WorldWideScience

Sample records for aterrizamiento del ice

  1. Aplicación del sistema comunicativo "ICING" para la gestión del mantenimiento del alumbrado urbano

    OpenAIRE

    de la Viuda Valcárcel, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    Este proyecto pretende mejorar la gestión actual del mantenimiento del alumbrado público en el municipio de estudio haciendo uso de una de las tecnologías emergentes con más potencial: el código QR (a través del teléfono móvil). El proyecto piloto ICING (año 2006) ya propuso este sistema como método comunicativo entre el ciudadano y la Administración Pública. Otro de los objetivos, aprovechando la tecnología anterior, es mejorar la comunicación entre ambos. No toda la sociedad ...

  2. Modernización del sistema de información de actividades formativas del ICE-UPC

    OpenAIRE

    Chamorro Garcia, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Modernización y optimización del sistema de información que utiliza el ICE-UPC para gestionar las actividades formativas. También se realiza una re ingeniería de procesos para optimizar éstos a los nuevos empleados disponibles y al nuevo sistema. Dicho sistema es el primero en conectarse con Atenea.

  3. Distribución del ictioplancton en la Patagonia austral de Chile: potenciales efectos del deshielo de Campos de Hielo Sur Ichthyoplankton distribution in South Patagonia, Chile: potential effects of ice melting from the Southern Ice Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio F Landaeta

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Durante octubre-noviembre de 2009 se realizó un crucero oceanográfico entre 50 y 53°S de Chile austral, en las cercanías del glaciar Campos de Hielo Sur. Las estaciones cercanas al glaciar presentaron baja temperatura (1-3°C y salinidad ( 0,1 ciclos s-1. Los principales taxa del ictioplancton fueron huevos y larvas de sardina fueguina Sprattus fuegensis, pez hacha Maurolicus parvipinnis, Macrouridae y merluza austral Merluccius australis. El desove principal de S. fuegensis (~ 8000 huevos 10 m-2 ocurrió en zonas mezcladas de la plataforma continental adyacente, mientras que el desove de M. parvipinnis ocurrió en canales intermedios asociado a valores intermedios de estabilidad (N~0,06 ciclos s-1. Se observó una nula o baja abundancia de huevos y larvas de peces en las cercanías del glaciar, y la abundancia de huevos de M. parvipinnis estuvo relacionada positivamente con la temperatura y salinidad de la columna de agua y negativamente con la estabilidad de la columna de agua. Además, hubo una relación negativa entre la densidad del agua de mar y el diámetro de los huevos de S. fuegensis. La relación entre deshielo e ictioplancton podría tener consecuencias en el transporte advectivo y mortalidad masiva de huevos y larvas de peces y el acople pelágico-bentónico en la Patagonia austral de Chile. Como el cambio climático global ha incrementado los deshielos de glaciares en latitudes altas, y el aumento del ingreso de aguas de baja temperatura y salinidad podría tener consecuencias en el ictioplancton de la Patagonia chilena.In October-November 2009, an oceanographic survey was carried out between 50 and 53°S off southern Chile, near the Southern Ice Field. The stations near the glacier showed low temperatures (1-3°C and salinity ( 0.1 cycles s-1. Main ichthyoplankton taxa were eggs and larvae of southern sprat Sprattus fuegensis, lightfish Maurolicus parvipinnis, Macrouridae, and southern hake Merluccius australis. The main

  4. Monitoring the fall of large atmospheric ice conglomerations: a multianalytical approach to the study of the Mejorada del Campo megacryometeor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Francisco Alamilla; Alegre, José Ma Ramiro; Cordero Pérez, José Carlos; Martín Redondo, Ma Paz; Delgado Huertas, Antonio; Fernández Sampedro, Ma Teresa; Menor-Salván, César; Ruiz-Bermejo, Marta; López-Vera, Fernando; Rodríguez-Losada, José A; Martinez-Frias, Jesus

    2008-04-01

    Certain local atmospheric anomalies, such as the formation of unusually large ice conglomerations (megacryometeors), have been proposed to be a potential natural hazard for people and aviation, as well as geoindicators for fingerprinting larger-scale atmospheric environmental changes. On March 13th 2007, at approximately 10:15 am, an ice chunk weighing about 10 kg fell from the clear-sky and crashed through the roof (around 15 m) of an industrial storage house in Mejorada del Campo, a town located 20 km east from Madrid. The megacryometeor monitoring follow-up and the original investigation presented here includes, for the first time, both logistic and scientific collaboration between the Laboratory of the Environment, Criminalistic Service (SECRIM, the Spanish "Guardia Civil") and academic and scientific institutions (universities and the Spanish National Research Council). We propose that the management procedure of the incident, along with the detailed scientific research and combination of analytical methodologies in different laboratories, can serve as a protocol model for other similar events. PMID:18385879

  5. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  6. Ice cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Anders

    Ice cores from Antarctica, from Greenland, and from a number of smaller glaciers around the world yield a wealth of information on past climates and environments. Ice cores offer unique records on past temperatures, atmospheric composition (including greenhouse gases), volcanism, solar activity......, dustiness, and biomass burning, among others. In Antarctica, ice cores extend back more than 800,000 years before present (Jouzel et al. 2007), whereas. Greenland ice cores cover the last 130,000 years...

  7. Ice Cream

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, E.

    2014-01-01

    Ice cream is a popular dessert, which owes its sensorial properties (mouth feel) to its complex microstructure. The microstructure is a result of the combination of the ingredients and the production process. Ice cream is produced by simultaneous freezing and shearing of the ice cream mix, which res

  8. Legal Ice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandsbjerg, Jeppe

    The idealised land|water dichotomy is most obviously challenged by ice when ‘land practice’ takes place on ice or when ‘maritime practice’ is obstructed by ice. Both instances represent disparity between the legal codification of space and its social practice. Logically, then, both instances call...... for alternative legal thought and practice; in the following I will emphasise the former and reflect upon the relationship between ice, law and politics. Prior to this workshop I had worked more on the relationship between cartography, geography and boundaries than specifically on ice. Listening to...

  9. Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovich, D.; Gerland, S.; Hendricks, S.; Meier, Walter N.; Nicolaus, M.; Richter-Menge, J.; Tschudi, M.

    2013-01-01

    During 2013, Arctic sea ice extent remained well below normal, but the September 2013 minimum extent was substantially higher than the record-breaking minimum in 2012. Nonetheless, the minimum was still much lower than normal and the long-term trend Arctic September extent is -13.7 per decade relative to the 1981-2010 average. The less extreme conditions this year compared to 2012 were due to cooler temperatures and wind patterns that favored retention of ice through the summer. Sea ice thickness and volume remained near record-low levels, though indications are of slightly thicker ice compared to the record low of 2012.

  10. Sea ice terminology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    A group of definitions of terms related to sea ice is presented, as well as a graphic representation of late winter ice zonation of the Beaufort Sea Coast. Terms included in the definition list are belt, bergy bit, bight, brash ice, calving, close pack ice, compacting, compact pack ice, concentration, consolidated pack ice, crack, diffuse ice edge, fast ice, fast-ice boundary, fast-ice edge, first-year ice, flaw, flaw lead, floe, flooded ice, fractured, fractured zone, fracturing, glacier, grey ice, grey-white ice, growler, hummock, iceberg, iceberg tongue, ice blink, ice boundary, ice cake, ice edge, ice foot, ice free, ice island, ice shelf, large fracture, lead, medium fracture, multiyear ice, nilas, old ice, open pack ice, open water, pack ice, polar ice, polynya, puddle, rafted ice, rafting, ram, ridge, rotten ice, second-year ice, shearing, shore lead, shore polynya, small fracture, strip, tabular berg, thaw holes, very close pack ice, very open pack ice, water sky, young coastal ice, and young ice.

  11. Interstellar Ices

    CERN Document Server

    Boogert, A C A

    2003-01-01

    Currently ~36 different absorption bands have been detected in the infrared spectra of cold, dense interstellar and circumstellar environments. These are attributed to the vibrational transitions of ~17 different molecules frozen on dust grains. We review identification issues and summarize the techniques required to extract information on the physical and chemical evolution of these ices. Both laboratory simulations and line of sight studies are essential. Examples are given for ice bands observed toward high mass protostars, fields stars and recent work on ices in disks surrounding low mass protostars. A number of clear trends have emerged in recent years. One prominent ice component consists of an intimate mixture between H2O, CH3OH and CO2 molecules. Apparently a stable balance exists between low temperature hydrogenation and oxidation reactions on grain surfaces. In contrast, an equally prominent ice component, consisting almost entirely of CO, must have accreted directly from the gas phase. Thermal proc...

  12. A spongy icing model for aircraft icing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Researches have indicated that impinging droplets can be entrapped as liquid in the ice matrix and the temperature of accreting ice surface is below the freezing point. When liquid entrapment by ice matrix happens, this kind of ice is called spongy ice. A new spongy icing model for the ice accretion problem on airfoil or aircraft has been developed to account for entrapped liquid within accreted ice and to improve the determination of the surface temperature when entering clouds with supercooled droplets. Different with conventional icing model, this model identifies icing conditions in four regimes: rime, spongy without water film, spongy with water film and glaze. By using the Eulerian method based on two-phase flow theory, the impinging droplet flow was investigated numerically. The accuracy of the Eulerian method for computing the water collection efficiency was assessed, and icing shapes and surface temperature distributions predicted with this spongy icing model agree with experimental results well.

  13. A spongy icing model for aircraft icing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xin; Bai Junqiang; Hua Jun; Wang Kun; Zhang Yang

    2014-01-01

    Researches have indicated that impinging droplets can be entrapped as liquid in the ice matrix and the temperature of accreting ice surface is below the freezing point. When liquid entrapment by ice matrix happens, this kind of ice is called spongy ice. A new spongy icing model for the ice accretion problem on airfoil or aircraft has been developed to account for entrapped liquid within accreted ice and to improve the determination of the surface temperature when enter-ing clouds with supercooled droplets. Different with conventional icing model, this model identifies icing conditions in four regimes:rime, spongy without water film, spongy with water film and glaze. By using the Eulerian method based on two-phase flow theory, the impinging droplet flow was investigated numerically. The accuracy of the Eulerian method for computing the water collection efficiency was assessed, and icing shapes and surface temperature distributions predicted with this spongy icing model agree with experimental results well.

  14. Ice Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    blugerman, n.

    2015-10-01

    My project is to make ice observatories to perceive astral movements as well as light phenomena in the shape of cosmic rays and heat, for example.I find the idea of creating an observation point in space, that in time will change shape and eventually disappear, in consonance with the way we humans have been approaching the exploration of the universe since we started doing it. The transformation in the elements we use to understand big and small transformations, within the universe elements.

  15. Ice ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Earth's climate undergoes great changes in cycles of 104 to 105 years. Deep sea sediments contain proof of these changes. The critical parameter is the O18/O16 isotope ratio. The astronomical theory is discussed of ice ages based on the changes in the shape of the Earth's orbit around the sun. Forecasts for the future are given - in the coming years the climate is expected to get warmer owing to increased CO2 levels in the atmosphere, and then a long cooler period is expected to follow. (M.D.)

  16. Ice warriors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woof, M.

    2004-02-01

    Sitting under a glacier, SNSK's productive Svea North longwall mine is like no other. Situated on the Norwegian archipelago of Spitzbergen this is one of the Europe's two top producing coal mines and produced 2.7 mt of coal in 2003. A long tunnel has recently been built under the glacier with a conveyor system, to overcome problems of hauling coal along the ice road. The building of this tunnel is described in the article. The longwall mining operation and equipment used is described. 4 figs.

  17. Great Lakes Ice Charts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Charts show ice extent and concentration three times weekly during the ice season, for all lakes except Ontario, from the 1973/74 ice season through the 2001/2002...

  18. Forecasting Turbine Icing Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Neil; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Clausen, Niels-Erik;

    In this study, we present a method for forecasting icing events. The method is validated at two European wind farms in with known icing events. The icing model used was developed using current ice accretion methods, and newly developed ablation algorithms. The model is driven by inputs from the WRF...... mesoscale model, allowing for both climatological estimates of icing and short term icing forecasts. The current model was able to detect periods of icing reasonably well at the warmer site. However at the cold climate site, the model was not able to remove ice quickly enough leading to large ice...... accumulations, which have not been seen in observations. In addition to the model evaluation we were able to investigate the potential occurrence of ice induced power loss at two wind parks in Europe using observed data. We found that the potential loss during an icing event is large even when the turbine...

  19. Forecasting Turbine Icing Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Neil; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Clausen, Niels-Erik;

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we present a method for forecasting icing events. The method is validated at two European wind farms in with known icing events. The icing model used was developed using current ice accretion methods, and newly developed ablation algorithms. The model is driven by inputs from the WRF...... mesoscale model, allowing for both climatological estimates of icing and short term icing forecasts. The current model was able to detect periods of icing reasonably well at the warmer site. However at the cold climate site, the model was not able to remove ice quickly enough leading to large ice...... accumulations, which have not been seen in observations. In addition to the model evaluation we were able to investigate the potential occurrence of ice induced power loss at two wind parks in Europe using observed data. We found that the potential loss during an icing event is large even when the turbine...

  20. Wave-Ice interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈奚海莉

    2001-01-01

    The growth and movement of sea ice cover are influenced by the presence of wave field. Inturn, the wave field is influenced by the presence of ice cover. Their interaction is not fully understood.In this paper, we discuss some current understanding on wave attenuation when it propagates through frag-mented ice cover, ice drift due to the wave motion, and the growth characteristics of ice cover in wave field.

  1. Doped Colloidal Artificial Ice

    OpenAIRE

    Libal, A.; Reichhardt, C. J. Olson; Reichhardt, C.

    2015-01-01

    We examine square and kagome artificial spin ice for colloids confined in arrays of double-well traps. Unlike magnetic artificial spin ices, colloidal and vortex artificial spin ice realizations allow creation of doping sites through double occupation of individual traps. We find that doping square and kagome ice geometries produces opposite effects. For square ice, doping creates local excitations in the ground state configuration that produce a local melting effect as the temperature is rai...

  2. Ice Adhesion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Uses Evaluate and compare the relative performance of materials and surfcae coating based on their ability to aid in ice removal Test the effectiveness of de-icing...

  3. Forecast Icing Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Forecast Icing Product (FIP) is an automatically-generated index suitable for depicting areas of potentially hazardous airframe icing. The FIP algorithm uses...

  4. IOMASA SEA ICE DEVELOPMENTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren; Tonboe, Rasmus; Heygster, Georg; Melsheimer, Christian; Pedersen, Leif Toudal; Schyberg, Harald; Tveter, Frank; Dahlgren, Per; Lundelius, Tomas; Gustafsson, Nils

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity studies show that the radiometer ice concentration estimate can be biased by +10% by anomalous atmospheric emissivity and -20% by anomalous ice surface emissivity. The aim of the sea ice activities in EU 5th FP project IOMASA is to improve sea ice concentration estimates at higher...... spatial resolution. The project is in the process of facilitating an ice concentration observing system through validation and a better understanding of the microwave radiative transfer of the sea ice and overlying snow layers. By use of a novel modelling approach, it is possible to better detect and...... determine the circumstances that may lead to anomalous sea ice concentration retrieval as well as to assess and possibly minimize the sensitivities of the retrieval system. Through an active partnership with the SAF on Ocean and Sea Ice, a prototype system will be implemented as an experimental product...

  5. Ice rule correlations in stuffed spin ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuffed spin ice is a chemical variation of a spin ice material like Ho2Ti2O7 in which extra magnetic ions are inserted into the crystal structure. Previous studies have shown that the degree of stuffing has very little effect on the residual entropy in the system, which takes a value very close to the spin ice entropy. We argue, however, that the observation of this entropy does not imply long range coherence of the ice rules, that determine the local spin configurations. We have characterized deviations from the ice rules by means of a polarized neutron diffraction study of a single crystal of Ho2+δTi2−δO7−δ/2 with δ = 0.3. Our results demonstrate that the ice rules in stuffed spin ice are strictly valid only over a relatively short range, and that at longer range stuffed spin ice exhibits some characteristics of a ‘cluster glass’, with a tendency to more conventional ferromagnetic correlations. (paper)

  6. Synchronizing ice cores from the Renland and Agassiz ice caps to the Greenland Ice Core Chronology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Bo Møllesøe; Clausen, Henrik Brink; Fischer, D. A.; Koerner, R. M.; Johnsen, Sigfus Johann; Andersen, Katrine Krogh; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Rasmussen, Sune Olander; Steffensen, Jørgen Peder; Svensson, Anders

    Four ice cores from the Agassiz ice cap in the Canadian high arctic and one ice core from the Renland ice cap in eastern Greenland have been synchronized to the Greenland Ice Core Chronology 2005 (GICC05) which is based on annual layer counts in the DYE-3, GRIP and NGRIP ice cores. Volcanic...

  7. ICE SLURRY APPLICATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffeld, M; Wang, M J; Goldstein, V; Kasza, K E

    2010-12-01

    The role of secondary refrigerants is expected to grow as the focus on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions increases. The effectiveness of secondary refrigerants can be improved when phase changing media are introduced in place of single phase media. Operating at temperatures below the freezing point of water, ice slurry facilitates several efficiency improvements such as reductions in pumping energy consumption as well as lowering the required temperature difference in heat exchangers due to the beneficial thermo-physical properties of ice slurry. Research has shown that ice slurry can be engineered to have ideal ice particle characteristics so that it can be easily stored in tanks without agglomeration and then be extractable for pumping at very high ice fraction without plugging. In addition ice slurry can be used in many direct contact food and medical protective cooling applications. This paper provides an overview of the latest developments in ice slurry technology. PMID:21528014

  8. Autonomous Aerial Ice Observation for Ice Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joakim Haugen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the tasks in ice defense is to gather information about the surrounding ice environment using various sensor platforms. In this manuscript we identify two monitoring tasks known in literature, namely dynamic coverage and target tracking, and motivate how these tasks are relevant in ice defense using RPAS. An optimization-based path planning concept is outlined for solving these tasks. A path planner for the target tracking problem is elaborated in more detail and a hybrid experiment, which consists of both a real fixed-wing aircraft and simulated objects, is included to show the applicability of the proposed framework.

  9. INGRESOS, GASTOS E INVERSIONES DE CAPITAL EN EL ICE

    OpenAIRE

    Dirección de Planificación Estratégic Institucional del ICE

    2003-01-01

    La elaboración y ejecución de las políticas monetarias y fiscales restrictivas en las dos últimas décadas en nuestro país, han afectado el correcto funcionamiento del ICE. Las metas que se plantean las autoridades monetarias y hacendarias año tras año, conllevan a una serie de restricciones en el ámbito presupuestario, limitándose el nivel de gastos corrientes, de inversiones y de endeudamiento de dicha institución. Con el argumento de que el ICE es parte del problema (cuando en realidad ha c...

  10. Land Ice: Greenland & Antarctic ice mass anomaly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Data from NASA's Grace satellites show that the land ice sheets in both Antarctica and Greenland are losing mass. The continent of Antarctica (left chart) has been...

  11. Naled ice growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schohl, G. A.; Ettema, R.

    1986-02-01

    Based on theoretical formulation and dimensional analysis, supported by the results of laboratory experiments, a theory and a detailed description of naled ice growth are presented. The theory, concepts, and data should be of interest to engineers concerned with the effects of naleds (also referred to as aufeis or icings) on engineering works. The growth of a two dimensional, or laterally confined (flume), naled is shown to depend primarily on seven, independent, dimensionless parameters. The early, two dimensional, phase of growth, a naled consists of a mixture of ice and water, or ice-water slush, forming on a frigid base. The influence of two of the three remaining parameters is not felt until after a transition time has passed. The continuing, cyclic process by which slush layers form and eventually freeze results in the ice laminations that are a feature of naled ice.

  12. Small Icing Wind Tunnel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horák, V.; Hoření, Bohumír; Rozehnal, D.; Svoboda, E.

    Brno: University of Defence, 2007, s. 91-98. ISBN 978-80-7231-238-2. [ICMT'07, The international conference on military technologies. Brno (CZ), 02.05.2007-04.05.2007] R&D Projects: GA MPO FT-TA/026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : aircraft icing * icing wind tunnel * ice accretion Subject RIV: JR - Other Machinery

  13. Sputtering of water ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baragiola, R.A.; Vidal, R.A.; Svendsen, W.;

    2003-01-01

    We present results of a range of experiments of sputtering of water ice together with a guide to the literature. We studied how sputtering depends on the projectile energy and fluence, ice growth temperature, irradiation temperature and external electric fields. We observed luminescence from...

  14. Ice sheet in peril

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Christine Schøtt

    2016-01-01

    Earth's large ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are major contributors to sea level change. At present, the Greenland Ice Sheet (see the photo) is losing mass in response to climate warming in Greenland (1), but the present changes also include a long-term response to past climate transitions...

  15. Testing The Ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The country’s fourth scientific expedition tothe North Pole starts OBSERVATION STATIONS:Members of China’s fourth Arctic expedition set up polar bear-proof "apple houses" on the ice surface of the Arctic Ocean on August 8 The Chinese ice breaker Xuelong

  16. SMILES ice cloud products

    Science.gov (United States)

    MilláN, L.; Read, W.; Kasai, Y.; Lambert, A.; Livesey, N.; Mendrok, J.; Sagawa, H.; Sano, T.; Shiotani, M.; Wu, D. L.

    2013-06-01

    Upper tropospheric water vapor and clouds play an important role in Earth's climate, but knowledge of them, in particular diurnal variation in deep convective clouds, is limited. An essential variable to understand them is cloud ice water content. The Japanese Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on board the International Space Station (ISS) samples the atmosphere at different local times allowing the study of diurnal variability of atmospheric parameters. We describe a new ice cloud data set consisting of partial Ice Water Path and Ice Water Content. Preliminary comparisons with EOS-MLS, CloudSat-CPR and CALIOP-CALIPSO are presented. Then, the diurnal variation over land and over open ocean for partial ice water path is reported. Over land, a pronounced diurnal variation peaking strongly in the afternoon/early evening was found. Over the open ocean, little temporal dependence was encountered. This data set is publicly available for download in HDF5 format.

  17. Islands in the ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Tina; Kjær, Kurt H.; Haile, James Seymour;

    2012-01-01

    Nunataks are isolated bedrocks protruding through ice sheets. They vary in age, but represent island environments in 'oceans' of ice through which organism dispersals and replacements can be studied over time. The J.A.D. Jensen's Nunataks at the southern Greenland ice sheet are the most isolated...... nunataks on the northern hemisphere - some 30 km from the nearest biological source. They constitute around 2 km(2) of ice-free land that was established in the early Holocene. We have investigated the changes in plant composition at these nunataks using both the results of surveys of the flora over the...... where the botanical survey was exhaustive. As no animals and humans are found on the nunataks, this change in diversity over a period of just 42 years must relate to environmental changes probably being climate-driven. This suggests that even the flora of fairly small and isolated ice-free areas reacts...

  18. Coating Reduces Ice Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Trent; Prince, Michael; DwWeese, Charles; Curtis, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The Shuttle Ice Liberation Coating (SILC) has been developed to reduce the adhesion of ice to surfaces on the space shuttle. SILC, when coated on a surface (foam, metal, epoxy primer, polymer surfaces), will reduce the adhesion of ice by as much as 90 percent as compared to the corresponding uncoated surface. This innovation is a durable coating that can withstand several cycles of ice growth and removal without loss of anti-adhesion properties. SILC is made of a binder composed of varying weight percents of siloxane(s), ethyl alcohol, ethyl sulfate, isopropyl alcohol, and of fine-particle polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The combination of these components produces a coating with significantly improved weathering characteristics over the siloxane system alone. In some cases, the coating will delay ice formation and can reduce the amount of ice formed. SILC is not an ice prevention coating, but the very high water contact angle (greater than 140 ) causes water to readily run off the surface. This coating was designed for use at temperatures near -170 F (-112 C). Ice adhesion tests performed at temperatures from -170 to 20 F (-112 to -7 C) show that SILC is a very effective ice release coating. SILC can be left as applied (opaque) or buffed off until the surface appears clear. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data show that the coating is still present after buffing to transparency. This means SILC can be used to prevent ice adhesion even when coating windows or other objects, or items that require transmission of optical light. Car windshields are kept cleaner and SILC effectively mitigates rain and snow under driving conditions.

  19. GLERL Radiation Transfer Through Freshwater Ice

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Radiation transmittance (ratio of transmitted to incident radiation) through clear ice, refrozen slush ice and brash ice, from ice surface to ice-water interface in...

  20. Cyclic steps on ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokokawa, M.; Izumi, N.; Naito, K.; Parker, G.; Yamada, T.; Greve, R.

    2016-05-01

    Boundary waves often form at the interface between ice and fluid flowing adjacent to it, such as ripples under river ice covers, and steps on the bed of supraglacial meltwater channels. They may also be formed by wind, such as the megadunes on the Antarctic ice sheet. Spiral troughs on the polar ice caps of Mars have been interpreted to be cyclic steps formed by katabatic wind blowing over ice. Cyclic steps are relatives of upstream-migrating antidunes. Cyclic step formation on ice is not only a mechanical but also a thermodynamic process. There have been very few studies on the formation of either cyclic steps or upstream-migrating antidunes on ice. In this study, we performed flume experiments to reproduce cyclic steps on ice by flowing water, and found that trains of steps form when the Froude number is larger than unity. The features of those steps allow them to be identified as ice-bed analogs of cyclic steps in alluvial and bedrock rivers. We performed a linear stability analysis and obtained a physical explanation of the formation of upstream-migrating antidunes, i.e., precursors of cyclic steps. We compared the results of experiments with the predictions of the analysis and found the observed steps fall in the range where the analysis predicts interfacial instability. We also found that short antidune-like undulations formed as a precursor to the appearance of well-defined steps. This fact suggests that such antidune-like undulations correspond to the instability predicted by the analysis and are precursors of cyclic steps.

  1. Initial Cooling Experiment (ICE)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1978-01-01

    In 1977, in a record-time of 9 months, the magnets of the g-2 experiment were modified and used to build a proton/antiproton storage ring: the "Initial Cooling Experiment" (ICE). It served for the verification of the cooling methods to be used for the "Antiproton Project". Stochastic cooling was proven the same year, electron cooling followed later. Also, with ICE the experimental lower limit for the antiproton lifetime was raised by 9 orders of magnitude: from 2 microseconds to 32 hours. For its previous life as g-2 storage ring, see 7405430. More on ICE: 7711282, 7809081, 7908242.

  2. 趣话ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘奉越

    2002-01-01

    在英语中,ice是一个很普通的词,它的基本含义是“冰,冰块”。如:The sportsman slipped on the ice and one of his legs was broken.(这个运动员在冰上滑倒了,一条腿摔断了。)它还可指“冰淇淋”,相当于ice cream。如.After having two ices I felt uncomfortable.

  3. PROTONIC PHOTOCONDUCTIVITY OF ICE

    OpenAIRE

    Petrenko, V.; Ebinuma, T.; Maeno, N.

    1987-01-01

    A number of attempts have been made to find the protonic photoconductivity of ice (abbreviated as PPC hereafter), but most of them were not successful. Camp and Spears (1) tried to excite PPC of pure ice single crystals by a xenon lamp and concluded that the probability of photodissociation of ice, if any, is very small. De Haas et al. (2) and Itagaki et al. (3) used gamma-rays, X-rays, or electron beams, and found a change in the electrical conductivity. Very high-energy beams were used in t...

  4. Ice nucleation terminology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vali, G.; DeMott, P.; Möhler, O.; Whale, T. F.

    2014-08-01

    Progress in the understanding of ice nucleation is being hampered by the lack of uniformity in how some terms are used in the literature. This even extends to some ambiguity of meanings attached to some terms. Suggestions are put forward here for common use of terms. Some are already well established and clear of ambiguities. Others are less engrained and will need a conscious effort in adoption. Evolution in the range of systems where ice nucleation is being studied enhances the need for a clear nomenclature. The ultimate limit in the clarity of definitions is, of course, the limited degree to which ice nucleation processes are understood.

  5. Milankovitch solar rdiation variations and ice age ice sheet sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fluctuations in the size of ice age ice sheets are caclulated using glacier mechanics and the Milankovitch solar radiation variations. The calculations are greatly simplified by considering only two-dimensional ice sheets with profiles that would be appropriate if ice obeyed the flow law of a perfectly plastic solid. The solar radiation variations seem to be large enough to account for ice ages. (author)

  6. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Libal, Andras J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  7. Ice Cream Stick Math.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, Cynthia

    1992-01-01

    Described is a teaching technique which uses the collection of ice cream sticks as a means of increasing awareness of quantity in a self-contained elementary special class for students with learning disabilities and mild mental retardation. (DB)

  8. Global ice sheet modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed

  9. Ice slurry accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, K.G.; Kauffeld, M.

    1998-06-01

    More and more refrigeration systems are designed with secondary loops, thus reducing the refrigerant charge of the primary refrigeration plant. In order not to increase energy consumption by introducing a secondary refrigerant, alternatives to the well established single phase coolants (brines) and different concepts of the cooling plant have to be evaluated. Combining the use of ice-slurry - mixture of water, a freezing point depressing agent (antifreeze) and ice particles - as melting secondary refrigerant and the use of a cool storage makes it possible to build plants with secondary loops without increasing the energy consumption and investment. At the same time the operating costs can be kept at a lower level. The accumulation of ice-slurry is compared with other and more traditional storage systems. The method is evaluated and the potential in different applications is estimated. Aspects of practically use of ice-slurry has been examined in the laboratory at the Danish Technological Institute (DTI). This paper will include the final conclusions from this work concerning tank construction, agitator system, inlet, outlet and control. The work at DTI indicates that in some applications systems with ice-slurry and accumulation tanks have a great future. These applications are described by a varying load profile and a process temperature suiting the temperature of ice-slurry (-3 - -8/deg. C). (au)

  10. Ice-Borehole Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Alberto; Carsey, Frank; Lane, Arthur; Engelhardt, Herman

    2006-01-01

    An instrumentation system has been developed for studying interactions between a glacier or ice sheet and the underlying rock and/or soil. Prior borehole imaging systems have been used in well-drilling and mineral-exploration applications and for studying relatively thin valley glaciers, but have not been used for studying thick ice sheets like those of Antarctica. The system includes a cylindrical imaging probe that is lowered into a hole that has been bored through the ice to the ice/bedrock interface by use of an established hot-water-jet technique. The images acquired by the cameras yield information on the movement of the ice relative to the bedrock and on visible features of the lower structure of the ice sheet, including ice layers formed at different times, bubbles, and mineralogical inclusions. At the time of reporting the information for this article, the system was just deployed in two boreholes on the Amery ice shelf in East Antarctica and after successful 2000 2001 deployments in 4 boreholes at Ice Stream C, West Antarctica, and in 2002 at Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska. The probe is designed to operate at temperatures from 40 to +40 C and to withstand the cold, wet, high-pressure [130-atm (13.20-MPa)] environment at the bottom of a water-filled borehole in ice as deep as 1.6 km. A current version is being outfitted to service 2.4-km-deep boreholes at the Rutford Ice Stream in West Antarctica. The probe (see figure) contains a sidelooking charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera that generates both a real-time analog video signal and a sequence of still-image data, and contains a digital videotape recorder. The probe also contains a downward-looking CCD analog video camera, plus halogen lamps to illuminate the fields of view of both cameras. The analog video outputs of the cameras are converted to optical signals that are transmitted to a surface station via optical fibers in a cable. Electric power is supplied to the probe through wires in the cable at a

  11. Modeling Commercial Turbofan Engine Icing Risk With Ice Crystal Ingestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that have been attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was degraded engine performance, and one or more of the following: loss of thrust control (roll back), compressor surge or stall, and flameout of the combustor. As ice crystals are ingested into the fan and low pressure compression system, the increase in air temperature causes a portion of the ice crystals to melt. It is hypothesized that this allows the ice-water mixture to cover the metal surfaces of the compressor stationary components which leads to ice accretion through evaporative cooling. Ice accretion causes a blockage which subsequently results in the deterioration in performance of the compressor and engine. The focus of this research is to apply an engine icing computational tool to simulate the flow through a turbofan engine and assess the risk of ice accretion. The tool is comprised of an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor flow path, without modeling the actual ice accretion. A commercial turbofan engine which has previously experienced icing events during operation in a high altitude ice crystal environment has been tested in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The PSL has the capability to produce a continuous ice cloud which are ingested by the engine during operation over a range of altitude conditions. The PSL test results confirmed that there was ice accretion in the engine due to ice crystal ingestion, at the same simulated altitude operating conditions as experienced previously in

  12. Larsen Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Warmer surface temperatures over just a few months in the Antarctic can splinter an ice shelf and prime it for a major collapse, NASA and university scientists report in the latest issue of the Journal of Glaciology. Using satellite images of tell-tale melt water on the ice surface and a sophisticated computer simulation of the motions and forces within an ice shelf, the scientists demonstrated that added pressure from surface water filling crevasses can crack the ice entirely through. The process can be expected to become more widespread if Antarctic summer temperatures increase. This true-color image from Landsat 7, acquired on February 21, 2000, shows pools of melt water on the surface of the Larsen Ice Shelf, and drifting icebergs that have split from the shelf. The upper image is an overview of the shelf's edge, while the lower image is displayed at full resolution of 30 meters (98 feet) per pixel. The labeled pond in the lower image measures roughly 1.6 by 1.6 km (1.0 x 1.0 miles). Full text of Press Release More Images and Animations Image courtesy Landsat 7 Science Team and NASA GSFC

  13. The ICES system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ICES is an integrated system used in the various engineering fields. It is made up of the Basic System and the applied Subsystems. ICES is controlled by the Operating System of the computer, from which it calls for suitable services: space allocation, loading of the modules etc... To be able to use software of this type on a computer the Operating System should be made more general. The Subsystems are developed with special programs included in the ICES Basic System. Each Subsystem is associated with an area of application. In other words, a Subsystem can only treat a previously defined ''class of problems''. The engineer (user) communicates with the Subsystem using a language oriented towards the problem (POL) also previously defined using the CDL language. The use of the (POL) language makes the engineer-computer contact much easier. The applied programs written in ICETRAN, once supplied as input to the ICETRAN Precompiler, become Fortran programs with special characteristics. A Fortran compiler produces the corresponding object programs with which, using the ICES ''Link-edit'' procedures, one obtains the modules which can be executed by an ICES Subsystem

  14. IDEOLOGICALLY CHALLENGING ENTERTAINMENT (ICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Lori Chalmers

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ideologically Challenging Entertainment (ICE is entertainment that challenges ‘us vs. them’ ideologies associated with radicalization, violent conflict and terrorism. ICE presents multiple perspectives on a conflict through mainstream entertainment. This article introduces the theoretical underpinnings of ICE, the first ICE production and the audience responses to it. The first ICE production was Two Merchants: The Merchant of Venice adapted to challenge ideologies of the Arab-Israeli Conflict. A mixed-methods study of audience responses explored whether this production inspired audiences to shift their ideological views. Each performance included two versions of the adaptation: a Jewish dominated society with an Arab Muslim minority, contrasted with an Arab Muslim dominated society and a Jewish minority. A mixed-methods study of audience responses explored whether this production inspired audiences to shift their ideological views to become more tolerant of differences away from ideological radicalization. Of audience members who did not initially agree with the premise of the production, 40% reconsidered their ideological views, indicating increased tolerance, greater awareness of and desire to change their own prejudices. In addition, 86% of the audience expressed their intention to discuss the production with others, thereby encouraging critical engagement with, and broader dissemination of the message. These outcomes suggest that high quality entertainment – as defined by audience responses to it - can become a powerful tool in the struggle against radicalised ideologies.

  15. Data archaeology at ICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Harry D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the function of the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), both past and present, in particular in the context of its interest in compiling oceanographic data sets. Details are provided of the procedures it adopted to ensure adequate internationally collaborative marine investigations during the first part of the century, such as how it provided a forum for action by its member states, how it coordinated and published the results of scientific programs, and how it provided a foundation, through scientists employed in the ICES Office, for the establishment of the original oceanographic marine databases and associated products, and the scientific interpretation of the results. The growth and expansion of this area of ICES activity is then traced, taking into account the changing conditions for oceanographic data management resulting from the establishment of the National Data Centres, as well as the World Data Centres for Oceanography, which were created to meet the needs of the International Geophysical Year (IGY). Finally, there is a discussion of the way in which the very existence of ICES has proved to be a valuable source of old data, some of which have not yet been digitized, but which can be readily retrieved because they have been very carefully documented throughout the years. Lessons from this activity are noted, and suggestions are made on how the past experiences of ICES can be utilized to ensure the availability of marine data to present and future generations of scientists.

  16. Ice Cores of the National Ice Core Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. National Ice Core Laboratory (NICL) is a facility for storing, curating, and studying ice cores recovered from the polar regions of the world. It provides...

  17. The Great Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Louis L.

    1992-01-01

    The Great Ice Age, a recent chapter in the Earth's history, was a period of recurring widespread glaciations. During the Pleistocene Epoch of the geologic time scale, which began about a million or more years ago, mountain glaciers formed on all continents, the icecaps of Antarctica and Greenland were more extensive and thicker than today, and vast glaciers, in places as much as several thousand feet thick, spread across northern North America and Eurasia. So extensive were these glaciers that almost a third of the present land surface of the Earth was intermittently covered by ice. Even today remnants of the great glaciers cover almost a tenth of the land, indicating that conditions somewhat similar to those which produced the Great Ice Age are still operating in polar and subpolar climates.

  18. INGRESOS, GASTOS E INVERSIONES DE CAPITAL EN EL ICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirección de Planificación Estratégic Institucional del ICE

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available La elaboración y ejecución de las políticas monetarias y fiscales restrictivas en las dos últimas décadas en nuestro país, han afectado el correcto funcionamiento del ICE. Las metas que se plantean las autoridades monetarias y hacendarias año tras año, conllevan a una serie de restricciones en el ámbito presupuestario, limitándose el nivel de gastos corrientes, de inversiones y de endeudamiento de dicha institución. Con el argumento de que el ICE es parte del problema (cuando en realidad ha contribuido ha aminorarlo del desequilibrio en las finanzas públicas, se ha cercenado su autonomía e independencia; sin atacar la verdadera causa de dicho desbalance, tal y como son el déficit del gobierno central y de la autoridad monetaria.A nivel de las finanzas públicas, se incorporan las estadísticas del ICE bajo un formato contable que difiere de manera importante con los principios de la contabilidad que utilizan las empresas del sector privado. Dicha metodología es obsoleta, presentado serias deficiencias que el mismo FMI (quien la elaboró reconoce. Este mismo organismo ya ha elaborado una nueva metodología que aún no se utiliza en nuestro país. Más aún, existen países que utilizan metodologías diferentes, las cuales están mas acordes con la contabilidad tradicional de empresa privada.Los impactos positivos o negativos que la actuación del ICE pueda tener sobre el equilibrio macroeconómico, el crecimiento y el desarrollo del país, es algo aún no medido, cuyas relaciones de causa y efecto no se han establecido de manera real. En el debate y las discusiones, han prevalecido más bien las posturas políticas e ideológicas (en respuesta a intereses particulares, en detrimento del análisis científico y técnico. Así mismo, las discusiones se han fundamentado en postulados teóricos, sin ser contrarrestados contra la realidad.

  19. EASE-Grid Sea Ice Age

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides weekly estimates of sea ice age for the Arctic Ocean from remotely sensed sea ice motion and sea ice extent. The ice age data are derived...

  20. Spatial complexity of ice flow across the Antarctic Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Felix S. L.

    2015-11-01

    Fast-flowing ice streams carry ice from the interior of the Antarctic Ice Sheet towards the coast. Understanding how ice-stream tributaries operate and how networks of them evolve is essential for developing reliable models of the ice sheet’s response to climate change. A particular challenge is to unravel the spatial complexity of flow within and across tributary networks. Here I define a measure of planimetric flow convergence, which can be calculated from satellite measurements of the ice sheet’s surface velocity, to explore this complexity. The convergence map of Antarctica clarifies how tributaries draw ice from its interior. The map also reveals curvilinear zones of convergence along lateral shear margins of streaming, and abundant ripples associated with nonlinear ice rheology and changes in bed topography and friction. Convergence on ice-stream tributaries and their feeding zones is uneven and interspersed with divergence. For individual drainage basins, as well as the ice sheet as a whole, fast flow cannot converge or diverge as much as slow flow. I therefore deduce that flow in the ice-stream networks is subject to mechanical regulation that limits flow-orthonormal strain rates. These findings provide targets for ice-sheet simulations and motivate more research into the origin and dynamics of tributarization.

  1. Vacancy Concentration in Ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1977-01-01

    Based on the diffusion constant for self-diffusion in ice, which is believed to take place by a vacancy mechanism, we estimate the relative vacancy concentration near the melting point to be at least ∼ 10−6, i.e. much higher than previous estimates of about 10−10.......Based on the diffusion constant for self-diffusion in ice, which is believed to take place by a vacancy mechanism, we estimate the relative vacancy concentration near the melting point to be at least ∼ 10−6, i.e. much higher than previous estimates of about 10−10....

  2. ICE Online Detainee Locator System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Online Detainee Locator datasets provide the location of a detainee who is currently in ICE custody, or who was release from ICE custody for any reason with the...

  3. Ice crystal ingestion by turbofans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios Pabon, Manuel A.

    This Thesis will present the problem of inflight icing in general and inflight icing caused by the ingestion of high altitude ice crystals produced by high energy mesoscale convective complexes in particular, and propose a new device to prevent it based on dielectric barrier discharge plasma. Inflight icing is known to be the cause of 583 air accidents and more than 800 deaths in more than a decade. The new ice crystal ingestion problem has caused more than 100 flights to lose engine power since the 1990's, and the NTSB identified it as one of the causes of the Air France flight 447 accident in 1-Jun2008. The mechanics of inflight icing not caused by ice crystals are well established. Aircraft surfaces exposed to supercooled liquid water droplets will accrete ice in direct proportion of the droplet catch and the freezing heat transfer process. The multiphase flow droplet catch is predicted by the simple sum of forces on each spherical droplet and a droplet trajectory calculation based on Lagrangian or Eulerian analysis. The most widely used freezing heat transfer model for inflight icing caused by supercooled droplets was established by Messinger. Several computer programs implement these analytical models to predict inflight icing, with LEWICE being based on Lagrangian analysis and FENSAP being based on Eulerian analysis as the best representatives among them. This Thesis presents the multiphase fluid mechanics particular to ice crystals, and explains how it differs from the established droplet multiphase flow, and the obstacles in implementing the former in computational analysis. A new modification of the Messinger thermal model is proposed to account for ice accretion produced by ice crystal impingement. Because there exist no computational and experimental ways to fully replicate ice crystal inflight icing, and because existing ice protections systems consume vast amounts of energy, a new ice protection device based on dielectric barrier discharge plasma is

  4. Greenland Ice Sheet Retreat Since the Little Ice Age

    OpenAIRE

    Beitch, Marci Jillian

    2014-01-01

    Late 20th century and 21st century satellite imagery of the perimeter of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) provide high resolution observations of the ice sheet margins. Examining changes in ice margin positions over time yield measurements of GrIS area change and rates of margin retreat. However, longer records of ice sheet margin change are needed to establish more accurate predictions of the ice sheet's future response to global conditions. In this study, the trimzone, the area of deglaciated...

  5. The little ice age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grove, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Little Ice Age, a period of glacier expansion in alpine regions that began sometime between the twelfth and sixteenth centuries and lasted until late in the nineteenth century, was recorded not only in glacial features dated by geologic techniques but also in historical documents such as field sketches, land values, and weather records, especially in the Alps. Indirect evidence of its impact in other parts of the world includes the records of sea-ice extent near Iceland and Greenland, the fate of the Viking settlements in Greenland, and many other suggestions that the climate was colder in the recent past than it is today. Jean Grove's book is an authoritative, superbly documented, and excellently written summary of the abundant evidence of climatic change during the last few centuries in the context of broader climatic variations of the last 10,000 years. This summary provides a much-needed perspective for considering the magnitude and frequency of natural climatic variations in the past, given predictions for the future. In the final chapter, Grove notes that natural climatic variations, including another minor ice age, might be expected in the future but at the end of the Little Ice Age coincided with the increased burning of fossil fuels during the industralization of Europe and North America. This coincidence does indeed suggest that modern scientists already have had a significant impact on the global climate.

  6. Melting ice, growing trade?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Bensassi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Large reductions in Arctic sea ice, most notably in summer, coupled with growing interest in Arctic shipping and resource exploitation have renewed interest in the economic potential of the Northern Sea Route (NSR. Two key constraints on the future viability of the NSR pertain to bathymetry and the future evolution of the sea ice cover. Climate model projections of future sea ice conditions throughout the rest of the century suggest that even under the most “aggressive” emission scenario, increases in international trade between Europe and Asia will be very low. The large inter-annual variability of weather and sea ice conditions in the route, the Russian toll imposed for transiting the NSR, together with high insurance costs and scarce loading/unloading opportunities, limit the use of the NSR. We show that even if these obstacles are removed, the duration of the opening of the NSR over the course of the century is not long enough to offer a consequent boost to international trade at the macroeconomic level.

  7. Ice stadium in Prague

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svobodová, Markéta

    Prague: Prostor - architektura, interiér, design, 2012 - (Švácha, R.), s. 150-153 ISBN 978-80-87064-09-2 Institutional support: RVO:68378033 Keywords : ice stadium * Josef Fuchs * Bohumil Steigenhöfer Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage

  8. THE SPITZER ICE LEGACY: ICE EVOLUTION FROM CORES TO PROTOSTARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ices regulate much of the chemistry during star formation and account for up to 80% of the available oxygen and carbon. In this paper, we use the Spitzer c2d Legacy ice survey, complimented with data sets on ices in cloud cores and high-mass protostars, to determine standard ice abundances and to present a coherent picture of the evolution of ices during low- and high-mass star formation. The median ice composition H2O:CO:CO2:CH3OH:NH3:CH4:XCN is 100:29:29:3:5:5:0.3 and 100:13:13:4:5:2:0.6 toward low- and high-mass protostars, respectively, and 100:31:38:4:-:-:- in cloud cores. In the low-mass sample, the ice abundances with respect to H2O of CH4, NH3, and the component of CO2 mixed with H2O typically vary by 2O. In contrast, some CO and CO2 ice components, XCN, and CH3OH vary by factors 2-10 between the lower and upper quartile. The XCN band correlates with CO, consistent with its OCN- identification. The origin(s) of the different levels of ice abundance variations are constrained by comparing ice inventories toward different types of protostars and background stars, through ice mapping, analysis of cloud-to-cloud variations, and ice (anti-)correlations. Based on the analysis, the first ice formation phase is driven by hydrogenation of atoms, which results in an H2O-dominated ice. At later prestellar times, CO freezes out and variations in CO freezeout levels and the subsequent CO-based chemistry can explain most of the observed ice abundance variations. The last important ice evolution stage is thermal and UV processing around protostars, resulting in CO desorption, ice segregation, and the formation of complex organic molecules. The distribution of cometary ice abundances is consistent with the idea that most cometary ices have a protostellar origin.

  9. Del Piero

    OpenAIRE

    Umbaca, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    Rifacendosi al “Pinturicchio”, epiteto con cui Gianni Agnelli consacrava il calciatore Alessandro Del Piero un “artista del calcio”, Enzo Umbaca scrisse al popolare personaggio invitandolo a collaborare ad una performance durante la quale Pinturicchio-Del Piero avrebbe affrescato il muro di una galleria torinese calciando un pallone macchiato di grafite contro un muro sul quale è appesa la copia di un opera del Pinturicchio.

  10. Modelling the Antarctic Ice Sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Holm, A.

    2015-01-01

    Science) Antarctic Ice Sheet (DAIS) model (Shaffer 2014) is forced by reconstructed time series of Antarctic temperature, global sea level and ocean subsurface temperature over the last two glacial cycles. In this talk a modelling work of the Antarctic ice sheet over most of the Cenozoic era using the......The Antarctic ice sheet is a major player in the Earth’s climate system and is by far the largest depository of fresh water on the planet. Ice stored in the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) contains enough water to raise sea level by about 58 m, and ice loss from Antarctica contributed significantly to...... DAIS model will be presented. G. Shaffer (2014) Formulation, calibration and validation of the DAIS model (version 1), a simple Antarctic ice sheet model sensitive to variations of sea level and ocean subsurface temperature, Geosci. Model Dev., 7, 1803‐1818...

  11. The reconstruction and climatic implication of an independent palaeo ice cap within the Andean rain shadow east of the former Patagonian ice sheet, Santa Cruz Province, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Ingo W.; Glasser, Neil F.; Hubbard, Alun

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the reconstruction of the previously undocumented Meseta Cuadrada palaeo ice cap on south-west Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires, Santa Cruz Province, Patagonia. Based on theoretical surface profiles the reconstruction of the Meseta Cuadrada Palaeo Ice Cap indicates an ice mass covering at least 78 km2 with a total ice volume around 9.2 km3. The inferred equilibrium line altitude (ELA) of the palaeo ice cap (2031 m asl) represents a drop of 286 m compared to the ELA of the current Meseta Cuadrada glacier (~ 2317 m asl). We explain this small change in ELA with reference to the flat hypsometry of the palaeo ice cap and an enhanced aridity to the west of the Patagonian Andes caused by the existence of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) Patagonian ice sheet. Calculated annual accumulation values of ca. 402 to 957 mm/a at the ELA of the Meseta Cuadrada palaeo ice cap derived by a degree day model (DDM) during the last local glacial maximum extent are low compared with estimations of the current accumulation at the ELA of the remaining glacierized area of around 3789 mm/a. This strongly supports the existence of increased aridity and seasonality east of the Patagonian Andes during the Last Glacial Maximum, provided both maximum extents were synchronous.

  12. Oceanographic conditions beneath Fimbul Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Abrahamsen, Einar Povl

    2012-01-01

    Antarctic ice shelves play a key role in the global climate system, acting as important sites for the cooling of shelf waters, thereby facilitating deep and bottom water formation. Many of the processes that take place under large ice shelves can be observed more conveniently beneath smaller ice shelves such as Fimbul Ice Shelf, an ice shelf in the eastern Weddell Sea. Fimbul Ice Shelf and nearby ice shelves might also play a significant regional role: although no bottom water is produced in ...

  13. GPR capabilities for ice thickness sampling of low salinity ice and for detecting oil in ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalumiere, Louis [Sensors by Design Ltd. (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This report discusses the performance and capabilities test of two airborne ground-penetrating radar (GPR) systems of the Bedford Institute of Oceanography (BIO), Noggin 1000 and Noggin 500, for monitoring low salinity snow and ice properties which was used to measure the thickness of brackish ice on Lake Melville in Labrador and on a tidal river in Prince Edward Island. The work of other researchers is documented and the measurement techniques proposed are compared to the actual GPR approach. Different plots of GPR data taken over snow and freshwater ice and over ice with changing salinity are discussed. An interpretation of brackish ice GPR plots done by the Noggin 1000 and Noggin 500 systems is given based on resolution criterion. Additionally, the capability of the BIO helicopter-borne GPR to detect oil-in-ice has been also investigated, and an opinion on the likelihood of the success of GPR as an oil-in-ice detector is given.

  14. IceCube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutrino astronomy beyond the Sun was first imagined in the late 1950s; by the 1970s, it was realized that kilometer-scale neutrino detectors were required. The first such instrument, IceCube, is near completion and taking data. Its scientific missions include the observation of Galactic supernova explosions, the search for dark matter, and the study of the neutrinos themselves. These reach energies more than two orders of magnitude beyond those produced by accelerator beams. In these lectures, we will focus on IceCube's most publicized mission, the search for the sources of cosmic rays. We will conclude with an overview of the first results obtained with the partially completed detector.These lectures are based on a review paper co-authored with Spencer Klein (arXiv:astroph.HE/1007.1247) to be published in Review of Scientific Instruments.

  15. ICE SLURRY APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Kauffeld, M.; Wang, M.J.; Goldstein, V.; Kasza, K.E.

    2010-01-01

    The role of secondary refrigerants is expected to grow as the focus on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions increases. The effectiveness of secondary refrigerants can be improved when phase changing media are introduced in place of single phase media. Operating at temperatures below the freezing point of water, ice slurry facilitates several efficiency improvements such as reductions in pumping energy consumption as well as lowering the required temperature difference in heat exchangers ...

  16. The Joy of Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAyeal, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    The effectiveness of cryospheric science in addressing its main purpose (predicting and assessing response to climate change) is powerfully, but intangibly enhanced by the mysterious nature and the remote locations of ice and snow phenomena. Study of the cryosphere, in essence, depends as much on the universal human desire to satisfy curiosity as it does on the fact that cryospheric science informs humanity about the consequences of the environmental changes now clearly visible in all realms of the cryosphere. In my presentation, I shall consider the study of ice-shelf dynamics and stability, and shall draw on the perspective of my 37 years of involvement in this small, but important corner of glaciology, to show where curiosity has, and continues to be, a major driver of understanding. Joyful moments within the development of ice-shelf glaciology include examples where complete misunderstandings and blind alleys have ironically led to unexpected insight into how related phenomena operate, including: the flow of ice streams, the role of sticky spots, styles and drivers of iceberg calving, tidewater glacier terminus behavior, the source mechanisms and interpretations of cryospheric related seismic signals, and the dynamics of iceberg-drift-steering ocean circulation in basins separated by mid-ocean ridges. The familiar joke, "Why did the man who lost his keys on a dark night only search underneath the streetlamp?", is apt for cryospheric science--but with a perverse twist: We cryospheric scientists are more akin to the man who is driven to also grope for the key in the darkness because of the chance that in addition to the key, the car that the key will start might also be found somewhere beyond the glow of the streetlamp.

  17. Ice Giant Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymer, A. M.; Arridge, C. S.; Masters, A.; Turtle, E. P.; Simon, A. A.; Hofstadter, M. D.; Turrini, D.; Politi, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ice Giants in our solar system, Uranus and Neptune, are fundamentally different from their Gas Giant siblings Jupiter and Saturn, from the different proportions of rock and ice to the configuration of their planetary magnetic fields. Kepler space telescope discoveries of exo-planets indicate that planets of this type are among the most ubiquitous universally and therefore a future mission to explore the nature of the Ice Giants in our own solar system will provide insights into the nature of extra-solar system objects in general. Uranus has the smallest self- luminosity of all the planets, potentially related to catastrophic events early in the planet's history, which also may explain Uranus' large obliquity. Uranus' atmosphere is subject to extreme seasonal forcing making it unique in the Solar System. Neptune is also unique in a number of ways, notably its large moon Triton which is likely a captured Kuiper Belt Object and one of only two moons in the solar system with a robustly collisional atmosphere. Similar to Uranus, the angle between the solar wind and the magnetic dipole axis is subject to large-amplitude variations on both diurnal and seasonal timescales, but peculiarly it has one of the quietest magnetospheres of the solar system, at least according to Voyager 2, the only spacecraft to encounter Neptune to date. A comprehensive mission, as advocated in the Decadal Survey, would provide enormous science return but is also challenging and expensive. In this presentation we will discuss mission scenarios and suggest how collaboration between disciplines and internationally can help us to pursue a mission that includes Ice Giant exploration.

