocyte activation markers in the coronary circulation. Monocyte and neutrophil CD11b, neutrophil CD66b expression and intracellular neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the coronary arteries were determined by flow cytometry in patients undergoing coronary angiography. The primary outcome included fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarction or arterial vascular intervention due to unstable angina pectoris. In total 99 subjects who were included, 70 had CAD at inclusion (26 patients had single-vessel disease, 18 patients had twovessel disease and 26 patients had three-vessel disease). The median follow-up duration was 2242 days (interquartile range: 2142-2358). During follow-up, 13 patients (13%) developed progression of CAD. Monocyte CD11b, neutrophil CD11b and CD66b expression and intracellular MPO measured in blood obtained from the coronary arteries were not associated with the progression of CAD. These data indicate that coronary monocyte CD11b, neutrophil CD11b and CD66b expression and intracellular MPO do not predict the risk of progression of CAD. PMID:26831871

  8. High glucose enhance expression of matrix metalloproteinase—2 in smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAOFeng; YUJin-De

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effects of high glucose on expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2(MMP-2) in rat aortic smooth muscle cells and the influence of matrix remodeling on atherogenesis in diabetic patients. METHODS: The smooth muscle cells were cultured from the thoracic aorta of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat. MMP-2 mRNA was determined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR),MMP-2 protein was measured by Western blotting, and MMP-2 activity in conditioned medium was observed by zymography. RESULTS:In comparison with the control, there was no difference in the expression of MMP-2 when glucose concentration was 1g/L,whereas MMP-2 activity in smooth muscle cells was significantly increased by the glucose 5 g/L(P<0.01). CONCLUSION:High glucose enhanced the expression and activity of MMP-2 in smooth muscle cells, which may provide an explanation for the phenomenon that diabetes patients are prone to have atherosclerotic lesions.

  9. Obesity-related inflammation & cardiovascular disease: Efficacy of a yoga-based lifestyle intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sarvottam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a global health burden and its prevalence is increasing substantially due to changing lifestyle. Chronic adiposity is associated with metabolic imbalance leading to dyslipidaemia, diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases (CVD. Adipose tissue acts as an endocrine organ releasing several adipocytokines, and is associated with increased levels of tissue and circulating inflammatory biomolecules causing vascular inflammation and atherogenesis. Further, inflammation is also associated independently with obesity as well as CVD. Keeping this in view, it is possible that a reduction in weight may lead to a decrease in inflammation, resulting in CVD risk reduction, and better management of patients with CVD. Lifestyle intervention has been endorsed by several health authorities in prevention and management of chronic diseases. A yoga-based lifestyle intervention appears to be a promising option in reducing the risk for CVD as well as management of patients with CVD as it is simple to follow and cost-effective with high compliance. The efficacy of such lifestyle intervention programmes is multifaceted, and is achieved via reduction in weight, obesity-related inflammation and stress, thereby culminating into risk reduction towards several chronic diseases including CVD. In this review, the association between obesity-related inflammation and CVD, and the role of yoga-based lifestyle intervention in prevention and management of CVD are discussed.

  10. Sialic Acid-Binding Immunoglobulin-like Lectin G Promotes Atherosclerosis and Liver Inflammation by Suppressing the Protective Functions of B-1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Gruber

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is initiated and sustained by hypercholesterolemia, which results in the generation of oxidized LDL (OxLDL and other metabolic byproducts that trigger inflammation. Specific immune responses have been shown to modulate the inflammatory response during atherogenesis. The sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin G (Siglec-G is a negative regulator of the functions of several immune cells, including myeloid cells and B-1 cells. Here, we show that deficiency of Siglec-G in atherosclerosis-prone mice inhibits plaque formation and diet-induced hepatic inflammation. We further demonstrate that selective deficiency of Siglec-G in B cells alone is sufficient to mediate these effects. Levels of B-1 cell-derived natural IgM with specificity for OxLDL were significantly increased in the plasma and peritoneal cavity of Siglec-G-deficient mice. Consistent with the neutralizing functions of OxLDL-specific IgM, Siglec-G-deficient mice were protected from OxLDL-induced sterile inflammation. Thus, Siglec-G promotes atherosclerosis and hepatic inflammation by suppressing protective anti-inflammatory effector functions of B cells.

  11. FY 1995 basic research to develop instruments for diagnosis of atherosclerosis on the basis of autofluorescence analysis of blood and vascular walls; 1995 nendo ketsueki oyobi kekkanheki no jiko keiko bunseki ni yoru domyaku koka shindan kiki kaiahtsu no tame no kisoteki kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    To obtain the basic data to develop instruments for diagnosis of atherosclerosis and to elucidate the mechanisms of atherogenesis by focusing on the autofluorescence of blood and vascular walls of atherosclerotic animal models and human patients. We have performed experiments to examine the relationships between autofluorescence of blood and vascular walls of guinea pig atherosclerotic model and human patients and obtained the following results. 1. The autofluorescence from human atherosclerotic aorta included the components with longer wave length than normal aorta, suggesting that diagnosis of atherosclerotic aortic walls will be possible using spectroscopic analysis through glass fiber catheter into vascular system. Further studies should be needed to the quantitative diagnosis. 2. The autofluorescence from blood plasma of human atherosclerotic patients has showed that the peak wave length was shorter than that of normal plasma. This phenomenon was mainly caused by the oxidization of plasma, especially lipoproteins, LDL and HDL. 3. Atherosclerotic model of the guinea pigs was quite similar to human atherosclerosis at the points of cholesterol levels and localization of lipid deposit to arterial walls, and showed to be useful for the studies of atherosclerosis. (NEDO)

  12. Eicosapentaenoic Acid Protects against Palmitic Acid-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction via Activation of the AMPK/eNOS Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Hsin Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that free fatty acids are associated with chronic inflammation, which may be involved in vascular injury. The intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA can decrease cardiovascular disease risks, but the protective mechanisms of EPA on endothelial cells remain unclear. In this study, primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs treated with palmitic acid (PA were used to explore the protective effects of EPA. The results revealed that EPA attenuated PA-induced cell death and activation of apoptosis-related proteins, such as caspase-3, p53 and Bax. Additionally, EPA reduced the PA-induced increase in the generation of reactive oxygen species, the activation of NADPH oxidase, and the upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS. EPA also restored the PA-mediated reduction of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK phosphorylation. Using AMPK siRNA and the specific inhibitor compound C, we found that EPA restored the PA-mediated inhibitions of eNOS and AKT activities via activation of AMPK. Furthermore, the NF-κB signals that are mediated by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK were involved in protective effects of EPA. In summary, these results provide new insight into the possible molecular mechanisms by which EPA protects against atherogenesis via the AMPK/eNOS-related pathway.

  13. Consumption of hydrogen water prevents atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Yamagata, Kumi; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Ohta, Shigeo

    2008-12-26

    Oxidative stress is implicated in atherogenesis; however most clinical trials with dietary antioxidants failed to show marked success in preventing atherosclerotic diseases. We have found that hydrogen (dihydrogen; H(2)) acts as an effective antioxidant to reduce oxidative stress [I. Ohsawa, M. Ishikawa, K. Takahashi, M. Watanabe, K. Nishimaki, K. Yamagata, K. Katsura, Y. Katayama, S, Asoh, S. Ohta, Hydrogen acts as a therapeutic antioxidant by selectively reducing cytotoxic oxygen radicals, Nat. Med. 13 (2007) 688-694]. Here, we investigated whether drinking H(2)-dissolved water at a saturated level (H(2)-water) ad libitum prevents arteriosclerosis using an apolipoprotein E knockout mouse (apoE(-/-)), a model of the spontaneous development of atherosclerosis. ApoE(-/-) mice drank H(2)-water ad libitum from 2 to 6 month old throughout the whole period. Atherosclerotic lesions were significantly reduced by ad libitum drinking of H(2)-water (p=0.0069) as judged by Oil-Red-O staining series of sections of aorta. The oxidative stress level of aorta was decreased. Accumulation of macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions was confirmed. Thus, consumption of H(2)-dissolved water has the potential to prevent arteriosclerosis. PMID:18996093

  14. Did we finally slay the evil dragon of cigarette smoking in the late 20th century?: unfortunately, the answer is no - the dragon is still alive and well in the 21st century and living in the third world. Shame on us!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Richard D; Murphy, Joseph G; Dunn, William F

    2014-12-01

    If cigarettes were introduced as a new consumer product today, it is unlikely they would receive government regulatory approval. Cigarettes have proven biologic toxicities (carcinogenesis, atherogenesis, teratogenesis) and well-established causal links to human disease. Things were very different in 1913 when the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company introduced the first modern cigarette, the iconic Camel. By the early 1950s, definitive scientific reports linked cigarettes and human disease, but it was more than a half century later (2006) that cigarette manufacturers were found guilty by a federal court of deceptive product marketing regarding the health hazards of tobacco use. In the United States, cigarette smoking remains a major but slowly declining problem. But in developing countries, cigarette use is expanding tremendously. In global terms, the epidemic of smoking-caused disease is projected to increase rapidly in coming decades, not decline. Society may have begun to slowly win the smoking battle in the developed world, but we are resoundingly losing the global war on smoking. All is not lost! There is some good news! The 2003 Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, supported strongly by the American College of Chest Physicians, is the first global public health treaty of the new millennium. Many developed societies have begun planning to rid their countries of cigarettes in what is called the Endgame Strategy, and now is the time for the international medical community to help change tobacco policy to a worldwide endgame approach to rid all humanity of smoking-related diseases. PMID:25451345

  15. What is metabolic syndrome, and why are children getting it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Ram; Bremer, Andrew A; Lustig, Robert H

    2013-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome comprises a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, altered glucose metabolism, dyslipidemia, and abdominal obesity) that occur in obese children. However, metabolic syndrome can also occur in lean individuals, suggesting that obesity is a marker for the syndrome, not a cause. Metabolic syndrome is difficult to define, due to its nonuniform classification and reliance on hard cutoffs in the evaluation of disorders with non-Gaussian distributions. Defining the syndrome is even more difficult in children, owing to racial and pubertal differences and lack of cardiovascular events. Lipid partitioning among specific fat depots is associated with insulin resistance, which can lead to mitochondrial overload and dysfunctional subcellular energy use and drive the various elements of metabolic syndrome. Multiple environmental factors, in particular a typical Western diet, drive mitochondrial overload, while other changes in Western society, such as stress and sleep deprivation, increase insulin resistance and the propensity for food intake. These culminate in an adverse biochemical phenotype, including development of altered glucose metabolism and early atherogenesis during childhood and early adulthood. PMID:23356701

  16. Purple sweet potato color inhibits endothelial premature senescence by blocking the NLRP3 inflammasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunhui; Fan, Shaohua; Wang, Xin; Lu, Jun; Zhang, Zifeng; Wu, Dongmei; Shan, Qun; Zheng, Yuanlin

    2015-10-01

    Purple sweet potato color (PSPC), flavonoids isolated from purple sweet potato, has been well demonstrated for the pharmacological properties. In the present study, we attempt to explore whether the antisenescence was involved in PSPC-mediated protection against endothelium dysfunction in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and, if involved, what are the possible mechanisms. The results showed that atherogenesis and endothelial senescence in the thoracic aorta were promoted in mice with prediabetes; meanwhile, PSPC attenuated the deterioration of vascular vessel and inhibited the endothelial senescence. Diabetes mellitus is a documented high-risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. Studies show that D-galactose (D-gal) promotes endothelial cell senescence in vitro. In our study, we have determined that PSPC could suppress the D-gal-induced premature senescence and the abnormal endothelial function, discovered in the early stages of atherosclerosis induced by T2DM. We have discovered that the PSPC down-regulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and the NLRP3 inflammasome functions. Furthermore, the premature senescence induced by D-gal was inhibited after attenuation of ROS and deactivation of NLRP3 inflammasomes. However, once the NLRP3 inflammasomes are overactivated, PSPC could not restrain cell senescence. These data imply that the beneficial effects of PSPC on diabetes-induced endothelial dysfunction and senescence are mediated through ROS and NLRP3 signaling pathways, suggesting a potential target for the prevention of endothelial senescence-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26164602

  17. Association of periodontitis with rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis: Novel paradigms in etiopathogeneses and management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mena Soory

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Mena SooryKing’s College London Dental Institute, Denmark Hill, London UKAbstract: There is increasing documentation of a link between inflammatory periodontal disease affecting the supporting structure of teeth, rheumatoid arthritis, and coronary artery disease. Periodontitis is initiated predominantly by Gram-negative bacteria and progresses as a consequence of the host inflammatory response to periodontal pathogens. Lipopolysaccharide, a cell wall constituent stimulates the production of inflammatory cytokines via the activation of signaling pathways perpetuating inflammatory pathogenesis in a cyclical manner in susceptible individuals; with an element of autoimmune stimulation, not dissimilar to the sequential events seen in RA. Periodontitis, also implicated as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, promotes mechanisms for atherosclerosis by enhancing an imbalance in systemic inflammatory mediators; more direct mechanisms attributed to microbial products are also implicated in both RA and atherogenesis. Severe periodontal disease characterized by clinical and radiographic parameters has been associated with ischemic stroke risk, significant levels of C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A, amongst others common to both periodontitis and atherosclerosis. Existing data supports the hypothesis that persistent localized infection in periodontitis may influence systemic levels of inflammatory markers and pose a risk for RA and atherosclerosis. A common nucleus of activity in their pathogeneses provides novel paradigms of therapeutic targeting for reciprocal benefit.Keywords: periodontitis, RA, atherosclerosis, periodontal pathogens, cytokines, therapeutic targets

  18. High glucose and palmitate increases bone morphogenic protein 4 expression in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Oak-Kee; Yoo, Soon-Jib; Son, Jang-Won; Kim, Mee-Kyoung; Baek, Ki-Hyun; Song, Ki-Ho; Cha, Bong-Yun; Jo, Hanjoong; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang

    2016-03-01

    Here, we investigated whether hyperglycemia and/or free fatty acids (palmitate, PAL) aff ect the expression level of bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4), a proatherogenic marker, in endothelial cells and the potential role of BMP4 in diabetic vascular complications. To measure BMP4 expression, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to high glucose concentrations and/or PAL for 24 or 72 h, and the effects of these treatments on the expression levels of adhesion molecules and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were examined. BMP4 loss-of-function status was achieved via transfection of a BMP4-specific siRNA. High glucose levels increased BMP4 expression in HUVECs in a dose-dependent manner. PAL potentiated such expression. The levels of adhesion molecules and ROS production increased upon treatment with high glucose and/or PAL, but this eff ect was negated when BMP4 was knocked down via siRNA. Signaling of BMP4, a proinflammatory and pro-atherogenic cytokine marker, was increased by hyperglycemia and PAL. BMP4 induced the expression of infl ammatory adhesion molecules and ROS production. Our work suggests that BMP4 plays a role in atherogenesis induced by high glucose levels and/or PAL. PMID:26937213

  19. Cholesteryl ester hydrolase activity is abolished in HSL-/- macrophages but unchanged in macrophages lacking KIAA1363.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchebner, Marlene; Pfeifer, Thomas; Rathke, Nora; Chandak, Prakash G; Lass, Achim; Schreiber, Renate; Kratzer, Adelheid; Zimmermann, Robert; Sattler, Wolfgang; Koefeler, Harald; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Kostner, Gerhard M; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Chiang, Kyle P; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Cravatt, Benjamin; Kratky, Dagmar

    2010-10-01

    Cholesteryl ester (CE) accumulation in macrophages represents a crucial event during foam cell formation, a hallmark of atherogenesis. Here we investigated the role of two previously described CE hydrolases, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and KIAA1363, in macrophage CE hydrolysis. HSL and KIAA1363 exhibited marked differences in their abilities to hydrolyze CE, triacylglycerol (TG), diacylglycerol (DG), and 2-acetyl monoalkylglycerol ether (AcMAGE), a precursor for biosynthesis of platelet-activating factor (PAF). HSL efficiently cleaved all four substrates, whereas KIAA1363 hydrolyzed only AcMAGE. This contradicts previous studies suggesting that KIAA1363 is a neutral CE hydrolase. Macrophages of KIAA1363(-/-) and wild-type mice exhibited identical neutral CE hydrolase activity, which was almost abolished in tissues and macrophages of HSL(-/-) mice. Conversely, AcMAGE hydrolase activity was diminished in macrophages and some tissues of KIAA1363(-/-) but unchanged in HSL(-/-) mice. CE turnover was unaffected in macrophages lacking KIAA1363 and HSL, whereas cAMP-dependent cholesterol efflux was influenced by HSL but not by KIAA1363. Despite decreased CE hydrolase activities, HSL(-/-) macrophages exhibited CE accumulation similar to wild-type (WT) macrophages. We conclude that additional enzymes must exist that cooperate with HSL to regulate CE levels in macrophages. KIAA1363 affects AcMAGE hydrolase activity but is of minor importance as a direct CE hydrolase in macrophages.

  20. Cross-reacting antibacterial auto-antibodies are produced within coronary atherosclerotic plaques of acute coronary syndrome patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Canducci

    Full Text Available Coronary atherosclerosis, the main condition predisposing to acute myocardial infarction, has an inflammatory component caused by stimuli that are yet unknown. We molecularly investigated the nature of the immune response within human coronary lesion in four coronary plaques obtained by endoluminal atherectomy from four patients. We constructed phage-display libraries containing the IgG1/kappa antibody fragments produced by B-lymphocytes present in each plaque. By immunoaffinity, we selected from these libraries a monoclonal antibody, arbitrarily named Fab7816, able to react both with coronary and carotid atherosclerotic tissue samples. We also demonstrated by confocal microscopy that this monoclonal antibody recognized human transgelin type 1, a cytoskeleton protein involved in atherogenesis, and that it co-localized with fibrocyte-like cells transgelin+, CD68+, CD45+ in human sections of coronary and carotid plaques. In vitro fibrocytes obtained by differentiating CD14+ cells isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells also interacted with Fab7816, thus supporting the hypothesis of a specific recognition of fibrocytes into the atherosclerotic lesions. Interestingly, the same antibody, cross-reacted with the outer membrane proteins of Proteus mirabilis and Klebsiella pneumoniae (and possibly with homologous proteins of other enterobacteriaceae present in the microbiota. From all the other three libraries, we were able to clone, by immunoaffinity selection, human monoclonal antibodies cross-reacting with bacterial outer membrane proteins and with transgelin. These findings demonstrated that in human atherosclerotic plaques a local cross-reactive immune response takes place.

  1. Multi-analyte profiling in human carotid atherosclerosis uncovers pro-inflammatory macrophage programming in plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalhoub, Joseph; Viiri, Leena E; Cross, Amanda J; Gregan, Scott M; Allin, David M; Astola, Nagore; Franklin, Ian J; Davies, Alun H; Monaco, Claudia

    2016-05-01

    Molecular characterisation of vulnerable atherosclerosis is necessary for targeting functional imaging and plaque-stabilising therapeutics. Inflammation has been linked to atherogenesis and the development of high-risk plaques. We set to quantify cytokine, chemokine and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) protein production in cells derived from carotid plaques to map the inflammatory milieu responsible for instability. Carotid endarterectomies from carefully characterised symptomatic (n=35) and asymptomatic (n=32) patients were enzymatically dissociated producing mixed cell type atheroma cell suspensions which were cultured for 24 hours. Supernatants were interrogated for 45 analytes using the Luminex 100 platform. Twenty-nine of the 45 analytes were reproducibly detectable in the majority of donors. The in vitro production of a specific network of mediators was found to be significantly higher in symptomatic than asymptomatic plaques, including: tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL) 1β, IL-6, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), CCL5, CCL20, CXCL9, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 and MMP-9. Ingenuity pathway analysis of differentially expressed analytes between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients identified a number of key biological pathways (p< 10(-25)). In conclusion, the carotid artery plaque culprit of ischaemic neurological symptoms is characterised by an inflammatory milieu favouring inflammatory cell recruitment and pro-inflammatory macrophage polarisation. PMID:26763091

  2. Possible mechanisms of C-reactive protein mediated acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordjour, Patrick Asare; Wang, Yadong; Shi, Yang; Agyemang, Kojo; Akinyi, Mary; Zhang, Qiang; Fan, Guanwei

    2015-08-01

    Myocardial infarction is a relevant cardiovascular event worldwide for morbidity and mortality. It has been theorized that acute myocardial infarctions (AMIs) and other acute coronary events that are precipitated by atherosclerosis are due to arterial blockage from fat deposits. It is now known, however, that atherosclerosis involves more than just lipids. Inflammation has also been studied extensively to play a substantial role in myocardial infarction. There have been debates and conflicting reports over the past few years about the value of assessing levels of C-reactive protein and other biomarkers of inflammation for the prediction of cardiovascular events. Several studies have shown that CRP is not only an inflammatory marker, but also involved in the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction. Studies have linked atherogenesis and rupture of atherosclerotic lesion to endothelial dysfunction. CRP directly inhibits endothelial cell nitric oxide (NO) production via destabilizing endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Decreased NO release causes CRP mediated inhibition of angiogenesis, stimulating endothelial cell apoptosis. CRP can also activate the complement system through the classical pathway. Complement activation plays an important role in mediating monocyte and neutrophil recruitment in an injured myocardium and may therefore lead to increase in infarct size. This article discusses the possible roles of CRP in complement activation, endothelial dysfunction and its impact on the development of myocardial infarction. We also reviewed the possible therapeutic approaches to myocardial infarction.

  3. Epigallocatechin Gallate Attenuates Proliferation and Oxidative Stress in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Induced by Interleukin-1β via Heme Oxygenase-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Len Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs triggered by inflammatory stimuli and oxidative stress contributes importantly to atherogenesis. The association of green tea consumption with cardiovascular protection has been well documented in epidemiological observations, however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study aimed to elucidate the effects of the most active green tea catechin derivative, (−-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs, focusing particularly on the role of a potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidative enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1. We found that pretreatment of EGCG dose- and time-dependently induced HO-1 protein levels in HASMCs. EGCG inhibited interleukin- (IL-1β-induced HASMC proliferation and oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner. The HO-1 inducer CoPPIX decreased IL-1β-induced cell proliferation, whereas the HO-1 enzyme inhibitor ZnPPIX significantly reversed EGCG-caused growth inhibition in IL-1β-treated HASMCs. At the molecular level, EGCG treatment significantly activated nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor (Nrf2 transcription activities. These results suggest that EGCG might serve as a complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of these pathologies by inducing HO-1 expression and subsequently decreasing VSMC proliferation.

  4. Toward non-Newtonian effects on secondary flow structures in a 180 degree bent tube model for curved arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyk, Stevin; Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; Fuchs, Laszlo; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the development of vortical flow structures of blood like fluids in a 180 degree tube bend, analogous to the aortic arch. Cardiovascular diseases are localized to regions of curvature in the arterial tree. The pathology of atherogenesis is widely considered an inflammatory response, hypothesized to be modulated by the interplay between Wall Shear Stress (WSS) variations and particulate transport mechanisms from the bulk fluid core to the near wall. The WSS is determined by the local flow characteristics as well as the rheological properties of the blood, which in turn are dependent on the bulk secondary flows. In this work, the time dependent fluid flow under various physiological flow conditions are investigated both experimentally and numerically. A Newtonian blood analog fluid model is considered in both studies to validate both methods and thereby study flow structure development during steady as well as pulsatile conditions. Particle image velocimetry (2C - 2D PIV) is used to acquire velocity field data from an acrylic tube bend. The numerical study is extended to consider the non-Newtonian properties of blood according to an empirical model to identify the relative importance of the non-Newtonian behavior. The studies show complex Dean and Lyne vortex interaction that are enhanced with increasing peak Reynolds numbers.

  5. Vascular wall function in insulin-resistant JCR:LA-cp rats: role of male and female sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, S F; Russell, J C; Dolphin, P J; Davidge, S T

    2000-08-01

    Vascular wall function was assessed in obese insulin-resistant (cp/cp) and lean normal (+/?), male and female, JCR:LA-cp rats. Both male and female cp/cp rats showed enhanced maximum contractility in response to norepinephrine; impaired smooth muscle in response to sodium nitroprusside, a nitric oxide (NO) donor; and impaired relaxation in response to acetylcholine (ACh), compared with their lean counterparts. The abnormalities were similar in male and female cp/cp rats. The NO synthase inhibitor, Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), inhibited ACh-mediated relaxation significantly in male rats, both cp/cp and +/?. The inhibition of ACh-mediated relaxation by L-NAME in +/? females was less, with no reduction in maximal relaxation, and was absent in cp/cp females. These effects suggest that the relative importance of NO in the endothelial modulation of smooth muscle contractility is greater in male rats. The results are consistent with a decreased role for endothelial NO in the cp/cp rats of both sexes and a reduction in NO-independent cholinergic relaxation in the male cp/cp rat. This NO-independent mechanism is not affected in the female cp/cp rats. The relatively small differences between males and females in smooth muscle cell and vascular function may contribute to sex-related differences in the atherogenesis, vasospasm, and ischemic damage associated with the obese insulin-resistant state.

  6. Leishmania major Self-Limited Infection Increases Blood Cholesterol and Promotes Atherosclerosis Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana R. Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania major infection of resistant mice causes a self-limited lesion characterized by macrophage activation and a Th1 proinflammatory response. Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease involving hypercholesterolemia and macrophage activation. In this study, we evaluated the influence of L. major infection on the development of atherosclerosis using atherosclerosis-susceptible apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE KO mice. After 6 weeks of infection, apoE KO mice exhibited reduced footpad swelling and parasitemia similar to C57BL/6 controls, confirming that both strains are resistant to infection with L. major. L. major-infected mice had increased plasma cholesterol levels and reduced triacylglycerols. With regard to atherosclerosis, noninfected mice developed only fatty streak lesions, while the infected mice presented with advanced lesions containing a necrotic core and an abundant inflammatory infiltrate. CD36 expression was increased in the aortic valve of the infected mice, indicating increased macrophage activation. In conclusion, L. major infection, although localized and self-limited in resistant apoE KO mice, has a detrimental effect on the blood lipid profile, increases the inflammatory cell migration to atherosclerotic lesions, and promotes atherogenesis. These effects are consequences of the stimulation of the immune system by L. major, which promotes the inflammatory components of atherosclerosis, which are primarily the parasite-activated macrophages.

  7. Regional gene expression of LOX-1, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 in aorta of HIV-1 transgenic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Mette Fisker Hag

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increased prevalence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients has been observed. The cause of this accelerated atherosclerosis is a matter of controversy. As clinical studies are complicated by a multiplicity of risk-factors and a low incidence of hard endpoints, studies in animal models could be attractive alternatives. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated gene expression of lectin-like oxidized-low-density-lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 in HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg rats; these genes are all thought to play important roles in early atherogenesis. Furthermore, the plasma level of sICAM-1 was measured. We found that gene expressions of LOX-1 and VCAM-1 were higher in the aortic arch of HIV-1Tg rats compared to controls. Also, the level of sICAM-1 was elevated in the HIV-1Tg rats compared to controls, but the ICAM-1 gene expression profile did not show any differences between the groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HIV-1Tg rats have gene expression patterns indicating endothelial dysfunction and accelerated atherosclerosis in aorta, suggesting that HIV-infection per se may cause atherosclerosis. This transgenic rat model may be a very promising model for further studies of the pathophysiology behind HIV-associated cardiovascular disease.

  8. Simvastatin Ameliorates Matrix Stiffness-Mediated Endothelial Monolayer Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampi, Marsha C; Faber, Courtney J; Huynh, John; Bordeleau, Francois; Zanotelli, Matthew R; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffening accompanies both aging and atherosclerosis, and age-related stiffening of the arterial intima increases RhoA activity and cell contractility contributing to increased endothelium permeability. Notably, statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors whose pleiotropic effects include disrupting small GTPase activity; therefore, we hypothesized the statin simvastatin could be used to attenuate RhoA activity and inhibit the deleterious effects of increased age-related matrix stiffness on endothelial barrier function. Using polyacrylamide gels with stiffnesses of 2.5, 5, and 10 kPa to mimic the physiological stiffness of young and aged arteries, endothelial cells were grown to confluence and treated with simvastatin. Our data indicate that RhoA and phosphorylated myosin light chain activity increase with matrix stiffness but are attenuated when treated with the statin. Increases in cell contractility, cell-cell junction size, and indirect measurements of intercellular tension that increase with matrix stiffness, and are correlated with matrix stiffness-dependent increases in monolayer permeability, also decrease with statin treatment. Furthermore, we report that simvastatin increases activated Rac1 levels that contribute to endothelial barrier enhancing cytoskeletal reorganization. Simvastatin, which is prescribed clinically due to its ability to lower cholesterol, alters the endothelial cell response to increased matrix stiffness to restore endothelial monolayer barrier function, and therefore, presents a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent atherogenesis initiated by age-related arterial stiffening.

  9. Simvastatin Ameliorates Matrix Stiffness-Mediated Endothelial Monolayer Disruption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha C Lampi

    Full Text Available Arterial stiffening accompanies both aging and atherosclerosis, and age-related stiffening of the arterial intima increases RhoA activity and cell contractility contributing to increased endothelium permeability. Notably, statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors whose pleiotropic effects include disrupting small GTPase activity; therefore, we hypothesized the statin simvastatin could be used to attenuate RhoA activity and inhibit the deleterious effects of increased age-related matrix stiffness on endothelial barrier function. Using polyacrylamide gels with stiffnesses of 2.5, 5, and 10 kPa to mimic the physiological stiffness of young and aged arteries, endothelial cells were grown to confluence and treated with simvastatin. Our data indicate that RhoA and phosphorylated myosin light chain activity increase with matrix stiffness but are attenuated when treated with the statin. Increases in cell contractility, cell-cell junction size, and indirect measurements of intercellular tension that increase with matrix stiffness, and are correlated with matrix stiffness-dependent increases in monolayer permeability, also decrease with statin treatment. Furthermore, we report that simvastatin increases activated Rac1 levels that contribute to endothelial barrier enhancing cytoskeletal reorganization. Simvastatin, which is prescribed clinically due to its ability to lower cholesterol, alters the endothelial cell response to increased matrix stiffness to restore endothelial monolayer barrier function, and therefore, presents a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent atherogenesis initiated by age-related arterial stiffening.

  10. EKSTRAK JAHE (Zingiber officinale Roscoe PENGHAMBAT OKSIDASI LDL [Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe Extracts Inhibits LDL Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulistiyani 3

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative modification of LDL is believed to play an important role in atherogenesis. Dichloromethane extract of ginger rhizomes exhibited a strong antioxidative activity using linoleic acid as substrate. We investigated the in vitro effect of these extract enrichment on the prevention of oxidative LDL by CuSO4. Plasma was supplemented with 43, 430, or 4300 g/ml dichloromethane extract in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO (10 l DMSO per ml plasma, incubated, and the LDL was isolated. Lag phase and malonaldehide content was analized after the isolated LDL was oxidized using CuSO4. The result showed that dichloromethane extract of ginger rhizomes suplementation prolonged lag phase and reduced malonaldehide formation depended on its concentration. Concentration of 43 and 4300 g/ml plasma of these extract reduced malonaldehide formation by 35,29 % and 69,72 % respectively, but not significant in prolonged lag phase. Concentration of these extract with largest prolonged lag phase (82,16 % and reduced malonaldehide formation (74,95 % was 430 g/ml plasma. This research has shown that ginger extract is capable of protecting LDL from oxidation.

  11. Metabolic syndrome, inflammation and atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Paoletti

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Rodolfo Paoletti1,2, Chiara Bolego1, Andrea Poli2, Andrea Cignarella1,31Department of Pharmacological Sciences, University of Milan, Italy; 2Nutrition Foundation of Italy (NFI, Milan; 3Department of Pharmacology and Anesthesiology, University of Padova, ItalyAbstract: The inflammatory component of atherogenesis has been increasingly recognized over the last decade. Inflammation participates in all stages of atherosclerosis, not only during initiation and during evolution of lesions, but also with precipitation of acute thrombotic complications. The metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk for development of both cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes in humans. Central obesity and insulin resistance are thought to represent common underlying factors of the syndrome, which features a chronic low-grade inflammatory state. Diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome occurs using defined threshold values for waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose and dyslipidemia. The metabolic syndrome appears to affect a significant proportion of the population. Therapeutic approaches that reduce the levels of proinflammatory biomarkers and address traditional risk factors are particularly important in preventing cardiovascular disease and, potentially, diabetes. The primary management of metabolic syndrome involves healthy lifestyle promotion through moderate calorie restriction, moderate increase in physical activity and change in dietary composition. Treatment of individual components aims to control atherogenic dyslipidemia using fibrates and statins, elevated blood pressure, and hyperglycemia. While no single treatment for the metabolic syndrome as a whole yet exists, emerging therapies offer potential as future therapeutic approaches.Keywords: metabolic syndrome, systemic inflammation, coronary artery disease

  12. Plaque Rupture and Thrombosis: the Value of the Atherosclerotic Rabbit Model in Defining the Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abela, Oliver G; Ahsan, Chowdhury H; Alreefi, Fadi; Salehi, Negar; Baig, Imran; Janoudi, Abed; Abela, George S

    2016-06-01

    Persistent inflammation and mechanical injury associated with cholesterol crystal accretion within atherosclerotic plaques typically precedes plaque disruption (rupture and/or erosion) and thrombosis-often the terminal events of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. To elucidate the mechanisms of these events, the atherosclerotic rabbit model provides a unique and powerful tool that facilitates studies of atherogenesis starting with plaque buildup to eventual disruption. Examination of human coronary arteries obtained from patients who died with myocardial infarction demonstrates evidence of cholesterol crystals perforating the plaque cap and intimal surface of the arterial wall that can lead to rupture. These observations were made possible by omitting ethanol, an avid lipid solvent, from the tissue processing steps. Importantly, the atherosclerotic rabbit model exhibits a similar pathology of cholesterol crystals perforating the intimal surface as seen in ruptured human plaques. Local and systemic inflammatory responses in the model are also similar to those observed in humans. The strong parallel between the rabbit and human pathology validates the atherosclerotic rabbit model as a predictor of human pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Thus, the atherosclerotic rabbit model can be used with confidence to evaluate diagnostic imaging and efficacy of novel anti-atherosclerotic therapy. PMID:27091328

  13. The burden of type 2 diabetes: strategies to prevent or delay onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayyar Iqbal

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Nayyar IqbalDepartment of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia VA Medical Center, PA, USAAbstract: Type 2 diabetes is widespread and its prevalence is increasing rapidly. In the US alone, approximately 41 million individuals have prediabetes, placing them at high risk for the development of diabetes. The pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes involves inadequate insulin secretion and resistance to the action of insulin. Suggestive data link insulin resistance and accompanying hyperglycemia to an excess of abdominal adipose tissue, a link that appears to be mediated partially by adipocyte secretion of multiple adipokines that mediate inflammation, thrombosis, atherogenesis, hypertension, and insulin resistance. The adipokine adiponectin has reduced expression in obesity and appears to be protective against the development of type 2 diabetes. Current recommendations to prevent type 2 diabetes center on lifestyle modifications, such as diet and exercise. Clinical trials have established the efficacy of lifestyle intervention, as well as pharmacologic interventions that target glycemic control or fat metabolism. However, diabetes did develop in a substantial percentage of individuals who received intensive intervention in these trials. Thus there is an unmet need for additional strategies in high-risk individuals. Recent data suggest thiazolidinediones and blockade of the endocannabinoid system represent novel therapeutic approaches that may be used for the prevention of diabetes.Keywords: cardiometabolic risk, abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia, diabetes, insulin resistance, endocannabinoid system

  14. Association between epicardial fat volume and coronary plaques diagnosed by multislice computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Morán Quijada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Coronary atherosclerotic disease is a major cause of death in Cuba and elsewhere. The volume of epicardial fat is considered a new cardiovascular risk factor because of its association with coronary atherogenesis.Objective: To determine, by multislice computed tomography, the association between epicardial fat volume and the presence of coronary atherosclerotic plaques.Method: A descriptive study was conducted with a universe of 130 patients with chest pain suggestive of ischemic heart disease, of which 117 were selected by opinion sampling. These patients underwent a calcium score study, a coronary angiography and a measurement of the epicardial fat volume.Results: Male patients predominated (54.7% and those aged 60-69 years (32.5%. A high volume of epicardial fat was found in 51.3% of patients, affecting 52.8% of women; 78.9% of patients with a calcium score between 100 and 399 UH had a high volume of epicardial fat, just as 71.2% of those with plaques and 100% of those with 4 or 5 plaques; 41% of patients had various types of plaque, which were mainly located in the anterior descending artery (88.1%.Conclusions: The measurement of the volume of epicardial fat is a useful tool to estimate the presence of coronary disease. When it was high, it was associated with older age, female gender and the presence of a higher calcium score, more plaques, more injuries and a greater involvement of the anterior descending artery.

  15. Antiatherogenic effects of n-3 fatty acids - evidence and mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Zampolli

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available N-3 (omega-3 (polyunsaturated fatty acids are thought to display a variety of beneficial effects for human health. Clues to the occurrence of cardiovascular protective effects have been, however, the spur for the first biomedical interest in these compounds, and are the best documented. Historically, the epidemiologic association between dietary consumption of n-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular protection was first suggested by Bang and Dyerberg, who identified the high consumption of fish, and therefore, of fish oil-derived n-3 fatty acids, as the likely explanation for the strikingly low rate of coronary heart disease events reported in the Inuit population. Since their initial reports, research has proceeded in parallel to provide further evidence for their cardioprotection and to understand underlying mechanisms. Decreased atherogenesis is currently thought to be a part of the cardiovascular protection by n-3 fatty acids. This article summarizes the evidence for such a claim and the mechanisms putatively involved. (Heart International 2006; 3-4: 141-54

  16. Citrus Flavonoids as Regulators of Lipoprotein Metabolism and Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvihill, Erin E; Burke, Amy C; Huff, Murray W

    2016-07-17

    Citrus flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds with significant biological properties. This review summarizes recent advances in understanding the ability of citrus flavonoids to modulate lipid metabolism, other metabolic parameters related to the metabolic syndrome, and atherosclerosis. Citrus flavonoids, including naringenin, hesperitin, nobiletin, and tangeretin, have emerged as potential therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic dysregulation. Epidemiological studies reveal an association between the intake of citrus flavonoid-containing foods and a decreased incidence of cardiovascular disease. Studies in cell culture and animal models, as well as a limited number of clinical studies, reveal the lipid-lowering, insulin-sensitizing, antihypertensive, and anti-inflammatory properties of citrus flavonoids. In animal models, supplementation of rodent diets with citrus flavonoids prevents hepatic steatosis, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance primarily through inhibition of hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increased fatty acid oxidation. Citrus flavonoids blunt the inflammatory response in metabolically important tissues including liver, adipose, kidney, and the aorta. The mechanisms underlying flavonoid-induced metabolic regulation have not been completely established, although several potential targets have been identified. In mouse models, citrus flavonoids show marked suppression of atherogenesis through improved metabolic parameters as well as through direct impact on the vessel wall. Recent studies support a role for citrus flavonoids in the treatment of dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis, obesity, and atherosclerosis. Larger human studies examining dose, bioavailability, efficacy, and safety are required to promote the development of these promising therapeutic agents. PMID:27146015

  17. Recent advances in apolipoprotein M and atherosclerosis%载脂蛋白M与动脉粥样硬化的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘杨; 张晓膺; 罗光华

    2011-01-01

    @@ 心、脑血管疾病的发生率及死亡率居各种疾病前列,动脉粥样硬化(atherosclerosis,AS)是其重要的病理基础,因此对动脉粥样硬化的研究具有极其重要的临床意义.动脉粥样硬化研究范围广泛,近年来,载脂蛋白与动脉粥样硬化关系的研究进展尤为迅速.%Atherosclerosis is a complex pathological process, which has a close relationship with inflammatory response and disorder of lipid metabolism.The cardioprotective role of high - density lipoprotein ( HDL ) is related to its characters of protecting the vascular endothelial cells and the properties of anti - inflammation and anti - oxidation.Low density lipoprotein ( LDL ) and very - low - density lipoprotein ( VLDL ) are thought to have the adverse effects on human atherosclerosis.Apolipoprotein M ( apoM, found in 1999 ) is an apolipoprotein mainly associated with HDLs.ApoM has a remarkable property of anti - atherosclerosis in animal experiment.However, recent studies have not yet been able to establish that apoM is a defining risk factor for human coronary heart disease, and the biological functions of apoM, including its potential role in human atherogenesis, need to be established.

