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Sample records for ataxia patients cellular

  1. Cellular radiosensitivity in ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypersensitivity to both the cell-killing and chromosome-damaging effects of ionizing radiations, and other agents causing DNA breakage, is a consistent feature of cells from individuals with the cancer-prone disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T). Evidence for a defect in DNA strand break rejoining is slight, but a higher-than-normal level of chromosomal breaks persists in irradiated A-T cells. There is also evidence for elevated frequencies of DNA recombination and deletion mutation in A-T cells; these responses may be linked through a loss of fidelity in rejoining DNA breaks through recombination mechanisms. Additionally the regulation of cell-cycle responses is altered in A-T cells: in all phases of the cycle there is some loss of 'checkpoint' function shortly after irradiation, allowing cells to continue cycling despite extensive DNA damage. However, on present evidence, radiation hypersensitivity cannot be explained by this loss of regulatory function. It is suggested that the A-T gene product acts in the early stages of a DNA damage-recognition pathway, normally interacting with regulatory proteins such as p53, but also with proteins involved in the processing of DNA breaks. Reduced efficiency in this type of signalling function could well explain the link between radiosensitivity and cancer proneness. (author)

  2. Gluten ataxia of sporadic and hereditary cerebellar ataxia in patients from mainland China

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    Wen-Juan Guan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gluten sensitivity (GS is a spectrum of disorders with diverse manifestations. Recent evidence suggests that ataxia may be the only manifestation of GS and that it may be one of the causes of sporadic ataxia. Aim: To investigate the prevalence of gluten ataxia among patients with ataxia in China. Materials and Methods: Serum levels of anti-gliadin, anti-transglutaminase 2 (TG2, and anti-transglutaminase 6 (TG6 antibodies measured in 125 patients with ataxia (100 patients with sporadic ataxia and 25 patients with hereditary ataxia and 51 healthy controls by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results: The serum concentrations of anti-gliadin, anti-TG2 IgG, IgA, and TG6-IgG antibodies were elevated in ataxia patients, but the increase was not statistically significant. However, TG6-IgA serum levels were significantly higher in sporadic ataxia as compared to those in healthy controls (P < 0.05. Conclusions: These results provide evidence that sporadic ataxia in a subgroup of patients may be due to gluten ataxia in mainland China. Measurement of serum anti-TG6 antibodies along with anti-TG2 and anti-gliadin antibodies may be useful for diagnosing gluten ataxia.

  3. Malignancies in pediatric patients with ataxia telangiectasia

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    Murphy, R.C.; Berdon, W.E.; Ruzal-Shapiro, C. [Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, Department of Radiology, NY (United States); Hall, E.J. [Center for Radiological Research, Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Kornecki, A.; Daneman, A. [Hospital for Sick Children, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Brunelle, F. [Groupe-Hospitalier, Necker-Enfants-Malades, Paris (France); Campbell, J.B. [Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children and Women, Dept. of Radiology, Orlando, FL (United States)

    1999-04-01

    Background. Patients with ataxia telangiectasia (AT), known to have an inherent increased susceptibility to the development of cancer, may present with malignancies that are unusual for the patient`s age, are often difficult to diagnose clinically and radiographically and respond poorly to conventional therapy. Materials and methods. We reviewed the clinical presentation and imaging studies of 12 AT patients who developed malignancies. Results. Eight of the twelve patients developed non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma (CNS, thorax, bone), two developed Hodgkin`s disease, and two were diagnosed with gastrointestinal mucinous adenocarcinoma. Conclusion. The lymphomas were commonly extra nodal, and infiltrative rather than mass-like. The recognition of the tumors was often delayed due to confusion with the known infectious complications in AT patients. (orig.) With 8 figs., 1 tab., 12 refs.

  4. Ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, Sara; Singh, Piyush K; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2013-01-01

    The approach to the child with ataxia requires a detailed history and careful general and neurological examination as well as selected blood work and brain imaging and increasingly available genetic testing for inherited ataxias that usually have an episodic or progressive presentation. The differential of acute and recurring ataxia covered in this chapter includes intoxication (e.g., antiepileptics, lead, alcohol), postinfectious cerebellitis, hemorrhage, ischemic stroke, tumor (posterior fossa or cerebellum), brainstem encephalitis, occult neuroblastoma, Miller Fisher syndrome, conversion reaction, multiple sclerosis, epileptic pseudoataxia, vasculitis (e.g., Kawasaki), metabolic etiologies (e.g., maple syrup urine disease, pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency, biotinidase deficiency, Hartnup disease, and argininosuccinic aciduria), migraine, migraine equivalents (benign paroxysmal positional vertigo), autosomal dominant episodic ataxias (with seven types currently identified), and hypothyroidism. Cooperation with therapists and providers from other specialties including ophthalmology and genetics and metabolism is essential to caring for these children and their families. PMID:23622331

  5. Malignancies in pediatric patients with ataxia telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Patients with ataxia telangiectasia (AT), known to have an inherent increased susceptibility to the development of cancer, may present with malignancies that are unusual for the patient's age, are often difficult to diagnose clinically and radiographically and respond poorly to conventional therapy. Materials and methods. We reviewed the clinical presentation and imaging studies of 12 AT patients who developed malignancies. Results. Eight of the twelve patients developed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (CNS, thorax, bone), two developed Hodgkin's disease, and two were diagnosed with gastrointestinal mucinous adenocarcinoma. Conclusion. The lymphomas were commonly extra nodal, and infiltrative rather than mass-like. The recognition of the tumors was often delayed due to confusion with the known infectious complications in AT patients. (orig.)

  6. Cellular and molecular response to irradiation in ataxia telangiectasia and in Fanconi's anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) and Fanconi anemia (FA) are recessive genetic diseases featuring chromosomal instability, increased predisposition to cancer and in vitro hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation (AT) or DNA cross-linking agents (FA). Moreover, an in vivo hypersensitivity to γ-rays exposure was reported in both syndromes. Cellular response to irradiation includes growth arrest (cell cycle modification) and cell death (by apoptosis or necrosis). Since it is generally accepted that apoptosis modulates cellular sensitivity to genotoxic stress, it was of interest to investigate the contribution of apoptosis in determining FA and AT responses to DNA Damaging Agents. The results support the contention that the in vivo hypersensitivity to radiation in these syndromes is not related to a higher rate of apoptotic cells but could be to a higher necrotic response triggering inflammatory reactions in the patients affected by this syndromes. (authors)

  7. PMPCA mutations cause abnormal mitochondrial protein processing in patients with non-progressive cerebellar ataxia.

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    Jobling, Rebekah K; Assoum, Mirna; Gakh, Oleksandr; Blaser, Susan; Raiman, Julian A; Mignot, Cyril; Roze, Emmanuel; Dürr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Lévy, Nicolas; Prasad, Chitra; Paton, Tara; Paterson, Andrew D; Roslin, Nicole M; Marshall, Christian R; Desvignes, Jean-Pierre; Roëckel-Trevisiol, Nathalie; Scherer, Stephen W; Rouleau, Guy A; Mégarbané, André; Isaya, Grazia; Delague, Valérie; Yoon, Grace

    2015-06-01

    Non-progressive cerebellar ataxias are a rare group of disorders that comprise approximately 10% of static infantile encephalopathies. We report the identification of mutations in PMPCA in 17 patients from four families affected with cerebellar ataxia, including the large Lebanese family previously described with autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia and short stature of Norman type and localized to chromosome 9q34 (OMIM #213200). All patients present with non-progressive cerebellar ataxia, and the majority have intellectual disability of variable severity. PMPCA encodes α-MPP, the alpha subunit of mitochondrial processing peptidase, the primary enzyme responsible for the maturation of the vast majority of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins, which is necessary for life at the cellular level. Analysis of lymphoblastoid cells and fibroblasts from patients homozygous for the PMPCA p.Ala377Thr mutation and carriers demonstrate that the mutation impacts both the level of the alpha subunit encoded by PMPCA and the function of mitochondrial processing peptidase. In particular, this mutation impacts the maturation process of frataxin, the protein which is depleted in Friedreich ataxia. This study represents the first time that defects in PMPCA and mitochondrial processing peptidase have been described in association with a disease phenotype in humans. PMID:25808372

  8. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6: MRI of three Japanese patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the MRI findings in three Japanese patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) in which a polymorphic CAG repeat was identified in the gene encoding the α1A voltage-dependent P/Q-type Ca2+ channel subunit (CACNL1A4). All showed slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia and mild pyramidal signs. Neuroradiologically, they had moderate cerebellar atrophy, most prominently in the superior vermis, whereas the brain stem appeared to be spared. No abnormal signal intensity was identified. (orig.)

  9. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6: MRI of three Japanese patients

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    Satoh, J.I.; Tokumoto, H.; Yukitake, M.; Matsui, M.; Kuroda, Y. [Division of Neurology, Department of Internal Medicine, Saga Medical School, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849 (Japan); Matsuyama, Z.; Kawakami, H.; Nakamura, S. [Third Department of Internal Medicine, Hiroshima University School of Medicine Hiroshima (Japan)

    1998-04-01

    We describe the MRI findings in three Japanese patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) in which a polymorphic CAG repeat was identified in the gene encoding the {alpha}{sub 1A} voltage-dependent P/Q-type Ca{sup 2+} channel subunit (CACNL1A4). All showed slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia and mild pyramidal signs. Neuroradiologically, they had moderate cerebellar atrophy, most prominently in the superior vermis, whereas the brain stem appeared to be spared. No abnormal signal intensity was identified. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 23 refs.

  10. Bilateral maculopathy in a patient with ataxia telangiectasia.

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    Gioia, Lauren V; Bonsall, Dean; Moffett, Kathryn; Leys, Monique

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of toxoplasmosis with bilateral maculopathy in a 7-year-old boy diagnosed with ataxia telangiectasia (AT) at age 6. AT manifests as ataxia, apraxia, telangiectasia, and dysarthria. Common ophthalmologic findings in AT include fine conjunctival telangiectasia. Patients also suffer from recurrent sinopulmonary infections; however, serious opportunistic infection is rarely diagnosed. At 8 years of age he developed disseminated Toxoplasma gondii (toxoplasmosis) infection and meningoencephalitis. This ophthalmologic finding and the subsequent toxoplasmosis meningoencephalitis have not been previously reported in AT. PMID:26917084

  11. Visual System Involvement in Patients with Friedreich's Ataxia

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    Fortuna, Filippo; Barboni, Piero; Liguori, Rocco; Valentino, Maria Lucia; Savini, Giacomo; Gellera, Cinzia; Mariotti, Caterina; Rizzo, Giovanni; Tonon, Caterina; Manners, David; Lodi, Raffaele; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Carelli, Valerio

    2009-01-01

    Optic neuropathy is common in mitochondrial disorders, but poorly characterized in Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA), a recessive condition caused by lack of the mitochondrial protein frataxin. We investigated 26 molecularly confirmed FRDA patients by studying both anterior and posterior sections of the visual pathway using a new, integrated approach.…

  12. Preliminary Study of Intravenous Amantadine Treatment for Ataxia Management in Patients with Probable Multiple System Atrophy with Predominant Cerebellar Ataxia

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    Jinyoung Youn

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia is a disabling neurologic disease. However, effective management has not yet been established. We conducted a short-term, open-label preliminary study to assess the benefits of intravenous amantadine treatment in patients with probable multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia. Methods: Twenty patients (10 male, 10 female with probable multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia received 400 mg of amantadine by intravenous per day for 5 days. Ataxia severity was evaluated by the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale before and after intravenous amantadine therapy and all subjects reported subjective improvement after intravenous amantadine treatment using a patient global impression scale. We analyzed the total and subscale scores by the ataxia scale and patient global impression scale. Results: The mean age was 57.4 years (range: 47–72 and the mean disease duration was 30.8 months (range: 11–79. The ataxia severity significantly decreased after intravenous amantadine therapy from 42.5 to 37.3 (p < 0.001. The mean patient global impression scale for improvement was 2.9 and there were no side effects of intravenous amantadine treatment observed. When we assessed responders, the duration of intravenous amantadine effect was more than 1 month in 4 subjects of 7 responders. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that intravenous amantadine treatment can be a safe management option in cerebellar ataxia, although the mechanism is unclear. Thus, further double-blind, long-term studies with a larger sample size are needed.

  13. Unusual and severe disease course in a child with ataxia-telangiectasia.

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    Meyts, I.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Wolf-Peeters, C. de; Proesmans, M.; Renard, M.; Uyttebroeck, A.; Boeck, K. de

    2003-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is an autosomal recessive syndrome of combined immunodeficiency. Hallmarks of the disease comprise progressive cerebellar ataxia, oculocutaneous telangiectasia, cancer susceptibility and variable humoral and cellular immunodeficiency. We describe a patient with AT presenti

  14. Novel Point Mutations in Frataxin Gene in Iranian Patients with Friedreich’s Ataxia

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    Mohammad Mehdi HEIDARI*

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Heidari MM , Khatami M, Pourakrami J. Novel Point Mutations in Frataxin Gene in Iranian Patients withFriedreich’s Ataxia. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1:32-36. ObjectiveFriedreich’s ataxia is the most common form of hereditary ataxia with autosomal recessive pattern. More than 96% of patients are homozygous for GAA repeat extension on both alleles in the first intron of FXN gene and the remainingpatients have been shown to be heterozygous for a GAA extension in one allele and point mutation in other allele.Materials & MethodsIn this study, exons of 1, 2, 3, and 5 of frataxin gene were searched by single strand conformation polymorphism polymerase chain reaction (PCR-SSCP in 5 patients with GAA extension in one allele. For detection of exact mutation,samples with band shifts were sent for DNA sequencing.Results Three novel point mutations were found in patients heterozygous for the GAA repeat expansion, p.S81A, p.Y123D, and p.S192C. ConclusionOur results showed that these point mutations in one allele with GAA extension in another allele are associated with FRDA signs. Thus, these results emphasize the importance of performing molecular genetic analysis for point mutations inFRDA patients. References:Delatycki MB, Williamson R, Forrest SM. Friedreich ataxia: an overview. J Med Genet 2000;37(1:1-8.Harding AE, Zilkha KJ. ‘Pseudo-dominant’ inheritance in Friedreich’s ataxia. J Med Genet 1981;18(4:285-7.Schulz JB, Boesch S, Burk K, Durr A, Giunti P, Mariotti C, et al. Diagnosis and treatment of Friedreich ataxia: a European perspective. Nat Rev Neurol 2009;5(4:222-34.Campuzano V, Montermini L, Lutz Y, Cova L, Hindelang C, Jiralerspong S, et al. Frataxin is reduced in Friedreich ataxia patients and is associated with mitochondrial membranes. Hum Mol Genet 1997;6(11:1771-80.Sharma R, De Biase I, Gomez M, Delatycki MB, Ashizawa T, Bidichandani SI. Friedreich ataxia in carriers of unstable borderline

  15. Dysregulation of cellular iron metabolism in Friedreich ataxia: from primary iron-sulfur cluster deficit to mitochondrial iron accumulation

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    HelenePuccio

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia (FRDA is the most common recessive ataxia in the Caucasian population and is characterized by a mixed spinocerebellar and sensory ataxia frequently associating cardiomyopathy. The disease results from decreased expression of the FXN gene coding for the mitochondrial protein frataxin. Early histological and biochemical study of the pathophysiology in patient’s samples revealed that dysregulation of iron metabolism is a key feature of the disease, mainly characterized by mitochondrial iron accumulation and by decreased activity of iron-sulfur cluster enzymes. In the recent past years, considerable progress in understanding the function of frataxin has been provided through cellular and biochemical approaches, pointing to the primary role of frataxin in iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis. However, why and how the impact of frataxin deficiency on this essential biosynthetic pathway leads to mitochondrial iron accumulation is still poorly understood. Herein, we review data on both the primary function of frataxin and the nature of the iron metabolism dysregulation in FRDA. To date, the pathophysiological implication of the mitochondrial iron overload in FRDA remains to be clarified.

  16. Visuomotor ataxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three patients with visuomotor ataxia, a disorder of hand movement to grasp objects located in the periphery of the visual field, were studied clinically and neuroradiologically with conventional and reformatted CT scans. Visuomotor ataxia was noted in the hemifield contralateral to the parieto-occipital lesion with both hands regardless the side of the lesion in this study. No dominant hemisphere for visuomotor ataxia was noted. The responsible lesions for this disorder were overlapped at Broadmann's area 7, 18, 19 and their surrounded white matter including the connecting fibers to the contralateral hemisphere via the splenium of corpus callosum. No direct lesion was found in the angular gyrus (Broadmann area 39). Visuomotor ataxia was seen with both hands in our series and it can be explained by the disconnection of either or both of the direct and crossed long association fibers between visual association areas and motor association areas at the parieto-occipital junction. (author)

  17. Nuclear Ataxias

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    Orr, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    Historically basic neuroscience research has made several important contributions to the cell biology of the nucleus, in particular the elucidation of nuclear structures and compartments. As research progressed towards elucidating the mechanism of neurological disease at the cellular and molecular levels, it is now providing insight into the importance and basis of coordination of nuclear pathways within the nucleus and with other cellular compartments. Ataxias, lethal neurodegenerative disea...

  18. Physiotherapy in degenerative cerebellar ataxias: utilisation, patient satisfaction, and professional expertise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonteyn, E.M.R.; Keus, S.H.J.; Verstappen, C.C.P.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2013-01-01

    Physiotherapy plays an important role in the management of patients with degenerative cerebellar ataxias. However, our insight in the quantity and quality of physiotherapy prescription in this group of patients is incomplete. The purposes of this study were to investigate the utilization of physioth

  19. The effectiveness of allied health care in patients with ataxia: a systematic review

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    Fonteyn, E.M.R.; Keus, S.H.J.; Verstappen, C.C.P.; Schols, L.; Groot, I.J.M. de; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with cerebellar ataxia have serious disabilities in daily life, while pharmacological treatment options are absent. Therefore, allied health care is considered to be important in the management of these patients. The goal of this review is to evaluate scientific evidence for allied hea

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients presenting with (sub)acute cerebellar ataxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute or subacute cerebellar inflammation is mainly caused by postinfectious, toxic, neoplastic, vascular, or idiopathic processes and can result in cerebellar ataxia. Previous magnetic resonance (MR) studies in single patients who developed acute or subacute ataxia showed varying imaging features. Eighteen patients presenting with acute and subacute onset of ataxia were included in this study. Cases of chronic-progressive/hereditary and noncerebellar causes (ischemia, multiple sclerosis lesions, metastasis, bleedings) were excluded. MR imaging findings were then matched with the clinical history of the patient. An underlying etiology for ataxic symptoms were found in 14/18 patients (postinfectious/infectious, paraneoplastic, autoimmune, drug-induced). In two of five patients without MR imaging findings and three of eight patients with minimal imaging features (cerebellar atrophy, slight signal alterations, and small areas of restricted diffusion), adverse clinical outcomes were documented. Of the five patients with prominent MR findings (cerebellar swelling, contrast enhancement, or broad signal abnormalities), two were lost to follow-up and two showed long-term sequelae. No correlation was found between the presence of initial MRI findings in subacute or acute ataxia patients and their long-term clinical outcome. MR imaging was more flagrantly positive in cases due to encephalitis. (orig.)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients presenting with (sub)acute cerebellar ataxia

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    Schneider, Tanja [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Thomalla, Goetz [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Neurology, Hamburg (Germany); Goebell, Einar [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); Piotrowski, Anna [The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yousem, David Mark [The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-02-17

    Acute or subacute cerebellar inflammation is mainly caused by postinfectious, toxic, neoplastic, vascular, or idiopathic processes and can result in cerebellar ataxia. Previous magnetic resonance (MR) studies in single patients who developed acute or subacute ataxia showed varying imaging features. Eighteen patients presenting with acute and subacute onset of ataxia were included in this study. Cases of chronic-progressive/hereditary and noncerebellar causes (ischemia, multiple sclerosis lesions, metastasis, bleedings) were excluded. MR imaging findings were then matched with the clinical history of the patient. An underlying etiology for ataxic symptoms were found in 14/18 patients (postinfectious/infectious, paraneoplastic, autoimmune, drug-induced). In two of five patients without MR imaging findings and three of eight patients with minimal imaging features (cerebellar atrophy, slight signal alterations, and small areas of restricted diffusion), adverse clinical outcomes were documented. Of the five patients with prominent MR findings (cerebellar swelling, contrast enhancement, or broad signal abnormalities), two were lost to follow-up and two showed long-term sequelae. No correlation was found between the presence of initial MRI findings in subacute or acute ataxia patients and their long-term clinical outcome. MR imaging was more flagrantly positive in cases due to encephalitis. (orig.)

  2. Chemo- and radiosensitivity testing in a patient with ataxia telangiectasia and Hodgkin disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, RYJ; Dolsma, WV; Leeuw, JA; Kampinga, HH

    2002-01-01

    Treatment of Hodgkin disease (HD) in ataxia telangiectasia (AT) patients is hampered by hypersensitivity to radiation and chemotherapy. Most patients die, due to toxicity or rarely, to progressive disease. The authors report on a 9-year-old girl with stage IIA HD and AT She was treated with a tailor

  3. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3: subphenotypes in a cohort of brazilian patients

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    Adriana Moro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3 involves cerebellar, pyramidal, extrapyramidal, motor neuron and oculomotor systems with strong phenotypic heterogeneity, that lead us to classify the disorder into different clinical subtypes according to the predominantly affected motor systems. Method The series comprises 167 SCA3 patients belonging to 68 pedigrees, studied from 1989-2013. These patients were categorized into seven different subphenotypes. Results SCA3 cases were clustered according to the predominant clinical features. Three most common forms were subphenotype 2, characterized by ataxia and pyramidal symptom was observed in 67.5%, subphenotype 3 with ataxia and peripheral signs in 13.3%, and subphenotype 6 with pure cerebellar syndrome in 7.2%. Conclusion Our study was the first to systematically classify SCA3 into seven subphenotypes. This classification may be particularly useful for determination of a more specific and direct phenotype/genotype correlation in future studies.

  4. Spinocerebellar ataxias Ataxias espinocerebelares

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    Hélio A.G. Teive

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs constitute a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia in association with some or all of the following conditions: ophthalmoplegia, pyramidal signs, movement disorders, pigmentary retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, cognitive dysfunction and dementia. OBJECTIVE: To carry out a clinical and genetic review of the main types of SCA. METHOD: The review was based on a search of the PUBMED and OMIM databases. RESULTS: Thirty types of SCAs are currently known, and 16 genes associated with the disease have been identified. The most common types are SCA type 3, or Machado-Joseph disease, SCA type 10 and SCA types 7, 2, 1 and 6. SCAs are genotypically and phenotypically very heterogeneous. A clinical algorithm can be used to distinguish between the different types of SCAs. CONCLUSIONS: Detailed clinical neurological examination of SCA patients can be of great help when assessing them, and the information thus gained can be used in an algorithm to screen patients before molecular tests to investigate the correct etiology of the disease are requested.As ataxias espinocerebelares (AECs compreendem um grupo heterogeneo de enfermidades neurodegenerativas, que se caracterizam pela presença de ataxia cerebelar progressiva, associada de forma variada com oftalmoplegia, sinais piramidais, distúrbios do movimento, retinopatia pigmentar, neuropatia periférica, disfunção cognitiva e demência. OBJETIVO: Realizar uma revisão clínico-genética dos principais tipos de AECs. MÉTODO: A revisão foi realizada através da pesquisa pelo sistema do PUBMED e do OMIM. RESULTADOS: Na atualidade existem cerca de 30 tipos de AECs, com a descoberta de 16 genes. Os tipos mais comuns são a AEC tipo 3, ou doença de Machado-Joseph, a AEC tipo 10, e as AECs tipo 7, 2 1, e 6. As AECs apresentam grande heterogeneidade genotípica e fenotípica. Pode-se utilizar um algoritmo clínico para a

  5. Frequency analysis of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias in mainland Chinese patients and clinical and molecular characterization of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Hong; TANG Bei-sha; XU Bo; ZHAO Guo-hua; SHEN Lu; TANG Jian-guang; LI Qing-hua; XIA Kun

    2005-01-01

    Background Dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. This study was to further assess the frequency of SCA1 (spinocerebellar ataxia type 1), SCA2, SCA3/MJD (spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease), SCA6, SCA7, SCA8, SCA10, SCA12, SCA14, SCA17 and DRPLA (dentatorubro-pallidoluysian atrophy) in mainland Chinese, and to specifically characterize mainland Chinese patients with SCA6 in terms of clinical and molecular features.Methods Using a molecular approach, we investigated SCA in 120 mainland Chinese families with dominantly inherited ataxias and in 60 mainland Chinese patients with sporadic ataxias. Clinical and molecular features of SCA6 were further characterized in 13 patients from 4 families. Results SCA3/MJD was the most common type of autosomal dominant SCA in mainland Chinese, accounting for 83 patients from 59 families (49.2%), followed by SCA2[8(6.7%)], SCA1[7(5.8%)], SCA6[4(3.3%)], SCA7[1(0.8%)], SCA8(0%), SCA10(0%), SCA12(0%), SCA14(0%), SCA17(0%) and DRPLA(0%). The genes responsible for 41 (34.2%) of dominantly inherited SCA families remain to be determined. Among the 60 patients with sporadic ataxias in the present series, 3 (5.0%) was found to harbor SCA3 mutations while none was found to harbor SCA6 mutations. In the 4 families with SCA6, significant anticipation was found in the absence of genetic instability on transmission.Conclusion A geographic cluster of families with SCA6 subtype was initially identified in a mainland Chinese population.

  6. Normal repair of DNA single-strand breaks in patients with ataxia telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The repair of DNA single-strand breaks induced by X-rays or bleomycin was investigated in diploid fibroblasts isolated from normal individuals and from patients with ataxia telangiectasia by the technique of alkaline elution. No difference was observed between these cell strains in the rate of rejoining of DNA strand breaks induced by low or moderate doses of X-rays or by treatment with bleomycin. Owing to the sensitivity of the technique employed, the possibility that ataxia telangiectasia cells are deficient in DNA single-strand break repair appears unlikely. (Auth.)

  7. Poor fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in myocardial viability study in nondiabetic Friedreich's ataxia patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 48-year-old man, a known case of Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) underwent cardiac fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography -computed tomography (PET/CT) for evaluation of myocardial viability. Tetrofosmin images showed an enlarged left ventricular cavity with small mid and basal inferior and apical infarct global hypokinesia with ejection fraction of 39%. Fluorodeoxyglucose images showed poor quality myocardial images. Friedreich's ataxia is associated with a high incidence of diabetes mellitus. Non-diabetic patients with Friedreich's ataxia have insulin resistance. This is associated with a reduction in the affinity of insulin receptors and membrane abnormality that alters the binding function of the insulin receptor

  8. Fatigue in spinocerebellar ataxia: Patient self-assessment of an early and disabling symptom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Brusse (Esther); M.G.J. Brusse-Keizer (Marjolein G.J.); H.J. Duivenvoorden (Hugo); J.C. van Swieten (John)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To identify the prevalence and severity of fatigue and predicting factors for severe fatigue in autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). Methods: We studied a cross-section of 123 patients with SCA. Six functional scales were used in a self-assessment: the Fatigue Seve

  9. Motor pathway degeneration in young ataxia telangiectasia patients: A diffusion tractography study

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    Ishani Sahama

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Whole tract analysis of the corticomotor, corticospinal and somatosensory pathways in ataxia telangiectasia showed significant white matter degeneration along the entire length of motor circuits, highlighting that ataxia–telangiectasia gene mutation impacts the cerebellum and multiple other motor circuits in young patients.

  10. The humanδ2 glutamate receptor gene is not mutated in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinxiang Huang; Aiyu Lin; Haiyan Dong; Chaodong Wang

    2014-01-01

    The human glutamate receptor delta 2 gene (GRID2) shares 90%homology with the orthologous mouse gene. The mouse Grid2 gene is involved with functions of the cerebellum and sponta-neous mutation of Grid2 leads to a spinocerebellar ataxia-like phenotype. To investigate whether such mutations occur in humans, we screened for mutations in the coding sequence of GRID2 in 24 patients with familial or sporadic spinocerebellar ataxia and in 52 normal controls. We de-tected no point mutations or insertion/deletion mutations in the 16 exons of GRID2. However, a polymorphic 4 nucleotide deletion (IVS5-121_-118 GAGT) and two single nucleotide polymor-phisms (c.1251G>T and IVS14-63C>G) were identiifed. The frequency of these polymorphisms was similar between spinocerebellar ataxia patients and normal controls. These data indicate that spontaneous mutations do not occur in GRID2 and that the incidence of spinocerebellar ataxia in humans is not associated with GRID2 mutation or polymorphisms.

  11. Conjunctival Telangiectasia in a Patient with Ataxia Telangiectasia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özge Pınar Akarsu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to report a 7-year-old patient who developed bilateral conjunctival hyperemia while being under treatment of pneumonia in Pediatric Infectious Diseases Clinic at Sisli Etfal Training and Research Hospital. Ophthalmological examination revealed bilateral conjunctival telangiectasias which were thought to be the ophthalmologic sign of ataxia telangiectasia after considering the other clinical findings, laboratory and imaging results, and family history. (Turk J Oph thal mol 2012; 42: 75-7

  12. Conjunctival Telangiectasia in a Patient with Ataxia Telangiectasia: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Özge Pınar Akarsu; Cemile Üçgül Atılgan; Dilek Güven

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report a 7-year-old patient who developed bilateral conjunctival hyperemia while being under treatment of pneumonia in Pediatric Infectious Diseases Clinic at Sisli Etfal Training and Research Hospital. Ophthalmological examination revealed bilateral conjunctival telangiectasias which were thought to be the ophthalmologic sign of ataxia telangiectasia after considering the other clinical findings, laboratory and imaging results, and family history. (Tu...

  13. Molecular studies on the nature of the repair defect in ataxia-telangiectasia and their implications for cellular radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have utilized DNA transfer and recombinant DNA techniques to probe DNA double-strand break repair in the human ionizing radiation-sensitive genetic syndrome ataxia-telangiectasis (A-T). Using restriction enzyme-generated double-strand breaks in the coding sequence of a selectable gene we have detected a significantly greater frequency of mis-repair of such breaks in a permanent A-T cell line compared with cell lines of normal radiosensitivity. This mis-repair in A-T can explain many of the clinical features of the disease but was insufficiently detailed to address the broad problem of DNA repair mechanisms relevant to ionizing radiation-induced damage. To extend these observations of DNA double-strand break mis-repair we have now applied this type of repair assay to novel, de novo induced mammalian X-ray-sensitive cell lines and to appropriate Escherichia coli mutants. In both cellular systems we have found some equivalence to the A-T repair defect. Studies on one E. coli mutant suggest an involvement of a topoisomerase activity in DNA double-strand break mis-repair, which may be relevant to the biochemical defect in A-T. (author)

  14. POINT MUTATIONS ON MITOCHONDRIAL DNA IN IRANIAN PATIENTS WITH FRIEDREICH’S ATAXIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Etemad Ahari

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveMitochondrial DNA (mtDNA is considered a candidate modifier factor for neuro-degenerative disorders. The most common type of ataxia is Friedreich's ataxia (FA. The aim of this study was to investigate different parts of mtDNA in 20 Iranian FA patients and 80 age-matched controls by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and automated DNA sequencing methods to find any probable point mutations involved in the pathogenesis of FA.Materials and MethodsWe identified 13 nucleotide substitutions including A3505G, T3335C, G3421A, G8251A, A8563G, A8563G, G8584A, T8614C, T8598C, C8684T, A8701G, G8994A and A9024G.ResultsTwelve of 13 nucleotide substitutions had already been reported as polymorphism. One of the nucleotide substitutions (A9024G had not been reported before. The A9024G nucleotide substitution does not change its amino acid. The controls were also investigated for this polymorphism which was found in two of them (2.5%.ConclusionNone of the mutations found in this study can affect the clinical manifestations of FA. This survey also provides evidence that the mtDNA A9024G allele is a new nonpathogenic polymorphism. We suggest follow-up studies for this polymorphism in different populations.Keywords:Mitochondrial DNA, Friedreich's Ataxia

  15. Cerebellar Dysfunction and Ataxia in Patients with Epilepsy: Coincidence, Consequence, or Cause?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, Pavel; Bareš, Martin; Brázdil, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Basic epilepsy teachings assert that seizures arise from the cerebral cortex, glossing over infratentorial structures such as the cerebellum that are believed to modulate rather than generate seizures. Nonetheless, ataxia and other clinical findings in epileptic patients are slowly but inevitably drawing attention to this neural node. Tracing the evolution of this line of inquiry from the observed coincidence of cerebellar atrophy and cerebellar dysfunction (most apparently manifested as ataxia) in epilepsy to their close association, this review considers converging clinical, physiological, histological, and neuroimaging evidence that support incorporating the cerebellum into epilepsy pathology. We examine reports of still controversial cerebellar epilepsy, studies of cerebellar stimulation alleviating paroxysmal epileptic activity, studies and case reports of cerebellar lesions directly associated with seizures, and conditions in which ataxia is accompanied by epileptic seizures. Finally, the review substantiates the role of this complex brain structure in epilepsy whether by coincidence, as a consequence of deleterious cortical epileptic activity or antiepileptic drugs, or the very cause of the disease. PMID:27375960

  16. Speech changes after coordinative training in patients with cerebellar ataxia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tykalova, Tereza; Pospisilova, Mariana; Cmejla, Roman; Jerabek, Jaroslav; Mares, Pavel; Rusz, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Although rehabilitative training is a necessary adjunct in the management of gait ataxia, it remains unknown whether the possible beneficial effect of intensive coordinative training may translate to activities of daily living, which are closely connected with postural alignment. The aim of the present study was to examine the effectiveness of a 2-week intensive coordinative motor training on speech production. Speech and motor performances in a cohort of ten individuals with cerebellar degeneration were examined three times; before the introduction of training, directly and 4 weeks after the last training session. Each patient was instructed to perform a speaking task of fast syllable repetition and monologue. Objective acoustic analyses were used to investigate six key aspects of speech production disturbed in ataxic dysarthria including accuracy of consonant articulation, accuracy of vowel articulation, irregular alternating motion rates, prolonged phonemes, slow alternating motion rates and inappropriate segmentation. We found that coordinative training had a mild beneficial effect on speech in cerebellar patients. Immediately after the last training session, slight speech improvements were evident in all ten patients. Furthermore, follow-up assessment performed 4 weeks later revealed that 90 % of the patients showed better speech performance than before initiation of the therapy. The present study supports evidence that the intensive rehabilitative training may positively affect fine-motor movements such as speech in patients with cerebellar ataxia. PMID:26377098

  17. Ataxia and tremor due to lesions involving cerebellar projection pathways: a DTI tractographic study in six patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, M; Paus, S; Allert, N; Mädler, B; Klockgether, T; Urbach, H; Coenen, V A

    2015-01-01

    Focal lesions of brainstem, thalamus, and subcortical white matter may cause movement disorders that are clinically indistinguishable from cerebellar symptoms. It is suspected that ataxia in these cases is due to damage of efferent or afferent pathways of the cerebellum. However, the precise anatomical correlate often remains undefined. We used deterministic diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) tractography to study the anatomical relationship between lesions causing ataxia and efferent cerebellar pathways. Study subjects were six male patients with focal lesions of different etiology (demyelination, hemorrhage, ischemia, neoplasm) outside the cerebellum. Five patients had cerebellar-like ataxia with prominent contralateral upper limb involvement. One patient with an almost midline mesencephalic lesion had a symmetrical ataxic syndrome. We used 3T MRI (Intera, Philips Medical Systems, Best, Netherlands) and DTI tractography (32 directions, StealthViz DTI, Medtronic Navigation, Louisville, USA) to delineate the dentato-rubro-thalamo-cortical tract (DRT). In all patients, tractography demonstrated focal lesions affecting the DRT in different locations. We conclude that in vivo mapping of cerebral pathways using DTI tractography in patients with focal extracerebellar brain lesions may provide direct evidence of circumscribed damage to the DRT, causing unilateral cerebellar-like ataxia. Also, a unilateral mesencephalic lesion at the level of the crossing of the DRT may cause bilateral ataxia. PMID:25287016

  18. Evaluation of acetazolamine response in patients with cerebellar ataxia using dynamic quantitative F-18-FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebellar Ataxia (CA) usually shows dramatic response to acetazolamide treatment. But few cases of acetazolamide unresponse CA were reported recently. Using dynamic FDG PET, we tried to evaluate the metabolic abnormality and its drug response in CA. Quantitative F-18-FDG PET was performed prior and after treatment of acetazolamide (250 mg qid for 10 days) in two patient suspected episodic cerebellar ataxia. Using Model-based clustering method, the regional cerebral glucose metabolic rate (rCMRglu) was calculated. Two patients showed different treatment response to acetazolamide. In one patient who showed markedly reduced frequency of the ataxic attack after treatment. FDG PET showed that mean cerebellar glucose metabolism was increased after treatment (ΔrCMRglu:9%). However, in the other who showed poor response to acetazolamide, FDG PET showed the more decrease metabolism in cerebellar metabolism after treatment (ΔrCMRglu:-17%). The change of the cerebellar glucose metabolism on FDG PET reflected the symptomatic improvement after acetazolamide in these two CA patients. We could expected that FDG PET might be a very useful tool to quantitatively predict the treatment response in CA and other neurologic disorder

  19. Evaluation of acetazolamine response in patients with cerebellar ataxia using dynamic quantitative F-18-FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. K.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, J. S.; Kim, M. H.; Lee, K. M.; Yeo, J. S.; Chung, J. K.; Lee, M. C. [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Cerebellar Ataxia (CA) usually shows dramatic response to acetazolamide treatment. But few cases of acetazolamide unresponse CA were reported recently. Using dynamic FDG PET, we tried to evaluate the metabolic abnormality and its drug response in CA. Quantitative F-18-FDG PET was performed prior and after treatment of acetazolamide (250 mg qid for 10 days) in two patient suspected episodic cerebellar ataxia. Using Model-based clustering method, the regional cerebral glucose metabolic rate (rCMRglu) was calculated. Two patients showed different treatment response to acetazolamide. In one patient who showed markedly reduced frequency of the ataxic attack after treatment. FDG PET showed that mean cerebellar glucose metabolism was increased after treatment ({delta}rCMRglu:9%). However, in the other who showed poor response to acetazolamide, FDG PET showed the more decrease metabolism in cerebellar metabolism after treatment ({delta}rCMRglu:-17%). The change of the cerebellar glucose metabolism on FDG PET reflected the symptomatic improvement after acetazolamide in these two CA patients. We could expected that FDG PET might be a very useful tool to quantitatively predict the treatment response in CA and other neurologic disorder.

  20. Friedreich's Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedreich's ataxia is an inherited disease that damages your nervous system. The damage affects your spinal cord and the ... of 5 and 15. The main symptom is ataxia, which means trouble coordinating movements. Specific symptoms include ...

  1. Ataxia - telangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001394.htm Ataxia - telangiectasia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Ataxia-telangiectasia is a rare childhood disease. It affects ...

  2. Ataxia Telangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare, inherited disease. It affects the nervous system, immune system, and ... young children, usually before age 5. They include Ataxia - trouble coordinating movements Poor balance Slurred speech Tiny, ...

  3. White matter changes in patients with Friedreich ataxia after treatment with erythropoietin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Karl; Clemm von Hohenberg, Christian; Schocke, Michael F; Guttmann, Charles RG; Wassermann, Demian; Wigand, Marlene C; Nachbauer, Wolfgang; Kremser, Christian; Sturm, Brigitte; Scheiber-Mojdehkar, Barbara; Kubicki, Marek; Shenton, Martha E; Boesch, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Erythropoietin (EPO) has received growing attention because of its neuro-regenerative properties. Preclinical and clinical evidence supports its therapeutic potential in brain conditions like stroke, multiple sclerosis and schizophrenia. Also in Friedreich ataxia, clinical improvement after EPO therapy was shown. The aim of the present study was to assess possible therapy-associated brain white-matter changes in these patients. Methods Nine patients with Friedreich ataxia underwent Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) before and after EPO treatment. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) was used for longitudinal comparison. Results We detected widespread longitudinal increase in fractional anisotropy (FA) and axial diffusivity (D||) in cerebral hemispheres bilaterally (p<0.05, corrected), while no changes were observed within the cerebellum, medulla oblongata and pons. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first DTI study to investigate the effects of erythropoietin in a neurodegenerative disease. Anatomically, the diffusivity changes appear disease-unspecific, and their biological underpinnings deserve further study. PMID:24015771

  4. Gene Expression Profile in Peripheral Blood Cells of Friedreich Ataxia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahao, Agessandro; Pedroso, Jose Luiz; de Carvalho Aguiar, Patricia Maria; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas

    2016-06-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most common autosomal recessive ataxia characterized by a combination of neurological involvement, cardiomyopathy, and skeletal and glucose metabolism disturbances. FRDA is caused by mutations in FXN gene that results in reduction of mRNA and protein levels of frataxin. Previous microarray and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) studies showed that the downregulation of FXN is associated with a complex gene expression profile. However, these studies showed a wide variability in the subset of genes with altered expression among tissues and models. Genes differentially expressed in peripheral blood cells (PBC) could potentially help in the understanding of FRDA pathophysiology and also function as reliable disease biomarkers obtained from an easily accessible tissue, which could have implications in clinical practice. This study aimed to validate by qPCR the expression of 26 genes, revealed as differentially expressed by other studies, using peripheral blood cells (PBC) of 11 FRDA patients compared to 11 healthy controls. We found a robust downregulation of FXN, but no statistically significant differences were found between FRDA and controls for the remaining genes. Except for FXN, our study did not find a differential gene expression profile in PBC of FRDA patients and a reliable gene expression profile biomarker in a clinical relevant and noninvasive tissue remains unclear. PMID:26170003

  5. Diagnosis of Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donate to the National Ataxia Foundation Diagnosis of Ataxia Being diagnosed with Ataxia can be overwhelming. Below ... help you to understand ataxia better. What is Ataxia? The word "ataxia", comes from the Greek word, " ...

  6. Sugammadex reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block in a patient with ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 17-year-old adolescent with ataxia-telangiectasia was scheduled to have laparoscopic colectomy for a resection of colon cancer. He had symptoms and signs of dyspnea, generalized dystonia, dysmetria, ataxia, and telangiectasia on the orbit. General anesthesia was performed, and rocuronium 30 mg was administered for muscle relaxation. Deep neuromuscular block (post-tetanic count: 0-8) was maintained for 95 minutes without additional rocuronium. On completion of surgery, sugammadex 80 mg was injected and train-of-four ratio was 0.93 at 210 seconds after administration. The tracheal tube was removed 5 min after the end of surgery. He recovered full spontaneous respiration and voluntary movements within 1 minute after extubation. After the surgery, he transferred to the intensive care unit and discharged 14 days after the surgery without any concrete problem. The reversal of rocuronium induced neuromuscular block by sugammadex was fast, complete, and recovered to the initial preoperative level of neuromuscular function in this patient. (author)

  7. Temporal retinal nerve fiber loss in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Stricker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 is an adult onset progressive disorder with well characterized neurodegeneration in the cerebellum and brainstem. Beyond brain atrophy, few data exist concerning retinal and optic nerve involvement. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate retinal changes in SCA1 patients compared to age and gender matched healthy controls. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Nine patients with SCA1 were prospectively recruited from the ataxia clinic and were compared to nine age and gender matched healthy controls. Both cohorts received assessment of visually evoked potentials and eye examination by optical coherence tomography to determine retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and total macular volume. While no differences were found in visually evoked potentials, SCA1 patients showed a significant reduction of mean retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT compared to healthy controls (84±13 µm vs. 97±8 µm, p = 0.004. Temporal areas showed the most prominent RNFLT reduction with high statistical significances (temporal-inferior: p<0.001, temporal: p<0.001, temporal-superior: p = 0.005 whereas RNFLT in nasal areas was in the range of the control group. From six SCA1 patients an additional macular scan was obtained. The comparison to the corresponding healthy control showed a slight but not significant reduction in TMV (8.22±0.68 mm(3 vs. 8.61±0.41 mm(3, p = 0.15. CONCLUSION: In SCA1 patients, we found evidence for degeneration of retinal nerve fibers. The temporal focus of the observed retinal nerve fiber layer reduction suggests an involvement of the papillo-macular bundle which resembles pathology found in toxic or mitochondrial optic nerve disease such as Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON or dominant optic atrophy (DOA.

  8. Bladder Wall Telangiectasia in a Patient with Ataxia-Telangiectasia and How to Manage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Deniz Aygün

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T is a rare neurodegenerative, inherited disease causing severe morbidity. Oculocutaneous telangiectasias are almost constant findings among the affected cases as telangiectasia is considered the main clinical finding for diagnosis. Vascular abnormalities in organs have been reported infrequently but bladder wall telangiectasias are extremely rare. We aimed to report recurrent hemorrhage from bladder wall telangiectasia in a 9-year-old boy with A-T who had received intravenous cyclophosphamide for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Since A-T patients are known to be more susceptible to chemical agents, we suggested that possibly cyclophosphamide was the drug which induced bladder wall injury in this patient.

  9. Gastric outlet obstruction due to adenocarcinoma in a patient with Ataxia-Telangiectasia syndrome: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammond Sue

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ataxia-Telangiectasia syndrome is characterized by progressive cerebellar dysfunction, conjuctival and cutaneous telangiectasias, severe immune deficiencies, premature aging and predisposition to cancer. Clinical and radiographic evaluation for malignancy in ataxia-telangiectasia patients is usually atypical, leading to delays in diagnosis. Case presentation We report the case of a 20 year old ataxia-telangiectasia patient with gastric adenocarcinoma that presented as complete gastric outlet obstruction. Conclusion A literature search of adenocarcinoma associated with ataxia-telangiectasia revealed 6 cases. All patients presented with non-specific gastrointestinal complaints suggestive of ulcer disease. Although there was no correlation between immunoglobulin levels and development of gastric adenocarcinoma, the presence of chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia seem to lead to the development of gastric adenocarcinoma. One should consider adenocarcinoma in any patient with ataxia-telangiectasia who presents with non-specific gastrointestinal complaints, since this can lead to earlier diagnosis.

  10. Generation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell line SCA3.B11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne K.; Borland, Helena; Hasholt, Lis F.;

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by an expansion of the CAG-repeat in ATXN3. In this study, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were generated from SCA3 patient dermal fibroblasts by electroporation with episomal plasmids encoding L...

  11. Generation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell line SCA3.A11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne K.; Borlandb, Helena; Hasholt, Lis F.;

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG-repeat expanding mutation in ATXN3. We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a SCA3 patient by electroporation of dermal fibroblasts with episomal plasmids encoding L-MYC, LIN28...

  12. Reduced cardiac 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine uptake in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2: a comparative study with Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia, supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, and peripheral neuropathy. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction is often present. This study evaluated the cardiac sympathetic function in patients with SCA2 using 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) in comparison with patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and control subjects. Nine patients with SCA2, nine patients with PD, and nine control subjects underwent 123I-MIBG imaging studies from which early and late heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratios and myocardial washout rates were calculated. Early (F = 12.3, p 123I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy demonstrated an impairment of cardiac sympathetic function in patients with SCA2, which was less marked than in PD patients. These results suggest that 123I-MIBG cardiac imaging could become a useful tool for analysing the pathophysiology of SCA2. (orig.)

  13. Chinese patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 presenting with rare clinical symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yi; Sun, Yi-Min; Ni, Wang; Gan, Shi-Rui; Wu, Zhi-Ying

    2013-01-15

    Clinical heterogeneity is the prominent feature of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) which is sometimes neglected and often impedes the timely diagnosis of patients. In this study, the clinical data of 201 unrelated Chinese SCA3 patients were retrospectively studied. The rare clinical features were summarized and the underlying genetic mutations were screened by direct DNA sequencing. Three patients were found primarily presenting with the rare clinical features, including dystonic phenotype without response to levodopa, chorea and memory decline, and hearing impairment, respectively. We firstly reported three diverse heterogeneities of SCA3 patients, which are quite uncommon in the Chinese SCA3 patients. Our results expanded the variable phenotypes of SCA3 and provided the explicit information for the rare and special SCA3 manifestations. Based on this new knowledge, we suggested that when the presentation was consistent with HD or DRD while negative in the corresponding genetic testing, SCA3 should be considered, and clinicians should divert partial attention to the examinations on the auditory system of SCA3 patients. PMID:23174085

  14. Prepulse Inhibition in Patients with Fragile X-associated Tremor Ataxia Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Andrea; Ballinger, Elizabeth; Chavez, Alyssa; Tassone, Flora; Randi J Hagerman; Hessl, David

    2010-01-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder that affects carriers of the fragile X premutation, typically after age 50. Common symptoms include intention tremor, ataxia, neuropathy, autonomic dysfunction, cognitive decline, and dementia.

  15. Selective loss of Purkinje cells in a patient with anti-gliadin-antibody-positive autoimmune cerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasegawa Akira

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The patient was an 84-year-old woman who had the onset of truncal ataxia at age 77 and a history of Basedow's disease. Her ataxic gait gradually deteriorated. She could not walk without support at age 81 and she was admitted to our hospital at age 83. Gaze-evoked nystagmus and dysarthria were observed. Mild ataxia was observed in all limbs. Her deep tendon reflex and sense of position were normal. IgA anti-gliadin antibody, IgG anti-gliadin antibody, anti-SS-A/Ro antibody, anti-SS-B/La antibody and anti-TPO antibody were positive. A conventional brain MRI did not show obvious cerebellar atrophy. However, MRI voxel based morphometry (VBM and SPECT-eZIS revealed cortical cerebellar atrophy and reduced cerebellar blood flow. IVIg treatment was performed and was moderately effective. After her death at age 85, the patient was autopsied. Neuropathological findings were as follows: selective loss of Purkinje cells; no apparent degenerative change in the efferent pathways, such as the dentate nuclei or vestibular nuclei; no prominent inflammatory reaction. From these findings, we diagnosed this case as autoimmune cerebellar atrophy associated with gluten ataxia. All 3 autopsies previously reported on gluten ataxia have noted infiltration of inflammatory cells in the cerebellum. In this case, we postulated that the infiltration of inflammatory cells was not found because the patient's condition was based on humoral immunity. The clinical conditions of gluten ataxia have not yet been properly elucidated, but are expected to be revealed as the number of autopsied cases increases.

  16. Mutation of senataxin alters disease-specific transcriptional networks in patients with ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Brent L; Cho, Ellen; Wahnich, Amanda; Gao, Fuying; Becherel, Olivier J; Wang, Xizhe; Fike, Francesca; Chen, Leslie; Criscuolo, Chiara; De Michele, Giuseppe; Filla, Alessandro; Collins, Abigail; Hahn, Angelika F; Gatti, Richard A; Konopka, Genevieve; Perlman, Susan; Lavin, Martin F; Geschwind, Daniel H; Coppola, Giovanni

    2014-09-15

    Senataxin, encoded by the SETX gene, contributes to multiple aspects of gene expression, including transcription and RNA processing. Mutations in SETX cause the recessive disorder ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2) and a dominant juvenile form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4). To assess the functional role of senataxin in disease, we examined differential gene expression in AOA2 patient fibroblasts, identifying a core set of genes showing altered expression by microarray and RNA-sequencing. To determine whether AOA2 and ALS4 mutations differentially affect gene expression, we overexpressed disease-specific SETX mutations in senataxin-haploinsufficient fibroblasts and observed changes in distinct sets of genes. This implicates mutation-specific alterations of senataxin function in disease pathogenesis and provides a novel example of allelic neurogenetic disorders with differing gene expression profiles. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) demonstrated these senataxin-associated genes to be involved in both mutation-specific and shared functional gene networks. To assess this in vivo, we performed gene expression analysis on peripheral blood from members of 12 different AOA2 families and identified an AOA2-specific transcriptional signature. WGCNA identified two gene modules highly enriched for this transcriptional signature in the peripheral blood of all AOA2 patients studied. These modules were disease-specific and preserved in patient fibroblasts and in the cerebellum of Setx knockout mice demonstrating conservation across species and cell types, including neurons. These results identify novel genes and cellular pathways related to senataxin function in normal and disease states, and implicate alterations in gene expression as underlying the phenotypic differences between AOA2 and ALS4. PMID:24760770

  17. National Ataxia Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Page - Twitter - YouTube Giving a talk on Ataxia? - Ataxia Presentation Thank You To Our Partners Donate Now! Welcome to the National Ataxia Foundation International Ataxia Awareness Day (IAAD) The "International Ataxia Awareness Day" ...

  18. Causes of Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donate to the National Ataxia Foundation Causes of Ataxia The hereditary ataxias are genetic, which means they ... the disease is inherited as a recessive gene. Ataxia Gene Identified in 1993 The first ataxia gene ...

  19. Spinocerebellar ataxias type 8, 12, and 17 and dentatorubro-pallidoluysian atrophy in Czech ataxic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musova, Zuzana; Sedlacek, Zdenek; Mazanec, Radim; Klempir, Jiri; Roth, Jan; Plevova, Pavlina; Vyhnalek, Martin; Kopeckova, Marta; Apltova, Ludmila; Krepelova, Anna; Zumrova, Alena

    2013-04-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders currently associated with 27 genes. The most frequent types are caused by expansions in coding CAG repeats. The frequency of SCA subtypes varies among populations. We examined the occurrence of rare SCAs, SCA8, SCA12, SCA17 and dentatorubro-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA), in the Czech population from where the data were missing. We analyzed causal gene expansions in 515 familial and sporadic ataxic patients negatively tested for SCA1-3 and SCA6-7. Pathogenic SCA8 and SCA17 expansions were identified in eight and five patients, respectively. Tay-Sachs disease was later diagnosed in one patient with an SCA8 expansion and the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) was suspected in two other patients with SCA8 expansions. These findings are probably coincidental, although the participation of SCA8 expansions in the susceptibility to MS and disease progression cannot be fully excluded. None of the patients had pathogenic SCA12 or DRPLA expansions. However, three patients had intermediate SCA12 alleles out of the normal range with 36 and 43 CAGs. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was probable in the patient with 43 CAGs. This coincidence is remarkable, especially in the context with the recently identified predisposing role of longer SCA2 alleles in ALS. Five families with SCA17 represent a significant portion of ataxic patients and this should be reflected in the diagnostics of SCAs in the Czech population. SCA8 expansions must be considered after careful clinical evaluation. PMID:22872568

  20. Social and Cultural Elements Associated with Neurocognitive Dysfunctions in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadillo, Roberto Emmanuele; Galvez, Víctor; Díaz, Rosalinda; Paredes, Lorena; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier; Hernandez-Castillo, Carlos R; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 (SCA2) is a rare genetic disorder producing cerebellar degeneration and affecting motor abilities. Neuroimaging studies also show neurodegeneration in subcortical and cortical regions related to emotional and social processes. From social neuroscience, it is suggested that motor and social abilities can be influenced by particular cultural dynamics so, culture is fundamental to understand the effect of brain-related alterations. Here, we present the first analysis about the cultural elements related to the SCA2 disorder in 15 patients previously evaluated with neuroimaging and psychometric instruments, and their nuclear relationships distributed in six geographical and cultural regions in Mexico. Ethnographic records and photographic and video archives about the quotidian participant's routine were obtained from the patients, their relatives and their caregivers. The information was categorized and interpreted taking into consideration cultural issues and patients' medical files. Our analyses suggest that most of the participants do not understand the nature of the disease and this misunderstanding favors magic and non-medical explanations. Patients' testimonies suggest a decrease in pain perception as well as motor alterations that may be related to interoceptive dysfunctions. Relatives' testimonies indicate patients' lack of social and emotional interests that may be related to frontal, temporal, and cerebellar degeneration. In general, participants use their religious beliefs to deal with the disease and only a few of them trust the health system. Patients and their families are either openly rejected and ignored, tolerated or even helped by their community accordingly to different regional traits. We propose that ethnography can provide social representations to understand the patients' alterations, to formulate neurobiological hypotheses, to develop neurocognitive interventions, and to improve the medical approach to the disease

  1. Radiotherapeutic management of medulloblastoma in a pediatric patient with ataxia telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a genetic disorder with a predisposition to malignancy. Cells from patients with AT demonstrate an increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation which creates a problem when these patients require treatment for their malignant disease. An eleven-year-old boy with a previous diagnosis of AT was seen in consultation following partial resection of medulloblastoma in the posterior fossa. To estimate how much the conventional radiation dose might have to be reduced, we compared the radiosensitivity of bone marrow myeloid progenitor cells from this patient to that of cells from the marrow of normal individuals, using colony formation in an agar culture assay system as the endpoint (CFU-Cs). Neither radiation dose-survival curve exhibited a shoulder--each displayed an extrapolation number of 0.99. The survival curve of normal cells displayed a steep slope with a D0 of 0.98 Gy (0.83-1.19 Gy, 95% confidence limits); the slope for the AT cells was considerably steeper with a value for D0 of 0.32 Gy (0.29-0.35 Gy). The ratio of D0's indicated that these AT cells were approximately 3X more radiosensitive than normal cells. Based on this, the daily dose was reduced from 1.8 to 0.6 Gy and the radiation was restricted to 25 treatments to the posterior fossa rather than the conventional cranio-spinal treatment. An additional 5 treatments at 1.0 Gy per day were given to the whole brain. The patient's skin responded to these reduced fraction sizes and doses to a similar degree as normal patients' skin following a standard schedule and the patient is doing well nine months after initiation of treatment

  2. Radiosensitivity in ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiosensitivity is a major hallmark of the human genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia. This hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation has been demonstrated in vitro after exposure of patients to therapeutic thought to be the major factor contculture. Clearly an understanding of the nature of the molecular defect in ataxia-telangiectasia will be of considerable assistance in delineating additional pathways that determine cellular radiosensitivity/radioresistance. Furthermore, since patients with this syndrome are also predisposed to developing a number of leukaemias and lymphomas the possible connection between radiosensitivity and cancer predisposition is of interest. Now that the gene (ATM) responsible for this genetic disease has been cloned and identified, progress is being made in determining the role of the ATM protein in mediating the effects of cellular exposure to ionizing radiation and other forms of redox stress. Proteins such as the product of the tumour suppressor gene p53 and the proto-oncogene c-Abl (a protein tyrosine kinase) have been shown to interact with ATM. Since several intermediate steps in both the p53 and c-Abl pathways, activated by ionizing radiation, are known it will be possible to map the position of ATM in these pathways and describe its mechanism of action. What are the clinical implications of understanding the molecular basis of the defect in ataxia-telangiectasia? As outlined above since radiosensitivity is a universal characteristic of A-T understanding the mechanism of action of ATM will provide additional information or radiation signalling in human cells. With this information it may be possible to sensitize tumour cells to radiation and thus increase the therapeutic benefit of radiotherapy. This might involve the use of small molecules that would interfere with the normal ATM controlled pathways and thus sensitize cells to radiation or alternatively it might involve the efficient introduction of ATM anti-sense c

  3. Radiosensitivity in ataxia-telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavin, M.F. [Royal Brisbane Hospital, QLD (Australia). Queensland Institute of Medical Research and The Department of Surgery; Khanna, K.K.; Watters, D. [Royal Brisbane Hospital, QLD (Australia). Queensland Institute of Medical Research

    1998-12-31

    Full text: Radiosensitivity is a major hallmark of the human genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia. This hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation has been demonstrated in vitro after exposure of patients to therapeutic thought to be the major factor contculture. Clearly an understanding of the nature of the molecular defect in ataxia-telangiectasia will be of considerable assistance in delineating additional pathways that determine cellular radiosensitivity/radioresistance. Furthermore, since patients with this syndrome are also predisposed to developing a number of leukaemias and lymphomas the possible connection between radiosensitivity and cancer predisposition is of interest. Now that the gene (ATM) responsible for this genetic disease has been cloned and identified, progress is being made in determining the role of the ATM protein in mediating the effects of cellular exposure to ionizing radiation and other forms of redox stress. Proteins such as the product of the tumour suppressor gene p53 and the proto-oncogene c-Abl (a protein tyrosine kinase) have been shown to interact with ATM. Since several intermediate steps in both the p53 and c-Abl pathways, activated by ionizing radiation, are known it will be possible to map the position of ATM in these pathways and describe its mechanism of action. What are the clinical implications of understanding the molecular basis of the defect in ataxia-telangiectasia? As outlined above since radiosensitivity is a universal characteristic of A-T understanding the mechanism of action of ATM will provide additional information or radiation signalling in human cells. With this information it may be possible to sensitize tumour cells to radiation and thus increase the therapeutic benefit of radiotherapy. This might involve the use of small molecules that would interfere with the normal ATM controlled pathways and thus sensitize cells to radiation or alternatively it might involve the efficient introduction of ATM anti-sense c

  4. Ataxia telangiectasia: learning from previous mistakes

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Naveen; Aggarwal, Puneet; Dev, Nishanth; Kumar, Gunjan

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia is an early onset neurodegenerative disorder. We report a case of childhood onset ataxia and ocular telangiectasia, presenting with pulmonary infection. The patient was diagnosed as ataxia telangiectasia. The patient succumbed to death owing to late diagnosis and sepsis.