  18. Mars Ice Age, Simulated

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    December 17, 2003This simulated view shows Mars as it might have appeared during the height of a possible ice age in geologically recent time.Of all Solar System planets, Mars has the climate most like that of Earth. Both are sensitive to small changes in orbit and tilt. During a period about 2.1 million to 400,000 years ago, increased tilt of Mars' rotational axis caused increased solar heating at the poles. A new study using observations from NASA's Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey orbiters concludes that this polar warming caused mobilization of water vapor and dust into the atmosphere, and buildup of a surface deposit of ice and dust down to about 30 degrees latitude in both hemispheres. That is the equivalent of the southern Unites States or Saudi Arabia on Earth. Mars has been in an interglacial period characterized by less axial tilt for about the last 300,000 years. The ice-rich surface deposit has been degrading in the latitude zone of 30 degrees to 60 degrees as water-ice returns to the poles.In this illustration prepared for the December 18, 2003, cover of the journal Nature, the simulated surface deposit is superposed on a topography map based on altitude measurements by Global Surveyor and images from NASA's Viking orbiters of the 1970s.Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey are managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington.

  19. Subsonic Aircraft Safety Icing Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sharon Monica; Reveley, Mary S.; Evans, Joni K.; Barrientos, Francesca A.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) Project is one of four projects within the agency s Aviation Safety Program (AvSafe) in the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD). The IRAC Project, which was redesigned in the first half of 2007, conducts research to advance the state of the art in aircraft control design tools and techniques. A "Key Decision Point" was established for fiscal year 2007 with the following expected outcomes: document the most currently available statistical/prognostic data associated with icing for subsonic transport, summarize reports by subject matter experts in icing research on current knowledge of icing effects on control parameters and establish future requirements for icing research for subsonic transports including the appropriate alignment. This study contains: (1) statistical analyses of accident and incident data conducted by NASA researchers for this "Key Decision Point", (2) an examination of icing in other recent statistically based studies, (3) a summary of aviation safety priority lists that have been developed by various subject-matter experts, including the significance of aircraft icing research in these lists and (4) suggested future requirements for NASA icing research. The review of several studies by subject-matter experts was summarized into four high-priority icing research areas. Based on the Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) Project goals and objectives, the IRAC project was encouraged to conduct work in all of the high-priority icing research areas that were identified, with the exception of the developing of methods to sense and document actual icing conditions.

  20. Improved ice loss estimate of the northwestern Greenland ice sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Kjeldsen, K. K.; Khan, S. A.; van den Broeke, M.R.; van Angelen, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    We estimate ice volume change rates in the northwest Greenland drainage basin during 2003–2009 using Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) laser altimeter data. Elevation changes are often reported to be largest near the frontal portion of outlet glaciers. To improve the volume change estimate, we supplement the ICESat data with altimeter surveys from NASA’s Airborne Topographic Mapper from 2002 to 2010 and NASA’s Land, Vegetation and Ice Sensor from 2010. The Airborne data are mai...

  1. Improved ice loss estimate of the northwestern Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, K. K.; Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Wahr, J.;

    2013-01-01

    We estimate ice volume change rates in the northwest Greenland drainage basin during 2003–2009 using Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) laser altimeter data. Elevation changes are often reported to be largest near the frontal portion of outlet glaciers. To improve the volume change...... estimate, we supplement the ICESat data with altimeter surveys from NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper from 2002 to 2010 and NASA's Land, Vegetation and Ice Sensor from 2010. The Airborne data are mainly concentrated along the ice margin and thus have a significant impact on the estimate of the volume...

  2. The Spitzer ice legacy: Ice evolution from cores to protostars

    CERN Document Server

    Oberg, Karin I; Pontoppidan, Klaus M; Broek, Saskia van den; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Bottinelli, Sandrine; Blake, Geoffrey A; Evans, Neal J

    2011-01-01

    Ices regulate much of the chemistry during star formation and account for up to 80% of the available oxygen and carbon. In this paper, we use the Spitzer c2d ice survey, complimented with data sets on ices in cloud cores and high-mass protostars, to determine standard ice abundances and to present a coherent picture of the evolution of ices during low- and high-mass star formation. The median ice composition H2O:CO:CO2:CH3OH:NH3:CH4:XCN is 100:29:29:3:5:5:0.3 and 100:13:13:4:5:2:0.6 toward low- and high-mass protostars, respectively, and 100:31:38:4:-:-:- in cloud cores. In the low-mass sample, the ice abundances with respect to H2O of CH4, NH3, and the component of CO2 mixed with H2O typically vary by <25%, indicative of co-formation with H2O. In contrast, some CO and CO2 ice components, XCN and CH3OH vary by factors 2-10 between the lower and upper quartile. The XCN band correlates with CO, consistent with its OCN- identification. The origin(s) of the different levels of ice abundance variations are cons...

  3. IceCube systematic errors investigation: Simulation of the ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IceCube is a neutrino observatory for astroparticle and astronomy research at the South Pole. It uses one cubic kilometer of Antartica's deepest ice (1500 m-2500 m in depth) to detect Cherenkov light, generated by charged particles traveling through the ice, with an array of phototubes encapsulated in glass pressure spheres. The arrival time as well as the charge deposited of the detected photons represent the base measurements that are used for track and energy reconstruction of those charged particles. The optical properties of the deep antarctic ice vary from layer to layer. Measurements of the ice properties and their correct modeling in Monte Carlo simulation is then of primary importance for the correct understanding of the IceCube telescope behavior. After a short summary about the different methods to investigate the ice properties and to calibrate the detector, we show how the simulation obtained by using this information compares to the measured data and how systematic errors due to uncertain ice properties are determined in IceCube.

  4. IceCube systematic errors investigation: Simulation of the ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resconi, Elisa; Wolf, Martin [Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Schukraft, Anne [RWTH, Aachen University (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    IceCube is a neutrino observatory for astroparticle and astronomy research at the South Pole. It uses one cubic kilometer of Antartica's deepest ice (1500 m-2500 m in depth) to detect Cherenkov light, generated by charged particles traveling through the ice, with an array of phototubes encapsulated in glass pressure spheres. The arrival time as well as the charge deposited of the detected photons represent the base measurements that are used for track and energy reconstruction of those charged particles. The optical properties of the deep antarctic ice vary from layer to layer. Measurements of the ice properties and their correct modeling in Monte Carlo simulation is then of primary importance for the correct understanding of the IceCube telescope behavior. After a short summary about the different methods to investigate the ice properties and to calibrate the detector, we show how the simulation obtained by using this information compares to the measured data and how systematic errors due to uncertain ice properties are determined in IceCube.

  5. The Influence of Platelet Ice and Snow on Antarctic Landfast Sea Ice

    OpenAIRE

    Hoppmann, Mario; Nicolaus, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    Sea ice fastened to coasts, icebergs and ice shelves is of crucial importance for climate- and ecosystems. Near Antarctic ice shelves, this land-fast sea ice exhibits two unique characteristics: a significant fraction of incorporated ice platelets and a thick snow cover, leading to surface flooding and snow-ice formation. In order to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of sea-ice and snow thicknesses, we have initiated a regular observation program on the land-fast sea ice of ...

  6. Towards an ice free Arctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article surveys the rate of ice melting in Arctic and forecasts that the region will be free of ice during this century. Observations of the atmospheric and sea climate, total ice areas for the period 1978 to 1998 and predictions for the areas from 1990 to 2040 by using two different models are presented. Possible reasons for the changes are discussed and some views on the consequences for the Norwegian climate presented

  7. PSL Icing Facility Upgrade Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Thomas A.; Dicki, Dennis J.; Lizanich, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center Propulsion Systems Lab (PSL) was recently upgraded to perform engine inlet ice crystal testing in an altitude environment. The system installed 10 spray bars in the inlet plenum for ice crystal generation using 222 spray nozzles. As an altitude test chamber, the PSL is capable of simulating icing events at altitude in a groundtest facility. The system was designed to operate at altitudes from 4,000 to 40,000 ft at Mach numbers up to 0.8M and inlet total temperatures from -60 to +15 degF. This paper and presentation will be part of a series of presentations on PSL Icing and will cover the development of the icing capability through design, developmental testing, installation, initial calibration, and validation engine testing. Information will be presented on the design criteria and process, spray bar developmental testing at Cox and Co., system capabilities, and initial calibration and engine validation test. The PSL icing system was designed to provide NASA and the icing community with a facility that could be used for research studies of engine icing by duplicating in-flight events in a controlled ground-test facility. With the system and the altitude chamber we can produce flight conditions and cloud environments to simulate those encountered in flight. The icing system can be controlled to set various cloud uniformities, droplet median volumetric diameter (MVD), and icing water content (IWC) through a wide variety of conditions. The PSL chamber can set altitudes, Mach numbers, and temperatures of interest to the icing community and also has the instrumentation capability of measuring engine performance during icing testing. PSL last year completed the calibration and initial engine validation of the facility utilizing a Honeywell ALF502-R5 engine and has duplicated in-flight roll back conditions experienced during flight testing. This paper will summarize the modifications and buildup of the facility to accomplish these tests.

  8. THE INITIAL COOLING EXPERIMENT (ICE)

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    ICE was built during 1977, in a record time of 9 months, using the modified bending magnets of the g-2 muon storage ring (see 7405430). ICE was a proton and antiproton storage ring, built to verify the validity of stochastic and electron cooling for the antiproton project to be launched in 1978. More on the ICE experimental programme with 7802099. See also 7809081, 7908242.

  9. Fram Strait sea ice outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, R.; Cunningham, G. F.; Pang, S. S.

    2004-01-01

    We summarize 24 years of ice export estimates and examine, over a 9-year record, the associated variability in the time-varying upward-looking sonar (ULS) thickness distributions of the Fram Strait. A more thorough assessment of the PMW (passive microwave) ice motion with 5 years of synthetic aperture radar (SAR)observations shows the uncertainties to be consistent with that found by Kwok and Rothrock [1999], giving greater confidence to the record of ice flux calculations.

  10. Ice Sheets and the Anthropocene

    OpenAIRE

    Wolff, Eric W.

    2014-01-01

    Ice could play a role in identifying and defining the Anthropocene. The recurrence of northern hemisphere glaciation and the stability of the Greenland Ice Sheet are both potentially vulnerable to human impact on the environment. However, only a very long hiatus in either would be unusual in the context of the Quaternary Period, requiring the definition of a geological boundary. Human influence can clearly be discerned in several ice-core measurements. These include a sharp boundary in radioa...

  11. Ice-driven CO2 feedback on ice volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. F. Ruddiman

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The origin of the major ice-sheet variations during the last 2.7 million years remains a mystery. Neither the dominant 41 000-year cycles in δ18O and ice-volume during the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene nor the late-Pleistocene variations near 100 000 years is a linear (''Milankovitch'' response to summer insolation forcing. Both result from non-linear behavior within the climate system. Greenhouse gases (primarily CO2 are a plausible source of this non-linearity, but confusion has persisted over whether the gases force ice volume or are a positive feedback. During the last several hundred thousand years, CO2 and ice volume (marine δ18O have varied in phase both at the 41 000-year obliquity cycle and within the ~100 000-year eccentricity band. This timing argues against greenhouse-gas forcing of a slow ice response and instead favors ice control of a fast CO2 response. Because the effect of CO2 on temperature is logarithmic, the temperature/CO2 feedback on ice volume is also logarithmic. In the schematic model proposed here, ice sheets were forced by insolation changes at the precession and obliquity cycles prior to 0.9 million years ago and responded in a linear way, but CO2 feedback amplified (roughly doubled the ice response at 41 000 years. After 0.9 million years ago, as polar climates continued to cool, ablation weakened. CO2 feedback continued to amplify ice-sheet growth at 41 000-year intervals, but weaker ablation permitted ice to survive subsequent insolation maxima of low intensity. These longer-lived ice sheets persisted until peaks in northern summer insolation paced abrupt deglaciations every 100 000±15 000 years. Most ice melting during deglaciations was achieved by the same CO2/temperature feedback that had built the ice sheets, but now acting in the opposite direction. Several processes have the northern geographic origin, as well as the requisite orbital tempo and phasing, to have been the mechanisms by which ice sheets

  12. Fluid dynamics of planetary ices

    CERN Document Server

    Greve, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    The role of water ice in the solar system is reviewed from a fluid-dynamical point of view. On Earth and Mars, water ice forms ice sheets, ice caps and glaciers at the surface, which show glacial flow under their own weight. By contrast, water ice is a major constituent of the bulk volume of the icy satellites in the outer solar system, and ice flow can occur as thermal convection. The rheology of polycrystalline aggregates of ordinary, hexagonal ice Ih is described by a power law, different forms of which are discussed. The temperature dependence of the ice viscosity follows an Arrhenius law. Therefore, the flow of ice in a planetary environment constitutes a thermo-mechanically coupled problem; its model equations are obtained by inserting the flow law and the thermodynamic material equations in the balance laws of mass, momentum and energy. As an example of gravity-driven flow, the polar caps of Mars are discussed. For the north-polar cap, large-scale flow velocities of the order of 0.1...1 mm/a are likely...

  13. Ice and conical structure interactions

    OpenAIRE

    LU, Wenjun

    2010-01-01

    The pursuit of energy in Arctic waters drives people to design ocean structures applying new concepts.Conical structures which shift the ice failure mode from crushing to bending could reduce the total iceload. Moreover, its symmetric geometry naturally achieves the requirement of ice-vaning and reduces the risk of possible large ice loads induced by the failure of ice-vaning that might be encountered by other shapes of floaters. The thesis is based on the model test results of a group of con...

  14. Marine ice profiling : future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marko, J.R.; Fissel, D.B. [ASL Environmental Sciences Inc., Sidney, BC (Canada)

    2006-11-15

    High sampling-frequency ice profiling tools are needed to characterize ice covers for the purposes of offshore development and climate-change studies. This paper reviewed the contribution that upward-looking sonars moored on the sea floor have made towards the qualitative and quantitative understandings of ocean ice covers, with particular reference to the IPS4 Ice Profiler developed by ASL Environmental Sciences Inc. This water column profiler enables quasi-continuous measurements of ice draft along curvilinear tracks to accuracies as great as 0.05 m. This paper provided a description of both the instrument and measurement methodology, including an outline of the steps involved in the extraction of ice drafts from range information. The IPS4 has been used to acquire and store data from more than 100 deployments in polar and sub-polar ice-infested regions. The acquired data on ice properties is used to characterize platform and operations design, planning, navigation support and for scientific ice and climate studies. The combined application of the IPS4 and a sister instrument specialized for shallow water environments has resulted in new deployment methodologies in addition to simple ice draft measurements of the ice undersurface and draft statistics. These include the detection of unconsolidated ice content in lower portions of ice keels or loose ice under ice covers in shallow waters. The development of new generation IPS5 instrumentation is guided by perceived future needs in both conventional draft profiling and in new applications. The IPS5 will offer users improved access to better, more complete, information on ice and other components of the upper ocean and freshwater environments. This paper also reviewed ASL's vision of this instrumentation and progress toward prototype construction. ASL is also finalizing the design and manufacture of a plastic pressure case to address corrosion problems associated with long term deployments. The new instrument

  15. Climatic implications of ice microphysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liou, K.N. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Based on aircraft measurements of mid-latitude cirrus clouds, ice crystal size distribution and ice water content (IWC) are shown to be dependent on temperature. This dependence is also evident from the theoretical consideration of ice crystal growth. Using simple models of the diffusion and accretion growth of ice particles, the computed mean ice crystal size and IWC compare reasonably well with the measured mean values. The temperature dependence of ice crystal size and IWC has important climatic implications in that the temperature field perturbed by external radiative forcings, such as greenhouse warming, can alter the composition of ice crystal clouds. Through radiative transfer, ice microphysics can in turn affect the temperature field. Higher IWC would increase cloud solar albedo and infrared emissivity, while for a given IWC, larger crystals would reduce cloud albedo and emissivity. The competing effects produced by greenhouse temperature perturbations via ice micro-physics and radiation interactions and feedbacks are assessed by a one-dimensional radiative-convective climate model that includes an advanced radiation parameterization program. 3 figs.

  16. The importance of large scale sea ice drift and ice type distribution on ice extent in the Weddell Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Schwegmann, Sandra; Timmermann, Ralph; Haas, Christian; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Lemke, Peter

    2009-01-01

    In austral winter large regions of the Southern Ocean are covered by seasonal sea ice which disappears in summer. Only in few regions sea ice persists during the summer and becomes second year ice. Most of this second year ice is located in the Weddell Sea, making this region particularly interesting. The variation of the ice covered area modifies the exchange of heat, mass and momentum between ocean and atmosphere. Therefore knowledge of ice extent and its variability is necessary for an ad...

  17. Ice storm `98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soulard, F.; Trant, D.; Filoso, J.; Van Wesenbeeck, P. [Statistics Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Environment Statistics Program

    1998-12-31

    As much as 100 millimeters of freezing rain fell on central and eastern Canada between January 4 to 10, 1998. This study concentrates on Canada`s St. Lawrence River Valley where total precipitation exceeded 73 mm in Kingston, 85 mm in Ottawa and 100 mm in areas south of Montreal. By comparison, the largest previously recorded ice storms left between 30 and 40 mm of ice. A state of emergency was declared for the affected regions. 56 per cent of Quebec`s population and 11 per cent of Ontario`s population were affected by the storm. Over 1000 power transmission towers collapsed and more than 30,000 wooden utility poles were brought down. In Quebec, nearly 1.4 million customers were left without electricity. In Ontario that number was about 230,000. While some manufacturers benefited directly from the storm, including makers of hydro and telephone poles, batteries and specialized electrical equipment, the overall economic losses for Montreal and Ottawa were high as estimates run to $585 million and $114 million, respectively. Almost 5 million sugar maple taps in Quebec and Ontario were located and suffered some damage in the affected areas. Nearly one-quarter (274,000) of all dairy cows were also located in the affected areas. Since in the absence of electricity they could not be milked, many of them suffered from mastitis. Many succumbed, others that survived may never attain their former level of productivity. As of June 1998, over 600,000 insurance claims totaling one billion dollars had been filed by Canadian households and businesses from the area affected by the ice storm.1 fig.

  18. Improved ice loss estimate of the northwestern Greenland ice sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kjeldsen, K.K.; Khan, S.A.; van den Broeke, M.R.; van Angelen, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    We estimate ice volume change rates in the northwest Greenland drainage basin during 2003–2009 using Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) laser altimeter data. Elevation changes are often reported to be largest near the frontal portion of outlet glaciers. To improve the volume change est

  19. Monitoring Fram Strait sea ice outflow and thin ice thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, R.

    2001-01-01

    We propose to: 1) use sequential SAR maps to monitor the profile of sea ice motion through Fram Strait over the period 2003 throught 2005; and 2) explore the potential of using L-band polarimetric data to determine the thickness of thin ice over the same region.

  20. Delicious ice cream, why does salt thaw ice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnoli, Franco

    2016-04-01

    During winter, we use to spread salt to thaw ice on the streets. In a physics show, one can be almost sure that after showing this effect, the answer to what happens to temperature will be "it increases". But no! It goes down, in such amount that one can complement the show by producing hand-made ice creams [1].

  1. Proceedings of ICED'09

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The 17th International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED'09, was held August 24-27 2009 at Stanford University, California, USA. The Conference is the flagship event of the Design Society, a society dedicated to contributing to a broad and established understanding of development and design...... thinking, theory, and practice, with a premium placed on evidence-based research. The papers are published in a total of ten volumes of Proceedings, in addition to electronic publication. This volume contains 32 papers concerned with Design for X, Design to X, where X can represent a variety of attributes...

  2. 14 CFR 29.1419 - Ice protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 29.1419 Ice protection. (a) To obtain... analysis and physical evaluation prescribed in paragraph (b) of this section, the effectiveness of the ice... of the rotorcraft in icing conditions. Miscellaneous Equipment...

  3. Primary spectrum and composition with IceCube/IceTop

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    IceCube, with its surface array IceTop, detects three different components of extensive air showers: the total signal at the surface, GeV muons in the periphery of the showers and TeV muons in the deep array of IceCube. The spectrum is measured with high resolution from the knee to the ankle with IceTop. Composition and spectrum are extracted from events seen in coincidence by the surface array and the deep array of IceCube. The muon lateral distribution at the surface is obtained from the data and used to provide a measurement of the muon density at 600 meters from the shower core up to 30 PeV. Results are compared to measurements from other experiments to obtain an overview of the spectrum and composition over an extended range of energy. Consistency of the surface muon measurements with hadronic interaction models and with measurements at higher energy is discussed.

  4. Using ice-penetrating radars to date ice-rise formation and Late Holocene ice-sheet retreat in the Ronne Ice Shelf region, West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingslake, Jonathan; Hindmarsh, Richard; King, Edward; Corr, Hugh

    2015-04-01

    The history of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet in the region currently occupied by the Ronne Ice Shelf is poorly known. This reflects a lack of accessible recently deglaciated surfaces, which prohibits conventional paleo glaciological techniques that can provide evidence of past ice-sheet extent and retreat, for example ocean coring or exposure-dating of geological material. We use a glaciological technique, Raymond Effect Dating, to constrain the retreat of the ice sheet through the Ronne Ice Shelf region. During two Antarctic field seasons, we used a pulse-echo ice-penetrating radar to image the base and internal stratigraphy of four ice rises - areas of grounded ice containing ice divides. Towing the radar with skidoos, we conducted over 2000 km of surveys on the Skytrain, Korff, Henry and Fowler Ice Rises and the ice shelf between them. We also used a step-frequency radar called pRES to measure the vertical ice flow in the vicinity of each ice divide. Isochronal ice layers imaged during the surveys deforming in a predictable way with ice flow, meaning that their shape contains information about past ice flow. Directly beneath ice divides the downward motion of the ice is impeded by an ice-dynamical phenomenon called the Raymond Effect. This causes layers beneath the divides to form 'Raymond Arches' that grow over time. We will present the data and simulate the growth of the Raymond Arches using our pRES-measured vertical ice velocities and date the onset of ice-divide flow at each ice rise by comparing the size of simulated arches to the arches imaged during our radar surveys. We consider the main sources of uncertainty associated with these ice-rise formation dates and discuss what they can tell us about the retreat of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet through this region during the last few thousand years.

  5. The physics of ice cream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Chris

    2003-05-01

    Almost everybody likes ice cream, so it can provide an excellent vehicle for discussing and demonstrating a variety of physical phenomena, such as Newton's law of cooling, Boyle's law and the relationship between microstructure and macroscopic properties (e.g. Young's modulus). Furthermore, a demonstration of freezing point depression can be used to make ice cream in the classroom!

  6. Ice sheet hydrology from observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrological systems of ice sheets are complex. Our view of the system is split, largely due to the complexity of observing the systems. Our basic knowledge of processes have been obtained from smaller glaciers and although applicable in general to the larger scales of the ice sheets, ice sheets contain features not observable on smaller glaciers due to their size. The generation of water on the ice sheet surface is well understood and can be satisfactorily modeled. The routing of water from the surface down through the ice is not complicated in terms of procat has been problematic is the way in which the couplings between surface and bed has been accomplished through a kilometer of cold ice, but with the studies on crack propagation and lake drainage on Greenland we are beginning to understand also this process and we know water can be routed through thick cold ice. Water generation at the bed is also well understood but the main problem preventing realistic estimates of water generation is lack of detailed information about geothermal heat fluxes and their geographical distribution beneath the ice. Although some average value for geothermal heat flux may suffice, for many purposes it is important that such values are not applied to sub-regions of significantly higher fluxes. Water generated by geothermal heat constitutes a constant supply and will likely maintain a steady system beneath the ice sheet. Such a system may include subglacial lakes as steady features and reconfiguration of the system is tied to time scales on which the ice sheet geometry changes so as to change pressure gradients in the basal system itself. Large scale re-organization of subglacial drainage systems have been observed beneath ice streams. The stability of an entirely subglacially fed drainage system may hence be perturbed by rapid ice flow. In the case of Antarctic ice streams where such behavior has been observed, the ice streams are underlain by deformable sediments. It is

  7. The IceProd Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Abbasi, R.; Ackermann, M.;

    2015-01-01

    IceCube is a one-gigaton instrument located at the geographic South Pole, designed to detect cosmic neutrinos, iden- tify the particle nature of dark matter, and study high-energy neutrinos themselves. Simulation of the IceCube detector and processing of data require a significant amount of...... computational resources. IceProd is a distributed management system based on Python, XML-RPC and GridFTP. It is driven by a central database in order to coordinate and admin- ister production of simulations and processing of data produced by the IceCube detector. IceProd runs as a separate layer on top of other...... middleware and can take advantage of a variety of computing resources, including grids and batch systems such as CREAM, Condor, and PBS. This is accomplished by a set of dedicated daemons that process job submission in a coordinated fashion through the use of middleware plugins that serve to abstract the...

  8. Ice sheet hydrology from observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Peter (Dept. of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm Univ-, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    The hydrological systems of ice sheets are complex. Our view of the system is split, largely due to the complexity of observing the systems. Our basic knowledge of processes have been obtained from smaller glaciers and although applicable in general to the larger scales of the ice sheets, ice sheets contain features not observable on smaller glaciers due to their size. The generation of water on the ice sheet surface is well understood and can be satisfactorily modeled. The routing of water from the surface down through the ice is not complicated in terms of procat has been problematic is the way in which the couplings between surface and bed has been accomplished through a kilometer of cold ice, but with the studies on crack propagation and lake drainage on Greenland we are beginning to understand also this process and we know water can be routed through thick cold ice. Water generation at the bed is also well understood but the main problem preventing realistic estimates of water generation is lack of detailed information about geothermal heat fluxes and their geographical distribution beneath the ice. Although some average value for geothermal heat flux may suffice, for many purposes it is important that such values are not applied to sub-regions of significantly higher fluxes. Water generated by geothermal heat constitutes a constant supply and will likely maintain a steady system beneath the ice sheet. Such a system may include subglacial lakes as steady features and reconfiguration of the system is tied to time scales on which the ice sheet geometry changes so as to change pressure gradients in the basal system itself. Large scale re-organization of subglacial drainage systems have been observed beneath ice streams. The stability of an entirely subglacially fed drainage system may hence be perturbed by rapid ice flow. In the case of Antarctic ice streams where such behavior has been observed, the ice streams are underlain by deformable sediments. It is

  9. The importance of large scale sea ice drift and ice type distribution on ice extent in the Weddell Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwegmann, S.; Haas, C.; Timmermann, R.; Gerdes, R.; Lemke, P.

    2009-12-01

    In austral winter large parts of Antarctic Seas are covered by sea ice. This modifies the exchange of heat, mass and momentum between ocean and atmosphere. The knowledge of ice extent and its variability is necessary for an adequate simulation of those fluxes and thus for climate modelling. The goal of this study is the observation of interannual and seasonal ice extent variations and their underlying causes. Variability is analysed by using monthly means of microwave and scatterometer satellite data. Results are correlated with ice drift variations calculated from a Finite Element Sea ice-Ocean Model (FESOM) and with satellite derived sea ice drift products to determine the dependency of ice extent on sea ice drift. An additional cause for changing ice extent could be the variability of ice type distribution, i.e. the contribution of first and second year ice to the total ice covered area. These ice types are determined on monthly time scales from scatterometer satellite data. Ice class distribution and sea ice drift variability are compared with the characteristics and variability of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) to evaluate the relative importance of different sea ice parameters for shaping Weddell Sea ice extent and its variability.

  10. New Fluid Prevents Railway Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Through a licensing agreement between NASA's Ames Research Center and Midwest Industrial Supply, Inc. (MIS), two MIS products have been enhanced with NASA's anti-icing fluid technology. MIS offers the new fluid in two commercial products, the Zero Gravity(TM) Third Rail Anti-Icer/Deicer and the Ice Free Switch(R). Using NASA's fluid technology, these products form a protective-coating barrier that prevents the buildup of ice and snow. Applying the fluid to the railway components prior to ice or snowstorm works as an anti-icing fluid, remaining in place to melt precipitation as it hits the surface. It also functions as a deicing fluid. If applied to an already frozen switch or rail, it will quickly melt the ice, free the frozen parts, and then remain in place to prevent refreezing. Additional benefits include the ability to cling to vertical rail surfaces and resist the effects of rain and wind. With the Ice Free Switch, it takes only five minutes to treat the switch by spraying, brushing, or pouring on the product. Ice Free Switch requires as little as one gallon per switch whereas other deicing fluids require five to ten gallons of liquid to effectively melt ice. Zero Gravity serves the same anti-icing/deicing purposes but applies fluid to the third rail through a system that is easily installed onto mass transit cars. A tank of fluid and a dispensing system are placed underneath the train car and the fluid is applied as the train runs its route.

  11. The IceProd (IceCube Production) Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IceProd is a data processing and management framework developed by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory for processing of Monte Carlo simulations and data. IceProd runs as a separate layer on top of middleware or cluster job schedulers and can take advantage of a variety of computing resources including grids such as EGI, OSG, and NorduGrid as well as local clusters running batch systems like HT Condor, PBS, and SGE. This is accomplished by a set of dedicated daemons which process job submission in a coordinated fashion through the use of middleware plug-ins that serve to abstract the details of job submission and job management. IceProd can also manage complex workflow DAGs across distributed computing grids in order to optimize usage of resources. We describe several aspects of IceProd's design and it's applications in collaborative computing environments. We also briefly discuss design aspects of a second generation IceProd, currently being tested in IceCube.

  12. del Nim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Martínez Rodríguez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Dado su uso específico como fuente de insecticidas naturales de fácil biodegradación, entre otras ventajas, el cultivo del árbol Nim ha sido mundialmente extendido en muchas regiones de Asia, África, Australia y América Latina, incluyendo Cuba. La cosecha del fruto del Nim se hace engorrosa debido a la altura que adquieren estos árboles a los pocos años de sembrados, siendo la cosecha mecánica mediante sacudidores de ramas o del tronco, una posible vía de solución práctica de esta problemática. En el presente trabajo se efectúa, mediante la simulación con el empleo de herramientas CAD-3D y programas de análisis por elementos finitos, un análisis modal abarcador de un número importante de modos de vibración del sistema fruto-pedúnculo del Nim. Como resultado del estudio se pudieron recomendar entornos de frecuencias de las vibraciones a aplicar con mejores expectativas durante la cosecha mecanizada de este producto.

  13. Sea ice-albedo climate feedback mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, J.L.; Curry, J.A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Ebert, E.E. [Bureau of Meterology Research Center, Melbourne (Australia)

    1995-02-01

    The sea ice-albedo feedback mechanism over the Arctic Ocean multiyear sea ice is investigated by conducting a series of experiments using several one-dimensional models of the coupled sea ice-atmosphere system. In its simplest form, ice-albedo feedback is thought to be associated with a decrease in the areal cover of snow and ice and a corresponding increase in the surface temperature, further decreasing the area cover of snow and ice. It is shown that the sea ice-albedo feedback can operate even in multiyear pack ice, without the disappearance of this ice, associated with internal processes occurring within the multiyear ice pack (e.g., duration of the snow cover, ice thickness, ice distribution, lead fraction, and melt pond characteristics). The strength of the ice-albedo feedback mechanism is compared for several different thermodynamic sea ice models: a new model that includes ice thickness distribution., the Ebert and Curry model, the Mayjut and Untersteiner model, and the Semtner level-3 and level-0 models. The climate forcing is chosen to be a perturbation of the surface heat flux, and cloud and water vapor feedbacks are inoperative so that the effects of the sea ice-albedo feedback mechanism can be isolated. The inclusion of melt ponds significantly strengthens the ice-albedo feedback, while the ice thickness distribution decreases the strength of the modeled sea ice-albedo feedback. It is emphasized that accurately modeling present-day sea ice thickness is not adequate for a sea ice parameterization; the correct physical processes must be included so that the sea ice parameterization yields correct sensitivities to external forcing. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. INITIAL COOLING EXPERIMENT (ICE)

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    ICE was built in 1977, in a record time of 9 months, using the modified bending magnets of the g-2 muon storage ring. Its purpose was to verify the validity of stochastic and electron cooling for the antiproton project, to be launched in 1978. Already early in 1978, stochastic cooling proved a resounding success, such that the antiproton (p-pbar)project was entirely based on it. Tests of electron cooling followed later: protons of 46 MeV kinetic energy were cooled with an electron beam of 26 kV and 1.3 A. The cage seen prominently in the foreground houses the HV equipment, adjacent to the "cooler" installed in a straight section of the ring. With some modifications, the cooler was later transplanted into LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring) and then, with further modifications, into the AD (Antiproton Decelerator), where it cools antiprotons to this day (2006). See also: 7711282, 7802099, 7908242.

  15. INITIAL COOLING EXPERIMENT (ICE)

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    ICE was built in 1977, using the modified bending magnets of the g-2 muon storage ring (see 7405430). Its purpose was to verify the validity of stochastic and electron cooling for the antiproton project. Stochastic cooling proved a resounding success early in 1978 and the antiproton project could go ahead, now entirely based on stochastic cooling. Electron cooling was experimented with in 1979. The 26 kV equipment is housed in the cage to the left of the picture, adjacent to the "e-cooler" located in a straight section of the ring. With some modifications, the cooler was later transplanted into LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring) and then, with further modifications, into the AD (Antiproton Decelerator), where it cools antiprotons to this day (2006). See also: 7711282, 7802099, 7809081.

  16. Red de coordinación del prácticum del grado de Ciencias de la actividad física y el deporte

    OpenAIRE

    Manchado, Carmen; Tortosa Martínez, Juan; Toribio Jover, José María; Ávalos Ramos, María Alejandra; Caus i Pertegaz, Núria; Cejuela Anta, Roberto; Clavero Serrano, Mario; Cortell Tormo, Juan Manuel

    2016-01-01

    El trabajo está enmarcado en la RED de coordinación del prácticum del Grado de Ciencias de la actividad física y el deporte, dentro del Programa de REDES de investigación en docencia universitaria del ICE/Universidad de Alicante. Tomando como referencia las competencias generales del título así como las específicas de la asignatura se han elaborado los objetivos formativos, contenidos tanto teóricos como prácticos así como el plan de aprendizaje y la evaluación de cada uno de los cuatro posib...

  17. IceTop: The surface component of IceCube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IceTop, the surface component of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole, is an air shower array with an area of 1 km2. The detector allows a detailed exploration of the mass composition of primary cosmic rays in the energy range from about 100 TeV to 1 EeV by exploiting the correlation between the shower energy measured in IceTop and the energy deposited by muons in the deep ice. In this paper we report on the technical design, construction and installation, the trigger and data acquisition systems as well as the software framework for calibration, reconstruction and simulation. Finally the first experience from commissioning and operating the detector and the performance as an air shower detector will be discussed.

  18. IceTop: The surface component of IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Buitink, S; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eisch, J; Elliott, C; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jlelati, O; Johansson, H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Klepser, S; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McDermott, A; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Nießen, P; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pieloth, D; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rädel, L; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Roth, J; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Roucelle, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönherr, L; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Shulman, L; Smith, M W E; Soiron, M; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Sulanke, K-H; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zilles, A; Zoll, M

    2012-01-01

    IceTop, the surface component of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole, is an air shower array with an area of 1 km2. The detector allows a detailed exploration of the mass composition of primary cosmic rays in the energy range from about 100 TeV to 1 EeV by exploiting the correlation between the shower energy measured in IceTop and the energy deposited by muons in the deep ice. In this paper we report on the technical design, construction and installation, the trigger and data acquisition systems as well as the software framework for calibration, reconstruction and simulation. Finally the first experience from commissioning and operating the detector and the performance as an air shower detector will be discussed.

  19. Wing airfoil ice accretion model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hoření, Bohumír; Horák, V.

    Bucharest : Military technical academy, 2005, 3.56-3.62. ISBN 973-640-074-3. [Internationally attended scientific conference /31./ : modern technologies in the XXI century. Bucharest (RO), 03.11.2005-04.11.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK2076106; GA ČR GA103/04/0970; GA MPO FT-TA/026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2060917 Keywords : aircraft icing * ice accretion * icing modell Subject RIV: JU - Aeronautics, Aerodynamics, Aircrafts

  20. Ice Nucleation Activity in Lichens

    OpenAIRE

    Kieft, Thomas L.

    1988-01-01

    A newly discovered form of biological ice nucleus associated with lichens is described. Ice nucleation spectra of a variety of lichens from the southwestern United States were measured by the drop-freezing method. Several epilithic lichen samples of the genera Rhizoplaca, Xanthoparmelia, and Xanthoria had nuclei active at temperatures as warm as −2.3°C and had densities of 2.3 × 106 to more than 1 × 108 nuclei g−1 at −5°C (2 to 4 orders of magnitude higher than any plants infected with ice nu...

  1. Rewritable artificial magnetic charge ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Xiao, Zhili; Snezhko, Alexey; Xu, Jing; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Divan, Ralu; Pearson, John E.; Crabtree, George W.; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2016-05-20

    Artificial ices enable the study of geometrical frustration by design and through direct observation. However, it has proven difficult to achieve tailored long-range ordering of their diverse configurations, limiting both fundamental and applied research directions. We designed an artificial spin structure that produces a magnetic charge ice with tunable long-range ordering of eight different configurations. We also developed a technique to precisely manipulate the local magnetic charge states and demonstrate write-read-erase multifunctionality at room temperature. This globally reconfigurable and locally writable magnetic charge ice could provide a setting for designing magnetic monopole defects, tailoring magnonics, and controlling the properties of other two-dimensional materials.

  2. Rewritable artificial magnetic charge ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Xiao, Zhi-Li; Snezhko, Alexey; Xu, Jing; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Divan, Ralu; Pearson, John E.; Crabtree, George W.; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2016-05-01

    Artificial ices enable the study of geometrical frustration by design and through direct observation. However, it has proven difficult to achieve tailored long-range ordering of their diverse configurations, limiting both fundamental and applied research directions. We designed an artificial spin structure that produces a magnetic charge ice with tunable long-range ordering of eight different configurations. We also developed a technique to precisely manipulate the local magnetic charge states and demonstrate write-read-erase multifunctionality at room temperature. This globally reconfigurable and locally writable magnetic charge ice could provide a setting for designing magnetic monopole defects, tailoring magnonics, and controlling the properties of other two-dimensional materials.

  3. Influence of winter sea-ice motion on summer ice cover in the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriaki Kimura

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Summer sea-ice cover in the Arctic varies largely from year to year owing to several factors. This study examines one such factor, the relationship between interannual difference in winter ice motion and ice area in the following summer. A daily-ice velocity product on a 37.5-km resolution grid is prepared using the satellite passive microwave sensor Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer—Earth Observing System data for the nine years of 2003–2011. Derived daily-ice motion reveals the dynamic modification of the winter ice cover. The winter ice divergence/convergence is strongly related to the summer ice cover in some regions; the correlation coefficient between the winter ice convergence and summer ice area ranges between 0.5 and 0.9 in areas with high interannual variability. This relation implies that the winter ice redistribution controls the spring ice thickness and the summer ice cover.

  4. Ice911 Research: Preserving and Rebuilding Multi-Year Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, L. A.; Chetty, S.; Manzara, A.

    2013-12-01

    A localized surface albedo modification technique is being developed that shows promise as a method to increase multi-year ice using reflective floating materials, chosen so as to have low subsidiary environmental impact. Multi-year ice has diminished rapidly in the Arctic over the past 3 decades (Riihela et al, Nature Climate Change, August 4, 2013) and this plays a part in the continuing rapid decrease of summer-time ice. As summer-time ice disappears, the Arctic is losing its ability to act as the earth's refrigeration system, and this has widespread climatic effects, as well as a direct effect on sea level rise, as oceans heat, and once-land-based ice melts into the sea. We have tested the albedo modification technique on a small scale over five Winter/Spring seasons at sites including California's Sierra Nevada Mountains, a Canadian lake, and a small man-made lake in Minnesota, using various materials and an evolving array of instrumentation. The materials can float and can be made to minimize effects on marine habitat and species. The instrumentation is designed to be deployed in harsh and remote locations. Localized snow and ice preservation, and reductions in water heating, have been quantified in small-scale testing. Climate modeling is underway to analyze the effects of this method of surface albedo modification in key areas on the rate of oceanic and atmospheric temperature rise. We are also evaluating the effects of snow and ice preservation for protection of infrastructure and habitat stabilization. This paper will also discuss a possible reduction of sea level rise with an eye to quantification of cost/benefit. The most recent season's experimentation on a man-made private lake in Minnesota saw further evolution in the material and deployment approach. The materials were successfully deployed to shield underlying snow and ice from melting; applications of granular materials remained stable in the face of local wind and storms. Localized albedo

  5. ICE911 Research: Preserving and Rebuilding Reflective Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, L. A.; Chetty, S.; Manzara, A.; Venkatesh, S.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a localized surface albedo modification technique that shows promise as a method to increase reflective multi-year ice using floating materials, chosen so as to have low subsidiary environmental impact. It is now well-known that multi-year reflective ice has diminished rapidly in the Arctic over the past 3 decades and this plays a part in the continuing rapid decrease of summer-time ice. As summer-time bright ice disappears, the Arctic is losing its ability to reflect summer insolation, and this has widespread climatic effects, as well as a direct effect on sea level rise, as oceans heat and once-land-based ice melts into the sea. We have tested the albedo modification technique on a small scale over six Winter/Spring seasons at sites including California's Sierra Nevada Mountains, a Canadian lake, and a small man-made lake in Minnesota, using various materials and an evolving array of instrumentation. The materials can float and can be made to minimize effects on marine habitat and species. The instrumentation is designed to be deployed in harsh and remote locations. Localized snow and ice preservation, and reductions in water heating, have been quantified in small-scale testing. We have continued to refine our material and deployment approaches, and we have had laboratory confirmation by NASA. In the field, the materials were successfully deployed to shield underlying snow and ice from melting; applications of granular materials remained stable in the face of local wind and storms. We are evaluating the effects of snow and ice preservation for protection of infrastructure and habitat stabilization, and we are concurrently developing our techniques to aid in water conservation. Localized albedo modification options such as those being studied in this work may act to preserve ice, glaciers, permafrost and seasonal snow areas, and perhaps aid natural ice formation processes. If this method is deployed on a large enough scale, it could conceivably

  6. Monitoring under ice phyto- and zooplankton blooms with the Nereid Under Ice remotely operated vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Laney, Samuel R.; Katlein, Christian; Whitcomb, Louis L.; Elliott, Stephen; Jakuba, Mike V.; Boetius, Antje; German, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    The perennially ice-covered Central Arctic is changing rapidly due to extensive sea-ice retreat and the loss of multiyear ice. The thinning of the ice allows more light to reach the water column enhancing productivity. These changes in the under ice ecosystem can lead to under-ice phytoplankton blooms which may increase grazing and carbon export. However, our knowledge of the interactions between sea ice, sub-ice and under-ice communities is still poor, especially in high latitudes. A key lim...

  7. Airframe Icing Research Gaps: NASA Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapczuk, Mark

    2009-01-01

    qCurrent Airframe Icing Technology Gaps: Development of a full 3D ice accretion simulation model. Development of an improved simulation model for SLD conditions. CFD modeling of stall behavior for ice-contaminated wings/tails. Computational methods for simulation of stability and control parameters. Analysis of thermal ice protection system performance. Quantification of 3D ice shape geometric characteristics Development of accurate ground-based simulation of SLD conditions. Development of scaling methods for SLD conditions. Development of advanced diagnostic techniques for assessment of tunnel cloud conditions. Identification of critical ice shapes for aerodynamic performance degradation. Aerodynamic scaling issues associated with testing scale model ice shape geometries. Development of altitude scaling methods for thermal ice protections systems. Development of accurate parameter identification methods. Measurement of stability and control parameters for an ice-contaminated swept wing aircraft. Creation of control law modifications to prevent loss of control during icing encounters. 3D ice shape geometries. Collection efficiency data for ice shape geometries. SLD ice shape data, in-flight and ground-based, for simulation verification. Aerodynamic performance data for 3D geometries and various icing conditions. Stability and control parameter data for iced aircraft configurations. Thermal ice protection system data for simulation validation.

  8. Potencial del agua del suelo

    OpenAIRE

    Bustamante Heliodoro

    2012-01-01

    La energía potencial del agua presenta diferencias de un punto del suelo a otro; esas diferencias son las que originan el movimiento del agua de acuerdo a la tendencia universal de la materia en el sentido de moverse de donde la energía potencial es mayor a donde dicha energía es menor. En el suelo el agua en consecuencia se mueve hacia donde su energía decrece hasta lograr su estado de equilibrio. Se desprende entonces que la cantidad de energía potencial absoluta contenida en el agua, no es...

  9. Transmission line icing measurement on photogrammetry method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; Ma, Xiaohong; Zhao, Lijin; Du, Hao; Luo, Hong; Mao, Xianyin; Tang, Min; Liu, Yawen

    2015-12-01

    Icing thickness parameter is the basic data for power sector to make decision for icing accident prevention. In this paper, a transmission line icing measurement method is proposed. It used the photogrammetry method to realize icing parameters measurement through the integration of high resolution camera, laser range finder and inertial measurement unit. Compared with traditional icing measurement method, this method is flexible and is the effective supplement of the fixed icing detection terminal. And its high accuracy measurement guarantees the reliability of the icing thickness parameters.

  10. Holocene accumulation and ice flow near the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide ice core site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutnik, Michelle R.; Fudge, T. J.; Conway, Howard; Waddington, Edwin D.; Neumann, Thomas A.; Cuffey, Kurt M.; Buizert, Christo; Taylor, Kendrick C.

    2016-05-01

    The West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide Core (WDC) provided a high-resolution climate record from near the Ross-Amundsen Divide in Central West Antarctica. In addition, radar-detected internal layers in the vicinity of the WDC site have been dated directly from the ice core to provide spatial variations in the age structure of the region. Using these two data sets together, we first infer a high-resolution Holocene accumulation-rate history from 9.2 kyr of the ice-core timescale and then confirm that this climate history is consistent with internal layers upstream of the core site. Even though the WDC was drilled only 24 km from the modern ice divide, advection of ice from upstream must be taken into account. We evaluate histories of accumulation rate by using a flowband model to generate internal layers that we compare to observed layers. Results show that the centennially averaged accumulation rate was over 20% lower than modern at 9.2 kyr before present (B.P.), increased by 40% from 9.2 to 2.3 kyr B.P., and decreased by at least 10% over the past 2 kyr B.P. to the modern values; these Holocene accumulation-rate changes in Central West Antarctica are larger than changes inferred from East Antarctic ice-core records. Despite significant changes in accumulation rate, throughout the Holocene the regional accumulation pattern has likely remained similar to today, and the ice-divide position has likely remained on average within 5 km of its modern position. Continent-scale ice-sheet models used for reconstructions of West Antarctic ice volume should incorporate this accumulation history.

  11. Radiative properties of ice clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, D.L.; Koracin, D.; Carter, E. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV (United States)

    1996-04-01

    A new treatment of cirrus cloud radiative properties has been developed, based on anomalous diffraction theory (ADT), which does not parameterize size distributions in terms of an effective radius. Rather, is uses the size distribution parameters directly, and explicitly considers the ice particle shapes. There are three fundamental features which characterize this treatment: (1) the ice path radiation experiences as it travels through an ice crystal is parameterized, (2) only determines the amount of radiation scattered and absorbed, and (3) as in other treatments, the projected area of the size distribution is conserved. The first two features are unique to this treatment, since it does not convert the ice particles into equivalent volume or area spheres in order to apply Mie theory.

  12. Melting of Ice under Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwegler, E; Sharma, M; Gygi, F; Galli, G

    2008-07-31

    The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10 to 50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 to 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above {approx}45 GPa there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve due to the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid, prior to melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid.

  13. Let's Make Metric Ice Cream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Marianna

    1975-01-01

    Describes a classroom activity which involved sixth grade students in a learning situation including making ice cream, safety procedures in a science laboratory, calibrating a thermometer, using metric units of volume and mass. (EB)

  14. Greenland Ice Sheet Mass Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeh, N.

    1984-01-01

    Mass balance equation for glaciers; areal distribution and ice volumes; estimates of actual mass balance; loss by calving of icebergs; hydrological budget for Greenland; and temporal variations of Greenland mass balance are examined.

  15. Hydrodynamics and Thermodynamics of Ice Particle Accretion

    OpenAIRE

    Kintea, Daniel Martin

    2016-01-01

    Icing in warm environments, e.g. in aircraft engines or heated measurement probes, occurs if airplanes fly through areas with high amounts of atmospheric ice crystals. Ingested into the warm engine, they start to melt, resulting in an airflow laden with mixed-phase particles consisting of water and ice. Liquid water deposits on component surfaces, which enables ice particles to adhere to them, forming ice accretion of considerable thickness. Such an accretion reduces reliability, power and ef...

  16. A study of ice response spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chunguang; JIA Lingling

    2009-01-01

    Some problems concerning the ice forces and ice response spectra are studied from both theoretical and practical points of view. On the basis of structural analysis,the analysis method of ice response spectra is proposed, since it plays an important role in the prediction of maximum structural response in cold regions. And it is illustrated that it is easy to study the structural response to ice using the ice response spectra.

  17. Satellite altimeter remote sensing of ice caps

    OpenAIRE

    Rinne, Eero Juhani

    2011-01-01

    This thesis investigates the use of satellite altimetry techniques for measuring surface elevation changes of ice caps. Two satellite altimeters, Radar Altimeter 2 (RA-2) and Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) are used to assess the surface elevation changes of three Arctic ice caps. This is the first time the RA-2 has been used to assess the elevation changes of ice caps - targets much smaller than the ice sheets which are the instrument’s primary land ice targets. Algor...

  18. Ice thickness measurements by Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Pershin, Sergey M; Klinkov, Vladimir K; Yulmetov, Renat N; Bunkin, Alexey F

    2014-01-01

    A compact Raman LIDAR system with a spectrograph was used for express ice thickness measurements. The difference between the Raman spectra of ice and liquid water is employed to locate the ice-water interface while elastic scattering was used for air-ice surface detection. This approach yields an error of only 2 mm for an 80-mm-thick ice sample, indicating that it is promising express noncontact thickness measurements technique in field experiments.

  19. Simulating Ice Accretion Effects on Engine Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.; Wright, William

    2011-01-01

    Develop a modeling tool that can be used to predict the onset of engine icing due to ice crystal ingestion. The tool will be capable of modeling the effects of ice build up as well as its effect on engine performance. Perform a parametric study of an engine with simulated ice blockage effects at altitude conditions. Using the tool, estimate the effect of blockage in the low pressure compressor due to ice buildup (accretion), and its effects on engine performance.

  20. Ice sheet hydrology - a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Peter; Naeslund, Jens-Ove [Dept. of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Rodhe, Lars [Geological Survey of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2007-03-15

    This report summarizes the theoretical knowledge on water flow in and beneath glaciers and ice sheets and how these theories are applied in models to simulate the hydrology of ice sheets. The purpose is to present the state of knowledge and, perhaps more importantly, identify the gaps in our understanding of ice sheet hydrology. Many general concepts in hydrology and hydraulics are applicable to water flow in glaciers. However, the unique situation of having the liquid phase flowing in conduits of the solid phase of the same material, water, is not a commonly occurring phenomena. This situation means that the heat exchange between the phases and the resulting phase changes also have to be accounted for in the analysis. The fact that the solidus in the pressure-temperature dependent phase diagram of water has a negative slope provides further complications. Ice can thus melt or freeze from both temperature and pressure variations or variations in both. In order to provide details of the current understanding of water flow in conjunction with deforming ice and to provide understanding for the development of ideas and models, emphasis has been put on the mathematical treatments, which are reproduced in detail. Qualitative results corroborating theory or, perhaps more often, questioning the simplifications made in theory, are also given. The overarching problem with our knowledge of glacier hydrology is the gap between the local theories of processes and the general flow of water in glaciers and ice sheets. Water is often channelized in non-stationary conduits through the ice, features which due to their minute size relative to the size of glaciers and ice sheets are difficult to incorporate in spatially larger models. Since the dynamic response of ice sheets to global warming is becoming a key issue in, e.g. sea-level change studies, the problems of the coupling between the hydrology of an ice sheet and its dynamics is steadily gaining interest. New work is emerging

  1. Ice sheet hydrology - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the theoretical knowledge on water flow in and beneath glaciers and ice sheets and how these theories are applied in models to simulate the hydrology of ice sheets. The purpose is to present the state of knowledge and, perhaps more importantly, identify the gaps in our understanding of ice sheet hydrology. Many general concepts in hydrology and hydraulics are applicable to water flow in glaciers. However, the unique situation of having the liquid phase flowing in conduits of the solid phase of the same material, water, is not a commonly occurring phenomena. This situation means that the heat exchange between the phases and the resulting phase changes also have to be accounted for in the analysis. The fact that the solidus in the pressure-temperature dependent phase diagram of water has a negative slope provides further complications. Ice can thus melt or freeze from both temperature and pressure variations or variations in both. In order to provide details of the current understanding of water flow in conjunction with deforming ice and to provide understanding for the development of ideas and models, emphasis has been put on the mathematical treatments, which are reproduced in detail. Qualitative results corroborating theory or, perhaps more often, questioning the simplifications made in theory, are also given. The overarching problem with our knowledge of glacier hydrology is the gap between the local theories of processes and the general flow of water in glaciers and ice sheets. Water is often channelized in non-stationary conduits through the ice, features which due to their minute size relative to the size of glaciers and ice sheets are difficult to incorporate in spatially larger models. Since the dynamic response of ice sheets to global warming is becoming a key issue in, e.g. sea-level change studies, the problems of the coupling between the hydrology of an ice sheet and its dynamics is steadily gaining interest. New work is emerging

  2. Electromelting of Confined Monolayer Ice

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, Hu; Guo, Wanlin

    2013-01-01

    In sharp contrast to the prevailing view that electric fields promote water freezing, here we show by molecular dynamics simulations that monolayer ice confined between two parallel plates can melt into liquid water under perpendicularly applied electric field. The melting temperature of the monolayer ice decreases with the increasing strength of the external field due to field-induced disruption of the water-wall interaction induced well-ordered network of hydrogen bond. This electromelting ...

  3. Rewritable Artificial Magnetic Charge Ice

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Xiao, Zhi-Li; Snezhko, Alexey; Xu, Jing; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Divan, Ralu; Pearson, John E.; Crabtree, George W.; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2016-01-01

    Artificial ices enable the study of geometrical frustration by design and through direct observation. However, it has proven difficult to achieve tailored long-range ordering of their diverse configurations, limiting both fundamental and applied research directions. We designed an artificial spin structure that produces a magnetic charge ice with tunable long-range ordering of eight different configurations. We also developed a technique to precisely manipulate the local magnetic charge state...