  18. MicroRNA-155 promotes atherosclerosis by repressing Bcl6 in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari-Jahantigh, Maliheh; Wei, Yuanyuan; Noels, Heidi; Akhtar, Shamima; Zhou, Zhe; Koenen, Rory R; Heyll, Kathrin; Gremse, Felix; Kiessling, Fabian; Grommes, Jochen; Weber, Christian; Schober, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques drive inflammatory responses, degrade lipoproteins, and phagocytose dead cells. MicroRNAs (miRs) control the differentiation and activity of macrophages by regulating the signaling of key transcription factors. However, the functional role of macrophage-related miRs in the immune response during atherogenesis is unknown. Here, we report that miR-155 is specifically expressed in atherosclerotic plaques and proinflammatory macrophages, where it was induced by treatment with mildly oxidized LDL (moxLDL) and IFN-γ. Leukocyte-specific Mir155 deficiency reduced plaque size and number of lesional macrophages after partial carotid ligation in atherosclerotic (Apoe-/-) mice. In macrophages stimulated with moxLDL/IFN-γ in vitro, and in lesional macrophages, loss of Mir155 reduced the expression of the chemokine CCL2, which promotes the recruitment of monocytes to atherosclerotic plaques. Additionally, we found that miR-155 directly repressed expression of BCL6, a transcription factor that attenuates proinflammatory NF-κB signaling. Silencing of Bcl6 in mice harboring Mir155-/- macrophages enhanced plaque formation and CCL2 expression. Taken together, these data demonstrated that miR-155 plays a key role in atherogenic programming of macrophages to sustain and enhance vascular inflammation. PMID:23041630

  19. Interleukin-1 regulates multiple atherogenic mechanisms in response to fat feeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Chamberlain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory process that develops in individuals with known risk factors that include hypertension and hyperlipidaemia, influenced by diet. However, the interplay between diet, inflammatory mechanisms and vascular risk factors requires further research. We hypothesised that interleukin-1 (IL-1 signaling in the vessel wall would raise arterial blood pressure and promote atheroma. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Apoe(-/- and Apoe(-/-/IL-1R1(-/- mice were fed high fat diets for 8 weeks, and their blood pressure and atherosclerosis development measured. Apoe(-/-/IL-R1(-/- mice had a reduced blood pressure and significantly less atheroma than Apoe(-/- mice. Selective loss of IL-1 signaling in the vessel wall by bone marrow transplantation also reduced plaque burden (p < 0.05. This was associated with an IL-1 mediated loss of endothelium-dependent relaxation and an increase in vessel wall Nox 4. Inhibition of IL-1 restored endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and reduced levels of arterial oxidative stress. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The IL-1 cytokine system links atherogenic environmental stimuli with arterial inflammation, oxidative stress, increased blood pressure and atherosclerosis. This is the first demonstration that inhibition of a single cytokine can block the rise in blood pressure in response to an environmental stimulus. IL-1 inhibition may have profound beneficial effects on atherogenesis in man.

  20. Chylomicrons metabolism in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chylomicrons are the triglyceride-rich lipoproteins that carry dietary lipids absorbed in the intestine. In the bloodstream , chylomicron triglycerides are broken-down by lipoprotein lipase using apoliprotein (apo) CII as co factor. Fatty acids and glycerol resulting from the enzymatic action are absorbed and stored in the body tissues mainly adipose and muscle for subsequent utilizations energy source. The resulting triglycerides depleted remnants are taken-up by liver receptor such as the LDL receptor using mainly apo E as ligand. For methodological reasons, chylomicron metabolism has been unfrequently studied in subjects despite its pathophysiological importance, and this metabolism was not evaluated in the great clinical trials that established the link between atherosclerosis and lipids. In studies using oral fat load tests, it has been shown that in patients with coronary artery disease there is a trend to accumulation of post-prandial triglycerides, vitamin A or apo B-48 , suggesting that in those patients chylomicrons and their remnants are slowly removed from the circulation. A triglyceride-rich emulsion marked radioisotopic which mimics chylomicron metabolism when injected into the bloodstream has been described that can offer a more straight forward approach to evaluate chylomicrons. In coronary artery disease patients both lipolysis and remnant removal from the plasma of the chylomicron-like emulsions were found slowed-down compared with control subjects without the disease. The introduction of more practical techniques to assess chylomicron metabolism may be new mechanisms underlying atherogenesis. (author)

  1. POSSIBLE ROLE OF MITOCHONDRIAL GENOME MUTATIONS IN CORONARY HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Egorova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are not only the major producers of adenosine triphosphate, but also an endogenous source of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrialdysfunction plays a key role in the trigger and progression of atherosclerotic lesion. Impaired function in the mitochondria due to their elevated level of oxidized oxygen species, the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA damages, and the exhaustion of respiratory chains induces dysfunction and apoptosis in the endothelial cells; activation of matrix metalloproteinases; growth of vascular smooth muscle cells and their migration into the intima; expression of adhesion molecules, and oxidation of low-density lipoproteins. Mitochondrial dysfunction may be an important unifying mechanism that accounts for the atherogenic effect of major cardiovascular risk factors. Small clinical pilot studies have shown an association of different mitochondrial genome mutations with atherosclerotic lesion in the artery. Taking into account the available data on the possible role of mitochondria in atherogenesis, novel drugs are now being designed to affect mitochondrial function.

  2. Effect of Quercetin on Paraoxonase 2 Levels in RAW264.7 Macrophages and in Human Monocytes—Role of Quercetin Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred James Mueller

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that the intracellular antioxidant enzyme paraoxonase 2 (PON2 may have a protective function in the prevention of atherogenesis. An enhancement of PON2 activity by dietary factors including flavonoids is therefore of interest. In the present study we determined the effect of quercetin on paraoxonase 2 levels in cultured murine macrophages in vitro and in overweight subjects with a high cardiovascular risk phenotype supplemented with 150 mg quercetin/day for 42 days in vivo. Supplementation of murine RAW264.7 macrophages in culture with increasing concentrations of quercetin (1, 10, 20 μmol/L resulted in a significant increase in PON2 mRNA and protein levels, as compared to untreated controls. Unlike quercetin, its glucuronidated metabolite quercetin-3-glucuronide did not affect PON2 gene expression in cultured macrophages. However the methylated quercetin derivative isorhamnetin enhanced PON2 gene expression in RAW264.7 cells to similar extent like quercetin. Although supplementing human volunteers with quercetin was accompanied by a significant increase in plasma quercetin concentration, dietary quercetin supplementation did not change PON2 mRNA levels in human monocytes in vivo. Current data indicate that quercetin supplementation increases PON2 levels in cultured monocytes in vitro but not in human volunteers in vivo.

  3. Activity of myricetin and other plant-derived polyhydroxyl compounds in human LDL and human vascular endothelial cells against oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Riccardo; Chen, Zheng; Marin, Raffaella; Donati, Maddalena; Feltrinelli, Angela; Montopoli, Monica; Zambon, Sabina; Manzato, Enzo; Froldi, Guglielmina

    2016-08-01

    Studies indicate that oxidative modifications of endothelium and LDL play a preeminent role in atherogenesis; therefore, the preservation of the endothelial antioxidant capacity and the inhibition of LDL oxidation by use of plant-derived compounds are an appealing strategy against several vascular disorders. On this basis, baicalein, eupatorin, galangin, magnolol, myricetin, oleuropein, silibinin and bilobalide were studied against various oxidative conditions. The radical scavenging capacity was analysed using DPPH and ORAC assays. Furthermore, the LDL oxidation was detected by measuring the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and by monitoring the oxidation kinetics. Further, we used cultured HUVEC to investigate the activities of the polyhydroxyl compounds towards the oxidative stress induced by H2O2. The lowest levels of TBARS were observed in the presence of oleuropein and baicalein, while myricetin, magnolol and eupatorin inhibited these ones to a lesser extent. In addition, oleuropein and myricetin exhibited higher protection in copper-induced LDL oxidation kinetics. However, only myricetin and galangin showed significant protective effects against H2O2 oxidative injury in HUVEC cells. Taken all together the results indicate myricetin as the most active agent among the selected plant-derived polyhydroxyl compounds, with prominent capacities against ox-LDL and ROS production in HUVEC. PMID:27470387

  4. Nitric Oxide as a Unique Bioactive Signaling Messenger in Physiology and Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuteja Narendra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is an intra- and extracellular messenger that mediates diverse signaling pathways in target cells and is known to play an important role in many physiological processes including neuronal signaling, immune response, inflammatory response, modulation of ion channels, phagocytic defense mechanism, penile erection, and cardiovascular homeostasis and its decompensation in atherogenesis. Recent studies have also revealed a role for NO as signaling molecule in plant, as it activates various defense genes and acts as developmental regulator. In plants, NO can also be produced by nitrate reductase. NO can operate through posttranslational modification of proteins (nitrosylation. NO is also a causative agent in various pathophysiological abnormalities. One of the very important systems, the cardiovascular system, is affected by NO production, as this bioactive molecule is involved in the regulation of cardiovascular motor tone, modulation of myocardial contractivity, control of cell proliferation, and inhibition of platelet activation, aggregation, and adhesion. The prime source of NO in the cardiovascular system is endothelial NO synthase, which is tightly regulated with respect to activity and localization. The inhibition of chronic NO synthesis leads to neurogenic and arterial hypertensions, which later contribute to development of myocardial fibrosis. Overall, the modulation of NO synthesis is associated with hypertension. This review briefly describes the physiology of NO, its synthesis, catabolism, and targeting, the mechanism of NO action, and the pharmacological role of NO with special reference to its essential role in hypertension.

  5. Betaine:homocysteine methyltransferase--a new assay for the liver enzyme and its absence from human skin fibroblasts and peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J A; Dudman, N P; Lynch, J; Wilcken, D E

    1991-12-31

    Chronic elevation of plasma homocysteine is associated with increased atherogenesis and thrombosis, and can be lowered by betaine (N,N,N-trimethylglycine) treatment which is thought to stimulate activity of the enzyme betaine:homocysteine methyltransferase. We have developed a new assay for this enzyme, in which the products of the enzyme-catalysed reaction between betaine and homocysteine are oxidised by performic acid before being separated and quantified by amino acid analysis. This assay confirmed that human liver contains abundant betaine:homocysteine methyltransferase (33.4 nmol/h/mg protein at 37 degrees C, pH 7.4). Chicken and lamb livers also contain the enzyme, with respective activities of 50.4 and 6.2 nmol/h/mg protein. However, phytohaemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes and cultured human skin fibroblasts contained no detectable betaine:homocysteine methyltransferase (less than 1.4 nmol/h/mg protein), even after cells were pre-cultured in media designed to stimulate production of the enzyme. The results emphasize the importance of the liver in mediating the lowering of elevated circulating homocysteine by betaine. PMID:1819467

  6. Effects of rosiglitazone on contralateral iliac artery after vascular injury in hypercholesterolemic rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baroncini Liz

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective was to evaluate the effects of rosiglitazone on iliac arteries of hypercholesterolemic rabbits undergoing balloon catheter injury in the contralateral iliac arteries. Methods White male rabbits were fed a hypercholesterolemic diet for 6 weeks and divided into two groups as follows: rosiglitazone group, 14 rabbits treated with rosiglitazone (3 mg/Kg body weight/day during 6 weeks; and control group, 18 rabbits without rosiglitazone treatment. All animals underwent balloon catheter injury of the right iliac artery on the fourteenth day of the experiment. Results There was no significant difference in intima/media layer area ratio between the control group and the rosiglitazone group. Rosiglitazone did not reduce the probability of lesions types I, II, or III (72.73% vs. 92.31%; p = 0.30 and types IV or V (27.27% vs. 7.69%; p = 0.30. There were no differences in the extent of collagen type I and III deposition or in the percentage of animals with macrophages in the intima layer. The percentage of rabbits with smooth muscle cells in the intima layer was higher in rosiglitazone group (p = 0.011. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that rosiglitazone given for 6 weeks did not prevent atherogenesis at a vessel distant from the injury site.

  7. Atherosclerosis induced by diabetogenic diet in New Zealand white rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To observe the effects of diabetogenic (high fat high sucrose, lacking choleserol) diet on atherogenesis in New Zealand white rabbits. Two groups of New Zealand white rabbits received regular rabbit chow (the normal control), or high fat high sucrose diet for 4 months. The levels of plasma total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, and glucose were investigated, the areas of fatty streak of the aortae were measured after staining with Sodan IV, and the aortic, coronary specimens were observed with light and electron microscopies. The plasma glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol were increased significantly by high fat high sucrose feeding. At the end of 4 months, the early charateristics of atherosclerosis were present in the animals' vascular specimens. Our findings suggest that high fat high sucrose feeding can induce hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia and atherosclerosis in New Zealand white rabbits, and this could be a potential animal model for studying the mechanisms of diabetes-accelerated atherosclerosis. This study raised a question: What is the mechanism by which high fat high sucrose feeding induces atherosclerosis?. The related hypothesis was given in this article.

  8. In vitro study of the direct effect of extracellular hemoglobin on myelin components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamm, Vladimir V; Lanthier, Danielle K; Stephenson, Erin L; Smith, Graham S T; Harauz, George

    2015-01-01

    There is a relationship between cerebral vasculature and multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions: abnormal accumulations of iron have been found in the walls of dilated veins in MS plaques. The sources of this iron can be varied, but capillary and venous hemorrhages leading to blood extravasation have been recorded, and could result in the release of hemoglobin extracellularly. Extracellular hemoglobin oxidizes quickly and is known to become a reactive molecule that triggers low-density lipoprotein oxidation and plays a pivotal role in atherogenesis. In MS, it could lead to local oxidative stress, inflammation, and tissue damage. Here, we investigated whether extracellular hemoglobin and its breakdown products can cause direct oxidative damage to myelin components in a peroxidative environment such as occurs in inflamed tissue. Oxidation of lipids was assessed by the formation of fluorescent peroxidized lipid-protein covalent adducts, by the increase in conjugated diene and malondialdehyde. Oxidation of proteins was analyzed by the change in protein mass. The results suggest that the globin radical could be a trigger of myelin basic protein oxidative cross-linking, and that heme transferred to the lipids is involved in lipid peroxidation. This study provides new insight into the mechanism by which hemoglobin exerts its pathological oxidative activity towards myelin components. This work supports further research into the vascular pathology in MS, to gain insight into the origin and role of iron deposits in disease pathogenesis, or in stimulation of different comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease.

  9. Curcumin enhanced cholesterol efflux by upregulating ABCA1 expression through AMPK-SIRT1-LXRα signaling in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiao-long; Liu, Mi-Hua; Hu, Hui-Jun; Feng, Hong-ru; Fan, Xiao-Juan; Zou, Wei-wen; Pan, Yong-quan; Hu, Xue-mei; Wang, Zuo

    2015-09-01

    Curcumin, a traditional Chinese derivative from the rhizomes of Curcuma longa, is beneficial to health by modulating lipid metabolism and suppressing atherogenesis. A key part of atherosclerosis is the failure of macrophages to restore their cellular cholesterol homeostasis and the formation of foam cells. In this study, results showed that curcumin dramatically increased the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter 1 (ABCA1), promoted cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells, and reduced cellular cholesterol levels. Curcumin activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and SIRT1, and then activated LXRα in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells. Inhibiting AMPK/SIRT1 activity by its specific inhibitor or by small interfering RNA could inhibit LXRα activation and abolish curcumin-induced ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux. Thus, curcumin enhanced cholesterol efflux by upregulating ABCA1 expression through activating AMPK-SIRT1-LXRα signaling in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells. This study describes a possible mechanism for understanding the antiatherogenic effects of curcumin on attenuating the progression of atherosclerosis.

  10. Development of small molecule non-peptide formyl peptide receptor (FPR) ligands and molecular modeling of their recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepetkin, I A; Khlebnikov, A I; Giovannoni, M P; Kirpotina, L N; Cilibrizzi, A; Quinn, M T

    2014-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) expressed on a variety of cell types. These receptors play an important role in the regulation of inflammatory reactions and sensing cellular damage. They have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases, cataract formation, and atherogenesis. Thus, FPR ligands, both agonists and antagonists, may represent novel therapeutics for modulating host defense and innate immunity. A variety of molecules have been identified as receptor subtype-selective and mixed FPR agonists with potential therapeutic value during last decade. This review describes our efforts along with recent advances in the identification, optimization, biological evaluation, and structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of small molecule non-peptide FPR agonists and antagonists, including chiral molecules. Questions regarding the interaction at the molecular level of benzimidazoles, pyrazolones, pyridazin-3(2H)-ones, N-phenylureas and other derivatives with FPR1 and FPR2 are discussed. Application of computational models for virtual screening and design of FPR ligands is also considered. PMID:24350845

  11. Effects of Low Carbohydrate High Protein (LCHP) diet on atherosclerotic plaque phenotype in ApoE/LDLR-/- mice: FT-IR and Raman imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, T P; Marzec, K M; Chlopicki, S; Maślak, E; Jasztal, A; Franczyk-Żarów, M; Czyżyńska-Cichoń, I; Moszkowski, T; Kostogrys, R B; Baranska, M

    2015-09-22

    Low Carbohydrate High Protein (LCHP) diet displays pro-atherogenic effects, however, the exact mechanisms involved are still unclear. Here, with the use of vibrational imaging, such as Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman (RS) spectroscopies, we characterize biochemical content of plaques in Brachiocephalic Arteries (BCA) from ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice fed LCHP diet as compared to control, recomended by American Institute of Nutrition, AIN diet. FT-IR images were taken from 6-10 sections of BCA from each mice and were complemented with RS measurements with higher spatial resolution of chosen areas of plaque sections. In aortic plaques from LCHP fed ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice, the content of cholesterol and cholesterol esters was increased, while that of proteins was decreased as evidenced by global FT-IR analysis. High resolution imaging by RS identified necrotic core/foam cells, lipids (including cholesterol crystals), calcium mineralization and fibrous cap. The decreased relative thickness of the outer fibrous cap and the presence of buried caps were prominent features of the plaques in ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice fed LCHP diet. In conclusion, FT-IR and Raman-based imaging provided a complementary insight into the biochemical composition of the plaque suggesting that LCHP diet increased plaque cholesterol and cholesterol esters contents of atherosclerotic plaque, supporting the cholesterol-driven pathogenesis of LCHP-induced atherogenesis.

  12. Serum amyloid A stimulates macrophage foam cell formation via lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 upregulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ha Young, E-mail: hayoung@skku.edu [Department of Biological Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, Dong-A University, Busan 602-714 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Doo [Department of Biological Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Suk-Hwan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Joon Hyuk [Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyung-Hyun [School of Biotechnology, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Zabel, Brian A. [Palo Alto Institute for Research and Education, Veterans Affairs Hospital, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Bae, Yoe-Sik, E-mail: yoesik@skku.edu [Department of Biological Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, Dong-A University, Busan 602-714 (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. ► SAA stimulated upregulation of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1). ► SAA-induced LOX1 expression and foam cell formation is mediated by JNK/NF-κB signaling. ► HDL-conjugated SAA also stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 upregulation. ► The finding reveals a novel mechanism of action of SAA in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Elevated levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, however, the role of SAA in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here we show that SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. SAA-stimulated foam cell formation was mediated by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Moreover, both SAA and SAA-conjugated high density lipoprotein stimulated the expression of the important scavenger receptor lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1) via nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). A LOX1 antagonist carrageenan significantly blocked SAA-induced foam cell formation, indicating that SAA promotes foam cell formation via LOX1 expression. Our findings therefore suggest that SAA stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 induction, and thus likely contributes to atherogenesis.

  13. Association of CD36 expression and polymorphism with serum biochemical indices in Cherry Valley duck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D D; Li, W G; Zhang, Y Y

    2016-01-01

    Cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) plays a crucial role in lipid sensing, innate immunity, atherogenesis, and glycolipid metabolism. This aims of this study were to delineate the CD36 mRNA expression profile in 16 duck tissues using relative quantitative real-time PCR and to screen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the duck CD36 gene by PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism and DNA direct sequencing. In addition, this study investigated CD36 gene expression, genetic variation, and their effect on serum biochemical indices in duck. The results showed that CD36 mRNA was expressed in all tissues, and was highly specific to the pituitary and large intestine, and to subcutaneous and abdominal fat. Furthermore, three genotypes of the SNP g.476593 T > C in exon 9 of the duck CD36 gene were identified: MM, MN, and NN. The dominant genotype and allele were MM and M, with frequencies of 0.453 and 0.643, respectively. The genotype distributions deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P NN genotype were significantly higher than those in birds with the MM genotype. These findings demonstrated that CD36 might be an important genetic marker for the selection of lipid metabolism and meat quality traits in ducks. PMID:27323079

  14. Eskimo plasma constituents, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid inhibit the release of atherogenic mitogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D L; Willis, A L; Nguyen, N; Conner, D; Zahedi, S; Fulks, J

    1989-01-01

    Studies in man and laboratory animals suggest that omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid constituents of fish oils have antiatherosclerotic properties. We have studied the effects of several such polyunsaturated fatty acids for ability to modify the in vitro release of mitogens from human platelets. Such mitogens may produce the fibro-proliferative component of atherosclerotic plaques. Both 5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 omega 3) and 4,7,10,13,16,19-docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 omega 3), major constituents of fish oils, inhibited adenosine diphosphate-induced aggregation of platelets and the accompanying release of mitogens. These effects are dose dependent. Linolenic acid (18:3 omega 3), the biosynthetic precursor of eicosapentaenoic acid, also inhibited platelet aggregation and mitogen release. Eicosapentaenoic acid also inhibited mitogen release from human monocyte-derived macrophages, which, in vivo, are an additional source of mitogens during atherogenesis. Potent inhibition of human platelet aggregation and mitogen release was also seen with dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (8,11,14-eicosatrienoic acid 20:3 omega 6), whose levels are reportedly elevated in Eskimos subsisting on marine diets. We conclude that diets that elevate plasma and/or tissue levels of eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid precursor gamma-linolenic acid (18:3 omega 6) may exert antiatherosclerotic effects by inhibiting the release of mitogens from platelets and other cells.

  15. Asymmetric dimethylarginine triggers macrophage apoptosis via the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Dan; Gao, Hai-Chao; Wang, Xiang; Li, Ling-Fang; Li, Chuan-Chang; Luo, Ying; Wang, Kang-Kai; Bai, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Guo-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), is emerging as a key contributing factor in atherogenesis, a process in turn known to involve macrophage apoptosis. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ADMA on macrophage apoptosis, with specific reference to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway. Macrophage apoptosis was evaluated by Annexin V- Propidium iodide (PI) and Hoechst 33258 staining assays. Levels of the ER stress marker glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) were characterized by western blot. Levels of the proapoptotic C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP) were evaluated by western blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and caspase-4 activity was measured using a colorimetric protease assay kit. We observed ADMA dose- and time-dependent increases in macrophage levels of GRP78. Similar ADMA dose- and time-dependent increases were detected in intracellular caspase-4 activity and macrophage apoptosis, all of which were sensitive to treatment with siRNAs for protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase and inositol-requiring protein-1 (IRE1), the ADMA antagonist L-arginine, as well as inhibitors of eukaryotic translation initiation factor-2 (salubrinal), IRE1 (irestatin 9389), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SP600125). Our results indicate that ADMA triggers macrophage apoptosis via the ER stress pathway. PMID:25209804

  16. Association of periodontitis with rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis: Novel paradigms in etiopathogeneses and management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soory, Mena

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing documentation of a link between inflammatory periodontal disease affecting the supporting structure of teeth, rheumatoid arthritis, and coronary artery disease. Periodontitis is initiated predominantly by Gram-negative bacteria and progresses as a consequence of the host inflammatory response to periodontal pathogens. Lipopolysaccharide, a cell wall constituent stimulates the production of inflammatory cytokines via the activation of signaling pathways perpetuating inflammatory pathogenesis in a cyclical manner in susceptible individuals; with an element of autoimmune stimulation, not dissimilar to the sequential events seen in RA. Periodontitis, also implicated as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, promotes mechanisms for atherosclerosis by enhancing an imbalance in systemic inflammatory mediators; more direct mechanisms attributed to microbial products are also implicated in both RA and atherogenesis. Severe periodontal disease characterized by clinical and radiographic parameters has been associated with ischemic stroke risk, significant levels of C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A, amongst others common to both periodontitis and atherosclerosis. Existing data supports the hypothesis that persistent localized infection in periodontitis may influence systemic levels of inflammatory markers and pose a risk for RA and atherosclerosis. A common nucleus of activity in their pathogeneses provides novel paradigms of therapeutic targeting for reciprocal benefit.

  17. Chylomicrons metabolism in patients with coronary artery disease; Metabolismo de quilomicrons em pacientes portadores de doenca arterial coronaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandizzi, Laura Ines Ventura

    2002-07-01

    Chylomicrons are the triglyceride-rich lipoproteins that carry dietary lipids absorbed in the intestine. In the bloodstream , chylomicron triglycerides are broken-down by lipoprotein lipase using apoliprotein (apo) CII as co factor. Fatty acids and glycerol resulting from the enzymatic action are absorbed and stored in the body tissues mainly adipose and muscle for subsequent utilizations energy source. The resulting triglycerides depleted remnants are taken-up by liver receptor such as the LDL receptor using mainly apo E as ligand. For methodological reasons, chylomicron metabolism has been unfrequently studied in subjects despite its pathophysiological importance, and this metabolism was not evaluated in the great clinical trials that established the link between atherosclerosis and lipids. In studies using oral fat load tests, it has been shown that in patients with coronary artery disease there is a trend to accumulation of post-prandial triglycerides, vitamin A or apo B-48 , suggesting that in those patients chylomicrons and their remnants are slowly removed from the circulation. A triglyceride-rich emulsion marked radioisotopic which mimics chylomicron metabolism when injected into the bloodstream has been described that can offer a more straight forward approach to evaluate chylomicrons. In coronary artery disease patients both lipolysis and remnant removal from the plasma of the chylomicron-like emulsions were found slowed-down compared with control subjects without the disease. The introduction of more practical techniques to assess chylomicron metabolism may be new mechanisms underlying atherogenesis. (author)

  18. Effect of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in angiogenesis-related diseases%磷脂酰肌醇3-激酶在血管新生相关性疾病中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    权伟; 张丽莙

    2011-01-01

    @@ 血管新生参与了人体多种生理与病理过程,前者如创伤愈合,后者包括肿瘤、动脉粥样硬化(atherosclerosis,AS)、类风湿性关节炎(rheumatoid arthritis,RA)等多种疾病,血管新生与这些疾病的发生发展密切相关.磷脂酰肌醇3-激酶(phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, PI3K)作为细胞内重要的信号蛋白,可介导细胞迁移、增殖与血管新生等多种生物学行为的信号转导.%Angiogenesis is involved in the pathological processes such as wound healing, atherosclerosis,rheumatoid arthritis and tumor, in which the pathogenesis and development are closely related to the new blood vessel formation. Phosphatidylinositol 3 - kinase ( PI3 K ), one of the important intracellular signaling proteins, mediates many signal transductions in cell migration, proliferation and angiogenesis. The activity of PI3 K and its signaling pathway play a unique role in atherogenesis, unstability of atherosclerotic plaque, tumor metastasis and recurrence, etc. This review summarizes the effect of PI3 K in angiogenesis - related diseases.

  19. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2: a novel marker of cardiovascular risk and potential therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macphee, Colin; Benson, G Martin; Shi, Yi; Zalewski, Andrew

    2005-06-01

    Although the clinical benefit of statins is well established, these agents reduce the risk of cardiovascular events by only 20 - 40%, and the residual risk for high-risk patients is considerable. The recognition of atherosclerosis as an inflammatory disease has opened the door to numerous complementary therapeutic approaches to further reduce risk and the overall burden of cardiovascular disease. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) (Lp-PLA(2)) is a novel inflammatory marker of cardiovascular risk that is being evaluated as a potential therapeutic target. The biological function of this enzyme in atherosclerosis has been controversial but recent evidence supports its pro-atherogenic role. The enzyme is predominantly bound to low-density lipoprotein cholesterol particles in humans, and its activity produces bioactive lipid mediators that promote inflammatory processes present at every stage of atherogenesis, from atheroma initiation to plaque destabilisation and rupture. Initial clinical studies suggest that the inhibitors of Lp-PLA(2) can block enzyme activity in plasma and within atherosclerotic plaques. However, more studies are needed to determine the potential clinical benefits of inhibiting Lp-PLA(2). PMID:16004595

  20. Paraoxonases 1, 2, and 3, oxidative stress, and macrophage foam cell formation during atherosclerosis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviram, Michael; Rosenblat, Mira

    2004-11-01

    Paraoxonases PON1 and PON3, which are both associated in serum with HDL, protect the serum lipids from oxidation, probably as a result of their ability to hydrolyze specific oxidized lipids. The activity of HDL-associated PON1 seems to involve an activity (phospholipase A2-like activity, peroxidase-like activity, lactonase activity) which produces LPC. To study the possible role of PON1 in macrophage foam cell formation and atherogenesis we used macrophages from control mice, from PON1 knockout mice, and from PON1 transgenic mice. Furthermore, we analyzed PON1-treated macrophages and PON1-transfected cells to demonstrate the contribution of PON1 to the attenuation of macrophage cholesterol and oxidized lipid accumulation and foam cell formation. PON1 was shown to inhibit cholesterol influx [by reducing the formation of oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL), increasing the breakdown of specific oxidized lipids in Ox-LDL, and decreasing macrophage uptake of Ox-LDL]. PON1 also inhibits cholesterol biosynthesis and stimulates HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophages. PON2 and PON3 protect against oxidative stress, with PON2 acting mainly at the cellular level. Whereas serum PON1 and PON3 were inactivated under oxidative stress, macrophage PON2 expression and activity were increased under oxidative stress, probably as a compensatory mechanism against oxidative stress. Intervention to increase the paraoxonases (cellular and humoral) by dietary or pharmacological means can reduce macrophage foam cell formation and attenuate atherosclerosis development. PMID:15454271

  1. No associations of Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric atrophy with plasma total homocysteine in Japanese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Itou, Yasuyuki Goto, Takaaki Kondo, Kazuko Nishio, Sayo Kawai, Yoshiko Ishida, Mariko Naito, Nobuyuki Hamajima

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection might be a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Since the bacterium has not been isolated from atherosclerotic lesions, a direct role in atherogenesis is not plausible. We examined associations of plasma total homocysteine (tHcy and serum folate, independent risk factors for atherosclerosis, with H. pylori infection and subsequent gastric atrophy among 174 patients (78 males and 96 females aged 20 to 73 years, who visited an H. pylori eradication clinic of Nagoya University from July 2004 to October 2005. Polymorphism genotyping was conducted for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T and thymidylate synthase (TS 28-bp tandem repeats by PCR with confronting two-pair primers and PCR, respectively. H. pylori infection and gastric atrophy were not significantly associated with hyperhomocysteinemia (tHcy ≥ 12 nmol/ml, when adjusted by sex, age, smoking, alcohol, and genotypes of MTHFR and TS. The adjusted odds ratio of gastric atrophy for low folate level (≤ 4mg/ml was 0.21 (95% confidence interval = 0.05-0.78. The associations of tHcy with serum folate and MTHFR genotype were clearly observed in this dataset. The present study demonstrated that folate and MTHFR genotype were the deterministic factors of plasma tHcy, but not H. pylori infection and subsequent gastric atrophy, indicating that even if H. pylori infection influences the risk of atherosclerosis, the influence may not be through the elevation of homocysteine.

  2. Asociación entre el volumen de grasa epicárdica y las placas coronarias diagnosticadas por tomografía multicorte/ Associationbetweenepicardialfatvolume and coronary plaques diagnosedbymultislicecomputedtomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Morán Quijada

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Coronary atherosclerotic disease is a major cause of death in Cuba and elsewhere. The volume of epicardial fat is considered a new cardiovascular risk factor because of its association with coronary atherogenesis. Objective: To determine, by multislice computed tomography, the association between epicardial fat volume and the presence of coronary atherosclerotic plaques. Method: A descriptive study was conducted with a universe of 130 patients with chest pain suggestive of ischemic heart disease, of which 117 were selected by opinion sampling. These patients underwent a calcium score study, a coronary angiography and a measurement of the epicardial fat volume. Results: Male patients predominated (54.7% and those aged 60-69 years (32.5%. A high volume of epicardial fat was found in 51.3% of patients, affecting 52.8% of women; 78.9% of patients with a calcium score between 100 and 399 UH had a high volume of epicardial fat, just as 71.2% of those with plaques and 100% of those with 4 or 5 plaques; 41% of patients had various types of plaque, which were mainly located in the anterior descending artery (88.1%. Conclusions: The measurement of the volume of epicardial fat is a useful tool to estimate the presence of coronary disease. When it was high, it was associated with older age, female gender and the presence of a higher calcium score, more plaques, more injuries and a greater involvement of the anterior descending artery.

  3. Erythrocyte Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC):diagnostic and therapeutic implications in atherosclerotic Cardiovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stavros APOSTOLAKIS; Georgios K CHALIKIAS; Dimitrios N TZIAKAS; Stavros KONSTANTINIDES

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease.The last three decades efforts have been made to elucidate the biochemical pathways that are implicated in the process of atherogenesis and plaque development.Chemokines are crucial mediators in every step of this process.Additionally.cellular components of the peripheral blood have been proved important mediators in the formation and progression of atherosclerotic lesions.However,until recently data were mostly focusing on leukocytes and platelets.Erythrocytes were considered unreceptive bystanders and limited data supported their importance in the progression and destabilization of the atherosclerotic plaque.Recently erythrocytes, through their Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines(DARC),have been proposed as appealing regulators of chemokine-induced pathways.Dissimilar to every other chemokine receptor DARC possesses high affinity for severalligands from both CC and CXC chemokine sub-families.Moreover,DARC is not coupled to a G-protein or any other intracellular signalling system;thus it is incapable of generating second messages.The exact biochemical role of erythrocyte DARC remains to be determined.It is however challenging the fact that DARC is a regulator of almost every CC and CXC chemokine ligand and therefore DARC antagonism could efiectively block the complex pre-inflammatory chemokine network.In the present review we intent to provid recent evidence supporting the role of erythrocytes in atherosclerosis focusing on the erythrocyte-chemokine interaction through the Duffy antigen system.

  4. Did we finally slay the evil dragon of cigarette smoking in the late 20th century?: unfortunately, the answer is no - the dragon is still alive and well in the 21st century and living in the third world. Shame on us!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Richard D; Murphy, Joseph G; Dunn, William F

    2014-12-01

    If cigarettes were introduced as a new consumer product today, it is unlikely they would receive government regulatory approval. Cigarettes have proven biologic toxicities (carcinogenesis, atherogenesis, teratogenesis) and well-established causal links to human disease. Things were very different in 1913 when the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company introduced the first modern cigarette, the iconic Camel. By the early 1950s, definitive scientific reports linked cigarettes and human disease, but it was more than a half century later (2006) that cigarette manufacturers were found guilty by a federal court of deceptive product marketing regarding the health hazards of tobacco use. In the United States, cigarette smoking remains a major but slowly declining problem. But in developing countries, cigarette use is expanding tremendously. In global terms, the epidemic of smoking-caused disease is projected to increase rapidly in coming decades, not decline. Society may have begun to slowly win the smoking battle in the developed world, but we are resoundingly losing the global war on smoking. All is not lost! There is some good news! The 2003 Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, supported strongly by the American College of Chest Physicians, is the first global public health treaty of the new millennium. Many developed societies have begun planning to rid their countries of cigarettes in what is called the Endgame Strategy, and now is the time for the international medical community to help change tobacco policy to a worldwide endgame approach to rid all humanity of smoking-related diseases.

  5. Hen egg yolk lipid fractions with antiatherogenic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasopoulou, Constantina; Gogaki, Vassiliki; Panagopoulou, Eleanna; Demopoulos, Constantinos; Zabetakis, Ioannis

    2013-03-01

    Three different types of hen egg yolk, cage-free, organic and daily fresh, were tested for their antiatherogenic properties. Total lipids (TL) of all hen egg yolk samples were extracted by the method of Bligh and Dyer and further separated into total polar lipids (TPL) and total neutral lipids (TNL) by counter current distribution chromatography. TPL and TNL were further separated by preparative thin-layer chromatography (TLC). TL, TPL, TNL and the obtained polar and neutral lipid fractions after TLC separation were tested to determine whether they induce platelet activation or inhibit platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced platelet activation. All three hen egg yolk TL samples possessed strong inhibitory activity against PAF-induced platelet activation that was mainly attributed to TPL, especially to PL fraction 4. Cage-free hen egg yolk exhibited the most potent anti-PAF activity in all lipid classes (TL, TPL and TNL). Thus hen egg yolk contains PAF inhibitors that reinforce their nutritional value in terms of protection against cardiovascular diseases, since PAF is a crucial inflammatory phospholipid mediator that is implicated in the mechanism of atherogenesis. PMID:23480708

  6. s-ICAM-1 and s-VCAM-1 in healthy men are strongly associated with traits of the metabolic syndrome, becoming evident in the postprandial response to a lipid-rich meal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nothnagel Michael

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of the postprandial state for the early stages of atherogenesis is increasingly acknowledged. We conducted assessment of association between postprandial triglycerides, insulin and glucose after ingestion of a standardized lipid-rich test meal, and soluble cellular adhesion molecules (sCAM in young healthy subjects. Methods Metabolic parameters and sICAM-1, sVCAM-1 and E-selectin were measured before and hourly until 6 hours after ingestion of a lipid-rich meal in 30 healthy young men with fasting triglycerides 260 mg/dl. Levels of CAM were compared in HR and NR, and correlation with postprandial triglyceride, insulin and glucose response was assessed. Results Fasting sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 levels were significantly higher in HR as compared to NR (p = 0.046, p = 0.03. For sE-selectin there was such a trend (p = 0.05. There was a strong positive and independent correlation between sICAM-1 and postprandial insulin maxima (r = 0.70, p Conclusion This independent association of postprandial triglycerides with sICAM-1 may indicate a particular impact of postprandial lipid metabolism on endothelial reaction.

  7. Effects of Nebivolol on Endothelial Gene Expression during Oxidative Stress in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulisse Garbin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The endothelium plays a key role in the development of atherogenesis and its inflammatory and proliferative status influences the progression of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study is to compare the effects of two beta blockers such as nebivolol and atenolol on gene expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs following an oxidant stimulus. HUVECs were incubated with nebivolol or atenolol (10 micromol/L for 24 hours and oxidative stress was induced by the addition of oxidized (ox-LDL. Ox-LDL upregulated adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, ICAM-2, ICAM-3, E-selectin, and P-selectin; proteins linked to inflammation (IL-6 and TNFalpha, thrombotic state (tissue factor, PAI-1 and uPA, hypertension such as endothelin-1 (ET-1, and vascular remodeling such as metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9 and protease inhibitor (TIMP-1. The exposure of HUVECs to nebivolol, but not to atenolol, reduced these genes upregulated by oxidative stress both in terms of protein and RNA expression. The known antioxidant properties of the third generation beta blocker nebivolol seem to account to the observed differences seen when compared to atenolol and support the specific potential protective role of this beta blocker on the expression of a number of genes involved in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis.

  8. Site-specific influence of polyunsaturated fatty acids on atherosclerosis in immune incompetent LDL receptor deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Catherine A; Blachowicz, Lydia; Gupta, Gaorav; Lukens, John; Nissenbaum, Michael; Getz, Godfrey S

    2006-08-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are thought to influence plasma lipid levels, atherosclerosis, and the immune system. In this study, we fed male LDL receptor deficient (LDLR(-/-)) mice and immune incompetent LDLR(-/-) RAG2(-/-) mice diets containing predominantly saturated fats (milk fat) or PUFA (safflower oil) to determine if the response to diet was influenced by immune status. Relative to milk fat diet, plasma lipid and VLDL levels in both the LDLR(-/-) and LDLR(-/-) RAG2(-/-) mice fed safflower oil diet were lower, suggesting that the primary effect of PUFA on plasma lipids was not due to its inhibition of the immune system. Neither diet nor immune status influenced hepatic triglyceride production and post-heparin lipase activity, suggesting that the differences in triglyceride levels are due to differences in rates of catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. While both diets promoted atherogenesis, both aortic root and innominate artery atherosclerosis in LDLR(-/-) mice was less in safflower oil fed animals. In contrast, a site-specific effect of PUFA was observed in the immune incompetent LDLR(-/-) RAG2(-/-). In these mice, aortic root atherosclerosis, but not innominate artery atherosclerosis, was less in PUFA fed animal. These results suggest that PUFA and the immune system may influence innominate artery atherosclerosis by some overlapping mechanisms.