  5. Mutation of senataxin alters disease-specific transcriptional networks in patients with ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2

    OpenAIRE

    Fogel, Brent L.; Cho, Ellen; Wahnich, Amanda; Gao, Fuying; Becherel, Olivier J.; Wang, Xizhe; Fike, Francesca; Chen, Leslie; Criscuolo, Chiara; De Michele, Giuseppe; Filla, Alessandro; Collins, Abigail; Hahn, Angelika F.; Gatti, Richard A.; Konopka, Genevieve

    2014-01-01

    Senataxin, encoded by the SETX gene, contributes to multiple aspects of gene expression, including transcription and RNA processing. Mutations in SETX cause the recessive disorder ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2) and a dominant juvenile form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4). To assess the functional role of senataxin in disease, we examined differential gene expression in AOA2 patient fibroblasts, identifying a core set of genes showing altered expression by microarray and ...

  6. Adult onset sporadic ataxias: a diagnostic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Graziani Povoas Barsottini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with adult onset non-familial progressive ataxia are classified in sporadic ataxia group. There are several disease categories that may manifest with sporadic ataxia: toxic causes, immune-mediated ataxias, vitamin deficiency, infectious diseases, degenerative disorders and even genetic conditions. Considering heterogeneity in the clinical spectrum of sporadic ataxias, the correct diagnosis remains a clinical challenge. In this review, the different disease categories that lead to sporadic ataxia with adult onset are discussed with special emphasis on their clinical and neuroimaging features, and diagnostic criteria.

  7. Friedreich's Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Order Brochures News From NINDS Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Friedreich's Ataxia Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS Disorders Get Web page suited for printing Email this to a friend ...

  8. Social and Cultural Elements Associated with Neurocognitive Dysfunctions in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadillo, Roberto Emmanuele; Galvez, Víctor; Díaz, Rosalinda; Paredes, Lorena; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier; Hernandez-Castillo, Carlos R.; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 (SCA2) is a rare genetic disorder producing cerebellar degeneration and affecting motor abilities. Neuroimaging studies also show neurodegeneration in subcortical and cortical regions related to emotional and social processes. From social neuroscience, it is suggested that motor and social abilities can be influenced by particular cultural dynamics so, culture is fundamental to understand the effect of brain-related alterations. Here, we present the first analysis about the cultural elements related to the SCA2 disorder in 15 patients previously evaluated with neuroimaging and psychometric instruments, and their nuclear relationships distributed in six geographical and cultural regions in Mexico. Ethnographic records and photographic and video archives about the quotidian participant’s routine were obtained from the patients, their relatives and their caregivers. The information was categorized and interpreted taking into consideration cultural issues and patients’ medical files. Our analyses suggest that most of the participants do not understand the nature of the disease and this misunderstanding favors magic and non-medical explanations. Patients’ testimonies suggest a decrease in pain perception as well as motor alterations that may be related to interoceptive dysfunctions. Relatives’ testimonies indicate patients’ lack of social and emotional interests that may be related to frontal, temporal, and cerebellar degeneration. In general, participants use their religious beliefs to deal with the disease and only a few of them trust the health system. Patients and their families are either openly rejected and ignored, tolerated or even helped by their community accordingly to different regional traits. We propose that ethnography can provide social representations to understand the patients’ alterations, to formulate neurobiological hypotheses, to develop neurocognitive interventions, and to improve the medical approach to

  9. Social and cultural elements associated with neurocognitive dysfunctions in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Emmanuele Mercadillo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 (SCA2 is a rare genetic disorder producing cerebellar degeneration and affecting motor abilities. Neuroimaging studies also show neurodegeneration in subcortical and cortical regions related to emotional and social processes. From social neuroscience it is suggested that motor and social abilities can be influenced by particular cultural dynamics so, culture is fundamental to understand the effect of brain related alterations. Here we present the first analysis about the cultural elements related to the SCA2 disorder in 15 patients previously evaluated with neuroimaging and psychometric instruments, and their nuclear relationships distributed in six geographical and cultural regions in Mexico. Ethnographic records and photographic and video archives about the quotidian participant’s routine were obtained from the patients, their relatives and their caregivers. The information was categorized and interpreted taking into consideration cultural issues and patients’ medical files. Our analyses suggest that most of the participants do not understand the nature of the disease and this misunderstanding favors magic and non-medical explanations. Patients’ testimonies suggest a decrease in pain perception as well as motor alterations that may be related to interoceptive dysfunctions. Relatives’ testimonies indicate patients’ lack of social and emotional interests that may be related to frontal, temporal and cerebellar degeneration. In general, participants use their religious beliefs to deal with the disease and only a few of them trust the health system. Patients and their families are either openly rejected and ignored, tolerated or even helped by their community accordingly to different regional traits. We propose that ethnography can provide social representations to understand the patients’ alterations, to formulate neurobiological hypotheses, to develop neurocognitive interventions, and to improve the

  10. Extensive White Matter Alterations and Its Correlations with Ataxia Severity in SCA 2 Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R Hernandez-Castillo

    Full Text Available Previous studies of SCA2 have revealed significant degeneration of white matter tracts in cerebellar and cerebral regions. The motor deficit in these patients may be attributable to the degradation of projection fibers associated with the underlying neurodegenerative process. However, this relationship remains unclear. Statistical analysis of diffusion tensor imaging enables an unbiased whole-brain quantitative comparison of the diffusion proprieties of white matter tracts in vivo.Fourteen genetically confirmed SCA2 patients and aged-matched healthy controls participated in the study. Tract-based spatial statistics were performed to analyze structural white matter damage using two different measurements: fractional anisotropy (FA and mean diffusivity (MD. Significant diffusion differences were correlated with the patient's ataxia impairment.Our analysis revealed decreased FA mainly in the inferior/middle/superior cerebellar peduncles, the bilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule and the bilateral superior corona radiata. Increases in MD were found mainly in cerebellar white matter, medial lemniscus, and middle cerebellar peduncle, among other regions. Clinical impairment measured with the SARA score correlated with FA in superior parietal white matter and bilateral anterior corona radiata. Correlations with MD were found in cerebellar white matter and the middle cerebellar peduncle.Our findings show significant correlations between diffusion measurements in key areas affected in SCA2 and measures of motor impairment, suggesting a disruption of information flow between motor and sensory-integration areas. These findings result in a more comprehensive view of the clinical impact of the white matter degeneration in SCA2.

  11. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, especially younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  12. Friedreich's Ataxia Research Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tools Raising Awareness Advocacy Memorials What is Friedreich's Ataxia? About FARA Mission & Organization Financials Leadership & Staff Scientific ... Tools Raising Awareness Advocacy Memorials What is Friedreich's Ataxia? FARA News / Blogs Ride Ataxia rideATAXIA Chicago 2016 ...

  13. Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2: clinical, biological and genotype/phenotype correlation study of a cohort of 90 patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Anheim, M

    2009-10-01

    Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2) is an autosomal recessive disease due to mutations in the senataxin gene, causing progressive cerebellar ataxia with peripheral neuropathy, cerebellar atrophy, occasional oculomotor apraxia and elevated alpha-feto-protein (AFP) serum level. We compiled a series of 67 previously reported and 58 novel ataxic patients who underwent senataxin gene sequencing because of suspected AOA2. An AOA2 diagnosis was established for 90 patients, originating from 15 countries worldwide, and 25 new senataxin gene mutations were found. In patients with AOA2, median AFP serum level was 31.0 microg\\/l at diagnosis, which was higher than the median AFP level of AOA2 negative patients: 13.8 microg\\/l, P = 0.0004; itself higher than the normal level (3.4 microg\\/l, range from 0.5 to 17.2 microg\\/l) because elevated AFP was one of the possible selection criteria. Polyneuropathy was found in 97.5% of AOA2 patients, cerebellar atrophy in 96%, occasional oculomotor apraxia in 51%, pyramidal signs in 20.5%, head tremor in 14%, dystonia in 13.5%, strabismus in 12.3% and chorea in 9.5%. No patient was lacking both peripheral neuropathy and cerebellar atrophy. The age at onset and presence of occasional oculomotor apraxia were negatively correlated to the progression rate of the disease (P = 0.03 and P = 0.009, respectively), whereas strabismus was positively correlated to the progression rate (P = 0.03). An increased AFP level as well as cerebellar atrophy seem to be stable in the course of the disease and to occur mostly at or before the onset of the disease. One of the two patients with a normal AFP level at diagnosis had high AFP levels 4 years later, while the other had borderline levels. The probability of missing AOA2 diagnosis, in case of sequencing senataxin gene only in non-Friedreich ataxia non-ataxia-telangiectasia ataxic patients with AFP level > or =7 microg\\/l, is 0.23% and the probability for a non-Friedreich ataxia non-ataxia

  14. Primary progressive cerebellar ataxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-two patients with primary progressive cerebellar ataxia were studied using MRI. This technique is better than CT in demonstrating atrophy of cerebellar structures as well as of brainstem and spinal cord. The differential diagnosis from other diseases particularly with multiple sclerosis is easier. The degree of ataxia correlated well with the degree of atrophy of cerebellum. However, we could not see any correlation between the degree of atrophy and the onset and duration of the disease and no certain specific aspects could be demonstrated in the different groups examined. (orig.)

  15. Bladder Wall Telangiectasia in a Patient with Ataxia-Telangiectasia and How to Manage?

    OpenAIRE

    Fatma Deniz Aygün; Serdar Nepesov; Haluk Çokuğraş; Yıldız Camcıoğlu

    2015-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare neurodegenerative, inherited disease causing severe morbidity. Oculocutaneous telangiectasias are almost constant findings among the affected cases as telangiectasia is considered the main clinical finding for diagnosis. Vascular abnormalities in organs have been reported infrequently but bladder wall telangiectasias are extremely rare. We aimed to report recurrent hemorrhage from bladder wall telangiectasia in a 9-year-old boy with A-T who had received i...

  16. Molecular analysis of a t(14;14) translocation in leukemic T-cells of an ataxia telangiectasia patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have detected and cloned two rearrangements in the T-cell receptor α locus from a clone of somatic cell hybrids carrying a t(14;14)(q11;q32) chromosomal translocation derived from an ataxia telangiectasia patient with T-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The T-cell clone carrying the t(14;14) chromosomal translocation was known to be present for > 10 years before the onset of overt leukemia. One molecular rearrangement of the T-cell receptor α locus corresponded to a functional variable-joining region (V-J) joining, whereas the other derived from the breakpoint of the t(14;14)(q11;q32) translocation. Chromosomal in situ hybridization of the probe derived from the t(14;14) breakpoint localized the breakpoint region to 14q32.1, apparently the same region that is involved in another ataxia telangiectasia characteristic chromosome translocation, t(7;14)(q35;q32). The 14q32.1 breakpoint is at least 10,000 kilobase pairs (kbp) centromeric to the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus. Sequence analysis of the breakpoint indicates the involvement of a Jα sequence during the translocation. Comigration of high-molecular weight DNA fragments involved with t(7;14) and t(14;14) translocations suggests the presence of a cluster of breakpoints in the 14q32.1 region, the site of a putative oncogene, TCL1

  17. Host cell reactivation of sunlamp-exposed adenovirus in fibroblasts from patients with Bloom's syndrome, ataxia telangiectasia, and Huntington's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a sensitive host cell reactivation (HCR) technique was used to examine the repair capacity for DNA damaged by sunlamp exposure in fibroblast strains derived from 5 normal individuals and 8 patients representing three different diseases associated with DNA repair deficiencies. Adenovirus type 2 (Ad 2) was exposed to radiation from a GE 275 W sunlamp and subsequently used to infect fibroblast monolayers. At 48 hr after infection, cells were scored for the presence of viral structural antigens (Vag) using indirect immunofluorescent staining. Previous reports using this technique showed a substantial reduction in the HCR of sunlamp-exposed Ad 2 for infection of excision repair deficient fibroblasts from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. In contrast, the HCR of Vag synthesis for sunlamp-exposed Ad 2 was in the normal range for the three ataxia telangiectasia, three Bloom's syndrome, and two Huntington's disease fibroblasts strains

  18. The production and repair of double strand breaks in cells from normal humans and patients with ataxia telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production and repair of double strand breaks induced by γ-rays in the DNA of human fibroblasts have been measured by sedimentation in sucrose gradients under non-denaturing conditions. Unirradiated DNA formed a rapidly sedimenting gel. Low doses of radiation released freely sedimenting DNA molecules from this gel. Higher doses reduced the rate of sedimentation of the free DNA due to the introduction of double strand breaks. The breakage efficiency was 1 break/1.3x1010 daltons of DNA/krad. Postirradiation incubation after a high dose of radiation resulted in an increase in molecular weight of the free DNA molecules, and after a low dose the rapidly-sedimenting gel was reformed. These data suggest that double strand breaks are repaired in human fibroblasts. No significant differences were found between fibroblasts from two normal donors and four patients with the radiosensitive disorder, ataxia telangiectasia, in either the production or repair of double strand breaks

  19. Generation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell line SCA3.A11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne K. Hansen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3 is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG-repeat expanding mutation in ATXN3. We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from a SCA3 patient by electroporation of dermal fibroblasts with episomal plasmids encoding L-MYC, LIN28, SOX2, KLF4, OCT4 and short hairpin RNA targeting P53. The resulting iPSCs had normal karyotype, were free of genomically integrated episomal plasmids, expressed pluripotency markers, could differentiate into the three germ layers in vitro and retained the disease-causing ATXN3 mutation. This iPSC line could be useful for the investigation of SCA3 disease mechanisms.

  20. Generation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell line SCA3.B11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne K. Hansen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3 is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by an expansion of the CAG-repeat in ATXN3. In this study, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs were generated from SCA3 patient dermal fibroblasts by electroporation with episomal plasmids encoding L-MYC, LIN28, SOX2, KLF4, OCT4 and short hairpin RNA targeting P53. The resulting iPSCs had normal karyotype, were free of integrated episomal plasmids, expressed pluripotency markers, could differentiate into the three germ layers in vitro and retained the disease-causing ATXN3 mutation. Potentially, this iPSC line could be a useful tool for the investigation of SCA3 disease mechanisms.

  1. Friedreich Ataxia and Diabetes Mellitus: family study

    OpenAIRE

    Melo, M; Fagulha, A; Barros, L.; Guimarães, J; Carrilho, F; Carvalheiro, M

    2005-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FA) is one of the genetic syndromes sometimes associated with diabetes and the most common hereditary ataxia. It is a autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease, caused by a mutation in the FRDA gene, which originates decreased expression of frataxin, a mitochondrial protein involved in iron metabolism. The disorder is usually manifest in childhood and is characterised by ataxia, dysarthria, scoliosis and feet deformity. About two thirds of patients have hypertrophic c...

  2. Language Impairment in Cerebellar Ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gaalen, Judith; de Swart, Bert J. M.; Oostveen, Judith; Knuijt, Simone; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.; Kremer, Berry (H. ) P. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several studies have suggested that language impairment can be observed in patients with cerebellar pathology. The aim of this study was to investigate language performance in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). Methods: We assessed speech and language in 29 SCA6 patients

  3. Cerebellar ataxia as presenting feature of hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwal, Suman Kumar; Kotwal, Shalija; Gupta, Rohan; Singh, Jang Bhadur; Mahajan, Annil

    2016-04-01

    Symptoms and signs of the hypothyroidism vary in relation to the magnitude and acuteness of the thyroid hormone deficiency. The usual clinical features are constipation, fatigue, cold intolerance and weight gain. Rarely it can present with neurologic problems like reversible cerebellar ataxia, dementia, peripheral neuropathy, psychosis and coma. Hypothyroidism should be suspected in all cases of ataxia, as it is easily treatable. A 40 year-old male presented with the history facial puffiness, hoarseness of voice and gait-ataxia. Investigations revealed frank primary hypothyroidism. Anti-TPO antibody was positive. Thyroxine was started and patient improved completely within eight weeks. Hypothyroidism can present with ataxia as presenting feature. Hypothyroidism should be considered in all cases of cerebellar ataxia as it is a reversible cause of ataxia. PMID:26886095

  4. A Case of Ataxia with Isolated Vitamin E Deficiency Initially Diagnosed as Friedreich’s Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bonello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia with isolated vitamin E deficiency (AVED is a rare autosomal recessive condition that is caused by a mutation in the alpha tocopherol transfer protein gene. It is almost indistinguishable clinically from Friedreich’s ataxia but with appropriate treatment its devastating neurological features can be prevented. Patients can present with a progressive cerebellar ataxia, pyramidal spasticity, and evidence of a neuropathy with absent deep tendon reflexes. It is important to screen for this condition on initial evaluation of a young patient presenting with progressive ataxia and it should be considered in patients with a long standing ataxia without any diagnosis in view of the potential therapeutics and genetic counselling. In this case report we present a patient who was initially diagnosed with Friedreich’s ataxia but was later found to have AVED.

  5. A Case of Ataxia with Isolated Vitamin E Deficiency Initially Diagnosed as Friedreich's Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonello, Michael; Ray, Partha

    2016-01-01

    Ataxia with isolated vitamin E deficiency (AVED) is a rare autosomal recessive condition that is caused by a mutation in the alpha tocopherol transfer protein gene. It is almost indistinguishable clinically from Friedreich's ataxia but with appropriate treatment its devastating neurological features can be prevented. Patients can present with a progressive cerebellar ataxia, pyramidal spasticity, and evidence of a neuropathy with absent deep tendon reflexes. It is important to screen for this condition on initial evaluation of a young patient presenting with progressive ataxia and it should be considered in patients with a long standing ataxia without any diagnosis in view of the potential therapeutics and genetic counselling. In this case report we present a patient who was initially diagnosed with Friedreich's ataxia but was later found to have AVED. PMID:26989534

  6. An early-onset recessive cerebellar disorder with distal amyotrophy and, in two patients, gross myoclonia: A probable ataxia telangiectasia variant

    OpenAIRE

    Graaf, A. de; De Jong, G; Kleijer, Wim

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWe report a family of 4 siblings from a non-consanguineous marriage, presenting with an early onset recessive cerebellar ataxia and progressive distal limb wasting. Ocular or other telangiectasias were absent. There were neither frequent infections nor immunodeficiencies. The two youngest patients exhibited an incapacitating myoclonus which abated markedly after 20 years. Late onset diabetes was demonstrated in 3 patients. Hypogonadism was not a feature and there was a prolonged s...

  7. Abundance and Significance of Iron, Zinc, Copper, and Calcium in the Hearts of Patients With Friedreich Ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Pamela C; Yang, Karl X; Parsons, Patrick J; Becker, Alyssa B; Feustel, Paul J; Koeppen, Arnulf H

    2016-07-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a frequent cause of death in patients with Friedreich ataxia (FA), and a characteristic pathological feature is the focal accumulation of iron (Fe) in cardiomyocytes. This restricted localization of the metal contrasts with the diffuse cardiac Fe overload in hemochromatosis and transfusion siderosis. Nevertheless, heart Fe in FA contributes to cardiomyocyte necrosis, inflammation, and scarring as the disease progresses. A putative mechanism of cardiomyopathy in FA is Fe-mediated oxidative damage. Two other transition metals zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu), are diffusely distributed throughout normal hearts and the hearts of patients with FA. The myocardium in FA is also prone to deposits of calcium in the form of scattered concretions. In this study, heart tissues (left and right ventricular walls and ventricular septum) of 23 patients with genetically confirmed FA and 8 normal controls were obtained at autopsy and analyzed for Fe, Zn, Cu, and calcium. The principal assay methods were inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and plasma mass spectrometry. Total levels of Fe in bulk extracts were not significantly higher than normal, and the concentrations of Zn also remained in the normal range. Cu levels, however, were significantly lower in FA. In conclusion, the decrease of Cu may be important in consideration of the potential benefit of Cu supplements in FA cardiomyopathy. PMID:27189813

  8. The evaluation of swallowing in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia and oropharyngeal dysphagia: A comparison study of videofluoroscopic and sonar doppler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmassih, Edna Márcia da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA is a degenerative disease that can cause loss of coordination of voluntary muscle movement such as that required for swallowing. Aims: The purposes of this cross-sectional and comparative case study were: (1 to assess the severity of dysphagia through a videofluoroscopic swallow study, and (2 to compare differences in frequency, intensity, and duration of sound waves produced during swallowing in normal and SCA patients by using sonar Doppler. Method: During swallow evaluation using videofluoroscopy, a sonar Doppler transducer was placed on the right side of the neck, at the lateral edge of the trachea, just below the cricoid cartilage to capture the sounds of swallowing in 30 SCA patients and 30 controls. Result: The prevalence in the dynamic evaluation of swallowing videofluoroscopy was by changes in the oral phase of swallowing. The analysis of variance of the averages found in each variable - frequency, intensity and duration of swallowing - shows there was a significant correlation when compared to the healthy individual curve. Conclusion: The study demonstrates the prevalence of oral dysphagia observed in dynamic videofluoroscopic swallow evaluation. In patients with SCA, the mean initial frequency (IF, initial intensity (II, and final intensity (FI were higher and the time (T and peak frequency (PF were lower, demonstrating a pattern of cricopharyngeal opening very close to that found in normal populations.

  9. Antigliadin antibody in sporadic adult ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Aloosh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common neurologic manifestationof gluten sensitivity is ataxia, which accounts for up to 40%of idiopathic sporadic ataxia. Timing of diagnosis of glutenataxia is vital as it is one of the very few treatable causes ofsporadic ataxia and causes irreversible loss of Purkinje cells.Antigliadin antibody (AGA of the IgG type is the bestmarker for neurological manifestations of gluten sensitivity.This study was conducted to measure the prevalence ofgluten ataxia in a group of Iranian patients with idiopathicataxia.Methods: For 30 patients with idiopathic cerebellar ataxia, aquestionnaire about clinical and demographic data wascompleted. Serum AGA (IgA and IgG and antiendomysialantibody (AEA were assessed. Gluten ataxic patientsunderwent duodenal biopsy. Magnetic resonanceimaging was done for all patients to see if cerebellaratrophy is present.Results: Only 2 patients had a positive IgG AGA (6.7%who both had a positive AEA while none of themshowed changes of celiac disease in their duodenalbiopsies. Only presence of gastrointestinal symptomsand pursuit eye movement disorders were higher inpatients with gluten ataxia.Conclusion: Prevalence of gluten ataxia in Iranianpatients with idiopathic ataxia seems to be lower thanmost of other regions. This could be explained by smallsample size, differences in genetics and nutritionalhabits and also effect of serologic tests in clinical versusresearch setting. Further researches with larger samplesize are recommended.

  10. Clinical challenges in the ataxias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.H. Subramony

    2011-01-01

    Ataxias are rare diseases and the etiologic heterogeneity make individual entities even rarer. There are still substantial numbers of patients who are still poorly understood. Available assessment techniques still point to large numbers of patients needed for clinical trials and the need for cooperative efforts, better assessment tools and novel trial designs. Better understanding of neural circuitry abnormalities may lead to more effective symptomatic therapy. Opportunities exist for targeting at risk individuals for effective therapies but how this can be done is not clear. Preventive strategies may become feasible in many ataxias.

  11. Friedreich's ataxia cardiomyopathy: case based discussion and management issues.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanley, A

    2010-04-01

    Cardiac involvement is common in Friedreich\\'s Ataxia and is a common cause of premature death. Evidence regarding treatment of congestive heart failure in patients with Friedreich\\'s Ataxia is lacking. The case of a 31-year-old male with advanced Friedreich\\'s Ataxia who presented with an acute diarrhoeal illness and features of acute heart failure is discussed. We then review the reported cardiac manifestations of Friedreich\\'s Ataxia and discuss management options.

  12. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Types 1, 2, 3 and 6 : the Clinical Spectrum of Ataxia and Morphometric Brainstem and Cerebellar Findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobi, Heike; Hauser, Till-Karsten; Giunti, Paola; Globas, Christoph; Bauer, Peter; Schmitz-Huebsch, Tanja; Baliko, Laszlo; Filla, Alessandro; Mariotti, Caterina; Rakowicz, Maria; Charles, Perine; Ribai, Pascale; Szymanski, Sandra; Infante, Jon; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.; Duerr, Alexandra; Timmann, Dagmar; Boesch, Sylvia; Fancellu, Roberto; Rola, Rafal; Depondt, Chantal; Schoels, Ludger; Zdzienicka, Elzbieta; Kang, Jun-Suk; Ratzka, Susanne; Kremer, Berry; Stephenson, Dennis A.; Melegh, Bela; Pandolfo, Massimo; du Montcel, Sophie Tezenas; Borkert, Johannes; Schulz, Joerg B.; Klockgether, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    To assess the clinical spectrum of ataxia and cerebellar oculomotor deficits in the most common spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs), we analysed the baseline data of the EUROSCA natural history study, a multicentric cohort study of 526 patients with either spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, 2, 3 or 6. To qua

  13. Ataxia-telangiectasia: future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhary MW

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mohammed Wajid Chaudhary, Raidah Saleem Al-Baradie Pediatric Neurology, Neurosciences Centre, King Fahad Specialist Hospital, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Abstract: Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T is an autosomal recessive multi-system disorder caused by mutation in the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene (ATM. ATM is a large serine/threonine protein kinase, a member of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK family whose best-studied function is as master controller of signal transduction for the DNA damage response (DDR in the event of double strand breaks (DSBs. The DDR rapidly recognizes DNA lesions and initiates the appropriate cellular programs to maintain genome integrity. This includes the coordination of cell-cycle checkpoints, transcription, translation, DNA repair, metabolism, and cell fate decisions, such as apoptosis or senescence. DSBs can be generated by exposure to ionizing radiation (IR or various chemical compounds, such as topoisomerase inhibitors, or can be part of programmed generation and repair of DSBs via cellular enzymes needed for the generation of the antibody repertoire as well as the maturation of germ cells. AT patients have immunodeficiency, and are sterile with gonadal dysgenesis as a result of defect in meiotic recombination. In the cells of nervous system ATM has additional role in vesicle dynamics as well as in the maintenance of the epigenetic code of histone modifications. Moderate levels of ATM are associated with prolonged lifespan through resistance to oxidative stress. ATM inhibitors are being viewed as potential radiosensitizers as part of cancer radiotherapy. Though there is no cure for the disease at present, glucocorticoids have been shown to induce alternate splicing site in the gene for ATM partly restoring its activity, but their most effective timing in the disease natural history is not yet known. Gene therapy is promising but large size of the gene makes it technically difficult

  14. Burden of Friedreich’s Ataxia to the Patients and Healthcare Systems in the United States and Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SamSalek

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The study intended to substantiate healthcare resource utilization, costs and funding patterns of US and Canadian Friedreich's Ataxia (FRDA populations, to assess compliance with treatment guidance and to identify areas where novel healthcare measures or improved access to existing care may improve patients’ functional and social capabilities and reduce the financial impact on the healthcare systems. Methods: Healthcare resource utilization and costs were collected in a cross sectional study in the US (N=197 and Canada (N=43 and analyzed across severity of disease categories. Descriptive statistics, correlation analysis and hypothesis testing were applied. Results: In the US, healthcare costs of FRDA patients were higher than those of ‘adults with two and more chronic conditions’. Significantly higher costs were incurred in advanced stages of the disease, with paid homecare being the main driver. This pattern was also observed in Canada. Compliance with the recommended annual neurological and cardiological follow-up was high, but was low for the recommended regular speech therapy. In the US public and private funding ratios were similar for the FRDA and the general populations. In Canada the private funding ratio for FRDA was higher than average. Conclusions: The variety of healthcare measures addressing the broad range of symptoms of FRDA, and the increasing use of paid home care as disease progresses made total US healthcare costs of FRDA exceed the costs of US adults with two and more chronic conditions. Therefore, measures delaying disease progression will allow patients to maintain their independence longer and may reduce costs to the healthcare system. Novel measures to address dysarthria and to ensure access to them should be further investigated. The higher than average private funding ratio in Canada was due to the relatively high cost of the pharmacological treatment of FRDA.

  15. A Patient with Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome Presenting with Executive Cognitive Deficits and Cerebral White Matter Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensaku Kasuga

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder that primarily affects males who are carriers of a premutation of a CGG expansion in the FMR1 gene. In Asian populations, FXTAS has rarely been reported. Here, we report the case of a Japanese FXTAS patient who showed predominant executive cognitive deficits as the main feature of his disease. In contrast, the patient exhibited only very mild symptoms of intention tremor and ataxia, which did not interfere with daily activities. A gene analysis revealed that the patient carried a premutation of a CGG expansion (111 CGG repeats in the FMR1 gene. The mRNA expression level of FMR1 in the patient was 1.5-fold higher than in controls. On brain MRI scans, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images showed high-intensity lesions in the middle cerebellar peduncles and the cerebral white matter, with a frontal predominance. The present case extends previous notions regarding the cognitive impairment in FXTAS patients. Recognizing FXTAS patients with predominant cognitive impairment from various ethnic backgrounds would contribute to our understanding of the phenotypic variation of this disease.

  16. Medical Management of Pediatric Malignant Bowel Obstruction in a Patient with Burkitt's Lymphoma and Ataxia Telangiectasia Using Continuous Ambulatory Drug Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Arunangshu; Salins, Naveen; Damani, Anuja; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, M A

    2016-01-01

    Malignant bowel obstruction (MBO) is commonly seen in patients with advanced abdominal cancers. The incidence of pediatric MBO in a patient with Burkitt's lymphoma and ataxia telangiectasia is rare, with no published case reports till now. Conservative management of inoperable MBO results in relief of symptoms and improves quality of life. An 11-year-old boy with Burkitt's lymphoma and ataxia telangiectasia was referred to pediatric palliative care with MBO. The objective of this report is to demonstrate conservative management of pediatric MBO using continuous ambulatory drug delivery system. The patient was initiated on continuous ambulatory drug delivery (CADD) system for symptom relief. MBO was reversed with conservative management and the child was discharged on self-collapsible portable elastomeric continuous infusion pump under the supervision of a local family physician. The child remained comfortable at home for 4 weeks until his death. His parents were satisfied with the child's symptom control, quality of life, and were able to care for the child at home. In a resource-limited setting, managing patients at home using elastomeric continuous infusion pumps instead of expensive automated CADD is a practical pharmacoeconomic approach. PMID:26862790

  17. Gene Testing for Hereditary Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    FAQ NATIONAL ATAXIA FOUNDATION FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT... Gene Testing for Hereditary Ataxia This fact sheet provides an overview of gene testing for ataxia. It also addresses commonly asked ...

  18. Reduced cardiac {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine uptake in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2: a comparative study with Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Rosa, Anna; De Leva, Maria Fulvia; Maddaluno, Gennaro; Filla, Alessandro; De Michele, Giuseppe [University Federico II, Department of Neurosciences and Reproductive and Odontostomatologic Sciences, Naples (Italy); Pappata, Sabina; Pellegrino, Teresa [National Council of Research, Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, Naples (Italy); Fiumara, Giovanni [Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, SDN Foundation, Naples (Italy); Carotenuto, Raffaella; Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Petretta, Mario [University Federico II, Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Naples (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia, supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, and peripheral neuropathy. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction is often present. This study evaluated the cardiac sympathetic function in patients with SCA2 using {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) in comparison with patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and control subjects. Nine patients with SCA2, nine patients with PD, and nine control subjects underwent {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging studies from which early and late heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratios and myocardial washout rates were calculated. Early (F = 12.3, p < 0.0001) and late (F = 16.8, p < 0.0001) H/M ratios were significantly different among groups. In controls, early and late H/M ratios (2.2 {+-} 0.12 and 2.1 {+-} 0.20) were significantly higher than in patients with SCA2 (1.9 {+-} 0.23 and 1.8 {+-} 0.20, both p < 0.05) and with patients with PD (1.7 {+-} 0.29 and 1.4 {+-} 0.35, both p < 0.001). There was also a significant difference in washout rates among groups (F = 11.7, p < 0.0001). In controls the washout rate (19.9 {+-} 9.6 %) was significantly lower (p < 0.005) than in patients with PD (51.0 {+-} 23.7 %), but not different from that in SCA2 patients (19.5 {+-} 9.4 %). In SCA2 patients, in a multivariable linear regression analysis only the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia score was independently associated with early H/M ratio ({beta} = -0.12, p < 0.05). {sup 123}I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy demonstrated an impairment of cardiac sympathetic function in patients with SCA2, which was less marked than in PD patients. These results suggest that {sup 123}I-MIBG cardiac imaging could become a useful tool for analysing the pathophysiology of SCA2. (orig.)

  19. [Ataxia telangiectasia: review of 13 new cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena, O; Póo, P; Campistol, J; Vernet, A; Fernández-Alvarez, E; Sierra, I; Gean, E

    1996-01-01

    We report the review of 13 patients who were diagnosed of ataxia telangiectasia before 6 years of age. All of them manifested cerebelous ataxia, oculocutaneus telangiectasias (11), sinopulmonary infections (9), dystonia (9), oculomotor apraxia (9) and Burkitt linfoma (1). We analyse the most common presentation of the disease in early stages and the complementary studies performed. The prompt diagnosis allow us a better control of infections, malignant process and finally the possibility of genetic counseling. PMID:8852005

  20. Abnormal retention of X-irradiated ataxia-telangiectasia fibroblasts in G2 phase of the cell cycle: cellular RNA content, chromatin stability and the effects of 3-aminobenzamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have addressed three aspects of the abnormal sensitivity of SV40 transformed ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) fibroblasts to X-irradiation, namely: (a) the radiogenic perturbations in cell-cycle traverse analysed by flow cytometry; (b) the involvement of 3-aminobenzamide-sensitive processes in cellular recovery in terms of viability and release from G2+M phase delay; and (c) the functional and structural integrity of cells delayed in G2+M phase using acridine orange as a probe for cellular RNA content and chromatin structure. We report that A-T cells show a dose-dependent and survival-related abnormal retention in G2+M phase due to the lack of a recovery process, despite the capacity of such cells to synthesize ribosomal RNA and maintain the structural integrity of chromatin. Evidence is presented that the recovery process is dependent upon poly(ADPribosyl)ation activity in both normal and A-T cells except that in the latter cell type recovery potential is rapidly saturated in terms of X-ray dose. (author)

  1. Friedreich's Ataxia (FA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facts About Friedreich’s Ataxia Updated December 2009 Michelle Moffitt Smith Michelle and James Smith at their wedding Dear Friends: W hen I was ... some tests, I found out I had Friedreich’s ataxia. My parents and I immediately learned all we ...

  2. A Precocious Cerebellar Ataxia and Frequent Fever Episodes in a 16-Month-Old Infant Revealing Ataxia-Telangiectasia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Nespoli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT is the most frequent progressive cerebellar ataxia in infancy and childhood. Immunodeficiency which includes both cellular and humoral arms has variable severity. Since the clinical presentation is extremely variable, a high clinical suspicion will allow an early diagnosis. Serum alpha-fetoprotein is elevated in 80–85% of patients and therefore could be used as a screening tool. Here, we present a case of a 5-year-old female infant who was admitted to our department at the age of 16 months because of gait disorders and febrile episodes that had begun at 5 months after the cessation of breastfeeding. Serum alfa-fetoprotein level was elevated. Other investigations showed leukocytopenia with lymphopenia, reduced IgG2 and IgA levels, and low titers of specific postimmunization antibodies against tetanus toxoid and Haemophilus B polysaccharide. Peripheral lymphocytes subsets showed reduction of T cells with a marked predominance of T cells with a memory phenotype and a corresponding reduction of naïve T cells; NK cells were very increased (41% with normal activity. The characterization of the ATM gene mutations revealed 2 specific mutations (c.5692C > T/c.7630-2A > C compatible with AT diagnosis. It was concluded that AT syndrome should be considered in children with precocious signs of cerebellar ataxia and recurrent fever episodes.

  3. Marked variation in the cardiomyopathy associated with Friedreich's ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Dutka, D.; Donnelly, J; Nihoyannopoulos, P; Oakley, C; Nunez, D

    1999-01-01

    Objective—To document the cardiac phenotype associated with Friedreich's ataxia, a recessively inherited disorder characterised by spinocerebellar degeneration.
Setting—Individuals with Friedreich's ataxia who accepted the invitation to participate in the study.
Hypothesis—The cardiomyopathy associated with Friedreich's ataxia may offer a human model for the study of factors modulating cardiac hypertrophy.
Methods—55 patients (mean (SD) age 30 (9) years) with a clinical diagnosis of Friedreic...

  4. Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia and previous undetermined acute cerebellar injury: a mysterious clinical condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende Pinto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias represent a wide group of neurological diseases secondary to dysfunctions of cerebellum or its associated pathways, rarely coursing with acute-onset acquired etiologies and chronic non-progressive presentation. We evaluated patients with acquired non-progressive cerebellar ataxia that presented previous acute or subacute onset. Clinical and neuroimaging characterization of adult patients with acquired non-progressive ataxia were performed. Five patients were identified with the phenotype of acquired non-progressive ataxia. Most patients presented with a juvenile to adult-onset acute to subacute appendicular and truncal cerebellar ataxia with mild to moderate cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Establishing the etiology of the acute triggering events of such ataxias is complex. Non-progressive ataxia in adults must be distinguished from hereditary ataxias.

  5. Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia and previous undetermined acute cerebellar injury: a mysterious clinical condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende Pinto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias represent a wide group of neurological diseases secondary to dysfunctions of cerebellum or its associated pathways, rarely coursing with acute-onset acquired etiologies and chronic non-progressive presentation. We evaluated patients with acquired non-progressive cerebellar ataxia that presented previous acute or subacute onset. Clinical and neuroimaging characterization of adult patients with acquired non-progressive ataxia were performed. Five patients were identified with the phenotype of acquired non-progressive ataxia. Most patients presented with a juvenile to adult-onset acute to subacute appendicular and truncal cerebellar ataxia with mild to moderate cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Establishing the etiology of the acute triggering events of such ataxias is complex. Non-progressive ataxia in adults must be distinguished from hereditary ataxias.

  6. Phenotype variability and early onset ataxia symptoms in spinocerebellar ataxia type 7: comparison and correlation with other spinocerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius Cristino de Albuquerque

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA are a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by heterogeneous clinical presentation. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7 is caused by an abnormal CAG repeat expansion and includes cerebellar signs associated with visual loss and ophthalmoplegia. Marked anticipation and dynamic mutation is observed in SCA7. Moreover, phenotype variability and very early onset of symptoms may occur. In this article, a large series of Brazilian patients with different SCA subtypes was evaluated, and we compared the age of onset of SCA7 with other SCA. From the 26 patients with SCA7, 4 manifested their symptoms before 10-year-old. Also, occasionally the parents may have the onset of symptoms after their children. In conclusion, our study highlights the genetic anticipation phenomenon that occurs in SCA7 families. Patients with very early onset ataxia in the context of a remarkable family history, must be considered and tested for SCA7.

  7. Diet for Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discuss these guidelines with a physical therapist and nutritionist familiar with movement disorders. Ataxia is a complex ... fiber to your diet with your physician or nutritionist, ask them if you might also benefit by ...

  8. Pseudocyst of the auricle in patients with movement disorders: report of two patients with ataxia-associated auricular pseudocysts

    OpenAIRE

    Beutler, Bryce D; Cohen, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudocyst of the auricle is a benign condition of the ear characterized by an asymptomatic, noninflammatory swelling on the lateral or anterior surface of the auricle. It typically presents as a 1 to 5 centimeter cystic lesion located within the scaphoid or triangular fossa. In most patients, the lesion develops spontaneously. However, pseudocyst of the auricle has also been associated with trauma to the ear. Purpose: We describe the clinical findings of two men who developed pse...

  9. Clinical validity of MR based program for analysis of fluid/brain index of posterior cranial fossa structures in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) and type 2 (SCA2) belong to the group of neurodegenerative disorders of autosomal dominant inheritance, genetically and clinically heterogeneous, caused by CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion, which leads to productions of protein carrying the abnormal polyglutamine chain (polyQ). Molecular abnormalities cause degenerative changes - atrophy of posterior cranial fossa structures. The clinical symptoms typical of this disorder include progressive gait and limb ataxia, dysarthria, occulomotor disturbances, pyramidal tract and peripheral nerves involvement. The aim of the study is to evaluate the usefulness of a computer program prepared in our department for volumetric measurements of posterior cranial fossa structures (the pons, vermis and cerebellar hemispheres) in a group of SCA patients. MR examinations of 22 patients suffering from SCA were used to calculate the value of fluid/brain index of posterior cranial fossa structures and compared with the results of group of 10 healthy volunteers. The degree of atrophy of posterior cranial fossa structures can be objectively evaluated by special volumetric measurements. We found fluid/brain index (FBI) of posterior cranial fossa structures in group of SCA patients to vary from 0.1411 to 0.3929 (mean 0.2456 SD±0.601). 1. MR-based calculation of fluid/brain index of posterior fossa structures is a valuable tool for morphological assessment of SCA-related changes in brain structures. 2. The presented software enables objective evaluation of the course and stage of posterior fossa structures atrophy. 3. Our self-made computer program to calculate the fluid/brain index of posterior cranial fossa structures is easy to use on a personal computer- it is a good tool in everyday radiological practice. (author)

  10. Potentiation by caffeine of x-ray damage to cultured human skin fibroblasts from normal subjects and ataxia-telangiectasia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffeine was found to potentiate x-ray-induced killing of human diploid fibroblasts from a normal subject and an ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) patient when it was present at 2 mM concentration for 30 to 66 h postirradiation. The dose-modifying factor for caffeine-treated normal cells had an average value of 1.26 +- 0.13 which did not vary significantly with treatment time or x-ray dose. The dose-modifying factor for caffeine-treated AT cells was 1.12 +- 0.12 at 30 h, rose to 1.66 +- 0.17 at 41 h, and decreased to 1.31 +- 0.13 at 66 h. Thus no clear difference was observed between these two cell strains' susceptibility to postirradiation caffeine treatment

  11. The potentiation by caffeine of X-ray damage to cultured human skin fibroblasts from normal subjects and ataxia-telangiectasia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffeine was found to potentiate X-ray-induced killing of human diploid fibroblasts from a normal subject and an ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) patient when it was present at 2 mM concentration for 30 to 66 hr postirradiation. The dose-modifying factor for caffeine-treated normal cells had an average value of 1.26 +/- 0.13 which did not vary significantly with treatment time or X-ray dose. The dose-modifying factor for caffeine-treated AT cells was 1.12 +/- 0.12 at 30 hr, rose to 1.66 +/- 0.17 at 41 hr, and decreased to 1.31 +/- 0.13 at 66 hr. Thus no clear difference was observed between these two cell strains' susceptibility to postirradiation caffeine treatment

  12. Bioenergetics of the calf muscle in Friedreich ataxia patients measured by 31P-MRS before and after treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Nachbauer

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia (FRDA is caused by a GAA repeat expansion in the FXN gene leading to reduced expression of the mitochondrial protein frataxin. Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhuEPO is suggested to increase frataxin levels, alter mitochondrial function and improve clinical scores in FRDA patients. Aim of the present pilot study was to investigate mitochondrial metabolism of skeletal muscle tissue in FRDA patients and examine effects of rhuEPO administration by phosphorus 31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS. Seven genetically confirmed FRDA patients underwent 31P MRS of the calf muscles using a rest-exercise-recovery protocol before and after receiving 3000 IU of rhuEPO for eight weeks. FRDA patients showed more rapid phosphocreatine (PCr depletion and increased accumulation of inorganic phosphate (Pi during incremental exercise as compared to controls. After maximal exhaustive exercise prolonged regeneration of PCR and slowed decline in Pi can be seen in FRDA. PCr regeneration as hallmark of mitochondrial ATP production revealed correlation to activity of complex II/III of the respiratory chain and to demographic values. PCr and Pi kinetics were not influenced by rhuEPO administration. Our results confirm mitochondrial dysfunction and exercise intolerance due to impaired oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle tissue of FRDA patients. MRS did not show improved mitochondrial bioenergetics after eight weeks of rhuEPO exposition in skeletal muscle tissue of FRDA patients.EU Clinical Trials Register2008-000040-13.

  13. Gly118Asp is a SCA14 founder mutation in the Dutch ataxia population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, DS; van de Warrenburg, BPC; Hennekam, FAM; Dooijes, D; Ippel, PF; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, CC; Kremer, HPH; Sinke, RJ

    2005-01-01

    Missense mutations in the PRKCG gene have recently been identified in spinocerebellar ataxia 14 (SCA14) patients; these include the Gly118Asp mutation that we found in a large Dutch autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) family. We subsequently screened the current Dutch ataxia cohort (approxim

  14. DNA repair enzymes in Ataxia telangiectasia and Bloom's syndrome fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ataxia telangiectasia, Bloom's syndrome and normal fibroblasts were compared as to the capacity of their cellular extracts to enhance the priming activity of γ-irradiated colicin E1 DNA for purified DNA polymerase. It was found that an ataxia strain had substantially lower, and a Bloom's syndrome strain had slightly lower capacity than a normal strain; while the activities of apurinic site specific endonuclease in these extracts were comparable

  15. Brain pathology of spinocerebellar ataxias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidel, Kay; Siswanto, Sonny; Brunt, Ewout R. P.; den Dunnen, Wilfred; Korf, Horst-Werner; Rueb, Udo

    2012-01-01

    The autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCAs) represent a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases with progressive ataxia and cerebellar degeneration. The current classification of this disease group is based on the underlying genetic defects and their typical disease courses. Accordin

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Friedreich ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Friedreich ataxia Friedreich ataxia Enable ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: episodic ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mapping for a large pedigree with episodic ataxia. Neurology. 2005 Jul 12;65(1):156-8. Citation ... RW. Clinical spectrum of episodic ataxia type 2. Neurology. 2004 Jan 13;62(1):17-22. Citation ...

  18. Ataxia with Vitamin E Deficiency in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areej Elkamil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED is a rare autosomal recessive neurological disorder which usually starts in childhood. The clinical presentation is very similar to Friedreich ataxia, most patients have progressive truncal and extremity ataxia, areflexia, positive Babinski sign, dysarthria and sensory neuropathy. Methods We made an inquiry to our colleagues in Norway, we included information from a prevalence study published southern Norway and added data from our own known case. Results A newly published prevalence study of hereditary ataxias (total of 171 subjects found only one subject with AVED in Southeast Norway. We describe two more patients, one from the Central part and one from the Northern part of Norway. All 3 cases had age of onset in early childhood (age of 4–5 years and all experienced gait ataxia and dysarthria. The genetic testing confirmed that they had pathogenic mutations in the α-tocopherol transfer protein gene (TTPA. All were carriers of the non-sense c.400C > T mutation, one was homozygous for that mutation and the others were compound heterozygous, either with c.358G > A or c.513_514insTT. The homozygous carrier was by far the most severely affected case. Conclusions We estimate the occurrence of AVED in Norway to be at least 0.6 per million inhabitants. We emphasize that all patients who develop ataxia in childhood should be routinely tested for AVED to make an early diagnosis for initiating treatment with high dose vitamin E to avoid severe neurological deficits.

  19. Dietary treatment of gluten ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Hadjivassiliou, M; DAVIES-JONES, G; Sanders, D.; Grunewald, R

    2003-01-01

    Background: Gluten ataxia is an immune mediated disease, part of the spectrum of gluten sensitivity, and accounts for up to 40% of cases of idiopathic sporadic ataxia. No systematic study of the effect of gluten-free diet on gluten ataxia has ever been undertaken.

  20. An enzyme activity in normal and ataxia telangiectasia cell lines which is involved in the repair of γ-irradiation-induced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An enzyme that enhances the activity of DNA polymerase I (EC 2.7.7.7) for γ-irradiated calf thymus DNA was demonstrated in cellular extracts of normal human fibroblasts and lymphoid-cell lines. This enzyme was found to be deficient in all cellular extracts of fibroblasts and lymphoid-cell lines examined from patients with the autosomal recessive disease ataxia telangiectasia. The activity in cellular extracts from normal fibroblasts was removed when heated to 1000C for 2 min or when the assay was performed at 40C. No significant deficiency in primer activating enzyme activity was observed in cell-free extracts of lymphoid lines from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum, Huntington's chorea or neurofibromatosis, or from an ataxia telangiectasia heterozygote. (author)

  1. Friedreich's Ataxia as a Cause of Premature Coronary Artery Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Giugliano, Gregory R.; Sethi, Prabhdeep S.

    2007-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is the most common hereditary neurodegenerative disorder, and more than half of all patients show echocardiographic evidence of cardiomyopathy. Although angina has been reported in these patients, the role of coronary artery disease has previously been dismissed and is therefore underestimated. Premature obstructive coronary disease has rarely been angiographically demonstrated in patients with Friedreich's ataxia. We present an unusual case of a 35-year-old woman with Fri...

  2. Childhood Ataxia with Cerebral Hypomyelination Syndrome: a Variant of Patient with Early Childhood Onset Related to EIF2B3 Mutation. A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetto, F; Stoppino, L P; Calì, A; Milillo, P; Grilli, G; Vinci, R; Macarini, L

    2012-03-01

    Childhood ataxia with central nervous system hypomyelination (CACH) syndrome is an autosomal recessive transmitted leukodystrophy characterised by early childhood onset and acute deterioration following febrile illnesses or head trauma. We describe the case of a child with early onset of CACH syndrome. He presented with cerebellar ataxia beginning around two years of age with mild mental retardation. MRI showed diffuse white matter signal changes with thinning of the corpus callosum. PMID:24028880

  3. Cerebellar ataxia of early onset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eight cases of childhood cerebellar ataxia were reported. All these cases showed chronic cerebellar ataxia with early onset, and the other diseases of cerebellum such as infections, neoplasms and storage diseases were excluded by clinical symptoms and laboratory findings including blood counts, blood chemistry, lactate, pyruvate, ceruloplasmine, urinalysis, serum immunoglobulins, amino acid analysis in blood and urine, CSF analysis, leukocyte lysosomal enzymes, MCV, EMG, EEG and brain X-CT. Two pairs of siblings were included in this study. The clinical diagnosis were cerebellar type (5), spinocerebellar type (1), one Marinesco-Sjoegren syndrome and undetermined type (1). The age of onset was 1 to 5 years. The chief complaint was motor developmental delay in 6 cases; among them 5 patients could walk alone at the ages of 2 to 3 years'. Mental retardation was observed in 7 cases and epilepsy in 2. TRH was effective in 5 cases. The MRI study revealed that the area of medial sagittal slice of the cerebellum was reduced significantly in all cases and also that of pons was reduced in 5 cases. Different from typical adult onset spinocerebellar degenerations, most of the present cases have achieved slow developmental milestones and the clinical course was not progressive. Genetic factors are suspected in the pathogenesis of this disease in some cases. (author)

  4. Population-based study of acquired cerebellar ataxia in Al-Kharga district, New Valley, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farghaly WMA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Wafaa MA Farghaly1, Hamdy N El-Tallawy1, Ghaydaa A Shehata1, Tarek A Rageh1, Nabil Abdel Hakeem2, Noha M Abo-Elfetoh11Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt; 2Al Azhar University, Assiut Branch, EgyptBackground: The aim of this research was to determine the prevalence and etiology of acquired ataxia in Al-Kharga district, New Valley, Egypt.Methods: A population-based study of acquired ataxia was conducted in a defined geographical region with a total population of 62,583. A door-to-door survey was used to identify cases of acquired cerebellar ataxia. Patients with acquired cerebellar ataxia at any age and of both genders were included. Cases of known inherited cerebellar ataxia, acquired neurological disorders with ataxia as a minor feature, or pure acquired sensory ataxia, were excluded.Results: We identified 17 cases of acquired ataxia, of which eight were vascular, six were an ataxic cerebral palsy subtype, and three involved postencephalitic ataxia. The crude prevalence rate for acquired ataxia was 27.16/100,000 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 14.3–40.1. The mean age of the patients at interview was 31.8 (range 4–72 years, with a male to female ratio of 2.1:1. The most frequent presenting complaint was disturbance of gait (90.7%. The majority (92% were ambulatory, but only 9.3% were independently self-caring.Conclusion: This population-based study provides an insight into acquired cerebellar ataxia within a defined region, and may inform decisions about the rational use of health care resources for patients with acquired cerebellar ataxia. The most common causes of acquired cerebellar ataxia in this region were cerebrovascular injury and cerebral palsy.Keywords: acquired cerebellar ataxia, prevalence, subtypes, Egypt

  5. Molecular basis of ataxia telangiectasia and related diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lindsay G BALL; Wei XIAO

    2005-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a rare human disease characterized by extreme cellular sensitivity to radiation and a predisposition to cancer, with a hallmark of onset in early childhood. Several human diseases also share similar symptoms with AT albeit with different degrees of severity and different associated disorders. While all AT patients contain mutations in the AT-mutated gene (ATM), most other ATlike disorders are defective in genes encoding an MRN protein complex consisting of Mre11, Rad50 and Nbs1. Both ATM and MRN function as cellular sensors to DNA double-strand breaks, which lead to the recruitment and phosphorylation of an array of substrate proteins involved in DNA repair, apoptosis and cell-cycle checkpoints, as well as gene regulation, translation initiation and telomere maintenance. ATM is a member of the family of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinases (PIKK), and the discovery of many ATM substrates provides the underlying mechanisms of heterologous symptoms among AT patients. This review article focuses on recent findings related to the initial recognition of doublestrand breaks by ATM and MRN, as well as a DNA-dependent protein kinase complex consisting of the heterodimer Ku70/Ku80 and its catalytic subunit DNAPKcs, another member of PIKK. This possible interaction suggests that a much greater complex is involved in sensing, transducing and co-ordinating cellular events in response to genome instability.

  6. Ataxia-telangiectasia

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson Pires Ferreira

    1983-01-01

    São apresentados os casos de dois irmãos com ataxia-telangiectasia, estudados sob os pontos de vista clínico, eletrencefalográfico, liquórico e encefalográfico. O autor resume os achados de diversos autores e chama a atenção para a regressão parcial da síndrome cerebelar em ambos os pacientes, fato ainda não referido na literatura.

  7. Identification of telomere dysfunction in Friedreich ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Anjomani Virmouni, Sara; Al-Mahdawi, Sahar; Sandi, Chiranjeevi; Yasaei, Hemad; Giunti, Paola; Slijepcevic, Predrag; Mark A. Pook

    2015-01-01

    Background Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is a progressive inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutation of the FXN gene, resulting in decreased frataxin expression, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. A recent study has identified shorter telomeres in FRDA patient leukocytes as a possible disease biomarker. Results Here we aimed to investigate both telomere structure and function in FRDA cells. Our results confirmed telomere shortening in FRDA patient leukocytes and identifie...

  8. Sleep disorders in cerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Pedroso

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias comprise a wide range of etiologies leading to central nervous system-related motor and non-motor symptoms. Recently, a large body of evidence has demonstrated a high frequency of non-motor manifestations in cerebellar ataxias, specially in autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA. Among these non-motor dysfunctions, sleep disorders have been recognized, although still under or even misdiagnosed. In this review, we highlight the main sleep disorders related to cerebellar ataxias focusing on REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD, restless legs syndrome (RLS, periodic limb movement in sleep (PLMS, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS, insomnia and sleep apnea.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia-telangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions ataxia-telangiectasia ataxia-telangiectasia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ataxia-telangiectasia is a rare inherited disorder that affects ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia with oculomotor apraxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ataxia with oculomotor apraxia ataxia with oculomotor apraxia Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia is a condition characterized by ...

  11. Consensus Paper: Neuroimmune Mechanisms of Cerebellar Ataxias

    OpenAIRE

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Adhikari, Keya; Aeschlimann, Daniel; Chattopadhyay, Partha; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Hampe, Christiane S.; Honnorat, Jérôme; Joubert, Bastien; Kakei, Shinji; Lee, Jongho; Manto, Mario; Matsunaga, Akiko; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nanri, Kazunori; Shanmugarajah, Priya

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, a lot of publications suggested that disabling cerebellar ataxias may develop through immune-mediated mechanisms. In this consensus paper, we discuss the clinical features of the main described immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias and address their presumed pathogenesis. Immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias include cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-GAD antibodies, the cerebellar type of Hashimoto’s encephalopathy, primary autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, gluten ataxia, Mi...

  12. Atypical Friedreich ataxia in patients with FXN p.R165P point mutation or comorbid hemochromatosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ygland, Emil; Taroni, Franco; Gellera, Cinzia; Caldarazzo, Serena; Duno, Morten; Soller, Maria; Puschmann, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    homozygote trinucleotide repeat expansion carriers. Patients were assessed clinically. Trinucleotide expansion length was determined and lymphocyte frataxin levels measured. RESULTS: p.R165P mutation carriers became wheelchair bound early, but had retained reflexes, better arm function, milder dysarthria...

  13. Acute cerebellar ataxia: A neurological manifestation in malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peddametla Shravan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a vector-borne disease transmitted by the bite of an infected female anopheles mosquito presents with varied clinical manifestations. Neurological manifestations include headaches, confusion, convulsions, hemiplegia, ataxia, cerebral palsy, cortical blindness, and Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS. We are presenting a case report of acute cerebellar ataxia in a 20-year-old male patient who presented with fever and positive for Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum malaria antibodies.