  4. Potassium chloride-bearing ice VII and ice planet dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Mark R.; Scott, Henry P.; Aarestad, Elizabeth; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2016-02-01

    Accurate modeling of planetary interiors requires that the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) properties of phases present within the body be well understood. The high-pressure polymorphs of H2O have been studied extensively due to the abundance of ice phases in icy moons and, likely, vast number of extra-solar planetary bodies, with only select studies evaluating impurity-laden ices. In this study, ice formed from a 1.6 mol percent KCl-bearing aqueous solution was studied up to 32.89 ± 0.19 GPa and 625 K, and the incorporation of K+ and Cl- ionic impurities into the ice VII structure was documented. The compression data at 295 K were fit with a third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and yielded a bulk modulus (KT0), its pressure derivative (KT0‧), and zero pressure volume (V0) of 24.7 ± 0.9 GPa, 4.44 ± 0.09, and 39.2 ± 0.2 Å3, respectively. The impurity-laden ice was found to be 6-8% denser than ice VII formed from pure H2O. Thermal expansion coefficients were also determined for several isothermal compression curves at elevated temperatures, and a PVT equation of state was obtained. The melting curve of ice VII with incorporated K+ and Cl- was estimated by fitting experimental data up to 10.2 ± 0.4 GPa, where melting occurred at 625 K, to the Simon-Glatzel equation. The melting curve of this impurity-laden ice is systematically depressed relative to that of pure H2O by approximately 45 K and 80 K at 4 and 11 GPa, respectively. A portion of the K+ and Cl- contained within the ice VII structure was observed to exsolve with increasing temperature. This suggests that an internal differentiating process could concentrate a K-rich phase deep within H2O-rich planets, and we speculate that this could supply an additional source of heat through the radioactive decay of 40K. Our data illustrate ice VII can incorporate significant concentrations of K+ and Cl- and increasing the possibility of deep-sourced and solute-rich plumes in moderate to large sized H2O

  5. Better constraints on the sea-ice state using global sea-ice data assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mathiot

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Short-term and decadal sea-ice prediction systems need a realistic initial state, generally obtained using ice-ocean model simulations with data assimilation. However, only sea-ice concentration and velocity data are currently assimilated. In this work, an Ensemble Kalman Filter system is used to assimilate observed ice concentration and freeboard (i.e. thickness of emerged sea ice data into a global coupled ocean–sea-ice model. The impact and effectiveness of our data assimilation system is assessed in two steps: firstly, through the assimilation of synthetic data (i.e., model-generated data and, secondly, through the assimilation of satellite data. While ice concentrations are available daily, freeboard data used in this study are only available during six one-month periods spread over 2005–2007. Our results show that the simulated Arctic and Antarctic sea-ice extents are improved by the assimilation of synthetic ice concentration data. Assimilation of synthetic ice freeboard data improves the simulated sea-ice thickness field. Using real ice concentration data enhances the model realism in both hemispheres. Assimilation of ice concentration data significantly improves the total hemispheric sea-ice extent all year long, especially in summer. Combining the assimilation of ice freeboard and concentration data leads to better ice thickness, but does not further improve the ice extent. Moreover, the improvements in sea-ice thickness due to the assimilation of ice freeboard remain visible well beyond the assimilation periods.

  6. Extraction of Ice Sheet Layers from Two Intersected Radar Echograms Near Neem Ice Core in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, S.; Muller, J.-P.

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation of snow and ice over time result in ice sheet layers. These can be remotely sensed where there is a contrast in electromagnetic properties, which reflect variations of the ice density, acidity and fabric orientation. Internal ice layers are assumed to be isochronous, deep beneath the ice surface, and parallel to the direction of ice flow. The distribution of internal layers is related to ice sheet dynamics, such as the basal melt rate, basal elevation variation and changes in ice flow mode, which are important parameters to model the ice sheet. Radar echo sounder is an effective instrument used to study the sedimentology of the Earth and planets. Ice Penetrating Radar (IPR) is specific kind of radar echo sounder, which extends studies of ice sheets from surface to subsurface to deep internal ice sheets depending on the frequency utilised. In this study, we examine a study site where folded ice occurs in the internal ice sheet south of the North Greenland Eemian ice drilling (NEEM) station, where two intersected radar echograms acquired by the Multi-channel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder (MCoRDS) employed in the NASA's Operation IceBridge (OIB) mission imaged this folded ice. We propose a slice processing flow based on a Radon Transform to trace and extract these two sets of curved ice sheet layers, which can then be viewed in 3-D, demonstrating the 3-D structure of the ice folds.

  7. Development of 3D Ice Accretion Measurement Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sam; Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Sills, Robert; Pifer, Ellen M.

    2012-01-01

    Icing wind tunnels are designed to simulate in-flight icing environments. The chief product of such facilities is the ice accretion that forms on various test articles. Documentation of the resulting ice accretion key piece of data in icing-wind-tunnel tests. Number of currently used options for documenting ice accretion in icing-wind-tunnel testing.

  8. Response of passive microwave sea ice concentration algorithms to thin ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heygster, Georg; Huntemann, Marcus; Ivanova, Natalia; Saldo, Roberto; Pedersen, Leif Toudal

    The influence of sea ice thickness brightness temperatures and ice concentrations retrieved from passive microwave observations is quantified, using horizontally homogeneous sea ice thickness retrievals from ESA's SMOS sensor observations at high incidence angles. Brightness temperatures are...

  9. Canadian Ice Service Arctic Regional Sea Ice Charts in SIGRID-3 Format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Canadian Ice Service (CIS) produces digital Arctic regional sea ice charts for marine navigation, climate research, and input to the Global Digital Sea Ice Data...

  10. Diversity of cultured bacteria from the perennial ice block of Scarisoara Ice Cave, Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Corina Iţcuş; Mădălina-Denisa Pascu; Traian Brad; Aurel Perşoiu; Cristina Purcarea

    2016-01-01

    Cave ice ecosystems represent a poorly investigated glacial environment. Diversity of cave ice bacteria and their distribution in perennial ice deposits of this underground glacial habitat could constitute a proxy for microbial response to climatic and environmental changes. Scarisoara Ice Cave (Romania) hosts one of the oldest and largest cave ice blocks worldwide. Here we report on cultured microbial diversity of recent, 400, and 900 years-old perennial ice from this cave, representing the ...

  11. Culturas del Mundo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benwell, Ann Fenger; Costa, Alberto; Waehle, Espen

    2006-01-01

    ’Culturas del mundo. Colecciones del Museo Nacional de Dinamarca’ with Ann Fenger Benwell in Culturas del Mundo. Colecciones del Museo Nacional de Dinamarca, ed. Silvia Sauquet, Fundación "la Caixa", Barcelona 2006, pp. 31-39......’Culturas del mundo. Colecciones del Museo Nacional de Dinamarca’ with Ann Fenger Benwell in Culturas del Mundo. Colecciones del Museo Nacional de Dinamarca, ed. Silvia Sauquet, Fundación "la Caixa", Barcelona 2006, pp. 31-39...

  12. Role of ice dynamics in anomalous ice conditions in the Beaufort Sea during 2006 and 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, J. K.; Rigor, I. G.

    2012-05-01

    A new record minimum in summer sea ice extent was set in 2007 and an unusual polynya formed in the Beaufort Sea ice cover during the summer of 2006. Using a combination of visual observations from cruises, ice drift, and satellite passive microwave sea ice concentration, we show that ice dynamics during preceding years included events that preconditioned the Beaufort ice pack for the unusual patterns of opening observed in both summers. Intrusions of first year ice from the Chukchi Sea to the Northern Beaufort, and increased pole-ward ice transport from the western Arctic during summer has led to reduced replenishment of multiyear ice, older than five years, in the western Beaufort, resulting in a younger, thinner ice pack in most of the Beaufort. We find ice younger than five years melts out completely by the end of summer, south of 76N. The 2006 unusual polynya was bounded to the south by an ice tongue composed of sea ice older than 5 years, and formed when first year and second year ice melted between 76N and the older ice to the south. In this paper we demonstrate that a recent shift in ice circulation patterns in the western Arctic preconditions the Beaufort ice pack for increased seasonal ice zone extent.

  13. What Determines the Ice Polymorph in Clouds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudait, Arpa; Molinero, Valeria

    2016-07-20

    Ice crystals in the atmosphere nucleate from supercooled liquid water and grow by vapor uptake. The structure of the ice polymorph grown has strong impact on the morphology and light scattering of the ice crystals, modulates the amount of water vapor in ice clouds, and can impact the molecular uptake and reactivity of atmospheric aerosols. Experiments and molecular simulations indicate that ice nucleated and grown from deeply supercooled liquid water is metastable stacking disordered ice. The ice polymorph grown from vapor has not yet been determined. Here we use large-scale molecular simulations to determine the structure of ice that grows as a result of uptake of water vapor in the temperature range relevant to cirrus and mixed-phase clouds, elucidate the molecular mechanism of the formation of ice at the vapor interface, and compute the free energy difference between cubic and hexagonal ice interfaces with vapor. We find that vapor deposition results in growth of stacking disordered ice only under conditions of extreme supersaturation, for which a nonequilibrium liquid layer completely wets the surface of ice. Such extreme conditions have been used to produce stacking disordered frost ice in experiments and may be plausible in the summer polar mesosphere. Growth of ice from vapor at moderate supersaturations in the temperature range relevant to cirrus and mixed-phase clouds, from 200 to 260 K, produces exclusively the stable hexagonal ice polymorph. Cubic ice is disfavored with respect to hexagonal ice not only by a small penalty in the bulk free energy (3.6 ± 1.5 J mol(-1) at 260 K) but also by a large free energy penalty at the ice-vapor interface (89.7 ± 12.8 J mol(-1) at 260 K). The latter originates in higher vibrational entropy of the hexagonal-terminated ice-vapor interface. We predict that the free energy penalty against the cubic ice interface should decrease strongly with temperature, resulting in some degree of stacking disorder in ice grown from

  14. Inteligencia emocional en estudiantes de la Universidad Nacional del Centro del Perú, 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Cesar Reyes Lujan; Iris Carrasco Díaz

    2014-01-01

    Objetivos: Determinar los niveles de inteligencia emocional predominantes en los estudiantes de la Facultad de Enfermería de la Universidad Nacional del Centro del Perú en el año 2013. Método: Se empleó el método descriptivo prospectivo. Se evaluaron un total de 195 estudiantes de 16 a 30 años de edad en toda la facultad. Para la recolección de datos, se aplicó el inventario Emocional de BarOn y el inventario de coeficiente emocional (ICE) que permitió conocer su inteligencia emocional. Resul...

  15. Vapor deposition of water on graphitic surfaces: Formation of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupi, Laura; Kastelowitz, Noah; Molinero, Valeria, E-mail: Valeria.Molinero@utah.edu [Department of Chemistry, The University of Utah, 315 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0850 (United States)

    2014-11-14

    Carbonaceous surfaces are a major source of atmospheric particles and could play an important role in the formation of ice. Here we investigate through molecular simulations the stability, metastability, and molecular pathways of deposition of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, and ice I from water vapor on graphitic and atomless Lennard-Jones surfaces as a function of temperature. We find that bilayer ice is the most stable ice polymorph for small cluster sizes, nevertheless it can grow metastable well above its region of thermodynamic stability. In agreement with experiments, the simulations predict that on increasing temperature the outcome of water deposition is amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water. The deposition nucleation of bilayer ice and ice I is preceded by the formation of small liquid clusters, which have two wetting states: bilayer pancake-like (wetting) at small cluster size and droplet-like (non-wetting) at larger cluster size. The wetting state of liquid clusters determines which ice polymorph is nucleated: bilayer ice nucleates from wetting bilayer liquid clusters and ice I from non-wetting liquid clusters. The maximum temperature for nucleation of bilayer ice on flat surfaces, T{sub B}{sup max} is given by the maximum temperature for which liquid water clusters reach the equilibrium melting line of bilayer ice as wetting bilayer clusters. Increasing water-surface attraction stabilizes the pancake-like wetting state of liquid clusters leading to larger T{sub B}{sup max} for the flat non-hydrogen bonding surfaces of this study. The findings of this study should be of relevance for the understanding of ice formation by deposition mode on carbonaceous atmospheric particles, including soot.

  16. Quantification of segregation dynamics in ice mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Öberg, Karin I.; Fayolle, Edith C.; Cuppen, Herma M.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Linnartz, Harold

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) The observed presence of pure CO2 ice in protostellar envelopes is attributed to thermally induced ice segregation, but a lack of quantitative experimental data has prevented its use as a temperature probe. Quantitative segregation studies are also needed to characterize diffusion in ices, which underpins all ice dynamics and ice chemistry. This study aims to quantify the segregation mechanism and barriers in different H2O:CO2 and H2O:CO ice mixtures covering a range of astrophysic...

  17. Turbulence and heat exchange under ice

    OpenAIRE

    Sirevaag, Anders

    2003-01-01

    Turbulent fluxes of heat and salt were measured under sea ice at four different locations around Spitsbergen. In Kongsfjorden on West Spitsbergen additional measurements of heat fluxes in the ice and in the atmosphere were done and compared in an air/sea/ice heat budget. Ocean heat flux in Kongsfjorden is about 13 W/m2 and comparison with the other heat fluxes at the ice/ocean interface shows a good agreement. From the heat budget at the ice/ocean interface, the ice growth during three subseq...

  18. The Greenland Ice Mapping Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joughin, I.; Smith, B.; Howat, I. M.; Moon, T. A.; Scambos, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Numerous glaciers in Greenland have sped up rapidly and unpredictably during the first part of the 21st Century. We started the Greenland Ice Mapping Project (GIMP) to produce time series of ice velocity for Greenland's major outlet glaciers. We are also producing image time series to document the advance and retreat of glacier calving fronts and other changes in ice-sheet geometry (e.g., shrinking ice caps and ice shelves). When the project began, there was no digital elevation model (DEM) with sufficient accuracy and resolution to terrain-correct the SAR-derived products. Thus, we also produced the 30-m GIMP DEM, which, aside from improving our processing, is an important product in its own right. Although GIMP focuses on time series, complete spatial coverage for initializing ice sheet models also is important. There are insufficient data, however, to map the full ice sheet in any year. There is good RADARSAT coverage for many years in the north, but the C-band data decorrelate too quickly to measure velocity in the high accumulation regions of the southeast. For such regions, ALOS data usually correlate well, but speckle-tracking estimates at L-band are subject to large ionospheric artifacts. Interferometric phase data are far less sensitive to the effect of the ionosphere, but velocity estimates require results from crossing orbits. Thus, to produce a nearly complete mosaic we used data from multiple sensors, beginning with ERS-1/2 data from the mid 1990s. By using a primarily phase-only solution for much of the interior, we have reduced the velocity errors to ~1-3 m/yr. For the faster moving ice-sheet margin where phase data cannot be unwrapped, we used speckle-tracking data. In particular, we have relied on TerraSAR-X for many fast-moving glaciers because the ionosphere far less affects X-band data. This pan-Greenland velocity map as well as many of the time series would not have been possible without an extensive archive of data collected using six

  19. Ice-condenser aerosol tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of an experimental investigation of aerosol particle transport and capture using a full-scale height and reduced-scale cross section test facility based on the design of the ice compartment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) ice-condenser containment system. Results of 38 tests included thermal-hydraulic as well as aerosol particle data. Particle retention in the test section was greatly influenced by thermal-hydraulic and aerosol test parameters. Test-average decontamination factor (DF) ranged between 1.0 and 36 (retentions between ∼0 and 97.2%). The measured test-average particle retentions for tests without and with ice and steam ranged between DF = 1.0 and 2.2 and DF = 2.4 and 36, respectively. In order to apparent importance, parameters that caused particle retention in the test section in the presence of ice were steam mole fraction (SMF), noncondensible gas flow rate (residence time), particle solubility, and inlet particle size. Ice-basket section noncondensible flows greater than 0.1 m3/s resulted in stable thermal stratification whereas flows less than 0.1 m3/s resulted in thermal behavior termed meandering with frequent temperature crossovers between flow channels. 10 refs., 66 figs., 16 tabs

  20. Sea Ice Concentration and Extent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiso, Josefino C.

    2014-01-01

    Among the most seasonal and most dynamic parameters on the surface of the Earth is sea ice which at any one time covers about 3-6% of the planet. In the Northern Hemisphere, sea ice grows in extent from about 6 x 10(exp 6) sq km to 16 x 10(exp 6) sq km, while in the Southern Hemisphere, it grows from about 3 x 10(exp 6) sq km to about 19 x 10(exp 6) sq km (Comiso, 2010; Gloersen et al., 1992). Sea ice is up to about 2-3 m thick in the Northern Hemisphere and about 1 m thick in the Southern Hemisphere (Wadhams, 2002), and compared to the average ocean depth of about 3 km, it is a relatively thin, fragile sheet that can break due to waves and winds or melt due to upwelling of warm water. Being constantly advected by winds, waves, and currents, sea ice is very dynamic and usually follows the directions of the many gyres in the polar regions. Despite its vast expanse, the sea ice cover was previously left largely unstudied and it was only in recent years that we have understood its true impact and significance as related to the Earths climate, the oceans, and marine life.

  1. Ice-condenser aerosol tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Eschbach, E.J.; Winegardner, W.K. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1991-09-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental investigation of aerosol particle transport and capture using a full-scale height and reduced-scale cross section test facility based on the design of the ice compartment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) ice-condenser containment system. Results of 38 tests included thermal-hydraulic as well as aerosol particle data. Particle retention in the test section was greatly influenced by thermal-hydraulic and aerosol test parameters. Test-average decontamination factor (DF) ranged between 1.0 and 36 (retentions between {approximately}0 and 97.2%). The measured test-average particle retentions for tests without and with ice and steam ranged between DF = 1.0 and 2.2 and DF = 2.4 and 36, respectively. In order to apparent importance, parameters that caused particle retention in the test section in the presence of ice were steam mole fraction (SMF), noncondensible gas flow rate (residence time), particle solubility, and inlet particle size. Ice-basket section noncondensible flows greater than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in stable thermal stratification whereas flows less than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in thermal behavior termed meandering with frequent temperature crossovers between flow channels. 10 refs., 66 figs., 16 tabs.

  2. Recrystallization inhibition in ice due to ice binding protein activity detected by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R. Brown

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Liquid water present in polycrystalline ice at the interstices between ice crystals results in a network of liquid-filled veins and nodes within a solid ice matrix, making ice a low porosity porous media. Here we used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR relaxation and time dependent self-diffusion measurements developed for porous media applications to monitor three dimensional changes to the vein network in ices with and without a bacterial ice binding protein (IBP. Shorter effective diffusion distances were detected as a function of increased irreversible ice binding activity, indicating inhibition of ice recrystallization and persistent small crystal structure. The modification of ice structure by the IBP demonstrates a potential mechanism for the microorganism to enhance survivability in ice. These results highlight the potential of NMR techniques in evaluation of the impact of IBPs on vein network structure and recrystallization processes; information useful for continued development of ice-interacting proteins for biotechnology applications.

  3. Characterization of an IceTop tank for the IceCube surface extension IceVeto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, Julian; Auffenberg, Jan; Hansmann, Bengt; Rongen, Martin; Stahlberg, Martin; Wiebusch, Christopher [III. Physikalisches Institut B, RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    IceTop is an air-shower detector located at the South Pole on the surface above the IceCube detector. It consists of 81 detector stations with two Cherenkov tanks each. The tanks are filled with clear ice and instrumented with two photomultipliers. IceTop detects cosmic-ray induced air-showers above an energy threshold of ∝300 TeV. Muons and neutrinos from these air-showers are the main background for astrophysical neutrino searches with IceCube. The usage of IceTop to veto air-showers largely reduces this background in the field of view. To enlarge the field of view an extension of the surface detector, IceVeto, is planned. Therefore, we investigate the properties of an original IceTop tank as a laboratory reference for the development of new detection module designs. First results of these measurements are presented.

  4. The safety band of Antarctic ice shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürst, Johannes Jakob; Durand, Gaël; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Tavard, Laure; Rankl, Melanie; Braun, Matthias; Gagliardini, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    The floating ice shelves along the seaboard of the Antarctic ice sheet restrain the outflow of upstream grounded ice. Removal of these ice shelves, as shown by past ice-shelf recession and break-up, accelerates the outflow, which adds to sea-level rise. A key question in predicting future outflow is to quantify the extent of calving that might precondition other dynamic consequences and lead to loss of ice-shelf restraint. Here we delineate frontal areas that we label as `passive shelf ice’ and that can be removed without major dynamic implications, with contrasting results across the continent. The ice shelves in the Amundsen and Bellingshausen seas have limited or almost no `passive’ portion, which implies that further retreat of current ice-shelf fronts will yield important dynamic consequences. This region is particularly vulnerable as ice shelves have been thinning at high rates for two decades and as upstream grounded ice rests on a backward sloping bed, a precondition to marine ice-sheet instability. In contrast to these ice shelves, Larsen C Ice Shelf, in the Weddell Sea, exhibits a large `passive’ frontal area, suggesting that the imminent calving of a vast tabular iceberg will be unlikely to instantly produce much dynamic change.

  5. Experimental Studies in Ice Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Timothy Peter

    Ice nuclei play a critical role in the formation of precipitation in mixed phase clouds. Modification of IN concentrations can lead to changes in cloud lifetimes and precipitation size. Presented in this study are experimental investigations into ice nuclei in an ongoing effort to reduce the uncertainties that ice nuclei have on cloud processes and climate. This research presents a new version of the cold stage drop freezing assay to investigate the time-dependence of heterogeneous nucleation. The temperature range for the instrument spans from the melting point of water to the homogeneous freezing limit of ˜-38 deg C. Temperature stability for the instrument allowed for experimental operation for up to four days while interrogating the same sample. Up to a one hundred fold increase in the number of analyzed drops was accomplished through an in-house written automated drop freezing detection software package. Combined instrument design improvements allow for the analysis of IN concentrations down to ˜10-8 ice nuclei per picoliter of sample water. A new variant of the multiple-component stochastic model for heterogeneous ice nucleation was used to investigate the time dependence of heterogeneous freezing processes. This was accomplished by analyzing how the changes in the cooling rate can impact the observed nucleation rate. The model employed four material-dependent parameters to accurately capture the observed freezing of water drops containing Arizona Test Dust. The parameters were then used to accurately predict the freezing behavior of the drops in time dependent experiments. The time dependence freezing of a wide range of materials was then investigated. These materials included the minerals montmorillonite and kaolinite, the biological proxy ice nuclei contained within the product Icemax, and flame soot generated from the incomplete combustion of ethylene gas. The time dependence for ice nuclei collected from rainwater samples was also investigated. The

  6. Atmospheric Methane in Ice Cores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The reconstruction of air trapped in ice cores provides us the most direct information about atmospheric CH4 variations in the past history. Ice core records from the "Three Poles (Antarctica, Greenland and Tibetan Plateau)" reveal the detailed fluctuations of atmospheric CH4 concentration with time and are allowed to quantify the CH4 differences among latitudes. These data are indispensably in the farther study of the relationship between greenhouse gases and climatic change, and of the past changes in terrestrial CH4 emissions. Ice cores reconstruction indicates that atmospheric CH4 concentration has increased quickly since industrialization, and the present day's level of atmospheric CH4 (1800 ppbv) is unprecedented during the past Glacial-Interglacial climate cycles.

  7. Summer Ice and Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, G.; Gavin, J.

    1981-10-01

    The extent of Antarctic pack ice in the summer, as charted from satellite imagery, decreased by 2.5 million square kilometers between 1973 and 1980. The U.S. Navy and Russian atlases and whaling and research ship reports from the 1930's indicate that summer ice conditions earlier in this century were heavier than the current average. Surface air temperatures along the seasonally shifting belt of melting snow between 55 degrees and 80 degrees N during spring and summer were higher in 1974 to 1978 than in 1934 to 1938. The observed departures in the two hemispheres qualitatively agree with the predicted impact of an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide. However, since it is not known to what extent the changes in snow and ice cover and in temperature can be explained by the natural variability of the climate system or by other processes unrelated to carbon dioxide, a cause-and-effect relation cannot yet be established.

  8. Electromelting of Confined Monolayer Ice

    CERN Document Server

    Qiu, Hu

    2013-01-01

    In sharp contrast to the prevailing view that electric fields promote water freezing, here we show by molecular dynamics simulations that monolayer ice confined between two parallel plates can melt into liquid water under perpendicularly applied electric field. The melting temperature of the monolayer ice decreases with the increasing strength of the external field due to field-induced disruption of the water-wall interaction induced well-ordered network of hydrogen bond. This electromelting process should add an important new ingredient to the physics of water.

  9. Debating the Little Ice Age

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Morgan; Ó Gráda, Cormac

    2014-01-01

    This paper replies to commentaries by Sam White and by Ulf Büntgen and Lena Hellmann on our 'The Waning of the Little Ice Age: Climate Change in Early Modern Europe'. White and Büntgen/Hellmann seek to prove that Europe experienced the kind of sustained falls in temperature between the fifteenth and nineteenth centuries that can justify the notion of a Little Ice Age. Neither of them adequately addresses the cogency of the anecdotal or statistical evidence presented in our article, especially...

  10. Improving Hydrology in Land Ice Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Stephen; Flowers, Gwenn; Schoof, Christian

    2011-05-01

    Community Earth System Model Land Ice Working Group Meeting; Boulder, Colorado, 13 January 2011 ; Recent observations indicate that mass loss from glaciers and ice sheets (“land ice”) is increasing. The drivers of these changes are not well understood, and modeling the land ice response to them remains challenging. As a result, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change explicitly avoided speculating on 21st-century sea level rise from ice dynamical processes in its fourth assessment report. The mismatch between observations of land ice change and model skill at mimicking those changes is behind recent efforts to develop next-generation land ice models. Necessary improvements to existing models include improved dynamics, coupling to climate models, and better representations of important boundary conditions and physical processes. Basal sliding, the primary control on the rate of land ice delivery to the oceans, is one such boundary condition that is largely controlled by land ice hydrology.

  11. Southern Hemisphere Ice Limits, 1973-1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weekly Southern Ocean ice limits, have been digitized from U.S. Navy Fleet Weather Facility ice charts, at the Max-Planck Institut fur Meteorologie, Hamburg....

  12. Global Lake and River Ice Phenology Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Lake and River Ice Phenology Database contains freeze and thaw/breakup dates as well as other descriptive ice cover data for 865 lakes and rivers in the...

  13. Greenland Radar Ice Sheet Thickness Measurements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Two 150-MHz coherent radar depth sounders were developed and flown over the Greenland ice sheet to obtain ice thickness measurements in support of PARCA...

  14. Arctic Landfast Sea Ice 1953-1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The files in this data set contain landfast sea ice data (monthly means) gathered from both Russian Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI) and Canadian Ice...

  15. Monthly snow/ice averages (ISCCP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — September Arctic sea ice is now declining at a rate of 11.5 percent per decade, relative to the 1979 to 2000 average. Data from NASA show that the land ice sheets...

  16. 14 CFR 27.1419 - Ice protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 27.1419 Ice protection. (a) To obtain... effectiveness of the ice protection system and its components must be shown by flight tests of the rotorcraft...

  17. RIDES: Raman Icing Detection System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Inflight icing of engines and airframe presents a significant hazard to air transport, especially at lower flight elevations during take-off or on approach. Ice...

  18. Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice

    CERN Document Server

    Dartois, E; Boduch, P; Brunetto, R; Chabot, M; Domaracka, A; Ding, J J; Kamalou, O; Lv, X Y; Rothard, H; da Silveira, E F; Thomas, J C

    2015-01-01

    Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic ...

  19. De-icing technologies: Introduction to Manitoba Hydro's use of ice melting and ice rolling technologies to remove ice from subtransmission and 115 kV transmission lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manitoba Hydro's Ice Storm Management Program to reduce ice damage to overhead power lines in the voltage range of 8 kV to 115 kV is described. Overhead power lines are de-iced either by AC ice melting, which involves placing a three-phase short at a calculated point, or ice rolling, which is a process of mechanically stripping ice from conductors. Direct current heating and underground distribution systems are also accepted prevention measures. Advantages and disadvantages of each of these methods of de-icing are reviewed. Material for this paper has been extracted from a workshop manual prepared for the 1993 and 1998 Ice Storm Management workshops organized by Manitoba Hydro through the Canadian Electrical Association. 1 ref

  20. Components of the ice age circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rind, D.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of ice age boundary conditions on atmospheric dynamics and regional climate patterns are investigated using four GCM simulations. Particular consideration is given to sea surface temperature-sea ice distribution, the appearance of land ice, and the increased elevation of land ice. It is observed that the ice-age sea surface temperature stabilizes the atmosphere over the oceans, increases the frequency of storm tracking through central North America, and amplifies transient eddy energy without increasing baroclinic generation. It is detected that low-elevation ice generates low pressure over eastern North America and southern Europe in winter, while increasing cloud cover and cooling the land in summer. Elevation of the ice sheets cools the land in winter, further intensifies storms off northeastern North America, induces subsidence warming downstream of the European ice sheets in summer, and increases the transient and stationary eddy energy through increased baroclinicity.

  1. Ice sheet anisotropy measured with polarimetric ice sounding radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    For polar ice sheets, valuable stress and strain information can be deduced from crystal orientation fabrics (COF) and their prevailing c-axis alignment. Polarimetric radio echo sounding is a promising technique to measure the anisotropic electromagnetic propagation and reflection properties...

  2. Atmospheric icing of structures: Observations and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ágústsson, H.; Elíasson, Á. J.; Thorsteins, E.; Rögnvaldsson, Ó.; Ólafsson, H.

    2012-04-01

    This study compares observed icing in a test span in complex orography at Hallormsstaðaháls (575 m) in East-Iceland with parameterized icing based on an icing model and dynamically downscaled weather at high horizontal resolution. Four icing events have been selected from an extensive dataset of observed atmospheric icing in Iceland. A total of 86 test-spans have been erected since 1972 at 56 locations in complex terrain with more than 1000 icing events documented. The events used here have peak observed ice load between 4 and 36 kg/m. Most of the ice accretion is in-cloud icing but it may partly be mixed with freezing drizzle and wet snow icing. The calculation of atmospheric icing is made in two steps. First the atmospheric data is created by dynamically downscaling the ECMWF-analysis to high resolution using the non-hydrostatic mesoscale Advanced Research WRF-model. The horizontal resolution of 9, 3, 1 and 0.33 km is necessary to allow the atmospheric model to reproduce correctly local weather in the complex terrain of Iceland. Secondly, the Makkonen-model is used to calculate the ice accretion rate on the conductors based on the simulated temperature, wind, cloud and precipitation variables from the atmospheric data. In general, the atmospheric model correctly simulates the atmospheric variables and icing calculations based on the atmospheric variables correctly identify the observed icing events, but underestimate the load due to too slow ice accretion. This is most obvious when the temperature is slightly below 0°C and the observed icing is most intense. The model results improve significantly when additional observations of weather from an upstream weather station are used to nudge the atmospheric model. However, the large variability in the simulated atmospheric variables results in high temporal and spatial variability in the calculated ice accretion. Furthermore, there is high sensitivity of the icing model to the droplet size and the possibility that

  3. Ice stratigraphy at the Pakitsoq ice margin, West Greenland, derived from gas records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaefer, H.; Petrenko, V. V.; Brook, E. J.;

    2009-01-01

    measured in the ice matrix (delta O-18(ice)) and air occlusions (delta O-18(atm), delta N-15 of N-2 and methane concentration) to date ice layers from specific climatic intervals. The data presented here expand our understanding of the stratigraphy and three-dimensional structure of ice layers outcropping...

  4. Geochemical and isotopic signatures of ice shelves and ice shelf circulation in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Duanne; Fink, David; Simon, Krista; Post, Alix; Galton-Fenzi, Ben; Yokoyama, Yusuke

    2016-04-01

    Ice shelves are a key component of the ice sheet drainage network. Most ice lost from the present day Antarctic ice sheet occurs via ice shelves, so ice shelf processes (e.g. calving and basal melt) modulate ice sheet mass balance. Knowledge of the past distribution and geometry of ice shelves will help understand their sensitivity to climate forcing, and the response of ice sheets to changes and loss of ice shelves. However, detecting the presence or absence of past ice shelves in the sedimentary record is challenging. In this study, we compare concentrations of elemental and isotopic tracers in modern sediments in open water in Prydz Bay to those being deposited underneath the Amery Ice Shelf at ten sites across the region. Our results suggest that sub-ice shelf and open water sediments differ in their acid-extractable elemental concentrations. Also, meteoric Be-10 concentrations are on average lower in sub-ice shelf settings than they are in open water environments. However, the Be-10 concentration is modulated by sub-ice shelf ocean circulation, so that there is overlap between the sediment concentrations in these two environments. In combination, we suggest that these tracers can be used as proxies to reconstruct former ice shelf geometries and sub-shelf circulation.

  5. The fast Ice Nucleus chamber FINCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundke, U.; Nillius, B.; Jaenicke, R.; Wetter, T.; Klein, H.; Bingemer, H.

    2008-11-01

    We present first results of our new developed Ice Nucleus (IN) counter FINCH from the sixth Cloud and Aerosol Characterization Experiment (CLACE 6) campaign at Jungfraujoch station, 3571 m asl. Measurements were made at the total and the ICE CVI inlet. Laboratory measurements of ice onset temperatures by FINCH are compared to those of the static diffusion chamber FRIDGE (FRankfurt Ice Deposition Freezing Experiment). Within the errors of both new instruments the results compare well to published data.

  6. Ice Shapes on a Tail Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreeger, Richard E.; Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Testing of a thermally-protected helicopter rotor in the Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was completed. Data included inter-cycle and cold blade ice shapes. Accreted ice shapes were thoroughly documented, including tracing, scanning and photographing. This was the first time this scanning capability was used outside of NASA. This type of data has never been obtained for a rotorcraft before. This data will now be used to validate the latest generation of icing analysis tools.

  7. Modeling interfacial liquid layers on environmental ices

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, M H; S. G. Moussa; V. F. McNeill

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial layers on ice significantly influence air-ice chemical interactions. In solute-containing aqueous systems, a liquid brine may form upon freezing due to the exclusion of impurities from the ice crystal lattice coupled with freezing point depression in the concentrated brine. The brine may be segregated to the air-ice interface where it creates a surface layer, in micropockets, or at grain boundaries or triple junctions.

    We present a model for brines and their a...

  8. Ice condensation as a planet formation mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Ros, K.; Johansen, A.

    2013-01-01

    We show that condensation is an efficient particle growth mechanism, leading to growth beyond decimeter-sized pebbles close to an ice line in protoplanetary discs. As coagulation of dust particles is frustrated by bouncing and fragmentation, condensation could be a complementary, or even dominant, growth mode in the early stages of planet formation. Ice particles diffuse across the ice line and sublimate, and vapour diffusing back across the ice line recondenses onto already existing particle...

  9. Ancient ice streams and their megalineated beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyles, Nick; Ross, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Ice streams are corridors of fast-flowing (~ 800 m yr- 1) ice inset within otherwise sluggish-moving ice sheets. According to reported estimates, as much as 90% of the total discharge of the Antarctic Ice Sheet, for example, occurs through such corridors. Recognition of ice stream records in paleo-ice sheet research has profoundly changed the discipline of glacial geology. The key has been identification of the distinctive corrugated or 'megalineated' geomorphology of their beds, consisting of elongate ridges that are parallel to ice flow direction and often transitional to drumlins. Access to new satellite imagery has enabled mapping of megascale glacial lineations (MSGLs) over large swaths of terrain and the recognition of regional-scale ice stream flow paths and origins. At the peak of the last ice age, just after 20,000 years ago, there were more than 100 ice streams within the Laurentide Ice Sheet. Only now are we beginning to fully appreciate the fundamental role that such streams (which have been called the 'arteries' of ice sheets) have had on glaciated landscapes, by moving enormous volumes of sediment and releasing armadas of floating ice to the Arctic and Atlantic oceans. There is also a growing awareness of the erosional role of ice streams in overdeepening of lakes, fiords and other troughs along coastlines. Much remains to be learnt and new discoveries surely await. The picture of past ice sheets, like the Laurentide and Fennoscandian Ice Sheets, that is emerging today is very different from that of 20 years ago.

  10. Influence of Icing on Bridge Cable Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koss, Holger; Frej Henningsen, Jesper; Olsen, Idar

    2013-01-01

    determination of these force coefficients require a proper simulation of the ice layer occurring under the specific climatic conditions, favouring real ice accretion over simplified artificial reproduction. The work presented in this paper was performed to study the influence of ice accretion on the aerodynamic...... forces of different bridge cables types. The experiments were conducted in a wind tunnel facility capable amongst others to simulate incloud icing conditions....

  11. Perfil del visitante del parque nacional Desierto del Carmen

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth López Carré

    2007-01-01

    El artículo presenta los resultados obtenidos del proyecto de investigación titulado "Evaluación del potencial de comercialización y caracterización del visitante del Santo Desierto de Tenancingo", específicamente los correspondientes al perfil del visitante a dicho Parque Nacional. La metodología utilizada se sustenta en la investigación de mercados propuesta por Kinnear y Taylor. El resultado de dicha investigación permitió integrar el perfil del segmento de mercado religioso...

  12. Toward a radiometric ice clock: uranium ages of the Dome C ice core

    OpenAIRE

    Aciego, S.; Institute of Geochemistry and Petrology, ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Bourdon, B.; Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; Schwander, J.; Climate and Environmental Physics, Physics Institute, University of Bern, Switzerland; Baur, H.; Institute of Geochemistry and Petrology, ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Forieri, A.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia

    2011-01-01

    Ice sheets and deep ice cores have yielded a wealth of paleoclimate information based on continuous dating methods while independent radiometric ages of ice have remained elusive. Here we demonstrate the application of (234U/238U) measurements to dating the EPICA Dome C ice core based on the accumulation of 234U in the ice matrix from recoil during 238U decay out of dust bound within the ice. Measured (234U/238U) activity ratios within the ice generally increase with depth while the surface a...

  13. Arctic sea ice decline contributes to thinning lake ice trend in northern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, Vladimir A.; Arp, Christopher D.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Cai, Lei

    2016-07-01

    Field measurements, satellite observations, and models document a thinning trend in seasonal Arctic lake ice growth, causing a shift from bedfast to floating ice conditions. September sea ice concentrations in the Arctic Ocean since 1991 correlate well (r = +0.69, p characterizing lake ice conditions. A lake ice growth model forced with Weather Research and Forecasting model output produced a 7% decrease in lake ice growth when 2007/08 sea ice was imposed on 1991/92 climatology and a 9% increase in lake ice growth for the opposing experiment. Here, we clearly link early winter ‘ocean-effect’ snowfall and warming to reduced lake ice growth. Future reductions in sea ice extent will alter hydrological, biogeochemical, and habitat functioning of Arctic lakes and cause sub-lake permafrost thaw.

  14. Development of a capacitive ice sensor to measure ice growth in real time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Xiang; Cho, Hyo Chang; Wang, Bo; Ahn, Cheol Hee; Moon, Hyeong Soon; Go, Jeung Sang

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of the capacitive sensor to measure the growth of ice on a fuel pipe surface in real time. The ice sensor consists of pairs of electrodes to detect the change in capacitance and a thermocouple temperature sensor to examine the ice formation situation. In addition, an environmental chamber was specially designed to control the humidity and temperature to simulate the ice formation conditions. From the humidity, a water film is formed on the ice sensor, which results in an increase in capacitance. Ice nucleation occurs, followed by the rapid formation of frost ice that decreases the capacitance suddenly. The capacitance is saturated. The developed ice sensor explains the ice growth providing information about the icing temperature in real time. PMID:25808770

  15. Development of a Capacitive Ice Sensor to Measure Ice Growth in Real Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of the capacitive sensor to measure the growth of ice on a fuel pipe surface in real time. The ice sensor consists of pairs of electrodes to detect the change in capacitance and a thermocouple temperature sensor to examine the ice formation situation. In addition, an environmental chamber was specially designed to control the humidity and temperature to simulate the ice formation conditions. From the humidity, a water film is formed on the ice sensor, which results in an increase in capacitance. Ice nucleation occurs, followed by the rapid formation of frost ice that decreases the capacitance suddenly. The capacitance is saturated. The developed ice sensor explains the ice growth providing information about the icing temperature in real time.

  16. Variablility of Fram Strait Ice Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, R.; Rothrock, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    We estimate the winter sea ice export through the Fram Strait using ice motion from satellite passive microwave data. Sea ice motion (October through May)is obtained by tracking the displacement of common features in sequential 85 GHz and 37 GHz brightness temperature fields.

  17. The Last Arctic Sea Ice Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfirman, S. L.; Tremblay, B.; Newton, R.; Fowler, C.

    2010-12-01

    Summer sea ice may persist along the northern flank of Canada and Greenland for decades longer than the rest of the Arctic, raising the possibility of a naturally formed refugium for ice-associated species. Observations and models indicate that some ice in this region forms locally, while some is transported to the area by winds and ocean currents. Depending on future changes in melt patterns and sea ice transport rates, both the central Arctic and Siberian shelf seas may be sources of ice to the region. An international system of monitoring and management of the sea ice refuge, along with the ice source regions, has the potential to maintain viable habitat for ice-associated species, including polar bears, for decades into the future. Issues to consider in developing a strategy include: + the likely duration and extent of summer sea ice in this region based on observations, models and paleoenvironmental information + the extent and characteristics of the “ice shed” contributing sea ice to the refuge, including its dynamics, physical and biological characteristics as well as potential for contamination from local or long-range sources + likely assemblages of ice-associated species and their habitats + potential stressors such as transportation, tourism, resource extraction, contamination + policy, governance, and development issues including management strategies that could maintain the viability of the refuge.

  18. Anti-icing performance of superhydrophobic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article studies the anti-ice performance of several micro/nano-rough hydrophobic coatings with different surface chemistry and topography. The coatings were prepared by spin-coating or dip coating and used organosilane, fluoropolymer or silicone rubber as a top layer. Artificially created glaze ice, similar to the naturally accreted one, was deposited on the nanostructured surfaces by spraying supercooled water microdroplets (average size ∼80 μm) in a wind tunnel at subzero temperature (-10 deg. C). The ice adhesion strength was evaluated by spinning the samples in a centrifuge at constantly increasing speed until ice delamination occurred. The results show that the anti-icing properties of the tested materials deteriorate, as their surface asperities seem to be gradually broken during icing/de-icing cycles. Therefore, the durability of anti-icing properties appears to be an important point for further research. It is also shown that the anti-icing efficiency of the tested superhydrophobic surfaces is significantly lower in a humid atmosphere, as water condensation both on top and between surface asperities takes place, leading to high values of ice adhesion strength. This implies that superhydrophobic surfaces may not always be ice-phobic in the presence of humidity, which can limit their wide use as anti-icing materials.

  19. Anti-icing performance of superhydrophobic surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhadi, S.; Farzaneh, M. [CIGELE/INGIVRE, Department of Applied Sciences, Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, 555 University blvd., Saguenay, PQ, G7H 2B1 (Canada); Kulinich, S.A., E-mail: skulinic@uqac.ca [CIGELE/INGIVRE, Department of Applied Sciences, Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, 555 University blvd., Saguenay, PQ, G7H 2B1 (Canada)

    2011-05-01

    This article studies the anti-ice performance of several micro/nano-rough hydrophobic coatings with different surface chemistry and topography. The coatings were prepared by spin-coating or dip coating and used organosilane, fluoropolymer or silicone rubber as a top layer. Artificially created glaze ice, similar to the naturally accreted one, was deposited on the nanostructured surfaces by spraying supercooled water microdroplets (average size {approx}80 {mu}m) in a wind tunnel at subzero temperature (-10 deg. C). The ice adhesion strength was evaluated by spinning the samples in a centrifuge at constantly increasing speed until ice delamination occurred. The results show that the anti-icing properties of the tested materials deteriorate, as their surface asperities seem to be gradually broken during icing/de-icing cycles. Therefore, the durability of anti-icing properties appears to be an important point for further research. It is also shown that the anti-icing efficiency of the tested superhydrophobic surfaces is significantly lower in a humid atmosphere, as water condensation both on top and between surface asperities takes place, leading to high values of ice adhesion strength. This implies that superhydrophobic surfaces may not always be ice-phobic in the presence of humidity, which can limit their wide use as anti-icing materials.

  20. Dielectric Signatures of Annealing in Glacier Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, R. E.; Stillman, D. E.; MacGregor, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed the dielectric spectra of 49 firn and ice samples from ice sheets and glaciers to better understand how differing ice formation and evolution affect electrical properties. The dielectric relaxation of ice is well known and its characteristic frequency increases with the concentration of soluble impurities in the ice lattice. We found that meteoric ice and firn generally possess two such relaxations, indicating distinct crystal populations or zonation. Typically, one population is consistent with that of relatively pure ice, and the other is significantly more impure. However, high temperatures (e.g., temperate ice), long residence times (e.g., ancient ice from Mullins Glacier, Antarctica), or anomalously high impurity concentrations favor the development of a single relaxation. These relationships suggest that annealing causes two dielectrically distinct populations to merge into one population. The dielectric response of temperate ice samples indicates increasing purity with increasing depth, suggesting final rejection of impurities from the lattice. Separately, subglacially frozen samples from the Vostok 5G ice core possess a single relaxation whose variable characteristic frequency likely reflects the composition of the source water. Multi-frequency electrical measurements on cores and in the field can track annealing of glacier ice.

  1. Balance of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    For several decades, measurements of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet showed it to be retreating rapidly. But new data derived from satellite-borne radar sensors show the ice sheet to be growing. Changing Antarctic ice sheets remains an area of high scientific interest, particularly in light of recent global warming concerns. These new findings are significant because scientists estimate that sea level would rise 5-6 meters (16-20 feet) if the ice sheet collapsed into the sea. Do these new measurements signal the end of the ice sheet's 10,000-year retreat? Or, are these new satellite data simply much more accurate than the sparse ice core and surface measurements that produced the previous estimates? Another possibility is that the ice accumulation may simply indicate that the ice sheet naturally expands and retreats in regular cycles. Cryologists will grapple with these questions, and many others, as they examine the new data. The image above depicts the region of West Antarctica where scientists measured ice speed. The fast-moving central ice streams are shown in red. Slower tributaries feeding the ice streams are shown in blue. Green areas depict slow-moving, stable areas. Thick black lines depict the areas that collect snowfall to feed their respective ice streams. Reference: Ian Joughin and Slawek Tulaczyk Science Jan 18 2002: 476-480. Image courtesy RADARSAT Antarctic Mapping Project

  2. Where to find 1.5 million yr old ice for the IPICS "Oldest-Ice" ice core

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Hubertus; Severinghaus, J.; Brook, E.; Wolff, E; Albert, M.; Alemany, O.; R. Arthern; C. Bentley; Blankenship, D.; J. Chappellaz; Creyts, T.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; M. Dinn; Frezzotti, M.; Fujita, S.

    2013-01-01

    The recovery of a 1.5 million yr long ice core from Antarctica represents a keystone of our understanding of Quaternary climate, the progression of glaciation over this time period and the role of greenhouse gas cycles in this progression. Here we tackle the question of where such ice may still be found in the Antarctic ice sheet. We can show that such old ice is most likely to exist in the plateau area of the East Antarctic ice sheet (EAIS) without stratigraphic disturbance and should be abl...

  3. Where to find 1.5 million yr old ice for the IPICS "Oldest-Ice" ice core

    OpenAIRE

    H. Fischer; Severinghaus, J.; Brook, E.; Wolff, E; Albert, M.; Alemany, O.; R. Arthern; C. Bentley; Blankenship, D.; J. Chappellaz; Creyts, T.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; M. Dinn; Frezzotti, M.; Fujita, S.

    2013-01-01

    The recovery of a 1.5 million yr long ice core from Antarctica represents a keystone of our understanding of Quaternary climate, the progression of glaciation over this time period and the role of greenhouse gas cycles in this progression. Here we tackle the question of where such ice may still be found in the Antarctic ice sheet. We can show that such old ice is most likely to exist in the plateau area of the East Antarctic ice sheet (EAIS) without stratigraphic disturbance...

  4. Development of a Capacitive Ice Sensor to Measure Ice Growth in Real Time

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang Zhi; Hyo Chang Cho; Bo Wang; Cheol Hee Ahn; Hyeong Soon Moon; Jeung Sang Go

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of the capacitive sensor to measure the growth of ice on a fuel pipe surface in real time. The ice sensor consists of pairs of electrodes to detect the change in capacitance and a thermocouple temperature sensor to examine the ice formation situation. In addition, an environmental chamber was specially designed to control the humidity and temperature to simulate the ice formation conditions. From the humidity, a water film is formed on the ice sensor, which...

  5. Climatic Conditions for modelling the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets throughout the ice age cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Abe-Ouchi, A.; Segawa, T; F. Saito

    2007-01-01

    The ice sheet-climate interaction as well as the climatic response to orbital parameters and atmospheric CO2 content are examined in order to drive an ice sheet model throughout an ice age cycle. Feedback processes between ice sheet and atmosphere are analyzed by numerical experiments using a high resolution General Circulation Model (GCM) under different conditions at the Last Glacial Maximum. Among the proposed processes, the ice albedo feedback, the elevation-mass ba...

  6. Configuration of Pluto's Volatile Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, William M.; Binzel, R. P.; Cook, J. C.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Earle, A. M.; Ennico, K.; Jennings, D. E.; Howett, C. J. A.; Linscott, I. R.; Lunsford, A. W.; Olkin, C. B.; Parker, A. H.; Parker, J. Wm; Protopapa, S.; Reuter, D. C.; Singer, K. N.; Spencer, J. R.; Stern, S. A.; Tsang, C. C. C.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Weaver, H. A.; Young, L. A.; Berry, K.; Buie, M. W.; Stansberry, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    We report on near-infrared remote sensing by New Horizons' Ralph instrument (Reuter et al. 2008, Space Sci. Rev. 140, 129-154) of Pluto's N2, CO, and CH4 ices. These especially volatile ices are mobile even at Pluto's cryogenic surface temperatures. Sunlight reflected from these ices becomes imprinted with their characteristic spectral absorption bands. The detailed appearance of these absorption features depends on many aspects of local composition, thermodynamic state, and texture. Multiple-scattering radiative transfer models are used to retrieve quantitative information about these properties and to map how they vary across Pluto's surface. Using parameter maps derived from New Horizons observations, we investigate the striking regional differences in the abundances and scattering properties of Pluto's volatile ices. Comparing these spatial patterns with the underlying geology provides valuable constraints on processes actively modifying the planet's surface, over a variety of spatial scales ranging from global latitudinal patterns to more regional and local processes within and around the feature informally known as Sputnik Planum. This work was supported by the NASA New Horizons Project.

  7. Medical ice slurry production device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasza, Kenneth E.; Oras, John; Son, HyunJin

    2008-06-24

    The present invention relates to an apparatus for producing sterile ice slurries for medical cooling applications. The apparatus is capable of producing highly loaded slurries suitable for delivery to targeted internal organs of a patient, such as the brain, heart, lungs, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, and others, through medical size diameter tubing. The ice slurry production apparatus includes a slurry production reservoir adapted to contain a volume of a saline solution. A flexible membrane crystallization surface is provided within the slurry production reservoir. The crystallization surface is chilled to a temperature below a freezing point of the saline solution within the reservoir such that ice particles form on the crystallization surface. A deflector in the form of a reciprocating member is provided for periodically distorting the crystallization surface and dislodging the ice particles which form on the crystallization surface. Using reservoir mixing the slurry is conditioned for easy pumping directly out of the production reservoir via medical tubing or delivery through other means such as squeeze bottles, squeeze bags, hypodermic syringes, manual hand delivery, and the like.

  8. The Sea Ice Board Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Kathryn Berry

    2008-01-01

    The National Science Foundation-funded Arctic Climate Modeling Program (ACMP) provides "curriculum resource-based professional development" materials that combine current science information with practical classroom instruction embedded with "best practice" techniques for teaching science to diverse students. The Sea Ice Board Game, described…

  9. Glaciology and the Ice Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carozzi, Albert V.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses: (1) the beginning of glaciology; (2) origin of erratic boulders, meteorites, volcanic explosions, floods, and drift; (3) ice age hypothesis in Europe and the United States; (4) development of glacial theory; (5) and a unified explanation of glacial events. A bibliography of classical research on glaciology is included. (BC)

  10. Women of Ice and Fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The anthology offers 11 original contributions about the women in GoT, the transmedial universe of George R.R. Martin's book series A Song of Ice and Fire, the HBO TV series Game of Thrones, computer games and online fan activities. The anthology examines the representation of women, and activity...

  11. Microwave emissivity of fresh water ice--Lake ice and Antarctic ice pack--Radiative transfer simulations versus satellite radiances

    CERN Document Server

    Mills, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Microwave emissivity models of sea ice are poorly validated empirically. Typical validation studies involve using averaged or stereotyped profiles of ice parameters against averaged radiance measurements. Measurement sites are rarely matched and even less often point-by-point. Because of saline content, complex permittivity of sea ice is highly variable and difficult to predict. Therefore, to check the validity of a typical, plane-parallel, radiative-transfer-based ice emissivity model, we apply it to fresh water ice instead of salt-water ice. Radiance simulations for lake ice are compared with measurements over Lake Superior from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer on EOS (AMSR-E). AMSR-E measurements are also collected over Antarctic icepack. For each pixel, a thermodynamic model is driven by four years of European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis data and the resulting temperature profiles used to drive the emissivity model. The results suggest that the relatively simple ...

  12. Modeling and Grid Generation of Iced Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickerman, Mary B.; Baez, Marivell; Braun, Donald C.; Hackenberg, Anthony W.; Pennline, James A.; Schilling, Herbert W.

    2007-01-01

    SmaggIce Version 2.0 is a software toolkit for geometric modeling and grid generation for two-dimensional, singleand multi-element, clean and iced airfoils. A previous version of SmaggIce was described in Preparing and Analyzing Iced Airfoils, NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 8 (August 2004), page 32. To recapitulate: Ice shapes make it difficult to generate quality grids around airfoils, yet these grids are essential for predicting ice-induced complex flow. This software efficiently creates high-quality structured grids with tools that are uniquely tailored for various ice shapes. SmaggIce Version 2.0 significantly enhances the previous version primarily by adding the capability to generate grids for multi-element airfoils. This version of the software is an important step in streamlining the aeronautical analysis of ice airfoils using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. The user may prepare the ice shape, define the flow domain, decompose it into blocks, generate grids, modify/divide/merge blocks, and control grid density and smoothness. All these steps may be performed efficiently even for the difficult glaze and rime ice shapes. Providing the means to generate highly controlled grids near rough ice, the software includes the creation of a wrap-around block (called the "viscous sublayer block"), which is a thin, C-type block around the wake line and iced airfoil. For multi-element airfoils, the software makes use of grids that wrap around and fill in the areas between the viscous sub-layer blocks for all elements that make up the airfoil. A scripting feature records the history of interactive steps, which can be edited and replayed later to produce other grids. Using this version of SmaggIce, ice shape handling and grid generation can become a practical engineering process, rather than a laborious research effort.

  13. Sedimentary record of ice divide migration and ice streams in the Keewatin core region of the Laurentide Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, Tyler J.; Ross, Martin; Menzies, John

    2016-06-01

    The Aberdeen Lake region of central mainland Nunavut is a former core region of the Laurentide Ice Sheet that is characterized by streamlined glacial landforms classified into multiple crosscutting flow sets and near continuous till blanket. The presence of widespread till near the centre of the Keewatin Ice Dome raises questions about its origin. Detailed drillcore logging revealed a complex stratigraphy consisting of at least 6 till units, variably preserved across the study area. Till provenance analysis indicates deposition by near opposite-trending ice flow phases, interpreted as evidence of reconfiguration of the Keewatin Ice Divide. At the surface, large north-northwesterly aligned landforms are present across the study area. The till stratigraphy within these landforms indicates the same NNW ice flow phase is responsible for considerable till production. This ice flow phase is also correlated to a long regional dispersal train of erratics toward the Gulf of Boothia. The production of an extensive, thick (~ 12 m), till sheet during the NNW-trending ice flow phase occurred far from the ice margin at a time of extensive ice cover of mainland Nunavut, likely from an east-west oriented ice divide. A deglacial westerly trending ice flow phase formed small drumlins atop the larger NNW streamlined till ridges and deposited a surficial till unit that is too thin to mask the NNW flow set across the study area. It is proposed that the Boothia paleo-ice stream catchment area propagated deep into the Laurentide Ice Sheet and contributed to significant till production in this core region of the Keewatin Sector prior to the westerly ice flow shift. The apparent relationship between till thickness and the size of the associated or correlated drumlins, flow sets, and dispersal trains indicates complex erosion/deposition interplay is involved in the formation of streamlined subglacial landforms.