  9. Characterization of the natural killer T-cell response in an adoptive transfer model of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderLaan, Paul A; Reardon, Catherine A; Sagiv, Yuval; Blachowicz, Lydia; Lukens, John; Nissenbaum, Michael; Wang, Chyung-Ru; Getz, Godfrey S

    2007-03-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells have recently been implicated in atherogenesis, primarily for their ability to recognize and respond to lipid antigens. Because the atherosclerotic lesion is characterized by the retention and modification of lipids in the vascular wall, NKT cells may be involved in promoting the local vascular inflammatory response. Here, we investigate the proatherogenic role of NKT cells in an adoptive transfer model of atherosclerosis, using as recipients immune-deficient, atherosclerosis-susceptible RAG1(-/-)LDLR(-/-) mice. The adoptive transfer of an NKT cell-enriched splenocyte population from Valpha14Jalpha18 T-cell receptor transgenic mice resulted in a 73% increase in aortic root lesion area compared with recipients of NKT cell-deficient splenocytes derived from CD1d(-/-) mice after 12 weeks of Western-type diet feeding. The total serum from hypercholesterolemic mice leads to a small but significant activation of Valpha14Jalpha18 T-cell receptor-expressing hybridoma line by dendritic cells that is CD1d-dependent. Therefore, these studies demonstrate that NKT cells are proatherogenic in the absence of exogenous stimulation, and this activity is likely associated with endogenous lipid antigens carried by lipoproteins in the circulation and perhaps also in the atherosclerotic plaque.

  10. How much can be inferred from the left main coronary artery?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Esteban Escolar; Nell J. Weissman

    2004-01-01

    @@ Atherosclerotic diseases is a diffuse process that involves the coronaries, carotids, renals and all other peripheral arteries owing to the systemic nature of atherosclerotic pathophysiology. This systemic precipitants that promote aggressive atherogenesis have been confirmed in multiple studies showing a relationship between atherosclerotic disease in one vascular bed with disease in another. However, the strength of this relationship varies from patient to patient. Thus, the practical utility of the diffuse nature of atheresclerosis is questionable. Ge and colleagues have proposed the use of left main (LM)coronary artery disease as a potential marker for left anterior descending (lAD) atherosclerotic disease. At first thought, this seems useless since the evaluation of the LM (by angiography or IVUS) can just as easily be performed in the LAD so why bother searching for such a surrogate? However, newer (non-invasive) imaging modalifies are making great gains and will be able to reliably image the LM sooner than the LAD (especially the distal LAD) so such a surrogate could have practical applications.

  11. Detection of Fungal Elements in Atherosclerotic Plaques Using Mycological, Pathological and Molecular Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid MASOUMI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to detect fungi in atherosclerotic plaques and investigate their possible role in atherosclerosis.Methods: Coronary atherosclerotic plaques specimen were obtained from patients with atherosclerosis. Direct exami-nation, culture, histopathology study, PCR and sequencing were performed to detect/identify the mycotic elements in the plaques. Age, sex, smoking, obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, family history of heart diseases and diabetes were considered and data were analyzed using Chi Square test by SPSS version 15.Results: A total of 41 specimens were analyzed. Direct examination for fungal elements was negative in all cases but in culture only one specimen grew as a mold colony. The presence of fungal elements were confirmed in 6 and 2 tissue sections stained by Gomori methenamine silver and Hematoxylin and Eosin methods, respectively. Using PCR, 11 cases were positive for fungi. The DNA sequence analysis of six positive specimens which were randomly selected revealed fungi as Candida albicans (n=3, Candida guilliermondii (n=2 and Monilia sp. (n=1.Conclusion: A significant association between the presence of fungi in atherosclerotic plaques and severity of athero-genesis and atherosclerotic disease was not found. This could be due to limited numbers of patients included in our study. However, the presence of fungal elements in 26.8% of our specimens is considerable and the results does not exclude the correlation between the presence of fungi with atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease.

  12. Aminoguanidine effects on nerve blood flow, vascular permeability, electrophysiology, and oxygen free radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kihara, Mikihiro; Schmelzer, J.D.; Poduslo, J.F.; Curran, G.L.; Nickander, K.K.; Low, P.A. (Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States))

    1991-07-15

    Since advanced glycosylation end products have been suggested to mediate hyperglycemia-induced microvascular atherogenesis and because aminoguanidine (AG) prevents their generation, the authors examined whether AG could prevent or ameliorate the physiologic and biochemical indices of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced experimental diabetic neuropathy. Four groups of adult Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: group I received STZ plus AG, group II received STZ plus AG, group III received STZ alone, and group IV was a control. They monitored conduction and action potential amplitudes serially in sciatic-tibial and caudal nerves, nerve blood flow, oxygen free radical activity (conjugated dienes and hydroperoxides), and the product of the permeability coefficient and surface area to {sup 125}I-labeled albumin. STZ-induced diabetes (group III) caused a 57% reduction in nerve blood flow and in abnormal nerve conduction and amplitudes and a 60% increase in conjugated dienes. Nerve blood flow was normalized by 8 weeks with AG (groups I and II) and conduction was significantly improved, in a dose-dependent manner, by 16 and 24 weeks in sciatic-tibial and caudal nerves, respectively. The permeability coefficient was not impaired, suggesting a normal blood-nerve barrier function for albumin, and the oxygen free-radical indices were not ameliorated by AG. They suggest that AG reverses nerve ischemia and more gradually improves their electrophysiology by an action on nerve microvessels. AG may have potential in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy.

  13. [Glycation of extracellular matrix proteins and its role in atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzan, Aleksandra; Chwiłkowska, Agnieszka; Kobielarz, Magdalena; Pezowicz, Celina; Gamian, Andrzej

    2012-10-29

    Glycation consists in formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) during non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. This review is focused mainly on glycation of collagen and its role in acceleration of vascular disease. Collagen is an extracellular matrix protein characterized by unique structure forming fibrils with great anti-tensile and anti-breaking strength. The protein builds the connective tissue and is responsible for biomechanical properties of blood vessels. It is reported that higher content of glycated collagen correlates with lower elasticity and greater toughness of the vessel walls and, as a consequence, a faster rate of atherosclerosis development. Numerous mechanisms connected with AGE formation are involved in atherogenesis, among others: receptor-mediated production of free radicals, triggering an inflammatory process, activation of leukocytes and thrombocytes, facilitation of LDL binding, change in level of growth factors, adhesion molecules, MMP and some other proteins' expression. The coverages allow the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent or slow down the pathological processes connected with glycation of collagen and other proteins in the artery wall. The main strategies are based on limitation of exogenous AGE, consumption of products which contain rutin, treatment with drugs which inhibit AGE formation, such as pyridoxamine, and chemicals which are able to cleave already formed AGE protein-protein crosslinks, such as ALT-711.

  14. [Atherogenic modification of low-density lipoproteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhorukov, V N; Karagodin, V P; Orekhov, A N

    2016-05-01

    One of the first manifestations of atherosclerosis is accumulation of extra- and intracellular cholesterol esters in the arterial intima. Formation of foam cells is considered as a trigger in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Low density lipoprotein (LDL) circulating in human blood is the source of lipids accumulated in the arterial walls. This review considered features and role in atherogenesis different modified forms of LDL: oxidized, small dense, electronegative and especially desialylated LDL. Desialylated LDL of human blood plasma is capable to induce lipid accumulation in cultured cells and it is atherogenic. LDL possesses numerous alterations of protein, carbohydrate and lipid moieties and therefore can be termed multiple-modified LDL. Multiple modification of LDL occurs in human blood plasma and represents a cascade of successive changes in the lipoprotein particle: desialylation, loss of lipids, reduction in the particle size, increase of surface electronegative charge, etc. In addition to intracellular lipid accumulation, stimulatory effects of naturally occurring multiple-modified LDL on other processes involved in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, namely cell proliferation and fibrosis, were shown. PMID:27562992

  15. Dual AAV/IL-10 Plus STAT3 Anti-Inflammatory Gene Delivery Lowers Atherosclerosis in LDLR KO Mice, but without Increased Benefit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maohua Cao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Both IL-10 and STAT3 are in the same signal transduction pathway, with IL-10-bound IL10 receptor (R acting through STAT3 for anti-inflammatory effect. To investigate possible therapeutic synergism, we delivered both full-length wild-type human (h STAT3 and hIL-10 genes by separate adenoassociated virus type 8 (AAV8 tail vein injection into LDLR KO on HCD. Compared to control Neo gene-treated animals, individual hSTAT3 and hIL-10 delivery resulted in significant reduction in atherogenesis, as determined by larger aortic lumen size, thinner aortic wall thickness, and lower blood velocity (all statistically significant. However, dual hSTAT3/hIL-10 delivery offered no improvement in therapeutic effect. Plasma cholesterol levels in dual hSTAT3/hIL-10-treated animals were statistically higher compared to hIL-10 alone. While no advantage was seen in this case, we consider that the dual gene approach has intrinsic merit, but properly chosen partnered genes must be used.

  16. Vitamin B6 Supplementation Improves Oxidative Stress and Enhances Serum Paraoxonase/Arylesterase Activities in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Taş

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of vitamin B6 (Vit B6 on oxidant and antioxidant status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Thirty-two Wistar rats were divided into four groups: control (C, control + Vit B6 group (C + Vit B6, diabetes (D, and diabetes + Vit B6 group (D + Vit B6. Vit B6 (4 mg/kg body weight was administered in drinking water for 4 weeks after the induction of diabetes. Vitamin B6 reduced serum total cholesterol level in the C + Vit B6 (P < 0.01 and D + Vit B6 (P < 0.05 groups. Plasma and tissue malondialdehyde levels were reduced in the C + Vit B6 and D + Vit B6 groups. Whole blood glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD activities were higher in the D group (P < 0.05. GSH-Px and SOD activities were increased in C + Vit B6 group while these parameters decreased in the D + Vit B6 group. Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities were decreased in the D group while they were increased in C + Vit B6 and D + Vit B6 groups. The results of present study suggest that vitamin B6 supplementation might be a promising adjunctive agent for improving oxidative stress and metabolic disturbances and for preventing diabetic complications including atherogenesis.

  17. INSULIN RESISTANCE AND CAROTID ATHEROSCLEROSIS IN 221 PATIENTS WITH POTENTIAL HYPERGLYCEMIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Yang; Tian-de Li; Jin-song Wang; Guang Zhi; Wen-sheng Jin; Yong Xu

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between insulin resistance and carotid atherosclerosis in patients with potential hyperglycemia.Methods A total of 221 patients were recruited among those with potential hyperglycemia. All participants underwent physical examination, medical history interview, and 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. Venous blood was sampled for measurement of insulin and cholesterol levels. The intima-media thickness (IMT) in bilateral common carotid arteries was observed by B-mode ultrasound. Insulin resistance index was calculated by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR).Subjects were stratified in quintiles according to HOMA-IR values. Risk factors and atherosclerotic parameters were analyzed.Results With HOMA-IR value increase, incidence of impaired glucose tolerance, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and coronary artery disease increased, the levels of triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), fasting plasma glucose, 2 hour plasma glucose, and fasting insulin increased as well, while the level of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) decreased. Meanwhile, all atherosclerotic parameters increased. Multivariate regression analysis showed that TG, total cholesterol, HDL-C, LDL-C levels, and In(HOMA-IR) were related to IMT, hence were risk factors for IMT increase.Conchsion Insulin resistance is implicated in atherogenesis.

  18. Nutrient-Induced Inflammation in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Role in the Development of Metabolic Aberration and Ovarian Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Frank

    2015-07-01

    A pathophysiology paradigm shift has emerged with the discovery that polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a proinflammatory state. Despite the dogma that the compensatory hyperinsulinemia of insulin resistance is the promoter of hyperandrogenism, physiological insulin infusion has no effect on androgen levels in PCOS. The dogma also does not explain the cause of hyperandrogenism and ovarian dysfunction in the 30 to 50% of women with PCOS who are of normal weight and lack insulin resistance. Inflammation is the underpinning of insulin resistance in obesity and type 2 diabetes, and may also be the cause of insulin resistance when present in PCOS. The origin of inflammation in PCOS has been ascribed to excess abdominal adiposity or frank obesity. However, nutrients such as glucose and saturated fat can incite inflammation from circulating mononuclear cells (MNC) of women with PCOS independent of excess adiposity and insulin resistance, and can also promote atherogenesis. Hyperandrogenism activates MNC in the fasting state to increase MNC sensitivity to nutrients, and is a potential mechanism for initiating inflammation in PCOS. However, chronic ovarian androgen suppression does not reduce inflammation in normal-weight women with PCOS. Direct exposure of ovarian theca cells to proinflammatory stimuli in vitro increases androgen production. These findings may be corroborated in vivo with anti-inflammatory therapy to normal-weight insulin-sensitive women with PCOS without abdominal adiposity to observe for amelioration of ovarian dysfunction.

  19. Recent advances in atherosclerosis-based proteomics: new biomarkers and a future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Barderas, Maria Eugenia G; Darde, Veronica; Padial, Luis R; Vivanco, Fernando

    2008-10-01

    Vascular proteomics is providing two main types of data: proteins that actively participate in vascular pathophysiological processes and novel protein candidates that can potentially serve as useful clinical biomarkers. Although both types of proteins can be identified by similar proteomic strategies and methods, it is important to clearly distinguish biomarkers from mediators of disease. A particular protein, or group of proteins, may participate in a pathogenic process but not serve as an effective biomarker. Alternatively, a useful biomarker may not mediate pathogenic pathways associated with disease (i.e., C-reactive protein). To date, there are no clear successful examples in which discovery proteomics has led to a novel useful clinical biomarker in cardiovascular diseases. Nevertheless, new sources of biomarkers are being explored (i.e., secretomes, circulating cells, exosomes and microparticles), an increasing number of novel proteins involved in atherogenesis are constantly described, and new technologies and analytical strategies (i.e., quantitative proteomics) are being developed to access low abundant proteins. Therefore, this presages a new era of discovery and a further step in the practical application to diagnosis, prognosis and early action by medical treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:18937558

  20. Proteomic Biomarkers of Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Diaz-Prieto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers provide a powerful approach to understanding the spectrum of cardiovascular diseases. They have application in screening, diagnostic, prognostication, prediction of recurrences and monitoring of therapy. The “omics” tool are becoming very useful in the development of new biomarkers in cardiovascular diseases. Among them, proteomics is especially fitted to look for new proteins in health and disease and is playing a significant role in the development of new diagnostic tools in cardiovascular diagnosis and prognosis. This review provides an overview of progress in applying proteomics to atherosclerosis. First, we describe novel proteins identified analysing atherosclerotic plaques directly. Careful analysis of proteins within the atherosclerotic vascular tissue can provide a repertoire of proteins involved in vascular remodelling and atherogenesis. Second, we discuss recent data concerning proteins secreted by atherosclerotic plaques. The definition of the atheroma plaque secretome resides in that proteins secreted by arteries can be very good candidates of novel biomarkers. Finally we describe proteins that have been differentially expressed (versus controls by individual cells which constitute atheroma plaques (endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, macrophages and foam cells as well as by circulating cells (monocytes, platelets or novel biomarkers present in plasma.

  1. Proteomic Biomarkers of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivanco, F; Padial, L R; Darde, V M; de la Cuesta, F; Alvarez-Llamas, G; Diaz-Prieto, Natacha; Barderas, M G

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY: Biomarkers provide a powerful approach to understanding the spectrum of cardiovascular diseases. They have application in screening, diagnostic, prognostication, prediction of recurrences and monitoring of therapy. The "omics" tool are becoming very useful in the development of new biomarkers in cardiovascular diseases. Among them, proteomics is especially fitted to look for new proteins in health and disease and is playing a significant role in the development of new diagnostic tools in cardiovascular diagnosis and prognosis. This review provides an overview of progress in applying proteomics to atherosclerosis. First, we describe novel proteins identified analysing atherosclerotic plaques directly. Careful analysis of proteins within the atherosclerotic vascular tissue can provide a repertoire of proteins involved in vascular remodelling and atherogenesis. Second, we discuss recent data concerning proteins secreted by atherosclerotic plaques. The definition of the atheroma plaque secretome resides in that proteins secreted by arteries can be very good candidates of novel biomarkers. Finally we describe proteins that have been differentially expressed (versus controls) by individual cells which constitute atheroma plaques (endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, macrophages and foam cells) as well as by circulating cells (monocytes, platelets) or novel biomarkers present in plasma. PMID:19578499

  2. Pathogenesis of Cognitive Decline Following Therapeutic Irradiation for Head and Neck Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abayomi, Olubunmi K. [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2002-08-01

    Cognitive decline is a significant but largely unrecognized sequela following irradiation for several head and neck tumors, particularly cancer of the nasopharynx and paranasal sinuses. In this article the cellular mechanisms of radiation-induced vascular damage in the temporal lobe and its effects on the medial temporal lobe memory systems are described. Recognition of the mechanisms and site of the injury should permit the use of treatment planning systems, such as 3-dimensional (3-D) conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques, to spare large volumes of the temporal lobe from receiving a high dose. Furthermore, the emerging concepts of vascular irradiation damage as an inflammatory fibroproliferative response to endothelial injury may permit the application of measures directed at inhibiting the expression of proinflammatory genes and thus mitigate the inflammatory response. Moreover, comorbid factors such as hypertension, diabetes, lipidemia, obesity and smoking are known to promote atherogenesis and therefore may exacerbate radiation-induced vascular damage. Control of these factors may also reduce the incidence and severity of this sequela.

  3. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ligands as antiatherogenic agents: panacea or another Pandora's box?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molavi, Behzad; Rasouli, Neda; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2002-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear receptor super family that modulate gene expression upon ligand activation. They are 3 major subtypes of PPARs: alpha, delta (also called beta), and gamma. PPAR-gamma is widely expressed in the cardiovascular system and is involved in the regulation of tissue inflammation and smooth muscle cell growth pathways as well as in lipoprotein metabolism and coagulation cascades. PPAR-gamma ligands of (e.g., rosigitazone and pioglitazone) have been shown to exert antiatherogenic effects both in vitro and in vivo. PPAR-alpha ligands (e.g., clofibrate and benzofibrate) modulate lipoprotein metabolism, and affect inflammation and coagulation cascade. These effects may be helpful in resolving the dilemma arising from studies that showed significant mortality and morbidity benefits of fibrates in the face of minimal changes in HDL-cholesterol levels. The role of PPAR-delta in atherogenesis remains largely unknown, although it appears that PPAR-delta activation affects lipoprotein metabolism. PPAR ligands appear to be promising agents in limiting atherosclerosis; however, large-scale clinical trials are required to assess their safety and efficacy before they can be added to the clinicians' arsenal of antiatherosclerotic agents. PMID:12000972

  4. Mucosal Administration of Collagen V Ameliorates the Atherosclerotic Plaque Burden by Inducing Interleukin 35-dependent Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Arick C; Huang, Guorui; Jankowska-Gan, Ewa; Massoudi, Dawiyat; Kernien, John F; Vignali, Dario A; Sullivan, Jeremy A; Wilkes, David S; Burlingham, William J; Greenspan, Daniel S

    2016-02-12

    We have shown previously that collagen V (col(V)) autoimmunity is a consistent feature of atherosclerosis in human coronary artery disease and in the Apoe(-/-) mouse model. We have also shown sensitization of Apoe(-/-) mice with col(V) to markedly increase the atherosclerotic burden, providing evidence of a causative role for col(V) autoimmunity in atherosclerotic pathogenesis. Here we sought to determine whether induction of immune tolerance to col(V) might ameliorate atherosclerosis, providing further evidence for a causal role for col(V) autoimmunity in atherogenesis and providing insights into the potential for immunomodulatory therapeutic interventions. Mucosal inoculation successfully induced immune tolerance to col(V) with an accompanying reduction in plaque burden in Ldlr(-/-) mice on a high-cholesterol diet. The results therefore demonstrate that inoculation with col(V) can successfully ameliorate the atherosclerotic burden, suggesting novel approaches for therapeutic interventions. Surprisingly, tolerance and reduced atherosclerotic burden were both dependent on the recently described IL-35 and not on IL-10, the immunosuppressive cytokine usually studied in the context of induced tolerance and amelioration of atherosclerotic symptoms. In addition to the above, using recombinant protein fragments, we were able to localize two epitopes of the α1(V) chain involved in col(V) autoimmunity in atherosclerotic Ldlr(-/-) mice, suggesting future courses of experimentation for the characterization of such epitopes.

  5. Oxidation-specific epitopes are dominant targets of innate natural antibodies in mice and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Meng-Yun; Fogelstrand, Linda; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Hansen, Lotte F; Woelkers, Douglas; Shaw, Peter X; Choi, Jeomil; Perkmann, Thomas; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Miller, Yury I; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Corr, Maripat; Witztum, Joseph L; Binder, Christoph J

    2009-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the accumulation of oxidized lipoproteins and apoptotic cells. Adaptive immune responses to various oxidation-specific epitopes play an important role in atherogenesis. However, accumulating evidence suggests that these epitopes are also recognized by innate receptors, such as scavenger receptors on macrophages, and plasma proteins, such as C-reactive protein (CRP). Here, we provide multiple lines of evidence that oxidation-specific epitopes constitute a dominant, previously unrecognized target of natural Abs (NAbs) in both mice and humans. Using reconstituted mice expressing solely IgM NAbs, we have shown that approximately 30% of all NAbs bound to model oxidation-specific epitopes, as well as to atherosclerotic lesions and apoptotic cells. Because oxidative processes are ubiquitous, we hypothesized that these epitopes exert selective pressure to expand NAbs, which in turn play an important role in mediating homeostatic functions consequent to inflammation and cell death, as demonstrated by their ability to facilitate apoptotic cell clearance. These findings provide novel insights into the functions of NAbs in mediating host homeostasis and into their roles in health and diseases, such as chronic inflammatory diseases and atherosclerosis.

  6. Physiology and pathophysiology of oxLDL uptake by vascular wall cells in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pietro, Natalia; Formoso, Gloria; Pandolfi, Assunta

    2016-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease in which endothelial cell dysfunction, macrophage foam cell formation, and smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation, lead to the loss of vascular homeostasis. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) may play a pre-eminent function in atherosclerotic lesion formation, even if their role is still debated. Several types of scavenger receptors (SRs) such as SR-AI/II, SRBI, CD36, lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), toll-like receptors (TLRs) and others can promote the internalization of oxLDL. They are expressed on the surface of vascular wall cells (endothelial cells, macrophages and smooth muscle cells) and they mediate the cellular effects of oxLDL. The key influence of both oxLDL and SRs on the atherogenic process has been established in atherosclerosis-prone animals, in which antioxidant treatment and/or silencing of SRs has been shown to reduce atherogenesis. Despite some discrepancies, the indication from cohort studies that there is an association between oxLDL and cardiovascular (CV) events seems to point toward a role for oxLDL in atherosclerotic plaque progress and disruption. Finally, randomized clinical trials using antioxidants have demonstrated benefits only in high-risk patients, suggesting that additional proofs are still needed to better define the involvement of each type of modified LDL in the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:27256928

  7. Multilevel systems biology modeling characterized the atheroprotective efficiencies of modified dairy fats in a hamster model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jean-Charles; Berton, Amélie; Ginies, Christian; Bott, Romain; Scheercousse, Pierre; Saddi, Alessandra; Gripois, Daniel; Landrier, Jean-François; Dalemans, Daniel; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Delplanque, Bernadette

    2015-09-01

    We assessed the atheroprotective efficiency of modified dairy fats in hyperlipidemic hamsters. A systems biology approach was implemented to reveal and quantify the dietary fat-related components of the disease. Three modified dairy fats (40% energy) were prepared from regular butter by mixing with a plant oil mixture, by removing cholesterol alone, or by removing cholesterol in combination with reducing saturated fatty acids. A plant oil mixture and a regular butter were used as control diets. The atherosclerosis severity (aortic cholesteryl-ester level) was higher in the regular butter-fed hamsters than in the other four groups (P < 0.05). Eighty-seven of the 1,666 variables measured from multiplatform analysis were found to be strongly associated with the disease. When aggregated into 10 biological clusters combined into a multivariate predictive equation, these 87 variables explained 81% of the disease variability. The biological cluster "regulation of lipid transport and metabolism" appeared central to atherogenic development relative to diets. The "vitamin E metabolism" cluster was the main driver of atheroprotection with the best performing transformed dairy fat. Under conditions that promote atherosclerosis, the impact of dairy fats on atherogenesis could be greatly ameliorated by technological modifications. Our modeling approach allowed for identifying and quantifying the contribution of complex factors to atherogenic development in each dietary setup. PMID:26071539

  8. Antiobesogenic and Antiatherosclerotic Properties of Caralluma fimbriata Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soundararajan Kamalakkannan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that the principles present in the widely consumed Indian food plant C. fimbriata extract (CFE suppress appetite, and provide antiobesogenic and metabolic benefits. The Diet-Induced Obesity (DIO rat model was used to investigate CFE's anorexigenic effects. Rats were randomly divided into three groups: (i untreated control (C, (ii control for cafeteria diet (CA, and (iii cafeteria diet fed + CFE treated. Rats in the test group received cafeteria diet and CFE from day one onwards. CFE was administered by gavage at three doses (25, 50, 100 mg/Kg BW per day for 90 days. The antiobesogenic effects of CFE were evaluated by monitoring changes in feed intake, body weight, serum lipid and hormonal (leptin profiles, fat pads, and liver weight. Antiatherosclerotic effects were measured by histology. CFE induced significant and dose-dependent inhibition of food intake, with dose-related prevention of gains in body weight, liver weight, and fat pad mass. Alterations in serum lipid profiles associated with weight gain were similarly inhibited, as were the typical increases in serum leptin levels. These data substantiate CFE's reported anorexigenic effects. CFE treatment also conferred protection against atherogenesis. We conclude that CFE possesses antiobesogenic and antiatherosclerotic properties.

  9. Effects of Thyme Extract Oils (from Thymus vulgaris, Thymus zygis, and Thymus hyemalis on Cytokine Production and Gene Expression of oxLDL-Stimulated THP-1-Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ocaña

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of thyme extracts from three different species (Thymus vulgaris, Thymus zygis, and Thymus hyemalis were examined. Two oil fractions from each species were obtained by CO2 supercritical fluid extraction. Main compounds presented in the supercritical extracts of the three thyme varieties were 1,8 cineole, thymol, camphor, borneol, and carvacrol. As a cellular model of inflammation/atherogenesis, we use human macrophages derived from THP-1 monocytes and activated by oxidized LDLs. These cells were incubated with the thyme fraction oils, and the productions and gene expressions of the inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1B, IL-6, and IL-10 were determined. Thyme extracts significantly reduced production and gene expression of the proinflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1B, and IL-6 and highly increased these parameters on the anti-inflammatory IL-10 cytokine. Changes on production and gene expressions were dose dependent and according to the thyme content of each species. Taken together, these results may suggest that thyme extracts could have anti-inflammatory effects.

  10. The relationship between atherosclerosis and pulmonary emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučević Danijela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The etiopathogenesis of atherosclerosis and subsequent pulmonary emphysema has not been fully elucidated. Experimental Studies Foam cells are of great importance in the development of these diseases. It is known that local cytokine secretion and modification of native lipoprotein particles, which are internalized by the vascular and alveolar macrophages via the scavenger receptors on the surfaces of these cells, lead to the formation of foam cells. Thus, the exacerbation of local inflammatory process in the vascular and lung tissue ensues due to a generation of reactive oxygen species, resulting in further lipoprotein modification and cytokine production. Accumulating evidence suggests that oxidants may facilitate the inflammatory response by impairing antiprotease function, directly attacking vascular and lung matrix proteins and by inactivating enzymes involved in elastin synthesis and vascular and lung repair. Clinical Studies Cigarette smoke is recognized as a rich source of oxidants. Nearly 90% of all patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are smokers. The process of atherogenesis is also influenced by tobacco smoke. Conclusion The role of vascular and alveolar macrophages has become increasingly important in understanding the development of atherosclerosis and resulting pulmonary emphysema.[Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175015

  11. Molecular Targeting of Proteins by l-Homocysteine: Mechanistic Implications for Vascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushchenko, Alla V.; Jacobsen, Donald W.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, complications of pregnancy, cognitive impairment, and osteoporosis. That elevated homocysteine leads to vascular dysfunction may be the linking factor between these apparently unrelated pathologies. Although a growing body of evidence suggests that homocysteine plays a causal role in atherogenesis, specific mechanisms to explain the underlying pathogenesis have remained elusive. This review focuses on chemistry unique to the homocysteine molecule to explain its inherent cytotoxicity. Thus, the high pKa of the sulfhydryl group (pKa, 10.0) of homocysteine underlies its ability to form stable disulfide bonds with protein cysteine residues, and in the process, alters or impairs the function of the protein. Studies in this laboratory have identified albumin, fibronectin, transthyretin, and metallothionein as targets for homocysteinylation. In the case of albumin, the mechanism of targeting has been elucidated. Homocysteinylation of the cysteine residues of fibronectin impairs its ability to bind to fibrin. Homocysteinylation of the cysteine residues of metallothionein disrupts zinc binding by the protein and abrogates inherent superoxide dismutase activity. Thus, S-homocysteinylation of protein cysteine residues may explain mechanistically the cytotoxicity of elevated l-homocysteine. PMID:17760510

  12. Decreased Regulatory T Cells in Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Lesions: Imbalance between Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Cells in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilonka Rohm

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall in which presentation of autoantigens by dendritic cells (DCs leads to the activation of T cells. Anti-inflammatory cells like Tregs counterbalance inflammation in atherogenesis. In our study, human carotid plaque specimens were classified as stable (14 and unstable (15 according to established morphological criteria. Vessel specimens (n=12 without any signs of atherosclerosis were used as controls. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to detect different types of DCs (S100, fascin, CD83, CD209, CD304, and CD123, proinflammatory T cells (CD3, CD4, CD8, and CD161, and anti-inflammatory Tregs (FoxP3. The following results were observed: in unstable lesions, significantly higher numbers of proinflammatory cells like DCs, T helper cells, cytotoxic T cells, and natural killer cells were detected compared to stable plaques. Additionally, there was a significantly higher expression of HLA-DR and more T cell activation (CD25, CD69 in unstable lesions. On the contrary, unstable lesions contained significantly lower numbers of Tregs. Furthermore, a significant inverse correlation between myeloid DCs and Tregs was shown. These data suggest an increased inflammatory state in vulnerable plaques resulting from an imbalance of the frequency of local pro- and anti-inflammatory immune cells.

  13. Low Density Lipoprotein-Containing Circulating Immune Complexes: Role in Atherosclerosis and Diagnostic Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor A. Sobenin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that low density lipoprotein-containing circulating immune complexes (LDL-CIC play a role in atherogenesis and are involved in the formation of early atherosclerotic lesion. These complexes, as well as anti-LDL autoantibodies, have been found in the blood and in the atherosclerotic lesions of patients with different cardiovascular diseases, as well as in the blood of animals with experimental atherosclerosis. It can be suggested that the presence of anti-LDL antibodies in the blood is a result of immune response induced by lipoprotein modification. LDL-CIC differs from native LDL in many aspects. It has much lower sialic acid content, smaller diameter, and higher density and is more electronegative than native LDL. Fraction of LDL-CICs is fundamental to the serum atherogenicity manifested at the cellular level. LDL-CIC, unlike native LDL, is able to induce intracellular accumulation of neutral lipids, especially esterified cholesterol, in cells cultured from uninvolved human aortic intima and in macrophage cultures. After removal of LDL-CIC, the CHD patient’s sera lose their atherogenic properties. Titer of LDL-CIC in blood serum significantly correlates with progression of atherosclerosis in human in vivo and has the highest diagnostic value among other measured serum lipid parameters. Elevated CIC-cholesterol might well be a possible risk factor of coronary atherosclerosis.

  14. Periodontitis-atherosclerosis syndrome: an expanded model of pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offenbacher, S; Madianos, P N; Champagne, C M; Southerland, J H; Paquette, D W; Williams, R C; Slade, G; Beck, J D

    1999-10-01

    The early reports of a linkage between periodontitis and atherosclerosis have garnered further support by additional data generated by several investigative teams in many different countries. The evidence continues to suggest that periodontitis may be an important risk factor or risk indicator for cardiovascular pathology for some individuals. The term periodontitis-atherosclerosis syndrome (PAS) is proposed as a new diagnostic term to describe this condition in these individuals. Current evidence, albeit preliminary in nature, which describes a cluster of clinical signs and symptoms that are associated with this condition, is presented. It is clear that this syndrome will require considerable study and refinement before a definitive diagnosis and treatment plan can be formulated. Potential mechanisms by which systemic inflammation and infectious challenge of periodontal origin may serve as a potential modifier of cardiovascular disease are discussed in the context of a detailed working model of pathogenesis. This hypothetical model embraces many cellular and molecular components of atherogenesis and thromboembolic diseases from the perspective of periodontitis pathogenesis. Many aspects of the hypothetical model remain unproved; however, it is our opinion that only through the clarification of the mechanisms of pathogenesis can we ultimately construct a knowledge framework for accurate diagnoses and successful therapies. The concept of diagnosing and treating a periodontal patient to minimize the deleterious effects of this chronic infectious and inflammatory condition on the cardiovascular system represents an unprecedented challenge to our profession. PMID:10685359

  15. Periodontal associations in cardiovascular diseases: The latest evidence and understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, C M; Kim, J W M; Quan, V H; Nguyen, B H; Tran, S D

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are inflammatory diseases. Recent epidemiological studies have associated the effect of periodontitis on CVD progression. Findings of oral pathogens in carotid atheromas provided a plausible relationship between these two diseases. One possible mechanism is the infiltration of oral/periodontal pathogens through inflamed and ulcerated gingival epithelium. This results in translocation of oral pathogens throughout the systemic circulation affecting vascular tissues, and initiating a cascade of inflammatory reactions detrimental to the cardiovascular system. In addition, leakage of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines from the ulcerated periodontium into the bloodstream may cause the production of hepatic acute-phase proteins. Moreover, as chronic bacteremia occurs, the adaptive immune system is activated. Antibodies produced in response to periodontal pathogens trigger a cross-reaction between endothelial cells and modified low-density lipoprotein to enhance the movement of lipids into cells within the vessel wall. Some antibodies and inflammatory cytokines promote the Th1 response, thereby further activating macrophages within the atheroma. These plausible mechanisms are contributing factors in initiating and propagating atherogenesis. This review discusses the current understanding of CVD pathology/periodontitis, potential underlying mechanisms regarding this association, and general guidelines for treating patients with CVD risks. PMID:26587382

  16. Human macrophage scavenger receptors: Primary structure, expression, and localization in atherosclerotic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of cDNAs for human macrophage scavenger receptors were cloned from a cDNA library derived from the phorbol ester-treated human monocytic cell line THP-1. The type I and type II human scavenger receptors encoded by these cDNAs are homologous (73% and 71% amino acid identity) to their previously characterized bovine counterparts and consist of six domains: cytoplasmic (I), membrane-spanning (II), spacer (III), α-helical coiled-coil (IV), collagen-like (V), and a type-specific C-terminal (VI). The receptor gene is located on human chromosome 8. The human receptors expressed in CHO-K1 cells mediated endocytosis of modified low density lipoproteins. Two mRNAs, 4.0 and 3.2 kilobases, have been detected in human liver, placenta, and brain. Immunohistochemical studies using an anti-peptide antibody which recognizes human scavenger receptors indicated the presence of the scavenger receptors in the macrophages of lipid-rich atherosclerotic lesions, suggesting the involvement of scavenger receptors in atherogenesis

  17. Effect of Antioxidant Mineral Elements Supplementation in the Treatment of Hypertension in Albino Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress has been implicated in various pathologies, including hypertension, atherosclerosis, diabetes, and chronic renal disease. The current work was designed with the aim of investigating the potentials of antioxidants copper, manganese, and zinc in the treatment of hypertension in Wistar rats. The rats were fed 8% NaCl diet for 5 weeks and treatment with supplements in the presence of the challenging agent for additional 4 weeks. The supplementation significantly decreased the blood pressure as compared with hypertensive control. The result also indicated significant decreased in the levels of total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, malondialdehyde, insulin and increase in the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total antioxidant activities, and nitric oxide of the supplemented groups relative to the hypertensive control. The average percentage protection against atherogenesis indicated 47.13 ± 9.60% for all the supplemented groups. The mean arterial blood pressure showed significant positive correlation with glucose, total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, atherogenic index, insulin resistance and malondialdehyde while high density lipoprotein-cholesterol and total antioxidant activities showed negative correlation. The result therefore indicated strong relationship between oxidative stress and hypertension and underscores the role of antioxidant minerals in reducing oxidative stress, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance associated with hypertension.

  18. p66(Shc) protein, oxidative stress, and cardiovascular complications of diabetes: the missing link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Pietro; Cosentino, Francesco; Schiavoni, Marzia; Huang, Yale; Perna, Enrico; Camici, Giovani G; Lüscher, Thomas F; Volpe, Massimo

    2009-09-01

    Diabetes affects more than 150 million people worldwide, and it is estimated that this would increase to 299 million by the year 2025. The incidence of and mortality from cardiovascular disease are two- to eightfold higher in subjects with diabetes than in those without, coronary artery disease accounting for the large majority of deaths. Among the full spectrum of biochemical effects of high glucose, generation of oxygen-derived free radicals is one of the main pathophysiological mechanisms linking hyperglycemia to atherosclerosis, nephropathy, and cardiomyopathy. The adaptor protein p66(Shc) is implicated in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and translation of oxidative signals into apoptosis. Indeed, p66(Shc-/-) mice display prolonged lifespan, reduced production of intracellular oxidants, and increased resistance to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Accordingly, a series of studies defined the pathophysiological role of p66(Shc) in cardiovascular disease where ROS represent a substantial triggering component. As p66(Shc) modulates the production of cellular ROS, it represents a proximal node through which high glucose exerts its deleterious effects on different cell types; indeed, several studies tested the hypothesis that deletion of the p66(Shc) gene may confer protection against diabetes-related cardiovascular complications. The present review focuses on the reported evidence linking p66(Shc) signaling pathway to high glucose-associated endothelial dysfunction, atherogenesis, nephropathy, and cardiomyopathy.

  19. Apple Peel Supplemented Diet Reduces Parameters of Metabolic Syndrome and Atherogenic Progression in ApoE−/− Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Gonzalez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD represent about 30% of all causes of death worldwide. The development of CVD is related in many cases with the previous existence of metabolic syndrome (MS. It is known that apple consumption has a cardiovascular protecting effect, containing phenolic compounds with antioxidant effect, which are concentrated in the fruit peel. The objective of this study was to test the effect of apple peel consumption in a murine model of MS and apoE−/− mice. Apple supplemented diets reduced the biochemical parameters (glycaemia, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, ureic nitrogen, triglycerides, insulin, and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA of MS model in CF1 mice significantly. The model apoE−/− mouse was used to evaluate the capacity of the apple peel to revert the progression of the atherogenesis. FD with HAP reverts cholesterol significantly and slows down the progression of the plate diminishing the cholesterol accumulation area. With these results, it can be concluded that the consumption of apple peel reduces several MS parameters and the atherogenic progression in mice.

  20. [Significance of Toll-like receptors in the pathophysiology of surgical sepsis].

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Romics, Laszlo Jr

    2012-02-03

    The discovery of Toll-like receptors has substantially changed our knowledge of pathogen recognition. 11 Toll-like receptors have so far been described in humans. These recognize distinct pathogen associated molecular patterns, as well as endogenous ligands and small molecular synthetic compounds. TLRs have a multifunctional role in pathogen-triggered immune responses and represent an important connection between the "innate" and "adaptive" immunity. The role of the TLRs in the recognition of pathogens renders them a key figure in the activation of the immune response during surgical sepsis. However, emerging evidence points to a fundamental role in tumorigenesis, transplantation, wound healing, atherogenesis and inflammatory bowel disease. The aim hence was to review experimental data pertaining to the activation of TLR signalling pathways in conditions associated with surgical sepsis. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken by searching the MEDLINE database for the period 1966-2004 without language restriction. The paper also analyses the possible therapeutic utilization of the TLR signalling pathways in surgical sepsis.