  14. Consensus Paper: Neuroimmune Mechanisms of Cerebellar Ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Adhikari, Keya; Aeschlimann, Daniel; Chattopadhyay, Partha; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Hampe, Christiane S; Honnorat, Jérôme; Joubert, Bastien; Kakei, Shinji; Lee, Jongho; Manto, Mario; Matsunaga, Akiko; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nanri, Kazunori; Shanmugarajah, Priya; Yoneda, Makoto; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-04-01

    In the last few years, a lot of publications suggested that disabling cerebellar ataxias may develop through immune-mediated mechanisms. In this consensus paper, we discuss the clinical features of the main described immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias and address their presumed pathogenesis. Immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias include cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-GAD antibodies, the cerebellar type of Hashimoto's encephalopathy, primary autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, gluten ataxia, Miller Fisher syndrome, ataxia associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Humoral mechanisms, cell-mediated immunity, inflammation, and vascular injuries contribute to the cerebellar deficits in immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias. PMID:25823827

  15. Frequency of the different mutations causing spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA1, SCA2, MJD/SCA3 and DRPLA in a large group of Brazilian patients Freqüência das mutações que causam ataxia espinocerebelar (SCA1, SCA2, MJD/SCA3 e DRPLA em um grupo numeroso de pacientes Brasileiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iscia Lopes-Cendesi

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1, spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2 and Machado-Joseph disease or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (MJD/SCA3 are three distinctive forms of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA caused by expansions of an unstable CAG repeat localized in the coding region of the causative genes. Another related disease, dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA is also caused by an unstable triplet repeat and can present as SCA in late onset patients. We investigated the frequency of the SCA1, SCA2, MJD/SCA3 and DRPLA mutations in 328 Brazilian patients with SCA, belonging to 90 unrelated families with various patterns of inheritance and originating in different geographic regions of Brazil. We found mutations in 35 families (39%, 32 of them with a clear autosomal dominant inheritance. The frequency of the SCA1 mutation was 3% of all patients; and 6 % in the dominantly inherited SCAs. We identified the SCA2 mutation in 6% of all families and in 9% of the families with autosomal dominant inheritance. The MJD/SCA3 mutation was detected in 30 % of all patients; and in the 44% of the dominantly inherited cases. We found no DRPLA mutation. In addition, we observed variability in the frequency of the different mutations according to geographic origin of the patients, which is probably related to the distinct colonization of different parts of Brazil. These results suggest that SCA may be occasionally caused by the SCA1 and SCA2 mutations in the Brazilian population, and that the MJD/SCA3 mutation is the most common cause of dominantly inherited SCA in Brazil.Ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 1 (SCA1, ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 2 (SCA2 e doença de Machado-Joseph ou ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 3 (MJD/SCA3 são três formas de ataxia espinocerebelar (SCA que apresentam herança genética autossômica dominante. Nessas três doenças foi encontrada uma expansão instável de trinucleotídeo CAG localizada na região codificadora dos

  16. Ataxia-telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Pires Ferreira

    1966-09-01

    Full Text Available São apresentados os casos de dois irmãos com ataxia-telangiectasia, estudados sob os pontos de vista clínico, eletrencefalográfico, liquórico e encefalográfico. O autor resume os achados de diversos autores e chama a atenção para a regressão parcial da síndrome cerebelar em ambos os pacientes, fato ainda não referido na literatura.

  17. Genetics of the dominant ataxias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Dineke S.; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.

    2011-01-01

    The relevant clinical, genetic, and cell biologic aspects of the dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are reviewed in this article. SCAs are diseases of the entire nervous system; in addition to cerebellar ataxia, the central (but not obligate) disease feature, many noncerebellar comp

  18. An early-onset recessive cerebellar disorder with distal amyotrophy and, in two patients, gross myoclonia: A probable ataxia telangiectasia variant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. de Graaf (A.); G. de Jong (G.); W.J. Kleijer (Wim)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWe report a family of 4 siblings from a non-consanguineous marriage, presenting with an early onset recessive cerebellar ataxia and progressive distal limb wasting. Ocular or other telangiectasias were absent. There were neither frequent infections nor immunodeficiencies. The two younges

  19. Therapeutic effect of allogeneic cord blood stem cells transplantation on ataxia patients%异体脐血干细胞移植治疗共济失调患者疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周艳辉; 王琦; 余丹; 林珍

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of allogeneic cord blood stem cells transplantation on ataxia patients. Methods A retrospective analysis of the effect of allogeneic cord blood stem cells transplantation on 3 ataxia patients,using ICARS and Berg Balance Scale.ReSUltS The ICARS score of 3 patients' after treatment dropped by 2.30El?.65,and Berg Balance Scale score rised about 9.00 ?3.00, showing significant difference (P<0.05 = . Conclusion The stem cells transplantation is effective in treatment of ataxia patients, while a followup of long - term effect and side effects is indicated.%目的 探讨异体脐血干细胞移植治疗共济失调患者的疗效.方法 回顾性分析3例共济失调患者经异体脐血干细胞移植治疗后的疗效,使用世界神经病联合会国际合作共济失调量表(ICARS)及Berg平衡量表评分.结果 3例患者治疗后ICARS评分下降2.30E1±2.65,Berg平衡量表评分升高9.00±3.00,P< 0.05.结论 异体脐血干细胞移植治疗共济失调疗效明确,但长期疗效及副作用尚需继续观察.

  20. Internuclear ophthalmoplegia plus ataxia indicates a dorsomedial tegmental lesion at the pontomesencephalic junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Uk; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Park, Jeong-Jin; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) indicates a lesion involving the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) that interconnects the abducens nucleus and medial rectus subnucleus of the oculomotor nuclear complex. In fact, rostral-caudal localization value of the INO is often limited except when it accompanies symptoms and signs owing to involvement of nearby structures. Ataxia is often observed in lesions involving the cerebellum or the fibers to and from it anywhere in the brainstem. Herein, we sought to determine the localizing value of INO plus ataxia in the rostrocaudal axis of the brainstem. Thirty patients with INO plus limb or truncal ataxia were subjected to analyses. For comparison, 20 patients with isolated INO without any ataxia served as the control. We determined the lesion extent in the MRIs responsible for INO plus ataxia using a probabilistic lesion mapping and subtraction analysis and analyzed the neuro-otologic findings using video-oculography. In patients with INO with limb or truncal ataxia, the responsible lesions were mostly restricted to the paramedian tegmentum at the pontomesencephalic junction. In contrast, the lesions causing isolated INO without ataxia were mostly located in the caudal or mid-pontine area. The rostro-caudal distribution of the lesions was similar among the patients with only limb ataxia (n = 3), both limb and truncal ataxia (n = 10), and only truncal ataxia (n = 17). INO plus ataxia indicates a lesion involving the MLF at the pontomesencephalic junction. Damage to the brachium conjunctivum or mesencephalic locomotor region may explain the ataxia in association with INO in lesions involving this area. PMID:26995360

  1. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type III: a review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Fujioka Shinsuke; Sundal Christina; Wszolek Zbigniew K

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia (ADCA) Type III is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) classically characterized by pure cerebellar ataxia and occasionally by non-cerebellar signs such as pyramidal signs, ophthalmoplegia, and tremor. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in adulthood; however, a minority of patients develop clinical features in adolescence. The incidence of ADCA Type III is unknown. ADCA Type III consists of six subtypes, SCA5, SCA6, SCA11, SCA26, SCA30, and...

  2. The cardiomyopathy in Friedreich's ataxia: isotopic ventriculography and myocardial imaging with thallium-201

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myocardial scanning after the intravenous administration of Thallium 201 was used to evaluate regional myocardial perfusion in 14 patients with Friedreich's ataxia. Isotopic ventriculography was also used to assess left ventricular contractility. Myocardial images in patients with Friedreich's ataxia were found to be precociously abnormal irrespective of the degree of neurological impairment or of the severity of myocardial hypertrophy

  3. [Heart involvement in Friedreich's ataxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidemann, F; Scholz, F; Florescu, C; Liu, D; Hu, K; Herrmann, S; Ertl, G; Störk, S

    2015-03-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is a rare hereditary disease and although the gene defect has already been identified as a deficiency of the mitochondrial protein frataxin, the pathophysiology is still unknown. Although a multisystem disorder organ involvement is predominantly neurological. Besides the characteristic features of spinocerebellar ataxia the heart is frequently also affected. Cardiac involvement typically manifests as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which can progress to heart failure and death. So far most research has focused on the neurological aspects and cardiac involvement in Friedreich's ataxia has not been systematically investigated. Thus, a better understanding of the progression of the cardiomyopathy, cardiac complications and long-term cardiac outcome is warranted. Although no specific treatment is available general cardiac therapeutic options for cardiomyopathy should be considered. The current review focuses on clinical and diagnostic features of cardiomyopathy and discusses potential therapeutic developments for Friedreich's ataxia. PMID:24848865

  4. Therapeutic Developments in Friedreich Ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Robert B Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia is an inherited, severe, progressive neuro- and cardiodegenerative disorder for which there currently is no approved therapy. Friedreich ataxia is caused by the decreased expression and/or function of frataxin, a mitochondrial matrix protein that binds iron and is involved in the formation of iron-sulfur clusters. Decreased frataxin function leads to decreased iron-sulfur cluster formation, mitochondrial iron accumulation, cytosolic iron depletion, oxidative stress, and mito...

  5. Ataxia-telangiectasia: future prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhary MW; Al-Baradie RS

    2014-01-01

    Mohammed Wajid Chaudhary, Raidah Saleem Al-Baradie Pediatric Neurology, Neurosciences Centre, King Fahad Specialist Hospital, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Abstract: Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive multi-system disorder caused by mutation in the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene (ATM). ATM is a large serine/threonine protein kinase, a member of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) family whose best-studied function is as master controller of si...

  6. Effect of surgery and/or radiotherapy on the cellular immune status in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of cellular immune status, as measured by E-rosette forming T-lymphocyctes, was done in 10 healthy controls and 30 cancer patients during and after therapy. Cancer patients were divided into 3 groups treated by different modalities, viz. surgery alone (group I), radio-therapy alone (group II) and combination therapy (group III). Pre-treatment T-lymphocyte number and percentage were significantly lower in cancer patients in comparison to the healthy controls. Group II and III patients revealed progressive impairment of cellular immune status till completion of therapy while in group I patients, the depression of cellular immune response was transient-recovering within one week. Thus, surgery alone produces less marked impairment of cellular immune response- a valuable defence mechanism, than radio-therapy/ combination therapy. (author)

  7. Ataxia, acute mountain sickness, and high altitude cerebral edema

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Tianyi; Ma Siqing; Bian Huiping; Zhang Minming

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations suggest that ataxia is common and often one of the most reliable warning signs of high altitude cerebral edema(HACE).The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic role of ataxia in acute mountain sickness (AMS) and HACE among mountain rescuers on the quake areas,and in approaching the relation between AMS and HACE.After the earthquake on April 14,2010,approximately 24080 lowland rescuers were rapidly transported from sea level or lowlands to the mountainous rescue sites at 3750 ~ 4568 m,and extremely hardly worked for an emergency treatment after arrival.Assessments of acute altitude illness on the quake areas were using the Lake Louise Scoring System.73 % of the rescuers were found to be developed AMS.The incidence of high altitude pulmonary edema(HAPE) and HACE was 0.73 % and 0.26 %,respectively,on the second to third day at altitude.Ataxia sign was measured by simple tests of coordination including a modified Romberg test.The clinical features of 62 patients with HACE were analyzed.It was found that the most frequent,serious neurological symptoms and signs were altered mental status(50/62,80.6 %)and truncal ataxia (47/62,75.8 %).Mental status change was rated slightly higher than ataxia,but ataxia occurred earlier than mental status change and other symptoms.The earliest sign of ataxia was a vague unsteadiness of gait,which may be present alone in association with or without AMS.Advanced ataxia was correlated with the AMS scores,but mild ataxia did not correlate with AMS scores at altitudes of 3750~4568 m.Of them,14 patients were further examined by computerized tomographic scanning of the brain and cerebral magnetic resonance imagines were examined in another 15 cases.These imaging studies indicated that the presence of the cerebral edema was in 97 % of cases who were clinically diagnosed as HACE (28/29).Ataxia seems to be a reliable sign of advanced AMS or HACE,so does altered mental status.

  8. 共济失调患者手运动时脑激活区域的定量分析%Quantitative analysis of the hand motor cortex in ataxia patients using blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    元小冬; 王小洁; 王德; 赵丽君; 王守红

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the characteristics of the hand motor cortex in ataxia patients during active and passive finger-to-thumb opposition movements using bold oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI). Methods Ten right-handed healthy volunteers and 16 ataxia patients with motor cortex lesions were selected, and whole-brain BOLD-fMRI examinations were made while the subjects were performing the active and passive movements. Activated volume and intensity were recorded from the corresponding motor cortex and analyzed quantitatively. Meanwhile, the patients' coordination was evaluated using the international cooperative ataxia rating scale (ICARS). Results During passive movement of the ataxia patient's affected hands, the ipsilateral supplementary motor area (SMA) activated volume was larger than that during normal ipsilateral hand movement, and the activation intensity was also higher than that in the healthy controls. The ipsilateral cerebellum activated volume and intensity were significantly lower than those in the control group, and the frequency of appearance of the cerebellum was also less. The patients' activated volume and intensity in the ipsilateral cerebellum showed no correlation with ICARS scores. Conclusions When the ataxia patients' affected side cerebellum was dysfunctional, the ipsilateral SMA could compensate for the weak cerebellum function. The ICARS does not reflect cerebellum function.%目的 利用血氧水平依赖性功能性磁共振成像(BOLD-fMRI)技术,探讨共济失调患者在主动与被动复杂对指运动模式下关键脑功能区激活体积和强度的变化.方法 选取共济失调患者16例作为病例组,另选10名健康志愿者作为正常组.入选者均进行主动与被动复杂对指运动,在这两种运动模式下进行BOLD-fMRl检查,记录相应脑运动功能区的激活体积和强度并进行定量分析.采用共济失调量表(ICARS)对共济失调患者的

  9. An unusual cause of adult onset cerebellar ataxia with hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Ramshekhar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an unusual case of sporadic adult onset cerebellar ataxia with hypogonadism. A 40-year-old unmarried man presented with progressive ataxia and dysarthria along with complaints of non-development of secondary sexual characteristics and erectile dysfunction. There were complaints of intermittent diarrhea. Clinical examination revealed a pan-cerebellar syndrome with features of hypoandrogenism. No eye movement abnormalities were evident. There were signs of malabsorption. Investigations confirmed the presence of auto-antibodies found in celiac disease, and a duodenal biopsy confirmed the same. Hypoandrogenism was postulated to be due to hypergonadotropic hypogonadism which has been mentioned in a few patients of celiac disease. However, the pattern seen in our patient was of a hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. This is probably secondary to an autoimmune hypophysitis seen in some patients in the absence of other clinical manifestations. Autoantibody testing should be a diagnostic necessity in any adult with a sporadic cerebellar ataxia.

  10. Cellular origin and procoagulant activity of tissue factor-exposing microparticles in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, A.; Berckmans, R.J.; Böing, A.N.; Sturk, A.; Büller, H.R.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Nieuwland, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In patients with cancer, tissue factor-exposing microparticles (TF-exposing MP) have been associated with disease progression and thrombosis. The cellular origin and coagulant activity of TF-exposing MP, however, remain disputed. Therefore, we investigated the cellular origin of the TF-e

  11. Ramsay Hunt Syndrome : Clinical Characterization of Progressive Myoclonus Ataxia Caused by GOSR2 Mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Egmond, Martje E.; Verschuuren - Bemelmans, Cornelia; Nibbeling, Esther A.; Elting, Jan Willem J.; Sival, Deborah A.; Brouwer, Oebele F.; de Vries, Jeroen J.; Kremer, Hubertus P.; Sinke, Richard J.; Tijssen, Marina A.; de Koning, Tom J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ramsay Hunt syndrome (progressive myoclonus ataxia) is a descriptive diagnosis characterized by myoclonus, ataxia, and infrequent seizures. Often the etiology cannot be determined. Recently, a mutation in the GOSR2 gene (c.430G>T, p.Gly144Trp) was reported in 6 patients with childhood-on

  12. Neuropathology in classical and variant ataxia-telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, Mijke M. M.; Martin, Jean-Jacques; van Deuren, Marcel; Groote, Chantal Ceuterick-de; Weemaes, Corry M. R.; Kremer, Berry H. P. H.; Taylor, Malcolm A. R.; Willemsen, Michel A. A. P.; Lammens, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is classically characterized by progressive neurodegeneration, oculocutaneous telangiectasia, immunodeficiency and elevated a-fetoprotein levels. Some patients, classified as variant A-T, exhibit a milder clinical course. In the latter patients extrapyramidal symptoms, in

  13. Adult-onset cerebellar Ataxia: a clinical and genetic Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Brusse (Esther)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCerebellar ataxias represent a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. Two main categories are distinguished: hereditary and sporadic ataxias. Sporadic ataxias may be symptomatic or idiopathic. The clinical classification of hereditary ataxias is nowadays being replaced by an

  14. The Correlation between Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Tumor Cellularity in Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lihua; Liu, Min; Bao, Jing; XIA, YUNBAO; Zhang, Jiuquan; Zhang, Lin; Huang, Xuequan; Jian WANG

    2013-01-01

    Objective To perform a meta-analysis exploring the correlation between the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and tumor cellularity in patients. Materials and Methods We searched medical and scientific literature databases for studies discussing the correlation between the ADC and tumor cellularity in patients. Only studies that were published in English or Chinese prior to November 2012 were considered for inclusion. Summary correlation coefficient (r) values were extracted from each study...

  15. SETX mutations are a frequent genetic cause of juvenile and adult onset cerebellar ataxia with neuropathy and elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein

    OpenAIRE

    Nanetti, Lorenzo; Cavalieri, Simona; Pensato, Viviana; Erbetta, Alessandra; Pareyson, Davide; Panzeri, Marta; Zorzi, Giovanna; Antozzi, Carlo; Moroni, Isabella; Gellera, Cinzia; Brusco, Alfredo; Mariotti, Caterina

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/background Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia defines a group of genetically distinct recessive ataxias including ataxia-telangectasia (A-T, ATM gene), ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 1 (AOA1, APTX gene) and type 2 (AOA2, SETX gene). Although, a few unique clinical features differentiate each of these forms, the patients also share common clinical signs, such as the presence of cerebellar atrophy, sensorimotor axonal neuropathy, and elevated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) serum level. Mat...

  16. Cranial MRI in ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined five males with laboratory-confirmed ataxia-telangiectasia (AT), aged 9-28 years, several times by MRI (9 examinations: 5 at 0.15 T, 3 at 0.5 T, 1 at 1.5 T). Intermediate, T1-, T2- and T2*-weighted spin-echo and gradient-echo sequences were performed. All patients showed vermian atrophy, enlarged fourth ventricle and cisterna magna; four showed cerebellar hemisphere atrophy; two enlarged infracerebellar subarachnoid spaces and four patients had sinusitis. No focal areas of abnormal signal were seen in the brain, diffuse high signal was found in the central cerebral white matter of the oldest patient. AT is an important human model of inherited cancer susceptibility and multisystem ageing; as in xeroderma pigmentosum and other ''breakage syndromes'', ionising radiation should be avoided. When imaging is necessary, MRI should be preferred to CT in patients known or suspected to have AT and those with undefined paediatric ataxias of nontraumatic origin. If atrophy of only the cerebellum, especially the vermis, is noted, laboratory research should be performed to confirm the diagnosis of AT. (orig.)

  17. Cranial MRI in ataxia-telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardanelli, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Parodi, R.C. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Ottonello, C. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Renzetti, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Saitta, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Lignana, E. [G. Gaslini Inst., Genoa (Italy); Mancardi, G.L. [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy)

    1995-01-01

    We examined five males with laboratory-confirmed ataxia-telangiectasia (AT), aged 9-28 years, several times by MRI (9 examinations: 5 at 0.15 T, 3 at 0.5 T, 1 at 1.5 T). Intermediate, T1-, T2- and T2{sup *}-weighted spin-echo and gradient-echo sequences were performed. All patients showed vermian atrophy, enlarged fourth ventricle and cisterna magna; four showed cerebellar hemisphere atrophy; two enlarged infracerebellar subarachnoid spaces and four patients had sinusitis. No focal areas of abnormal signal were seen in the brain, diffuse high signal was found in the central cerebral white matter of the oldest patient. AT is an important human model of inherited cancer susceptibility and multisystem ageing; as in xeroderma pigmentosum and other ``breakage syndromes``, ionising radiation should be avoided. When imaging is necessary, MRI should be preferred to CT in patients known or suspected to have AT and those with undefined paediatric ataxias of nontraumatic origin. If atrophy of only the cerebellum, especially the vermis, is noted, laboratory research should be performed to confirm the diagnosis of AT. (orig.)

  18. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions SCA2 spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 ( SCA2 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions SCA3 spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 ( SCA3 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions SCA6 spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 ( SCA6 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions SCA1 spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 ( SCA1 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  2. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 14 (SCA14)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SCA14) is one of those types of hereditary cerebellar ataxias. The involved gene, discovered in 2003, is located ... evaluation by a physician makes the diagnosis of cerebellar ataxia. A CT or MRI scan of the brain ...

  3. Familial cerebellar ataxia and diabetes insipidus.

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, I C; O'Malley, B P; Young, I D

    1988-01-01

    Two sisters are reported who both developed partial cranial diabetes insipidus in their 4th decade, followed by progressive cerebellar ataxia. This appears to be the first report of cerebellar ataxia and diabetes insipidus occurring together as a genetic entity.

  4. Ataxia cerebelar aguda na criança Acute cerebellar ataxia in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriana Moura Ribeiro

    1968-03-01

    Full Text Available São relatados os casos de 6 crianças com ataxia cerebelar aguda. Admitem os autores a presença de um fator etiológico de caráter viral comum a todos êles, discutindo os mecanismos patogênicos com base nos casos da literatura. A evolução foi favorável em todos os pacientes, com regressão completa da sintomatologia, dentro do período de 6 a 60 dias.Clinical observations of 6 children with acute cerebellar ataxia and respective laboratorial data are reported. Considerations are made in order to support the hypothesis of involving virus. The evolution of the disorder was a nonfatal one and the patients regained normal cerebellar function within a period of 6 to 60 days.

  5. A case of human immunodeficiency virus infection with cerebellar ataxia that suggested by an association with autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Shigeto; Kondo, Takayuki; Nakamura, Takashi; Nakagawa, Tomokazu; Matsumoto, Sadayuki

    2016-04-28

    We report a case of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that showed subacute progressive cerebellar ataxia without HIV encephalopathy or other encephalopathies, including progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy or encephalitis of other human herpes virus (HHV) infections. A 43-year-old man exhibited unsteady gait. Neurological examination disclosed ataxia of the trunk and lower extremities. Personality change and dementia were absent. Magnetic resonance imaging did not reveal any abnormal finding, including of the cerebellum. The serum HIV-1-RNA was 1.2 × 10(5) copies/ml, and the absolute CD4 lymphocyte count was 141 cells/ml. Remarkably, the serum anti-Yo antibody, as an anti-cerebellar antibody of paraneoplastic syndrome, and anti-gliadin antibody, associated with celiac disease or gluten ataxia, were positive. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immunoglobulin G index was 1.2 (ataxia, cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody, and Hashimoto's encephalopathy might manifest as autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. As regards the association of HIV infection and autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, a previous report suggested that anti-gliadin antibody was detected in about 30% of HIV-infected children, though there is no reference to an association with cerebellar ataxia. Moreover, to our knowledge, detection of anti-Yo antibody in an HIV-infected patient with cerebellar ataxia has not been reported. These findings suggest that, although it is extremely rare, clinicians need to consider HIV infection in a patient exhibiting autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. PMID:27010096

  6. CT in autosomal dominant and idiopathic cerebellar ataxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signs of atrophy on cranial CT were investigated in 35 patients diagnosed as suffering from autosomal dominant (n=21) or idiopathic (n=14) cerebellar ataxia. Thirteen patients with a pure cerebellar syndrome were examined after at least 4 years of disease (mean duration 10.5 years) and were classified as cerebellar atrophy (CA). Twenty-two patients with additional non-cerebellar signs were classified as olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (OPCA). Four (30%) of the patients with CA had atrophy of the brain stem in addition. Of the 22 patients with OPCA, 9 (40%) had atrophy of the cerebellum only. In patients with CA or OPCA correlation of clinical signs with severity of atrophy on CT was poor. Atrophy on CT often fails to differentiate autosomal dominant or idiopathic cerebellar ataxias in CA or OPCA: Patients with CA can also have atrophy of the brain stem and patients with OPCA do not necessarily show brain stem atrophy. (orig.)

  7. Clinical Features of Friedreich Ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Delatycki, Martin B.; Corben, Louise A

    2012-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia, the most common hereditary ataxia, affects about 1:29 000 Caucasians. In about 98% of these individuals it is due to homozygosity for a GAA trinucleotide repeat expansion in intron 1 of FXN; in the other 2% it is due to compound heterozygosity for a GAA expansion and point mutation or deletion. The condition affects multiple sites in the central and peripheral nervous system as well as a number of other organ systems, resulting in multiple signs and symptoms. Onset of this ...

  8. SUBCLINICAL HEPATIC ENCEPHALOPATHY DETECTED THROUGH PSYCHOMETRIC TESTS IN PATIENTS WITH HEPATIC CELLULAR CARCINOMA AND CIRRHOSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李薇; 吴积坰; 李惠芳; 顾海蔚; 范晓方

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study subclinical hepatic encephalopathy (SHE) in patients with hepatic cellular carcinoma by using psychometric tests.Methods 112 cases of hepatic cellular carcinoma complicated with cirrhosis and 65 controls were detected with number connection test (NCT), digital span test (DSP) and digital symbol test (DSY).Results The abnormal rate of NCT, DSY and DSP in patients was 23.2% (26/112), 14.3% (16/112) and 11.6%(13/112) respectively. Patients in the Child-Pugh B group had a significantly higher abnormal rate than that in the Child-Pugh A group.Conclusion SHE has an incidence of 25.0% (28/112) in patients with hepatic cellular carcinoma and cirrhosis in this study population; its occurrence is associated with the severity of liver impairment.

  9. Friedreich's Ataxia: a review from a cardiology perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bourke, T

    2011-12-01

    Neuromuscular disorders are not among the common causes of cardiomyopathy in the general population; however, cardiomyopathy is known to occur in several neuromuscular disorders including Friedreich\\'s Ataxia (FA). In patients with neuromuscular disorders, concomitant cardiac involvement contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality and often leads to premature death.

  10. Clinical spectrum of ataxia-telangiectasia in adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, M. M. M.; Abdo, W. F.; Willemsen, M. A. A. P.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Smeets, D. F. C. M.; Hiel, J. A. P.; Brunt, E. R.; van Rijn, M. A.; Krakauer, D. Majoor; Oldenburg, R. A.; Broeks, A.; Last, J. I.; van't Veer, L. J.; Tijssen, M. A. J.; Dubois, A. M. I.; Kremer, H. P. H.; Weemaes, C. M. R.; Taylor, A. M. R.; van Deuren, M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To describe the phenotype of adult patients with variant and classic ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), to raise the degree of clinical suspicion for the diagnosis variant A-T, and to assess a genotype-phenotype relationship for mutations in the ATM gene. Methods: Retrospective analysis of the

  11. Clinical spectrum of ataxia-telangiectasia in adulthood.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, M.M.; Abdo, W.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Hiel, J.A.P.; Brunt, E.R.; Rijn, M.A. van; Majoor Krakauer, D.; Oldenburg, R.A.; Broeks, A.; Last, J.I.; Veer, L.J. van 't; Tijssen, M.A.; Dubois, A.M.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Taylor, A.M.; Deuren, M. van

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the phenotype of adult patients with variant and classic ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), to raise the degree of clinical suspicion for the diagnosis variant A-T, and to assess a genotype-phenotype relationship for mutations in the ATM gene. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of the

  12. ERS statement on the multidisciplinary respiratory management of ataxia telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhatt, J.M.; Bush, A.; Gerven, M.; Nissenkorn, A.; Renke, M.; Yarlett, L.; Taylor, M.; Tonia, T.; Warris, A.; Zielen, S.; Zinna, S.; Merkus, P.J.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare, progressive, multisystem disease that has a large number of complex and diverse manifestations which vary with age. Patients with A-T die prematurely with the leading causes of death being respiratory diseases and cancer. Respiratory manifestations include immu

  13. Cellular origin of prognostic chromosomal aberrations in AML patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mora-Jensen, H.; Jendholm, J.; Rapin, N.;

    2015-01-01

    these aberrations occur in normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSCs/HPCs) before definitive leukemic transformation through additional acquisition of a few (that is, mostly 1 or 2) leukemia-promoting driver aberrations. NGS studies on sorted bone marrow (BM) populations of AML patients with...... molecular aberrations that were present in the fully transformed committed HPCs together with the prognostic driver aberration. Adding to this vast heterogeneity and complexity of AML genomes and their clonal evolution, a recent study of a murine AML model demonstrated that t(9;11) AML originating from HSCs...

  14. DNA triplex structures in neurodegenerative disorder, Friedreich's ataxia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Moganty R Rajeswari

    2012-07-01

    It is now established that a small fraction of genomic DNA does adopt the non-canonical B-DNA structure or ‘unusual’ DNA structure. The unusual DNA structures like DNA-hairpin, cruciform, Z-DNA, triplex and tetraplex are represented as hotspots of chromosomal breaks, homologous recombination and gross chromosomal rearrangements since they are prone to the structural alterations. Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA), the autosomal recessive degenerative disorder of nervous and muscles tissue, is caused by the massive expansion of (GAA) repeats that occur in the first intron of Frataxin gene X25 on chromosome 9q13-q21.1. The purine strand of the DNA in the expanded (GAA) repeat region folds back to form the (R∙R*Y) type of triplex, which further inhibits the frataxin gene expression, and this clearly suggests that the shape of DNA is the determining factor in the cellular function. FRDA is the only disease known so far to be associated with DNA triplex. Structural characterization of GAA-containing DNA triplexes using some simple biophysical methods like UV melting, UV absorption, circular dichroic spectroscopy and electrophoretic mobility shift assay are discussed. Further, the clinical aspects and genetic analysis of FRDA patients who carry (GAA) repeat expansions are presented. The potential of some small molecules that do not favour the DNA triplex formation as therapeutics for FRDA are also briefly discussed.

  15. Serum versus Imaging Biomarkers in Friedreich Ataxia to Indicate Left Ventricular Remodeling and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Nishaki; Chacko, Paul; Jin, James; Tran, Tam; Prior, Thomas W; He, Xin; Agarwal, Gunjan; Raman, Subha V

    2016-08-01

    Patients with Friedreich ataxia typically die of cardiomyopathy, marked by myocardial fibrosis and abnormal left ventricular (LV) geometry. We measured procollagen I carboxyterminal propeptide (PICP), a serum biomarker of collagen production, and characterized genotypes, phenotypes, and outcomes in these patients. Twenty-nine patients with Friedreich ataxia (mean age, 34.2 ± 2.2 yr) and 29 healthy subjects (mean age, 32.5 ± 1.1 yr) underwent serum PICP measurements. Patients underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and outcome evaluations at baseline and 12 months. Baseline PICP values were significantly higher in the patients than in the control group (1,048 ± 77 vs 614 ± 23 ng/mL; P ataxia and indicates baseline abnormal LV geometry and subsequent dilation. Cardiac magnetic resonance and PICP warrant consideration as complementary biomarkers in therapeutic trials of Friedreich ataxia cardiomyopathy. PMID:27547137

  16. Speech Prosody in Cerebellar Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Maureen A.; Raphael, Lawrence J.; Harris, Katherine S.; Geibel, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy…

  17. Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxias: A Korean Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Sun Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary ataxia is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive ataxia combined with/without peripheral neuropathy, extrapyramidal symptoms, pyramidal symptoms, seizure, and multiple systematic involvements. More than 35 autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have been designated as spinocerebellar ataxia, and there are 55 recessive ataxias that have not been named systematically. Conducting genetic sequencing to confirm a diagnosis is difficult due to the large amount of subtypes with phenotypic overlap. The prevalence of hereditary ataxia can vary among countries, and estimations of prevalence and subtype frequencies are necessary for planning a diagnostic strategy in a specific population. This review covers the various hereditary ataxias reported in the Korean population with a focus on the prevalence and subtype frequencies as the clinical characteristics of the various subtypes.

  18. Spectrum of centrosome autoantibodies in childhood varicella and post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stinton Laura M

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sera from children with post-varicella infections have autoantibodies that react with centrosomes in brain and tissue culture cells. We investigated the sera of children with infections and post-varicella ataxia and related conditions for reactivity to five recombinant centrosome proteins: γγ-enolase, pericentrin, ninein, PCM-1, and Mob1. Methods Sera from 12 patients with acute post-varicella ataxia, 1 with post-Epstein Barr virus (EBV ataxia, 5 with uncomplicated varicella infections, and other conditions were tested for reactivity to cryopreserved cerebellum tissue and recombinant centrosome proteins. The distribution of pericentrin in the cerebellum was studied by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF using rabbit antibodies to the recombinant protein. Antibodies to phospholipids (APL were detected by ELISA. Results Eleven of 12 children with post-varicella ataxia, 4/5 children with uncomplicated varicella infections, 1/1 with post-EBV ataxia, 2/2 with ADEM, 1/2 with neuroblastoma and ataxia, and 2/2 with cerebellitis had antibodies directed against 1 or more recombinant centrosome antigens. Antibodies to pericentrin were seen in 5/12 children with post-varicella ataxia but not in any of the other sera tested. IIF demonstrated that pericentrin is located in axons and centrosomes of cerebellar cells. APL were detected in 75% of the sera from children with post-varicella ataxia and 50% of children with varicella without ataxia and in none of the controls. Conclusion This is the first study to show the antigen specificity of anti-centrosome antibodies in children with varicella. Our data suggest that children with post-varicella ataxia have unique autoantibody reactivity to pericentrin.

  19. Hereditary ataxias and paraplegias in Cantabria, Spain. An epidemiological and clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, J M; Calleja, J; Combarros, O; Berciano, J

    1991-04-01

    A clinical, genetic and epidemiological study of hereditary ataxias and paraplegias was conducted within a defined area (Cantabria) in Northern Spain from 1974 to 1986. The series comprised 48 index cases and 65 affected relatives. On prevalence day, 103 patients were alive, giving a prevalence of 20.2 cases per 100,000. There were 24 patients (18 families) with Friedreich's ataxia (FA), 12 (6 families) with early onset cerebellar ataxia (EOCA) differing from FA, 6 (3 families) with dominantly transmitted late onset cerebellar ataxia (LOCA), 11 with 'idiopathic' LOCA, 49 (9 families) with 'pure' hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), and 1 patient with congenital cerebellar ataxia. The prevalence found here is comparable with the highest figures described in previous surveys. This may in part be due to the great number of secondary cases in our series. A high frequency of parental consanguinity occurred in FA patients, 'pseudodominant' inheritance being observed in 1 family. The clinical features were those of classical FA except for later onset and slower course in 1 family, and retained tendon reflexes in the lower limbs in 2 cases. Such data indicate the need for modification of the essential criteria for the disease. EOCA included 4 patients with normoreflexic ataxia and 1 patient with ataxia and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone deficiency. In addition, there were 7 patients from 2 unrelated families with a homogeneous syndrome characterized by autosomal recessive inheritance, cerebellar ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa and sensory neuropathy. This syndrome is therefore a well defined nosological entity to be added to the list of autosomal recessive mendelian phenotypes. The clinical picture of patients with LOCA was either a 'pure' cerebellar or a 'cerebellar-plus' syndrome. Genetic subgroups of 'pure' HSP were autosomal dominant type I in 5 families and type II in 2, and autosomal recessive in 2 families. PMID:2043954

  20. Using human pluripotent stem cells to study Friedreich ataxia cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombie, Duncan E; Pera, Martin F; Delatycki, Martin B; Pébay, Alice

    2016-06-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most common of the inherited ataxias. It is an autosomal recessive disease characterised by degeneration of peripheral sensory neurons, regions of the central nervous system and cardiomyopathy. FRDA is usually due to homozygosity for trinucleotide GAA repeat expansions found within first intron of the FRATAXIN (FXN) gene, which results in reduced levels of the mitochondrial protein FXN. Reduced FXN protein results in mitochondrial dysfunction and iron accumulation leading to increased oxidative stress and cell death in the nervous system and heart. Yet the precise functions of FXN and the underlying mechanisms leading to disease pathology remain elusive. This is particularly true of the cardiac aspect of FRDA, which remains largely uncharacterized at the cellular level. Here, we summarise current knowledge on experimental models in which to study FRDA cardiomyopathy, with a particular focus on the use of human pluripotent stem cells as a disease model. PMID:27019046

  1. Friedreich's ataxia: clinical and molecular study of 25 Brazilian cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albano Lilian M. J.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Friedreich's ataxia is a neurodegenerative disorder whose clinical diagnostic criteria for typical cases basically include: a early age of onset (< 20 or 25 years, b autosomal recessive inheritance, c progressive ataxia of limbs and gait, and d absence of lower limb tendon reflexes. METHODS: We studied the frequency and the size of expanded GAA and their influence on neurologic findings, age at onset, and disease progression in 25 Brazilian patients with clinical diagnosis of Friedreich's ataxia - 19 typical and 6 atypical - using a long-range PCR test. RESULTS: Abnormalities in cerebellar signs, in electrocardiography, and pes cavus occurred more frequently in typical cases; however, plantar response and speech were more frequently normal in this group when the both typical and atypical cases were compared. Homozygous GAA expansion repeats were detected in 17 cases (68% - all typical cases. In 8 patients (32% (6 atypical and 2 typical, no expansion was observed, ruling out the diagnosis of Friedreich's ataxia. In cases with GAA expansions, foot deformity, cardiac abnormalities, and some neurologic findings occurred more frequently; however, abnormalities in cranial nerves and in tomographic findings were detected less frequently than in patients without GAA expansions. DISCUSSION: Molecular analysis was imperative for the diagnosis of Friedreich's ataxia, not only for typical cases but also for atypical ones. There was no genotype-phenotype correlation. Diagnosis based only on clinical findings is limited; however, it aids in better screening for suspected cases that should be tested. Evaluation for vitamin E deficiency is recommended, especially in cases without GAA expansion.

  2. The usefulness of the nuclear cardiology in the cellular implant in patients with severe myocardial damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent therapeutic advances as the cellular implant as well as those different protocols of image acquisition in the field of the Nuclear Cardiology its have allowed that the patient with severe myocardial damage and without some possibility of revascularization is benefited with these advances. Doubtless the Tl-201 par excellence has an important paper for standardize the more appropriate therapeutic behavior for the heart attack patient; reason by this investigation protocol was developed. The objective of the study was to identify the heart attack regions without viable tissue with SPECT in patient with important myocardial damage without some possibility of traditional revascularization; for the 'Stem cell' cellular implantation therapy. The methodology it was carried out by a study of myocardial perfusion in 10 patients with important myocardial damage previous cellular implants, with PICANUC/ SPECT methodology and using a software (Emory Tool Box) for the image processing validated by the University of Emory Atlanta GA; and using as tracer the Tl - 201 to identify the heart attack regions without presence of viable tissue with an analysis model of 17 segments standardized for the left ventricle; qualifying this way the myocardial perfusion in: 0 (normal), 1 (light), 2 (moderate), 3 (severe), 4 (absent) and x (bad technique). The conclusions were that the SPECT study with PICANUC methodology with Tl-201 is safe and effective for the precise localization for the cellular implantation via direct intra myocardial. (Author)

  3. Unanswered Questions in Friedreich Ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, David R; Deutsch, Eric C.; Wilson, Robert B.; Tennekoon, Gihan

    2012-01-01

    During the past 15 years, the pace of research advancement in Friedreich ataxia has been rapid. The abnormal gene has been discovered and its gene product characterized, leading to the development of new evidence-based therapies. Still, various unsettled issues remain that affect clinical trials. These include the level of frataxin deficiency needed to cause disease, the mechanism by which frataxin-deficient mitochondrial dysfunction leads to symptomatology, and the reason selected cells are ...

  4. DNA strand breakage repair in ataxia telangiectasia fibroblast-like cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human diploid fibroblast-like cells derived from four patients with the genetic disease ataxia telangiectasia and from two non-mutant donors were examined for the repair of X-ray induced strand breaks in DNA. The ataxia telangiectasia cultures showed no significant differences from the non-mutant cultures in the kinetics and extent of strand repair. This suggests that the increased spontaneous and X-ray induced chromatid aberrations observed in ataxia telangiectasia cells are not caused by a defect in the repair of single strand breaks as might be suspected from a general model of aberration production

  5. Huntington’s disease masquerading as spinocerebellar ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Quiroga, Sergio Alejandro; Gonzalez-Morón, Dolores; Garretto, Nelida; Kauffman, Marcelo Andres

    2013-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterised by the presence of choreic abnormal movements, behavioural or psychiatric disturbances and dementia. Noteworthy, despite atypical motor symptoms other than chorea have been reported as initial presentation in some patients, a very few number of HD patients, presenting at onset mostly cerebellar dysfunction masquerading dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA), were occasionally reported. We rep...

  6. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Truncal Ataxia and HINTS as Cardinal Signs for Acute Vestibular Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Sergio; Martínez, Carlos; Zalazar, Guillermo; Moro, Marcela; Batuecas-Caletrio, Angel; Luis, Leonel; Gordon, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The head impulse, nystagmus type, test of skew (HINTS) protocol set a new paradigm to differentiate peripheral vestibular disease from stroke in patients with acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). The relationship between degree of truncal ataxia and stroke has not been systematically studied in patients with AVS. We studied a group of 114 patients who were admitted to a General Hospital due to AVS, 72 of them with vestibular neuritis (based on positive head impulse, abnormal caloric tests, and negative MRI) and the rest with stroke: 32 in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) territory (positive HINTS findings, positive MRI) and 10 in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) territory (variable findings and grade 3 ataxia, positive MRI). Truncal ataxia was measured by independent observers as grade 1, mild to moderate imbalance with walking independently; grade 2, severe imbalance with standing, but cannot walk without support; and grade 3, falling at upright posture. When we applied the HINTS protocol to our sample, we obtained 100% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity, similar to previously published findings. Only those patients with stroke presented with grade 3 ataxia. Of those with grade 2 ataxia (n = 38), 11 had cerebellar stroke and 28 had vestibular neuritis, not related to the patient's age. Grade 2-3 ataxia was 92.9% sensitive and 61.1% specific to detect AICA/PICA stroke in patients with AVS, with 100% sensitivity to detect AICA stroke. In turn, two signs (nystagmus of central origin and grade 2-3 Ataxia) had 100% sensitivity and 61.1% specificity. Ataxia is less sensitive than HINTS but much easier to evaluate. PMID:27551274

  7. Friedreich's ataxia reveals a mechanism for coordinate regulation of oxidative metabolism via feedback inhibition of the SIRT3 deacetylase

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Gregory R.; Pride, P. Melanie; Babbey, Clifford M.; Payne, R. Mark

    2012-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is the most common inherited human ataxia and is caused by a deficiency in the mitochondrial protein frataxin. Clinically, patients suffer from progressive spinocerebellar degeneration, diabetes and a fatal cardiomyopathy, associated with mitochondrial respiratory chain defects. Recent findings have shown that lysine acetylation regulates mitochondrial function and intermediary metabolism. However, little is known about lysine acetylation in the setting of pathologi...

  8. Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions that can cause acquired ataxia include stroke, multiple sclerosis, tumors, alcoholism, peripheral neuropathy, metabolic disorders, and vitamin deficiencies. Is there any treatment? There is no ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia with vitamin E deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions ataxia with vitamin E deficiency ataxia with vitamin E deficiency Enable Javascript to view ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency is a disorder that ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... anemia and ataxia X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Close All Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia is a rare condition characterized by a blood ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Open All Close All Description Dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia (DCMA) syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  12. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Truncal Ataxia and HINTS as Cardinal Signs for Acute Vestibular Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Sergio; Martínez, Carlos; Zalazar, Guillermo; Moro, Marcela; Batuecas-Caletrio, Angel; Luis, Leonel; Gordon, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The head impulse, nystagmus type, test of skew (HINTS) protocol set a new paradigm to differentiate peripheral vestibular disease from stroke in patients with acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). The relationship between degree of truncal ataxia and stroke has not been systematically studied in patients with AVS. We studied a group of 114 patients who were admitted to a General Hospital due to AVS, 72 of them with vestibular neuritis (based on positive head impulse, abnormal caloric tests, and negative MRI) and the rest with stroke: 32 in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) territory (positive HINTS findings, positive MRI) and 10 in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) territory (variable findings and grade 3 ataxia, positive MRI). Truncal ataxia was measured by independent observers as grade 1, mild to moderate imbalance with walking independently; grade 2, severe imbalance with standing, but cannot walk without support; and grade 3, falling at upright posture. When we applied the HINTS protocol to our sample, we obtained 100% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity, similar to previously published findings. Only those patients with stroke presented with grade 3 ataxia. Of those with grade 2 ataxia (n = 38), 11 had cerebellar stroke and 28 had vestibular neuritis, not related to the patient’s age. Grade 2–3 ataxia was 92.9% sensitive and 61.1% specific to detect AICA/PICA stroke in patients with AVS, with 100% sensitivity to detect AICA stroke. In turn, two signs (nystagmus of central origin and grade 2–3 Ataxia) had 100% sensitivity and 61.1% specificity. Ataxia is less sensitive than HINTS but much easier to evaluate. PMID:27551274

  13. Cellular fibronectin response to supervised moderate aerobic training in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghadir, Ahmad H; Gabr, Sami A; Al-Eisa, Einas

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] Physical activity is one of the most pivotal targets for the prevention and management of vascular complications, especially endothelial dysfunctions. Cellular fibronectin is an endothelium-derived protein involved in subendothelial matrix assembly. Its plasma levels reflect matrix alterations and vessel wall destruction in patients with type II diabetes. This study investigated the influence of 12 weeks of supervised aerobic training on cellular fibronectin and its relationship with insulin resistance and body weight in type II diabetic subjects. [Subjects and Methods] This study included 50 men with type II diabetes who had a mean age of 48.8 ± 14.6 years and were randomly divided into two groups: an aerobic exercise group (12 weeks, three 50 minutes sessions per week) and control group. To examine changes in cellular fibronectin, glycosylated hemoglobin, insulin resistance, fasting insulin, fasting blood sugar, and lipid profile, 5 ml of blood was taken from the brachial vein of patients before and 48 hours after completion of the exercise period and after 12 hours of fasting at rest. Data analysis was performed using the SPSS-16 software with the independent and paired t-tests. [Results] A significant decrease was observed in body mass index and body fat percentage in the experimental group. Compared with the control group, the aerobic exercise group showed a significant decrease in cellular fibronectin, glycosylated hemoglobin, insulin resistance, fasting insulin, fasting blood sugar, and lipid profile after 12 weeks of aerobic exercise. The change in cellular fibronectin showed positive significant correlation with body mass index, diabetic biomarkers, and physical activity level. [Conclusion] The results showed that supervised aerobic exercise as a stimulus can change the levels of cellular fibronectin as matrix metalloproteinase protein a long with improvement of insulin sensitivity and glycosylated hemoglobin in order to prevent

  14. Cell biological study on ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnosis of ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) has largely been dependent on the clinical findings such as cerebellar ataxia, telangiectasia, and immunological deficiency. However, diagnosis of AT by these ordinary criteria is sometimes not sufficient because of the lack of immunological abnormalities. We examined three cases of AT by ordinary clinical criteria and also by X-ray sensitivity of cultured skin fibroblasts. Case 1, a 9-year-old boy, revealed typical clinical features of AT. However, he had no abnormality in serum IgA or IgE. Case 2, a 10-year-old boy, showed decreased serum IgA level. Case 3, a 19-year-old female, had typical clinical features of AT with normal serum IgA, and developed papillary adenocarcinoma of thyroid which was surgically removed. Fibroblast strains derived from these three cases of AT and from the parents of Case 3 were examined with regard to X-ray sensitivity. Three fibroblast strains derived from AT patients (AT homozygotes) showed remarkable hypersensitivity to X-ray. Fibroblast strains derived from the parents (AT heterozygotes) of Case 3, however, showed normal X-ray sensitivity. Recently, AT fibroblasts have been known to show hypersensitivity also to some mutagen like neocarzinostazin as reported by Shiloh et al. Fibroblasts from Case 3 revealed hypersensitivity to neocarzinostazin. However, the sensitivity of the strains from AT heterozygotes (the parents of Case 3) showed no apparent difference from that of control cells. The assay system for mutagen is quite unstable and proper conditioning of the seeding cell number is important for the carrier detection. However, the diagnosis of AT homozygotes was definitely established by X-ray irradiation to cultured fibroblasts from patients. (author)

  15. Studies on cellular immunity in patients with renal carcinoma: radiation-induced inhibition of leukocyte migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-two patients with hypernephroma (renal carcinoma) untreated or preoperatively exposed to local radiotherapy, were examined for tumor-directed cellular hypersensitivity by means of the indirect leukocyte migration test (LMT). (a) When soluble tumor extracts from preoperatively radiated hypernephromas were tested with autologous lymphocytes, 17 of 19 cancer patients gave a positive response; 10 of 11 were positive with allogenic lymphocytes from hypernephroma patients. In no instance could migration inhibition be induced with allogenic lymphocytes from 14 normal donors. Similarly, in 9 of 10 patients there was no significant inhibition with allogenic lymphocytes from patients with histologically different types of malignant tumors other than hypernephroma. (b) Tissue extracts from untreated hypernephromas failed to react in 12 of 13 patients when treated with autologous lymphocytes. LMT's, however, became positive in 6 of 7 patients from this group by in vitro-radiation of tumor samples (60Co or electrons) before preparation of tissue extracts. This radiation-induced effect was dose-related and specific, since radiation of normal kidney tissue did not significantly influence the migratory activity of leukocytes. Our data indicating that an in vivo as well as in vitro- radiation of the hypernephroma will be suitable for the induction and the demonstration of a directed cellular immune response, may be considered as an additional perspective in the integration of radiotherapy in the management of this neoplasm. (author)

  16. Disorders of Upper Limb Movements in Ataxia-Telangiectasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aasef G Shaikh

    Full Text Available Ataxia-telangiectasia is known for cerebellar degeneration, but clinical descriptions of abnormal tone, posture, and movements suggest involvement of the network between cerebellum and basal ganglia. We quantitatively assessed the nature of upper-limb movement disorders in ataxia-telangiectasia. We used a three-axis accelerometer to assess the natural history and severity of abnormal upper-limb movements in 80 ataxia-telangiectasia and 19 healthy subjects. Recordings were made during goal-directed movements of upper limb (kinetic task, while arms were outstretched (postural task, and at rest. Almost all ataxia-telangiectasia subjects (79/80 had abnormal involuntary movements, such as rhythmic oscillations (tremor, slow drifts (dystonia or athetosis, and isolated rapid movements (dystonic jerks or myoclonus. All patients with involuntary movements had both kinetic and postural tremor, while 48 (61% also had resting tremor. The tremor was present in transient episodes lasting several seconds during two-minute recording sessions of all three conditions. Percent time during which episodic tremor was present was greater for postural and kinetic tasks compared to rest. Resting tremor had higher frequency but smaller amplitude than postural and kinetic tremor. Rapid non-rhythmic movements were minimal during rest, but were triggered during sustained arm postures and goal directed arm movements suggesting they are best considered a form of dystonic jerks or action myoclonus. Advancing age did not correlate with the severity of involuntary limb movements. Abnormal upper-limb movements in ataxia-telangiectasia feature classic cerebellar impairment, but also suggest involvement of the network between the cerebellum and basal ganglia.

  17. Ataxia Telangiectasia–Mutated Gene Polymorphisms and Acute Normal Tissue Injuries in Cancer Patients After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Lihua [Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun (China); Cui, Jingkun [Department of Internal Medicine, Nanling School District Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun (China); Tang, Fengjiao; Cong, Xiaofeng [Cancer Center, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun (China); Han, Fujun, E-mail: fujun_han@aliyun.com [Cancer Center, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun (China)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: Studies of the association between ataxia telangiectasia–mutated (ATM) gene polymorphisms and acute radiation injuries are often small in sample size, and the results are inconsistent. We conducted the first meta-analysis to provide a systematic review of published findings. Methods and Materials: Publications were identified by searching PubMed up to April 25, 2014. Primary meta-analysis was performed for all acute radiation injuries, and subgroup meta-analyses were based on clinical endpoint. The influence of sample size and radiation injury incidence on genetic effects was estimated in sensitivity analyses. Power calculations were also conducted. Results: The meta-analysis was conducted on the ATM polymorphism rs1801516, including 5 studies with 1588 participants. For all studies, the cut-off for differentiating cases from controls was grade 2 acute radiation injuries. The primary meta-analysis showed a significant association with overall acute radiation injuries (allelic model: odds ratio = 1.33, 95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.71). Subgroup analyses detected an association between the rs1801516 polymorphism and a significant increase in urinary and lower gastrointestinal injuries and an increase in skin injury that was not statistically significant. There was no between-study heterogeneity in any meta-analyses. In the sensitivity analyses, small studies did not show larger effects than large studies. In addition, studies with high incidence of acute radiation injuries showed larger effects than studies with low incidence. Power calculations revealed that the statistical power of the primary meta-analysis was borderline, whereas there was adequate power for the subgroup analysis of studies with high incidence of acute radiation injuries. Conclusions: Our meta-analysis showed a consistency of the results from the overall and subgroup analyses. We also showed that the genetic effect of the rs1801516 polymorphism on acute radiation injuries was

  18. Ataxia Telangiectasia–Mutated Gene Polymorphisms and Acute Normal Tissue Injuries in Cancer Patients After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Studies of the association between ataxia telangiectasia–mutated (ATM) gene polymorphisms and acute radiation injuries are often small in sample size, and the results are inconsistent. We conducted the first meta-analysis to provide a systematic review of published findings. Methods and Materials: Publications were identified by searching PubMed up to April 25, 2014. Primary meta-analysis was performed for all acute radiation injuries, and subgroup meta-analyses were based on clinical endpoint. The influence of sample size and radiation injury incidence on genetic effects was estimated in sensitivity analyses. Power calculations were also conducted. Results: The meta-analysis was conducted on the ATM polymorphism rs1801516, including 5 studies with 1588 participants. For all studies, the cut-off for differentiating cases from controls was grade 2 acute radiation injuries. The primary meta-analysis showed a significant association with overall acute radiation injuries (allelic model: odds ratio = 1.33, 95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.71). Subgroup analyses detected an association between the rs1801516 polymorphism and a significant increase in urinary and lower gastrointestinal injuries and an increase in skin injury that was not statistically significant. There was no between-study heterogeneity in any meta-analyses. In the sensitivity analyses, small studies did not show larger effects than large studies. In addition, studies with high incidence of acute radiation injuries showed larger effects than studies with low incidence. Power calculations revealed that the statistical power of the primary meta-analysis was borderline, whereas there was adequate power for the subgroup analysis of studies with high incidence of acute radiation injuries. Conclusions: Our meta-analysis showed a consistency of the results from the overall and subgroup analyses. We also showed that the genetic effect of the rs1801516 polymorphism on acute radiation injuries was

  19. Clinical spectrum of early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes: an autosomal recessive ataxia not to be missed Espectro clínico da ataxia cerebelar de início precoce com reflexos mantidos: uma ataxia autossômica recessiva para não ser esquecida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Pedroso

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias are a heterogeneous group of neurological disorders. In 1981, a neurological entity comprised by early onset progressive cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, pyramidal weakness of the limbs and retained or increased upper limb reflexes and knee jerks was described. This disorder is known as early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes. In this article, we aimed to call attention for the diagnosis of early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes as the second most common cause of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias, after Friedreich ataxia, and also to perform a clinical spectrum study of this syndrome. In this data, 12 patients from different families met all clinical features for early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes. Dysarthria and cerebellar atrophy were the most common features in our sample. It is uncertain, however, whether early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes is a homogeneous disease or a group of phenotypically similar syndromes represented by different genetic entities. Further molecular studies are required to provide definitive answers to the questions that remain regarding early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes.As ataxias cerebelares autossômicas recessivas são um grupo heterogêneo de doenças neurológicas. Em 1981, foi descrita uma entidade neurológica incluindo ataxia cerebelar progressiva de início precoce, disartria, liberação piramidal e manutenção ou aumento dos reflexos tendíneos nos membros superiores e inferiores. Essa síndrome é conhecida como ataxia cerebelar de início precoce com reflexos mantidos. Neste artigo, o objetivo foi chamar a atenção para o diagnóstico de ataxia cerebelar de início precoce com reflexos mantidos como a segunda causa mais comum de ataxia cerebelar autossômica recessiva, após a ataxia de Friedreich, e também realizar um estudo do espectro cl

  20. Reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Song; NIU Hui-xia; ZHAO Lu; GAO Yuan; LU Jia-meng; SHI Chang-he; Chandra Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Background The Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) was shown to be a reliable and valid measurement for patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA).The Brazilian version and the Japanese version of SARAwere favorable for good reliability and validity.This study aimed to translate SARA into Chinese and test its reliability and validity in measurement of cerebellar ataxia.Methods SARA was translated into Chinese.A total 39 patients with degeneration cerebellar ataxia were evaluated independently by two neurologists with the Chinese version of SARA.Then the patients were evaluated by one of above neurologists with International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS).The statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 17.0 for Windows.Results The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the Chinese version of SARA was 0.78,which represents a good internal consistence.The correlation coefficient of the Chinese version of SARA scores between the two evaluators was 0.86,illustrating that the inter-rater reliability of Chinese version of SARA was good.The correlation coefficient between the Chinese version of SARA and ICARS was 0.91,illustrating that the criterion validity of Chinese version of SARA was not bad.Conclusions The Chinese version of SARA is reliable and effective for the assessment of degeneration cerebellar ataxia.Compared with ICARS,the evaluation of Chinese version of SARA is more objective,the assessment time is shortened,and the maneuverability is better.

  1. Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses to Yersinia pestis Infection in Long-Term Recovered Plague Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bei; Du, Chunhong; Zhou, Lei; Bi, Yujing; Wang, Xiaoyi; Wen, Li; Guo, Zhaobiao; Song, Zhizhong; Yang, Ruifu

    2012-01-01

    Plague is one of the most dangerous diseases and is caused by Yersinia pestis. Effective vaccine development requires understanding of immune protective mechanisms against the bacterium in humans. In this study, the humoral and memory cellular immune responses in plague patients (n = 65) recovered from Y. pestis infection during the past 16 years were investigated using a protein microarray and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay (ELISpot). The seroprevalence to the F1 antigen in all re...