  14. Ice stream reorganization and ice sheet mass balance following the reactivation of Kamb Ice Stream, West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougamont, Marion; Christoffersen, Poul; Price, Stephen; Carter, Sasha

    2015-04-01

    Ice streams in Antarctica account for most of the ice volume discharged to the ocean, and their flow variability greatly influences the mass balance of the ice sheet. Today, the Siple Coast region of West Antarctica is the only one to experience a positive mass balance (~36Gt/yr), as a consequence of the stagnation of Kamb Ice Stream about 170 years ago and the ongoing slowdown of Whillans Ice Stream. However, this positive trend could be temporary; past studies have shown that both ice streams experienced significant flow variability over the past millennia, with stagnation typically followed by reactivation on centennial timescales, occurring in response to internal processes. The impact this variability may have on the future mass balance of the WAIS remains unknown. Here, we explore the future flow variability of the Siple Coast ice streams by using a three-dimensional higher-order ice sheet model (CISM), coupled to a physically-based basal processes model and a model of regional hydrology. To obtain realistic initial flow conditions, we assimilate available velocity data for this region from 1997. We perform forward simulations over a 200 year period, during which the basal properties evolve according to the distribution of meltwater beneath the ice and its drainage/flow through a subglacial till layer. First, we assume that the bed evolves according to ice-till interactions with only local exchange of water between the ice and till. Next, we include a model of the regional basal water system capable of transporting water over long distances, so that meltwater is routed laterally along the bed before interacting with the till layer. We also explore the effect of geothermal heat flux uncertainties. We find that ice discharge to the grounding line is larger and more sustained in time when the regional water system is included in the simulations. Still, in all experiments, the main future perturbation to the current state of flow follows from the reactivation of

  15. Ice-Binding Proteins and Their Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar Dolev, Maya; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter L

    2016-06-01

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) are a diverse class of proteins that assist organism survival in the presence of ice in cold climates. They have different origins in many organisms, including bacteria, fungi, algae, diatoms, plants, insects, and fish. This review covers the gamut of IBP structures and functions and the common features they use to bind ice. We discuss mechanisms by which IBPs adsorb to ice and interfere with its growth, evidence for their irreversible association with ice, and methods for enhancing the activity of IBPs. The applications of IBPs in the food industry, in cryopreservation, and in other technologies are vast, and we chart out some possibilities. PMID:27145844

  16. Monitoring sea ice flux through Fram Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Axel J.; Rothrock, D. Andrew

    1994-01-01

    A methodology for estimating daily ice velocity through Fram Strait is presented. Ice velocity fields are estimated from a combination of motions observed by SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) or buoys and drift estimated by a simple wind drift model. The analysis includes ice motion vectors from approximately 300 pairs of ERS-1 images, Feb. - Jun. 1993. ESA UILR8 low resolution images derived from the Fast Delivery (FD) products are analyzed to produce ice velocity vectors using a semi-automated interactive approach. This method reveals substantial variability in the ice motion field that would not be apparent from a single data source.

  17. Sea Ice, Climate and Fram Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunkins, K.

    1984-01-01

    When sea ice is formed the albedo of the ocean surface increases from its open water value of about 0.1 to a value as high as 0.8. This albedo change effects the radiation balance and thus has the potential to alter climate. Sea ice also partially seals off the ocean from the atmosphere, reducing the exchange of gases such as carbon dioxide. This is another possible mechanism by which climate might be affected. The Marginal Ice Zone Experiment (MIZEX 83 to 84) is an international, multidisciplinary study of processes controlling the edge of the ice pack in that area including the interactions between sea, air and ice.

  18. Ice sheet topography by satellite altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, R.L.; Campbell, W.J.; Ramseier, R.O.; Stanley, H.R.; Zwally, H.J.

    1978-01-01

    The surface elevation of the southern Greenland ice sheet and surface features of the ice flow are obtained from the radar altimeter on the GEOS 3 satellite. The achieved accuracy in surface elevation is ???2 m. As changes in surface elevation are indicative of changes in ice volume, the mass balance of the present ice sheets could be determined by repetitive mapping of the surface elevation and the surface could be monitored to detect surging or significant changes in ice flow. ?? 1978 Nature Publishing Group.

  19. Sea Ice Mapping using Unmanned Aerial Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solbø, S.; Storvold, R.

    2011-12-01

    Mapping of sea ice extent and sea ice features is an important task in climate research. Since the arctic coastal and oceanic areas have a high probability of cloud coverage, aerial platforms are superior to satellite measurements for high-resolution optical measurements. However, routine observations of sea ice conditions present a variety of problems using conventional piloted aircrafts. Specially, the availability of suitable aircrafts for lease does not cover the demand in major parts of the arctic. With the recent advances in unmanned aerial systems (UAS), there is a high possibility of establishing routine, cost effective aerial observations of sea ice conditions in the near future. Unmanned aerial systems can carry a wide variety of sensors useful for characterizing sea-ice features. For instance, the CryoWing UAS, a system initially designed for measurements of the cryosphere, can be equipped with digital cameras, surface thermometers and laser altimeters for measuring freeboard of ice flows. In this work we will present results from recent CryoWing sea ice flights on Svalbard, Norway. The emphasis will be on data processing for stitching together images acquired with the non-stabilized camera payload, to form high-resolution mosaics covering large spatial areas. These data are being employed to map ice conditions; including ice and lead features and melt ponds. These high-resolution mosaics are also well suited for sea-ice mechanics, classification studies and for validation of satellite sea-ice products.

  20. Models for polythermal ice sheets and glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Ian; Schoof, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of ice-sheets and glaciers depend sensitively on their thermal structure. Many ice masses are polythermal, containing both cold ice, with temperature below the melting point, and temperate ice, with temperature at the melting point. The temperate ice is really an ice-water mixture, with water produced at grain boundaries by dissipative heating. Although the water content is typically small, it can have an important effect on ice dynamics; water content controls ice viscosity, and internal meltwater percolation affects hydrology. Locations where this may be important are in the enhanced shear layer at the base of fast-flowing outlet glaciers, and in the shear margins of ice streams. In this study, we present a simplified model to describe the temperature and water-content of polythermal ice masses, accounting for the possibility of gravity- and pressure-driven water drainage according to Darcy's law. The model is based on the principle of energy conservation and the theory of viscous compaction. Numerical solutions are described and a number of illustrative test problems presented. The model is compared with existing methods in the literature, including enthalpy gradient methods, to which it reduces under certain conditions. Based on the results of our analysis, we suggest a modified enthalpy method that allows for drainage under gravity but that can be relatively easily implemented in ice-sheet models.

  1. Solar radiation interactions with seasonal sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehn, Jens Kristian

    Presently, the Arctic Ocean is undergoing an escalating reduction in sea ice and a transition towards a seasonal sea ice environment. This warrants detailed investigations into improving our understanding of the seasonal evolution of sea ice and snow covers, and their representation in climate models. The interaction of solar radiation with sea ice is an important process influencing the energy balance and biological activity in polar seas, and consequently plays a key role in the earth's climate system. This thesis focuses on characterization of the optical properties---and the underlying physical properties that determine them---of seasonal sea ice during the fall freeze-up and the spring melt periods. Both periods display high spatial heterogeneity and rapid temporal changes in sea ice properties, and are therefore poorly understood. Field data were collected in Amundsen Gulf/Franklin Bay (FB), southern-eastern Beaufort Sea, in Oct.-Nov. 2003 and Apr. 2004 and in Button Bay (BB), western Hudson Bay, in Mar.-May 2005 to address (1) the temporal and spatial evolution of surface albedo and transmittance, (2) how radiative transfer in sea ice is controlled by its physical nature, and (3) the characteristics of the bottom ice algae community and its effect on the optical properties. The fall study showed the importance of surface features such as dry or slushy bare ice, frost flowers and snow cover in determining the surface albedo. Ice thickness was also important, however, mostly because surface features were associated with thickness. For example, nilas (snow layer as snow grains were dissolved or merged with the salty and warm brine skim layer on the surface, while surface conditions on thicker ice types were cold and dry enough to support a snow cover. In general, the surface albedo increased exponentially with an ice thickness increase, however, variability within ice thickness types were very large. It is apparent that a more complete treatment of brine

  2. A toy model of sea ice growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorndike, Alan S.

    1992-01-01

    My purpose here is to present a simplified treatment of the growth of sea ice. By ignoring many details, it is possible to obtain several results that help to clarify the ways in which the sea ice cover will respond to climate change. Three models are discussed. The first deals with the growth of sea ice during the cold season. The second describes the cycle of growth and melting for perennial ice. The third model extends the second to account for the possibility that the ice melts away entirely in the summer. In each case, the objective is to understand what physical processes are most important, what ice properties determine the ice behavior, and to which climate variables the system is most sensitive.

  3. Predictability of the Arctic sea ice edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goessling, H. F.; Tietsche, S.; Day, J. J.; Hawkins, E.; Jung, T.

    2016-02-01

    Skillful sea ice forecasts from days to years ahead are becoming increasingly important for the operation and planning of human activities in the Arctic. Here we analyze the potential predictability of the Arctic sea ice edge in six climate models. We introduce the integrated ice-edge error (IIEE), a user-relevant verification metric defined as the area where the forecast and the "truth" disagree on the ice concentration being above or below 15%. The IIEE lends itself to decomposition into an absolute extent error, corresponding to the common sea ice extent error, and a misplacement error. We find that the often-neglected misplacement error makes up more than half of the climatological IIEE. In idealized forecast ensembles initialized on 1 July, the IIEE grows faster than the absolute extent error. This means that the Arctic sea ice edge is less predictable than sea ice extent, particularly in September, with implications for the potential skill of end-user relevant forecasts.

  4. Holocene deceleration of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, Joseph A; Colgan, William T; Fahnestock, Mark A; Morlighem, Mathieu; Catania, Ginny A; Paden, John D; Gogineni, S Prasad

    2016-02-01

    Recent peripheral thinning of the Greenland Ice Sheet is partly offset by interior thickening and is overprinted on its poorly constrained Holocene evolution. On the basis of the ice sheet's radiostratigraphy, ice flow in its interior is slower now than the average speed over the past nine millennia. Generally higher Holocene accumulation rates relative to modern estimates can only partially explain this millennial-scale deceleration. The ice sheet's dynamic response to the decreasing proportion of softer ice from the last glacial period and the deglacial collapse of the ice bridge across Nares Strait also contributed to this pattern. Thus, recent interior thickening of the Greenland Ice Sheet is partly an ongoing dynamic response to the last deglaciation that is large enough to affect interpretation of its mass balance from altimetry. PMID:26912699

  5. Life in Ice: Implications to Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    During the 2008 Tawani International Expedition Schirmacher Oasis/Lake Untersee Antarctica Expedition, living and instantly motile bacteria were found in freshly thawed meltwater from ice of the Schirmacher Oasis Lakes, the Anuchin Glacier ice and samples of the that perennial ice sheet above Lake Untersee. This phenomenon of living bacteria encased in ice had previously been observed in the 32,000 year old ice of the Fox Tunnel. The bacteria found in this ice included the strain FTR1T which was isolated and published as valid new species (Carnobacterium pleistocenium) the first validly published living Pleistocene organism still alive today. Living bacteria were also extracted from ancient ice cores from Vostok, Antarctica. The discovery that many strains of bacteria are able to survive and remain alive while frozen in ice sheets for long periods of time may have direct relevance to Astrobiology. The abundance of viable bacteria in the ice sheets of Antarctica suggests that the presence of live bacteria in ice is common, rather than an isolated phenomenon. This paper will discuss the results of recent studies at NSSTC of bacteria cryopreserved in ice. This paper advances the hypothesis that cryopreserved cells, and perhaps even viable bacterial cells, may exist today--frozen in the water-ice of lunar craters, the Polar Caps or craters of Mars; or in the permafrost of Mars; ice and rocks of comets or water bearing asteroids; or in the frozen crusts of the icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn. The existence of bacterial life in ice suggests that it may not be necessary to drill through a thick ice crust to reach liquid water seas deep beneath the icy crusts of Europa, Ganymede and Enceladus. The presence of viable bacteria in the ice of the Earth s Polar Caps suggests that the possibility that cryo-panspermia (i.e., the trans-planetary transfer of microbial life by impact ejection/spallation of bacteria-rich polar ice masses) deserves serious consideration and study as a

  6. The Elementary Marine Ice Sheet Model (EMISM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattyn, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Ice sheet models become more and more components of global climate system modelling instead of stand-alone features to study cryospheric processes. Full coupling of ice sheet models to atmospheric and ocean models requires a standard for ice sheet models, and more precisely for marine ice sheet models, where complex feedbacks between ice and ocean, such as marine ice sheet instability, and the atmosphere, such as the elevation-mass balance feedback, operate at different time scales. Recent model intercomparisons (e.g., SeaRISE, MISMIP) have shown that basic requirements for marine ice sheet models are still lacking and that the complexity of many ice sheet models is focused on processes that are either not well captured numerically (spatial resolution issue) or are of secondary importance compared to the essential features of marine ice sheet dynamics. Here, we propose a new and fast computing ice sheet model, devoid of most complexity, but capturing the essential feedbacks when coupled to ocean or atmospheric models. Its computational efficiency guarantees to easily tests its advantages as well as limits through ensemble modelling. EMISM (Elementary Marine Ice Sheet Model) is a vertically integrated ice sheet model based on the Shallow-Ice Approximation extended a Weertman sliding law. Although vertically integrated, thermomechanical coupling is ensured through a simplified representation of ice sheet thermodynamics based on an analytical solution of the vertical temperature profile, enhanced with strain heating. The marine boundary is represented by a parameterized flux condition similar to Pollard & Deconto (2012), based on Schoof (2007). A simplified ice shelf is added to account for buttressing of ice shelves in this parameterization. The ice sheet model is solved on a finite difference grid and special care is taken to its numerical efficiency and stability. While such model has a series of (known) deficiencies with respect to short time effects, its overall

  7. The effect of ice-cream-scoop water on the hygiene of ice cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, I G; Heaney, J C; Weatherup, S T

    1997-08-01

    A survey of unopened ice cream, ice cream in use, and ice-cream-scoop water (n = 91) was conducted to determine the effect of scoop water hygiene on the microbiological quality of ice cream. An aerobic plate count around 10(6) c.f.u. ml-1 was the modal value for scoop waters. Unopened ice creams generally had counts around 10(3)-10(4) c.f.u. ml-1 and this increased by one order of magnitude when in use. Many scoop waters had low coliform counts, but almost half contained > 100 c.f.u. ml-1. E. coli was isolated in 18% of ice creams in use, and in 10% of unopened ice creams. S. aureus was not detected in any sample. Statistical analysis showed strong associations between indicator organisms and increased counts in ice cream in use. EC guidelines for indicator organisms in ice cream were exceeded by up to 56% of samples. PMID:9287941

  8. Massive subsurface ice formed by refreezing of ice-shelf melt ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Bryn; Luckman, Adrian; Ashmore, David W.; Bevan, Suzanne; Kulessa, Bernd; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Philippe, Morgane; Jansen, Daniela; Booth, Adam; Sevestre, Heidi; Tison, Jean-Louis; O'Leary, Martin; Rutt, Ian

    2016-06-01

    Surface melt ponds form intermittently on several Antarctic ice shelves. Although implicated in ice-shelf break up, the consequences of such ponding for ice formation and ice-shelf structure have not been evaluated. Here we report the discovery of a massive subsurface ice layer, at least 16 km across, several kilometres long and tens of metres deep, located in an area of intense melting and intermittent ponding on Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctica. We combine borehole optical televiewer logging and radar measurements with remote sensing and firn modelling to investigate the layer, found to be ~10 °C warmer and ~170 kg m-3 denser than anticipated in the absence of ponding and hitherto used in models of ice-shelf fracture and flow. Surface ponding and ice layers such as the one we report are likely to form on a wider range of Antarctic ice shelves in response to climatic warming in forthcoming decades.

  9. North Pole ice thickness and association with ice motion history 1977-1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shy, Timothy L.; Walsh, John E.

    Ice drafts measured by U.S. Navy submarine sonar near the North Pole from 1977 to 1992 were used together with Arctic Ocean drifting buoy data from 1979 to 1992 to investigate North Pole ice thickness changes during this 15-year period. A primary objective was to determine dynamical forcing mechanisms and associated time scales relevant to ice thickness variation. North Pole ice thickness showed much interannual variability, and no systematic decrease of ice thickness was observed. Changes in ice thickness were closely associated with long-term directional deviation of ice motion from geostrophic wind-forcing, and with ice convergence and divergence at the North Pole during the 1-2 weeks prior to submarine measurement. The geographic origin of ice within the Arctic Ocean was not associated with its eventual thickness at the North Pole.

  10. AMS14C dating and stable isotope plots of Late Pleistocene ice-wedge ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strategy for AMS14C dating of organic micro inclusions from syngenetic ice-wedge ice is considered. AMS14C dates are interpreted in terms of fictitious aging of ice-wedge and permafrost sediments due to high concentration of allochthonous organic material. The dating of organic material from small sample, gives the reliable 14C age. The 14C dates from syngenetic ice-wedges are compared with the dates of the host sediments surrounding syngenetic ice wedges. AMS14C dating of small samples of ice-wedge ice yields to set δ18O plots from ice-wedges to the time scale and to correlate them with ice core δ18O record

  11. New ice rules for nanoconfined monolayer ice from first principles

    CERN Document Server

    Corsetti, Fabiano; Artacho, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the structural tendencies of nanoconfined water is of great interest for nanoscience and biology, where nano/micro-sized objects may be separated by very few layers of water. Here we investigate the properties of ice confined to a quasi-2D monolayer by a featureless, chemically neutral potential, using density-functional theory simulations with a non-local van der Waals density functional. An ab initio random structure search reveals all the energetically competitive monolayer configurations to belong to only two of the previously-identified families, characterized by a square or honeycomb hydrogen-bonding network, respectively. From an in-depth analysis we show that the well-known ice rules for bulk ice need to be revised for the monolayer, with distinct new rules appearing for the two networks. All identified stable phases for both are found to be non-polar (but with a topologically non-trivial texture for the square) and, hence, non-ferroelectric, in contrast to the predictions of empirical f...

  12. Comparison of techniques for dating of subsurface ice from Monlesi ice cave, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetscher, Marc; Bolius, David; Schwikowski, Margit; Schotterer, Ulrich; Smart, Peter L.

    The presence of cave ice is documented in many karst regions but very little is known about the age range of this potential paleoclimate archive. This case study from the Monlesi ice cave, Swiss Jura Mountains, demonstrates that dating of cave ice is possible using a multi-parameter approach. Ice petrography, debris content and oxygen isotope composition have the potential for identification of annual growth layers, but require a continuous core from the ice deposits, limiting application of this approach. Furthermore, complete melting of ice accumulations from individual years may occur, causing amalgamation of several annual bands. Use of3H content of the ice and14C dating of organic debris present in the ice proved to be of limited utility, providing rather broad bounds for the actual age. Initial estimates based on 210Pb analyses from clear ice samples gave results comparable to those from other methods. The most reliable techniques applied were the determination of ice turnover rates, and the dating of anthropogenic inclusions (a roof tile) in the ice. These suggest, respectively, that the base of the cave ice was a minimum of 120 and a maximum of 158 years old. Therefore, our data support the idea that mid-latitude and low-altitude subsurface ice accumulations result from modern deposition processes rather than from presence of Pleistocene relict ice.

  13. Characterizing Arctic sea ice topography using high-resolution IceBridge data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Alek A.; Tsamados, Michel C.; Kurtz, Nathan T.; Farrell, Sinead L.; Newman, Thomas; Harbeck, Jeremy P.; Feltham, Daniel L.; Richter-Menge, Jackie A.

    2016-05-01

    We present an analysis of Arctic sea ice topography using high-resolution, three-dimensional surface elevation data from the Airborne Topographic Mapper, flown as part of NASA's Operation IceBridge mission. Surface features in the sea ice cover are detected using a newly developed surface feature picking algorithm. We derive information regarding the height, volume and geometry of surface features from 2009 to 2014 within the Beaufort/Chukchi and Central Arctic regions. The results are delineated by ice type to estimate the topographic variability across first-year and multi-year ice regimes. The results demonstrate that Arctic sea ice topography exhibits significant spatial variability, mainly driven by the increased surface feature height and volume (per unit area) of the multi-year ice that dominates the Central Arctic region. The multi-year ice topography exhibits greater interannual variability compared to the first-year ice regimes, which dominates the total ice topography variability across both regions. The ice topography also shows a clear coastal dependency, with the feature height and volume increasing as a function of proximity to the nearest coastline, especially north of Greenland and the Canadian Archipelago. A strong correlation between ice topography and ice thickness (from the IceBridge sea ice product) is found, using a square-root relationship. The results allude to the importance of ice deformation variability in the total sea ice mass balance, and provide crucial information regarding the tail of the ice thickness distribution across the western Arctic. Future research priorities associated with this new data set are presented and discussed, especially in relation to calculations of atmospheric form drag.

  14. The impact of under-ice melt ponds on Arctic sea ice volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Naomi; Flocco, Daniela; Feltham, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    A one-dimensional, thermodynamic model of Arctic sea ice [Flocco et al, 2015] has been adapted to study the evolution of under-ice melt ponds, pools of fresh water that are found below the Arctic sea ice, and false bottoms, sheets of ice that form at the boundary between the under-ice melt pond and the oceanic mixed layer. Over time, either the under-ice melt pond freezes or the false bottom is completely ablated. We have been investigating the impact that these features have on the growth or ablation of sea ice during the time that they are present. The sensitivity of our model to a range of parameters has been tested, revealing some interesting effects of the thermodynamic processes taking place during the life-cycle of these phenomena. For example, the under-ice melt pond and its associated false bottom can insulate the sea ice layer from ocean, increasing the thickness of sea ice present at the end of the time frame considered. A comparison of the results of the model of under-ice melt pond evolution with that of sea ice with a bare base has been used to estimate the impact of under-ice melt ponds on sea ice volume towards the end of the melt season. We find that the under-ice melt ponds could have a significant impact on the mass balance of the sea ice, suggesting that it could be desirable to include a parameterisation of the effects of under-ice melt pond in the sea ice components of climate models.

  15. Facies del subfondo del canal Beagle, Tierra del Fuego Sub-bottom facies of the Beagle Channel, Tierra del Fuego

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Bujalesky

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available El canal Beagle conecta los océanos Pacífico y Atlántico en el extremo meridional de Sudamérica y se ubica en el ambiente subantártico. Conforma una cuenca de unos 300 m de profundidad máxima y está separada del océano Atlántico por un umbral de 30 m de profundidad. El canal es un valle tectónico que fue completamente cubierto por el hielo glacial durante la última glaciación. Posteriormente, el canal fue ocupado por un lago glacial desde los 12.000 a los 8.000 años A.P., cuando fue invadido por el mar que alcanzó un nivel máximo entre los 6.000 y 5.000 años A.P. Con el objetivo de analizar las facies sedimentarias superficiales y del subfondo del canal se realizó un relevamiento geofísico con sonar de barrido lateral y un perfilador de 3,5 kHz. Sobre un basamento constituido por rocas metamórficas del Mesozoico, se identificaron depósitos de till y secuencias granodecrecientes que representan distintos estadios del retroceso glaciar, evidenciando hacia la sección superior facies lacustres y por encima depósitos de la transgresión marina del Holoceno. Además, se han identificado paleocauces y secuencias fluviales cubiertas por sedimentos marinos transgresivos.The Beagle Channel connects the Pacific and Atlantic oceans in the southernmost part of South America, and has a subantarctic environment. It is a deep basin (300 m depth separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a shallow sill (30 m depth. The Beagle Channel is a tectonic valley that was completely covered by ice during the Last Glaciation. Later, it was occupied by a glacial lake from 12,000 to 8,000 years B.P. and then flooded by the sea, reaching a maximum sea level between 6,000 and 5,000 years B.P. A geophysical survey (side scan sonar and 3.5 kHz profiler was carried out in the channel to analyze the sea-bed and sub-bottom sedimentary facies. Metamorphic Mesozoic basement rocks are overlain by glacial deposits (till and fining upwards sequences. These sequences

  16. Theory and Finite Element Analysis of Shallow Ice Shelves

    OpenAIRE

    Weis, Magnus

    2001-01-01

    This thesis concerns the dynamics of ice shelves, which are large, floating ice masses that are adjacent to and fed by the Antarctic ice sheet. Starting from the approaches found in the literature for the derivation of simplified, zeroth order equations describing the dynamics of ice sheets, these methods are applied to ice shelves taking the dominant stresses into account. Two different layers of ice are distinguished: Meteoric ice that is built from precipitation that accumulates either on ...

  17. Do crustal deformations observed by GPS in Tierra del Fuego (Argentina) reflect glacial-isostatic adjustment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, L.; Richter, A.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Perdomo, R.; Del Cogliano, D.; Dietrich, R.; Fritsche, M.

    2010-09-01

    Vertical site velocities determined by geodetic GPS observations in the Lago Fagnano area, Tierra del Fuego main island, are interpreted with respect to their potential relation with the glacial-isostatic crustal response to ice mass changes. The spatial pattern of the uplift rates, in combination with the horizontal crustal deformation pattern, point towards a fault-tectonic rather than glacial-isostatic origin of the determined vertical crustal deformations. This implies rather small GIA effects pointing towards relatively small Holocene ice-mass changes in Tierra del Fuego. However, these findings are considered to be preliminary. They should be confirmed by additional observations covering an extended area with GPS sites.

  18. Continuous Chemistry in Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Helle Astrid

    Ice cores provide high resolution records of past climate and environment. In recent years the use of continuous flow analysis (CFA) systems has increased the measurement throughput, while simultaneously decreasing the risk of contaminating the ice samples. CFA measurements of high temporal...... resolution increase our knowledge on fast climate variations and cover a wide range of proxies informing on a variety of components such as atmospheric transport, volcanic eruptions, forest fires and many more. New CFA methods for the determination of dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) and pH are presented...... as part of this thesis. Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for the biosphere. The phosphorus is cycled mainly via hydrology, but some biological systems, such as the remote oceans and old forests are dependent on atmospheric deposition of phosphorus. The flux of phosphorus to the ocean is suggested...

  19. Controls on Arctic sea ice from first-year and multi-year ice survival rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, K.; Bitz, C. M.; Hunke, E. C.; Thompson, L.

    2009-12-01

    The recent decrease in Arctic sea ice cover has transpired with a significant loss of multi-year (MY) ice. The transition to an Arctic that is populated by thinner first-year (FY) sea ice has important implications for future trends in area and volume. We develop a reduced model for Arctic sea ice with which we investigate how the survivability of FY and MY ice control various aspects of the sea-ice system. We demonstrate that Arctic sea-ice area and volume behave approximately as first-order autoregressive processes, which allows for a simple interpretation of September sea-ice in which its mean state, variability, and sensitivity to climate forcing can be described naturally in terms of the average survival rates of FY and MY ice. This model, used in concert with a sea-ice simulation that traces FY and MY ice areas to estimate the survival rates, reveals that small trends in the ice survival rates explain the decline in total Arctic ice area, and the relatively larger loss of MY ice area, over the period 1979-2006. Additionally, our model allows for a calculation of the persistence time scales of September area and volume anomalies. A relatively short memory time scale for ice area (~ 1 year) implies that Arctic ice area is nearly in equilibrium with long-term climate forcing at all times, and therefore observed trends in area are a clear indication of a changing climate. A longer memory time scale for ice volume (~ 5 years) suggests that volume can be out of equilibrium with climate forcing for long periods of time, and therefore trends in ice volume are difficult to distinguish from its natural variability. With our reduced model, we demonstrate the connection between memory time scale and sensitivity to climate forcing, and discuss the implications that a changing memory time scale has on the trajectory of ice area and volume in a warming climate. Our findings indicate that it is unlikely that a “tipping point” in September ice area and volume will be

  20. Laser vaporization of cirrus-like ice particles with secondary ice multiplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Mary; Pomel, François; Wender, Christiane; Kiselev, Alexei; Duft, Denis; Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Leisner, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the interaction of ultrashort laser filaments with individual 90-μm ice particles, representative of cirrus particles. The ice particles fragment under laser illumination. By monitoring the evolution of the corresponding ice/vapor system at up to 140,000 frames per second over 30 ms, we conclude that a shockwave vaporization supersaturates the neighboring region relative to ice, allowing the nucleation and growth of new ice particles, supported by laser-induced plasma photochemistry. This process constitutes the first direct observation of filament-induced secondary ice multiplication, a process that strongly modifies the particle size distribution and, thus, the albedo of typical cirrus clouds. PMID:27386537

  1. Polar ices: rapid climatic changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent successes of the European GRIP (GReenland Ice core Project) and American GISP 2 (Greenland Ice Sheet Project) drillings which have reached in 1992 and 1993 the basement rocks of central Greenland (SUMMIT site, 3250 m of altitude) have allow to reconstruct the climate evolution for the last 100,000 years or more. A comparison of climatic informations deduced from these two drillings with records from Vostok (Antarctica) is given in this paper. The δD and δ18O isotopic approach have been used for the reconstruction of climatic series and paleotemperatures in polar regions. Empirical relationships explained by Rayleigh's isotopic models are used as a base for paleotemperature reconstructions from isotopic analyses of ice. A one degree Celsius cooling corresponds to an oxygen 18 decay of 0.67 per thousand and to a 6 per thousand deuterium decay. The GRIP and GISP 2 drillings have demonstrated the exceptional stability of Greenland climate during the last 10.000 years in comparison with strong instabilities encountered during the last 100.000 years and also recorded in North Atlantic marine sediments. The time scales associated with these instabilities are of the order of a few decades for the warming phase. Thanks to Vostok ice-trapped air bubbles analyses, it is now well demonstrated that the strongest instabilities (cooling during the last deglaciation and major glaciation inter stages) are also recorded but less pronounced in Antarctica. GRIP data for the last interglacial stage have been interpreted in terms of climate instabilities but neither GISP 2 results nor Vostok results allow to confirm this interpretation. (J.S.). 29 refs, 3 figs

  2. Solar ice; Sonne und Eis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolland, Simon

    2012-07-01

    Fishing and fish marketing are the major sources of income at Santo Antao, the biggest of the Cape Verde Islands off Africa's west coast. In the coastal village of Monte Trigo, ice for keeping the fish fresh is now produced by a photovoltaic plant. As the Alliance for Rural Electrification recently reported, the community now gets its power from a 27.3 kW local power grid.

  3. Contrasting Arctic and Antarctic sea ice temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancoppenolle, Martin; Raphael, Marilyn; Rousset, Clément; Vivier, Frédéric; Moreau, Sébastien; Delille, Bruno; Tison, Jean-Louis

    2016-04-01

    Sea ice temperature affects the sea ice growth rate, heat content, permeability and habitability for ice algae. Large-scale simulations with NEMO-LIM suggest large ice temperature contrasts between the Arctic and the Antarctic sea ice. First, Antarctic sea ice proves generally warmer than in the Arctic, in particular during winter, where differences reach up to ~10°C. Second, the seasonality of temperature is different among the two hemispheres: Antarctic ice temperatures are 2-3°C higher in spring than they are in fall, whereas the opposite is true in the Arctic. These two key differences are supported by the available ice core and mass balance buoys temperature observations, and can be attributed to differences in air temperature and snow depth. As a result, the ice is found to be habitable and permeable over much larger areas and much earlier in late spring in the Antarctic as compared with the Arctic, which consequences on biogeochemical exchanges in the sea ice zone remain to be evaluated.

  4. RADARSAT-2 Polarimetry for Lake Ice Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Feng; Kang, Kyung-Kuk; Duguay, Claude

    2016-04-01

    Changes in the ice regime of lakes can be employed to assess long-term climate trends and variability in high latitude regions. Lake ice cover observations are not only useful for climate monitoring, but also for improving ice and weather forecasts using numerical prediction models. In recent years, satellite remote sensing has assumed a greater role in observing lake ice cover for both purposes. Radar remote sensing has become an essential tool for mapping lake ice at high latitudes where cloud cover and polar darkness severely limits ice observations from optical systems. In Canada, there is an emerging interest by government agencies to evaluate the potential of fully polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data from RADARSAT-2 (C-band) for lake ice monitoring. In this study, we processed and analyzed the polarization states and scattering mechanisms of fully polarimetric RADARSAT-2 data obtained over Great Bear Lake, Canada, to identify open water and different ice types during the freeze-up and break-up periods. Polarimetric decompositions were employed to separate polarimetric measurements into basic scattering mechanisms. Entropy, anisotropy, and alpha angle were derived to characterize the scattering heterogeneity and mechanisms. Ice classes were then determined based on entropy and alpha angle using the unsupervised Wishart classifier and results evaluated against Landsat 8 imagery. Preliminary results suggest that the RADARSAT-2 polarimetric data offer a strong capability for identifying open water and different lake ice types.

  5. Modeling of ice pinnacle formation on Callisto

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Oliver L.; Umurhan, Orkan M.; Moore, Jeffrey M.; Howard, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    Callisto's pinnacle terrain has been interpreted to form through sublimation weathering of bedrock and subsequent deposition of the sublimated ice in local cold traps on peaks and crater rims. To investigate how these processes are affected by environmental parameters, including solar illumination and the composition and concentration of ices in the crust, we employ the MARSSIM landform evolution model and advance its treatment of the physics that underlies the relevant processes. Both ice sublimation and deposition are controlled by surface temperature, which we calculate based on energy contributions from both insolation and thermal reradiation from the surrounding landscape. We perform 4.5 Gyr duration simulations whereby we separately consider and model CO2 and H2O as the crustal ice species. We find that sublimating a crustal content of 10% CO2 ice (a reasonable but arbitrarily selected value) yields present-day landform degradation and regolith coverage that is comparable to what is observed on Callisto. In our H2O ice simulations we reproduce the essential features of pinnacle ice distribution at both the equator and midlatitudes. Our present nominal crustal H2O ice content is 33%, which produces a maximum pinnacle ice thickness of 64 m. Pinnacle height is likely limited by collapse or mass wasting of the ice once it reaches a certain thickness.

  6. Correlated Energy Exchange in Drifting Sea Ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chmel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The ice floe speed variations were monitored at the research camp North Pole 35 established on the Arctic ice pack in 2008. A three-month time series of measured speed values was used for determining changes in the kinetic energy of the drifting ice floe. The constructed energy distributions were analyzed by methods of nonextensive statistical mechanics based on the Tsallis statistics for open nonequilibrium systems, such as tectonic formations and drifting sea ice. The nonextensivity means the nonadditivity of externally induced energy changes in multicomponent systems due to dynamic interrelation of components having no structural links. The Tsallis formalism gives one an opportunity to assess the correlation between ice floe motions through a specific parameter, the so-called parameter of nonextensivity. This formalistic assessment of the actual state of drifting pack allows one to forecast some important trends in sea ice behavior, because the level of correlated dynamics determines conditions for extended mechanical perturbations in ice pack. In this work, we revealed temporal fluctuations of the parameter of nonextensivity and observed its maximum value before a large-scale sea ice fragmentation (faulting of consolidated sea ice. The correlation was not detected in fragmented sea ice where long-range interactions are weakened.

  7. Atmospheric icing on large wind turbine blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad S. Virk, Matthew C. Homola, Per J. Nicklasson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical study of atmospheric ice accretion on a large horizontal axis ‘NREL 5 MW’ wind turbine blade has been carried out using the computational fluid dynamics based technique. Numerical analyses were carried out at five different sections along the wind turbine blade for both rime and glaze ice conditions. Based upon the flow field calculation and the droplet collision efficiency, the rate and shape of accreted ice was simulated at different atmospheric temperatures. Results indicate that the icing is less severe near the blade root sections, where the blade profiles are larger and thicker, both in terms of local ice mass and accreted ice thickness. Change in accreted ice growth with the atmospheric temperature is significant along the blade sections from centre to tip. The research work also highlighted that the ice accretion on wind turbine blades can also be controlled by optimizing its geometric design features instead of only using the energy consuming anti icing and de-icing systems.

  8. Environmentally friendly anti-icing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockyer, Robert T. (Inventor); Zuk, John (Inventor); Haslim, Leonard A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention describes an aqueous, non-electrolytic, non-toxic, biodegradable, continuous single phase liquid anti-icing or deicing composition for use on the surfaces of, for example, aircraft, airport pavements, roadways, walkways, bridges, entrances, structures, canals, locks, components, vessels, nautical components, railroad switches, and motor vehicles. The anti-icing or deicing composition comprises: (a) water; (b) a non-toxic freezing point depressant selected from the group consisting of monohydric alcohols having from 2 to 6 carbon atoms, polyhydric alcohols having from 3 to 12 carbon atoms, monomethyl or ethyl ethers of polyhydric alcohols having from 3 to 12 atoms or mixtures thereof, wherein the freezing point depressant present is between about 14 to 60 percent by weight; (c) a thickener which is present in between about 0.01 and 10 percent by weight; and (d) optionally a corrosion inhibitor which is present in between about 0.01 and 0.1 percent by weight of the total composition. In one embodiment, the deicing composition further includes (e) a monohydric primary aliphatic unbranched alcohol as a means of forming a thin layer of the composition on the surface of the structure to be given ice protection, and/or as means of forming a homogenized foam with xanthan thickener; which alcohol is selected from the group consisting of alcohols having between 8 to 24 carbon atoms, preferably, 1-dodecanol. Compositions of water, propylene glycol, and/or propanol and xanthan are preferred.

  9. ICE-DIP kicks off

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    Last month, Marie Curie Actions* added a new member to its ranks: ICE-DIP (the Intel-CERN European Doctorate Industrial Program). The programme held its kick-off meeting on 18-19 February in Leixlip near Dublin, Ireland, at Intel’s premises.   Building on CERN’s long-standing relationship with Intel in the CERN openlab project, ICE-DIP brings together CERN and industrial partners, Intel and Xena Networks, to train five Early Stage ICT Researchers. These researchers will be funded by the European Commission and granted a CERN Fellow contract while enrolled in the doctoral programmes at partner universities Dublin City University and National University of Ireland Maynooth. The researchers will go on extended secondments to Intel Labs Europe locations across Europe during their three-year training programme. The primary focus of the ICE-DIP researchers will be the development of techniques for acquiring and processing data that are relevant for the trigger a...

  10. Hidden force opposing ice compression

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Chang Q; Zheng, Weitao

    2012-01-01

    Coulomb repulsion between the unevenly-bound bonding and nonbonding electron pairs in the O:H-O hydrogen-bond is shown to originate the anomalies of ice under compression. Consistency between experimental observations, density functional theory and molecular dynamics calculations confirmed that the resultant force of the compression, the repulsion, and the recovery of electron-pair dislocations differentiates ice from other materials in response to pressure. The compression shortens and strengthens the longer-and-softer intermolecular O:H lone-pair virtual-bond; the repulsion pushes the bonding electron pair away from the H+/p and hence lengthens and weakens the intramolecular H-O real-bond. The virtual-bond compression and the real-bond elongation symmetrize the O:H-O as observed at ~60 GPa and result in the abnormally low compressibility of ice. The virtual-bond stretching phonons ( 3000 cm-1) softened upon compression. The cohesive energy of the real-bond dominates and its loss lowers the critical temperat...

  11. Airfoil Ice-Accretion Aerodynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Michael B.; Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Guffond, Didier; Montreuil, E.

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center, ONERA, and the University of Illinois are conducting a major research program whose goal is to improve our understanding of the aerodynamic scaling of ice accretions on airfoils. The program when it is completed will result in validated scaled simulation methods that produce the essential aerodynamic features of the full-scale iced-airfoil. This research will provide some of the first, high-fidelity, full-scale, iced-airfoil aerodynamic data. An initial study classified ice accretions based on their aerodynamics into four types: roughness, streamwise ice, horn ice, and spanwise-ridge ice. Subscale testing using a NACA 23012 airfoil was performed in the NASA IRT and University of Illinois wind tunnel to better understand the aerodynamics of these ice types and to test various levels of ice simulation fidelity. These studies are briefly reviewed here and have been presented in more detail in other papers. Based on these results, full-scale testing at the ONERA F1 tunnel using cast ice shapes obtained from molds taken in the IRT will provide full-scale iced airfoil data from full-scale ice accretions. Using these data as a baseline, the final step is to validate the simulation methods in scale in the Illinois wind tunnel. Computational ice accretion methods including LEWICE and ONICE have been used to guide the experiments and are briefly described and results shown. When full-scale and simulation aerodynamic results are available, these data will be used to further develop computational tools. Thus the purpose of the paper is to present an overview of the program and key results to date.

  12. Evidence for biological shaping of hair ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, D.; Preuss, G.; Mätzler, C.

    2015-07-01

    An unusual ice type, called hair ice, grows on the surface of dead wood of broad-leaf trees at temperatures slightly below 0 °C. We describe this phenomenon and present physical, chemical, and biological investigations to gain insight in the properties and processes related to hair ice. Tests revealed that the biological activity of a winter-active fungus is required in the wood for enabling the growth of hair ice. We confirmed the fungus hypothesis originally suggested by Wegener (1918) by reproducing hair ice on wood samples. Treatment by heat and fungicide suppresses the formation of hair ice. Fruiting bodies of Asco- and Basidiomycota are identified on hair-ice-carrying wood. One species, Exidiopsis effusa (Ee), was present on all investigated samples. Both hair-ice-producing wood samples and those with killed fungus show essentially the same temperature variation, indicating that the heat produced by fungal metabolism is very small, that the freezing rate is not influenced by the fungus activity, and that ice segregation is the common mechanism of ice growth on the wood surface. The fungus plays the role of shaping the ice hairs and preventing them from recrystallisation. Melted hair ice indicates the presence of organic matter. Chemical analyses show a complex mixture of several thousand CHO(N,S) compounds similar to fulvic acids in dissolved organic matter (DOM). The evaluation reveals decomposed lignin as being the main constituent. Further work is needed to clarify its role in hair-ice growth and to identify the recrystallisation inhibitor.

  13. Summer sea ice characteristics of the Chukchi Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    During August 1999, we investigated sea ice characteristics; its distribution, surface feature, thickness, ice floe movement, and the temperature field around inter-borders of air/ice/seawater in the Chukchi Sea. Thirteen ice cores were drilled at 11 floe stations in the area of 72°24′ 77°18′N, 153°34′ 163°28′W and the ice core structure was observed. From field observation, three melting processes of ice were observed; surface layer melting, surface and bottom layers melting, and all of ice melting. The observation of temperature fields around sea ice floes showed that the bottom melting under the ice floes were important process. As ice floes and open water areas were alternately distributed in summer Arctic Ocean; the water under ice was colder than the open water by 0.4 2.8℃. The sun radiation heated seawater in open sea areas so that the warmer water went to the bottom when the ice floes move to those areas. This causes ice melting to start at the bottom of the ice floes. This process can balance effectively the temperature fluctuating in the sea in summer. From the crystalline structure of sea ice observed from the cores, it was concluded that the ice was composed of ice crystals and brine-ice films. During the sea ice melting, the brine-ice films between ice crystals melted firstly; then the ice crystals were encircled by brine films; the sea ice became the mixture of ice and liquid brine. At the end of melting, the ice crystals would be separated each other, the bond between ice crystals weakens and this leads to the collapse of the ice sheet.

  14. CO2 (dry ice) cleaning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Donald M.

    1995-01-01

    Tomco Equipment Company has participated in the dry ice (solid carbon dioxide, CO2) cleaning industry for over ten years as a pioneer in the manufacturer of high density, dry ice cleaning pellet production equipment. For over four years Tomco high density pelletizers have been available to the dry ice cleaning industry. Approximately one year ago Tomco introduced the DI-250, a new dry ice blast unit making Tomco a single source supplier for sublimable media, particle blast, cleaning systems. This new blast unit is an all pneumatic, single discharge hose device. It meters the insertion of 1/8 inch diameter (or smaller), high density, dry ice pellets into a high pressure, propellant gas stream. The dry ice and propellant streams are controlled and mixed from the blast cabinet. From there the mixture is transported to the nozzle where the pellets are accelerated to an appropriate blasting velocity. When directed to impact upon a target area, these dry ice pellets have sufficient energy to effectively remove most surface coatings through dry, abrasive contact. The meta-stable, dry ice pellets used for CO2 cleaning, while labeled 'high density,' are less dense than alternate, abrasive, particle blast media. In addition, after contacting the target surface, they return to their equilibrium condition: a superheated gas state. Most currently used grit blasting media are silicon dioxide based, which possess a sharp tetrahedral molecular structure. Silicon dioxide crystal structures will always produce smaller sharp-edged replicas of the original crystal upon fracture. Larger, softer dry ice pellets do not share the same sharp-edged crystalline structures as their non-sublimable counterparts when broken. In fact, upon contact with the target surface, dry ice pellets will plastically deform and break apart. As such, dry ice cleaning is less harmful to sensitive substrates, workers and the environment than chemical or abrasive cleaning systems. Dry ice cleaning system

  15. del cambio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Canales

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo analiza las propuestas y los compromisos en materia de cobertura y de financiamiento en el periodo 2000-2006. En particular, revisa las modificaciones y los ajustes de los tres principales documentos en los que se expresaron las iniciativas: el de la Asociación Nacional de Universidades e Instituciones de Educación Superior, el del equipo de la transición y el programa sectorial. Los resultados muestran que las cifras de atención a la demanda educativa e inversión quedaron lejos de las metas autoimpuestas por el gobierno federal y que será necesario realizar mayores esfuerzos para atender tales desafíos.

  16. Vibrational dynamics of ice in reverse micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokter, Adriaan M; Petersen, Christian; Woutersen, Sander; Bakker, Huib J

    2008-01-28

    The ultrafast vibrational dynamics of HDO:D(2)O ice at 180 K in anionic reverse micelles is studied by midinfrared femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Solutions containing reverse micelles are cooled to low temperatures by a fast-freezing procedure. The heating dynamics of the micellar solutions is studied to characterize the micellar structure. Small reverse micelles with a water content up to approximately 150 water molecules contain an amorphous form of ice that shows remarkably different vibrational dynamics compared to bulk hexagonal ice. The micellar amorphous ice has a much longer vibrational lifetime than bulk hexagonal ice and micellar liquid water. The vibrational lifetime is observed to increase linearly from 0.7 to 4 ps with the resonance frequency ranging from 3100 to 3500 cm(-1). From the pump dependence of the vibrational relaxation the homogeneous linewidth of the amorphous ice is determined (55+/-5 cm(-1)). PMID:18247971

  17. Vibrational dynamics of ice in reverse micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokter, Adriaan M.; Petersen, Christian; Woutersen, Sander; Bakker, Huib J.

    2008-01-01

    The ultrafast vibrational dynamics of HDO :D2O ice at 180K in anionic reverse micelles is studied by midinfrared femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Solutions containing reverse micelles are cooled to low temperatures by a fast-freezing procedure. The heating dynamics of the micellar solutions is studied to characterize the micellar structure. Small reverse micelles with a water content up to approximately 150 water molecules contain an amorphous form of ice that shows remarkably different vibrational dynamics compared to bulk hexagonal ice. The micellar amorphous ice has a much longer vibrational lifetime than bulk hexagonal ice and micellar liquid water. The vibrational lifetime is observed to increase linearly from 0.7to4ps with the resonance frequency ranging from 3100to3500cm-1. From the pump dependence of the vibrational relaxation the homogeneous linewidth of the amorphous ice is determined (55±5cm-1).

  18. Some Recent Advances on Ice Related Problems in Offshore Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段梦兰; 刘杰鸣; 樊晓东; 朱守铭; 赵秀菊

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with several hot topics in ice related problems. In recent years, advances have been made on ice breaking modes, dynamic ice loads on offshore structures, ice-induced structural vibrations, fatigue and fracture by ice-structure interaction, and design of jackets in the Bohai Gulf.

  19. Measurement of South Pole ice transparency with the IceCube LED calibration system

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohaichuk, S; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clark, K; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Groß, A; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leute, J; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rädel, L; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönherr, L; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soiron, M; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zilles, A; Zoll, M

    2013-01-01

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory, approximately 1 km^3 in size, is now complete with 86 strings deployed in the Antarctic ice. IceCube detects the Cherenkov radiation emitted by charged particles passing through or created in the ice. To realize the full potential of the detector, the properties of light propagation in the ice in and around the detector must be well understood. This report presents a new method of fitting the model of light propagation in the ice to a data set of in-situ light source events collected with IceCube. The resulting set of derived parameters, namely the measured values of scattering and absorption coefficients vs. depth, is presented and a comparison of IceCube data with simulations based on the new model is shown.

  20. Ice Draft and Ice Velocity Data in the Beaufort Sea, 1990-2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set provides measurement of sea ice draft (m) and the movement of sea ice (cm/s) over the continental shelf of the Eastern Beaufort Sea. The data set...

  1. National Ice Center Arctic Sea Ice Charts and Climatologies in Gridded Format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. National Ice Center (NIC) is an inter-agency sea ice analysis and forecasting center comprised of the Department of Commerce/NOAA, the Department of...

  2. Measurement of South Pole ice transparency with the IceCube LED calibration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory, approximately 1 km3 in size, is now complete with 86 strings deployed in the Antarctic ice. IceCube detects the Cherenkov radiation emitted by charged particles passing through or created in the ice. To realize the full potential of the detector, the properties of light propagation in the ice in and around the detector must be well understood. This report presents a new method of fitting the model of light propagation in the ice to a data set of in situ light source events collected with IceCube. The resulting set of derived parameters, namely the measured values of scattering and absorption coefficients vs. depth, is presented and a comparison of IceCube data with simulations based on the new model is shown

  3. Impact of sea ice initialization on sea ice and atmosphere prediction skill on seasonal timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guemas, V.; Chevallier, M.; Déqué, M.; Bellprat, O.; Doblas-Reyes, F.

    2016-04-01

    We present a robust assessment of the impact of sea ice initialization from reconstructions of the real state on the sea ice and atmosphere prediction skill. We ran two ensemble seasonal prediction experiments from 1979 to 2012 : one using realistic sea ice initial conditions and another where sea ice is initialized from a climatology, with two forecast systems. During the melting season in the Arctic Ocean, sea ice forecasts become skilful with sea ice initialization until 3-5 months ahead, thanks to the memory held by sea ice thickness. During the freezing season in both the Arctic and Antarctic Oceans, sea ice forecasts are skilful for 7 and 2 months, respectively, with negligible differences between the two experiments, the memory being held by the ocean heat content. A weak impact on the atmosphere prediction skill is obtained.

  4. Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula, Alaska ESI: ICE (Ice Extent Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains locations of ice extent in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Vector lines in the data set represent 50 percent ice coverage. Location-specific type and...

  5. Measurement of South Pole ice transparency with the IceCube LED calibration system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aartsen, M.G. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Abbasi, R. [Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Ackermann, M. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Aguilar, J.A. [Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire, Université de Genève, CH-1211 Genève (Switzerland); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Altmann, D. [Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Auffenberg, J. [Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Baker, M. [Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Barwick, S.W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Baum, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

    2013-05-21

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory, approximately 1 km{sup 3} in size, is now complete with 86 strings deployed in the Antarctic ice. IceCube detects the Cherenkov radiation emitted by charged particles passing through or created in the ice. To realize the full potential of the detector, the properties of light propagation in the ice in and around the detector must be well understood. This report presents a new method of fitting the model of light propagation in the ice to a data set of in situ light source events collected with IceCube. The resulting set of derived parameters, namely the measured values of scattering and absorption coefficients vs. depth, is presented and a comparison of IceCube data with simulations based on the new model is shown.

  6. Ice sheets and sea-level changes

    OpenAIRE

    Alley, R.; Clark, P.U.; Huybrechts, Philippe; Joughin, I.

    2005-01-01

    Future sea-level rise is an important issue related to the continuing buildup of atmospheric greenhouse-gas concentrations. The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, with the potential to raise sea level ~70 m if completely melted, dominate uncertainties in projected sea-level change. Freshwater fluxes from these ice sheets also may affect oceanic circulation, contributing to climate change. Observational and modeling advances have reduced many uncertainties related to ice sheet behavior, but r...

  7. On Sea Level - Ice Sheet Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez, Natalya Alissa

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the physics of static sea-level changes following variations in the distribution of grounded ice and the influence of these changes on the stability and dynamics of marine ice sheets. Gravitational, deformational and rotational effects associated with changes in grounded ice mass lead to markedly non-uniform spatial patterns of sea-level change. I outline a revised theory for computing post-glacial sea-level predictions and discuss the dominant physical effects that c...

  8. Ice nucleation properties of mineral dusts

    OpenAIRE

    Steinke, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Ice nucleation in clouds has a significant impact on the global hydrological cycle as well as on the radiative budget of the Earth. The AIDA cloud chamber was used to investigate the ice nucleation efficiency of various atmospherically relevant mineral dusts. From experiments with Arizona Test Dust (ATD) a humidity and temperature dependent ice nucleation active surface site density parameterization was developed to describe deposition nucleation at temperatures above 220 K. Based...

  9. Dust ice nuclei effects on cirrus clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kuebbeler

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to study aerosol-cloud interactions in cirrus clouds we apply a new multiple-mode ice microphysical scheme to the general circulation model ECHAM5-HAM. The multiple-mode ice microphysical scheme allows to analyse the competition between homogeneous freezing of solution droplets, deposition nucleation of pure dust particles, immersion freezing of coated dust particles and pre-existing ice. We base the freezing efficiencies of coated and pure dust particles on most recent laboratory data. The effect of pre-existing ice, which was neglected in previous ice nucleation parameterizations, is to deplete water vapour by depositional growth and thus prevent homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing from occurring. In a first step, we extensively tested the model and validated the results against in-situ measurements from various aircraft campaigns. The results compare well with observations; properties like ice crystal size and number concentration as well as supersaturation are predicted within the observational spread. We find that heterogeneous nucleation on mineral dust particles and the consideration of pre-existing ice in the nucleation process may lead to significant effects: globally, ice crystal number and mass are reduced by 10% and 5%, whereas the ice crystals size is increased by 3%. The reductions in ice crystal number are most pronounced in the tropics and mid-latitudes on the Northern Hemisphere. While changes in the microphysical and radiative properties of cirrus clouds in the tropics are mostly driven by considering pre-existing ice, changes in the northern hemispheric mid-latitudes mainly result from heterogeneous nucleation. The so called negative Twomey-effect in cirrus clouds is represented in ECHAM5-HAM. The net change in the radiation budget is −0.94 W m−2, implying that both, heterogeneous nucleation on dust and pre-existing ice have the potential to modulate cirrus properties in climate simulations and thus should be

  10. Elevator deflections on the icing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Randall K.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of elevator deflection of the horizontal stabilizer for certain icing parameters is investigated. Elevator deflection can severely change the lower and upper leading-edge impingement limits, and ice can accrete on the elevator itself. Also, elevator deflection had practically no effect on the maximum local collection efficiency. It is shown that for severe icing conditions (large water droplets), elevator deflections that increase the projected height of the airfoil can significantly increase the total collection efficiency of the airfoil.

  11. Rapid Formation of Ice Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Boss, A P; Haghighipour, N; Boss, Alan P.; Wetherill, George W.; Haghighipour, Nader

    2002-01-01

    The existence of Uranus and Neptune presents severe difficulties for the core accretion model for the formation of ice giant planets. We suggest an alternative mechanism, namely disk instability leading to the formation of gas giant protoplanets, coagulation and settling of dust grains to form ice/rock cores at their centers, and photoevaporation of their gaseous envelopes by a nearby OB star, as a possible means of forming ice giant planets.