  1. Biological behaviour and role of endothelial progenitor cells in vascular diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qiu-hua; SHE Ming-peng

    2007-01-01

    Obiective To review the biological behaviour of endothelial progenitor cells and their role in vascular diseases.Data sources The data used in this review were mainly from Medline and PubMed for relevant English language articles published from 1985 to March 2007.The search term was "endothelial progenitor cells".Study selection Articles about the biological behaviour of endothelial progenitor cells and their roles in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases such as atherogenesis were used.Results Progenitor cells in bone marrow,peripheral blood and adventitia can differentiate into mature endothelial cells (ECs).The progenitor cells,which express certain surface markers including AC133,CD34 and KDR,enable restoration of the microcirculation and ECs when injury or ischaemia occurs.Endothelial progenitor cells used in experimental models and clinical trials for ischaemic syndromes could restore endothelial integrity and inhibit neointima development.Moreover,their number and functional properties are influenced by certain cytokines and atherosclerotic risk factors.Impairment of the progenitor cells might limit the regenerative capacity,even lead to the development of atherosclerosis or other vascular diseases.Conclusions Endothelial progenitor cells have a particular role in prevention and treatment of certain cardiovascular diseases.However,many challenges remain in understanding differentiation of endothelial progenitor cells,their mobilization and revascularization.

  2. Overexpression of TGF-ß1 in macrophages reduces and stabilizes atherosclerotic plaques in ApoE-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Reifenberg

    Full Text Available Although macrophages represent the hallmark of both human and murine atherosclerotic lesions and have been shown to express TGF-ß1 (transforming growth factor β1 and its receptors, it has so far not been experimentally addressed whether the pleiotropic cytokine TGF-ß1 may influence atherogenesis by a macrophage specific mechanism. We developed transgenic mice with macrophage specific TGF-ß1 overexpression, crossed the transgenics to the atherosclerotic ApoE (apolipoprotein E knock-out strain and quantitatively analyzed both atherosclerotic lesion development and composition of the resulting double mutants. Compared with control ApoE(-/- mice, animals with macrophage specific TGF-ß1 overexpression developed significantly less atherosclerosis after 24 weeks on the WTD (Western type diet as indicated by aortic plaque area en face (p<0.05. Reduced atherosclerotic lesion development was associated with significantly less macrophages (p<0.05 after both 8 and 24 weeks on the WTD, significantly more smooth muscle cells (SMCs; p<0.01 after 24 weeks on the WTD, significantly more collagen (p<0.01 and p<0.05 after 16 and 24 weeks on the WTD, respectively without significant differences of inner aortic arch intima thickness or the number of total macrophages in the mice pointing to a plaque stabilizing effect of macrophage-specific TGF-ß1 overexpression. Our data shows that macrophage specific TGF-ß1 overexpression reduces and stabilizes atherosclerotic plaques in ApoE-deficient mice.

  3. Childhood obesity, adipose tissue distribution, and the pediatric practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slyper, A H

    1998-07-01

    coronary disease tend to be obese. Very low-density lipoprotein and intermediate-density lipoprotein particles, which are small in size, may be important in atherogenesis but they cannot be identified in a fasting lipid panel. The propensity to atherogenesis cannot be interpreted readily from a fasting lipid panel, which therefore should be interpreted in conjunction with a family history for coronary risk factors. Hypertriglyceridemia may be indicative of increased visceral fat, familial combined hyperlipidemia, familial dyslipidemic hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, or diabetes. Almost half of adult females with polycystic ovary syndrome are obese and many have a central distribution of body fat. This condition frequently has its origins in adolescence. It is associated with increased androgen secretion, hirsutism, menstrual abnormalities, and infertility, although these may not be present in every case. Adults with polycystic ovary syndrome adults are hyperlipidemic, have a high incidence of impaired glucose tolerance and noninsulin-dependent diabetes, and are at increased risk for coronary artery disease. Weight reduction and lipid lowering therefore are an important part of therapy. Obstructive sleep apnea with daytime somnolence is a common problem in obese adults. Pediatric studies suggest that obstructive sleep apnea occurs in approximately 17% of obese children and adolescents. Sleep disorders in the obese may be a major cause of learning disability and school failure, although this remains to be confirmed. Symptoms suggestive of a sleep disorder include snoring, restlessness at night with difficulty breathing, arousals and sweating, nocturnal enuresis, and daytime somnolence. Questions to exclude obstructive sleep apnea should be part of the history of all obese children, particularly for the morbidly obese. For many children and adolescents with mild obesity, and particularly for females, one can speculate that obesity may not be a great health risk PMID

  4. Childhood obesity, adipose tissue distribution, and the pediatric practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slyper, A H

    1998-07-01

    coronary disease tend to be obese. Very low-density lipoprotein and intermediate-density lipoprotein particles, which are small in size, may be important in atherogenesis but they cannot be identified in a fasting lipid panel. The propensity to atherogenesis cannot be interpreted readily from a fasting lipid panel, which therefore should be interpreted in conjunction with a family history for coronary risk factors. Hypertriglyceridemia may be indicative of increased visceral fat, familial combined hyperlipidemia, familial dyslipidemic hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, or diabetes. Almost half of adult females with polycystic ovary syndrome are obese and many have a central distribution of body fat. This condition frequently has its origins in adolescence. It is associated with increased androgen secretion, hirsutism, menstrual abnormalities, and infertility, although these may not be present in every case. Adults with polycystic ovary syndrome adults are hyperlipidemic, have a high incidence of impaired glucose tolerance and noninsulin-dependent diabetes, and are at increased risk for coronary artery disease. Weight reduction and lipid lowering therefore are an important part of therapy. Obstructive sleep apnea with daytime somnolence is a common problem in obese adults. Pediatric studies suggest that obstructive sleep apnea occurs in approximately 17% of obese children and adolescents. Sleep disorders in the obese may be a major cause of learning disability and school failure, although this remains to be confirmed. Symptoms suggestive of a sleep disorder include snoring, restlessness at night with difficulty breathing, arousals and sweating, nocturnal enuresis, and daytime somnolence. Questions to exclude obstructive sleep apnea should be part of the history of all obese children, particularly for the morbidly obese. For many children and adolescents with mild obesity, and particularly for females, one can speculate that obesity may not be a great health risk

  5. Recent advances in lipoprotein and atherosclerosis: A nutrigenomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López, Sergio

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a disease in which multiple factors contribute to the degeneration of the vascular wall. Many risk factors have been identified as having influence on the progression of atherosclerosis among them, the type of diet. Multifactorial interaction among lipoproteins, vascular wall cells, and inflammatory mediators has been recognised as the basis of atherogenesis. Dietary intake affects lipoprotein concentration and composition providing risk or protection at several stages of atherosclerosis. More intriguingly, it has been demonstrated that the extent to which each lipid or lipoprotein is associated with cardiovascular disease depends on the time to last meal; thus, postprandial lipoproteins, main lipoproteins in blood after a high-fat meal, have been shown to strongly influence atherogenesis. As a complex biological process, the full cellular and molecular characterization of atherosclerosis derived by diet, calls for application of the newly developing “omics” techniques of analysis. This review will considered recent studies using high-throughput technologies and a nutrigenomic approach to reveal the patho-physiological effects that the fasting and postprandial lipoproteins may exert on the vascular wall.La aterosclerosis es una enfermedad en la que múltiples factores, entre los que se encuentra la dieta, contribuyen a la degradación de la pared vascular. En la etiología de la aterogénesis son determinantes las lipoproteínas plasmáticas y los distintos tipos celulares de la pared vascular, incluyendo una respuesta inflamatoria. La ingesta de alimentos afecta la concentración y composición de las lipoproteínas, ejerciendo un papel de riesgo o protector durante las diferentes etapas del proceso aterosclerótico. Es importante destacar que la naturaleza de las lipoproteínas y por lo tanto su papel en la enfermedad cardiovascular, también depende del tiempo transcurrido entre comidas. Por ejemplo, las lipoprote

  6. Mitochondrion-Targeted Peptide SS-31 Inhibited Oxidized Low-Density Lipoproteins-Induced Foam Cell Formation through both ROS Scavenging and Inhibition of Cholesterol Influx in RAW264.7 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shuangying; Ji, Jiajie; Zhao, Hongting; Shang, Longcheng; Wu, Jing; Li, Huihui; Qiao, Tong; Li, Kuanyu

    2015-12-01

    Foam cell formation as a result of imbalance of modified cholesterol influx and efflux by macrophages is a key to the occurrence and development of atherosclerosis. Oxidative stress is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. SS-31 is a member of the Szeto-Schiller (SS) peptides shown to specifically target the inner mitochondrial membrane to scavenge reactive oxygen species. In this study, we investigated whether SS-31 may provide protective effect on macrophage from foam cell formation in RAW264.7 cells. The results showed that SS-31 inhibited oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL)-induced foam cell formation and cholesterol accumulation, demonstrated by intracellular oil red O staining and measurement of cholesterol content. The mechanism was revealed that SS-31 did not only significantly attenuated ox-LDL-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased the activities of superoxide dismutases, but also dose-dependently inhibited the expression of CD36 and LOX-1, two scavenger receptors of ox-LDL, while the expression of ATP-binding cassette A1 and G1, playing a pivotal role in cholesterol efflux, was not affected. As a result, SS-31 decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha, suggesting the prevention of inflammatory responses. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that SS-31 provides a beneficial effect on macrophages from foam cell formation, likely, through both ROS scavenging and inhibition of cholesterol influx. Therefore, SS-31 may potentially be of therapeutic relevance in prevention of human atherogenesis.

  7. Erythropoietin and a nonerythropoietic peptide analog promote aortic endothelial cell repair under hypoxic conditions: role of nitric oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikal L

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Lamia Heikal,1 Pietro Ghezzi,1 Manuela Mengozzi,1 Blanka Stelmaszczuk,2 Martin Feelisch,2 Gordon AA Ferns1 1Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Falmer, Brighton, 2Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital and Institute for Life Sciences, Southampton, UK Abstract: The cytoprotective effects of erythropoietin (EPO and an EPO-related nonerythropoietic analog, pyroglutamate helix B surface peptide (pHBSP, were investigated in an in vitro model of bovine aortic endothelial cell injury under normoxic (21% O2 and hypoxic (1% O2 conditions. The potential molecular mechanisms of these effects were also explored. Using a model of endothelial injury (the scratch assay, we found that, under hypoxic conditions, EPO and pHBSP enhanced scratch closure by promoting cell migration and proliferation, but did not show any effect under normoxic conditions. Furthermore, EPO protected bovine aortic endothelial cells from staurosporine-induced apoptosis under hypoxic conditions. The priming effect of hypoxia was associated with stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor-1α, EPO receptor upregulation, and decreased Ser-1177 phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS; the effect of hypoxia on the latter was rescued by EPO. Hypoxia was associated with a reduction in nitric oxide (NO production as assessed by its oxidation products, nitrite and nitrate, consistent with the oxygen requirement for endogenous production of NO by endothelial NOS. However, while EPO did not affect NO formation in normoxia, it markedly increased NO production, in a manner sensitive to NOS inhibition, under hypoxic conditions. These data are consistent with the notion that the tissue-protective actions of EPO-related cytokines in pathophysiological settings associated with poor oxygenation are mediated by NO. These findings may be particularly relevant to atherogenesis and postangioplasty restenosis. Keywords

  8. Retinoic acid receptor agonists regulate expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaori, Makoto; Yakushiji, Emi; Ogura, Masatsune; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Hisada, Tetsuya; Uto-Kondo, Harumi; Takiguchi, Shunichi; Terao, Yoshio; Sasaki, Makoto; Komatsu, Tomohiro; Iizuka, Maki; Yogo, Makiko; Uehara, Yoshinari; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Ikewaki, Katsunori

    2012-04-01

    ABC transporter G1 (ABCG1) plays a pivotal role in HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux and atherogenesis. We investigated whether, and how, retinoic acid receptors (RARs) regulate ABCG1 expression in macrophages. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), an RAR ligand, increased ABCG1 protein levels and apoA-I/HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from the macrophages. Both ATRA and other RAR agonists, TTNPB and Am580, increased major transcripts driven by promoter B upstream of exon 5, though minor transcripts driven by promoter A upstream of exon 1 were only increased by ATRA. The stimulatory effects of ATRA on ABCG1 expression were completely abolished in the presence of RAR/RXR antagonists but were only partially canceled in the presence of an LXR antagonist. Adenovirus with overexpressed oxysterol sulfotransferase abolished the LXR pathway, as previously reported, and ATRA-responsiveness in ABCA1/ABCG1 expressions were respectively attenuated by 38 and 22% compared to the control virus. Promoter assays revealed that ABCG1 levels were regulated more by promoter B than promoter A, and ATRA activated promoter B in a liver X receptor-responsive element (LXRE)-dependent manner. Further, LXRE-B in intron 7, but not LXRE-A in intron 5, enhanced ATRA responsiveness under overexpression of all RAR isoforms-RARα/β/γ. In contrast, the activation of promoter B by TTNPB depended on LXRE-B and RARα, but not on RARβ/γ. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation and gel-shift assays revealed a specific and direct repeat 4-dependent binding of RARα to LXRE-B. In conclusion, RAR ligands increase ABCA1/G1 expression and apoA-I/HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophages, and modulate ABCG1 promoter activity via LXRE-dependent mechanisms.

  9. Comparison of efficacy of the disease-specific LOX1- and constitutive cytomegalovirus-promoters in expressing interleukin 10 through adeno-associated virus 2/8 delivery in atherosclerotic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongqing Zhu

    Full Text Available The development of gene therapy vectors for treating diseases of the cardiovascular system continues at a steady pace. Moreover, in the field of gene therapy the utility of "disease-specific promoters" has strong appeal. Many therapeutic genes, including transforming growth factor beta 1 or interleukin 10, are associated to adverse effects. The use of a disease-specific promoter might minimize toxicity. The lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor 1 is a marker of cardiovascular disease and a potential therapeutic target. The lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor 1 is known to be up-regulated early during disease onset in a number of cell types at the sites where the disease will be clinically evident. In this study an adeno-associated virus-2 DNA vector (AAV2 using the AAV8 capsid, and containing the full length The lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor 1 promoter, was generated and assayed for its ability to express human interleukin 10 in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice on high cholesterol diet. The cytomegalovirus early promoter was used for comparison in a similarly structured vector. The two promoters were found to have equal efficacy in reducing atherogenesis as measured by aortic systolic blood velocity, aortic cross sectional area, and aortic wall thickness. This is the first head-to-head comparison of a constitutive with a disease-specific promoter in a therapeutic context. These data strongly suggest that the use of a disease-specific promoter is appropriate for therapeutic gene delivery.

  10. Metformin reduces the endotoxin-induced down-regulation of apolipoprotein E gene expression in macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stavri, Simona; Trusca, Violeta G.; Simionescu, Maya; Gafencu, Anca V., E-mail: anca.gafencu@icbp.ro

    2015-05-29

    The atheroprotective role of macrophage-derived apolipoprotein E (apoE) is well known. Our previous reports demonstrated that inflammatory stress down-regulates apoE expression in macrophages, aggravating atherogenesis. Metformin, extensively used as an anti-diabetic drug, has also anti-inflammatory properties, and thus confers vascular protection. In this study, we questioned whether metformin could have an effect on apoE expression in macrophages in normal conditions or under lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced stress. The results showed that metformin slightly increases the apoE expression only at high doses (5–10 mM). Low doses of metformin (1–3 mM) significantly reduce the LPS down-regulatory effect on apoE expression in macrophages. Our experiments demonstrated that LPS-induced NF-κB binds to the macrophage-specific distal regulatory element of apoE gene, namely to the multienhancer 2 (ME.2) and its 5′-deletion fragments. The NF-κB binding on ME.2 and apoE promoter has a down-regulatory effect. In addition, data revealed that metformin impairs NF-κB nuclear translocation, and thus, improves the apoE levels in macrophages under inflammatory stress. The positive effect of metformin in the inflammatory states, its clinical safety and low cost, make this drug a potential adjuvant in the therapeutic strategies for atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • High doses of metformin slightly increase apoE expression in macrophages. • Low doses of metformin up-regulate apoE gene in endotoxin-stressed macrophages. • Metformin reduces the negative effect of LPS on apoE expression by NF-κB inhibition.

  11. Experimental Study of Yishou Tiaozhi Tablet(益寿调脂片) on Inhibiting Hyperlipemia and Atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of Yishou Tiaozhi tablet(YSTZT) on lipid metabolism and aortic intimal atherosclerotic plaque coverage in rabbit model of experimental hyperlipemia and atherosclerosis.Methods: Thirty-two rabbits were randomly divided into four groups, Group A, B, C and D, 8 in each group. Forage with cholesterol and lipid plus 1.59 g/kg of YSTZT was fed to Group A every day;for Group B, 22.54 mg/kg gypenoside tablet was added to forage with cholesterol and lipid; for Group C, hyperlipid forage was given and for Group D, only ordinary forage was given. Biochemical parameters were measured and pathomorphological examinations were carried out 6 weeks later.Results: (1) YSTZT obviously lowered the levels of serum total cholesterol(TC), triglyceride(TG), atherosclerotic index(AI), apoprotein(ApoB), lipoprotein [Lp(a)], oxygen-low density lipoprotein cholesterol(ox-LDL), hydroxyproline(HYP), plasma Ca2+, thromboxane B2(TXB2), and increased the levels of serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol(HDL-C), apoprotein A1(Apo A1), ApoA1 /ApoB, plasma 6-keto-PGF1α (P<0.01). (2) Pathomorphological examination showed that in Group A aortic intimal atherosclerotic plaque area and arterial intima thickness were obviously reduced, smooth muscle cell hyperplasia and elastic fibers were not seen.Conclusion: YSTZT can inhibit experimental hyperlipemia and atherogenesis. It is an ideal and effective medicine in preventing and treating hyperlipemia and atherosclerosis.

  12. Inflammation and infection do not promote arterial aging and cardiovascular disease risk factors among lean horticulturalists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gurven

    Full Text Available Arterial aging is well characterized in industrial populations, but scantly described in populations with little access to modern medicine. Here we characterize health and aging among the Tsimane, Amazonian forager-horticulturalists with short life expectancy, high infectious loads and inflammation, but low adiposity and robust physical fitness. Inflammation has been implicated in all stages of arterial aging, atherogenesis and hypertension, and so we test whether greater inflammation associates with atherosclerosis and CVD risk. In contrast, moderate to vigorous daily activity, minimal obesity, and low fat intake predict minimal CVD risk among older Tsimane.Peripheral arterial disease (PAD, based on the Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI, and hypertension were measured in Tsimane adults, and compared with rates from industrialized populations. No cases of PAD were found among Tsimane and hypertension was comparatively low (prevalence: 3.5%, 40+; 23%, 70+. Markers of infection and inflammation were much higher among Tsimane than among U.S. adults, whereas HDL was substantially lower. Regression models examine associations of ABI and BP with biomarkers of energy balance and metabolism and of inflammation and infection. Among Tsimane, obesity, blood lipids, and disease history were not significantly associated with ABI. Unlike the Tsimane case, higher cholesterol, C-reactive protein, leukocytes, cigarette smoking and systolic pressure among North Americans are all significantly associated with lower ABI.Inflammation may not always be a risk factor for arterial degeneration and CVD, but instead may be offset by other factors: healthy metabolism, active lifestyle, favorable body mass, lean diet, low blood lipids and cardiorespiratory health. Other possibilities, including genetic susceptibility and the role of helminth infections, are discussed. The absence of PAD and CVD among Tsimane parallels anecdotal reports from other small-scale subsistence

  13. SERUM AMYLASE: AN EARLY MARKER OF RENAL DAMAGE IN HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangaswamy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available : INTRODUCTION: Hypertension is one of the risk factors for cardiovascular disease and causes progressive damage to kidney in a long term process. Hypertension impairs glomerular function and also leads to subclinical atherogenesis, there is a excretion of low molecular weight compounds like albumin and amylase in urine. This study was conducted to analyze the changes in amylase levels in hypertension. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This is a hospital based study. The patients attending the medicine department were selected for the study. 60 subjects were selected based on history and clinical examination consisting of 30 hypertensive patients and 30 normotensive subjects in the age group 35-60 years. Blood samples collected in vacutainers were analyzed in the clinical biochemistry laboratory. Serum samples were analyzed for total protein, albumin and amylase. RESULT: The study showed a statistically significant change in the levels of serum albumin and amylase. The level of serum albumin was 3.71 ± 0.22 g/dl in cases while it was 4.14 ± 0.20 g/dl in controls. The serum amylase levels were 99.79 ±13.63 U/L in cases while it was 137.76 ± 16.86 U/L in the control. The p-value was 0.0001 which was statistically significant. CONCLUSION: The initial damage to glomerulus can be detected by the alteration in serum amylase values in hypertension. Thus serum amylase can be considered as an early marker for detecting the renal damage in hypertension

  14. MCP-1 binds to oxidized LDL and is carried by lipoprotein(a) in human plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Philipp; Tafelmeier, Maria; Chittka, Dominik; Choi, Soo-Ho; Zhang, Li; Byun, Young Sup; Almazan, Felicidad; Yang, Xiaohong; Iqbal, Navaid; Chowdhury, Punam; Maisel, Alan; Witztum, Joseph L.; Handel, Tracy M.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Miller, Yury I.

    2013-01-01

    Lipoprotein oxidation plays an important role in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (OxLDL) induces profound inflammatory responses in vascular cells, such as production of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) [chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2], a key chemokine in the initiation and progression of vascular inflammation. Here we demonstrate that OxLDL also binds MCP-1 and that the OxLDL-bound MCP-1 retains its ability to recruit monocytes. A human MCP-1 mutant in which basic amino acids Arg-18 and Lys-19 were replaced with Ala did not bind to OxLDL. The MCP-1 binding to OxLDL was inhibited by the monoclonal antibody E06, which binds oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs) in OxLDL. Because OxPLs are carried by lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] in human plasma, we tested to determine whether Lp(a) binds MCP-1. Recombinant wild-type but not mutant MCP-1 added to human plasma bound to Lp(a), and its binding was inhibited by E06. Lp(a) captured from human plasma contained MCP-1 and the Lp(a)-associated endogenous MCP-1 induced monocyte migration. These results demonstrate that OxLDL and Lp(a) bind MCP-1 in vitro and in vivo and that OxPLs are major determinants of the MCP-1 binding. The association of MCP-1 with OxLDL and Lp(a) may play a role in modulating monocyte trafficking during atherogenesis. PMID:23667177

  15. Vascular lipid accumulation, lipoprotein oxidation and macrophage lipid uptake in hypercholesterolemic zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoletov, Konstantin; Fang, Longhou; Choi, Soo-Ho; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Hansen, Lotte F.; Hall, Chris; Pattison, Jennifer; Juliano, Joseph; Miller, Elizabeth R.; Almazan, Felicidad; Crosier, Phil; Witztum, Joseph L.; Klemke, Richard L.; Miller, Yury I.

    2010-01-01

    Lipid accumulation in arteries induces vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis, the major cause of heart attack and stroke in humans. Extreme hyperlipidemia induced in mice and rabbits enables modeling many aspects of human atherosclerosis, but microscopic examination of plaques is possible only postmortem. Here we report that feeding adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) a high-cholesterol diet (HCD) resulted in hypercholesterolemia, remarkable lipoprotein oxidation and fatty streak formation in the arteries. Feeding an HCD supplemented with a fluorescent cholesteryl ester to optically transparent fli1:EGFP zebrafish larvae in which endothelial cells (EC) express GFP, and using confocal microscopy enabled monitoring vascular lipid accumulation and the EC layer disorganization and thickening in a live animal. The HCD feeding also increased leakage of a fluorescent dextran from the blood vessels. Administering ezetimibe significantly diminished the HCD-induced EC layer thickening and improved its barrier function. Feeding HCD to lyz:DsRed2 larvae in which macrophages and granulocytes express DsRed, resulted in the accumulation of fluorescent myeloid cells in the vascular wall. Using a fluorogenic substrate for phospholipase A2 (PLA2), we observed an increased vascular PLA2 activity in live HCD-fed larvae compared to control larvae. Furthermore, by transplanting genetically modified murine cells into HCD-fed larvae, we demonstrated that toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) was required for efficient in vivo lipid uptake by macrophages. These results suggest that the novel zebrafish model is suitable for studying temporal characteristics of certain inflammatory processes of early atherogenesis and the in vivo function of vascular cells. PMID:19265037

  16. Correlation between serum adiponectin and clinical characteristics, biochemical parameters in Indian women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita J Ramanand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a common disorder. PCOS women are at a high risk for insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome (MS. Adiponectin is positively related to insulin sensitivity. It has a preventive role in atherogenesis and MS. The present work was conducted to study the correlation between serum adiponectin levels and clinical characteristics and biochemical parameters in PCOS patients. Materials and Methods: A prospective study in 49 newly diagnosed (as per Rotterdam criteria Indian PCOS women was conducted. PCOS women were clinically examined and investigated for biochemical parameters. Results : The mean serum adiponectin was 12 ± 9.4 μg/mL (range 0.47-45. Hypoadiponectinemia (serum adiponectin <4 μg/mL was present in 22% patients. Age and adiponectin correlated significantly and inversely (r = −0.42, P = 0.027. Overweight/obese patients had lower mean adiponectin levels than normal weight (11.62 ± 9.5 vs 13.58 ± 9.5, P = 0.56. It was significantly lower in patients with acanthosis nigricans (AN as compared with those without AN (8.4 ± 5.9 vs 15 ± 11, P = 0.038. Hirsute patients showed lower mean adiponectin levels than nonhirsute (10 ± 7.3 vs 13 ± 10, P = 0.57. A positive, insignificant correlation was observed between serum adiponectin and cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, thyroid stimulating hormone, levels. A negative insignificant correlation existed between serum adiponectin and luteinizing hormone (LH, LH: FSH ratio, prolactin, dehydroepiandrosterone, testosterone, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein, fasting blood glucose, fasting insulin, and Homeostasis Model Assessment. Conclusion: Hypoadiponectinemia is present in one-fifth of women with PCOS. Adiponectin levels decrease as age advances. Low levels of adiponectin possibly contributes to the development of dermal manifestation (AN of insulin resistance.

  17. Comparison of Efficacy of the Disease-Specific LOX1- and Constitutive Cytomegalovirus-Promoters in Expressing Interleukin 10 through Adeno-Associated Virus 2/8 Delivery in Atherosclerotic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongqing; Cao, Maohua; Mirandola, Leonardo; Figueroa, Jose A.; Cobos, Everardo; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Hermonat, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    The development of gene therapy vectors for treating diseases of the cardiovascular system continues at a steady pace. Moreover, in the field of gene therapy the utility of “disease-specific promoters” has strong appeal. Many therapeutic genes, including transforming growth factor beta 1 or interleukin 10, are associated to adverse effects. The use of a disease-specific promoter might minimize toxicity. The lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor 1 is a marker of cardiovascular disease and a potential therapeutic target. The lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor 1 is known to be up-regulated early during disease onset in a number of cell types at the sites where the disease will be clinically evident. In this study an adeno-associated virus-2 DNA vector (AAV2) using the AAV8 capsid, and containing the full length The lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor 1 promoter, was generated and assayed for its ability to express human interleukin 10 in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice on high cholesterol diet. The cytomegalovirus early promoter was used for comparison in a similarly structured vector. The two promoters were found to have equal efficacy in reducing atherogenesis as measured by aortic systolic blood velocity, aortic cross sectional area, and aortic wall thickness. This is the first head-to-head comparison of a constitutive with a disease-specific promoter in a therapeutic context. These data strongly suggest that the use of a disease-specific promoter is appropriate for therapeutic gene delivery. PMID:24736312

  18. Alu elements in ANRIL non-coding RNA at chromosome 9p21 modulate atherogenic cell functions through trans-regulation of gene networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesca M Holdt

    Full Text Available The chromosome 9p21 (Chr9p21 locus of coronary artery disease has been identified in the first surge of genome-wide association and is the strongest genetic factor of atherosclerosis known today. Chr9p21 encodes the long non-coding RNA (ncRNA antisense non-coding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL. ANRIL expression is associated with the Chr9p21 genotype and correlated with atherosclerosis severity. Here, we report on the molecular mechanisms through which ANRIL regulates target-genes in trans, leading to increased cell proliferation, increased cell adhesion and decreased apoptosis, which are all essential mechanisms of atherogenesis. Importantly, trans-regulation was dependent on Alu motifs, which marked the promoters of ANRIL target genes and were mirrored in ANRIL RNA transcripts. ANRIL bound Polycomb group proteins that were highly enriched in the proximity of Alu motifs across the genome and were recruited to promoters of target genes upon ANRIL over-expression. The functional relevance of Alu motifs in ANRIL was confirmed by deletion and mutagenesis, reversing trans-regulation and atherogenic cell functions. ANRIL-regulated networks were confirmed in 2280 individuals with and without coronary artery disease and functionally validated in primary cells from patients carrying the Chr9p21 risk allele. Our study provides a molecular mechanism for pro-atherogenic effects of ANRIL at Chr9p21 and suggests a novel role for Alu elements in epigenetic gene regulation by long ncRNAs.

  19. Microarray analysis of ox-LDL (oxidized low-density lipoprotein)-regulated genes in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minta, Joe; Jungwon Yun, James; St Bernard, Rosanne

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that circulating LDL (low-density lipoproteins) play a central role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and the oxidized form (ox-LDL) is highly atherogenic. Deposits of ox-LDL have been found in atherosclerotic plaques, and ox-LDL has been shown to promote monocyte recruitment, foam cell formation and the transition of quiescent and contractile vascular SMCs (smooth muscle cells) to the migratory and proliferative phenotype. SMC phenotype transition and hyperplasia are the pivotal events in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. To comprehend the complex molecular mechanisms involved in ox-LDL-mediated SMC phenotype transition, we have compared the differential gene expression profiles of cultured quiescent human coronary artery SMCs with cells induced with ox-LDL for 3 and 21 h using Affymetrix HG-133UA cDNA microarray chips. Assignment of the regulated genes into functional groups indicated that several genes involved in metabolism, membrane transport, cell-cell interactions, signal transduction, transcription, translation, cell migration, proliferation and apoptosis were differentially expressed. Our data suggests that the interaction of ox-LDL with its cognate receptors on SMCs modulates the induction of several growth factors and cytokines, which activate a variety of intracellular signalling mechanisms (including PI3K, MAPK, Jak/STAT, sphingosine, Rho kinase pathways) that contribute to SMC transition from the quiescent and contractile phenotype to the proliferative and migratory phenotype. Our study has also identified several genes (including CDC27, cyclin A1, cyclin G2, glypican 1, MINOR, p15 and apolipoprotein) not previously implicated in ox-LDL-induced SMC phenotype transition and substantially extends the list of potential candidate genes involved in atherogenesis.

  20. Effect of a diet and exercise intervention on oxidative stress, inflammation and monocyte adhesion in diabetic men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christian K; Won, Dean; Pruthi, Sandeep; Lin, San San; Barnard, R James

    2006-09-01

    Diabetes increases the risk of coronary artery disease. We examined the effects of lifestyle modification on key contributing factors to atherogenesis, including oxidative stress, inflammation and cell adhesion. Diabetic men (N=13) were placed on a high-fiber, low-fat diet in a 3-week residential program where food was provided ad libitum and daily aerobic exercise was performed. In each subject, pre- and post-intervention fasting blood was drawn for circulating levels of serum lipids, glucose and insulin, oxidative stress marker 8-isoprostaglandin F2alpha (8-iso-PGF2alpha), the inflammatory protein C-reactive protein (CRP), and soluble intracellular adhesion molecule (sICAM)-1 and sE-selectin as indicators of endothelial activation. Using subject sera and human aortic endothelial cell (HAEC) culture systems, serum-induced monocyte adhesion, ICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and cell surface abundance, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) production were determined. Nitric oxide (NO), superoxide, and hydrogen peroxide production were measured in vitro by fluorometric detection. After 3 weeks, significant reductions (pfasting serum glucose (157.5+/-10.1 mg/dL versus 126.7+/-8.7 mg/dL), insulin (33.8+/-4.0 microU/ml versus 23.8+/-3.4 microU/ml), homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, 8-iso-PGF2alpha, CRP, sICAM-1, and sE-selectin were noted. In vitro, serum-stimulated monocyte adhesion, cellular ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression (p<0.05), and fluorometric detection of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production decreased, while a concomitant increase in NO production was noted (all p<0.01). A combination of diet and exercise ameliorates oxidative stress, inflammation, and monocyte-endothelial interaction. Intensive lifestyle modification may improve novel CAD risk factors in men with diabetes. PMID:16616795

  1. Morbidity of severe obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, J G

    2001-10-01

    Although obesity is an easy diagnosis to make, its etiologies, pathophysiology, and symptomatology are extraordinarily complex. Progress in surgical technique and anesthesiological management has substantially improved the safety of performing operations on the severely obese in the last 20 years. These improvements have occurred more or less empirically, without a full understanding of etiology or pathophysiology, although this has advanced concomitantly with improvements in practice. This review has attempted to provide a framework to facilitate progress in the neglected areas of patient selection and choice of operation, in an effort to improve long-term outcome. Despite the disparate etiologies of obesity and its diverse comorbidities and complications, there are unifying interdependent pathogenetic mechanisms of great relevance to the practice of antiobesity surgery. The rate of eating, whether driven by HPA dysfunction, ambient stress, or related hereditary susceptibility factors including the increased energy demands of an expanded body fat mass, participates in a cycle that results in disordered satiety (see Fig. 3). This leads to substrate overload, causing extensive metabolic abnormalities such as atherogenesis, insulin resistance, thrombogenesis, and carcinogenesis. This interpretation of the pathophysiology of obesity ironically accords with the original meaning of the word obesity: "to overeat." The ultimate solution to the problem of obesity--preventing it--will not be forthcoming until the food industry is forced to lower production and change its marketing strategies, as the liquor and tobacco industries in the United States were compelled to do. This cannot occur until the large and fast-growing populations of industrialized nations become educated in the personal implications of the energy principle. Regardless of whether school curricula are modified to prioritize health education, the larger problems of cultural and economic change remain for

  2. Effect of a short-term diet and exercise intervention on oxidative stress, inflammation, MMP-9, and monocyte chemotactic activity in men with metabolic syndrome factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christian K; Won, Dean; Pruthi, Sandeep; Kurtovic, Silvia; Sindhu, Ram K; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Barnard, R James

    2006-05-01

    The present study was designed to examine the effects of lifestyle modification on key contributing factors to atherogenesis, including oxidative stress, inflammation, chemotaxis, and cell adhesion. Obese men (n = 31), 15 of whom had metabolic syndrome, were placed on a high-fiber, low-fat diet in a 3-wk residential program where food was provided ad libitum and daily aerobic exercise was performed. In each subject, pre- and postintervention fasting blood was drawn for circulating levels of serum lipids, glucose and insulin (for estimation of insulin sensitivity), oxidative stress-generating enzyme myeloperoxidase and marker 8-isoprostaglandin F2alpha, the inflammatory protein C-reactive protein, soluble ICAM-1 as an indicator of endothelial activation, sP-selectin as a marker of platelet activation, the chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha, and total matrix metalloproteinase-9. Using subject sera and human aortic endothelial cell culture systems, we measured VCAM-1 cell surface abundance and monocyte chemotactic protein-1, nitric oxide, superoxide, and hydrogen peroxide production in vitro by fluorometric detection. Also determined in vitro was serum-induced, monocyte adhesion and monocyte chemotactic activity. After 3 wk, significant reductions (P fasting glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, myeloperoxidase, 8-isoprostaglandin F2alpha, C-reactive protein, soluble ICAM-1, soluble P-selectin, macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were noted. In vitro, serum-stimulated cellular VCAM-1 expression, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 production, and fluorometric detection of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production decreased, whereas a concomitant increase in NO production was noted (all P < 0.01). Additionally, both monocyte adhesion (P < 0.05) and MCA (P < 0.01) decreased. Nine of 15 were no longer positive for metabolic syndrome postintervention. Intensive lifestyle modification may

  3. OX40-OX40L interaction promotes proliferation and activation of lymphocytes via NFATc1 in ApoE-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinchuan Yan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our previous studies have shown that OX40-OX40L interaction regulates the expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells c1(NFATc1 in ApoE(-/- mice during atherogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether OX40-OX40L interaction promotes Th cell activation via NFATc1 in ApoE(-/- mice. METHODS AND RESULTS: The lymphocytes isolated from spleen of ApoE (-/- mice were cultured with anti-CD3 mAb in the presence or absence of anti-OX40 or anti-OX40L antibodies. The expression of NFATc1 mRNA and protein in isolated lymphocytes were measured by real time PCR (RT-PCR and flow cytometry (FCM, respectively. The proliferation of lymphocytes was analyzed by MTT method,and the expression of IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-γ in the cultured cells and supernatant were measured by RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assary (ELISA, respectively. After stimulating OX40-OX40L signal pathway, the expression of NFATc1 and the proliferation of leukocytes were significantly increased. Anti-OX40L suppressed the expression of NFATc1 in lymphocytes of ApoE-/- mice. Anti-OX40L or the NFATc1 inhibitor (CsA markedly suppressed the cell proliferation induced by anti-OX40. Moreover, the expression of IL-2 and IFN-γ was increased in lymphocytes induced by OX40-OX40L interaction. Blocking OX40-OX40L interaction or NFATc1 down-regulated the expression of IL-2 and IFN-γ, but didn't alter the expression of IL-4 in supernatants. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that OX40-OX40L interaction promotes the proliferation and activation of lymphocytes through NFATc1.

  4. Low numbers of FOXP3 positive regulatory T cells are present in all developmental stages of human atherosclerotic lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onno J de Boer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: T cell mediated inflammation contributes to atherogenesis and the onset of acute cardiovascular disease. Effector T cell functions are under a tight control of a specialized T cell subset, regulatory T cells (Treg. At present, nothing is known about the in situ presence of Treg in human atherosclerotic tissue. In the present study we investigated the frequency of naturally occurring Treg cells in all developmental stages of human atherosclerotic lesions including complicated thrombosed plaques. METHODOLOGY: Normal arteries, early lesions (American Heart Association classification types I, II, and III, fibrosclerotic plaques (types Vb and Vc and 'high risk' plaques (types IV, Va and VI were obtained at surgery and autopsy. Serial sections were immunostained for markers specific for regulatory T cells (FOXP3 and GITR and the frequency of these cells was expressed as a percentage of the total numbers of CD3+ T cells. Results were compared with Treg counts in biopsies of normal and inflammatory skin lesions (psoriasis, spongiotic dermatitis and lichen planus. PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: In normal vessel fragments T cells were virtually absent. Treg were present in the intima during all stages of plaque development (0.5-5%. Also in the adventitia of atherosclerotic vessels Treg were encountered, in similar low amounts. High risk lesions contained significantly increased numbers of Treg compared to early lesions (mean: 3.9 and 1.2%, respectively. The frequency of FOXP3+ cells in high risk lesions was also higher compared to stable lesions (1.7%, but this difference was not significant. The mean numbers of intimal FOXP3 positive cells in atherosclerotic lesions (2.4% was much lower than those in normal (24.3% or inflammatory skin lesions (28%. CONCLUSION: Low frequencies of Treg in all developmental stages of human plaque formation could explain the smoldering chronic inflammatory process that takes place throughout the longstanding course of

  5. Characterization of VCAM-1-binding peptide-functionalized quantum dots for molecular imaging of inflamed endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Chen

    Full Text Available Inflammation-induced activation of endothelium constitutes one of the earliest changes during atherogenesis. New imaging techniques that allow detecting activated endothelial cells can improve the identification of persons at high cardiovascular risk in early stages. Quantum dots (QDs have attractive optical properties such as bright fluorescence and high photostability, and have been increasingly studied and developed for bio-imaging and bio-targeting applications. We report here the development of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 binding peptide (VCAM-1 binding peptide functionalized QDs (VQDs from amino QDs. It was found that the QD fluorescence signal in tumor necrosis factor [Formula: see text] (TNF-[Formula: see text] treated endothelial cells in vitro was significantly higher when these cells were labeled with VQDs than amino QDs. The VQD labeling of TNF-[Formula: see text]-treated endothelial cells was VCAM-1 specific since pre-incubation with recombinant VCAM-1 blocked cells' uptake of VQDs. Our ex vivo and in vivo experiments showed that in the inflamed endothelium, QD fluorescence signal from VQDs was also much stronger than that of amino QDs. Moreover, we observed that the QD fluorescence peak was significantly blue-shifted after VQDs interacted with aortic endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro. A similar blue-shift was observed after VQDs were incubated with recombinant VCAM-1 in tube. We anticipate that the specific interaction between VQDs and VCAM-1 and the blue-shift of the QD fluorescence peak can be very useful for VCAM-1 detection in vivo.