  2. Ataxias agudas en la infancia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaline Betancourt Fursow

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available La ataxia cerebelosa aguda infantil (ACAI es la forma más frecuente de complicación neurológica por el virus de la varicela.Descritas dentro del grupo de las cerebelitis agudas. Los objetivos de este estudio fueron: evaluar la presentación clínica, manejo y seguimiento de niños hospitalizados con ACAI en un hospital pediátrico terciario donde la inmunización para varicela no está disponible (parte I y describir los diagnósticos diferenciales de la cerebelitis aguda (parte II. Estudiamos 95 pacientes. Los criterios diagnósticos de ataxia aguda se basaron en: pérdida aguda de la coordinación o dificultad para la marcha con o sin nistagmo asociado y duración menor de 48 horas, en un niño previamente sano. Estos criterios se cumplían en todos los casos valorados, excepto en las ataxias secundarias a ingesta de tóxicos, en los que la duración debía ser menor de 24 horas para su inclusión en el estudio. Se registraron los datos en una historia clínica pediátrica y neurológica. Entre los pacientes inmunosuprimidos la incidencia mayor fue la complicación por varicela. La mayoría de los pacientes fueron varones. El rango de edad fue la preescolar, 5 años . El intervalo entre la presentación del rash y el ingreso fue de 1 a 3 días. El estudio de LCR se practicó en 59.5% de los casos. La TAC y la resonancia magnética cerebral (RM presentaron edema en el 33.3%. El aciclovir endovenoso fue utilizado en 23 pacientes; pero no hubo diferencias significativas en las manifestaciones clínicas y seguimiento entre tratados y no tratados. La ataxia fue la primera manifestación clínica. La estadía hospitalaria fue de 4 días (rango: 2-11 días.

  3. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 : a genetic update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Dineke S.

    2009-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 locus was identified in 2004 based on linkage analysis in a large, two-generation Dutch family. The age of onset ranged 43-56 years and the phenotype was characterized by a slowly progressive, isolated ataxia. Neuropathological examination revealed neuronal loss in

  4. Signal transduction of ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is characterized by immunodeficiency, progressive cerebellar ataxia, gonadal abnormalities, radiosensitivity, and cancer predisposition. The signal transduction of AT are reviewed, including ATM (AT mutated) gene and clinical symptoms, some transcription factors in the signaling pathway induced by ionizing radiation, cell cycle checkpoint defects, durative oxidative stress and cell apoptosis

  5. Friedreich's ataxia presenting after cardiac transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard, H; Forsyth, R.

    2001-01-01

    A 4 year old boy underwent cardiac transplantation because of cardiomyopathy with ischaemia. Following transplantation he developed neurological signs of Friedreich's ataxia and the diagnosis was confirmed with genetic testing. Cardiomyopathy is a rare presentation of Friedreich's ataxia and to our knowledge this is the first reported transplant operation for the cardiomyopathy associated with this condition.



  6. [From gene to disease; ataxia telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeks, A.; Veer, L.J. van 't; Ottenheim, C.; Hiel, J.A.P.; Kleijer, W.J.; Weemaes, C.M.R.

    2003-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectasia, immune defects, and a predisposition to malignancy. Chromosomal breakage is a feature. AT cells are abnormally sensitive to cell kill by ionising radiation and abnormally resistant to in

  7. Maculopathy and spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebranchu, Pierre; Le Meur, Guylène; Magot, Armelle;

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia is a rare heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by cerebellar symptoms, often associated with other multisystemic signs. Mild optic neuropathy has been associated with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), but macular dysfunction has been reported in...

  8. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Spinocerebellar Ataxia: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Brouillette, Ashley M.; Gülin Öz; Gomez, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, including the spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA), would benefit from the identification of reliable biomarkers that could serve as disease subtype-specific and stage-specific indicators for the development and monitoring of treatments. We analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of tau, α-synuclein, DJ-1, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), proteins previously associated with neurodegenerative processes, in patients with the autosomal dominant SCA1, SCA2, an...

  9. An update on Spino-cerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banashree Mondal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The dominantly inherited ataxias, also known as Spino-cerebellar ataxias (SCAs, are rapidly expanding entities. New mutations are being identified at remarkable regularity. Recent awareness of molecular abnormalities in SCAs has addressed some of the long sought questions, but gaps in knowledge still exist. Three major categories of SCAs, according to molecular mechanisms, have evolved over recent few years: Polyglutamate expansion ataxia, non-coding zone repeat ataxia, and ataxia due to conventional mutation. Using the fulcrum of these mechanisms, the article provides an update of SCAs. Shared and specific clinical features, genetic abnormalities, and possible links between molecular abnormalities and cerebellar degeneration have been discussed. Emphasis has been placed on the mechanisms of polyglutamate toxicity.

  10. Safety Profile of Amnion-Derived Cellular Cytokine Solution (ACCS) Following Topical Skin Application in Patients Receiving Breast Radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Trombetta, Mark; Julian, Thomas B.; Wickerham, D. Lawrence; Steed, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To establish a safety profile for amnion-derived cellular cytokine solution following topical application in patients undergoing whole breast radiotherapy for breast cancer. Materials and Methods: Twenty female patients with early-stage breast cancer were enrolled in 2 separate cohorts of an institutional review board–approved phase I protocol. Cohort 1 consisted of 10 patients who received topical amnion-derived cellular cytokine solution to the breast immediately following the fi...

  11. Studies on determining the cellular factors in pediatric mycoplasma pneumonia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the interrelation between the degree of infection and changes in cellular factors in pediatrics mycoplasma pneumonia patients. Methods: 91 cases of pediatric mycoplasma pneumonia were divided into a serious group and a lighter group according to the serum IgM levels. The fast serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were determined with ratio-immunoassay (RIA) in those patients as well as 35 controls. Results: The levels of serum TNF-α and IL-6 in both groups of patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (P < 0.01). The levels in the serious group were also significantly higher than those in the lighter group (P < 0.05). The data in patient groups were analysed with linear correlation. The correlative coefficient of TNF-α was r = 0.49 and that of IL-6 was r = 0.95, Suggesting positive correlation with the seriousness of infection. Conclusion: The cellular factors TNF-α and IL-6 might participate in the whole process of mycoplasma infection and their serum levels were positively correlated with the seriousness of the disease

  12. Dystonia as presenting manifestation of ataxia telangiectasia : a case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Goyal V; Behari M

    2002-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia is a genetically inherited multisystem disorder with predominant feature being telangiectasia and cerebellar ataxia. In this report, a family of three siblings suffering from ataxia telangiectasia is described. The proband presented with dystonia and dystonic myoclonus, both of which are rare presenting features of ataxia telangiectasia.

  13. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7: Report of an Indian family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurusidheshwar M Wali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7 is a form of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia which is associated with pigmentary retinal degeneration. It is known for its world-wide rarity except in the Scandinavian countries. It is very rarely reported from India and the neighbouring Asian countries . The present report describes the neurogenetic findings of a family of SCA7, from the northern part of Karnataka in South India. It documents the wide intrafamilial phenotypic variability, which could be correlated with the CAG repeat counts and phenomenon of anticipation. Genotype phenotype correlation highlighted certain disparities in comparison with the previous studies. The report highlights the need for multiethnic population studies and the role of genetic counseling and prenatal testing in SCA7 patients.

  14. The ataxia (axJ mutation causes abnormal GABAA receptor turnover in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Lappe-Siefke

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia represents a pathological coordination failure that often involves functional disturbances in cerebellar circuits. Purkinje cells (PCs characterize the only output neurons of the cerebellar cortex and critically participate in regulating motor coordination. Although different genetic mutations are known that cause ataxia, little is known about the underlying cellular mechanisms. Here we show that a mutated ax(J gene locus, encoding the ubiquitin-specific protease 14 (Usp14, negatively influences synaptic receptor turnover. Ax(J mouse mutants, characterized by cerebellar ataxia, display both increased GABA(A receptor (GABA(AR levels at PC surface membranes accompanied by enlarged IPSCs. Accordingly, we identify physical interaction of Usp14 and the GABA(AR alpha1 subunit. Although other currently unknown changes might be involved, our data show that ubiquitin-dependent GABA(AR turnover at cerebellar synapses contributes to ax(J-mediated behavioural impairment.

  15. Paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-Hu antibodies and benign ganglioneuroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancellu, Roberto; Corsini, Elena; Bernardi, Giorgio; Buzzo, Paolo; Ferrari, Maria Luisa; Lamantea, Eleonora; Garaventa, Alberto; Truini, Mauro; Salvarani, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-Hu antibodies and benign ganglioneuroma. A 28-year-old woman developed progressive ataxia with hyporeflexia at the age of 19. Brain MRI showed progressive cerebellar atrophy. Neurophysiological studies, screening of immune-mediated ataxias, oncological markers, vitamin E and genetic tests for spinocerebellar ataxia types 1,2,3, Friedreich ataxia and POLG1 were negative. Anti-Hu antibodies were positive in Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence (1:640). Total-body computed tomography revealed a mediastinum mass; the histological diagnosis was maturing ganglioneuroma. Immunohistochemistry showed a mild reaction between the tumor and the patient's serum, and no reaction between the tumor and control serum. After surgery, serum anti-Hu titer decreased, while ataxic symptoms initially worsened and then stabilized. Ganglioneuroma is a benign tumor, usually derived from the maturation of a neuroblastoma. The benign histology and the presence of anti-Hu antibodies could be related to the positive oncological prognosis and to the slow clinical course mimicking a degenerative ataxia. PMID:25764259

  16. 100 CHILDREN WITH ACUTE ATAXIA; A SURVEY IN MOFID CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Karimzadeh

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The term "Ataxia" refers to disturbances of body posture and movementthat are normally controlled by the cerebellum, frontal lobes and theposterior columns of the spinal cord. The primary symptom and themost prominent feature of ataxia is abnormal gait which is characterizedby lurching and wide base walking.Ataxia was considered acute, if it had occurred within the two precedingweeks. Knowing how frightening acute-onset Ataxia is for the familyis not surprising that the condition prompts an immediate visit to thephysician.Material & Methods:In view of the lack of information in our country, on the etiology ofsudden-onset Ataxia, the authors enrolled 100 children with the chiefcomplaint of acute loss of equilibrium, who came to the attention ofthe Pediatric Neurology Department over a two year duration(Sept.2001-Sept 2003; they were admitted to the Mofid Childrens'Hospital and all necessary investigations were carried out.Results & Conclusion:The results revealed that Acute Cerebellar Ataxia was the most commoncause of the problem, the second most frequent being drug intoxication,which most commonly occurred in patients, 2-4years old. The remainingcausative factors in order of descending frequency consisted ofinfectious polyneuropathy, migraine, opsoclonus-myoclonus, braintumor, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, multiple sclerosis, andepilepsy.

  17. Effect of Astragalus Injection on Serious Abdominal Traumatic Patients' Cellular Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the change of serious abdominal traumatic patients' cellular immunity and the effect of Astragalus Injection (Al) on it. Methods: Sixty-three serious abdominal traumatic patients were randomly assigned into two groups, the conventional group and the treated group, patients in the conventional group were given conventional treatment, while others in the treated group were given conventional treatment as the basis, with Al 20 mi was added into 250 mi of 5% glucose solution given through intravenous dripping, and then on the first day and 14th day, their T cell activated antigens as well as that of 10 healthy subjects were monitored.Results: On the first day, in the conventional group and treated group, the levels of CD3 + , CD4 + , CD4 +/CD8 + ,CD16+ , CD69 + and CD3 +/homologous leucocytic antigen-DR (HLA-DR+) were apparently lower than those in the healthy group (P<0.05), while the CD8 + was significantly higher than that in the healthy group ( P<0.05), and there was no significant difference between the conventional group and the treated group (P>0.05) ; on the 14th days, the levels of CD3+, CD4+, CD4+/CD8+, CD16+, CD69+ and CD3+/HLA-DR+ of the treated group gotclosed to healthy subject value, and got even higher than those of conventional group (P<0.05); CD8 + got close to that of healthy subjects, while obviously lower than that of conventional group (P<0.05). Conclusion: After serious abdominal trauma, cellular immunity lowered, auxiliary use of Al was beneficial to the restoration of cellular immunity.

  18. A systematic literature review examining soluble and cellular biomarkers in HIV patients receiving antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Byrnes

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of antiretroviral therapies (ART for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 has led to more favorable prognoses for infected individuals, including reduced HIV viral load, improved CD4 + T-cell recovery, and slower disease progression. However, ART-treated HIV+patients may have increased risk of adverse outcomes associated with chronic inflammation and immune activation. Molecules associated with chronic immune system activation and inflammatory cytokine production may be useful biomarkers of HIV pathogenesis and/or ART outcomes. We systematically identified MEDLINE-indexed articles published in the past decade investigating the association of several soluble (IL-6, CRP, MCP-1, IP-10, D-dimer, soluble CD14, and LPS and cellular (CD28, CD38, HLA-DR, PD-1, caspase-3, IFNγ and IL-2 ELISpots biomarkers with clinical outcomes in ART-treated HIV positive (HIV+ patients. Seventy publications were included, consisting mainly of observational studies of soluble biomarkers. One quartile elevations in baseline IL-6, CRP, and D-dimer were associated with increased risk of disease progression or death (ORs 1.8–2.4; p≤0.01 and all-cause mortality (ORs 4.1–5.3; p≤0.0001; these elevations were also associated with increased rates of IRIS (ORs 1.59–2.07; p≤0.001. Additionally, IL-6, CRP, and D-dimer levels were higher in patients who experienced a cardiovascular event than in controls (p≤0.001. The association between soluble biomarkers and quantitative assessments of HIV viral load has not been studied as thoroughly. However, several studies found an association between D-dimer and viral load. Research is lacking regarding the relationship between CD4 count and soluble biomarkers. Most studies evaluating cellular biomarkers examined their association with HIV viral load and CD4 count, but did not examine clinical outcomes. The most commonly studied cellular biomarkers were the T cell activation markers CD38 and HLA

  19. Ataxia-telangiectasia: the pattern of cerebellar atrophy on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe MRI of the brain in 19 patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) and correlate the appearances with the degree of neurologic deficit. We examined 10 male and nine female patients; 17 were aged between 2 and 12 years (mean 8 years) but a woman and her brother were 35 and 38 years old, and had a variant of AT. Ataxia was the first recognized sign of the disease in every patient. We detected the following patterns of cerebellar atrophy: in the youngest patient, aged 2 years, the study was normal; in the five next youngest patients 3-7 years of age, the lateral cerebellum and superior vermis showed the earliest changes of atrophy; and all but one of the other patients had moderate to marked diffuse atrophy of vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. There were 12 patients aged 9 years and above; one, who was normal, was 9 years old. The five patients who at the time of examination were unable to walk all had diffuse atrophy involving both vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. (orig.)

  20. Ataxia-telangiectasia: the pattern of cerebellar atrophy on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavani, F. [Department of Radiology, University of Modena (Italy); Zimmerman, R.A.; Gatti, R.; Bingham, P. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Berry, G.T. [Department of Endocrinology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Sullivan, K. [Department of Immunology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States)

    2003-05-01

    We describe MRI of the brain in 19 patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) and correlate the appearances with the degree of neurologic deficit. We examined 10 male and nine female patients; 17 were aged between 2 and 12 years (mean 8 years) but a woman and her brother were 35 and 38 years old, and had a variant of AT. Ataxia was the first recognized sign of the disease in every patient. We detected the following patterns of cerebellar atrophy: in the youngest patient, aged 2 years, the study was normal; in the five next youngest patients 3-7 years of age, the lateral cerebellum and superior vermis showed the earliest changes of atrophy; and all but one of the other patients had moderate to marked diffuse atrophy of vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. There were 12 patients aged 9 years and above; one, who was normal, was 9 years old. The five patients who at the time of examination were unable to walk all had diffuse atrophy involving both vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. (orig.)

  1. Acute Cerebellar Ataxia and Lyme Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Child neurologists at Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Turkey, report the case of a 5-year-old girl from the Mediterranean region of Anatolia with a 4-day history of progressive ataxia.

  2. Sporadic Ataxia and Multiple System Atrophy (MSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is unclear why some people with sporadic ataxia progress to develop MSA whereas others do not. Many people with adult onset cerebellar degeneration may have the dominantly inherited form, which ...

  3. Cerebellar Involvement in Ataxia and Generalized Epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Kros (Lieke)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The work described in this thesis was performed in order to elucidate the role of different cerebellar modules in ataxia and generalized epilepsy using various techniques including in vivo electrophysiology, optogenetics, pharmacological interventions, immunohistology a

  4. EFFECT OF ACUPUNCTURE TREATMENT ON CELLULAR HEMORHEOLOGY,CHOLESTEROL AND TRIGLYCERIDE OF SIMPLE OBESITY PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵宁侠; 郭瑞林; 任秦有; 张周良; 史恒军

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of acupuncture on simple obesity and cellular hemorheology. Methods: Thirty-two cases of simple obesity patients were enrolled into this study. Acupoints of the Stomach Meridian and Spleen Meridian as Zhongwan (中脘CV 12), Liangmen (梁门ST 21), Tianshu (天枢ST 25), Guanyuan (关元CV 4), etc. were punctured, once daily in the first 5 days, and once every other day afterwards, with 10 sessions being a therapeutic course. Before treatment and after 3 courses of treatment, the body weight, waistline, weight index, serum cholesterol (CH), triglyceride and aggregation index of red blood cell (RBC) were detected. Results: After acupuncture treatment, all the indexes of body weight, waistline, weight index, serum CH, triglyceride and aggregation index of RBC decreased significantly in comparison with those of pre-treatment (P<0.05). Conclusion: Acupuncture can apparently improve cellular hemorheology, reduce body weight, serum cholesterol and TG levels in simple obesity patients.

  5. Clinical responses to rituximab in a case of neuroblastoma with refractory opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Samin; Kord Valeshabad, Ali; Moradveisi, Borhan; Aminasnafi, Ali; Arzanian, Mohammad Taghi

    2012-01-01

    Opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome (OMS) is a rare neurologic syndrome. In a high proportion of children, it is associated with neuroblastoma. The etiology of this condition is thought to be immune mediated. In children, immunotherapy with conventional treatments such as corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and even antiepileptic drugs has been tried. Recently rituximab has been used safely for refractory OMS in children with neuroblastoma. Our patient was a 3.5-year-old girl referred for ataxia and dancing eye movements starting since 1.5 years ago. She was diagnosed with neuroblastoma on imaging studies on admission. The OMS was refractory to surgical resection, chemotherapy, corticosteroids, and intravenous immunoglobulin. Patient received rituximab simultaneously with chemotherapy. The total severity score decreased by 61.1% after rituximab. Patient's ataxia markedly improved that she was able to walk independently after 6 months. Our case confirmed the clinical efficacy and safety of rituximab in a refractory case of OMS. PMID:23198199

  6. Clinical Responses to Rituximab in a Case of Neuroblastoma with Refractory Opsoclonus Myoclonus Ataxia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samin Alavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome (OMS is a rare neurologic syndrome. In a high proportion of children, it is associated with neuroblastoma. The etiology of this condition is thought to be immune mediated. In children, immunotherapy with conventional treatments such as corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and even antiepileptic drugs has been tried. Recently rituximab has been used safely for refractory OMS in children with neuroblastoma. Our patient was a 3.5-year-old girl referred for ataxia and dancing eye movements starting since 1.5 years ago. She was diagnosed with neuroblastoma on imaging studies on admission. The OMS was refractory to surgical resection, chemotherapy, corticosteroids, and intravenous immunoglobulin. Patient received rituximab simultaneously with chemotherapy. The total severity score decreased by 61.1% after rituximab. Patient's ataxia markedly improved that she was able to walk independently after 6 months. Our case confirmed the clinical efficacy and safety of rituximab in a refractory case of OMS.

  7. First de novo KCND3 mutation causes severe Kv4.3 channel dysfunction leading to early onset cerebellar ataxia, intellectual disability, oral apraxia and epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smets, Katrien; Duarri, Anna; Deconinck, Tine; Ceulemans, Berten; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.; Zuechner, Stephan; Gonzalez, Michael Anthony; Schuele, Rebecca; Synofzik, Matthis; Van der Aa, Nathalie; De Jonghe, Peter; Verbeek, Dineke S.; Baets, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Identification of the first de novo mutation in potassium voltage-gated channel, shal-related subfamily, member 3 (KCND3) in a patient with complex early onset cerebellar ataxia in order to expand the genetic and phenotypic spectrum. Methods: Whole exome sequencing in a cerebellar ataxia

  8. Contactin 1 IgG4 associates to chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with sensory ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Miura, Yumako; Devaux, Jérôme J.; Fukami, Yuki; Manso, Constance; Belghazi, Maya; Wong, Anna Hiu Yi; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is clinically heterogeneous and shows varying responses to immunotherapy. In a cohort of 533 Japanese patients with CIDP, Miura et al. identify 13 patients with IgG4 antibodies against the axonal adhesion molecule, contactin-1. Antibodies are associated with subacute onset, sensory ataxia and good response to corticosteroids.

  9. Characteristic brain MRI findings in ataxia-neuropathy spectrum related to POLG mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henao, Adriana I; Pira, Sonia; Herrera, Diego A; Vargas, Sergio A; Montoya, Jorge; Castillo, Mauricio

    2016-02-01

    Patients with mutations in the polymerase gamma gene (POLG) may present with progressive ataxia and in such situations neuroimaging findings may suggest the diagnosis. Herein we report a patient with a POLG gene W748S homozygous mutation and characteristic lesions in the thalamus, cerebellum and inferior olivary nucleus seen on magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26755490

  10. Cerebellar Ataxia with Bilateral Vestibulopathy: Description of a Syndrome and Its Characteristic Clinical Sign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, Americo A.; Halmagyi, G. Michael; McGarvie, Leigh A.; Cremer, Phillip D.

    2004-01-01

    We report four patients with the syndrome of cerebellar ataxia with bilateral vestibulopathy (CABV) and, using search coil oculography, we validate its characteristic clinical sign, namely impairment of the visually enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex (VVOR) or doll's head reflex. In our four patients, CABV began in the sixth decade of life; they are…

  11. Cerebellar ataxia and functional genomics : Identifying the routes to cerebellar neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, C J L M; Verbeek, D S

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias are progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by atrophy of the cerebellum leading to motor dysfunction, balance problems, and limb and gait ataxia. These include among others, the dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias, recessive cerebellar ataxias such as Fried

  12. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 olfactory impairment shows a pattern similar to other major neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-Pérez, Luis; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan; Díaz, Rosalinda; González, Ruth Pérez; Ochoa, Nalia Canales; Cruz, Gilberto Sánchez; Mederos, Luis Enrique Almaguer; Góngora, Edilberto Martínez; Hudson, Robyn; Drucker-Colin, René

    2006-09-01

    Olfactory function is affected in different neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, it has been found that some hereditary ataxias are also associated with significant olfactory impairment. However, the initial findings did not examine the nature of the olfactory impairment associated with these ataxias. In the present article the effect of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) on olfactory function was studied in 53 SCA2 patients and 53 healthy control subjects from Holguín, Cuba. Several tests were applied to evaluate olfactory threshold, description, identification and discrimination. The results show significant impairment in SCA2 patients on all olfactory measurements, and the pattern of olfactory deficits found suggests that they have much in common with those reported for other neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. PMID:16609806

  13. From Space to the Septic Patient: Assessment of Cellular Immunity in Severely Immune Compromised Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhoff, Lars; Kaufmann, Ines; Feuerecker, Matthias; Crucian, Brian; Sams, Clarence; Mehta, Satish; Pierson, Duane; Schelling, Gustav; Chouker, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Immune dysfunctions and sepsis as a most severe condition immune dysfunction constitute the leading cause for death in critically ill patients and accounts for about as many annual deaths as acute myocardial infarction, making it an eminent health care issue. In progressed phases of sepsis, the cellular immune response is typically markedly dysfunctional. Space and Antarctic analogues of space have revealed states of major immune dysfunction. Due to various contributing stressors, such as physical stress and hypoxia, spaceflight can exerts strong modulatory and even depressive effects on the immune system, entailing a broad panel of studies on the topic. The aim of this study was to analyze the cellular immunity of septic patients in comparison to healthy controls, hereby translating the question from space to the patient and applying the newly developed and evolved DLR/ESA-NASA immune assays to the clinic accordingly. Methods: 76 patients were enrolled for blood withdrawal within 24 hours after the onset of severe sepsis or septic shock, as opposed to eleven healthy controls. Whole blood was stimulated with bacterial antigen mixture (containing diphteria-, tetanus- and pertussis-toxoid), fungal antigen mixture (containing candida-lysate and trichophyton-lysate), pokeweed mitogen (PWM), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), phorbol-myristate-acetate and anti-CD3/CD28, respectively. Subsequent to a 48-hour incubation period, supernatant cytokine concentrations were measured using Luminex xMAP technology (Bioplex). Non-normally distributed data is given as median [interquartile range (IQR)]. Results: In almost all of the multiple read-outs analyzed, marked immune dysfunction was present in the critically ill patient collective (median SAPS II (Simplified Acute Physiology Score): 67). As an exception, IL-10 release was scarcely impaired. Exemplarily, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) was severely suppressed in the patient group in whole blood stimulated with

  14. Maximum entropy, fractal dimension and lacunarity in quantification of cellular rejection in myocardial biopsy of patients submitted to heart transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a method for the quantification of cellular rejection in endomyocardial biopsies of patients submitted to heart transplant. The model is based on automatic multilevel thresholding, which employs histogram quantification techniques, histogram slope percentage analysis and the calculation of maximum entropy. The structures were quantified with the aid of the multi-scale fractal dimension and lacunarity for the identification of behavior patterns in myocardial cellular rejection in order to determine the most adequate treatment for each case.

  15. Maximum entropy, fractal dimension and lacunarity in quantification of cellular rejection in myocardial biopsy of patients submitted to heart transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, L. A.; Oliveira, F. R.; Peres, F. A.; Moreira, R. D.; Moriel, A. R.; de Godoy, M. F.; Murta Junior, L. O.

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a method for the quantification of cellular rejection in endomyocardial biopsies of patients submitted to heart transplant. The model is based on automatic multilevel thresholding, which employs histogram quantification techniques, histogram slope percentage analysis and the calculation of maximum entropy. The structures were quantified with the aid of the multi-scale fractal dimension and lacunarity for the identification of behavior patterns in myocardial cellular rejection in order to determine the most adequate treatment for each case.

  16. A gene for nystagmus-associated episodic ataxia maps to chromosome 19p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, P.L.; Root, D.; Gancher, S. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Episodic ataxia (EA) is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by attacks of generalized ataxia and relatively normal neurological function between attacks. Onset occurs in childhood or adolescence and persists through adulthood. Penetrance is nearly complete. EA is clinically heterogeneous, including at least two distinct entities: (1) episodes of ataxia and dysarthria lasting hours to days, generally with interictal nystagmus (MIM 108500); (2) episodes of ataxia and dysarthria lasting only minutes, with interictal myokymia (MMM 160120). The EA/nystagmus patients sometimes develop persistent ataxia and cerebellar atrophy. Previously we reported linkage in four EA/myokymia families to a K{sup +} channel gene on chromosome 12p. We excluded this region in a large family with EA/nystagmus. We now report evidence for linkage to chromosome 19p in this and in one other EA/nystagmus family, based on eight microsatellite markers which span approximately 30 cM. The region is flanked distally by D19S209 and proximally by D19S226. All six markers within this region gave positive evidence for linkage; the highest total two-point lod scores occurred wtih D19S221 (3.98 at theta = 0.10) and D19S413 (3.37 at theta = 0.05). Interestingly, Joutel et al. (1993) mapped a gene for familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) to the region around D19S221. Some individuals in these families have ataxia, cerebellar atrophy and interictal nystagmus, but no episodic ataxia. These results demonstrate that the clinical heterogeneity in EA reflects underlying genetic hetreogeneity. In addition, they suggest that EA/nystagmus and some FHM may represent different mutations in the same gene locus on chromosome 19p.

  17. Maize Prolamins Could Induce a Gluten-Like Cellular Immune Response in Some Celiac Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Sánchez, Juan P.; Cabrera-Chávez, Francisco; Calderón de la Barca, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune-mediated enteropathy triggered by dietary gluten in genetically prone individuals. The current treatment for CD is a strict lifelong gluten-free diet. However, in some CD patients following a strict gluten-free diet, the symptoms do not remit. These cases may be refractory CD or due to gluten contamination; however, the lack of response could be related to other dietary ingredients, such as maize, which is one of the most common alternatives to wheat used in the gluten-free diet. In some CD patients, as a rare event, peptides from maize prolamins could induce a celiac-like immune response by similar or alternative pathogenic mechanisms to those used by wheat gluten peptides. This is supported by several shared features between wheat and maize prolamins and by some experimental results. Given that gluten peptides induce an immune response of the intestinal mucosa both in vivo and in vitro, peptides from maize prolamins could also be tested to determine whether they also induce a cellular immune response. Hypothetically, maize prolamins could be harmful for a very limited subgroup of CD patients, especially those that are non-responsive, and if it is confirmed, they should follow, in addition to a gluten-free, a maize-free diet. PMID:24152750

  18. Genetics Home Reference: neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions NARP neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa Enable Javascript to view the ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa ( NARP ) is a condition that ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions IOSCA infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia ( IOSCA ) is a progressive disorder that affects the ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ARCA1 autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 ( ARCA1 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  1. Fragile X-Associated Tremor and Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources and Publications Fragile X-Associated Tremor and Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS): Overview Skip sharing on social media ... this: Page Content Fragile X-associated tremor and ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset condition (occurs ...

  2. Application of an Image Cytometry Protocol for Cellular and Mitochondrial Phenotyping on Fibroblasts from Patients with Inherited Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-Guerra, Paula; Lund, Martin; Corydon, T J;

    2015-01-01

    Cellular phenotyping of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) from patients with inherited diseases provides invaluable information for diagnosis, disease aetiology, prognosis and assessing of treatment options. Here we present a cell phenotyping protocol using image cytometry that combines measurement...... mitochondrial parameters by image cytometry in HDFs from patients with inherited metabolic diseases.......Cellular phenotyping of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) from patients with inherited diseases provides invaluable information for diagnosis, disease aetiology, prognosis and assessing of treatment options. Here we present a cell phenotyping protocol using image cytometry that combines measurements...... of crucial cellular and mitochondrial parameters: (1) cell number and viability, (2) thiol redox status (TRS), (3) mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and (4) mitochondrial superoxide levels (MSLs). With our protocol, cell viability, TRS and MMP can be measured in one small cell sample and MSL on...

  3. Generation and characterisation of Friedreich ataxia YG8R mouse fibroblast and neural stem cell models

    OpenAIRE

    Chiranjeevi Sandi; Madhavi Sandi; Harvinder Jassal; Vahid Ezzatizadeh; Sara Anjomani-Virmouni; Sahar Al-Mahdawi; Pook, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by GAA repeat expansion in the first intron of the FXN gene, which encodes frataxin, an essential mitochondrial protein. To further characterise the molecular abnormalities associated with FRDA pathogenesis and to hasten drug screening, the development and use of animal and cellular models is considered essential. Studies of lower organisms have already contributed to understanding FRDA disease pat...

  4. The interrelationship between disease severity, dynamic stability, and falls in cerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schniepp, Roman; Schlick, Cornelia; Pradhan, Cauchy; Dieterich, Marianne; Brandt, Thomas; Jahn, Klaus; Wuehr, Max

    2016-07-01

    Cerebellar ataxia (CA) results in discoordination of body movements (ataxia), a gait disorder, and falls. All three aspects appear to be obviously interrelated; however, experimental evidence is sparse. This study systematically correlated the clinical rating of the severity of ataxia with dynamic stability measures and the fall frequency in patients with CA. Clinical severity of CA in patients with sporadic (n = 34) and hereditary (n = 24) forms was assessed with the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Gait performance was examined during slow, preferred, and maximally fast walking speeds. Spatiotemporal variability parameters in the fore-aft and medio-lateral directions were analyzed. The fall frequency was assessed using a standardized interview about fall events within the last 6 months. Fore-aft gait variability showed significant speed-dependent characteristics with highest magnitudes during slow and fast walking. The SARA score correlated positively with fore-aft gait variability, most prominently during fast walking. The fall frequency was significantly associated to fore-aft gait variability during slow walking. Severity of ataxia, dynamic stability, and the occurrence of falls were interrelated in a speed-dependent manner: (a) Severity of ataxia symptoms was closely related to instability during fast walking. (b) Fall frequency was associated with instability during slow walking. These findings suggest the presence of a speed-dependent, twofold cerebellar locomotor control. Assessment of gait performance during non-preferred, slow and fast walking speeds provides novel insights into the pathophysiology of cerebellar locomotor control and may become a useful approach in the clinical evaluation of patients with CA. PMID:27159995

  5. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P;

    2004-01-01

    identified in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the...... significantly relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations.......Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...

  6. Cerebral Abnormalities in Adults with Ataxia-Telangiectasia

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, D.D.M.; Barker, P. B.; Lederman, H M; Crawford, T O

    2013-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia, an autosomal recessive disorder caused by defect of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene, is characterized by progressive neurologic impairment with cerebellar atrophy, ocular and cutaneous telangiectasia, immunodeficiency, heightened sensitivity to ionizing radiation and susceptibility to developing lymphoreticular malignancy. Supratentorial brain abnormalities have been reported only rarely. In this study, brain MRI was performed in 10 adults with ataxia-telangiecta...

  7. Assessment of the radiosensitivity of ataxia-telangiectasia heterozygotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heterozygotes of ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) can, in certain parts of the world, represent a significant proportion of the population. Epidemiological studies suggest that they are more cancer prone than normal individuals. Fibroblasts of five AT heterozygotes are significantly more sensitive to gamma irradiation (mean D0 = 1.18 Gy) than five normals (mean D0 = 1.49 Gy) although some overlap in response is observed. Experiments designed to maximize differences in survival by allowing a period for the repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) showed that only one out of five AT heterozygotes was defective in the repair of PLD. This technique does not, therefore, permit an improved discrimination of AT heterozygotes. Two AT heterozygotes were tested for their ability to repair lesions that give rise to micronuclei. Both, like the homozygote, were seen to be defective in this capacity. Defects in the repair of chromosome damage may permit a cellular discrimination of the heterozygotes

  8. Cognitive and speech-language performance in children with ataxia telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinck, Anja; Verhagen, Mijke M. M.; van Gerven, Marjo; de Groot, Imelda J. M.; Weemaes, Corry M. R.; Maassen, Ben A. M.; Willemsen, Michel A. A. P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe cognitive and speech-language functioning of patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) in relation to their deteriorating (oculo)motor function. Design: Observational case series. Methods: Cognitive functioning, language, speech and oral-motor functioning were examined in eigh

  9. Telomerase activity is spontaneously increased in lymphocytes from patients with atopic dermatitis and correlates with cellular proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Kehuai; Volke, Anne Rehné; Lund, Marianne;

    1999-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme involved with cellular proliferation and cellular senescence. The aim of the present study was to investigate telomerase activity in lymphocytes from patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) and to observe its regulation of cellular proliferation. Peripheral...... staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) (0.1 microg/ml). Telomerase activity was measured by the telomeric repeat amplification protocol-based telomerase polymerase chain reaction enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at 0 and 72 h of incubation. In addition, DNA synthesis of the cells was assayed using 3H......-thymidine incorporation. We found that telomerase activity in non-stimulated PBMC from patients with AD was significantly up-regulated without any stimulation during the 72 h of in vitro incubation. The most potent stimulator of telomerase activity was SEA, followed by anti-CD3 plus IL-2, anti-CD3 alone, and PPD. IL-2...

  10. The oxygen enhancement ratio for radiation lethality in ataxia telangiectasia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ataxia telangiectasis (AT) patients are hypersensitive to radiotherapy, and this radiosensitivity is also displayed at a cellular level. The o.e.r. has been determined for X-ray killing in one AT fibroblast line (CRL 1343) known to be defective in DNA repair, and in four presumably normal human fibroblast lines. No significant difference was revealed between the weighted mean of the o.e.r. for AT fibroblasts (2.29 + - 0.11) and that for the four normal cell lines (2.20 + - 0.07). Defective excision of oxygen-independent γ-lesions in CRL 1343 did not therefore alter the ability of oxygen to modify cell killing in this AT line, relative to normal lines. The suggested explanation is that the γ-lesion recognised by M. luteus and defectively excised in this AT line is not a lethal lesion, i.e., the radiation hypersensitivity is not caused by the documented repair defect. (U.K.)

  11. Mechanisms of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity: the use of effector cells from chronic granulomatous disease patients as investigative probes.

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, P.; Simone, C B; Henkart, P A; Fauci, A S

    1980-01-01

    The present study characterized the antibody-dependent cellular cytoxicity (ADCC) of leukocyte effector cells (neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes) from normal subjects and from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients. CGD phagocytic cells (neutrophils and monocytes) had depressed ADCC activity against antibody-coated human erythrocyte (HRBC) targets in suspension cultures indicative of abnormal intracellular postphagocytic killing. However, when phagocytosis was prevented by using a...

  12. Clinical and genetic features of ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are several variants of ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T): classical A-T with marked radiation sensitivity; classical A-T with intermediate levels of radiation sensitivity; mild A-T with intermediate levels of radiation sensitivity; A-T without telangiectasia; A-T without oculomoto apraxia; and A-T with microcephaly. These disorders are probably caused by different allelic mutations, because affected sibs resemble the index patients, and because there is an association of certain haplo-types of 11q22-23 with specific phenotypes. The Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome, with its lack of ataxia, seems on clinical grounds to be a different disorder. Although A-T is almost always inherited as an autosomal recessive, there are some unusual features; an unexpectedly low parental consanguinity rate, an incidence in sibs that is < 0.25, and occurrence of disease in many different races and in the offspring of mixed race unions. Moreover, looking at haplotypes from 63 UK patients, there is a remarkably low incidence of homozygosity. An autosomal recessive condition that is deficient in parental consanguinity, and in homozygosity for the region around the gene, can be explained by J.H. Edwards' hypothesis that homozygosity for alleles at a neighbouring locus are lethal early in embryogenesis. Other possible mechanisms to explain the unusual genetic features are discussed. (author)

  13. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Spinocerebellar Ataxia: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouillette, Ashley M; Öz, Gülin; Gomez, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, including the spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA), would benefit from the identification of reliable biomarkers that could serve as disease subtype-specific and stage-specific indicators for the development and monitoring of treatments. We analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of tau, α-synuclein, DJ-1, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), proteins previously associated with neurodegenerative processes, in patients with the autosomal dominant SCA1, SCA2, and SCA6, and the sporadic disease multiple system atrophy, cerebellar type (MSA-C), compared with age-matched controls. We estimated disease severity using the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Most proteins measured trended higher in disease versus control group yet did not reach statistical significance. We found the levels of tau in both SCA2 and MSA-C patients were significantly higher than control. We found that α-synuclein levels were lower with higher SARA scores in SCA1 and tau levels were higher with greater SARA in MSA-C, although this final correlation did not reach statistical significance after post hoc correction. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are needed to improve the power of these studies and validate the use of CSF biomarkers in SCA and MSA-C. PMID:26265793

  14. Huntington’s disease masquerading as spinocerebellar ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Quiroga, Sergio Alejandro; Gonzalez-Morón, Dolores; Garretto, Nelida; Kauffman, Marcelo Andres

    2013-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterised by the presence of choreic abnormal movements, behavioural or psychiatric disturbances and dementia. Noteworthy, despite atypical motor symptoms other than chorea have been reported as initial presentation in some patients, a very few number of HD patients, presenting at onset mostly cerebellar dysfunction masquerading dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA), were occasionally reported. We report the case of a 42-year-old man with a 5-year history of gait disturbance, dysarthria and cognitive impairment and familial antecedents of dementia and movement disorders. Initially the clinical picture suggested the diagnosis of a dominant SCA, but finally a diagnosis of HD was made based on the molecular evidence of abnormal 39 Cytosine-Adenine-Guanine (CAG) repeats in exon 1 of Huntingtin gene. The authors highlight the importance of suspecting HD in the aetiology of spinocerebellar ataxias when dementia is a prominent feature in the proband or their family. PMID:23853009

  15. Clinical and genetic features of ataxia-telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bundey, S. [Birmingham Maternity Hospital (United Kingdom). Clinical Genetics Unit

    1994-12-01

    There are several variants of ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T): classical A-T with marked radiation sensitivity; classical A-T with intermediate levels of radiation sensitivity; mild A-T with intermediate levels of radiation sensitivity; A-T without telangiectasia; A-T without oculomoto apraxia; and A-T with microcephaly. These disorders are probably caused by different allelic mutations, because affected sibs resemble the index patients, and because there is an association of certain haplo-types of 11q22-23 with specific phenotypes. The Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome, with its lack of ataxia, seems on clinical grounds to be a different disorder. Although A-T is almost always inherited as an autosomal recessive, there are some unusual features; an unexpectedly low parental consanguinity rate, an incidence in sibs that is < 0.25, and occurrence of disease in many different races and in the offspring of mixed race unions. Moreover, looking at haplotypes from 63 UK patients, there is a remarkably low incidence of homozygosity. An autosomal recessive condition that is deficient in parental consanguinity, and in homozygosity for the region around the gene, can be explained by J.H. Edwards` hypothesis that homozygosity for alleles at a neighbouring locus are lethal early in embryogenesis. Other possible mechanisms to explain the unusual genetic features are discussed. (author).

  16. Spinocerebellar ataxia-10 with paranoid schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavesh Trikamji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spino-cerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10 is an autosomal dominant disorder that is characterized by cerebellar ataxia, seizures and nystagmus with a fragmented pursuit. Schizophrenia has been reported with SCAs 1 and 2 yet in SCA 10, psychiatric manifestations are uncommon. We report a Hispanic family involving a father and his four children with SCA10 genetic mutation. Two of his children, a 20-year-old female and a 23-year-old male, presented with gradually progressive spino-cerebellar ataxia and paranoid schizophrenia. Neurological examination revealed ocular dysmetria, dysdiadokinesia, impaired finger-to-nose exam, gait ataxia and hyperreflexia in both the cases. Additionally, they had a history of psychosis with destructive behavior, depression and paranoid delusions with auditory hallucinations. Serology and CSF studies were unremarkable and MRI brain revealed cerebellar volume loss. Ultimately, a test for ATAXIN-10 mutation was positive thus confirming the diagnosis of SCA10 in father and his four children. We now endeavor to investigate the association between schizophrenia and SCA10.

  17. Acute cerebellar ataxia and infectious mononucleosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wadhwa, N. K.; Ghose, R R

    1983-01-01

    A 28-year-old man, who presented with acute cerebellar ataxia, was found to have haematological features of infectious mononucleosis. There was serological evidence of recent infection with Epstein-Barr virus. It is speculated that cerebellar dysfunction results from virus-induced inflammatory changes within the central nervous system.

  18. Cellular heterogeneity in superficial and deep subcutaneous adipose tissues in overweight patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Nathalie; Estève, David; Bouloumié, Anne; Galitzky, Jean

    2013-09-01

    Human abdominal adipose tissue (AAT) can be divided into two compartments according to anatomical location to dermis layer, i.e. superficial and deep compartments (sAAT and dAAT). In morbidly obese patients, dAAT mass has been linked to obesity-associated pathologies. In the present study, we characterized in overweight healthy individuals human sAAT and dAAT cellular composition and adipogenic potential. Twelve paired sAAT and dAAT samples were collected. sAAT compared to dAAT adipocytes are larger. In agreement with increased size, real-time PCR analyses performed on isolated adipocytes showed that sAAT adipocytes exhibited higher leptin transcript levels but also higher expression of genes involved in metabolism including hormone-sensitive lipase compared to dAAT adipocytes. Flow cytometry analyses performed on stroma-vascular fraction (SVF) showed no difference in the numbers of progenitor cells, endothelial cells and macrophages between sAAT and dAAT. Macrophage phenotypes were not distinct between both AAT compartments. However, CD3+ T lymphocyte number was higher in dAAT than in sAAT. Adipogenic potential of dAAT SVF was lower than sAAT SVF whereas the one of isolated progenitor cells was not distinct whatever the AAT compartments. Therefore, in overweight patients, both sAAT and dAAT compartments exhibit differences in terms of adipocytes and T lymphocyte accumulation. dAAT is characterized by higher T lymphocyte accumulation together with smaller less metabolically active adipocytes. The lower adipogenic potential of dAAT SVF is not due to intrinsic progenitor cell properties but more likely to the increased T lymphocyte accumulation. PMID:23184733

  19. Treponemal antibody in CSF and cellular immunity in peripheral blood of syphilitic patients with persisting positive rapid plasma regain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei-Qiang; Wang, Huan-Li; Zhong, Dao-Qing; Lin, Lu-Yang; Qiu, Xiao-Shan; Yang, Ri-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The ratio of patients with RPR constant positive more than 2 years despite receiving standard syphilis treatment has been reported to be 11.54%~31.3%. The current interpretations on this phenomenon are cellular immune function restrained and the existence of neurosyphilis or asymptomatic neurosyphilis. We conducted this study to detect the treponemal antibody in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood of syphilis patients with persisting RPR positive more than 2 years without neurologic signs, and then explore their relationship. In this study, Treponemal antibody in CSF of 46 syphilitic with HIV negative were measured by syphilis serum test and compared with that of 5 neurosyphilis. Lymphocyte subsets were measured by flow cytometry (FCM) and compared with that of 30 healthy controls. We observed that treponemal antibody in CSF was detected not only in 12 cases (25.21%) of 46 treated patients, but also in 5 neurosyphilis. The ratio of lymphocyte subsets revealed that CD3+, CD4+ T cells and natural killer (NK) cells showed no significant differences between the patient and healthy controls (P>0.05), while CD8+ T cells in patients were significant higher than that in healthy controls (P0.05). In conclusion, the treponemal antibody in CSF of treated patients suggests that part of them were asymptomatic neurosyphilis and with cellular immunodifeciency. And there is no significant relationship between asymptomatic neurosyphilis and cellular immunodeficiency in peripheral blood. PMID:26191296

  20. Cellular senescence in aging primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbig, Utz; Ferreira, Mark; Condel, Laura; Carey, Dee; Sedivy, John M

    2006-03-01

    The aging of organisms is characterized by a gradual functional decline of all organ systems. Mammalian somatic cells in culture display a limited proliferative life span, at the end of which they undergo an irreversible cell cycle arrest known as replicative senescence. Whether cellular senescence contributes to organismal aging has been controversial. We investigated telomere dysfunction, a recently discovered biomarker of cellular senescence, and found that the number of senescent fibroblasts increases exponentially in the skin of aging baboons, reaching >15% of all cells in very old individuals. In addition, the same cells contain activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase and heterochromatinized nuclei, confirming their senescent status. PMID:16456035

  1. Clinical and molecular studies in five Brazilian cases of Friedreich ataxia Avaliação clínica e molecular de cinco pacientes brasileiros com ataxia de Friedreich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IDA V.D. SCHWARTZ

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia (FRDA, the most common autosomal recessive ataxia, is caused in 94% of cases by homozygous expansions of an unstable GAA repeat localised in intron 1 of the X25 gene. We have investigated this mutation in five Brazilian patients: four with typical FRDA findings and one patient with atypical manifestations, who was considered to have some other form of cerebellar ataxia with retained reflexes. The GAA expansion was detected in all these patients. The confirmation of FRDA diagnosis in the atypical case may be pointing out, as in other reports, that clinical spectrum of Friedreich's ataxia is broader than previously recognised and includes cases with intact tendon reflexes.A ataxia de Friedreich (FRDA é a mais frequente das ataxias com herança autossômica recessiva. Em 94 % dos casos, é causada por uma expansão homozigota instável da repetição de trinucleotídeos GAA, localizada no primeiro íntron do gene X25. Esta mutação foi investigada em cinco pacientes brasileiros: quatro com quadro clínico típico de FRDA e um paciente com manifestações atípicas, cujo diagnóstico prévio era o de alguma outra forma de ataxia cerebelar com preservação de reflexos. A investigação foi positiva nos cinco casos. A confirmação do diagnóstico de FRDA no paciente com quadro atípico, assim como em outros casos semelhantes já relatados na literatura, sugere que o espectro de manifestações clínicas da FRDA seja mais amplo do que o classicamente reconhecido, incluindo casos com preservação de reflexos.

  2. Spontaneous and induced chromosome breakage in chorionic villus samples: a cytogenetic approach to first trimester prenatal diagnosis of ataxia telangiectasia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llerena, J; Murer-Orlando, M; McGuire, M; Zahed, L; Sheridan, R J; Berry, A C; Bobrow, M

    1989-01-01

    Patients with ataxia telangiectasia (AT) syndrome exhibit a high level of spontaneous chromosome aberrations, with hypersensitivity to gamma radiation and radiomimetic chemicals at the chromosomal and cellular level. Previously pregnancies at risk for AT have been screened solely by analysis of amniotic fluid samples. In this report we describe a cytogenetic approach to the prenatal diagnosis of AT using chorionic villus sampling (CVS). Levels of spontaneous and induced (gamma radiation and bleomycin) chromosome breakage were established in direct, semidirect, and culture preparations of CVS samples from normal pregnancies. The methods developed were then successfully applied to the screening of a pregnancy at risk for AT. Semidirect preparations showed normal levels of chromosome breakage, and this result was further confirmed in chorion, amniotic fluid, and lymphocyte cultures. In chorion villus samples, gamma radiation is probably the easiest and most reliable way of discriminating between unaffected fetuses and those with AT. PMID:2468772

  3. ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) abnormality and diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ataxia-Telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive inherited disease due to mutation of ATM gene on chromosome 11q22.3, with major symptoms of ataxia, telangiectasia, immunodeficiency and frequent complication of cancer, and the cells have characters of chromosomal break, high sensitivity to radiation and inappropriate continuation of DNA synthesis after radiation. This review describes past and present studies of ATM functions with clinical features in the following order: Clinical symptoms and epidemiology; ATM gene mutation in A-T patients, mainly by frame-shift (80-90%); ATM, whose gene consisted from 66 exons (150 kb), functions in phosphoinositide-3-kinase related kinase family which protecting cells from stress and integrating their system, at response to DNA double strand break, and in the cell cycle checkpoints at G1/S, S and G2/M phases; ATM nonsense/missense mutations in embryonic cells leading to carcinogenesis and role of ATM in the suppression of carcinogenesis in somatic cells; Chromosomal translocation which relating to carcinogenesis, by functional defect of ATM; and Other functions of ATM in neuronal growth, immunodeficiency, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, early senescence, and virus infection. ATM is thus an essential molecule to maintain growth and homeostasis. (T.I.)

  4. Generation and characterisation of Friedreich ataxia YG8R mouse fibroblast and neural stem cell models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiranjeevi Sandi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Friedreich ataxia (FRDA is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by GAA repeat expansion in the first intron of the FXN gene, which encodes frataxin, an essential mitochondrial protein. To further characterise the molecular abnormalities associated with FRDA pathogenesis and to hasten drug screening, the development and use of animal and cellular models is considered essential. Studies of lower organisms have already contributed to understanding FRDA disease pathology, but mammalian cells are more related to FRDA patient cells in physiological terms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have generated fibroblast cells and neural stem cells (NSCs from control Y47R mice (9 GAA repeats and GAA repeat expansion YG8R mice (190+120 GAA repeats. We then differentiated the NSCs in to neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes as confirmed by immunocytochemical analysis of cell specific markers. The three YG8R mouse cell types (fibroblasts, NSCs and differentiated NSCs exhibit GAA repeat stability, together with reduced expression of frataxin and reduced aconitase activity compared to control Y47R cells. Furthermore, YG8R cells also show increased sensitivity to oxidative stress and downregulation of Pgc-1α and antioxidant gene expression levels, especially Sod2. We also analysed various DNA mismatch repair (MMR gene expression levels and found that YG8R cells displayed significant reduction in expression of several MMR genes, which may contribute to the GAA repeat stability. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We describe the first fibroblast and NSC models from YG8R FRDA mice and we confirm that the NSCs can be differentiated into neurons and glia. These novel FRDA mouse cell models, which exhibit a FRDA-like cellular and molecular phenotype, will be valuable resources to further study FRDA molecular pathogenesis. They will also provide very useful tools for preclinical testing of frataxin-increasing compounds for FRDA drug therapy

  5. Axonal inclusions in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3

    OpenAIRE

    Seidel, Kay; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.; Schultz, Christian; Paulson, Henry; Frank, Stefanie; de Vos, Rob A.; Brunt, Ewout R.; Deller, Thomas; Harm H Kampinga; Rüb, Udo

    2010-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a major pathological hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders including polyglutamine diseases. Aggregation of the mutated form of the disease protein ataxin-3 into neuronal nuclear inclusions is well described in the polyglutamine disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3 or Machado–Joseph disease), although these inclusions are not thought to be directly pathogenic. Neuropil aggregates have not yet been described in SCA3. We performed a systematic immunohistoch...

  6. Cellular and humoral responses to Leishmania major virulence factors in healed cutaneous leishmaniasis and Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Lakhal-Naouar, Inès; Boussoffara, Thouraya; Meddeb-Garnaoui, Amel; Ben Achour-Chenik, Yosser; Louzir, Hechmi; Chenik, Mehdi

    2009-01-01

    Cellular and humoral immune responses of healed cutaneous leishmaniasis and Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis patients were evaluated against results for Leishmania major virulence proteins L. major protein disulfide isomerase (LmPDI) and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK). Only MAPKK induces significant peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation with gamma interferon production as well as antibody responses. Thus, MAPKK may be of interest in Leishmania vaccination and se...

  7. Autosomal dominant ataxia: Genetic evidence for locus heterogeneity from a cuban founder-effect population

    OpenAIRE

    Auburger, Georg; Diaz, Guillermo Orozco; Capote, Raul Ferreira; Sanchez, Suzana Gispert; Perez, Marta Paradoa; del Cueto, Marianela Estrada; Meneses, Mirna Garcia; Farrall, Martin; Williamson, Robert; Chamberlain, Susan; Baute, Luis Heredero

    1990-01-01

    The locus for autosomal dominant ataxia with a diagnosis of olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy at autopsy has been previously assigned to chromosome 6p. However, evidence for two alternative locations has been reported. We have recently described a large potential founder-effect population of such patients in the Holguin province of Cuba. With an estimated 1,000 patients available for analysis, this extensive cluster of families provides a unique opportunity for the definitive localization of the...

  8. Myocardial ischemia in the absence of epicardial coronary artery disease in Friedreich's ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Dickerson Jennifer A; Raman Subha V; Al-Dahhak Roula

    2008-01-01

    Abstract We present the first in vivo detection of microvascular abnormality in a patient with Friedreich's ataxia (FA) without epicardial coronary artery disease using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). The patient had exertional chest pain and dyspnea prompting referral for cardiac evaluation. These symptoms were reproduced during intravenous adenosine infusion, and simultaneous first-pass perfusion imaging showed a significant subendocardial defect; both symptoms and perfusion deficit were ...

  9. Cutaneous granulomas in ataxia telangiectasia and other primary immunodeficiencies: Reflection of inappropriate immune regulation?

    OpenAIRE

    Chiam, L. Y T; Verhagen, Mijke; Haraldsson, Ásgeir; Wulffraat, Nico; Driessen, Gertjan; Netea, Mihai,; Weemaes, Corry; Seyger, Marieke; van Deuren, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Non-infective cutaneous granulomas with unknown pathogenesis occur in various primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) including ataxia telangiectasia (A-T). Objective: To find a common immunological denominator in these cutaneous granulomas. Methods: The dermatological and immunological features of 4 patients with A-T and cutaneous granulomas were described. The literature on skin granulomas in A-T and in other PIDs is reviewed. Results: All 4 A-T patients had progressive gr...

  10. Friedreich Ataxia: Molecular Mechanisms, Redox Considerations, and Therapeutic Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Renata; Lefevre, Sophie; Sliwa, Dominika; Seguin, Alexandra; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Lesuisse, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage are at the origin of numerous neurodegenerative diseases like Friedreich ataxia and Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases. Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most common hereditary ataxia, with one individual affected in 50,000. This disease is characterized by progressive degeneration of the central and peripheral nervous systems, cardiomyopathy, and increased incidence of diabetes mellitus. FRDA is caused by a dynamic mutation, a GAA trinucleotide repe...

  11. Response of sensitive human ataxia and resistant T-1 cell lines to accelerated heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation dose responses of fibroblast from a patient with Ataxia telangiectasis (AT-2SF) and an established line of human T-1 cells were studied. Nearly monoenergetic accelerated neon and argon ions were used at the Berkeley Bevalac with various residual range values. The LET of the particles varied from 30 keV/μm to over 1000 keV/μm. All Ataxia survival curves were exponential functions of the dose. Their radiosensitivity reached peak values at 100 to 200 keV/μm. Human T-1 cells have effective sublethal damage repair as has been evidenced by split dose experiments, and they are much more resistant to low LET than to high LET radiation. The repair-misrepair model has been used to interpret these results. We have obtained mathematical expressions that describe the cross sections and inactivation coefficients for both human cell lines as a function of the LET and the type of particle used. The results suggest either that high-LET particles induce a greater number of radiolesions per track or that heavy-ions at high LET induce lesions that kill cells more effectively and that are different from those produced at low LET. We assume that the lesions induced in T-1 and Ataxia cells are qualitatively similar and that each cell line attempts to repair these lesions. The result in most irradiated Ataxia cells, however, is either lethal misrepair or incomplete repair leading to cell death. 63 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  12. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type III: a review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujioka Shinsuke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia (ADCA Type III is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA classically characterized by pure cerebellar ataxia and occasionally by non-cerebellar signs such as pyramidal signs, ophthalmoplegia, and tremor. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in adulthood; however, a minority of patients develop clinical features in adolescence. The incidence of ADCA Type III is unknown. ADCA Type III consists of six subtypes, SCA5, SCA6, SCA11, SCA26, SCA30, and SCA31. The subtype SCA6 is the most common. These subtypes are associated with four causative genes and two loci. The severity of symptoms and age of onset can vary between each SCA subtype and even between families with the same subtype. SCA5 and SCA11 are caused by specific gene mutations such as missense, inframe deletions, and frameshift insertions or deletions. SCA6 is caused by trinucleotide CAG repeat expansions encoding large uninterrupted glutamine tracts. SCA31 is caused by repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding region of the disease gene. Currently, there are no specific gene mutations associated with SCA26 or SCA30, though there is a confirmed locus for each subtype. This disease is mainly diagnosed via genetic testing; however, differential diagnoses include pure cerebellar ataxia and non-cerebellar features in addition to ataxia. Although not fatal, ADCA Type III may cause dysphagia and falls, which reduce the quality of life of the patients and may in turn shorten the lifespan. The therapy for ADCA Type III is supportive and includes occupational and speech modalities. There is no cure for ADCA Type III, but a number of recent studies have highlighted novel therapies, which bring hope for future curative treatments.