  12. Seismic Surveys in Ice-Covered Waters

    OpenAIRE

    Klavenes, Jørgen Sørensen

    2013-01-01

    The master’s thesis ‘Seismic surveys in ice-covered waters’ describes several methods within the maritime seismic industry to acquire data concerning the Earth’s strata. It is the objective of this thesis to present a viable solution enabling the seismic industry to perform surveys in ice influenced waters. The hardware conducted for conventional seismic surveys are introduced and explained. Arctic area and ice issues in regards to marine seismic surveys are investigated. A suitable theor...

  13. Finite element methods for sea ice modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Lietaer, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    In order to study and understand the behavior of sea ice, numerical sea ice models have been developed since the early seventies and have traditionally been based on structured grids and finite difference schemes. This doctoral research is part of the Second-generation Louvain-la-Neuve Ice-ocean Model (SLIM) project whose objective is to bring to oceanography modern numerical techniques. The motivation for this thesis is therefore to investigate the potential of finite element methods and uns...

  14. Icing Branch Current Research Activities in Icing Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Current development: A grid block transformation scheme which allows the input of grids in arbitrary reference frames, the use of mirror planes, and grids with relative velocities has been developed. A simple ice crystal and sand particle bouncing scheme has been included. Added an SLD splashing model based on that developed by William Wright for the LEWICE 3.2.2 software. A new area based collection efficiency algorithm will be incorporated which calculates trajectories from inflow block boundaries to outflow block boundaries. This method will be used for calculating and passing collection efficiency data between blade rows for turbo-machinery calculations.

  15. Estimation of Ice Resistance of Ships based on Measurements of Ice Thickness, Speed and Power

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    The activity in the polar marine areas is increasing from offshore and shipping activities supporting both commercial and tourist operations. Particular of interest is the expansion in offshore oil and gas exploration and productions activities in ice covered waters in the northern hemisphere. The presence of sea ice is the main factor for the complexity for operations in these regions. The presence of sea ice is the main factor hindering the operations in Arctic. Sea ice is a complex materia...

  16. Estimation of Ice Resistance of Ships based on Measurements of Ice Thickness, Speed and Power

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    The activity in the polar marine areas is increasing from offshore and shipping activities supporting both commercial and tourist operations. Particular of interest is the expansion in offshore oil and gas exploration and productions activities in ice covered waters in the northern hemisphere. The presence of sea ice is the main factor for the complexity for operations in these regions.The presence of sea ice is the main factor hindering the operations in Arctic. Sea ice is a complex material...

  17. Decadal trends in the Antarctic sea ice extent ultimately controlled by ice-ocean feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Goosse

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The large natural variability of the Antarctic sea ice is a key characteristic of the system that might be responsible for the small positive trend in sea ice extent observed since 1979. In order to gain insight in the processes responsible for this variability, we have analysed in a control simulation performed with a coupled climate model a strong positive ice-ocean feedback that amplifies sea ice variations. When sea ice concentration increases in a region, in particular close to the ice edge, the mixed layer depth tends to decrease. This can be caused by a net inflow of ice and thus of freshwater that stabilizes the water column. Another stabilizing mechanism at interannual time scales that appears more widespread in our simulation is associated with the downward salt transport due to the seasonal cycle of ice formation: brine is released in winter when ice is formed and mixed over a deep layer while the freshwater flux caused by ice melting is included in a shallow layer, resulting in a net vertical transport of salt. Because of this stronger stratification due to the presence of sea ice, more heat is stored at depth in the ocean and the vertical oceanic heat flux is reduced, which contributes to maintain a higher ice extent. This positive feedback is not associated with a particular spatial pattern. Consequently, the spatial distribution of the trend in ice concentration is largely imposed by the wind changes that can provide the initial perturbation. A positive freshwater flux could alternatively be the initial trigger but the amplitude of the final response of the sea ice extent is finally set up by the amplification related to ice-ocean feedback. Initial conditions have also an influence as the chance to have a large increase in ice extent is higher if starting from a state characterized by a low value.

  18. Possible Mechanisms for Turbofan Engine Ice Crystal Icing at High Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Jen-Ching; Struk, Peter M.; Oliver, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A thermodynamic model is presented to describe possible mechanisms of ice formation on unheated surfaces inside a turbofan engine compression system from fully glaciated ice crystal clouds often formed at high altitude near deep convective weather systems. It is shown from the analysis that generally there could be two distinct types of ice formation: (1) when the "surface freezing fraction" is in the range of 0 to 1, dominated by the freezing of water melt from fully or partially melted ice crystals, the ice structure is formed from accretion with strong adhesion to the surface, and (2) when the "surface melting fraction" is the range of 0 to 1, dominated by the further melting of ice crystals, the ice structure is formed from accumulation of un-melted ice crystals with relatively weak bonding to the surface. The model captures important qualitative trends of the fundamental ice-crystal icing phenomenon reported earlier1,2 from the research collaboration work by NASA and the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada. Further, preliminary analysis of test data from the 2013 full scale turbofan engine ice crystal icing test3 conducted in the NASA Glenn Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) has also suggested that (1) both types of ice formation occurred during the test, and (2) the model has captured some important qualitative trend of turning on (or off) the ice crystal ice formation process in the tested engine low pressure compressor (LPC) targeted area under different icing conditions that ultimately would lead to (or suppress) an engine core roll back (RB) event.

  19. Late Holocene environmental ice core record from Akademii Nauk ice cap (Severnaya Zemlya)

    OpenAIRE

    Fritzsche, Diedrich; Opel, Thomas; Meyer, Hanno; Merchel, S.; Rugel, G.; Enamorado Baez, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    Ice cores are established as archives for environmental changes since many years. On Severnaya Zemlya, the easternmost archipelago with considerable glaciation in the Eurasian Arctic, a 724 m long ice core has been drilled on Akademii Nauk the largest ice cap there. Stable water isotope and major ions concentrations in this ice core are presented (e.g. Fritzsche et al., 2005, Opel et al., 2013). They represent more than 3000 years of regional climate and environmental history. A well-known de...

  20. Capabilities and performance of Elmer/Ice, a new-generation ice sheet model

    OpenAIRE

    O. Gagliardini; Zwinger, T.; Gillet-Chaulet, F; Durand, G.; L. Favier; B. de Fleurian; R. Greve; Malinen, M.; Martín, C.; Råback, P.; Ruokolainen, J.; Sacchettini, M.; M. Schäfer; Seddik, H; Thies, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Fourth IPCC Assessment Report concluded that ice sheet flow models, in their current state, were unable to provide accurate forecast for the increase of polar ice sheet discharge and the associated contribution to sea level rise. Since then, the glaciological community has undertaken a huge effort to develop and improve a new generation of ice flow models, and as a result a significant number of new ice sheet models have emerged. Among them is the parallel f...

  1. Coupled regional climate–ice-sheet simulation shows limited Greenland ice loss during the Eemian

    OpenAIRE

    M. M. Helsen; Van De Berg, W. J.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; Van De Broeke, M. R.; J. Oerlemans

    2013-01-01

    During the last interglacial period (Eemian, 130–115 kyr BP) eustatic global sea level likely peaked at > 6 m above the present-day level, but estimates of the contribution of the Greenland Ice Sheet vary widely. Here we use an asynchronously two-way-coupled regional climate–ice-sheet model, which includes physically realistic feedbacks between the changing ice sheet topography and climate forcing. Our simulation results in a contribution from the Greenland Ice Sheet to the ...

  2. Inteligencia emocional en estudiantes de la Universidad Nacional del Centro del Perú, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Reyes Lujan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Determinar los niveles de inteligencia emocional predominantes en los estudiantes de la Facultad de Enfermería de la Universidad Nacional del Centro del Perú en el año 2013. Método: Se empleó el método descriptivo prospectivo. Se evaluaron un total de 195 estudiantes de 16 a 30 años de edad en toda la facultad. Para la recolección de datos, se aplicó el inventario Emocional de BarOn y el inventario de coeficiente emocional (ICE que permitió conocer su inteligencia emocional. Resultados: Se determinó los niveles de inteligencia emocional general siendo la capacidad emocional “adecuada” o promedio en un 49% seguido de una capacidad emocional “por debajo del promedio” y “muy bajo” con el 36% y 11% respectivamente. En cuanto a los componentes, intrapersonal, presenta una capacidad emocional adecuada del 83%, siendo la más alta respecto a los demás componentes seguido del interpersonal 55%, y el estado de ánimo 54%, quienes presentaron inteligencia emocional adecuada o promedio, los estudiantes que alcanzaron una baja capacidad emocional por debajo del promedio fueron en los componentes de adaptabilidad 53%, en manejo de estrés 42%. En relación al sexo masculino en el componente interpersonal y manejo de estrés presenta un 56% y 39% por debajo del promedio; en mujeres en el componente adaptabilidad y manejo de estrés con 54% y 44% presentan capacidad emocional debajo del promedio. Conclusión: Los componentes de inteligencia emocional general, adaptabilidad y manejo de estrés, tienen niveles de riesgo y deberán ser mejorados al igual que la inteligencia emocional interpersonal en sexo masculino. No se encontraron diferencias significativas entre varones y mujeres en la inteligencia emocional general.

  3. Modeling interfacial liquid layers on environmental ices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Kuo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Interfacial layers on ice significantly influence air-ice chemical interactions. In solute-containing aqueous systems, a liquid brine may form upon freezing due to the exclusion of impurities from the ice crystal lattice coupled with freezing point depression in the concentrated brine. The brine may be segregated to the air-ice interface where it creates a surface layer, in micropockets, or at grain boundaries or triple junctions.

    We present a model for brines and their associated liquid layers in environmental ice systems that is valid over a wide range of temperatures and solute concentrations. The model is derived from fundamental equlibrium thermodynamics and takes into account nonideal solution behavior in the brine, partitioning of the solute into the ice matrix, and equilibration between the brine and the gas phase for volatile solutes. We find that these phenomena are important to consider when modeling brines in environmental ices, especially at low temperatures. We demonstrate its application for environmentally important volatile and nonvolatile solutes including NaCl, HCl, and HNO3. The model is compared to existing models and experimental data from literature where available. We also identify environmentally relevant regimes where brine is not predicted to exist, but the QLL may significantly impact air-ice chemical interactions. This model can be used to improve the representation of air-ice chemical interactions in polar atmospheric chemistry models.

  4. Partially ordered state of ice XV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, K.; Noritake, F.; Machida, S.; Sano-Furukawa, A.; Hattori, T.; Yamane, R.; Kagi, H.

    2016-01-01

    Most ice polymorphs have order–disorder “pairs” in terms of hydrogen positions, which contributes to the rich variety of ice polymorphs; in fact, three recently discovered polymorphs— ices XIII, XIV, and XV—are ordered counter forms to already identified disordered phases. Despite the considerable effort to understand order–disorder transition in ice crystals, there is an inconsistency among the various experiments and calculations for ice XV, the ordered counter form of ice VI, i.e., neutron diffraction observations suggest antiferroelectrically ordered structures, which disagree with dielectric measurement and theoretical studies, implying ferroelectrically ordered structures. Here we investigate in-situ neutron diffraction measurements and density functional theory calculations to revisit the structure and stability of ice XV. We find that none of the completely ordered configurations are particular favored; instead, partially ordered states are established as a mixture of ordered domains in disordered ice VI. This scenario in which several kinds of ordered configuration coexist dispels the contradictions in previous studies. It means that the order–disorder pairs in ice polymorphs are not one-to-one correspondent pairs but rather have one-to-n correspondence, where there are n possible configurations at finite temperature. PMID:27375120

  5. Aerodynamic Simulation of Ice Accretion on Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Bragg, Michael B.; Busch, Greg T.; Montreuil, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    This report describes recent improvements in aerodynamic scaling and simulation of ice accretion on airfoils. Ice accretions were classified into four types on the basis of aerodynamic effects: roughness, horn, streamwise, and spanwise ridge. The NASA Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was used to generate ice accretions within these four types using both subscale and full-scale models. Large-scale, pressurized windtunnel testing was performed using a 72-in.- (1.83-m-) chord, NACA 23012 airfoil model with high-fidelity, three-dimensional castings of the IRT ice accretions. Performance data were recorded over Reynolds numbers from 4.5 x 10(exp 6) to 15.9 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers from 0.10 to 0.28. Lower fidelity ice-accretion simulation methods were developed and tested on an 18-in.- (0.46-m-) chord NACA 23012 airfoil model in a small-scale wind tunnel at a lower Reynolds number. The aerodynamic accuracy of the lower fidelity, subscale ice simulations was validated against the full-scale results for a factor of 4 reduction in model scale and a factor of 8 reduction in Reynolds number. This research has defined the level of geometric fidelity required for artificial ice shapes to yield aerodynamic performance results to within a known level of uncertainty and has culminated in a proposed methodology for subscale iced-airfoil aerodynamic simulation.

  6. Thin Ice Films at Mineral Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeşilbaş, Merve; Boily, Jean-François

    2016-07-21

    Ice films formed at mineral surfaces are of widespread occurrence in nature and are involved in numerous atmospheric and terrestrial processes. In this study, we studied thin ice films at surfaces of 19 synthetic and natural mineral samples of varied structure and composition. These thin films were formed by sublimation of thicker hexagonal ice overlayers mostly produced by freezing wet pastes of mineral particles at -10 and -50 °C. Vibration spectroscopy revealed that thin ice films contained smaller populations of strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecules than in hexagonal ice and liquid water. Thin ice films at the surfaces of the majority of minerals considered in this work [i.e., metal (oxy)(hydr)oxides, phyllosilicates, silicates, volcanic ash, Arizona Test Dust] produced intense O-H stretching bands at ∼3400 cm(-1), attenuated bands at ∼3200 cm(-1), and liquid-water-like bending band at ∼1640 cm(-1) irrespective of structure and composition. Illite, a nonexpandable phyllosilicate, is the only mineral that stabilized a form of ice that was strongly resilient to sublimation in temperatures as low as -50 °C. As mineral-bound thin ice films are the substrates upon which ice grows from water vapor or aqueous solutions, this study provides new constraints from which their natural occurrences can be understood. PMID:27377606

  7. Dynamics of colloidal particles in ice

    KAUST Repository

    Spannuth, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    We use x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) to probe the dynamics of colloidal particles in polycrystalline ice. During freezing, the dendritic ice morphology and rejection of particles from the ice created regions of high particle density, where some of the colloids were forced into contact and formed disordered aggregates. The particles in these high density regions underwent ballistic motion, with a characteristic velocity that increased with temperature. This ballistic motion is coupled with both stretched and compressed exponential decays of the intensity autocorrelation function. We suggest that this behavior could result from ice grain boundary migration. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Seismic explosion sources on an ice cap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shulgin, Alexey; Thybo, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Controlled source seismic investigation of crustal structure below ice covers is an emerging technique. We have recently conducted an explosive refraction/wide-angle reflection seismic experiment on the ice cap in east-central Greenland. The data-quality is high for all shot points and a full...... crustal model can be modelled. A crucial challenge for applying the technique is to control the sources. Here, we present data that describe the efficiency of explosive sources in the ice cover. Analysis of the data shows, that the ice cap traps a significant amount of energy, which is observed as a...

  9. RIDES: Raman Icing Detection System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Michigan Aerospace Corporation proposes to develop an integrated LIDAR instrument capable of identifying icing conditions while also providing air data sensing...

  10. Modelling of ice throws from wind turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Renström, Joakim

    2015-01-01

    As the wind energy sector expands into areas with colder climate, the problem with ice throw will increase. Due to a rotor diameter of more than 120 meters for a typical modern turbine with an effect of 3.3 MW, the separated ice fragment will get a high initial velocity, and therefore, they will also be thrown a long distance. Ice throw might therefore be a large safety risk for the people, who are staying in surrounding areas to wind turbines. A ballistic ice throw model has been developed t...

  11. What Darkens the Greenland Ice Sheet?

    OpenAIRE

    Tedesco, M.; Doherty, S; Warren, S; Tranter, M.; J. Stroeve; Fettweis, Xavier; Alexander, P.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the massive ice sheet that covers roughly four fifths of Greenland melts at the surface in summer. As long as the ice sheet regains its mass in the winter, this is not catastrophic. However, if the ice sheet melted entirely, sea levels would rise by more than 7 meters, with obvious and severe consequences for human civilization. Not surprisingly, scientists are working hard to determine if and when the ice sheet will transition (or if it has already transitioned) from a stable sta...

  12. History of sea ice in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polyak, Leonid; Alley, Richard B.; Andrews, John T.;

    2010-01-01

    Optimum, and consistently covered at least part of the Arctic Ocean for no less than the last 13–14 million years. Ice was apparently most widespread during the last 2–3 million years, in accordance with Earth’s overall cooler climate. Nevertheless, episodes of considerably reduced sea ice or even......-scale) and lower-magnitude variability. The current reduction in Arctic ice cover started in the late 19th century, consistent with the rapidly warming climate, and became very pronounced over the last three decades. This ice loss appears to be unmatched over at least the last few thousand years and...

  13. Partially ordered state of ice XV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, K; Noritake, F; Machida, S; Sano-Furukawa, A; Hattori, T; Yamane, R; Kagi, H

    2016-01-01

    Most ice polymorphs have order-disorder "pairs" in terms of hydrogen positions, which contributes to the rich variety of ice polymorphs; in fact, three recently discovered polymorphs- ices XIII, XIV, and XV-are ordered counter forms to already identified disordered phases. Despite the considerable effort to understand order-disorder transition in ice crystals, there is an inconsistency among the various experiments and calculations for ice XV, the ordered counter form of ice VI, i.e., neutron diffraction observations suggest antiferroelectrically ordered structures, which disagree with dielectric measurement and theoretical studies, implying ferroelectrically ordered structures. Here we investigate in-situ neutron diffraction measurements and density functional theory calculations to revisit the structure and stability of ice XV. We find that none of the completely ordered configurations are particular favored; instead, partially ordered states are established as a mixture of ordered domains in disordered ice VI. This scenario in which several kinds of ordered configuration coexist dispels the contradictions in previous studies. It means that the order-disorder pairs in ice polymorphs are not one-to-one correspondent pairs but rather have one-to-n correspondence, where there are n possible configurations at finite temperature. PMID:27375120

  14. Climate Data Records (CDRs) for Ice Motion, Ice Age, and Melt Pond Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschudi, M. A.; Maslanik, J. A.; Fowler, C.; Stroeve, J. C.; Rigor, I. G.

    2010-12-01

    Remotely-sensed Arctic sea ice motion, sea ice age, and melt pond coverage have been proposed for development into full CDRs. The first has a considerable history of use, while the latter two are relatively new products. Our technique to estimate sea ice motion utilizes images from SSM/I, as well as the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) and the series of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensors to estimate the daily motion of ice parcels. This method is augmented by incorporating ice motion observations from the network of drifting buoys deployed as part of the International Arctic Buoy Program. Our technique to calculate ice age relies on following the actual age of the ice for each ice parcel, categorizing the parcel as first-year ice, second-year ice, etc. based on how many summer melt seasons the ice parcel survives. Our method to estimate melt pond coverage on sea ice involves solving a set of linear equations that relate each surface feature’s individual reflectance within the sensor’s (currently using the MODIS surface reflectance product, MOD09) pixel to the overall reflectance in that pixel. These three research-grade products have been interpolated onto 25x25 km grid points spanning the entire Arctic Ocean using the Equal-Area Scalable Earth (EASE) grid.

  15. Bridge ice accretion and de- and anti-icing systems: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleissl, Kenneth; Georgakis, Christos

    turn lead to severe financial losses. This paper presents a review of the different de- and anti-icing techniques, already developed or in development, which could be applied to bridge cables or pylons. Furthermore, the fundamentals of icing caused by freezing precipitation and in-cloud icing are...

  16. Impact of ice temperature on microwave emissivity of thin newly formed sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Byong Jun; Ehn, Jens K.; Barber, David G.

    2008-02-01

    This study examines the impact of ice temperature on microwave emissivity over thin, newly formed sea ice at 6, 19, and 37 GHz during October 2003 in the southern Beaufort Sea, where the physical properties of newly formed sea ice were coincidently measured with microwave emissions. Six ice stations with distinct properties were selected and divided according to ice surface temperature into warm (above -3°C) or cold (below -3°C) stations. The warm stations had a lower emissivity at the vertical polarization by 0.1 than the cold stations and a corresponding difference in brine volume and dielectric properties. Significant correlations were observed between brine volume and ice emissivity (R2 = 0.8, p value emissivity between warm and cold stations. The results suggest that the temperature of thin bare ice could be the critical factor in determining ice emissivity near the melting point (about -2°C). Furthermore, a slight decrease in ice temperature (i.e., from -2° to -5°C) significantly reduces the brine volume, thus resulting in high ice emissivity. Finally, we demonstrate the potential of newly formed ice to cause errors in estimating sea ice concentrations using Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-E data.

  17. Mapping and Assessing Variability in the Antarctic Marginal Ice Zone, the Pack Ice and Coastal Polynyas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroeve, Julienne; Jenouvrier, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    Sea ice variability within the marginal ice zone (MIZ) and polynyas plays an important role for phytoplankton productivity and krill abundance. Therefore mapping their spatial extent, seasonal and interannual variability is essential for understanding how current and future changes in these biological active regions may impact the Antarctic marine ecosystem. Knowledge of the distribution of different ice types to the total Antarctic sea ice cover may also help to shed light on the factors contributing towards recent expansion of the Antarctic ice cover in some regions and contraction in others. The long-term passive microwave satellite data record provides the longest and most consistent data record for assessing different ice types. However, estimates of the amount of MIZ, consolidated pack ice and polynyas depends strongly on what sea ice algorithm is used. This study uses two popular passive microwave sea ice algorithms, the NASA Team and Bootstrap to evaluate the distribution and variability in the MIZ, the consolidated pack ice and coastal polynyas. Results reveal the NASA Team algorithm has on average twice the MIZ and half the consolidated pack ice area as the Bootstrap algorithm. Polynya area is also larger in the NASA Team algorithm, and the timing of maximum polynya area may differ by as much as 5 months between algorithms. These differences lead to different relationships between sea ice characteristics and biological processes, as illustrated here with the breeding success of an Antarctic seabird.

  18. Metastable Phases in Ice Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Fabian; Baloh, Philipp; Kubel, Frank; Hoelzel, Markus; Parker, Stewart; Grothe, Hinrich

    2014-05-01

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds and Cirrus Clouds contain both, pure water ice and phases of nitric acid hydrates. Preferentially for the latter, the thermodynamically stable phases have intensively been investigated in the past (e.g. nitric acid trihydrate, beta-NAT). As shown by Peter et al. [1] the water activity inside clouds is higher than expected, which might be explained by the presence of metastable stable phases (e.g. cubic ice). However, also metastable nitric acid hydrates might be important due to the inherent non-equilibrium freezing conditions in the upper atmosphere. The delta ice theory of Gao et al. [2] presents a model approach to solve this problem by involving both metastable ice and NAT as well. So it is of high interest to investigate the metastable phase of NAT (i.e. alpha-NAT), the structure of which was unknown up to the presence. In our laboratory a production procedure for metastable alpha-NAT has been developed, which gives access to neutron diffraction and X-ray diffraction measurements, where sample quantities of several Gramm are required. The diffraction techniques were used to solve the unknown crystalline structure of metastable alpha-NAT, which in turn allows the calculation of the vibrational spectra, which have also been recorded by us in the past. Rerefences [1] Peter, T., C. Marcolli, P. Spichtinger, T. Corti, M. B. Baker, and T. Koop. When dry air is too humid. Science, 314:1399-1402, 2006. [2] Gao, R., P. Popp, D. Fahey, T. Marcy, R. L. Herman, E. Weinstock, D. Baumgardener, T. Garrett, K. Rosenlof, T. Thompson, T. P. Bui, B. Ridley, S. C. Wofsy, O. B. Toon, M. Tolbert, B. Kärcher, Th. Peter, P. K. Hudson, A. Weinheimer, and A. Heymsfield. Evidence That Nitric Acid Increases Relative Humidity in Low-Temperature Cirrus Clouds, Science, 303:516-520, 2004. [3] Tizek, H., E. Knözinger, and H. Grothe. Formation and phase distribution of nitric acid hydrates in the mole fraction range xHNO3<0.25: A combined XRD and IR study, PCCP, 6

  19. Backhand tecniques in ice hockey

    OpenAIRE

    Luoma, Matti

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this project based multimedia thesis is to show video material of how to use a backhand side of the ice hockey stick’s blade in different ways. The video material is to spread the awareness as well as present the idea that the backhand is as important side on the hockey sticks blade than what the forehand side is. There are three sections in the DVD. On these three sections the focus is only in the use of a backhand. These skills are straight related to the ability...

  20. Results from IceCube

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeYoung, Tyce

    2016-04-01

    Data from the IceCube Neutrino Observatory have revealed the existence of a flux of high energy neutrinos of extraterrestrial origin, which is observed in a number of analyses spanning different energy ranges, fields of view, and neutrino flavors. The current data are consistent with an isotropic, equal-flavor flux described by a simple power law spectrum, but deviations from this simple model cannot yet be constrained with high precision. The existing observations in this area are reviewed, along with recent results on dark matter searches and observations of cosmic rays.

  1. Results from IceCube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeYoung Tyce

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Data from the IceCube Neutrino Observatory have revealed the existence of a flux of high energy neutrinos of extraterrestrial origin, which is observed in a number of analyses spanning different energy ranges, fields of view, and neutrino flavors. The current data are consistent with an isotropic, equal-flavor flux described by a simple power law spectrum, but deviations from this simple model cannot yet be constrained with high precision. The existing observations in this area are reviewed, along with recent results on dark matter searches and observations of cosmic rays.

  2. Multisensor Analyzed Sea Ice Extent - Northern Hemisphere (MASIE-NH)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Multisensor Analyzed Sea Ice Extent Northern Hemisphere (MASIE-NH) products provide measurements of daily sea ice extent and sea ice edge boundary for the...

  3. Influence of icings on river aufeis fluviogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. R. Alekseev

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Formation and development of a river network in the permafrost zone is heavily influenced by icings and icing processes. It is of the most widespread occurrence in regions of discontinuous and continuous permafrost where the mean thickness of the ice on rivers varies over the range 1−2.5 m, and most of the ice cover is formed by consecutive freezing of outcropping groundwater. The intensity of cryogenic channel formation in the permafrost zone has a clearly pronounced cyclic character that depends on the exceeding of the icing ice over the water edge of the river during the autumn low-water period. Five stages of cryogenic channel genesis are described: preglacial, transgressive, stabilizing, regressive, and postglacial. To each stage there corresponds a definite glaciohydrological regime of the discharge channels, their shape, size, and spatial distribution. The channel network is in its maximum development during the third and fourth states when the channel of the allochthonous flow divides into a number of shallow branches producing a complicated plan pattern of the terrain. Mature sites of annual appearance of icings clearly show areas that are in different development stages, which bears witness to a broad range of variability in the channel icing genesis across space and time. According to the size of icings, the flow of the river and geologo-geomorphological and cryogenic-hydrological conditions, five kinds of icing structure of the channel network have been identified: fan-shaped, cone-shaped, treelike, reticular, and longitudinal-insular. The channel icing network is a characteristic indicator of the specific character of development of glaciohydrosystems in the permafrost zone.

  4. Seasonal Greenland Ice Sheet ice flow variations in regions of differing bed and surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, A. J.; Livingstone, S. J.; Rippin, D. M.; Hill, J.; McMillan, M.; Quincey, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The contribution of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) to future sea-level rise is uncertain. Observations reveal the important role of basal water in controlling ice-flow to the ice sheet margin. In Greenland, drainage of large volumes of surface meltwater to the ice sheet bed through moulins and hydrofracture beneath surface lakes dominates the subglacial hydrological system and provides an efficient means of moving mass and heat through the ice sheet. Ice surface and bed topography influence where meltwater can access the bed, and the nature of its subsequent flow beneath the ice. However, no systematic investigation into the influence of topographic variability on Greenland hydrology and dynamics exists. Thus, physical processes controlling storage and drainage of surface and basal meltwater, and the way these affect ice flow are not comprehensively understood. This presents a critical obstacle in efforts to predict the future evolution of the GrIS. Here we present high-resolution satellite mapping of the ice-surface drainage network (e.g. lakes, channels and moulins) and measurements of seasonal variations in ice flow in south west Greenland. The region is comprised of three distinct subglacial terrains which vary in terms of the amplitude and wavelength and thus the degree to which basal topography is reflected in the ice sheet surface. We find that the distribution of surface hydrological features is related to the transfer of bed topography to the ice sheet surface. For example, in areas of thinner ice and high bed relief, moulins occur more frequently and are more uniformly dispersed, indicating a more distributed influx of surface-derived meltwater to the ice sheet bed. We investigate the implications of such spatial variations in surface hydrology on seasonal ice flow rates.

  5. Ice, Ice, Baby: A Program for Sustained, Classroom-Based K-8 Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, C.

    2009-12-01

    Ice, Ice, Baby is a K-8 science program created by the education team at the Center for the Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS), an NSF-funded science and technology center headquartered at the University of Kansas. The twenty-four hands-on activities, which constitute the Ice, Ice, Baby curriculum, were developed to help students understand the role of polar ice sheets in sea level rise. These activities, presented in classrooms by CReSIS' Educational Outreach Coordinator, demonstrate many of the scientific properties of ice, including displacement and density. Student journals are utilized with each lesson as a strategy for improving students' science process skills. Journals also help the instructor identify misconceptions, assess comprehension, and provide students with a year-long science reference log. Pre- and post- assessments are given to both teachers and students before and after the program, providing data for evaluation and improvement of the Ice, Ice, Baby program. While students are actively engaged in hands-on learning about the unusual topics of ice sheets, glaciers, icebergs and sea ice, the CReSIS' Educational Coordinator is able to model best practices in science education, such as questioning and inquiry-based methods of instruction. In this way, the Ice, Ice, Baby program also serves as ongoing, in-class, professional development for teachers. Teachers are also provided supplemental activities to do with their classes between CReSIS' visits to encourage additional science lessons, reinforce concepts taught in the Ice, Ice, Baby program, and to foster teachers' progression toward more reform-based science instruction.

  6. del discurso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Mosquera

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available En varios comunicados quedó reflejada la tensión de la reciente crisis entre Colombia y Venezuela, suscitada a raíz de la captura en diciembre de 2004 de un guerrillero de la FARC en Caracas (Rodrigo Granda. El presente trabajo es un avance de un proyecto de investigación, que persigue como objetivos: 1 describir el discurso implícito en dichos comunicados; 2 identificar los aspectos semánticos y pragmáticos presentes en la confrontación discursiva; y 3 delinear el componente ideológico reflejado en los comunicados. Para el respectivo análisis se siguieron algunos aspectos teóricos y metodológicos de Colle (2000, Bolívar (1998 yMolero de Cabeza (1985. Entre las conclusiones preliminares de este avance se tiene que, con el caso Granda, Colombia recurrió a la vieja política del "fin justifica los medios", a la vez que puso en entredicho el papel de Venezuela en la lucha contra el terrorismo, quizás como respuesta a su política exterior de estrechos vínculos con el gobierno estadounidense

  7. Crystallization of CO2 ice and the absence of amorphous CO2 ice in space

    OpenAIRE

    Escribano, Rafael M.; Muñoz Caro, Guillermo M.; Cruz-Diaz, Gustavo A.; Rodríguez-Lazcano, Yamilet; Maté, Belén

    2013-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is one of the most relevant and abundant species in astrophysical and atmospheric media. In particular, CO2 ice is present in several solar system bodies, as well as in interstellar and circumstellar ice mantles. The amount of CO2 in ice mantles and the presence of pure CO2 ice are significant indicators of the temperature history of dust in protostars. It is therefore important to know if CO2 is mixed with other molecules in the ice matrix or segregated and whether it is...

  8. The last Scandinavian ice sheet in northwestern Russia: ice flow patterns and decay dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demidov, L.; Houmark-Nielsen, Michael; Kjær, Kurt Henrik; Larsen, E.

    2006-01-01

    dynamics of the ice sheet and guided the direction of flow. We advocate that, while reaching the maximum extent, lobe-shaped glaciers protruded eastward from SIS and moved along the path of water-filled lowland basins. Ice-sheet collapse and deglaciation in the region commenced when ice lobes were detached...... successively detached ice lobes. Deglaciation led to the development of hummocky moraine landscapes with scattered periglacial and ice-dammed lakes, while a sub-arctic flora invaded the region. Udgivelsesdato: August 2006...

  9. Roughness of Weddell Sea Ice and Estimates of the Air-Ice Drag Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreas, Edgar L.; Lange, Manfred A.; Ackley, Stephen F.; Wadhams, Peter

    1993-07-01

    The roughness of a sheet of sea ice encodes its deformational history and determines its aerodynamic coupling with the overlying air and underlying water. Here we report snow surface, ice surface, and ice underside roughness computed from 47 surface elevation profiles collected during a transect of the Weddell Sea. The roughness for each surface, parameterized as the standard deviation of the surface elevation, segregates according to whether or not a floe has been deformed: deformed ice has greater roughness than undeformed ice. Regardless of deformational history, the underside roughness is almost always greater than the snow surface and ice surface roughnesses, which are nearly equal. Roughness spectra for all three surfaces and for both deformed and undeformed ice roll off roughly as k-1 when the wavenumber k is between 0.1 and 3 rad m-1. The snow surface and underside spectra roll off somewhat faster than k-1, and the ice surface spectra roll off somewhat slower than k-1. Both top and underside Arctic ice roughness spectra, on the other hand, have been reported to roll off faster than k-2. We speculate that the excess spectral intensity at high wavenumbers in the Antarctic ice surface spectra results from the small-scale roughness that the ice sheet had on consolidation. This excess high-wavenumber spectral intensity persists in the ice surface spectra of second-year ice. Evidently, once formed, the ice surface remains unchanged on the microscale until the entire ice sheet melts. With a remote measurement of roughness, we should be able to decide whether an ice floe is deformed or undeformed. Our spectral analysis hints that remote sensing may also be able to differentiate between first-year and second-year ice. From the snow surface spectra, we compute a roughness scale ξ that parameterizes the air-ice momentum coupling and lets us estimate the neutral stability drag coefficient referenced to a height of 10 m, CDN10. Typical CDN10 values are 1.1-1.4 × 10

  10. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Moored Ships in Level Ice

    OpenAIRE

    Aksnes, Vegard Øgård

    2011-01-01

    Moored ships are believed to be feasible for marine operations in ice-covered waters. A variety of ice features, such as broken ice, level ice, ridged ice and icebergs, will pose potential challenges with respect to design and operations. This thesis presents studies on the actions of level ice on moored ships and the resulting vessel response. Focus was put on both analysing physical measurements and deriving suitable numerical models. The thesis is thus articulated around three parts:analys...

  11. The lunar thermal ice pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has long been suggested that water ice can exist in extremely cold regions near the lunar poles, where sublimation loss is negligible. The geographic distribution of H-bearing regolith shows only a partial or ambiguous correlation with permanently shadowed areas, thus suggesting that another mechanism may contribute to locally enhancing water concentrations. We show that under suitable conditions, water molecules can be pumped down into the regolith by day-night temperature cycles, leading to an enrichment of H2O in excess of the surface concentration. Ideal conditions for pumping are estimated and found to occur where the mean surface temperature is below 105 K and the peak surface temperature is above 120 K. These conditions complement those of the classical cold traps that are roughly defined by peak temperatures lower than 120 K. On the present-day Moon, an estimated 0.8% of the global surface area experiences such temperature variations. Typically, pumping occurs on pole-facing slopes in small areas, but within a few degrees of each pole the equator-facing slopes are preferred. Although pumping of water molecules is expected over cumulatively large areas, the absolute yield of this pump is low; at best, a few percent of the H2O delivered to the surface could have accumulated in the near-surface layer in this way. The amount of ice increases with vapor diffusivity and is thus higher in the regolith with large pore spaces.

  12. The lunar thermal ice pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schorghofer, Norbert [Institute for Astronomy and NASA Astrobiology Institute, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Aharonson, Oded, E-mail: norbert@hawaii.edu [Helen Kimmel Center for Planetary Science, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, 76100 (Israel)

    2014-06-20

    It has long been suggested that water ice can exist in extremely cold regions near the lunar poles, where sublimation loss is negligible. The geographic distribution of H-bearing regolith shows only a partial or ambiguous correlation with permanently shadowed areas, thus suggesting that another mechanism may contribute to locally enhancing water concentrations. We show that under suitable conditions, water molecules can be pumped down into the regolith by day-night temperature cycles, leading to an enrichment of H{sub 2}O in excess of the surface concentration. Ideal conditions for pumping are estimated and found to occur where the mean surface temperature is below 105 K and the peak surface temperature is above 120 K. These conditions complement those of the classical cold traps that are roughly defined by peak temperatures lower than 120 K. On the present-day Moon, an estimated 0.8% of the global surface area experiences such temperature variations. Typically, pumping occurs on pole-facing slopes in small areas, but within a few degrees of each pole the equator-facing slopes are preferred. Although pumping of water molecules is expected over cumulatively large areas, the absolute yield of this pump is low; at best, a few percent of the H{sub 2}O delivered to the surface could have accumulated in the near-surface layer in this way. The amount of ice increases with vapor diffusivity and is thus higher in the regolith with large pore spaces.

  13. Ammonia Ice Clouds on Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The top cloud layer on Jupiter is thought to consist of ammonia ice, but most of that ammonia 'hides' from spectrometers. It does not absorb light in the same way ammonia does. To many scientists, this implies that ammonia churned up from lower layers of the atmosphere 'ages' in some way after it condenses, possibly by being covered with a photochemically generated hydrocarbon mixture. The New Horizons Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA), the half of the Ralph instrument that is able to 'see' in infrared wavelengths that are absorbed by ammonia ice, spotted these clouds and watched them evolve over five Jupiter days (about 40 Earth hours). In these images, spectroscopically identified fresh ammonia clouds are shown in bright blue. The largest cloud appeared as a localized source on day 1, intensified and broadened on day 2, became more diffuse on days 3 and 4, and disappeared on day 5. The diffusion seemed to follow the movement of a dark spot along the boundary of the oval region. Because the source of this ammonia lies deeper than the cloud, images like these can tell scientists much about the dynamics and heat conduction in Jupiter's lower atmosphere.

  14. Episodic Explosions in Interstellar Ices

    CERN Document Server

    Rawlings, J M C; Viti, S; Cecchi-Pestellini, C

    2013-01-01

    We present a model for the formation of large organic molecules in dark clouds. The molecules are produced in the high density gas-phase that exists immediately after ice mantles are explosively sublimated. The explosions are initiated by the catastrophic recombination of trapped atomic hydrogen. We propose that, in molecular clouds, the processes of freeze-out onto ice mantles, accumulation of radicals, explosion and then rapid (three-body) gas-phase chemistry occurs in a cyclic fashion. This can lead to a cumulative molecular enrichment of the interstellar medium. A model of the time-dependent chemistries, based on this hypothesis, shows that significant abundances of large molecular species can be formed, although the complexity of the species is limited by the short expansion timescale in the gas, immediately following mantle explosion. We find that this mechanism may be an important source of smaller organic species, such as methanol and formaldehyde, as well as precursors to bio-molecule formation. Most...

  15. Topographically mediated ice stream subglacial drainage networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiester, J.; Sergienko, O. V.; Hulbe, C. L.

    2016-02-01

    Satellite laser altimetry reveals short timescale changes in Antarctic ice sheet surface elevation that are suggested to be driven by subglacial water transport and storage. Here details of the interaction between the dynamics of ice stream flow, subglacial water system, and bed elevation relief are examined in the context of idealized, heterogeneous bed geometries. Using a two-way coupled model of ice and subglacial water flow, we show that basal topography controls the temporal and spatial variability of the sub-ice stream hydraulic system. The orientation and characteristic dimensions of the topographic undulations determine the morphology (connected subglacial ponds or channel-like subglacial water features) and timescales of the sub-ice stream drainage system. The short-term (several years to decades) variability of the simulated coupled ice stream/subglacial water system suggests that the short-term surface variations detected in remote sensing observations may be indicative of a rapidly evolving subglacial water system. Our simulations also show that interaction between ice flow and the highly dynamic subglacial water system has a strong effect on effective stress in the ice. Large effective stress magnitudes arise over areas where the basal traction is characterized by strong spatial gradients, that is, transitions from high to low basal traction or vise versa. These transitions migrate on multiyear timescales and thus cause large effective stress variability on the same temporal scales.

  16. Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (COREs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffies, Stephen M.; Biastoch, Arne; Böning, Claus; Bryan, Frank; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Chassignet, Eric P.; England, Matthew H.; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Haak, Helmuth; Hallberg, Robert W.; Hazeleger, Wilco; Jungclaus, Johann; Large, William G.; Madec, Gurvan; Pirani, Anna; Samuels, Bonita L.; Scheinert, Markus; Gupta, Alex Sen; Severijns, Camiel A.; Simmons, Harper L.; Treguier, Anne Marie; Winton, Mike; Yeager, Stephen; Yin, Jianjun

    Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (COREs) are presented as a tool to explore the behaviour of global ocean-ice models under forcing from a common atmospheric dataset. We highlight issues arising when designing coupled global ocean and sea ice experiments, such as difficulties formulating a consistent forcing methodology and experimental protocol. Particular focus is given to the hydrological forcing, the details of which are key to realizing simulations with stable meridional overturning circulations. The atmospheric forcing from [Large, W., Yeager, S., 2004. Diurnal to decadal global forcing for ocean and sea-ice models: the data sets and flux climatologies. NCAR Technical Note: NCAR/TN-460+STR. CGD Division of the National Center for Atmospheric Research] was developed for coupled-ocean and sea ice models. We found it to be suitable for our purposes, even though its evaluation originally focussed more on the ocean than on the sea-ice. Simulations with this atmospheric forcing are presented from seven global ocean-ice models using the CORE-I design (repeating annual cycle of atmospheric forcing for 500 years). These simulations test the hypothesis that global ocean-ice models run under the same atmospheric state produce qualitatively similar simulations. The validity of this hypothesis is shown to depend on the chosen diagnostic. The CORE simulations provide feedback to the fidelity of the atmospheric forcing and model configuration, with identification of biases promoting avenues for forcing dataset and/or model development.

  17. Major new sources of biological ice nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, B. F.; Hill, T.; Henderson-Begg, S. K.

    2009-12-01

    Almost all research on biological ice nucleation has focussed on a limited number of bacteria. Here we characterise several major new sources of biogenic ice nuclei. These include mosses, hornworts, liverworts and cyanobacteria. Ice nucleation in the eukaryotic bryophytes appears to be ubiquitous. The temperature at which these organisms nucleate is that at which the difference in vapour pressure over ice and water is at or close to its maximum. At these temperatures (-8 to -18 degrees C) ice will grow at the expense of supercooled water. These organisms are dependent for their water on occult precipitation - fog, dew and cloudwater which by its nature is not collected in conventional rain gauges. Therefore we suggest that these organism produce ice nuclei as a water harvesting mechanism. Since the same mechanism would also drive the Bergeron-Findeisen process, and as moss is known to become airborne, these nuclei may have a role in the initiation of precipitation. The properties of these ice nuclei are very different from the well characterised bacterial nuclei. We will also present DNA sequence data showing that, although related, the proteins responsible are only very distantly related to the classical bacterial ice nuclei.

  18. We Scream for Nano Ice Cream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. Gail; Krebs, Denise L.; Banks, Alton J.

    2011-01-01

    There is a wide range of new products emerging from nanotechnology, and "nano ice cream" is an easy one that you can use to teach topics from surface area to volume applications. In this activity, students learn how ice cream can be made smoother and creamier tasting through nanoscience. By using liquid nitrogen to cool the cream mixture, students…

  19. 21 CFR 135.160 - Water ices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Water ices. 135.160 Section 135.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FROZEN DESSERTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Frozen Desserts § 135.160 Water ices....

  20. Ice-phobic surfaces that are wet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Howard A

    2012-08-28

    Ice formation on surfaces and structures produces damage and inefficiencies that negatively impact all manners of activities. Not surprisingly, for a long time, an unmet challenge has been to design materials capable of minimizing or even eliminating the formation of ice on the surface of the material. In recent years, there were significant efforts to develop such ice-phobic surfaces by building on the advances made with superhydrophobic materials since these, by definition, tend to repel water. However, a robust response includes the ability to deter the formation of ice when a substrate colder than the freezing temperature is exposed either to impacting water droplets or water vapor (i.e., frost formation). In the latter case, superhydrophobic surfaces in high humidity conditions were shown to allow significant ice accumulation. Consequently, a new design idea was needed. In this issue of ACS Nano, it is shown how a liquid-infiltrated porous solid, where the liquid strongly wets and is retained within the material, has many of the properties desired for an ice-phobic substrate. The composite material exhibits low contact angle hysteresis so only small forces are needed to provoke droplets to slide off of a cold substrate. This new slippery surface shows many characteristics required for ice-phobicity, and a method is demonstrated for applying this kind of material as a coating on aluminum. Ice may have met its match. PMID:22876765

  1. Cesium-137 contamination in Arctic Ocean ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sea ice and ice-borne sediment samples were collected across the western Arctic basin on the joint US/Canada Arctic Ocean Section during August 1994. Samples were processed on board and returned at the completion of the cruise to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for analysis. Sediment was observed on the surface and in the ice from the southern ice limit in the Chukchi Sea to the North Pole. Preliminary results on the ice-borne sediment samples show widespread elevated concentrations of 137Cs, ranging from 4.9 to 73 mBq g dry weight-1. An analysis of the measurements indicate that sea ice is primary transport mechanism by which contaminated sediments are redistributed throughout the Arctic Ocean and possibly exported into the Greenland Sea and North Atlantic through Fram Strait. The wide variability in the ice-borne sediment concentrations of 137Cs measured along the transect argues that contaminants incorporated on the Siberian shelves can follow much more variable trajectories than is suggested by mean ice drift calculations. 2 figs

  2. Internet video monitoring of ice boom performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ice released into the Niagara River from Lake Erie in the early freeze-up period of winter has been known to cause significant power generation losses at the hydroelectric power plants on the Niagara River. A monitoring program has been developed by the New York Power Authority and Ontario Hydro to help minimize the impacts of ice on power generation in the area. Water level gauges, water temperature probes and low-light-level television cameras are used to obtain real-time observations of certain ice and hydraulic characteristics. Visual observations of ice conditions in the vicinity of the intakes are also recorded. An ice boom, which is about 2,700 m long, is located nearly 50 km upstream from the generating stations which are about 11 km downstream of Niagara Falls. First-hand knowledge of the ice conditions at the ice boom is important for forecasting the availability of power from the Niagara River generating stations and planning possibilities for the power system. The monitoring program has proven to be useful in the evaluation of an ice boom design improvement. 25 figs

  3. Ices in starless and starforming cores

    CERN Document Server

    Oberg, Karin I; Pontoppidan, Klaus M; Broek, Saskia van den; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Bottinelli, Sandrine; Blake, Geoffrey A; Evans, Neal J

    2011-01-01

    Icy grain mantles are commonly observed through infrared spectroscopy toward dense clouds, cloud cores, protostellar envelopes and protoplanetary disks. Up to 80% of the available oxygen, carbon and nitrogen are found in such ices; the most common ice constituents - H2O, CO2 and CO - are second in abundance only to H2 in many star forming regions. In addition to being a molecular reservoir, ice chemistry is responsible for much of the chemical evolution from H2O to complex, prebiotic molecules. Combining the existing ISO, Spitzer, VLT and Keck ice data results in a large sample of ice sources (\\sime80) that span all stages of star formation and a large range of protostellar luminosities (<0.1-105 L\\odot). Here we summarize the different techniques that have been applied to mine this ice data set on information on typical ice compositions in different environments and what this implies about how ices form and evolve during star and planet formation. The focus is on how to maximize the use of empirical const...

  4. Ice Accretion with Varying Surface Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilanin, Alan J.; Anderson, David N.

    1995-01-01

    During an icing encounter of an aircraft in flight, super-cooled water droplets impinging on an airfoil may splash before freezing. This paper reports tests performed to determine if this effect is significant and uses the results to develop an improved scaling method for use in icing test facilities. Simple laboratory tests showed that drops splash on impact at the Reynolds and Weber numbers typical of icing encounters. Further confirmation of droplet splash came from icing tests performed in the NaSA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) with a surfactant added to the spray water to reduce the surface tension. The resulting ice shapes were significantly different from those formed when no surfactant was added to the water. These results suggested that the droplet Weber number must be kept constant to properly scale icing test conditions. Finally, the paper presents a Weber-number-based scaling method and reports results from scaling tests in the IRT in which model size was reduced up to a factor of 3. Scale and reference ice shapes are shown which confirm the effectiveness of this new scaling method.

  5. Self-releasing submerged ice maker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, W.E. Jr.; Greer, M.E.; Stickler, L.A. [Univ. of Missouri-Columbia, Independence, MO (United States)

    1989-03-01

    This study reports the results of a series of experiments which investigated a thermal storage technology whereby slush ice is grown on a submerged cold surface and the resultant growth of slush ice released without auxiliary thermal or mechanical means. The process investigated consists of growing slush ice from an electrolyte solution of low molarity. The cold surface (substrate) upon which the slush ice forms is submerged in the bulk solution. As the buoyancy force on the ice crystals exceeds the adhesion to the cold surface, the slush ice is forced from the substrate and floats away, to the top of the solution. The results of this study reveal the relative insensitivity of the growth rate of ice crystals to solution initial bulk concentration over the range of values tested and to concentration of electrolyte during accumulation of ice crystals. The critical parameter appears to be substrate temperature, which generally cannot be less than approximately 2{degrees}C below the freezing point temperature of the solution, as apparent adhesion increases rapidly with decreasing substrate temperature.

  6. Ice induced vibrations of offshore structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Salganik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article was to analyze the process of the dynamic interaction between ice and offshore structures and find conditions of vibration beginnings. The problems of creating a full-scale finite element model of ice and offshore structure interaction and comparison of the received results of vibration conditions with the field data were solved. Modeling was realized with the finite element analysis software ANSYS. The problems of modeling cracks formation, checking the multilateral model using basic ice strength tests and finding ice loads level on different types of structures were solved in order to create a destructible ice model. The object of the investigation is the role of elastic and inertial offshore structure parameters and geometrical and dynamical ice field parameters in the process of ice-induced structure vibrations. Molikpaq drilling and oil production platform in Canada and Norströmsgrund lighthouse in Sweden were chosen as objects for modeling. The research contains verification of the results, their comparison to field data, load magnitudes from ISO 19906 «Petroleum and natural gas industries – Arctic offshore structures» algorithm and results of discrete element modeling. The results are acceptable in comparison with the results of other ice-induced vibration research.

  7. Stable isotope analysis in ice core paleoclimatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ice cores from New Zealand and the Antarctic margin provide an excellent means of addressing the lack of longer-term climate observations in the Southern Hemisphere with near instrumental quality. Ice core records provide an annual-scale, 'instrumental-quality' baseline of atmospheric temperature and circulation changes back many thousands of years. (author).

  8. Simple Cloud Chambers Using Gel Ice Packs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Masahiro; Kubota, Miki

    2012-01-01

    Although cloud chambers are highly regarded as teaching aids for radiation education, school teachers have difficulty in using cloud chambers because they have to prepare dry ice or liquid nitrogen before the experiment. We developed a very simple and inexpensive cloud chamber that uses the contents of gel ice packs which can substitute for dry…

  9. Ice Accretion on Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudecz, Adriána; Koss, Holger; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    2013-01-01

    used to estimate the aerodynamic coefficients of the iced profiles. It was found that both reduction of lift coefficient and increase of drag coefficient is a nearly linear process. Mixed ice formation causes the largest flow disturbance and thus the most lift degradation. Whereas, the suction side of...

  10. Sea Ice Thickness, Freeboard, and Snow Depth products from Operation IceBridge Airborne Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, N. T.; Farrell, S. L.; Studinger, M.; Galin, N.; Harbeck, J. P.; Lindsay, R.; Onana, V. D.; Panzer, B.; Sonntag, J. G.

    2013-01-01

    The study of sea ice using airborne remote sensing platforms provides unique capabilities to measure a wide variety of sea ice properties. These measurements are useful for a variety of topics including model evaluation and improvement, assessment of satellite retrievals, and incorporation into climate data records for analysis of interannual variability and long-term trends in sea ice properties. In this paper we describe methods for the retrieval of sea ice thickness, freeboard, and snow depth using data from a multisensor suite of instruments on NASA's Operation IceBridge airborne campaign. We assess the consistency of the results through comparison with independent data sets that demonstrate that the IceBridge products are capable of providing a reliable record of snow depth and sea ice thickness. We explore the impact of inter-campaign instrument changes and associated algorithm adaptations as well as the applicability of the adapted algorithms to the ongoing IceBridge mission. The uncertainties associated with the retrieval methods are determined and placed in the context of their impact on the retrieved sea ice thickness. Lastly, we present results for the 2009 and 2010 IceBridge campaigns, which are currently available in product form via the National Snow and Ice Data Center

  11. Mass Balance Changes and Ice Dynamics of Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets from Laser Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babonis, G. S.; Csatho, B.; Schenk, T.

    2016-06-01

    During the past few decades the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have lost ice at accelerating rates, caused by increasing surface temperature. The melting of the two big ice sheets has a big impact on global sea level rise. If the ice sheets would melt down entirely, the sea level would rise more than 60 m. Even a much smaller rise would cause dramatic damage along coastal regions. In this paper we report about a major upgrade of surface elevation changes derived from laser altimetry data, acquired by NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite mission (ICESat) and airborne laser campaigns, such as Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) and Land, Vegetation and Ice Sensor (LVIS). For detecting changes in ice sheet elevations we have developed the Surface Elevation Reconstruction And Change detection (SERAC) method. It computes elevation changes of small surface patches by keeping the surface shape constant and considering the absolute values as surface elevations. We report about important upgrades of earlier results, for example the inclusion of local ice caps and the temporal extension from 1993 to 2014 for the Greenland Ice Sheet and for a comprehensive reconstruction of ice thickness and mass changes for the Antarctic Ice Sheets.

  12. Pilots' Information Needs and Strategies for Operating in Icing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigeant-Langlois, Laurence N.; Hansman, R. John

    2003-01-01

    Pilot current use of icing information, pilot encounters and strategies for dealing with in-flight aircraft structural icing situations, and desired attributes of new icing information systems were investigated through a survey of pilots of several operational categories. The survey identified important information elements and fiequently used information paths for obtaining icing-related information. Free- response questions solicited descriptions of significant , icing encounters, and probed key icing-related decision and information criteria. Results indicated the information needs for the horizontal and vertical location of icing conditions and the identification of icing-free zones.

  13. Numerical Predictions of Global and Local Ice Loads on Ships

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Biao

    2011-01-01

    Ice loads represent the dominant load for ice-going ships, and it is important to estimate both global and local ice loads on ship hulls. The global ice load governs the ship’s overall performance in ice, and it is an integrated effect of local ice loads over the hull area. Information on the distributions of local ice loads around the hull can be used for more effective design of ice-going ships both in terms of overall operation and from the structural point of view.The present thesis focus...

  14. Factors Affecting the Changes of Ice Crystal Form in Ice Cream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Watanabe, Manabu; Suzuki, Toru

    In this study, the shape of ice crystals in ice cream was quantitatively evaluated by introducing fractal analysis. A small droplet of commercial ice cream mix was quickly cooled to about -30°C on the cold stage of microscope. Subsequently, it was heated to -5°C or -10°C and then held for various holding time. Based on the captured images at each holding time, the cross-sectional area and the length of circumference for each ice crystal were measured to calculate fractal dimension using image analysis software. The results showed that the ice crystals were categorized into two groups, e.g. simple-shape and complicated-shape, according to their fractal dimensions. The fractal dimension of ice crystals became lower with increasing holding time and holding temperature. It was also indicated that the growing rate of complicated-shape ice crystals was relatively higher because of aggregation.