  6. Endothelial dysfunction is associated with carotid plaque: a cross-sectional study from the population based Northern Manhattan Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boden-Albala Bernadette

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impaired vascular function occurs early in atherogenesis. Brachial flow mediated dilatation (FMD is a non-invasive measure of vascular function and may be an important marker of preclinical atherosclerosis. Data on the association between FMD and carotid plaque in multi-ethnic populations are limited. The objective of this study was to determine whether endothelial dysfunction is independently associated with carotid plaque in a community of northern Manhattan. Methods In the population-based Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS, high-resolution B-mode ultrasound images of the brachial and carotid arteries were obtained in 643 stroke-free subjects (mean age 66 years; 55% women; 65% Caribbean-Hispanic, 17% African-American, 16% Caucasian. Brachial FMD was measured during reactive hyperemia. Maximum carotid plaque thickness (MCPT was measured at the peak plaque prominence. Results The mean brachial FMD was 5.78 ± 3.83 %. Carotid plaque was present in 339 (53% subjects. The mean MCPT was 1.68 ± 0.82 mm, and the 75th percentile was 2.0 mm. Reduced FMD was significantly associated with increased MCPT. After adjusting for demographics, vascular risk factors, and education, each percent of FMD decrease was associated with a significant 0.02 mm increase in MCPT (p = 0.028. In a dichotomous adjusted model, blunted FMD was associated with an increased risk of MCPT ≥ 2.0 mm (OR, 1.11 for every 1% decrease in FMD; 95% CI, 1.03–1.19. Conclusion Decreased brachial FMD is independently associated with carotid plaque. Non-invasive evaluation of endothelial dysfunction may be a useful marker of preclinical atherosclerosis and help to individualize cardiovascular risk assessment beyond traditional risk factors.

  7. Postprandial dyslipidemia in men with visceral obesity: an effect of reduced LDL receptor expression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamo, J C; Watts, G F; Barrett, P H; Smith, D; James, A P; Pal, S

    2001-09-01

    Postprandial lipemia after an oral fat challenge was studied in middle-aged men with visceral obesity. The two groups had similar plasma cholesterol levels, but obese subjects had higher levels of plasma triglyceride and reduced amounts of high-density cholesterol. Fasting plasma insulin was fourfold greater in obese subjects because of concomitant insulin resistance, with a calculated HOMA score of 3.1 +/- 0.6 vs. 0.8 +/- 0.2, respectively. Plasma apolipoprotein B(48) (apoB(48)) and retinyl palmitate (RP) after an oral fat challenge were used to monitor chylomicron metabolism. Compared with lean subjects, the fasting concentration of apoB(48) was more than twofold greater in obese individuals, suggestive of an accumulation of posthydrolyzed particles. After the oral lipid load, the incremental areas under the apoB(48) and RP curves (IAUC) were both significantly greater in obese subjects (apoB(48): 97 +/- 17 vs. 44 +/- 12 microg.ml(-1). h; RP: 3,120 +/- 511 vs. 1,308 +/- 177 U. ml(-1). h, respectively). A delay in the conversion of chylomicrons to remnants probably contributed to postprandial dyslipidemia in viscerally obese subjects. The triglyceride IAUC was 68% greater in obese subjects (4.7 +/- 0.6 vs. 2.8 +/- 0.8 mM. h, P removal of proatherogenic chylomicron remnants, we suggest that the hepatic clearance of these particles might be compromised in insulin-resistant obese subjects. Premature and accelerated atherogenesis in viscerally obese, insulin-resistant subjects may in part reflect delayed clearance of postprandial lipoprotein remnants. PMID:11500319

  8. TLR4-Activated MAPK-IL-6 Axis Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guan-Lin; Wu, Jing-Yiing; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Fu; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Kuo, Cheng-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) into the intima is considered to be a vital event in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Despite substantial evidence supporting the pathogenic role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the progression of atherogenesis, its function in the regulation of VSMC migration remains unclear. The goal of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism by which TLR4 regulates VSMC migration. Inhibitor experiments revealed that TLR4-induced IL-6 secretion and VSMC migration were mediated via the concerted actions of MyD88 and TRIF on the activation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling. Neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibodies abrogated TLR4-driven VSMC migration and F-actin polymerization. Blockade of p38 MAPK or ERK1/2 signaling cascade inhibited TLR4 agonist-mediated activation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Moreover, siRNA-mediated suppression of CREB production repressed TLR4-induced IL-6 production and VSMC migration. Rac-1 inhibitor suppressed TLR4-driven VSMC migration but not IL-6 production. Importantly, the serum level of IL-6 and TLR4 endogenous ligand HMGB1 was significantly higher in patients with coronary artery diseases (CAD) than in healthy subjects. Serum HMGB1 level was positively correlated with serum IL-6 level in CAD patients. The expression of both HMGB1 and IL-6 was clearly detected in the atherosclerotic tissue of the CAD patients. Additionally, there was a positive association between p-CREB and HMGB1 in mouse atherosclerotic tissue. Based on our findings, we concluded that, upon ligand binding, TLR4 activates p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling through MyD88 and TRIF in VSMCs. These signaling pathways subsequently coordinate an additive augmentation of CREB-driven IL-6 production, which in turn triggers Rac-1-mediated actin cytoskeleton to promote VSMC migration. PMID:27563891

  9. Adiponectin and C - reactive protein Relationship in the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Relation to Cardiovascular Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), one of the most common reproductive abnormalities, shares some components of the metabolic cardiovascular syndrome. Therefore, PCOS patients may represent the largest group of women at high risk for the development of early-onset cardiovascular disease (CVD) and/or diabetes. The adipokine, adiponectin inhibits vascular inflammation and acts as an endogenous modulator of obesity - linked diseases. High - sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is recently debated as a risk factor and mediator for atherosclerosis. The objective of this study was to investigate the relation between adiponectin and hs- CRP in The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and to identify their relation to Cardiovascular Disease. Adiponectin and hs- CRP measurements were undertaken in 90 PCOS patients and 70 body mass index-matched controls with regular menstrual cycles. Whereas 36.8% of the PCOS patients had CRP levels above 5 mg/liter, only 9.6% of the controls exhibited high CRP levels (P < 0.001). The mean ± SD was 5.46 ± 7.0 in the PCOS group vs. 2.04 ± 1.9 mg/liter in the control (P < 0.001). The body mass index, white blood cell count, TSH, glucose, cholesterol, and homocysteine levels were not significantly different between the two groups. CRP levels are elevated in patients with PCOS and may be a marker of early cardiovascular risk in these patients. The plasma adiponectin levels being significantly lower in these patients. These results suggest that elevation of CRP and reduction of adiponectin could emerge as mediators of atherogenesis and insulin resistance. (author)

  10. Inflammation, oxidative stress and renin angiotensin system in atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazim; Husain; Wilfredo; Hernandez; Rais; A; Ansari; Leon; Ferder

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with cardiovascular dysfunction including myocardial infarction, unstable angina, sudden cardiac death, stroke and peripheral thromboses. It has been predicted that atherosclerosis will be the primary cause of death in the world by 2020. Atherogenesis is initiated by endothelial injury due to oxidative stress associated with cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cigarette smoking, dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. The impairment of the endothelium associated with cardiovascular risk factors creates an imbalance between vasodilating and vasoconstricting factors, in particular, an increase in angiotensin Ⅱ(Ang Ⅱ) and a decrease in nitric oxide. The renin-angiotensin system(RAS), and its primary mediator Ang Ⅱ, also have a direct influence on the progression of the atherosclerotic process via effects on endothelial function, inflammation, fibrinolytic balance, and plaque stability. Anti-inflammatory agents [statins, secretory phospholipase A2 inhibitor, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 inhibitor, 5-lipoxygenase activating protein, chemokine motif ligand-2, C-C chemokine motif receptor 2 pathway inhibitors, methotrexate, IL-1 pathway inhibitor and RAS inhibitors(angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors)], Ang Ⅱ receptor blockers and ranin inhibitors may slow inflammatory processes and disease progression. Several studies in human using anti-inflammatory agents and RAS inhibitors revealed vascular benefits and reduced progression of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with stable angina pectoris; decreased vascular inflammatory markers, improved common carotid intima-media thickness and plaque volume in patients with diagnosed atherosclerosis. Recent preclinical studies have demonstrated therapeutic efficacy of vitamin D analogs paricalcitol in Apo E-deficient atherosclerotic mice.

  11. Effects of adenoidectomy on markers of endothelial function and inflammation in normal-weight and overweight prepubescent children with sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelishadi, Roya; Nilforoushan, Neshat; Okhovat, Ahmadreza; Amra, Babak; Poursafa, Parinaz; Rogha, Mehrdad

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This trial study aimed to assess the effects of adenoidectomy on the markers of endothelial function and inflammation in normal-weight and overweight prepubescent children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). METHODS: This trial study was conducted in Isfahan, Iran in 2009. The study population was comprised of 90 prepubescent children (45 normal-weight and 45 overweight children), aged between 4-10 years old, who volunteered for adenoidectomy and had OSA documented by validated questionnaire. The assessment included filling questionnaire, physical examination, and laboratory tests; it was conducted before the surgery and was repeated two weeks and six months after the surgery. RESULTS: Out of the 90 children evaluated, 83 completed the 2-week evaluation and 72 patients continued with the study for the 6-month follow up. Markers of endothelial function, i.e., serum adhesion molecules including endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule (E-selectin), intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), and the markers of inflammation, i.e., interleukin-6, and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) decreased significantly in both normal-weight and overweight children after both two weeks and six months. After six months, the total and LDL-cholesterol showed a significant decrease in the overweight children. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of the study demonstrated that irrespective of the weight status, children with OSA had increased levels of the endothelial function and inflammation markers, which improved after OSA treatment by adenoidectomy. This might be a form of confirmatory evidence on the onset of atherogenesis from the early stages of the life, and the role of inflammation in the process. The reversibility of endothelial dysfunction after improvement of OSA underscores the importance of primordial and primary prevention of chronic diseases from the early stages of the life. PMID:22247723

  12. Wall Shear Stress Distribution in Patient Specific Coronary Artery Bifurcation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahab Dehlaghi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Atherogenesis is affected by hemodynamic parameters, such as wall shear stress and wall shear stress spatial gradient. These parameters are largely dependent on the geometry of arterial tree. Arterial bifurcations contain significant flow disturbances. Approach: The effects of branch angle and vessel diameter ratio at the bifurcations on the wall shear stress distribution in the coronary arterial tree based on CT images were studied. CT images were digitally processed to extract geometrical contours representing the coronary vessel walls. The lumen of the coronary arteries of the patients was segmented using the open source software package (VMTK. The resulting lumens of coronary arteries were fed into a commercial mesh generator (GAMBIT, Fluent Inc. to generate a volume that was filled with tetrahedral elements. The FIDAP software (Fluent Corp. was used to carry out the simulation by solving Navier-Stokes equations. The FIELDVIEW software (Version 10.0, Intelligent Light, Lyndhurst, NJ was used for the visualization of flow patterns and the quantification of wall shear stress. Post processing was done with VMTK and MATLAB. A parabolic velocity profile was prescribed at the inlets and outlets, except for 1. Stress free outlet was assigned to the remaining outlet. Results: The results show that for angle lower than 90°, low shear stress regions are observed at the non-flow divider and the apex. For angle larger than 90°, low shear stress regions only at the non-flow divider. By increasing of diameter of side branch ratio, low shear stress regions in the side branch appear at the non-flow divider. Conclusion: It is concluded that not only angle and diameter are important, but also the overall 3D shape of the artery. More research is required to further quantify the effects angle and diameter on shear stress patterns in coronaries.

  13. Effects of low-fat or full-fat fermented and non-fermented dairy foods on selected cardiovascular biomarkers in overweight adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestel, Paul J; Mellett, Natalie; Pally, Suzana; Wong, Gerard; Barlow, Chris K; Croft, Kevin; Mori, Trevor A; Meikle, Peter J

    2013-12-01

    The association between consumption of full-fat dairy foods and CVD may depend partly on the nature of products and may not apply to low-fat dairy foods. Increased circulating levels of inflammatory biomarkers after consumption of dairy product-rich meals suggest an association with CVD. In the present study, we tested the effects of low-fat and full-fat dairy diets on biomarkers associated with inflammation, oxidative stress or atherogenesis and on plasma lipid classes. Within full-fat dairy diets, we also compared fermented v. non-fermented products. In a randomised cross-over study, twelve overweight/obese subjects consumed during two 3-week periods two full-fat dairy diets containing either yogurt plus cheese (fermented) or butter, cream and ice cream (non-fermented) or a low-fat milk plus yogurt diet, with the latter being consumed between and at the end of the full-fat dairy dietary periods. The concentrations of six inflammatory and two atherogenic biomarkers known to be raised in CVD were measured as well as those of plasma F2-isoprostanes and lipid classes. The concentrations of six of the eight biomarkers tended to be higher on consumption of the low-fat dairy diet than on that of the fermented dairy diet and the concentrations of two plasmalogen lipid classes reported to be associated with increased oxidisability were also higher on consumption of the low-fat dairy diet than on that of the fermented dairy diet (Pfermented dairy diet than on that of the low-fat dairy diet (Pproducts did not lead to a more favourable biomarker profile associated with CVD risk compared with the full-fat dairy products, suggesting that full-fat fermented dairy products may be the more favourable. PMID:23756569

  14. Vitamins, Minerals and Flavonoids Intake and the Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Keshavarz

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Diseases of heart and stroke cause most deaths in both sexes of all ethnic groups. For more than 40 years epidemiological studies, experimental studies, and clinical trials have shown that numerous dietary risk factors affect serum lipids, atherogenesis and coronary heart disease (CHD. Substantial interest has recently focused on the hypothesis that the naturally occurring antioxidant vitamins such as vitamin E, vitamin C, and ß-carotene may prevent myocardial infarction, progression of coronary heart disease. Substantial laboratory, animal, and human data suggest that oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol is an important step in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic lesions. Oxidation of LDL cholesterol is important in both the initiation and progression of plaque or increases the risk for plaque rupture. The major lipid-soluble antioxidant vitamins are vitamin E ( -tocopherol and ß-carotene, a precursor of vitamin A. The major water-soluble antioxidant vitamin is vitamin C (ascorbic acid. Vitamin E is important in preventing oxidation of LDL cholesterol. ß-Carotene prevents oxidation of LDL cholesterol. Vitamin C prevents oxidation of LDL cholesterol and preserves vitamin E and ß-carotene levels during oxidative stress. It is increasingly recognized that folate and vitamin B6 may play a role in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. The primary mechanism proposed for their effect on coronary vascular disease (CVD is a reduction in plasma homocysteine concentration by remethylation of homocysteine back to methionine. Minerals like magnesium, Potassium and calcium and also vitamin D have protective effect in blood pressure. Selenium is an important component of antioxidant defence and flavonoids which are derived from plants have been shown to inhibit platelet aggregation and adhesion, which may be another way they lower the risk of heart disease. In this article the role of micronutrients in prevention of cardiovascular

  15. Experimental Study of Yishou Tiaozhi Tablet(

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG; Yi

    2001-01-01

    [1]XU SY. Screening method on lowering lipid drug and inhibiting arteriosclerosis drug. Pharmacological Experimental Methodology. Beijing: The People's Health Publishing House, 1985∶781-783.[2]LI YL. Assay of alkali hydrolytic decomposition method on serum HYP determination. Clinical Journal of Decimology 1988;6(2)∶69-71.[3]LI ZJ, HAN CS, WANG JX. Practical Radioimmunology. Beijing: The Scientific Technological Archive Publishing House, 1989∶198-221.[4]GAO YC. Effect of Yixing decoction on rats' serum lipid level in hyperlipidemia and its mechanism. Academic Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine 1990;(5)∶53-56.[5]Manninen V, Tenkanen L. Lipid alteration and decline in the incidence of coronary heart disease in the Helsinki Heart Study. JAMA 1988;260∶641-651.[6]HUANG JG, translated. The atherosclerous lipid marker. Fascicle of Cardiovascular Disease in Journal of Foreign Medicine 1987;14(1)∶4-9.[7]YANG RX. Lp(a) and atherosclerosis. Journal of Progression on Cardiovascular Disease 1994;15(4)∶221-223.[8]Colin J, Schwartz MD. A modern view of atherogenesis. Am J Cardio 1993;71∶9B-14B.[9]LIN XQ. Exploration on relationship between HYP and atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemia. Journal of Chinese Circulation 1993;8(3)∶160-163.[10].CHEN SH. Hyperlipidemia and platelet high response. Fascicle of Cardiovascular Disease in Journal of Foreign Medicine 1989;16(5)∶257-262.

  16. The Relationship Between Chronic Inflammation and Glucidic-Lipidic Profile Disorders in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarța I.D.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic inflammation has a proven role in atherogenesis, lipid profile parameters being related to cytokine production. In kidney transplant recipients, interleukin 6 (IL-6 is significantly associated with graft-related outcomes and also alterations of cholesterol and triglyceride metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between chronic inflammation and glucidic-lipidic metabolism disorders in a group of patients with kidney transplantation as renal replacement therapy. Methods: A prospective observational study which enrolled thirtysix non-diabetic kidney transplant recipients was conducted in the Nephrology and Peritoneal Dialysis Department, County Clinic Hospital of Tirgu Mures. The study group was divided as following: recipients with serum IL-6 concentration higher than 3.8 pg/ml (group A and IL-6 within the normal range (group B. Results: Allograft recipients with higher serum IL-6 had significant higher erytrocyte sedimentation rate(ESR, p=0.0067. Patients with over-the-range levels of IL-6 had significant higher levels of serum cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol respectively (p=0.0242 and p=0.0081. Serum Apo-B was also significant higher in Group A than Group B. Protein excretion was significant higher in patients from group A (p=0.0013. No statistical significant relationship could be proven between elevated levels of IL-6 and hbA1c, insulin and glycosuria disturbances in the two groups. Also, we found no statistical significant association between resistivity and pulsatility indices (both hilum and intragraft or carotid intima media thickness. Conclusion: Serum interleukin 6 is related to lipid profile disorders and less to glucidic metabolism anomalies in non-diabetic kidney transplant recipients.

  17. Arterial pulse wave velocity, inflammatory markers, pathological GH and IGF states, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Graham

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Michael R Graham1, Peter Evans2, Bruce Davies1, Julien S Baker11Health and Exercise Science Research Unit, Faculty of Health Sport and Science, University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd, Wales, United Kingdom; 2Royal Gwent Hospital, Newport, Gwent, United KingdomAbstract: Blood pressure (BP measurements provide information regarding risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease, but only in a specific artery. Arterial stiffness (AS can be determined by measurement of arterial pulse wave velocity (APWV. Separate from any role as a surrogate marker, AS is an important determinant of pulse pressure, left ventricular function and coronary artery perfusion pressure. Proximal elastic arteries and peripheral muscular arteries respond differently to aging and to medication. Endogenous human growth hormone (hGH, secreted by the anterior pituitary, peaks during early adulthood, declining at 14% per decade. Levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I are at their peak during late adolescence and decline throughout adulthood, mirror imaging GH. Arterial endothelial dysfunction, an accepted cause of increased APWV in GH deficiency (GHD is reversed by recombinant human (rh GH therapy, favorably influencing the risk for atherogenesis. APWV is a noninvasive method for measuring atherosclerotic and hypertensive vascular changes increases with age and atherosclerosis leading to increased systolic blood pressure and increased left ventricular hypertrophy. Aerobic exercise training increases arterial compliance and reduces systolic blood pressure. Whole body arterial compliance is lowered in strength-trained individuals. Homocysteine and C-reactive protein are two infl ammatory markers directly linked with arterial endothelial dysfunction. Reviews of GH in the somatopause have not been favorable and side effects of treatment have marred its use except in classical GHD. Is it possible that we should be assessing the combined effects of therapy with rhGH and rh

  18. Variations in mass transfer to single endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doormaal, Mark A; Zhang, Ji; Wada, Shigeo; Shaw, James E; Won, Doyon; Cybulsky, Myron I; Yip, Chris M; Ethier, C Ross

    2009-06-01

    Mass transfer between flowing blood and arterial mural cells (including vascular endothelial cells) may play an important role in atherogenesis. Endothelial cells are known to have an apical surface topography that is not flat, and hence mass transfer patterns to individual endothelial cells are likely affected by the local cellular topography. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between vascular endothelial cell surface topography and cellular level mass transfer. Confluent porcine endothelial monolayers were cultured under both shear and static conditions and atomic force microscopy was used to measure endothelial cell topography. Using finite element methods and the measured cell topography, flow and concentration fields were calculated for a typical, small, blood-borne solute. A relative Sherwood number was defined as the difference between the computed Sherwood number and that predicted by the Leveque solution for mass transfer over a flat surface: this eliminates the effects of axial location on mass transfer efficiency. The average intracellular relative Sherwood number range was found to be dependent on cell height and not dependent on cell elongation due to shear stress in culture. The mass flux to individual cells reached a maximum at the highest point on the endothelial cell surface, typically corresponding to the nucleus of the cell. Therefore, for small receptor-mediated solutes, increased solute uptake efficiency can be achieved by concentrating receptors near the nucleus. The main conclusion of the work is that although the rate of mass transfer varies greatly over an individual cell, the average mass transfer rate to a cell is close to that predicted for a flat cell. In comparison to other hemodynamic factors, the topography of endothelial cells therefore seems to have little effect on mass transfer rates and is likely physiologically insignificant.

  19. (18F-FDG PET imaging of murine atherosclerosis: association with gene expression of key molecular markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Mette Fisker Hag

    Full Text Available AIM: To study whether (18F-FDG can be used for in vivo imaging of atherogenesis by examining the correlation between (18F-FDG uptake and gene expression of key molecular markers of atherosclerosis in apoE(-/- mice. METHODS: Nine groups of apoE(-/- mice were given normal chow or high-fat diet. At different time-points, (18F-FDG PET/contrast-enhanced CT scans were performed on dedicated animal scanners. After scans, animals were euthanized, aortas removed, gamma counted, RNA extracted from the tissue, and gene expression of chemo (C-X-C motif ligand 1 (CXCL-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1, cluster of differentiation molecule (CD-68, osteopontin (OPN, lectin-like oxidized LDL-receptor (LOX-1, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α, HIF-2α, vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF, and tissue factor (TF was measured by means of qPCR. RESULTS: The uptake of (18F-FDG increased over time in the groups of mice receiving high-fat diet measured by PET and ex vivo gamma counting. The gene expression of all examined markers of atherosclerosis correlated significantly with (18F-FDG uptake. The strongest correlation was seen with TF and CD68 (p<0.001. A multivariate analysis showed CD68, OPN, TF, and VCAM-1 to be the most important contributors to the uptake of (18F-FDG. Together they could explain 60% of the (18F-FDG uptake. CONCLUSION: We have demonstrated that (18F-FDG can be used to follow the progression of atherosclerosis in apoE(-/- mice. The gene expression of ten molecular markers representing different molecular processes important for atherosclerosis was shown to correlate with the uptake of (18F-FDG. Especially, the gene expressions of CD68, OPN, TF, and VCAM-1 were strong predictors for the uptake.

  20. Lack of glutathione peroxidase-1 facilitates a pro-inflammatory and activated vascular endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arpeeta; Yuen, Derek; Huet, Olivier; Pickering, Raelene; Stefanovic, Nada; Bernatchez, Pascal; de Haan, Judy B

    2016-04-01

    A critical early event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is vascular inflammation leading to endothelial dysfunction (ED). Reactive oxygen species and inflammation are inextricably linked and declining antioxidant defense is implicated in ED. We have previously shown that Glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx1) is a crucial antioxidant enzyme in the protection against diabetes-associated atherosclerosis. In this study we aimed to investigate mechanisms by which lack of GPx1 affects pro-inflammatory mediators in primary aortic endothelial cells (PAECs) isolated from GPx1 knockout (GPx1 KO) mice. Herein, we demonstrate that lack of GPx1 prolonged TNF-α induced phosphorylation of P38, ERK and JNK, all of which was reversed upon treatment with the GPx1 mimetic, ebselen. In addition, Akt phosphorylation was reduced in GPx1 KO PAECs, which correlated with decreased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability as compared to WT PAECs. Furthermore, IκB degradation was prolonged in GPx1 KO PAECS suggesting an augmentation of NF-κB activity. In addition, the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) was significantly increased in GPx1 KO PAECs and aortas. Static and dynamic flow adhesion assays showed significantly increased adhesion of fluorescently labeled leukocytes to GPx1 KO PAECS and aortas respectively, which were significantly reduced by ebselen treatment. Our results suggest that GPx1 plays a critical role in regulating pro-inflammatory pathways, including MAPK and NF-κB, and down-stream mediators such as VCAM-1, in vascular endothelial cells. Lack of GPx1, via effects on p-AKT also affects signaling to eNOS-derived NO. We speculate based on these results that declining antioxidant defenses as seen in cardiovascular diseases, by failing to regulate these pro-inflammatory pathways, facilitates an inflammatory and activated endothelium leading to ED and atherogenesis. PMID:26569096

  1. Inhibition of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT suppresses accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna V Zetterqvist

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY: Diabetic patients have a much more widespread and aggressive form of atherosclerosis and therefore, higher risk for myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease and stroke, but the molecular mechanisms leading to accelerated damage are still unclear. Recently, we showed that hyperglycemia activates the transcription factor NFAT in the arterial wall, inducing the expression of the pro-atherosclerotic protein osteopontin. Here we investigate whether NFAT activation may be a link between diabetes and atherogenesis. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetes in apolipoprotein E(-/- mice resulted in 2.2 fold increased aortic atherosclerosis and enhanced pro-inflammatory burden, as evidenced by elevated blood monocytes, endothelial activation- and inflammatory markers in aorta, and pro-inflammatory cytokines in plasma. In vivo treatment with the NFAT blocker A-285222 for 4 weeks completely inhibited the diabetes-induced aggravation of atherosclerosis, having no effect in non-diabetic mice. STZ-treated mice exhibited hyperglycemia and higher plasma cholesterol and triglycerides, but these were unaffected by A-285222. NFAT-dependent transcriptional activity was examined in aorta, spleen, thymus, brain, heart, liver and kidney, but only augmented in the aorta of diabetic mice. A-285222 completely blocked this diabetes-driven NFAT activation, but had no impact on the other organs or on splenocyte proliferation or cytokine secretion, ruling out systemic immunosuppression as the mechanism behind reduced atherosclerosis. Instead, NFAT inhibition effectively reduced IL-6, osteopontin, monocyte chemotactic protein 1, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, CD68 and tissue factor expression in the arterial wall and lowered plasma IL-6 in diabetic mice. CONCLUSIONS: Targeting NFAT signaling may be a novel and attractive approach for the treatment of diabetic macrovascular complications.

  2. ROCK inhibitor fasudil attenuated high glucose-induced MCP-1 and VCAM-1 expression and monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hailing

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies suggested that the RhoA/ROCK pathway may contribute to vascular complications in diabetes. The present study was designed to investigate whether ROCK inhibitor fasudil could prevent high glucose-induced monocyte-endothelial cells adhesion, and whether this was related to fasudil effects on vascular endothelial cell expression of chemotactic factors, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1. Methods HUVECs were stimulated with high glucose (HG or HG + fasudil in different concentration or different time. Monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion was determined using fluorescence-labeled monocytes. The mRNA and protein expression of VCAM-1 and MCP-1 were measured using real-time PCR and western blot. The protein levels of RhoA, ROCKI and p-MYPT were determined using western blot analysis. ELISA was employed to measure the expression of soluble VCAM-1 and MCP-1 in cell supernatants and human serum samples. Results Fasudil significantly suppressed HG-induced adhesion of THP-1 to HUVECs. Fasudil reduced Rho/ROCK activity (as indicated by lower p-MYPT/MYPT ratio, and prevented HG induced increases in VCAM-1 and MCP-1 mRNA and protein levels. Fasudil also decreased MCP-1 concentration in HUVEC supernatants, but increased sVCAM-1 shedding into the media. In human diabetic subjects, 2 weeks of fasudil treatment significantly decreased serum MCP-1 level from 27.9 ± 10.6 pg/ml to 13.8 ± 7.0 pg/ml (P P  Conclusions Treatment with the Rho/ROCK pathway inhibitor fasudil attenuated HG-induced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion, possibly by reducing endothelial expression of VCAM-1 and MCP-1. These results suggest inhibition of Rho/ROCK signaling may have therapeutic potential in preventing diabetes associated vascular inflammation and atherogenesis.

  3. Dietary Antioxidants Decrease Serum Soluble Adhesion Molecule (sVCAM-1, sICAM-1 but not Chemokine (JE/MCP-1, KC Concentrations, and Reduce Atherosclerosis in C57BL but Not ApoE*3 Leiden Mice Fed an Atherogenic Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuala Murphy

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Dietary antioxidants are reported to suppress cellular expression of chemokines and adhesion molecules that recruit monocytes to the artery wall during atherosclerosis. In the present study we measured the effect of feeding apoE*3 Leiden mice or their non-transgenic (C57BL littermates with atherogenic diets either deficient in, or supplemented with, dietary antioxidants (vitamin E, vitamin C and β-carotene for 12 weeks, on serum levels of CC (JE/MCP-1 and CXC (KC chemokines and soluble adhesion molecules (sVCAM-1, sICAM-1 and atherosclerotic lesion size. ApoE*3 Leiden mice developed gross hypercholesterolaemia, and markedly accelerated (10–20 fold; P < 0.0001 atherogenesis, compared with non-transgenic animals. Antioxidant consumption reduced lesion area in non-transgenic, but not apoE*3 Leiden, mice. Serum sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 levels were significantly (P < 0.0001 increased (sVCAM-1 up to 3.9 fold; sICAM-1 up to 2.4 fold by 4—8 weeks in all groups, and then declined. The initial increase in the concentration of adhesion molecules was reduced by 38%— 61% (P < 0.05 by antioxidant consumption, particularly in non-transgenic mice. By contrast, serum chemokine levels tended to increase more rapidly from baseline in apoE*3 Leiden mice, compared with non-transgenic animals, but were unaffected by dietary antioxidants. We conclude that dietary antioxidants reduce circulating soluble adhesion molecules and atherosclerosis in C57BL mice.

  4. Cocaine-induced renal infarction: report of a case and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosrati Saeid M

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cocaine abuse has been known to have detrimental effects on the cardiovascular system. Its toxicity has been associated with myocardial ischemia, cerebrovascular accidents and mesenteric ischemia. The pathophysiology of cocaine-related renal injury is multifactorial and involves renal hemodynamic changes, alterations in glomerular matrix synthesis, degradation and oxidative stress, and possibly induction of renal atherogenesis. Renal infarction as a result of cocaine exposure, however, is rarely reported in the literature. Case presentation A 48 year-old male presented with a four-day history of severe right flank pain following cocaine use. On presentation, he was tachycardic, febrile and had severe right costovertebral angle tenderness. He had significant proteinuria, leukocytosis and elevated serum creatinine and lactate dehydrogenase. Radiographic imaging studies as well as other screening tests for thromboembolic events, hypercoagulability states, collagen vascular diseases and lipid disorders were suggestive of Cocaine-Induced Renal Infarction (CIRI by exclusion. Conclusion In a patient with a history of cocaine abuse presenting with fevers and flank pain suggestive of urinary tract infection or nephrolithiasis, cocaine-induced renal infarction must be considered in the differential diagnosis. In this article, we discuss the prior reported cases of CIRI and thoroughly review the literature available on this disorder. This is important for several reasons. First, it will allow us to discuss and elaborate on the mechanism of renal injury caused by cocaine. In addition, this review will demonstrate the importance of considering the diagnosis of CIRI in a patient with documented cocaine use and an atypical presentation of acute renal injury. Finally, we will emphasize the need for a consensus on optimal treatment of this disease, for which therapy is not yet standardized.

  5. Lipocalin (LCN 2 Mediates Pro-Atherosclerotic Processes and Is Elevated in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghav Oberoi

    Full Text Available Lipocalin (LCN 2 is associated with multiple acute and chronic inflammatory diseases but the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigated whether LCN2 is released from macrophages and contributes to pro-atherosclerotic processes and whether LCN2 plasma levels are associated with the severity of coronary artery disease progression in humans.In an autocrine-paracrine loop, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α promoted the release of LCN2 from murine bone-marrow derived macrophages (BMDM and vice versa. Moreover, LCN2 stimulation of BMDM led to up-regulation of M1 macrophage markers. In addition, enhanced migration of monocytic J774A.1 cells towards LCN2 was observed. Furthermore, LCN2 increased the expression of the scavenger receptors Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1 as well as scavenger receptor class A-1 (SRA-1 and induced the conversion of macrophages to foam cells. In atherosclerotic lesions of low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (ldlr-/- mice fed a high fat, high cholesterol diet, LCN2 was found to be co-localized with macrophages in the shoulder region of the atherosclerotic plaque. In addition, LCN2 plasma levels were significantly increased in plasma samples of these mice. Finally, LCN2 plasma levels correlated with the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD in patients as determined by coronary angiography.Here we demonstrated that LCN2 plays a pivotal role in processes involved in atherogenesis by promoting polarization and migration of monocytic cells and development of macrophages towards foam cells. Moreover, LCN2 may be used as a prognostic marker to determine the status of CAD progression.

  6. Endothelial RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asdonk, Tobias, E-mail: tobias.asdonk@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Motz, Inga; Werner, Nikos [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Coch, Christoph; Barchet, Winfried; Hartmann, Gunther [Institute for Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Nickenig, Georg; Zimmer, Sebastian [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation alters HCAEC biology in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPC function is affected by RIG-I stimulation in vitro. -- Abstract: Background: Endothelial dysfunction is a crucial part of the chronic inflammatory atherosclerotic process and is mediated by innate and acquired immune mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that pattern recognition receptors (PRR) specialized in immunorecognition of nucleic acids may play an important role in endothelial biology in a proatherogenic manner. Here, we analyzed the impact of endothelial retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) activation upon vascular endothelial biology. Methods and results: Wild type mice were injected intravenously with 32.5 {mu}g of the RIG-ligand 3pRNA (RNA with triphosphate at the 5 Prime end) or polyA control every other day for 7 days. In 3pRNA-treated mice, endothelium-depended vasodilation was significantly impaired, vascular oxidative stress significantly increased and circulating endothelial microparticle (EMP) numbers significantly elevated compared to controls. To gain further insight in RIG-I dependent endothelial biology, cultured human coronary endothelial cells (HCAEC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) were stimulated in vitro with 3pRNA. Both cells types express RIG-I and react with receptor upregulation upon stimulation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation is enhanced in both cell types, whereas apoptosis and proliferation is not significantly affected in HCAEC. Importantly, HCAEC release significant amounts of proinflammatory cytokines in response to RIG-I stimulation. Conclusion: This study shows that activation of the cytoplasmatic nucleic acid receptor RIG-I leads to endothelial dysfunction. RIG-I induced endothelial damage could therefore be an important pathway in atherogenesis.

  7. Paradoxical effect of a pequi oil-rich diet on the development of atherosclerosis: balance between antioxidant and hyperlipidemic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar, E.C. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Jascolka, T.L. [Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Teixeira, L.G.; Lages, P.C.; Ribeiro, A.C.C.; Vieira, E.L.M. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Peluzio, M.C.G. [Departamento de Nutrição, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Viçosa, MG (Brazil); Alvarez-Leite, J.I. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2012-05-11

    Pequi is the fruit of Caryocar brasiliense and its oil has a high concentration of monounsaturated and saturated fatty acids, which are anti- and pro-atherogenic agents, respectively, and of carotenoids, which give it antioxidant properties. Our objective was to study the effect of the intake of a cholesterol-rich diet supplemented with pequi oil, compared to the same diet containing soybean oil, on atherosclerosis development, and oxidative stress in atherosclerosis-susceptible LDL receptor-deficient mice (LDLr{sup −/−}, C57BL/6-background). Female mice were fed a cholesterol-rich diet containing 7% soybean oil (Soybean group, N = 12) or 7% pequi oil (Pequi group, N = 12) for 6 weeks. The Pequi group presented a more atherogenic lipid profile and more advanced atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic root compared to the Soybean group. However, the Pequi group presented a less advanced lesion in the aorta than the Soybean group and showed lower lipid peroxidation (Soybean group: 50.2 ± 7.1; Pequi group: 30.0 ± 4.8 µmol MDA/mg protein) and anti-oxidized LDL autoantibodies (Soybean group: 35.7 ± 9.4; Pequi group: 15.6 ± 3.7 arbitrary units). Peritoneal macrophages from the Pequi group stimulated with zymosan showed a reduction in the release of reactive oxygen species compared to the Soybean group. Our data suggest that a pequi oil-rich diet slows atherogenesis in the initial stages, possibly due to its antioxidant activity. However, the increase of serum cholesterol induces a more prominent LDL migration toward the intimae of arteries, increasing the advanced atherosclerotic plaque. In conclusion, pequi oil associated with an atherogenic diet worsens the lipid profile and accelerates the formation of advanced atherosclerotic lesions despite its antioxidant action.

  8. Dietary total antioxidant capacity is inversely related to central adiposity as well as to metabolic and oxidative stress markers in healthy young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulet M Ángeles

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary total antioxidant capacity (TAC has been assumed as a useful tool to assess the relationship between the cumulative antioxidant food capacity and several chronic disorders. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the potential relationships of dietary TAC with adiposity, metabolic and oxidative stress markers in healthy young adults. Methods This study enrolled 266 healthy subjects (105 men/ 161 women; 22 ± 3 years-old; 22.0 ± 2.7 kg/m2. Dietary intake, anthropometry, blood pressure, lifestyle features, and biochemical data were assessed with validated procedures. Results In linear regression analyses, dietary TAC values were inversely associated with glycemia, total cholesterol:HDL-c ratio, triglycerides and oxidized-LDL concentrations, and positively associated with HDL-c concentrations, independently of gender, age, smoking status, physical activity, vitamin use supplement, waist circumference, energy intake, fatty acid intake. In addition, plasma TAC was negatively correlated with ox-LDL concentrations (r= -0.20, P = 0.003, independently of the assessed confounding variables. Finally, dietary TAC values were inversely related to waist circumference values (r= -0.17, P = 0.005 as well as to lower mild central obesity occurrence (waist circumference ≥ 80/ 94 cm for women/ men, respectively. Conclusion Dietary TAC values are inversely associated with glucose and lipid biomarkers as well as with central adiposity measurements in healthy young adults, indicating dietary TAC as a useful tool to assess the health benefits of cumulative antioxidant capacity from food intake. In addition, the independent and inverse relationships of ox-LDL concentrations with dietary and plasma TAC respectively suggest a putative role of antioxidant rich-diet in the link between redox state and atherogenesis at early stage.