  13. DNA synthesis in ataxia telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractAfter the discovery that cultured cells from AT patients are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation the suggestion was made that AT-could be the 1 X-ray-analogue 1 of xeroderma pigmentosum. The latter syndrome (XP) is characterized by hypersensitivity to short-wave UV-radiation, caused by

  14. Characterization of humoral and cellular immune responses in patients with human papilloma virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A descriptive and cross-sectional study was carried out in 30 females infected with the human papilloma virus, attended in the office of Immunology of the Specialty Polyclinic belonging to 'Saturnino Lora' Provincial Clinical Surgical Teaching Hospital in Santiago de Cuba, from June 2009 to June 2010, in order to characterize them according to immune response. To evaluate the humoral and cellular immune response rosetting assay and quantification of immunoglobulins were used respectively. Women between 25-36 years of age (40 %) infected with this virus, especially those coming from urban areas, prevailed in the series, and a significant decrease of the cellular response as compared to the humoral response was evidenced

  15. Improvement of balance in progressive degenerative cerebellar ataxias after Ayurvedic therapy: A preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriranjini S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The treatment options for improving the balance in degenerative cerebellar ataxias are very few. Ayurvedic texts have described diverse treatment regimens for this disease. Aims: To determine the change in balance indices, if any, by dynamic posturography (Biodex Balance System, USA in progressive cerebellar ataxia following Ayurvedic treatment. Materials and Methods: We performed a preliminary open labelled study on ten patients diagnosed with progressive cerebellar ataxia. The patients were treated over a period of one month. Treatment consisted of Shirobasti (therapeutic retention of medicament over the scalp in male patients and Shirodhara (pouring of a steady stream of medicament on the forehead in female patients with Dhanvantaram tailam (medicated oil for 45 minutes daily, followed by Abhyanga (methodical massage with Dhanvantaram tailam and Bhashpa sweda (steam bath, for 14 days. In addition, the treatment also consisted Abhyantara aushadha (oral medicines of Maharasnadi kashayam 15ml thrice daily, Dhanvantaram capsules 101 two capsules thrice daily, and Ashwagandha tablet 500 mg one tablet thrice daily, for one month. The patients were assessed on the Biodex balance system before and after the treatment. Results were analyzed using paired samples ′t′ test. Results: All patients tolerated the treatment well without any adverse events and reported subjective improvement in walking. There was a statistically significant improvement in the overall and anteroposterior balance indices of dynamic stability. Conclusions: Over the short period of the present study, Ayurvedic therapy was found to be safe and, showed improvement in the balance in patients with progressive degenerative cerebellar ataxia. Further randomized placebo-control double-blind studies are needed to validate the results.

  16. Ataxia with Vitamin E Deficiency May Present with Cervical Dystonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Andrew E.; Vargas, Wendy; Pearson, Toni S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED) is an autosomal recessive disorder that usually presents with ataxia, areflexia, and proprioceptive and vibratory sensory loss. Dystonia has been reported rarely. Case Report An 11-year-old female presented with dystonic head tremor and cervical and bilateral arm dystonia. Her 14-year-old older brother had dystonic head tremor and generalized dystonia. One year later, the brother developed dysarthria, limb dysmetria, and gait ataxia. Compound heterozygous mutations in TTPA were detected, confirming the diagnosis of AVED. Discussion AVED may present with dystonia rather than ataxia, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of progressive dystonia.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: PRICKLE1-related progressive myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with ataxia PRICKLE1-related progressive myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Description PRICKLE1 -related progressive myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia is a rare inherited condition characterized by recurrent ...

  18. Cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy, and vestibular areflexia syndrome: a slowly progressive disorder with stereotypical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzato, Daniele; Bella, Eleonora Dalla; Dacci, Patrizia; Mariotti, Caterina; Lauria, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    Cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy and vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS) is a newly described condition with onset in adulthood, characterized by progressive balance impairment and sensory disturbances in the lower limbs, which can severely affect patients' quality of life. Its pathogenesis remains obscure and the diagnosis challenging. We described four patients complaining of slowly progressive gait unbalance and sensory disturbances at the feet followed, after a period ranging 2-6 years, by cerebellar dysfunction. All patients showed gait and limb ataxia, positive Romberg sign, cerebellar dysarthria, gaze-evoked nystagmus, absent deep tendon reflexes, and impaired vibratory sensation. Nerve conduction studies revealed axonal sensory neuropathy, brain magnetic resonance imaging showed cerebellar atrophy, and otoneurological investigation demonstrated bilateral vestibular areflexia with impaired vestibulo-ocular reflexes. The diagnosis of CANVAS should be suspected on clinical ground based on homogeneous course of symptoms and signs, and addressed by video-oculography eye movement recording. PMID:26566912

  19. Quantification of cellular volume and sub-cellular density fluctuations: comparison of normal peripheral blood cells and circulating tumor cells identified in a breast cancer patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KevinGregoryPhillips

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis, the leading cause of cancer-related deaths, is facilitated in part by the hematogenous transport of circulating tumor cells (CTCs through the vasculature. Clinical studies have demonstrated that CTCs circulate in the blood of patients with metastatic disease across the major types of carcinomas, and that the number of CTCs in peripheral blood is correlated with overall survival in metastatic breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer. While the potential to monitor metastasis through CTC enumeration exists, the basic physical features of CTCs remain ill defined and moreover, the corresponding clinical utility of these physical parameters is unknown. To elucidate the basic physical features of CTCs we present a label-free imaging technique utilizing differential interference contrast (DIC microscopy to measure cell volume and to quantify sub-cellular mass-density variations as well as the size of subcellular constituents from mass-density spatial correlations. DIC measurements were carried out on CTCs identified in a breast cancer patient using the high-definition (HD CTC detection assay. We compared the biophysical features of HD-CTC to normal blood cell subpopulations including leukocytes, platelets, and red blood cells. HD-CTCs were found to possess larger volumes, decreased mass-density fluctuations, and shorter-range spatial density correlations in comparison to leukocytes. Our results suggest that HD-CTCs exhibit biophysical signatures that might be used to potentially aid in their detection and to monitor responses to treatment in a label-free fashion. The biophysical parameters reported here can be incorporated into computational models of CTC-vascular interactions and in vitro flow models to better understand metastasis.

  20. Ataxia, Dementia, and Hypogonadotropism Caused by Disordered Ubiquitination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margolin, David H.; Kousi, Maria; Chan, Yee-Ming;

    2013-01-01

    affected patients. Neurologic and reproductive endocrine phenotypes were characterized in detail. The effects of sequence variants and the presence of an epistatic interaction were tested in a zebrafish model. RESULTS Digenic homozygous mutations in RNF216 and OTUD4, which encode a ubiquitin E3 ligase...... in cerebellar pathways and the hippocampus; surviving hippocampal neurons contained ubiquitin-immunoreactive intranuclear inclusions. Defects were detected at the hypothalamic and pituitary levels of the reproductive endocrine axis. CONCLUSIONS The syndrome of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, ataxia, and dementia...... can be caused by inactivating mutations in RNF216 or by the combination of mutations in RNF216 and OTUD4. These findings link disordered ubiquitination to neurodegeneration and reproductive dysfunction and highlight the power of whole-exome sequencing in combination with functional studies to unveil...

  1. Vitamin B12 deficiency presenting as acute ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, John Ross; Say, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    A previously healthy 7-year-old Caucasian boy was hospitalised for evaluation of acute ataxia and failure to thrive, initially suspicious for an intracranial mass. Weight and body mass index were below the third percentile and he demonstrated loss of joint position and vibratory sense on examination. Laboratory studies revealed megaloblastic anaemia while an initial MRI of the brain showed no evidence of mass lesions or other abnormalities. A dietary history revealed the child subscribed to a restrictive vegan diet with little to no intake of animal products or other fortified foods. The child was diagnosed with presumed vitamin B12 deficiency and was treated with intramuscular B12 injections. Neurological symptoms resolved promptly within several days after starting therapy. This case underlines the importance of assessing nutritional status in the evaluation of neurological dysfunction in the pediatric patient. PMID:23536622

  2. ERS statement on the multidisciplinary respiratory management of ataxia telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Jayesh M; Bush, Andrew; van Gerven, Marjo; Nissenkorn, Andreea; Renke, Michael; Yarlett, Lian; Taylor, Malcolm; Tonia, Thomy; Warris, Adilia; Zielen, Stefan; Zinna, Shairbanu; Merkus, Peter J F M

    2015-12-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare, progressive, multisystem disease that has a large number of complex and diverse manifestations which vary with age. Patients with A-T die prematurely with the leading causes of death being respiratory diseases and cancer. Respiratory manifestations include immune dysfunction leading to recurrent upper and lower respiratory infections; aspiration resulting from dysfunctional swallowing due to neurodegenerative deficits; inefficient cough; and interstitial lung disease/pulmonary fibrosis. Malnutrition is a significant comorbidity. The increased radiosensitivity and increased risk of cancer should be borne in mind when requesting radiological investigations. Aggressive proactive monitoring and treatment of these various aspects of lung disease under multidisciplinary expertise in the experience of national multidisciplinary clinics internationally forms the basis of this statement on the management of lung disease in A-T. Neurological management is outwith the scope of this document. PMID:26621971

  3. ERS statement on the multidisciplinary respiratory management of ataxia telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayesh M. Bhatt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T is a rare, progressive, multisystem disease that has a large number of complex and diverse manifestations which vary with age. Patients with A-T die prematurely with the leading causes of death being respiratory diseases and cancer. Respiratory manifestations include immune dysfunction leading to recurrent upper and lower respiratory infections; aspiration resulting from dysfunctional swallowing due to neurodegenerative deficits; inefficient cough; and interstitial lung disease/pulmonary fibrosis. Malnutrition is a significant comorbidity. The increased radiosensitivity and increased risk of cancer should be borne in mind when requesting radiological investigations. Aggressive proactive monitoring and treatment of these various aspects of lung disease under multidisciplinary expertise in the experience of national multidisciplinary clinics internationally forms the basis of this statement on the management of lung disease in A-T. Neurological management is outwith the scope of this document.

  4. DNA synthesis in ataxia telangiectasia

    OpenAIRE

    Jaspers, Nicolaas

    1985-01-01

    textabstractAfter the discovery that cultured cells from AT patients are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation the suggestion was made that AT-could be the 1 X-ray-analogue 1 of xeroderma pigmentosum. The latter syndrome (XP) is characterized by hypersensitivity to short-wave UV-radiation, caused by a reduced ability to properly remove UV-induced DNA damage. The evidence for a DNA repair defect in AT cells is not as strong as in the case of XP (see section 2.2.5 of this thesis). Different XP p...

  5. Ayurvedic approach in the management of spinocerebellar ataxia-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rajoria, Kshipra

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia -2 is a progressive, degenerative genetic disease caused by an expanded (CAG) trinucleotide repetition on the chromosome 12 resulting in production of an abnormal protein called ataxin-2. There is no known effective management or cure in biomedicine for this genetic disease. In the present study a case of SCA2 that was treated with Ayurvedic intervention is reported. Ayurvedic treatments in this case were directed towards alleviating symptoms and to reduce severe disability due to progressive nature of disease. A 42 year old male patient was diagnosed for Vāta vyādhi (group of various neurological disorders) and was- treated with Śālisastika pinda svedana (sudation with bolus of medicated cooked rice) for 30 days-, Śirobasti (sudation of head with the help of a cap on head) with Aśvagandhā taila for 45 days and Balādi ksīra basti (enema with medicated milk) with Aśvagandhā taila anuvāsana (enema with oil) for 30 days in Karma basti krama (30 days regime of purification and oleation enema) along with a combination of Ayurvedic oral drugs which consisted of Brahadvātacintāmanirasa – 125 mg, Vasantāmaltī rasa- 125 mg, Daśamūla kvātha- 40 ml, Aśvagandhā cūrṇa (powder of Withania somnifera DUNAL)- 3g, Amrtā cūrṇa (powder of Tinospora cordifolia Willd.)- 500 mg, Muktāśukti pisti – 500 mg, Yogarāja Guggulu – 500 mg twice a day for 2 months. Patient's condition was assessed on the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Before treatment, mean SARA score was 35. This reduced to 15 after treatment. Good relief in dysarthria, fasciculation, heaviness in eye, blurred vision, axial tremor; constipation and quality of life were observed in this case.

  6. Ayurvedic approach in the management of spinocerebellar ataxia-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rajoria, Kshipra

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia -2 is a progressive, degenerative genetic disease caused by an expanded (CAG) trinucleotide repetition on the chromosome 12 resulting in production of an abnormal protein called ataxin-2. There is no known effective management or cure in biomedicine for this genetic disease. In the present study a case of SCA2 that was treated with Ayurvedic intervention is reported. Ayurvedic treatments in this case were directed towards alleviating symptoms and to reduce severe disability due to progressive nature of disease. A 42 year old male patient was diagnosed for Vāta vyādhi (group of various neurological disorders) and was- treated with Śālisastika pinda svedana (sudation with bolus of medicated cooked rice) for 30 days-, Śirobasti (sudation of head with the help of a cap on head) with Aśvagandhā taila for 45 days and Balādi ksīra basti (enema with medicated milk) with Aśvagandhā taila anuvāsana (enema with oil) for 30 days in Karma basti krama (30 days regime of purification and oleation enema) along with a combination of Ayurvedic oral drugs which consisted of Brahadvātacintāmanirasa - 125 mg, Vasantāmaltī rasa- 125 mg, Daśamūla kvātha- 40 ml, Aśvagandhā cūrṇa (powder of Withania somnifera DUNAL)- 3g, Amrtā cūrṇa (powder of Tinospora cordifolia Willd.)- 500 mg, Muktāśukti pisti - 500 mg, Yogarāja Guggulu - 500 mg twice a day for 2 months. Patient's condition was assessed on the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Before treatment, mean SARA score was 35. This reduced to 15 after treatment. Good relief in dysarthria, fasciculation, heaviness in eye, blurred vision, axial tremor; constipation and quality of life were observed in this case. PMID:27143801

  7. Ayurvedic approach in the management of spinocerebellar ataxia-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvesh Kumar Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia -2 is a progressive, degenerative genetic disease caused by an expanded (CAG trinucleotide repetition on the chromosome 12 resulting in production of an abnormal protein called ataxin-2. There is no known effective management or cure in biomedicine for this genetic disease. In the present study a case of SCA2 that was treated with Ayurvedic intervention is reported. Ayurvedic treatments in this case were directed towards alleviating symptoms and to reduce severe disability due to progressive nature of disease. A 42 year old male patient was diagnosed for Vāta vyādhi (group of various neurological disorders and was- treated with Śālisastika pinda svedana (sudation with bolus of medicated cooked rice for 30 days-, Śirobasti(sudation of head with the help of a cap on head with Aśvagandhā taila for 45 days and Balaādi ksiāra basti (enema with medicated milk with Aśvagandhā taila anuvaāsana(enema with oil for 30 days in Karma basti krama(30 days regime of purification and oleation enema along with a combination of Ayurvedic oral drugs which consisted of Brahadvaātacintaāmanirasa – 125 mg, Vasantaāmaltiā rasa- 125 mg, Daśamūla kvātha- 40 ml, Aśvagandhā cūrṃa(powder of Withania somnifera DUNAL- 3g, Amrtaā cūrṃa (powder of Tinospora cordifolia Willd.- 500 mg, Muktāśukti pisti – 500 mg, Yogaraāja Guggulu – 500 mg twice a day for 2 months. Patient's condition was assessed on the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA. Before treatment, mean SARA score was 35. This reduced to 15 after treatment. Good relief in dysarthria, fasciculation, heaviness in eye, blurred vision, axial tremor; constipation and quality of life were observed in this case.

  8. Targeted disruption of Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young June; Ahn, Kwang Sung; Kim, Minjeong; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Sang-Min; Ryu, Junghyun; Ahn, Jin Seop; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Choi, You Jung [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong-Jun [Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Hosup, E-mail: shim@dku.edu [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physiology, Dankook University School of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM gene-targeted pigs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. • A novel large animal model for ataxia telangiectasia was developed. • The new model may provide an alternative to the mouse model. - Abstract: Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a recessive autosomal disorder associated with pleiotropic phenotypes, including progressive cerebellar degeneration, gonad atrophy, and growth retardation. Even though A-T is known to be caused by the mutations in the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, the correlation between abnormal cellular physiology caused by ATM mutations and the multiple symptoms of A-T disease has not been clearly determined. None of the existing ATM mouse models properly reflects the extent to which neurological degeneration occurs in human. In an attempt to provide a large animal model for A-T, we produced gene-targeted pigs with mutations in the ATM gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The disrupted allele in the ATM gene of cloned piglets was confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis. The ATM gene-targeted pigs generated in the present study may provide an alternative to the current mouse model for the study of mechanisms underlying A-T disorder and for the development of new therapies.

  9. Targeted disruption of Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • ATM gene-targeted pigs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. • A novel large animal model for ataxia telangiectasia was developed. • The new model may provide an alternative to the mouse model. - Abstract: Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a recessive autosomal disorder associated with pleiotropic phenotypes, including progressive cerebellar degeneration, gonad atrophy, and growth retardation. Even though A-T is known to be caused by the mutations in the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, the correlation between abnormal cellular physiology caused by ATM mutations and the multiple symptoms of A-T disease has not been clearly determined. None of the existing ATM mouse models properly reflects the extent to which neurological degeneration occurs in human. In an attempt to provide a large animal model for A-T, we produced gene-targeted pigs with mutations in the ATM gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The disrupted allele in the ATM gene of cloned piglets was confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis. The ATM gene-targeted pigs generated in the present study may provide an alternative to the current mouse model for the study of mechanisms underlying A-T disorder and for the development of new therapies

  10. False-positive head-impulse test in cerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olympia eKremmyda

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The objective of this study was to compare the findings of the bedside head impulse test (HIT, passive head rotation gain, and caloric irrigation in patients with cerebellar ataxia (CA. In 16 patients with CA and bilaterally pathological bedside HIT, VOR gains were measured during HIT and passive head rotation by scleral search coil technique. Eight of the patients had pathologically reduced caloric responsiveness, while the other eight had normal caloric responses. Those with normal calorics showed a slightly reduced HIT gain (mean±SD: 0.73±0.15. In those with pathological calorics, gains 80ms and 100 ms after the HIT as well as the passive rotation VOR gains were significantly lower. The corrective saccade after head turn occurred earlier in patients with pathological calorics (111±62 ms after onset of the HIT than in those with normal calorics. (191±17 ms, p=0.0064 We indentified two groups of patients with CA: those with an isolated moderate HIT deficit only, probably due to floccular dysfunction, and those with combined HIT, passive rotation and caloric deficit, probably due to a peripheral vestibular deficit. From a clinical point of view, these results show that the bedside HIT alone can be false positive for establishing a diagnosis of a bilateral peripheral vestibular deficit in patients with CA.

  11. Ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and NBS1-dependent phosphorylation of Chk1 on Ser-317 in response to ionizing radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gatei, Magtouf; Sloper, Katie; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard;

    2003-01-01

    In mammals, the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated) and ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) protein kinases function as critical regulators of the cellular DNA damage response. The checkpoint functions of ATR and ATM are mediated, in part, by a pair of checkpoint effector kinases termed Chk1 and Chk2. In...

  12. Friedreich ataxia is not only a GAA repeats expansion disorder: implications for molecular testing and counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Mazurczak, Tomasz; Zajkowski, Tomasz; Tataj, Renata; Górka-Skoczylas, Paulina; Połatyńska, Katarzyna; Kępczyński, Łukasz; Stasiołek, Mariusz; Bal, Jerzy

    2016-08-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most common hereditary ataxia. It is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations of the FXN gene, mainly the biallelic expansion of the (GAA)n repeats in its first intron. Heterozygous expansion/point mutations or deletions are rare; no patients with two point mutations or a point mutation/deletion have been described, suggesting that loss of the FXN gene product, frataxin, is lethal. This is why routine FRDA molecular diagnostics is focused on (GAA)n expansion analysis. Additional tests are considered only in cases of heterozygous expansion carriers and an atypical clinical picture. Analyses of the parent's carrier status, together with diagnostic tests, are performed in rare cases, and, because of that, we may underestimate the frequency of deletions. Even though FXN deletions are characterised as 'exquisitely rare,' we were able to identify one case (2.4 %) of a (GAA)n expansion/exonic deletion in a group of 41 probands. This was a patient with very early onset of disease with rapid progression of gait instability and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We compared the patient's clinical data to expansion/deletion carriers available in the literature and suggest that, in clinical practice, the FXN deletion test should be taken into account in patients with early-onset, rapid progressive ataxia and severe scoliosis. PMID:26906906

  13. Functional and Gait Assessment in Children and Adolescents Affected by Friedreich's Ataxia: A One-Year Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasco, Gessica; Gazzellini, Simone; Petrarca, Maurizio; Lispi, Maria Luisa; Pisano, Alessandra; Zazza, Marco; Della Bella, Gessica; Castelli, Enrico; Bertini, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is the most common autosomal recessive form of neurodegenerative ataxia. We present a longitudinal study on the gait pattern of children and adolescents affected by Friedreich's ataxia using Gait Analysis and the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). We assessed the spectrum of changes over 12 months of the gait characteristics and the relationship between clinical and instrumental evaluations. We enrolled 11 genetically confirmed patients affected by Friedreich's ataxia in this study together with 13 normally developing age-matched subjects. Eight patients completed a 12-month follow-up under the same protocol. By comparing the gait parameters of Friedreich's ataxia with the control group, we found significant differences for some relevant indexes. In particular, the increased knee and ankle extension in stance revealed a peculiar biomechanical pattern, which correlated reliably with SARA Total, Gait and Sitting scores. The knee pattern showed its consistency also at the follow-up: Knee extension increased from 6.8±3.5° to -0.5±3.7° and was significantly correlated with the SARA total score. This feature anticipated the loss of the locomotor function in two patients. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that the selective and segmental analysis of kinetic/kinematic features of ataxic gait, in particular the behavior of the knee, provides sensitive measures to detect specific longitudinal and functional alterations, more than the SARA scale, which however has proved to be a reliable and practical assessment tool. Functional outcomes measures integrated by instrumental evaluation increase their sensitivity, reliability and suitability for the follow-up of the disease progression and for the application in clinical trials and in rehabilitative programs. PMID:27598307

  14. Acute cerebellar ataxia with human parvovirus B19 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Y; Ueno, T.; Komatsu, H.; Takada, H.; Nunoue, T.

    1999-01-01

    A 2 year old boy developed acute cerebellar ataxia in association with erythema infectiosum. During the disease, genomic DNA and antibodies against human parvovirus B19 were detected in serum but not in cerebrospinal fluid. Parvovirus B19 associated acute cerebellar ataxia might occur due to transient vascular reaction in the cerebellum during infection.



  15. A case of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 mimicking olivopontocerebellar atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is an autosomal dominant, slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia without multisystem involvement. We report a 57-year-old woman with genetically confirmed SCA6 who showed clinical features of olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Conventional T2-weighted and FLAIR MRI demonstrated high signal in the middle cerebellar peduncles, in addition to mild atrophy of the pons and cerebellum. (orig.)

  16. CT and MR imaging of acute cerebellar ataxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An adult female showed mild cerebellar ataxia and CSF pleocytosis following an acute infection of the upper respiratory tract, and was diagnosed as having acute cerebellar ataxia (ACA). CT and MR appearances in the acute stage revealed moderate swelling of the cerebellum and bilaterally increased signal intensity in the cerebellar cortex. (orig.)

  17. Drug-induced cerebellar ataxia: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, J. van; Kerstens, F.G.; Maas, R.P.P.W.M.; Harmark, L.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Cerebellar ataxia can be induced by a large number of drugs. We here conducted a systemic review of the drugs that can lead to cerebellar ataxia as an adverse drug reaction (ADR). METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search in Pubmed (1966 to January 2014) and EMB

  18. Ataxia rating scales are age-dependent in healthy children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, Rick; Spits, Anne H.; Kuiper, Marieke J.; Lunsing, Roelinka J.; Burger, Huibert; Kremer, Hubertus P.; Sival, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate ataxia rating scales in children for reliability and the effect of age and sex. METHOD: Three independent neuropaediatric observers cross-sectionally scored a set of paediatric ataxia rating scales in a group of 52 healthy children (26 males, 26 females) aged 4 to 16 years (mean

  19. Longitudinal Cerebral Blood Flow Changes during Speech in Hereditary Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidtis, John J.; Strother, Stephen C.; Naoum, Ansam; Rottenberg, David A.; Gomez, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias constitute a group of degenerative diseases that progress over years or decades. With principal pathology involving the cerebellum, dysarthria is an early feature of many of the ataxias. Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow changes during speech production over a 21 month period in a…

  20. Dysarthria and Friedreich's Ataxia: What Can Intelligibility Assessment Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaney, Bronagh; Hewlett, Nigel

    2007-01-01

    Background: Friedreich's ataxia is one of the most common hereditary disorders of the nervous system. Dysarthria is a pervasive symptom of Friedreich's ataxia, yet the clinical presentation of speech symptoms remains poorly understood, leaving clinicians without the evidence required to develop therapy interventions. Aims: The research reported…

  1. Leukoencephalopathy after prophylactic radiation for leukaemia in ataxia telangiectasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Eyre, J A; Gardner-Medwin, D; Summerfield, G P

    1988-01-01

    Children with ataxia telangiectasia have a high probability of developing acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, and have increased sensitivity to chemotherapy and irradiation. We report a 51/2 year old boy who had undiagnosed ataxia telangiectasia when he presented with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. He subsequently developed a chemoradiation induced leukoencephalopathy after conventional central nervous system prophylaxis.

  2. A case of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 mimicking olivopontocerebellar atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, N.; Katayama, T.; Makita, Y.; Kuroda, K.; Aizawa, H.; Kikuchi, K. [First Dept. of Internal Medicine, Asahikawa Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is an autosomal dominant, slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia without multisystem involvement. We report a 57-year-old woman with genetically confirmed SCA6 who showed clinical features of olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Conventional T2-weighted and FLAIR MRI demonstrated high signal in the middle cerebellar peduncles, in addition to mild atrophy of the pons and cerebellum. (orig.)

  3. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia with bull's-eye macular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruysberg, J.R.M.; Eerola, K.U.; Vrijland, H.R.; Aandekerk, A.L.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Deutman, A.F.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: In 1980, we published in the American Journal of Ophthalmology two siblings with hereditary ataxia and atrophic maculopathy. The report is cited in the literature as autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia with retinal degeneration. The purpose of the present study is to document the progressi

  4. Spinocerebellar ataxia 17: Inconsistency between phenotype and neuroimage findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia 17 (SCA17 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease clinically characterized by the presence of cerebellar ataxia in combination with variable neurological symptoms. Here we report a Chinese SCA17 family which proband′s clinical manifestation was inconsistent with the neuroimage findings.

  5. Meningococcal meningitis presenting with bilateral deafness and ataxia.

    OpenAIRE

    Sandyk, R.; Brennan, M J

    1984-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented with bilateral deafness and ataxia of sudden onset and without constitutional symptoms or signs of meningeal irritation. He was subsequently proved to have meningococcal meningitis, and the deafness and ataxia resolved following appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  6. KCNJ10 gene mutations causing EAST syndrome (epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and tubulopathy) disrupt channel function

    OpenAIRE

    Reichold, Markus; Zdebik, Anselm A.; Lieberer, Evelyn; Rapedius, Markus; Schmidt, Katharina; Bandulik, Sascha; Sterner, Christina; Tegtmeier, Ines; Penton, David; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Hulton, Sally-Anne; Witzgall, Ralph; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Howie, Alexander J.; Kleta, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of the KCNJ10 (Kir4.1) K+ channel underlie autosomal recessive epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and (a salt-wasting) renal tubulopathy (EAST) syndrome. We investigated the localization of KCNJ10 and the homologous KCNJ16 in kidney and the functional consequences of KCNJ10 mutations found in our patients with EAST syndrome. Kcnj10 and Kcnj16 were found in the basolateral membrane of mouse distal convoluted tubules, connecting tubules, and cortical collecting ducts. In the hu...

  7. Clinical Responses to Rituximab in a Case of Neuroblastoma with Refractory Opsoclonus Myoclonus Ataxia Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Samin Alavi; Ali Kord Valeshabad; Borhan Moradveisi; Ali Aminasnafi; Mohammad Taghi Arzanian

    2012-01-01

    Opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome (OMS) is a rare neurologic syndrome. In a high proportion of children, it is associated with neuroblastoma. The etiology of this condition is thought to be immune mediated. In children, immunotherapy with conventional treatments such as corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and even antiepileptic drugs has been tried. Recently rituximab has been used safely for refractory OMS in children with neuroblastoma. Our patient w...

  8. Familial cerebellar ataxia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: evidence for hypothalamic LHRH deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berciano, J; Amado, J A; Freijanes, J; Rebollo, M; Vaquero, A

    1982-01-01

    A family with familial cerebellar ataxia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is described. The condition was inherited as an autosomal recessive defect. CT scan in one case revealed cerebellar and brain stem atrophy. Endocrinological tests showed abnormalities only in two patients who were clinically affected. In both cases raised gonadotropic levels were found after repetitive stimulation with luteining hormone-releasing hormone which suggests that the hypogonadism was due to a primary hypothalamic disturbance. Images PMID:6813427

  9. Rehabilitation for Ataxia Following Chemotherapy for Burkitt Lymphoma Involving the Rectum

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyoung Seop; Jung, Chul Oh; Jeon, Ha Ra; Sung, Lee Ho

    2012-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma is a type of B-cell lymphoma that occurs mostly in children, and rarely in adults. The sporadic type is known to occur mostly at the ileum and cecum. Cytarabine, which is used for central nervous system prophylaxis during chemotherapy for Burkitt lymphoma, has known neurotoxicity, and its side effects include motor ataxia due to cerebellar injury, ataxic dysarthria, dysfunction of ocular movement, confusion, somnolence and lethargy. This case report is about a patient diagnos...

  10. The contribution of the cerebellum to cognition in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Freya E.; Manon Grube; Elsegood, Kelly J.; Welch, John L.; Kelly, Thomas P.; Chinnery, Patrick F; Griffiths, Timothy D

    2010-01-01

    This study sought evidence for a specific cerebellar contribution to cognition by characterising the cognitive phenotype of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 (SCA-6); an autosomal dominant genetic disease which causes a highly specific late-onset cerebellar degeneration. A comprehensive neuropsychological assessment was administered to 27 patients with genetically confirmed SCA-6. General intellectual ability, memory and executive function were examined using internationally standardised tests (W...

  11. RNA-mediated neurodegeneration in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yujing; Jin, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Carriers of fragile X syndrome (FXS) have FMR1 alleles, called premutations, with a number of 5’-untranslated CGG repeats somewhere between patients, who have over 200 repeats, and normal individuals, with fewer than 60 repeats. Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder, has been recognized in older male fragile X premutation carriers, and FXTAS is uncoupled from the neurodevelopmental disorder, FXS. Several lines of evidence have led to the ...

  12. The ATM gene and the radiobiology of ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is the classic human genetic disease involving severe ionizing radiation sensitivity and as such has been intensely studied by radiation biologists over the years. Unlike its counterpart for UV light sensitivity -xeroderma pigmentosum - A-T has no obvious DNA repair defect; and there has been much speculation as to the mechanism underlying the altered radioresponses associated with this disease. The gene defective in A-T (ATM) has recently been cloned, and its primary coding sequence determined. The primary sequence of the ATM protein suggests that it has some regulatory functions related to cellular radioresponse and maintenance of genomic stability, and shares these functions with a growing family of other proteins in various organisms. At this juncture it is appropriate to review our current knowledge about the radiobiology of A-T and reflect on the possible radiobiological mechanisms that are suggested by the ATM gene itself. This article will attempt briefly to review current knowledge about the radiobiology of A-T and to introduce new speculations about underlying radiobiological mechanisms that are suggested by the primary amino acid sequence of the predicted ATM gene product. (Author)

  13. Friedreich`s ataxia in American families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Costa, A.; Maguire, B.A.; Sylvester, J.E. [Hahnemann Univ., Philadephia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Freidreich`s ataxia (FRDA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder presenting with dysarthia, loss of tendon reflexes, and ataxic gait. Both diabetes mellitus and cardiomyopathy are frequently found associated with the disease. The gene, FRDA, has been localized to 9q13-21. Recent reports of recombination events in individuals homozygous by descent have positioned the gene to a 450 KB region in the FRDA locus centromeric to the original markers. Candidate cDNA`s have been isolated from part of this region, and characterized, but not shown to be responsible for the disease. We have performed linkage analysis on 46 American families with markers in the FRDA region. A recombination has been detected in a family which has the phenotypic criteria for Friedreich`s; none of the three affected exhibit signs of cardiomyopathy which is a required diagnostic criteria. Since this recombination lies within the now excluded D9S5/D9S15 region, it is being tested for linkage to the {open_quotes}ataxia with selective vitamin E deficiency{close_quotes} (AVED) locus on chromosome 8q. Our lab has work in progress to subclone appropriate regions from YACs in order to identify expressed sequences and nucleotide variations (by SSCP) in the FRDA locus.

  14. Síndrome de Ataxia-Telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amauri Batista da Silva

    1971-06-01

    Full Text Available A ataxia-telangiectasia, doença de Mme. Louis-Bar, é caracterizada pela associação de ataxia cerebelar progressiva, em geral com início na primeira infância, telangiectasas óculo-cutâneas, movimentos coreoatetósicos, tendência a infecções repetidas do sistema respiratório, retardo estaturo-ponderal, demenciação. São mais ou menos freqüentes os tumores do sistema reticuloendotelial. A doença é geralmente familiar, transmitida por genes recessivos, autossômicos, não ligados ao sexo. A alteração bioquímica mais encontrada consiste na diminuição ou ausência completa da fração A das gamaglobulinas, bem como na perturbação das reações de hipersensibilidade retardada. Os AA. relatam o estudo clínico, biológico e pneumencefalográfico de uma criança de 3 anos de idade, apresentando essa enfermidade desde os 18 meses de vida, sem antecedentes familiares.

  15. Chromosome number distribution and cellular DNA content in colorectal adenomas from polyposis and nonpolyposis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, S E; Madsen, A L; Bak, Martin

    1991-01-01

    Ploidy analyses of colorectal adenomas were performed by combined flow cytometric DNA analysis of unfixed isolated nuclei and direct chromosome preparation after Colcemid incubation for 9-20 hours. Ten of 18 adenomas from nonpolyposis patients and 4 of 13 adenomas from patients with familial aden...

  16. Optical quantification of cellular mass, volume and density of circulating tumor cells identified in an ovarian cancer patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KevinGregoryPhillips

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Clinical studies have demonstrated that circulating tumor cells (CTCs are present in the blood of cancer patients with known metastatic disease across the major types of epithelial malignancies. Recent studies have shown that the concentration of CTCs in the blood is prognostic of overall survival in breast, prostate, colorectal and non-small cell lung cancer. This study characterizes CTCs identified using the high-definition (HD-CTC assay in an ovarian cancer patient with stage IIIC disease. We characterized the physical properties of 31 HD-CTCs and 50 normal leukocytes from a single blood draw taken just prior to the initial debulking surgery. We utilized a non-interferometric quantitative phase microscopy technique using brightfield imagery to measure cellular dry mass. Next we used a quantitative differential interference contrast microscopy technique to measure cellular volume. These techniques were combined to determine cellular dry mass density. We found that HD-CTCs were more massive than leukocytes: 33.6 ± 3.2 pg (HD-CTC compared to 18.7 ± 0.6 pg (leukocytes, p < 0.001; had greater volumes: 518.3 ± 24.5 fL (HD-CTC compared to 230.9 ± 78.5 fL (leukocyte, p<0.001; and possessed a decreased dry mass density with respect to leukocytes: 0.065 ± 0.006 pg/fL (HD-CTC compared to 0.085 ± 0.004 pg/fL (leukocyte, p < 0.006. Quantification of HD-CTC dry mass content and volume provide key insights into the fluid dynamics of cancer, and may provide the rationale for strategies to isolate, monitor or target CTCs based on their physical properties. The parameters reported here can also be incorporated into blood cell flow models to better understand metastasis.

  17. The effect of ranitidine on cellular immunity in patients with multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Nielsen, H; Moesgaard, F; Tvede, N; Klarlund, K; Mansa, B; Drivsholm, A

    1990-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is characterized by an increased susceptibility to infections and to other malignancies. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study the potential impact of immunomodulation by ranitidine was studied in 20 patients with multiple myeloma. Three patients were untreated, while 17.......19-2.25 nmol/min) (P less than 0.005 between groups). Among ranitidine-treated patients spontaneous NK cell activity was unchanged, while in vitro interleukin-2- and interferon-alpha-stimulated NK cell activity decreased (P less than 0.03, respectively). As production of oxygen radicals constitutes an...

  18. Administrative and research policies required to bring cellular therapies from the research laboratory to the patient's bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Robyn

    2005-10-01

    presidential administrations on cellular therapy, variations in individual state laws, and states becoming involved in research funding, such as California's Proposition 71. Legal concerns include expanding private litigation with diversity of lawsuits, expanding lists of defendants, and the use of class-action lawsuits in research cases. Ownership issues also arise in terms of intellectual property, patents, and ownership of stem cells collected from minors, as in umbilical cord blood donations. Situations that challenge the regulatory processes established to ensure participant safety include differences in reporting requirements for private- and public-funded research and the lack of adequate funding and resources to implement and support the institutional review board (IRB) process. Financial considerations influence the development of clinical protocols, because funding is often limited. Financial incentives, personal investment in companies funding research activities, and fundraising pressures may present potential conflicts. In addition, the increasing role of emerging biotechnology start-up companies and pharmaceutical companies in clinical research introduces additional financial considerations. Administrative policies are needed to address these possible conflicts and ensure research participant safety as cellular therapies progress from the research laboratories to the patient's bedside. Administrative policies to ensure minimum standards of quality for emerging products before human clinical trials, policies to enforce consistent reporting requirements for private and public cellular research, policies to minimize financial conflicts of interest, policies to strengthen implementation of the existing IRB process and to structure into the process a consistent, systematic review of these identified conflicts, and policies to limit private litigation will help to preserve the objectivity of the review process and ultimately increase participant safety. PMID:16181400

  19. Multiple Autoantibodies Display Association with Lymphopenia, Proteinuria, and Cellular Casts in a Large, Ethnically Diverse SLE Patient Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rufei Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study evaluates high-throughput autoantibody screening and determines associated systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE clinical features in a large lupus cohort. Methods. Clinical and demographic information, along with serum samples, were obtained from each SLE study participant after appropriate informed consent. Serum samples were screened for 10 distinct SLE autoantibody specificities and examined for association with SLE ACR criteria and subcriteria using conditional logistic regression analysis. Results. In European-American SLE patients, autoantibodies against 52 kD Ro and RNP 68 are independently enriched in patients with lymphopenia, anti-La, and anti-ribosomal P are increased in patients with malar rash, and anti-dsDNA and anti-Sm are enriched in patients with proteinuria. In African-American SLE patients, cellular casts associate with autoantibodies against dsDNA, Sm, and Sm/nRNP. Conclusion. Using a high-throughput, bead-based method of autoantibody detection, anti-dsDNA is significantly enriched in patienets with SLE ACR renal criteria as has been previously described. However, lymphopenia is associated with several distinct autoantibody specificities. These findings offer meaningful information to allow clinicians and clinical investigators to understand which autoantibodies correlate with select SLE clinical manifestations across common racial groups using this novel methodology which is expanding in clinical use.

  20. Assessment of speech in early-onset ataxia : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Marieke J.; Brandsma, Rick; Lawerman, T.F.; Lunsing, Roelineke J.; Keegstra, Anne L.; Burger, Huibert; De Koning, Tom J.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Sival, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the study was to determine whether paediatric ataxia speech subscores are reliably applicable for international early-onset ataxia (EOA) databases. If so, we reasoned that ataxia speech subscores should be associated with ataxia scores and involve high interobserver agreement, includ

  1. Association of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE Gene Polymorphism with Inflammation and Cellular Cytotoxicity in Vitiligo Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Rashed

    Full Text Available Vitiligo is a disorder with profound heterogeneity in its aetio-pathophysiology. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE plays an important role in the physiology of the vasculature, blood pressure and inflammation. An insertion/deletion (I/D polymorphism of the ACE gene was reported be associated with the development of vitiligo.Our aim was to evaluate the ACE I/D polymorphism in vitiligo patients and controls. Our second aim was to find a possible association between ACE gene polymorphism and inflammatory mediators (as interleukin (IL-6 and/or cellular cytotoxicity induced by serum nitrite (as a breakdown product of the cytotoxic nitric oxide in vitiligo patients.This case-control study included 74 vitiligo patients and 75 apparently healthy controls. The distribution of ACE gene I/D genotype was investigated using PCR. Serum ACE, IL-6 and nitrite were measured by colorimetric method, ELISA and Griess assay respectively.The ACE allele frequency was significantly different between vitiligo patients and healthy controls (P = 0.026. However there was no significant difference between the ACE genotyping frequency in both groups (P = 0.115. There were statistically significant higher VIDA score (P = 0.007, and serum IL-6 (P < 0.001 in patients with the DD genotype when compared to other genotypes. Serum nitrite in patients with the DD genotype was significantly higher (P = 0.007 when compared to patients with II genotype. Serum levels of ACE, IL-6 and nitrite in vitiligo patients were statistically significantly higher than those in controls.As a conclusion, ACE gene polymorphism might grant susceptibility to develop vitiligo. Serum IL-6 and nitrite levels might have an important role in the pathogenesis of vitiligo. Targeting these two factors might have an implication in the treatment of some resistant cases.

  2. Endonucleolytic activity for γ-irradiated DNA in normal and ataxia telangiectasia fibroblast cell extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increased sensitivity of ataxia telangiectasia cells towards ionizing radiation may be related to their inability to incise DNA near sites of radiation-induced base damages. When compared to 3 unaffected controls, crude extracts from 5 lines of fibroblast cells derived from ataxia telangiectasia patients were capable of incising γ-irradiated DNA to the same extent as normal cells as determined in a nicking assay, using the circular replicative form of PHI X 174. However, the types of alterations introduced into DNA by γ-irradiation could be distinguished from sites of base loss due to depurination or depyrimidination and from sites of base modification by OsO4. The specific endonuclease by its rate of temperature inactivation. (orig.)

  3. Ataxia and Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism with Intrafamilial Variability Caused by RNF216 Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqwaifly, Mohammed; Bohlega, Saeed

    2016-06-15

    Gordon Holmes syndrome (GHS) is a distinct phenotype of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia, characterized by ataxia, dementia, reproductive defects and hypogonadism; it has been recently found to be associated with RNF216 mutation. We performed whole-exome sequencing and filtered the resulting novel variants by the coordinates of the shared autozygome. We identified a novel splicing variant in RNF216 that is likely to abolish the canonical splice site at the junction of exon/intron 13 (NM_207111.3:c.2061G>A). We herein report two patients with GHS caused by a novel RNF216 mutation as the first follow up report on RNF216-related GHS, and show interfamilial variability of phenotype supporting the previously reported RNF216-related cases. PMID:27441066

  4. A case of midbrain infarction with acute bilateral cerebellar ataxia visualized by diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, Yuka; Kawabori, Masahito; Oura, Daisuke; Niiya, Yoshimasa; Iwasaki, Motoyuki; Mabuchi, Shoji

    2016-08-31

    An 85-year-old woman with hypertension was admitted with a sudden onset of gait disturbance and dysarthria. On admission, the patient showed severe bilateral cerebellar ataxia with moderate right medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) syndrome. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed an acute infarction in the lower and medial part of midbrain. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) started from both cerebellar peduncles revealed that the lesion of the acute infarction matched the decussation of superior cerebellar peduncle where crossing of tract was seen and a part of its tract was interrupted at the site. Interruption of the cerebellum red nuclear path at the medial part of midbrain was considered to be the reason for bilateral cerebellar ataxia and visualization of cerebellum red nuclear path by DTI can give better understanding of the neurological symptom. PMID:27477572

  5. The dynamic regulation of cortical excitability is altered in episodic ataxia type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmich, Rick C; Siebner, Hartwig R; Giffin, Nicola;

    2010-01-01

    Episodic ataxia type 2 and familial hemiplegic migraine are two rare hereditary disorders that are linked to dysfunctional ion channels and are characterized clinically by paroxysmal neurological symptoms. Impaired regulation of cerebral excitability is thought to play a role in the occurrence of......-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation at an interstimulus interval of 2 and 10 ms to assess intracortical inhibition and facilitation, respectively. The time course of burst-induced excitability changes differed between groups. Healthy controls showed a short-lived increase in excitability that was only present 50...... ms after the burst. In contrast, patients with episodic ataxia type 2 showed an abnormally prolonged increase in corticospinal excitability that was still present 250 ms after the transcranial magnetic stimulation burst. Furthermore, while controls showed a decrease in intracortical facilitation...

  6. The effect of ranitidine on cellular immunity in patients with multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Nielsen, H; Moesgaard, F; Tvede, N; Klarlund, K; Mansa, B; Drivsholm, A

    1990-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is characterized by an increased susceptibility to infections and to other malignancies. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study the potential impact of immunomodulation by ranitidine was studied in 20 patients with multiple myeloma. Three patients were untreated, while 17 af...... important mechanism of monocyte killing activity against microorganisms and probably against malignant cells, it is suggested that ranitidine may be of beneficial impact in the treatment of multiple myeloma....

  7. The Pointing Errors in Optic Ataxia Reveal the Role of "Peripheral Magnification" of the PPC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vindras, Philippe; Blangero, Annabelle; Ota, Hisaaki; Reilly, Karen T; Rossetti, Yves; Pisella, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Interaction with visual objects in the environment requires an accurate correspondence between visual space and its internal representation within the brain. Many clinical conditions involve some impairment in visuo-motor control and the errors created by the lesion of a specific brain region are neither random nor uninformative. Modern approaches to studying the neuropsychology of action require powerful data-driven analyses and error modeling in order to understand the function of the lesioned areas. In the present paper we carried out mixed-effect analyses of the pointing errors of seven optic ataxia patients and seven control subjects. We found that a small parameter set is sufficient to explain the pointing errors produced by unilateral optic ataxia patients. In particular, the extremely stereotypical errors made when pointing toward the contralesional visual field can be fitted by mathematical models similar to those used to model central magnification in cortical or sub-cortical structure(s). Our interpretation is that visual areas that contain this footprint of central magnification guide pointing movements when the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) is damaged and that the functional role of the PPC is to actively compensate for the under-representation of peripheral vision that accompanies central magnification. Optic ataxia misreaching reveals what would be hand movement accuracy and precision if the human motor system did not include elaborated corrective processes for reaching and grasping to non-foveated targets. PMID:27507938

  8. Progression of brain atrophy in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2: a longitudinal tensor-based morphometry study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Mascalchi

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2 is the second most frequent autosomal dominant inherited ataxia worldwide. We investigated the capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to track in vivo progression of brain atrophy in SCA2 by examining twice 10 SCA2 patients (mean interval 3.6 years and 16 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (mean interval 3.3 years on the same 1.5 T MRI scanner. We used T1-weighted images and tensor-based morphometry (TBM to investigate volume changes and the Inherited Ataxia Clinical Rating Scale to assess the clinical deficit. With respect to controls, SCA2 patients showed significant higher atrophy rates in the midbrain, including substantia nigra, basis pontis, middle cerebellar peduncles and posterior medulla corresponding to the gracilis and cuneatus tracts and nuclei, cerebellar white matter (WM and cortical gray matter (GM in the inferior portions of the cerebellar hemisphers. No differences in WM or GM volume loss were observed in the supratentorial compartment. TBM findings did not correlate with modifications of the neurological deficit. In conclusion, MRI volumetry using TBM is capable of demonstrating the progression of pontocerebellar atrophy in SCA2, supporting a possible role of MRI as biomarker in future trials.

  9. Ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 6: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Simone Zeigelboim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar as alterações vestibulococleares observadas em um caso de ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 6. O caso foi encaminhado do Hospital de Clínicas para o Laboratório de Otoneurologia de uma Instituição de Ensino e foi submetido aos seguintes procedimentos: anamnese, inspeção otológica, avaliações audiológica e vestibular. O caso retrata uma paciente com diagnóstico genético de ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 6, do sexo feminino, com 57 anos de idade, que referiu desequilíbrio à marcha com tendência a queda para a esquerda, disartria e disfonia. Na avaliação audiológica apresentou configuração audiométrica descendente a partir da frequência de 4kHz e curva timpanométrica do tipo "A" com presença dos reflexos estapedianos bilateralmente. No exame vestibular observou-se na pesquisa da vertigem posicional presença de nistagmo vertical inferior e oblíquo, espontâneo e semiespontâneo múltiplo com características centrais (ausência de latência, paroxismo, fatigabilidade e vertigem, nistagmooptocinético abolido e hiporreflexia à prova calórica. Constataram-se alterações labirínticas que indicaram afecção do sistema vestibular central evidenciando-se a importância dessa avaliação. A existência da possível relação entre os achados com os sintomas vestibulares apresentados pela paciente apontou a relevância do exame labiríntico neste tipo de ataxia uma vez que a presença do nistagmo vertical inferior demonstrou ser frequente neste tipo de patologia.

  10. Differences between spinocerebellar ataxias and multiple system atrophy-cerebellar type on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiing-Feng Lirng

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: A broad spectrum of diseases can manifest cerebellar ataxia. In this study, we investigated whether proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS may help differentiate spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA from multiple systemic atrophy- cerebellar type (MSA-C. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This prospective study recruited 156 patients with ataxia, including spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA types 1, 2, 3, 6 and 17 (N = 94 and MSA-C (N = 62, and 44 healthy controls. Single voxel proton MRS in the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis were measured. The differences were evaluated using nonparametric statistic tests. RESULTS: When compared with healthy controls, the cerebellar and vermis NAA/Cr and NAA/Cho were lower in all patients(p<0.002. The Cho/Cr was lower in SCA2 and MSA-C (p<0.0005. The NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr were lower in MSA-C or SCA2 comparing with SCA3 or SCA6. The MRS features of SCA1 were in between (p<0.018. The cerebellar NAA/Cho was lower in SCA2 than SCA1, SCA3 or SCA6 (p<0.04. The cerebellar NAA/Cho in MSA-C was lower than SCA3 (p<0.0005. In the early stages of diseases (SARA score<10, significant lower NAA/Cr and NAA/Cho in SCA2, SCA3, SCA6 or MSA-C were observed comparing with healthy controls (p<0.017. The Cho/Cr was lower in MSA-C or SCA2 (p<0.0005. Patients with MSA-C and SCA2 had lower NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr than SCA3 or SCA6 (p<0.016. CONCLUSION: By using MRS, significantly lower NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and NAA/Cho in the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis were found in patients with ataxia (SCAs and MSA-C. Rapid neuronal degeneration and impairment of membrane activities were observed more often in patients with MSA-C than those with SCA, even in early stages. MRS could also help distinguish between SCA2 and other subtypes of SCAs. MRS ratios may be of use as biomarkers in early stages of disease and should be further assessed in a longitudinal study.

  11. Molecular genetics of a Chinese family with spinocerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-dan WU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the genotype of the members of a Chinese family with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA. Methods The peripheral blood samples of 6 patients and 40 asymptomatic people belonged to the family were collected. Referring to the clinical manifestations of the proband and second-generation sequencing results, the CAG trinucleotide repeats of the pathogenic gene ATXN2 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The repeated times of the trinucleotide in normally and abnormally amplified alleles were defined by agarose gel electrophoresis and PCR products sequencing. Results Autosomal dominant heredity was the cause of the SCA in this family. Six out of 46 in the fourth-generation were SCA2 patients, 7 were the carriers of pathogenic allele. The repeated times of CAG trinucleotide were within the normal range in one of the two alleles of ATXN2, but they were in abnormal range in the another one. The repeated times of CAG trinucleotide were 40-46 in abnormal alleles of patients. Conclusion Autosomal dominant heredity SCA2 has been diagnosed in this family caused by the dynamic nutation of CAG trinucleotide repeats, and 7 pathogenic allele carriers in this family were confirmed by genetic diagnosis. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.08.07

  12. Impaired antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mediated by herceptin in patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Koji; Takahashi, Akihiro; Ichihara, Fumiko; Sugai, Hidemitsu; Fujii, Hideki; Matsumoto, Yoshirou

    2002-10-15

    The humanized monoclonal antibody Herceptin, which specifically targets HER-2/neu, exhibits growth inhibitory activity against HER-2/neu-overexpressing tumors and is approved for therapeutic use with proved survival benefit in patients with HER-2/neu-positive breast cancer. In the present study, we investigated whether Herceptin could affect the HER-2/neu-overexpressing gastric cancer cells based on antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and compared immune effector cells from gastric cancer patients with normal individuals on ADCC. HER-2/neu-expressing gastric cancer cells could be killed by Herceptin-mediated ADCC and the Herceptin-induced ADCC correlated with the degree of HER-2/neu expression on the gastric cancer cells. However, the Herceptin-mediated ADCC was significantly impaired in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from advanced disease patients (n = 10) compared with that in early disease (n = 12; P = 0.04) or healthy individuals (n = 10, P = 0.02). Moreover, natural killer (NK) cells purified from patients with advanced disease indicated less Herceptin-mediated ADCC in comparison with that from healthy donors (P = 0.04), whereas monocytes purified from the patients showed an almost equal amount of Herceptin-mediated ADCC in comparison with that from healthy individuals, indicating that NK cell dysfunction contributed to the impaired Herceptin-mediated ADCC in gastric cancer patients. Furthermore, the NK-cell dysfunction on Herceptin-mediated ADCC correlated with the down-regulation of CD16zeta expression in the patients, and interleukin 2 ex vivo treatment of NK cells could restore the impairment of Herceptin-mediated ADCC, concomitant to the normalization of the expression of CD16zeta molecules. Thus, some modalities such as interleukin 2 treatment aimed at reversing NK dysfunction may be necessary for successful Herceptin treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:12384543

  13. FXN Promoter Silencing in the Humanized Mouse Model of Friedreich Ataxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh K Chutake

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia is caused by an expanded GAA triplet-repeat sequence in intron 1 of the FXN gene that results in epigenetic silencing of the FXN promoter. This silencing mechanism is seen in patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells but it remains unknown if it is a widespread phenomenon affecting multiple cell types and tissues.The humanized mouse model of Friedreich ataxia (YG8sR, which carries a single transgenic insert of the human FXN gene with an expanded GAA triplet-repeat in intron 1, is deficient for FXN transcript when compared to an isogenic transgenic mouse lacking the expanded repeat (Y47R. We found that in YG8sR the deficiency of FXN transcript extended both upstream and downstream of the expanded GAA triplet-repeat, suggestive of deficient transcriptional initiation. This pattern of deficiency was seen in all tissues tested, irrespective of whether they are known to be affected or spared in disease pathogenesis, in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues, and in cultured primary fibroblasts. FXN promoter function was directly measured via metabolic labeling of newly synthesized transcripts in fibroblasts, which revealed that the YG8sR mouse was significantly deficient in transcriptional initiation compared to the Y47R mouse.Deficient transcriptional initiation accounts for FXN transcriptional deficiency in the humanized mouse model of Friedreich ataxia, similar to patient-derived cells, and the mechanism underlying promoter silencing in Friedreich ataxia is widespread across multiple cell types and tissues.

  14. Gait and Functional Mobility Deficits in Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Joan A; Robertson-Dick, Erin E; Hall, Deborah A; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) results from a "premutation" (PM) size CGG repeat expansion in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. Cerebellar gait ataxia is the primary feature in some FXTAS patients causing progressive disability. However, no studies have quantitatively characterized gait and mobility deficits in FXTAS. We performed quantitative gait and mobility analysis in seven FMR1 PM carriers with FXTAS and ataxia, six PM carriers without FXTAS, and 18 age-matched controls. We studied four independent gait domains, trunk range of motion (ROM), and movement transitions using an instrumented Timed Up and Go (i-TUG). We correlated these outcome measures with FMR1 molecular variables and clinical severity scales. PM carriers with FXTAS were globally impaired in every gait performance domain except trunk ROM compared to controls. These included total i-TUG duration, stride velocity, gait cycle time, cadence, double-limb support and swing phase times, turn duration, step time before turn, and turn-to-sit duration, and increased gait variability on several measures. Carriers without FXTAS did not differ from controls on any parameters, but double-limb support time was close to significance. Balance and disability scales correlated with multiple gait and movement transition parameters, while the FXTAS Rating Scale did not. This is the first study to quantitatively examine gait and movement transitions in FXTAS patients. Gait characteristics were consistent with those from previous cohorts with cerebellar ataxia. Sensitive measures like the i-TUG may help determine efficacy of interventions, characterize disease progression, and provide early markers of disease in FXTAS. PMID:26298472

  15. A new Purkinje cell antibody (anti-Ca associated with subacute cerebellar ataxia: immunological characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horn Sigrun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a newly discovered serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF reactivity to Purkinje cells (PCs associated with subacute inflammatory cerebellar ataxia. The patient, a previously healthy 33-year-old lady, presented with severe limb and gait ataxia, dysarthria, and diplopia two weeks after she had recovered from a common cold. Immunohistochemical studies on mouse, rat, and monkey brain sections revealed binding of a high-titer (up to 1:10,000 IgG antibody to the cerebellar molecular layer, Purkinje cell (PC layer, and white matter. The antibody is highly specific for PCs and binds to the cytoplasm as well as to the inner side of the membrane of PC somata, dendrites and axons. It is produced by B cell clones within the CNS, belongs to the IgG1 subclass, and activates complement in vitro. Western blotting of primate cerebellum extract revealed binding of CSF and serum IgG to an 80-97 kDa protein. Extensive control studies were performed to rule out a broad panel of previously described paraneoplastic and non-paraneoplastic antibodies known to be associated with cerebellar ataxia. Screening of >9000 human full length proteins by means of a protein array and additional confirmatory experiments revealed Rho GTPase activating protein 26 (ARHGAP26, GRAF, oligophrenin-1-like protein as the target antigen. Preadsorption of the patient's serum with human ARHGAP26 but not preadsorption with other proteins resulted in complete loss of PC staining. Our findings suggest a role of autoimmunity against ARHGAP26 in the pathogenesis of subacute inflammatory cerebellar ataxia, and extend the panel of diagnostic markers for this devastating disease.