  15. Measurements of Cosmic Rays with IceTop/IceCube: Status and Results

    CERN Document Server

    Tamburro, Alessio

    2012-01-01

    The IceCube Observatory at the South Pole is composed of a cubic kilometer scale neutrino telescope buried beneath the icecap and a square-kilometer surface water Cherenkov tank detector array known as IceTop. The combination of the surface array with the in-ice detector allows the dominantly electromagnetic signal of air showers at the surface and their high-energy muon signal in the ice to be measured in coincidence. This ratio is known to carry information about the nuclear composition of the primary cosmic rays. This paper reviews the recent results from cosmic-ray measurements performed with IceTop/IceCube: energy spectrum, mass composition, anisotropy, search for PeV gamma sources, detection of high energy muons to probe the initial stages of the air shower development, and study of transient events using IceTop in scaler mode.

  16. The use of dispersants in broken ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effectiveness of two commercial dispersants in breaking up oil spilled onto a mixture of broken ice and water, were evaluated. Tests were conducted in which a light crude oil was spilled into containment booms which had been frozen into the ice of a salt-water-filled wave tank. Cleaning agents were then added and low amplitude waves were generated for two hours. Spills were dispersed by 90% or better in a short time. Oil in water dispersion was monitored by fluorimetry, by video and still photography. At the end of the experiment, the remaining oil on the water and ice surface was measured. No measurable oil was dispersed into the water column between two moving smooth lead surfaces. It was concluded that it may be possible to disperse spilled oil with chemicals in the northern seas during ice formation and in early spring when the sheet ice is breaking up. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  17. Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

    2009-09-25

    PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice

  18. Ice-impact analysis of blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.; Reddy, E. S.

    1994-01-01

    A computational capability is described for evaluating the ice-impact on engine blades made from composites. The ice block is modeled as an equivalent spherical object and has the velocity opposite to that of the aircraft with direction parallel to the engine axis. A finer finite element mesh is used for a portion of the blade near the impact region compared to the course mesh for the rest of the blade. The effects of ice size and velocity on the average leading edge strain are evaluated for a simulated unswept composite propfan blade. Parametric studies are performed to assess the blade structural responses due to the ice-impact at various locations along the span. It is found that: (1) for a given engine speed, a critical ice speed exists that corresponds to the maximum strain; and (2) the tip bending type frequencies increase after impact while the torsion frequencies decrease.

  19. The Science of Solar System Ices

    CERN Document Server

    Castillo-Rogez, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The Science of Solar System Ices The role of laboratory research and simulations in advancing our understanding of solar system ices (including satellites, KBOs, comets, and giant planets) is becoming increasingly important. Understanding ice surface radiation processing, particle and radiation penetration depths, surface and subsurface chemistry, morphology, phases, density, conductivity, etc., are only a few examples of the inventory of issues that are being addressed by Earth-based laboratory research. As a response to the growing need for cross-disciplinary dialog and communication in the planetary ices science community, this book aims to foster focused collaborations among the observational, modeling, and laboratory research communities. The book is a compilation of articles from experts in ices: experimentalists, modelers, and observers (ground-based telescopes and space missions). Most of the contributors featured in this book are renowned experts in their respective fields. Many of these scientists h...

  20. The state of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Sebastian Bjerregaard

    compaction on ice sheet scales. The modeling objectives are multiple and aim at estimating the contribution from the firn to the observed volume change of the GrIS and to the diffusion of stable water isotopes. The firn modeling then provides crucial information on total mass balance of the GrIS and the...... parameterized by temperature and accumulation alone, as assumed previous studies. Ice-sheet model initialization is necessary to constrain projections of future sea-level rise and assess the present state of the GrIS. In this thesis, the initialization of the GrIS is investigated through ensemble studies of...... measures, such as the total ice-sheet volume, do not capture the full aspect of the present day state of the GrIS. The ensemble of ice-sheet initializations is then used to investigate how future projections of ice sheet evolution depend on the initialization. The further projections show a surprising...

  1. Changes in the West Antarctic ice sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The portion of the West Antarctic ice sheet that flows into the Ross Sea is thinning in some places and thickening in others. These changes are not caused by any current climatic change, but by the combination of a delayed response to the end of the last global glacial cycle and an internal instability. The near-future impact of the ice sheet on global sea level is largely due to processes internal to the movement of the ice sheet, and not so much to the threat of a possible greenhouse warming. Thus the near-term future of the ice sheet is already determined. However, too little of the ice sheet has been surveyed to predict its overall future behavior

  2. Uranium series dating of Allan Hills ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fireman, E. L.

    1986-01-01

    Uranium-238 decay series nuclides dissolved in Antarctic ice samples were measured in areas of both high and low concentrations of volcanic glass shards. Ice from the Allan Hills site (high shard content) had high Ra-226, Th-230 and U-234 activities but similarly low U-238 activities in comparison with Antarctic ice samples without shards. The Ra-226, Th-230 and U-234 excesses were found to be proportional to the shard content, while the U-238 decay series results were consistent with the assumption that alpha decay products recoiled into the ice from the shards. Through this method of uranium series dating, it was learned that the Allen Hills Cul de Sac ice is approximately 325,000 years old.

  3. Tecnolog??as del cuidado del mundo

    OpenAIRE

    Higuera Esp??n, Javier de la

    2011-01-01

    Desde la ??ptica de la ontolog??a de la actualidad, este texto pretende pensar en la posibilidad de unas ???tecnolog??as del mundo??? que, en correlaci??n con las ???tecnolog??as del yo???, sean responsables del cuidado del acontecer singular que define nuestro presente, amenazado por fuertes tendencias homogeneizadoras capaces de cerrar o compactar el mundo. Por el contrario, el mundo s??lo es mundo si ???en ??l puede abrirse un afuera??? (J.-L. Nancy). Para ello analiza la naturaleza de es...

  4. Ice repellency behaviour of superhydrophobic surfaces: Effects of atmospheric icing conditions and surface roughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel view on ice repellency of superhydrophobic surfaces in terms of contact angle hysteresis, roughness and icing condition has been discussed. • This study is the first to deal with the effect of icing parameters on the ice repellency behaviour of superhydrophobic surfaces. • Two fabricated superhydrophobic surfaces with similar wettability behaviour showed different icephobic behaviour. • Superhydrophobic surfaces are not always icephobic and ice repellency is governed by icing condition parameters like liquid water content and water droplet size. • Lower liquid water content and smaller water droplet size promote ice-repellency behaviour of superhydrophobic surfaces. - Abstract: This paper presents a novel view on ice repellency of superhydrophobic surfaces in terms of contact angle hysteresis, surface roughness and icing condition. Ice repellency performance of two superhydrophobic silicone rubber nanocomposite surfaces prepared via spin coating and spray coating methods were investigated. High contact angle (>150°), low contact angle hysteresis (<6°) and roll-off property were found for both spin and spray coated samples. The results showed a significant reduction of ice adhesion strength on the spin-coated sample while ice adhesion strength on the spray-coated sample was found to be unexpectedly similar to that of the uncoated sample. Indeed, this research study showed that the icephobic properties of a surface are not directly correlated to its superhydrphobicity and that further investigations, like taking icing condition effect into account, are required. It was found that icephobic behaviour of the spray coated sample improved at lower levels of liquid water content (LWC) and under icing conditions characterized by smaller water droplet size

  5. Influence of ice thickness and surface properties on light transmission through Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katlein, C.; Arndt, S.; Nicolaus, M.; Perovich, D. K.; Jakuba, M.; Suman, S.; Elliott, S.; Whitcomb, L. L.; McFarland, C.; Gerdes, R.; Boetius, A.

    2015-12-01

    The changes in physical properties of sea ice such as decreased thickness and increased melt pond cover observed over the last decades severely impact the energy budget of Arctic sea ice. Increased light transmission leads to increased deposition of solar energy in the upper ocean and thus plays a crucial role in the amount and timing of sea-ice-melt and under-ice primary production. Recent developments in underwater technology provide new opportunities to undertake challenging research at the largely inaccessible underside of sea ice. We measured spectral under-ice radiance and irradiance onboard the new Nereid Under-Ice (NUI) underwater robotic vehicle, during a cruise of the R/V Polarstern to 83°N 6°W in the Arctic Ocean in July 2014. NUI is a next generation hybrid remotely operated vehicle (H-ROV) designed for both remotely-piloted and autonomous surveys underneath land-fast and moving sea ice. Here we present results from one of the first comprehensive scientific dives of NUI employing its interdisciplinary sensor suite. We combine under-ice optical measurements with three-dimensional under-ice topography and aerial images of the surface conditions. We investigate the influence of spatially varying ice-thickness and surface properties during summer on the spatial variability of light transmittance. Results show that surface properties dominate the spatial distribution of the under-ice light field on small scales (<1000m²), while sea ice-thickness is the most important predictor for light transmission on larger scales. In addition, we suggest an algorithm to obtain histograms of light transmission from distributions of sea ice thickness and surface albedo.

  6. Influence of ice thickness and surface properties on light transmission through Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katlein, Christian; Arndt, Stefanie; Nicolaus, Marcel; Perovich, Donald K.; Jakuba, Michael V.; Suman, Stefano; Elliott, Stephen; Whitcomb, Louis L.; McFarland, Christopher J.; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Boetius, Antje; German, Christopher R.

    2015-09-01

    The observed changes in physical properties of sea ice such as decreased thickness and increased melt pond cover severely impact the energy budget of Arctic sea ice. Increased light transmission leads to increased deposition of solar energy in the upper ocean and thus plays a crucial role for amount and timing of sea-ice-melt and under-ice primary production. Recent developments in underwater technology provide new opportunities to study light transmission below the largely inaccessible underside of sea ice. We measured spectral under-ice radiance and irradiance using the new Nereid Under-Ice (NUI) underwater robotic vehicle, during a cruise of the R/V Polarstern to 83°N 6°W in the Arctic Ocean in July 2014. NUI is a next generation hybrid remotely operated vehicle (H-ROV) designed for both remotely piloted and autonomous surveys underneath land-fast and moving sea ice. Here we present results from one of the first comprehensive scientific dives of NUI employing its interdisciplinary sensor suite. We combine under-ice optical measurements with three dimensional under-ice topography (multibeam sonar) and aerial images of the surface conditions. We investigate the influence of spatially varying ice-thickness and surface properties on the spatial variability of light transmittance during summer. Our results show that surface properties such as melt ponds dominate the spatial distribution of the under-ice light field on small scales (<1000 m2), while sea ice-thickness is the most important predictor for light transmission on larger scales. In addition, we propose the use of an algorithm to obtain histograms of light transmission from distributions of sea ice thickness and surface albedo.

  7. Ice repellency behaviour of superhydrophobic surfaces: Effects of atmospheric icing conditions and surface roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momen, G., E-mail: gmomen@uqac.ca; Jafari, R.; Farzaneh, M.

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A novel view on ice repellency of superhydrophobic surfaces in terms of contact angle hysteresis, roughness and icing condition has been discussed. • This study is the first to deal with the effect of icing parameters on the ice repellency behaviour of superhydrophobic surfaces. • Two fabricated superhydrophobic surfaces with similar wettability behaviour showed different icephobic behaviour. • Superhydrophobic surfaces are not always icephobic and ice repellency is governed by icing condition parameters like liquid water content and water droplet size. • Lower liquid water content and smaller water droplet size promote ice-repellency behaviour of superhydrophobic surfaces. - Abstract: This paper presents a novel view on ice repellency of superhydrophobic surfaces in terms of contact angle hysteresis, surface roughness and icing condition. Ice repellency performance of two superhydrophobic silicone rubber nanocomposite surfaces prepared via spin coating and spray coating methods were investigated. High contact angle (>150°), low contact angle hysteresis (<6°) and roll-off property were found for both spin and spray coated samples. The results showed a significant reduction of ice adhesion strength on the spin-coated sample while ice adhesion strength on the spray-coated sample was found to be unexpectedly similar to that of the uncoated sample. Indeed, this research study showed that the icephobic properties of a surface are not directly correlated to its superhydrphobicity and that further investigations, like taking icing condition effect into account, are required. It was found that icephobic behaviour of the spray coated sample improved at lower levels of liquid water content (LWC) and under icing conditions characterized by smaller water droplet size.

  8. El Banco del Sur

    OpenAIRE

    Espejo, Silvana

    2012-01-01

    En este trabajo abordaremos las características principales del Banco del Sur como una institución financiera sudamericana. Primero presentaremos sus principales características y explicaremos las características de un banco de desarrollo regional. Luego, expondremos el proceso de conformación del mismo haciendo un recorrido por sus principales antecedentes. Por último, cerraremos con una evaluación sobre el estado actual del Banco del Sur. (Párrafo extraído del texto a modo de resumen)...

  9. Ice mechanics, basal water and the stagnation of Kamb Ice Stream, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, M.; Hulbe, C. L.; Fahnestock, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Several of the ice streams that move ice from the interior of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) to the Ross Ice Shelf are documented to stagnate and reactivate on multi-century time scales. Once such event may now be underway on the downstream ice plain of the Whillans Ice Stream (WIS), a stream that stopped and started between about 850 and 450 years ago. Kamb Ice Stream (KIS) ceased its rapid flow about 150 years ago in an event that appears to have initiated in the downstream reach of the ice stream. These switches from fast to slow and back again produce major changes in mass balance of the ice sheet and ice shelf system. Ice stream stagnation must in some way involve changes in the basal water that facilitates fast flow. Here, transients in ice thickness and surface slope, which together steer basal water, are examined in the context of the recent stagnation of KIS. Transients have both regional—changes in WIS flux and in Crary Ice Rise, for example—and local causes. A mechanical analysis of high-resolution surface elevation and ice velocity data sets on the now-active WIS is used as a proxy for past conditions on KIS and an ice flow model is used to place those local conditions in a regional context. We argue that thickness transients associated with stagnation of WIS required the KIS grounding line to retreat far upstream of its present location while reactivation of WIS led to regional thickening, grounding of floating ice, and advance of the KIS grounding line toward its present location. The present work examines the role of lateral margins near the grounding line, in particular the broad, flat, "Duckfoot" on the right lateral side of the KIS outlet and Lake Englehardt, which occupies the same postion at the outlet of WIS. Lake Englehardt diverts water away from the main trunk of the ice stream. In the past, the Duckfoot may have played a similar role and that diversion may have been associated with KIS stagnation. Overall, our aim is to understand

  10. Variability in the Antarctic Marginal Ice Zone and Pack Ice in Observations and NCAR CESM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroeve, J. C.; Campbell, G. G.; Holland, M. M.; Landrum, L.

    2015-12-01

    Sea ice around Antarctica reached another record high extent in September 2014, recording a maximum extent of more than 20 million km2 for the first time since the modern satellite data record began in October 1978. This follows previous record maxima in 2012 and 2013, resulting in an overall increase in Antarctic September sea ice extent of 1.3% per decade since 1979. Several explanations have been put forward to explain the increasing trends, such as anomalous short-term wind patterns that both grow and spread out the ice, and freshening of the surface ocean layer from increased melting of floating ice from the continent. These positive trends in Antarctic sea ice are at odds with climate model forecasts that suggest the sea ice should be declining in response to increasing greenhouse gases and stratospheric ozone depletion. While the reasons for the increases in total extent remain poorly understood, it is likely that these changes are not just impacting the total ice extent, but also the distribution of pack ice, the marginal ice zone (MIZ) and polynyas, with important ramifications for phytoplankton productivity that in turn impact zooplankton, fish, sea birds and marine mammals. This study evaluates changes in the distribution of the pack ice, polynyas and the marginal ice zone around Antarctica from two sea ice algorithms, the NASA Team and the Bootstrap. These results are further compared with climate model simulations from the CESM large ensemble output. Seasonal analysis of the different ice types using NASA Team and Bootstrap shows that during ice advance, the ice advances as pack ice, with a seasonal peak in September (broader peak for Bootstrap), and as the pack ice begins to retreat, it first converts to a wide area of MIZ, that reaches its peak around November (NASA Team) or December (Bootstrap). CESM also shows a similar seasonal cycle, with a peak in the pack ice in August, and a December/January peak in the MIZ. Seasonal variability and trends are

  11. Arctic sea ice balance and climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proxy data and local historical records show that sea ice extent has undergone large secular variations over past millennia and centuries, for reasons that are only qualitatively understood. Since the onset of systematic observations in situ and satellites, the record shows a remarkable constancy of the annual cycle of the arctic sea ice cover. This cycle is described by a continuity equation that is used to discuss the mechanisms relating ice extent and thickness to climate, and to illustrate how ice formation, transport, and melting combine to produce the seasonal cycle of sea ice cover. The heat balances and stresses at the surface and bottom of the sea ice are external forcing functions with small-scale and large-scale feedbacks. Examples are the stable stratification of the ocean boundary layer caused by bottom melting and surface drainage which suppress the vertical ocean heat flux, and the arctic summer stratus which forms over ice-covered ocean regions and limits surface melting. Recent efforts to model the seasonal cycle of sea ice in the Arctic are discussed in light of the observational record. A promising new development is the incorporation of satellite data as explicit variables carried in dynamic-thermodynamic ice models. Of special interest in the context of climate is the fresh water budget of the Arctic Basin. Its largest components, the runoff generated by mid-latitude precipitation over the Eurasian continent, and the ice export driven by the wind field over the Arctic Basin, have no immediately apparent connection. Taking into account all other components of the fresh water balance, Aagaard and Carmack estimate that the contemporary influx and outflux of fresh water at the perimeter of the Arctic Basin are equal. The unraveling of the mechanisms responsible for this equality, and the consequence of a possible imbalance remain challenging questions

  12. Sea Ice Biogeochemistry: A Guide for Modellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, Letizia; Vichi, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    Sea ice is a fundamental component of the climate system and plays a key role in polar trophic food webs. Nonetheless sea ice biogeochemical dynamics at large temporal and spatial scales are still rarely described. Numerical models may potentially contribute integrating among sparse observations, but available models of sea ice biogeochemistry are still scarce, whether their relevance for properly describing the current and future state of the polar oceans has been recently addressed. A general methodology to develop a sea ice biogeochemical model is presented, deriving it from an existing validated model application by extension of generic pelagic biogeochemistry model parameterizations. The described methodology is flexible and considers different levels of ecosystem complexity and vertical representation, while adopting a strategy of coupling that ensures mass conservation. We show how to apply this methodology step by step by building an intermediate complexity model from a published realistic application and applying it to analyze theoretically a typical season of first-year sea ice in the Arctic, the one currently needing the most urgent understanding. The aim is to (1) introduce sea ice biogeochemistry and address its relevance to ocean modelers of polar regions, supporting them in adding a new sea ice component to their modelling framework for a more adequate representation of the sea ice-covered ocean ecosystem as a whole, and (2) extend our knowledge on the relevant controlling factors of sea ice algal production, showing that beyond the light and nutrient availability, the duration of the sea ice season may play a key-role shaping the algal production during the on going and upcoming projected changes. PMID:24586604

  13. Sea ice biogeochemistry: a guide for modellers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letizia Tedesco

    Full Text Available Sea ice is a fundamental component of the climate system and plays a key role in polar trophic food webs. Nonetheless sea ice biogeochemical dynamics at large temporal and spatial scales are still rarely described. Numerical models may potentially contribute integrating among sparse observations, but available models of sea ice biogeochemistry are still scarce, whether their relevance for properly describing the current and future state of the polar oceans has been recently addressed. A general methodology to develop a sea ice biogeochemical model is presented, deriving it from an existing validated model application by extension of generic pelagic biogeochemistry model parameterizations. The described methodology is flexible and considers different levels of ecosystem complexity and vertical representation, while adopting a strategy of coupling that ensures mass conservation. We show how to apply this methodology step by step by building an intermediate complexity model from a published realistic application and applying it to analyze theoretically a typical season of first-year sea ice in the Arctic, the one currently needing the most urgent understanding. The aim is to (1 introduce sea ice biogeochemistry and address its relevance to ocean modelers of polar regions, supporting them in adding a new sea ice component to their modelling framework for a more adequate representation of the sea ice-covered ocean ecosystem as a whole, and (2 extend our knowledge on the relevant controlling factors of sea ice algal production, showing that beyond the light and nutrient availability, the duration of the sea ice season may play a key-role shaping the algal production during the on going and upcoming projected changes.

  14. Ice rises: The double role of imprinting and archiving ice-dynamics at the sheet-shelf boundary of Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Drews, Reinhard; Eisen, Olaf; Martin, Carlos; Steinhage, Daniel; Pattyn, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Almost three-quarters of the Antarctic ice-sheet boundary is in contact with the ocean. Floating ice shelves extend the continental ice seawards and provide an interface for the interaction of ice and ocean. Ice rises are grounded features embedded within ice-shelves. They typically develop a local ice-flow regime which on the one hand buttresses the large-scale ice flow from the Antarctic continent, and on the other hand may stabilize the grounding-line position on a inland facing bedrock sl...

  15. Ice Clouds in Color IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released August 9, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image in the Elysium region of Mars. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations. The light blue area in the center of this image is a very nice example of a water ice cloud. Water ice is frequently present in the Martian atmosphere as a thin haze. Clouds such as this one can be difficult to identify in a temperature image, but are easy to spot in the DCS images. In this case, the water ice is relatively confined and concentrated which may be due to the topography of the Elysium volcanic construct. Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 23.2, Longitude 150.1 East (209.9 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter

  16. Impact craters: An ice study on Rhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle Ore, Cristina M.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Mastrapa, Rachel M. E.; Lewis, Emma; White, Oliver L.

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this project is to study the properties of H2O ice in the environment of the Saturn satellites and in particular to measure the relative amounts of crystalline and amorphous H2O ice in and around two craters on Rhea. The craters are remnants of cataclysmic events that, by raising the local temperature, melted the ice, which subsequently crystallized. Based on laboratory experiments it is expected that, when exposed to ion bombardment at the temperatures typical of the Saturn satellites, the crystalline structure of the ice will be broken, resulting in the disordered, amorphous phase. We therefore expect the ice in and around the craters to be partially crystalline and partially amorphous. We have designed a technique that estimates the relative amounts of crystalline and amorphous H2O ice based on measurements of the distortion of the 2-μm spectral absorption band. The technique is best suited for planetary surfaces that are predominantly icy, but works also for surfaces slightly contaminated with other ices and non-ice components. We apply the tool to two areas around the Inktomi and the Obatala craters. The first is a young impact crater on the leading hemisphere of Rhea, the second is an older one on the trailing hemisphere. For each crater we obtain maps of the fraction of crystalline ice, which were overlain onto Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) images of the satellite searching for correlations between crystallinity and geography. For both craters the largest fractions of crystalline ice are in the center, as would be intuitively expected since the 'ground zero' areas should be most affected by the effects of the impact. The overall distribution of the crystalline ice fraction maps the shape of the crater and, in the case of Inktomi, of the rays. The Inktomi crater ranges between a maximum fraction of 67% crystalline ice to a minimum of 39%. The Obatala crater varies between a maximum of 51% and a minimum of 33%. Based on simplifying assumptions

  17. Fundamental Ice Crystal Accretion Physics Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struk, Peter M.; Broeren, Andy P.; Tsao, Jen-Ching; Vargas, Mario; Wright, William B.; Currie, Tom; Knezevici, Danny; Fuleki, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Due to numerous engine power-loss events associated with high-altitude convective weather, ice accretion within an engine due to ice crystal ingestion is being investigated. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada are starting to examine the physical mechanisms of ice accretion on surfaces exposed to ice-crystal and mixed-phase conditions. In November 2010, two weeks of testing occurred at the NRC Research Altitude Facility utilizing a single wedge-type airfoil designed to facilitate fundamental studies while retaining critical features of a compressor stator blade or guide vane. The airfoil was placed in the NRC cascade wind tunnel for both aerodynamic and icing tests. Aerodynamic testing showed excellent agreement compared with CFD data on the icing pressure surface and allowed calculation of heat transfer coefficients at various airfoil locations. Icing tests were performed at Mach numbers of 0.2 to 0.3, total pressures from 93 to 45 kPa, and total temperatures from 5 to 15 C. Ice and liquid water contents ranged up to 20 and 3 g/m3, respectively. The ice appeared well adhered to the surface in the lowest pressure tests (45 kPa) and, in a particular case, showed continuous leading-edge ice growth to a thickness greater than 15 mm in 3 min. Such widespread deposits were not observed in the highest pressure tests, where the accretions were limited to a small area around the leading edge. The suction surface was typically ice-free in the tests at high pressure, but not at low pressure. The icing behavior at high and low pressure appeared to be correlated with the wet-bulb temperature, which was estimated to be above 0 C in tests at 93 kPa and below 0 C in tests at lower pressure, the latter enhanced by more evaporative cooling of water. The authors believe that the large ice accretions observed in the low pressure tests would undoubtedly cause the aerodynamic performance of a compressor component

  18. Assimilation of sea ice motion in a finite-element sea ice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollenhagen, K.; Timmermann, R.; Janjić, T.; SchröTer, J.; Danilov, S.

    2009-05-01

    A finite-element sea ice model (FESIM) is applied in a data assimilation study with the singular evolutive interpolated Kalman (SEIK) filter. The model has been configured for a regional Arctic domain and is forced with a combination of daily NCEP reanalysis data for 2-m air temperature and 10-m winds with monthly mean humidities from the ECMWF reanalysis and climatological fields for precipitation and cloudiness. We assimilate 3-day mean ice drift fields derived from passive microwave satellite data. Based on multivariate covariances (which describe the statistical relationship between anomalies in different model fields), the sea ice drift data assimilation produces not only direct modifications of the ice drift but also updates for sea ice concentration and thickness, which in turn yield sustainable corrections of ice drift. We use observed buoy trajectories as an independent data set to validate the analyzed sea ice drift field. A good agreement between modeled and observed tracks is achieved already in the reference simulation. Application of the SEIK filter with satellite-derived drift fields further improves the agreement. Spatial and temporal variability of ice thickness increases due to the assimilation procedure; a comparison to thickness data from a submarine-based upward looking sonar indicates that the thickness distribution becomes more realistic. Validation with regard to satellite data shows that the velocity data assimilation has only a small effect on ice concentration, but a general improvement of the ice concentration within the pack is still evident.

  19. Basal characteristics of the main sticky spot on the ice plain of Whillans Ice Stream, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Tarun; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar; Winberry, J. Paul; Alley, Richard B.; Holschuh, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the processes that affect streaming ice flow and the mass balance of glaciers and ice sheets requires sound knowledge of their subglacial environments. Previous studies have shown that an extensive deformable subglacial sediment layer favors fast ice-stream flow. However, areas of high basal drag, termed sticky spots, are of particular interest because they inhibit the fast flow of the overriding ice. The stick-slip behavior of Whillans Ice Stream (WIS) is perhaps the most conspicuous manifestation of a subglacial sticky spot. We present new ice-thickness and seismic-reflection measurements collected over the main sticky spot in the ice plain of WIS, allowing us to elucidate its role in the behavior of the ice stream. Ice-thickness and surface-elevation data show that the sticky spot occupies a subglacial topographic high. Water flow in response to the hydrological potential gradient will be routed around the sticky spot if effective pressures are similar on the sticky spot and elsewhere. The seismic experiment imaged a laterally continuous basal layer approximately 6 m thick, having compressional wave velocities of greater than 1800 m s-1 and density greater than 1800 kg m-3, indicative of a till layer that is stiffer than corresponding till beneath well-lubricated parts of the ice stream. This layer likely continues to deform under the higher shear stress of the sticky spot, and some water may be pumped up onto the sticky spot during motion events.

  20. Role of ground ice dynamics and ecological feedbacks in recent ice wedge degradation and stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, M. T.; Kanevskiy, M.; Shur, Y.; Moskalenko, N.; Brown, D. R. N.; Wickland, K.; Striegl, R.; Koch, J.

    2015-11-01

    Ground ice is abundant in the upper permafrost throughout the Arctic and fundamentally affects terrain responses to climate warming. Ice wedges, which form near the surface and are the dominant type of massive ice in the Arctic, are particularly vulnerable to warming. Yet processes controlling ice wedge degradation and stabilization are poorly understood. Here we quantified ice wedge volume and degradation rates, compared ground ice characteristics and thermal regimes across a sequence of five degradation and stabilization stages and evaluated biophysical feedbacks controlling permafrost stability near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. Mean ice wedge volume in the top 3 m of permafrost was 21%. Imagery from 1949 to 2012 showed thermokarst extent (area of water-filled troughs) was relatively small from 1949 (0.9%) to 1988 (1.5%), abruptly increased by 2004 (6.3%) and increased slightly by 2012 (7.5%). Mean annual surface temperatures varied by 4.9°C among degradation and stabilization stages and by 9.9°C from polygon center to deep lake bottom. Mean thicknesses of the active layer, ice-poor transient layer, ice-rich intermediate layer, thermokarst cave ice, and wedge ice varied substantially among stages. In early stages, thaw settlement caused water to impound in thermokarst troughs, creating positive feedbacks that increased net radiation, soil heat flux, and soil temperatures. Plant growth and organic matter accumulation in the degraded troughs provided negative feedbacks that allowed ground ice to aggrade and heave the surface, thus reducing surface water depth and soil temperatures in later stages. The ground ice dynamics and ecological feedbacks greatly complicate efforts to assess permafrost responses to climate change.

  1. Capabilities and performance of Elmer/Ice, a new-generation ice sheet model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Gagliardini

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Fourth IPCC Assessment Report concluded that ice sheet flow models, in their current state, were unable to provide accurate forecast for the increase of polar ice sheet discharge and the associated contribution to sea level rise. Since then, the glaciological community has undertaken a huge effort to develop and improve a new generation of ice flow models, and as a result a significant number of new ice sheet models have emerged. Among them is the parallel finite-element model Elmer/Ice, based on the open-source multi-physics code Elmer. It was one of the first full-Stokes models used to make projections for the evolution of the whole Greenland ice sheet for the coming two centuries. Originally developed to solve local ice flow problems of high mechanical and physical complexity, Elmer/Ice has today reached the maturity to solve larger-scale problems, earning the status of an ice sheet model. Here, we summarise almost 10 yr of development performed by different groups. Elmer/Ice solves the full-Stokes equations, for isotropic but also anisotropic ice rheology, resolves the grounding line dynamics as a contact problem, and contains various basal friction laws. Derived fields, like the age of the ice, the strain rate or stress, can also be computed. Elmer/Ice includes two recently proposed inverse methods to infer badly known parameters. Elmer is a highly parallelised code thanks to recent developments and the implementation of a block preconditioned solver for the Stokes system. In this paper, all these components are presented in detail, as well as the numerical performance of the Stokes solver and developments planned for the future.

  2. Grounding Zone Process: Ice Mechanics and Margin Lakes, Kamb Ice Stream and Whillans Ice Stream, West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Mason

    The lateral "corners" where Kamb and Whillans Ice Streams (KIS and WIS) discharge into the Ross Ice Shelf share common geometries and ice mechanical settings. At both corners of the now-stagnant KIS outlet, shear margins of apparently different ages confine regions with a relatively flat, smooth surface expression. These features are called the "Duckfoot" on the northern, right-lateral side and the "Goosefoot" on the other. It has been suggested, on evidence found in ice internal layers, that the flat ice terrains on KIS were afloat in the recent past, at a time when the ice stream grounding line was upstream of its present location. The overdeepening in the bed just upstream of the KIS grounding line supports this view of the past geometry. The right-lateral margin at the outlet of the currently active WIS, the location of Subglacial Lake Englehardt (SLE), appears to have many similarities with the right lateral margin of KIS, though with a less developed looking inboard margin. This paper presents a mechanical analysis using surface and bed topography and velocity datasets comparing the Duckfoot flat ice terrain with the terrain around Subglacial Lake Englehardt. At both locations mechanical thinning along shear margins and lows in the bed topography redirects basal water routing towards the features. Here, I consider the history of these features and their role in ice stream variability by comparison of the relict and modern features and via numerical modeling of ice shelf grounding and ungrounding in response to variations in ice flow. We propose two scenarios for the development of flat ice terrains/subglacial lakes at the outlets of ice streams. In the first, development of a lake in the hydraulic potential low along a shear margin forces a margin jump as shearing develops along the inboard shore of the margin lake. This thesis presents evidence for an inboard (relative to the main outboard shear margin) zone of shear along the inboard shoreline of SLE

  3. Accesibilidad del sitio web del CONAPRED

    OpenAIRE

    Luján Mora, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Accesibilidad del sitio web del CONAPRED (Consejo Nacional para Prevenir la Discriminación) de México. Más información: - http://accesibilidadweb.dlsi.ua.es - http://desarrolloweb.dlsi.ua.es Autor: Sergio Luján Mora, profesor de la Universidad de Alicante (http://www.ua.es).

  4. Ice interactions at a dam face

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morse, B.; Morse, J.; Beaulieu, P.; Pratt, Y. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Stander, E. [State Univ. of New York, Cobleskill College, Cobleskill, NY (United States). Dept. of Natural Sciences; Cote, A.; Tarras, A.; Noel, P. [Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, PQ (Canada). IREQ

    2009-07-01

    This paper reported on a joint research project between Laval University and Hydro-Quebec to study ice forces on dams in an effort to harmonize design criteria and develop mitigation strategies. This paper introduced the project and explored some of the preliminary results of the 2007-2008 field season. Ice displacement, ice stresses and ice forces on the LaGabelle dam were measured at several locations. The paper identified and discussed the complex relationships between data sets and discussed the spatial-temporal variability of the ice forces and its impact on design criteria. The project objective was to develop design criteria for ice forces on dams and to provide a scientific basis for interpreting and harmonizing existing recommended criteria. The methodology and site description were presented. It was concluded that the ice processes in a reservoir near a dam face subject to water fluctuations are quite complex. Therefore, in order to know the real average pressure on the dam, a significant amount of panels are required, having important implications for determining safe design values. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Laser Altimetry Sampling Strategies over Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Sinead L.; Markus, Thorsten; Kwok, Ron; Connor, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    With the conclusion of the science phase of the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) mission in late 2009, and the planned launch of ICESat-2 in late 2015, NASA has recently established the IceBridge program to provide continuity between missions. A major goal of IceBridge is to obtain a sea-ice thickness time series via airborne surveys over the Arctic and Southern Oceans. Typically two laser altimeters, the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) and the Land, Vegetation and Ice Sensor (LVIS), are utilized during IceBridge flights. Using laser altimetry simulations of conventional analogue systems such as ICESat, LVIS and ATM, with the multi-beam system proposed for ICESat-2, we investigate differences in measurements gathered at varying spatial resolutions and the impact on sea-ice freeboard. We assess the ability of each system to reproduce the elevation distributions of two seaice models and discuss potential biases in lead detection and sea-surface elevation, arising from variable footprint size and spacing. The conventional systems accurately reproduce mean freeboard over 25km length scales, while ICESat-2 offers considerable improvements over its predecessor ICESat. In particular, its dense along-track sampling of the surface will allow flexibility in the algorithmic approaches taken to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio for accurate and precise freeboard retrieval.

  6. MORICE oil in ice testing at OHMSETT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, H.V. [SINTEF Applied Chemistry, Trondheim (Norway); Mullin, J.V. [U.S. Minerals Management Service, Herndon, VA (United States); McHale, J. [Alaska Clean Seas, Prudhoe Bay, AK (United States)

    2002-07-01

    MORICE (Mechanical Oil Recovery in Ice Infested Waters) is a skimmer designed to recover oil spills in ice-infested waters. It was initiated in 1995 as a multinational effort between Norwegian, Canadian, American and German researchers. It is now in its final stage of testing following several series of lab tests which examined various concepts and ideas and to refine those that were considered to have the best potential for working in ice. The objective of this last stage is to operate all the equipment together and to evaluate the capability of MORICE in recovering oil from ice in the field. The final phase test was conducted at the OHMSETT test facility in Leonardo, New Jersey. It included an evaluation of the work platform from which to operate, as well as an assessment of the ice deflectors and separators and two different oil recovery units, including one developed by the MORICE team and one developed by the LORI skimmer manufacturer. Test results indicated that the concepts of MORICE should be scaled up to increase its capacity of oil and ice processing. It will also be necessary to increase the overall strength of MORICE for heavier ice conditions. 5 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  7. ESR of ice and environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the environment of the earth, liquid water exists abundantly, but it cannot be seen in other environment in the solar system. The environment covered with solid water is seen in many celestial bodies, but these ices are not pure water, and contain NH3, SO2, CH4, CO, CO2 and others. Also the existence of solid CO2 on Mars, solid SO2 on Io and solid CH4 on Triton has been known. In many celestial bodies without atmosphere and with ice, it is considered that the ice causes dissociation and ionization due to the effects of ultraviolet ray, solar wind and cosmic γ ray. As the basis of examining these phenomena, the authors made various ices, and studied on the irradiation effect of gamma ray and ultraviolet ray in the laboratory. It became clear by the research using ESR that various kinds of radicals were formed in the ices by the irradiation. The age of the radicals formed in ices means the age of the events that extinguish the radicals occurred on the surfaces of the celestial bodies after ice formation. The problems in the principle of age measurement are the real formation of radicals, the stability of radicals, and the saturation of radical concentration. The research of these problems for H2O and SO2 is reported. (K.I.)

  8. Hydrogen-Bonding Surfaces for Ice Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Hadley, Kevin R.; McDougall, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Ice formation on aircraft, either on the ground or in-flight, is a major safety issue. While ground icing events occur predominantly during the winter months, in-flight icing can happen anytime during the year. The latter is more problematic since it could result in increased drag and loss of lift. Under a Phase I ARMD NARI Seedling Activity, coated aluminum surfaces possessing hydrogen-bonding groups were under investigation for mitigating ice formation. Hydroxyl and methyl terminated dimethylethoxysilanes were prepared via known chemistries and characterized by spectroscopic methods. These materials were subsequently used to coat aluminum surfaces. Surface compositions were based on pure hydroxyl and methyl terminated species as well as mixtures of the two. Coated surfaces were characterized by contact angle goniometry. Receding water contact angle data suggested several potential surfaces that may exhibit reduced ice adhesion. Qualitative icing experiments performed under representative environmental temperatures using supercooled distilled water delivered via spray coating were inconclusive. Molecular modeling studies suggested that chain mobility affected the interface between ice and the surface more than terminal group chemical composition. Chain mobility resulted from the creation of "pockets" of increased free volume for longer chains to occupy.

  9. A glacial geomorphological map of the southernmost ice lobes of Patagonia : the Bahía Inútil - San Sebastián, Magellan, Otway, Skyring and Bella Vista lobes.

    OpenAIRE

    Darvill, Christopher M.; Stokes, Chris R.; Bentley, Michael J.; Lovell, Harold

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a glacial geomorphological map of the landforms created by five large ice lobes that extended eastwards from the southernmost reaches of the Patagonian Ice Sheet during the Quaternary period. The study is focussed on Tierra del Fuego, but also updates previous mapping of the Skyring and Otway lobes, and the resulting level of detail and extent is a significant advance on previous work in the region. The map has been created as the necessary precursor for an improved unders...

  10. Relationships between water wettability and ice adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuler, Adam J; Smith, J David; Varanasi, Kripa K; Mabry, Joseph M; McKinley, Gareth H; Cohen, Robert E

    2010-11-01

    Ice formation and accretion may hinder the operation of many systems critical to national infrastructure, including airplanes, power lines, windmills, ships, and telecommunications equipment. Yet despite the pervasiveness of the icing problem, the fundamentals of ice adhesion have received relatively little attention in the scientific literature and it is not widely understood which attributes must be tuned to systematically design "icephobic" surfaces that are resistant to icing. Here we probe the relationships between advancing/receding water contact angles and the strength of ice adhesion to bare steel and twenty-one different test coatings (∼200-300 nm thick) applied to the nominally smooth steel discs. Contact angles are measured using a commercially available goniometer, whereas the average strengths of ice adhesion are evaluated with a custom-built laboratory-scale adhesion apparatus. The coatings investigated comprise commercially available polymers and fluorinated polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (fluorodecyl POSS), a low-surface-energy additive known to enhance liquid repellency. Ice adhesion strength correlates strongly with the practical work of adhesion required to remove a liquid water drop from each test surface (i.e., with the quantity [1 + cos θ(rec)]), and the average strength of ice adhesion was reduced by as much as a factor of 4.2 when bare steel discs were coated with fluorodecyl POSS-containing materials. We argue that any further appreciable reduction in ice adhesion strength will require textured surfaces, as no known materials exhibit receding water contact angles on smooth/flat surfaces that are significantly above those reported here (i.e., the values of [1 + cos θ(rec)] reported here have essentially reached a minimum for known materials). PMID:20949900

  11. Ice ages and nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is an overview of Quaternary Ice Age and its potential consequences for nuclear waste disposal. Geological information on past climatic changes is shortly reviewed, based on the following records: geomorphological information, loessic deposits, deep-sea carbonate sediments, ice-core records, and continental calcite precipitates. Even though the present 'Great Ice Age' has lasted more that two million years, the present variation in cycles of about 100 000 years seems to have commenced only about 600 - 700 thousands years ago. According to the present understanding, southern Finland was during a major span of Weichsel free of continental ice sheet. However, the conditions may have been very cold, periglacial, when the continental ice sheet covered the Caledonian mountains and large areas of central Fennoscandia. The last glacial maximum of Weichsel glaciation was shorter than estimated earlier. Periglacial conditions are characterized by deep permafrost, reaching even the depth of nuclear waste disposal. Calculations of the advancement of permafrost indicate that the permafrost-front may reach the depth of about 500 meters in less than 10 000 years. The crust beneath the continental ice cover depresses, and rebounds when the ice sheet retreats. During the most intensive vertical movement of the crust, some crush zones may be activated and bedrock movements may take place along them. Due to the growth of ice sheets, ocean water table also depresses during glacial maximum, thus changing hydrogeological conditions in non-glaciated terrains. Increase in global ice volume is manifested in the stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios. Based on isotope signals, as well other hydrogeochemical interpretation methods, indications of the earlier glaciations have been recognized in present groundwaters. (orig.)

  12. Geologia del Baix Ter

    OpenAIRE

    Mas-Pla, Josep

    1986-01-01

    Article que analitza el valor i la singularitat de les zones humides del Baix Ter, tenint en compte la descripció de les característiques geològiques de la Plana del Ter i dels diferents ambients morfodinàmics que s' hi troben

  13. Il dono del racconto

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polito, Paola

    1998-01-01

    L'articolo indaga a vari livelli strutturali del romanzo "Il coraggio del pettirosso" (rete metaforica, dialogismo diegetico, dialogismo come fenomeno di voce, strategie discorsive messe in atto dalla voce narrante, stile colloquiale) la complessa realizzazione testuale del genere narrativo /racc...

  14. Melt ponds and marginal ice zone from new algorithm of sea ice concentration retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repina, Irina; Tikhonov, Vasiliy; Komarova, Nataliia; Raev, Mikhail; Sharkov, Evgeniy

    2016-04-01

    Studies of spatial and temporal properties of sea ice distribution in polar regions help to monitor global environmental changes and reveal their natural and anthropogenic factors, as well as make forecasts of weather, marine transportation and fishing conditions, assess perspectives of mineral mining on the continental shelf, etc. Contact methods of observation are often insufficient to meet the goals, very complicated technically and organizationally and not always safe for people involved. Remote sensing techniques are believed to be the best alternative. Its include monitoring of polar regions by means of passive microwave sensing with the aim to determine spatial distribution, types, thickness and snow cover of ice. However, the algorithms employed today to retrieve sea ice characteristics from passive microwave sensing data for different reasons give significant errors, especially in summer period and also near ice edges and in cases of open ice. A new algorithm of sea ice concentration retrieval in polar regions from satellite microwave radiometry data is discussed. Beside estimating sea ice concentration, the algorithm makes it possible to indicate ice areas with melting snow and melt ponds. Melt ponds are an important element of the Arctic climate system. Covering up to 50% of the surface of drifting ice in summer, they are characterized by low albedo values and absorb several times more incident shortwave radiation than the rest of the snow and ice cover. The change of melt ponds area in summer period 1987-2015 is investigated. The marginal ice zone (MIZ) is defined as the area where open ocean processes, including specifically ocean waves, alter significantly the dynamical properties of the sea ice cover. Ocean wave fields comprise short waves generated locally and swell propagating from the large ocean basins. Depending on factors like wind direction and ocean currents, it may consist of anything from isolated, small and large ice floes drifting over a

  15. Ice cloud processing of ultra-viscous/glassy aerosol particles leads to enhanced ice nucleation ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Murray

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation potential of airborne glassy aqueous aerosol particles has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling cycles in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at temperatures between 247 and 216 K. Four different solutes were used as proxies for oxygenated organic matter found in the atmosphere: raffinose, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-DL-mandelic acid (HMMA, levoglucosan, and a multi-component mixture of raffinose with five dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulphate. Similar to previous experiments with citric acid aerosols, all particles were found to nucleate ice heterogeneously before reaching the homogeneous freezing threshold provided that the freezing cycles were started well below the respective glass transition temperatures of the compounds; this is discussed in detail in a separate article. In this contribution, we identify a further mechanism by which glassy aerosols can promote ice nucleation below the homogeneous freezing limit. If the glassy aerosol particles are probed in freezing cycles started only a few degrees below their respective glass transition temperatures, they enter the liquid regime of the state diagram upon increasing relative humidity (moisture-induced glass-to-liquid transition before being able to act as heterogeneous ice nuclei. Ice formation then only occurs by homogeneous freezing at elevated supersaturation levels. When ice forms the remaining solution freeze concentrates and re-vitrifies. If these ice cloud processed glassy aerosol particles are then probed in a second freezing cycle at the same temperature, they catalyse ice formation at a supersaturation threshold between 5 and 30% with respect to ice. By analogy with the enhanced ice nucleation ability of insoluble ice nuclei like mineral dusts after they nucleate ice once, we refer to this phenomenon as pre-activation. We propose a number of possible explanations for why glassy aerosols that have re-vitrified in

  16. Importance of Chemical Composition of Ice Nuclei on the Formation of Arctic Ice Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keita, Setigui Aboubacar; Girard, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Ice clouds play an important role in the Arctic weather and climate system but interactions between aerosols, clouds and radiation remain poorly understood. Consequently, it is essential to fully understand their properties and especially their formation process. Extensive measurements from ground-based sites and satellite remote sensing reveal the existence of two Types of Ice Clouds (TICs) in the Arctic during the polar night and early spring. TICs-1 are composed by non-precipitating small (radar-unseen) ice crystals of less than 30 μm in diameter. The second type, TICs-2, are detected by radar and are characterized by a low concentration of large precipitating ice crystals ice crystals (>30 μm). To explain these differences, we hypothesized that TIC-2 formation is linked to the acidification of aerosols, which inhibits the ice nucleating properties of ice nuclei (IN). As a result, the IN concentration is reduced in these regions, resulting to a lower concentration of larger ice crystals. Water vapor available for deposition being the same, these crystals reach a larger size. Current weather and climate models cannot simulate these different types of ice clouds. This problem is partly due to the parameterizations implemented for ice nucleation. Over the past 10 years, several parameterizations of homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation on IN of different chemical compositions have been developed. These parameterizations are based on two approaches: stochastic (that is nucleation is a probabilistic process, which is time dependent) and singular (that is nucleation occurs at fixed conditions of temperature and humidity and time-independent). The best approach remains unclear. This research aims to better understand the formation process of Arctic TICs using recently developed ice nucleation parameterizations. For this purpose, we have implemented these ice nucleation parameterizations into the Limited Area version of the Global Multiscale Environmental Model

  17. Water Accommodation on Bare and Coated Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangrui

    2015-04-01

    A good understanding of water accommodation on ice surfaces is essential for quantitatively predicting the evolution of clouds, and therefore influences the effectiveness of climate models. However, the accommodation coefficient is poorly constrained within the literature where reported values vary by up to three orders of magnitude. In addition, the complexity of the chemical composition of the atmosphere plays an important role in ice phase behavior and dynamics. We employ an environmental molecular beam (EMB) technique to investigate molecular water interactions with bare and impurity coated ice at temperatures from 170 K to 200 K. In this work, we summarize results of water accommodation experiments on bare ice (Kong et al., 2014) and on ice coated by methanol (Thomson et al., 2013), butanol (Thomson et al., 2013) and acetic acid (Papagiannakopoulos et al., 2014), and compare those results with analogous experiments using hexanol and nitric acid coatings. Hexanol is chosen as a complementary chain alcohol to methanol and butanol, while nitric acid is a common inorganic compound in the atmosphere. The results show a strong negative temperature dependence of water accommodation on bare ice, which can be quantitatively described by a precursor model. Acidic adlayers tend to enhance water uptake indicating that the system kinetics are thoroughly changed compared to bare ice. Adsorbed alcohols influence the temperature dependence of the accommodation coefficient and water molecules generally spend less time on the surfaces before desorbing, although the measured accommodation coefficients remain high and comparable to bare ice for the investigated systems. We conclude that impurities can either enhance or restrict water uptake in ways that are influenced by several factors including temperature and type of adsorbant, with potential implications for the description of ice particle growth in the atmosphere. This work was supported by the Swedish Research Council and

  18. Arctic tides from GPS on sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildegaard Rose, Stine; Skourup, Henriette; Forsberg, René

    The presence of sea-ice in the Arctic Ocean plays a significant role in the Arctic climate. Sea ice dampens the ocean tide amplitude with the result that global tidal models which use only astronomical data perform less accurately in the polar regions. This study presents a kinematic processing of...... Global Positioning System (GPS) buoys placed on sea-ice at five different sites north of Greenland for the study of sea level height and tidal analysis to improve tidal models in the Central Arctic. The GPS measurements are compared with the Arctic tidal model AOTIM-5, which assimilates tide-gauges and...

  19. MHD mesta Košice

    OpenAIRE

    Pavúková, Marianna

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this bachelor thesis is to analyze the present condition of municipal transportation system of Košice, point out to the problems and planned solutions. In the first theoretical part there is history of public transportation in the world, basic terms and the importance of the integrated transport systems. The second practical part describes characteristic of Košice city, condition of the public transportation and future plans for building the integrated transport system in Košice.

  20. Ice age plant refugia in East Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Svend Visby

    1979-01-01

    From the distribution of plants it has been inferred by some botanists that ice-free areas existed in East Greenland accommodating a flora which survived one or several ice ages in the area. Comparing this evidence with recent information on the chronology of glaciations and post-glacial vegetation...... of Greenland. 14 C dating and amino-acid age estimates of marine sediments show that lowland areas near the outer coast have been ice-free for at least 40,000 years. The vegetation history, as reflected in pollen diagrams extending back to ca. 10,000 yr. B.P., has shown that many of the extant species...

  1. Mirabilite solubility in equilibrium sea ice brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Benjamin Miles; Papadimitriou, Stathys; Santoro, Anna; Kennedy, Hilary

    2016-06-01

    The sea ice microstructure is permeated by brine channels and pockets that contain concentrated seawater-derived brine. Cooling the sea ice results in further formation of pure ice within these pockets as thermal equilibrium is attained, resulting in a smaller volume of increasingly concentrated residual brine. The coupled changes in temperature and ionic composition result in supersaturation of the brine with respect to mirabilite (Na2SO4·10H2O) at temperatures below -6.38 °C, which consequently precipitates within the sea ice microstructure. Here, mirabilite solubility in natural and synthetic seawater derived brines, representative of sea ice at thermal equilibrium, has been measured in laboratory experiments between 0.2 and -20.6 °C, and hence we present a detailed examination of mirabilite dynamics within the sea ice system. Below -6.38 °C mirabilite displays particularly large changes in solubility as the temperature decreases, and by -20.6 °C its precipitation results in 12.90% and 91.97% reductions in the total dissolved Na+ and SO42- concentrations respectively, compared to that of conservative seawater concentration. Such large non-conservative changes in brine composition could potentially impact upon the measurement of sea ice brine salinity and pH, whilst the altered osmotic conditions may create additional challenges for the sympagic organisms that inhabit the sea ice system. At temperatures above -6.38 °C, mirabilite again displays large changes in solubility that likely aid in impeding its identification in field samples of sea ice. Our solubility measurements display excellent agreement with that of the FREZCHEM model, which was therefore used to supplement our measurements to colder temperatures. Measured and modelled solubility data were incorporated into a 1D model for the growth of first-year Arctic sea ice. Model results ultimately suggest that mirabilite has a near ubiquitous presence in much of the sea ice on Earth, and illustrate the

  2. Radar Studies on Kamb Ice Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, R.; Osterhouse, D. J.; Mulhausen, A.; Welch, B. C.; Strandli, C. W.; Jacobel, R. W.

    2006-12-01

    During the past two Antarctic field seasons we acquired approximately 1600 km of ground-based ice- penetrating radar data on the lower trunk of Kamb Ice Stream (KIS) as part of radar, GPS and modeling study with scientists at the University of California Santa Cruz examining the possibility of ice stream reactivation. We present here a summary of radar results from this work and preliminary interpretations. Our working hypothesis is that the reactivation of the stagnant KIS may be triggered by excess influx of basal water produced by increased basal strain heating when mass builds up in the upper reaches of the locked ice stream. Using radar data, we have quantified variations in the amplitude of radar reflections from the ice-bed interface to estimate different provenances of occurrence of basal water. The weakest-reflecting ice-bed interface is found at a "sticky spot" in the middle of the ice stream trunk where ice appears to have become grounded over a large bedrock bump. At the sticky spot, bore holes drilled by California Technical Institute in 2000 showed a dry bed. A more highly reflective bed is located to either side of the sticky spot in regions of faster flow of KIS including one location where bore holes showed water at the ice-bed interface. However, the brightest bed is located approximately 80~km upstream of the sticky spot, where ice velocities are still on the order of 120~m a-1. Here radar reflected power is up to 1.5 times higher than elsewhere in the trunk despite the ice being 40% deeper. From this pattern of bed reflectivity we hypothesize that conditions allowing for rapid flow still exist under most areas of KIS and that sticky spots, like the one studied here, have played a key role in the ice stream shut down. We have also produced a map of detailed bed topography and tracked internal reflection layers over the sticky spot. We are able to trace the evolution of folds in the radar internal stratigraphy in this region in both time and space

  3. Late Weichselian ice sheet of Northern Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosswald, M. G.

    1980-01-01

    A considerable portion of Northern Eurasia, and particularly its continental shelf, was glaciated by inland ice during late Weichsel time. This was first inferred from such evidence as glacial striae, submarine troughs, sea-bed diamictons, boulder trains on adjacent land, and patterns of glacioisostatic crustal movements. Subsequently, the inference was confirmed by data on the occurrence and geographic position of late Weichselian end moraines and proglacial lacustrine deposits. The south-facing outer moraines in the northeastern Russian Plain, northern West Siberia, and on Taimyr Peninsula are underlain by sediments containing wood and peat, the radiocarbon dating of which yielded ages of 22,000 to 45,000 yr B.P. The youngest late-glacial moraines are of Holocene age: the double Markhida moraine in the lower Pechora River basin, presumably associated with "degradational" surges of the Barents Ice Dome, is underlain by sediments with wood and peat dated at 9000 to 9900 yr B.P.: this suggests that deglaciation of the Arctic continental shelf of Eurasia was not completed until after 9000 yr B.P. The reconstructed ice-front lines lead to the conclusion that the late Weichselian ice sheet of Northern Eurasia (proposed name: the Eurasian Ice Sheet) extended without interruptions from southwestern Ireland to the northeastern end of Taimyr Peninsula, a distance of 6000 km: it covered an area of 8,370,000 km 2, half of which lay on the present-day continental shelves and a quarter on lowlands that were depressed isostatically below sea level. Hence, the ice sheet was predominantly marine-based. A contour map of the ice sheet based both on the dependence of the heights of ice domes upon their radii and on factual data concerning the impact of bedrock topography upon ice relief has been constructed. The major features of the ice sheet were the British, Scandinavian, Barents, and Kara Ice Domes that had altitudes of 1.9 to 3.3 km and were separated from one another by ice

  4. An ice crystal model for jupiter's moon Europa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; schmidt, Karen Guldbae

    2003-01-01

    A simple model for crystal growth in the ice shell of Europa has been made in order to estimate the size of ice crystals at Europa's surface. If mass is lost from the surface of Europa due to sputtering processes, and the ice thickness is constant in time, ice crystals will be transported upwards...