  9. Furosemide modifies heart hypertrophy and glycosaminoglycan myocardium content in a rat model of neurogenic hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourzitaki, Chryssa; Tsaousi, Georgia; Manthou, Maria Eleni; Karakiulakis, Georgios; Kouvelas, Dimitrios; Papakonstantinou, Eleni

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for atherogenesis and heart hypertrophy, both of which are associated with specific morphological and functional changes of the myocardium. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are complex molecules involved both in tissue morphology and function. In the present study, we investigated the effects of neurogenic hypertension and subsequent antihypertensive treatment with furosemide, on heart hypertrophy and the content of GAGs in the myocardium. Neurogenic hypertension was achieved in male Wistar rats by bilateral aortic denervation (bAD). At days 2, 7 and 15 after surgery, animals were sacrificed and the hearts were dissected away, weighted, and homogenized. Total GAGs were assessed by measuring the uronic acid content colorimetrically and individual GAGs were isolated and characterized by enzymatic treatment, with GAG-degrading enzymes, using electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gradient gels and cellulose acetate membranes. In bAD-animals blood pressure, blood pressure lability, heart rate and heart weight were significantly increased 15 days postoperatively. These effects were prevented by treatment with furosemide. Major GAGs identified in the heart were chondroitin sulphates, heparin (H), heparan sulphate (HS) and hyaluronic acid. The content of uronic and the relative content of H and HS in the heart in bAD animals significantly decreased from day 2 to day 15 postoperatively. Furosemide prevented the bAD induced decrease in GAG content. Considering that H and HS are potent inhibitors of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, our results indicate that heart hypertrophy induced by neurogenic hypertension may be associated with decreases in the relative content of heparin and heparan sulphate in the heart. PMID:27221775

  10. Both common and specialty mushrooms inhibit adhesion molecule expression and in vitro binding of monocytes to human aortic endothelial cells in a pro-inflammatory environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Keith R

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD is a leading cause of mortality in the United States as well as globally. Epidemiological studies show that regular fruit and vegetable consumption reduces CVD risk, in part, due to antioxidant activity and immunomodulation since oxidative stress and inflammation are features of atherogenesis. Accumulating evidence also shows that dietary fungi, viz., mushrooms, can protect against chronic disease by altering inflammatory environments such as those associated with CVD although most research has focused on specialty mushrooms. In this study, we tested the ability of both common and specialty mushrooms to inhibit cellular processes associated with CVD. Methods Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC were incubated overnight with control media with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO vehicle (1% v/v or containing DMSO extracts of whole dehydrated mushrooms (0.1 mg/mL, which included Agaricus bisporus (white button and crimini, Lentinula edodes (shiitake, Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster, and Grifola frondosa (maitake. Monolayers were subsequently washed and incubated with medium alone or containing the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β (5 ng/mL for 6 h to upregulate pro-atherosclerotic adhesion molecules (AM. AM expression was assayed by ELISA and binding of U937 human monocytes pre-loaded with fluorescent dye was determined. Results White button mushrooms consistently reduced (p Conclusion These data provide evidence that dietary mushrooms can inhibit cellular processes such as adhesion molecule expression and ultimate binding of monocytes to the endothelium under pro-inflammatory conditions, which are associated with CVD. As a result, these findings support the notion that dietary mushrooms can be protective against CVD.

  11. Regulation of microRNA-155 in atherosclerotic inflammatory responses by targeting MAP3K10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhu

    Full Text Available AIMS: Accumulating evidence suggest that numerous microRNAs (miRNAs play important roles in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation, as well as various diseases that accompany inflammatory responses. Inflammation is known to be a major contributor to atherogenesis. Previous studies provide promising evidence in support of the role of miRNAs in cardiovascular disease. However, mechanistic data on these small molecules in atherosclerosis (AS are still missing. The present study aims to investigate the potential role of miRNAs in AS. METHODS AND RESULTS: The miRNA transcriptase was verified by TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. Thoracic aorta samples were obtained from Apolipoprotein E knockout mice, and plasma samples were from coronary artery disease (CAD patients. The results showed that the miR-155 level was the most significantly elevated both in AS mice and CAD patients relative to the normal control. The functional role of miR-155 in the atherosclerotic path physiological process was also observed in vivo and in vitro. The observations suggested that miR-155 is a part of a negative feedback loop, which down-modulates inflammatory cytokine production and decreases AS progression. miR-155 was also found to mediate the inflammatory response and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway by targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 10. CONCLUSIONS: miR-155 contributes to the prevention of AS development and progression. It may also be involved in the posttranscriptional regulation of the inflammatory response and MAPK pathway by targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 10.

  12. MicroRNA-155 in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis: a conflicting role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaochun; Ma, Chi; Zheng, Xia

    2013-10-01

    Atherosclerosis is widely appreciated to involve a chronic lipid-induced inflammatory reaction of the arterial wall in response to haemodynamic stress and dyslipidaemia. The dysfunction of resident vascular cells and recruitment of infiltrating leukocyte cells orchestrate a complex interplay in the initiation and development of atherosclerosis. Despite a great many advances in recent years, the detailed mechanisms modulating the inflammation in atherosclerosis have not been fully elucidated. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA (ncRNA) molecules that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally by degradation and translational repression of target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Substantial evidence demonstrates that miRNAs play a vital role in the physiological control of gene expression and in the pathogenesis of malignant, infectious, and cardiovascular disorders. MiR-155, a typical multi-functional miRNA, has recently emerged as a novel component of inflammatory signal transduction in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. MiR-155-mediated regulation is extensively involved in endothelial cells (ECs), macrophages, dendritic cell (DCs), vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and differentiation of leukocyte subsets. MiR-155 can modulate the expression of genes correlated with inflammation in different cell types in vitro and also affect the atherogenesis in vivo. However, miR-155 appears to play a conflicting role in the disease pathogenesis. Besides, miR-155 is potentially applied as a novel disease biomarker and therapeutic target in diagnosing and treating atherosclerosis. This article reviews the pertinent literature and mechanisms of action of miR-155 that have thus far been associated with atherosclerosis. Here we first introduce in brief the basic knowledge of the miRNA regulation and later discuss with emphasis the regulatory role of miR-155 in various cell types involved in atherosclerosis. PMID:23827206

  13. Rosiglitazone reverses endothelial dysfunction but not remodeling of femoral artery in Zucker diabetic fatty rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onyia Jude E

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Endothelial dysfunction precedes atherogenesis and clinical complications in type 2 diabetes. The vascular dysfunction in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF rats was evaluated at different ages along with the effect of treatment with rosiglitazone (Rosi on endothelial function and mechanical remodeling. Methods The Rosi treatment was given to ZDF rats for 3 weeks. The endothelium-dependent vasodilation and α-adrenoceptor-dependent vasoconstriction of femoral arteries were studied using an ex-vivo isovolumic myograph. The biomechanical passive property of the arteries was studied in Ca2+-free condition. The expressions of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, α-adrenoceptor, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, and elastase were evaluated. Results Endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of the femoral artery was blunted at low doses in ZDF rats at 11 weeks of age and attenuated at all doses in ZDF rats at 19 weeks of age. The expression of eNOS was consistent with the endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. The α-adrenoceptor was activated and the mechanical elastic modulus was increased in ZDF rats at 19 weeks of age. The expressions of α-adrenoceptor, MMP9, and elastase were up regulated in ZDF rats at 19 weeks of age. Rosi treatment for 3 weeks restored endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and the expression of eNOS and the adrenoceptor activation at the doses below 10-6 mole/L in ZDF rats at 19 weeks of age. Rosi treatment for 3 weeks did not, however, improve the mechanical properties of blood vessel, the expressions of α-adrenoceptor, MMP9, and elastase in ZDF rats. Conclusion The endothelial dysfunction and mechanical remodeling are observed as early as 19 weeks of age in ZDF rat. Rosi treatment for 3 weeks improves endothelial function but not mechanical properties.

  14. Group IVA phospholipase A2-associated production of MMP-9 in macrophages and formation of atherosclerotic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ii, Hiromi; Hontani, Naoya; Toshida, Issei; Oka, Mayuko; Sato, Takashi; Akiba, Satoshi

    2008-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is involved in atherogenesis, and the production of MMP-9 in macrophages is considered to be mediated by the arachidonic acid cascade. The present study examined the possible involvement of group IVA phospholipase A2 (IVA-PLA2), a key enzyme in the arachidonic acid cascade, in the production of MMP-9 induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) in macrophages and high-fat diet-induced formation of atherosclerotic lesions using IVA-PLA2-deficient mice (C57BL/6 background). In wild-type mouse peritoneal macrophages, oxLDL induced an increase in MMP-9 in the culture medium. The oxLDL-promoted production of MMP-9 was markedly reduced in IVA-PLA2-deficient macrophages compared to wild-type macrophages. Feeding of wild-type mice with a high-fat diet caused the formation of early atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic root with increases in MMP-9 and macrophages in the lesions and with higher serum levels of total cholesterol. Such lesions were apparently less severe in IVA-PLA2-deficient mice fed a high-fat diet, despite higher total cholesterol levels. Under the conditions, a high-fat diet reduced the serum levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) in wild-type mice. However, IVA-PLA2-deficient mice fed a high-fat diet were protected against the decrease in HDL-C levels. The present results suggest that IVA-PLA2 is involved in the oxLDL-induced production of MMP-9 in macrophages and the high-fat diet-induced formation of early atherosclerotic lesions. The protection against the lesions in IVA-PLA2-deficient mice may be ascribable, in part, to the impaired production of MMP-9 and/or the maintained levels of HDL-C.

  15. Antioxidant activity of tea polyphenols in vivo: evidence from animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Balz; Higdon, Jane V

    2003-10-01

    Tea is particularly rich in polyphenols, including catechins, theaflavins and thearubigins, which are thought to contribute to the health benefits of tea. Tea polyphenols act as antioxidants in vitro by scavenging reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and chelating redox-active transition metal ions. They may also function indirectly as antioxidants through 1) inhibition of the redox-sensitive transcription factors, nuclear factor-kappaB and activator protein-1; 2) inhibition of "pro-oxidant" enzymes, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase, lipoxygenases, cyclooxygenases and xanthine oxidase; and 3) induction of phase II and antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione S-transferases and superoxide dismutases. The fact that catechins are rapidly and extensively metabolized emphasizes the importance of demonstrating their antioxidant activity in vivo. Animal studies offer a unique opportunity to assess the contribution of the antioxidant properties of tea and tea polyphenols to the physiological effects of tea administration in different models of oxidative stress. Most promising are the consistent findings in animal models of skin, lung, colon, liver and pancreatic cancer that tea and tea polyphenol administration inhibit carcinogen-induced increases in the oxidized DNA base, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. In animal models of atherosclerosis, green and black tea administration has resulted in modest improvements in the resistance of lipoproteins to ex vivo oxidation, although limited data suggest that green tea or green tea catechins inhibit atherogenesis. To determine whether tea polyphenols act as effective antioxidants in vivo, future studies in animals and humans should employ sensitive and specific biomarkers of oxidative damage to lipids, proteins and DNA.

  16. Inclusion bodies enriched for p62 and polyubiquitinated proteins in macrophages protect against atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergin, Ismail; Bhattacharya, Somashubhra; Emanuel, Roy; Esen, Emel; Stokes, Carl J; Evans, Trent D; Arif, Batool; Curci, John A; Razani, Babak

    2016-01-05

    Autophagy is a catabolic cellular mechanism that degrades dysfunctional proteins and organelles. Atherosclerotic plaque formation is enhanced in mice with macrophages deficient for the critical autophagy protein ATG5. We showed that exposure of macrophages to lipids that promote atherosclerosis increased the abundance of the autophagy chaperone p62 and that p62 colocalized with polyubiquitinated proteins in cytoplasmic inclusions, which are characterized by insoluble protein aggregates. ATG5-null macrophages developed further p62 accumulation at the sites of large cytoplasmic ubiquitin-positive inclusion bodies. Aortas from atherosclerotic mice and plaques from human endarterectomy samples showed increased abundance of p62 and polyubiquitinated proteins that colocalized with plaque macrophages, suggesting that p62-enriched protein aggregates were characteristic of atherosclerosis. The formation of the cytoplasmic inclusions depended on p62 because lipid-loaded p62-null macrophages accumulated polyubiquitinated proteins in a diffuse cytoplasmic pattern. Lipid-loaded p62-null macrophages also exhibited increased secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and had an increased tendency to undergo apoptosis, which depended on the p62 ubiquitin-binding domain and at least partly involved p62-mediated clearance of NLRP3 inflammasomes. Consistent with our in vitro observations, p62-deficient mice formed greater numbers of more complex atherosclerotic plaques, and p62 deficiency further increased atherosclerotic plaque burden in mice with a macrophage-specific ablation of ATG5. Together, these data suggested that sequestration of cytotoxic ubiquitinated proteins by p62 protects against atherogenesis, a condition in which the clearance of protein aggregates is disrupted.

  17. Epigenetic Regulatory Effect of Exercise on Glutathione Peroxidase 1 Expression in the Skeletal Muscle of Severely Dyslipidemic Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Nguyen

    Full Text Available Exercise is an effective approach for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD and loss of muscular mass and function. Its benefits are widely documented but incompletely characterized. It has been reported that exercise can induce changes in the expression of antioxidant enzymes including Sod2, Trx1, Prdx3 and Gpx1 and limits the rise in oxidative stress commonly associated with CVD. These enzymes can be subjected to epigenetic regulation, such as DNA methylation, in response to environmental cues. The aim of our study was to determine whether in the early stages of atherogenesis, in young severely dyslipidemic mice lacking LDL receptors and overexpressing human ApoB100 (LDLR-/-; hApoB+/+, exercise regulates differentially the expression of antioxidant enzymes by DNA methylation in the skeletal muscles that consume high levels of oxygen and thus generate high levels of reactive oxygen species. Expression of Sod2, Txr1, Prdx3 and Gpx1 was altered by 3 months of exercise and/or severe dyslipidemia in 6-mo dyslipidemic mice. Of these genes, only Gpx1 exhibited changes in DNA methylation associated with dyslipidemia and exercise: we observed both increased DNA methylation with dyslipidemia and a transient decrease in DNA methylation with exercise. These epigenetic alterations are found in the second exon of the Gpx1 gene and occur alongside with inverse changes in mRNA expression. Inhibition of expression by methylation of this specific locus was confirmed in vitro. In conclusion, Gpx1 expression in the mouse skeletal muscle can be altered by both exercise and dyslipidemia through changes in DNA methylation, leading to a fine regulation of free radical metabolism.

  18. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Deficiency Attenuates the Development of Atherosclerosis in Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soro-Paavonen, Aino; Watson, Anna M.D.; Li, Jiaze; Paavonen, Karri; Koitka, Audrey; Calkin, Anna C.; Barit, David; Coughlan, Melinda T.; Drew, Brian G.; Lancaster, Graeme I.; Thomas, Merlin; Forbes, Josephine M.; Nawroth, Peter P.; Bierhaus, Angelika; Cooper, Mark E.; Jandeleit-Dahm, Karin A.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in diabetic vasculature is considered to be a key mediator of atherogenesis. This study examines the effects of deletion of RAGE on the development of atherosclerosis in the diabetic apoE−/− model of accelerated atherosclerosis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—ApoE−/− and RAGE−/−/apoE−/− double knockout mice were rendered diabetic with streptozotocin and followed for 20 weeks, at which time plaque accumulation was assessed by en face analysis. RESULTS—Although diabetic apoE−/− mice showed increased plaque accumulation (14.9 ± 1.7%), diabetic RAGE−/−/apoE−/− mice had significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque area (4.9 ± 0.4%) to levels not significantly different from control apoE−/− mice (4.3 ± 0.4%). These beneficial effects on the vasculature were associated with attenuation of leukocyte recruitment; decreased expression of proinflammatory mediators, including the nuclear factor-κB subunit p65, VCAM-1, and MCP-1; and reduced oxidative stress, as reflected by staining for nitrotyrosine and reduced expression of various NADPH oxidase subunits, gp91phox, p47phox, and rac-1. Both RAGE and RAGE ligands, including S100A8/A9, high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), and the advanced glycation end product (AGE) carboxymethyllysine were increased in plaques from diabetic apoE−/− mice. Furthermore, the accumulation of AGEs and other ligands to RAGE was reduced in diabetic RAGE−/−/apoE−/− mice. CONCLUSIONS—This study provides evidence for RAGE playing a central role in the development of accelerated atherosclerosis associated with diabetes. These findings emphasize the potential utility of strategies targeting RAGE activation in the prevention and treatment of diabetic macrovascular complications. PMID:18511846

  19. Cardiovascular Disease and Chronic Inflammation in End Stage Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Zyga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD is one of the most severe diseases worldwide. In patients affected by CKD, a progressive destruction of the nephrons is observed not only in structuralbut also in functional level. Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease of large and medium-sized arteries. It is characterized by the deposition of lipids and fibrous elements and is a common complication of the uremic syndrome because of the coexistence of a wide range of risk factors. High blood pressure, anaemia, insulin resistance, inflammation, high oxidative stress are some of the most common factors that cause cardiovascular disease and atherogenesis in patients suffering from End Stage Kidney Disease (ESRD. At the same time, the inflammatory process constitutes a common element in the apparition and development of CKD. A wide range of possible causes can justify the development of inflammation under uremic conditions. Such causes are oxidative stress, oxidation, coexistentpathological conditions as well as factors that are due to renal clearance techniques. Patients in ESRD and coronary disease usually show increased acute phase products. Pre-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF-a, and acute phase reactants, such as CRP and fibrinogen, are closely related. The treatment of chronic inflammation in CKD is of high importance for the development ofthe disease as well as for the treatment of cardiovascular morbidity.Conclusions: The treatment factors focus on the use of renin-angiotensic system inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid, statins and anti-oxidant treatment in order to prevent the action of inflammatorycytokines that have the ability to activate the mechanisms of inflammation.

  20. Stress and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Nobutaka

    2014-01-01

    Recent major advances in medical science have introduced a wide variety of treatments against atherosclerosis-based cardiovascular diseases, which has led to a significant reduction in mortality associated with these diseases. However, atherosclerosis-based cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of death. Furthermore, progress in medical science has demonstrated the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease to be complicated, with a wide variety of underlying factors. Among these factors, stress is thought to be pivotal. Several types of stress are involved in the development of cardiovascular disease, including oxidative stress, mental stress, hemodynamic stress and social stress. Accumulating evidence indicates that traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis, including diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and smoking, induce oxidative stress in the vasculature. Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction, atherogenesis, hypertension and remodeling of blood vessels. Meanwhile, mental stress is a well-known major contributor to the development of cardiovascular disease. The cardiovascular system is constantly exposed to hemodynamic stress by the blood flow and/or pulsation, and hemodynamic stress exerts profound effects on the biology of vascular cells and cardiomyocytes. In addition, social stress, such as that due to a lack of social support, poverty or living alone, has a negative impact on the incidence of cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, there are interactions between mental, oxidative and hemodynamic stress. The production of reactive oxygen species is increased under high levels of mental stress in close association with oxidative stress. These stress responses and their interactions play central roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis-based cardiovascular disease. Accordingly, the pathophysiological and clinical implications of stress are discussed in this article.

  1. Smokeless tobacco, sport and the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagué, Frédéric; Guenancia, Charles; Gudjoncik, Aurélie; Moreau, Daniel; Cottin, Yves; Zeller, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Smokeless tobacco (snuff) is a finely ground or shredded tobacco that is sniffed through the nose or placed between the cheek and gum. Chewing tobacco is used by putting a wad of tobacco inside the cheek. Smokeless tobacco is widely used by young athletes to enhance performance because nicotine improves some aspects of physiology. However, smokeless tobacco has harmful health effects, including cardiovascular disorders, linked to nicotine physiological effects, mainly through catecholamine release. Nicotine decreases heart rate variability and the ventricular fibrillation threshold, and promotes the occurrence of various arrhythmias; it also impairs endothelial-dependent vasodilation and could therefore promote premature atherogenesis. At rest, heart rate, blood pressure, inotropism, cardiac output and myocardial oxygen consumption are increased by nicotine, leading to an imbalance between myocardial oxygen demand and supply. The same occurs at submaximal levels of exercise. These increases are accompanied by a rise in systemic resistances. At maximal exercise, heart rate, cardiac output and maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max) are unaffected by nicotine. Because endothelial dysfunction is promoted by nicotine, paradoxical coronary vasoconstriction may occur during exercise and recovery. Nicotine induces a decrease in muscular strength and impairs anaerobic performance. However, nicotine is used in sports as it diminishes anxiety, enhances concentration and agility, improves aerobic performance and favours weight control. Importantly, smokeless tobacco, similar to cigarette smoking, leads to nicotine dependence through dopaminergic pathways. Smokeless tobacco has harmful cardiovascular effects and is addictive: it fulfils all the criteria for inclusion in the World Anti-Doping Agency prohibited list as a doping product. Smokeless tobacco use in sporting activities must be discouraged.

  2. STAT4 deficiency reduces the development of atherosclerosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavie-Moghadam, Parésa L; Gjurich, Breanne N; Jabeen, Rukhsana; Krishnamurthy, Purna; Kaplan, Mark H; Dobrian, Anca D; Nadler, Jerry L; Galkina, Elena V

    2015-11-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory process that leads to plaque formation in large and medium sized vessels. T helper 1 (Th1) cells constitute the majority of plaque infiltrating pro-atherogenic T cells and are induced via IFNγ-dependent activation of T-box (Tbet) and/or IL-12-dependent activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4). We thus aimed to define a role for STAT4 in atherosclerosis. STAT4-deficiency resulted in a ∼71% reduction (p atherosclerosis (∼31%, p < 0.01) in western diet fed Stat4(-/-)Apoe(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, reduced atherogenesis in Stat4(-/-)Apoe(-/-) mice was not due to attenuated IFNγ production in vivo by Th1 cells, suggesting an at least partially IFNγ-independent pro-atherogenic role of STAT4. STAT4 is expressed in T cells, but also detected in macrophages (MΦs). Stat4(-/-)Apoe(-/-)in vitro differentiated M1 or M2 MΦs had reduced cytokine production compare to Apoe(-/-) M1 and M2 MΦs that was accompanied by reduced induction of CD69, I-A(b), and CD86 in response to LPS stimulation. Stat4(-/-)Apoe(-/-) MΦs expressed attenuated levels of CCR2 and demonstrated reduced migration toward CCL2 in a transwell assay. Importantly, the percentage of aortic CD11b(+)F4/80(+)Ly6C(hi) MΦs was reduced in Stat4(-/-)Apoe(-/-) vs Apoe(-/-) mice. Thus, this study identifies for the first time a pro-atherogenic role of STAT4 that is at least partially independent of Th1 cell-derived IFNγ, and primarily involving the modulation of MΦ responses.

  3. Rationale and design of the Leipzig (LIFE Heart Study: phenotyping and cardiovascular characteristics of patients with coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Beutner

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We established the Leipzig (LIFE Heart Study, a biobank and database of patients with different stages of coronary artery disease (CAD for studies of clinical, metabolic, cellular and genetic factors of cardiovascular diseases. DESIGN: The Leipzig (LIFE Heart Study (NCT00497887 is an ongoing observational angiographic study including subjects with different entities of CAD. Cohort 1, patients undergoing first-time diagnostic coronary angiography due to suspected stable CAD with previously untreated coronary arteries. Cohort 2, patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI requiring percutaneous revascularization. Cohort 3, patients with known left main coronary artery disease (LMCAD. RESULTS: We present preliminary results of demographics and phenotyping based on a 4-years analysis of a total of 3,165 subjects. Cohort 1 (n=2,274 shows the typical distribution of elective coronary angiography cohorts with 43% cases with obstructive CAD and 37% normal angiograms. Cohorts 2 and 3 consist of 590 and 301 subjects, respectively, adding patients with severe forms of CAD. The suitability of the database and biobank to perform association studies was confirmed by replication of the CAD susceptibility locus on chromosome 9p21 (OR per allele: 1.55 (any CAD, 1.54 (MI, 1.74 (LMCAD, p<10(-6, respectively. A novel finding was that patients with LMCAD had a stronger association with 9p21 than patients with obstructive CAD without LMCAD (OR 1.22, p=0.042. In contrast, 9p21 did not associate with myocardial infarction in excess of stable CAD. CONCLUSION: The Leipzig (LIFE Heart Study provides a basis to identify molecular targets related to atherogenesis and associated metabolic disorders. The study may contribute to an improvement of individual prediction, prevention, and treatment of CAD.

  4. Early Stage of Hypertensive Retinopathy; Is It Really Important?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat KARAMAN

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between early stage hypertensive retinopathy (HTRP and endothelial dysfunction (ED in atherogenesis. MATERIAL and METHODS: A total of 99 subjects consisting of 73 patients diagnosed with Essential Hypertension (HT and 26 healthy subjects were included to the study. Flow mediated dilatation (FMD was performed to detect ED. Asymmetric dimethylarginine-ADMA was measured as a marker of ED and the hsCRP and sTWEAK levels were measured for microvascular inflammation. All patients were screened for retinopathy. RESULTS: The mean blood pressure of the hypertensive patients and the control subjects was 140.1±13.7/86.1±10.7 and 107.12±10.0/65.38±10.2 respectively. HTRP was positive in 60.3% (n=44 and negative in 39.7% (n=29 of the patients with hypertension. There was grade 1 retinopathy in 52.1% and grade 2 retinopathy in 8.2% of hypertensive patients. The hsCRP, sTWEAK and ADMA levels were significantly higher in hypertensive patients than in the control group (respectively, p=0,011, p=0,001, p=0,001. FMD levels were lower in the hypertensive group, as expected. FMD levels were lower in the retinopathy group when the hypertensive group with and without retinopathy and the control group compared. hsCRP, sTWEAK and ADMA levels were significantly higher in subjects with retinopathy. hsCRP, sTWEAK and ADMA levels were also significantly higher in subjects with retinopathy (p=0.039, p=0.001, p=0.001. CONCLUSION: ED is thought to play a role in HT etiology and is also important in the development of HT complications. It would be appropriate to evaluate hypertensive patients more carefully and perform the necessary laboratory tests to detect ED so that the proper treatment can be started (ACEI, exercise, lifestyle changes.

  5. Cardiovascular diseases: oxidative damage and antioxidant protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P-Y; Xu, X; Li, X-C

    2014-10-01

    Atherosclerosis, the hardening of arteries under oxidative stress is related to oxidative changes of low density lipoproteins (LDL). The antioxidants prevent the formation of oxidized LDL during atherogenesis. Perhaps more than one mechanism is involved in the atherosclerosis disease where LDL is oxidized in all the cells of arterial wall during the development of this disease. The oxidation of LDL produces lipid peroxidation products such as isoprostans from arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, oxysterols from cholesterol, hydroxyl fatty acids, lipid peroxides and aldehydes. The lipid peroxidation bioassay can serve as a marker for the risk of cardiovascular. An in vivo test of levels of oxidative lipid damage is an early prediction of development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Serum paraoxonase (PON) activity is correlated to severity of the coronary artery disease. The antioxidants level in the serum and serum paraoxonase activity provides information for the risk of CVD. The antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase is responsible for dismutation of superoxide, a free radical chain initiator. The subcellular changes in the equilibrium in favor of free radicals can cause increase in the oxidative stress which leads to cardiomyopathy, heart attack or cardiac dysfunction. The oxidative damage and defense of heart disease has been reported where dietary antioxidants protect the free radical damage to DNA, proteins and lipids. The ascorbic acid, vitamin C is an effective antioxidant and high vitamin E intake can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) by inhibition of atherogenic forms of oxidized LDL. The vitamin A and beta-carotene protect lipid peroxidation and provitamin-A activity. It has been recently suggested that the protection of oxidative damage and related CVD is best served by antioxidants found in the fruits and vegetables. The oxidative damage and antioxidant protection of CVD have been described here. PMID:25392110

  6. An experimental evaluation of the anti-atherogenic potential of the plant, Piper betle, and its active constitutent, eugenol, in rats fed an atherogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkadeswaran, Karuppasamy; Thomas, Philip A; Geraldine, Pitchairaj

    2016-05-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for systemic atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular disease. Lipoperoxidation-mediated oxidative damage is believed to contribute strongly to the progression of atherogenesis. In the current investigation, putative anti-atherogenic and antioxidative properties of an ethanolic extract of Piper betle and of its active constituent, eugenol, were sought in an experimental animal model of chronic hypercholesterolemia. Atherogenic diet-fed rats that received either Piper betle extract orally (500mg/kg b.wt) or eugenol orally (5mg/kg b.wt) for 15days (commencing 30days after the atherogenic diet had been started) exhibited the following variations in different parameters, when compared to atherogenic diet-fed rats that received only saline: (1) significantly lower mean levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol in both serum and hepatic tissue samples; (2) lower mean serum levels of aspartate amino-transferase, alanine amino-transferase, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase and lipid-metabolizing enzymes (lipoprotein lipase, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase; (3) significantly lower mean levels of enzymatic antioxidants (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase) and non-enzymatic antioxidants (reduced glutathione, vitamin C and vitamin E) and significantly higher mean levels of malondialdehyde in haemolysate and hepatic tissue samples. Histopathological findings suggested a protective effect of the Piper betle extract and a more pronounced protective effect of eugenol on the hepatic and aortic tissues of atherogenic diet-fed (presumed atherosclerotic) rats. These results strongly suggest that the Piper betle extract and its active constituent, eugenol, exhibit anti-atherogenic effects which may be due to their anti-oxidative properties. PMID:27133067

  7. PPAR agonist-induced reduction of Mcp1 in atherosclerotic plaques of obese, insulin-resistant mice depends on adiponectin-induced Irak3 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Hulsmans

    Full Text Available Synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR agonists are used to treat dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. In this study, we examined molecular mechanisms that explain differential effects of a PPARα agonist (fenofibrate and a PPARγ agonist (rosiglitazone on macrophages during obesity-induced atherogenesis. Twelve-week-old mice with combined leptin and LDL-receptor deficiency (DKO were treated with fenofibrate, rosiglitazone or placebo for 12 weeks. Only rosiglitazone improved adipocyte function, restored insulin sensitivity, and inhibited atherosclerosis by decreasing lipid-loaded macrophages. In addition, it increased interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-3 (Irak3 and decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (Mcp1 expressions, indicative of a switch from M1 to M2 macrophages. The differences between fenofibrate and rosiglitazone were independent of Pparγ expression. In bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM, we identified the rosiglitazone-associated increase in adiponectin as cause of the increase in Irak3. Interestingly, the deletion of Irak3 in BMDM (IRAK3(-/- BMDM resulted in activation of the canonical NFκB signaling pathway and increased Mcp1 protein secretion. Rosiglitazone could not decrease the elevated Mcp1 secretion in IRAK3(-/- BMDM directly and fenofibrate even increased the secretion, possibly due to increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. Furthermore, aortic extracts of high-fat insulin-resistant LDL-receptor deficient mice, with lower adiponectin and Irak3 and higher Mcp1, showed accelerated atherosclerosis. In aggregate, our results emphasize an interaction between PPAR agonist-mediated increase in adiponectin and macrophage-associated Irak3 in the protection against atherosclerosis by PPAR agonists.

  8. PPAR Agonist-Induced Reduction of Mcp1 in Atherosclerotic Plaques of Obese, Insulin-Resistant Mice Depends on Adiponectin-Induced Irak3 Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, Thierry; Tsatsanis, Christos; Holvoet, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists are used to treat dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. In this study, we examined molecular mechanisms that explain differential effects of a PPARα agonist (fenofibrate) and a PPARγ agonist (rosiglitazone) on macrophages during obesity-induced atherogenesis. Twelve-week-old mice with combined leptin and LDL-receptor deficiency (DKO) were treated with fenofibrate, rosiglitazone or placebo for 12 weeks. Only rosiglitazone improved adipocyte function, restored insulin sensitivity, and inhibited atherosclerosis by decreasing lipid-loaded macrophages. In addition, it increased interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-3 (Irak3) and decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (Mcp1) expressions, indicative of a switch from M1 to M2 macrophages. The differences between fenofibrate and rosiglitazone were independent of Pparγ expression. In bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), we identified the rosiglitazone-associated increase in adiponectin as cause of the increase in Irak3. Interestingly, the deletion of Irak3 in BMDM (IRAK3−/− BMDM) resulted in activation of the canonical NFκB signaling pathway and increased Mcp1 protein secretion. Rosiglitazone could not decrease the elevated Mcp1 secretion in IRAK3−/− BMDM directly and fenofibrate even increased the secretion, possibly due to increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. Furthermore, aortic extracts of high-fat insulin-resistant LDL-receptor deficient mice, with lower adiponectin and Irak3 and higher Mcp1, showed accelerated atherosclerosis. In aggregate, our results emphasize an interaction between PPAR agonist-mediated increase in adiponectin and macrophage-associated Irak3 in the protection against atherosclerosis by PPAR agonists. PMID:23620818

  9. Daintain/AIF-1 Plays Roles in Coronary Heart Disease via Affecting the Blood Composition and Promoting Macrophage Uptake and Foam Cell Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhan Wang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Daintain/AIF-1 is an inflammatory polypeptide factor/allograft inflammatory factor 1 derived from macrophages. It is characterized in APOE-/- mice as a novel inflammatory factor associated with atherosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to characterize its function in human atherosclerosis. Methods: Immunohistochemistry was used to identify the expression of daintain/AIF-1 in vessel segments within and far from atherosclerotic plaques; High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC was used to display the effects of daintain/AIF-1 on C-reactive protein (CRP, oxidative capacity and superoxide dismutase (SOD in vivo; Oil Red O Staining was used to show the effects of daintain/AIF-1 on uptake of oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL into U937 cells, a macrophage line; Western Blot was used to test scavenger receptor A (SRA expression. Results: A high density of daintain/AIF-1 was observed in the tunica intima and media of coronary artery with atherosclerotic plaque, and fewer daintain/AIF-1 in the vessels without atherosclerotic plaque; Daintain/AIF-1 injected intravenously into BALB/c mice boosted oxidative capacity, significantly impaired SOD activities and augmented the CRP level in blood. According to the oil red O test, daintain/AIF-1 profoundly facilitated the uptake of ox-LDL in U937 macrophages and formation of foam cells in the endothelium. We also found that the molecular mechanisms are effective by promoting overexpression of SRA on macrophages. Conclusion: These findings implicate that the inflammatory factor daintain/AIF-1 is closely associated with atherogenesis, and could be further characterized as a novel risk factor for atherosclerosis

  10. Relation of Persistent Depressive Symptoms to Coronary Artery Calcification in Women Aged 46 to 59 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Imke; Powell, Lynda H; Matthews, Karen A; Jasielec, Mateusz S; Hollenberg, Steven M; Bromberger, Joyce T; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Everson-Rose, Susan A

    2016-06-15

    Depressive disorders have been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), but the impact of depression on early atherogenesis has not been well described, particularly in women and minorities. The relation between repeated episodes of high depressive symptoms and coronary calcium (CAC) is unknown in women at midlife when depression is common. Participants in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Heart study were assessed annually for depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale [CES-D scale]) over 5 years before CAC assessment and classified as high (CES-D ≥16) or not. CAC, measured by computed tomography, was analyzed as a categorical variable using cumulative logit partial proportional odds models. In these middle-aged women free of CVD and diabetes (194 black, 334 white), high depressive symptoms over 5 years were common; 19% had 1, 9% had 2, and 11% experienced ≥3 episodes. CAC was low; 54% had no CAC, 25% had scores from 0 to 10, and 21% had CAC ≥10 Agatston score. After adjusting for CVD risk factors, women with ≥3 episodes were twice as likely to have significant CAC (≥10 Agatston units) than women with no depressive episodes (odds ratio 2.20, 95% confidence interval 1.13 to 4.28, p = 0.020) with no difference by race. Women with 1 or 2 episodes did not differ from women with no episodes. In conclusion, in healthy women aged 46 to 59 years without clinical CVD or diabetes, persistent depressive symptoms were significantly associated with elevated CAC scores, suggesting that they are more likely to have pathophysiological and behavioral effects on the development of subclinical CVD than does a single episode of elevated depressive symptoms. PMID:27138181

  11. Depressive Symptoms are Related to Progression of Coronary Calcium in Midlife Women: The Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Heart Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Imke; Powell, Lynda H.; Matthews, Karen A.; Cursio, John F.; Hollenberg, Steven M.; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Bromberger, Joyce T.; Everson-Rose, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Major depression and depressive symptoms are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), but the impact of depression on early atherogenesis is less well known, particularly in women and minorities. This study examined whether depressive symptoms are associated with progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC) among women at mid-life. Methods The Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN) is a longitudinal, multi-site study assessing health and psychological factors in mid-life women. An ancillary study (SWAN Heart) evaluated subclinical atherosclerosis in women who reported no history of CVD or diabetes. In 346 women, CAC was measured twice by electron beam computed tomography, an average of 2.3 years apart. Progression, defined as an increase by 10 Agatston units or more, was analyzed using relative risk regression. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale. Results Progression of CAC was observed in 67 women (19.1%). Each 1–SD higher CES-D score at baseline related to a 25% increased risk of CAC progression [RR 1.25, CI 1.06–1.47, p=0.007], adjusting for age, time between scans, ethnicity, education, menopausal status, and known CVD risk factors. This risk was similar to the risk induced by BMI [RR 1.31, CI 1.11–1.54, p=0.001] and systolic blood pressure [RR 1.28, CI 1.06–1.55, p=0.01]. Conclusions Depressive symptoms were independently associated with progression of CAC in this cohort of midlife women. Depressive symptoms may represent a risk factor that is potentially modifiable for early prevention of CVD in women. PMID:21641367

  12. Rapeseed protein in a high-fat mixed meal alleviates postprandial systemic and vascular oxidative stress and prevents vascular endothelial dysfunction in healthy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magné, Joëlle; Huneau, Jean François; Tsikas, Dimitrios; Delemasure, Stéphanie; Rochette, Luc; Tomé, Daniel; Mariotti, François

    2009-09-01

    High-saturated fat and high-sucrose meals induce vascular endothelial dysfunction, the early hallmark of atherogenesis. The impact of dietary protein on vascular homeostasis remains misunderstood. In this study, we investigated whether rapeseed protein, an emergent arginine- and cysteine-rich protein, can acutely modulate the onset of adverse effects induced by a high-saturated fat meal (HFM). In a series of crossover experiments, healthy rats received 3 HFM (saturated fat: 60%; sucrose: 20%; protein: 20% energy) with the protein source being either total milk protein (MP; control), rapeseed protein (RP), or MP supplemented with cysteine and arginine to the same level as in RP (MP+AA). Endothelium-related vascular reactivity, measured as an acetylcholine-induced transient decrease in blood pressure, and plasma triglycerides, hydroperoxides, cyclic GMP (cGMP), and free 3-nitrotyrosine were measured before and 2, 4, and 6 h after meals. Superoxide anion production, expressed as ethidine fluorescence, was measured in the aorta 6 h after meals. Whereas plasma triglycerides rose similarly in all meals, the decrease in vascular reactivity after MP was attenuated after MP+AA and entirely prevented after RP. The type of meal had no consistent effect on plasma cGMP and free 3-nitrotyrosine over the postprandial period. The postprandial increase in plasma hydroperoxides differed according to the meal, and concentrations were 43% lower 6 h after MP+AA and RP than after MP. Aortic superoxide anion production was 36% lower 6 h after RP than MP. These results show that substituting rapeseed protein for milk protein markedly reduces vascular and oxidative disturbances induced by an HFM and this may be mediated in part by cysteine and arginine. PMID:19587122

  13. KR-31543 reduces the production of proinflammatory molecules in human endothelial cells and monocytes and attenuates atherosclerosis in mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Hoon; Yoo, Ji-Young; Kim, Sun-Ok; Yoo, Sung-Eun; Oh, Goo Taeg

    2012-12-31

    KR-31543, (2S, 3R, 4S)-6-amino-4-[N-(4-chlorophenyl)- N-(2-methyl-2H-tetrazol-5-ylmethyl) amino]-3,4-dihydro- 2-dimethyoxymethyl-3-hydroxy-2-methyl-2H-1-benz opyran is a new neuroprotective agent for ischemiareperfusion damage. It has also been reported that KR-31543 has protective effects on lipid peroxidation and H₂O₂-induced reactive oxygen species production. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic properties of KR-31543. We observed that KR-31543 treatment reduced the production of MCP-1, IL-8, and VCAM-1 in HUVECs, and of MCP-1 and IL-6 in THP-1 human monocytes. We also examined the effect of KR-31543 on monocytes migration in vitro. KR-31543 treatment effectively reduced the migration of THP-1 human monocytes to the HUVEC monolayer in a dose-dependent manner. We next examined the effects of this compound on atherogenesis in LDL receptor deficient (Ldlr ⁻/⁻) mice. After 10 weeks of western diet, the formation of atherosclerotic lesion in aorta was reduced in the KR-31543-treated group compared to the control group. The accumulation of macrophages in lesion was also reduced in KR-31543 treated group. However, the plasma levels of total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triglyceride were not affected by KR-31543 treatment. Taken together, these results show that KR-31543 has anti-inflammatory properties on human monocytes and endothelial cells, and inhibits fatty streak lesion formation in mouse model of atherosclerosis, suggesting the potential of KR-31543 for the treatment for atherosclerosis.