  16. Imaging follow-up in patients with unresectable cellular hepatocarcinoma treated with conventional TACE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents more than 5% of all neoplasms and is the most frequent cause of mortality in patients with cirrhosis. Although a number of therapeutic options are available, transarterial chemoembolisation is widely used in the treatment of unresectable HCC. Aim: Evaluation of the role of CT and MRI exams in the imaging followup of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma treated with conventional transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE). Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed 120 consecutive patients with the diagnosis of HCC, sent to the Department of Radiology, Medical Imaging and Interventional Radiology between january 2011 and april 2012 for TACE. The diagnosis of HCC was established using imaging criteria and elevated alfafetoprotein levels (higher than 400ng/ml) or histologic diagnosis. After the procedure, the imaging followup algorithm consisted in an ultrasound exam 24 hours after the procedure, a CT exam 1 month, a MRI exam 3 months later (if the previous CT showed no tumoral residues) and a CT exam 6 months later. The tumoral response was evaluated using the modified RECIST criteria (tumoral dimensions defined as the product of the 2 largest diameters), the visualisation of tumoral arterial enhancement and the presence of intratumoral lipiodol accumulation (defined as absent, homogenous or heterogenous). Results: At the CT exam performed 1 month after the procedure, 44 patients (37%) had homogenous intratumoral lipiodol accumulation, without any tumoral residues and with dimensional reduction. In patients with tumoral residue (n=76), the intratumoral lipiodol accumulation was homogenous (n=48) or heterogenous (n=28); in 5 cases, after the first TACE procedure, we had no lipiodol accumulation in the target lesion. Conclusion: CT exam is an essential tool in the postprocedural followup in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma treated with conventional transarterial

  17. [The cellular immunity indices of patients with malignant melanoma using the viral immunomodulator rigvir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinkina, L S; Bruvere, R Zh; Venskus, D R; Garklava, R R; Muceniece, A J

    1992-01-01

    The effect of rigvir, an immunomodulator of the viral origin, on cell-mediated immunity was studied in patients with skin malignant melanoma. Rosette formation and monoclonal antibody techniques were used to measure blood immunocompetent cell levels in patients with the above pathology, cases of benign skin tumors and healthy subjects. Rigvir was shown to influence natural resistance by raising blood monocyte and large granule-containing lymphocyte levels. It potentiated recruitment of pre-T-lymphocytes and young active T-lymphocytes to the peripheral blood. PMID:1300752

  18. Research progress of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-wei ZHANG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1 is a kind of autosomal dominant genetic neurodegenerative disorder. To date, the pathogenesis of SCA1 remains unclear. Studies in numerous SCA1 experimental models, including transgenic mice, transgenic drosophila and induced pluripotent stem cells, have shown that phosphorylation of S776 in mutant ataxin-1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin-proteasome system and down-regulation of several components of RAS-MAPK-MSK1 pathway may involve in the pathogenesis of SCA1. In this review, the clinical and pathological features of SCA1, and the latest advances of pathogenesis, model systems and therapeutic exploration will be briefly summarized. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.05.017

  19. Paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-Hu antibodies and benign ganglioneuroma

    OpenAIRE

    Fancellu, Roberto; Corsini, Elena; Bernardi, Gaetano; Buzzo, Paolo; Ferrari, Maria Luisa; Lamantea, Eleonora; Garaventa, Alberto; Truini, Mauro; Salvarani, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-Hu antibodies and benign ganglioneuroma. A 28-year-old woman developed progressive ataxia with hyporeflexia at the age of 19. Brain MRI showed progressive cerebellar atrophy. Neurophysiological studies, screening of immune-mediated ataxias, oncological markers, vitamin E and genetic tests for spinocerebellar ataxia types 1,2,3, Friedreich ataxia and POLG1 were negative. Anti-Hu antibodies were positive in Western blot and indirect i...

  20. Localization of the candidate gene d-amino acid oxidase outside the refined 1-cM region of spinocerebellar ataxia 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auburger, G.; Gispert, S.; Lunkes, A. [Univ. Hospital, Duesseldorf (Germany)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2) is one form of the neurodegenerative autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias and has been linked to chromosome 12q in 25 previously described and 13 new families from a founder collective of {ge}500 patients in Holguin, Cuba. Although SCA2 in most patients cannot be distinguished from other spinocerebellar ataxias by clinical criteria, in some patients it exhibits a particular phenotype with early neuropathy/late slow saccades and late myoclonus. Autopsy in 11 patients demonstrated olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy with a selective sparing of the dentate nucleus. Complete allelic association within the Holguin population was established with the microsatellite D12S105, and the candidate region was determined to be within a 6-cM region distal to the marker D12S84, contrasting previous reports by Pulst and Lopes-Cendes and according to preliminary data between D12S84 and D12S1329. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. [Diabetes and alternative medicine: diabetic patients experiences with Ayur-Ved, "clinical ecology" and "cellular nutrition" methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanelli, M; Chiari, G; Gugliotta, M; Capuano, C; Giacalone, T; Gruppi, L; Condò, M

    2002-04-01

    In the last two years we discovered that three of our patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (0.8%) suffered an unexpected worsening in their glycemic control due to a reduction of their insulin dosage in favour of some "alternative" diabetes treatments using herbs, vitamins, fantastic diets and trace elements prescribed by non-medical practitioners. The first patient, a 6.6 year old boy, was admitted to hospital because of a severe ketoacidosis with first degree coma as a result of his parents having reduced his insulin dosage by 77% and replacing the insulin with an ayurvedic herbal preparation (Bardana Actium Lapp). The second patient, a 10.4 year old boy, was admitted to hospital after his teachers noticed that he appeared tired, thinner and polyuric. During hospital admission for mild ketoacidosis the mother, reluctant at first, finally confessed that her son was under the care of a "clinical ecologist". Having identified several food allergies this "clinical ecologist" had placed the child on a spartan diet of bread, water and salt, and had reduced his insulin dosage by 68%. The third patient, a 21 year old male, upon transfer to the Adult Diabetic Center, reported that he had been under the care of a pranotherapist for several years. The pranotherapist had prescribed a cellular nutrition preparation (called "Madonna drops"), a meditation program and also a 50% reduction in his insulin dosage. During this period his HbAlc values had increased from 6.4% to 12%. Current orthodox diabetes treatments are considered unsatisfactory by many people and it is thus not surprising that they search for "miracle" cures. It is important, however, that hospital staff do not ridicule the patients or their parents for trying these alternative therapies. Nevertheless, it would be useful for staff to discuss in advance these "therapies" with patients, highlighting their ineffectiveness and strongly discouraging cures that call for a reduction or elimination of the insulin

  2. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 in eastern India: Some new observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyan B Bhattacharyya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs are hereditary, autosomal dominant progressive neurodegenerative disorders showing clinical and genetic heterogeneity. They are usually manifested clinically in the third to fifth decade of life although there is a wide variability in the age of onset. More than 36 different types of SCAs have been reported so far and about half of them are caused by pathological expansion of the trinucleotide, Cytosine Alanine Guanine (CAG repeat. The global prevalence of SCA is 0.3-2 per 100,000 population, SCA3 being the commonest variety worldwide, accounting for 20-50 per cent of all cases, though SCA 2 is generally considered as the commonest one in India. However, SCA6 has not been addressed adequately from India though it is common in the eastern Asian countries like, Japan, Korea and Thailand. Objective: The present study was undertaken to identify the prevalence of SCA6 in the city of Kolkata and the eastern part of India. Materials and Methods: 83 consecutive patients were recruited for the study of possible SCAs and their clinical features and genotype were investigated. Results: 6 of the 83 subjects turned out positive for SCA6, constituting therefore, 13.33% of the patient pool. Discussion: SCA6 is prevalent in the eastern part of India, though not as frequent as the other common varieties. Conclusions: Further community based studies are required in order to understand the magnitude of SCA6 in the eastern part, as well as in other regions of India.

  3. Radiation hypersensitivity and radioresistant DNA synthesis in ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with the autosomal recessive genetic disease, ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), are cancer-prone and hypersensitive to the killing effects of ionizing radiation. In an attempt to isolate the gene(s) responsible for the hypersensitivity of A-T cells, they were transfected with normal human DNA in cosmid vectors containing a rescuable marker (G-418 resistance), and revertants to normal sensitivity were isolated and characterized. The failure of radioresistant revertants to demonstrate a reversion of the phenotype, radioresistant DNA synthesis, shows that this feature is dependent on a gene separate from the one conferring resistance to cell killing. Cells from every A-T patient thus far examined demonstrate both hypersensitivity, in terms of radiation-induced cell killing, and radioresistant DNA synthesis. The results reported here, however, show that the former is not a result of the latter, as previously proposed. Moreover, the fact that these two characteristics can be uncoupled obscures the role(s) that either of them plays in the etiology of the disease, or in the development in its other features, including cancer-proneness

  4. Genetics Home Reference: myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions MEMSA myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia Enable Javascript to view the ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  5. The radiotoxicity of iodine-125 in ataxia telangiectasia fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normal and ataxia telangiectasia fibroblast strains were labeled with 3H- or 125I-labelled iododeoxyuridine, were stored at -750C to accumulate damage, and were thawed for survival assays. X-ray survival of frozen, unlabeled cells was also determined. The ataxia telangiectasia strains were about twice as sensitive as normal (based upon survival curve slopes) when irradiated with X-rays or 3H decays under frozen conditions. Accumulated 125I decays, while about 13 time more toxic than 3H decays, also killed ataxia telangiectasia cells about twice as efficiently as normal cells. These results indicate that a large proportion of 125I-induced damage - at least 50% - is subject to repair in normal cells. In addition, they suggest that ataxia telangiectasia cells less capably repair a lesion that is induced in common by X-rays and 125I, but in larger proportion by the latter - probably a DNA double-strand break. (Auth.)

  6. Analysis of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 in an extended family of central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashikant Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spinocerebeller ataxia type 1 (SCA1 is a specific type of ataxia among a group of inherited diseases of the central nervous system. In SCA1, genetic defects lead to impairment of specific nerve fibers carrying messages to and from the brain, resulting in the degeneration of the cerebellum, the coordination center of the brain. We investigated 24 members of an extended family in Gwalior city, India, some of which were earlier clinically diagnosed to be suffering from yet unconfirmed type of SCA neurodegenerative disorder. Materials and Methods: All the family members from each age group were screened clinically and the characteristics of those resembling with ataxia were recorded for diagnosis by MRI. The confirmed patients of the family were genetically tested by PCR based molecular testing to identify the type of SCA (i.e., SCA 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 or 7. Family tree of the disease inheritance was constructed by pedigree based method. Result and Conclusion: We found the clinical (symptoms and MRI and genetic (Pedigree and PCR results to be correlated. The PCR result revealed the disease to be of SCA 1 type being inherited in the family.

  7. Imaging study of lymphoreticular tumor development in ataxia-telangiectasia and Nijmegen breakage syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT), or Louis-Bar syndrome, is an autosomal recessive illness characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia, oculo-cutaneous telangiectasia, immunodeficiency combined with susceptibility to sinopulmonary infections and high incidence of neoplastic development. Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a variant of AT, is also an autosomal recessive illness that presents cerebellar ataxia, as well as combined immunodeficiency and a tendency toward tumor development. Contrary to Louis-Bar syndrome, it doesn't present telangiectasia and exhibits a characteristics phenotype (short stature, bird-like face and microcephaly). Both entities are classified as syndrome of chromosomal instability or chromosomal fragility, a group which also includes Bloom syndrome and Fanconi anemia. All of these show an increase in the frequency of neoplastic pathologies, mainly lymphoid tumors. We present three patients,two with AT and one with NBS, who developed different lymphoma types in the course of the illness. We highlight the most outstanding aspects from a clinical-radiological point of view. (Author) 17 refs

  8. Motor Decline in Clinically Presymptomatic Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 Gene Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-Perez, Luis; Díaz, Rosalinda; Pérez-González, Ruth; Canales, Nalia; Rodríguez-Labrada, Roberto; Medrano, Jacquelín; Sánchez, Gilberto; Almaguer-Mederos, Luis; Torres, Cira; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2009-01-01

    Background Motor deficits are a critical component of the clinical characteristics of patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. However, there is no current information on the preclinical manifestation of those motor deficits in presymptomatic gene carriers. To further understand and characterize the onset of the clinical manifestation in this disease, we tested presymptomatic spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 gene carriers, and volunteers, in a task that evaluates their motor performance and their motor learning capabilities. Methods and Findings 28 presymptomatic spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 gene carriers and an equal number of control volunteers matched for age and gender participated in the study. Both groups were tested in a prism adaptation task known to be sensible to both motor performance and visuomotor learning deficits. Our results clearly show that although motor learning capabilities are intact, motor performance deficits are present even years before the clinical manifestation of the disease start. Conclusions The results show a clear deficit in motor performance that can be detected years before the clinical onset of the disease. This motor performance deficit appears before any motor learning or clinical manifestations of the disease. These observations identify the performance coefficient as an objective and quantitative physiological biomarker that could be useful to assess the efficiency of different therapeutic agents. PMID:19401771

  9. Neurodegeneration in Friedreich’s Ataxia: From Defective Frataxin to Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio M. Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Friedreich’s ataxia is the most common inherited autosomal recessive ataxia and is characterized by progressive degeneration of the peripheral and central nervous systems and cardiomyopathy. This disease is caused by the silencing of the FXN gene and reduced levels of the encoded protein, frataxin. Frataxin is a mitochondrial protein that functions primarily in iron-sulfur cluster synthesis. This small protein with an α/β sandwich fold undergoes complex processing and imports into the mitochondria, generating isoforms with distinct N-terminal lengths which may underlie different functionalities, also in respect to oligomerization. Missense mutations in the FXN coding region, which compromise protein folding, stability, and function, are found in 4% of FRDA heterozygous patients and are useful to understand how loss of functional frataxin impacts on FRDA physiopathology. In cells, frataxin deficiency leads to pleiotropic phenotypes, including deregulation of iron homeostasis and increased oxidative stress. Increasing amount of data suggest that oxidative stress contributes to neurodegeneration in Friedreich’s ataxia.

  10. Deep Learning for Cerebellar Ataxia Classification and Functional Score Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zhen; Zhong, Shenghua; Carass, Aaron; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxia is a progressive neuro-degenerative disease that has multiple genetic versions, each with a characteristic pattern of anatomical degeneration that yields distinctive motor and cognitive problems. Studying this pattern of degeneration can help with the diagnosis of disease subtypes, evaluation of disease stage, and treatment planning. In this work, we propose a learning framework using MR image data for discriminating a set of cerebellar ataxia types and predicting a disease ...

  11. Ionizing radiation and cell cycle progression in ataxia telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of mammalian cells to ionizing radiation causes delay in normal progress through the cell cycle at a number of different checkpoints. Abnormalities in these checkpoints have been described for ataxia telangiectasia cells after irradiation. In this report we show that these abnormalities occur at different phases in the cell cycle in several ataxia telangiectasia lymphoblastoid cells. Ataxia telangiectasia cells, synchronized in late G1 phase with either mimosine or aphidicolin and exposed to radiation, showed a reduced delay in entering S phase compared to irradiated control cells. Failure to exhibit G1-phase delay in ataxia telangiectasia cells is accompanied by a reduced ability of radiation to activate the product of the tumor suppressor gene p53, a protein involved in G1/S-phase delay. When the progress of irradiated G1-phase cells was followed into the subsequent G2 and G1 phases ataxia telangiectasia cells showed a more pronounced accumulation in G2 phase than control cells. When cells were irradiated in S phase and extent of delay was more evident in G2 phase and ataxia telangiectasia cells were delayed to a greater extent. These results suggest that the lack of initial delay in both G1 and S phases to the radiosensitivity observed in this syndrome. 26 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Post-Plasmodium vivax malaria cerebellar ataxia and optic neuritis: A new form of delayed cerebellar ataxia or cerebellar variant of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav M Kasundra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM is commonly seen after viral and bacterial infections, immunization, and Plasmodium falciparum (PF malaria. Plasmodium vivax (PV rarely causes ADEM. We report a 14-year-old female patient who presented with acute onset bilateral cerebellar ataxia and optic neuritis, 2 weeks after recovery from PV. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral cerebellar hyperintensities suggestive of ADEM. No specific viral etiology was found on cerebrospinal fluid examination. Patient responded well to treatment without any sequelae. Thus, PV too is an important cause of ADEM along with PF. Two of the previously reported cases had co-infection with falciparum malaria. The only other two reported cases, as also this patient, are from Asia. A geographical or racial predisposition needs to be evaluated. Also, a possibility of post-PV delayed cerebellar ataxia, which is classically described post-PF infection, may be considered as it may be clinically, radiologically, and prognostically indistinguishable from a milder presentation of ADEM.

  13. Ethical dilemmas in genetic testing: examples from the Cuban program for predictive diagnosis of hereditary ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Tania Cruz; Armiñán, Rubén Reynaldo; Cedeño, Humberto Jorge; Mesa, José Miguel Laffita; Zaldivar, Yanetza González; Rodríguez, Raúl Aguilera; Santos, Miguel Velázquez; Mederos, Luis Enrique Almaguer; Herrera, Milena Paneque; Pérez, Luis Velázquez

    2011-06-01

    Predictive testing protocols are intended to help patients affected with hereditary conditions understand their condition and make informed reproductive choices. However, predictive protocols may expose clinicians and patients to ethical dilemmas that interfere with genetic counseling and the decision making process. This paper describes ethical dilemmas in a series of five cases involving predictive testing for hereditary ataxias in Cuba. The examples herein present evidence of the deeply controversial situations faced by both individuals at risk and professionals in charge of these predictive studies, suggesting a need for expanded guidelines to address such complexities. PMID:21264501

  14. Correlation of atrophic change of brain stem by MRI and the degree of symptoms from the ataxia rating scale between Machado-Joseph disease and olivopontocerebellar atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated atrophic changes of brain stem and the degree of symptoms from the ataxia rating scale in 13 cases of Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) and 10 cases of olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA). Patients with MJD and OPCA and normal controls were examined using 1.5-T MRI. Furthermore, we evaluated 3 cases of each two groups with a long-term follow-up study. We used International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS) for the evaluation of ataxia. The MRI of patients with MJD disclosed remarkably reduced width of the middle cerebellar peduncles and the dilatation of 4th ventricle, which correlated with the limb ataxia in ICARS. On the other hand, the MRI of patients with OPCA revealed diminished anteroposterior and transverse diameters of the pons. The latter of which correlated inversely with the total ICARS. In long-term follow up, MJD showed slow progression of atrophic change and clinical course contrasted to OPCA. In conclusion, we suggested that atrophic changes of brain stem of MJD and OPCA were well correlated with ataxia rating scale, ICARS. (author)

  15. Studying of a wave activity condition and cellular metabolism of tissues in patients with perioral dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grashkin V.A.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Perioral dermatitis is a facial skin disease with insuffciently studied ethiology and pathogenetic mechanisms, being one of actual problems of dermatology. It is a chronic relapsing facial skin disease mainly in women of young and middle age (in men and children meets less often. The disease has an independent clinical picture which is different from rosacea, demodecosis, seborrheic dermatitis, etc. The standard diagnostic criterion is a visual estimation of expression of an infammation on the basis of signs of exudative reaction which has a subjective character. Possibilities of a radiometric method for an objective estimation of a facial skin functional condition and indicators of an intracellular metabolism in patients with a perioral dermatitis were frst studied.

  16. Occupational therapy in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3: an open-label trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C.R. Silva

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Occupational therapy (OT is a profession concerned with promoting health and well-being through occupation, by enabling handicapped people to participate in the activities of everyday life. OT is part of the clinical rehabilitation of progressive genetic neurodegenerative diseases such as spinocerebellar ataxias; however, its effects have never been determined in these diseases. Our aim was to investigate the effect of OT on both physical disabilities and depressive symptoms of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3 patients. Genomically diagnosed SCA3 patients older than 18 years were invited to participate in the study. Disability, as evaluated by functional independence measurement and Barthel incapacitation score, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF, was determined at baseline and after 3 and 6 months of treatment. Twenty-six patients agreed to participate in the study. All were treated because OT prevents blinding of a control group. Fifteen sessions of rehabilitative OT were applied over a period of 6 months. Difficult access to food, clothing, personal hygiene, and leisure were some of the main disabilities focused by these patients. After this treatment, disability scores and quality of life were stable, and the Hamilton scores for depression improved. Since no medication was started up to 6 months before or during OT, this improvement was related to our intervention. No association was found between these endpoints and a CAG tract of the MJD1 gene (CAGn, age, age of onset, or neurological scores at baseline (Spearman test. Although the possibly temporary stabilization of the downhill disabilities as an effect of OT remains to be established, its clear effect on depressive symptoms confirms the recommendation of OT to any patient with SCA3 or spinocerebellar ataxia.

  17. Memantine Improves Attentional Processes in Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome: Electrophysiological Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Jin-Chen Yang; Annette Rodriguez; Ashley Royston; Yu-Qiong Niu; Merve Avar; Ryan Brill; Christa Simon; Jim Grigsby; HAGERMAN, RANDI J; Olichney, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Progressive cognitive deficits are common in patients with fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), with no targeted treatment yet established. In this substudy of the first randomized controlled trial for FXTAS, we examined the effects of NMDA antagonist memantine on attention and working memory. Data were analyzed for patients (24 in each arm) who completed both the primary memantine trial and two EEG recordings (at baseline and follow-up) using an auditory “oddball” task. Resul...

  18. Cytokines in Machado Joseph Disease/Spinocerebellar Ataxia 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Carvalho, Gerson; Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; Haas, Clarissa Branco; Torrez, Vitor Rocco; Brochier, Andressa Wigner; Souza, Gabriele Nunes; Furtado, Gabriel Vasata; Gheno, Tailise; Russo, Aline; Monte, Thais Lampert; Schumacher-Schuh, Artur; D'Avila, Rui; Donis, Karina Carvalho; Castilhos, Raphael Machado; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Torman, Vanessa Leotti; Camey, Suzi; Portela, Luis Valmor; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study is to describe the serum concentrations of a broad spectrum of cytokines in symptomatic and asymptomatic carriers of Machado Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD) CAG expansions. Molecularly confirmed carriers and controls were studied. Age at onset, disease duration, and clinical scales Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA), Neurological Examination Score for Spinocerebellar Ataxias (NESSCA), SCA Functional Index (SCAFI), and Composite Cerebellar Functional Score (CCFS) were obtained from the symptomatic carriers. Serum was obtained from all individuals and a cytokine panel "consisted of" eotaxin, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interferon (IFN)-α, IFN-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1RA, IL-2, IL-2R, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17, interferon gamma-induced protein (IP)-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-a, MIP-b, regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was analyzed. In a subgroup of symptomatic carriers, the cytokine panel was repeated after 360 days. Cytokine distribution among groups was studied by discriminant analysis; changes in serum levels after 360 days were studied by generalized estimation equation. Sixty-six symptomatic carriers, 13 asymptomatic carriers, and 43 controls were studied. No differences in cytokine patterns were found between controls and carriers of the CAG expansions or between controls and symptomatic carriers only. In contrast, eotaxin concentrations were significantly higher in asymptomatic than in symptomatic carriers or in controls (p = 0.001, ANCOVA). Eotaxin did not correlate with age, disease duration, CAG expansion, NESSCA score, and SARA score. Among symptomatic carriers, eotaxin dropped after 360 days (p = 0.039, GEE). SCA3/MJD patients presented a benign pattern of

  19. Change in the cortical complexity of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 appears earlier than clinical symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Yun Wang

    Full Text Available Patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3 have exhibited cerebral cortical involvement and various mental deficits in previous studies. Clinically, conventional measurements, such as the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE and electroencephalography (EEG, are insensitive to cerebral cortical involvement and mental deficits associated with SCA3, particularly at the early stage of the disease. We applied a three-dimensional fractal dimension (3D-FD method, which can be used to quantify the shape complexity of cortical folding, in assessing cortical degeneration. We evaluated 48 genetically confirmed SCA3 patients by employing clinical scales and magnetic resonance imaging and using 50 healthy participants as a control group. According to the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA, the SCA3 patients were diagnosed with cortical dysfunction in the cerebellar cortex; however, no significant difference in the cerebral cortex was observed according to the patients' MMSE ratings. Using the 3D-FD method, we determined that cortical involvement was more extensive than involvement of traditional olivopontocerebellar regions and the corticocerebellar system. Moreover, the significant correlation between decreased 3D-FD values and disease duration may indicate atrophy of the cerebellar cortex and cerebral cortex in SCA3 patients. The change of the cerebral complexity in the SCA3 patients can be detected throughout the disease duration, especially it becomes substantial at the late stage of the disease. Furthermore, we determined that atrophy of the cerebral cortex may occur earlier than changes in MMSE scores and EEG signals.

  20. Alterations in cellular energy metabolism associated with the antiproliferative effects of the ATM inhibitor KU-55933 and with metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakikhani, Mahvash; Bazile, Miguel; Hashemi, Sina; Javeshghani, Shiva; Avizonis, Daina; St Pierre, Julie; Pollak, Michael N

    2012-01-01

    KU-55933 is a specific inhibitor of the kinase activity of the protein encoded by Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important tumor suppressor gene with key roles in DNA repair. Unexpectedly for an inhibitor of a tumor suppressor gene, KU-55933 reduces proliferation. In view of prior preliminary evidence suggesting defective mitochondrial function in cells of patients with Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT), we examined energy metabolism of cells treated with KU-55933. The compound increased AMPK activation, glucose uptake and lactate production while reducing mitochondrial membrane potential and coupled respiration. The stimulation of glycolysis by KU-55933 did not fully compensate for the reduction in mitochondrial functions, leading to decreased cellular ATP levels and energy stress. These actions are similar to those previously described for the biguanide metformin, a partial inhibitor of respiratory complex I. Both compounds decreased mitochondrial coupled respiration and reduced cellular concentrations of fumarate, malate, citrate, and alpha-ketogluterate. Succinate levels were increased by KU-55933 levels and decreased by metformin, indicating that the effects of ATM inhibition and metformin are not identical. These observations suggest a role for ATM in mitochondrial function and show that both KU-55933 and metformin perturb the TCA cycle as well as oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:23185347

  1. Alterations in cellular energy metabolism associated with the antiproliferative effects of the ATM inhibitor KU-55933 and with metformin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahvash Zakikhani

    Full Text Available KU-55933 is a specific inhibitor of the kinase activity of the protein encoded by Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM, an important tumor suppressor gene with key roles in DNA repair. Unexpectedly for an inhibitor of a tumor suppressor gene, KU-55933 reduces proliferation. In view of prior preliminary evidence suggesting defective mitochondrial function in cells of patients with Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT, we examined energy metabolism of cells treated with KU-55933. The compound increased AMPK activation, glucose uptake and lactate production while reducing mitochondrial membrane potential and coupled respiration. The stimulation of glycolysis by KU-55933 did not fully compensate for the reduction in mitochondrial functions, leading to decreased cellular ATP levels and energy stress. These actions are similar to those previously described for the biguanide metformin, a partial inhibitor of respiratory complex I. Both compounds decreased mitochondrial coupled respiration and reduced cellular concentrations of fumarate, malate, citrate, and alpha-ketogluterate. Succinate levels were increased by KU-55933 levels and decreased by metformin, indicating that the effects of ATM inhibition and metformin are not identical. These observations suggest a role for ATM in mitochondrial function and show that both KU-55933 and metformin perturb the TCA cycle as well as oxidative phosphorylation.

  2. Cellular immune responses in patients with hepatitis B surface antigen seroclearance induced by antiviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Xiaolin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms by which chronic hepatitis B is completely resolved through antiviral therapy are unknown, and the contribution of acquired T cell immunity to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg seroclearance has not been investigated. Therefore, we measured the T-cell responses to core and envelope antigens in patients with HBsAg seroclearance. Methods Fourteen subjects with HBsAg seroclearance following antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis B, 7 HBeAg-positive immunotolerant HBV carriers and 9 HBeAg-negative inactive HBsAg carriers were recruited. HBV-specific T-cell responses to recombinant HBV core (rHBcAg and envelope (rHBsAg proteins and pools of core and envelope peptides were measured using an ELISPOT assay detecting interferon-gamma and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS assays detecting interferon-gamma or interleukin 2. Results Interferon-gamma ELISPOT assays showed a low frequency of weak responses to the rHBsAg and S peptide pool in the HBsAg seroclearance group, and the response frequency to the rHBcAg and the C peptide pool was higher than to the rHBsAg (P P = 0.001 respectively. A higher response frequency to C than S peptide pools was confirmed in the interferon-gamma ICS assays for both CD4+ (P = 0.033 and CD8+ (P = 0.040 T cells in the HBsAg seroclearance group. The responses to C and S antigens in the inactive carriers were similar. Conclusions There was a low frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell immune responses to envelope antigens in Chinese subjects with HBsAg seroclearance following antiviral therapy. It is unlikely that these immune responses are responsible for HBsAg seroclearance in these subjects.

  3. Defect in radiation signal transduction in ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of mammalian cells to ionizing radiation causes a delay in progression through the cycle at several checkpoints. Cells from patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) ignore these checkpoint controls postirradiation. The tumour suppressor gene product p53 plays a key role at the G1/S checkpoint preventing the progression of cells into S phase. The induction of p53 by radiation is reduced and/or delayed in A-T cells, which appears to account for the failure of delay at the G1/S checkpoint. We have investigated further this defect in radiation signal transduction in A-T. While the p53 response was defective after radiation, agents that interfered with cell cycle progression such as mimosine, aphidicolin and deprivation of serum led to a normal p53 response in A-T cells. None of these agents caused breaks in DNA, as determined by pulse-field gel electrophoresis, in order to elicit the response. Since this pathway is mediated by protein kinases, we investigated the activity of several of these enzymes in control and A-T cells. Ca+2-dependent and -independent protein kinase C activities were increased by radiation to the same extent in the two cell types, a variety of serine/threonine protein kinase activities were approximately the same and anti-tyrosine antibodies failed to reveal any differences in protein phosphorylation between A-T and control cells. (author)

  4. Some aspects of glutathione metabolism in ataxia-telangiectasia fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levels of glutathione (GSH) and two enzymes involved in GSH metabolism, glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione-S-transferase(s) (GST), were measured in four SV40-transformed human fibroblast cell lines. MRC5-V1 and GM0637, derived from normal individuals, had mean GSH levels of 4.2 and 6.5 nmoles/106 cells, respectively. TAT2SF and AT5BIVA, both from ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) patients, respectively had 6.5 and 4.2 nmol/106 cells, indicating that basal GSH levels were similar in A-T and normal cells. There was some variation in GST activity among the four cell lines but deficiency in this enzyme cannot be associated with radiosensitivity in A-T. When GR activity was measured, A-T cells had approximately 82 per cent of the mean normal activity. Though statistically significant, (P = 0.05), this small deficiency could be due to chance and is unlikely to be responsible for the radiosensitive phenotype of A-T. (author)

  5. Rapid Onset of Motor Deficits in a Mouse Model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 Precedes Late Cerebellar Degeneration 1,2,3

    OpenAIRE

    Jayabal, Sriram; Ljungberg, Lovisa; Erwes, Thomas; Cormier, Alexander; Quilez, Sabrina; El Jaouhari, Sara; Watt, Alanna J

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is an autosomal-dominant cerebellar ataxia that has been associated with loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Disease onset is typically at midlife, although it can vary widely from late teens to old age in SCA6 patients. Our study focused on an SCA6 knock-in mouse model with a hyper-expanded (84X) CAG repeat expansion that displays midlife-onset motor deficits at ∼7 months old, reminiscent of midlife-onset symptoms in SCA6 patients, although a deta...

  6. Germ-line CAG repeat instability causes extreme CAG repeat expansion with infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Ek, Jakob; Duno, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of diseases, characterized by dominant inheritance, progressive cerebellar ataxia and diverse extracerebellar symptoms. A subgroup of the ataxias is caused by unstable CAG-repeat expansions in their respective...

  7. Health-related quality of life in sporadic adult-onset ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abele, Michael; Klockgether, Thomas

    2007-02-15

    Despite progressive disability in sporadic adult-onset ataxia (SAOA), little is known about patients' assessment of their ataxic disorder and its impact on health-related quality of life (Hr-QoL). This study investigated Hr-QoL by means of the following self-administered scales: Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Medical Outcome Study Short Form (SF-36). Twenty-two unselected ataxia patients were included. Sleep-related complaints were found in 9 (41%) of 22 and symptoms of depression in 6 (38%) of 16 patients. Compared to a large german control group, SAOA patients had lower scores in all SF-36 dimensions except for bodily pain. The greatest impairment was found in the domain physical functioning, followed by the domains social functioning and role limitations (emotional problems). There was a significant negative correlation of all nonmotor SF-36 dimensions with the BDI score. Walking aid dependency was significantly correlated with poorer health status perception in several motor and nonmotor domains. In addition, impaired sleep quality was correlated with an impaired general health perception and with bodily pain. The study demonstrates a great impact of SAOA on Hr-QoL. Adequate treatment of depression, motor disability, and impaired sleep quality is essential to improve Hr-QoL in ataxic patients. PMID:17149704

  8. Novel Missense Mitochondrial ND4L Gene Mutations in Friedreich's Ataxia

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    Mohammad Mehdi Heidari

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective(sThe mitochondrial defects in Friedreich's ataxia have been reported in many researches. Mitochondrial DNA is one of the candidates for defects in mitochondrion, and complex I is the first and one of the largest catalytic complexes of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS system. Materials and MethodsWe searched the mitochondrial ND4L gene for mutations by TTGE and sequencing on 30 FRDA patients and 35 healthy controls.ResultsWe found 3 missense mutations [m.10506A>G (T13A, m.10530G>A (V21M, and m.10653G>A (A62T] in four patients whose m.10530G>A and m.10653G>A were not reported previously. In two patients, heteroplasmic m.10530G>A mutation was detected. They showed a very early ataxia syndrome. Our results showed that the number of mutations in FRDA patients was higher than that in the control cases (P= 0.0287.ConclusionAlthough this disease is due to nuclear gene mutation, the presence of these mutations might be responsible for further mitochondrial defects and the increase of the gravity of the disease. Thus, it should be considered in patients with this disorder.

  9. Impact of comorbid anxiety and depression on quality of life and cellular immunity changes in patients with digestive tract cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu-Ling Zhou; Wang-Gang Zhang; Yong-Chang Wei; Kang-Ling Xu; Ling-Yun Hui; Xu-Sheng Wang; Ming-Zhong Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: A study was performed to investigate the impact of comorbid anxiety and depression (CAD) on quality of life (QOL) and cellular immunity changes in patients with digestive tract cancers.METHODS: One hundred and fifty-six cases of both sexes with cancers of the digestive tract admitted between March 2001 and February 2004 in the Department of Medical Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University were randomly enrolled in the study. Depressive and anxiety disorder diagnoses were assessed by using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-Ⅳ. All adult patients were evaluated with the Hamilton depressive scale (HAMD, the 24-item version), the Hamilton anxiety scale (HAMA, a modified 14-item version), quality of life questionnaire-core 30 (QLQ-C30), social support rating scale (SSRS), simple coping style questionnaire (SCSQ), and other questionnaires, respectively. In terms of HAMD ≥ 20 and HAMA ≥ 14, the patients were categorized, including CAD (n = 31) in group A, anxiety disorder (n = 23) in group B,depressive disorder (n = 37) in group C, and non-disorder (n = 65) in group D. Immunological parameters such as T-lymphocyte subsets and natural killer (NK) cell activities in peripheral blood were determined and compared among the four groups.RESULTS: The incidence of CAD was 21.15% in patients with digestive tract cancers. The average scores of social support was 43.67±7.05 for 156 cases, active coping 20.34±7.33, and passive coping 9.55±5.51. Compared with group D, subjective support was enhanced slightly in group A, but social support, objective support, and utilization of support reduced, especially utilization of support with significance (6.16 vs 7.80, P<0.05); total scores of active coping decreased, while passive coping reversed; granulocytes proliferated, monocytes declined,and lymphocytes declined significantly (32.87 vs 34.00,P<0.05); moreover, the percentage of CD3, CD4, CD8and CD56 in T lymphocyte subsets was in lower

  10. Ataxias cerebelares hereditárias: do martelo ao gen Hereditary cerebellar ataxias from neurological hammer to genetics

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    Walter Oleschko Arruda

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available As heredoataxias constituem grupo complexo de doenças neurodegenerativas hereditárias, para o qual várias formas de classificação clínica e patológica foram propostas com sucesso variável. O desenvolvimento das técnicas de biologia molecular trouxe informações importantes que têm permitido caracterizar geneticamente as ataxias cerebelares hereditárias. O reconhecimento das doenças causadas por expansões de trinucleotídeos abre novo capítulo para a pesquisa sobre outros mecanismos de doenças, como na ataxia de Friedreich e nas várias formas de ataxia cerebelar autossômica dominante(SCAl a SCA7, das quais a doença de Machado-Joseph / SCA3 parece ser a mais comum no nosso meio. A deficiência familial de vitamina E (cromossomo 8q leva a quadro semelhante ao da ataxia de Friedreich (cromossomo 9p, mas responde à reposição oral de tocoferol. Formas familiais de ataxia periódica com (cromossomo 12p ou sem (cromossomo 19p mioquimia foram caracterizadas, a primeira resultado de mutações dos gens de canais de potássio. Os portadores do gen da ataxia-teleangiectasia (cromossomo 1 lq representam 1-3% da população e são suscetíveis aos efeitos oncogênicos da radiação iônica. Sem olvidar da importância da avaliação clínica neurológica, a avaliação genética laboratorial passa a ser valiosa ferramenta para o diagnóstico e aconselhamento genético, além do melhor entendimento da patogênese dessas doenças.The hereditary ataxias comprise a complex group of neurological disorders involving the cerebellum and its connections. Several classifications based on clinical and/or pathological data have been only partially successful. Recent progress in molecular genetics has identified the genic loci of hereditary ataxias and has allowed a more precise diagnosis of distinct genetic diseases. Trinucleotide repeat expansions has been recognized as a mechanism of disease in some autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (ADCA

  11. Ataxia crónica en pediatría

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Erazo Torricelli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Las ataxias crónicas constituyen un grupo heterogéneo de enfermedades, que afectan al niño a diferentes edades. Así las formas congénitas, generalmente no progresivas, se observan desde los primeros meses de vida y se expresan por hipotonía y retraso motor, mucho antes de que la ataxia se haga evidente. La resonancia magnética cerebral puede ser diagnóstica en algunos cuadros, como ocurre con el síndrome de Joubert. El grupo de ataxias hereditarias progresivas, en constante expansión, suelen comenzar después del período del lactante. Los signos clínicos destacables son la apraxia ocular y la inestabilidad de la marcha que pueden asociarse a telangiectasias oculocutáneas (ataxia-telangiectasia o a neuropatía sensitiva (ataxia de Friedreich. En esta revisión se describen en forma sucinta las ataxias congénitas y en forma más detallada las causas principales de ataxias hereditarias progresivas autosómicas recesivas, autosómicas dominantes y mitocondriales. Se destaca la importancia del estudio genético, que es la clave para lograr el diagnóstico en la mayoría de estas enfermedades. Aunque aún no hay tratamiento para la mayoría de las ataxias hereditarias progresivas, algunas sí lo tienen, como la enfermedad de Refsum, déficit de vitamina E, déficit de Coenzima Q10, por lo cual el diagnóstico en estos casos es aún más relevante. En la actualidad, el diagnóstico de los cuadros de ataxia hereditaria del niño aún no tratable es fundamental para lograr un manejo adecuado, determinar un pronóstico preciso y dar a la familia un consejo genético oportuno.

  12. Ataxia espinocerebelosa 7: Investigación clínica y genética en una familia argentina Spinocerebellar ataxia 7: Clinical and genetic investigation in an Argentine family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan I. Rojas

    2007-04-01

    was confirmed by a genetic analysis of the index case in whom the characteristic genetic abnormality of SCA7 was discovered. To our knowledge, this is the first case of SCA7 confirmed by genetic study in Argentina. Only two other reports on family cases were found in a review of the literature of Latin America up to January 2006. The purpose of our report is to draw attention to the diagnosis of this degenerative disease in patients with progressive cerebellar ataxia associated with loss of visual acuity symptoms, where a positive family history is found.

  13. A limit cycle oscillator model for cycling mood variations of bipolar disorder patients derived from cellular biochemical reaction equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, T. D.

    2013-08-01

    We derive a nonlinear limit cycle model for oscillatory mood variations as observed in patients with cycling bipolar disorder. To this end, we consider two signaling pathways leading to the activation of two enzymes that play a key role for cellular and neural processes. We model pathway cross-talk in terms of an inhibitory impact of the first pathway on the second and an excitatory impact of the second on the first. The model also involves a negative feedback loop (inhibitory self-regulation) for the first pathway and a positive feedback loop (excitatory self-regulation) for the second pathway. We demonstrate that due to the cross-talk the biochemical dynamics is described by an oscillator equation. Under disease-free conditions the oscillatory system exhibits a stable fixed point. The breakdown of the self-inhibition of the first pathway at higher concentration levels is studied by means of a scalar control parameter ξ, where ξ equal to zero refers to intact self-inhibition at all concentration levels. Under certain conditions, stable limit cycle solutions emerge at critical parameter values of ξ larger than zero. These oscillations mimic pathological cycling mood variations that emerge due to a disease-induced bifurcation. Consequently, our modeling analysis supports the notion of bipolar disorder as a dynamical disease. In addition, our study establishes a connection between mechanistic biochemical modeling of bipolar disorder and phenomenological nonlinear oscillator approaches to bipolar disorder suggested in the literature.

  14. Motor Training in Degenerative Spinocerebellar Disease: Ataxia-Specific Improvements by Intensive Physiotherapy and Exergames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is essentially involved in movement control and plays a critical role in motor learning. It has remained controversial whether patients with degenerative cerebellar disease benefit from high-intensity coordinative training. Moreover, it remains unclear by which training methods and mechanisms these patients might improve their motor performance. Here, we review evidence from different high-intensity training studies in patients with degenerative spinocerebellar disease. These studies demonstrate that high-intensity coordinative training might lead to a significant benefit in patients with degenerative ataxia. This training might be based either on physiotherapy or on whole-body controlled videogames (“exergames”). The benefit shown in these studies is equal to regaining one or more years of natural disease progression. In addition, first case studies indicate that even subjects with advanced neurodegeneration might benefit from such training programs. For both types of training, the observed clinical improvements are paralleled by recoveries in ataxia-specific dysfunctions (e.g., multijoint coordination and dynamic stability). Importantly, for both types of training, the retention of the effects seems to depend on the frequency and continuity of training. Based on these studies, we here present preliminary recommendations for clinical practice, and articulate open questions that might guide future studies on neurorehabilitation in degenerative spinocerebellar disease. PMID:24877117

  15. Motor Training in Degenerative Spinocerebellar Disease: Ataxia-Specific Improvements by Intensive Physiotherapy and Exergames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthis Synofzik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum is essentially involved in movement control and plays a critical role in motor learning. It has remained controversial whether patients with degenerative cerebellar disease benefit from high-intensity coordinative training. Moreover, it remains unclear by which training methods and mechanisms these patients might improve their motor performance. Here, we review evidence from different high-intensity training studies in patients with degenerative spinocerebellar disease. These studies demonstrate that high-intensity coordinative training might lead to a significant benefit in patients with degenerative ataxia. This training might be based either on physiotherapy or on whole-body controlled videogames (“exergames”. The benefit shown in these studies is equal to regaining one or more years of natural disease progression. In addition, first case studies indicate that even subjects with advanced neurodegeneration might benefit from such training programs. For both types of training, the observed clinical improvements are paralleled by recoveries in ataxia-specific dysfunctions (e.g., multijoint coordination and dynamic stability. Importantly, for both types of training, the retention of the effects seems to depend on the frequency and continuity of training. Based on these studies, we here present preliminary recommendations for clinical practice, and articulate open questions that might guide future studies on neurorehabilitation in degenerative spinocerebellar disease.

  16. Motor training in degenerative spinocerebellar disease: ataxia-specific improvements by intensive physiotherapy and exergames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synofzik, Matthis; Ilg, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is essentially involved in movement control and plays a critical role in motor learning. It has remained controversial whether patients with degenerative cerebellar disease benefit from high-intensity coordinative training. Moreover, it remains unclear by which training methods and mechanisms these patients might improve their motor performance. Here, we review evidence from different high-intensity training studies in patients with degenerative spinocerebellar disease. These studies demonstrate that high-intensity coordinative training might lead to a significant benefit in patients with degenerative ataxia. This training might be based either on physiotherapy or on whole-body controlled videogames ("exergames"). The benefit shown in these studies is equal to regaining one or more years of natural disease progression. In addition, first case studies indicate that even subjects with advanced neurodegeneration might benefit from such training programs. For both types of training, the observed clinical improvements are paralleled by recoveries in ataxia-specific dysfunctions (e.g., multijoint coordination and dynamic stability). Importantly, for both types of training, the retention of the effects seems to depend on the frequency and continuity of training. Based on these studies, we here present preliminary recommendations for clinical practice, and articulate open questions that might guide future studies on neurorehabilitation in degenerative spinocerebellar disease. PMID:24877117

  17. A high frequency of distinct ATM gene mutations in ataxia-telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, J.; Teraoka, S.; Concannon, P. [Univ. of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    The clinical features of the autosomal recessive disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) include a progressive cerebellar ataxia, hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation, and an increased susceptibility to malignancies. Epidemiological studies have suggested that AT heterozygotes may also be at increased risk for malignancy, possibly as a consequence of radiation exposure. A gene mutated in AT patients (ATM) has recently been isolated, making mutation screening in both patients and the general population possible. Because of the relatively large size of the ATM gene, the design of screening programs will depend on the types and distribution of mutations in the general population. In this report, we describe 30 mutations identified in a panel of unrelated AT patients and controls. Twenty-five of the 30 were distinct, and most patients were compound heterozygotes. The most frequently detected mutation was found in three different families and had previously been reported in five others. This corresponds to a frequency of 8% of all reported ATM mutations. Twenty-two of the alterations observed would be predicted to lead to protein truncation at sites scattered throughout the molecule. Two fibroblast cell lines, which displayed normal responses to ionizing radiation, also proved to be heterozygous for truncation mutations of ATM. These observations suggest that the carrier frequency of ATM mutations may be sufficiently high to make population screening practical. However, such screening may need to be done prospectively, that is, by searching for new mutations rather than by screening for just those already identified in AT families. 33 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Particular Characterisation of an In-Vitro-DTH Test to Monitor Cellular Immunity - Applications for Patient Care and Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feurecker, M.; Mayer, W.; Gruber, M.; Muckenthaler, F.; Draenert, R.; Bogner, J.; Kaufmann, I.; Crucian, B.; Rykova, M.; Morukov, B.; Sams, C.; Chouker, A.

    2010-01-01

    Goal:i) Characterization of the role of the main immune reactive cell types contributing to the cellular immune response in the in-vitro DTH and ii) Validation of the in-vitro DTH under different clinical and field conditions. Methods:As positive control whole blood was incubated in the in-vitro DTH, supernatants were gathered after 12, 24 and 48h. Readout parameters of this test are cytokines in the assay's supernatant. To determine the role of T-cells, monocytes and natural killer (NK), these cell populations were depleted using magnetic beads prior to in-vitro-DTH incubation. Validation of the test has occurred under clinical (HIV-patients, ICU) and field-conditions (parabolic/space-flights, confinement). Results:T-cell depletion abandoned almost any IL-2 production and reduced IFN-gamma production irrespective of the type of antigen, whereas CD56 depleted cultures tended to lower IL-2 secretion and IFN-gamma and to parallel a IL-10-increase after viral challenge. This IL-10-increase was seen also in CD14-depleted setups. DTH read-out was significantly different under acute stress (parabolic flight) or chronic stress (ISS), respectively. Preliminary data of HIV infected patients demonstrate that this test can display the contemporary immune status during an antiviral therapy. Conclusion:The in-vitro DTH mirrors adaptive and innate immune activation and may serve as tool also for longitudinal follow up of Th1/Th2 weighed immune response under adverse life conditions on earth and in space. It is planned to implement the assay in the on the ISS (MoCISS).

  19. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 Protein Aggregates Cause Deficits in Motor Learning and Cerebellar Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Mark, Melanie D.; Krause, Martin; Boele, Henk-Jan; Kruse, Wolfgang; Pollok, Stefan; Kuner, Thomas; Dalkara, Deniz; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Herlitze, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is linked to poly-glutamine (polyQ) within the C terminus (CT) of the pore-forming subunits of P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels (Cav2.1) and is characterized by CT protein aggregates found in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). One hypothesis regarding SCA6 disease is that a CT fragment of the Cav2.1 channel, which is detected specifically in cytosolic and nuclear fractions in SCA6 patients, is associated with the SCA6 pathogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we expres...

  20. Brain Metabolic Changes of Cervical Dystonia with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1 after Botulinum Toxin Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Akio; Takeda, Atsushi; Sugeno, Naoto; Miura, Emiko; Kato, Kazuhiro; Hasegawa, Takafumi; Baba, Toru; Konno, Masatoshi; Oshima, Ryuji; Watanuki, Shoichi; Hiraoka, Kotaro; Tashiro, Manabu; Aoki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We occasionally observe long-term remission of cervical dystonia after several botulinum toxin treatments. However, botulinum toxin transiently acts on neuromuscular junctions. We herein report that a cervical dystonia patient with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 could have long-term remission as a result of the depression of hypermetabolism in the bilateral putamen and primary sensorimotor cortex after botulinum toxin therapy. We suggest that botulinum toxin impacts the central nervous system, causing prolonged improvement through the normalization of basal ganglia circuits in addition to its effects at neuromuscular junctions. PMID:27432104

  1. Episodic ataxia type 2 manifests as epileptiform electroencephalographic activity with no epileptic attacks in two family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaido, Misako; Furuta, Mitsuru; Nakamori, Masayuki; Yuasa, Yoshihito; Takahashi, Masanori P

    2016-04-28

    Here, we report two cases of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) in a 63-year-old woman and her 36-year-old daughter. The mother experienced recurrent attacks of cerebellar dysfunction lasting 4 to 5 hours since the age of 41 years. On several occasions, she was admitted to the emergency room, where she was diagnosed with epilepsy or stroke. Based on these diagnoses, she was treated with antiepileptic or anticoagulant drugs, but both treatments were eventually discontinued. The frequency of the attacks increased after the patient reached the age of 62. Interictal neurological examination demonstrated signs of slight cerebellar ataxia, i.e. saccadic eye movements, gaze-directed nystagmus, and mild truncal ataxia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed cerebellar vermis atrophy. Electroencephalography (EEG) revealed various spike and wave patterns: solitary spikes, spike-and-slow wave complexes, and slow wave bursts. Photoparoxysmal response (PPR) type 3 was also observed. Treatment with acetazolamide abolished the patient's attacks almost completely. The daughter started experiencing 5- to 10-minute ataxic episodes at the age of 16 years. Based on her epileptiform EEG activities with PPR (type 2), antiepileptic drugs (valproate and zonisamide) were prescribed. Despite pharmacological treatment, the attacks recurred; however, their frequency gradually decreased with time, until they almost entirely disappeared when the patient was 33. Unfortunately, migraine-like headaches arose instead. Subtle truncal ataxia was observed during interictal periods. Sanger sequencing of the exons of the CACNA1A gene revealed a novel single base deletion (c.3575delA) in both patients. Despite the difference in age of onset and clinical course, both patients showed clearly epileptiform EEG activities without experiencing the concurrent epileptic episodes. Thus, EA2 is a disease that may be misdiagnosed as epilepsy or stroke in the field of emergency medicine. PMID:27025991

  2. Is Friedreich ataxia an epigenetic disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari Daman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Friedreich ataxia (FRDA is a debilitating and frequently fatal neurological disorder that is recessively inherited. It belongs to the group of genetic disorders known as the Repeat Expansion Diseases, in which pathology arises from the deleterious consequences of the inheritance of a tandem repeat array whose repeat number exceeds a critical threshold. In the case of FRDA, the repeat unit is the triplet GAA•TTC and the tandem array is located in the first intron of the frataxin (FXN gene. Pathology arises because expanded alleles make lower than normal levels of mature FXN mRNA and thus reduced levels of frataxin, the FXN gene product. The repeats form a variety of unusual DNA structures that have the potential to affect gene expression in a number of ways. For example, triplex formation in vitro and in bacteria leads to the formation of persistent RNA:DNA hybrids that block transcription. In addition, these repeats have been shown to affect splicing in model systems. More recently, it has been shown that the region flanking the repeats in the FXN gene is enriched for epigenetic marks characteristic of transcriptionally repressed regions of the genome. However, exactly how repeats in an intron cause the FXN mRNA deficit in FRDA has been the subject of much debate. Identifying the mechanism or mechanisms responsible for the FXN mRNA deficit in FRDA is important for the development of treatments for this currently incurable disorder. This review discusses evidence for and against different models for the repeat-mediated mRNA deficit.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ARSACS autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay Enable Javascript to view the ... Open All Close All Description Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay , more commonly known as ARSACS , ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions FXTAS fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... All Close All Description Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome ( FXTAS ) is characterized by problems with movement ...

  5. New insights into the pathoanatomy of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (Machado-Joseph disease)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueb, Udo; Brunt, Ewout R.; Deller, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review This review summarizes recent neuropathological findings in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 and discusses their relevance for clinical neurology. Recent findings The extent of the spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 related central nervous neurodegenerative changes has been recently system

  6. Frataxin and the molecular mechanism of mitochondrial iron-loading in Friedreich's ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Shannon; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Sahni, Sumit; Lane, Darius J R; Merlot, Angelica M; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Huang, Michael L-H; Richardson, Des R

    2016-06-01

    The mitochondrion is a major site for the metabolism of the transition metal, iron, which is necessary for metabolic processes critical for cell vitality. The enigmatic mitochondrial protein, frataxin, is known to play a significant role in both cellular and mitochondrial iron metabolism due to its iron-binding properties and its involvement in iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) and heme synthesis. The inherited neuro- and cardio-degenerative disease, Friedreich's ataxia (FA), is caused by the deficient expression of frataxin that leads to deleterious alterations in iron metabolism. These changes lead to the accumulation of inorganic iron aggregates in the mitochondrial matrix that are presumed to play a key role in the oxidative damage and subsequent degenerative features of this disease. Furthermore, the concurrent dys-regulation of cellular antioxidant defense, which coincides with frataxin deficiency, exacerbates oxidative stress. Hence, the pathogenesis of FA underscores the importance of the integrated homeostasis of cellular iron metabolism and the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox environments. This review focuses on describing the pathogenesis of the disease, the molecular mechanisms involved in mitochondrial iron-loading and the dys-regulation of cellular antioxidant defense due to frataxin deficiency. In turn, current and emerging therapeutic strategies are also discussed. PMID:27129098

  7. Mutation analysis of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) in a large Iakut kinship of Eastern Siberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldfarb, L.G.; Lunkes, A.; Vaconcelos, O. [and others

    1994-09-01

    We have studied 131 patients with autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia clinically and pathologically expressed as olivopontocerebellar atrophy. The disease in this Siberian kinship has been genetically linked to the SCA1 gene on chromosome 6p, and the pedigree was screened for the recently described CAG repeat expansion in this gene using the GeneScan program (ABI). The normal allele in the affected individuals had 26 to 32 repeats, and among 424 analyzed normal alleles of the unaffected members of the kinship, unrelated controls and patients with other neurological disorders, the range of repeat numbers was 26 to 37, with 92% within 28 to 30 repeats. All 65 normal alleles in which the repeat area has been sequenced show a CAT or CATCAGCAT interruption between the first and the second stretches of 10 to 17 CAG repeats. The SCA1 allele was extended to 39 to 60 uninterrupted repeats in all fifty-nine analyzed ataxia patients. Repeat numbers of 40 to 55 were also found in thirty-nine of 105 tested unaffected first and second degree relatives. Two patients and an unaffected child were homozygous for the elongated allele. In seven of 10 paternal transmissions an increase of 2 to 11 repeats have occurred; in nine maternal transmissions the repeat numbers remained the same or grew for just one repeat. Mutation analysis provides new opportunities in diagnosis and risk assessment of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1.

  8. A haplotype common to intermediate radiosensitivity variants of ataxia-telangiectasia in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a study of ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) in the UK, patients in10 out of 60 families were shown to have a much lower level of chromosomal radiosensitivity compared with the majority of patients. In some patients the level of radiosensitivity was hardly distinguishable from normal. Patients in this group, however, could be distinguished clinically from the majority either by the later onset of severe cerebellar features or the slower rate of progress of the disorder. By using highly polymorphic microsatellite repeat markers a chromosome 11q22-23 haplotype common to the majority of these patients, and not occurring in any non-A-T chromosome in 60 families, was identified on one chromosome. The haplotype probably defines the region of the A-T gene in these families and the mutation associated with this haplotype may be much less severe than the second mutation thereby producing the slightly milder phenotype. (author)

  9. A haplotype common to intermediate radiosensitivity variants of ataxia-telangiectasia in the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, A.M.R.; McConville, C.M.; Byrd, P.J. [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom). Medical School; Rotman, G.; Shiloh, Y. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Sackler School of Medicine

    1994-12-01

    In a study of ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) in the UK, patients in10 out of 60 families were shown to have a much lower level of chromosomal radiosensitivity compared with the majority of patients. In some patients the level of radiosensitivity was hardly distinguishable from normal. Patients in this group, however, could be distinguished clinically from the majority either by the later onset of severe cerebellar features or the slower rate of progress of the disorder. By using highly polymorphic microsatellite repeat markers a chromosome 11q22-23 haplotype common to the majority of these patients, and not occurring in any non-A-T chromosome in 60 families, was identified on one chromosome. The haplotype probably defines the region of the A-T gene in these families and the mutation associated with this haplotype may be much less severe than the second mutation thereby producing the slightly milder phenotype. (author).

  10. Clinical and genetic study of spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 in East Asian population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yan; YU Long; ZHENG Hui-min; GUAN Yang-tai

    2010-01-01

    Background Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) is known as an autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia; patients with genetically confirmed diagnoses of SCA7 have increased rapidly in recent years.However, SCA7 is a rare subtype of SCA, and most data available about SCA7 are those of white people.The aim of the present study was to systematically review the prevalence and clinical and genetic aspects of SCA7 patients in East Asian population.Methods A search for publications on SCA7 was performed by using the "PubMed" database with the published language limited in English.Publications mainly focusing on the prevalence of SCA7 in patients with SCA and the clinical and genetic features of SCA7 patients were fully reviewed and analyzed.Results The prevalence of SCA7 in SCA patients ranged from 0 to 7.7%, which was similar to those reported previously.The clinical manifestations were typically present at the 30's of its victims (median, 29 years; interquartile range (IQR),19.5-36.5 years), and the symptoms appeared 15 years ((15.17±4.22) years) earlier on average in the offspring than in the parents.Gait ataxia and visual impairment were both found in all patients of whom the clinical features were described.Mutant SCA7 alleles contained 40-100 CAG repeats, with a median of 47 repeats (IQR, 44.5-50.0); and the offspring had 13 more repeats on average compared with their parents (12.62±19.03).A strong negative correlation was found between CAG repeat size and the onset age of patients (r=-0.739, P=0.000).In addition, no significant difference was found in CAG repeat sizes between patients with visual impairment as the initial symptom and those with gait disturbance as their initial symptom (P=0.476).Conclusions The prevalence of SCA7 in SCA patients, the age at onset and CAG repeats of SCA7 patients in East Asia are consistent with those of white people.However, larger population study is needed to assess the correlation between the CAG repeat size and initial symptoms

  11. Cellular Cardiomyoplasty: Clinical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Chachques, J. (J.); Acar, C; J. Herreros; Trainini, J. (Jorge); Prosper, F.; D’Attellis, N. (N.); Fabiani, J. N.; Carpentier, A

    2004-01-01

    Myocardial regeneration can be induced with the implantation of a variety of myogenic and angiogenic cell types. More than 150 patients have been treated with cellular cardiomyoplasty worldwide, 18 patients have been treated by our group. Cellular cardiomyoplasty seems to reduce the size and fibrosis of infarct scars, limit postischemic remodelling, and restore regional myocardial contractility. Techniques for skeletal myoblasts culture and ex vivo expansion using auto...