  5. Age characteristics in a multidecadal Arctic sea ice simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunke, Elizabeth C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bitz, Cecllia M [UNIV. OF WASHINGTON

    2008-01-01

    Results from adding a tracer for age of sea ice to a sophisticated sea ice model that is widely used for climate studies are presented. The consistent simulation of ice age, dynamics, and thermodynamics in the model shows explicitly that the loss of Arctic perennial ice has accelerated in the past three decades, as has been seen in satellite-derived observations. Our model shows that the September ice age average across the Northern Hemisphere varies from about 5 to 8 years, and the ice is much younger (about 2--3 years) in late winter because of the expansion of first-year ice. We find seasonal ice on average comprises about 5% of the total ice area in September, but as much as 1.34 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} survives in some years. Our simulated ice age in the late 1980s and early 1990s declined markedly in agreement with other studies. After this period of decline, the ice age began to recover, but in the final years of the simulation very little young ice remains after the melt season, a strong indication that the age of the pack will again decline in the future as older ice classes fail to be replenished. The Arctic ice pack has fluctuated between older and younger ice types over the past 30 years, while ice area, thickness, and volume all declined over the same period, with an apparent acceleration in the last decade.

  6. Optical properties of melting first-year Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Bonnie; Perovich, Donald K.; Webster, Melinda A.; Polashenski, Christopher; Dadic, Ruzica

    2015-11-01

    The albedo and transmittance of melting, first-year Arctic sea ice were measured during two cruises of the Impacts of Climate on the Eco-Systems and Chemistry of the Arctic Pacific Environment (ICESCAPE) project during the summers of 2010 and 2011. Spectral measurements were made for both bare and ponded ice types at a total of 19 ice stations in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. These data, along with irradiance profiles taken within boreholes, laboratory measurements of the optical properties of core samples, ice physical property observations, and radiative transfer model simulations are employed to describe representative optical properties for melting first-year Arctic sea ice. Ponded ice was found to transmit roughly 4.4 times more total energy into the ocean, relative to nearby bare ice. The ubiquitous surface-scattering layer and drained layer present on bare, melting sea ice are responsible for its relatively high albedo and relatively low transmittance. Light transmittance through ponded ice depends on the physical thickness of the ice and the magnitude of the scattering coefficient in the ice interior. Bare ice reflects nearly three-quarters of the incident sunlight, enhancing its resiliency to absorption by solar insolation. In contrast, ponded ice absorbs or transmits to the ocean more than three-quarters of the incident sunlight. Characterization of the heat balance of a summertime ice cover is largely dictated by its pond coverage, and light transmittance through ponded ice shows strong contrast between first-year and multiyear Arctic ice covers.

  7. High resolution modelling of the decreasing Arctic sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, K. S.; Rasmussen, T. A. S.; Blüthgen, Jonas;

    2012-01-01

    The Arctic sea ice cover has been rapidly decreasing and thinning over the last decade, with minimum ice extent in 2007 and almost as low extent in 2011. This study investigates two aspects of the decreasing ice cover; first the large scale thinning and changing dynamics of the polar sea ice, and...

  8. Quaternary Sea Ice Reconstruction: Proxy Data and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersonde, R.; De Vernal, A.; Wolff, E. W.

    2014-11-01

    The satellite-based observation of distinct contrasts between Arctic and Antarctic sea ice development provides a strong motivation to improve our knowledge of physical and biological processes governing sea ice occurrence and the role of sea ice as a polar climate amplifier. For further insight into such processes, sea ice records must be extended beyond instrumental observations.

  9. Ice-Shelf Flexure and Tidal Forcing of Bindschadler Ice Stream, West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ryan T.; Parizek, Bryron R.; Alley, Richard B.; Brunt, Kelly M.; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar

    2014-01-01

    Viscoelastic models of ice-shelf flexure and ice-stream velocity perturbations are combined into a single efficient flowline model to study tidal forcing of grounded ice. The magnitude and timing of icestream response to tidally driven changes in hydrostatic pressure and/or basal drag are found to depend significantly on bed rheology, with only a perfectly plastic bed allowing instantaneous velocity response at the grounding line. The model can reasonably reproduce GPS observations near the grounding zone of Bindschadler Ice Stream (formerly Ice Stream D) on semidiurnal time scales; however, other forcings such as tidally driven ice-shelf slope transverse to the flowline and flexurally driven till deformation must also be considered if diurnal motion is to be matched

  10. Antarctic ice sheet GLIMMER model test and its simplified model on 2-dimensional ice flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueyuan Tang; Zhanhai Zhang; Bo Sun; Yuansheng Li; Na Li; Bangbing Wang; Xiangpei Zhang

    2008-01-01

    The 3-dimensional finite difference thermodynamic coupled model on Antarctic ice sheet, GLIMMER model, is described. An ide-alized ice sheet numerical test was conducted under the EISMINT-I benchmark, and the characteristic curves of ice sheets under steady state were obtained. Based on this, this model was simplified from a 3-dimensional one to 2-dimensional one. Improvement of the dif-ference method and coordinate system was proposed. Evolution of the 2-dimensional ice flow was simulated under coupled temperature field conditions. The results showed that the characteristic curves deriving from the conservation of the mass, momentum and energy agree with the results of ice sheet profile simulated with GLIMMER model and with the theoretical results. The application prospect of the simplified 2-dimensional ice flow model to simulate the relation of age-depth-accumulation in Dome A region was discussed.

  11. Improving Surface Mass Balance Over Ice Sheets and Snow Depth on Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Lora Suzanne; Box, Jason; Kurtz, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Surface mass balance (SMB) over ice sheets and snow on sea ice (SOSI) are important components of the cryosphere. Large knowledge gaps remain in scientists' abilities to monitor SMB and SOSI, including insufficient measurements and difficulties with satellite retrievals. On ice sheets, snow accumulation is the sole mass gain to SMB, and meltwater runoff can be the dominant single loss factor in extremely warm years such as 2012. SOSI affects the growth and melt cycle of the Earth's polar sea ice cover. The summer of 2012 saw the largest satellite-recorded melt area over the Greenland ice sheet and the smallest satellite-recorded Arctic sea ice extent, making this meeting both timely and relevant.

  12. connecting the dots between Greenland ice sheet surface melting and ice flow dynamics (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Box, J. E.; Colgan, W. T.; Fettweis, X.; Phillips, T. P.; Stober, M.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation is of a 'unified theory' in glaciology that first identifies surface albedo as a key factor explaining total ice sheet mass balance and then surveys a mechanistic self-reinforcing interaction between melt water and ice flow dynamics. The theory is applied in a near-real time total Greenland mass balance retrieval based on surface albedo, a powerful integrator of the competing effects of accumulation and ablation. New snowfall reduces sunlight absorption and increases meltwater retention. Melting amplifies absorbed sunlight through thermal metamorphism and bare ice expansion in space and time. By ';following the melt'; we reveal mechanisms linking existing science into a unified theory. Increasing meltwater softens the ice sheet in three ways: 1.) sensible heating given the water temperature exceeds that of the ice sheet interior; 2.) Some infiltrating water refreezes, transferring latent heat to the ice; 3.) Friction from water turbulence heats the ice. It has been shown that for a point on the ice sheet, basal lubrication increases ice flow speed to a time when an efficient sub-glacial drainage network develops that reduces this effect. Yet, with an increasing melt duration the point where the ice sheet glides on a wet bed increases inland to a larger area. This effect draws down the ice surface elevation, contributing to the ';elevation feedback'. In a perpetual warming scenario, the elevation feedback ultimately leads to ice sheet loss reversible only through much slower ice sheet growth in an ice age environment. As the inland ice sheet accelerates, the horizontal extension pulls cracks and crevasses open, trapping more sunlight, amplifying the effect of melt accelerated ice. As the bare ice area increases, the direct sun-exposed crevassed and infiltration area increases further allowing the ice warming process to occur more broadly. Considering hydrofracture [a.k.a. hydrofracking]; surface meltwater fills cracks, attacking the ice integrity

  13. Validation Ice Crystal Icing Engine Test in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) is an existing altitude simulation jet engine test facility located at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, OH. It was modified in 2012 with the integration of an ice crystal cloud generation system. This paper documents the inaugural ice crystal cloud test in PSL--the first ever full scale, high altitude ice crystal cloud turbofan engine test to be conducted in a ground based facility. The test article was a Lycoming ALF502-R5 high bypass turbofan engine, serial number LF01. The objectives of the test were to validate the PSL ice crystal cloud calibration and engine testing methodologies by demonstrating the capability to calibrate and duplicate known flight test events that occurred on the same LF01 engine and to generate engine data to support fundamental and computational research to investigate and better understand the physics of ice crystal icing in a turbofan engine environment while duplicating known revenue service events and conducting test points while varying facility and engine parameters. During PSL calibration testing it was discovered than heated probes installed through tunnel sidewalls experienced ice buildup aft of their location due to ice crystals impinging upon them, melting and running back. Filtered city water was used in the cloud generation nozzle system to provide ice crystal nucleation sites. This resulted in mineralization forming on flow path hardware that led to a chronic degradation of performance during the month long test. Lacking internal flow path cameras, the response of thermocouples along the flow path was interpreted as ice building up. Using this interpretation, a strong correlation between total water content (TWC) and a weaker correlation between median volumetric diameter (MVD) of the ice crystal cloud and the rate of ice buildup along the instrumented flow path was identified. For this test article the engine anti-ice system was required to be turned on before ice crystal

  14. Molecular simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation. I. Controlling ice nucleation through surface hydrophilicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Stephen J.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Slater, B.; Michaelides, Angelos

    2015-05-14

    Ice formation is one of the most common and important processes on earth and almost always occurs at the surface of a material. A basic understanding of how the physicochemical properties of a material’s surface affect its ability to form ice has remained elusive. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to directly probe heterogeneous ice nucleation at a hexagonal surface of a nanoparticle of varying hydrophilicity. Surprisingly, we find that structurally identical surfaces can both inhibit and promote ice formation and analogous to a chemical catalyst, it is found that an optimal interaction between the surface and the water exists for promoting ice nucleation.We use our microscopic understanding of the mechanism to design a modified surface in silico with enhanced ice nucleating ability. C 2015 Author(s). All article content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

  15. Inter-annual and geographical variations in the extent of bare ice and dark ice on the Greenland ice sheet derived from MODIS satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Rigen; Takeuchi, Nozomu; Aoki, Teruo

    2016-04-01

    Areas of dark ice have appeared on the Greenland ice sheet every summer in recent years. These are likely to have a great impact on the mass balance of the ice sheet because of their low albedo. We report annual and geographical variations in the bare ice and dark ice areas that appeared on the Greenland Ice Sheet from 2000 to 2014 by using MODIS satellite images. The July monthly mean of the extent of bare ice showed a positive trend over these 15 years, and large annual variability ranging from 89,975 km2 to 279,075 km2, 5% and 16% of the entire ice sheet, respectively. The extent of dark ice also showed a positive trend and varied annually, ranging from 3,575 km2 to 26,975 km2, 4% and 10% of the bare ice extent. These areas are geographically varied, and their expansion is the greatest on the western side, particularly the southwestern side of the ice sheet. The bare ice extent correlates strongly with the monthly mean air temperature in July, suggesting that the extent was determined by snow melt. The dark ice extent also correlates with the air temperature; however, the correlation is weaker. The dark ice extent further correlates negatively with solar radiation. This suggests that the extent of dark ice is not only controlled by snow melt on the ice, but also by changes in the surface structures of the bare ice surface, such as cryoconite holes, which are associated with impurities appearing on the ice surface.

  16. Energy Usage prediction model comparing Indoor Vs. Outdoor Ice Rinks

    OpenAIRE

    Khalid, Waqas

    2012-01-01

    Indoor ice rinks use 1091 MWh per annum for ice hockey based on statistics from over 100 Swedish ice rinks (Stoppsladd, 2011).The refrigeration system contributes 35 to75%( (Rogstam, 2010) of total energy usage in ice rinks with average value of 43% (Stoppsladd, 2010) for indoor to 75% for outdoor ice rinks. The basic aim of project is to reduce energy consumption in Swedish ice rinks and scope is for indoor and outdoor ice rinks in cold and mild summer climatic conditions like Sweden. To ach...

  17. Greenland Ice sheet mass balance from satellite and airborne altimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Bevis, M. G.; Wahr, J. M.; Wouters, B.; Sasgen, I.; van Dam, T. M.; Van Den Broeke, M. R.; Hanna, E; Huybrechts, P.; Kjaer, K. H.; N. J. Korsgaard; Bjork, A. A.; Kjeldsen, K.K.

    2013-01-01

    Ice loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is dominated by loss in the marginal areas. Dynamic induced ice loss and its associated ice surface lowering is often largest close to the glacier calving front and may vary from rates of tens of meters per years to a few meters per year over relatively short distances. Hence, high spatial resolution data are required to accurately estimate volume changes. Here, we estimate ice volume change rate of the Greenland ice sheet using data from Ice, Clou...

  18. Modeling ocean wave propagation under sea ice covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Shen, Hayley H.; Cheng, Sukun

    2015-02-01

    Operational ocean wave models need to work globally, yet current ocean wave models can only treat ice-covered regions crudely. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview of ice effects on wave propagation and different research methodology used in studying these effects. Based on its proximity to land or sea, sea ice can be classified as: landfast ice zone, shear zone, and the marginal ice zone. All ice covers attenuate wave energy. Only long swells can penetrate deep into an ice cover. Being closest to open water, wave propagation in the marginal ice zone is the most complex to model. The physical appearance of sea ice in the marginal ice zone varies. Grease ice, pancake ice, brash ice, floe aggregates, and continuous ice sheet may be found in this zone at different times and locations. These types of ice are formed under different thermal-mechanical forcing. There are three classic models that describe wave propagation through an idealized ice cover: mass loading, thin elastic plate, and viscous layer models. From physical arguments we may conjecture that mass loading model is suitable for disjoint aggregates of ice floes much smaller than the wavelength, thin elastic plate model is suitable for a continuous ice sheet, and the viscous layer model is suitable for grease ice. For different sea ice types we may need different wave ice interaction models. A recently proposed viscoelastic model is able to synthesize all three classic models into one. Under suitable limiting conditions it converges to the three previous models. The complete theoretical framework for evaluating wave propagation through various ice covers need to be implemented in the operational ocean wave models. In this review, we introduce the sea ice types, previous wave ice interaction models, wave attenuation mechanisms, the methods to calculate wave reflection and transmission between different ice covers, and the effect of ice floe breaking on shaping the sea ice morphology

  19. Introduction of parameterized sea ice drag coefficients into ice free-drift modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Peng; LI Zhijun; HAN Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Many interesting characteristics of sea ice drift depend on the atmospheric drag coefficient (Ca) and oceanic drag coefficient (Cw). Parameterizations of drag coefficients rather than constant values provide us a way to look insight into the dependence of these characteristics on sea ice conditions. In the present study, the parameterized ice drag coefficients are included into a free-drift sea ice dynamic model, and the wind factorα and the deflection angleθ between sea ice drift and wind velocity as well as the ratio ofCa toCw are studied to investigate their dependence on the impact factors such as local drag coefficients, floe and ridge geometry. The results reveal that in an idealized steady ocean,Ca/Cw increases obviously with the increasing ice concentration for small ice floes in the marginal ice zone, while it remains at a steady level (0.2–0.25) for large floes in the central ice zone. The wind factorα increases rapidly at first and approaches a steady level of 0.018 whenA is greater than 20%. And the deflection angleθ drops rapidly from an initial value of approximate 80° and decreases slowly asA is greater than 20% without a steady level likeα. The values of these parameters agree well with the previously reported observations in Arctic. The ridging intensity is an important parameter to determine the dominant contribution of the ratio of skin friction drag coefficient (Cs’/Cs) and the ratio of ridge form drag coefficient (Cr’/Cr) to the value of Ca/Cw,α, andθ, because of the dominance of ridge form drag for large ridging intensity and skin friction for small ridging intensity among the total drag forces. Parameterization of sea ice drag coefficients has the potential to be embedded into ice dynamic models to better account for the variability of sea ice in the transient Arctic Ocean.

  20. Skating on thin ice: a study of the injuries sustained at a temporary ice skating rink

    OpenAIRE

    Barr, Lynne V.; Imam, Samirul; Crawford, John R.; Owen, P. Julian

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, ice skating and temporary ice skating rinks have become increasingly popular. Regular elite competitors are known to be at risk of both acute and chronic injuries. It may be postulated that skaters at the temporary rinks are at high risk of acute injuries from falls due to both their lack of expertise and the inherent dangers of ice skating. Injuries sustained at skating rinks present a significant burden to local healthcare resources, in particular orthopaedic departments. F...

  1. Regional Changes in the Sea Ice Cover and Ice Production in the Antarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiso, Josefino C.

    2011-01-01

    Coastal polynyas around the Antarctic continent have been regarded as sea ice factories because of high ice production rates in these regions. The observation of a positive trend in the extent of Antarctic sea ice during the satellite era has been intriguing in light of the observed rapid decline of the ice extent in the Arctic. The results of analysis of the time series of passive microwave data indicate large regional variability with the trends being strongly positive in the Ross Sea, strongly negative in the Bellingshausen/Amundsen Seas and close to zero in the other regions. The atmospheric circulation in the Antarctic is controlled mainly by the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) and the marginal ice zone around the continent shows an alternating pattern of advance and retreat suggesting the presence of a propagating wave (called Antarctic Circumpolar Wave) around the circumpolar region. The results of analysis of the passive microwave data suggest that the positive trend in the Antarctic sea ice cover could be caused primarily by enhanced ice production in the Ross Sea that may be associated with more persistent and larger coastal polynyas in the region. Over the Ross Sea shelf, analysis of sea ice drift data from 1992 to 2008 yields a positive rate-of-increase in the net ice export of about 30,000 km2 per year. For a characteristic ice thickness of 0.6 m, this yields a volume transport of about 20 km3/year, which is almost identical, within error bars, to our estimate of the trend in ice production. In addition to the possibility of changes in SAM, modeling studies have also indicated that the ozone hole may have a role in that it causes the deepening of the lows in the western Antarctic region thereby causing strong winds to occur offthe Ross-ice shelf.

  2. Ice condensation on sulfuric acid tetrahydrate: Implications for polar stratospheric ice clouds

    OpenAIRE

    T. J. Fortin; Drdla, K.; Iraci, L. T.; M. A. Tolbert

    2003-01-01

    The mechanism of ice nucleation to form Type 2 PSCs is important for controlling the ice particle size and hence the possible dehydration in the polar winter stratosphere. This paper probes heterogeneous ice nucleation on sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT). Laboratory experiments were performed using a thin-film, high-vacuum apparatus in which the condensed phase is monitored via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and water pressure is monitored with the combination of an MKS baratr...

  3. Recent summer sea ice thickness surveys in Fram Strait and associated ice volume fluxes

    OpenAIRE

    T. Krumpen; R. Gerdes; Haas, C.; Hendricks, S.; A. Herber; Selyuzhenok, V.; Smedsrud, L.; Spreen, G.

    2016-01-01

    Fram Strait is the main gateway for sea ice export out of the Arctic Ocean, and therefore observations there give insight into the composition and properties of Arctic sea ice in general and how it varies over time. A data set of ground-based and airborne electromagnetic ice thickness measurements collected during summer between 2001 and 2012 is presented here, including long transects well into the southern part of the Transpolar Drift obtained using fixed-wing aircrafts. T...

  4. EFFECTS OF RIVER ICE ON STAGE——DISCHARGE RELATIONSHIPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jueyi SUI; Ronald THRING; Bryan W. KARNEY; Jun WANG

    2007-01-01

    Using field observations at four gauging stations along the Inner Mongolia Reach of the Yellow River in China, this paper explores effects of the ice on the hydraulics of this river reach for four different conditions, namely: under open channel flow, during ice-running period, the ice-covered period, and the river break-up period. The rating curves were found to be well recognized under open channel situations, but were sometimes poorly defined and extremely variable under ice conditions. The results also show that the water level is insensitive to flowing ice prior to freeze-up. However, significant, but hardly surprising, variations were observed during ice-covered conditions. The rating curves for both the ice covered condition and river ice breakup period are developed and some related hydraulic issues are examined. Additionally, the impacts of the ice accumulation and associated riverbed deformation during ice period on the rating curves are discussed.

  5. Laboratory tests of oil spreading under the ice cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laboratory study on oil spreading and drifting under ice was conducted by VTT Manufacturing Technology, Finland. The aim of the study was to find out threshold conditions for the oil movement under ice. The oil was released under ice in calm water and the spreading of the oil slick under the bottom of the ice was investigated. In the oil drifting part, oil drifting velocities under level ice in steady water flow, water flow velocities making oil to submerge from open water to under ice and water velocities making oil to escape from under ice ridges were studied. This paper describes the oil spreading part of the study. The study included four types of oil, namely the fresh and pre-altered North Sea Brent crude oil, lubrication oil and diesel fuel oil. All the measurements were taken in water under ice, thus at the temperature of zero Celcius. In the level ice studies, three different ice bottom roughnesses were tested. (author)

  6. Time history of dynamic ice force for narrow conical structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, N.; Yue, Q.; Bi, X. [Dalian Univ. of Technology, Dalian (China); Qu, Y. [China National Offshore Oil Corp. (China); Tuomo, K. [Karna Research and Consulting, Helsinki (Finland)]|[Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    2008-07-01

    The dominant environmental force affecting offshore structures in cold regions is ice action from floating ice sheets. As ocean exploration expands, oil platforms must be designed to withstand ice action. This paper described the dynamic ice force process that occurs when ice sheets acting on narrow cones bend and fail. Full scale tests were conducted on a multi-leg jacket platform. The tests revealed that the broken ice completely cleared-up beside the cone, indicating that the ice force returns to zero before the next action. This phenomenon was verified by the direct ice force measurement by the ice load panel. This paper also discussed the role of dynamic ice force during the failure period. It was concluded that the assumptions used for conical structures with narrow cones and flexible behaviour can be used to design jackets in the Bohai Bay in North China and to analyze the applicability for new structures. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Response timescales for martian ice masses and implications for ice flow on Mars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutnik, Michelle Rebecca; Waddington, E.D.; Winebrener, D.P.; Pathare, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    On Earth and on Mars, ice masses experience changes in precipitation, temperature, and radiation. In a new climate state, flowing ice masses will adjust in length and in thickness, and this response toward a new steady state has a characteristic timescale. However, a flowing ice mass has a...... topography is more diagnostic of flow than are internal-layer shapes. Because the shape of Gemina Lingula, North Polar Layered Deposits indicates that it flowed at some time in the past, we use its current topography to infer characteristics of those past ice conditions, or past climate conditions, in which...

  8. Reduced ice thickness in Arctic Transpolar Drift favors rapid ice retreat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Christian; Pfaffling, Andreas; Hendricks, Stefan; Rabenstein, Lasse; Etienne, Jean-Louis; Rigor, Ignatius

    2008-09-01

    Helicopter-borne electromagnetic sea ice thickness measurements were performed over the Transpolar Drift in late summers of 2001, 2004, and 2007, continuing ground-based measurements since 1991. These show an ongoing reduction of modal and mean ice thicknesses in the region of the North Pole of up to 53 and 44%, respectively, since 2001. A buoy derived ice age model showed that the thinning was mainly due to a regime shift from predominantly multi- and second-year ice in earlier years to first-year ice in 2007, which had modal and mean summer thicknesses of 0.9 and 1.27 m. Measurements of second-year ice which still persisted at the North Pole in April 2007 indicate a reduction of late-summer second-year modal and mean ice thicknesses since 2001 of 20 and 25% to 1.65 and 1.81 m, respectively. The regime shift to younger and thinner ice could soon result in an ice free North Pole during summer.

  9. Massive subsurface ice formed by refreezing of ice-shelf melt ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Bryn; Luckman, Adrian; Ashmore, David W; Bevan, Suzanne; Kulessa, Bernd; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Philippe, Morgane; Jansen, Daniela; Booth, Adam; Sevestre, Heidi; Tison, Jean-Louis; O'Leary, Martin; Rutt, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Surface melt ponds form intermittently on several Antarctic ice shelves. Although implicated in ice-shelf break up, the consequences of such ponding for ice formation and ice-shelf structure have not been evaluated. Here we report the discovery of a massive subsurface ice layer, at least 16 km across, several kilometres long and tens of metres deep, located in an area of intense melting and intermittent ponding on Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctica. We combine borehole optical televiewer logging and radar measurements with remote sensing and firn modelling to investigate the layer, found to be ∼10 °C warmer and ∼170 kg m(-3) denser than anticipated in the absence of ponding and hitherto used in models of ice-shelf fracture and flow. Surface ponding and ice layers such as the one we report are likely to form on a wider range of Antarctic ice shelves in response to climatic warming in forthcoming decades. PMID:27283778

  10. International ice core community meets to discuss best practices for ice core curation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkley, Todd

    Several countries now have national ice core laboratories, or substantial ice core facilities, where these proxy archives of the Earth's past climate and atmosphere are safeguarded, processed, and analyzed. Australia, China, Denmark, Japan, Argentina, and the United States have formal, dedicated ice core repositories with laboratories. India's is under construction, in Goa. France, Germany, Russia, and the U.K. have long had substantial ice core holdings and facilities for analysis of ice cores. Brazil, Chile, Italy, and Switzerland have expanding field acquisition and analytical programs that require favorable storage conditions for ice cores.Representatives of 12 countries gathered in Milan, Italy, in late August for a first meeting, InterICE, of “international ice core establishments,” to compare and discuss ideas about best practices for acquisition, storage, curation, and distribution of the ice cores that have been drilled from the polar and temperate glaciers of the world, representing up to a half-million years of the Earth's most recent past.

  11. Communication: On the stability of ice 0, ice i, and I{sub h}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigley, D., E-mail: d.quigley@warwick.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Centre for Scientific Computing, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Alfè, D. [Department of Earth Sciences and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Slater, B. [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-28

    Using ab initio methods, we examine the stability of ice 0, a recently proposed tetragonal form of ice implicated in the homogeneous freezing of water [J. Russo, F. Romano, and H. Tanaka, Nat. Mater. 13, 670 (2014)]. Vibrational frequencies are computed across the complete Brillouin Zone using Density Functional Theory (DFT), to confirm mechanical stability and quantify the free energy of ice 0 relative to ice I{sub h}. The robustness of this result is tested via dispersion corrected semi-local and hybrid DFT, and Quantum Monte-Carlo calculation of lattice energies. Results indicate that popular molecular models only slightly overestimate the stability of ice zero. In addition, we study all possible realisations of proton disorder within the ice zero unit cell, and identify the ground state as ferroelectric. Comparisons are made to other low density metastable forms of ice, suggesting that the ice i structure [C. J. Fennel and J. D. Gezelter, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 1, 662 (2005)] may be equally relevant to ice formation.

  12. Comparing flow-through and static ice cave models for Shoshone Ice Cave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaj E. Williams

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we suggest a new ice cave type: the “flow-through” ice cave. In a flow-through ice cave external winds blow into the cave and wet cave walls chill the incoming air to the wet-bulb temperature, thereby achieving extra cooling of the cave air. We have investigated an ice cave in Idaho, located in a lava tube that is reported to have airflow through porous wet end-walls and could therefore be a flow-through cave. We have instrumented the site and collected data for one year. In order to determine the actual ice cave type present at Shoshone, we have constructed numerical models for static and flow-through caves (dynamic is not relevant here. The models are driven with exterior measurements of air temperature, relative humidity and wind speed. The model output is interior air temperature and relative humidity. We then compare the output of both models to the measured interior air temperatures and relative humidity. While both the flow-through and static cave models are capable of preserving ice year-round (a net zero or positive ice mass balance, both models show very different cave air temperature and relative humidity output. We find the empirical data support a hybrid model of the static and flow-through models: permitting a static ice cave to have incoming air chilled to the wet-bulb temperature fits the data best for the Shoshone Ice Cave.

  13. Characterization of ice recrystallization in ice cream during storage using the focused beam reflectance measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Ndoye, Fatou Toutie; Alvarez, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Ice recrystallization was investigated in two commercial and differently stabilized ice creams using an original and real time particles counting and sizing method: the focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM). Ice cream A (with locust bean gum - LBG - as primary stabilizer) and ice cream B (with carrageenan as primary stabilizer) were stored for 154 days at four different temperatures (-5, -8, -12 and -18 °C) and three amplitudes of temperature fluctuations (±0.1°C, ±0.75°C, ±2.5°C). Crys...

  14. Snow and ice on Bear Lake (Alaska – sensitivity experiments with two lake ice models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tido Semmler

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Snow and ice thermodynamics of Bear Lake (Alaska are investigated with a simple freshwater lake model (FLake and a more complex snow and ice thermodynamic model (HIGHTSI. A number of sensitivity experiments have been carried out to investigate the influence of snow and ice parameters and of different complexity on the results. Simulation results are compared with observations from the Alaska Lake Ice and Snow Observatory Network. Adaptations of snow thermal and optical properties in FLake can largely improve accuracy of the results. Snow-to-ice transformation is important for HIGHTSI to calculate the total ice mass balance. The seasonal maximum ice depth is simulated in FLake with a bias of −0.04 m and in HIGHTSI with no bias. Correlation coefficients between ice depth measurements and simulations are high (0.74 for FLake and 0.9 for HIGHTSI. The snow depth simulation can be improved by taking into account a variable snow density. Correlation coefficients for surface temperature are 0.72 for FLake and 0.81 for HIGHTSI. Overall, HIGHTSI gives slightly more accurate surface temperature than FLake probably due to the consideration of multiple snow and ice layers and the expensive iteration calculation procedure.

  15. Observations of the Askaryan Effect in Ice

    CERN Document Server

    Barwick, S W; Besson, D Z; Binns, W R; Chen, P; Clem, J M; Connolly, A; Dowkontt, P F; Duvernois, M A; Field, R C; Goldstein, D; Goodhue, A; Gorham, P W; Hast, C; Hebert, C L; Hoover, S; Israel, M H; Kowalski, J; Learned, J G; Liewer, K M; Link, J T; Lusczek, E; Matsuno, S; Mercurio, B; Miki, C; Miocinovic, P; Nam, J; Naudet, C J; Ng, J; Nichol, R; Palladino, K J; Reil, K; Romero-Wolf, A; Rosen, M; Saltzberg, D; Secke, D; Varner, G S; Walz, D; Wu, F

    2006-01-01

    We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.

  16. Widespread Excess Ice in Arcadia Planitia, Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Bramson, Ali M; Putzig, Nathaniel E; Sutton, Sarah; Plaut, Jeffrey J; Brothers, T Charles; Holt, John W

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of subsurface water ice on Mars is a key constraint on past climate, while the volumetric concentration of buried ice (pore-filling versus excess) provides information about the process that led to its deposition. We investigate the subsurface of Arcadia Planitia by measuring the depth of terraces in simple impact craters and mapping a widespread subsurface reflection in radar sounding data. Assuming that the contrast in material strengths responsible for the terracing is the same dielectric interface that causes the radar reflection, we can combine these data to estimate the dielectric constant of the overlying material. We compare these results to a three-component dielectric mixing model to constrain composition. Our results indicate a widespread, decameters-thick layer that is excess water ice ~10^4 km^3 in volume. The accumulation and long-term preservation of this ice is a challenge for current Martian climate models.

  17. Russian River Ice Thickness and Duration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of river ice thickness measurements, and beginning and ending dates for river freeze-up events from fifty stations in northern Russia. The...

  18. Hydrologic Outlets of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hydrologic Outlets of the Greenland Ice Sheet data set contains GIS point shapefiles that include 891 observed and potential hydrologic outlets of the Greenland...

  19. IceBridge BedMachine Greenland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains bed topography beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet based on mass conservation derived from airborne radar tracks and satellite radar. The data...

  20. Arctic and Southern Ocean Sea Ice Concentrations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly sea ice concentration for Arctic (1901 to 1995) and Southern oceans (1973 to 1990) were digitized on a standard 1-degree grid (cylindrical projection) to...

  1. On the predictability of ice avalanches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pralong

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The velocity of unstable large ice masses from hanging glaciers increases as a power-law function of time prior to failure. This characteristic acceleration presents a finite-time singularity at the theoretical time of failure and can be used to forecast the time of glacier collapse. However, the non-linearity of the power-law function makes the prediction difficult. The effects of the non-linearity on the predictability of a failure are analyzed using a non-linear regression method. Predictability strongly depends on the time window when the measurements are performed. Log-periodic oscillations have been observed to be superimposed on the motion of large unstable ice masses. The value of their amplitude, frequency and phase are observed to be spatially homogeneous over the whole unstable ice mass. Inclusion of a respective term in the function describing the acceleration of unstable ice masses greatly increases the accuracy of the prediction.

  2. Great Lakes Aerial Photos of Ice Conditions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The collection consists of approximately 50,000 high-quality negatives and transparencies showing ice cover impact on navigation or hydroelectric operation from...

  3. Cold, Ice, and Snow Safety (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Cold, Ice, and Snow Safety KidsHealth > For Parents > Cold, ... matter how much white stuff piles up outside. Cold-Weather Hazards Certain injuries are more common in ...

  4. International Ice Patrol (IIP) Iceberg Sightings Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The International Ice Patrol (IIP) has been collecting information on iceberg activity in the North Atlantic since 1911. This database contains the data from these...

  5. International Ice Patrol Iceberg Drift Tracks

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The International Ice Patrol (IIP) tracks, plots and predicts iceberg positions in the North Atlantic Ocean. The IIP area of responsibility is 40 to 52 degrees...

  6. Near-tropical subsurface ice on Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Vincendon, Mathieu; Forget, François; Kreslavsky, Mikhail; Spiga, Aymeric; Murchie, Scott; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; 10.1029/2009GL041426

    2011-01-01

    Near-surface perennial water ice on Mars has been previously inferred down to latitudes of about 45{\\deg} and could result from either water vapor diffusion through the regolith under current conditions or previous ice ages precipitations. In this paper we show that at latitudes as low as 25{\\deg} in the southern hemisphere buried water ice in the shallow (< 1 m) subsurface is required to explain the observed surface distribution of seasonal CO2 frost on pole facing slopes. This result shows that possible remnants of the last ice age, as well as water that will be needed for the future exploration of Mars, are accessible significantly closer to the equator than previously thought, where mild conditions for both robotic and human exploration lie.

  7. FY 2013 ICE Immigration Removal Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — In addition to its criminal investigative responsibilities, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) shares responsibility for enforcing the nation’s civil...

  8. Icing modelling in NSMB with chimera overset grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, D. [Ècole Polytechnique de Montréal (Canada); ICUBE, Strasbourg University (France); Deloze, T.; Laurendeau, E. [Ècole Polytechnique de Montréal (Canada); Hoarau, Y. [ICUBE, Strasbourg University (France)

    2015-03-10

    In aerospace Engineering, the accurate simulation of ice accretion is a key element to increase flight safety and avoid accidents related to icing effects. The icing code developed in the NSMB solver is based on an Eulerian formulation for droplets tracking, an iterative Messinger model using a modified water runback scheme for ice thickness calculation and mesh deformation to track the ice/air interface through time. The whole process is parallelized with MPI and applied with chimera grids.

  9. Radiostratigraphy and age structure of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Macgregor, JA; Fahnestock, MA; Catania, GA; Paden, JD; Prasad Gogineni, S; Young, SK; Rybarski, SC; Mabrey, AN; Wagman, BM; M. Morlighem

    2015-01-01

    Several decades of ice-penetrating radar surveys of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have observed numerous widespread internal reflections. Analysis of this radiostratigraphy has produced valuable insights into ice sheet dynamics and motivates additional mapping of these reflections. Here we present a comprehensive deep radiostratigraphy of the Greenland Ice Sheet from airborne deep ice-penetrating radar data collected over Greenland by The University of Kansas between 1993 and 2013. T...

  10. Continental Ice Sheets and the Planetary Radiation Budget

    OpenAIRE

    Oerlemans, J.

    1980-01-01

    The interaction between continental ice sheets and the planetary radiation budget is potentially important in climate-sensitivity studies. A simple ice-sheet model incorporated in an energybalance climate model provides a tool for studying this interaction in a quantitative way. Experiments in which the ice-sheet model is coupled step by step to the climate model show that ice sheets hardly affect the zonal mean radiation balance because the albedo feedback due to sea ice and snow cover is do...

  11. Thermal Diffusivity Identification of Distributed Parameter Systems to Sea Ice

    OpenAIRE

    Liqiong Shi; Zhijun Li; Enmin Feng; Yila Bai; Yu Yang

    2013-01-01

    A method of optimal control is presented as a numerical tool for solving the sea ice heat transfer problem governed by a parabolic partial differential equation. Taken the deviation between the calculated ice temperature and the measurements as the performance criterion, an optimal control model of distributed parameter systems with specific constraints of thermal properties of sea ice was proposed to determine the thermal diffusivity of sea ice. Based on sea ice physical processes, the param...

  12. Biodiversidad del margen continental del Caribe colombiano.

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Incluye valiosa información producto de varios años de investigación marina de las aguas profundas, la plataforma continental y el talud superior del Caribe colombiano, llevada a cabo por un grupo multidisciplinario de investigadores en áreas de taxonomía, geología, ecología, cartografía y conservación del Invemar. Dentro de los resultados más destacados se encuentra el haber colectado e identificado más de 1600 especies, de las cuales alrededor del 35% se constituyeron en primeros registr...

  13. Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kok, Gregory; Kulkarni, Gourihar

    2014-07-10

    An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70 deg C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45 deg C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

  14. Status of Radio Ice Cherenkov Experiment (RICE)

    OpenAIRE

    RICE Collaboration; Allen, C.; Bean, A; Besson, D.; Frichter, G.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I; McKAY, D; Miller, T.; Piccirillo, L.; Ralston, J.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.(Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, 54022, River Falls, WI, USA); Spiczak, G.

    1997-01-01

    RICE is designed to detect ultrahigh energy (>100 TeV) neutrinos from astrophysical sources. It will consist of an array of compact radio (100 to 1000 MHz) receivers buried in ice at the South Pole. During the 1995-96 and 1996-97 austral summers, several receivers transmitters were deployed in bore holes drilled for the AMANDA project, at depths of 141 to 260 m. This was the first in situ test of radio receivers in deep ice for neutrino astronomy.

  15. Ice Chemistry in Starless Molecular Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvāns, J.

    2015-06-01

    Starless molecular cores are natural laboratories for interstellar molecular chemistry research. The chemistry of ices in such objects was investigated with a three-phase (gas, surface, and mantle) model. We considered the center part of five starless cores, with their physical conditions derived from observations. The ice chemistry of oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and complex organic molecules (COMs) was analyzed. We found that an ice-depth dimension, measured, e.g., in monolayers, is essential for modeling of chemistry in interstellar ices. Particularly, the H2O:CO:CO2:N2:NH3 ice abundance ratio regulates the production and destruction of minor species. It is suggested that photodesorption during the core-collapse period is responsible for the high abundance of interstellar H2O2 and O2H and other species synthesized on the surface. The calculated abundances of COMs in ice were compared to observed gas-phase values. Smaller activation barriers for CO and H2CO hydrogenation may help explain the production of a number of COMs. The observed abundance of methyl formate HCOOCH3 could be reproduced with a 1 kyr, 20 K temperature spike. Possible desorption mechanisms, relevant for COMs, are gas turbulence (ice exposure to interstellar photons) or a weak shock within the cloud core (grain collisions). To reproduce the observed COM abundances with the present 0D model, 1%-10% of ice mass needs to be sublimated. We estimate that the lifetime for starless cores likely does not exceed 1 Myr. Taurus cores are likely to be younger than their counterparts in most other clouds.

  16. Accelerated dissolution of iron oxides in ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jeong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron dissolution from mineral dusts and soil particles is vital as a source of bioavailable iron in various environmental media. In this work, the dissolution of iron oxide particles trapped in ice was investigated as a new pathway of iron supply. The dissolution experiments were carried out in the absence and presence of various organic complexing ligands under dark condition. In acidic pH conditions (pH 2, 3, and 4, the dissolution of iron oxides was greatly enhanced in the ice phase compared to that in water. The dissolved iron was mainly in the ferric form, which indicates that the dissolution is not a reductive process. The extent of dissolved iron was greatly affected by the kind of organic complexing ligands and the surface area of iron oxides. The iron dissolution was most pronounced with high surface area iron oxides and in the presence of strong iron binding ligands. The enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice is mainly ascribed to the "freeze concentration effect", which concentrates iron oxide particles, organic ligands, and protons in the liquid like ice grain boundary region and accelerates the dissolution of iron oxides. The ice-enhanced dissolution effect gradually decreased when decreasing the freezing temperature from −10 to −196 °C, which implies that the presence and formation of the liquid-like ice grain boundary region play a critical role. The proposed phenomenon of enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice may provide a new pathway of bioavailable iron production. The frozen atmospheric ice with iron-containing dust particles in the upper atmosphere thaws upon descending and may provide bioavailable iron upon deposition onto the ocean surface.

  17. T-P phase diagram for ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study we obtain a T-P phase diagram of ice using the mean field theory. We fit our calculated phase line equations to the experimental T-P phase diagram. By choosing appropriately the coefficients in the free-energy expansions, our calculated phase diagram agrees well with the experimentally observed phase diagram of ice. Some thermodynamic functions are calculated using the free energy for the transitions studied here.

  18. Concussion among Swedish elite ice hockey players.

    OpenAIRE

    Tegner, Y; Lorentzon, R

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of concussion in Swedish ice hockey and to establish a uniform grading and treatment model for concussions of different severity. METHODS: Frequency of concussion was investigated in two studies, one retrospective and one prospective. In the retrospective study, all Swedish elite ice hockey players (n = 265) were asked to answer a questionnaire on the number and treatment of previous concussions. Only concussions diagnosed by a doctor were recorded. The qu...

  19. Photosynthesis in Antarctic sea ice diatoms

    OpenAIRE

    Mock, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    This thesis was conducted to apply new techniques for measuring photosynthesis in Antarctic sea ice diatoms. A systematic approach of investigations was applied to obtain precise measurements of photosynthesis under natural conditions in the field from which questions were derived for further analysis in the laboratory. In situ measurements with the tracer 14C through the entire thickness of a young sea ice floe revealed that algae are able to actively assimilate dissolved inorganic carbon un...

  20. Dark matter and IceCube neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Biondi, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    We show that the excess of high energy neutrinos observed by the IceCube collaboration at energies above 100 TeV might originate from baryon number violating decays of heavy shadow baryons from mirror sector, which in turn constitute Dark Matter. Due to tiny mixing between mirror and ordinary neutrinos, it is possible to explain the specific features of the IceCube events spectrum.

  1. The 'Little Ice Age' – only temperature?

    OpenAIRE

    Nesje, Atle; Dahl, Svein Olaf

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the climate of the last few centuries, including the 'Little Ice Age', may help us better understand modern-day natural climate variability and make climate predictions. The conventional view of the climate development during the last millennium has been that it followed the simple sequence of a 'Mediaeval Warm Period', a cool 'Little Ice Age' followed by warming in the later part of the nineteenth century and during the twentieth century. This view was mainly based on evidence ...

  2. Spectral properties of water ice and contaminants. [of importance to remote sensing of ice in solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, P. G.; Clark, R. N.

    1985-01-01

    For remote sensing studies of ices in the solar system, it is important to understand the optical properties of water ice, and mixtures of ice and particulate materials. The present paper has the objective to review the current understanding of the spectral properties of ice, and mixtures of ice and particulates. The review is to provide a basis for the understanding of the remote sensing of ice. It is found that reflectance spectra of ice-soil intimate mixtures are complex, nonlinear functions of the optical and physical properties of the components which comprise the surface.

  3. Turbulent heat transfer as a control of platelet ice growth in supercool under-ice ocean boundary-layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, M. G.; Stevens, C. L.; Smith, I. J.; Robinson, N. J.

    2015-11-01

    Late winter measurements of turbulent quantities in tidally modulated flow under land-fast sea ice near the Erebus Glacier Tongue, McMurdo Sound, identified processes that influence growth at the interface of an ice surface in contact with supercool seawater. The data suggest that turbulent heat exchange at the ocean-ice boundary is characterized by the product of friction velocity and (negative) water temperature departure from freezing, analogous to similar results for moderate melting rates in seawater above freezing. Platelet ice growth appears to increase the hydraulic roughness (drag) of fast ice compared with undeformed fast ice without platelets. We hypothesize that platelet growth in supercool water under thick ice is rate-limited by turbulent heat transfer and that this is a significant factor to be considered in mass transfer at the under-side of ice shelves and sea ice in the vicinity of ice shelves.

  4. Turbulent heat transfer as a control of platelet ice growth in supercooled under-ice ocean boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, Miles G.; Stevens, Craig L.; Smith, Inga J.; Robinson, Natalie J.

    2016-04-01

    Late winter measurements of turbulent quantities in tidally modulated flow under land-fast sea ice near the Erebus Glacier Tongue, McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, identified processes that influence growth at the interface of an ice surface in contact with supercooled seawater. The data show that turbulent heat exchange at the ocean-ice boundary is characterized by the product of friction velocity and (negative) water temperature departure from freezing, analogous to similar results for moderate melting rates in seawater above freezing. Platelet ice growth appears to increase the hydraulic roughness (drag) of fast ice compared with undeformed fast ice without platelets. Platelet growth in supercooled water under thick ice appears to be rate-limited by turbulent heat transfer and that this is a significant factor to be considered in mass transfer at the underside of ice shelves and sea ice in the vicinity of ice shelves.

  5. Thermodynamics of ice nucleation in liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Shui; Xu, Qinzhi; Mi, Jianguo

    2015-01-29

    We present a density functional theory approach to investigate the thermodynamics of ice nucleation in supercooled water. Within the theoretical framework, the free-energy functional is constructed by the direct correlation function of oxygen-oxygen of the equilibrium water, and the function is derived from the reference interaction site model in consideration of the interactions of hydrogen-hydrogen, hydrogen-oxygen, and oxygen-oxygen. The equilibrium properties, including vapor-liquid and liquid-solid phase equilibria, local structure of hexagonal ice crystal, and interfacial structure and tension of water-ice are calculated in advance to examine the basis for the theory. The predicted phase equilibria and the water-ice surface tension are in good agreement with the experimental data. In particular, the critical nucleus radius and free-energy barrier during ice nucleation are predicted. The critical radius is similar to the simulation value, suggesting that the current theoretical approach is suitable in describing the thermodynamic properties of ice crystallization. PMID:25546012

  6. Influence of sea ice on Arctic precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopec, Ben G; Feng, Xiahong; Michel, Fred A; Posmentier, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    Global climate is influenced by the Arctic hydrologic cycle, which is, in part, regulated by sea ice through its control on evaporation and precipitation. However, the quantitative link between precipitation and sea ice extent is poorly constrained. Here we present observational evidence for the response of precipitation to sea ice reduction and assess the sensitivity of the response. Changes in the proportion of moisture sourced from the Arctic with sea ice change in the Canadian Arctic and Greenland Sea regions over the past two decades are inferred from annually averaged deuterium excess (d-excess) measurements from six sites. Other influences on the Arctic hydrologic cycle, such as the strength of meridional transport, are assessed using the North Atlantic Oscillation index. We find that the independent, direct effect of sea ice on the increase of the percentage of Arctic sourced moisture (or Arctic moisture proportion, AMP) is 18.2 ± 4.6% and 10.8 ± 3.6%/100,000 km(2) sea ice lost for each region, respectively, corresponding to increases of 10.9 ± 2.8% and 2.7 ± 1.1%/1 °C of warming in the vapor source regions. The moisture source changes likely result in increases of precipitation and changes in energy balance, creating significant uncertainty for climate predictions. PMID:26699509

  7. The greenhouse effect and the Arctic ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact on the Arctic ice of global warming is important for many people and for the environment. Less ice means changed conditions for the Inuits, hard times for the polar bears and changed conditions for the fishing sector. There is at present some uncertainty about the thickness of the ice and what might be the cause of its oscillation. It was reported a few years ago that the thickness of the ice had almost been reduced by 50 per cent since the 1950s and some researchers suggested that within a few decades the ice would disappear during the summer. These measurements have turned out not to be representative for the whole Arctic region, and it now appears that a great deal of the measured thickness variation can be attributed to changes in the atmospheric circulation. The article discusses the Arctic Oscillation and the North Atlantic Oscillation in relation to the ice thickness, and climate models. Feedback mechanisms such as reduced albedo may have a big impact in the Arctic in a global greenhouse warming. Model simulations are at variance, and the scenarios for the future are uncertain

  8. Honeycomb artificial spin ice at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeissler, Katharina; Chadha, Megha; Cohen, Lesley; Branford, Will

    2015-03-01

    Artificial spin ice is a macroscopic playground for magnetically frustrated systems. It consists of a geometrically ordered but magnetically frustrated arrangement of ferromagnetic macros spins, e.g. an arrangement of single domain ferromagnetic nanowires on a honeycomb lattice. Permalloy and cobalt which have critical temperature scales far above 290 K, are commonly used in the construction of such systems. Previous measurements have shown unusual features in the magnetotransport signature of cobalt honeycomb artificial spin ice at temperatures below 50 K which are due to changes in the artificial spin ice's magnetic reversal. In that case, the artificial spin ice bars were 1 micron long, 100 nm wide and 20 nm thick. Here we explore the low temperature magnetic behavior of honeycomb artificial spin ice structures with a variety of bar dimensions, indirectly via electrical transport, as well as, directly using low temperature magnetic imaging techniques. We discuss the extent to which this change in the magnetic reversal at low temperatures is generic to the honeycomb artificial spin ice geometry and whether the bar dimensions have an influence on its onset temperature. The EPSRC (Grant No. EP/G004765/1; Grant No. EP/L504786/1) and the Leverhulme Trust (Grant No. RPG 2012-692) funded this scientific work.

  9. Design of offshore structures in ice environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of offshore structures in ice environments was addressed in this presentation with particular reference to permanent steel GBS solutions in 15 metre to 150 metre water depth; permanent steel drilling/production/storage solutions in 150 metre to 1000 metres; and platform costs for 30 metres to 1000 metre water depth in the Canadian Beaufort. Major design concerns in the Canadian and United States Beaufort involve ice loads, foundation capacity, and float instability. In the Sakhalin, major design concerns involve waves, foundation capacity, earthquakes, and float instability. The presentation included several charts illustrating permanent production platform costs in the Canadian Beaufort; design ice loads; base design criteria; and evolution of Arctic structures. It included illustrations and photographs of a MAT skirt system; skirt detail showing thin bladed design; stiffener post yield failure response; and ice load equaling 50 per cent buoyancy. The presentation also provided a comparison of the principal properties of tripod and vertical tension leg platforms. The criteria for 1000 metre permanent platform in the Canadian Beaufort include: no catastrophic failure under 1000 year ice load; less than 1 degree rotation under 100 year ice load; capability to operate in the weakest foundation conditions; and a target cost of less than $2 billion. Potential uses include development drilling and production platform; storage and loading platform for tanker transportation; production platform with pipeline to shore; and platform base for satellite drilling. tabs., figs

  10. Supernova Neutrino Detection with IceCube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IceCube was completed in December 2010. It forms a lattice of 5160 photomultiplier tubes that monitor a volume of ∼ 1 km3 in the deep Antarctic ice for particle induced photons. The telescope was designed to detect neutrinos with energies greater than 100 GeV. Owing to subfreezing ice temperatures, the photomultiplier dark noise rates are particularly low. Hence IceCube can also detect large numbers of MeV neutrinos by observing a collective rise in all photomultiplier rates on top of the dark noise. With 2 ms timing resolution, IceCube can track subtle features in the temporal development of the supernova neutrino burst. For a supernova at the galactic center, its sensitivity matches that of a background-free megaton-scale supernova search experiment. The sensitivity decreases to 20 standard deviations at the galactic edge (30 kpc) and 6 standard deviations at the Large Magellanic Cloud (50 kpc). IceCube is sending triggers from potential supernovae to the Supernova Early Warning System. The sensitivity to neutrino properties such as the neutrino hierarchy is discussed and simulations of tantalizing signatures, such as the formation of a quark star or a black hole as well as the characteristics of shock waves are presented. All results are preliminary.

  11. Ice chemistry in starless molecular cores

    CERN Document Server

    Kalvans, Juris

    2015-01-01

    Starless molecular cores are natural laboratories for interstellar molecular chemistry research. The chemistry of ices in such objects was investigated with a three-phase (gas, surface, and mantle) model. We considered the center part of five starless cores, with their physical conditions derived from observations. The ice chemistry of oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and complex organic molecules (COMs) was analyzed. We found that an ice-depth dimension, measured, e.g., in monolayers, is essential for modeling of chemistry in interstellar ices. Particularly, the H2O:CO:CO2:N2:NH3 ice abundance ratio regulates the production and destruction of minor species. It is suggested that photodesorption during core collapse period is responsible for high abundance of interstellar H2O2 and O2H, and other species synthesized on the surface. The calculated abundances of COMs in ice were compared to observed gas-phase values. Smaller activation barriers for CO and H2CO hydrogenation may help explain the production of a number of...

  12. A Terminal Area Icing Remote Sensing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.; Serke, David J.

    2014-01-01

    NASA and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) have developed an icing remote sensing technology that has demonstrated skill at detecting and classifying icing hazards in a vertical column above an instrumented ground station. This technology is now being extended to provide volumetric coverage surrounding an airport. With volumetric airport terminal area coverage, the resulting icing hazard information will be usable by aircrews, traffic control, and airline dispatch to make strategic and tactical decisions regarding routing when conditions are conducive to airframe icing. Building on the existing vertical pointing system, the new method for providing volumetric coverage will utilize cloud radar, microwave radiometry, and NEXRAD radar. This terminal area icing remote sensing system will use the data streams from these instruments to provide icing hazard classification along the defined approach paths into an airport. Strategies for comparison to in-situ instruments on aircraft and weather balloons for a planned NASA field test are discussed, as are possible future applications into the NextGen airspace system.