  14. Inhibition of S6K1 accounts partially for the anti-inflammatory effects of the arginase inhibitor L-norvaline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruffieux Jean

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pharmacological inhibition of endothelial arginase-II has been shown to improve endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS function and reduce atherogenesis in animal models. We investigated whether the endothelial arginase II is involved in inflammatory responses in endothelial cells. Methods Human endothelial cells were isolated from umbilical veins and stimulated with TNFα (10 ng/ml for 4 hours. Endothelial expression of the inflammatory molecules i.e. vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, and E-selectin were assessed by immunoblotting. Results The induction of the expression of endothelial VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin by TNFα was concentration-dependently reduced by incubation of the endothelial cells with the arginase inhibitor L-norvaline. However, inhibition of arginase by another arginase inhibitor S-(2-boronoethyl-L-cysteine (BEC had no effects. To confirm the role of arginase-II (the prominent isoform expressed in HUVECs in the inflammatory responses, adenoviral mediated siRNA silencing of arginase-II knocked down the arginase II protein level, but did not inhibit the up-regulation of the adhesion molecules. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of L-norvaline was not reversed by the NOS inhibitor L-NAME and L-norvaline did not interfere with TNFα-induced activation of NF-κB, JNK, p38mapk, while it inhibited p70s6k (S6K1 activity. Silencing S6K1 prevented up-regulation of E-selectin, but not that of VCAM-1 or ICAM-1 induced by TNFα. Conclusion The arginase inhibitor L-norvaline exhibits anti-inflammatory effects independently of inhibition of arginase in human endothelial cells. The anti-inflammatory properties of L-norvaline are partially attributable to its ability to inhibit S6K1.

  15. Involvement of insulin-regulated aminopeptidase in the effects of the renin-angiotensin fragment angiotensin IV: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stragier, Bart; De Bundel, Dimitri; Sarre, Sophie; Smolders, Ilse; Vauquelin, Georges; Dupont, Alain; Michotte, Yvette; Vanderheyden, Patrick

    2008-09-01

    For decades, angiotensin (Ang) II was considered as the end product and the only bioactive peptide of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). However, later studies revealed biological activity for other Ang fragments. Amongst those, Ang IV has drawn a lot of attention since it exerts a wide range of central and peripheral effects including the ability to enhance learning and memory recall, anticonvulsant and anti-epileptogenic properties, protection against cerebral ischemia, activity at the vascular level and an involvement in atherogenesis. Some of these effects are AT(1) receptor dependent but others most likely result from the binding of Ang IV to insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) although the exact mechanism(s) of action that mediate the Ang IV-induced effects following this binding are until now not fully known. Nevertheless, three hypotheses have been put forward: since Ang IV is an inhibitor of the catalytic activity of IRAP, its in vivo effects might result from a build-up of IRAP's neuropeptide substrates. Second, IRAP is co-localized with the glucose transporter GLUT4 in several tissue types and therefore, Ang IV might interact with the uptake of glucose. A final and more intriguing hypothesis ascribes a receptor function to IRAP and hence an agonist role to Ang IV. Taken together, it is clear that further work is required to clarify the mechanism of action of Ang IV. On the other hand, a wide range of studies have made it clear that IRAP might become an important target for drug development against different pathologies such as Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy and ischemia.

  16. The Effect of EDTA and Garlic Extract Combination on Plasma Lipids, Lipoporteins, and Fatty Streaks in Cholesterol Fed Male Rabbit Aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R Sharifi

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Garlic extract is used in treatment of hypercholesterolemia, although its efficacy isn’t exactly clear. There is a little information about mechanism of garlic effect on plasma lipids. By intervention of garlic in atherogenesis process it has been shown that it has a protective effect against cardiovascular disease. On the other hand, it has been shown that EDTA (Ethylene Diamin Tetra Acetic Acid improves blood flow and decreases the vascular atherosclerotic symptoms. Methods: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of EDTA and garlic extract with together on plasma concentration of cholesterol, Triglyceride, LDL, and HDL, and formation of fatty streaks through the phenomena called “chelation therapy” in male Rabbit aorta. 32 male Rabbits were used and divided to 4 groups as group 1: cholesterol – rich diet (CRD + EDTA + Garlic Extract (GE, group 2: CRD + EDTA, Group 3: CRD + GE, Group 4: CRD (control group. The animals were under food and drug diet for 5 weeks. Blood samples of Rabbits were taken before and after the test and then plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL and HDL were measured. Finally, abdominal aorta was studied and pathologically evaluated. Results: The experiments showed the significant decrease of mean cholesterol in case groups and mean triglyceride in the groups which have received EDTA + GE and EDTA. Our results showed that mean LDL and LDL/HDL Ratio in case groups have been decreased in comparison to control group. In addition, there was a significant increase in mean HDL in the group which has received EDTA + GE. Conclusion: In this study it was shown that the using of fresh garlic and EDTA with together has a reductive effect on cholesterol, Triglyceride, and LDL concentration and also has an increasing effect on HDL concentration. But it seems that concomitant using of these tow substances with together strengthen the effect of each one, and it produces a great reduction of the blood

  17. Adipokine Imbalance in the Pericardial Cavity of Cardiac and Vascular Disease Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atlanta G I M Elie

    Full Text Available Obesity and especially hypertrophy of epicardial adipose tissue accelerate coronary atherogenesis. We aimed at comparing levels of inflammatory and atherogenic hormones from adipose tissue in the pericardial fluid and circulation of cardiovascular disease patients.Venous plasma (P and pericardial fluid (PF were obtained from elective cardiothoracic surgery patients (n = 37. Concentrations of leptin, adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (A-FABP and adiponectin (APN were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA. The median concentration of leptin in PF (4.3 (interquartile range: 2.8-9.1 μg/L was comparable to that in P (5.9 (2.2-11 μg/L and these were significantly correlated to most of the same patient characteristics. The concentration of A-FABP was markedly higher (73 (28-124 versus 8.4 (5.2-14 μg/L and that of APN was markedly lower (2.8 (1.7-4.2 versus 13 (7.2-19 mg/L in PF compared to P. APN in PF was unlike in P not significantly related to age, body mass index, plasma triglycerides or coronary artery disease. PF levels of APN, but not A-FABP, were related to the size of paracardial adipocytes. PF levels of APN and A-FABP were not related to the immunoreactivity of paracardial adipocytes for these proteins.In cardiac and vascular disease patients, PF is enriched in A-FABP and poor in APN. This adipokine microenvironment is more likely determined by the heart than by the circulation or paracardial adipose tissue.

  18. Cross-talk between macrophages and smooth muscle cells impairs collagen and metalloprotease synthesis and promotes angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butoi, E; Gan, A M; Tucureanu, M M; Stan, D; Macarie, R D; Constantinescu, C; Calin, M; Simionescu, M; Manduteanu, I

    2016-07-01

    Coronary atherosclerosis complicated by plaque disruption and thrombosis is a critical event in myocardial infarction and stroke, the major causes of cardiovascular death. In atherogenesis, macrophages (MAC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) are key actors; they synthesize matrix components and numerous factors involved in the process. Here, we design experiments to investigate whether SMC-MAC communication induces changes in ECM protein composition and/or neo-angiogenesis. Cell to cell communication was achieved using trans-well chambers, where SMCs were grown in the upper chamber and differentiated MAC in the bottom chamber for 24 or 72h. We found that cross-talk between MAC and SMC during co-culture: (i) significantly decreased the expression of ECM proteins (collagen I, III, elastin) in SMC; (ii) increased the expression and activity of metalloprotease MMP-9 and expression of collagenase MMP-1, in both MAC and SMC; (iii) augmented the secretion of soluble VEGF in the conditioned media of cell co-culture and VEGF gene expression in both cell types, compared with control cells. Moreover, the conditioned media collected from MAC-SMC co-culture promoted endothelial cell tube formation in Matrigel, signifying an increased angiogenic effect. In addition, the MAC-SMC communication led to an increase in inflammatory IL-1β and TLR-2, which could be responsible for cellular signaling. In conclusion, MAC-SMC communication affects factors and molecules that could alter ECM composition and neo-angiogenesis, features that could directly dictate the progression of atheroma towards the vulnerable plaque. Targeting the MAC-SMC cross-talk may represent a novel therapeutic strategy to slow-down or retard the plaque progression. PMID:27060293

  19. Peripheral vascular diseases resulting from chronic arsenical poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hsin-Su; Lee, Chih-Hung; Chen, Gwo-Shing

    2002-03-01

    Drinking water contaminated by arsenic remains a major public health problem. Long-term arsenic exposure has been found to be associated with peripheral vascular diseases in a variety of studies. Reports of vascular effects of arsenic in drinking water, which span almost 100 years, have been published in Taiwan, Chile, Mexico, and China. This paper reviewed the association of peripheral vascular diseases resulting from arsenic exposure to drinking water from the clinical and pathological points of view. An endemic peripheral vascular disorder called "blackfoot disease" has been noticed in a limited area in Taiwan. This disease results in gangrene in the extremities. It has been associated with the ingestion of high concentrations of arsenic-tainted artesian well water. Epidemiological studies confirmed a dose-response relationship between long-term arsenic exposure and the occurrence of blackfoot disease. Whereas arsenic has induced various clinical manifestations of vascular effects in Chile, Mexico and China, they do not compare in magnitude or severity to the blackfoot disease found in Taiwan. The pathogenesis of vascular effects induced by arsenic is still controversial. The possible mechanisms include endothelial cell destruction, arsenic-associated atherogenesis, carotene and zinc deficiency, and/or some immunological mechanism. Microcirculatory assessments revealed that deficits of capillary blood flow and permeability exist in clinically normal skin of patients with chronic arsenical poisoning. The vascular effects of chronic arsenic poisoning may involve cardiovascular and cerebrovascular systems as well. In view of the increasing public health problems caused by arsenic exposure, vascular effects should be included in the future study of health effects of arsenic.

  20. Paradoxical effect of a pequi oil-rich diet on the development of atherosclerosis: balance between antioxidant and hyperlipidemic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pequi is the fruit of Caryocar brasiliense and its oil has a high concentration of monounsaturated and saturated fatty acids, which are anti- and pro-atherogenic agents, respectively, and of carotenoids, which give it antioxidant properties. Our objective was to study the effect of the intake of a cholesterol-rich diet supplemented with pequi oil, compared to the same diet containing soybean oil, on atherosclerosis development, and oxidative stress in atherosclerosis-susceptible LDL receptor-deficient mice (LDLr−/−, C57BL/6-background). Female mice were fed a cholesterol-rich diet containing 7% soybean oil (Soybean group, N = 12) or 7% pequi oil (Pequi group, N = 12) for 6 weeks. The Pequi group presented a more atherogenic lipid profile and more advanced atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic root compared to the Soybean group. However, the Pequi group presented a less advanced lesion in the aorta than the Soybean group and showed lower lipid peroxidation (Soybean group: 50.2 ± 7.1; Pequi group: 30.0 ± 4.8 µmol MDA/mg protein) and anti-oxidized LDL autoantibodies (Soybean group: 35.7 ± 9.4; Pequi group: 15.6 ± 3.7 arbitrary units). Peritoneal macrophages from the Pequi group stimulated with zymosan showed a reduction in the release of reactive oxygen species compared to the Soybean group. Our data suggest that a pequi oil-rich diet slows atherogenesis in the initial stages, possibly due to its antioxidant activity. However, the increase of serum cholesterol induces a more prominent LDL migration toward the intimae of arteries, increasing the advanced atherosclerotic plaque. In conclusion, pequi oil associated with an atherogenic diet worsens the lipid profile and accelerates the formation of advanced atherosclerotic lesions despite its antioxidant action

  1. TNFα signals via p66(Shc to induce E-Selectin, promote leukocyte transmigration and enhance permeability in human endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Laviola

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells participate in inflammatory events leading to atherogenesis by regulating endothelial cell permeability via the expression of VE-Cadherin and β-catenin and leukocyte recruitment via the expression of E-Selectins and other adhesion molecules. The protein p66(Shc acts as a sensor/inducer of oxidative stress and may promote vascular dysfunction. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of p66(Shc in tumor necrosis factor TNFα-induced E-Selectin expression and function in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. Exposure of HUVEC to 50 ng/ml TNFα resulted in increased leukocyte transmigration through the endothelial monolayer and E-Selectin expression, in association with augmented phosphorylation of both p66(Shc on Ser(36 and the stress kinase c-Jun NH2-terminal protein kinase (JNK-1/2, and higher intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS levels. Overexpression of p66(Shc in HUVEC resulted in enhanced p66(Shc phosphorylation on Ser(36, increased ROS and E-Selectin levels, and amplified endothelial cell permeability and leukocyte transmigration through the HUVEC monolayer. Conversely, overexpression of a phosphorylation-defective p66(Shc protein, in which Ser(36 was replaced by Ala, did not augment ROS and E-Selectin levels, nor modify cell permeability or leukocyte transmigration beyond those found in wild-type cells. Moreover, siRNA-mediated silencing of p66(Shc resulted in marked reduction of E-Selectin expression and leukocyte transmigration. In conclusion, p66(Shc acts as a novel intermediate in the TNFα pathway mediating endothelial dysfunction, and its action requires JNK-dependent phosphorylation of p66(Shc on Ser(36.

  2. A Chinese Herbal Preparation Containing Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae, Radix Notoginseng and Borneolum Syntheticum Reduces Circulating Adhesion Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie A. O’Brien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating adhesion molecules (CAMs, surface proteins expressed in the vascular endothelium, have emerged as risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD. CAMs are involved in intercellular communication that are believed to play a role in atherosclerosis. A Chinese medicine, the “Dantonic Pill” (DP (also known as the “Cardiotonic Pill”, containing three Chinese herbal material medica, Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae, Radix Notoginseng and Borneolum Syntheticum, has been used in China for the prevention and management of CVD. Previous laboratory and animal studies have suggested that this preparation reduces both atherogenesis and adhesion molecule expression. A parallel double blind randomized placebo-controlled study was conducted to assess the effects of the DP on three species of CAM (intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and endothelial cell selectin (E-selectin in participants with mild-moderate hypercholesterolemia. Secondary endpoints included biochemical and hematological variables and clinical effects. Forty participants were randomized to either treatment or control for 12 weeks. Treatment with DP was associated with a statistically significant decrease in ICAM-1 (9% decrease, P = .03 and E-Selectin (15% decrease, P = .004. There was no significant change in renal function tests, liver function tests, glucose, lipids or C-reactive protein levels and clinical adverse effects did not differ between the active and the control groups. There were no relevant changes in participants receiving placebo. These results suggest that this herbal medicine may contribute to the development of a novel approach to cardiovascular risk reduction.

  3. Is atherosclerosis a multifactorial disease or is it induced by a sequence of lipid peroxidation reactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiteller, Gerhard

    2005-06-01

    The delivery of not only free cholesterol but also cholesterol esters to cells by low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has hitherto been unstudied. Minor compounds present in mammalian-derived food include cholesterol linoleate and arachidonate. Evidence is presented that these esters are directly incorporated into VLDL and are responsible for the deleterious effects of atherosclerosis. Cholesterol esterified with these polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is readily oxidized at the PUFA residue during storage and heating. Apparently, the liver is unable to distinguish between nonoxidized and oxidized cholesterol PUFA esters and also incorporates the latter into VLDL, which is transformed to LDL. When this LDL is transferred to endothelial cells, the toxic products are liberated and induce cell damage. Cell damage is combined with structural changes that influence neighboring cells and cause an influx of Ca2+ ions and activation of phospholipases and lipoxygenases, resulting in production of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOHs). When the level of free PUFAs generated by phospholipases exceeds a certain limit, lipoxygenases commit suicide, causing liberation of iron ions. The latter react with LOOHs and thus induce a switch from enzymatic to nonenzymatic generation of lipid peroxidation (LPO) products. Although the LOO. radicals produced in enzymatic reactions are deactivated within the enzyme complex, LOO. radicals generated in nonenzymatic reactions are able to attack any biological compound, inducing severe damage. Apparently, iron ions and LOOH molecules at the surface of injured cells transfer the nonenzymatic LPO reactions to the phospholipid layer of bypassing lipoproteins, thus explaining why inflammatory diseases, such as diabetes, are combined with atherogenesis. PMID:16037257

  4. Prevention of Atherosclerosis Progression by 9-cis-β-Carotene Rich Alga Dunaliella in apoE-Deficient Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayelet Harari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. β-Carotene-rich diet has been shown to be inversely associated with the risk of coronary heart disease. However, clinical trials using synthetic all-trans-β-carotene failed to demonstrate a beneficial effect. We therefore sought to study the effect of natural source of β-carotene, the alga Dunaliella, containing both all-trans and 9-cis-β-carotene on atherosclerosis. In a previous study we showed that 9-cis-β-carotene-rich powder of the alga Dunaliella inhibits early atherogenesis in low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice. Aims. The aims of the current work were to study whether diet enriched with Dunaliella powder would inhibit the progression of established atherosclerosis in old male apoE-deficient mice and to compare the effect of Dunaliella on lipid profile and atherosclerosis in a low-versus high-fat diet fed mice. Methods. In the first experiment, young mice (12 weeks old were allocated into 3 groups: (1 low-fat diet; (2 low-fat diet + Dunaliella powder (8%; (3 low-fat diet + β-carotene-deficient Dunaliella. In the second experiment, old mice (7 months old with established atherosclerotic lesions were allocated into 4 groups: (1 low-fat diet; (2 low-fat diet + Dunaliella; (3 high fat-diet; (4 high-fat diet + Dunaliella. Results. In young mice fed a low-fat diet, a trend toward lower atherosclerotic lesion area in the aortic sinus was found in the Dunaliella group compared with the control group. In old mice with established atherosclerotic lesion, Dunaliella inhibited significantly plasma cholesterol elevation and atherosclerosis progression in mice fed a high-fat diet. Conclusion. The results of this study suggest that a diet containing natural carotenoids, rich in 9-cis-β-carotene, has the potential to inhibit atherosclerosis progression, particularly in high-fat diet regime.

  5. Effects of canola oil supplemented with atherogenic element and nigella sativa (kalonji) on serum lipids in albino rats - an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare effects of canola oil supplemented with atherogenic element and Nigella sativa on serum lipids in albino rats. Place and Duration of Study: Study was conducted at Pathology Department of Postgraduate Medical Institute, for 12 weeks. Study Design: Laboratory based randomized controlled trials. Material and Methods: Seventy two albino rats were selected and randomly divided into six groups of twelve animals with equal number of male and female in each. Fourteen days after acclimatization to the environment and basal diet, fasting blood samples (zero week) were collected by heart puncture under ether anesthesia and experimental diets were started which were continued for 12 weeks. All parameters were measured using enzymatic colorimetric methods. Results: Estimations of serum lipids showed increase in total cholesterol (TC) and High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol (HDL-c) levels but fall in LDL-c concentrations in groups fed on canola oil diet. On the other hand, even atherogenic supplemented groups had decrease in cardio-protective HDL-c and raised LDL-c; although statistically non-significant. Thus canola oil diets were not hyperlipidaemic and prevented adiposity. Nigella sativa (NS) diets significantly decreased serum total cholesterol and LDL-c while HDL-c was raised but non-significantly. Thus Nigella sativa prevented deposition of lipids in tissues, thus preventing tendency to obesity and atherogenesis by decreasing LDL-c in serum. Conclusion: Nigella sativa produces antilipidaemic and anti-obesity effects by decreasing low density lipoprotein cholesterol level which is statistically significant in two out of the three groups fed on Ns; it also increased high density cholesterol which was however non-significant in comparison with Canola oil alone. (author)

  6. Lipid minor constituents in wines. A biochemical approach in the French paradox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Fragopoulou

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available E Fragopoulou1, C A Demopoulos2, S Antonopoulou11Department of Science of Nutrition-Dietetics, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece; 2Faculty of Chemistry, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, GreeceAbstract: The “French paradox” is the observation that the French suffer a relatively low incidence of coronary heart disease, despite having a diet relatively rich in saturated fats. Several theories have been proposed in order to explain this phenomenon and several debates arose. One of them attributed this phenomenon to the regular and moderate consumption of wine in France. More specific, it is thought that the existence of bioactive compounds in wine could have an effect on the cardiovascular system, preventing or delaying atherosclerosis. The mechanisms mediating these beneficial effects include: low-density lipoprotein oxidation; endothelium function; smooth muscle cells proliferation; platelet aggregation and angiogenesis. Several mediators participate in these pathophysiological mechanisms, among them are plateletactivating factor (PAF and oxidized phospholipids that play a crucial and essential role in the initiation and the progression of atherogenesis. In this review, apart from the already known and well characterized biological effects of wine bioactive compounds, the co-existence of compounds that could modulate the production and the actions of PAF is highlighted. The existence of bioactive compounds in wine that could reduce PAF production and inhibit its actions may offer a new insight into the well  known French paradox and expand the already reported mechanisms by including the inhibition of PAF actions.Keywords: wine, bioactive compounds, lipids, platelet-activating factor, atherosclerosis

  7. [HIV lipodystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snopková, S; Matýsková, M; Povolná, K; Polák, P; Husa, P

    2010-12-01

    Combined antiretroviral therapy results in extraordinary decrease of morbidity and mortality of HIV-infected patients and in an essential change of the HIV/AIDS disease prognosis. However, long-term intake of antiretroviral medicaments is related to occurrence of metabolic and morphological abnormalities, of which some have been combined into a new syndrome--the so called HIV lipodystrophy. The HIV lipodystrophy syndrome covers metabolic and morphological changes. Metabolic changes include dyslipidaemia with hypercholesterolaemia and/or hypertriglyceridaemia, insulin resistance with hyperinsulinaemia and hyperlaktataemia. Morphological changes have the nature of lipoatrophia (loss of subcutaneous fat--on the cheeks, on extremities, on buttocks and marked prominence of surface veins) or lipohypertrophia (growth of fat tissue--on the chest, in the dorsocervical area, lipomatosis of visceral tissues and organs, fat accumulation in the abdominal area). Several HIV lipodystrophy features are very similar to the metabolic syndrome of the general population. That is why this new syndrome represents a prospective risk of premature atherosclerosis and increase of the cardiovascular risk in young HIV positive individuals. The article mentions major presented studies dealing with the relation of antiretroviral treatment and the cardiovascular risk. The conclusions of the studies are not unequivocal--this is, among others, given by the reason that their length is short from the viewpoint of atherogenesis. The major risk of subclinical atherosclerosis acceleration seems to be related to the deep immunodeficiency and low number of CD4+ lymphocytes and florid, uncontrolled HIV infection with a high number of HIV-1 RNA copies actually circulating in the plasma. The question, whether metabolic and morphological changes related to HIV and cART carry a similar atherogenic potential as in the general population, remains open for future. PMID:21261108

  8. Using image-based flow cytometry to measure monocyte oxidized LDL phagocytosis: A potential risk factor for CVD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Andrea L; Venable, Adam S; Prado, Eric A; Best Sampson, Jill N; McFarlin, Brian K

    2015-08-01

    Obesity and cardiovascular disease is a worldwide health concern that has been a major focus in research for several decades. Among these diseases, atherosclerosis is one of the leading causes of death and disability nationwide. Circulating monocytes are believed to be primary cells responsible for foam cell formation. The present report describes a novel method for measuring monocyte oxLDL phagocytosis capacity using image-based flow cytometry. Human venous blood monocytes were incubated with different concentrations of oxLDL for different lengths of time to optimize the assay. High (post-meal) and low (pre-meal) responder samples were generated by feeding human subjects a high-fat (~85% of daily fat allowance), high-calorie (~65% of daily calorie needs) meal. This is a relevant model with respect to obesity and risk of developing atherogenesis. After the functional assay, classic (CD14+/CD16-) and pro-inflammatory (CD14+/CD16+) monocytes were assessed for oxLDL uptake, adhesion molecule expression (CD11b and CD18), and scavenger receptor expression (CD36) using an image-based flow cytometer (FlowSight). The present method represents a novel advance in methods available to detect the propensity of circulating monocytes to become intima foam cells. We found the assay to be most effective at separating high from low responder samples when using a fixed oxLDL concentration (120 μL/mL) and incubation length (1-h). In a clinical application, this method demonstrated that consuming a single high-fat meal causes an increase in the proportion of monocyte oxLDL phagocytosis and their adhesion capacity, suggesting a higher propensity to become foam cells. PMID:25858228

  9. The inhibition of macrophage foam cell formation by 9-cis β-carotene is driven by BCMO1 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Zolberg Relevy

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed societies, and begins when activated endothelial cells recruit monocytes and T-cells from the bloodstream into the arterial wall. Macrophages that accumulate cholesterol and other fatty materials are transformed into foam cells. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated that a diet rich in carotenoids is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease; while previous work in our laboratory has shown that the 9-cis β-carotene rich alga Dunaliella inhibits atherogenesis in mice. The effect of 9-cis β-carotene on macrophage foam cell formation has not yet been investigated. In the present work, we sought to study whether the 9-cis β-carotene isomer, isolated from the alga Dunaliella, can inhibit macrophage foam cell formation upon its conversion to retinoids. The 9-cis β-carotene and Dunaliella lipid extract inhibited foam cell formation in the RAW264.7 cell line, similar to 9-cis retinoic acid. Furthermore, dietary enrichment with the algal powder in mice resulted in carotenoid accumulation in the peritoneal macrophages and in the inhibition of foam cell formation ex-vivo and in-vivo. We also found that the β-carotene cleavage enzyme β-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase (BCMO1 is expressed and active in macrophages. Finally, 9-cis β-carotene, as well as the Dunaliella extract, activated the nuclear receptor RXR in hepa1-6 cells. These results indicate that dietary carotenoids, such as 9-cis β-carotene, accumulate in macrophages and can be locally cleaved by endogenous BCMO1 to form 9-cis retinoic acid and other retinoids. Subsequently, these retinoids activate the nuclear receptor RXR that, along with additional nuclear receptors, can affect various metabolic pathways, including those involved in foam cell formation and atherosclerosis.

  10. 9-cis β-Carotene Increased Cholesterol Efflux to HDL in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapir Bechor

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol efflux from macrophages is a key process in reverse cholesterol transport and, therefore, might inhibit atherogenesis. 9-cis-β-carotene (9-cis-βc is a precursor for 9-cis-retinoic-acid (9-cis-RA, which regulates macrophage cholesterol efflux. Our objective was to assess whether 9-cis-βc increases macrophage cholesterol efflux and induces the expression of cholesterol transporters. Enrichment of a mouse diet with βc from the alga Dunaliella led to βc accumulation in peritoneal macrophages. 9-cis-βc increased the mRNA levels of CYP26B1, an enzyme that regulates RA cellular levels, indicating the formation of RA from βc in RAW264.7 macrophages. Furthermore, 9-cis-βc, as well as all-trans-βc, significantly increased cholesterol efflux to high-density lipoprotein (HDL by 50% in RAW264.7 macrophages. Likewise, food fortification with 9-cis-βc augmented cholesterol efflux from macrophages ex vivo. 9-cis-βc increased both the mRNA and protein levels of ABCA1 and apolipoprotein E (APOE and the mRNA level of ABCG1. Our study shows, for the first time, that 9-cis-βc from the diet accumulates in peritoneal macrophages and increases cholesterol efflux to HDL. These effects might be ascribed to transcriptional induction of ABCA1, ABCG1, and APOE. These results highlight the beneficial effect of βc in inhibition of atherosclerosis by improving cholesterol efflux from macrophages.

  11. The Inhibition of Macrophage Foam Cell Formation by 9-Cis β-Carotene Is Driven by BCMO1 Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolberg Relevy, Noa; Bechor, Sapir; Harari, Ayelet; Ben-Amotz, Ami; Kamari, Yehuda; Harats, Dror; Shaish, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed societies, and begins when activated endothelial cells recruit monocytes and T-cells from the bloodstream into the arterial wall. Macrophages that accumulate cholesterol and other fatty materials are transformed into foam cells. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated that a diet rich in carotenoids is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease; while previous work in our laboratory has shown that the 9-cis β-carotene rich alga Dunaliella inhibits atherogenesis in mice. The effect of 9-cis β-carotene on macrophage foam cell formation has not yet been investigated. In the present work, we sought to study whether the 9-cis β-carotene isomer, isolated from the alga Dunaliella, can inhibit macrophage foam cell formation upon its conversion to retinoids. The 9-cis β-carotene and Dunaliella lipid extract inhibited foam cell formation in the RAW264.7 cell line, similar to 9-cis retinoic acid. Furthermore, dietary enrichment with the algal powder in mice resulted in carotenoid accumulation in the peritoneal macrophages and in the inhibition of foam cell formation ex-vivo and in-vivo. We also found that the β-carotene cleavage enzyme β-carotene 15,15’-monooxygenase (BCMO1) is expressed and active in macrophages. Finally, 9-cis β-carotene, as well as the Dunaliella extract, activated the nuclear receptor RXR in hepa1-6 cells. These results indicate that dietary carotenoids, such as 9-cis β-carotene, accumulate in macrophages and can be locally cleaved by endogenous BCMO1 to form 9-cis retinoic acid and other retinoids. Subsequently, these retinoids activate the nuclear receptor RXR that, along with additional nuclear receptors, can affect various metabolic pathways, including those involved in foam cell formation and atherosclerosis. PMID:25629601

  12. 9-cis β-Carotene Increased Cholesterol Efflux to HDL in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechor, Sapir; Zolberg Relevy, Noa; Harari, Ayelet; Almog, Tal; Kamari, Yehuda; Ben-Amotz, Ami; Harats, Dror; Shaish, Aviv

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol efflux from macrophages is a key process in reverse cholesterol transport and, therefore, might inhibit atherogenesis. 9-cis-β-carotene (9-cis-βc) is a precursor for 9-cis-retinoic-acid (9-cis-RA), which regulates macrophage cholesterol efflux. Our objective was to assess whether 9-cis-βc increases macrophage cholesterol efflux and induces the expression of cholesterol transporters. Enrichment of a mouse diet with βc from the alga Dunaliella led to βc accumulation in peritoneal macrophages. 9-cis-βc increased the mRNA levels of CYP26B1, an enzyme that regulates RA cellular levels, indicating the formation of RA from βc in RAW264.7 macrophages. Furthermore, 9-cis-βc, as well as all-trans-βc, significantly increased cholesterol efflux to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) by 50% in RAW264.7 macrophages. Likewise, food fortification with 9-cis-βc augmented cholesterol efflux from macrophages ex vivo. 9-cis-βc increased both the mRNA and protein levels of ABCA1 and apolipoprotein E (APOE) and the mRNA level of ABCG1. Our study shows, for the first time, that 9-cis-βc from the diet accumulates in peritoneal macrophages and increases cholesterol efflux to HDL. These effects might be ascribed to transcriptional induction of ABCA1, ABCG1, and APOE. These results highlight the beneficial effect of βc in inhibition of atherosclerosis by improving cholesterol efflux from macrophages. PMID:27447665

  13. Perilipin1 deficiency in whole body or bone marrow-derived cells attenuates lesions in atherosclerosis-prone mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Zhao

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to determine the role of perilipin 1 (Plin1 in whole body or bone marrow-derived cells on atherogenesis.Accumulated evidence have indicated the role of Plin1 in atherosclerosis, however, these findings are controversial. In this study, we showed that Plin1 was assembled and colocalized with CD68 in macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques of ApoE-/- mice. We further found 39% reduction of plaque size in the aortic roots of Plin1 and ApoE double knockout (Plin1-/-ApoE-/- females compared with ApoE-/- female littermates. In order to verify whether this reduction was macrophage-specific, the bone marrow cells from wild-type or Plin1 deficient mice (Plin1-/- were transplanted into LDL receptor deficient mice (LDLR-/-. Mice receiving Plin1-/- bone marrow cells showed also 49% reduction in aortic atherosclerotic lesions compared with LDLR-/- mice received wild-type bone marrow cells. In vitro experiments showed that Plin1-/- macrophages had decreased protein expression of CD36 translocase and an enhanced cholesterol ester hydrolysis upon aggregated-LDL loading, with unaltered expression of many other regulators of cholesterol metabolism, such as cellular lipases, and Plin2 and 3. Given the fundamental role of Plin1 in protecting LD lipids from lipase hydrolysis, it is reasonably speculated that the assembly of Plin1 in microphages might function to reduce lipolysis and hence increase lipid retention in ApoE-/- plaques, but this pro-atherosclerotic property would be abrogated on inactivation of Plin1.Plin1 deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells may be responsible for reduced atherosclerotic lesions in the mice.

  14. Protective effects of let-7a and let-7b on oxidized low-density lipoprotein induced endothelial cell injuries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Hua Bao

    Full Text Available Lectin-like low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1 is a receptor for oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL in endothelial cells. The activation of LOX-1 by oxLDL stimulates the apoptosis and dysfunction of endothelial cells, and contributes to atherogenesis. However, the regulatory factors for LOX-1 are still unclear. MicroRNAs are small, endogenous, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expressions at a post-transcriptional level. The let-7 family is the second microRNA been discovered, which plays important roles in cardiovascular diseases. Let-7a and let-7b were predicted to target LOX-1 3'-UTR and be highly expressed in endothelial cells. The present study demonstrated that LOX-1 was a target of let-7a and let-7b. They inhibited the expression of LOX-1 by targeting the positions of 310-316 in LOX-1 3'-UTR. Over-expression of let-7a and let-7b inhibited the oxLDL-induced endothelial cell apoptosis, NO deficiency, ROS over-production, LOX-1 upregulation and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS downregulation. Moreover, we found that oxLDL treatment induced p38MAPK phosphorylation, NF-κB nuclear translocation, IκB degradation and PKB dephosphorylation. Let-7a or let-7b over-expression attenuated these alterations significantly. The present study may provide a new insight into the protective properties of let-7a and let-7b in preventing the endothelial dysfunction associated with cardiovascular disease, such as atherosclerosis.

  15. Mast cell degranulator compound 48-80 promotes atherosclerotic plaque in apolipoprotein E knockout mice with perivascular common carotid collar placement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Ya-ling; YANG Yong-zong; WANG Shuang; HUANG Tao; TANG Chao-ke; XU Zeng-xiang; SUN Yu-hui

    2009-01-01

    Background Study of the relationship between mast cells and atherosclerosis is mostly dependent on pathological observation and cytology experiments. To investigate the effects of mast cells degranulation on plaque and their possible mechanisms we used apolipoprotein E knockout mice which had been placed perivascular common carotid collar with mast cells degranulator compound 48-80.Methods Forty apolipoprotein E knockout mice were fed a western-type diet and operated on with placement of perivascular right common carotid collar. Four weeks after surgery, the mice were intraperitoneally injected with compound 48-80 (0.5 mg/kg) or D-Hanks every other day for 4 times. The serum lipids and activity of tryptase were measured. Tissue sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Corresponding sections were stained with toluidine blue and immunohistochemically with antibodies against macrophage-specific antigen, α-smooth muscle actin, interleukin-1β and van Willebrand factor. Simultaneously, basic fibroblast growth factor was detected by in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence.Results No pathological change was observed in common carotid non-collar placement but atherogenesis in common carotid collar placement of both groups. There was a significant increase in plaque area ((5.85±0.75)×104 vs (0.86±0.28)×104 μm2, P<0.05), the degree of lumen stenosis ((81±15)% vs (41±12)%, P <0.05), the activity of tryptase in serum ((0.57±0.13) U/L vs (0.36±0.10) U/L, P <0.05), and the percentage of degranulated mast cells ((80.6±17.8)% vs (13.5±4.1)%, P <0.05). The expressions of macrophage-specific antigen, α-smooth muscle actin, interleukin-1β, basic fibroblast growth factor and the density of neovessel in plaque were more in the compound 48-80 group than in the control group.Conclusions Perivascular common carotid collar placement can promote atherosclerotic plaque formation in apolipoprotein E knockout mice. Compound 48-80 increases plaque area and the degree

  16. Oxidized LDL triggers pro-oncogenic signaling in human breast mammary epithelial cells partly via stimulation of MiR-21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaidakov, Magomed; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2012-01-01

    Dyslipidemia and obesity are primary risk factors for the development of atherosclerosis and are also epidemiologically linked to increased susceptibility to a variety of cancers including breast cancer. One of the prominent features of dyslipidemia is enhanced production of oxidized LDL (ox-LDL), which has been shown to be implicated in key steps of atherogenesis including inflammatory signaling and proliferation of vascular cells. In this study we analyzed the effects of ox-LDL in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A). MCF10A cells avidly internalized dil-ox-LDL and exhibited increased proliferative response to ox-LDL within the range of 1-50 µg/ml in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of cells with 20 µg/ml ox-LDL for 2 and 12 hours was associated with upregulation of LOX-1 and CD36 scavenger receptors while MSR1 and CXLC16 receptors did not change. Ox-LDL-treated cells displayed significant upregulation of NADPH oxidases (subunits P22(phox) and P47(phox)), lipoxygenases-12 and -15, and cytoplasmic, but not mitochondrial, SOD. Ox-LDL also triggered phosphorylation of IκBα coupled with nuclear translocation of NF-κB and stimulated p44/42 MAPK, PI3K and Akt while intracellular PTEN (PI3K/Akt pathway inhibitor and target of miR-21) declined. Quantitative PCR revealed increased expression of hsa-miR-21 in ox-LDL treated cells coupled with inhibition of miR-21 target genes. Further, transfection of MCF10A cells with miR-21 inhibitor prevented ox-LDL mediated stimulation of PI3K and Akt. We conclude that, similarly to vascular cells, mammary epithelial cells respond to ox-LDL by upregulation of proliferative and pro-inflammatory signaling. We also report for the first time that part of ox-LDL triggered reactions in MCF10A cells is mediated by oncogenic hsa-miR-21 through inhibition of its target gene PTEN and consequent activation of PI3K/Akt pathway.

  17. Oxidized LDL triggers pro-oncogenic signaling in human breast mammary epithelial cells partly via stimulation of MiR-21.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magomed Khaidakov

    Full Text Available Dyslipidemia and obesity are primary risk factors for the development of atherosclerosis and are also epidemiologically linked to increased susceptibility to a variety of cancers including breast cancer. One of the prominent features of dyslipidemia is enhanced production of oxidized LDL (ox-LDL, which has been shown to be implicated in key steps of atherogenesis including inflammatory signaling and proliferation of vascular cells. In this study we analyzed the effects of ox-LDL in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A. MCF10A cells avidly internalized dil-ox-LDL and exhibited increased proliferative response to ox-LDL within the range of 1-50 µg/ml in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of cells with 20 µg/ml ox-LDL for 2 and 12 hours was associated with upregulation of LOX-1 and CD36 scavenger receptors while MSR1 and CXLC16 receptors did not change. Ox-LDL-treated cells displayed significant upregulation of NADPH oxidases (subunits P22(phox and P47(phox, lipoxygenases-12 and -15, and cytoplasmic, but not mitochondrial, SOD. Ox-LDL also triggered phosphorylation of IκBα coupled with nuclear translocation of NF-κB and stimulated p44/42 MAPK, PI3K and Akt while intracellular PTEN (PI3K/Akt pathway inhibitor and target of miR-21 declined. Quantitative PCR revealed increased expression of hsa-miR-21 in ox-LDL treated cells coupled with inhibition of miR-21 target genes. Further, transfection of MCF10A cells with miR-21 inhibitor prevented ox-LDL mediated stimulation of PI3K and Akt. We conclude that, similarly to vascular cells, mammary epithelial cells respond to ox-LDL by upregulation of proliferative and pro-inflammatory signaling. We also report for the first time that part of ox-LDL triggered reactions in MCF10A cells is mediated by oncogenic hsa-miR-21 through inhibition of its target gene PTEN and consequent activation of PI3K/Akt pathway.