  12. Large Genomic Deletions in CACNA1A Cause Episodic Ataxia Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jijun eWan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Episodic ataxia (EA syndromes are heritable diseases characterized by dramatic episodes of imbalance and incoordination. Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2, the most common and the best characterized subtype, is caused by mostly nonsense, splice site, small indel and sometimes missense mutations in CACNA1A. Direct sequencing of CACNA1A fails to identify mutations in some patients with EA2-like features, possibly due to incomplete interrogation of CACNA1A or defects in other EA genes not yet defined. Previous reports described genomic deletions between 4-40kb in EA2. In 47 subjects with EA (26 with EA2-like features who tested negative for mutations in the known EA genes, we used Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA to analyze CACNA1A for exonic copy number variations. Breakpoints were further defined by long-range PCR. We identified distinct multi-exonic deletions in three probands with classic EA2-like features: episodes of prolonged vertigo and ataxia triggered by stress and fatigue, interictal nystagmus, with onset during infancy or early childhood. The breakpoints in all three probands are located in Alu sequences, indicating errors in homologous recombination of Alu sequences as the underlying mechanism. The smallest deletion spanned exons 39 and 40, while the largest deletion spanned 200kb, missing all but the first three exons. One deletion involving exons 39 through 47 arose spontaneously. The search for mutations in CACNA1A appears most fruitful in EA patients with interictal nystagmus and onset early in life. The finding of large heterozygous deletions suggests haploinsufficiency as a possible pathomechanism of EA2.

  13. Early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes : foot deformity in a first grade family member

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelhaas, HJ; Van der Hulst, M; Ippel, E; Prevo, RL; Hageman, G

    1999-01-01

    Early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (EOCA) is a clinical syndrome characterised by progressive cerebellar ataxia with an onset before the age of 25 years and a wide spectrum of associated features. It is distinguished from Friedreich's ataxia (FA) mainly by the preservation o

  14. Identification and characterization of novel PDYN mutations in dominant cerebellar ataxia cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jezierska, Justyna; Stevanin, Giovanni; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Fokkens, Michiel R.; Zagnoli, Fabien; Kok, Jerome; Goas, Jean-Yves; Bertrand, Pierre; Robin, Christophe; Brice, Alexis; Bakalkin, Georgy; Durr, Alexandra; Verbeek, Dineke S.

    2013-01-01

    We have recently identified missense mutations in prodynorphin (PDYN), the precursor to dynorphin opioid peptides, as the cause for spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA23) in Dutch ataxia cases. We report a screen of PDYN for mutations in 371 cerebellar ataxia cases, which had a positive family history; most

  15. Hereditary cerebellar ataxia progressively impairs force adaptation during goal-directed arm movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschke, Matthias; Gomez, Christopher M; Ebner, Timothy J; Konczak, Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    We investigated how humans with hereditary cerebellar degeneration [spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) type 6 and 8, n = 9] and age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n = 9) adapted goal-directed arm movements to an unknown external force field. We tested whether learning could be generalized to untrained regions in the workspace, an aspect central to the idea of an internal model, and if any learning could be retained. After removal of the force field, SCA patients showed little or no learning-related aftereffects indicating that repeated force-field exposure never led to successful force compensation. In contrast, healthy control subjects quickly adapted their movements to the new force field. The difference in force adaptation was significant for movements to targets that required both the shoulder and elbow joint (P < 0.001). Moreover, the generalization of learned movements to targets outside the learned workspace was prevented by the cerebellar degeneration (P < 0.01). Retention of force adaptation was significantly lower in SCA patients (P = 0.003). The severity of ataxia in SCA patients correlated negatively with the extent of learning (r = -0.84, P = 0.004). Our findings imply that progressive loss of cerebellar function gradually impairs force adaptation. The failure to generalize learning suggests that cerebellar degeneration prevents the formation of an internal representation of the limb dynamics. PMID:13679403

  16. Double Disassociation of Anosognosia for Alexia and Simultanagnosia but Quantitative Awareness of Optic Ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Reed C; Patira, Riddhi; Altschuler, Eric L

    2016-03-01

    A 66-yr-old man with a history of atrial fibrillation and a pacemaker developed sudden onset confusion, disorientation, and visual disturbance without motor weakness. Clinically, significant deficits were found in reading (alexia) and simultaneous multiobject perception (simultanagnosia), both of which the patient denied limitation in, and in vision-right hemianopsia-which he readily acknowledged. Visual acuity in the left visual field was normal. The patient also demonstrated a symptom of optic ataxia-a lack of coordination between visual inputs and hand movements-a deficit he also acknowledged. Work-up with computed topography revealed a left posterior cerebral artery infarct affecting the occipital lobe and extending to involve the parietal lobe and the splenium of the corpus callosum. The authors describe and discuss this fascinating case-the first case to their knowledge of a double disassociation of anosognosia for alexia and simultanagnosia but full, indeed quantitative, awareness of hemianopsia and optic ataxia. This case may be informative on the mechanism of anosognosia in general and supports intentional feed-forward and exemplar reafference models. With regard to the rehabilitation process, appreciation that a patient has anosognosia for various deficits is crucial in recovery and health maintenance. PMID:26368835

  17. Enfermedad cardiovascular en pacientes cubanos afectados por Ataxia de Friedreich.

    OpenAIRE

    Tania Cruz Mariño; Ana Luz Portelles Caminero; William Áreas Zalazar; Luís Velázquez Pérez

    2010-01-01

    Al describir la ataxia de Friedreich, Nicholaus hizo referencia a la patología cardiaca. Esta enfermedad autosómica recesiva se debe a una mutación dinámica en el gen FRDA, codificándose deficientemente la proteína Frataxina, conduciendo a estrés oxidativo y muerte celular cardiaca. La presente investigación se desarrolló con el objetivo de describir las anomalías cardiovasculares presentes en los pacientes cubanos afectados por ataxia de Friedreich. A los individuos con diagnóstico molecular...

  18. Episodic ataxia : a case report and review of literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singhvi J

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the clinical features of a 29 year female presenting with a 3 years history of episodes of cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria and nystagmus lasting 3-5 days, recurring almost every month. Sleep disturbance and buzzing in ears were noted 3-4 days before each episode. No other precipitant factor was present. Family history was negative. She was diagnosed as a case of episodic ataxia type-2 and was successfully treated with acetazolamide, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. She was asymptomatic at 2 year followup.

  19. Cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Codd, E F

    1968-01-01

    Cellular Automata presents the fundamental principles of homogeneous cellular systems. This book discusses the possibility of biochemical computers with self-reproducing capability.Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of some theorems dealing with conditions under which universal computation and construction can be exhibited in cellular spaces. This text then presents a design for a machine embedded in a cellular space or a machine that can compute all computable functions and construct a replica of itself in any accessible and sufficiently large region of t

  20. Genetic linkage studies in autosomal dominant ataxia families with an MJD phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, I.; Lopes-Cendes, I.; Paciel, P. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is an autosomal dominant spinocerebellar degeneration which was originally described in patients originating from the Portuguese islands of the Azores. The first non-Portuguese kindred was described in 1979 and was an American black family originating from North Carolina. Since then the number of pedigrees of non-Azorean, non-Portuguese origin has increased with families being reported from other European countries, as well as Brazil, Japan, India, The United States and Australia. The autosomal dominant ataxias are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. To date, genetic analysis of families with autosomal dominant ataxias has permitted the identification of four loci, the SCA1 (spinocerebellar ataxia type 1) locus on chromosome 6p, the SCA2 locus on chromosome 12q, a third locus on chromosome 14q, the MJD/SCA3 and, more recently, the DRPLA (Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy) locus on chromosome 12p. We ascertained a total of 181 individuals with 60 affected from eight Indian, two Brazilian and one Sicilian-American family; all of them have received the clinical diagnosis of MJD. Recently, we have begun molecular genetic studies in these families in order to test these four candidate regions. The SCA1 mutation and the DRPLA mutation has been found to be an expansion of a CAG repeat. Direct analysis of the SCA1 and DRPLA expansion has been performed in all families and no expansion was found in the affected individuals. We are now running flanking markers for the SCA2 and MJD/SCA3 loci. These results will also be presented.

  1. Clinical Characteristics, Radiological Features and Gene Mutation in 10 Chinese Families with Spinocerebellar Ataxias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Wen Chen; Li Zhao; Feng Zhang; Lan Li; Yu-Hang Gu; Jing-Yuan Zhou; Hui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a group ofneurodegenerative disorders that primarily cause the degeneration in the cerebellum,spinal cord,and brainstem.We study the clinical characteristics,radiological features and gene mutation in Chinese families with SCAs.Methods:In this study,we investigated 10 SCAs Chinese families with SCA1,SCA3/Machado-Joseph disease (MJD),SCA7,SCAB.There were 27 people who were genetically diagnosed as SCA,of which 21 people showed clinical symptoms,and 6 people had no clinical phenotype that we called them presymptomatic patients.In addition,3 people with cerebellar ataxia and cataracts were diagnosed according to the Harding diagnostic criteria but failed to be recognized as SCAs on genetic testing.Clinical characteristic analyses of each type of SCAs and radiological examinations were performed.Results:We found that SCA3/MJD was the most common subtype in Han population in China,and the ratio of the pontine tegmentum and the posterior fossa area was negatively correlated with the number of cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) repeats;the disease duration was positively correlated with the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale score;and the CAG repeats number of abnormal alleles was negatively correlated with the age of onset.Conclusions:Collectively our study is a systematic research on SCAs in China,which may help for the clinical diagnosis and prenatal screening of this disease,and it may also aid toward better understanding of this disease.

  2. Clinical and genetic study of a Chinese family with spinocerebellar ataxia type 7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Yan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia 7 (SCA7 is a rare disease, and only few SCA7 families have been reported, especially from East Asia. Clinical features of a genetically confirmed SCA7 Chinese family were evaluated. The onset of the disease varied from 4 years to 48 years, and the initial presenting feature was cerebellar ataxia or visual impairment, or both. There were abnormal findings on fundus photography, electroretinogram, flash visual evoked potential and oscillatory potentials. Abnormal mitochondria were also found in skeletal muscle or liver biopsies. The number of cytosine adenine guanine (CAG repeats ranged from 50 to 97, and the length of CAG repeat was inversely correlated with the age of onset (r=-0.867, P=0.025. Conclusion: The clinical manifestations and SCA7 gene of SCA7 patients were homogeneous in this study. Larger CAG repeats had not only resulted in earlier onset, but also related to the rapid progression and severity of the disease. Abnormal mitochondria may be a common finding in biopsy studies of various organs in SCA7 patients.

  3. A practical approach to late-onset cerebellar ataxia: putting the disorder with lack of order into order.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, J. van; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2012-01-01

    The clinical management of cerebellar ataxia is challenging, mainly because ataxia is a symptom of many neurological diseases. Many types of ataxia disorders are genetic and some are extremely rare. Here, the authors suggest a diagnostic approach to ataxia developed around a case of sporadic, late-o

  4. Republished: A practical approach to late-onset cerebellar ataxia: putting the disorder with lack of order into order.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, J. van; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2012-01-01

    The clinical management of cerebellar ataxia is challenging, mainly because ataxia is a symptom of many neurological diseases. Many types of ataxia disorders are genetic and some are extremely rare. Here, the authors suggest a diagnostic approach to ataxia developed around a case of sporadic, late-o

  5. Voicing Status of Word Final Plosives in Friedreich's Ataxia Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaney, B. E.; Hewlett, N.

    2007-01-01

    In a previous study, the authors identified final plosive voicing contrast as the highest single error source in dysarthria associated with Friedreich's Ataxia in a group of Irish English-speaking participants. This study aimed to determine the acoustic features underlying misperceptions of voicing status and implications for clinical management.…

  6. Speech Perception Ability in Individuals with Friedreich Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rance, Gary; Fava, Rosanne; Baldock, Heath; Chong, April; Barker, Elizabeth; Corben, Louise; Delatycki

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate auditory pathway function and speech perception ability in individuals with Friedreich ataxia (FRDA). Ten subjects confirmed by genetic testing as being homozygous for a GAA expansion in intron 1 of the FXN gene were included. While each of the subjects demonstrated normal, or near normal sound detection, 3…

  7. Speech Characteristics Associated with Three Genotypes of Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidtis, John J.; Ahn, Ji Sook; Gomez, Christopher; Sidtis, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Advances in neurobiology are providing new opportunities to investigate the neurological systems underlying motor speech control. This study explores the perceptual characteristics of the speech of three genotypes of spino-cerebellar ataxia (SCA) as manifest in four different speech tasks. Methods: Speech samples from 26 speakers with SCA…

  8. Cellular HIV type 1 DNA levels are equivalent among drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains in newly diagnosed and antiretroviral naive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadou, Zoi-Anna; Hezka, Johana; Kousiappa, Ioanna; Mamais, Ioannis; Skoura, Lemonia; Pilalas, Dimitris; Metallidis, Simeon; Nicolaidis, Pavlos; Malisiovas, Nicolaos; Kostrikis, Leondios G

    2014-03-01

    The emergence of resistance against current antiretroviral drugs to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is an increasingly important concern to the continuous success of antiretroviral therapy to HIV-1-infected patients. In the past decade, a number of studies reported that the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance among newly diagnosed patients has reached an overall 9% prevalence worldwide. Also, a number of studies using longitudinal HIV-1 patient study cohorts demonstrated that the cellular HIV-1 DNA level in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has a prognostic value for the progression of HIV-1 disease independently of plasma HIV-1 RNA load and CD4 count. Using a previously established molecular-beacon-based real-time PCR methodology, cellular HIV-1 DNA levels were quantified in newly diagnosed and antiretroviral-naive patients in Northern Greece recruited between 2009 and 2010 using a predefined enrolling strategy, in an effort to investigate whether there is any relationship between cellular HIV-1 DNA levels and HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance. As part of the same study, DNA sequences encoding the env (C2-C5 region of gp120) were also amplified from PBMC-extracted DNA in order to determine the genotypic coreceptor tropism and genetic subtype. Cellular HIV-1 DNA levels had a median of 3.309 log10 HIV-1 copies per 10(6) PBMCs and demonstrated no correlation between cellular HIV-1 DNA levels and HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance. An absence of association between cellular HIV-1 DNA levels with plasma viral HIV-1 RNA load and CD4 levels was also found reconfirming the previously published study. Genotypic analysis of coreceptor tropism indicated that 96% of samples, independently of the presence or not of genotypic drug resistance, were CCR5-tropic. Overall, the findings reconfirmed the previously proposed proposition that transmitted drug resistance does not have an impact on disease progression in HIV-1-infected individuals. Also, CCR5

  9. The rejoining of x-ray-induced breaks in human interphase chromosomes from normal and ataxia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with the genetically inherited recessive disease ataxia telangiectasia (AT), in addition to various clinical disorders including cancer proneness, are extremely sensitive to the lethal effects of ionizing radiations. Following irradiation, cells cultured from such individuals show greatly enhanced cell killing, and marked increase in the production of chromosomal aberrations. Consequently, it has been proposed that AT cells are deficient in the repair of radiation-induced damage to DNA, yet it has not been possible to demonstrate the nature of this deficiency at the molecular level. The authors have measured the rejoining rates of x-ray-induced breakage in the interphase chromosomes of normal human, and AT fibroblasts by means of premature chromosome condensation (PCC). Results show that neither the level of initially sustained x-ray damage, nor the rate at which PCC fragments rejoin, are significantly different between the two cell types. However, an appreciably larger fraction of breaks failed to rejoin in ataxia cells

  10. The Pointing Errors in Optic Ataxia Reveal the Role of “Peripheral Magnification” of the PPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vindras, Philippe; Blangero, Annabelle; Ota, Hisaaki; Reilly, Karen T.; Rossetti, Yves; Pisella, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Interaction with visual objects in the environment requires an accurate correspondence between visual space and its internal representation within the brain. Many clinical conditions involve some impairment in visuo-motor control and the errors created by the lesion of a specific brain region are neither random nor uninformative. Modern approaches to studying the neuropsychology of action require powerful data-driven analyses and error modeling in order to understand the function of the lesioned areas. In the present paper we carried out mixed-effect analyses of the pointing errors of seven optic ataxia patients and seven control subjects. We found that a small parameter set is sufficient to explain the pointing errors produced by unilateral optic ataxia patients. In particular, the extremely stereotypical errors made when pointing toward the contralesional visual field can be fitted by mathematical models similar to those used to model central magnification in cortical or sub-cortical structure(s). Our interpretation is that visual areas that contain this footprint of central magnification guide pointing movements when the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) is damaged and that the functional role of the PPC is to actively compensate for the under-representation of peripheral vision that accompanies central magnification. Optic ataxia misreaching reveals what would be hand movement accuracy and precision if the human motor system did not include elaborated corrective processes for reaching and grasping to non-foveated targets. PMID:27507938

  11. Cell death, chromosome damage and mitotic delay in normal human, ataxia telangiectasia and retinoblastoma fibroblasts after X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We recently showed (Scott and Zampetti-Bosseler 1980) that X-ray sensitive mouse lymphoma cells sustain more chromosome damage, mitotic delay and spindle defects than X-ray resistant cells. We proposed that (a) chromosome aberrations contribute much more to lethality than spindle defects, and (b) that DNA lesions are less effectively repaired in the sensitive cells and give rise to more G2 mitotic delay and chromosome aberrations. Our present results on human fibroblasts with reported differential sensitivity to ionizing radiation (i.e. normal donors and patients with ataxia telangiectasia and retinoblastoma) support the first hypothesis since we observed a positive correlation between chromosome aberration frequencies and cell killing and no induced spindle defects. Our second hypothesis is however not substantiated since X-ray sensitive fibroblasts from the ataxia patient suffered less mitotic delay than cells from normal donors. A common lesion for mitotic delay and chromosome aberrations can still be assumed by adopting the hypothesis of Painter and Young (1981) that the defect in ataxia cells is not in repair but in a failure of DNA damage to initiate mitotic delay. In contrast to other reports, we found the retinoblastoma cells to be of normal radiation sensitivity (cell killing and aberrations). (author)

  12. Ocular-motor profile and effects of memantine in a familial form of adult cerebellar ataxia with slow saccades and square wave saccadic intrusions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Rosini

    Full Text Available Fixation instability due to saccadic intrusions is a feature of autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxias, and includes square wave intrusions (SWI and macrosaccadic oscillations (MSO. A recent report suggested that the non-competitive antagonist of NMDA receptors, memantine, could decrease MSO and improve fixation in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia with saccadic intrusions (SCASI. We similarly tested two sisters, respectively of 58 and 60 years, with an unrecognized form of recessive, adult-onset cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy and slow saccades, who showed prominent SWI and also complained with difficulty in reading. We tested horizontal visually guided saccades (10°-18° and three minutes of steady fixation in each patient and in thirty healthy controls. Both patients showed a significant reduction of peak and mean velocity compared with control subjects. Large SWI interrupting steady fixation were prominent during steady fixation and especially following visually guided saccades. Eye movements were recorded before and during the treatment with memantine, 20 mg/daily for 6 months. The treatment with memantine reduced both the magnitude and frequency of SWI (the former significantly, but did not modified neurological conditions or saccade parameters. Thus, our report suggests that memantine may have some general suppressive effect on saccadic intrusions, including both SWI and MSO, thereby restoring the capacity of reading and visual attention in these and in other recessive forms of ataxia, including Friedreich's, in which saccadic intrusions are prominent.

  13. Imaging study of lymphoreticular tumor development in ataxia-telangiectasia and Nijmegen breakage syndrome; Estudio por imagen del desarrollo de tumores linforreticulares en la ataxia telangiectasia y el sindrome de Nijmegen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Leon, M. I.; Ceres-Ruiz, L.; Cuesta, M. A.; Garcia-Martin, F. J. [Hospital Materno-Infantil C.H.U. Carlos Haya. Malaga (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT), or Louis-Bar syndrome, is an autosomal recessive illness characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia, oculo-cutaneous telangiectasia, immunodeficiency combined with susceptibility to sinopulmonary infections and high incidence of neoplastic development. Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a variant of AT, is also an autosomal recessive illness that presents cerebellar ataxia, as well as combined immunodeficiency and a tendency toward tumor development. Contrary to Louis-Bar syndrome, it doesn't present telangiectasia and exhibits a characteristics phenotype (short stature, bird-like face and microcephaly). Both entities are classified as syndrome of chromosomal instability or chromosomal fragility, a group which also includes Bloom syndrome and Fanconi anemia. All of these show an increase in the frequency of neoplastic pathologies, mainly lymphoid tumors. We present three patients,two with AT and one with NBS, who developed different lymphoma types in the course of the illness. We highlight the most outstanding aspects from a clinical-radiological point of view. (Author) 17 refs.

  14. Widespread neuronal damage and cognitive dysfunction in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Tátila Martins; D'Abreu, Anelyssa; França, Marcondes Cavalcante; Yasuda, Clarissa Lin; Betting, Luiz Eduardo; Samara, Adriana Bastos; Castellano, Gabriela; Somazz, Júlio César; Balthazar, Marcio Luiz Figueredo; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Cendes, Fernando

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrated cognitive impairments in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3/MJD); however, there is no consensus about the cognitive domains affected and the correlation with structural brain abnormalities. We investigated the neuropsychological profile and 3T-MRI findings, including high-resolution T1-images, diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of 32 patients with SCA3/MJD and 32 age-, gender- and educational level-matched healthy controls. We reviewed patients' clinical history and CAG repeat length, and performed assessment and rating of ataxia (SARA)-Brazilian version and the neuropsychiatric inventory. Patients presented worse performance in episodic and working memory and Beck inventories (depression and anxiety). SCA3/MJD patients had a reduction of gray matter volume (GM) in the cerebellum, putamen, cingulum, precentral and parietal lobe. A positive correlation was identified between the cognitive findings and GM of temporal, frontal, parietal, culmen and insula. We observed positive correlation between the brainstem's fractional anisotropy and digit span-forward. The following cerebellar metabolite groups (measured relative to creatine) were reduced in patients: N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), NAA + N-acetyl-aspartate-glutamate and glutamate + glutamine (Glx). We found a positive correlation between Corsi's block-tapping task forward with Glx; semantic verbal fluency with phosphorylcholine and glycerophosphorylcholine; digits span-forward with NAA. The cognitive impairments in SCA3/MJD are associated not only with cerebellar and brainstem abnormalities, but also with neuroimaging evidence of diffuse neuronal and axonal dysfunction, particularly in temporal, frontal, parietal and insular areas. PMID:23775343

  15. Nerve Growth Factor for the Treatment of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3: An Open-label Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Tan; Rui-Hao Wang; Hui-Xia Niu; Chang-He Shi; Cheng-Yuan Mao; Rui Zhang; Bo Song

    2015-01-01

    Background:Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is the most common subtype of SCA worldwide,and runs a slowly progressive and unremitting disease course.There is currently no curable treatment available.Growing evidence has suggested that nerve growth factor (NGF) may have therapeutic effects in neurodegenerative diseases,and possibly also in SCA3.The objective of this study was to test the efficacy of NGF in SCA3 patients.Methods:We performed an open-label prospective study in genetically confirmed adult (>18 years old) SCA3 patients.NGF was administered by intramuscular injection (18 μg once daily) for 28 days consecutively.All the patients were evaluated at baseline and 2 and 4 weeks after treatment using the Chinese version of the scale for assessment and rating of ataxia (SARA).Results:Twenty-one SCA3 patients (10 men and 11 women,mean age 39.14 ± 7.81 years,mean disease duration 4.14 ± 1.90 years,mean CAG repeats number 77.57 ± 2.27) were enrolled.After 28 days of NGF treatment,the mean total SARA score decreased significantly from a baseline of 8.48 ± 2.40 to 6.30 ± 1.87 (P < 0.001).Subsections SARA scores also showed significant improvements in stance (P =0.003),speech (P =0.023),finger chase (P =0.015),fast alternating hand movements (P =0.009),and heel-shin slide (P =0.001).Conclusions:Our preliminary data suggest that NGF may be effective in treating patients with SCA3.

  16. A randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of strength training on clinical and muscle cellular outcomes in patients with prostate cancer during androgen deprivation therapy: rationale and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies indicate that strength training has beneficial effects on clinical health outcomes in prostate cancer patients during androgen deprivation therapy. However, randomized controlled trials are needed to scientifically determine the effectiveness of strength training on the muscle cell level. Furthermore, close examination of the feasibility of a high-load strength training program is warranted. The Physical Exercise and Prostate Cancer (PEPC) trial is designed to determine the effectiveness of strength training on clinical and muscle cellular outcomes in non-metastatic prostate cancer patients after high-dose radiotherapy and during ongoing androgen deprivation therapy. Patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy for 9-36 months combined with external high-dose radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer are randomized to an exercise intervention group that receives a 16 week high-load strength training program or a control group that is encouraged to maintain their habitual activity level. In both arms, androgen deprivation therapy is continued until the end of the intervention period. Clinical outcomes are body composition (lean body mass, bone mineral density and fat mass) measured by Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry, serological outcomes, physical functioning (muscle strength and cardio-respiratory fitness) assessed with physical tests and psycho-social functioning (mental health, fatigue and health-related quality of life) assessed by questionnaires. Muscle cellular outcomes are a) muscle fiber size b) regulators of muscle fiber size (number of myonuclei per muscle fiber, number of satellite cells per muscle fiber, number of satellite cells and myonuclei positive for androgen receptors and proteins involved in muscle protein degradation and muscle hypertrophy) and c) regulators of muscle fiber function such as proteins involved in cellular stress and mitochondrial function. Muscle cellular outcomes are measured on muscle cross sections and

  17. A randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of strength training on clinical and muscle cellular outcomes in patients with prostate cancer during androgen deprivation therapy: rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsen Lene

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies indicate that strength training has beneficial effects on clinical health outcomes in prostate cancer patients during androgen deprivation therapy. However, randomized controlled trials are needed to scientifically determine the effectiveness of strength training on the muscle cell level. Furthermore, close examination of the feasibility of a high-load strength training program is warranted. The Physical Exercise and Prostate Cancer (PEPC trial is designed to determine the effectiveness of strength training on clinical and muscle cellular outcomes in non-metastatic prostate cancer patients after high-dose radiotherapy and during ongoing androgen deprivation therapy. Methods/design Patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy for 9-36 months combined with external high-dose radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer are randomized to an exercise intervention group that receives a 16 week high-load strength training program or a control group that is encouraged to maintain their habitual activity level. In both arms, androgen deprivation therapy is continued until the end of the intervention period. Clinical outcomes are body composition (lean body mass, bone mineral density and fat mass measured by Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry, serological outcomes, physical functioning (muscle strength and cardio-respiratory fitness assessed with physical tests and psycho-social functioning (mental health, fatigue and health-related quality of life assessed by questionnaires. Muscle cellular outcomes are a muscle fiber size b regulators of muscle fiber size (number of myonuclei per muscle fiber, number of satellite cells per muscle fiber, number of satellite cells and myonuclei positive for androgen receptors and proteins involved in muscle protein degradation and muscle hypertrophy and c regulators of muscle fiber function such as proteins involved in cellular stress and mitochondrial function. Muscle cellular outcomes

  18. Computational Insights into The Neuroprotective Action of Riluzole on 3-Acetylpyridine-Induced Ataxia in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahyar Janahmadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Intra-peritoneal administration of riluzole has been shown to preserve the membrane properties and firing characteristics of Purkinje neurons in a rat model of cerebellar ataxia induced by 3-acetylpyridine (3-AP. However, the exact mechanism(s by which riluzole restores the normal electrophysiological properties of Purkinje neurons is not completely understood. Changes in the conductance of several ion channels, including the BK channels, have been proposed as a neuro protective target of riluzole. In this study, the possible cellular effects of riluzole on Purkinje cells from 3-AP-induced ataxic rats that could be responsible for its neuro protective action have been investigated by computer simulations.Materials and Methods: This is a computational stimulation study. The simulation environment enabled a change in the properties of the specific ion channels as the possible mechanism of action of riluzole. This allowed us to study the resulted changes in the firing activity of Purkinje cells without concerns about its other effects and interfering parameters in the experiments. Simulations were performed in the NEURON environment (Version 7.1 in a time step of 25 μs; analyses were conducted using MATLAB r2010a (The Mathworks. Data were given as mean ± SEM. Statistical analyses were performed by the student’s t test, and differences were considered significant if p<0.05.Results: The computational findings demonstrated that modulation of an individual ion channel current, as suggested by previous experimental studies, should not be considered as the only possible target for the neuro protective effects of riluzole to restore the normal firing activity of Purkinje cells from ataxic rats.Conclusion: Changes in the conductance of several potassium channels, including voltage-gated potassium (Kv1, Kv4 and big Ca2+-activated K+ (BK channels may be responsible for the neuro protective effect of riluzole against 3-AP induced alterations in

  19. Ataxia-telangiectasia as a model system for studies of radiation protection mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT), a human autosomal recessive genetic disease, are uniformly hypersensitive to ionizing radiation as measured by colony-forming ability and by chromosomal aberrations. Obligate heterozygotes, i.e., parents of AT patients, are slightly more radiosensitive than normal humans in terms of both colony-forming ability and chromosomal aberrations formed in G2. Thus, this system not only furnishes a model system to study factors that are responsible for radioresistance in normal human beings, but is also a unique tool for determining the role of gene dosage on radiation-induced cell killing. Because AT cells seem to be hypomutable to ionizing radiation, they also can be used to study the relationship between radiosensitivity and mutability and, therefore, carcinogenesis. Isolation of the defective gene that causes hypersensitivity in AT cells and its counterpart in normal cells should lead to a breakthrough in our understanding of radiation effects and how they can be prevented in human beings

  20. A rare midbrain infarction presenting with plus-minus lid syndrome with ataxia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sattin Justin A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present the case of a patient with midbrain infarction with an unusual clinical presentation, where clinical diagnosis and anatomical localization were valuable tools in deciding treatment. Case presentation Our patient was a 59-year-old, right-handed Caucasian man with hypertension who presented to our facility with acute diplopia that persisted until he developed complete right-sided ptosis. He also had difficulty walking and coordinating movements of his upper extremities bilaterally, but this was worse on his left side. Conclusions Plus-minus lid syndrome with ataxia is a rare presentation of midbrain infarction with a unique localization and anatomical description. This case highlights the importance of clinical skills for making a diagnosis in the absence of imaging to confirm the findings.

  1. Multimodal evoked potentials in spinocerebellar ataxia types 1, 2, and 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Chandran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders that are characterized by ataxia and an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. The aim of our study was to describe the findings of evoked potentials (EPs among genetically proven SCA types 1, 2, and 3 and to additionally evaluate if EPs can be used to differentiate between them. Materials and Methods: Forty-three cases of genetically proven SCA (SCA1 = 19, SCA2 = 13, and SCA3 = 11 were evaluated with median somatosensory-EP (mSSEP, visual-EP (VEP, and brainstem auditory-evoked response (BAER by standard procedures and compared with normative laboratory data. An EP was considered abnormal if latency was prolonged (>mean + 3 standard deviation (SD of laboratory control data or the waveform was absent or poorly defined. The waves studied were as follows: mSSEP - N20, VEP - P100 and BAER - interpeak latency 1-3 and 3-5. Results: EPs were abnormal in at least one modality in 90.9% of patients. The most common abnormality was of BAER (86.1% followed by VEP (34.9% and mSSEP (30.2%. The degree of abnormality in VEP, mSSEP, and BAER among patients with SCA1 was 42.1, 41.2, and 73.3%, respectively; among patients with SCA2 was 38.5, 27.3, and 100%, respectively; and among patients with SCA3 was 18.2, 37.5, and 88.9%, respectively. The differences between the subgroups of SCAs were not statistically significant. Conclusions: BAER was the most frequent abnormality in SCA types 1, 2, and 3; abnormalities of mSSEP were comparable in the three SCAs; whereas, abnormality of VEP was less often noted in SCA3.

  2. Prolonged c-jun expression in irradiated ataxia telangiectasia fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with radiation sensitivity and an increased incidence of leukemia, lymphoma, and some solid tumors. After exposure to ionizing radiation, cells from patients with AT demonstrate an attenuated G1-phase checkpoint. Because c-jun is known to regulate, in part, the exit from G1 and the onset of DNA replication, we analyzed c-jun transcription in irradiated AT fibroblasts. Methods and Materials: AT5BI fibroblasts were irradiated and RNA was extracted and assayed for c-jun expression by Northern blot analysis. Transcriptional regulation of c-jun was evaluated by use of the 5' untranslated region of the jun promoter linked to the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) reporter gene. Deletion mutants of the RSRF, SP-1, AP-1, and CCAAT domains within the jun promoter linked to the CAT reporter were transfected into AT5BI cells. Transfectants were irradiated, and CAT expression was quantified. After x-irradiation, nuclear protein binding to CCAAT was evaluated by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Results: X-ray-mediated c-jun expression was sustained in AT5BI cells as compared to only transient expression in irradiated normal diploid fibroblasts. Mutation of either the AP-1 or CCAAT domains within the c-jun promoter reduced transcription by 50% and combined deletion of both AP-1 and CCAAT cis-acting elements entirely eliminated radiation-mediated transcriptional activation. Electrophoretic mobility gel shift assay of the nuclear proteins isolated from irradiated AT fibroblasts demonstrated their increased binding to the CCAAT sequence at 30 min after irradiation. Competition for nuclear protein binding to the CCAAT sequence with excess cold CCAAT demonstrated that protein binding to this sequence was specific. These findings were distinct from induction by phorbol esthers in that the RSRF cis-acting element and DNA segments upstream of -132 base pairs do participate in c-jun induction

  3. Inverted duplication of JH associated with chromosome 14 translocation and T-cell leukemia in ataxia-telangiectasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, J P; Gatti, R A; Sears, T S; White, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    A specific 14q32 breakpoint is observed in a homologous chromosome 14 translocation [t(14;14)q12q32] occurring in the T-cells of about 10% of patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT). To investigate whether the 14q32 breakpoint in AT occurs within the immunoglobulin gene cluster as is frequently detected in B-cell lymphoma, immunoglobulin clones were hybridized to Southern blots of DNA isolated from the T-cells of two AT patients with this chromosome 14 translocation. The 14q32 translocation ...

  4. A Study Of Sporadic Adult Onset Degenerative Cerebellar Ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha K K

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-four cases of sporadic olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (OPCA of adult onset were studied over a period of two years. Results suggest that this disorder has its usual onset in the 5th and 6th decade of life with a male: female ratio of 2:1. It manifests clinically with gait ataxia in all, dysarthria, other cerebellar signs and autonomic involvement in vast majority. There were features of basal ganglia involvement in some. No known identifiable environmental cause was found and genetically they are quite distinct from the known autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias though sporadic occurrence in recessive inheritance or a de novo mutation could not be ruled out completely, but it is unlikely.

  5. 遗传性共济失调%Hereditary ataxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿德勤; 刘春风

    2006-01-01

    @@ 共济失调是患者不能按一定的形式维持精细步态、完成精确动作的一种病理状态,任何累及小脑传入或传出途径的病变都可能导致共济失调,其中多数由遗传因素所致,故统称为遗传性共济失调(hereditary ataxia,HA).HA包括一组比较接近的变性疾病.病变部位主要在脊髓、小脑和脑干,故也称为脊髓-小脑-脑干疾病,或称为脊髓小脑共济失调( spinocerebellar ataxia, SCA) .

  6. Inherited Ataxias%遗传性共济失调

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋雨平; 邬剑军

    2011-01-01

    Inherited ataxia consists of spinal cord, cerebellum and brainstem degeneration. It also involves the peripheral nerves, optic nerve, brain and other regions. Although the causes of inherited ataxia were unknown, genetic, biochemical, metabolic abnormalities or other endogenous factors caused specific cell degeneration. Thisarticledescribedtheclinicalclassificationofhereditaryataxiaandsomeinterestingproblems.%遗传性共济失调是一组以脊髓、小脑、脑干为主的变性病,有时也累及周围神经、视神经、大脑等区域,病因不明.可能与遗传、生化代谢异常或尚未明确的内源性因素造成细胞变性有关.本文对遗传性共济失调的临床症状、分型和研究进展予以介绍.

  7. The Development of Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Kinase Inhibitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andrs, M.; Kobarecny, J.; Nepovimova, E.; Jun, D.; Hodný, Zdeněk; Moravcová, Simona; Hanzlíková, Hana; Kuca, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 10 (2014), s. 805-811. ISSN 1389-5575 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0044 Grant ostatní: MH CZ - DRO (University Hospital Hradec Kralove(CZ) 00179906 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Ataxia telangiectasia mutated * cancer * chemosensitization * DNA damage response Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.903, year: 2014

  8. Miller-Fisher Syndrome: Is the ataxia central or peripheral?

    OpenAIRE

    Sandler, R.D.; Hoggard, N; Hadjivassiliou, M

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented with a brief history of slurred speech, unsteadiness, double vision and paraesthesia. He had been unwell for 12 days with campylobacter gastroenteritis. On examination, there was ophthalmoplegia, nystagmus, areflexia and lower limb and gait ataxia. Serological testing was positive for GQ1b antibody in keeping with the diagnosis of Miller Fisher Syndrome (MFS). He was treated with two courses of intravenous immunoglobulins and made a good recovery, only displaying m...

  9. Vitamin B12 deficiency presenting as acute ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, John Ross; Say, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    A previously healthy 7-year-old Caucasian boy was hospitalised for evaluation of acute ataxia and failure to thrive, initially suspicious for an intracranial mass. Weight and body mass index were below the third percentile and he demonstrated loss of joint position and vibratory sense on examination. Laboratory studies revealed megaloblastic anaemia while an initial MRI of the brain showed no evidence of mass lesions or other abnormalities. A dietary history revealed the child subscribed to a...

  10. A case of Spinocerebellar Ataxia from ethnic tribe of Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayal Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we present the case of a 17-year-old girl belonging to an ethnic tribe (Bodo tribe of Assam, presenting with bilateral cerebellar signs and with history suggestive of an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance, who was found to have spinocerebellar ataxia 7 on genetic testing. This case throws light on the probability of more such cases in the multi-ethnic society of the North-Eastern Indian states, which are not studied or reported till date.

  11. In vivo venous assessment of red blood cell aggregate sizes in diabetic patients with a quantitative cellular ultrasound imaging method: proof of concept.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Tripette

    Full Text Available Diabetic patients present higher level of red blood cell (RBC aggregation contributing to the development of vascular complications. While it has been suggested that this hematology/rheology parameter could bring additional prognostic information for the management of those patients, RBC aggregation screening is not included as a clinical practice. Most medical centers are not equipped to measure properly this parameter, although sedimentation tests can bring some indication. Here, we aimed at evaluating the feasibility of using ultrasound to assess in-vivo hyper-aggregation in type 2 diabetic patients.Seventeen diabetic patients and 15 control subjects underwent ultrasound measurements of RBC aggregation in both cephalic and great saphenous veins. Non-invasive in-vivo ultrasound measurements were performed using a newly developed cellular imaging technique, the structure factor size and attenuation estimator (SFSAE. Comparisons with an ex-vivo gold standard rheometry technique were done, along with measurements of pro-aggregating plasma molecule concentrations.In-vivo RBC aggregation was significantly higher in diabetic patients compared with controls for cephalic vein measurements, while a trend (p = 0.055 was noticed in the great saphenous vein. SFSAE measurements were correlated with gold standard in-vitro measures, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein plasma concentrations.RBC aggregation can be measured in-vivo in diabetic patients using ultrasound. Prospective studies are needed to determine whether the SFSAE method could help clinicians in the early management of vascular complications in this patient population.

  12. A novel c.5308_5311delGAGA mutation in Senataxin in a Cypriot family with an autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamba-Papanicolaou Eleni

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Senataxin (chromosome 9q34 was recently identified as the causative gene for an autosomal recessive form of Ataxia (ARCA, termed as Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia, type 2 (AOA2 and characterized by generalized incoordination, cerebellar atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, "oculomotor apraxia" and increased alpha-fetoprotein (AFP. Here, we report a novel Senataxin mutation in a Cypriot ARCA family. Methods We studied several Cypriot autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia (ARCA families for linkage to known ARCA gene loci. We linked one family (909 to the SETX locus on chromosome 9q34 and screened the proband for mutations by direct sequencing. Results Sequence analysis revealed a novel c.5308_5311delGAGA mutation in exon 11 of the SETX gene. The mutation has not been detected in 204 control chromosomes from the Cypriot population, the remaining Cypriot ARCA families and 37 Cypriot sporadic cerebellar ataxia patients. Conclusion We identified a novel SETX homozygous c.5308_5311delGAGA mutation that co-segregates with ARCA with cerebellar atrophy and raised AFP.

  13. Deranged Bioenergetics and Defective Redox Capacity in T Lymphocytes and Neutrophils Are Related to Cellular Dysfunction and Increased Oxidative Stress in Patients with Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko-Jen Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary excretion of N-benzoyl-glycyl-Nε-(hexanonyllysine, a biomarker of oxidative stress, was higher in 26 patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE than in 11 non-SLE patients with connective tissue diseases and in 14 healthy volunteers. We hypothesized that increased oxidative stress in active SLE might be attributable to deranged bioenergetics, defective reduction-oxidation (redox capacity, or other factors. We demonstrated that, compared to normal cells, T lymphocytes (T and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN of active SLE showed defective expression of facilitative glucose transporters GLUT-3 and GLUT-6, which led to increased intracellular basal lactate and decreased ATP production. In addition, the redox capacity, including intracellular GSH levels and the enzyme activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px and γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase (GGT, was decreased in SLE-T. Compared to normal cells, SLE-PMN showed decreased intracellular GSH levels, and GGT enzyme activity was found in SLE-PMN and enhanced expression of CD53, a coprecipitating molecule for GGT. We conclude that deranged cellular bioenergetics and defective redox capacity in T and PMN are responsible for cellular immune dysfunction and are related to increased oxidative stress in active SLE patients.

  14. Comparative Analysis of Cellular Immune Responses in Treated Leishmania Patients and Hamsters against Recombinant Th1 Stimulatory Proteins of Leishmania donovani

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Sumit; Yadav, Narendra K.; Rawat, Keerti; Tripathi, Chandra Dev P.; Jaiswal, Anil K.; Khare, Prashant; Tandon, Rati; Baharia, Rajendra K.; Das, Sanchita; Gupta, Reema; Kushawaha, Pramod K.; Sundar, Shyam; Sahasrabuddhe, Amogh A.; Dube, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Our prior studies demonstrated that cellular response of T helper 1 (Th1) type was generated by a soluble antigenic fraction (ranging from 89.9 to 97.1 kDa) of Leishmania donovani promastigote, in treated Leishmania patients as well as hamsters and showed significant prophylactic potential against experimental visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Eighteen Th1 stimulatory proteins were identified through proteomic analysis of this subfraction, out of which 15 were developed as recombinant proteins. In the present work, we have evaluated these 15 recombinant proteins simultaneously for their comparative cellular responses in treated Leishmania patients and hamsters. Six proteins viz. elongation factor-2, enolase, aldolase, triose phosphate isomerase, protein disulfide isomerase, and p45 emerged as most immunogenic as they produced a significant lymphoproliferative response, nitric oxide generation and Th1 cytokine response in PBMCs and lymphocytes of treated Leishmania patients and hamsters respectively. The results suggested that these proteins may be exploited for developing a successful poly-protein and/or poly-epitope vaccine against VL. PMID:27047452

  15. [{sup 123}I]-IMP SPECT findings in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Yasuhiko; Nakabayashi, Haruo; Iguchi, Yasuyuki; Suzuki, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Masayuki [Jikei Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kashiwa Hospital; Nakajima, Takashi

    2000-01-01

    To study the dynamics of metabolic function in the cerebellar hemispheres, vermis and brain stem of patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6), we used single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p-[{sup 123}I] iodoamphetamine (IMP) to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in six Japanese patients with SCA6 and nine normal control subjects. All patients with SCA6 were found to have expanded CAG repeats (from 22 to 24 repeats). The SPECT data were also analyzed semiquantitatively. The rCBF in the cerebellar hemisphere, vermis and brain stem was not significantly lower in patients with SCA6 than in normal controls. However, the ratio of the cerebellar hemisphere to occipital lobe (C/O ratio) was significantly lower in patients. The ratio of the vermis and brain stem to occipital lobe (V/O, P/O ratio) were not significantly lower in patients. The C/O, V/O and P/O ratio were especially sensitive indexes for regional cerebral function in patients with SCA6. Results of this study suggest that the functional decrease in SCA6 may begin in the cerebellar hemispheres. IMP SPECT was useful for evaluating rCBF in patients with SCA6. (author)

  16. Abnormal brain MRI in a case of acute ataxia as the only sign of abdominal neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ataxia is a movement disorder that may manifest an acute, intermittent, non progressive or chronic progressive course. Ataxia alone is rare as a para neoplastic sign, especially if it is due to neuroblastoma (abdominal or chest). We report an abdominal neuroblastoma in a two-year-old girl presenting with only acute ataxia and abnormal neuroimaging. Brain MRI showed abnormal signal finding in the medulla, pons, cortico spinal tract and the periventricular space. In the abdominal CT, a mass was detected in the right adrenal gland with calcification and the histopathologic examination re-vealed neuroblastoma. We suggest in children with acute ataxia, with or without opalescence-myoclonus, neuroblastoma should be considered.

  17. Cellular Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Bagnoli, Franco

    1998-01-01

    An introduction to cellular automata (both deterministic and probabilistic) with examples. Definition of deterministic automata, dynamical properties, damage spreading and Lyapunov exponents; probabilistic automata and Markov processes, nonequilibrium phase transitions, directed percolation, diffusion; simulation techniques, mean field. Investigation themes: life, epidemics, forest fires, percolation, modeling of ecosystems and speciation. They represent my notes for the school "Dynamical Mod...

  18. Nature of a defect in cells from individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cells and tissues of patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), an inherited disease characterized by a high degree of proneness to cancer, are abnormally sensitive to ionizing radiation. Noncycling cultures of normal human and A-T fibroblasts were exposed to x-rays so that the breakage and rejoining of prematurely condensed chromosomes in the G1 phase could be compared. After a dose of 6.0 grays, both cell types had the same initial frequency of breaks and the same rate for rejoining of the breaks, but the fraction of breaks that did not rejoin was five to six times greater for the A-T cells. The results also show that progression of cells into the S phase is not a prerequisite for the increased frequency of chromosome fragments that appear in mitosis after A-T cells are irradiated in the G1 or G0 phase

  19. Humoral and cellular responses to Pneumocystis carinii, CMV, and herpes simplex in patients with AIDS and in controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, B; Nielsen, P B; Ødum, Niels; Gerstoft, J; Platz, P; Ryder, L P; Poulsen, A G; Mathiesen, L; Dickmeiss, E; Norrild, B

    1988-01-01

    The titers of IgG and IgA to Pneumocystis carinii in 36 AIDS patients did not differ significantly from those in 31 controls. Only 2/15 patients (13%) with P. carinii pneumonia (PCP) had titers of IgM antibodies greater than or equal to 5, which is significantly less frequent than in 32 controls ...

  20. Plasma circulating cell-free mitochondrial DNA in the assessment of Friedreich's ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantham, Subrahamanyam; Srivastava, Achal K; Gulati, Sheffali; Rajeswari, Moganty R

    2016-06-15

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is one of the most devastating childhood onset neurodegenerative disease affecting multiple organs in the course of progression. FRDA is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction due to deficit in a nuclear encoded mitochondrial protein, frataxin. Identification of disease-specific biomarker for monitoring the severity remains to be a challenging topic. This study was aimed to identify whether circulating cell-free nuclear DNA (nDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in blood plasma can be a potential biomarker for FRDA. Clinical information was assessed using International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale and the disease was confirmed using Long-range PCR for GAA repeat expansion within the gene encoding frataxin. The frataxin expression was measured using Western blot. Plasma nDNA and mtDNA levels were quantified by Multiplex real-time PCR. The major observation is that the levels of nDNA found to be increased, whereas mtDNA levels were reduced significantly in the plasma of FRDA patients (n=21) as compared to healthy controls (n=21). Further, plasma mtDNA levels showed high sensitivity (90%) and specificity (76%) in distinguishing from healthy controls with optimal cutoff indicated at 4.1×10(5)GE/mL. Interestingly, a small group of follow-up patients (n=9) on intervention with, a nutrient supplement, omega-3 fatty acid (a known enhancer of mitochondrial metabolism) displayed a significant improvement in the levels of plasma mtDNA, supporting our hypothesis that plasma mtDNA can be a potential monitoring or prognosis biomarker for FRDA. PMID:27206881

  1. Alternations of cellular immunity in the patients with chronic hepatitis B after the interventional administration of thymosin and Huangqi via the portal vein catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate feasibility administration of thymosin and Huangqi through the portal vein catheterization. And an assessment of the effects of the interventional therapy on the cellular immunity in the patients with chronic hepatitis B. Methods: Thymosin and Huangqi solution were given via portal vein catheterization in eight cases of chronic hepatitis B with hepatic carcinoma. The CD3, CD3+CD8+, CD3+CD4+, and NK cell level of peripheral blood were analyzed by flow cytometry pre- and post-operatively. Results: The level of CD3 was pre-operative 665.63 ± 434.80/μlvs post-operative 1326.50 ± 551.09/μl; CD3+CD8+ was 275.63 ± 205.78/μl vs 513.50 ± 231.00/μl; CD3+CD4+ was 515.88 ± 329.75 μl vs 981.75 ± 478.54/μl; and NK was 130.86 ± 176.58/μl vs 303.43 ± 190.90/μl, respectively. There were significance difference between pre-operative and post-operative data. Conclusion: The administration of thymosin and Huangqi via the portal vein catheterization is an effective and safe therapy to improve cellular immunity in patients with chronic hepatitis B, and potentially is a new treatment of chronic hepatitis B. Study of larger sample is expected. (authors)

  2. Scotblood 2015: Improving and delivering blood products, novel cellular therapies, and celebrating patients and donor engagement within transfusion services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colligan, David; McGowan, Neil; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2016-08-01

    Blood Transfusion Services are striving to continually improve the efficacy and quality of their blood products whilst also simultaneously diversifying into novel cellular products. For this to be successful the relationships between the various arms of the organisation must be strong and interlinked. As new technologies impact on the products that blood transfusion services supply it should be noted that the interaction between the service and its donor base is also affected by advancing technologies. Social media has fundamentally altered the way in which the public can access information and news, as such blood services must engage and interact appropriately with these new forms of media. As a reflection of these challenges the Scotblood 2015 programme was focussed on service and product improvement, donor engagement and people centred transfusion. This commentary comprises summaries of the presentations, based in part on the abstracts provided by the speakers. PMID:27524267

  3. Clinical Analysis of 13 Cases with Cerebellar Ataxia%小脑性共济失调13例病例报道

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施韵; 干静; 陈伟; 刘振国

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨以进行性小脑性共济失调为主要临床症状的疾病诊断.方法:回顾性分析13例以慢性进行性小脑共济失调为主要临床表现患者的临床资料、实验室、影像学和基因检查结果.结果:13例患者中,脊髓小脑性共济失调3例,多系统萎缩-小脑型6例,小脑肿瘤1例,桥小脑结合臂脓肿1例,小脑梗死后遗症2例.结论:对于以进行性小脑共济失调为主要体征的患者,临床上首先要排除占位性病变,其次多系统萎缩和脊髓小脑性共济失调为主要的遗传变性病因.%Aim: To investigate the diagnosis for the diseases that present with progressive cerebellar ataxia Methods : The data of 13 cases manifesting with cerebellar ataxia as a main clinical feature, including clinical data laboratory data and images, were analyzed. Results: Among 13 cases, 3 cases were spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) , 6 cases MSA with predominant cerebellar ataxia (MSA-C) , 1 case cerebellar tumor, 1 case pontocerebellar brachium abscess and 2 cases with sequela of cerebellar infarction. Conclusion : For the patients with cerebellar ataxia as the main signs, space-occupying lesions should be first excluded. And then MSA and SCA may be the main degenerative and genetic causes.

  4. Alterations in Cellular Energy Metabolism Associated with the Antiproliferative Effects of the ATM Inhibitor KU-55933 and with Metformin

    OpenAIRE

    Zakikhani, Mahvash; Bazile, Miguel; Hashemi, Sina; Javeshghani, Shiva; Avizonis, Daina; Pierre, Julie St; Pollak, Michael N.

    2012-01-01

    KU-55933 is a specific inhibitor of the kinase activity of the protein encoded by Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important tumor suppressor gene with key roles in DNA repair. Unexpectedly for an inhibitor of a tumor suppressor gene, KU-55933 reduces proliferation. In view of prior preliminary evidence suggesting defective mitochondrial function in cells of patients with Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT), we examined energy metabolism of cells treated with KU-55933. The compound increased AM...

  5. REACTIVITY AND ENDOGENOUS INTOXICATION CELLULAR TESTS OF THE FIRST TIME DIAGNOSTED SOCIALLY ADOPTED PATIENTS WITH INFILTRATIVE LUNG TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Mordyk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research was to assess the endogenous intoxication degree and reactivity condition of an organism by calculation the blood leukocyte indexes and their influence assessment for the outcome of first time diagnosed infiltrative lung tuberculosis for the revealed socially safe patients. Case-records of 260 patients were analysed retrospectively. Inclusion criteria were: first time diagnosed and confirmed diagnosis of infiltrative lungs tuberculosis; age at least 18 years; socially adopted patients (the patients taking official or informal work place, the constant income in a family, a residence, a registration. Exception criteria were: extra pulmonary or other forms of lung tuberculosis at the patient; existence of a serious somatic illness; HIV infection; existence of malignant new growths; mental diseases; the social disadaptation (homeless persons who aren’t working, released from jails or being under examination, abusing alcohol in the form of hard drinkings and accepting drugs. All patients included in research were divided into two groups: first (main — patients with a failure in quantity the 66, second (group of comparison — patients with a favourable outcome of infiltrative tuberculosis of lungs, in number of 194. Failure criterion was the existence (preservation of a disintegration lung cavity confirmed by the last X-ray picture. According patients blood test results the intoxication leukocyte index (ILI, with Kalf-Kalif formula, an blood leukocytes shift index (BLSI, an organism resistance index (ORI, a Dashtayants nuclear index was carried out. Followly the Spirmen correlation analysis with Statistica 6.0 software package was estimated. As a result of research the following data were obtained. The Dashtayants nuclear index high level at primary blood test has the strongest impact on development of infiltrative lungs tuberculosis failure in patients; the ILI and BLSI high levels at the time of the beginning of

  6. The thermal sensitivity of normal and ataxia telangiectasia human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human normal and ataxia telangiectasia (AT) heterozygote and homozygote cell strains were heated at 42.0 and 45.00C to determine their thermal responses. All cell strains had approximately the same thermal sensitivity and were less thermally sensitive than Chinese hamster cells or many other rodent cell lines reported in the literature. No shoulders were observed on the survival curves for heating at 42.0 or 45.00C. Thermal tolerance developed in both the normal and AT cells strains with heating for prolonged intervals at 42.0GAMMA

  7. Impaired Inhibition of Prepotent Motor Tendencies in Friedreich Ataxia Demonstrated by the Simon Interference Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corben, L. A.; Akhlaghi, H.; Georgiou-Karistianis, N.; Bradshaw, J. L.; Egan, G. F.; Storey, E.; Churchyard, A. J.; Delatycki, M. B.

    2011-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most common of the genetically inherited ataxias. We recently demonstrated that people with FRDA have impairment in motor planning--most likely because of pathology affecting the cerebral cortex and/or cerebello-cortical projections. We used the Simon interference task to examine how effective 13 individuals with…

  8. EFNS/ENS Consensus on the diagnosis and management of chronic ataxias in adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Gaalen, J. van; Boesch, S.; Burgunder, J.M.; Durr, A.; Giunti, P.; Klockgether, T.; Mariotti, C.; Pandolfo, M.; Riess, O.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The ataxias are a challenging group of neurological diseases due the aetiological heterogeneity and the complexity of the genetic subtypes. This guideline focuses on the heredodegenerative ataxias. The aim is to provide a peer-reviewed evidence-based guideline for clinical

  9. A GENE FOR EPISODIC ATAXIA/MYOKYMIA MAPS TO CHROMOSOME 12P13

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LITT, M; KRAMER, P; BROWNE, D; GANCHER, S; BRUNT, ERP; ROOT, D; PHROMCHOTIKUL, T; DUBAY, CJ; NUTT, J

    1994-01-01

    Episodic ataxia (EA) is a rare, familial disorder producing attacks of generalized ataxia, with normal or near-normal neurological function between attacks. Families with autosomal dominant EA represent at least two distinct clinical syndromes. One clinical type of EA (MIM 160120) includes individua

  10. HEREDITARY MYOKYMIA AND PAROXYSMAL ATAXIA LINKED TO CHROMOSOME-12 IS RESPONSIVE TO ACETAZOLAMIDE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LUBBERS, WJ; BRUNT, ERP; SCHEFFER, H; LITT, M; STULP, R; BROWNE, DL; VANWEERDEN, TW

    1995-01-01

    A sixth family with autosomal dominantly inherited myokymia and paroxysmal ataxia is described. The syndrome in this family is linked to the recently discovered locus for inherited myokymia and paroxysmal ataxia on the human chromosome 12p, and a missense mutation is shown in the KCNA1 gene. The att

  11. There May Be More to Reaching than Meets the Eye: Re-Thinking Optic Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Stephen R.; Newport, Roger; Husain, Masud; Fowlie, Jane E.; O'Donoghue, Michael; Bajaj, Nin

    2009-01-01

    Optic ataxia (OA) is generally thought of as a disorder of visually guided reaching movements that cannot be explained by any simple deficit in visual or motor processing. In this paper we offer a new perspective on optic ataxia; we argue that the popular characterisation of this disorder is misleading and is unrepresentative of the pattern of…

  12. Two sisters with mental retardation, cataract, ataxia, progressive hearing loss, and polyneuropathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Begeer, J H; Scholte, F A; van Essen, A J

    1991-01-01

    Two sisters are described with a disorder characterised by mental retardation, congenital cataract, progressive spinocerebellar ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and signs of peripheral neuropathy. Progressive hearing loss, ataxia, and polyneuropathy became evident in the third decade. The differential diagnosis of this syndrome is discussed including the syndromes described by Berman et al and Koletzko et al.

  13. DNA repair enzyme deficiency and in vitro complementation of the enzyme activity in cell-free extracts from ataxia telangiectasia fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three ataxia telangiectasia homozygotes, one heterozygote and normal fibroblast strains were compared as to the capacity of their cellular extracts to enhance the priming activity of gamma-irradiated colicin E1 DNA for purified DNA polymerase (EC 2.7.7.7) of Escherichia coli. It was found that homozygotes had substantially lower activity than normal strains, while no difference was detected between the heterozygote and normal strains. In vitro complementation of the activity occurred between extracts of certain strains of homozygotes, allocating them to two complementation groups. (Auth.)

  14. The relationship between trinucleotide (GAA) repeat length and clinical features in Friedreich ataxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filla, A.; De Michele, G.; Cavalcanti, F. [Federico II Univ., Naples (Italy)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FA) is associated with the expansion of a GAA trinucleotide repeat in the first intron of the X25 gene. We found both alleles expanded in 67 FA patients from 48 Italian families. Five patients from three families were compound heterozygotes with expansion on one allele and an isoleucine{r_arrow}phenylalanine change at position 154 on the other one. We found neither expansions nor point mutations in three patients. The length of FA alleles ranged from 201 to 1,186 repeat units, with no overlap with the normal range, and showed a negatively skewed distribution with a peak between 800 and 1,000 repeats. The FA repeat showed meiotic instability with a median variation of 150 repeats. The lengths of both larger and smaller alleles in each patient inversely correlated with age at onset of the disorder. Smaller alleles showed the best correlation, accounting for {approximately}50% of the variation of age at onset. Mean allele length was significantly higher in patients with diabetes and in those with cardiomyopathy. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. EPISODIC ATAXIA MYOKYMIA SYNDROME IS ASSOCIATED WITH POINT MUTATIONS IN THE HUMAN POTASSIUM CHANNEL GENE, KCNA1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROWNE, DL; GANCHER, ST; NUTT, JG; BRUNT, ERP; SMITH, EA; KRAMER, P; LITT, M

    1994-01-01

    Episodic ataxia (EA) is a rare, familial disorder producing attacks of generalized ataxia, with normal or near-normal neurological function between attacks. One type of EA is characterized by brief episodes of ataxia with myokymia (rippling of muscles) evident between attacks. Linkage studies in fou

  16. p53-Mediated apoptosis is the primary cause of radiation sensitivity in ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The autosomal recessive disease ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is characterized by ataxia, immune defects, genetic instability and cancer. A cardinal feature of A-T is a marked sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation. However, repair of DNA damage in A-T cells is grossly normal and the cause of the radiation sensitivity has remained puzzling despite numerous investigations. We now report that p53-mediated apoptosis is primarily responsible for the radiation sensitivity of A-T cells. We exposed representing three different complementation groups as well as two control cell lines to 0, 1.5 and 3 Gy of 250 kv X-radiation. Morphologic changes, the appearance of cells with sub-G1 DNA content and presence of nucleosome ladders in genomic DNA were considered evidence of apoptosis. By all three criteria, apoptosis was detectable in the A-T cells 24-48 hours after irradiation, peaking by 72 hours. In contrast, control cells underwent minimal apoptosis. Similar results were obtained with 24 hours' exposure to 0.25-0.5 ng/ml streptonigrin, a radiomimetic mutagen. Disruption of p53 function in an A-T fibroblast line by transfection of either the dominant-negative p53143ala mutant or an HPV18 E6 gene was associated with acquisition of near-normal drug resistance and radiation-resistance, while transfection and expression of the p53143ala mutant did not affect the streptonigrin sensitivity of a control fibroblast line. Our results support our hypothesis that an unusually low threshold for the activation of p53-mediated apoptosis by DNA damage may be the primary etiology for both in vivo and in vitro mutagen-sensitivity in A-T. These data also suggest an etiology for the neurological deterioration and immune defects seen in A-T patients: inappropriate activation of apoptosis by spontaneous DNA damage

  17. ATP1A3 Mutation in Adult Rapid-Onset Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweadner, Kathleen J.; Toro, Camilo; Whitlow, Christopher T.; Snively, Beverly M.; Cook, Jared F.; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Markello, Thomas C.; Brashear, Allison

    2016-01-01

    A 21-year old male presented with ataxia and dysarthria that had appeared over a period of months. Exome sequencing identified a de novo missense variant in ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3 subunit of Na,K-ATPase. Several lines of evidence suggest that the variant is causative. ATP1A3 mutations can cause rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism (RDP) with a similar age and speed of onset, as well as severe diseases of infancy. The patient’s ATP1A3 p.Gly316Ser mutation was validated in the laboratory by the impaired ability of the expressed protein to support the growth of cultured cells. In a crystal structure of Na,K-ATPase, the mutated amino acid was directly apposed to a different amino acid mutated in RDP. Clinical evaluation showed that the patient had many characteristics of RDP, however he had minimal fixed dystonia, a defining symptom of RDP. Successive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed progressive cerebellar atrophy, explaining the ataxia. The absence of dystonia in the presence of other RDP symptoms corroborates other evidence that the cerebellum contributes importantly to dystonia pathophysiology. We discuss the possibility that a second de novo variant, in ubiquilin 4 (UBQLN4), a ubiquitin pathway component, contributed to the cerebellar neurodegenerative phenotype and differentiated the disease from other manifestations of ATP1A3 mutations. We also show that a homozygous variant in GPRIN1 (G protein-regulated inducer of neurite outgrowth 1) deletes a motif with multiple copies and is unlikely to be causative. PMID:26990090

  18. Absence of the Autophagy Adaptor SQSTM1/p62 Causes Childhood-Onset Neurodegeneration with Ataxia, Dystonia, and Gaze Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Tobias B; Ignatius, Erika; Calvo-Garrido, Javier; Iuso, Arcangela; Isohanni, Pirjo; Maffezzini, Camilla; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Suomalainen, Anu; Gorza, Matteo; Kremer, Laura S; Graf, Elisabeth; Hartig, Monika; Berutti, Riccardo; Paucar, Martin; Svenningsson, Per; Stranneheim, Henrik; Brandberg, Göran; Wedell, Anna; Kurian, Manju A; Hayflick, Susan A; Venco, Paola; Tiranti, Valeria; Strom, Tim M; Dichgans, Martin; Horvath, Rita; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Freyer, Christoph; Meitinger, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; Senderek, Jan; Wredenberg, Anna; Carroll, Christopher J; Klopstock, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    SQSTM1 (sequestosome 1; also known as p62) encodes a multidomain scaffolding protein involved in various key cellular processes, including the removal of damaged mitochondria by its function as a selective autophagy receptor. Heterozygous variants in SQSTM1 have been associated with Paget disease of the bone and might contribute to neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Using exome sequencing, we identified three different biallelic loss-of-function variants in SQSTM1 in nine affected individuals from four families with a childhood- or adolescence-onset neurodegenerative disorder characterized by gait abnormalities, ataxia, dysarthria, dystonia, vertical gaze palsy, and cognitive decline. We confirmed absence of the SQSTM1/p62 protein in affected individuals' fibroblasts and found evidence of a defect in the early response to mitochondrial depolarization and autophagosome formation. Our findings expand the SQSTM1-associated phenotypic spectrum and lend further support to the concept of disturbed selective autophagy pathways in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27545679

  19. Cellular resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Lena; Harris, Georgina; Leist, Marcel; Hartung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cellular resilience describes the ability of a cell to cope with environmental changes such as toxicant exposure. If cellular metabolism does not collapse directly after the hit or end in programmed cell death, the ensuing stress responses promote a new homeostasis under stress. The processes of reverting "back to normal" and reversal of apoptosis ("anastasis") have been studied little at the cellular level. Cell types show astonishingly similar vulnerability to most toxicants, except for those that require a very specific target, metabolism or mechanism present only in specific cell types. The majority of chemicals triggers "general cytotoxicity" in any cell at similar concentrations. We hypothesize that cells differ less in their vulnerability to a given toxicant than in their resilience (coping with the "hit"). In many cases, cells do not return to the naive state after a toxic insult. The phenomena of "pre-conditioning", "tolerance" and "hormesis" describe this for low-dose exposures to toxicants that render the cell more resistant to subsequent hits. The defense and resilience programs include epigenetic changes that leave a "memory/scar" - an alteration as a consequence of the stress the cell has experienced. These memories might have long-term consequences, both positive (resistance) and negative, that contribute to chronic and delayed manifestations of hazard and, ultimately, disease. This article calls for more systematic analyses of how cells cope with toxic perturbations in the long-term after stressor withdrawal. A technical prerequisite for these are stable (organotypic) cultures and a characterization of stress response molecular networks. PMID:26536287

  20. Long-term preservation of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of natural killer cells amplified in vitro from the peripheral blood of breast cancer patients after chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clémenceau, Béatrice; Gallot, Géraldine; Vivien, Régine; Gaschet, Joëlle; Campone, Mario; Vié, Henri

    2006-01-01

    Twenty percent of breast cancer adenocarcinomas overexpress the oncogene c-erb-2 that is recognized by the humanized anti-Her2/neu monoclonal antibody Herceptin. Results from clinical studies suggest that antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is involved in the clinical response of Herceptin-treated patients. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the possibility of amplifying in vitro the CD3-/CD16+ natural killer (NK) cell subset that mediates ADCC from breast cancer patients after chemotherapy. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from six breast cancer patients taken 2 months after chemotherapy completion were co-cultured with an autologous irradiated Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) in the presence of interleukin-2 (IL-2) for 4-6 weeks. These LCL + IL2 activated cultures (ACs) were tested for ADCC potential, and their CD3/CD16 NK proportion was quantified. Among the ACs, the proportion of CD3-/CD16+ NK cells increased up to 64% over the first 2 weeks of culture and the ACs continued to expand for 1 month thereafter. Control and patient ACs displayed ADCC activity (tested in the presence of Rituximab against the autologous LCL to take into account any possible effect of inhibitory NK receptors) as well as against the MCF-7(Her2/neu) breast cancer cell line in the presence of Herceptin. This ADCC activity was maintained during the entire culture period. In conclusion, chemotherapy in breast cancer patients does not obviate the possibility of amplifying in vitro the NK cell subset that mediates ADCC. Consequently, adoptive transfer of lymphocytes mediating ADCC can be considered using this protocol to test its benefit in patients under Herceptin treatment. PMID:16365600

  1. 丁螺环酮治疗小脑性共济失调%The Treatment of Cerebellar Ataxia with Buspirone Hydrochloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邬剑军; 蒋雨平

    2001-01-01

    目的:探讨5-HT1A受体激动剂丁螺环酮改善共济失调症状的作用。方法:应用评分计分法观察丁螺环酮治疗24例共济失调患者3个月。结果:治疗前后共济失调评分,包括稳定性、协调性、构音、眼球运动各方面的差异均有显著意义(P0.05)。结论:丁螺环酮短期内可以有效地改善患者小脑性共济失调的症状。%Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of buspirone hydrochloride, a serotonin (5-hydroxytrypamine1A) agonist, in treating patients with cerebellar ataxia. Methods:Open-table study in which 24 patients received buspimne hydrochloride for three months. Results:All who completed the study showed significant improvement in ataxia rating scale, including stability, coordination, articulation, ocular movement, but not in the Hamilton anxiety scale. Conclusion:Short-term treatment with buspirone hydrochloride can improve the symptoms of patients with cerebellar ataxia.

  2. Exploration of transitional life events in individuals with Friedreich ataxia: Implications for genetic counseling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farmer Jennifer M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human development is a process of change, adaptation and growth. Throughout this process, transitional events mark important points in time when one's life course is significantly altered. This study captures transitional life events brought about or altered by Friedreich ataxia, a progressive chronic illness leading to disability, and the impact of these events on an affected individual's life course. Methods Forty-two adults with Friedreich ataxia (18-65y were interviewed regarding their perceptions of transitional life events. Data from the interviews were coded and analyzed thematically using an iterative process. Results Identified transitions were either a direct outcome of Friedreich ataxia, or a developmental event altered by having the condition. Specifically, an awareness of symptoms, fear of falling and changes in mobility status were the most salient themes from the experience of living with Friedreich ataxia. Developmental events primarily influenced by the condition were one's relationships and life's work. Conclusions Friedreich ataxia increased the complexity and magnitude of transitional events for study participants. Transitional events commonly represented significant loss and presented challenges to self-esteem and identity. Findings from this study help alert professionals of potentially challenging times in patients' lives, which are influenced by chronic illness or disability. Implications for developmental counseling approaches are suggested for genetic counseling. Background Human development can be described in terms of key transitional events, or significant times of change. Transitional events initiate shifts in the meaning or direction of life and require the individual to develop skills or utilize coping strategies to adapt to a novel situation 12. A successful transition has been defined as the development of a sense of mastery over the changed event 3. Transitions can be influenced by a variety

  3. Gastrocnemius and soleus spasticity and muscle length in Friedreich's ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Sarah C; Corben, Louise A; Yiu, Eppie; Delatycki, Martin B; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie

    2016-07-01

    Lower limb spasticity compromises the independence of people with Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA). This study sought to examine lower limb spasticity in FRDA in order to offer new insight as to the best approach and timing of spasticity management. Gastrocnemius and soleus spasticity and muscle length were measured by the Modified Tardieu Scale (MTS) in 31 participants with typical and late-onset FRDA. Relationships between the MTS and the Friedreich Ataxia Rating Scale (FARS), Functional Independence Measure (FIM), and disease duration were analysed. Differences between ambulant (n=18) and non-ambulant (n=13) participants were also examined. All participants had spasticity in at least one muscle, and 38.9% of ambulant and 69.2% of non-ambulant participants had contracture in one or both of their gastrocnemius muscles. Significant negative correlations were found between both gastrocnemius and soleus angle of catch and the FARS score. The FIM score also demonstrated significant correlations with gastrocnemius muscle length and angle of catch. Gastrocnemius and soleus spasticity and contracture is apparent in people with FRDA. Spasticity is evident early in the disease and in ambulant participants. Management of spasticity and reduced muscle length should be considered in people with FRDA at disease onset to optimise function. PMID:27021226

  4. Ataxia cerebelosa persistente despues de la administracion toxica de difenilhidantoina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés M. Villa

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available La intoxicacion cronica con difenilhidantoina (DFH es bien conocida como causa de ataxia irreversible en pacientes epilépticos debida a atrofia cerebelosa con perdida de células de Purkinje. No es asi con la intoxicación aguda, puesto que sus signos y síntomas son reversibles. Presentamos un paciente con convulsiones parciales complejas, secundarias a un quiste temporal, que habia sido tratado irregularmente con DFH durante dos años con dosis variables que oscilaban en los 100 mg/dia. Dada la refractariedad de su cuadro convulsivo en una entrevista previa a su ingreso se le indico un aumento brusco de la dosis del fármaco que alcanzo a los 400 mg/dia. Ello ocasiono un sindrome pancerebeloso severo que motivo su internación. Posteriormente a la suspension de la DFH y la exeresis del quiste temporal mejoro su cuadro convulsivo, aunque quedo con ataxia de miembros inferiores y asinergia de tronco, cuadro con el que fue dado de alta. Un año despues, el paciente se encontraba libre de convulsiones, pero su sindrome cerebeloso no se habia modificado. El estudio por imágenes no evidencio atrofia cerebelosa.

  5. Enfermedad cardiovascular en pacientes cubanos afectados por Ataxia de Friedreich.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Cruz Mariño

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Al describir la ataxia de Friedreich, Nicholaus hizo referencia a la patología cardiaca. Esta enfermedad autosómica recesiva se debe a una mutación dinámica en el gen FRDA, codificándose deficientemente la proteína Frataxina, conduciendo a estrés oxidativo y muerte celular cardiaca. La presente investigación se desarrolló con el objetivo de describir las anomalías cardiovasculares presentes en los pacientes cubanos afectados por ataxia de Friedreich. A los individuos con diagnóstico molecular confirmatorio de la enfermedad se les realizó electrocardiograma y ecocardiograma, así como evaluación clínica mediante escalas validadas internacionalmente: ICARS y SARA. Los trastornos de repolarización ventricular difusos, los trastornos de conducción intraauricular, así como los trastornos de la función diastólica resultaron hallazgos frecuentes. El patrón restrictivo apreciado provee evidencia invivo de que la enfermedad conduce a disfunción diastólica del ventrículo izquierdo. La ocurrencia de un Infarto Agudo del Miocardio silente indica la importancia de identificar formas incipientes de afectación miocárdica.

  6. Working memory dysfunction associated with brain functional deficits and cellular metabolic changes in patients with generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Chung-Man; Sundaram, Thirunavukkarasu; Choi, Nam-Gil; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2016-08-30

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is associated with brain functional and morphological changes in connected with emotional dysregulation and cognitive deficit. This study dealt with the neural functional deficits and metabolic abnormalities in working memory (WM) task with emotion-inducing distractors in patients with GAD. Fourteen patients with GAD and 14 healthy controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at 3T. In response to the emotional distractors in WM tasks, the patients concurrently showed higher activity in the hippocampus and lower activities in the superior occipital gyrus, superior parietal gyrus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and precentral gyrus compared to the controls. MRS revealed significantly lower choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) and choline/N-acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) ratios in the DLPFC. In particular, the Cho ratios were positively correlated with the brain activities based on blood oxygenation level-dependent signal change in the DLPFC. This study provides the first evidence for the association between the metabolic alterations and functional deficit in WM processing with emotion-inducing distractors in GAD. These findings will be helpful to understand the neural dysfunction in connection with WM impairment in GAD. PMID:27442922

  7. Impaired Spatio-Temporal Predictive Motor Timing Associated with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broersen, Robin; Onuki, Yoshiyuki; Abdelgabar, Abdel R; Owens, Cullen B; Picard, Samuel; Willems, Jessica; Boele, Henk-Jan; Gazzola, Valeria; Van der Werf, Ysbrand D; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2016-01-01

    Many daily life activities demand precise integration of spatial and temporal information of sensory inputs followed by appropriate motor actions. This type of integration is carried out in part by the cerebellum, which has been postulated to play a central role in learning and timing of movements. Cerebellar damage due to atrophy or lesions may compromise forward-model processing, in which both spatial and temporal cues are used to achieve prediction for future motor states. In the present study we sought to further investigate the cerebellar contribution to predictive and reactive motor timing, as well as to learning of sequential order and temporal intervals in these tasks. We tested patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) and healthy controls for two related motor tasks; one requiring spatio-temporal prediction of dynamic visual stimuli and another one requiring reactive timing only. We found that healthy controls established spatio-temporal prediction in their responses with high temporal precision, which was absent in the cerebellar patients. SCA6 patients showed lower predictive motor timing, coinciding with a reduced number of correct responses during the 'anticipatory' period on the task. Moreover, on the task utilizing reactive motor timing functions, control participants showed both sequence order and temporal interval learning, whereas patients only showed sequence order learning. These results suggest that SCA6 affects predictive motor timing and temporal interval learning. Our results support and highlight cerebellar contribution to timing and argue for cerebellar engagement during spatio-temporal prediction of upcoming events. PMID:27571363

  8. 脊髓小脑性共济失调一家系的遗传学研究%Genetics of a Chinese family with spinocerebellar ataxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丹; 郭洪; 王凯; 白云

    2011-01-01

    Objective To do genetic diagnosis of an autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia family and discuss its clinical characteristics. Methods Familial investigation and pedigree analysis were per formed. The duplicate number of tri-nucleotides in pathogenic CAG was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct DNA sequencing in the family members. Results Autosomal dominant heredity was found in this family. Clinical symptoms such as gait, dysphagia and slurred speech occurred in three spinocerebellar ataxia patients of the family at the age of over 30 years. Genetic diagnosis of spinocerebellar ataxia showed that the CAG duplicate number of SCA2 and SCA3 was normal in all the family members of spinocerebellar ataxia patients, and abnormal allelic gene SCA1 was detected in 3 spinocerebellar ataxia patients. The CAG was amplified 43, 48, and 51 times, respectively, and amplified 53 and 50 times for another 2 members of the family who were diagnosed as presymptomatic SCA1. Conclusion Type 1 spinocerebellar ataxia can be diagnosed in the family members of spinocerebellar ataxia patients according to their autosomal dominant heredity caused by dynamic mutations. Genetic diagnosis can be established in 2 presymptomatic SCA1 patients of the family.%目的 对一个常染色体显性遗传的脊髓小脑共济失调家系(spinocerebellar ataxias,SCA)进行基因诊断并探讨其临床特点.方法 完成家系调查和系谱分析,通过聚合酶链式反应和直接测序的方法 对收集到的家系成员进行脊髓小脑性共济失调致病基因CAG三核苷酸重复数目的 检测.结果 该家系呈常染色体显性遗传模式,家系中3名患者均于30岁后逐渐表现为行走不稳、饮水呛咳、言语不清等共济失调的临床特征.对所有家系成员进行基因诊断,结果 发现,SCA2和SCA3致病基因的CAG重复数目均在正常范围内;而家系中3名患者SCA1致病基因出现异常等位基因,CAG扩增次数分别为43、48

  9. MAJOR LYMPHOCYTE SUBPOPULATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS AND THEIR ASSOCIATIONS WITH CELLULAR AND HUMORAL ANTI-ENDOTOXIN IMMUNITY

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    D. V. Shaduro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At the present time, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE takes the leading place among systemic autoimmune disorders. Despite considerable progress in understanding basic pathogenesis of this disease, many subtle mechanisms of progressive inflammation in SLE are still unknown. It has been discovered that the persistent self-maintenance factors of autoimmune inflammation could be represented by lipopolysaccharides or endotoxins of Gram-negative intestinal bacteria. The objective of this study was to assess the levels of major lymphocyte subpopulations, and their probable relation to specific anti-endotoxin antibodies and endotoxin-neutralizing receptors of granulocytes and monocytes in peripheral blood of SLE patients. The study involved forty-eight patients with SLE. The levels of lymphocyte subpopulations, expression of monocyte and granulocyte anti-endotoxin receptors, amounts of total and endotoxin-specific immunoglobulins were determined by means of, respectively, cytometric analysis and enzyme immunoassay techniques. The results of study have shown an increase in overall numbers of activated and cytotoxic T lymphocytes, a decrease in lymphocytes and NK-cells, diminished levels endotoxin-binding receptors on the monocytes and granulocytes, along with increased anti-endotoxin IgG antibodies. Our study revealed correlations between the levels of the leukocyte endotoxin-binding receptors, and B-lymphocyte contents, like as some associations between anti-endotoxin IgM antibodies, and the levels of B-lymphocytes, and cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. A correlation was also found between anti-endotoxin IgG antibodies and CD4+ lymphocyte levels. Significant alterations of the endotoxin-specific immunity among SLE patients suggest that this imbalance might play an important role in the mechanisms of onset and progression of autoimmune diseases.

  10. Dynamic modeling of cellular response to DNA damage based on p53 stress response networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinpeng Qi; Yongsheng Ding; Shihuang Shao

    2009-01-01

    Under acute perturbations from the outside, cells can trigger self-defensive mechanisms to fight against genome stress. To investigate the cellular response to continuous ion radiation (IR), a dynamic model for p53 stress response networks at the cellular level is proposed. The model can successfully be used to simulate the dynamic processes of double-strand breaks (DSBs) generation and their repair, switch-like ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) activation, oscillations occurring in the p53-MDM2 feedback loop, as well as toxins elimination triggered by p53 stress response networks. Especially, the model can predict the plausible outcomes of cellular response under different IR dose regimes.

  11. Preserved Glucose Metabolism of Deep Cerebellar Nuclei in a Case of Multiple System Atrophy with Predominant Cerebellar Ataxia: F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Study

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    Oh Dae Kwon

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar glucose metabolism of multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia (MSA-C is known to be decreased but is not defined among areas of cerebellum. We encountered a 54-year-old man who developed dizziness and progressive ataxia followed by urinary incontinence and orthostatic hypotension, all of those symptoms progressed relentlessly and the symptoms responded poorly to levodopa therapy. Visual analysis and statistical parametric mapping analysis of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed hypometabolism of both cerebellar hemisphere, severe at cortical area, and pons. There was clear sparing of deep cerebellar nuclei. Our report, as we know, shows the first case of preserved glucose metabolism of deep cerebellar nuclei relative to cerebellar cortex in an MSA-C patient.

  12. CAG repeats determine brain atrophy in spinocerebellar ataxia 17: a VBM study.

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    Kathrin Reetz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abnormal repeat length has been associated with an earlier age of onset and more severe disease progression in the rare neurodegenerative disorder spinocerebellar ataxia 17 (SCA17. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine whether specific structural brain degeneration and rate of disease progression in SCA17 might be associated with the CAG repeat size, observer-independent voxel-based morphometry was applied to high-resolution magnetic resonance images of 16 patients with SCA17 and 16 age-matched healthy controls. The main finding contrasting SCA17 patients with healthy controls demonstrated atrophy in the cerebellum bilaterally. Multiple regression analyses with available genetic data and also post-hoc correlations revealed an inverse relationship again with cerebellar atrophy. Moreover, we found an inverse relationship between the CAG repeat length and rate of disease progression. CONCLUSIONS: Our results highlight the fundamental role of the cerebellum in this neurodegenerative disease and support the genotype-phenotype relationship in SCA17 patients. Genetic factors may determine individual susceptibility to neurodegeneration and rate of disease progression.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells attenuate peripheral neuronal degeneration in spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 knockin mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieda, Tokue; Suto, Nana; Iizuka, Akira; Matsuura, Serina; Iizuka, Haku; Takagishi, Kenji; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2016-03-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder in which an abnormally expanded polyglutamine tract is inserted into causative ataxin-1 proteins. We have previously shown that SCA1 knockin (SCA1-KI) mice over 6 months of age exhibit a degeneration of motor neuron axons and their encasing myelin sheaths, as reported in SCA1 patients. We examined whether axon degeneration precedes myelin degeneration or vice versa in SCA1-KI mice and then attempted to mitigate motor neuron degeneration by intrathecally administering mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Temporal examination of the diameters of motor neuron axons and their myelin sheaths revealed a decrease in diameter of the axon but not of the myelin sheaths in SCA1-KI mice as early as 1 month of age, which suggests secondary degeneration of the myelin sheaths. We injected MSCs into the intrathecal space of SCA1-KI mice at 1 month of age, which resulted in a significant suppression of degeneration of both motor neuron axons and myelin sheaths, even 6 months after the MSC injection. Thus, MSCs effectively suppressed peripheral nervous system degeneration in SCA1-KI mice. It has not yet been clarified how clinically administered MSCs exhibit significant therapeutic effects in patients with SCA1. The morphological evidence presented in this current mouse study might explain the mechanisms that underlie the therapeutic effects of MSCs that are observed in patients with SCA1. PMID:26707550

  14. A randomized controlled pilot trial of lithium in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccà, Francesco; Puorro, Giorgia; Brunetti, Arturo; Capasso, Giovambattista; Cervo, Amedeo; Cocozza, Sirio; de Leva, Mariafulvia; Marsili, Angela; Pane, Chiara; Quarantelli, Mario; Russo, Cinzia Valeria; Trepiccione, Francesco; De Michele, Giuseppe; Filla, Alessandro; Morra, Vincenzo Brescia

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is an autosomal dominant disorder. Lithium is able to stimulate autophagy, and to reduce Ca(2+) efflux from the inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate receptor. We designed a phase II, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, 48-week trial with lithium carbonate in 20 patients with SCA2. The primary objective was to determine safety and tolerability of lithium. The secondary objectives were to determine disease progression, quality of life, mood, and brain volume change. Sixteen patients completed the trial, 8 randomized to lithium, 8 to placebo. Forty adverse events (AEs) were reported during the trial, twenty-eight in the lithium and 12 in the placebo group (p = 0.11). Mean AE duration was 57.4 ± 60.8 and 77.4 ± 68.5 days (p = 0.37). Non-significant differences were observed for the SARA and for brain volume change, whereas a significant reduction in the BDI-II was observed for lithium group (p bipolar disorder patients. A correctly powered phase III trial is needed to assess if lithium may slow disease progression in SCA2. PMID:25346067

  15. The Contribution of the Cerebellum to Cognition in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6

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    Freya E. Cooper

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study sought evidence for a specific cerebellar contribution to cognition by characterising the cognitive phenotype of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 (SCA-6; an autosomal dominant genetic disease which causes a highly specific late-onset cerebellar degeneration. A comprehensive neuropsychological assessment was administered to 27 patients with genetically confirmed SCA-6. General intellectual ability, memory and executive function were examined using internationally standardised tests (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III, Wechsler Memory Scale-III, Delis and Kaplan Executive Function System, Brixton Spatial Anticipation test. The patient group showed no evidence of intellectual or memory decline. However, tests of executive function involving skills of cognitive flexibility, inhibition of response and verbal reasoning and abstraction demonstrated significant impairment at the group level with large effect sizes. The results demonstrate an executive deficit due to SCA-6 that can be conceptualised as parallel to the motor difficulties suffered by these patients: the data support a role for the cerebellum in the regulation and coordination of cognitive, as well as motor processes that is relevant to individual performance.

  16. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 in South Africa: Epidemiology, pathogenesis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, L; Smith, D C; Scholefield, J; Ballo, R; Kidson, S; Greenberg, L J; Wood, M J A

    2016-01-01

    Disorders of the nervous system represent a significant proportion of the global burden of non-communicable diseases, due to the trend towards ageing populations. The Department (now Division) of Human Genetics at the University of Cape Town (UCT) has been involved in pioneering research into these diseases since the appointment of Prof. Peter Beighton as Head of Department in 1972. Beighton's emphasis on understanding the genetic basis of disease laid the groundwork for investigations into several monogenic neurodegenerative conditions, including Huntington's disease and the polyglutamine spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs). In particular, SCA7, which occurs at an unusually high frequency in the South African (SA) population, was identified as a target for further research and therapeutic development. Beginning with early epidemiological surveys, the SCA7 project progressed to molecular genetics-based investigations, leading to the identification of a founder effect in the SA SCA7 patient population in the mid-2000s. Capitalising on the founder haplotype shared by many SCA7 patients, UCT researchers went on to develop the first population-specific gene-silencing approach for the disease. More recently, efforts have shifted to the development of a more accurate model to decipher the precise mechanisms of neurodegeneration, using induced pluripotent stem cells derived from SA SCA7 patients. In many ways, the SA SCA7 journey reflects the legacy and vision of Prof. Peter Beighton, and his efforts to establish world-class, collaborative research into diseases affecting the African continent. PMID:27245542

  17. Missense mutations in ITPR1 cause autosomal dominant congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia

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    Huang Lijia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia is characterized by early gross motor delay, hypotonia, gait ataxia, mild dysarthria and dysmetria. The clinical presentation remains fairly stable and may be associated with cerebellar atrophy. To date, only a few families with autosomal dominant congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia have been reported. Linkage to 3pter was demonstrated in one large Australian family and this locus was designated spinocerebellar ataxia type 29. The objective of this study is to describe an unreported Canadian family with autosomal dominant congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia and to identify the underlying genetic causes in this family and the original Australian family. Methods and Results Exome sequencing was performed for the Australian family, resulting in the identification of a heterozygous mutation in the ITPR1 gene. For the Canadian family, genotyping with microsatellite markers and Sanger sequencing of ITPR1 gene were performed; a heterozygous missense mutation in ITPR1 was identified. Conclusions ITPR1 encodes inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, type 1, a ligand-gated ion channel that mediates calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Deletions of ITPR1 are known to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 15, a distinct and very slowly progressive form of cerebellar ataxia with onset in adulthood. Our study demonstrates for the first time that, in addition to spinocerebellar ataxia type 15, alteration of ITPR1 function can cause a distinct congenital nonprogressive ataxia; highlighting important clinical heterogeneity associated with the ITPR1 gene and a significant role of the ITPR1-related pathway in the development and maintenance of the normal functions of the cerebellum.

  18. Evidence that lipopolisaccharide may contribute to the cytokine storm and cellular activation in patients with visceral leishmaniasis.

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    Joanna R Santos-Oliveira

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visceral leishmaniasis (VL is characterized by parasite-specific immunosuppression besides an intense pro-inflammatory response. Lipopolisaccharide (LPS has been implicated in the immune activation of T-cell deficient diseases such as HIV/AIDS and idiopathic lymphocytopenia. The source of LPS is gram-negative bacteria that enter the circulation because of immunological mucosal barrier breakdown. As gut parasitization also occurs in VL, it was hypothesized that LPS may be elevated in leishmaniasis, contributing to cell activation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Flow cytometry analysis and immunoassays (ELISA and luminex micro-beads system were used to quantify T-cells and soluble factors. Higher LPS and soluble CD14 levels were observed in active VL in comparison to healthy subjects, indicating that LPS was bioactive; there was a positive correlation between these molecules (r = 0.61;p<0.05. Interestingly, LPS was negatively correlated with CD4(+ (r = -0.71;p<0.01 and CD8(+ T-cells (r = -0.65;p<0.05. Moreover, higher levels of activation-associated molecules (HLA-DR, CD38, CD25 were seen on T lymphocytes, which were positively associated with LPS levels. Pro-inflammatory cytokines and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF were also augmented in VL patients. Consistent with the higher immune activation status, LPS levels were positively correlated with the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 (r = 0.63;p<0.05, IL-8 (r = 0.89;p<0.05, and MIF (r = 0.64;p<0.05. Also, higher plasma intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP levels were observed in VL patients, which correlated with LPS levels (r = 0.57;p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Elevated levels of LPS in VL, in correlation with T-cell activation and elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines and MIF indicate that this bacterial product may contribute to the impairment in immune effector function. The cytokine storm and chronic immune hyperactivation status may

  19. Huntington's disease-like and ataxia syndromes: identification of a family with a de novo SCA17/TBP mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Sara; Petersen, Thor; Nørremølle, Anne;

    2010-01-01

    tract in the respective proteins. SCA17 is caused by a CAG/CAA repeat expansion in the TATA box-binding protein-gene (TBP). In some cases the clinical phenotype of SCA17 overlaps that of Huntington's disease (HD), hence the use of the term Huntington's disease-like. We screened 89 patients with a...... Huntington's disease-like phenotype without the HD-gene mutation and 178 patients with genetically unclassified cerebellar ataxia for the mutation in TBP. A 33-year old woman presenting with an HD like phenotype with a de novo 54 CAG/CAA repeat expansion was identified. Her normal allele included 38 repeats....... The patient's mother and father both carried normal range repeats, 38/38 and 33/39 respectively. Analysis of the repeat structures revealed that the expansion had occurred upon expansion of the longer paternal allele. We conclude that, however rare, SCA17 must be considered as a cause of Huntington...

  20. Mutations in DNMT1 cause autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkelmann, Juliane; Lin, Ling; Schormair, Barbara;

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy (ADCA-DN) is characterized by late onset (30-40 years old) cerebellar ataxia, sensory neuronal deafness, narcolepsy-cataplexy and dementia. We performed exome sequencing in five individuals from three ADCA-DN kindreds and identified DNMT.......GLY605Ala mutation was subsequently identified. Narcolepsy and deafness were the first symptoms to appear in all pedigrees, followed by ataxia. DNMT1 is a widely expressed DNA methyltransferase maintaining methylation patterns in development, and mediating transcriptional repression by direct binding to...

  1. Increased Prevalence 12308 A > G mutation in Mitochondrial tRNALeu (CUN Gene Associated with earlier Age of Onset in Friedreich Ataxia

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    Mohammad Medhi HEIDARI

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Heidari MM, Khatami M, Houshmand M, Mahmoudi E, Nafissi Sh .Increased Prevalence 12308 A > G mutation in MitochondrialtRNALeu (CUN Gene Associated with earlier Age of Onset in Friedreich Ataxia. Iranian Journal of Child Neurology 2011;5(4:25-31.Objective Friedreich ataxia (FRDA is an inherited recessive disorder. Mitochondrial DNA is a candidate modifying factor for FRDA.The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the tRNALeu (CUN 12308 A> G mutation and age of onset in Friedreich ataxia.Materials & Methods The 12308 A> G substitution in mitochondrial tRNALeu (CUN was examined in DNA samples from 30 Friedreich ataxia patients and 48 control subjects by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE and sequencing. Logistic regression was used to determine of cutoff age of onset.ResultsTwenty-two patients had the 12308 A> G mutation, and we found that its overall prevalence was significantly higher in 20 patients aged 17 years or younger than in 2 patients aged over 17 years (90% versus 10%. The 12308 A> G mutation lies in a region that has been highly conserved between species.Conclusion Our results show that the 12308 A > G mutation is associated with earlier age of onset in Friedreich ataxia. Thus, this mutation might cause the younger age of onset in FRDA.References Grabczyk E, Usdin K. The GAA*TTC triplet repeat expanded in Friedreich ataxia impedes transcription elongation by T7 RNA polymerase in a length and supercoil dependent manner. Nucleic Acids Res 2000;28(14:2815-22.Sakamoto N, Chastain PD, Parniewski P, Ohshima K, Pandolfo M, Griffith JD, et al. Sticky DNA: self association properties of long GAA.TTC repeats in R.R.Y triplex structures from Friedreich ataxia. Mol Cell1999;3(4:465-75.Lodi R, Cooper JM, Bradley JL, Manners D, Styles P, Taylor DJ, et al. Deficit of in vivo mitochondrial ATP production in patients with Friedreich ataxia. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 1999

  2. The 3-second rule in hereditary pure cerebellar ataxia: a synchronized tapping study.

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    Shunichi Matsuda

    Full Text Available The '3-second rule' has been proposed based on miscellaneous observations that a time period of around 3 seconds constitutes the fundamental unit of time related to the neuro-cognitive machinery in normal humans. The aim of paper was to investigate the temporal processing in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6 and SCA31, pure cerebellar types of spinocerebellar degeneration, using a synchronized tapping task. Seventeen SCA patients (11 SCA6, 6 SCA31 and 17 normal age-matched volunteers participated. The task required subjects to tap a keyboard in synchrony with sequences of auditory stimuli presented at fixed interstimulus intervals (ISIs between 200 and 4800 ms. In this task, the subjects required non-motor components to estimate the time of forthcoming tone in addition to motor components to tap. Normal subjects synchronized their taps to the presented tones at shorter ISIs, whereas as the ISI became longer, the normal subjects displayed greater latency between the tone and the tapping (transition zone. After the transition zone, normal subjects pressed the button delayed relative to the tone. On the other hand, SCA patients could not synchronize their tapping with the tone even at shorter ISIs, although they pressed the button delayed relative to the tone earlier than normal subjects did. The earliest time of delayed tapping appearance after the transition zone was 4800 ms in normal subjects but 1800 ms in SCA patients. The span of temporal integration in SCA patients is shortened compared to that in normal subjects. This could represent non-motor cerebellar dysfunction in SCA patients.

  3. Infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia caused by compound heterozygosity for Twinkle mutations and modeling of Twinkle mutations causing recessive disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulsuner, Suleyman; Stapleton, Gail A.; Walsh, Tom; Lee, Ming K.; Mandell, Jessica B.; Morales, Augusto; Klevit, Rachel E.; King, Mary-Claire; Rogers, R. Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in nuclear genes required for the replication and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA cause progressive multisystemic neuromuscular disorders with overlapping phenotypes. Biallelic mutations in C10orf2, encoding the Twinkle mitochondrial DNA helicase, lead to infantile-onset cerebellar ataxia (IOSCA), as well as milder and more severe phenotypes. We present a 13-year-old girl with ataxia, severe hearing loss, optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Whole-exome sequencing revealed that the patient is compound heterozygous for previously unreported variants in the C10orf2 gene: a paternally inherited frameshift variant (c.333delT; p.L112Sfs*3) and a maternally inherited missense variant (c.904C>T; p.R302W). The identification of novel C10orf2 mutations extends the spectrum of mutations in the Twinkle helicase causing recessive disease, in particular the intermediate IOSCA phenotype. Structural modeling suggests that the p.R302W mutation and many other recessively inherited Twinkle mutations impact the position or interactions of the linker region, which is critical for the oligomeric ring structure and activity of the helicase. This study emphasizes the utility of whole-exome sequencing for the genetic diagnosis of a complex multisystemic disorder. PMID:27551684

  4. Infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia caused by compound heterozygosity for Twinkle mutations and modeling of Twinkle mutations causing recessive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Sarah B; Gulsuner, Suleyman; Stapleton, Gail A; Walsh, Tom; Lee, Ming K; Mandell, Jessica B; Morales, Augusto; Klevit, Rachel E; King, Mary-Claire; Rogers, R Curtis

    2016-07-01

    Mutations in nuclear genes required for the replication and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA cause progressive multisystemic neuromuscular disorders with overlapping phenotypes. Biallelic mutations in C10orf2, encoding the Twinkle mitochondrial DNA helicase, lead to infantile-onset cerebellar ataxia (IOSCA), as well as milder and more severe phenotypes. We present a 13-year-old girl with ataxia, severe hearing loss, optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Whole-exome sequencing revealed that the patient is compound heterozygous for previously unreported variants in the C10orf2 gene: a paternally inherited frameshift variant (c.333delT; p.L112Sfs*3) and a maternally inherited missense variant (c.904C>T; p.R302W). The identification of novel C10orf2 mutations extends the spectrum of mutations in the Twinkle helicase causing recessive disease, in particular the intermediate IOSCA phenotype. Structural modeling suggests that the p.R302W mutation and many other recessively inherited Twinkle mutations impact the position or interactions of the linker region, which is critical for the oligomeric ring structure and activity of the helicase. This study emphasizes the utility of whole-exome sequencing for the genetic diagnosis of a complex multisystemic disorder. PMID:27551684

  5. 4-aminopyridine reverses ataxia and cerebellar firing deficiency in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayabal, Sriram; Chang, Hui Ho Vanessa; Cullen, Kathleen E; Watt, Alanna J

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is a devastating midlife-onset autosomal dominant motor control disease with no known treatment. Using a hyper-expanded polyglutamine (84Q) knock-in mouse, we found that cerebellar Purkinje cell firing precision was degraded in heterozygous (SCA6(84Q/+)) mice at 19 months when motor deficits are observed. Similar alterations in firing precision and motor control were observed at disease onset at 7 months in homozygous (SCA6(84Q/84Q)) mice, as well as a reduction in firing rate. We further found that chronic administration of the FDA-approved drug 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), which targets potassium channels, alleviated motor coordination deficits and restored cerebellar Purkinje cell firing precision to wildtype (WT) levels in SCA6(84Q/84Q) mice both in acute slices and in vivo. These results provide a novel therapeutic approach for treating ataxic symptoms associated with SCA6. PMID:27381005

  6. Optic ataxia as a result of the breakdown of the global tuning fields of parietal neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia-Mayer, Alexandra; Caminiti, Roberto

    2002-02-01

    Optic ataxia is characterized by an impaired visual control of the direction of arm reaching to a visual target, accompanied by defective hand orientation and grip formation. In humans, optic ataxia is associated with lesions of the superior parietal lobule (SPL), which also affect visually guided saccades and other forms of eye-hand coordination. In the last 10 years, anatomical and physiological studies of the SPL have shed new light on the role of parietal cortex in the control of combined eye-hand movements to visual targets, and on the underlying distributed network which links parietal to frontal cortex. A main emerging functional feature of SPL neurones seems to be their capacity to combine, in a spatially congruent fashion, different directional eye- and hand-related information, that any coding scheme so far proposed, considers essential for the composition of motor commands for reaching. This integration occurs within the global tuning field of parietal neurones, is context-dependent and involves eye and hand information that shares the same directional properties. Depending on task demands, this integration of signals can result in the representation of different reference frames for coordinated eye-hand movements. The dynamic operations occurring within the global tuning fields might depend, at least in part, on the reciprocal sets of association connections linking the SPL and the premotor areas of the frontal lobe. From this picture, the SPL emerges as both a main source of visual input to the frontal cortex and a key structure for visuomotor integration based on re-entrant signalling and, therefore, as a crucial node in the visual control of movement. It is hypothesized that in parietal patients, the directional errors that characterize reaching are a consequence of the breakdown of the combination of directional eye and hand information within the global tuning fields of parietal neurones. In these patients, the spatial match among information about

  7. The effect of bleomycin on DNA synthesis in ataxia telangiectasia lymphoid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleomycin, a radiomimetic glycopeptide, inhibits de novo DNA synthesis in ataxia telangiectasia lymphoblastoid B cells to a markedly lesser extent than in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum lymphoid cells. This observation is similar to that following ionizing radiation; however, the effect is slower following the chemical treatment. Recovery of the normal cells occurs 15-18 hours after treatment, whereas the ataxia telangiectasia lines do not attain normal levels of DNA synthesis during the entire 24-hour observation period. Similar differences were not observed following treatment with mitomycin C, a bifunctional alkylating agent, indicating a specific effect of bleomycin on DNA synthesis in ataxia telangiectasia cells. Following bleomycin treatment and preincubation with hydroxyurea, residual DNA synthesis in ataxia telangiectasia cells was similar to that in both normal and xeroderma pigmentosum lymphoid lines, suggesting that the capacity to repair the induced DNA lesion is present

  8. Cutaneous granulomas in ataxia telangiectasia and other primary immunodeficiencies: Reflection of inappropriate immune regulation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.Y.T. Chiam (L. Y T); M.M.M. Verhagen (Mijke); A. Haraldsson (Ásgeir); N.M. Wulffraat (Nico); G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan); M.G. Netea (Mihai); C.M.R. Weemaes (Corry); M.M.B. Seyger (Marieke); M. van Deuren (Marcel)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Non-infective cutaneous granulomas with unknown pathogenesis occur in various primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) including ataxia telangiectasia (A-T). Objective: To find a common immunological denominator in these cutaneous granulomas. Methods: The dermatological and immunolo

  9. Clinical data and characterization of the liver conditional mouse model exclude neoplasia as a non-neurological manifestation associated with Friedreich’s ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Martelli

    2012-11-01

    Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA is the most common hereditary ataxia in the caucasian population and is characterized by a mixed spinocerebellar and sensory ataxia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and increased incidence of diabetes. FRDA is caused by impaired expression of the FXN gene coding for the mitochondrial protein frataxin. During the past ten years, the development of mouse models of FRDA has allowed better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease. Among the mouse models of FRDA, the liver conditional mouse model pointed to a tumor suppressor activity of frataxin leading to the hypothesis that individuals with FRDA might be predisposed to cancer. In the present work, we investigated the presence and the incidence of neoplasia in the largest FRDA patient cohorts from the USA, Australia and Europe. As no predisposition to cancer could be observed in both cohorts, we revisited the phenotype of the liver conditional mouse model. Our results show that frataxin-deficient livers developed early mitochondriopathy, iron-sulfur cluster deficits and intramitochondrial dense deposits, classical hallmarks observed in frataxin-deficient tissues and cells. With age, a minority of mice developed structures similar to the ones previously associated with tumor formation. However, these peripheral structures contained dying, frataxin-deficient hepatocytes, whereas the inner liver structure was composed of a pool of frataxin-positive cells, due to inefficient Cre-mediated recombination of the Fxn gene, that contributed to regeneration of a functional liver. Together, our data demonstrate that frataxin deficiency and tumorigenesis are not associated.

  10. Time-resolved functional analysis of acute impairment of frataxin expression in an inducible cell model of Friedreich ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörte Poburski

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a GAA triplet repeat expansion in the first intron of the frataxin gene, which results in reduced expression levels of the corresponding protein. Despite numerous animal and cellular models, therapeutic options that mechanistically address impaired frataxin expression are lacking. Here, we have developed a new mammalian cell model employing the Cre/loxP recombination system to induce a homozygous or heterozygous frataxin knockout in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Induction of Cre-mediated disruption by tamoxifen was successfully tested on RNA and protein levels. After loss of frataxin protein, cell division, aconitase activity and oxygen consumption rates were found to be decreased, while ROS production was increased in the homozygous state. By contrast, in the heterozygous state no such changes were observed. A time-resolved analysis revealed the loss of aconitase activity as an initial event after induction of complete frataxin deficiency, followed by secondarily elevated ROS production and a late increase in iron content. Initial impairments of oxygen consumption and ATP production were found to be compensated in the late state and seemed to play a minor role in Friedreich ataxia pathophysiology. In conclusion and as predicted from its proposed role in iron sulfur cluster (ISC biosynthesis, disruption of frataxin primarily causes impaired function of ISC-containing enzymes, whereas other consequences, including elevated ROS production and iron accumulation, appear secondary. These parameters and the robustness of the newly established system may additionally be used for a time-resolved study of pharmacological candidates in a HTS manner.

  11. Time-resolved functional analysis of acute impairment of frataxin expression in an inducible cell model of Friedreich ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poburski, Dörte; Boerner, Josefine Barbara; Koenig, Michel; Ristow, Michael; Thierbach, René

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a GAA triplet repeat expansion in the first intron of the frataxin gene, which results in reduced expression levels of the corresponding protein. Despite numerous animal and cellular models, therapeutic options that mechanistically address impaired frataxin expression are lacking. Here, we have developed a new mammalian cell model employing the Cre/loxP recombination system to induce a homozygous or heterozygous frataxin knockout in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Induction of Cre-mediated disruption by tamoxifen was successfully tested on RNA and protein levels. After loss of frataxin protein, cell division, aconitase activity and oxygen consumption rates were found to be decreased, while ROS production was increased in the homozygous state. By contrast, in the heterozygous state no such changes were observed. A time-resolved analysis revealed the loss of aconitase activity as an initial event after induction of complete frataxin deficiency, followed by secondarily elevated ROS production and a late increase in iron content. Initial impairments of oxygen consumption and ATP production were found to be compensated in the late state and seemed to play a minor role in Friedreich ataxia pathophysiology. In conclusion and as predicted from its proposed role in iron sulfur cluster (ISC) biosynthesis, disruption of frataxin primarily causes impaired function of ISC-containing enzymes, whereas other consequences, including elevated ROS production and iron accumulation, appear secondary. These parameters and the robustness of the newly established system may additionally be used for a time-resolved study of pharmacological candidates in a HTS manner. PMID:27106929

  12. Exploration of transitional life events in individuals with Friedreich ataxia: Implications for genetic counseling

    OpenAIRE

    Farmer Jennifer M; Leib Jennifer R; White V Brook; Biesecker Barbara B

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Human development is a process of change, adaptation and growth. Throughout this process, transitional events mark important points in time when one's life course is significantly altered. This study captures transitional life events brought about or altered by Friedreich ataxia, a progressive chronic illness leading to disability, and the impact of these events on an affected individual's life course. Methods Forty-two adults with Friedreich ataxia (18-65y) were interview...

  13. Avances en el tratamiento de las ataxias crónicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Celeste Buompadre

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Las ataxias crónicas cerebelosas autosómicas recesivas constituyen el grupo más amplio de ataxias hereditarias, con presentación principalmente en la edad pediátrica, se caracterizan por degeneración o desarrollo anormal del cerebelo y de la médula espinal. Hasta el momento el tratamiento etiológico está disponible sólo para algunas formas: aquellas con defecto metabólico conocido como la abetalipoproteinemia, la ataxia con deficiencia de vitamina E y la xantomatosis cerebrotendinosa. En estas entidades la modificación de la dieta, el suplemento con vitaminas E y A principalmente y la administración de ácido quenodexocicólico pueden cambiar el curso de la enfermedad. En la mayoría de los otros tipos de ataxia el tratamiento es solo de soporte, como por ejemplo el uso de antioxidantes y quelantes del hierro en la ataxia de Friederich con el objetivo de disminuir los depósitos de hierro mitocondriales, de corticoides en la ataxia telangiectasia y de ubiquinona /coenzima Q10 en la ataxia por deficiencia de coenzima Q-10. Si bien hasta el momento ningún tratamiento es curativo para la mayoría de las ataxias crónicas autosómico recesivas, el diagnóstico precoz de estas entidades se asocia con una mejor respuesta a las diferentes drogas.

  14. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of the Trinucleotide-Repeat Spinocerebellar Ataxias

    OpenAIRE

    Ingram, Melissa A.C.; Harry T Orr; Clark, H. Brent

    2011-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are dominantly inherited disorders that primarily affect coordination of motor function but also frequently involve other brain functions. The models described in this review address mechanisms of trinucleotide-repeat expansions, particularly those relating to polyglutamine expression in the mutant proteins. Modeling chronic late-onset human ataxias in mice is difficult because of their short life-span. While this potential hindrance has been partially overco...

  15. Effect of X-radiation on DNA and histone synthesis in ataxia telangiectasia and normal lymphoblastoid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility that the radiosensitivity of lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is due to an aberrant content of histones has been examined. The histone pattern of lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from A-T patients was found to be indistinguishable from that obtained from normal individuals. X-ray irradiation led to a greater decrease in cell growth rate in the A-T cells than in the normal cells but was accompanied by a greater decrease of DNA synthesis rate in the normal cells. This difference in radiosensitivity was not reflected in differences in the content or rates of synthesis of histones or of major non-histone proteins in these cells. The authors conclude that the hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation in A-T cells is not due to fundamental differences in the composition or synthesis of the major chromosomal proteins. (Auth.)

  16. A Mutation in the Golgi Qb-SNARE Gene GOSR2 Causes Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy with Early Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Mark A.; Schwake, Michael; Bahlo, Melanie; Dibbens, Leanne M.; Lin, Meng; Gandolfo, Luke C.; Vears, Danya F.; O'Sullivan, John D.; Robertson, Thomas; Bayly, Marta A.; Gardner, Alison E.; Vlaar, Annemarie M.; Korenke, G. Christoph; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; de Coo, Irenaeus F.; Verhagen, Judith M.A.; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Gecz, Jozef; Berkovic, Samuel F.

    2011-01-01

    The progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PMEs) are a group of predominantly recessive disorders that present with action myoclonus, tonic-clonic seizures, and progressive neurological decline. Many PMEs have similar clinical presentations yet are genetically heterogeneous, making accurate diagnosis difficult. A locus for PME was mapped in a consanguineous family with a single affected individual to chromosome 17q21. An identical-by-descent, homozygous mutation in GOSR2 (c.430G>T, p.Gly144Trp), a Golgi vesicle transport gene, was identified in this patient and in four apparently unrelated individuals. A comparison of the phenotypes in these patients defined a clinically distinct PME syndrome characterized by early-onset ataxia, action myoclonus by age 6, scoliosis, and mildly elevated serum creatine kinase. This p.Gly144Trp mutation is equivalent to a loss of function and results in failure of GOSR2 protein to localize to the cis-Golgi. PMID:21549339

  17. Enhanced chromatid damage in blood lymphocytes after G2 phase x irradiation, a marker of the ataxia-telangiectasia gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assay for ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) heterozygotes, i.e., healthy carriers of the A-T gene(s), requiring only a small sample (3.5 mL) of peripheral blood, is described. Frequencies of chromatid aberrations in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated blood lymphocytes collected by demecolcine from 0.5 hour to 1.5 hours after x irradiation with 58 roentgens were twofold to threefold higher in A-T heterozygotes than in clinically normal controls and twofold to three-fold higher in A-T patients (homozygotes) than in A-T gene carriers. The persistence of chromatid breaks and gaps in lymphocytes following radiation-induced DNA damage during G2 suggests a deficiency or deficiencies in DNA repair that may be the defect at the molecular level that results in the enhanced radiosensitivity and cancer proneness characterizing A-T gene carriers and patients

  18. Actual problems of cellular cardiomyoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulat Kaupov

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides review of cellular technologies used incardiology, describes types of cellular preparations depending onsources of cells and types of compounding cells. The generalmechanisms of therapies with stem cells applications are described.Use of cellular preparations for treatment of cardiovascular diseasesand is improvement of the forecast at patients with heartinsufficiency of various genesis is considered as alternative topractice with organ transplantations. Efforts of biotechnologicallaboratories are directed on search of optimum population of cellsfor application in cardiology and studying of mechanisms andfactors regulating function of cardiac stem cells.

  19. The usefulness of the nuclear cardiology in the cellular implant in patients with severe myocardial damage; La utilidad de la cardiologia nuclear en el implante celular en pacientes con dano miocardico severo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omelas A, M.; Arguero S, R.; Garrido G, M.H.; Rodriguez C, A.; Careaga, G.; Castano G, R.; Nambo, M.J.; Pascual P, J.; Ortega R, A.; Gaxiola A, A.; Magana S, J.A.; Estrada A, H.; Equipo de Tecnicos en Medicina Nuclear [Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI IMSS Hospital de Cardiologia-Servicio de Medicina Nuclear Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The recent therapeutic advances as the cellular implant as well as those different protocols of image acquisition in the field of the Nuclear Cardiology its have allowed that the patient with severe myocardial damage and without some possibility of revascularization is benefited with these advances. Doubtless the Tl-201 par excellence has an important paper for standardize the more appropriate therapeutic behavior for the heart attack patient; reason by this investigation protocol was developed. The objective of the study was to identify the heart attack regions without viable tissue with SPECT in patient with important myocardial damage without some possibility of traditional revascularization; for the 'Stem cell' cellular implantation therapy. The methodology it was carried out by a study of myocardial perfusion in 10 patients with important myocardial damage previous cellular implants, with PICANUC/ SPECT methodology and using a software (Emory Tool Box) for the image processing validated by the University of Emory Atlanta GA; and using as tracer the Tl - 201 to identify the heart attack regions without presence of viable tissue with an analysis model of 17 segments standardized for the left ventricle; qualifying this way the myocardial perfusion in: 0 (normal), 1 (light), 2 (moderate), 3 (severe), 4 (absent) and x (bad technique). The conclusions were that the SPECT study with PICANUC methodology with Tl-201 is safe and effective for the precise localization for the cellular implantation via direct intra myocardial. (Author)

  20. Quantitative evaluation of brain involvement in ataxia telangiectasia by diffusion weighted MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firat, Ahmet Kemal [Inonu University Medical Faculty, Turgut Ozal Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Malatya 44280 (Turkey); Karakas, Hakki Muammer [Inonu University Medical Faculty, Turgut Ozal Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Malatya 44280 (Turkey)]. E-mail: hkarakas@inonu.edu.tr; Firat, Yezdan [Inonu University Medical Faculty, Turgut Ozal Medical Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Malatya (Turkey); Yakinci, Cengiz [Inonu University Medical Faculty, Turgut Ozal Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Malatya (Turkey)

    2005-11-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in diagnosing ataxia telangiectasia (AT) and to investigate the spatial distribution of cerebral microstructural changes caused by the disease. Methods: Six AT patients (9-13 years) and nine healthy control subjects were examined on 1.5 T scanner. In addition to conventional MR images, DWI were performed with a fat suppressed, multishot spin echo EPI sequence using B values of 0, 500 and 1000 s/mm{sup 2}. Mean ADC values were measured from 16 different supra and infratentorial location. The difference between controls and AT patients regarding ADC values, and the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of them in discrimination were analyzed with t-tests, logistic regression analysis, ANOVA and ROC curves. Results: Conventional images of the controls were normal. In AT patients, the only conventional MR abnormality was cerebellar atrophy. The difference between both groups regarding mean ADC values was not significant for any of the cerebral structures. In contrary to cerebrum, cerebellar mean ADC values of patients and controls were statistically different (p < 0.011-0.0001). Patients and controls were classified with 100% accuracy using ADC values of cerebellar white matter and cortex together (p < 0.016). The cut-off ADC value (0.699 mm{sup 2}/s) for middle cerebellar cortex had produced highest (100%) sensitivity and specificity. There was a difference between superior, middle and inferior cerebellar cortex regarding ADC values (p < 0.026). Superior cerebellar cortex (0.987 {+-} 0.1956 mm{sup 2}/s) had higher ADC values than the middle and inferior cerebellar cortex. Conclusion: DWI provides a supplementary and objective imaging finding in AT. This finding is highly accurate in the radiological discrimination of healthy subjects and AT. Our findings also implicate that AT causes a diffuse atrophy and mostly affects superior part of the cortex.