  13. Comparative Views of Arctic Sea Ice Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    NASA researchers have new insights into the mysteries of Arctic sea ice, thanks to the unique abilities of Canada's Radarsat satellite. The Arctic is the smallest of the world's four oceans, but it may play a large role in helping scientists monitor Earth's climate shifts.Using Radarsat's special sensors to take images at night and to peer through clouds, NASA researchers can now see the complete ice cover of the Arctic. This allows tracking of any shifts and changes, in unprecedented detail, over the course of an entire winter. The radar-generated, high-resolution images are up to 100 times better than those taken by previous satellites.The two images above are separated by nine days (earlier image on the left). Both images represent an area (approximately 96 by 128 kilometers; 60 by 80 miles)located in the Baufort Sea, north of the Alaskan coast. The brighter features are older thicker ice and the darker areas show young, recently formed ice. Within the nine-day span, large and extensive cracks in the ice cover have formed due to ice movement. These cracks expose the open ocean to the cold, frigid atmosphere where sea ice grows rapidly and thickens.Using this new information, scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, Calif., can generate comprehensive maps of Arctic sea ice thickness for the first time. 'Before we knew only the extent of the ice cover,' said Dr. Ronald Kwok, JPL principal investigator of a project called Sea Ice Thickness Derived From High Resolution Radar Imagery. 'We also knew that the sea ice extent had decreased over the last 20 years, but we knew very little about ice thickness.''Since sea ice is very thin, about 3 meters (10 feet) or less,'Kwok explained, 'it is very sensitive to climate change.'Until now, observations of polar sea ice thickness have been available for specific areas, but not for the entire polar region.The new radar mapping technique has also given scientists a close look at how the sea ice cover

  14. Biological ice nucleation initiates hailstone formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Alexander B.; Dore, John E.; Leslie, Deborah; Lyons, W. Berry; Sands, David C.; Priscu, John C.

    2014-11-01

    Cloud condensation and ice nuclei in the troposphere are required precursors to cloud and precipitation formation, both of which influence the radiative balance of Earth. The initial stage of hailstone formation (i.e., the embryo) and the subsequent layered growth allow hail to be used as a model for the study of nucleation processes in precipitation. By virtue of the preserved particle and isotopic record captured by hailstones, they represent a unique form of precipitation that allows direct characterization of the particles present during atmospheric ice nucleation. Despite the ecological and economic consequences of hail storms, the dynamics of hailstone nucleation, and thus their formation, are not well understood. Our experiments show that hailstone embryos from three Rocky Mountain storms contained biological ice nuclei capable of freezing water at warm, subzero (°C) temperatures, indicating that biological particles can act as nucleation sites for hailstone formation. These results are corroborated by analysis of δD and δ18O from melted hailstone embryos, which show that the hailstones formed at similarly warm temperatures in situ. Low densities of ice nucleation active abiotic particles were also present in hailstone embryos, but their low concentration indicates they were not likely to have catalyzed ice formation at the warm temperatures determined from water stable isotope analysis. Our study provides new data on ice nucleation occurring at the bottom of clouds, an atmospheric region whose processes are critical to global climate models but which has challenged instrument-based measurements.

  15. Supernova Neutrino Detection with IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2011-01-01

    IceCube was completed in December 2010. It forms a lattice of 5160 photomultiplier tubes that monitor a volume of ~ 1 cubic km in the deep Antarctic ice for particle induced photons. The telescope was designed to detect neutrinos with energies greater than 100 GeV. Owing to subfreezing ice temperatures, the photomultiplier dark noise rates are particularly low. Hence IceCube can also detect large numbers of MeV neutrinos by observing a collective rise in all photomultiplier rates on top of the dark noise. With 2 ms timing resolution, IceCube can track subtle features in the temporal development of the supernova neutrino burst. For a supernova at the galactic center, its sensitivity matches that of a background-free megaton-scale supernova search experiment. The sensitivity decreases to 20 standard deviations at the galactic edge (30 kpc) and 6 standard deviations at the Large Magellanic Cloud (50 kpc). IceCube is sending triggers from potential supernovae to the Supernova Early Warning System. The sensitivity...

  16. Biogeochemical weathering under ice: Size matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadham, J. L.; Tranter, M.; Skidmore, M.; Hodson, A. J.; Priscu, J.; Lyons, W. B.; Sharp, M.; Wynn, P.; Jackson, M.

    2010-09-01

    The basal regions of continental ice sheets are gaps in our current understanding of the Earth's biosphere and biogeochemical cycles. We draw on existing and new chemical data sets for subglacial meltwaters to provide the first comprehensive assessment of sub-ice sheet biogeochemical weathering. We show that size of the ice mass is a critical control on the balance of chemical weathering processes and that microbial activity is ubiquitous in driving dissolution. Carbonate dissolution fueled by sulfide oxidation and microbial CO2 dominate beneath small valley glaciers. Prolonged meltwater residence times and greater isolation characteristic of ice sheets lead to the development of anoxia and enhanced silicate dissolution due to calcite saturation. We show that sub-ice sheet environments are highly geochemically reactive and should be considered in regional and global solute budgets. For example, calculated solute fluxes from Antarctica (72-130 t yr-1) are the same order of magnitude as those from some of the world's largest rivers and rates of chemical weathering (10-17 t km-2 yr-1) are high for the annual specific discharge (2.3-4.1 × 10-3 m). Our model of chemical weathering dynamics provides important information on subglacial biodiversity and global biogeochemical cycles and may be used to design strategies for the first sampling of Antarctic Subglacial Lakes and other sub-ice sheet environments for the next decade.

  17. Channelization of plumes beneath ice shelves

    KAUST Repository

    Dallaston, M. C.

    2015-11-11

    © 2015 Cambridge University Press. We study a simplified model of ice-ocean interaction beneath a floating ice shelf, and investigate the possibility for channels to form in the ice shelf base due to spatial variations in conditions at the grounding line. The model combines an extensional thin-film description of viscous ice flow in the shelf, with melting at its base driven by a turbulent ocean plume. Small transverse perturbations to the one-dimensional steady state are considered, driven either by ice thickness or subglacial discharge variations across the grounding line. Either forcing leads to the growth of channels downstream, with melting driven by locally enhanced ocean velocities, and thus heat transfer. Narrow channels are smoothed out due to turbulent mixing in the ocean plume, leading to a preferred wavelength for channel growth. In the absence of perturbations at the grounding line, linear stability analysis suggests that the one-dimensional state is stable to initial perturbations, chiefly due to the background ice advection.

  18. The progress in the study of Arctic pack ice ecology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何剑锋; 王桂忠; 蔡明红; 李少菁

    2004-01-01

    The sea ice community plays an important role in the Arctic marine ecosystem. Because of the predicted environmental changes in the Arctic environment and specifically related to sea ice, the Arctic pack ice biota has received more attention in recent years using modern ice-breaking research vessels. Studies show that the Arctic pack ice contains a diverse biota and besides ice algae, the bacterial and protozoan biomasses can be high. Surprisingly high primary production values were observed in the pack ice of the central Arctic Ocean. Occasionally biomass maximum were discovered in the interior of the ice floes, a habitat that had been ignored in most Arctic studies. Many scientific questions, which deserve special attention, remained unsolved due to logistic limitations and the sea ice characteristics. Little is know about the pack ice community in the central Arctic Ocean. Almost no data exists from the pack ice zone for the winter season. Concerning the abundance of bacteria and protozoa, more studies are needed to understand the microbial network within the ice and its role in material and energy flows. The response of the sea ice biota to global change will impact the entire Arctic marine ecosystem and a long-term monitoring program is needed. The techniques, that are applied to study the sea ice biota and the sea ice ecology, should be improved.

  19. Defining the Little Ice Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ø. Paasche

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The "Little Ice Age" (LIA is possibly the best-documented climatic anomaly of the past. A wide range of datasets portrays a harsh climate that worsened living conditions, primarily in terms of cooler temperatures, for people across Europe sometime during the last millennium. Regardless of the vast amount of data covering the LIA, there is presently no consensus concerning its spatial manifestation (was it regional or global?, its temporal constraints (when did it start and end?, or the broad-scale dynamics associated with it (what mechanisms did it involve?, although there is no shortage of suggestions. Based on a new compilation of data reflecting atmospheric circulation at both high and low latitudes, we show that the LIA lasted for roughly 400 years (∼1400–1800 AD. During this period at least four major atmospheric circulation systems on Earth co-varied on decadal to centennial timescales: Northern Annular Mode (NAM, Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ, El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO and West African Monsoon (WAM. This pattern of convergence suggests that a strong coupling between these circulation systems was an important pre-condition for the realisation of the LIA.

  20. Effect of the glacial rebound on elevation changes deduced from the ice core records in Greenland ice sheet

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    It is important to investigate the behavior of the Greenland ice sheet in Quaternary for elucidating the future sea-level rise due to glacial melting. In order to reconstruct the elevation changes of the Greenland ice sheet throughout the Holocene, δ18O data obtained from ice cores were recently used (Vinther et al., 2009). Vinther et al. (2009) also indicated that the Greenland ice sheet elevation changes inferred from ice core records show a significantly greater elevation reduction than th...

  1. Seasonal evolution of an ice-shelf influenced fast-ice regime, derived from an autonomous thermistor chain

    OpenAIRE

    Hoppmann, Mario; Nicolaus, Marcel; Hunkeler, Priska; Heil, Petra; Behrens, Lisa Katharina; König-Langlo, Gert; Gerdes, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Ice shelves strongly interact with coastal Antarctic sea ice and the associated ecosystem by creating conditions favorable to the formation of a sub-ice platelet layer. The close investigation of this phenomenon and its seasonal evolution remains a challenge due to logistical constraints and a lack of suitable methodology. In this study, we characterize the seasonal cycle of Antarctic fast ice adjacent to the Ekstr€om Ice Shelf in the eastern Weddell Sea. We used a thermistor chai...

  2. Improving the WRF model's simulation over sea ice surface through coupling with a complex thermodynamic sea ice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Y.; Huang, J.; Luo, Y.; Zhao, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Sea ice plays an important role in the air-ice-ocean interaction, but it is often represented simply in many regional atmospheric models. The Noah sea ice model, which has been widely used in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, exhibits cold bias in simulating the Arctic sea ice temperature when validated against the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) in situ observations. According to sensitivity tests, this bias is attributed not only to the simulation of snow depth and turbulent fluxes but also to the heat conduction within snow and ice. Compared with the Noah sea ice model, the high-resolution thermodynamic snow and ice model (HIGHTSI) has smaller bias in simulating the sea ice temperature. HIGHTSI is further coupled with the WRF model to evaluate the possible added value from better resolving the heat transport and solar penetration in sea ice from a complex thermodynamic sea ice model. The cold bias in simulating the surface temperature over sea ice in winter by the original Polar WRF is reduced when HIGHTSI rather than Noah is coupled with the WRF model, and this also leads to a better representation of surface upward longwave radiation and 2 m air temperature. A discussion on the impact of specifying sea ice thickness in the WRF model is presented. Consistent with previous research, prescribing the sea ice thickness with observational information would result in the best simulation among the available methods. If no observational information is available, using an empirical method based on the relationship between sea ice concentration and sea ice thickness could mimic the large-scale spatial feature of sea ice thickness. The potential application of a thermodynamic sea ice model in predicting the change in sea ice thickness in a RCM is limited by the lack of sea ice dynamic processes in the model and the coarse assumption on the initial value of sea ice thickness.

  3. A prelanding assessment of the ice table depth and ground ice characteristics in Martian permafrost at the Phoenix landing site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, M.T.; Boynton, W.V.; Feldman, W.C.; Arvidson, R. E.; Titus, Joshua T.N.; Bandfield, L.; Putzig, N.E.; Sizemore, H.G.

    2009-01-01

    We review multiple estimates of the ice table depth at potential Phoenix landing sites and consider the possible state and distribution of subsurface ice. A two-layer model of ice-rich material overlain by ice-free material is consistent with both the observational and theoretical lines of evidence. Results indicate ground ice to be shallow and ubiquitous, 2-6 cm below the surface. Undulations in the ice table depth are expected because of the thermodynamic effects of rocks, slopes, and soil variations on the scale of the Phoenix Lander and within the digging area, which can be advantageous for analysis of both dry surficial soils and buried ice-rich materials. The ground ice at the ice table to be sampled by the Phoenix Lander is expected to be geologically young because of recent climate oscillations. However, estimates of the ratio of soil to ice in the ice-rich subsurface layer suggest that that the ice content exceeds the available pore space, which is difficult to reconcile with existing ground ice stability and dynamics models. These high concentrations of ice may be the result of either the burial of surface snow during times of higher obliquity, initially high-porosity soils, or the migration of water along thin films. Measurement of the D/H ratio within the ice at the ice table and of the soil-to-ice ratio, as well as imaging ice-soil textures, will help determine if the ice is indeed young and if the models of the effects of climate change on the ground ice are reasonable. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Rapid Access Ice Drill: A New Tool for Exploration of the Deep Antarctic Ice Sheets and Subglacial Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodge, J. W.; Severinghaus, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Rapid Access Ice Drill (RAID) will penetrate the Antarctic ice sheets in order to core through deep ice, the glacial bed, and into bedrock below. This new technology will provide a critical first look at the interface between major ice caps and their subglacial geology. Currently in construction, RAID is a mobile drilling system capable of making several long boreholes in a single field season in Antarctica. RAID is interdisciplinary and will allow access to polar paleoclimate records in ice >1 Ma, direct observation at the base of the ice sheets, and recovery of rock cores from the ice-covered East Antarctic craton. RAID uses a diamond rock-coring system as in mineral exploration. Threaded drill-pipe with hardened metal bits will cut through ice using reverse circulation of Estisol for pressure-compensation, maintenance of temperature, and removal of ice cuttings. Near the bottom of the ice sheet, a wireline bottom-hole assembly will enable diamond coring of ice, the glacial bed, and bedrock below. Once complete, boreholes will be kept open with fluid, capped, and made available for future down-hole measurement of thermal gradient, heat flow, ice chronology, and ice deformation. RAID will also sample for extremophile microorganisms. RAID is designed to penetrate up to 3,300 meters of ice and take sample cores in less than 200 hours. This rapid performance will allow completion of a borehole in about 10 days before moving to the next drilling site. RAID is unique because it can provide fast borehole access through thick ice; take short ice cores for paleoclimate study; sample the glacial bed to determine ice-flow conditions; take cores of subglacial bedrock for age dating and crustal history; and create boreholes for use as an observatory in the ice sheets. Together, the rapid drilling capability and mobility of the drilling system, along with ice-penetrating imaging methods, will provide a unique 3D picture of the interior Antarctic ice sheets.

  5. Hexagonal ice transforms at high pressures and compression rates directly into "doubly metastable" ice phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Marion; Winkel, Katrin; Toebbens, Daniel M; Mayer, Erwin; Loerting, Thomas

    2009-12-14

    We report compression and decompression experiments of hexagonal ice in a piston cylinder setup in the temperature range of 170-220 K up to pressures of 1.6 GPa. The main focus is on establishing the effect that an increase in compression rate up to 4000 MPa/min has on the phase changes incurred at high pressures. While at low compression rates, a phase change to stable ice II takes place (in agreement with earlier comprehensive studies), we find that at higher compression rates, increasing fractions and even pure ice III forms from hexagonal ice. We show that the critical compression rate, above which mainly the metastable ice III polymorph is produced, decreases by a factor of 30 when decreasing the temperature from 220 to 170 K. At the highest rate capable with our equipment, we even find formation of an ice V fraction in the mixture, which is metastable with respect to ice II and also metastable with respect to ice III. This indicates that at increasing compression rates, progressively more metastable phases of ice grow from hexagonal ice. Since ices II, III, and V differ very much in, e.g., strength and rheological properties, we have prepared solids of very different mechanical properties just by variation in compression rate. In addition, these metastable phases have stability regions in the phase diagrams only at much higher pressures and temperatures. Therefore, we anticipate that the method of isothermal compression at low temperatures and high compression rates is a tool for the academic and industrial polymorph search with great potential. PMID:20001064

  6. PIXE analysis as a tool for dating of ice cores from the Greenland ice sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sections from the 2037 m long Dye 3 ice core drilled in 1979-1981 in the ice sheet of Southern Greenland were analysed with PIXE. The seven selected sections were from depths between 1778 and 1813 m, which corresponds to a time interval between about 8 500 and 10 000 years B.C. at the end of the last Ice Age. During this time period, fast climatic changes of several degrees centrigrade per century are known to have taken place. The exact time scales of these changes need yet to be verified by renewed measurements using nonconventional stratigraphic dating techniques such as PIXE. The problem is highly relevant for the prediction of climatic changes in our present age. A new sample preparation technique was developed which enables the determination of annual thicknesses of the parts of the ice core representing 10 000-40 000 years before present, where the thickness of the annual ice layers are believed to be less than 2.5 cm. More commonly used techniques of dating, such as measurements of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes δ18O and δD, nitrate, acidity or conductivity all have difficulties in resolving annual cycles in thicknesses of less than about 2 cm. The new technique involves sublimation of 18 cm long ice sections, after which the material contained in the ice is deposited on the thin backing. In this way, the material to be analysed is preconcentrated through the removal of the H2O, while still retaining the spatial distribution pattern of the various water soluble and insoluble components along the ice core. The resulting spatial resolution of the sublimation technique is estimated to be ±1 mm. A PIXE analysis was performed in contiguous millimeter steps across the sublimated ice sections. Estimations of annual ice layer thicknesses were based on the patterns of seasonal variation along the ice sections for several major and minor elements quantified with PIXE. (orig./TW)

  7. Recent wind driven high sea ice export in the Fram Strait contributes to Arctic sea ice decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. H. Smedsrud

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Arctic sea ice area decrease has been visible for two decades, and continues at a steady rate. Apart from melting, the southward drift through Fram Strait is the main loss. We present high resolution sea ice drift across 79° N from 2004 to 2010. The ice drift is based on radar satellite data and correspond well with variability in local geostrophic wind. The underlying current contributes with a constant southward speed close to 5 cm s−1, and drives about 33 % of the ice export. We use geostrophic winds derived from reanalysis data to calculate the Fram Strait ice area export back to 1957, finding that the sea ice area export recently is about 25 % larger than during the 1960's. The increase in ice export occurred mostly during winter and is directly connected to higher southward ice drift velocities, due to stronger geostrophic winds. The increase in ice drift is large enough to counteract a decrease in ice concentration of the exported sea ice. Using storm tracking we link changes in geostrophic winds to more intense Nordic Sea low pressure systems. Annual sea ice export likely has a significant influence on the summer sea ice variability and we find low values in the 60's, the late 80's and 90's, and particularly high values during 2005–2008. The study highlight the possible role of variability in ice export as an explanatory factor for understanding the dramatic loss of Arctic sea ice the last decades.

  8. Observations of Recent Arctic Sea Ice Volume Loss and Its Impact on Ocean-Atmosphere Energy Exchange and Ice Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, N. T.; Markus, T.; Farrell, S. L.; Worthen, D. L.; Boisvert, L. N.

    2011-01-01

    Using recently developed techniques we estimate snow and sea ice thickness distributions for the Arctic basin through the combination of freeboard data from the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) and a snow depth model. These data are used with meteorological data and a thermodynamic sea ice model to calculate ocean-atmosphere heat exchange and ice volume production during the 2003-2008 fall and winter seasons. The calculated heat fluxes and ice growth rates are in agreement with previous observations over multiyear ice. In this study, we calculate heat fluxes and ice growth rates for the full distribution of ice thicknesses covering the Arctic basin and determine the impact of ice thickness change on the calculated values. Thinning of the sea ice is observed which greatly increases the 2005-2007 fall period ocean-atmosphere heat fluxes compared to those observed in 2003. Although there was also a decline in sea ice thickness for the winter periods, the winter time heat flux was found to be less impacted by the observed changes in ice thickness. A large increase in the net Arctic ocean-atmosphere heat output is also observed in the fall periods due to changes in the areal coverage of sea ice. The anomalously low sea ice coverage in 2007 led to a net ocean-atmosphere heat output approximately 3 times greater than was observed in previous years and suggests that sea ice losses are now playing a role in increasing surface air temperatures in the Arctic.

  9. Observational Evidence of a Hemispheric-wide Ice-ocean Albedo Feedback Effect on Antarctic Sea-ice Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihashi, Sohey; Cavalieri, Donald J.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of ice-ocean albedo feedback (a kind of ice-albedo feedback) on sea-ice decay is demonstrated over the Antarctic sea-ice zone from an analysis of satellite-derived hemispheric sea ice concentration and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ERA-40) atmospheric data for the period 1979-2001. Sea ice concentration in December (time of most active melt) correlates better with the meridional component of the wind-forced ice drift (MID) in November (beginning of the melt season) than the MID in December. This 1 month lagged correlation is observed in most of the Antarctic sea-ice covered ocean. Daily time series of ice , concentration show that the ice concentration anomaly increases toward the time of maximum sea-ice melt. These findings can be explained by the following positive feedback effect: once ice concentration decreases (increases) at the beginning of the melt season, solar heating of the upper ocean through the increased (decreased) open water fraction is enhanced (reduced), leading to (suppressing) a further decrease in ice concentration by the oceanic heat. Results obtained fi-om a simple ice-ocean coupled model also support our interpretation of the observational results. This positive feedback mechanism explains in part the large interannual variability of the sea-ice cover in summer.

  10. Evidence of NAO control on subsurface ice accumulation in a 1200 yr old cave-ice sequence, St. Livres ice cave, Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Stoffel, Markus; Luetscher, Marc; Bollschweiler, Michelle; Schlatter, Frédéric

    2009-01-01

    Mid-latitude ice caves are assumed to be highly sensitive to climatic changes and thus represent a potentially interesting environmental archive. Establishing a precise chronology is, however, a prerequisite for the understanding of processes driving the cave-ice mass balance and thus allows a paleoenvironmental interpretation. At St. Livres ice cave (Jura Mountains, Switzerland), subfossil trees and organic material are abundant in the cave-ice deposit, therefore allowing the dating of indiv...

  11. Energy conservation in ice manufacturing; Ahorro de energia en la fabricacion de hielo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    This paper shows the results of the energy diagnosis study for ice manufacturing industries. The identified opportunities for conservation and efficient use of energy have allowed the reduction of the electric bill, modernizing at the same time, its installations and addressing inherent aspects of the use of energy producing items; in which the estimated investments are recovered in its major part in a period of a year, the goodness of the investments propitiate the growth and competitiveness required in these days. [Espanol] En este documento se exponen los resultados del estudio del diagnostico energetico para industrias productoras de hielo. Las oportunidades de ahorro y uso eficiente de energia identificadas, han permitido reducir la facturacion energetica, a la par de modernizar sus instalaciones y atender aspectos inherentes al uso de energeticos; en lo cual las inversiones estimadas se recuperan en su mayoria en un ano, las bondades de las inversiones propician un crecimiento y competitividad requerida en estos dias.

  12. Interactions Between Ice Thickness, Bottom Ice Algae, and Transmitted Spectral Irradiance in the Chukchi Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntsen, A. E.; Perovich, D. K.; Polashenski, C.; Stwertka, C.

    2015-12-01

    The amount of light that penetrates the Arctic sea ice cover impacts sea-ice mass balance as well as ecological processes in the upper ocean. The seasonally evolving macro and micro spatial variability of transmitted spectral irradiance observed in the Chukchi Sea from May 18 to June 17, 2014 can be primarily attributed to variations in snow depth, ice thickness, and bottom ice algae concentrations. This study characterizes the interactions among these dominant variables using observed optical properties at each sampling site. We employ a normalized difference index to compute estimates of Chlorophyll a concentrations and analyze the increased attenuation of incident irradiance due to absorption by biomass. On a kilometer spatial scale, the presence of bottom ice algae reduced the maximum transmitted irradiance by about 1.5 orders of magnitude when comparing floes of similar snow and ice thicknesses. On a meter spatial scale, the combined effects of disparities in the depth and distribution of the overlying snow cover along with algae concentrations caused maximum transmittances to vary between 0.0577 and 0.282 at a single site. Temporal variability was also observed as the average integrated transmitted photosynthetically active radiation increased by one order of magnitude to 3.4% for the last eight measurement days compared to the first nine. Results provide insight on how interrelated physical and ecological parameters of sea ice in varying time and space may impact new trends in Arctic sea ice extent and the progression of melt.

  13. Surface ice flow velocity and tide retrieval of the amery ice shelf using precise point positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, X.H.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2006-01-01

    Five days of continuous GPS observation data were collected in the frontal zone of the Amery ice shelf and subsequently post-processed using precise point position (PPP) technology based on precise orbit and clock products from the International GNSS service. The surface ice flow velocity of the ...

  14. A sea ice model for the marginal ice zone with an application to the Greenland Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Leif Toudal; Coon, Max D.

    A model is presented that describes the formation, transport, and desalinization of frazil and pancake ice as it is formed in marginal seas. This model uses as input the total ice concentration evaluated from Special Sensor Microwave Imager and wind speed and direction. The model calculates the a...

  15. NASA IceBridge: Scientific Insights from Airborne Surveys of the Polar Sea Ice Covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter-Menge, J.; Farrell, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA Operation IceBridge (OIB) airborne sea ice surveys are designed to continue a valuable series of sea ice thickness measurements by bridging the gap between NASA's Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), which operated from 2003 to 2009, and ICESat-2, which is scheduled for launch in 2017. Initiated in 2009, OIB has conducted campaigns over the western Arctic Ocean (March/April) and Southern Oceans (October/November) on an annual basis when the thickness of sea ice cover is nearing its maximum. More recently, a series of Arctic surveys have also collected observations in the late summer, at the end of the melt season. The Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) laser altimeter is one of OIB's primary sensors, in combination with the Digital Mapping System digital camera, a Ku-band radar altimeter, a frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) snow radar, and a KT-19 infrared radiation pyrometer. Data from the campaigns are available to the research community at: http://nsidc.org/data/icebridge/. This presentation will summarize the spatial and temporal extent of the OIB campaigns and their complementary role in linking in situ and satellite measurements, advancing observations of sea ice processes across all length scales. Key scientific insights gained on the state of the sea ice cover will be highlighted, including snow depth, ice thickness, surface roughness and morphology, and melt pond evolution.

  16. Ice condensation on sulfuric acid tetrahydrate: Implications for polar stratospheric ice clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Fortin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of ice nucleation to form Type 2 PSCs is important for controlling the ice particle size and hence the possible dehydration in the polar winter stratosphere. This paper probes heterogeneous ice nucleation on sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT. Laboratory experiments were performed using a thin-film, high-vacuum apparatus in which the condensed phase is monitored via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and water pressure is monitored with the combination of an MKS baratron and an ionization gauge. Results show that SAT is an efficient ice nucleus with a critical ice saturation ratio of S*ice = 1.3 to 1.02 over the temperature range 169.8-194.5 K. This corresponds to a necessary supercooling of 0.1-1.3 K below the ice frost point. The laboratory data is used as input for a microphysical/photochemical model to probe the effect that this heterogeneous nucleation mechanism could have on Type 2 PSC formation and stratospheric dehydration. In the model simulations, even a very small number of SAT particles (e.g., 10-3 cm-3 result in ice nucleation on SAT as the dominant mechanism for Type 2 PSC formation. As a result, Type 2 PSC formation is more widespread, leading to larger-scale dehydration. The characteristics of the clouds are controlled by the assumed number of SAT particles present, demonstrating that a proper treatment of SAT is critical for correctly modeling Type 2 PSC formation and stratospheric dehydration.

  17. Quantification of summertime water ice deposition on the Martian north polar ice cap

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Adrian J; Becerra, Patricio; Byrne, Shane

    2015-01-01

    We use observations from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) of the north polar cap during late summer for two Martian years, to monitor the complete summer cycle of albedo and water ice grain size in order to place quantitative limits of the amount of water ice deposited in late summer. We establish here for the first time the complete spring to summer cycle of water ice grain sizes on the north polar cap. The apparent grain sizes grow until Ls=132, when they appear to shrink again, until they are obscured at the end of summer by the north polar hood. Under the assumption that the shrinking of grain sizes is due to the deposition of find grained ice, we quantify the amount of water ice deposited per Martian boreal summer, and estimate the amount of water ice that must be transported equatorward. Interestingly, we find that the relative amount of water ice deposited in the north cap during boreal summer (0.7-7 microns) is roughly equivalent to the average amount of water ice depos...

  18. Ice crystal properties retrieval using radar spectral polarimetric measurements within ice/mixed-phase clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dufournet, Y.

    2010-01-01

    In the field of atmospheric research, ground-based radar systems are often employed to study ice/mixed-phase cloud properties based on retrieval techniques. These techniques convert the radar signal backscattered by each bulk of ice crystals being probed within the same radar resolution volume to cl

  19. Driving Stresses in Mars Polar Ice Caps and Conditions for Ice Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Saba, Jack L.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of the topography of the North polar ice cap by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) show that the ice cap is 2950 +/- 200 meters thick. The volume of the cap is about 1.2 x 10(exp 6) cu km covering an area of 1.04 x 10(exp 6) sq km, which is about 40 percent of the Greenland ice sheet in volume and 62 percent in area. The composition of the Northern cap was previously concluded to be predominately H2O, rather than CO2 ice, based on thermodynamic considerations of the insustainablity of CO2 during summer. Principal questions about the cap are: does the ice move and at what rate, is the cap currently growing or depleting in volume, and how and when was the cap formed? Recent research on terrestrial ice sheets indicates that rates of ice deformation at the low stress values characteristic of ice sheets are significantly higher than the rates given by the classic viscous-plastic flow laws commonly used.

  20. Recession of Thwaites Glacier: inferring relevant processes using the ice sheet model Elmer/Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Nacho; Durand, Gael; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Gourmelen, Noel; Stumpf, Andre; Lampert, Thomas; Gagliardini, Olivier

    2014-05-01

    Numerous studies focusing on ice sheets mass balance clearly show an increasing ice discharge mainly induced by the acceleration of ice flow through coastal outlet glaciers. As a crucial impact, imbalance of both Greenland and Antarctica is today an essential driver of the current sea level rise. In the specific case of West Antarctica, the Amundsen Sea sector is the most impacted region and current recession may be the first sign of a large, unstable and irrevocable retreat of the whole region. Projecting the forthcoming behavior of that sector in general, and the most out of balance Pine Island and Thwaites Glacier is therefore a large matter of concern. Using notably the 3D full-Stokes ice sheet model Elmer/Ice, a recent study has shown that the Pine Island Glacier retreat is currently driven by marine ice sheet instability. Here, we use similar methodologies to investigate the condition of stability of the neighboring Thwaites glacier. In particular, we focus on the effect of ice rises and induced crevasses onto the ice flow and show that their impact is of crucial importance prior to any attempt of projecting the short term response of Twaites glacier.

  1. Trends in sea-ice variability on the way to an ice-free Arctic

    CERN Document Server

    Bathiany, Sebastian; Williamson, Mark S; Lenton, Timothy M; Scheffer, Marten; van Nes, Egbert; Notz, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    It has been widely debated whether Arctic sea-ice loss can reach a tipping point beyond which a large sea-ice area disappears abruptly. The theory of dynamical systems predicts a slowing down when a system destabilises towards a tipping point. In simple stochastic systems this can result in increasing variance and autocorrelation, potentially yielding an early warning of an abrupt change. Here we aim to establish whether the loss of Arctic sea ice would follow these conceptual predictions, and which trends in sea ice variability can be expected from pre-industrial conditions toward an Arctic that is ice-free during the whole year. To this end, we apply a model hierarchy consisting of two box models and one comprehensive Earth system model. We find a consistent and robust decrease of the ice volume's annual relaxation time before summer ice is lost because thinner ice can adjust more quickly to perturbations. Thereafter, the relaxation time increases, mainly because the system becomes dominated by the ocean wa...

  2. Space Radar Image of Weddell Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is the first calibrated, multi-frequency, multi-polarization spaceborne radar image of the seasonal sea-ice cover in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. The multi-channel data provide scientists with details about the ice pack they cannot see any other way and indicates that the large expanse of sea-ice is, in fact, comprised of many smaller rounded ice floes, shown in blue-gray. These data are particularly useful in helping scientists estimate the thickness of the ice cover which is often extremely difficult to measure with other remote sensing systems. The extent, and especially thickness, of the polar ocean's sea-ice cover together have important implications for global climate by regulating the loss of heat from the ocean to the cold polar atmosphere. The image was acquired on October 3, 1994, by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour. This image is produced by overlaying three channels of radar data in the following colors: red (C-band, HH-polarization), green (L-band HV-polarization), and blue (L-band, HH-polarization). The image is oriented almost east-west with a center location of 58.2 degrees South and 21.6 degrees East. Image dimensions are 45 kilometers by 18 kilometers (28 miles by 11 miles). Most of the ice cover is composed of rounded, undeformed blue-gray floes, about 0.7 meters (2 feet) thick, which are surrounded by a jumble of red-tinged deformed ice pieces which are up to 2 meters (7 feet) thick. The winter cycle of ice growth and deformation often causes this ice cover to split apart, exposing open water or 'leads'. Ice growth within these openings is rapid due to the cold, brisk Antarctic atmosphere. Different stages of new-ice growth can be seen within the linear leads, resulting from continuous opening and closing. The blue lines within the leads are open water areas in new fractures which are roughened by wind. The bright red lines are an intermediate stage of new-ice

  3. Ice Load Project Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, Timothy J. [DNV GL, Seattle, WA (United States); Brown, Thomas [IFC Engineering, Calgary, AB (Canada); Byrne, Alex [DNV GL, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-10-30

    As interest and investment in offshore wind projects increase worldwide, some turbines will be installed in locations where ice of significant thickness forms on the water surface. This ice moves under the driving forces of wind, current, and thermal effects and may result in substantial forces on bottom-fixed support structures. The North and Baltic Seas in Europe have begun to see significant wind energy development and the Great Lakes of the United States and Canada may host wind energy development in the near future. Design of the support structures for these projects is best performed through the use of an integrated tool that can calculate the cumulative effects of forces due to turbine operations, wind, waves, and floating ice. The dynamic nature of ice forces requires that these forces be included in the design simulations, rather than added as static forces to simulation results. The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard[2] for offshore wind turbine design and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard[3] for offshore structures provide requirements and algorithms for the calculation of forces induced by surface ice; however, currently none of the major wind turbine dynamic simulation codes provides the ability to model ice loads. The scope of work of the project described in this report includes the development of a suite of subroutines, collectively named IceFloe, that meet the requirements of the IEC and ISO standards and couples with four of the major wind turbine dynamic simulation codes. The mechanisms by which ice forces impinge on offshore structures generally include the forces required for crushing of the ice against vertical-sided structures and the forces required to fracture the ice as it rides up on conical-sided structures. Within these two broad categories, the dynamic character of the forces with respect to time is also dependent on other factors such as the velocity and thickness of the moving ice

  4. Ice Age Geomorphology of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickert, A. D.; Anderson, R. S.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Picard, K.

    2012-12-01

    The Last Glacial Cycle in North America dramatically modified drainage patterns and geomorphology on a continental scale. As a consequence, the evolution of river systems holds information on the patterns of glaciation and isostatic response. This information can, in principle, be used to reconstruct the volumes of ice sheet sectors and eroded material by connecting the upstream ice sheets with stable isotope and other sedimentary records in offshore basins. Here we integrate this coupled geomorphic-hydrologic-glacial-sedimentary-paleoceanographic system to solve both the forward problem, how rivers evolve in response to Ice Age forcing, as well as the inverse problem, how fluvial systems record Quaternary history. The connections that define this system provide a link between climate and geomorphology that extends beyond the traditionally considered watershed-to-landscape scale by incorporating solid Earth deformations, large-scale shoreline migration, and the high amplitude changes in climate that drive the growth and decay of major ice sheets and water delivery to the bounding river systems. We address this continental scale problem using a valley-resolving drainage reconstruction that incorporates a realistic ice sheet history, a gravitationally self-consistent treatment of ice-age sea-level changes that includes shoreline migration, and precipitation and evapotranspiration retrodicted using general circulation model (GCM) runs. Drainage divides over the flat-lying North American interior migrate hundreds to thousands of kilometers in response to dynamic interactions between ice sheets and solid Earth response, and these changes coupled with post last glacial maximum (LGM) ice sheet melting drive high-amplitude variability in water and sediment discharge to the oceans. The Mackenzie River Delta records a sedimentary record produced by a highly non-eustatic sea level history and massive glacial sediment inputs routed along the axis that divided the Cordilleran

  5. Ice flux divergence anomalies on 79north Glacier, Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seroussi, H.; Morlighem, M.; Rignot, E.;

    2011-01-01

    The ice flux divergence of a glacier is an important quantity to examine because it determines the rate of temporal change of its thickness. Here, we combine high-resolution ice surface velocity observations of Nioghalvfjerdsfjorden (79north) Glacier, a major outlet glacier in north Greenland, with...... a dense grid of ice thickness data collected with an airborne radar sounder in 1998, to examine its ice flux divergence. We detect large variations, up to 100 m/yr, in flux divergence on grounded ice that are incompatible with what we know of the glacier surface mass balance, basal mass balance and...... onto a regular grid using a scheme (here block kriging) that does not conserve mass or ice flux. This problem is not unique to 79north Glacier but is common to all conventional ice thickness surveys of glaciers and ice sheets; and fundamentally limits the application of ice thickness grids to high...

  6. Image Techniques for Identifying Sea-Ice Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of ice forces are critical to Dynamic Positioning (DP operations in Arctic waters. Ice conditions are important for the analysis of ice-structure interaction in an ice field. To monitor sea-ice conditions, cameras are used as field observation sensors on mobile sensor platforms in Arctic. Various image processing techniques, such as Otsu thresholding, k-means clustering, distance transform, Gradient Vector Flow (GVF Snake, mathematical morphology, are then applied to obtain ice concentration, ice types, and floe size distribution from sea-ice images to ensure safe operations of structures in ice covered regions. Those techniques yield acceptable results, and their effectiveness are demonstrated in case studies.

  7. Method for estimating wind turbine production losses due to icing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turkia, V.; Huttunen, S.; Wallenius, T.

    2013-08-15

    Atmospheric icing causes production losses to wind turbines, poses a risk of ice throw and increases dynamic loading of wind turbine which might reduce the lifetime of turbine components. These effects are qualitatively widely known but not quantitatively. In order to estimate effects of icing to power production of a typical 3 MW wind turbine, a simulation based study was made. Three rime ice cases were selected with the meteorological conditions typical for Finnish climate. Conditions were the same for each case. The lengths of the icing events were varied to represent different phases of an icing event; beginning of icing, short icing event and long lasted icing event. Thus, three different ice masses accreted on a wind turbine blade were simulated. Accretion simulations were performed with a VTT inhouse code TURBICE. The aerodynamical properties of the iced profiles were modelled using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with ANSYS FLUENT flow solver. As a result, lift and drag coefficients were drawn as a function of an angle of attack. Small-scale surface roughness effect on drag coefficient was determined analytically. Finally, the power curves were generated with FAST software for the clean wind turbine and for the same turbine with the different ice accretions. The results showed relatively large impact of small-scale surface roughness on power production. In the beginning of an icing event, where ice causes basically only increased surface roughness, power production was discovered to reduce by approximately 17 % below rated wind speeds compared to the no-ice case. As the ice mass was increased, production reduction was 18 % for short icing event and 24 % for long lasted icing event. However, the relative reduction was smaller than in the beginning of icing, mainly due to the small-scale surface roughness that remained at the same level. The results indicate that the surface roughness is crucial to take into account when defining the aerodynamic penalty

  8. Ice-age Ice-sheet Rheology: Constraints from the Last Glacial Maximum Form of the Laurentide Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, W. Richard; Goldsby, David L.; Kohlstedt, David L.; Tarasov, Lev

    2000-01-01

    State-ot-the-art thermomechanical models of the modern Greenland ice and the ancient Laurenticle ice sheet that covered Canada at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) are not able to explain simultaneously the observed forms of these cryospheric structures when the same, anisotropy-enhanced, version of the conventional Glen flow law is employed to describe their rheology. The LGM Laurenticle ice sheet. predicted to develop in response to orbital climate forcing, is such that the ratio of its thickness to its horizontal extent is extremely large compared to the aspect ratio inferred on the basis of surface-geomorphological and solid-earth-geophysical constraints. We show that if the Glen flow law representation of the rheology is replaced with a new rheology based upon very high quality laboratory measurements of the stress-strain-rate relation, then the aspect ratios of both the modern Greenland ice sheet and the Laurenticle ice sheet, that existed at the LGM, are simultaneously explained with little or no retuning of the flow law.

  9. Sea Ice Brightness Temperature as a Function of Ice Thickness, Part II: Computed curves for thermodynamically modelled ice profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Mills, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Ice thickness is an important variable for climate scientists and is still an unsolved problem for satellite remote sensing specialists. There has been some success detecting the thickness of thin ice from microwave radiometers, and with this in mind this study attempts to model the thickness-radiance relation of sea ice at frequencies employed by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) radiometer and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR): between 1.4 and 89 GHz. In the first part of the study, the salinity of the ice was determined by a pair of empirical relationships, while the temperature was determined by a thermodynamic model. Because the thermodynamic model can be used as a simple ice growth model, in this, second part, the salinities are determined by the growth model. Because the model uses two, constant-weather scenarios representing two extremes ("fall freeze-up" and "winter cold snap"), brine expulsion is modelled with a single correction-step founded on mass conservation. The growt...

  10. Facies del subfondo del canal Beagle, Tierra del Fuego

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Bujalesky

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available El canal Beagle conecta los océanos Pacífico y Atlántico en el extremo meridional de Sudamérica y se ubica en el ambiente subantártico. Conforma una cuenca de unos 300 m de profundidad máxima y está separada del océano Atlántico por un umbral de 30 m de profundidad. El canal es un valle tectónico que fue completamente cubierto por el hielo glacial durante la última glaciación. Posteriormente, el canal fue ocupado por un lago glacial desde los 12.000 a los 8.000 años A.P., cuando fue invadido por el mar que alcanzó un nivel máximo entre los 6.000 y 5.000 años A.P. Con el objetivo de analizar las facies sedimentarias superficiales y del subfondo del canal se realizó un relevamiento geofísico con sonar de barrido lateral y un perfilador de 3,5 kHz. Sobre un basamento constituido por rocas metamórficas del Mesozoico, se identificaron depósitos de till y secuencias granodecrecientes que representan distintos estadios del retroceso glaciar, evidenciando hacia la sección superior facies lacustres y por encima depósitos de la transgresión marina del Holoceno. Además, se han identificado paleocauces y secuencias fluviales cubiertas por sedimentos marinos transgresivos.

  11. A Comparison of Sea Ice Type, Sea Ice Temperature, and Snow Thickness Distributions in the Arctic Seasonal Ice Zones with the DMSP SSM/I

    Science.gov (United States)

    St.Germain, Karen; Cavalieri, Donald J.; Markus, Thorsten

    1997-01-01

    Global climate studies have shown that sea ice is a critical component in the global climate system through its effect on the ocean and atmosphere, and on the earth's radiation balance. Polar energy studies have further shown that the distribution of thin ice and open water largely controls the distribution of surface heat exchange between the ocean and atmosphere within the winter Arctic ice pack. The thickness of the ice, the depth of snow on the ice, and the temperature profile of the snow/ice composite are all important parameters in calculating surface heat fluxes. In recent years, researchers have used various combinations of DMSP SSMI channels to independently estimate the thin ice type (which is related to ice thickness), the thin ice temperature, and the depth of snow on the ice. In each case validation efforts provided encouraging results, but taken individually each algorithm gives only one piece of the information necessary to compute the energy fluxes through the ice and snow. In this paper we present a comparison of the results from each of these algorithms to provide a more comprehensive picture of the seasonal ice zone using passive microwave observations.

  12. The ASIBIA sea-ice facility: First results from the Atmosphere-Sea-Ice-Biogeochemistry in the Arctic chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, James L.; Thomas, Max

    2016-04-01

    Working in the natural ocean-ice-atmosphere system is very difficult, as conducting fieldwork on sea-ice presents many challenges ice including costs, safety, experimental controls and access. The new ASIBIA (Atmosphere-Sea-Ice-Biogeochemistry in the Arctic) coupled Ocean-Sea-Ice-(Snow)-Atmosphere chamber facility at the University of East Anglia, UK, we are aiming to perform controlled first-year sea-ice investigations in areas such as sea-ice physics, physicochemical and biogeochemical processes in sea-ice and quantification of the bi-directional flux of gases in various states of first-year sea-ice conditions. The facility is a medium sized chamber with programmable temperatures from -55°C to +30°C, allowing a full range of first year sea-ice growing conditions in both the Arctic and Antarctic to be simulated. The water depth can be up to 1 m (including up to 25 cm of sea-ice) and an optional 1 m tall Teflon film atmosphere on top of the sea-ice, thus creating a closed and coupled ocean-sea-ice-atmosphere mesocosm. Ice growth in the tank is well suited for studying first-year sea-ice physical properties, with in-situ ice-profile measurements of temperature, salinity, conductivity, pressure and spectral light transmission. Underwater and above ice cameras are installed to record the physical development of the sea-ice. Here, we present the data from the first suites of experiments in the ASIBIA chamber focussing on sea-ice physics and give a brief description of the capabilities of the facility going forward. The ASIBIA chamber was funded as part of an ERC consolidator grant to the late Prof. Roland von Glasow and we hope this work and further development of the facility will act as a lasting legacy.

  13. Charging of ice-vapor interfaces: applications to thunderstorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Nelson

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The build-up of intrinsic Bjerrum and ionic defects at ice-vapor interfaces electrically charges ice surfaces and thus gives rise to many phenomena including thermoelectricity, ferroelectric ice films, sparks from objects in blizzards, electromagnetic emissions accompanying cracking in avalanches, glaciers, and sea ice, and charge transfer during ice-ice collisions in thunderstorms. Fletcher's theory of the ice surface in equilibrium proposed that the Bjerrum defects have a higher rate of creation at the surface than in the bulk, which produces a high concentration of surface D defects that then attract a high concentration of OH- ions at the surface. Here, we add to this theory the effect of a moving interface caused by growth or sublimation. This effect can increase the amount of ionic surface charges more than 10-fold for growth rates near 1 mm s-1 and can extend the spatial separation of interior charges in qualitative agreement with many observations. In addition, ice-ice collisions should generate sufficient pressure to melt ice at the contact region and we argue that the ice particle with the initially sharper point at contact loses more mass of melt than the other particle. A simple analytic model of this process with parameters that are consistent with observations leads to predicted collisional charge exchange that semiquantitatively explains the negative charging region of thunderstorms. The model also has implications for snowflake formation, ferroelectric ice, polarization of ice in snowpacks, and chemical reactions in ice surfaces

  14. Validation and evaluation of a workstation for monitoring sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Neil; Boardman, Diane; Darwin, David; Sullivan, Ken

    1994-12-01

    Demand for reliable sea ice information comes from many quarters including ship routing and resource exploitation companies, weather forecasting agencies and glaciological research institution. For operational purposes, this information is typically required for local regions on short timescales. To explore this market a prototype sea ice workstation has been developed. The workstation uses data from several current earth observation sensors, combining the advantages of regional survey, all-weather capability and high-resolution imagery. The output from the workstation is an integrated sea ice chart which can be used to display combinations of ice edge, ice type, ice concentrations, ice motion vectors and sea surface temperatures. During the course of its development significant new progress in automated ice classification has been achieved together with the enhancement of existing ice motion algorithms. The quality of the sea ice information from each geophysical algorithm was assessed through validation campaigns which collected independent datasets. The results of this analysis show the ice type classification to be most accurate in identifying multi-year ice; this is probably the most critical ice category for navigational purposes. A program of end-user evaluation has also been started in which sea ice charts are supplied to operational organizations and value-added services. This will continue during 1994 and provide feedback on the use of the workstation in a semi-operational environment.

  15. Summer fast ice evolution off Zhongshan Station, Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Ruibo; Li Zhijun; Zhang Zhanhai; Cheng Yanfeng; Dou Yinke

    2008-01-01

    Based on the field data acquired in the program of fast ice observationoff Zhongshan Station,Prydz Bay,East Antarctica during the austral summer 2005/2006,physical properties evolution of fast ice during the ice ablation seasonis analyzed in detail.Results show that the annual maximum ice thickness in 2005 occurred in later November,and then ice started to melt,and the ablation duration was 62 days; sea water under the ice became warmer synchronously; corresponding to the warming sea ice temperature,a "relative cold mid layer" appeared in sea ice; the fast ice marginal line recoiled back to the shore observably,and the recoil distance was 20.9 km from 18 December 2005 through 14 January 2006.In addition,based on the data of sea ice thickness survey along the investigation course of MV Xuelong on December 18 of 2005,the ice thickness distribution paten in the marginal ice zone have been described: sea ice thickness increased,but the diversity of floe ice thickness decreased from open water to fast icezone distinctly.

  16. Sensitivity of Cirrus Properties to Ice Nuclei Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The relative importance of heterogeneous and homogeneous ice nucleation for cirrus formation remains an active area of debate in the cloud physics community. From a theoretical perspective, a number of modeling studies have investigated the sensitivity of ice number concentration to the nucleation mechanism and the abundance of ice nuclei. However, these studies typically only addressed ice concentration immediately after ice nucleation. Recent modeling work has shown that the high ice concentrations produced by homogeneous freezing may not persist very long, which is consistent with the low frequency of occurrence of high ice concentrations indicated by cirrus measurements. Here, I use idealized simulations to investigate the impact of ice nucleation mechanism and ice nuclei abundance on the full lifecycle of cirrus clouds. The primary modeling framework used includes different modes of ice nucleation, deposition growth/sublimation, aggregation, sedimentation, and radiation. A limited number of cloud-resolving simulations that treat radiation/dynamics interactions will also been presented. I will show that for typical synoptic situations with mesoscale waves present, the time-averaged cirrus ice crystal size distributions and bulk cloud properties are less sensitive to ice nucleation processes than might be expected from the earlier simple ice nucleation calculations. I will evaluate the magnitude of the ice nuclei impact on cirrus for a range of temperatures and mesoscale wave specifications, and I will discuss the implications for cirrus aerosol indirect effects in general.

  17. Basal Crevasses at the Ice-Ocean Interface of Whillans Ice Stream, West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobel, R. W.; Christianson, K. A.; Wood, A. C.; Dalla Santa, K. L.; Gobel, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    The transition from limited- or no-slip conditions at the base of grounded ice to free-slip conditions beneath floating ice occurs across the few-kilometers-wide grounding zone of ice sheets. This transition is either an elastic flexural transition from bedrock to hydrostatically supported elevations (often tidally influenced), or a transition from thicker to thinner ice over a flat bed, or some combination of these processes. In either case, ice must flow across a changing stress field, often resulting in brittle deformation, which is manifested as basal crevassing at the ice sheet base and tidal strand cracking on the ice sheet surface. Thus the position and morphology of basal crevasses reveal important information about the stress state across this transition where ice and ocean interact. We acquired gridded ground-based radar surveys at two locations of the Whillans Ice Stream grounding zone, one over a subglacial peninsula where the transition to floatation is abrupt and the second over a subglacial embayment where several dynamic subglacial lakes drain to the ocean, likely resulting in episodic high sediment and water flux across the grounding line. Our surveys indicate a complex pattern of basal crevasses; some are related to basal topography, but others are more likely associated with ice flexure across the basal channel carrying water and sediment to the ocean. Due to the high reflectivity of seawater and the relatively shallow ice thickness, we image many off-nadir crevasses where the radar energy is first reflected from the ice-water interface and then from the crevasse, producing an echo signature with a reversed phase due to the second reflection. In several cases these crevasse echoes appear to mimic the geometry of a sub-ice 'wedge' dipping into the sediment, while in reality the radar never penetrates below the basal interface. Elsewhere we image pairs of crevasses from either side of a channel incised into the bed that produce curious signatures

  18. Feldspar minerals as efficient deposition ice nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Yakobi-Hancock

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dusts are well known to be efficient ice nuclei, where the source of this efficiency has typically been attributed to the presence of clay minerals such as illite and kaolinite. However, the ice nucleating abilities of the more minor mineralogical components have not been as extensively examined. As a result, the deposition ice nucleation abilities of 24 atmospherically-relevant mineral samples have been studied, using a continuous flow diffusion chamber at −40.0 ± 0.3 °C. The same particle size (200 nm and particle preparation procedure were used throughout. The ice nucleation behaviour of the pure minerals is compared to that of complex mixtures, such as Arizona Test Dust (ATD and Mojave Desert Dust (MDD, and to lead iodide, which has been previously proposed for cloud seeding. Lead iodide was the most efficient ice nucleus (IN, requiring a critical relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi of 122.0 ± 2.0% to activate 0.1% of the particles. MDD (RHi 126.3 ± 3.4% and ATD (RHi 129.5 ± 5.1% have lower but comparable activity. From a set of clay minerals (kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, non-clay minerals (e.g. hematite, magnetite, calcite, cerussite, quartz, and feldspar minerals (orthoclase, plagioclase present in the atmospheric dusts it was found that the feldspar minerals (particularly orthoclase, and not the clays, were the most efficient ice nuclei. Orthoclase and plagioclase were found to have critical RHi values of 127.1 ± 6.3% and 136.2 ± 1.3%, respectively. The presence of feldspars (specifically orthoclase may play a significant role in the IN behaviour of mineral dusts despite their lower percentage in composition relative to clay minerals.

  19. CYANATE ION IN COMPACT AMORPHOUS WATER ICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mate, Belen; Herrero, Victor J.; Rodriguez-Lazcano, Yamilet; Moreno, Miguel A.; Escribano, Rafael [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez-Torre, Delia [Departamento de Fisica Teorica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28050 Madrid (Spain); Gomez, Pedro C. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica I, Universidad Complutense, Unidad Asociada UCM-CSIC, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-11-10

    The 4.62 {mu}m infrared (2164.5 cm{sup -1}) absorption band, observed in ice mantels toward many young stellar objects, has been mostly attributed to the {nu}{sub 3} (CN stretch) band of OCN{sup -} ions. We present in this work a spectroscopic study of OCN{sup -} ions embedded in compact amorphous ice in a range of concentrations and temperatures relevant to astronomical observations together with quantum mechanical calculations of the {nu}{sub 3} band of OCN{sup -} in various H{sub 2}O environments. The ice samples containing the ions are prepared through hyperquenching of liquid droplets of K{sup +}OCN{sup -} solutions on a substrate at 14 K. The {nu}{sub 3} OCN{sup -} band appears as a broad feature peaking at 4.64 {mu}m with a secondary maximum at 4.54 {mu}m and is much weaker than the corresponding peak in the liquid solution or in the solid salt. A similar weakening is observed for other OCN{sup -} absorption peaks at 7.66 {mu}m (2{nu}{sub 2}) and 8.20 {mu}m ({nu}{sub 1}). The theoretical calculations for the {nu}{sub 3} vibration lead to a range of frequencies spanning the experimentally observed width. This frequency spread could help explain the pronounced drop in the band intensity in the ice. The OCN{sup -} {nu}{sub 3} band in the present compact ices is also broader and much weaker than that reported in the literature for OCN{sup -} ions obtained by variously processing porous ice samples containing suitable neutral precursors. The results of this study indicate that the astronomical detection of OCN{sup -} in ice mantels could be significantly impaired if the ion is embedded in a compact water network.

  20. Heat transfer in ice hockey halls: measurements, energy analysis and analytical ice pad temperature profile

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrantelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We consider heat transfer processes in an ice hockey hall, during operating conditions, with a bottom-up approach based upon on-site measurements. Detailed temperature data of both the ice pad and the air above the ice rink are used for a heat balance calculation in the steady-state regime, which quantifies the impact of each single heat source. We solve the heat equation in the ice slab in transient regime, and obtain a general analytical formula for the temperature profile. This solution is then applied to the resurfacing process by using our measurements as (time-dependent) boundary conditions (b.c.), and compared to an analogous numerical computation with good agreement. Our analytical formula is given with implicit initial condition and b.c., therefore it can be used not only in ice halls, but in a large variety of engineering applications.