  18. Both paraoxonase-1 genotype and activity do not predict the risk of future coronary artery disease; the EPIC-Norfolk Prospective Population Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh S Birjmohun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Paraoxonase-1 (PON1 is an antioxidant enzyme, that resides on high-density lipoprotein (HDL. PON1-activity, is heavily influenced by the PON1-Q192R polymorphism. PON1 is considered to protect against atherosclerosis, but it is unclear whether this relation is independent of its carrier, HDL. In order to evaluate the atheroprotective potential of PON1, we assessed the relationships among PON1-genotype, PON1-activity and risk of future coronary artery disease (CAD, in a large prospective case-control study. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cases (n = 1138 were apparently healthy men and women aged 45-79 years who developed fatal or nonfatal CAD during a mean follow-up of 6 years. Controls (n = 2237 were matched by age, sex and enrollment time. PON1-activity was similar in cases and controls (60.7+/-45.3 versus 62.6+/-45.8 U/L, p = 0.3 and correlated with HDL-cholesterol levels (r = 0.16, p<0.0001. The PON1-Q192R polymorphism had a profound impact on PON1-activity, but did not predict CAD risk (Odds Ratio [OR] per R allele 0.98[0.84-1.15], p = 0.8. Using conditional logistic regression, quartiles of PON1-activity showed a modest inverse relation with CAD risk (OR for the highest versus the lowest quartile 0.77[0.63-0.95], p = 0.01; p-trend = 0.06. PON1-activity adjusted for Q192R polymorphism correlated better with HDL-cholesterol (r = 0.26, p<0.0001 and more linearly predicted CAD risk (0.79[0.64-0.98], p = 0.03; p-trend = 0.008. However, these relationships were abolished after adjustment for HDL (particles-cholesterol-size and apolipoproteinA-I (0.94[0.74-1.18], p-trend = 0.3. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study, shows that PON1-activity inversely relates to CAD risk, but not independent of HDL, due to its close association with the HDL-particle. These data strongly suggest that a low PON1-activity is not a causal factor in atherogenesis.

  19. ELEVATE: an innovative study design to assess the efficacy, safety, and evolution of cardiovascular parameters in de novo kidney transplant recipients after early conversion from a calcineurin inhibitor to everolimus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Giet M

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Markus van der Giet,1 Josep M Cruzado,2 Johan W de Fijter,3 Hallvard Holdaas,4 Zailong Wang,5 Antonio Speziale,6 Guido Junge61Department of Nephrology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charite'-Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany; 2Department of Nephrology, University Hospital of Bellvitge, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain; 3Department of Nephrology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands; 4Section of Nephrology, Department of Transplant Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway; 5Biometrics and Statistical Science, Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, NJ, USA; 6Research and Development, Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, SwitzerlandAbstract: Progressive decline in allograft function and cardiovascular mortality after kidney transplantation remain major clinical challenges that can potentially be addressed by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitors, everolimus and sirolimus. mTOR inhibitors maintain immunosuppressive efficacy after minimization of calcineurin inhibitor (CNI therapy and can achieve significant long-term improvements in renal function. Recently, data have accumulated that suggest mTOR inhibitors may offer cardioprotective effects. In animal models, inhibition of mTOR leads to regression of cardiac hypertrophy, and the limited data consistently point to a remodeling benefit following heart transplantation. Experimentally, mTOR inhibitors restrict atherogenesis, confirmed clinically by intravascular ultrasound data demonstrating lower rates of transplant vasculopathy in heart transplant recipients on everolimus. Lastly, mTOR inhibitors appear to ameliorate arterial stiffness, a known risk factor for post-transplant cardiovascular events, but data remain sparse. The ELEVATE study will examine the renal effect of early conversion from CNI therapy to everolimus after kidney transplantation. Key secondary endpoints include the change in left ventricular mass index, the first time

  20. The prevalence of Chlamydia pneumoniae in the aortic wall and in peripheral blood of patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczaj, A; Stryjewski, P J; Fudal, M; Domal-Kwiatkowska, D; Ryfiński, B; Sliupkas-Dyrda, E; Smolik, S; Węglarz, L; Mazurek, U; Nowalany-Kozielska, E

    2016-01-01

    Some reports confirm a potential role of Chlamydia pneumoniae (ChP) in atherogenesis. In order to explore possible association between ChP and atherosclerosis, investigations were carried out in which the frequency of ChP in the arterial wall and peripheral blood was assessed in a group of patients with chronic coronary artery disease (CAD). Fifty-seven patients were enrolled in the study, 13 women and 44 men aged 61.8±6.5 (47-74), with previously diagnosed CAD, scheduled for planned coronary artery bypass grafting due to clinical indications. Vessel specimens retrieved from the ascending aorta (as a part of routine proximal venous graft development procedure) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from venous blood were evaluated for the presence of ChP DNA. Genomic DNA was extracted from PBMCs and vessel specimens. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to detect ChP DNA. A statistically more frequent occurrence of ChP was observed in aortic tissues compared to blood samples (70.2% vs 56.1%, respectively). Similarly, the number of ChP DNA genomic copies [n/1μg genomic DNA] was significantly higher in tissue specimens compared to blood samples (89±91 vs 41±77, respectively; p=0.0046). In patients without ChP in blood specimens, we observed significantly higher amounts of ChP in tissue specimens compared to patients with ChP in blood specimens (156±71 vs 107±88, respectively; p=0.0453). No correlation was found between the number of ChP DNA copies [n/1μg genomic DNA] in blood and in aortic specimens. The infection of ChP in the aortic wall was connected with hypercholesterolemia (p=0.029) and diabetes (p=0.03). We conclude that Chlamydia pneumoniae is a pathogen frequently occurring in the aortic wall of patients with CAD. The occurrence of ChP DNA in the aortic tissue is related to classic CAD risk factors such as diabetes and dyslipidemia. PMID:27358129

  1. SIRT1 inactivation induces inflammation through the dysregulation of autophagy in human THP-1 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda-Watanabe, Ai; Kitada, Munehiro; Kanasaki, Keizo [Diabetology and Endocrinology, Kanazawa Medical University, Kahoku-Gun, Ishikawa (Japan); Koya, Daisuke, E-mail: koya0516@kanazawa-med.ac.jp [Diabetology and Endocrinology, Kanazawa Medical University, Kahoku-Gun, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inactivation decreases autophagy in THP-1 cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of autophagy induces inflammation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inactivation induces inflammation through NF-{kappa}B activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The p62/Sqstm1 accumulation by impairment of autophagy is related to NF-{kappa}B activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inactivation is involved in the activation of mTOR and decreased AMPK activation. -- Abstract: Inflammation plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis. Monocytes/macrophages are some of the cells involved in the inflammatory process in atherogenesis. Autophagy exerts a protective effect against cellular stresses like inflammation, and it is regulated by nutrient-sensing pathways. The nutrient-sensing pathway includes SIRT1, a NAD{sup +}-dependent histone deacetylase, which is implicated in the regulation of a variety of cellular processes including inflammation and autophagy. The mechanism through which the dysfunction of SIRT1 contributes to the regulation of inflammation in relation to autophagy in monocytes/macrophages is unclear. In the present study, we demonstrate that treatment with 2-[(2-Hydroxynaphthalen-1-ylmethylene)amino]-N-(1-phenethyl)benzamide (Sirtinol), a chemical inhibitor of SIRT1, induces the overexpression of inflammation-related genes such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} and interleukin (IL)-6 through nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B signaling activation, which is associated with autophagy dysfunction, as shown through p62/Sqstm1 accumulation and decreased expression of light chain (LC) 3 II in THP-1 cells. The autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine, also induces inflammation-related NF-{kappa}B activation. In p62/Sqstm1 knockdown cells, Sirtinol-induced inflammation through NF-{kappa}B activation is blocked. In addition, inhibition of SIRT1 is involved in the activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and

  2. Hypertriglyceridemia: a too long unfairly neglected major cardiovascular risk factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, Alexander; Klempfner, Robert; Fisman, Enrique Z

    2014-01-01

    The existence of an independent association between elevated triglyceride (TG) levels, cardiovascular (CV) risk and mortality has been largely controversial. The main difficulty in isolating the effect of hypertriglyceridemia on CV risk is the fact that elevated triglyceride levels are commonly associated with concomitant changes in high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and other lipoproteins. As a result of this problem and in disregard of the real biological role of TG, its significance as a plausible therapeutic target was unfoundedly underestimated for many years. However, taking epidemiological data together, both moderate and severe hypertriglyceridaemia are associated with a substantially increased long term total mortality and CV risk. Plasma TG levels partially reflect the concentration of the triglyceride-carrying lipoproteins (TRL): very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), chylomicrons and their remnants. Furthermore, hypertriglyceridemia commonly leads to reduction in HDL and increase in atherogenic small dense LDL levels. TG may also stimulate atherogenesis by mechanisms, such excessive free fatty acids (FFA) release, production of proinflammatory cytokines, fibrinogen, coagulation factors and impairment of fibrinolysis. Genetic studies strongly support hypertriglyceridemia and high concentrations of TRL as causal risk factors for CV disease. The most common forms of hypertriglyceridemia are related to overweight and sedentary life style, which in turn lead to insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome (MS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Intensive lifestyle therapy is the main initial treatment of hypertriglyceridemia. Statins are a cornerstone of the modern lipids-modifying therapy. If the primary goal is to lower TG levels, fibrates (bezafibrate and fenofibrate for monotherapy, and in combination with statin; gemfibrozil only for monotherapy) could be the preferable drugs. Also ezetimibe has mild positive effects in lowering TG

  3. Atherosclerosis in rheumatoid arthtritis: the role of high-resolution B mode ultrasound in the measurement of the arterial intima-media thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Giuseppetti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA have a reduced life expectancy and high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as compared to the general population. A number of possible factors for the atherogenesis in this disease have been described, such as homocysteine, altered serum levels of selected lipopotroteins and treatment. Recent findigs indicate that the systemic inflammation may contribute to the development of atherosclerosis and confer an additional risk for cardiovascular death among patients with RA. The aim of our study was to evaluate the ability of high resolution Bmode ultrasoud and color Doppler to assess the existence of subclinical atherosclerosis in RA patients, measuring the intima- media thickness (IMT and resistence index of the common carotid arteries. Methods: Carotid IMT and carotid plaque were measured using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound in 40 patients with RA and 40 age- and sex-matched healthy persons. We used color Doppler ultrasound to assess vascular damage of the common carotid arteries and the resistence index (RI was determined by analysis of the spectral waveforms. Serum total cholesterol, trygliceridies, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, rheumatoid factor, body mass index (BMI, visual analogue scale (VAS were determined in patients and controls. C-reactive protein (CRP and the DAS28 were used to measure systemic inflammation. Results: Common carotid IMT were significantly higher (p=0.0009 in RA patients (0.83 ± 0.23 compared with controls (0.66 ± 0.22. In RA patients common carotid IMT was significantly correlated with serum total cholesterol (p=0.0008, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p=0.006, trygliceridies (p=0.042, age (p=0.031 and disease duration (p=0.019. No significant correlation was found with clinical and laboratory parameters reflecting disease activity. The prevalence of plaques was higher in RA patients compared with controls (25% vs

  4. Effects of combination therapy with mitiglinide and voglibose on postprandial plasma glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konya H

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hiroyuki Konya,1 Tomoyuki Katsuno,2 Taku Tsunoda,1 Yuzo Yano,1 Mai Kamitani,1 Masayuki Miuchi,2 Tomoya Hamaguchi,3 Jun-Ichiro Miyagawa,2 Mitsuyoshi Namba2 1Department of Internal Medicine, Ashiya Municipal Hospital, Ashiya, Hyogo, Japan; 2Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya, Hyogo, Japan; 3Division of Innovative Diabetes Treatment, Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya, Hyogo, Japan Abstract: Patients with diabetes mellitus are at increased risk from cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality as compared with healthy individuals. An association between the postprandial metabolic state and atherogenesis has been observed in patients with diabetes mellitus. In the Study to Prevent Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (STOP-NIDDM, treatment with an α-glucosidase inhibitor (α-GI in patients with impaired glucose tolerance not only reduced the rate of conversion from impaired glucose tolerance to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, but was also associated with a reduction in the risk of cardiovascular events. These results suggested the importance of treating postprandial hyperglycemia in the early stages of T2DM. Glinides are rapid and short-acting insulin secretagogues that bind to the sulfonylurea receptors on pancreatic β-cells to facilitate rapid insulin secretion, restore postprandial early insulin secretion, and reduce the postprandial glucose spike. Moreover, α-GIs reduce postprandial hyperglycemia and insulin secretion by delaying the digestion of carbohydrates and polysaccharides in the small intestine. Then, both glinides and α-GI have beneficial effects for treating patients with T2DM and impaired glucose tolerance. Considering the ameliorating effects of these drugs on postprandial metabolic disorders, combinations of glinides and α-GI might constitute a promising therapeutic strategy for managing patients with T2DM, and also appear to be

  5. Pentosan polysulfate decreases myocardial expression of the extracellular matrix enzyme ADAMTS4 and improves cardiac function in vivo in rats subjected to pressure overload by aortic banding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vistnes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that cleavage of the extracellular matrix (ECM proteoglycans versican and aggrecan by ADAMTS (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs proteases, which contributes to stress-induced ECM-reorganization in atherogenesis and osteoarthritis, also play a role in heart failure development. OBJECTIVES: The primary objective was to identify alterations in expression of ADAMTS versicanases and aggrecanases during development of heart failure, while evaluation of the effects of in vivo modulation of relevant changes in ADAMTS activity constituted the secondary objective. METHODS: Myocardial levels of versican, aggrecan, and their ADAMTS cleaving proteases were examined in Wistar rats six weeks after aortic banding (AB, and versican and selected ADAMTS versicanases were further analyzed in neonatal cardiomyocytes (NCM and cardiac fibroblasts (NFB after stimulation by inflammatory mediators. Based on the initial findings, ADAMTS4 was selected the most promising therapeutic target. Thus, rats with AB were treated with pentosan polysulfate (PPS, a polysaccharide with known ADAMTS4-inhibitory properties, and effects on versican fragmentation, left ventricular function and geometry were evaluated. RESULTS: We discovered that myocardial mRNA and protein levels of ADAMTS1 and -4, and mRNA levels of versican, aggrecan, and ADAMTS8 increased after AB, and TNF-α and IL-1β synergistically increased mRNA of versican and ADAMTS4 in NCM and NFB and secretion of ADAMTS4 from NCM. Furthermore, PPS-treatment improved systolic function, demonstrated by an improved fractional shortening (vehicle 48±3% versus PPS 60±1%, p<0.01 after AB. Following PPS-treatment, we observed an ∼80% reduction in myocardial ADAMTS4 mRNA (p = 0.03, and ∼50% reduction in the extracellular amount of the p150 versican fragments (p = 0.05, suggesting reduced versicanase activity. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that AB induces an

  6. Imaging of early carotid artery atherosclerotic lesions with {sup 111}In-labeled polyclonalhuman IgG (HIG); Darstellung frueher atherosklerotischer Laesionen der A. carotis mit {sup 111}In-markiertem polyklonalen humanem IgG (HIG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritz, H. [Wilhelm-Auerswald-Atherioskleroseforschungsgruppe (ASF), Wien (Austria); Rodrigues, M.; Sinzinger, H. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria)]|[Wilhelm-Auerswald-Atherioskleroseforschungsgruppe (ASF), Wien (Austria)

    1997-12-01

    To assess the value of scintigraphy with {sup 111}In-HIG for diagnosis and evaluation of the stage and the clinical extent of carotid artery disease in humans a prospective clinical comparative trial of scintigraphy vs. sonography was performed. 58 patients (38 male, 20 female; mean age 60{+-}7 years) with hyperlipidemia and ultrasonographically detectable carotid artery lesions were studied. After i.v. injection of 18.5 MBq {sup 111}In-HIG, anterior scintigraphic images of the neck were acquired. Real time two-dimensional B-mode ultrasonography of the left and the right carotid arteries was performed. {sup 111}In-HIG-scintigraphy as compared to the morphological gold standard (ultrasonography) had a sensitivity of 70-73%, specificity of 33-41% and a positive predictive value of 77-82% for detecting carotid atherosclerotic lesions. There was, however, no significant correlation between scintigraphy and ultrasonography. However, the data provide evidence that the two imaging techniques are visualizing different aspects of atherogenesis. On the one hand a functional one reflecting the activity of the disease ({sup 111}In-HIG) and on the other hand the morphological one resembling the extent of the disease (ultrasonography). (orig.) [Deutsch] Zur Erfassung morphologischer und funktioneller Veraenderungen bei fruehen atherosklerotischen Gefaessveraenderungen wurde in der vorliegenden prospektiven Vergleichsstudie die Wertigkeit der Szintigraphie mit {sup 111}In-markiertem humanem Immunglobulin G ({sup 111}In-HIG) im Vergleich zur hochaufloesenden Sonographie verglichen. 58 Patienten (38 Maenner, 20 Frauen; mittleres Alter 60{+-}7 Jahre) mit einer Dyslipoproteinaemie und sonographisch nachgewiesenen atherosklerotischen Laesionen der A. carotis wurden untersucht. Nach i.v. Applikation von 18,5 MBq {sup 111}In-HIG wurden a.p. Szintigramme der Halsregion angefertigt. Weiter wurde eine zweidimensionale Realtime-B-Mode-Sonographie der linken und rechten Arteria carotis

  7. Stress phase angle depicts differences in arterial stiffness: phantom and in vivo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The endothelial cells (ECs) lining of a blood vessel wall are exposed to both the wall shear stress (WSS) of blood flow and the circumferential strain (CS) of pulsing artery wall motion. Both WSS and CS keep involved in the modulation of ECs’ biochemical response and function and the temporal phase angle between the two is called stress phase angle (SPA). Previous studies at the cellular level have indicated that SPA is highly negative at sites that are prone to atherosclerosis, and hypothesized that large SPA may contribute to atherogenesis. Till now, there is no experimental data to support this hypothesis, probably due to the lack of a proper tool for measuring WSS and CS simultaneously and real time. In this study, a non-invasive ultrasonic biomechanics method was utilized to quantitatively calculate the SPA and experimentally evaluate the role of SPA in predicting early atherosclerosis. Three silicon tubes with a stiffness of 1.15, 3.62, 9.38 MPa were assembled in a pulsatile flow circuit and the values of SPA were measured to be −101.86 ± 3.65°,−170.19 ± 17.77° and −260.63 ± 18.62°, respectively. For the PVA-c phantoms, stiffness was 162.45, 235.68 and 374.24 kPa, the SPA corresponding to −170.32 ± 17.55°,−207.56 ± 10.78° and −261.08 ± 10.90°, respectively. Both phantom studies results demonstrated that SPA was highly negative in stiffer arteries. Further, experiments were taken in healthy living rats as control group (n = 3), atherosclerotic model group (n = 3), and drug treated group (n = 3), and the results showed that SPA was most negative in the model group, and SPA was least negative in the control group. Together, this study suggested that highly negative SPA appeared to be a prominent mechanical feature of vessels prone to atherosclerotic disease. (paper)

  8. Relationships between serum MCP-1 and subclinical kidney disease: African American-Diabetes Heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murea Mariana

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 plays important roles in kidney disease susceptibility and atherogenesis in experimental models. Relationships between serum MCP-1 concentration and early nephropathy and subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD were assessed in African Americans (AAs with type 2 diabetes (T2D. Methods Serum MCP-1 concentration, urine albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, and atherosclerotic calcified plaque (CP in the coronary and carotid arteries and infrarenal aorta were measured in 479 unrelated AAs with T2D. Generalized linear models were fitted to test for associations between MCP-1 and urine ACR, eGFR, and CP. Results Participants were 57% female, with mean ± SD (median age 55.6±9.5 (55.0 years, diabetes duration 10.3±8.2 (8.0 years, urine ACR 149.7±566.7 (14.0 mg/g, CKD-EPI eGFR 92.4±23.3 (92.0 ml/min/1.73m2, MCP-1 262.9±239.1 (224.4 pg/ml, coronary artery CP 280.1±633.8 (13.5, carotid artery CP 47.1±132.9 (0, and aorta CP 1616.0±2864.0 (319.0. Adjusting for age, sex, smoking, HbA1c, BMI, and LDL, serum MCP-1 was positively associated with albuminuria (parameter estimate 0.0021, P=0.04 and negatively associated with eGFR (parameter estimate −0.0003, P=0.001. MCP-1 remained associated with eGFR after adjustment for urine ACR. MCP-1 levels did not correlate with the extent of CP in any vascular bed, HbA1c or diabetes duration, but were positively associated with BMI. No interaction between BMI and MCP-1 was detected on nephropathy outcomes. Conclusions Serum MCP-1 levels are associated with eGFR and albuminuria in AAs with T2D. MCP-1 was not associated with subclinical CVD in this population. Inflammation appears to play important roles in development and/or progression of kidney disease in AAs.

  9. Atherosclerosis, cholesterol, nutrition, and statins – a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebbers, Jan-Olaf

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis, which causes approximately half of all deaths of adults over age 60 in industrialized nations, is a pandemic among inappropriately nourished and/or physically hypoactive children, adolescents, and adults world wide. Although nowadays statins are widely prescribed to middle age and elderly adults with high blood lipid levels as pharmacological prevention for the late complications of atherosclerosis, from a critical point of view statins seem not to solve the problem, especially when compared with certain natural ingredients of our nutrition like micronutrients as alternative strategy. Statin ingestion is associated with lowering of serum cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein concentrations; some prospective studies have shown statistical associations with subsequent modest reduction of mortality from cardiovascular disease. However, specific biochemical pathways and pharmacological roles of statins in prevention of atherosclerosis, if any, are unknown. Moreover, there have been no systematic cost-benefit analyses of life-style prophylaxis versus statin prophylaxis versus combined life-style plus statin prophylaxis versus neither life-style nor statin prophylaxis for clinically significant complications of cardiovascular diseases in the elderly. Further, in the trials of effectiveness statins were not compared with management of nutrition, which is the most appropriate alternative intervention. Such studies seem to be important, as the ever increasing world population, especially in developing countries, now demand expensive statins, which may be unaffordable for mitigating the pandemic. Studies of this kind are necessary to identify more precisely those patients for whom cardiovascular benefits will outweigh the risks and costs of the statin treatment in comparison with nutritional interventions. Against the background of the current pathogenetic concept of atherogenesis some of its possible risk factors, particularly the

  10. Hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids: Oxidised derivatives of linoleic acid and their role in inflammation associated with metabolic syndrome and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangaveti, Venkat N; Jansen, Holger; Kennedy, Richard Lee; Malabu, Usman H

    2016-08-15

    Linoleic acid (LA) is a major constituent of low-density lipoproteins. An essential fatty acid, LA is a polyunsaturated fatty acid, which is oxidised by endogenous enzymes and reactive oxygen species in the circulation. Increased levels of low-density lipoproteins coupled with oxidative stress and lack of antioxidants drive the oxidative processes. This results in synthesis of a range of oxidised derivatives, which play a vital role in regulation of inflammatory processes. The derivatives of LA include, hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids, oxo-​octadecadienoic acids, epoxy octadecadecenoic acid and epoxy-keto-octadecenoic acids. In this review, we examine the role of LA derivatives and their actions on regulation of inflammation relevant to metabolic processes associated with atherogenesis and cancer. The processes affected by LA derivatives include, alteration of airway smooth muscles and vascular wall, affecting sensitivity to pain, and regulating endogenous steroid hormones associated with metabolic syndrome. LA derivatives alter cell adhesion molecules, this initial step, is pivotal in regulating inflammatory processes involving transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor pathways, thus, leading to alteration of metabolic processes. The derivatives are known to elicit pleiotropic effects that are either beneficial or detrimental in nature hence making it difficult to determine the exact role of these derivatives in the progress of an assumed target disorder. The key may lie in understanding the role of these derivatives at various stages of development of a disorder. Novel pharmacological approaches in altering the synthesis or introduction of synthesised LA derivatives could possibly help drive processes that could regulate inflammation in a beneficial manner. Chemical Compounds: Linoleic acid (PubChem CID: 5280450), 9- hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (PubChem CID: 5312830), 13- hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (PubChem CID: 6443013), 9-oxo

  11. The hypocholesterolemic and antiatherogenic effects of Cholazol H, a chemically functionalized insoluble fiber with bile acid sequestrant properties in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T A; Romano, C; Liang, J; Nicolosi, R J

    1998-08-01

    Cholazol H (Alpha-Beta Technology, Worcester, MA), a chemically functionalized, insoluble dietary fiber with bile acid sequestrant properties, was studied in 30 male F1 B Golden Syrian hamsters for its effect on plasma lipid concentrations and early atherogenesis in experiment 1. In experiment 2, 30 male Golden Syrian hamsters were studied for the effects on plasma lipids and fecal excretion of bile acids. In experiment 1, three groups of 10 hamsters each were fed a chow-based hypercholesterolemic diet supplemented with 5% coconut oil and 0.1% cholesterol for 6 weeks. After 6 weeks, hamsters were continued on the diet with either 0% drug (hypercholesterolemic diet [HCD]), 0.5% cholestyramine (CSTY), or 0.5% Cholazol H for 8 weeks. Fasting plasma lipids were measured at weeks 6, 10, and 14, and early atherosclerosis (fatty streak formation) was measured at week 14. Relative to HCD, CSTY and Cholazol H significantly lowered plasma total cholesterol (TC) (-37%, P < .03, and -30%, P < .04, respectively) and plasma very-low and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (nonHDL-C) (-45%, P < .02, and -36%, P < .03, respectively) with no significant effects on plasma HDL-C or triglycerides (TG). Despite similar reductions in nonHDL-C, only Cholazol H significantly prevented early atherosclerosis (-38%, P < .02) relative to HCD. In experiment 2, three groups of 10 hamsters each were fed a chow-based hypercholesterolemic diet supplemented with 10% coconut oil and 0.05% cholesterol and either 0% drug HCD, 0.5% CSTY, or 0.5% Cholazol H for 4 weeks. Fasting plasma lipids were measured at weeks 2 and 4, and fecal bile acids were measured at week 4. Both Cholazol H and CSTY were equally effective in significantly lowering plasma TC (-16%, P < .003, and -13%, P < .01, respectively) and nonHDL-C (-22%, P < .004, and -18%, P < .02, respectively), with no significant effect on HDL-C and TG relative to HCD. Cholazol H and CSTY produced a significantly greater concentration of fecal total

  12. Angiotensin-(1-7) regulates Angiotensin II-induced VCAM-1 expression on vascular endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Feng [Department of Cardiology, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing (China); William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London (United Kingdom); Ren, Jingyi [Department of Cardiology, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing (China); Chan, Kenneth [William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London (United Kingdom); Chen, Hong, E-mail: chenhongbj@medmail.com.cn [Department of Cardiology, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We for the first time found that Ang-(1-7) inhibits Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inhibitory effect of Ang-(1-7) on VCAM-1 is mediated by MAS receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Ang-(1-7) is due to the suppression of NF-kappaB translocation. -- Abstract: Angiotensin II (Ang II) and Angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) are key effector peptides in the renin-angiotensin system. Increased circulatory Ang II level is associated with the development of hypertension and atherosclerosis, whereas Ang-(1-7) is a counter-regulatory mediator of Ang II which appears to be protective against cardiovascular disease. However, whether Ang-(1-7) regulates the action of Ang II on vascular endothelial cells (EC) remains unclear. We investigated the effects of Ang II and Ang-(1-7) in the context of atherogenesis, specifically endothelial cell VCAM-1 expression that is implicated in early plaque formation. The results show that Ang II increased VCAM-1 mRNA expression and protein displayed on EC surface, while Ang-(1-7) alone exerted no effects. However, Ang-(1-7) significantly suppressed Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression. Ang-(1-7) also inhibited the Ang II-induced VCAM-1 promoter activity driven by transcription factor NF-KappaB. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assay and ELISA showed that Ang II facilitated the nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB in ECs, and this was attenuated by the presence of Ang-(1-7). The inhibitory effects of Ang-(1-7) on Ang II-induced VCAM-1 promoter activity and NF-kappaB nuclear translocation were all reversed by the competitive antagonist of Ang-(1-7) at the Mas receptor. Our results suggest that Ang-(1-7) mediates its affects on ECs through the Mas receptor, and negatively regulates Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression by attenuating nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB.

  13. Prenatal arsenic exposure alters gene expression in the adult liver to a proinflammatory state contributing to accelerated atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Christopher States

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which environmental toxicants alter developmental processes predisposing individuals to adult onset chronic disease are not well-understood. Transplacental arsenic exposure promotes atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE(-/- mice. Because the liver plays a central role in atherosclerosis, diabetes and metabolic syndrome, we hypothesized that accelerated atherosclerosis may be linked to altered hepatic development. This hypothesis was tested in ApoE(-/- mice exposed to 49 ppm arsenic in utero from gestational day (GD 8 to term. GD18 hepatic arsenic was 1.2 µg/g in dams and 350 ng/g in fetuses. The hepatic transcriptome was evaluated by microarray analysis to assess mRNA and microRNA abundance in control and exposed pups at postnatal day (PND 1 and PND70. Arsenic exposure altered postnatal developmental trajectory of mRNA and microRNA profiles. We identified an arsenic exposure related 51-gene signature at PND1 and PND70 with several hubs of interaction (Hspa8, IgM and Hnf4a. Gene ontology (GO annotation analyses indicated that pathways for gluconeogenesis and glycolysis were suppressed in exposed pups at PND1, and pathways for protein export, ribosome, antigen processing and presentation, and complement and coagulation cascades were induced by PND70. Promoter analysis of differentially-expressed transcripts identified enriched transcription factor binding sites and clustering to common regulatory sites. SREBP1 binding sites were identified in about 16% of PND70 differentially-expressed genes. Western blot analysis confirmed changes in the liver at PND70 that included increases of heat shock protein 70 (Hspa8 and active SREBP1. Plasma AST and ALT levels were increased at PND70. These results suggest that transplacental arsenic exposure alters developmental programming in fetal liver, leading to an enduring stress and proinflammatory response postnatally that may contribute to early onset of atherosclerosis. Genes

  14. Antidiabetic treatment with gliptins: focus on cardiovascular effects and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisman, Enrique Z; Tenenbaum, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The traditional oral pharmacological therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been based on the prescription of metformin, a biguanide, as first line antihyperglycemic agent world over. It has been demonstrated that after 3 years of treatment, approximately 50% of diabetic patients could achieve acceptable glucose levels with monotherapy; but by 9 years this had declined to only 25%. Therefore, the implementation of a combined pharmacological therapy acting via different pathways becomes necessary, and its combination with a compound of the sulfonylurea group was along decades the most frequently employed prescription in routine clinical practice. Meglitinides, glitazones and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors were subsequently developed, but the five mentioned groups of oral antihyperglycemic agents are associated with variable degrees of undesirable or even severe cardiovascular events. The gliptins-also called dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors--are an additional group of antidiabetic compounds with increasing clinical use. We review the status of the gliptins with emphasis on their capabilities to positively or negatively affect the cardiovascular system, and their potential involvement in major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Alogliptin, anagliptin, linagliptin, saxagliptin, sitagliptin, teneligliptin and vildagliptin are the compounds currently in clinical use. Regardless differences in chemical structure and metabolic pathways, gliptins as a group exert favorable changes in experimental models. These changes, as an almost general rule, include improved endothelial function, reduction of inflammatory markers, oxidative stress ischemia/reperfusion injury and atherogenesis. In addition, increased adiponectin levels and modest decreases in lipidemia and blood pressure were reported. In clinical settings, several trials--notably the longer one, employing sitagliptin, with a mean follow-up period of 3 years--did not show an increased risk for ischemic

  15. Endothelial dysfunction in normal and abnormal glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esper, Ricardo J; Vilariño, Jorge O; Machado, Rogelio A; Paragano, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    independent risk factors for coronary heart disease, stroke, and peripheral arterial disease. Hyperglycemia causes glycosylation of proteins and phospholipids, thus increasing intracellular oxidative stress. Nonenzymatic reactive products, glucose-derived Schiff base, and Amadori products form chemically reversible early glycosylation products which subsequently rearrange to form more stable products, some of them long-lived proteins (collagen) which continue undergoing complex series of chemical rearrangements to form advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs). Once formed, AGEs are stable and virtually irreversible. AGEs generate ROS with consequent increased vessel oxidative damage and atherogenesis. The impressive correlation between coronary artery disease and alterations in glucose metabolism has raised the hypothesis that atherosclerosis and diabetes may share common antecedents. Large-vessel atherosclerosis can precede the development of diabetes, suggesting that rather than atherosclerosis being a complication of diabetes, both conditions may share genetic and environmental antecedents, a 'common soil'. PMID:18230954

  16. Differentially expressed microRNAs at different stages of atherosclerosis in ApoE-deficient mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAN Zhen; YAO Chen; LI Zi-lun; TENG Yuan; LI Wen; WANG Jin-song; YE Cai-sheng

    2013-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of cardiovascular disease,carotid artery disease,and peripheral vascular disease.However,it is hard to obtain human arterial tissue at different stages of atherosclerosis for a systematic study.The ApoE-deficient (ApoE 1-) mice predictably develop spontaneous atherosclerotic plaques with numerous features similar to the human lesions and contain nearly the entire spectrum of lesions observed during atherogenesis in humans.MicroRNA expression profiles at different stages of atherosclerosis in ApoE-deficient mice were screened to find out the differentially expressed microRNAs.Methods ApoE-deficient mice were euthanized at 4,8,and 20 weeks of age and divided into three groups according to the three time points,including groups A4 (fed a Western-type diet for 0 week),A8 (fed a Western-type diet for 4 weeks),and A20 (fed a Western-type diet for 16 weeks).Atherosclerotic lesions were analyzed.Fifteen aortas were collected and combined into three pools (five aortas in one pool) in each group.MicroRNA microarray analysis was replicated thrice in each group.The threshold of fold change ≥2.0 was used to screen up or down-regulated microRNAs.Differentially expressed microRNAs were subsequently verified with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.Those increasingly up or down-regulated microRNAs during the progression of atherosclerosis were selected.Results Atherosclerotic lesions first appeared in the aortic arch in group A8.Severe atherosclerotic lesions were observed in group A20.In group A8,seven MicroRNAs were up-regulated while two were down-regulated.In group A20,15 microRNAs were up-regulated while two were down-regulated.miR-34a-Sp and miR-497-5p were increasingly up-regulated,while miR-434-3p was progressively down-regulated when atherosclerosis progressed.Conclusions In this study,we described that microRNAs are differentially expressed at different stages of atherosclerosis in ApoE-deficient mice

  17. Hemostasis alterations in metabolic syndrome (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Iván; Alarcón, Marcelo; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo; Argilés, Josep M

    2006-11-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is characterized by the presence of at least three of the following alterations: enlargement of the waist diameter, higher levels of arterial pressure, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and glycemia, and reduction of high density lipoprotein cholesterol. The prevalence of MS reaches 23% in young adults, a percentage that increases with age. People with MS have a greater risk of suffering from cardiovascular disease (CVD). The physiopathologic alterations now found to exist in MS are diverse; among them is endothelial dysfunction, which triggers atherogenic lesions and hypercoagulability characterized by alterations of the coagulation factors and the regulatory proteins of fibrinolysis such as the plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1). The increase in oxidative stress and/or the reactive oxygen species in patients with MS is partially related to the oxidation state of the lipoproteins, especially of the low density lipoproteins. This fact favors atherogenesis. Moreover, the oxidative stress produces alterations in the production of adipokines, cytokines secreted by the adipose tissues. The abnormality in the transport of lipoprotein diminishes the catabolism of the very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and increases the catabolism of the high density lipoprotein (HDL), which creates insulin resistance. This process is associated with a lower concentration of adiponectin that in turn regulates the catabolism of VLDL and HDL; consequently increasing the flow of fatty acids from the adipose tissue to the liver and muscles. The proinflammatory cytokines, among them tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), are of great importance in MS regulating different processes and molecules such as PAI-1. PAI-1 is controlled by the group of transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), especially by PPAR gamma and alpha ligands. In summary, MS includes multiple alterations related to insulin resistance at several levels: hepatic

  18. A nuclear microscopy study of trace elements Ca, Fe, Zn and Cu in atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative mapping of trace elements Ca, Fe, Zn and Cu can be achieved in biological tissue using a nuclear microprobe. Presented here is a brief review of the work we have carried out in the last decade using the nuclear microscope to try and elucidate the role of trace elements Fe, Zn, Cu and Ca in induced atherosclerosis in New Zealand White rabbits fed on a 1% cholesterol diet. The lesions were studied using nuclear microscopy, incorporating a combination of ion beam techniques: particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM). Iron is present in early lesions at concentrations around seven times higher than the artery wall. Measurements of localized lesion iron concentrations were observed to be highly correlated with the depth of the lesion in the artery wall for each individual animal, implying that local elevated concentrations may provide an accelerated process of atherosclerosis in specific regions of the artery. When the rabbits were kept mildly anaemic, thereby reducing iron levels in the lesion, the progression of the disease was significantly slowed. Iron chelation using desferal showed that early treatment (three weeks into the high fat diet) for relatively long periods (nine weeks) significantly retarded the progression of the disease. Zinc is depleted in the lesion and is also observed to be anti-correlated with local lesion development and feeding the rabbits on a high fat diet with zinc supplements inhibited lesion development, although since no significant increase in lesion zinc levels was measured, this anti-atherosclerotic effect may be indirect. Copper, measured at low levels (∼3 ppm) in the early lesion, is also depleted compared to the artery wall, suggesting that it is not a major factor in atherogenesis. Calcium is also depleted in early lesions, although at a later stage mineral deposition (hydroxyapatite) is observed to take place in the lesion

  19. Hobby with Biochemistry: Use of active learning methodology in Biochemistry at the Medical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R.T. Prado

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objectives: The learning of Biochemistry is generally considered difficult by the graduates, because studies the molecular level the metabolism of living and it demands a great capacity for abstraction by students. Thus, researchers have tried alternative methods to provid an alternative study method. Materials and methods: 178 students of the School of Medicine, PUC-PR, that course the disciplines of Medical Biochemistry I and II, were divided into 50 groups, each with 3-4 students, and were have to draw up a hobby activity with a specific theme of the Biochemistry. The selected topics were, amino acids and proteins, enzymes, cellular respiration, glycogen metabolism, gluconeogenesis, lipid metabolism, metabolic integration, dyslipidemia and atherogenesis, pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome, mechanisms of diabetes mellitus complications. The hobby activities chosen were direct, duplex, self-defined, cryptogram, bugs game. Both issues such as the type of hobby was drawn between groups. The groups had to: elaborate hobby; presents it to class orally, applying the questions prepared; printing and expose the hobby at the wall in the University; answer an evaluation regarding the preparation of work; and all groups should get together and organize one titled magazine "Hobby with Biochemistry" and deliver it printed. Results and conclusions: According the groups, the greatest difficulty was the adequacy of the questions posed in the required format, once they had only one issue and restricted space for the responses. Furthermore, the formatting was also identified as a point very difficult in activity elaboration. On the topic of learning through the development of work, and/or a new skill groups assigned grades ranging between 7.0 and 10.0 and about 90% of the groups attributed note 10 on satisfaction of seeing the work done and its ability to produce it. According to the results, the activity proved to be

  20. Detection of early stage atherosclerotic plaques using PET and CT fusion imaging targeting P-selectin in low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Ikuko, E-mail: nakamuri@riken.jp [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan); Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Hasegawa, Koki [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan); Department of Pathology and Experimental Medicine, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Wada, Yasuhiro [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan); Hirase, Tetsuaki; Node, Koichi [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Watanabe, Yasuyoshi, E-mail: yywata@riken.jp [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► P-selectin regulates leukocyte recruitment as an early stage event of atherogenesis. ► We developed an antibody-based molecular imaging probe targeting P-selectin for PET. ► This is the first report on successful PET imaging for delineation of P-selectin. ► P-selectin is a candidate target for atherosclerotic plaque imaging by clinical PET. -- Abstract: Background: Sensitive detection and qualitative analysis of atherosclerotic plaques are in high demand in cardiovascular clinical settings. The leukocyte–endothelial interaction mediated by an adhesion molecule P-selectin participates in arterial wall inflammation and atherosclerosis. Methods and results: A {sup 64}Cu-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid conjugated anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody ({sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin mAb) probe was prepared by conjugating an anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody with DOTA followed by {sup 64}Cu labeling. Thirty-six hours prior to PET and CT fusion imaging, 3 MBq of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin mAb was intravenously injected into low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient Ldlr-/- mice. After a 180 min PET scan, autoradiography and biodistribution of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody was examined using excised aortas. In Ldlr-/- mice fed with a high cholesterol diet for promotion of atherosclerotic plaque development, PET and CT fusion imaging revealed selective and prominent accumulation of the probe in the aortic root. Autoradiography of aortas that demonstrated probe uptake into atherosclerotic plaques was confirmed by Oil red O staining for lipid droplets. In Ldlr-/- mice fed with a chow diet to develop mild atherosclerotic plaques, probe accumulation was barely detectable in the aortic root on PET and CT fusion imaging. Probe biodistribution in aortas was 6.6-fold higher in Ldlr-/- mice fed with a high cholesterol diet than in those fed with a normal chow diet. {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin m