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Sample records for ataxia immunological characterization

  1. A new Purkinje cell antibody (anti-Ca associated with subacute cerebellar ataxia: immunological characterization

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    Horn Sigrun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a newly discovered serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF reactivity to Purkinje cells (PCs associated with subacute inflammatory cerebellar ataxia. The patient, a previously healthy 33-year-old lady, presented with severe limb and gait ataxia, dysarthria, and diplopia two weeks after she had recovered from a common cold. Immunohistochemical studies on mouse, rat, and monkey brain sections revealed binding of a high-titer (up to 1:10,000 IgG antibody to the cerebellar molecular layer, Purkinje cell (PC layer, and white matter. The antibody is highly specific for PCs and binds to the cytoplasm as well as to the inner side of the membrane of PC somata, dendrites and axons. It is produced by B cell clones within the CNS, belongs to the IgG1 subclass, and activates complement in vitro. Western blotting of primate cerebellum extract revealed binding of CSF and serum IgG to an 80-97 kDa protein. Extensive control studies were performed to rule out a broad panel of previously described paraneoplastic and non-paraneoplastic antibodies known to be associated with cerebellar ataxia. Screening of >9000 human full length proteins by means of a protein array and additional confirmatory experiments revealed Rho GTPase activating protein 26 (ARHGAP26, GRAF, oligophrenin-1-like protein as the target antigen. Preadsorption of the patient's serum with human ARHGAP26 but not preadsorption with other proteins resulted in complete loss of PC staining. Our findings suggest a role of autoimmunity against ARHGAP26 in the pathogenesis of subacute inflammatory cerebellar ataxia, and extend the panel of diagnostic markers for this devastating disease.

  2. Ataxia-telangiectasia. (Clinical and immunological aspects).

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    Boder, E; Sedgwick, R P

    1970-01-01

    This syndrome was defined by the authors in 1947. Earlier publications of similar disease descriptions were by Syllaba and Henner (1926), Louis-Bar (1941). The authors at present have a stock of 253 cases. The cardinal symptoms of this phakomatosis are: Cerebellar ataxia which begin in infancy and take a slowly progressive course. In the late stages free walking and standing are no longer possible. Progressive atactic speech disorders, cerebellar atrophy in the pneumoencephalogram. Slowly progressing symmetrical skin and mucosal telangiectasia in the face and especially on the conjunctivae at the age of 3 to 6 years. Relapsing sinopulmonary infections with a tendency toward the development of bronchiectases. Apraxia of eye movements. Atrophy of facial skin and premature graying of hair. Recessively hereditary disorder with a high familial manifestation. This syndrome combines the spinocerebellar degeneration, phakomatoses, and infantile dementia processes. Such other conditions as abnormity or absence of thymus, reduction in gamma globulins, amino-aciduria, autosomal-recessive inheritance suggest a genetically determined "error of metabolism".

  3. Ataxia.

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    Winchester, Sara; Singh, Piyush K; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2013-01-01

    The approach to the child with ataxia requires a detailed history and careful general and neurological examination as well as selected blood work and brain imaging and increasingly available genetic testing for inherited ataxias that usually have an episodic or progressive presentation. The differential of acute and recurring ataxia covered in this chapter includes intoxication (e.g., antiepileptics, lead, alcohol), postinfectious cerebellitis, hemorrhage, ischemic stroke, tumor (posterior fossa or cerebellum), brainstem encephalitis, occult neuroblastoma, Miller Fisher syndrome, conversion reaction, multiple sclerosis, epileptic pseudoataxia, vasculitis (e.g., Kawasaki), metabolic etiologies (e.g., maple syrup urine disease, pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency, biotinidase deficiency, Hartnup disease, and argininosuccinic aciduria), migraine, migraine equivalents (benign paroxysmal positional vertigo), autosomal dominant episodic ataxias (with seven types currently identified), and hypothyroidism. Cooperation with therapists and providers from other specialties including ophthalmology and genetics and metabolism is essential to caring for these children and their families. PMID:23622331

  4. Ramsay Hunt Syndrome : Clinical Characterization of Progressive Myoclonus Ataxia Caused by GOSR2 Mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Egmond, Martje E.; Verschuuren - Bemelmans, Cornelia; Nibbeling, Esther A.; Elting, Jan Willem J.; Sival, Deborah A.; Brouwer, Oebele F.; de Vries, Jeroen J.; Kremer, Hubertus P.; Sinke, Richard J.; Tijssen, Marina A.; de Koning, Tom J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ramsay Hunt syndrome (progressive myoclonus ataxia) is a descriptive diagnosis characterized by myoclonus, ataxia, and infrequent seizures. Often the etiology cannot be determined. Recently, a mutation in the GOSR2 gene (c.430G>T, p.Gly144Trp) was reported in 6 patients with childhood-on

  5. Frequency analysis of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias in mainland Chinese patients and clinical and molecular characterization of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Hong; TANG Bei-sha; XU Bo; ZHAO Guo-hua; SHEN Lu; TANG Jian-guang; LI Qing-hua; XIA Kun

    2005-01-01

    Background Dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. This study was to further assess the frequency of SCA1 (spinocerebellar ataxia type 1), SCA2, SCA3/MJD (spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease), SCA6, SCA7, SCA8, SCA10, SCA12, SCA14, SCA17 and DRPLA (dentatorubro-pallidoluysian atrophy) in mainland Chinese, and to specifically characterize mainland Chinese patients with SCA6 in terms of clinical and molecular features.Methods Using a molecular approach, we investigated SCA in 120 mainland Chinese families with dominantly inherited ataxias and in 60 mainland Chinese patients with sporadic ataxias. Clinical and molecular features of SCA6 were further characterized in 13 patients from 4 families. Results SCA3/MJD was the most common type of autosomal dominant SCA in mainland Chinese, accounting for 83 patients from 59 families (49.2%), followed by SCA2[8(6.7%)], SCA1[7(5.8%)], SCA6[4(3.3%)], SCA7[1(0.8%)], SCA8(0%), SCA10(0%), SCA12(0%), SCA14(0%), SCA17(0%) and DRPLA(0%). The genes responsible for 41 (34.2%) of dominantly inherited SCA families remain to be determined. Among the 60 patients with sporadic ataxias in the present series, 3 (5.0%) was found to harbor SCA3 mutations while none was found to harbor SCA6 mutations. In the 4 families with SCA6, significant anticipation was found in the absence of genetic instability on transmission.Conclusion A geographic cluster of families with SCA6 subtype was initially identified in a mainland Chinese population.

  6. Spinocerebellar ataxias Ataxias espinocerebelares

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    Hélio A.G. Teive

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs constitute a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia in association with some or all of the following conditions: ophthalmoplegia, pyramidal signs, movement disorders, pigmentary retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, cognitive dysfunction and dementia. OBJECTIVE: To carry out a clinical and genetic review of the main types of SCA. METHOD: The review was based on a search of the PUBMED and OMIM databases. RESULTS: Thirty types of SCAs are currently known, and 16 genes associated with the disease have been identified. The most common types are SCA type 3, or Machado-Joseph disease, SCA type 10 and SCA types 7, 2, 1 and 6. SCAs are genotypically and phenotypically very heterogeneous. A clinical algorithm can be used to distinguish between the different types of SCAs. CONCLUSIONS: Detailed clinical neurological examination of SCA patients can be of great help when assessing them, and the information thus gained can be used in an algorithm to screen patients before molecular tests to investigate the correct etiology of the disease are requested.As ataxias espinocerebelares (AECs compreendem um grupo heterogeneo de enfermidades neurodegenerativas, que se caracterizam pela presença de ataxia cerebelar progressiva, associada de forma variada com oftalmoplegia, sinais piramidais, distúrbios do movimento, retinopatia pigmentar, neuropatia periférica, disfunção cognitiva e demência. OBJETIVO: Realizar uma revisão clínico-genética dos principais tipos de AECs. MÉTODO: A revisão foi realizada através da pesquisa pelo sistema do PUBMED e do OMIM. RESULTADOS: Na atualidade existem cerca de 30 tipos de AECs, com a descoberta de 16 genes. Os tipos mais comuns são a AEC tipo 3, ou doença de Machado-Joseph, a AEC tipo 10, e as AECs tipo 7, 2 1, e 6. As AECs apresentam grande heterogeneidade genotípica e fenotípica. Pode-se utilizar um algoritmo clínico para a

  7. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia with oculomotor apraxia

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    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ataxia with oculomotor apraxia ataxia with oculomotor apraxia Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia is a condition characterized by ...

  8. Identification and characterization of novel PDYN mutations in dominant cerebellar ataxia cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jezierska, Justyna; Stevanin, Giovanni; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Fokkens, Michiel R.; Zagnoli, Fabien; Kok, Jerome; Goas, Jean-Yves; Bertrand, Pierre; Robin, Christophe; Brice, Alexis; Bakalkin, Georgy; Durr, Alexandra; Verbeek, Dineke S.

    2013-01-01

    We have recently identified missense mutations in prodynorphin (PDYN), the precursor to dynorphin opioid peptides, as the cause for spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA23) in Dutch ataxia cases. We report a screen of PDYN for mutations in 371 cerebellar ataxia cases, which had a positive family history; most

  9. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias

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    Palau Francesc

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA are a heterogeneous group of rare neurological disorders involving both central and peripheral nervous system, and in some case other systems and organs, and characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of cerebellum and spinal cord, autosomal recessive inheritance and, in most cases, early onset occurring before the age of 20 years. This group encompasses a large number of rare diseases, the most frequent in Caucasian population being Friedreich ataxia (estimated prevalence 2–4/100,000, ataxia-telangiectasia (1–2.5/100,000 and early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (1/100,000. Other forms ARCA are much less common. Based on clinicogenetic criteria, five main types ARCA can be distinguished: congenital ataxias (developmental disorder, ataxias associated with metabolic disorders, ataxias with a DNA repair defect, degenerative ataxias, and ataxia associated with other features. These diseases are due to mutations in specific genes, some of which have been identified, such as frataxin in Friedreich ataxia, α-tocopherol transfer protein in ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED, aprataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA1, and senataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2. Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by ancillary tests such as neuroimaging (magnetic resonance imaging, scanning, electrophysiological examination, and mutation analysis when the causative gene is identified. Correct clinical and genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counseling and prognosis and, in some instances, pharmacological treatment. Due to autosomal recessive inheritance, previous familial history of affected individuals is unlikely. For most ARCA there is no specific drug treatment except for coenzyme Q10 deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia.

  10. Friedreich's Ataxia

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    Friedreich's ataxia is an inherited disease that damages your nervous system. The damage affects your spinal cord and the ... of 5 and 15. The main symptom is ataxia, which means trouble coordinating movements. Specific symptoms include ...

  11. Ataxia Telangiectasia

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    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare, inherited disease. It affects the nervous system, immune system, and ... young children, usually before age 5. They include Ataxia - trouble coordinating movements Poor balance Slurred speech Tiny, ...

  12. Diagnosis of Ataxia

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    ... Donate to the National Ataxia Foundation Diagnosis of Ataxia Being diagnosed with Ataxia can be overwhelming. Below ... help you to understand ataxia better. What is Ataxia? The word "ataxia", comes from the Greek word, " ...

  13. Cerebellar ataxia and functional genomics : Identifying the routes to cerebellar neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, C J L M; Verbeek, D S

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias are progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by atrophy of the cerebellum leading to motor dysfunction, balance problems, and limb and gait ataxia. These include among others, the dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias, recessive cerebellar ataxias such as Fried

  14. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia

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    ... anemia and ataxia X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Close All Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia is a rare condition characterized by a blood ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome

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    ... dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Open All Close All Description Dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia (DCMA) syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  16. Causes of Ataxia

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    ... Donate to the National Ataxia Foundation Causes of Ataxia The hereditary ataxias are genetic, which means they ... the disease is inherited as a recessive gene. Ataxia Gene Identified in 1993 The first ataxia gene ...

  17. Extraction, Characterization and Immunological Activity of Polysaccharides from Rhizoma gastrodiae

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    Juncheng Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A response surface and Box-Behnken design approach was applied to augment polysaccharide extraction from the residue of Rhizoma gastrodiae. Statistical analysis revealed that the linear and quadratic terms for three variables during extraction exhibited obvious effects on extraction yield. The optimum conditions were determined to be a liquid-to-solid ratio of 54 mL/g, an extraction temperature of 74 °C, an extraction time of 66 min, and three extractions. These conditions resulted in a maximum Rhizoma gastrodiae polysaccharide (RGP extraction yield of 6.11% ± 0.13%. Two homogeneous polysaccharides (RGP-1a and RGP-1b were obtained using DEAE cellulose-52 and Sephadex G-100 columns. The preliminary characterization of RGP-1a and RGP-1b was performed using HPLC-RID, HPGPC, and FTIR. Tests of the immunological activity in vitro showed that the two polysaccharides could significantly stimulate macrophages to release NO and enhance phagocytosis in a dose-dependent manner. In particular, RGP-1b (200 μg/mL and LPS (2 μg/mL had almost the same influence on the NO production and phagocytic activity of RAW 264.7 macrophages (p > 0.05. All the data obtained indicate that RGP-1a and RGP-1b have the potential to be developed as a health food.

  18. Extraction, Characterization and Immunological Activity of Polysaccharides from Rhizoma gastrodiae.

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    Chen, Juncheng; Tian, Shan; Shu, Xiaoying; Du, Hongtao; Li, Na; Wang, Junru

    2016-01-01

    A response surface and Box-Behnken design approach was applied to augment polysaccharide extraction from the residue of Rhizoma gastrodiae. Statistical analysis revealed that the linear and quadratic terms for three variables during extraction exhibited obvious effects on extraction yield. The optimum conditions were determined to be a liquid-to-solid ratio of 54 mL/g, an extraction temperature of 74 °C, an extraction time of 66 min, and three extractions. These conditions resulted in a maximum Rhizoma gastrodiae polysaccharide (RGP) extraction yield of 6.11% ± 0.13%. Two homogeneous polysaccharides (RGP-1a and RGP-1b) were obtained using DEAE cellulose-52 and Sephadex G-100 columns. The preliminary characterization of RGP-1a and RGP-1b was performed using HPLC-RID, HPGPC, and FTIR. Tests of the immunological activity in vitro showed that the two polysaccharides could significantly stimulate macrophages to release NO and enhance phagocytosis in a dose-dependent manner. In particular, RGP-1b (200 μg/mL) and LPS (2 μg/mL) had almost the same influence on the NO production and phagocytic activity of RAW 264.7 macrophages (p > 0.05). All the data obtained indicate that RGP-1a and RGP-1b have the potential to be developed as a health food. PMID:27347944

  19. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 2

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    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions SCA2 spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 ( SCA2 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 3

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    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions SCA3 spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 ( SCA3 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 6

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    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions SCA6 spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 ( SCA6 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

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    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions SCA1 spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 ( SCA1 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  3. Enzymatic, immunological and phylogenetic characterization of Brucella suis urease

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    Sriranganathan Nammalwar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sequenced genomes of the Brucella spp. have two urease operons, ure-1 and ure-2, but there is evidence that only one is responsible for encoding an active urease. The present work describes the purification and the enzymatic and phylogenomic characterization of urease from Brucella suis strain 1330. Additionally, the urease reactivity of sera from patients diagnosed with brucellosis was examined. Results Urease encoded by the ure-1 operon of Brucella suis strain 1330 was purified to homogeneity using ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatographies. The urease was purified 51-fold with a recovery of 12% of the enzyme activity and 0.24% of the total protein. The enzyme had an isoelectric point of 5, and showed optimal activity at pH 7.0 and 28–35°C. The purified enzyme exhibited a Michaelis-Menten saturation kinetics with a Km of 5.60 ± 0.69 mM. Hydroxyurea and thiourea are competitive inhibitors of the enzyme with Ki of 1.04 ± 0.31 mM and 26.12 ± 2.30 mM, respectively. Acetohydroxamic acid also inhibits the enzyme in a competitive way. The molecular weight estimated for the native enzyme was between 130–135 kDa by gel filtration chromatography and 157 ± 7 kDa using 5–10% polyacrylamide gradient non-denaturing gel. Only three subunits in SDS-PAGE were identified: two small subunits of 14,000 Da and 15,500 Da, and a major subunit of 66,000 Da. The amino terminal sequence of the purified large subunit corresponded to the predicted amino acid sequence encoded by ureC1. The UreC1 subunit was recognized by sera from patients with acute and chronic brucellosis. By phylogenetic and cluster structure analyses, ureC1 was related to the ureC typically present in the Rhizobiales; in contrast, the ureC2 encoded in the ure-2 operon is more related to distant species. Conclusion We have for the first time purified and characterized an active urease from B. suis. The enzyme was characterized at the kinetic

  4. Molecular and immunological characterization of mycobacteria associated with bovine farcy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to: i.isolate and identify Mycobacterium farcinogenese from the clinical samples (lymph nodes and serum), ii.charcterization of these species including mycobacterium senegalense and the related taxa using molecular biology methods (DNA extraction, PCR amplification, restriction fragment length plymorphism determination using restriction enzymes and DNA sequencing) and iii.immunological analysis of the species (animal pathogenicity tests, ELISA using sera samples from the clinical cases, protein antigen bands determination using SDS-PAGE method, and antigen-antibodies immunoassay using Western blotting and immunodiffusion tests). Seventeen clinical isolates identified as Mycobacterium farcinogenese were obtained from 578 lymph nodes and 36 positive sera samples of the 269 which were tested. Molecular characterization of the test strains was carried out using independent taxonomic criteria derived from the application of morphological, enzymatic and chemotaxonomic methods. DNA extraction method gave clearly resolved bands on agarose gel electrophoresis with clear common bands of 1500 base pairs. The extracted DNA was used as template for pcr amplification with universal primer 27f (5'AGAGTTTGATCCGGCTAG-3') and primer 1525r' (5'AAGGAGGTATCGAGCC-3') with appended restriction sites being ideal primers for amplification. No significant difference in the DNA fingerprints of the farcy agents were reproducible over successive generations and were in line with their placement in the genus Mycobacterium. PCR-DNA fingerprinting using BamHI restriction enzymes for restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis as a means for differentiating between Mycobacterium farcinogenes and Mycobacterium senegalense. The 16SrDNA sequencing of Mycobacterium farcinogenes and Mycobacterium senegalense the farcy sole agents, gave data of variable signals with 1482 nucleotides with 65 corresponding almost complete nucleotide sequences in 1404 positions. Manual

  5. Acute cerebellar ataxia

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    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, especially younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  6. Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxias: A Korean Perspective

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    Ji Sun Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary ataxia is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive ataxia combined with/without peripheral neuropathy, extrapyramidal symptoms, pyramidal symptoms, seizure, and multiple systematic involvements. More than 35 autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have been designated as spinocerebellar ataxia, and there are 55 recessive ataxias that have not been named systematically. Conducting genetic sequencing to confirm a diagnosis is difficult due to the large amount of subtypes with phenotypic overlap. The prevalence of hereditary ataxia can vary among countries, and estimations of prevalence and subtype frequencies are necessary for planning a diagnostic strategy in a specific population. This review covers the various hereditary ataxias reported in the Korean population with a focus on the prevalence and subtype frequencies as the clinical characteristics of the various subtypes.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: PRICKLE1-related progressive myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia

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    ... with ataxia PRICKLE1-related progressive myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Description PRICKLE1 -related progressive myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia is a rare inherited condition characterized by recurrent ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1

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    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ARCA1 autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 ( ARCA1 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  9. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 : a genetic update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Dineke S.

    2009-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 locus was identified in 2004 based on linkage analysis in a large, two-generation Dutch family. The age of onset ranged 43-56 years and the phenotype was characterized by a slowly progressive, isolated ataxia. Neuropathological examination revealed neuronal loss in

  10. Maculopathy and spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebranchu, Pierre; Le Meur, Guylène; Magot, Armelle;

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia is a rare heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by cerebellar symptoms, often associated with other multisystemic signs. Mild optic neuropathy has been associated with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), but macular dysfunction has been reported in...

  11. Cerebral Abnormalities in Adults with Ataxia-Telangiectasia

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, D.D.M.; Barker, P. B.; Lederman, H M; Crawford, T O

    2013-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia, an autosomal recessive disorder caused by defect of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene, is characterized by progressive neurologic impairment with cerebellar atrophy, ocular and cutaneous telangiectasia, immunodeficiency, heightened sensitivity to ionizing radiation and susceptibility to developing lymphoreticular malignancy. Supratentorial brain abnormalities have been reported only rarely. In this study, brain MRI was performed in 10 adults with ataxia-telangiecta...

  12. Clinical data and characterization of the liver conditional mouse model exclude neoplasia as a non-neurological manifestation associated with Friedreich’s ataxia

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    Alain Martelli

    2012-11-01

    Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA is the most common hereditary ataxia in the caucasian population and is characterized by a mixed spinocerebellar and sensory ataxia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and increased incidence of diabetes. FRDA is caused by impaired expression of the FXN gene coding for the mitochondrial protein frataxin. During the past ten years, the development of mouse models of FRDA has allowed better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease. Among the mouse models of FRDA, the liver conditional mouse model pointed to a tumor suppressor activity of frataxin leading to the hypothesis that individuals with FRDA might be predisposed to cancer. In the present work, we investigated the presence and the incidence of neoplasia in the largest FRDA patient cohorts from the USA, Australia and Europe. As no predisposition to cancer could be observed in both cohorts, we revisited the phenotype of the liver conditional mouse model. Our results show that frataxin-deficient livers developed early mitochondriopathy, iron-sulfur cluster deficits and intramitochondrial dense deposits, classical hallmarks observed in frataxin-deficient tissues and cells. With age, a minority of mice developed structures similar to the ones previously associated with tumor formation. However, these peripheral structures contained dying, frataxin-deficient hepatocytes, whereas the inner liver structure was composed of a pool of frataxin-positive cells, due to inefficient Cre-mediated recombination of the Fxn gene, that contributed to regeneration of a functional liver. Together, our data demonstrate that frataxin deficiency and tumorigenesis are not associated.

  13. Characterization and immunological activity of different forms of recombinant secreted Hc of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B products expressed in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Bo; Shi, DanYang; Chang, Shaohong; Gong, Xin; Yu, YunZhou; Sun, Zhiwei; Wu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The recombinant Hc proteins of botulinum neurotoxins and tetanus toxin are exclusively produced by intracellular heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris for use in subunit vaccines; the same Hc proteins produced by secreted heterologous expression are hyper-glycosylated and immunologically inert. Here, several different recombinant secreted Hc proteins of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B (BHc) were expressed in yeast and we characterized and assessed their immunological activity in detail. ...

  14. Friedreich's Ataxia Research Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adolescents Affected by Friedreich's Ataxia: A One-Year Longitudinal Study Pharmacological treatments for Friedreich ataxia FARA News ... FA What is FA Message for New Families Cardiac Primer Basics of Drug Development Participation in Clinical ...

  15. Preparation, Characterization, and Determination of Immunological Activities of Transfer Factor Specific to Human Sperm Antigen

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    Jianwei Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The objective of this study was to prepare, characterize, and determine immunological activities of specific transfer factor (STF specific to human sperm antigen (HSA for the preparation of antisperm contraceptive vaccine that can be used as an immunocontraceptive. Methods. HSA-STF was prepared using the spleens of rabbits vaccinated with HSA. The specific immunological activities were examined by lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT, leukocyte adhesion inhibition test (LAIT, and by determining the concentrations of IL-4, γ-IFN, and IL-21. HSA-STF was a helveolous substance, having a pH value of 7.0±0.4 and UV absorption maxima at 258 ± 6 nm. It contained seventeen amino acids; glycine and glutamic acids were the highest in terms of concentrations (38.8 μg/mL and 36.3 μg/mL, resp.. Results. The concentration of polypeptide was 2.34±0.31 mg/mL, and ribose was 0.717±0.043 mg/mL. The stimulation index for lymphocyte proliferation test was 1.84, and the leukocyte adhesion inhibition rate was 37.7%. There was a statistically significant difference between the cultural lymphocytes with HSA-STF and non-HSA-STF for γ-IFN and IL-21 (P0.05. Conclusion. HSA-STF was prepared and characterized successfully. It had immunological activity which could transfer the immune response specific to HSA and prove to be a potential candidate for the development of male immunocontraceptive agents.

  16. Cutaneous granulomas in ataxia telangiectasia and other primary immunodeficiencies: Reflection of inappropriate immune regulation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.Y.T. Chiam (L. Y T); M.M.M. Verhagen (Mijke); A. Haraldsson (Ásgeir); N.M. Wulffraat (Nico); G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan); M.G. Netea (Mihai); C.M.R. Weemaes (Corry); M.M.B. Seyger (Marieke); M. van Deuren (Marcel)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Non-infective cutaneous granulomas with unknown pathogenesis occur in various primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) including ataxia telangiectasia (A-T). Objective: To find a common immunological denominator in these cutaneous granulomas. Methods: The dermatological and immunolo

  17. Gene Testing for Hereditary Ataxia

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    FAQ NATIONAL ATAXIA FOUNDATION FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT... Gene Testing for Hereditary Ataxia This fact sheet provides an overview of gene testing for ataxia. It also addresses commonly asked ...

  18. Characterization and immunological activity of different forms of recombinant secreted Hc of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B products expressed in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Shi, DanYang; Chang, ShaoHong; Gong, Xin; Yu, YunZhou; Sun, ZhiWei; Wu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The recombinant Hc proteins of botulinum neurotoxins and tetanus toxin are exclusively produced by intracellular heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris for use in subunit vaccines; the same Hc proteins produced by secreted heterologous expression are hyper-glycosylated and immunologically inert. Here, several different recombinant secreted Hc proteins of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B (BHc) were expressed in yeast and we characterized and assessed their immunological activity in detail. Recombinant low-glycosylated secreted BHc products (BSK) were also immunologically inert, similar to hyper-glycosylated BHc products (BSG), although deglycosylation restored their immunological activities. Unexpectedly, deglycosylated proBHc contained an unexpected pro-peptide of an α-factor signal and fortuitous N-linked glycosylation sites in the non-cleaved pro-peptide sequences, but not in the BHc sequences. Notably, a non-glycosylated secreted homogeneous BHc isoform (mBHc), which we successfully prepared after deleting the pro-peptide and removing its single potential glycosylation site, was immunologically active and could confer effective protective immunity, similarly to non-glycosylated rBHc. In summary, we conclude that a non-glycosylated secreted BHc isoform can be prepared in yeast by deleting the pro-peptide of the α-factor signal and mutating its single potential glycosylation site. This approach provides a rational and feasible strategy for the secretory expression of botulism or other toxin antigens. PMID:25567004

  19. Extraction optimization, preliminary characterization and immunological activities in vitro of polysaccharides from Elaeagnus angustifolia L. pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hongtao; Chen, Juncheng; Tian, Shan; Gu, Hongling; Li, Na; Sun, Yao; Ru, Jiajia; Wang, Junru

    2016-10-20

    In this research, extraction optimization, preliminary characterization and immunological activities in vitro of polysaccharides from Elaeagnus angustifolia L. pulp were investigated. A response surface methodology (RSM) with a Box-Behnken design (BBD) was used to optimize the extraction process. The maximum EAP yield was 9.82±0.38%, which is in good agreement with the predicted value (9.93±0.24%). Two homogeneous polysaccharides, EAP-1a and EAP-1b with molecular weights of 8.70kDa and 4.39kDa respectively, were prepared by DEAE-52 cellulose and Sephadex G-100 columns and characterized by HPLC, HPGPC, and FT-IR. Three polysaccharides (EAP, EAP-1a and EAP-1b) could stimulate macrophages to release NO and enhance phagocytic activities of RAW 264.7 cells in dose-dependent manner. Moreover, there was no significant difference between crude EAP group (400μg/mL) and positive control group (LPS) in effects on macrophages. The results implied that EAP had the potential to be developed as natural medicines or health foods. PMID:27474576

  20. Genetics Home Reference: fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions FXTAS fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... All Close All Description Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome ( FXTAS ) is characterized by problems with movement ...

  1. Friedreich Ataxia: Molecular Mechanisms, Redox Considerations, and Therapeutic Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Renata; Lefevre, Sophie; Sliwa, Dominika; Seguin, Alexandra; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Lesuisse, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage are at the origin of numerous neurodegenerative diseases like Friedreich ataxia and Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases. Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most common hereditary ataxia, with one individual affected in 50,000. This disease is characterized by progressive degeneration of the central and peripheral nervous systems, cardiomyopathy, and increased incidence of diabetes mellitus. FRDA is caused by a dynamic mutation, a GAA trinucleotide repe...

  2. Friedreich's Ataxia (FA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facts About Friedreich’s Ataxia Updated December 2009 Michelle Moffitt Smith Michelle and James Smith at their wedding Dear Friends: W hen I was ... some tests, I found out I had Friedreich’s ataxia. My parents and I immediately learned all we ...

  3. Purification, cloning, and immunological characterization of arginine kinase, a novel allergen of Octopus fangsiao.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hai-Wang; Cao, Min-Jie; Cai, Qiu-Feng; Ruan, Mi-Mi; Mao, Hai-Yan; Su, Wen-Jin; Liu, Guang-Ming

    2012-03-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) is an important enzyme participating in energy metabolism in invertebrates, but, to date, there have been no reports that AK from octopus is an allergen. In this study, octopus AK was purified, and its molecular biological, immunological, and physicochemical characterizations were analyzed. The results showed that octopus AK was purified and confirmed by mass spectrometry for the first time, and its molecular mass was 38 kDa. The full-length gene sequence of octopus AK encompassed 1209 bp and was predicted to encode a protein with 348 amino acid residues. The homology of octopus AK and crustacean AK was about 54%, but the similarity between their three-dimensional structures was high. Octopus AK could react with mouse anti-shrimp AK and rabbit anti-crab AK polyclonal antibody singly. Octopus AK could also react with specific IgE of the sera from octopus-allergic patients effectively, whereas crab AK could inhibit the reaction between them. Finally, the IgE-binding activity of octopus AK could be reduced in the processes of thermal or acid-alkali treatment. In summary, AK was identified as a novel allergen in octopus, which had a sensitizing ability similar to that of crustacean AK. This is significant in allergy diagnosis and the treatment of octopus-allergic disorders.

  4. Spinocerebellar ataxia 17: Inconsistency between phenotype and neuroimage findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia 17 (SCA17 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease clinically characterized by the presence of cerebellar ataxia in combination with variable neurological symptoms. Here we report a Chinese SCA17 family which proband′s clinical manifestation was inconsistent with the neuroimage findings.

  5. Patients with an inherited syndrome characterized by immunodeficiency, microcephaly, and chromosomal instability: genetic relationship to ataxia telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaspers, N.G.; Taalman, R.D.; Baan, C.

    1988-01-01

    Fibroblast cultures from six unrelated patients having a familial type of immunodeficiency combined with microcephaly, developmental delay, and chromosomal instability were studied with respect to their response to ionizing radiation. The cells from five of them resembled those from individuals with ataxia telangiectasia (AT) in that they were two to three times more radiosensitive on the basis of clonogenic cell survival. In addition, after exposure to either X-rays or bleomycin, they showed an inhibition of DNA replication that was less pronounced than that in normal cells and characteristic of AT fibroblasts. However, the patients are clinically very different from AT patients, not showing any signs of neurocutaneous symptoms. Genetic complementation studies in fused cells, with the radioresistant DNA synthesis used as a marker, showed that the patients' cells could complement representatives of all presently known AT complementation groups. Furthermore, they were shown to constitute a genetically heterogeneous group as well. It is concluded that these patients are similar to AT patients with respect to cytological parameters. The clinical differences between these patients and AT patients are a reflection of genetic heterogeneity. The data indicate that the patients suffer from a chromosome-instability syndrome that is distinct from AT.

  6. Diet for Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discuss these guidelines with a physical therapist and nutritionist familiar with movement disorders. Ataxia is a complex ... fiber to your diet with your physician or nutritionist, ask them if you might also benefit by ...

  7. Purification of full-length human Pregnane and Xenobiotic Receptor: polyclonal antibody preparation for immunological characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mallampati SARADHI; Biji KRISHNA; Gauranga MUKHOPADHYAY; Rakesh K TYAGI

    2005-01-01

    Pregnane and Xenobiotic Receptor (PXR; or Steroid and Xenobiotic Receptor, SXR), a new member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is thought to modulate a network of genes that are involved in xenobiotic metabolism and elimination. To further explore the role of PXR in body's homeostatic mechanisms, we for the first time, report successful prokaryotic expression and purification of full-length PXR and preparation of polyclonal antibody against the whole protein. Thefull-length cDNA encoding a 434 amino acids protein was sub-cloned into prokaryotic expression vector, pET-30b and transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells for efficient over expression. The inclusion body fraction, containing the expressed recombinant protein, was purified first by solubilizing in sarcosine extraction buffer and then by affinity column chromatography using Ni-NTA His-Bind matrix. The efficacy of anti-PXR antibody was confirmed by immunocytology, Western blot analysis, EMSA and immunohistochemistry. The antibody obtained was capable of detecting human and mouse PXR with high specificity and sensitivity. Immunofluorescence staining of COS-1 cells transfected with human or mouse PXR showed a clear nuclear localization. Results from immunohistochemistry showed that level of PXR in liver sections is immunologically detectable in the nuclei. Similar to exogenously transfected PXR, Western blot analysis of cell extract from HepG2 and COLO320DM cells revealed a major protein band for endogenous PXR having the expected molecular weight of 50 kDa. Relevance of other immunodetectable bands with reference to PXR isoforms and current testimony are evaluated. Advantages of antibody raised against full-length PXR protein for functional characterization of receptor is discussed and its application for clinical purposes is envisaged.

  8. Phenotype variability and early onset ataxia symptoms in spinocerebellar ataxia type 7: comparison and correlation with other spinocerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius Cristino de Albuquerque

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA are a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by heterogeneous clinical presentation. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7 is caused by an abnormal CAG repeat expansion and includes cerebellar signs associated with visual loss and ophthalmoplegia. Marked anticipation and dynamic mutation is observed in SCA7. Moreover, phenotype variability and very early onset of symptoms may occur. In this article, a large series of Brazilian patients with different SCA subtypes was evaluated, and we compared the age of onset of SCA7 with other SCA. From the 26 patients with SCA7, 4 manifested their symptoms before 10-year-old. Also, occasionally the parents may have the onset of symptoms after their children. In conclusion, our study highlights the genetic anticipation phenomenon that occurs in SCA7 families. Patients with very early onset ataxia in the context of a remarkable family history, must be considered and tested for SCA7.

  9. Brain pathology of spinocerebellar ataxias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidel, Kay; Siswanto, Sonny; Brunt, Ewout R. P.; den Dunnen, Wilfred; Korf, Horst-Werner; Rueb, Udo

    2012-01-01

    The autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCAs) represent a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases with progressive ataxia and cerebellar degeneration. The current classification of this disease group is based on the underlying genetic defects and their typical disease courses. Accordin

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Friedreich ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Friedreich ataxia Friedreich ataxia Enable ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: episodic ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mapping for a large pedigree with episodic ataxia. Neurology. 2005 Jul 12;65(1):156-8. Citation ... RW. Clinical spectrum of episodic ataxia type 2. Neurology. 2004 Jan 13;62(1):17-22. Citation ...

  12. Radiological imaging in ataxia telangiectasia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahama, Ishani; Sinclair, Kate; Pannek, Kerstin; Lavin, Martin; Rose, Stephen

    2014-08-01

    The human genetic disorder ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is characterised by neurodegeneration, immunodeficiency, radiosensitivity, cell cycle checkpoint defects, genomic instability and cancer predisposition. Progressive cerebellar ataxia represents the most debilitating aspect of this disorder. At present, there is no therapy available to cure or prevent the progressive symptoms of A-T. While it is possible to alleviate some of the symptoms associated with immunodeficiency and deficient lung function, neither the predisposition to cancer nor the progressive neurodegeneration can be prevented. Significant effort has focused on improving our understanding of various clinical, genetic and immunological aspects of A-T; however, little attention has been directed towards identifying altered brain structure and function using MRI. To date, most imaging studies have reported radiological anomalies in A-T. This review outlines the clinical and biological features of A-T along with known radiological imaging anomalies. In addition, we briefly discuss the advent of high-resolution MRI in conjunction with diffusion-weighted imaging, which enables improved investigation of the microstructural tissue environment, giving insight into the loss in integrity of motor networks due to abnormal neurodevelopmental or progressive neurodegenerative processes. Such imaging approaches have yet to be applied in the study of A-T and could provide important new information regarding the relationship between mutation of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene and the integrity of motor circuitry. PMID:24683014

  13. Neuropathology in classical and variant ataxia-telangiectasia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, M.M.M.; Martin, J.J.; Deuren, M. van; Ceuterick-de Groote, C.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Kremer, B.; Taylor, M.A.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Lammens, M.M.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is classically characterized by progressive neurodegeneration, oculocutaneous telangiectasia, immunodeficiency and elevated alpha-fetoprotein levels. Some patients, classified as variant A-T, exhibit a milder clinical course. In the latter patients extrapyramidal symptoms

  14. National Ataxia Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 60th NAF Annual Ataxia Conference San Antonio, TX March 10-11, 2017 2017 AAC Announcment 2017 AAC Information Support MY Conference Campaign 2017 AAC Sponsor Packet 2017 AAC Exhibitor Packet 2016 AAC Presentations AAC Travel Grant Fund Adult Travel Grant Application Child Travel ...

  15. Epilepsy and Spinocerebellar Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A large consanguinous family from Saudi Arabia with 4 affected children presenting with an autosomal recessive ataxia, generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy and mental retardation is reported from the Institut de Genetique, Universite Louis Pasteur, Illkirch, France; Division of Pediatric Neurology, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; and other centers.

  16. Comparison of Biological and Immunological Characterization of Lipopolysaccharides From Brucella abortus RB51 and S19

    OpenAIRE

    Kianmehr, Zahra; Kaboudanian Ardestani, Sussan; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Fotouhi, Fatemeh; Alamian, Saeed; Ahmadian, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brucella abortus RB51 is a rough stable mutant strain, which has been widely used as a live vaccine for prevention of brucellosis in cattle instead of B. abortus strain S19. B. abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has unique properties in comparison to other bacterial LPS. Objectives: In the current study, two types of LPS, smooth (S-LPS) and rough (R-LPS) were purified from B. abortus S19 and RB51, respectively. The aim of this study was to evaluate biological and immunological prope...

  17. EPISODIC ATAXIA MYOKYMIA SYNDROME IS ASSOCIATED WITH POINT MUTATIONS IN THE HUMAN POTASSIUM CHANNEL GENE, KCNA1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROWNE, DL; GANCHER, ST; NUTT, JG; BRUNT, ERP; SMITH, EA; KRAMER, P; LITT, M

    1994-01-01

    Episodic ataxia (EA) is a rare, familial disorder producing attacks of generalized ataxia, with normal or near-normal neurological function between attacks. One type of EA is characterized by brief episodes of ataxia with myokymia (rippling of muscles) evident between attacks. Linkage studies in fou

  18. Biochemical and immunological characterization of the main products of crotoxin irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Bioengenharia

    1996-07-01

    Irradiation of crotoxin and its subunits with 2,000 Gy of gamma-rays from {sup 60} Co source leads to aggregation and generation of lower molecular weight breakdown products. Aggregates separated by gel filtration retain at least part of their higher-ordered structure, based on their reactivity with monoclonal antibodies, known to react with conformational epitopes in native crotoxin. Linear epitopes are also preserved, as demonstrated by peptide mapping of the aggregates. These same aggregates can function as antigens to raise antisera which cross-react and neutralize crotoxin. Compared with crotoxin, the aggregates appear to be less myotoxic, largely devoid of phospholipase activity and virtually non-toxic in mice. These results indicate that the irradiation of toxic proteins can promote significant detoxification, but still retain many of the original antigenic and immunological properties of native crotoxin. (author)

  19. Characterization of clinical and immunological features in patients coinfected with dengue virus and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrentes-Carvalho, Amanda; Hottz, Eugênio Damaceno; Marinho, Cintia Ferreira; da Silva, Jéssica Badolato-Corrêa; Pinto, Luzia Maria de Oliveira; Fialho, Luciana Gomes; Bozza, Fernando Augusto; Cunha, Rivaldo Venâncio; Damasco, Paulo Vieira; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes; de Azeredo, Elzinandes Leal

    2016-03-01

    The pathogenesis of dengue in subjects coinfected with HIV remains largely unknown. We investigate clinical and immunological parameters in coinfected DENV/HIV patients. According to the new dengue classification, most coinfected DENV/HIV patients presented mild clinical manifestations of dengue infection. Herein, we show that DENV/HIV coinfected patients had higher CD8 T cells percentages reflected as a lower CD4/CD8 ratio. Furthermore, CCR5 expression on CD4 T cells and CD107a expression on both T subsets were significantly higher in coinfected patients when compared with monoinfected DENV and HIV individuals respectively. Increased inflammatory response was observed in treated HAART coinfected patients despite undetectable HIV load. These data indicate that DENV infection may influence the clinical profile and immune response in individuals concomitantly infected with HIV.

  20. Biochemical and immunological characterization of the main products of crotoxin irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation of crotoxin and its subunits with 2,000 Gy of γ-rays from 60 Co source leads to aggregation and generation of lower molecular wight breakdown products. Aggregates separated by gel filtration retain at least part of their higher-ordered structure, based on their reactivity with monoclonal antibodies known to react with conformation epitopes in native crotoxin. These same aggregates can serve as antigens to raise antisera that cross-reacts and neutralizes crotoxin. Compared with native crotoxin, aggregates appears less myotoxic, are largely devoid of phospholipase activity, and are virtually non-toxic in mice. These results indicate that irradiation of toxic proteins can promote significant detoxification, but still retain many of the original antigenic and immunological properties of native crotoxin. (author)

  1. Molecular and immunological characterization of the glycosylated orange allergen Cit s 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöltl, Gerald; Ahrazem, Oussama; Paschinger, Katharina; Ibañez, M Dolores; Salcedo, Gabriel; Wilson, Iain B H

    2007-02-01

    The IgE of sera from patients with a history of allergy to oranges (Citrus sinensis) binds a number of proteins in orange extract, including Cit s 1, a germin-like protein. In the present study, we have analyzed its immunological cross-reactivity and its molecular nature. Sera from many of the patients examined recognize a range of glycoproteins and neoglycoconjugates containing beta1,2-xylose and core alpha1,3-fucose on their N-glycans. These reagents also inhibited the interaction of Cit s 1 with patients' sera, thus underlining the critical role of glycosylation in the recognition of this protein by patients' IgE and extending previous data showing that deglycosylated Cit s 1 does not possess IgE epitopes. In parallel, we examined the peptide sequence and glycan structure of Cit s 1, using mass spectrometric techniques. Indeed, we achieved complete sequence coverage of the mature protein compared with the translation of an expressed sequence tag cDNA clone and demonstrated that the single N-glycosylation site of this protein carries oligosaccharides with xylose and fucose residues. Owing to the presumed requirement for multivalency for in vivo allergenicity, our molecular data showing that Cit s 1 is monovalent as regards glycosylation and that the single N-glycan is the target of the IgE response to this protein explain the immunological cross-reactive properties of Cit s 1 as well as its equivocal nature as a clinically relevant allergen. PMID:17095532

  2. Spinocerebellar ataxia-10 with paranoid schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavesh Trikamji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spino-cerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10 is an autosomal dominant disorder that is characterized by cerebellar ataxia, seizures and nystagmus with a fragmented pursuit. Schizophrenia has been reported with SCAs 1 and 2 yet in SCA 10, psychiatric manifestations are uncommon. We report a Hispanic family involving a father and his four children with SCA10 genetic mutation. Two of his children, a 20-year-old female and a 23-year-old male, presented with gradually progressive spino-cerebellar ataxia and paranoid schizophrenia. Neurological examination revealed ocular dysmetria, dysdiadokinesia, impaired finger-to-nose exam, gait ataxia and hyperreflexia in both the cases. Additionally, they had a history of psychosis with destructive behavior, depression and paranoid delusions with auditory hallucinations. Serology and CSF studies were unremarkable and MRI brain revealed cerebellar volume loss. Ultimately, a test for ATAXIN-10 mutation was positive thus confirming the diagnosis of SCA10 in father and his four children. We now endeavor to investigate the association between schizophrenia and SCA10.

  3. Ataxia-telangiectasia

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson Pires Ferreira

    1983-01-01

    São apresentados os casos de dois irmãos com ataxia-telangiectasia, estudados sob os pontos de vista clínico, eletrencefalográfico, liquórico e encefalográfico. O autor resume os achados de diversos autores e chama a atenção para a regressão parcial da síndrome cerebelar em ambos os pacientes, fato ainda não referido na literatura.

  4. Study on diagnosis and treatment of hereditary ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TANG Bei-sha

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary ataxia (HA is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders with high mortality and morbidity. It is characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia of gait and limbs variably associated with ophthalmoplegia, pigmentary retinopathy, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, dementia and peripheral neuropathy. The molecular diagnosis process is proposed based on molecular classification. So far, symptomatic treatment is the mainly approach, with the lack of effective therapeutic method.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia-telangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions ataxia-telangiectasia ataxia-telangiectasia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ataxia-telangiectasia is a rare inherited disorder that affects ...

  6. Neurophysiological evaluation in children with Friedreich's ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sival, D A; du Marchie Sarvaas, G J; Brouwer, O F; Uges, D R; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, C C; Maurits, N M; Brunt, E R; van der Hoeven, J H

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In children with Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA children), clinical ataxia outcomes are hardly substantiated by underlying neurophysiological parameters. In young FRDA children, some reports (based upon International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale scores (ICARS)) mention transient neurolog

  7. Sleep disorders in cerebellar ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Pedroso

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias comprise a wide range of etiologies leading to central nervous system-related motor and non-motor symptoms. Recently, a large body of evidence has demonstrated a high frequency of non-motor manifestations in cerebellar ataxias, specially in autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA. Among these non-motor dysfunctions, sleep disorders have been recognized, although still under or even misdiagnosed. In this review, we highlight the main sleep disorders related to cerebellar ataxias focusing on REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD, restless legs syndrome (RLS, periodic limb movement in sleep (PLMS, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS, insomnia and sleep apnea.

  8. Consensus Paper: Neuroimmune Mechanisms of Cerebellar Ataxias

    OpenAIRE

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Adhikari, Keya; Aeschlimann, Daniel; Chattopadhyay, Partha; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Hampe, Christiane S.; Honnorat, Jérôme; Joubert, Bastien; Kakei, Shinji; Lee, Jongho; Manto, Mario; Matsunaga, Akiko; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nanri, Kazunori; Shanmugarajah, Priya

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, a lot of publications suggested that disabling cerebellar ataxias may develop through immune-mediated mechanisms. In this consensus paper, we discuss the clinical features of the main described immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias and address their presumed pathogenesis. Immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias include cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-GAD antibodies, the cerebellar type of Hashimoto’s encephalopathy, primary autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, gluten ataxia, Mi...

  9. "ATP1A3" Mutations in Infants: A New Rapid-Onset Dystonia-Parkinsonism Phenotype Characterized by Motor Delay and Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brashear, Allison; Mink, Jonathan W.; Hill, Deborah F.; Boggs, Niki; McCall, W. Vaughn; Stacy, Mark A.; Snively, Beverly; Light, Laney S.; Sweadner, Kathleen J.; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Morrison, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    We report new clinical features of delayed motor development, hypotonia, and ataxia in two young children with mutations (R756H and D923N) in the "ATP1A3" gene. In adults, mutations in "ATP1A3" cause rapid-onset dystonia-Parkinsonism (RDP, DYT12) with abrupt onset of fixed dystonia. The parents and children were examined and videotaped, and…

  10. Comparison of Biological and Immunological Characterization of Lipopolysaccharides From Brucella abortus RB51 and S19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianmehr, Zahra; Kaboudanian Ardestani, Sussan; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Fotouhi, Fatemeh; Alamian, Saeed; Ahmadian, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brucella abortus RB51 is a rough stable mutant strain, which has been widely used as a live vaccine for prevention of brucellosis in cattle instead of B. abortus strain S19. B. abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has unique properties in comparison to other bacterial LPS. Objectives: In the current study, two types of LPS, smooth (S-LPS) and rough (R-LPS) were purified from B. abortus S19 and RB51, respectively. The aim of this study was to evaluate biological and immunological properties of purified LPS as an immunogenical determinant. Materials and Methods: Primarily, S19 and RB51 LPS were extracted and purified by two different modifications of the phenol water method. The final purity of LPS was determined by chemical analysis (2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate (KDO), glycan, phosphate and protein content) and different staining methods, following sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). C57BL/6 mice were immunized subcutaneously three times at biweekly intervals with the same amount of purified LPSs. The humoral immunity was evaluated by measuring specific IgG levels and also different cytokine levels, such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-10, were determined for assessing T-cell immune response. Results: Biochemical analysis data and SDS-PAGE profile showed that the chemical nature of S19 LPS is different from RB51 LPS. Both S and R-LPS induce an immune response. T-cell immune response induced by both S and R-LPS had almost the same pattern whereas S19 LPS elicited humoral immunity, which was higher than RB51 LPS. Conclusions: Purified LPS can be considered as a safe adjuvant and can be used as a component in prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines targeting infectious disease, cancer and allergies. PMID:26862376

  11. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type III: a review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Fujioka Shinsuke; Sundal Christina; Wszolek Zbigniew K

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia (ADCA) Type III is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) classically characterized by pure cerebellar ataxia and occasionally by non-cerebellar signs such as pyramidal signs, ophthalmoplegia, and tremor. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in adulthood; however, a minority of patients develop clinical features in adolescence. The incidence of ADCA Type III is unknown. ADCA Type III consists of six subtypes, SCA5, SCA6, SCA11, SCA26, SCA30, and...

  12. Genetics of the dominant ataxias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Dineke S.; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.

    2011-01-01

    The relevant clinical, genetic, and cell biologic aspects of the dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are reviewed in this article. SCAs are diseases of the entire nervous system; in addition to cerebellar ataxia, the central (but not obligate) disease feature, many noncerebellar comp

  13. Ataxia-telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Pires Ferreira

    1966-09-01

    Full Text Available São apresentados os casos de dois irmãos com ataxia-telangiectasia, estudados sob os pontos de vista clínico, eletrencefalográfico, liquórico e encefalográfico. O autor resume os achados de diversos autores e chama a atenção para a regressão parcial da síndrome cerebelar em ambos os pacientes, fato ainda não referido na literatura.

  14. Immunological characterization of recombinantWuchereria bancrofti cuticular collagen (COL-4) as putative vaccine candidate for human lymphatic filariasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chakkaravarthy Arunkumar; Pandurangan Pandiaraja; P. R. Prince; Perumal Kaliraj

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To elucidate immunoprophylactic potential of recombinantWuchereria bancrofti(W. bancrofti) cuticular collagen(COL-4) inBALB/c mice and filarial clinical samples.Methods:col-4 gene wasPCR amplified fromW. bancroftiL3 cDNA library and cloned in pRSETB vector. RecombinantCOL-4 was over expressed in salt inducible system and was purified by nickel affinity chromatography.Humoral and cellular responses were measured byELISA and peripheral blood mononuclear cells(PBMC) of various filarial clinical samples respectively using purified recombinantCOL-4 antigen.Then the protective immune responses ofCOL-4 immunizedBALB/c mice were characterized.Results:Sequence analysis ofCOL-4 with human host proteins reveals lack of homology.The recombinantCOL-4 was found to be at15 kDa fusion protein.The affinity purifiedCOL-4 showed significant reactivity with putatively immune sera and in a similar fashion it demonstrated marked proliferation inPBMC samples.Immunization studies in experimental filarial host(mice) elicited significant titers with protective antibody isotype profile(IgM and IgG).Cellular immune responses were also significant in terms of splenocytes proliferation assay on mice samples.Conclusions:Our immunological findings in experimental host suggestTh2 mediated immune response.Hence, we propose thatW. bancroftiCOL-4 could be an efficacious vaccine candidate against lymphatic filariasis.

  15. Molecular, Structural and Immunological Characterization of Der p 18, a Chitinase-Like House Dust Mite Allergen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch, Yvonne; Blatt, Katharina; Malkus, Ursula; Fercher, Christian; Swoboda, Ines; Focke-Tejkl, Margit; Chen, Kuan-Wei; Seiberler, Susanne; Mittermann, Irene; Lupinek, Christian; Rodriguez-Dominguez, Azahara; Zieglmayer, Petra; Zieglmayer, René; Keller, Walter; Krzyzanek, Vladislav; Valent, Peter; Valenta, Rudolf; Vrtala, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Background The house dust mite (HDM) allergen Der p 18 belongs to the glycoside hydrolase family 18 chitinases. The relevance of Der p 18 for house dust mite allergic patients has only been partly investigated. Objective To perform a detailed characterization of Der p 18 on a molecular, structural and immunological level. Methods Der p 18 was expressed in E. coli, purified to homogeneity, tested for chitin-binding activity and its secondary structure was analyzed by circular dichroism. Der p 18-specific IgG antibodies were produced in rabbits to localize the allergen in mites using immunogold electron microscopy and to search for cross-reactive allergens in other allergen sources (i.e. mites, crustacea, mollusca and insects). IgE reactivity of rDer p 18 was tested with sera from clinically well characterized HDM-allergic patients (n = 98) and its allergenic activity was analyzed in basophil activation experiments. Results Recombinant Der p 18 was expressed and purified as a folded, biologically active protein. It shows weak chitin-binding activity and partial cross-reactivity with Der f 18 from D. farinae but not with proteins from the other tested allergen sources. The allergen was mainly localized in the peritrophic matrix of the HDM gut and to a lower extent in fecal pellets. Der p 18 reacted with IgE from 10% of mite allergic patients from Austria and showed allergenic activity when tested for basophil activation in Der p 18-sensitized patients. Conclusion Der p 18 is a rather genus-specific minor allergen with weak chitin-binding activity but exhibits allergenic activity and therefore should be included in diagnostic test panels for HDM allergy. PMID:27548813

  16. [Heart involvement in Friedreich's ataxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidemann, F; Scholz, F; Florescu, C; Liu, D; Hu, K; Herrmann, S; Ertl, G; Störk, S

    2015-03-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is a rare hereditary disease and although the gene defect has already been identified as a deficiency of the mitochondrial protein frataxin, the pathophysiology is still unknown. Although a multisystem disorder organ involvement is predominantly neurological. Besides the characteristic features of spinocerebellar ataxia the heart is frequently also affected. Cardiac involvement typically manifests as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which can progress to heart failure and death. So far most research has focused on the neurological aspects and cardiac involvement in Friedreich's ataxia has not been systematically investigated. Thus, a better understanding of the progression of the cardiomyopathy, cardiac complications and long-term cardiac outcome is warranted. Although no specific treatment is available general cardiac therapeutic options for cardiomyopathy should be considered. The current review focuses on clinical and diagnostic features of cardiomyopathy and discusses potential therapeutic developments for Friedreich's ataxia. PMID:24848865

  17. Immunological techniques as tools to characterize the subsurface microbial community at a trichloroethylene contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliermans, C.B.; Dougherty, J.M.; Franck, M.M.; McKinzey, P.C.; Hazen, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    Effective in situ bioremediation strategies require an understanding of the effects pollutants and remediation techniques have on subsurface microbial communities. Therefore, detailed characterization of a site's microbial communities is important. Subsurface sediment borings and water samples were collected from a trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated site, before and after horizontal well in situ air stripping and bioventing, as well as during methane injection for stimulation of methane-utilizing microorganisms. Subsamples were processed for heterotrophic plate counts, acridine orange direct counts (AODC), community diversity, direct fluorescent antibodies (DFA) enumeration for several nitrogen-transforming bacteria, and Biolog [reg sign] evaluation of enzyme activity in collected water samples. Plate counts were higher in near-surface depths than in the vadose zone sediment samples. During the in situ air stripping and bioventing, counts increased at or near the saturated zone, remained elevated throughout the aquifer, but did not change significantly after the air stripping. Sporadic increases in plate counts at different depths as well as increased diversity appeared to be linked to differing lithologies. AODCs were orders of magnitude higher than plate counts and remained relatively constant with depth except for slight increases near the surface depths and the capillary fringe. Nitrogen-transforming bacteria, as measured by serospecific DFA, were greatly affected both by the in situ air stripping and the methane injection. Biolog[reg sign] activity appeared to increase with subsurface stimulation both by air and methane. The complexity of subsurface systems makes the use of selective monitoring tools imperative.

  18. Immunological techniques as tools to characterize the subsurface microbial community at a trichloroethylene contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliermans, C.B.; Dougherty, J.M.; Franck, M.M.; McKinzey, P.C.; Hazen, T.C.

    1992-12-31

    Effective in situ bioremediation strategies require an understanding of the effects pollutants and remediation techniques have on subsurface microbial communities. Therefore, detailed characterization of a site`s microbial communities is important. Subsurface sediment borings and water samples were collected from a trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated site, before and after horizontal well in situ air stripping and bioventing, as well as during methane injection for stimulation of methane-utilizing microorganisms. Subsamples were processed for heterotrophic plate counts, acridine orange direct counts (AODC), community diversity, direct fluorescent antibodies (DFA) enumeration for several nitrogen-transforming bacteria, and Biolog {reg_sign} evaluation of enzyme activity in collected water samples. Plate counts were higher in near-surface depths than in the vadose zone sediment samples. During the in situ air stripping and bioventing, counts increased at or near the saturated zone, remained elevated throughout the aquifer, but did not change significantly after the air stripping. Sporadic increases in plate counts at different depths as well as increased diversity appeared to be linked to differing lithologies. AODCs were orders of magnitude higher than plate counts and remained relatively constant with depth except for slight increases near the surface depths and the capillary fringe. Nitrogen-transforming bacteria, as measured by serospecific DFA, were greatly affected both by the in situ air stripping and the methane injection. Biolog{reg_sign} activity appeared to increase with subsurface stimulation both by air and methane. The complexity of subsurface systems makes the use of selective monitoring tools imperative.

  19. Therapeutic Developments in Friedreich Ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Robert B Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia is an inherited, severe, progressive neuro- and cardiodegenerative disorder for which there currently is no approved therapy. Friedreich ataxia is caused by the decreased expression and/or function of frataxin, a mitochondrial matrix protein that binds iron and is involved in the formation of iron-sulfur clusters. Decreased frataxin function leads to decreased iron-sulfur cluster formation, mitochondrial iron accumulation, cytosolic iron depletion, oxidative stress, and mito...

  20. Ataxia-telangiectasia: future prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhary MW; Al-Baradie RS

    2014-01-01

    Mohammed Wajid Chaudhary, Raidah Saleem Al-Baradie Pediatric Neurology, Neurosciences Centre, King Fahad Specialist Hospital, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Abstract: Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive multi-system disorder caused by mutation in the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene (ATM). ATM is a large serine/threonine protein kinase, a member of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) family whose best-studied function is as master controller of si...

  1. Molecular and immunological characterization of a DNA-launched yellow fever virus 17D infectious clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaohong; Dalebout, Tim J; Lukashevich, Igor S; Bredenbeek, Peter J; Franco, David

    2015-04-01

    Yellow fever virus (YFV)-17D is an empirically developed, highly effective live-attenuated vaccine that has been administered to human beings for almost a century. YFV-17D has stood as a paradigm for a successful viral vaccine, and has been exploited as a potential virus vector for the development of recombinant vaccines against other diseases. In this study, a DNA-launched YFV-17D construct (pBeloBAC-FLYF) was explored as a new modality to the standard vaccine to combine the commendable features of both DNA vaccine and live-attenuated viral vaccine. The DNA-launched YFV-17D construct was characterized extensively both in cell culture and in mice. High titres of YFV-17D were generated upon transfection of the DNA into cells, whereas a mutant with deletion in the capsid-coding region (pBeloBAC-YF/ΔC) was restricted to a single round of infection, with no release of progeny virus. Homologous prime-boost immunization of AAD mice with both pBeloBAC-FLYF and pBeloBAC-YF/ΔC elicited specific dose-dependent cellular immune response against YFV-17D. Vaccination of A129 mice with pBeloBAC-FLYF resulted in the induction of YFV-specific neutralizing antibodies in all vaccinated subjects. These promising results underlined the potential of the DNA-launched YFV both as an alternative to standard YFV-17D vaccination and as a vaccine platform for the development of DNA-based recombinant YFV vaccines. PMID:25516543

  2. Reproductive immunology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ole B

    2013-01-01

    pathological pregnancy are suggested to predispose to adaptive immunological processes against alloantigens on the trophoblast that may further increase the risk of pathological pregnancy outcome. The best documented adaptive immune reaction against fetal alloantigens is directed against male-specific minor...

  3. Adult-onset cerebellar Ataxia: a clinical and genetic Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Brusse (Esther)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCerebellar ataxias represent a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. Two main categories are distinguished: hereditary and sporadic ataxias. Sporadic ataxias may be symptomatic or idiopathic. The clinical classification of hereditary ataxias is nowadays being replaced by an

  4. Adult onset sporadic ataxias: a diagnostic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Graziani Povoas Barsottini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with adult onset non-familial progressive ataxia are classified in sporadic ataxia group. There are several disease categories that may manifest with sporadic ataxia: toxic causes, immune-mediated ataxias, vitamin deficiency, infectious diseases, degenerative disorders and even genetic conditions. Considering heterogeneity in the clinical spectrum of sporadic ataxias, the correct diagnosis remains a clinical challenge. In this review, the different disease categories that lead to sporadic ataxia with adult onset are discussed with special emphasis on their clinical and neuroimaging features, and diagnostic criteria.

  5. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 14 (SCA14)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SCA14) is one of those types of hereditary cerebellar ataxias. The involved gene, discovered in 2003, is located ... evaluation by a physician makes the diagnosis of cerebellar ataxia. A CT or MRI scan of the brain ...

  6. Familial cerebellar ataxia and diabetes insipidus.

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, I C; O'Malley, B P; Young, I D

    1988-01-01

    Two sisters are reported who both developed partial cranial diabetes insipidus in their 4th decade, followed by progressive cerebellar ataxia. This appears to be the first report of cerebellar ataxia and diabetes insipidus occurring together as a genetic entity.

  7. Neuropathology in classical and variant ataxia-telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, Mijke M. M.; Martin, Jean-Jacques; van Deuren, Marcel; Groote, Chantal Ceuterick-de; Weemaes, Corry M. R.; Kremer, Berry H. P. H.; Taylor, Malcolm A. R.; Willemsen, Michel A. A. P.; Lammens, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is classically characterized by progressive neurodegeneration, oculocutaneous telangiectasia, immunodeficiency and elevated a-fetoprotein levels. Some patients, classified as variant A-T, exhibit a milder clinical course. In the latter patients extrapyramidal symptoms, in

  8. Visual System Involvement in Patients with Friedreich's Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Filippo; Barboni, Piero; Liguori, Rocco; Valentino, Maria Lucia; Savini, Giacomo; Gellera, Cinzia; Mariotti, Caterina; Rizzo, Giovanni; Tonon, Caterina; Manners, David; Lodi, Raffaele; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Carelli, Valerio

    2009-01-01

    Optic neuropathy is common in mitochondrial disorders, but poorly characterized in Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA), a recessive condition caused by lack of the mitochondrial protein frataxin. We investigated 26 molecularly confirmed FRDA patients by studying both anterior and posterior sections of the visual pathway using a new, integrated approach.…

  9. Characterization of some immunological parameters following exercise in chronic exposure to radioactive and non-radioactive toxic chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White mice were chronically exposed to a combination of 90Sr, stable lead and exercises of different intensity. Moderate-intensity exercises were found to stimulate and normalize some parameters of humoral nonspecific defence and immunity. More intensive exercise associated with stress (running in a drum, swimming) may lead to immunological impairments

  10. Ataxia telangiectasia: learning from previous mistakes

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Naveen; Aggarwal, Puneet; Dev, Nishanth; Kumar, Gunjan

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia is an early onset neurodegenerative disorder. We report a case of childhood onset ataxia and ocular telangiectasia, presenting with pulmonary infection. The patient was diagnosed as ataxia telangiectasia. The patient succumbed to death owing to late diagnosis and sepsis.

  11. Clinical challenges in the ataxias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.H. Subramony

    2011-01-01

    Ataxias are rare diseases and the etiologic heterogeneity make individual entities even rarer. There are still substantial numbers of patients who are still poorly understood. Available assessment techniques still point to large numbers of patients needed for clinical trials and the need for cooperative efforts, better assessment tools and novel trial designs. Better understanding of neural circuitry abnormalities may lead to more effective symptomatic therapy. Opportunities exist for targeting at risk individuals for effective therapies but how this can be done is not clear. Preventive strategies may become feasible in many ataxias.

  12. Clinical Features of Friedreich Ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Delatycki, Martin B.; Corben, Louise A

    2012-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia, the most common hereditary ataxia, affects about 1:29 000 Caucasians. In about 98% of these individuals it is due to homozygosity for a GAA trinucleotide repeat expansion in intron 1 of FXN; in the other 2% it is due to compound heterozygosity for a GAA expansion and point mutation or deletion. The condition affects multiple sites in the central and peripheral nervous system as well as a number of other organ systems, resulting in multiple signs and symptoms. Onset of this ...

  13. Basic and clinical immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinen, Javier; Shearer, William T.

    2003-01-01

    Progress in immunology continues to grow exponentially every year. New applications of this knowledge are being developed for a broad range of clinical conditions. Conversely, the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies is helping to elucidate the intricate mechanisms of the immune system. We have selected a few of the most significant contributions to the fields of basic and clinical immunology published between October 2001 and October 2002. Our choice of topics in basic immunology included the description of T-bet as a determinant factor for T(H)1 differentiation, the role of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase gene in B-cell development, the characterization of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, and the use of dynamic imaging to study MHC class II transport and T-cell and dendritic cell membrane interactions. Articles related to clinical immunology that were selected for review include the description of immunodeficiency caused by caspase 8 deficiency; a case series report on X-linked agammaglobulinemia; the mechanism of action, efficacy, and complications of intravenous immunoglobulin; mechanisms of autoimmunity diseases; and advances in HIV pathogenesis and vaccine development. We also reviewed two articles that explore the possible alterations of the immune system caused by spaceflights, a new field with increasing importance as human space expeditions become a reality in the 21st century.

  14. Immunology's theories of cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Alfred I

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary immunology has established its fundamental theory as a biological expression of personal identity, wherein the "immune self" is defended by the immune system. Protection of this agent putatively requires a cognitive capacity by which the self and the foreign are perceived and thereby discriminated; from such information, discernment of the environment is achieved and activation of pathways leading to an immune response may be initiated. This so-called cognitive paradigm embeds such functions as "perception," "recognition," "learning," and "memory" to characterize immune processes, but the conceptual character of such functions has meanings that vary with the particular theory adopted. When different formulations of cognition are considered, immunology's conceptual infrastructure shifts: Extensions of conventional psychological understanding of representational cognition based on a subject-object dichotomy support notions of immune agency; alternatively, formulations of perception that dispense with representations and attendant notions of agency reconfigure the predicate epistemology dominating current immune theory. Reviewing immunological literature of the past five decades, these two understandings of perception--representational and non-representational (considered here from ecological, enactivist, and autopoietic perspectives)--offer competing views of immune cognitive functions. These, in turn, provide competing philosophical understandings of immunology's conceptual foundations, which reflect parallel controversies dominating current debates in philosophy of mind and attendant discussions about personal identity.

  15. Progressive ataxia associated with ocular apraxia type 1 (AOA1 with a presence of a novel mutation on the aprataxin gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Qayyum Rana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia, although rare, can be a symptom of many debilitating movement disorders. Hereditary ataxias are one subset of this condition and manifest when there is a genetic abnormality involved. Ataxia oculomotor apraxia type 1 (AOA1, an autosomal recessive ataxia, results from a mutation on the aprataxin gene (APTX. We characterized a novel homozygous deletion mutation (IVS4-12delT on the APTX gene in a 14-year-old male born to consanguineous parents. This case report emphasizes the importance of investigating and increasing awareness of novel genetic mutations in order to help diagnose and further classify hereditary ataxias.

  16. Language Impairment in Cerebellar Ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gaalen, Judith; de Swart, Bert J. M.; Oostveen, Judith; Knuijt, Simone; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.; Kremer, Berry (H. ) P. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several studies have suggested that language impairment can be observed in patients with cerebellar pathology. The aim of this study was to investigate language performance in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). Methods: We assessed speech and language in 29 SCA6 patients

  17. Speech Prosody in Cerebellar Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Maureen A.; Raphael, Lawrence J.; Harris, Katherine S.; Geibel, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy…

  18. Deranged calcium signaling in Purkinje cells and pathogenesis in spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2) and other ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasumu, Adebimpe; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2012-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) constitute a heterogeneous group of more than 30 autosomal-dominant genetic and neurodegenerative disorders. SCAs are generally characterized by progressive ataxia and cerebellar atrophy. Although all SCA patients present with the phenotypic overlap of cerebellar atrophy and ataxia, 17 different gene loci have so far been implicated as culprits in these SCAs. It is not currently understood how mutations in these 17 proteins lead to the cerebellar atrophy and ataxia. Several pathogenic mechanisms have been studied in SCAs but there is yet to be a promising target for successful treatment of SCAs. Emerging research suggests that a fundamental cellular signaling pathway is disrupted by a majority of these mutated genes, which could explain the characteristic death of Purkinje cells, cerebellar atrophy, and ataxia that occur in many SCAs. We propose that mutations in SCA genes cause disruptions in multiple cellular pathways but the characteristic SCA pathogenesis does not begin until calcium signaling pathways are disrupted in cerebellar Purkinje cells either as a result of an excitotoxic increase or a compensatory suppression of calcium signaling. We argue that disruptions in Purkinje cell calcium signaling lead to initial cerebellar dysfunction and ataxic sympoms and eventually proceed to Purkinje cell death. Here, we discuss a calcium hypothesis of Purkinje cell neurodegeneration in SCAs by primarily focusing on an example of spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2). We will also present evidence linking deranged calcium signaling to the pathogenesis of other SCAs (SCA1, 3, 5, 6, 14, 15/16) that lead to significant Purkinje cell dysfunction and loss in patients.

  19. Friedreich`s ataxia in American families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Costa, A.; Maguire, B.A.; Sylvester, J.E. [Hahnemann Univ., Philadephia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Freidreich`s ataxia (FRDA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder presenting with dysarthia, loss of tendon reflexes, and ataxic gait. Both diabetes mellitus and cardiomyopathy are frequently found associated with the disease. The gene, FRDA, has been localized to 9q13-21. Recent reports of recombination events in individuals homozygous by descent have positioned the gene to a 450 KB region in the FRDA locus centromeric to the original markers. Candidate cDNA`s have been isolated from part of this region, and characterized, but not shown to be responsible for the disease. We have performed linkage analysis on 46 American families with markers in the FRDA region. A recombination has been detected in a family which has the phenotypic criteria for Friedreich`s; none of the three affected exhibit signs of cardiomyopathy which is a required diagnostic criteria. Since this recombination lies within the now excluded D9S5/D9S15 region, it is being tested for linkage to the {open_quotes}ataxia with selective vitamin E deficiency{close_quotes} (AVED) locus on chromosome 8q. Our lab has work in progress to subclone appropriate regions from YACs in order to identify expressed sequences and nucleotide variations (by SSCP) in the FRDA locus.

  20. Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome and Autosomal Recessive Spastic Ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay : A Report of Two Male Sibs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Willem M. A.; Egger, Jos I. M.; Ahmed, Amir I. M.; Kremer, Berry P. H.; Vermeer, Sascha; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the SACS gene (13q12) encoding the protein sacsin. It is characterized by early-onset cerebellar ataxia, lower limb spasticity, sensorimotor axonal polyneuropath

  1. Mutations in DNMT1 cause autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkelmann, Juliane; Lin, Ling; Schormair, Barbara;

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy (ADCA-DN) is characterized by late onset (30-40 years old) cerebellar ataxia, sensory neuronal deafness, narcolepsy-cataplexy and dementia. We performed exome sequencing in five individuals from three ADCA-DN kindreds and identified DNMT.......GLY605Ala mutation was subsequently identified. Narcolepsy and deafness were the first symptoms to appear in all pedigrees, followed by ataxia. DNMT1 is a widely expressed DNA methyltransferase maintaining methylation patterns in development, and mediating transcriptional repression by direct binding...

  2. Characterization of xenogeneic mouse-to-rat bone marrow chimeras. I. Examination of hematologic and immunologic function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, A.C.; Luckert, P.H.; Tazume, S.; Niedbalski, J.L.; Pollard, M.

    1987-07-01

    Eighteen xenogeneic chimeric rats (survival: greater than 100 days) were established by transplanting bone marrow cells from femurs of 10 gnotobiotic CFW mice into each germfree Sprague-Dawley or Wistar rat. The erythrocytes circulating in the rats were of mouse origin as determined by hemagglutination. Hemoglobin electrophoresis, radial immunodiffusion for IgG, and assay of granulocytic neutrophils for leukocyte alkaline phosphatase verified that true chimerism was achieved. The extent of hematological and immunological reconstitution varied. In general, hematocrit levels were low to normal, white blood cell counts and differentials were within normal limits, and serum protein levels were normal. Levels of circulating IgG of each species were comparable to those of germfree rat and mouse controls. Natural killer (NK) activity was depressed, a phenomenon that may be attributable to the radiation treatment of recipients, or to failure to transfer NK cells or precursors. Mitogenic stimulation reactions were varied, but most chimeric rats demonstrated moderately depressed responses. Reactions as a whole suggested that gnotobiotic rats with xenogeneic bone marrow are incompletely reconstituted, both hematologically and immunologically. No acute graft-versus-host reaction was seen.

  3. Cerebellar ataxia as presenting feature of hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwal, Suman Kumar; Kotwal, Shalija; Gupta, Rohan; Singh, Jang Bhadur; Mahajan, Annil

    2016-04-01

    Symptoms and signs of the hypothyroidism vary in relation to the magnitude and acuteness of the thyroid hormone deficiency. The usual clinical features are constipation, fatigue, cold intolerance and weight gain. Rarely it can present with neurologic problems like reversible cerebellar ataxia, dementia, peripheral neuropathy, psychosis and coma. Hypothyroidism should be suspected in all cases of ataxia, as it is easily treatable. A 40 year-old male presented with the history facial puffiness, hoarseness of voice and gait-ataxia. Investigations revealed frank primary hypothyroidism. Anti-TPO antibody was positive. Thyroxine was started and patient improved completely within eight weeks. Hypothyroidism can present with ataxia as presenting feature. Hypothyroidism should be considered in all cases of cerebellar ataxia as it is a reversible cause of ataxia. PMID:26886095

  4. Friedreich Ataxia and Diabetes Mellitus: family study

    OpenAIRE

    Melo, M; Fagulha, A; Barros, L.; Guimarães, J; Carrilho, F; Carvalheiro, M

    2005-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FA) is one of the genetic syndromes sometimes associated with diabetes and the most common hereditary ataxia. It is a autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease, caused by a mutation in the FRDA gene, which originates decreased expression of frataxin, a mitochondrial protein involved in iron metabolism. The disorder is usually manifest in childhood and is characterised by ataxia, dysarthria, scoliosis and feet deformity. About two thirds of patients have hypertrophic c...

  5. Complementation analysis of ataxia-telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaspers, N.G.; Painter, R.B.; Paterson, M.C.; Kidson, C.; Inoue, T.

    1985-01-01

    In a number of laboratories genetic analysis of ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) has been performed by studying the expression of the AT phenotype in fused somatic cells or mixtures of cell-free extracts from different patients. Complementation of the defective response to ionizing radiation was observed frequently, considering four different parameters for radiosensitivity in AT. The combined results from studies on cultured fibroblasts or lymphoblastoid cells from 17 unrelated families revealed the presence of at least four and possibly nine complementation groups. These findings suggest that there is an extensive genetic heterogeneity in AT. More extensive studies are needed for an integration of these data and to provide a set of genetically characterized cell strains for future research of the AT genetic defect.

  6. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias : the current state of affairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, S.; van de Warrenburg, B. P. C.; Willemsen, M. A. A. P.; Cluitmans, M.; Scheffer, H.; Kremer, B. P.; Knoers, N. V. A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Among the hereditary ataxias, autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCAs) encompass a diverse group of rare neurodegenerative disorders in which a cerebellar syndrome is the key clinical feature. The clinical overlap between the different cerebellar ataxias, the occasional atypical phenotypes, an

  7. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia with vitamin E deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions ataxia with vitamin E deficiency ataxia with vitamin E deficiency Enable Javascript to view ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency is a disorder that ...

  8. Gluten ataxia of sporadic and hereditary cerebellar ataxia in patients from mainland China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Juan Guan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gluten sensitivity (GS is a spectrum of disorders with diverse manifestations. Recent evidence suggests that ataxia may be the only manifestation of GS and that it may be one of the causes of sporadic ataxia. Aim: To investigate the prevalence of gluten ataxia among patients with ataxia in China. Materials and Methods: Serum levels of anti-gliadin, anti-transglutaminase 2 (TG2, and anti-transglutaminase 6 (TG6 antibodies measured in 125 patients with ataxia (100 patients with sporadic ataxia and 25 patients with hereditary ataxia and 51 healthy controls by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results: The serum concentrations of anti-gliadin, anti-TG2 IgG, IgA, and TG6-IgG antibodies were elevated in ataxia patients, but the increase was not statistically significant. However, TG6-IgA serum levels were significantly higher in sporadic ataxia as compared to those in healthy controls (P < 0.05. Conclusions: These results provide evidence that sporadic ataxia in a subgroup of patients may be due to gluten ataxia in mainland China. Measurement of serum anti-TG6 antibodies along with anti-TG2 and anti-gliadin antibodies may be useful for diagnosing gluten ataxia.

  9. Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions that can cause acquired ataxia include stroke, multiple sclerosis, tumors, alcoholism, peripheral neuropathy, metabolic disorders, and vitamin deficiencies. Is there any treatment? There is no ...

  10. Missense mutations in ITPR1 cause autosomal dominant congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Lijia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia is characterized by early gross motor delay, hypotonia, gait ataxia, mild dysarthria and dysmetria. The clinical presentation remains fairly stable and may be associated with cerebellar atrophy. To date, only a few families with autosomal dominant congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia have been reported. Linkage to 3pter was demonstrated in one large Australian family and this locus was designated spinocerebellar ataxia type 29. The objective of this study is to describe an unreported Canadian family with autosomal dominant congenital nonprogressive spinocerebellar ataxia and to identify the underlying genetic causes in this family and the original Australian family. Methods and Results Exome sequencing was performed for the Australian family, resulting in the identification of a heterozygous mutation in the ITPR1 gene. For the Canadian family, genotyping with microsatellite markers and Sanger sequencing of ITPR1 gene were performed; a heterozygous missense mutation in ITPR1 was identified. Conclusions ITPR1 encodes inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, type 1, a ligand-gated ion channel that mediates calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Deletions of ITPR1 are known to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 15, a distinct and very slowly progressive form of cerebellar ataxia with onset in adulthood. Our study demonstrates for the first time that, in addition to spinocerebellar ataxia type 15, alteration of ITPR1 function can cause a distinct congenital nonprogressive ataxia; highlighting important clinical heterogeneity associated with the ITPR1 gene and a significant role of the ITPR1-related pathway in the development and maintenance of the normal functions of the cerebellum.

  11. A novel frameshift mutation in FGF14 causes an autosomal dominant episodic ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquet, Karine; La Piana, Roberta; Brais, Bernard

    2015-07-01

    Episodic ataxias (EAs) are a heterogeneous group of neurological disorders characterized by recurrent attacks of ataxia. Mutations in KCNA1 and CACNA1A account for the majority of EA cases worldwide. We recruited a two-generation family affected with EA of unknown subtype and performed whole-exome sequencing on two affected members. This revealed a novel heterozygous mutation c.211_212insA (p.I71NfsX27) leading to a premature stop codon in FGF14. Mutations in FGF14 are known to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 27 (SCA27). Sanger sequencing confirmed segregation within the family. Our findings expand the phenotypic spectrum of SCA27 by underlining the possible episodic nature of this ataxia.

  12. Serum versus Imaging Biomarkers in Friedreich Ataxia to Indicate Left Ventricular Remodeling and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Nishaki; Chacko, Paul; Jin, James; Tran, Tam; Prior, Thomas W; He, Xin; Agarwal, Gunjan; Raman, Subha V

    2016-08-01

    Patients with Friedreich ataxia typically die of cardiomyopathy, marked by myocardial fibrosis and abnormal left ventricular (LV) geometry. We measured procollagen I carboxyterminal propeptide (PICP), a serum biomarker of collagen production, and characterized genotypes, phenotypes, and outcomes in these patients. Twenty-nine patients with Friedreich ataxia (mean age, 34.2 ± 2.2 yr) and 29 healthy subjects (mean age, 32.5 ± 1.1 yr) underwent serum PICP measurements. Patients underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and outcome evaluations at baseline and 12 months. Baseline PICP values were significantly higher in the patients than in the control group (1,048 ± 77 vs 614 ± 23 ng/mL; P ataxia and indicates baseline abnormal LV geometry and subsequent dilation. Cardiac magnetic resonance and PICP warrant consideration as complementary biomarkers in therapeutic trials of Friedreich ataxia cardiomyopathy. PMID:27547137

  13. Radiosensitivity in ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiosensitivity is a major hallmark of the human genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia. This hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation has been demonstrated in vitro after exposure of patients to therapeutic thought to be the major factor contculture. Clearly an understanding of the nature of the molecular defect in ataxia-telangiectasia will be of considerable assistance in delineating additional pathways that determine cellular radiosensitivity/radioresistance. Furthermore, since patients with this syndrome are also predisposed to developing a number of leukaemias and lymphomas the possible connection between radiosensitivity and cancer predisposition is of interest. Now that the gene (ATM) responsible for this genetic disease has been cloned and identified, progress is being made in determining the role of the ATM protein in mediating the effects of cellular exposure to ionizing radiation and other forms of redox stress. Proteins such as the product of the tumour suppressor gene p53 and the proto-oncogene c-Abl (a protein tyrosine kinase) have been shown to interact with ATM. Since several intermediate steps in both the p53 and c-Abl pathways, activated by ionizing radiation, are known it will be possible to map the position of ATM in these pathways and describe its mechanism of action. What are the clinical implications of understanding the molecular basis of the defect in ataxia-telangiectasia? As outlined above since radiosensitivity is a universal characteristic of A-T understanding the mechanism of action of ATM will provide additional information or radiation signalling in human cells. With this information it may be possible to sensitize tumour cells to radiation and thus increase the therapeutic benefit of radiotherapy. This might involve the use of small molecules that would interfere with the normal ATM controlled pathways and thus sensitize cells to radiation or alternatively it might involve the efficient introduction of ATM anti-sense c

  14. Radiosensitivity in ataxia-telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavin, M.F. [Royal Brisbane Hospital, QLD (Australia). Queensland Institute of Medical Research and The Department of Surgery; Khanna, K.K.; Watters, D. [Royal Brisbane Hospital, QLD (Australia). Queensland Institute of Medical Research

    1998-12-31

    Full text: Radiosensitivity is a major hallmark of the human genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia. This hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation has been demonstrated in vitro after exposure of patients to therapeutic thought to be the major factor contculture. Clearly an understanding of the nature of the molecular defect in ataxia-telangiectasia will be of considerable assistance in delineating additional pathways that determine cellular radiosensitivity/radioresistance. Furthermore, since patients with this syndrome are also predisposed to developing a number of leukaemias and lymphomas the possible connection between radiosensitivity and cancer predisposition is of interest. Now that the gene (ATM) responsible for this genetic disease has been cloned and identified, progress is being made in determining the role of the ATM protein in mediating the effects of cellular exposure to ionizing radiation and other forms of redox stress. Proteins such as the product of the tumour suppressor gene p53 and the proto-oncogene c-Abl (a protein tyrosine kinase) have been shown to interact with ATM. Since several intermediate steps in both the p53 and c-Abl pathways, activated by ionizing radiation, are known it will be possible to map the position of ATM in these pathways and describe its mechanism of action. What are the clinical implications of understanding the molecular basis of the defect in ataxia-telangiectasia? As outlined above since radiosensitivity is a universal characteristic of A-T understanding the mechanism of action of ATM will provide additional information or radiation signalling in human cells. With this information it may be possible to sensitize tumour cells to radiation and thus increase the therapeutic benefit of radiotherapy. This might involve the use of small molecules that would interfere with the normal ATM controlled pathways and thus sensitize cells to radiation or alternatively it might involve the efficient introduction of ATM anti-sense c

  15. Antigliadin antibody in sporadic adult ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Aloosh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common neurologic manifestationof gluten sensitivity is ataxia, which accounts for up to 40%of idiopathic sporadic ataxia. Timing of diagnosis of glutenataxia is vital as it is one of the very few treatable causes ofsporadic ataxia and causes irreversible loss of Purkinje cells.Antigliadin antibody (AGA of the IgG type is the bestmarker for neurological manifestations of gluten sensitivity.This study was conducted to measure the prevalence ofgluten ataxia in a group of Iranian patients with idiopathicataxia.Methods: For 30 patients with idiopathic cerebellar ataxia, aquestionnaire about clinical and demographic data wascompleted. Serum AGA (IgA and IgG and antiendomysialantibody (AEA were assessed. Gluten ataxic patientsunderwent duodenal biopsy. Magnetic resonanceimaging was done for all patients to see if cerebellaratrophy is present.Results: Only 2 patients had a positive IgG AGA (6.7%who both had a positive AEA while none of themshowed changes of celiac disease in their duodenalbiopsies. Only presence of gastrointestinal symptomsand pursuit eye movement disorders were higher inpatients with gluten ataxia.Conclusion: Prevalence of gluten ataxia in Iranianpatients with idiopathic ataxia seems to be lower thanmost of other regions. This could be explained by smallsample size, differences in genetics and nutritionalhabits and also effect of serologic tests in clinical versusresearch setting. Further researches with larger samplesize are recommended.

  16. Friedreich's ataxia presenting after cardiac transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard, H; Forsyth, R.

    2001-01-01

    A 4 year old boy underwent cardiac transplantation because of cardiomyopathy with ischaemia. Following transplantation he developed neurological signs of Friedreich's ataxia and the diagnosis was confirmed with genetic testing. Cardiomyopathy is a rare presentation of Friedreich's ataxia and to our knowledge this is the first reported transplant operation for the cardiomyopathy associated with this condition.



  17. [From gene to disease; ataxia telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeks, A.; Veer, L.J. van 't; Ottenheim, C.; Hiel, J.A.P.; Kleijer, W.J.; Weemaes, C.M.R.

    2003-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectasia, immune defects, and a predisposition to malignancy. Chromosomal breakage is a feature. AT cells are abnormally sensitive to cell kill by ionising radiation and abnormally resistant to in

  18. Ataxias agudas en la infancia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaline Betancourt Fursow

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available La ataxia cerebelosa aguda infantil (ACAI es la forma más frecuente de complicación neurológica por el virus de la varicela.Descritas dentro del grupo de las cerebelitis agudas. Los objetivos de este estudio fueron: evaluar la presentación clínica, manejo y seguimiento de niños hospitalizados con ACAI en un hospital pediátrico terciario donde la inmunización para varicela no está disponible (parte I y describir los diagnósticos diferenciales de la cerebelitis aguda (parte II. Estudiamos 95 pacientes. Los criterios diagnósticos de ataxia aguda se basaron en: pérdida aguda de la coordinación o dificultad para la marcha con o sin nistagmo asociado y duración menor de 48 horas, en un niño previamente sano. Estos criterios se cumplían en todos los casos valorados, excepto en las ataxias secundarias a ingesta de tóxicos, en los que la duración debía ser menor de 24 horas para su inclusión en el estudio. Se registraron los datos en una historia clínica pediátrica y neurológica. Entre los pacientes inmunosuprimidos la incidencia mayor fue la complicación por varicela. La mayoría de los pacientes fueron varones. El rango de edad fue la preescolar, 5 años . El intervalo entre la presentación del rash y el ingreso fue de 1 a 3 días. El estudio de LCR se practicó en 59.5% de los casos. La TAC y la resonancia magnética cerebral (RM presentaron edema en el 33.3%. El aciclovir endovenoso fue utilizado en 23 pacientes; pero no hubo diferencias significativas en las manifestaciones clínicas y seguimiento entre tratados y no tratados. La ataxia fue la primera manifestación clínica. La estadía hospitalaria fue de 4 días (rango: 2-11 días.

  19. Novel marmoset (Callithrix jacchus model of human Herpesvirus 6A and 6B infections: immunologic, virologic and radiologic characterization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Leibovitch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human Herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 is a ubiquitous virus with an estimated seroprevalence of 95% in the adult population. HHV-6 is associated with several neurologic disorders, including multiple sclerosis, an inflammatory demyelinating disease affecting the CNS. Animal models of HHV-6 infection would help clarify its role in human disease but have been slow to develop because rodents lack CD46, the receptor for cellular entry. Therefore, we investigated the effects of HHV-6 infections in a non-human primate, the common marmoset Callithrix jacchus. We inoculated a total of 12 marmosets with HHV-6A and HHV-6B intravenously and HHV-6A intranasally. Animals were monitored for 25 weeks post-inoculation clinically, immunologically and by MRI. Marmosets inoculated with HHV-6A intravenously exhibited neurologic symptoms and generated virus-specific antibody responses, while those inoculated intravenously with HHV-6B were asymptomatic and generated comparatively lower antibody responses. Viral DNA was detected at a low frequency in paraffin-embedded CNS tissue of a subset of marmosets inoculated with HHV-6A and HHV-6B intravenously. When different routes of HHV-6A inoculation were compared, intravenous inoculation resulted in virus-specific antibody responses and infrequent detection of viral DNA in the periphery, while intranasal inoculation resulted in negligible virus-specific antibody responses and frequent detection of viral DNA in the periphery. Moreover, marmosets inoculated with HHV-6A intravenously exhibited neurologic symptoms, while marmosets inoculated with HHV-6A intranasally were asymptomatic. We demonstrate that a marmoset model of HHV-6 infection can serve to further define the contribution of this ubiquitous virus to human neurologic disorders.

  20. Ataxia, Dementia, and Hypogonadotropism Caused by Disordered Ubiquitination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margolin, David H.; Kousi, Maria; Chan, Yee-Ming;

    2013-01-01

    affected patients. Neurologic and reproductive endocrine phenotypes were characterized in detail. The effects of sequence variants and the presence of an epistatic interaction were tested in a zebrafish model. RESULTS Digenic homozygous mutations in RNF216 and OTUD4, which encode a ubiquitin E3 ligase...... in zebrafish embryos induced defects in the eye, optic tectum, and cerebellum; combinatorial suppression of both genes exacerbated these phenotypes, which were rescued by nonmutant, but not mutant, human RNF216 or OTUD4 messenger RNA. All patients had progressive ataxia and dementia. Neuronal loss was observed...... in cerebellar pathways and the hippocampus; surviving hippocampal neurons contained ubiquitin-immunoreactive intranuclear inclusions. Defects were detected at the hypothalamic and pituitary levels of the reproductive endocrine axis. CONCLUSIONS The syndrome of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, ataxia, and dementia...

  1. Virtual Immunology: Software for Teaching Basic Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berçot, Filipe Faria; Fidalgo-Neto, Antônio Augusto; Lopes, Renato Matos; Faggioni, Thais; Alves, Luiz Anastácio

    2013-01-01

    As immunology continues to evolve, many educational methods have found difficulty in conveying the degree of complexity inherent in its basic principles. Today, the teaching-learning process in such areas has been improved with tools such as educational software. This article introduces "Virtual Immunology," a software program available…

  2. Reviewing the genetic causes of spastic-ataxias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, S.T. de; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Vermeer, S.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2012-01-01

    Although the combined presence of ataxia and pyramidal features has a long differential, the presence of a true spastic-ataxia as the predominant clinical syndrome has a rather limited differential diagnosis. Autosomal recessive ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay, late-onset Friedreich ataxia, and heredi

  3. Dystonia as presenting manifestation of ataxia telangiectasia : a case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Goyal V; Behari M

    2002-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia is a genetically inherited multisystem disorder with predominant feature being telangiectasia and cerebellar ataxia. In this report, a family of three siblings suffering from ataxia telangiectasia is described. The proband presented with dystonia and dystonic myoclonus, both of which are rare presenting features of ataxia telangiectasia.

  4. Hereditary ataxias and paraplegias in Cantabria, Spain. An epidemiological and clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, J M; Calleja, J; Combarros, O; Berciano, J

    1991-04-01

    A clinical, genetic and epidemiological study of hereditary ataxias and paraplegias was conducted within a defined area (Cantabria) in Northern Spain from 1974 to 1986. The series comprised 48 index cases and 65 affected relatives. On prevalence day, 103 patients were alive, giving a prevalence of 20.2 cases per 100,000. There were 24 patients (18 families) with Friedreich's ataxia (FA), 12 (6 families) with early onset cerebellar ataxia (EOCA) differing from FA, 6 (3 families) with dominantly transmitted late onset cerebellar ataxia (LOCA), 11 with 'idiopathic' LOCA, 49 (9 families) with 'pure' hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), and 1 patient with congenital cerebellar ataxia. The prevalence found here is comparable with the highest figures described in previous surveys. This may in part be due to the great number of secondary cases in our series. A high frequency of parental consanguinity occurred in FA patients, 'pseudodominant' inheritance being observed in 1 family. The clinical features were those of classical FA except for later onset and slower course in 1 family, and retained tendon reflexes in the lower limbs in 2 cases. Such data indicate the need for modification of the essential criteria for the disease. EOCA included 4 patients with normoreflexic ataxia and 1 patient with ataxia and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone deficiency. In addition, there were 7 patients from 2 unrelated families with a homogeneous syndrome characterized by autosomal recessive inheritance, cerebellar ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa and sensory neuropathy. This syndrome is therefore a well defined nosological entity to be added to the list of autosomal recessive mendelian phenotypes. The clinical picture of patients with LOCA was either a 'pure' cerebellar or a 'cerebellar-plus' syndrome. Genetic subgroups of 'pure' HSP were autosomal dominant type I in 5 families and type II in 2, and autosomal recessive in 2 families. PMID:2043954

  5. Molecular, immunological, and biological characterization of Tityus serrulatus venom hyaluronidase: new insights into its role in envenomation.

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Campolina Rebello Horta; Bárbara de Freitas Magalhães; Bárbara Bruna Ribeiro Oliveira-Mendes; Anderson Oliveira do Carmo; Clara Guerra Duarte; Liza Figueiredo Felicori; Ricardo Andrez Machado-de-Ávila; Carlos Chávez-Olórtegui; Evanguedes Kalapothakis

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Scorpionism is a public health problem in Brazil, and Tityus serrulatus (Ts) is primarily responsible for severe accidents. The main toxic components of Ts venom are low-molecular-weight neurotoxins; however, the venom also contains poorly characterized high-molecular-weight enzymes. Hyaluronidase is one such enzyme that has been poorly characterized. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined clones from a cDNA library of the Ts venom gland and described two novel isoforms of hy...

  6. A Case of Ataxia with Isolated Vitamin E Deficiency Initially Diagnosed as Friedreich’s Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bonello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia with isolated vitamin E deficiency (AVED is a rare autosomal recessive condition that is caused by a mutation in the alpha tocopherol transfer protein gene. It is almost indistinguishable clinically from Friedreich’s ataxia but with appropriate treatment its devastating neurological features can be prevented. Patients can present with a progressive cerebellar ataxia, pyramidal spasticity, and evidence of a neuropathy with absent deep tendon reflexes. It is important to screen for this condition on initial evaluation of a young patient presenting with progressive ataxia and it should be considered in patients with a long standing ataxia without any diagnosis in view of the potential therapeutics and genetic counselling. In this case report we present a patient who was initially diagnosed with Friedreich’s ataxia but was later found to have AVED.

  7. [Peripheral neuropathies associated with hereditary cerebellar ataxias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anheim, M; Tranchant, C

    2011-01-01

    Inherited cerebellar ataxias constitute a complicated and heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders affecting the cerebellum and/or spinocerebellar tract, spinal cord and peripheral nerves. A peripheral neuropathy is frequently seen in inherited cerebellar ataxias although it rarely reveals the disease. Moreover, the peripheral neuropathy is helpful for the diagnostic procedure and contributes to the functional prognosis of the disease. Thus, electroneuromyography is essential in the algorithm for the diagnosis of inherited cerebellar ataxias, as well as brain MRI (looking especially for cerebellar atrophy) and the assessment of several biomarkers (alpha-foetoprotein, vitamin E, albumin, LDL cholesterol, lactic acid, phytanic acid).

  8. Viro-immunological characterization of naïve patients with high cerebrospinal fluid (CSF HIV RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Iannuzzi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV can spread into the central nervous system (CNS early in the course of infection and this turns into intrathecal inflammation and neuronal damage. We aimed to investigate clinical and immunological parameters associated with elevated CSF VL in HIV-infected ART-naïve patients. Materials and Methods: HIV+ ART-naïve patients underwent a comprehensive battery of neurocognitive (NC tests and lumbar puncture (LP for CSF HIV-RNA detection. Plasma HIV-RNA and peripheral T-cell immune-phenotypes (CD38/CD45RA/CD45R0/CD127 on CD4/CD8 were also assessed (flow cytometry. High-CSF HIV RNA was defined as≥10000cp/mL (H-CSF, while CSF HIV RNA10000 cp/mL.Table 1 shows the features of H- versus L-CSF patients. Compared to L-CSF patients, H-CSF patients displayed lower current CD4+%, lower CD4/CD8 ratio and higher CD8%. No differences in NC tests performance were observed between groups (p=0.6. Regarding T-cell immuno-phenotypes, H-CSF patients displayed a higher proportion of CD45R0+CD38+CD8+ (11 vs 7%, p=0.02 and lower expression of CD45RA+CD8+ % (16 vs 20%, p=0.007, in comparison to L-CSF patients. In multivariate analysis CD45RA+CD8+ T-cells % (OR 0.917, CI 95% 0.852–0.987, p=0.002 was associated with H-CSF, even after adjustment for plasma VL, CD8 and CD4 count. Globally, in univariate CSF VL inversely correlated with CD45RA+CD8+ % (r=−0.223, p=0.0217 and CD127+CD4+ % (r= −0.204, p= 0.0225, while a positive association was found between CSF and plasma VL (r=0.303, p=0.0004 and CD8 % (r=0.211, p=0.016. In multivariate linear regression, in addition to positive association between plasma and CSF VL (β: 0.212, 95% CI 0.02–0.41, p=0.032, also CD45RA+CD8+ % were confirmed inversely associated to CSF VL (β: 0.21, 95% CI −0.5 to −0.002, p=0.036, adjusting for CD4/CD8 and CD4CD127 %. Conclusions: We hereby describe a 32% prevalence of H-CSF in a cohort of HIV+ ART-naïve patients. Subjects with high-CSF viral replication are mostly

  9. Mapping of the SCA23 locus involved in autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia to chromosome region 20p13-12.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, D S; van de Warrenburg, B P; Wesseling, P; Pearson, P L; Kremer, H P; Sinke, R J

    2004-01-01

    We report upon a Dutch autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) family, clinically characterized by a late-onset (>40 years), slowly progressive, isolated spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). Neuropathological examination in one affected subject showed neuronal loss in the Purkinje cell layer, dentate n

  10. Sporadic Ataxia and Multiple System Atrophy (MSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is unclear why some people with sporadic ataxia progress to develop MSA whereas others do not. Many people with adult onset cerebellar degeneration may have the dominantly inherited form, which ...

  11. Cerebellar Involvement in Ataxia and Generalized Epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Kros (Lieke)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The work described in this thesis was performed in order to elucidate the role of different cerebellar modules in ataxia and generalized epilepsy using various techniques including in vivo electrophysiology, optogenetics, pharmacological interventions, immunohistology a

  12. A Precocious Cerebellar Ataxia and Frequent Fever Episodes in a 16-Month-Old Infant Revealing Ataxia-Telangiectasia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Nespoli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT is the most frequent progressive cerebellar ataxia in infancy and childhood. Immunodeficiency which includes both cellular and humoral arms has variable severity. Since the clinical presentation is extremely variable, a high clinical suspicion will allow an early diagnosis. Serum alpha-fetoprotein is elevated in 80–85% of patients and therefore could be used as a screening tool. Here, we present a case of a 5-year-old female infant who was admitted to our department at the age of 16 months because of gait disorders and febrile episodes that had begun at 5 months after the cessation of breastfeeding. Serum alfa-fetoprotein level was elevated. Other investigations showed leukocytopenia with lymphopenia, reduced IgG2 and IgA levels, and low titers of specific postimmunization antibodies against tetanus toxoid and Haemophilus B polysaccharide. Peripheral lymphocytes subsets showed reduction of T cells with a marked predominance of T cells with a memory phenotype and a corresponding reduction of naïve T cells; NK cells were very increased (41% with normal activity. The characterization of the ATM gene mutations revealed 2 specific mutations (c.5692C > T/c.7630-2A > C compatible with AT diagnosis. It was concluded that AT syndrome should be considered in children with precocious signs of cerebellar ataxia and recurrent fever episodes.

  13. Writer's cramp in spinocerebellar ataxia Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khwaja, Geeta Anjum; Srivastava, Abhilekh; Ghuge, Vijay Vishwanath; Chaudhry, Neera

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia can be encountered in a small subset of patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), but task specific dystonia is extremely rare. We report a case of a 48-year-old male with confirmed SCA Type 1 (SCA1) with mild progressive cerebellar ataxia and a prominent and disabling Writer's cramp. This case highlights the ever-expanding phenotypic heterogeneity of the SCA's in general and SCA1 in particular.

  14. Writer's cramp in spinocerebellar ataxia Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khwaja, Geeta Anjum; Srivastava, Abhilekh; Ghuge, Vijay Vishwanath; Chaudhry, Neera

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia can be encountered in a small subset of patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), but task specific dystonia is extremely rare. We report a case of a 48-year-old male with confirmed SCA Type 1 (SCA1) with mild progressive cerebellar ataxia and a prominent and disabling Writer's cramp. This case highlights the ever-expanding phenotypic heterogeneity of the SCA's in general and SCA1 in particular. PMID:27695243

  15. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P;

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria, unip...... relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations....

  16. The ataxia (axJ mutation causes abnormal GABAA receptor turnover in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Lappe-Siefke

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia represents a pathological coordination failure that often involves functional disturbances in cerebellar circuits. Purkinje cells (PCs characterize the only output neurons of the cerebellar cortex and critically participate in regulating motor coordination. Although different genetic mutations are known that cause ataxia, little is known about the underlying cellular mechanisms. Here we show that a mutated ax(J gene locus, encoding the ubiquitin-specific protease 14 (Usp14, negatively influences synaptic receptor turnover. Ax(J mouse mutants, characterized by cerebellar ataxia, display both increased GABA(A receptor (GABA(AR levels at PC surface membranes accompanied by enlarged IPSCs. Accordingly, we identify physical interaction of Usp14 and the GABA(AR alpha1 subunit. Although other currently unknown changes might be involved, our data show that ubiquitin-dependent GABA(AR turnover at cerebellar synapses contributes to ax(J-mediated behavioural impairment.

  17. Molecular and immunological characterization of the first allergenic lipocalin in hamster: the major allergen from Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, José Alberto; de Las Heras, Manuel; Maroto, Aroa Sanz; Vivanco, Fernando; Sastre, Joaquín; Pastor-Vargas, Carlos

    2014-08-22

    The most frequent pet allergy is to cat and dog, but in recent years, it has become increasingly popular to have other pets, and the risk of exposure to new allergens is more prevalent. The list of new pets includes hamsters, and one of the most popular hamsters is the Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus). The aim of this study was the characterization and cloning of the major allergen from this hamster. The study of its allergenicity and cross-reactivity could improve the specific diagnosis and treatment for hamster-allergic patients. Thirteen Siberian hamster-allergic patients were recruited at the outpatient clinic. Protein extracts were prepared from the hair, urine, and salivary glands of four hamster species (European, golden, Siberian, and Roborovski). IgE-binding proteins were detected by immunoblotting and identified by mass spectrometry. The recombinant protein was produced in Escherichia coli and then purified by metal chelate affinity chromatography. The allergenic properties of the recombinant protein were tested by ELISA and immunoblotting, and biological activity was tested according to capacity for basophil activation. Three IgE-binding proteins were identified in extracts obtained from Siberian hamster hair, urine, and salivary glands. All proteins corresponded to the same protein, which was identified as a lipocalin. This lipocalin had no cross-reactivity with common and golden hamsters. The recombinant allergen was cloned and purified, showing similar IgE reactivity in vitro to Siberian hamster protein extracts. Also, the recombinant allergen was capable of producing biological activation in vivo. The major Siberian hamster allergen was cloned, and allergenic properties were characterized, providing a new tool for specific diagnosis of allergy to Siberian hamster.

  18. Modelling Immunological Memory

    CERN Document Server

    Garret, Simon; Walker, Joanne; Wilson, William; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Accurate immunological models offer the possibility of performing highthroughput experiments in silico that can predict, or at least suggest, in vivo phenomena. In this chapter, we compare various models of immunological memory. We first validate an experimental immunological simulator, developed by the authors, by simulating several theories of immunological memory with known results. We then use the same system to evaluate the predicted effects of a theory of immunological memory. The resulting model has not been explored before in artificial immune systems research, and we compare the simulated in silico output with in vivo measurements. Although the theory appears valid, we suggest that there are a common set of reasons why immunological memory models are a useful support tool; not conclusive in themselves.

  19. Ataxia-telangiectasia: future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhary MW

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mohammed Wajid Chaudhary, Raidah Saleem Al-Baradie Pediatric Neurology, Neurosciences Centre, King Fahad Specialist Hospital, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Abstract: Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T is an autosomal recessive multi-system disorder caused by mutation in the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene (ATM. ATM is a large serine/threonine protein kinase, a member of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK family whose best-studied function is as master controller of signal transduction for the DNA damage response (DDR in the event of double strand breaks (DSBs. The DDR rapidly recognizes DNA lesions and initiates the appropriate cellular programs to maintain genome integrity. This includes the coordination of cell-cycle checkpoints, transcription, translation, DNA repair, metabolism, and cell fate decisions, such as apoptosis or senescence. DSBs can be generated by exposure to ionizing radiation (IR or various chemical compounds, such as topoisomerase inhibitors, or can be part of programmed generation and repair of DSBs via cellular enzymes needed for the generation of the antibody repertoire as well as the maturation of germ cells. AT patients have immunodeficiency, and are sterile with gonadal dysgenesis as a result of defect in meiotic recombination. In the cells of nervous system ATM has additional role in vesicle dynamics as well as in the maintenance of the epigenetic code of histone modifications. Moderate levels of ATM are associated with prolonged lifespan through resistance to oxidative stress. ATM inhibitors are being viewed as potential radiosensitizers as part of cancer radiotherapy. Though there is no cure for the disease at present, glucocorticoids have been shown to induce alternate splicing site in the gene for ATM partly restoring its activity, but their most effective timing in the disease natural history is not yet known. Gene therapy is promising but large size of the gene makes it technically difficult

  20. A gene for nystagmus-associated episodic ataxia maps to chromosome 19p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, P.L.; Root, D.; Gancher, S. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Episodic ataxia (EA) is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by attacks of generalized ataxia and relatively normal neurological function between attacks. Onset occurs in childhood or adolescence and persists through adulthood. Penetrance is nearly complete. EA is clinically heterogeneous, including at least two distinct entities: (1) episodes of ataxia and dysarthria lasting hours to days, generally with interictal nystagmus (MIM 108500); (2) episodes of ataxia and dysarthria lasting only minutes, with interictal myokymia (MMM 160120). The EA/nystagmus patients sometimes develop persistent ataxia and cerebellar atrophy. Previously we reported linkage in four EA/myokymia families to a K{sup +} channel gene on chromosome 12p. We excluded this region in a large family with EA/nystagmus. We now report evidence for linkage to chromosome 19p in this and in one other EA/nystagmus family, based on eight microsatellite markers which span approximately 30 cM. The region is flanked distally by D19S209 and proximally by D19S226. All six markers within this region gave positive evidence for linkage; the highest total two-point lod scores occurred wtih D19S221 (3.98 at theta = 0.10) and D19S413 (3.37 at theta = 0.05). Interestingly, Joutel et al. (1993) mapped a gene for familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) to the region around D19S221. Some individuals in these families have ataxia, cerebellar atrophy and interictal nystagmus, but no episodic ataxia. These results demonstrate that the clinical heterogeneity in EA reflects underlying genetic hetreogeneity. In addition, they suggest that EA/nystagmus and some FHM may represent different mutations in the same gene locus on chromosome 19p.

  1. Isolation and immunological characterization of a novel Cladosporium herbarum allergen structurally homologous to the alpha/beta hydrolase fold superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rid, Raphaela; Onder, Kamil; Hawranek, Thomas; Laimer, Martin; Bauer, Johann W; Holler, Claudia; Simon-Nobbe, Birgit; Breitenbach, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Because the ascomycete Cladosporium herbarum embodies one of the most important, world-wide occurring fungal species responsible for eliciting typical IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions ranging from rhinitis and ocular symptoms to severe involvement of the lower respiratory tract, a more comprehensive definition of its detailed allergen repertoire is unquestionably of critical medical as well as therapeutic significance. By screening a C. herbarum cDNA library with IgE antibodies pooled from 3 mold-reactive sera, we were able to identify, clone and affinity-purify a novel allergen candidate (29.9 kDa) exhibiting considerable (three-dimensional) homology to the alpha/beta hydrolase fold superfamily. The latter covers a collection of hydrolytic enzymes of widely differing phylogenetic origin as well as catalytic activity (operating in countless biological contexts) that in general exhibit only little sequence similarity yet show a remarkable conservation of structural topology. Our present study (i) characterizes recombinant non-fusion C. herbarum hydrolase as a natively folded, minor mold allergen that displays a prevalence of IgE reactivity of approximately 17% in our in vitro immunoblot experiments, (ii) proposes the existence of several putative (speculatively cross-reactive) ascomycete orthologues as determined via genome-wide in silico predictions, and (iii) finally implies that C. herbarum hydrolase could be included in forthcoming minimal testing sets when fungal allergy is suspected.

  2. Molecular and immunological characterization of gluten proteins isolated from oat cultivars that differ in toxicity for celiac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Real

    Full Text Available A strict gluten-free diet (GFD is the only currently available therapeutic treatment for patients with celiac disease (CD. Traditionally, treatment with a GFD has excluded wheat, barley and rye, while the presence of oats is a subject of debate. The most-recent research indicates that some cultivars of oats can be a safe part of a GFD. In order to elucidate the toxicity of the prolamins from oat varieties with low, medium, and high CD toxicity, the avenin genes of these varieties were cloned and sequenced, and their expression quantified throughout the grain development. At the protein level, we have accomplished an exhaustive characterization and quantification of avenins by RP-HPLC and an analysis of immunogenicity of peptides present in prolamins of different oat cultivars. Avenin sequences were classified into three different groups, which have homology with S-rich prolamins of Triticeae. Avenin proteins presented a lower proline content than that of wheat gliadin; this may contribute to the low toxicity shown by oat avenins. The expression of avenin genes throughout the development stages has shown a pattern similar to that of prolamins of wheat and barley. RP-HPLC chromatograms showed protein peaks in the alcohol-soluble and reduced-soluble fractions. Therefore, oat grains had both monomeric and polymeric avenins, termed in this paper gliadin- and glutenin-like avenins. We found a direct correlation between the immunogenicity of the different oat varieties and the presence of the specific peptides with a higher/lower potential immunotoxicity. The specific peptides from the oat variety with the highest toxicity have shown a higher potential immunotoxicity. These results suggest that there is wide range of variation of potential immunotoxicity of oat cultivars that could be due to differences in the degree of immunogenicity in their sequences.

  3. The New Cellular Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  4. The immunology of filariasis*

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes the available information on the immunology of filariasis, and discusses immunodiagnosis and the immunological factors influencing the host—parasite relationship in lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis. Several areas that require further research are identified, particularly concerning the development of new serological techniques, and the fractionation of specific antigens. The problems associated with vaccine development are considered and the importance of finding...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions NARP neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa Enable Javascript to view the ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa ( NARP ) is a condition that ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions IOSCA infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia ( IOSCA ) is a progressive disorder that affects the ...

  7. Fragile X-Associated Tremor and Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources and Publications Fragile X-Associated Tremor and Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS): Overview Skip sharing on social media ... this: Page Content Fragile X-associated tremor and ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset condition (occurs ...

  8. The dynamic regulation of cortical excitability is altered in episodic ataxia type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmich, Rick C; Siebner, Hartwig R; Giffin, Nicola;

    2010-01-01

    cerebral excitability after facilitatory events. We tested this hypothesis in patients with episodic ataxia type 2 (n = 6), patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (n = 7) and healthy controls (n = 13). All subjects received a high-frequency burst (10 pulses at 20 Hz) of transcranial magnetic...... during the 1 s period following the transcranial magnetic stimulation burst, patients with episodic ataxia type 2 had increased intracortical facilitation 1000 ms after the burst. Intracortical inhibition was unaltered between groups. Patients with familial hemiplegic migraine were not significantly......Episodic ataxia type 2 and familial hemiplegic migraine are two rare hereditary disorders that are linked to dysfunctional ion channels and are characterized clinically by paroxysmal neurological symptoms. Impaired regulation of cerebral excitability is thought to play a role in the occurrence...

  9. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3: subphenotypes in a cohort of brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Moro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3 involves cerebellar, pyramidal, extrapyramidal, motor neuron and oculomotor systems with strong phenotypic heterogeneity, that lead us to classify the disorder into different clinical subtypes according to the predominantly affected motor systems. Method The series comprises 167 SCA3 patients belonging to 68 pedigrees, studied from 1989-2013. These patients were categorized into seven different subphenotypes. Results SCA3 cases were clustered according to the predominant clinical features. Three most common forms were subphenotype 2, characterized by ataxia and pyramidal symptom was observed in 67.5%, subphenotype 3 with ataxia and peripheral signs in 13.3%, and subphenotype 6 with pure cerebellar syndrome in 7.2%. Conclusion Our study was the first to systematically classify SCA3 into seven subphenotypes. This classification may be particularly useful for determination of a more specific and direct phenotype/genotype correlation in future studies.

  10. Friedreich's ataxia cardiomyopathy: case based discussion and management issues.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanley, A

    2010-04-01

    Cardiac involvement is common in Friedreich\\'s Ataxia and is a common cause of premature death. Evidence regarding treatment of congestive heart failure in patients with Friedreich\\'s Ataxia is lacking. The case of a 31-year-old male with advanced Friedreich\\'s Ataxia who presented with an acute diarrhoeal illness and features of acute heart failure is discussed. We then review the reported cardiac manifestations of Friedreich\\'s Ataxia and discuss management options.

  11. Gastric outlet obstruction due to adenocarcinoma in a patient with Ataxia-Telangiectasia syndrome: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammond Sue

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ataxia-Telangiectasia syndrome is characterized by progressive cerebellar dysfunction, conjuctival and cutaneous telangiectasias, severe immune deficiencies, premature aging and predisposition to cancer. Clinical and radiographic evaluation for malignancy in ataxia-telangiectasia patients is usually atypical, leading to delays in diagnosis. Case presentation We report the case of a 20 year old ataxia-telangiectasia patient with gastric adenocarcinoma that presented as complete gastric outlet obstruction. Conclusion A literature search of adenocarcinoma associated with ataxia-telangiectasia revealed 6 cases. All patients presented with non-specific gastrointestinal complaints suggestive of ulcer disease. Although there was no correlation between immunoglobulin levels and development of gastric adenocarcinoma, the presence of chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia seem to lead to the development of gastric adenocarcinoma. One should consider adenocarcinoma in any patient with ataxia-telangiectasia who presents with non-specific gastrointestinal complaints, since this can lead to earlier diagnosis.

  12. Cerebellar Ataxia and Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariño, Helena; Gresa-Arribas, Nuria; Blanco, Yolanda; Martínez-Hernández, Eugenia; Sabater, Lidia; Petit-Pedrol, Mar; Rouco, Idoia; Bataller, Luis; Dalmau, Josep O.; Saiz, Albert; Graus, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Current clinical and immunologic knowledge on cerebellar ataxia (CA) with glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 antibodies (GAD65-Abs) is based on case reports and small series with short-term follow-up data. OBJECTIVE To report the symptoms, additional antibodies, prognostic factors, and long-term outcomes in a cohort of patients with CA and GAD65-Abs. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective cohort study and laboratory investigations at a center for autoimmune neurologic disorders among 34 patients with CA and GAD65-Abs, including 25 with long-term follow-up data (median, 5.4 years; interquartile range, 3.1-10.3 years). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Analysis of clinicoimmunologic features and predictors of response to immunotherapy. Immunochemistry on rat brain, cultured neurons, and human embryonic kidney cells expressing GAD65, GAD67, α1-subunit of the glycine receptor, and a repertoire of known cell surface autoantigens were used to identify additional antibodies. Twenty-eight patients with stiff person syndrome and GAD65-Abs served as controls. RESULTS The median age of patients was 58 years (range, 33-80 years); 28 of 34 patients (82%) were women. Nine patients (26%) reported episodes of brainstem and cerebellar dysfunction or persistent vertigo several months before developing CA. The clinical presentation was subacute during a period of weeks in 13 patients (38%). Nine patients (26%) had coexisting stiff person syndrome symptoms. Systemic organ-specific autoimmunities (type 1 diabetes mellitus and others) were present in 29 patients (85%). Twenty of 25 patients with long-term follow-up data received immunotherapy (intravenous immunoglobulin in 10 and corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin or other immunosuppressors in 10), and 7 of them (35%) improved. Predictors of clinical response included subacute onset of CA (odds ratio [OR], 0.50; 95% CI, 0.25-0.99; P = .047) and prompt immunotherapy (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96-0.99; P = .01). Similar

  13. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Types 1, 2, 3 and 6 : the Clinical Spectrum of Ataxia and Morphometric Brainstem and Cerebellar Findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobi, Heike; Hauser, Till-Karsten; Giunti, Paola; Globas, Christoph; Bauer, Peter; Schmitz-Huebsch, Tanja; Baliko, Laszlo; Filla, Alessandro; Mariotti, Caterina; Rakowicz, Maria; Charles, Perine; Ribai, Pascale; Szymanski, Sandra; Infante, Jon; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.; Duerr, Alexandra; Timmann, Dagmar; Boesch, Sylvia; Fancellu, Roberto; Rola, Rafal; Depondt, Chantal; Schoels, Ludger; Zdzienicka, Elzbieta; Kang, Jun-Suk; Ratzka, Susanne; Kremer, Berry; Stephenson, Dennis A.; Melegh, Bela; Pandolfo, Massimo; du Montcel, Sophie Tezenas; Borkert, Johannes; Schulz, Joerg B.; Klockgether, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    To assess the clinical spectrum of ataxia and cerebellar oculomotor deficits in the most common spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs), we analysed the baseline data of the EUROSCA natural history study, a multicentric cohort study of 526 patients with either spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, 2, 3 or 6. To qua

  14. Immunological characterization of a non-toxic peptide conferring protection against the toxic fraction (AahG50) of the Androctonus australis hector venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srairi-Abid, Najet; Kaabi, Hajer; Mlayah-Bellalouna, Saoussen; Mejri, Thouraya; Sampieri, François; El Ayeb, Mohamed

    2008-03-01

    KAaH1 and KAaH2 are non-toxic peptides, isolated from the venom of the Androctonus australis hector (Aah) scorpion. In a previous study, we showed these peptides to be the most abundant (approximately 10% each) in the toxic fraction (AahG50) of the Aah venom. KAaH1 and KAaH2 showed high sequence identities (approximately 60%) with birtoxin-like peptides, which likewise are the major peptidic components of Parabuthus transvaalicus scorpion venom. Here, we report the immunological characterization of KAaH1 and KAaH2. These peptides were found to be specifically recognized by polyclonal antibodies raised against AahII, the most toxic peptide of Aah venom, and represents the second antigenic group, including toxins from different scorpion species in the world. Moreover, KAaH1 partially inhibits AahII binding to its specific antibody, suggesting some common epitopes between these two peptides. The identification of possible key antigenic residues in KAaH1 was deduced from comparison of its 3-D model with the experimental structure of AahII. Two clusters of putative antigenically important residues were found at the exposed surface; one could be constituted of V3 and D53, the other of D10, T15 and Y16. Polyclonal antibodies raised against KAaH1 in mice were found to cross-react with both AahII and AahG50, and neutralizing 5LD(50)/ml of the toxic fraction. Mice vaccinated with KAaH1 were protected against a challenge of 2LD(50) of AahG50 fraction. All these data suggest that KAaH1 has clear advantages over the use of the whole or part of the venom. KAaH1 is not toxic and could produce sera-neutralizing scorpion toxins, not only from Aah venom, but also toxins of other venoms from Buthus, Leiurus, or Parabuthus scorpion species presenting antigenically related toxins.

  15. Recent advances in hereditary spinocerebellar ataxias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Sinke, Richard J; Kremer, Berry

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, molecular genetic research has unraveled a major part of the genetic background of autosomal dominant and recessive spinocerebellar ataxias. These advances have also allowed insight in (some of) the pathophysiologic pathways assumed to be involved in these diseases. For the clinicia

  16. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P;

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria, unip...

  17. Quantitative evaluation of gait ataxia by accelerometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Shinichi; Yabe, Ichiro; Matsushima, Masaaki; Ito, Yoichi M; Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Hidenao

    2015-11-15

    An appropriate biomarker for spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) has not been identified. Here, we performed gait analysis on patients with pure cerebellar type SCD and assessed whether the obtained data could be used as a neurophysiological biomarker for cerebellar ataxia. We analyzed 25 SCD patients, 25 patients with Parkinson's disease as a disease control, and 25 healthy control individuals. Acceleration signals during 6 min of walking and 1 min of standing were measured by two sets of triaxial accelerometers that were secured with a fixation vest to the middle of the lower and upper back of each subject. We extracted two gait parameters, the average and the coefficient of variation of motion trajectory amplitude, from each acceleration component. Then, each component was analyzed by correlation with the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) and the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Compared with the gait control of healthy subjects and concerning correlation with severity and disease specificity, our results suggest that the average amplitude of medial-lateral (upper back) of straight gait is a physiological biomarker for cerebellar ataxia. Our results suggest that gait analysis is a quantitative and concise evaluation scale for the severity of cerebellar ataxia.

  18. Purinergic signaling at immunological synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubyak, G R

    2000-07-01

    The early studies and hypotheses of Geoffrey Burnstock catalyzed intensive characterization of roles for nucleotides and P2 nucleotide receptors in neurotransmission and neuromodulation. These latter analyses have focused on the mechanisms of nucleotide release and action in the microenvironments of nerve endings and synapses. However, studies of various white blood cells, such as monocytes, neutrophils, and lymphocytes, suggest that locally released nucleotides also modulate intercellular signaling at so-called 'immunological synapses'. This communication describes recent findings and speculations regarding nucleotide release and signaling in several key phases of the immune and inflammatory responses.

  19. Immunological memory is associative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.J.; Forrest, S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Perelson, A.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to show that immunological memory is an associative and robust memory that belongs to the class of sparse distributed memories. This class of memories derives its associative and robust nature by sparsely sampling the input space and distributing the data among many independent agents. Other members of this class include a model of the cerebellar cortex and Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM). First we present a simplified account of the immune response and immunological memory. Next we present SDM, and then we show the correlations between immunological memory and SDM. Finally, we show how associative recall in the immune response can be both beneficial and detrimental to the fitness of an individual.

  20. Immunology of methanogenic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macario, A.J.L.; Macario, E.C. de (New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States). Wadsworth Center for Labs. and Research School of Public Health, Albany, NY (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this brief review is to highlight some findings using immunologic methods and antibody probes developed for analysis of methanogens directly in samples from bioreactors, avoiding culture isolation. A considerable diversity of methanogens was revealed by antigenic fingerprinting in bioreactors, larger than previously suspected. It was also found that the number and immunologic characteristics of the methanogenic subpopulations form a pattern distinctive of bioreactor type, feedstocks and operating conditions. This pattern changed in response to perturbations and to temperature shifts. Time course quantitative measurements of methanogenic subpopulations demonstrated that these subpopulations undergo sequential changes during bioreactor operation. Parallel microbiologic, physiologic, and chemical determinations demonstrated the reliability of the immunologic methods and their potential for bioreactor monitoring and for manipulating microprobes (e.g. to exclude a strain from a bioreactor). (author)

  1. Investigation of epididymal immunology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Zong-Liang

    2005-01-01

    Immunology is the study of the structure and function of the immune system. The immune system consists of an earlier-stage innate immunity and a later-stage adaptive immunity. The task of the immune system is to efficiently respond to non-self antigens and the invasion of pathogens, thereby protecting the host's homeostasis. This review article discusses the structure and function of the epididymis, including the composition of the epithelial cells of the epididymis and their relationship to the immune system, through the assessment of alterations in the immune cells of the epididymis. The review also shows the anti-inflammatory properties of rat epididymal defensin and the description of the blood-epididymis barrier, immune barrier, epididymitis and pathological mechanisms of infertility in males. Taken together, we see that the epididymis possesses a close link with immunology. Finally, this review discusses the future of studies involving epididymal immunology.

  2. Systems Theory in Immunology

    CERN Document Server

    Doria, Gino; Koch, Giorgio; Strom, Roberto

    1979-01-01

    This volume collects the contributions presented at the "Working Conference on System Theory in Immunology", held in Rome, May 1978. The aim of the Conference was to bring together immunologists on one side and experts in system theory and applied mathematics on the other, in order to identify problems of common interest and to establish a network of joint effort toward their solution. The methodologies of system theory for processing experimental data and for describing dynamical phenomena could indeed contribute significantly to the under­ standing of basic immunological facts. Conversely, the complexity of experimental results and of interpretative models should stimulate mathematicians to formulate new problems and to design appropriate procedures of analysis. The multitude of scientific publications in theoretical biology, appeared in recent years, confirms this trend and calls for extensive interaction between mat- matics and immunology. The material of this volume is divided into five sections, along ...

  3. The spinocerebellar ataxia 2 locus is located within a 3-cm interval on chromosome 12q23-24.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allotey, R.; Twells, R.; Cemal, C. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    The autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCA) are a clinically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by a predominantly cerebellar syndrome of onset with gait ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria, and dysdiadochokinesia. Pathologically, the disorders are characterized by premature neuronal loss in the cerebellar cortex and the inferior olivary and pontine nuclei, with degeneration of the spinal cord. We have previously assigned the spinocerebellar ataxia 2 locus to chromosome 12q23-24.1, within a 31-cM interval flanked by the loci D12S58 and PLA2. Linkage to SCA2 has been demonstrated in pedigrees from Europe, Japan, and North America, the latter serving to refine the candidate region to a 16-cM interval. We report here genetic analysis undertaken between SCA2 and nine microsatellite loci known to span 8 cM within this interval. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Eye movements in ataxia-telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloh, R W; Yee, R D; Boder, E

    1978-11-01

    The spectrum of eye movement disorders in six patients with ataxia-telangiectasia at different stages of progression was assessed quantitatively by electrooculography. All patients demonstrated abnormalities of voluntary and involuntary saccades. The youngest and least involved patient had significantly increased reaction times of voluntary saccades, but normal accuracy and velocity. The other patients demonstrated increased reaction times and marked hypometria of horizontal and vertical voluntary saccades. Saccade velocity remained normal. Vestibular and optokinetic fast components (involuntary saccades) had normal amplitude and velocity but the eyes deviated tonically in the direction of the slow component. We conclude that patients with ataxia-telangiectasia have a defect in the initiation of voluntary and involuntary saccades in the earliest stages. These findings are distinctly different from those in other familial cerebellar atrophy syndromes.

  5. Immunologic mechanism at infertility

    OpenAIRE

    İlknur Aydın; Behice Erci

    2006-01-01

    Infertility has been serious problem for couples that want to have a child. It is estimated that %10-15 of marriages are involuntary childless; that is, there is the serious problem of infertility. In more than 40% of infertility couples that is the reason of their infertility was unknown. In those couples, probably immunological factors were found to be responsible for the infertility. In the article, it was aimed to review the immunologic causes of male and female infertility in the light o...

  6. Identification of telomere dysfunction in Friedreich ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Anjomani Virmouni, Sara; Al-Mahdawi, Sahar; Sandi, Chiranjeevi; Yasaei, Hemad; Giunti, Paola; Slijepcevic, Predrag; Mark A. Pook

    2015-01-01

    Background Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is a progressive inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutation of the FXN gene, resulting in decreased frataxin expression, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. A recent study has identified shorter telomeres in FRDA patient leukocytes as a possible disease biomarker. Results Here we aimed to investigate both telomere structure and function in FRDA cells. Our results confirmed telomere shortening in FRDA patient leukocytes and identifie...

  7. Axonal inclusions in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3

    OpenAIRE

    Seidel, Kay; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.; Schultz, Christian; Paulson, Henry; Frank, Stefanie; de Vos, Rob A.; Brunt, Ewout R.; Deller, Thomas; Harm H Kampinga; Rüb, Udo

    2010-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a major pathological hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders including polyglutamine diseases. Aggregation of the mutated form of the disease protein ataxin-3 into neuronal nuclear inclusions is well described in the polyglutamine disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3 or Machado–Joseph disease), although these inclusions are not thought to be directly pathogenic. Neuropil aggregates have not yet been described in SCA3. We performed a systematic immunohistoch...

  8. Uterine tumors in ataxia-telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, R A; Nieberg, R; Boder, E

    1989-02-01

    Roughly one-third of patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) develop malignant tumors, usually of lymphoid origin. AT patients also exhibit progeric changes. We describe three patients, between the ages of 27 and 32 years, with uterine tumors: one with a frank leiomyosarcoma and chronic T-cell leukemia, one with a multilobulated leiomyoma of uncertain malignant potential, and one with an unremarkable leiomyoma. Thus, the spectrum of tumors in AT patients beyond adolescence includes nonlymphoid malignancies and precocious, benign leiomyomas.

  9. DNA synthesis in ataxia telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractAfter the discovery that cultured cells from AT patients are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation the suggestion was made that AT-could be the 1 X-ray-analogue 1 of xeroderma pigmentosum. The latter syndrome (XP) is characterized by hypersensitivity to short-wave UV-radiation, caused by

  10. [Immunological markers of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszewska, Agnieszka; Madej, Marta; Wiland, Piotr

    2016-03-25

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common connective tissue disease of autoimmune origin. The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation leading to bone erosions and organ involvement. RA is a progressive disease. It affects the quality of life, leading to disability and death mainly due to premature cardiovascular disease. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential for prognosis and quality of life improvement. In 2010 the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) established new RA classification criteria. Besides clinical symptoms it includes two immunologic criteria: rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (anti-CCP antibodies). RF is the first well-known RA immunologic marker. It is observed in 80-85% of patients with RA. Elevated serum level of RF has been associated with increased disease activity, radiographic progression, and the presence of extraarticular manifestations. The sensitivity of RF is 50-90%, and specificity is 50-95%. Anti-CCP antibodies appear to be a more specific marker than RF. They are often present at the very beginning of the disease, or even years before the first symptoms. The prognostic value of anti-CCP antibodies is well established. High serum level of anti-CCP correlates with poor prognosis and early erosions of the joints. The sensitivity of anti-CCP2 is 48-80%, and specificity is 96-98%. New immunologic markers include anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP) and antibodies against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (anti-hnRNP A2/B1, RA33). Scientists aim to identify a highly sensitive and specific biomarker of the disease that not only has diagnostic and prognostic value but also may predict the response to treatment.

  11. Immunological markers of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Matuszewska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is the most common connective tissue disease of autoimmune origin. The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation leading to bone erosions and organ involvement. RA is a progressive disease. It affects the quality of life, leading to disability and death mainly due to premature cardiovascular disease. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential for prognosis and quality of life improvement. In 2010 the American College of Rheumatology (ACR and The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR established new RA classification criteria. Besides clinical symptoms it includes two immunologic criteria: rheumatoid factor (RF and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (anti-CCP antibodies. RF is the first well-known RA immunologic marker. It is observed in 80-85% of patients with RA. Elevated serum level of RF has been associated with increased disease activity, radiographic progression, and the presence of extraarticular manifestations. The sensitivity of RF is 50-90%, and specificity is 50-95%. Anti-CCP antibodies appear to be a more specific marker than RF. They are often present at the very beginning of the disease, or even years before the first symptoms. The prognostic value of anti-CCP antibodies is well established. High serum level of anti-CCP correlates with poor prognosis and early erosions of the joints. The sensitivity of anti-CCP2 is 48-80%, and specificity is 96-98%. New immunologic markers include anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP and antibodies against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (anti-hnRNP A2/B1, RA33. Scientists aim to identify a highly sensitive and specific biomarker of the disease that not only has diagnostic and prognostic value but also may predict the response to treatment.

  12. Reviewing the genetic causes of spastic-ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bot, Susanne T; Willemsen, Michel A A P; Vermeer, Sascha; Kremer, Hubertus P H; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C

    2012-10-01

    Although the combined presence of ataxia and pyramidal features has a long differential, the presence of a true spastic-ataxia as the predominant clinical syndrome has a rather limited differential diagnosis. Autosomal recessive ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay, late-onset Friedreich ataxia, and hereditary spastic paraplegia type 7 are examples of genetic diseases with such a prominent spastic-ataxic syndrome as the clinical hallmark. We review the various causes of spastic-ataxic syndromes with a focus on the genetic disorders, and provide a clinical framework, based on age at onset, mode of inheritance, and additional clinical features and neuroimaging signs, that could serve the diagnostic workup. PMID:23033504

  13. Oral Microbiology and Immunology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlén, Gunnar; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Olsen, Ingar

    , dental assistants and trainees may find it a useful source of reference. The contents are based on general microbiology and immunology. Oral microbiology is given particular attention, with examples relevant to oral infectious diseases. Each chapter opens with a relatively short pre-reading section...

  14. Immunology & Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Jeffrey R.; And Others

    This monograph was designed for the high school biology curriculum. The first section reviews the major areas of importance in immunology. Section three contains six instructional activities for the high school classroom and the second section contains teacher's materials for those activities. The activities address for students some of the major…

  15. The immunological synapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemmensen, Thomas; Pedersen, Lars Ostergaard; Geisler, Carsten

    2003-01-01

    . A distinct 3-dimensional supramolecular structure at the T cell/APC interface has been suggested to be involved in the information transfer. Due to its functional analogy to the neuronal synapse, the structure has been termed the "immunological synapse" (IS). Here, we review molecular aspects concerning...

  16. RADIOECOLOGY AND ECOLOGICAL IMMUNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Shubik

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The author's investigations results are presented in comparing with literary materials concerning the application of principles and methods of ecological immunology for solving radioecological questions. The data on characteristic of immunity and health of human population affected with radiation factors of the environment is given as well as animals' population state as the links offood ecological chains.

  17. HIV Molecular Immunology 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusim, Karina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Korber, Bette Tina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Brander, Christian [Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Barcelona (Spain); Barouch, Dan [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States). Division of Vaccine Research; de Boer, Rob [Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands). Faculty of Biology; Haynes, Barton F. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Duke Human Vaccine Institute and Departments of Medicine, Surgery and Immunology; Koup, Richard [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). Vaccine Research Center; Moore, John P. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Weill Medical College; Walker, Bruce D. [Ragon Institute, Cambridge, MA (United States); Watkins, David [Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Center, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-04-05

    The scope and purpose of the HIV molecular immunology database: HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2015 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/ content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as cross-reactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins

  18. HIV Molecular Immunology 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusim, Karina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Korber, Bette Tina Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Barouch, Dan [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Koup, Richard [Vaccine Research Center National Institutes of Health (United States); de Boer, Rob [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Biology; Moore, John P. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Weill Medical College; Brander, Christian [Institucioi Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Barcelona (Spain); Haynes, Barton F. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Duke Human Vaccine Institute and Departments of Medicine, Surgery and Immunology; Walker, Bruce D. [Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, Cambridge, MA (United States); Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-02-03

    HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2014 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as crossreactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins are provided.

  19. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type I: A review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujioka Shinsuke

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA characterized by ataxia with other neurological signs, including oculomotor disturbances, cognitive deficits, pyramidal and extrapyramidal dysfunction, bulbar, spinal and peripheral nervous system involvement. The global prevalence of this disease is not known. The most common type I ADCA is SCA3 followed by SCA2, SCA1, and SCA8, in descending order. Founder effects no doubt contribute to the variable prevalence between populations. Onset is usually in adulthood but cases of presentation in childhood have been reported. Clinical features vary depending on the SCA subtype but by definition include ataxia associated with other neurological manifestations. The clinical spectrum ranges from pure cerebellar signs to constellations including spinal cord and peripheral nerve disease, cognitive impairment, cerebellar or supranuclear ophthalmologic signs, psychiatric problems, and seizures. Cerebellar ataxia can affect virtually any body part causing movement abnormalities. Gait, truncal, and limb ataxia are often the most obvious cerebellar findings though nystagmus, saccadic abnormalities, and dysarthria are usually associated. To date, 21 subtypes have been identified: SCA1-SCA4, SCA8, SCA10, SCA12-SCA14, SCA15/16, SCA17-SCA23, SCA25, SCA27, SCA28 and dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA. Type I ADCA can be further divided based on the proposed pathogenetic mechanism into 3 subclasses: subclass 1 includes type I ADCA caused by CAG repeat expansions such as SCA1-SCA3, SCA17, and DRPLA, subclass 2 includes trinucleotide repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding regions of the disease gene including SCA8, SCA10 and SCA12. Subclass 3 contains disorders caused by specific gene deletions, missense mutation, and nonsense mutation and includes SCA13, SCA14, SCA15/16, SCA27 and SCA28. Diagnosis is based on clinical history, physical

  20. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type III: a review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujioka Shinsuke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia (ADCA Type III is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA classically characterized by pure cerebellar ataxia and occasionally by non-cerebellar signs such as pyramidal signs, ophthalmoplegia, and tremor. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in adulthood; however, a minority of patients develop clinical features in adolescence. The incidence of ADCA Type III is unknown. ADCA Type III consists of six subtypes, SCA5, SCA6, SCA11, SCA26, SCA30, and SCA31. The subtype SCA6 is the most common. These subtypes are associated with four causative genes and two loci. The severity of symptoms and age of onset can vary between each SCA subtype and even between families with the same subtype. SCA5 and SCA11 are caused by specific gene mutations such as missense, inframe deletions, and frameshift insertions or deletions. SCA6 is caused by trinucleotide CAG repeat expansions encoding large uninterrupted glutamine tracts. SCA31 is caused by repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding region of the disease gene. Currently, there are no specific gene mutations associated with SCA26 or SCA30, though there is a confirmed locus for each subtype. This disease is mainly diagnosed via genetic testing; however, differential diagnoses include pure cerebellar ataxia and non-cerebellar features in addition to ataxia. Although not fatal, ADCA Type III may cause dysphagia and falls, which reduce the quality of life of the patients and may in turn shorten the lifespan. The therapy for ADCA Type III is supportive and includes occupational and speech modalities. There is no cure for ADCA Type III, but a number of recent studies have highlighted novel therapies, which bring hope for future curative treatments.

  1. DNA synthesis in ataxia telangiectasia

    OpenAIRE

    Jaspers, Nicolaas

    1985-01-01

    textabstractAfter the discovery that cultured cells from AT patients are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation the suggestion was made that AT-could be the 1 X-ray-analogue 1 of xeroderma pigmentosum. The latter syndrome (XP) is characterized by hypersensitivity to short-wave UV-radiation, caused by a reduced ability to properly remove UV-induced DNA damage. The evidence for a DNA repair defect in AT cells is not as strong as in the case of XP (see section 2.2.5 of this thesis). Different XP p...

  2. Immunological network signatures of cancer progression and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavelle Timothy J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The immune contribution to cancer progression is complex and difficult to characterize. For example in tumors, immune gene expression is detected from the combination of normal, tumor and immune cells in the tumor microenvironment. Profiling the immune component of tumors may facilitate the characterization of the poorly understood roles immunity plays in cancer progression. However, the current approaches to analyze the immune component of a tumor rely on incomplete identification of immune factors. Methods To facilitate a more comprehensive approach, we created a ranked immunological relevance score for all human genes, developed using a novel strategy that combines text mining and information theory. We used this score to assign an immunological grade to gene expression profiles, and thereby quantify the immunological component of tumors. This immunological relevance score was benchmarked against existing manually curated immune resources as well as high-throughput studies. To further characterize immunological relevance for genes, the relevance score was charted against both the human interactome and cancer information, forming an expanded interactome landscape of tumor immunity. We applied this approach to expression profiles in melanomas, thus identifying and grading their immunological components, followed by identification of their associated protein interactions. Results The power of this strategy was demonstrated by the observation of early activation of the adaptive immune response and the diversity of the immune component during melanoma progression. Furthermore, the genome-wide immunological relevance score classified melanoma patient groups, whose immunological grade correlated with clinical features, such as immune phenotypes and survival. Conclusions The assignment of a ranked immunological relevance score to all human genes extends the content of existing immune gene resources and enriches our understanding

  3. Biochemical and immunological characterization of the main products of crotoxin irradiation; Caracterizacao bioquimica e imunologica dos principais produtos gerados pela irradiacao de crotoxina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Nanci do

    1995-07-01

    Irradiation of crotoxin and its subunits with 2,000 Gy of {gamma}-rays from {sup 60} Co source leads to aggregation and generation of lower molecular wight breakdown products. Aggregates separated by gel filtration retain at least part of their higher-ordered structure, based on their reactivity with monoclonal antibodies known to react with conformation epitopes in native crotoxin. These same aggregates can serve as antigens to raise antisera that cross-reacts and neutralizes crotoxin. Compared with native crotoxin, aggregates appears less myotoxic, are largely devoid of phospholipase activity, and are virtually non-toxic in mice. These results indicate that irradiation of toxic proteins can promote significant detoxification, but still retain many of the original antigenic and immunological properties of native crotoxin. (author)

  4. Recent Advancements in Targeted Delivery of Therapeutic Molecules in Neurodegenerative Disease - Spinocerebellar Ataxia - Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Prakash

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug discovery and its methodologies have been very effective in terms of treating cancers and immunological disorders but have not been able to stop genetic diseases as most of the drugs target at the protein level. They merely mitigate the symptoms of the disease. Spinocerebellar ataxia is a neurological genetic disorder that is caused by the formation of an abnormal protein. There have been several reports on ataxic drug development but actual clinical treatment is yet to be achieved. Oligonucleotide therapy called sequence specific siRNA mediated gene silencing has evolved with promising results. This approach emphasizes on suppressing the expression of the diseased gene at mRNA level. However, there is a limitation in delivery of siRNA to the target site. Several methods have been developed over the last decade to enhance the target specific delivery of DNA, siRNA, protein and small drug molecules for therapeutic purpose with less or no side effects. This review discusses the latest upcoming technologies in the field that focus on a number of nonviral nanocarriers for targeted delivery. In this review, we explore the promise and potential of novel therapeutics with interest on ataxia therapy.

  5. Ataxia-telangiectasia: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boder, E

    1985-01-01

    The more subtle clinical findings that facilitate early diagnosis and the most provocative long-term clinical observations in our series of patients are emphasized. The most striking pathological findings in our own series of 11 complete autopsies are reviewed in relation to new findings from 57 autopsy reports in the recent literature. Clinical and pathological findings in our oldest patient, who died at age 32, are systematically compared with those of her sister, who died 20 years earlier at age 10 1/2 and who was the subject of the first autopsy in AT, thus providing a rare comparison of the early and late stages of the disease. The clinical and pathological findings, including the gliovascular malformations in the CNS described recently in autopsies on older patients, reveal that AT is characterized throughout its course by multisystemic progeric changes. It is proposed, therefore, that AT can serve as a model for the study of premature aging. Clinical diagnosis, laboratory markers, and special diagnostic procedures, along with general management, immunotherapy, and rehabilitative measures, are reviewed in Part II.

  6. Immunology of lymphatic filariasis

    OpenAIRE

    Babu, Subash; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    The immune responses to filarial parasites encompass a complex network of innate and adaptive cells whose interaction with the parasite underlies a spectrum of clinical manifestations. The predominant immunological feature of lymphatic filariasis is an antigen - specific Th2 response and an expansion of IL-10 producing CD4+ T cells that is accompanied by a muted Th1 response. This antigen specific T cell hypo-responsiveness appears to be crucial for the maintenance of the sustained, long-stan...

  7. Acute cerebellar ataxia with human parvovirus B19 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Y; Ueno, T.; Komatsu, H.; Takada, H.; Nunoue, T.

    1999-01-01

    A 2 year old boy developed acute cerebellar ataxia in association with erythema infectiosum. During the disease, genomic DNA and antibodies against human parvovirus B19 were detected in serum but not in cerebrospinal fluid. Parvovirus B19 associated acute cerebellar ataxia might occur due to transient vascular reaction in the cerebellum during infection.



  8. Leukoencephalopathy after prophylactic radiation for leukaemia in ataxia telangiectasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Eyre, J A; Gardner-Medwin, D; Summerfield, G P

    1988-01-01

    Children with ataxia telangiectasia have a high probability of developing acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, and have increased sensitivity to chemotherapy and irradiation. We report a 51/2 year old boy who had undiagnosed ataxia telangiectasia when he presented with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. He subsequently developed a chemoradiation induced leukoencephalopathy after conventional central nervous system prophylaxis.

  9. A case of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 mimicking olivopontocerebellar atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, N.; Katayama, T.; Makita, Y.; Kuroda, K.; Aizawa, H.; Kikuchi, K. [First Dept. of Internal Medicine, Asahikawa Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is an autosomal dominant, slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia without multisystem involvement. We report a 57-year-old woman with genetically confirmed SCA6 who showed clinical features of olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Conventional T2-weighted and FLAIR MRI demonstrated high signal in the middle cerebellar peduncles, in addition to mild atrophy of the pons and cerebellum. (orig.)

  10. Drug-induced cerebellar ataxia: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, J. van; Kerstens, F.G.; Maas, R.P.P.W.M.; Harmark, L.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Cerebellar ataxia can be induced by a large number of drugs. We here conducted a systemic review of the drugs that can lead to cerebellar ataxia as an adverse drug reaction (ADR). METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search in Pubmed (1966 to January 2014) and EMB

  11. Ataxia rating scales are age-dependent in healthy children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, Rick; Spits, Anne H.; Kuiper, Marieke J.; Lunsing, Roelinka J.; Burger, Huibert; Kremer, Hubertus P.; Sival, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate ataxia rating scales in children for reliability and the effect of age and sex. METHOD: Three independent neuropaediatric observers cross-sectionally scored a set of paediatric ataxia rating scales in a group of 52 healthy children (26 males, 26 females) aged 4 to 16 years (mean

  12. Longitudinal Cerebral Blood Flow Changes during Speech in Hereditary Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidtis, John J.; Strother, Stephen C.; Naoum, Ansam; Rottenberg, David A.; Gomez, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias constitute a group of degenerative diseases that progress over years or decades. With principal pathology involving the cerebellum, dysarthria is an early feature of many of the ataxias. Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow changes during speech production over a 21 month period in a…

  13. Dysarthria and Friedreich's Ataxia: What Can Intelligibility Assessment Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaney, Bronagh; Hewlett, Nigel

    2007-01-01

    Background: Friedreich's ataxia is one of the most common hereditary disorders of the nervous system. Dysarthria is a pervasive symptom of Friedreich's ataxia, yet the clinical presentation of speech symptoms remains poorly understood, leaving clinicians without the evidence required to develop therapy interventions. Aims: The research reported…

  14. Friedreich's ataxia--a case of aberrant transcription termination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Jill Sergesketter; Napierala, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Reduced expression of the mitochondrial protein Frataxin (FXN) is the underlying cause of Friedreich's ataxia. We propose a model of premature termination of FXN transcription induced by pathogenic expanded GAA repeats that links R-loop structures, antisense transcription, and heterochromatin formation as a novel mechanism of transcriptional repression in Friedreich's ataxia.

  15. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia with bull's-eye macular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruysberg, J.R.M.; Eerola, K.U.; Vrijland, H.R.; Aandekerk, A.L.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Deutman, A.F.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: In 1980, we published in the American Journal of Ophthalmology two siblings with hereditary ataxia and atrophic maculopathy. The report is cited in the literature as autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia with retinal degeneration. The purpose of the present study is to document the progressi

  16. Immunology and Epidemiology

    CERN Document Server

    Hraba, Tomáš

    1986-01-01

    In February 1985 a small international meeting of scientists took place at the recreation resort of the Polish Academy of Sci­ ences in Mogilany, near Cracow, Poland. The initiative for holding the workshop came from a working meeting on mathematical immunology and related topics at the International Institute for Applied Sys­ tems Analysis in Laxenburg, Austria, in November 1983. In addition to representatives of IIASA, delegates of the IIASA National Member Organizations (NMO) of Czechoslovakia, Italy, and the soviet Union took part in that working meeting. The participants came to the conclusion that IIASA could play an important role in facilitating the development of research in this field. The first step that they recommended to I IASA was to organize a workshop on mathematical immunology. The purpose of the workshop was to review the progress that has been made in applying mathematics to problems in immunology and to explore ways in which further progress might be achieved, especially by more efficie...

  17. [Buspirone in the treatment of cerebellar ataxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetel, M; Vojvodić, N; Filipović, S R; Dragasević, N; Sternić, N; Kostić, V S

    1999-01-01

    Ataxia is defined as a disturbance which, quite independent of any motor weakness, alters direction and extent of voluntary movement and impairs the sustained voluntary of reflex muscle contraction necessary for maintaining postiue and equilibrium [1]. Since pathophysiological basis of cerebeller ataxia is still not completely clear, the current therapeutic attempts are mainly symptom-oriented [3]. One possible approach could be a modification of potentially involved neurotransmitter systems of the cerebellum, where particularly interesting is the serotonergic system. However, attempts with levorotatory form of tryptophan (5-HT precursors) proved to be ineffective [4, 5]. Since receptors in the cerebellum are mainly of 5-HTIA subtype, the use of specific agonists might be a more reasonable therapy [6]. The study initially involved 11 patients, but only 9 completed the protocol due to unfavorable side effects. Our open label prospective study lasted for 15 weeks. The patients were tested before the beginning of the treatment (initial visit), at 7th (first visit) and 11th week (second visit) of continuous therapy, and eventually at 15th week (final visit). The daily dose was 40 mg at the first and 60 mg at the second visit. We used the evaluation scale gurposed for cerebellar functions testing (speech, gait, coordination and ocular movements). Significant improvement of cerebellar ataxia in patients under buspiron therapy has been noted. We analyzed the results obtained from our 9 patients (4 females and 5 males), of which 6 patients suffered from cerebellar degeneration, one from multiple sclerosis, one from Ramsey-Hunt syndrome, and one from pontine myelinolysis. At the initial visit the patient score was 18.9 (SD = 7.3), subsequently, at the iirst visit the score was 15.4 (SD = 8), while the second visit yielded the score of 12.9 (SD = 8.2), and finally, after a two-weeks lasting wash-out period, it was 17.7 (SD = 7.1) (Table 1). It was found that patients

  18. Ataxia and Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism with Intrafamilial Variability Caused by RNF216 Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqwaifly, Mohammed; Bohlega, Saeed

    2016-06-15

    Gordon Holmes syndrome (GHS) is a distinct phenotype of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia, characterized by ataxia, dementia, reproductive defects and hypogonadism; it has been recently found to be associated with RNF216 mutation. We performed whole-exome sequencing and filtered the resulting novel variants by the coordinates of the shared autozygome. We identified a novel splicing variant in RNF216 that is likely to abolish the canonical splice site at the junction of exon/intron 13 (NM_207111.3:c.2061G>A). We herein report two patients with GHS caused by a novel RNF216 mutation as the first follow up report on RNF216-related GHS, and show interfamilial variability of phenotype supporting the previously reported RNF216-related cases. PMID:27441066

  19. Síndrome de Ataxia-Telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amauri Batista da Silva

    1971-06-01

    Full Text Available A ataxia-telangiectasia, doença de Mme. Louis-Bar, é caracterizada pela associação de ataxia cerebelar progressiva, em geral com início na primeira infância, telangiectasas óculo-cutâneas, movimentos coreoatetósicos, tendência a infecções repetidas do sistema respiratório, retardo estaturo-ponderal, demenciação. São mais ou menos freqüentes os tumores do sistema reticuloendotelial. A doença é geralmente familiar, transmitida por genes recessivos, autossômicos, não ligados ao sexo. A alteração bioquímica mais encontrada consiste na diminuição ou ausência completa da fração A das gamaglobulinas, bem como na perturbação das reações de hipersensibilidade retardada. Os AA. relatam o estudo clínico, biológico e pneumencefalográfico de uma criança de 3 anos de idade, apresentando essa enfermidade desde os 18 meses de vida, sem antecedentes familiares.

  20. Cranial MRI in ataxia-telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardanelli, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Parodi, R.C. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Ottonello, C. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Renzetti, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Saitta, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Lignana, E. [G. Gaslini Inst., Genoa (Italy); Mancardi, G.L. [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy)

    1995-01-01

    We examined five males with laboratory-confirmed ataxia-telangiectasia (AT), aged 9-28 years, several times by MRI (9 examinations: 5 at 0.15 T, 3 at 0.5 T, 1 at 1.5 T). Intermediate, T1-, T2- and T2{sup *}-weighted spin-echo and gradient-echo sequences were performed. All patients showed vermian atrophy, enlarged fourth ventricle and cisterna magna; four showed cerebellar hemisphere atrophy; two enlarged infracerebellar subarachnoid spaces and four patients had sinusitis. No focal areas of abnormal signal were seen in the brain, diffuse high signal was found in the central cerebral white matter of the oldest patient. AT is an important human model of inherited cancer susceptibility and multisystem ageing; as in xeroderma pigmentosum and other ``breakage syndromes``, ionising radiation should be avoided. When imaging is necessary, MRI should be preferred to CT in patients known or suspected to have AT and those with undefined paediatric ataxias of nontraumatic origin. If atrophy of only the cerebellum, especially the vermis, is noted, laboratory research should be performed to confirm the diagnosis of AT. (orig.)

  1. Molecular and immunological characterization of arginine kinase from the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella, a novel cross-reactive invertebrate pan-allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, M; Mahler, V; Hayek, B; Sperr, W R; Schöller, M; Prozell, S; Wiedermann, G; Valent, P; Valenta, R; Duchêne, M

    2001-11-01

    IgE recognition of indoor allergens represents a major cause of allergic asthma in atopic individuals. We found that 52 of 102 patients suffering from allergic symptoms indoors contained IgE Abs against allergens from the Indianmeal moth (Plodia interpunctella), a ubiquitous food pest. Using serum IgE from a moth-sensitized patient we screened an expression cDNA library constructed from P. interpunctella larvae. cDNAs coding for arginine kinase (EC 2.7.3.3), a 40-kDa enzyme commonly occurring in invertebrates that is involved in the storage of such high-energy phosphate bonds as phosphoarginine, were isolated. Recombinant moth arginine kinase, designated Plo i 1, was expressed in Escherichia coli as a histidine-tagged protein with enzymatic activity, and purified to homogeneity by nickel chelate affinity chromatography. Purified recombinant arginine kinase induced specific basophil histamine release and immediate as well as late-phase skin reactions. It reacted with serum IgE from 13 of the 52 (25%) moth-allergic patients and inhibited the binding of allergic patients' IgE to an immunologically related 40-kDa allergen present in house dust mite, cockroach, king prawn, lobster, and mussel. Our results indicate that arginine kinases represent a new class of cross-reactive invertebrate pan-allergens. Recombinant arginine kinase may be used to identify a group of polysensitized indoor allergic patients and for immunotherapy of these individuals.

  2. Structural characterization of low molecular weight polysaccharide from Astragalus membranaceus and its immunologic enhancement in recombinant protein vaccine against systemic candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Xiao, Chunyu; Qu, Jing; Wang, Guiyun

    2016-07-10

    Structure and immunologic enhancement of low molecular weight polysaccharide (LMW-ASP) isolated from the root of Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch) Bge. Were detected in recombinant protein vaccine. Structure analysis of LMW-ASP revealed that LMW-ASP (Mw=5.6kDa) was an acid heteropolysaccharide, which consisted of Glc, Gal, Ara, Xyl and GalA in ratio of 10.0:1.3:1.7:1.0:0.9. Recombinant protein (rP-HSP90C) contained epitope C (LKVIRK) from heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) of Candida albicans was used as a vaccine. The results indicated that LMW-ASP significantly promoted specific antibody titers IgG, IgG1, IgG2b, and IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 in sera of mice immunized with rP-HSP90C (p<0.05). It was also found LMW-ASP improved DTH response in HSP90C-injceted mice. More importantly, the mice immunized with rP-HSP90C/LMW-ASP had fewer CFU (colony forming unites) in the kidneys compared to the mice immunized with rP-HSP90C (p<0.05). Therefore, LMW-ASP could be exploited into the novel adjuvant to enhance the efficacy of recombinant protein vaccine. PMID:27106150

  3. Gait and Functional Mobility Deficits in Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Joan A; Robertson-Dick, Erin E; Hall, Deborah A; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) results from a "premutation" (PM) size CGG repeat expansion in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. Cerebellar gait ataxia is the primary feature in some FXTAS patients causing progressive disability. However, no studies have quantitatively characterized gait and mobility deficits in FXTAS. We performed quantitative gait and mobility analysis in seven FMR1 PM carriers with FXTAS and ataxia, six PM carriers without FXTAS, and 18 age-matched controls. We studied four independent gait domains, trunk range of motion (ROM), and movement transitions using an instrumented Timed Up and Go (i-TUG). We correlated these outcome measures with FMR1 molecular variables and clinical severity scales. PM carriers with FXTAS were globally impaired in every gait performance domain except trunk ROM compared to controls. These included total i-TUG duration, stride velocity, gait cycle time, cadence, double-limb support and swing phase times, turn duration, step time before turn, and turn-to-sit duration, and increased gait variability on several measures. Carriers without FXTAS did not differ from controls on any parameters, but double-limb support time was close to significance. Balance and disability scales correlated with multiple gait and movement transition parameters, while the FXTAS Rating Scale did not. This is the first study to quantitatively examine gait and movement transitions in FXTAS patients. Gait characteristics were consistent with those from previous cohorts with cerebellar ataxia. Sensitive measures like the i-TUG may help determine efficacy of interventions, characterize disease progression, and provide early markers of disease in FXTAS. PMID:26298472

  4. Assessment of speech in early-onset ataxia : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Marieke J.; Brandsma, Rick; Lawerman, T.F.; Lunsing, Roelineke J.; Keegstra, Anne L.; Burger, Huibert; De Koning, Tom J.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Sival, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the study was to determine whether paediatric ataxia speech subscores are reliably applicable for international early-onset ataxia (EOA) databases. If so, we reasoned that ataxia speech subscores should be associated with ataxia scores and involve high interobserver agreement, includ

  5. Hematology and immunology studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimzey, S. L.

    1977-01-01

    A coordinated series of experiments were conducted to evaluate immunologic and hemotologic system responses of Skylab crewmen to prolonged space flights. A reduced PHA responsiveness was observed on recovery, together with a reduced number of T-cells, with both values returning to normal 3 to 5 days postflight. Subnormal red cell count, hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit values also returned gradually to preflight limits. Most pronounced changes were found in the shape of red blood cells during extended space missions with a rapid reversal of these changes upon reentry into a normal gravitational environment.

  6. Immunology in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cose, Stephen; Bagaya, Bernard; Nerima, Barbara; Joloba, Moses; Kambugu, Andrew; Tweyongyere, Robert; Dunne, David W; Mbidde, Edward; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Elliott, Alison M

    2015-12-01

    Africa is a continent with a large burden of both infectious and non-communicable diseases. If we are to move forward as a continent, we need to equip our growing cadre of exceptional young scientists with the skills needed to tackle the diseases endemic to this continent. For this, immunology is among the key disciplines. Africans should be empowered to study and understand the diseases that affect them, and to perform their cutting-edge research in their country of origin. This requires a multifaceted approach, with buy-in from funders, overseas partners and perhaps, most important of all, African governments themselves.

  7. Mathematics in modern immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Mario; Lythe, Grant; Molina-París, Carmen; Ribeiro, Ruy M

    2016-04-01

    Mathematical and statistical methods enable multidisciplinary approaches that catalyse discovery. Together with experimental methods, they identify key hypotheses, define measurable observables and reconcile disparate results. We collect a representative sample of studies in T-cell biology that illustrate the benefits of modelling-experimental collaborations and that have proven valuable or even groundbreaking. We conclude that it is possible to find excellent examples of synergy between mathematical modelling and experiment in immunology, which have brought significant insight that would not be available without these collaborations, but that much remains to be discovered.

  8. Ataxia cerebelar aguda na criança Acute cerebellar ataxia in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriana Moura Ribeiro

    1968-03-01

    Full Text Available São relatados os casos de 6 crianças com ataxia cerebelar aguda. Admitem os autores a presença de um fator etiológico de caráter viral comum a todos êles, discutindo os mecanismos patogênicos com base nos casos da literatura. A evolução foi favorável em todos os pacientes, com regressão completa da sintomatologia, dentro do período de 6 a 60 dias.Clinical observations of 6 children with acute cerebellar ataxia and respective laboratorial data are reported. Considerations are made in order to support the hypothesis of involving virus. The evolution of the disorder was a nonfatal one and the patients regained normal cerebellar function within a period of 6 to 60 days.

  9. Characterization of dengue virus infections in a sample of patients suggests unique clinical, immunological, and virological profiles that impact on the diagnosis of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senaratne, Thamarasi; Wimalaratne, Harith; Alahakoon, D G S; Gunawardane, Nirmali; Carr, Jillian; Noordeen, Faseeha

    2016-10-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infections are increasing with respect to incidence and severity in the Central Province of Sri Lanka. The objective of this study was to define the clinical, immunological, and virological profiles of patients admitted to the General Hospital, Kandy with clinically apparent dengue. Demographic, clinical, hematological parameters, liver enzymes (ALT and AST), and blood samples were collected from 292 patients with fever dengue fever/dengue hemorrhagic fever (DF/DHF). Samples were analyzed for, anti-DENV IgM, IgG, and DENV nucleic acid. Myalgia was the commonest complaint by 65% of the patients. Packed cell volume was >45% in 27% of the patients while 42.12% had reduced platelets and 62.67% had reduced white blood cell counts. In contrast to other studies, positive tourniquet test (PTT) and petechiae were not major indicators of DENV infection or severity of the disease. Clinical profiles were significantly different between DF and DHF/DSS and showed many similarities to that reported elsewhere. Altogether, 43 patients (14.73%) were viremic as detected by RT-PCR; 181 patients (62%) were positive for anti-DENV IgM, and 245 (84%) patients were positive for anti-DENV IgG. In combination, anti-DENV IgM and RT-PCR assays detected 224 (77.5%) of DENV infected cases, thus improving the DENV diagnosis rate. Hence, the diagnostic utility of PTT, anti-DENV IgM/IgG serology, or RT-PCR used alone in the early phase of illness is low in Sri Lanka but the diagnostic value can be improved by a combination of serology and RT-PCR. J. Med. Virol. 88:1703-1710, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990973

  10. Ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 6: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Simone Zeigelboim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar as alterações vestibulococleares observadas em um caso de ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 6. O caso foi encaminhado do Hospital de Clínicas para o Laboratório de Otoneurologia de uma Instituição de Ensino e foi submetido aos seguintes procedimentos: anamnese, inspeção otológica, avaliações audiológica e vestibular. O caso retrata uma paciente com diagnóstico genético de ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 6, do sexo feminino, com 57 anos de idade, que referiu desequilíbrio à marcha com tendência a queda para a esquerda, disartria e disfonia. Na avaliação audiológica apresentou configuração audiométrica descendente a partir da frequência de 4kHz e curva timpanométrica do tipo "A" com presença dos reflexos estapedianos bilateralmente. No exame vestibular observou-se na pesquisa da vertigem posicional presença de nistagmo vertical inferior e oblíquo, espontâneo e semiespontâneo múltiplo com características centrais (ausência de latência, paroxismo, fatigabilidade e vertigem, nistagmooptocinético abolido e hiporreflexia à prova calórica. Constataram-se alterações labirínticas que indicaram afecção do sistema vestibular central evidenciando-se a importância dessa avaliação. A existência da possível relação entre os achados com os sintomas vestibulares apresentados pela paciente apontou a relevância do exame labiríntico neste tipo de ataxia uma vez que a presença do nistagmo vertical inferior demonstrou ser frequente neste tipo de patologia.

  11. An Introduction to Chinese Society of Immunology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Chinese Socicty of Immunology (CSI) was founded in 1984. It has had over 5000 members, among whom 1000 are members of IUIS. There are six Chinese periodicals associated with the Society: Chinese Journal of Immunology,Immunological Journal,Current Immunology,Chinese Journal of Cellular and Molecular Immunology,Chinese Journal of

  12. An Introduction to Chinese Society of Immunology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Chinese Society of Immunology (CSI) was founded in 1984. It has had over 5000 members, among whom 1000 are members of IUIS. There are six Chinese periodicals associated with the Society: Chinese Journal of Immunology, Immunological Journal, Current Immunology, Chinese Journal of Cellular and Molecular Immunology; Chinese Journal of

  13. Spinocerebellar ataxias in Venezuela: genetic epidemiology and their most likely ethnic descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisi, Irene; Ikonomu, Vassiliki; Arias, Sergio

    2016-03-01

    Dominantly inherited ataxias (spinocerebellar ataxias, SCAs) are a genetically heterogeneous group of neurologic diseases characterized by progressive cerebellar and spinal tract degeneration with ataxia and other signs, common to all known subtypes. Several types are relatively frequent worldwide, but in several countries, one specific SCA may show a higher prevalence owing to founder phenomena. In Venezuela, genetic epidemiological features of SCAs have been assessed during the last 30 years; mutations in ATXN1 (SCA1), ATXN2 (SCA2), ATXN3 (SCA3), CACNA1A (SCA6), ATXN7 (SCA7), ATXN8 (SCA8), ATXN10 (SCA10), TBP (SCA17) and ATN1 (dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy, DRPLA) loci were searched among 115 independent families. SCA7 was the most frequent subtype (26.6%), followed by SCA3 (25.0%), SCA2 (21.9%), SCA1 (17.2%), SCA10 (4.7%) and DRPLA (3.1%); in 43% of the families, the subtype remained unidentified. SCA7 mutations displayed strong geographic aggregation in two independent founder foci, and SCA1 showed a very remote founder effect for a subset of families. SCA10 families were scattered across the country, but all had an identical in-phase haplotype carried also by Mexican, Brazilian and Sioux patients, supporting a very old common Amerindian origin. Prevalence for dominant SCAs in Venezuela was estimated as 1:25 000 nuclear families, provenances of which are either Caucasoid, African or Amerindian. PMID:26538302

  14. Neurodegeneration in Friedreich’s Ataxia: From Defective Frataxin to Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio M. Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Friedreich’s ataxia is the most common inherited autosomal recessive ataxia and is characterized by progressive degeneration of the peripheral and central nervous systems and cardiomyopathy. This disease is caused by the silencing of the FXN gene and reduced levels of the encoded protein, frataxin. Frataxin is a mitochondrial protein that functions primarily in iron-sulfur cluster synthesis. This small protein with an α/β sandwich fold undergoes complex processing and imports into the mitochondria, generating isoforms with distinct N-terminal lengths which may underlie different functionalities, also in respect to oligomerization. Missense mutations in the FXN coding region, which compromise protein folding, stability, and function, are found in 4% of FRDA heterozygous patients and are useful to understand how loss of functional frataxin impacts on FRDA physiopathology. In cells, frataxin deficiency leads to pleiotropic phenotypes, including deregulation of iron homeostasis and increased oxidative stress. Increasing amount of data suggest that oxidative stress contributes to neurodegeneration in Friedreich’s ataxia.

  15. Spinocerebellar ataxias in Venezuela: genetic epidemiology and their most likely ethnic descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisi, Irene; Ikonomu, Vassiliki; Arias, Sergio

    2016-03-01

    Dominantly inherited ataxias (spinocerebellar ataxias, SCAs) are a genetically heterogeneous group of neurologic diseases characterized by progressive cerebellar and spinal tract degeneration with ataxia and other signs, common to all known subtypes. Several types are relatively frequent worldwide, but in several countries, one specific SCA may show a higher prevalence owing to founder phenomena. In Venezuela, genetic epidemiological features of SCAs have been assessed during the last 30 years; mutations in ATXN1 (SCA1), ATXN2 (SCA2), ATXN3 (SCA3), CACNA1A (SCA6), ATXN7 (SCA7), ATXN8 (SCA8), ATXN10 (SCA10), TBP (SCA17) and ATN1 (dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy, DRPLA) loci were searched among 115 independent families. SCA7 was the most frequent subtype (26.6%), followed by SCA3 (25.0%), SCA2 (21.9%), SCA1 (17.2%), SCA10 (4.7%) and DRPLA (3.1%); in 43% of the families, the subtype remained unidentified. SCA7 mutations displayed strong geographic aggregation in two independent founder foci, and SCA1 showed a very remote founder effect for a subset of families. SCA10 families were scattered across the country, but all had an identical in-phase haplotype carried also by Mexican, Brazilian and Sioux patients, supporting a very old common Amerindian origin. Prevalence for dominant SCAs in Venezuela was estimated as 1:25 000 nuclear families, provenances of which are either Caucasoid, African or Amerindian.

  16. Malignancies in pediatric patients with ataxia telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, R.C.; Berdon, W.E.; Ruzal-Shapiro, C. [Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, Department of Radiology, NY (United States); Hall, E.J. [Center for Radiological Research, Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Kornecki, A.; Daneman, A. [Hospital for Sick Children, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Brunelle, F. [Groupe-Hospitalier, Necker-Enfants-Malades, Paris (France); Campbell, J.B. [Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children and Women, Dept. of Radiology, Orlando, FL (United States)

    1999-04-01

    Background. Patients with ataxia telangiectasia (AT), known to have an inherent increased susceptibility to the development of cancer, may present with malignancies that are unusual for the patient`s age, are often difficult to diagnose clinically and radiographically and respond poorly to conventional therapy. Materials and methods. We reviewed the clinical presentation and imaging studies of 12 AT patients who developed malignancies. Results. Eight of the twelve patients developed non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma (CNS, thorax, bone), two developed Hodgkin`s disease, and two were diagnosed with gastrointestinal mucinous adenocarcinoma. Conclusion. The lymphomas were commonly extra nodal, and infiltrative rather than mass-like. The recognition of the tumors was often delayed due to confusion with the known infectious complications in AT patients. (orig.) With 8 figs., 1 tab., 12 refs.

  17. Research progress of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-wei ZHANG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1 is a kind of autosomal dominant genetic neurodegenerative disorder. To date, the pathogenesis of SCA1 remains unclear. Studies in numerous SCA1 experimental models, including transgenic mice, transgenic drosophila and induced pluripotent stem cells, have shown that phosphorylation of S776 in mutant ataxin-1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin-proteasome system and down-regulation of several components of RAS-MAPK-MSK1 pathway may involve in the pathogenesis of SCA1. In this review, the clinical and pathological features of SCA1, and the latest advances of pathogenesis, model systems and therapeutic exploration will be briefly summarized. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.05.017

  18. A new autosomal recessive non-progressive congenital cerebellar ataxia associated with mental retardation, optic atrophy, and skin abnormalities (CAMOS) maps to chromosome 15q24-q26 in a large consanguineous Lebanese Druze Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delague, Valérie; Bareil, Corinne; Bouvagnet, Patrice; Salem, Nabiha; Chouery, Eliane; Loiselet, Jacques; Mégarbané, André; Claustres, Mireille

    2002-03-01

    Congenital cerebellar ataxias are a heterogeneous group of non-progressive disorders characterized by hypotonia and developmental delay followed by the appearance of ataxia, and often associated with dysarthria, mental retardation, and atrophy of the cerebellum. We report the mapping of a disease gene in a large inbred Lebanese Druze family, with five cases of a new form of non-progressive autosomal recessive congenital ataxia associated with optic atrophy, severe mental retardation, and structural skin abnormalities, to a 3.6-cM interval on chromosome 15q24-15q26.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions MEMSA myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia Enable Javascript to view the ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  20. Immunological Detection of Arbutin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The relative molecular mass of Arbutin is small.Both fluorolabeling and radiolabeling may affect its properties and functions.Therefore, the immunoassay of Arbutin was studied.Arbutin was coupled to bovine serum albumin to get the Arbutin-BSA conjugate with high molar ratio of Arbutin to BSA.Two rabbits were injected with the conjugate to develop the anti-Arbutin serum.Ammonium sulfate precipitation and affinity chromatography were used to purify the antibody.Double agar diffusion test and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were adopted to identify the antibody titer.The results demonstrated that the purity and activity of the antibody are high.The method proposed is satisfactory for the immunological detection of Arbutin.

  1. Hepatocytes as Immunological Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispe, Ian N

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocytes are targeted for infection by a number of major human pathogens, including hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and malaria. However, hepatocytes are also immunological agents in their own right. In systemic immunity, they are central in the acute-phase response, which floods the circulation with defensive proteins during diverse stresses, including ischemia, physical trauma, and sepsis. Hepatocytes express a variety of innate immune receptors and, when challenged with pathogen- or damage-associated molecular patterns, can deliver cell-autonomous innate immune responses that may result in host defense or in immunopathology. Important human pathogens have evolved mechanisms to subvert these responses. Finally, hepatocytes talk directly to T cells, resulting in a bias toward immune tolerance. PMID:26685314

  2. Acute cerebellar ataxia: A neurological manifestation in malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peddametla Shravan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a vector-borne disease transmitted by the bite of an infected female anopheles mosquito presents with varied clinical manifestations. Neurological manifestations include headaches, confusion, convulsions, hemiplegia, ataxia, cerebral palsy, cortical blindness, and Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS. We are presenting a case report of acute cerebellar ataxia in a 20-year-old male patient who presented with fever and positive for Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum malaria antibodies.

  3. Deep Learning for Cerebellar Ataxia Classification and Functional Score Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zhen; Zhong, Shenghua; Carass, Aaron; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxia is a progressive neuro-degenerative disease that has multiple genetic versions, each with a characteristic pattern of anatomical degeneration that yields distinctive motor and cognitive problems. Studying this pattern of degeneration can help with the diagnosis of disease subtypes, evaluation of disease stage, and treatment planning. In this work, we propose a learning framework using MR image data for discriminating a set of cerebellar ataxia types and predicting a disease ...

  4. Friedreich's Ataxia as a Cause of Premature Coronary Artery Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Giugliano, Gregory R.; Sethi, Prabhdeep S.

    2007-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is the most common hereditary neurodegenerative disorder, and more than half of all patients show echocardiographic evidence of cardiomyopathy. Although angina has been reported in these patients, the role of coronary artery disease has previously been dismissed and is therefore underestimated. Premature obstructive coronary disease has rarely been angiographically demonstrated in patients with Friedreich's ataxia. We present an unusual case of a 35-year-old woman with Fri...

  5. Compound heterozygous PNPLA6 mutations cause Boucher–Neuhäuser syndrome with late-onset ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deik, A.; Johannes, B.; Rucker, J. C.; Sánchez, E.; Brodie, S. E.; Deegan, E.; Landy, K.; Kajiwara, Y.; Scelsa, S.; Saunders-Pullman, R.

    2014-01-01

    PNPLA6 mutations, known to be associated with the development of motor neuron phenotypes, have recently been identified in families with Boucher–Neuhäuser syndrome. Boucher–Neuhäuser is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by the co-occurrence of cerebellar ataxia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and chorioretinal dystrophy. Gait ataxia in Boucher–Neuhäuser usually manifests before early adulthood, although onset in the third or fourth decade has also been reported. However, given the recent identification of PNPLA6 mutations as the cause of this condition, the determining factors of age of symptom onset still need to be established. Here, we have identified a sporadic Boucher–Neuhäuser case with late-onset gait ataxia and relatively milder retinal changes due to compound heterozygous PNPLA6 mutations. Compound heterozygosity was confirmed by cloning and sequencing the patient’s genomic DNA from coding exons 26–29. Furthermore, both mutations (one novel and one known) fell in the phospholipase esterase domain, where most pathogenic mutations seem to cluster. Taken together, we herein confirm PNPLA6 mutations as the leading cause of Boucher–Neuhäuser syndrome and suggest inquiring about a history of hypogonadism or visual changes in patients presenting with late-onset gait ataxia. We also advocate for neuroophthalmologic evaluation in suspected cases. PMID:25267340

  6. Compound heterozygous PNPLA6 mutations cause Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome with late-onset ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deik, A; Johannes, B; Rucker, J C; Sánchez, E; Brodie, S E; Deegan, E; Landy, K; Kajiwara, Y; Scelsa, S; Saunders-Pullman, R; Paisán-Ruiz, C

    2014-12-01

    PNPLA6 mutations, known to be associated with the development of motor neuron phenotypes, have recently been identified in families with Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome. Boucher-Neuhäuser is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by the co-occurrence of cerebellar ataxia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and chorioretinal dystrophy. Gait ataxia in Boucher-Neuhäuser usually manifests before early adulthood, although onset in the third or fourth decade has also been reported. However, given the recent identification of PNPLA6 mutations as the cause of this condition, the determining factors of age of symptom onset still need to be established. Here, we have identified a sporadic Boucher-Neuhäuser case with late-onset gait ataxia and relatively milder retinal changes due to compound heterozygous PNPLA6 mutations. Compound heterozygosity was confirmed by cloning and sequencing the patient's genomic DNA from coding exons 26-29. Furthermore, both mutations (one novel and one known) fell in the phospholipase esterase domain, where most pathogenic mutations seem to cluster. Taken together, we herein confirm PNPLA6 mutations as the leading cause of Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome and suggest inquiring about a history of hypogonadism or visual changes in patients presenting with late-onset gait ataxia. We also advocate for neuroophthalmologic evaluation in suspected cases. PMID:25267340

  7. DNA triplex structures in neurodegenerative disorder, Friedreich's ataxia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Moganty R Rajeswari

    2012-07-01

    It is now established that a small fraction of genomic DNA does adopt the non-canonical B-DNA structure or ‘unusual’ DNA structure. The unusual DNA structures like DNA-hairpin, cruciform, Z-DNA, triplex and tetraplex are represented as hotspots of chromosomal breaks, homologous recombination and gross chromosomal rearrangements since they are prone to the structural alterations. Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA), the autosomal recessive degenerative disorder of nervous and muscles tissue, is caused by the massive expansion of (GAA) repeats that occur in the first intron of Frataxin gene X25 on chromosome 9q13-q21.1. The purine strand of the DNA in the expanded (GAA) repeat region folds back to form the (R∙R*Y) type of triplex, which further inhibits the frataxin gene expression, and this clearly suggests that the shape of DNA is the determining factor in the cellular function. FRDA is the only disease known so far to be associated with DNA triplex. Structural characterization of GAA-containing DNA triplexes using some simple biophysical methods like UV melting, UV absorption, circular dichroic spectroscopy and electrophoretic mobility shift assay are discussed. Further, the clinical aspects and genetic analysis of FRDA patients who carry (GAA) repeat expansions are presented. The potential of some small molecules that do not favour the DNA triplex formation as therapeutics for FRDA are also briefly discussed.

  8. Radiation hypersensitivity and radioresistant DNA synthesis in ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with the autosomal recessive genetic disease, ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), are cancer-prone and hypersensitive to the killing effects of ionizing radiation. In an attempt to isolate the gene(s) responsible for the hypersensitivity of A-T cells, they were transfected with normal human DNA in cosmid vectors containing a rescuable marker (G-418 resistance), and revertants to normal sensitivity were isolated and characterized. The failure of radioresistant revertants to demonstrate a reversion of the phenotype, radioresistant DNA synthesis, shows that this feature is dependent on a gene separate from the one conferring resistance to cell killing. Cells from every A-T patient thus far examined demonstrate both hypersensitivity, in terms of radiation-induced cell killing, and radioresistant DNA synthesis. The results reported here, however, show that the former is not a result of the latter, as previously proposed. Moreover, the fact that these two characteristics can be uncoupled obscures the role(s) that either of them plays in the etiology of the disease, or in the development in its other features, including cancer-proneness

  9. Molecular basis of ataxia telangiectasia and related diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lindsay G BALL; Wei XIAO

    2005-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a rare human disease characterized by extreme cellular sensitivity to radiation and a predisposition to cancer, with a hallmark of onset in early childhood. Several human diseases also share similar symptoms with AT albeit with different degrees of severity and different associated disorders. While all AT patients contain mutations in the AT-mutated gene (ATM), most other ATlike disorders are defective in genes encoding an MRN protein complex consisting of Mre11, Rad50 and Nbs1. Both ATM and MRN function as cellular sensors to DNA double-strand breaks, which lead to the recruitment and phosphorylation of an array of substrate proteins involved in DNA repair, apoptosis and cell-cycle checkpoints, as well as gene regulation, translation initiation and telomere maintenance. ATM is a member of the family of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinases (PIKK), and the discovery of many ATM substrates provides the underlying mechanisms of heterologous symptoms among AT patients. This review article focuses on recent findings related to the initial recognition of doublestrand breaks by ATM and MRN, as well as a DNA-dependent protein kinase complex consisting of the heterodimer Ku70/Ku80 and its catalytic subunit DNAPKcs, another member of PIKK. This possible interaction suggests that a much greater complex is involved in sensing, transducing and co-ordinating cellular events in response to genome instability.

  10. Preliminary Study of Intravenous Amantadine Treatment for Ataxia Management in Patients with Probable Multiple System Atrophy with Predominant Cerebellar Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyoung Youn

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia is a disabling neurologic disease. However, effective management has not yet been established. We conducted a short-term, open-label preliminary study to assess the benefits of intravenous amantadine treatment in patients with probable multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia. Methods: Twenty patients (10 male, 10 female with probable multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia received 400 mg of amantadine by intravenous per day for 5 days. Ataxia severity was evaluated by the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale before and after intravenous amantadine therapy and all subjects reported subjective improvement after intravenous amantadine treatment using a patient global impression scale. We analyzed the total and subscale scores by the ataxia scale and patient global impression scale. Results: The mean age was 57.4 years (range: 47–72 and the mean disease duration was 30.8 months (range: 11–79. The ataxia severity significantly decreased after intravenous amantadine therapy from 42.5 to 37.3 (p < 0.001. The mean patient global impression scale for improvement was 2.9 and there were no side effects of intravenous amantadine treatment observed. When we assessed responders, the duration of intravenous amantadine effect was more than 1 month in 4 subjects of 7 responders. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that intravenous amantadine treatment can be a safe management option in cerebellar ataxia, although the mechanism is unclear. Thus, further double-blind, long-term studies with a larger sample size are needed.

  11. Ataxia, acute mountain sickness, and high altitude cerebral edema

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Tianyi; Ma Siqing; Bian Huiping; Zhang Minming

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations suggest that ataxia is common and often one of the most reliable warning signs of high altitude cerebral edema(HACE).The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic role of ataxia in acute mountain sickness (AMS) and HACE among mountain rescuers on the quake areas,and in approaching the relation between AMS and HACE.After the earthquake on April 14,2010,approximately 24080 lowland rescuers were rapidly transported from sea level or lowlands to the mountainous rescue sites at 3750 ~ 4568 m,and extremely hardly worked for an emergency treatment after arrival.Assessments of acute altitude illness on the quake areas were using the Lake Louise Scoring System.73 % of the rescuers were found to be developed AMS.The incidence of high altitude pulmonary edema(HAPE) and HACE was 0.73 % and 0.26 %,respectively,on the second to third day at altitude.Ataxia sign was measured by simple tests of coordination including a modified Romberg test.The clinical features of 62 patients with HACE were analyzed.It was found that the most frequent,serious neurological symptoms and signs were altered mental status(50/62,80.6 %)and truncal ataxia (47/62,75.8 %).Mental status change was rated slightly higher than ataxia,but ataxia occurred earlier than mental status change and other symptoms.The earliest sign of ataxia was a vague unsteadiness of gait,which may be present alone in association with or without AMS.Advanced ataxia was correlated with the AMS scores,but mild ataxia did not correlate with AMS scores at altitudes of 3750~4568 m.Of them,14 patients were further examined by computerized tomographic scanning of the brain and cerebral magnetic resonance imagines were examined in another 15 cases.These imaging studies indicated that the presence of the cerebral edema was in 97 % of cases who were clinically diagnosed as HACE (28/29).Ataxia seems to be a reliable sign of advanced AMS or HACE,so does altered mental status.

  12. Immunology of lymphatic filariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, S; Nutman, T B

    2014-08-01

    The immune responses to filarial parasites encompass a complex network of innate and adaptive cells whose interaction with the parasite underlies a spectrum of clinical manifestations. The predominant immunological feature of lymphatic filariasis is an antigen-specific Th2 response and an expansion of IL-10 producing CD4(+) T cells that is accompanied by a muted Th1 response. This antigen-specific T-cell hyporesponsiveness appears to be crucial for the maintenance of the sustained, long-standing infection often with high parasite densities. While the correlates of protective immunity to lymphatic filariasis are still incompletely understood, primarily due to the lack of suitable animal models to study susceptibility, it is clear that T cells and to a certain extent B cells are required for protective immunity. Host immune responses, especially CD4(+) T-cell responses clearly play a role in mediating pathological manifestations of LF, including lymphedema, hydrocele and elephantiasis. The main underlying defect in the development of clinical pathology appears to be a failure to induce T-cell hyporesponsiveness in the face of antigenic stimulation. Finally, another intriguing feature of filarial infections is their propensity to induce bystander effects on a variety of immune responses, including responses to vaccinations, allergens and to other infectious agents. The complexity of the immune response to filarial infection therefore provides an important gateway to understanding the regulation of immune responses to chronic infections, in general.

  13. Immunology of lymphatic filariasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Subash; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    The immune responses to filarial parasites encompass a complex network of innate and adaptive cells whose interaction with the parasite underlies a spectrum of clinical manifestations. The predominant immunological feature of lymphatic filariasis is an antigen - specific Th2 response and an expansion of IL-10 producing CD4+ T cells that is accompanied by a muted Th1 response. This antigen specific T cell hypo-responsiveness appears to be crucial for the maintenance of the sustained, long-standing infection often with high parasite densities. While the correlates of protective immunity to lymphatic filariasis are still incompletely understood, primarily due to the lack of suitable animal models to study susceptibility, it is clear that T cells and to a certain extent B cells are required for protective immunity. Host immune responses, especially CD4+ T cell responses clearly play a role in mediating pathological manifestations of LF, including lymphedema, hydrocele and elephantiasis. The main underlying defect in the development of clinical pathology appears to be a failure to induce T cell hypo-responsiveness in the face of antigenic stimulation. Finally, another intriguing feature of filarial infections is their propensity to induce bystander effects on a variety of immune responses, including responses to vaccinations, allergens and to other infectious agents. The complexity of the immune response to filarial infection therefore provides an important gateway to understanding the regulation of immune responses to chronic infections, in general. PMID:24134686

  14. The fragile x-associated tremor and ataxia syndrome (FXTAS A síndrome de tremor e ataxia associada ao X frágil (FXTAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Pires Capelli

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available FXTAS (Fragile X-associated tremor and ataxia syndrome is a late- onset neurodegenerative disorder affecting mainly men, over 50 years of age, who are carriers of the FMR1 gene premutation. The full mutation of this gene causes the fragile X syndrome (FXS, the most common cause of inherited mental retardation. Individuals affected by FXTAS generally present intention tremor and gait ataxia that might be associated to specific radiological and/or neuropathological signs. Other features commonly observed are parkinsonism, cognitive decline, peripheral neuropathy and autonomic dysfunction. Nearly a decade after its clinical characterization, FXTAS is poorly recognized in Brazil. Here we present a review of the current knowledge on the clinical, genetic and diagnostic aspects of the disease.A FXTAS (síndrome de tremor e ataxia associada ao X frágil é uma doença neurodegenerativa de início tardio que afeta principalmente homens acima dos 50 anos de idade, portadores de pré-mutação do gene FMR1. A mutação completa desse gene é responsável pela síndrome do cromossomo X frágil (SXF, a causa mais comum de deficiência mental herdada. Indivíduos afetados pela FXTAS geralmente apresentam tremor de intenção e ataxia de marcha que podem estar associados a sinais radiológicos ou neuropatológicos específicos. Outras características comumente observadas são parkinsonismo, declínio cognitivo, neuropatia periférica e disfunções autonômicas. Quase uma década após sua caracterização clínica, a FXTAS é mal conhecida por médicos no Brasil. Esta revisão apresenta o conhecimento atual sobre os aspectos clínicos, genéticos e diagnósticos da síndrome.

  15. Sudden stopping in patients with cerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrao, Mariano; Conte, Carmela; Casali, Carlo; Ranavolo, Alberto; Mari, Silvia; Di Fabio, Roberto; Perrotta, Armando; Coppola, Gianluca; Padua, Luca; Monamì, Stefano; Sandrini, Giorgio; Pierelli, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    Stopping during walking, a dynamic motor task frequent in everyday life, is very challenging for ataxic patients, as it reduces their gait stability and increases the incidence of falls. This study was conducted to analyse the biomechanical characteristics of upper and lower body segments during abrupt stopping in ataxic patients in order to identify possible strategies used to counteract the instability in the sagittal and frontal plane. Twelve patients with primary degenerative cerebellar ataxia and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were studied. Time-distance parameters, dynamic stability of the centre of mass, upper body measures and lower joint kinematic and kinetic parameters were analysed. The results indicate that ataxic patients have a great difficulty in stopping abruptly during walking and adopt a multi-step stopping strategy, occasionally with feet parallel, to compensate for their inability to coordinate the upper body and to generate a well-coordinated lower limb joint flexor-extensor pattern and appropriate braking forces for progressively decelerating the progression of the body in the sagittal plane. A specific rehabilitation treatment designed to improve the ability of ataxic patients to transform unplanned stopping into planned stopping, to coordinate upper body and to execute an effective flexion-extension pattern of the hip and knee joints may be useful in these patients in order to improve their stopping performance and prevent falls.

  16. Ataxia espinocerebelosa 7: Investigación clínica y genética en una familia argentina Spinocerebellar ataxia 7: Clinical and genetic investigation in an Argentine family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan I. Rojas

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Las ataxias espino cerebelosas (AEC, constituyen un grupo de trastornos hereditarios neurodegenerativos de herencia autosómica dominante. Se caracterizan principalmente por la presencia clínica de ataxia cerebelosa asociada a oftalmoplejía, disartria, signos piramidales o extrapiramidales y pérdida de la sensibilidad profunda. La AEC 7 pertenece al grupo de las ataxias espinocerebelosas en la cual el trastorno es consecuencia de la expansión del triplete CAG localizado en el cromosoma 3 p12-p21. La característica clínica de dicha ataxia es la pérdida de la agudeza visual y posterior ceguera. Presentamos tres individuos de una familia con ataxia cerebelosa, pérdida de la agudeza visual y otros signos neurológicos. El diagnóstico fue confirmado por medio del análisis genético en el cual se observó la anormalidad característica de la AEC 7. Este es el primer caso de AEC 7 en Argentina confirmado por estudio genético. En la revisión de la literatura (hasta enero 2006 se hallaron sólo dos familias notificadas en América Latina. El objetivo del trabajo es el de enfocar la atención en el diagnóstico de esta enfermedad degenerativa en pacientes que se presentan con ataxia cerebelosa progresiva asociada con disminución de la agudeza visual e historia familiar positiva.Spino cerebellar ataxia (SCA are a complex group of hereditary neurodegenerative disturbances of autosomal dominant pattern. They are largely characterized by the clinical presence of cerebellar ataxia related to ophtalmoplegia, dysarthria, pyramidal and extra-pyramidal signs and loss of deep sensitivity. SCA 7 belongs to the SCA group in which the disturbance is a result of the expansion of CAG triplet repetition located in the 3p12-p21 chromosome. The characteristic clinical feature of SCA7 is the loss of visual acuity and blindness. We present here three cases of ataxia, from the same family, with loss of visual acuity and other neurological disorders. The diagnosis

  17. Ataxias cerebelares hereditárias: do martelo ao gen Hereditary cerebellar ataxias from neurological hammer to genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Oleschko Arruda

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available As heredoataxias constituem grupo complexo de doenças neurodegenerativas hereditárias, para o qual várias formas de classificação clínica e patológica foram propostas com sucesso variável. O desenvolvimento das técnicas de biologia molecular trouxe informações importantes que têm permitido caracterizar geneticamente as ataxias cerebelares hereditárias. O reconhecimento das doenças causadas por expansões de trinucleotídeos abre novo capítulo para a pesquisa sobre outros mecanismos de doenças, como na ataxia de Friedreich e nas várias formas de ataxia cerebelar autossômica dominante(SCAl a SCA7, das quais a doença de Machado-Joseph / SCA3 parece ser a mais comum no nosso meio. A deficiência familial de vitamina E (cromossomo 8q leva a quadro semelhante ao da ataxia de Friedreich (cromossomo 9p, mas responde à reposição oral de tocoferol. Formas familiais de ataxia periódica com (cromossomo 12p ou sem (cromossomo 19p mioquimia foram caracterizadas, a primeira resultado de mutações dos gens de canais de potássio. Os portadores do gen da ataxia-teleangiectasia (cromossomo 1 lq representam 1-3% da população e são suscetíveis aos efeitos oncogênicos da radiação iônica. Sem olvidar da importância da avaliação clínica neurológica, a avaliação genética laboratorial passa a ser valiosa ferramenta para o diagnóstico e aconselhamento genético, além do melhor entendimento da patogênese dessas doenças.The hereditary ataxias comprise a complex group of neurological disorders involving the cerebellum and its connections. Several classifications based on clinical and/or pathological data have been only partially successful. Recent progress in molecular genetics has identified the genic loci of hereditary ataxias and has allowed a more precise diagnosis of distinct genetic diseases. Trinucleotide repeat expansions has been recognized as a mechanism of disease in some autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (ADCA

  18. Inferior cerebellar hypoplasia resembling a Dandy-Walker-like malformation in purebred Eurasier dogs with familial non-progressive ataxia: a retrospective and prospective clinical cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Bernardino

    Full Text Available Cerebellar malformations can be inherited or caused by insults during cerebellar development. To date, only sporadic cases of cerebellar malformations have been reported in dogs, and the genetic background has remained obscure. Therefore, this study`s objective was to describe the clinical characteristics, imaging features and pedigree data of a familial cerebellar hypoplasia in purebred Eurasier dogs. A uniform cerebellar malformation characterized by consistent absence of the caudal portions of the cerebellar vermis and, to a lesser degree, the caudal portions of the cerebellar hemispheres in association with large retrocerebellar fluid accumulations was recognized in 14 closely related Eurasier dogs. Hydrocephalus was an additional feature in some dogs. All dogs displayed non-progressive ataxia, which had already been noted when the dogs were 5-6 weeks old. The severity of the ataxia varied between dogs, from mild truncal sway, subtle dysmetric gait, dysequilibrium and pelvic limb ataxia to severe cerebellar ataxia in puppies and episodic falling or rolling. Follow-up examinations in adult dogs showed improvement of the cerebellar ataxia and a still absent menace response. Epileptic seizures occurred in some dogs. The association of partial vermis agenesis with an enlarged fourth ventricle and an enlarged caudal (posterior fossa resembled a Dandy-Walker-like malformation in some dogs. Pedigree analyses were consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance.

  19. Inferior cerebellar hypoplasia resembling a Dandy-Walker-like malformation in purebred Eurasier dogs with familial non-progressive ataxia: a retrospective and prospective clinical cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardino, Filipa; Rentmeister, Kai; Schmidt, Martin J; Bruehschwein, Andreas; Matiasek, Kaspar; Matiasek, Lara A; Lauda, Alexander; Schoon, Heinz A; Fischer, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar malformations can be inherited or caused by insults during cerebellar development. To date, only sporadic cases of cerebellar malformations have been reported in dogs, and the genetic background has remained obscure. Therefore, this study`s objective was to describe the clinical characteristics, imaging features and pedigree data of a familial cerebellar hypoplasia in purebred Eurasier dogs. A uniform cerebellar malformation characterized by consistent absence of the caudal portions of the cerebellar vermis and, to a lesser degree, the caudal portions of the cerebellar hemispheres in association with large retrocerebellar fluid accumulations was recognized in 14 closely related Eurasier dogs. Hydrocephalus was an additional feature in some dogs. All dogs displayed non-progressive ataxia, which had already been noted when the dogs were 5-6 weeks old. The severity of the ataxia varied between dogs, from mild truncal sway, subtle dysmetric gait, dysequilibrium and pelvic limb ataxia to severe cerebellar ataxia in puppies and episodic falling or rolling. Follow-up examinations in adult dogs showed improvement of the cerebellar ataxia and a still absent menace response. Epileptic seizures occurred in some dogs. The association of partial vermis agenesis with an enlarged fourth ventricle and an enlarged caudal (posterior) fossa resembled a Dandy-Walker-like malformation in some dogs. Pedigree analyses were consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. PMID:25668516

  20. Ataxia crónica en pediatría

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Erazo Torricelli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Las ataxias crónicas constituyen un grupo heterogéneo de enfermedades, que afectan al niño a diferentes edades. Así las formas congénitas, generalmente no progresivas, se observan desde los primeros meses de vida y se expresan por hipotonía y retraso motor, mucho antes de que la ataxia se haga evidente. La resonancia magnética cerebral puede ser diagnóstica en algunos cuadros, como ocurre con el síndrome de Joubert. El grupo de ataxias hereditarias progresivas, en constante expansión, suelen comenzar después del período del lactante. Los signos clínicos destacables son la apraxia ocular y la inestabilidad de la marcha que pueden asociarse a telangiectasias oculocutáneas (ataxia-telangiectasia o a neuropatía sensitiva (ataxia de Friedreich. En esta revisión se describen en forma sucinta las ataxias congénitas y en forma más detallada las causas principales de ataxias hereditarias progresivas autosómicas recesivas, autosómicas dominantes y mitocondriales. Se destaca la importancia del estudio genético, que es la clave para lograr el diagnóstico en la mayoría de estas enfermedades. Aunque aún no hay tratamiento para la mayoría de las ataxias hereditarias progresivas, algunas sí lo tienen, como la enfermedad de Refsum, déficit de vitamina E, déficit de Coenzima Q10, por lo cual el diagnóstico en estos casos es aún más relevante. En la actualidad, el diagnóstico de los cuadros de ataxia hereditaria del niño aún no tratable es fundamental para lograr un manejo adecuado, determinar un pronóstico preciso y dar a la familia un consejo genético oportuno.

  1. Immunological findings in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohly, Hari Har Parshad; Panja, Asit

    2005-01-01

    The immunopathogenesis of autism is presented schematically in Fig. 1. Two main immune dysfunctions in autism are immune regulation involving pro-inflammatory cytokines and autoimmunity. Mercury and an infectious agent like the measles virus are currently two main candidate environmental triggers for immune dysfunction in autism. Genetically immune dysfunction in autism involves the MHC region, as this is an immunologic gene cluster whose gene products are Class I, II, and III molecules. Class I and II molecules are associated with antigen presentation. The antigen in virus infection initiated by the virus particle itself while the cytokine production and inflammatory mediators are due to the response to the putative antigen in question. The cell-mediated immunity is impaired as evidenced by low numbers of CD4 cells and a concomitant T-cell polarity with an imbalance of Th1/Th2 subsets toward Th2. Impaired humoral immunity on the other hand is evidenced by decreased IgA causing poor gut protection. Studies showing elevated brain specific antibodies in autism support an autoimmune mechanism. Viruses may initiate the process but the subsequent activation of cytokines is the damaging factor associated with autism. Virus specific antibodies associated with measles virus have been demonstrated in autistic subjects. Environmental exposure to mercury is believed to harm human health possibly through modulation of immune homeostasis. A mercury link with the immune system has been postulated due to the involvement of postnatal exposure to thimerosal, a preservative added in the MMR vaccines. The occupational hazard exposure to mercury causes edema in astrocytes and, at the molecular level, the CD95/Fas apoptotic signaling pathway is disrupted by Hg2+. Inflammatory mediators in autism usually involve activation of astrocytes and microglial cells. Proinflammatory chemokines (MCP-1 and TARC), and an anti-inflammatory and modulatory cytokine, TGF-beta1, are consistently

  2. Immunology of infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W R

    1981-12-01

    Recent research on immunological infertility in men and women is reviewed and the possibilities for therapeutic success in this area are assessed. Surface antigens of the acrosome and main tail piece appear to provoke antibodies of special relevance to male and female infertility and are recognized by circulating sperm-immobilizing antibodies in women and by immobilizing and agglutinizing antibodies in men. Assessment methods have focused on the development of tests of local immunity to sperm. Antisperm antibodies have been tested via sperm microagglutination, the gelatin agglutination test, the sperm immobilization test, and immunofluorescence techniques. In addition, measurement has focused on antibodies in cervical mucus, antibodies in seminal plasma, and cell-mediated immunity. Methods involving both partners include postcoital test, the sperm-cervical mucus penetration test, and the sperm-cervical mucus contact test. There remains a need for the development of specific radioimmunoassys for the precise detection and quantitation of antibodies to sperm antigens, especially those of cell membrane origin. In males, autoimmunity to sperm antigens can be related to infertility by 2 main pathogenic mechanisms: 1) the adverse effects of antibodies directly on spermatozoa, and 2) the association with disordered spermatogenesis resulting in oligospermia and azoospermia. In women, the effector pathways of local immunization mediate both systemic and cell-mediated immune responses. Local antibodies can interfere with the reproductive process by arming macrophages and enhancing phagocytic clearance of spermatozoa from the genital tract, mediating cytotoxic effects on sperm, preventing sperm from adequately penetrating cervical mucus, intefering with sperm capacitation, and influencing sperm selection within the female genital tract. Between 5-10% of infertile men and women show evidence of anitbodies to sperm. Treatment has included occlusion therapy, intrauterine

  3. Comparative functional characterization of mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells and peritoneal mast cells in response to non-immunological stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R; Kumar, P; Gupta, P P

    2001-04-01

    The cultured mouse mast cells that are dependent on spleen-derived factor for their proliferation and maintenance and have been shown to be similar to mucosal mast cells in terms of their T-cell dependence and histochemical staining characteristics. Mast cell heterogeneity has been confirmed by functional characterization of mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (MBMMC) and mouse peritoneal mast cells (MPMCs). MPMCs released around 30% of histamine when stimulated with compound 48/80 whereas MBMMC were almost unresponsive to the same stimulus. Calcium Ionophore A23187 on the other hand, released histamine in dose-dependent manner from MBMMC. The study was undertaken to investigate the effect of antiallergic drug, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), a synthetic cromone and quercetin, a plant-derived flavonoid on Ca ionophore A23187 induced histamine release from MBMMC. MBMMCs were almost unresponsive to DSCG whereas Ca Ionophore induced histamine release was blocked by Quercetin. The results indicate that response of mast cells at one anatomic site to a given stimulus does not necessarily predict the response of mast cells at a different anatomic location to the same stimulus. It shows functional heterogeneity within a single species. So, it cannot be assumed that antiallergic compounds stabilizing mast cells in one tissue site or organ will be equally efficacious against mast cells in other sites. PMID:11491575

  4. Large Genomic Deletions in CACNA1A Cause Episodic Ataxia Type 2

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    Jijun eWan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Episodic ataxia (EA syndromes are heritable diseases characterized by dramatic episodes of imbalance and incoordination. Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2, the most common and the best characterized subtype, is caused by mostly nonsense, splice site, small indel and sometimes missense mutations in CACNA1A. Direct sequencing of CACNA1A fails to identify mutations in some patients with EA2-like features, possibly due to incomplete interrogation of CACNA1A or defects in other EA genes not yet defined. Previous reports described genomic deletions between 4-40kb in EA2. In 47 subjects with EA (26 with EA2-like features who tested negative for mutations in the known EA genes, we used Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA to analyze CACNA1A for exonic copy number variations. Breakpoints were further defined by long-range PCR. We identified distinct multi-exonic deletions in three probands with classic EA2-like features: episodes of prolonged vertigo and ataxia triggered by stress and fatigue, interictal nystagmus, with onset during infancy or early childhood. The breakpoints in all three probands are located in Alu sequences, indicating errors in homologous recombination of Alu sequences as the underlying mechanism. The smallest deletion spanned exons 39 and 40, while the largest deletion spanned 200kb, missing all but the first three exons. One deletion involving exons 39 through 47 arose spontaneously. The search for mutations in CACNA1A appears most fruitful in EA patients with interictal nystagmus and onset early in life. The finding of large heterozygous deletions suggests haploinsufficiency as a possible pathomechanism of EA2.

  5. Unusual and severe disease course in a child with ataxia-telangiectasia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyts, I.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Wolf-Peeters, C. de; Proesmans, M.; Renard, M.; Uyttebroeck, A.; Boeck, K. de

    2003-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is an autosomal recessive syndrome of combined immunodeficiency. Hallmarks of the disease comprise progressive cerebellar ataxia, oculocutaneous telangiectasia, cancer susceptibility and variable humoral and cellular immunodeficiency. We describe a patient with AT presenti

  6. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ARSACS autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay Enable Javascript to view the ... Open All Close All Description Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay , more commonly known as ARSACS , ...

  7. New insights into the pathoanatomy of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (Machado-Joseph disease)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueb, Udo; Brunt, Ewout R.; Deller, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review This review summarizes recent neuropathological findings in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 and discusses their relevance for clinical neurology. Recent findings The extent of the spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 related central nervous neurodegenerative changes has been recently system

  8. Is Friedreich ataxia an epigenetic disorder?

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    Kumari Daman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Friedreich ataxia (FRDA is a debilitating and frequently fatal neurological disorder that is recessively inherited. It belongs to the group of genetic disorders known as the Repeat Expansion Diseases, in which pathology arises from the deleterious consequences of the inheritance of a tandem repeat array whose repeat number exceeds a critical threshold. In the case of FRDA, the repeat unit is the triplet GAA•TTC and the tandem array is located in the first intron of the frataxin (FXN gene. Pathology arises because expanded alleles make lower than normal levels of mature FXN mRNA and thus reduced levels of frataxin, the FXN gene product. The repeats form a variety of unusual DNA structures that have the potential to affect gene expression in a number of ways. For example, triplex formation in vitro and in bacteria leads to the formation of persistent RNA:DNA hybrids that block transcription. In addition, these repeats have been shown to affect splicing in model systems. More recently, it has been shown that the region flanking the repeats in the FXN gene is enriched for epigenetic marks characteristic of transcriptionally repressed regions of the genome. However, exactly how repeats in an intron cause the FXN mRNA deficit in FRDA has been the subject of much debate. Identifying the mechanism or mechanisms responsible for the FXN mRNA deficit in FRDA is important for the development of treatments for this currently incurable disorder. This review discusses evidence for and against different models for the repeat-mediated mRNA deficit.

  9. An unusual cause of adult onset cerebellar ataxia with hypogonadism

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    Menon Ramshekhar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an unusual case of sporadic adult onset cerebellar ataxia with hypogonadism. A 40-year-old unmarried man presented with progressive ataxia and dysarthria along with complaints of non-development of secondary sexual characteristics and erectile dysfunction. There were complaints of intermittent diarrhea. Clinical examination revealed a pan-cerebellar syndrome with features of hypoandrogenism. No eye movement abnormalities were evident. There were signs of malabsorption. Investigations confirmed the presence of auto-antibodies found in celiac disease, and a duodenal biopsy confirmed the same. Hypoandrogenism was postulated to be due to hypergonadotropic hypogonadism which has been mentioned in a few patients of celiac disease. However, the pattern seen in our patient was of a hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. This is probably secondary to an autoimmune hypophysitis seen in some patients in the absence of other clinical manifestations. Autoantibody testing should be a diagnostic necessity in any adult with a sporadic cerebellar ataxia.

  10. Immunological Assessment of addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Gamal El-Din Zaki(1 ,Kouka Saad Eldin Abdel-Wahab

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate some aspects of immunologic response among Egyptian addicts. The study was conducted on 33 drug addicts who were admitted to hospital for treatment. They were males with age range (19-30; mean 24.73 years. They were followed up at 2-weeks intervals for one month. Blood samples from 18 addicts and 10 non-drug-user control blood donors were evaluated for some lymphocyte immunophenotypic markers by flow cytometric analysis. Addicts showed significantly (P < 0.001 decreased percentages of both T-helper (CD4+ and T-cytotoxic (CD8+ compared with controls. There was also significant (P < 0.05 reduction of CD4+/CD8+ lymphocyte ratio. Sera from all addicts, whether on hospital admission or follow-up samples were subjected to the following investigations. Some blood-borne viral infections were investigated; hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg was present in 1/33 (3% addicts. Hepatitis C virus antibodies (anti-HCV were detected in 11/33 (33.3% addicts versus 1/10 (10% of controls. Human immunodeficiency virus antibodies (anti-HIV were present in one serum out of 33 (3% addicts. Reactivation of cytomegalovirus (CMV latent infection was assessed by detection of anti-CMV IgM in 1/33 (3% of addicts on hospital admission, which persisted during the first two weeks, then disappeared on the 4th week. Antibody activity as neutralizing antibodies to polioviruses 1,2 and 3 were tested in cell culture, the antibody titer was higher in follow-up samples than on the time of hospital admission. Antistreptolysin O (ASO was detected in serum of one addict (3% on hospital admission and in another addict 2-weeks later which indicated streptococcal infection. The acute inflammation phase C-reactive protein (CRP was high in 7/33 (21.2%, 3/33 (9.1% and 1/33 (3% upon hospital admission, 2-weeks and 4-weeks, after cessation of drug use respectively.

  11. Scale for the assessment and rating of ataxia: development of a new clinical scale.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz-Hubsch, T.; Montcel, S.T. du; Baliko, L.; Berciano, J.; Boesch, S.; Depondt, C.; Giunti, P.; Globas, C.; Infante, J.; Kang, J.S.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Mariotti, C.; Melegh, B.; Pandolfo, M.; Rakowicz, M.; Ribai, P.; Rola, R.; Schols, L.; Szymanski, S.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Durr, A.; Klockgether, T.; Fancellu, R.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a reliable and valid clinical scale measuring the severity of ataxia. METHODS: The authors devised the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) and tested it in two trials of 167 and 119 patients with spinocerebellar ataxia. RESULTS: The mean time to administer SARA

  12. Early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes : foot deformity in a first grade family member

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelhaas, HJ; Van der Hulst, M; Ippel, E; Prevo, RL; Hageman, G

    1999-01-01

    Early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (EOCA) is a clinical syndrome characterised by progressive cerebellar ataxia with an onset before the age of 25 years and a wide spectrum of associated features. It is distinguished from Friedreich's ataxia (FA) mainly by the preservation o

  13. Gly118Asp is a SCA14 founder mutation in the Dutch ataxia population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, DS; van de Warrenburg, BPC; Hennekam, FAM; Dooijes, D; Ippel, PF; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, CC; Kremer, HPH; Sinke, RJ

    2005-01-01

    Missense mutations in the PRKCG gene have recently been identified in spinocerebellar ataxia 14 (SCA14) patients; these include the Gly118Asp mutation that we found in a large Dutch autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) family. We subsequently screened the current Dutch ataxia cohort (approxim

  14. Isolation and immunological characterization analysis of allergen in pine pollen%江西南昌郊区松树花粉过敏原的分离与鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗忠勤; 陈小文

    2014-01-01

    目的:对江西南昌郊区松树花粉的变应原组分进行分离及免疫学鉴定。方法提取松树花粉粗提液,然后通过十二烷基磺酸钠-聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳(SDS-PAGE)对松树花粉的蛋白质组分进行分离并测定其分子量,采用免疫印迹(West-ern-blotting)法鉴定其变应原成分。结果松树花粉粗提液有10余条蛋白带,其中分子量为12kD、26kD和100kD的蛋白可与松树花粉过敏性病人血清IgE 结合,其中26kD为主要变应原。结论对松树花粉变应原进行了初步的分离、鉴定,为进一步对松树花粉变态反应性疾病的临床诊断和治疗提供初步的实验基础。%Objective To isolate and characterize the allergenic components of pine pollen. Methods Pine pollen coarse ex-traction fluid was extracted, and the proteins of pine pollen extraction and their molecular were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. To char-acterize the allergenic components, pine pollen coarse extraction fluid was analyzed by western-blotting. Results The pine pollen coarse extraction fluid displayed more than ten protein bands by SDS-PAGE,and three bands (relative molecular weights were 12 kD, 26 kD and 100 kD, respectively) could react with IgE in the sera of patients with allergy to pine pollen. Among the three bands, the 26 kD protein was the major allergen. Conclusion Our study of preliminary isolation and immunological characteriza-tion of the allergenic components in pine pollen will be used as a base for diagnosis and therapy of pine pollen related allergy.

  15. Cerebellar ataxia as the presenting manifestation of Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arav-Boger, Ravit; Crawford, Thomas; Steere, Allen C; Halsey, Neal A

    2002-04-01

    A 7-year-old boy from suburban Baltimore who presented with cerebellar ataxia and headaches was found by magnetic resonance imaging to have multiple cerebellar enhancing lesions. He had no history of tick exposure. He was initially treated with steroids for presumptive postinfectious encephalitis. Lyme disease was diagnosed 10 weeks later after arthritis developed. Testing of the cerebrospinal fluid obtained at the time cerebellar ataxia was diagnosed revealed intrathecal antibody production to Borrelia burgdorferi. Treatment with intravenous antibiotics led to rapid resolution of persistent cerebellar findings.

  16. Episodic ataxia : a case report and review of literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singhvi J

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the clinical features of a 29 year female presenting with a 3 years history of episodes of cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria and nystagmus lasting 3-5 days, recurring almost every month. Sleep disturbance and buzzing in ears were noted 3-4 days before each episode. No other precipitant factor was present. Family history was negative. She was diagnosed as a case of episodic ataxia type-2 and was successfully treated with acetazolamide, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. She was asymptomatic at 2 year followup.

  17. Bilateral maculopathy in a patient with ataxia telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, Lauren V; Bonsall, Dean; Moffett, Kathryn; Leys, Monique

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of toxoplasmosis with bilateral maculopathy in a 7-year-old boy diagnosed with ataxia telangiectasia (AT) at age 6. AT manifests as ataxia, apraxia, telangiectasia, and dysarthria. Common ophthalmologic findings in AT include fine conjunctival telangiectasia. Patients also suffer from recurrent sinopulmonary infections; however, serious opportunistic infection is rarely diagnosed. At 8 years of age he developed disseminated Toxoplasma gondii (toxoplasmosis) infection and meningoencephalitis. This ophthalmologic finding and the subsequent toxoplasmosis meningoencephalitis have not been previously reported in AT. PMID:26917084

  18. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6: MRI of three Japanese patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, J.I.; Tokumoto, H.; Yukitake, M.; Matsui, M.; Kuroda, Y. [Division of Neurology, Department of Internal Medicine, Saga Medical School, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849 (Japan); Matsuyama, Z.; Kawakami, H.; Nakamura, S. [Third Department of Internal Medicine, Hiroshima University School of Medicine Hiroshima (Japan)

    1998-04-01

    We describe the MRI findings in three Japanese patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) in which a polymorphic CAG repeat was identified in the gene encoding the {alpha}{sub 1A} voltage-dependent P/Q-type Ca{sup 2+} channel subunit (CACNL1A4). All showed slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia and mild pyramidal signs. Neuroradiologically, they had moderate cerebellar atrophy, most prominently in the superior vermis, whereas the brain stem appeared to be spared. No abnormal signal intensity was identified. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 23 refs.

  19. Noncoding RNAs in Cancer Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Liu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunology is the study of interaction between cancer cells and immune system by the application of immunology principle and theory. With the recent approval of several new drugs targeting immune checkpoints in cancer, cancer immunology has become a very attractive field of research and is thought to be the new hope to conquer cancer. This chapter introduces the aberrant expression and function of noncoding RNAs, mainly microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs, in tumor-infiltrating immune cells, and their significance in tumor immunity. It also illustrates how noncoding RNAs are shuttled between tumor cells and immune cells in tumor microenvironments via exosomes or other microvesicles to modulate tumor immunity. PMID:27376738

  20. Influence of gut microbiota on immunological maturation in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Brandt; Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Frøkiær, Hanne

    8+ T-cells as well as NK-cells similar to those found in adult mice, while splenocytes expressed severely reduced levels of these markers and were impaired in their ability to proliferate in response to anti-CD3/anti-CD28. To further characterize the development of immunological maturation...

  1. Citizens unite for computational immunology!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belden, Orrin S; Baker, Sarah Catherine; Baker, Brian M

    2015-07-01

    Recruiting volunteers who can provide computational time, programming expertise, or puzzle-solving talent has emerged as a powerful tool for biomedical research. Recent projects demonstrate the potential for such 'crowdsourcing' efforts in immunology. Tools for developing applications, new funding opportunities, and an eager public make crowdsourcing a serious option for creative solutions for computationally-challenging problems. Expanded uses of crowdsourcing in immunology will allow for more efficient large-scale data collection and analysis. It will also involve, inspire, educate, and engage the public in a variety of meaningful ways. The benefits are real - it is time to jump in!

  2. A practical approach to late-onset cerebellar ataxia: putting the disorder with lack of order into order.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, J. van; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2012-01-01

    The clinical management of cerebellar ataxia is challenging, mainly because ataxia is a symptom of many neurological diseases. Many types of ataxia disorders are genetic and some are extremely rare. Here, the authors suggest a diagnostic approach to ataxia developed around a case of sporadic, late-o

  3. Republished: A practical approach to late-onset cerebellar ataxia: putting the disorder with lack of order into order.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, J. van; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2012-01-01

    The clinical management of cerebellar ataxia is challenging, mainly because ataxia is a symptom of many neurological diseases. Many types of ataxia disorders are genetic and some are extremely rare. Here, the authors suggest a diagnostic approach to ataxia developed around a case of sporadic, late-o

  4. Friedreich's Ataxia: a review from a cardiology perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bourke, T

    2011-12-01

    Neuromuscular disorders are not among the common causes of cardiomyopathy in the general population; however, cardiomyopathy is known to occur in several neuromuscular disorders including Friedreich\\'s Ataxia (FA). In patients with neuromuscular disorders, concomitant cardiac involvement contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality and often leads to premature death.

  5. ERS statement on the multidisciplinary respiratory management of ataxia telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhatt, J.M.; Bush, A.; Gerven, M.; Nissenkorn, A.; Renke, M.; Yarlett, L.; Taylor, M.; Tonia, T.; Warris, A.; Zielen, S.; Zinna, S.; Merkus, P.J.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare, progressive, multisystem disease that has a large number of complex and diverse manifestations which vary with age. Patients with A-T die prematurely with the leading causes of death being respiratory diseases and cancer. Respiratory manifestations include immu

  6. Deep Learning for Cerebellar Ataxia Classification and Functional Score Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Zhong, Shenghua; Carass, Aaron; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxia is a progressive neuro-degenerative disease that has multiple genetic versions, each with a characteristic pattern of anatomical degeneration that yields distinctive motor and cognitive problems. Studying this pattern of degeneration can help with the diagnosis of disease subtypes, evaluation of disease stage, and treatment planning. In this work, we propose a learning framework using MR image data for discriminating a set of cerebellar ataxia types and predicting a disease related functional score. We address the difficulty in analyzing high-dimensional image data with limited training subjects by: 1) training weak classifiers/regressors on a set of image subdomains separately, and combining the weak classifier/regressor outputs to make the decision; 2) perturbing the image subdomain to increase the training samples; 3) using a deep learning technique called the stacked auto-encoder to develop highly representative feature vectors of the input data. Experiments show that our approach can reliably classify between one of four categories (healthy control and three types of ataxia), and predict the functional staging score for ataxia. PMID:25553339

  7. Voicing Status of Word Final Plosives in Friedreich's Ataxia Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaney, B. E.; Hewlett, N.

    2007-01-01

    In a previous study, the authors identified final plosive voicing contrast as the highest single error source in dysarthria associated with Friedreich's Ataxia in a group of Irish English-speaking participants. This study aimed to determine the acoustic features underlying misperceptions of voicing status and implications for clinical management.…

  8. Speech Perception Ability in Individuals with Friedreich Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rance, Gary; Fava, Rosanne; Baldock, Heath; Chong, April; Barker, Elizabeth; Corben, Louise; Delatycki

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate auditory pathway function and speech perception ability in individuals with Friedreich ataxia (FRDA). Ten subjects confirmed by genetic testing as being homozygous for a GAA expansion in intron 1 of the FXN gene were included. While each of the subjects demonstrated normal, or near normal sound detection, 3…

  9. Speech Characteristics Associated with Three Genotypes of Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidtis, John J.; Ahn, Ji Sook; Gomez, Christopher; Sidtis, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Advances in neurobiology are providing new opportunities to investigate the neurological systems underlying motor speech control. This study explores the perceptual characteristics of the speech of three genotypes of spino-cerebellar ataxia (SCA) as manifest in four different speech tasks. Methods: Speech samples from 26 speakers with SCA…

  10. Clinical spectrum of ataxia-telangiectasia in adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, M. M. M.; Abdo, W. F.; Willemsen, M. A. A. P.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Smeets, D. F. C. M.; Hiel, J. A. P.; Brunt, E. R.; van Rijn, M. A.; Krakauer, D. Majoor; Oldenburg, R. A.; Broeks, A.; Last, J. I.; van't Veer, L. J.; Tijssen, M. A. J.; Dubois, A. M. I.; Kremer, H. P. H.; Weemaes, C. M. R.; Taylor, A. M. R.; van Deuren, M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To describe the phenotype of adult patients with variant and classic ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), to raise the degree of clinical suspicion for the diagnosis variant A-T, and to assess a genotype-phenotype relationship for mutations in the ATM gene. Methods: Retrospective analysis of the

  11. Clinical spectrum of ataxia-telangiectasia in adulthood.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, M.M.; Abdo, W.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Hiel, J.A.P.; Brunt, E.R.; Rijn, M.A. van; Majoor Krakauer, D.; Oldenburg, R.A.; Broeks, A.; Last, J.I.; Veer, L.J. van 't; Tijssen, M.A.; Dubois, A.M.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Taylor, A.M.; Deuren, M. van

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the phenotype of adult patients with variant and classic ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), to raise the degree of clinical suspicion for the diagnosis variant A-T, and to assess a genotype-phenotype relationship for mutations in the ATM gene. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of the

  12. The double helix and immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossal, Gustav J. V.

    2003-01-01

    The immune system can recognize and produce antibodies to virtually any molecule in the Universe. This enormous diversity arises from the ingenious reshuffling of DNA sequences encoding components of the immune system. Immunology is an example of a field completely transformed during the past 50 years by the discovery of the structure of DNA and the emergence of DNA technologies that followed.

  13. CCL8 BASED IMMUNOLOGICAL MONITORING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to an immunological method and, more particularly, a method for measuring cell-mediated immune reactivity (CMI) in mammals based on the production of CCL8.The invention further discloses an assay and a kit for measuring CMI to an antigen using whole blood or other...

  14. Friedreich's ataxia: clinical and molecular study of 25 Brazilian cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albano Lilian M. J.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Friedreich's ataxia is a neurodegenerative disorder whose clinical diagnostic criteria for typical cases basically include: a early age of onset (< 20 or 25 years, b autosomal recessive inheritance, c progressive ataxia of limbs and gait, and d absence of lower limb tendon reflexes. METHODS: We studied the frequency and the size of expanded GAA and their influence on neurologic findings, age at onset, and disease progression in 25 Brazilian patients with clinical diagnosis of Friedreich's ataxia - 19 typical and 6 atypical - using a long-range PCR test. RESULTS: Abnormalities in cerebellar signs, in electrocardiography, and pes cavus occurred more frequently in typical cases; however, plantar response and speech were more frequently normal in this group when the both typical and atypical cases were compared. Homozygous GAA expansion repeats were detected in 17 cases (68% - all typical cases. In 8 patients (32% (6 atypical and 2 typical, no expansion was observed, ruling out the diagnosis of Friedreich's ataxia. In cases with GAA expansions, foot deformity, cardiac abnormalities, and some neurologic findings occurred more frequently; however, abnormalities in cranial nerves and in tomographic findings were detected less frequently than in patients without GAA expansions. DISCUSSION: Molecular analysis was imperative for the diagnosis of Friedreich's ataxia, not only for typical cases but also for atypical ones. There was no genotype-phenotype correlation. Diagnosis based only on clinical findings is limited; however, it aids in better screening for suspected cases that should be tested. Evaluation for vitamin E deficiency is recommended, especially in cases without GAA expansion.

  15. Disorders of Upper Limb Movements in Ataxia-Telangiectasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aasef G Shaikh

    Full Text Available Ataxia-telangiectasia is known for cerebellar degeneration, but clinical descriptions of abnormal tone, posture, and movements suggest involvement of the network between cerebellum and basal ganglia. We quantitatively assessed the nature of upper-limb movement disorders in ataxia-telangiectasia. We used a three-axis accelerometer to assess the natural history and severity of abnormal upper-limb movements in 80 ataxia-telangiectasia and 19 healthy subjects. Recordings were made during goal-directed movements of upper limb (kinetic task, while arms were outstretched (postural task, and at rest. Almost all ataxia-telangiectasia subjects (79/80 had abnormal involuntary movements, such as rhythmic oscillations (tremor, slow drifts (dystonia or athetosis, and isolated rapid movements (dystonic jerks or myoclonus. All patients with involuntary movements had both kinetic and postural tremor, while 48 (61% also had resting tremor. The tremor was present in transient episodes lasting several seconds during two-minute recording sessions of all three conditions. Percent time during which episodic tremor was present was greater for postural and kinetic tasks compared to rest. Resting tremor had higher frequency but smaller amplitude than postural and kinetic tremor. Rapid non-rhythmic movements were minimal during rest, but were triggered during sustained arm postures and goal directed arm movements suggesting they are best considered a form of dystonic jerks or action myoclonus. Advancing age did not correlate with the severity of involuntary limb movements. Abnormal upper-limb movements in ataxia-telangiectasia feature classic cerebellar impairment, but also suggest involvement of the network between the cerebellum and basal ganglia.

  16. Imaging study of lymphoreticular tumor development in ataxia-telangiectasia and Nijmegen breakage syndrome; Estudio por imagen del desarrollo de tumores linforreticulares en la ataxia telangiectasia y el sindrome de Nijmegen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Leon, M. I.; Ceres-Ruiz, L.; Cuesta, M. A.; Garcia-Martin, F. J. [Hospital Materno-Infantil C.H.U. Carlos Haya. Malaga (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT), or Louis-Bar syndrome, is an autosomal recessive illness characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia, oculo-cutaneous telangiectasia, immunodeficiency combined with susceptibility to sinopulmonary infections and high incidence of neoplastic development. Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a variant of AT, is also an autosomal recessive illness that presents cerebellar ataxia, as well as combined immunodeficiency and a tendency toward tumor development. Contrary to Louis-Bar syndrome, it doesn't present telangiectasia and exhibits a characteristics phenotype (short stature, bird-like face and microcephaly). Both entities are classified as syndrome of chromosomal instability or chromosomal fragility, a group which also includes Bloom syndrome and Fanconi anemia. All of these show an increase in the frequency of neoplastic pathologies, mainly lymphoid tumors. We present three patients,two with AT and one with NBS, who developed different lymphoma types in the course of the illness. We highlight the most outstanding aspects from a clinical-radiological point of view. (Author) 17 refs.

  17. Ataxia with loss of Purkinje cells in a mouse model for Refsum disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Zomer, Anna W M; Komen, Jasper C; van den Brink, Christina E; Thanos, Melissa; Hamers, Frank P T; Wanders, Ronald J A; van der Saag, Paul T; Poll-The, Bwee Tien; Brites, Pedro

    2008-11-18

    Refsum disease is caused by a deficiency of phytanoyl-CoA hydroxylase (PHYH), the first enzyme of the peroxisomal alpha-oxidation system, resulting in the accumulation of the branched-chain fatty acid phytanic acid. The main clinical symptoms are polyneuropathy, cerebellar ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa. To study the pathogenesis of Refsum disease, we generated and characterized a Phyh knockout mouse. We studied the pathological effects of phytanic acid accumulation in Phyh(-/-) mice fed a diet supplemented with phytol, the precursor of phytanic acid. Phytanic acid accumulation caused a reduction in body weight, hepatic steatosis, and testicular atrophy with loss of spermatogonia. Phenotype assessment using the SHIRPA protocol and subsequent automated gait analysis using the CatWalk system revealed unsteady gait with strongly reduced paw print area for both fore- and hindpaws and reduced base of support for the hindpaws. Histochemical analyses in the CNS showed astrocytosis and up-regulation of calcium-binding proteins. In addition, a loss of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum was observed. No demyelination was present in the CNS. Motor nerve conduction velocity measurements revealed a peripheral neuropathy. Our results show that, in the mouse, high phytanic acid levels cause a peripheral neuropathy and ataxia with loss of Purkinje cells. These findings provide important insights in the pathophysiology of Refsum disease.

  18. Ancestral origin of the ATTCT repeat expansion in spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Almeida

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by cerebellar ataxia and seizures. The disease is caused by a large ATTCT repeat expansion in the ATXN10 gene. The first families reported with SCA10 were of Mexican origin, but the disease was soon after described in Brazilian families of mixed Portuguese and Amerindian ancestry. The origin of the SCA10 expansion and a possible founder effect that would account for its geographical distribution have been the source of speculation over the last years. To unravel the mutational origin and spread of the SCA10 expansion, we performed an extensive haplotype study, using closely linked STR markers and intragenic SNPs, in families from Brazil and Mexico. Our results showed (1 a shared disease haplotype for all Brazilian and one of the Mexican families, and (2 closely-related haplotypes for the additional SCA10 Mexican families; (3 little or null genetic distance in small normal alleles of different repeat sizes, from the same SNP lineage, indicating that they are being originated by a single step mechanism; and (4 a shared haplotype for pure and interrupted expanded alleles, pointing to a gene conversion model for its generation. In conclusion, we show evidence for an ancestral common origin for SCA10 in Latin America, which might have arisen in an ancestral Amerindian population and later have been spread into the mixed populations of Mexico and Brazil.

  19. A SEL1L mutation links a canine progressive early-onset cerebellar ataxia to the endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD machinery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaisa Kyöstilä

    Full Text Available Inherited ataxias are characterized by degeneration of the cerebellar structures, which results in progressive motor incoordination. Hereditary ataxias occur in many species, including humans and dogs. Several mutations have been found in humans, but the genetic background has remained elusive in dogs. The Finnish Hound suffers from an early-onset progressive cerebellar ataxia. We have performed clinical, pathological, and genetic studies to describe the disease phenotype and to identify its genetic cause. Neurological examinations on ten affected dogs revealed rapidly progressing generalized cerebellar ataxia, tremors, and failure to thrive. Clinical signs were present by the age of 3 months, and cerebellar shrinkage was detectable through MRI. Pathological and histological examinations indicated cerebellum-restricted neurodegeneration. Marked loss of Purkinje cells was detected in the cerebellar cortex with secondary changes in other cortical layers. A genome-wide association study in a cohort of 31 dogs mapped the ataxia gene to a 1.5 Mb locus on canine chromosome 8 (p(raw = 1.1x10(-7, p(genome = 7.5x10(-4. Sequencing of a functional candidate gene, sel-1 suppressor of lin-12-like (SEL1L, revealed a homozygous missense mutation, c.1972T>C; p.Ser658Pro, in a highly conserved protein domain. The mutation segregated fully in the recessive pedigree, and a 10% carrier frequency was indicated in a population cohort. SEL1L is a component of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD machinery and has not been previously associated to inherited ataxias. Dysfunctional protein degradation is known to cause ER stress, and we found a significant increase in expression of nine ER stress responsive genes in the cerebellar cortex of affected dogs, supporting the pathogenicity of the mutation. Our study describes the first early-onset neurodegenerative ataxia mutation in dogs, establishes an ERAD-mediated neurodegenerative

  20. 42 CFR 493.927 - General immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General immunology. 493.927 Section 493.927 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.927 General immunology. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for immunology, the annual...

  1. 42 CFR 493.921 - Diagnostic immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diagnostic immunology. 493.921 Section 493.921... Testing Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.921 Diagnostic immunology. The subspecialties under the specialty of immunology for which a program may offer proficiency testing are...

  2. Novel frameshift mutation in the CACNA1A gene causing a mixed phenotype of episodic ataxia and familiar hemiplegic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinder, S; Ossig, C; Wienecke, M; Beyer, A; von der Hagen, M; Storch, A; Smitka, M

    2015-01-01

    Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2, MIM#108500) is the most common form of EA and an autosomal-dominant inherited disorder characterized by paroxysmal episodes of ataxia. The disease causative gene CACNA1A encodes for the alpha 1A subunit of the voltage-gated P/Q-type calcium channel. We report on a family with a novel mutation in the CACNA1A gene. The clinical symptoms within the family varied from the typical clinical presentation of EA2 with dysarthria, gait ataxia and oculomotor symptoms to migraine and dystonia. A novel nonsense mutation of the CACNA1A gene was identified in all affected family members and is most likely the disease causing molecular defect. The pharmacological treatment with acetazolamide (AAA) was successful in three family members so far. Treatment with AAA led to a reduction of migraine attacks and an improvement of the dystonia. This relationship confirmed the hypothesis that this novel mutation results in a heterogeneous phenotype and confutes the coincidence with common migraine. Dystonia is potentially included as a further part of the phenotype spectrum of CACNA1A gene mutations.

  3. Familial periodic cerebellar ataxia without myokymia maps to a 19-cM region on 19p13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teh, B.T.; Lindblad, K.; Betz, R. [Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Switzerland)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    Familial periodic cerebellar ataxia (FPCA) is a heterogenous group of rare autosomal dominant disorders characterized by episodic cerebellar disturbance. A potassium-channel gene (KCNA1) has been found to be responsible for one of its subgroups, familial periodic cerebellar ataxia with myokymia (FPCA/+M; MIM 160120). A different subgroup that is not associated with myokymia (FPCA/-M; MIM 108500) was recently mapped to chromosome 19p. Here we have performed linkage analysis in two large families with FPCA/-M that also demonstrated neurodegenerative pathology of the cerebellum. Three markers in 19p13 gave significant lod scores (>3.0), while linkage to KCNA1 and three known loci for spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA1, SCA2, and SCA3) was excluded. The highest lod score was obtained with the marker D19S413 (4.4 at recombination fraction 0), and identification of meiotic recombinants in affected individuals placed the locus between the flanking markers D19S406 and D19S226, narrowing the interval to 19 cM. A CAG trinucleotide-repeat expansion was detected in one family but did not consegregate with the disease. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Immunology of Photo(chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekin Şavk

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Perhaps the oldest empirical therapeutic modality in the history of medicine, photo(chemotherapy has well documented benefits but its mode of action is not fully elucidated. Today, thanks to advances in photoimmunology and molecular biology we are provided with important clues as to how photo(chemotherapy works. Initial research on UV light and skin cancer has brought about the groundbreaking discovery of the immunological effects UV. UVB is the UV light most frequently used for therapeutic purposes and its mechanisms of action are best demonstrated. UV light has several distinct effects on various components of the innate and acquired immune systems, especially T lymphocyte functions the common endpoint of which is immune supression. The antiproliferative and antifibrotic therapeutic effects of UVA and UVB have so far not been directly associated with immunological mechanisms.

  5. Cancer immunotherapy and immunological memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kenji; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

      Human immunological memory is the key distinguishing hallmark of the adaptive immune system and plays an important role in the prevention of morbidity and the severity of infection. The differentiation system of T cell memory has been clarified using mouse models. However, the human T cell memory system has great diversity induced by natural antigens derived from many pathogens and tumor cells throughout life, and profoundly differs from the mouse memory system constructed using artificial antigens and transgenic T cells. We believe that only human studies can elucidate the human immune system. The importance of immunological memory in cancer immunotherapy has been pointed out, and the trafficking properties and long-lasting anti-tumor capacity of memory T cells play a crucial role in the control of malignant tumors. Adoptive cell transfer of less differentiated T cells has consistently demonstrated superior anti-tumor capacity relative to more differentiated T cells. Therefore, a human T cell population with the characteristics of stem cell memory is thought to be attractive for peptide vaccination and adoptive cell transfer. A novel human memory T cell population that we have identified is closer to the naive state than previous memory T cells in the T cell differentiation lineage, and has the characteristics of stem-like chemoresistance. Here we introduce this novel population and describe the fundamentals of immunological memory in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27181230

  6. Immunological impact of Taekwondo competitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y W; Shin, K W; Paik, I-Y; Jung, W M; Cho, S-Y; Choi, S T; Kim, H D; Kim, J Y

    2012-01-01

    Immunological changes in elite adolescent female athletes during Taekwondo competitions were investigated on-field. 6 female athletes (16.7 ± 0.8 year-old) volunteered and performed 5 bouts of demonstration Taekwondo competitions simulating real tournaments in intensity, duration, and break-time intervals on the same day. Blood samples were taken before, after the competitions and during the recovery, respectively. Immunological changes and oxidative stress in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were evaluated by flow-cytometry. During the competitions, exercise intensity was 92.2 ± 3.8% (86.1~95.7) of the maximal heart rate. Blood lactate increased immediately after the competitions (p=0.0165) and decreased to baseline during recovery. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the peripheral blood increased continuously during recovery (pTaekwondo competitions. Further large-scaled Taekwondo studies on immunologic and apoptotic changes related to oxidative stress should be performed for improving and protecting the health of adolescent athletes.

  7. Cancer immunotherapy and immunological memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kenji; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

      Human immunological memory is the key distinguishing hallmark of the adaptive immune system and plays an important role in the prevention of morbidity and the severity of infection. The differentiation system of T cell memory has been clarified using mouse models. However, the human T cell memory system has great diversity induced by natural antigens derived from many pathogens and tumor cells throughout life, and profoundly differs from the mouse memory system constructed using artificial antigens and transgenic T cells. We believe that only human studies can elucidate the human immune system. The importance of immunological memory in cancer immunotherapy has been pointed out, and the trafficking properties and long-lasting anti-tumor capacity of memory T cells play a crucial role in the control of malignant tumors. Adoptive cell transfer of less differentiated T cells has consistently demonstrated superior anti-tumor capacity relative to more differentiated T cells. Therefore, a human T cell population with the characteristics of stem cell memory is thought to be attractive for peptide vaccination and adoptive cell transfer. A novel human memory T cell population that we have identified is closer to the naive state than previous memory T cells in the T cell differentiation lineage, and has the characteristics of stem-like chemoresistance. Here we introduce this novel population and describe the fundamentals of immunological memory in cancer immunotherapy.

  8. A novel c.5308_5311delGAGA mutation in Senataxin in a Cypriot family with an autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamba-Papanicolaou Eleni

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Senataxin (chromosome 9q34 was recently identified as the causative gene for an autosomal recessive form of Ataxia (ARCA, termed as Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia, type 2 (AOA2 and characterized by generalized incoordination, cerebellar atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, "oculomotor apraxia" and increased alpha-fetoprotein (AFP. Here, we report a novel Senataxin mutation in a Cypriot ARCA family. Methods We studied several Cypriot autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia (ARCA families for linkage to known ARCA gene loci. We linked one family (909 to the SETX locus on chromosome 9q34 and screened the proband for mutations by direct sequencing. Results Sequence analysis revealed a novel c.5308_5311delGAGA mutation in exon 11 of the SETX gene. The mutation has not been detected in 204 control chromosomes from the Cypriot population, the remaining Cypriot ARCA families and 37 Cypriot sporadic cerebellar ataxia patients. Conclusion We identified a novel SETX homozygous c.5308_5311delGAGA mutation that co-segregates with ARCA with cerebellar atrophy and raised AFP.

  9. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7: Report of an Indian family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurusidheshwar M Wali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7 is a form of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia which is associated with pigmentary retinal degeneration. It is known for its world-wide rarity except in the Scandinavian countries. It is very rarely reported from India and the neighbouring Asian countries . The present report describes the neurogenetic findings of a family of SCA7, from the northern part of Karnataka in South India. It documents the wide intrafamilial phenotypic variability, which could be correlated with the CAG repeat counts and phenomenon of anticipation. Genotype phenotype correlation highlighted certain disparities in comparison with the previous studies. The report highlights the need for multiethnic population studies and the role of genetic counseling and prenatal testing in SCA7 patients.

  10. [Hereditary ataxias, spastic parapareses and neuropathies in Eastern Canada].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, N; Chrestian, N; Thiffault, I; Brais, B; Rouleau, G A; Bouchard, J-P

    2008-01-01

    It has been demonstrated, for many inherited diseases, that historical events have shaped the various regional gene pools of Eastern Canada. In so doing, it has given rise to the increased prevalence of some rare diseases due, to founder effects. The following neurogenetic disorders were first identified in patients from Eastern Canada: AOA-2, Arsacs, HSN-2, Arca-1, HMSN/ACC and Arsal. The population of Eastern Canada, we are convinced, will still allow the identification of new rare forms of hereditary ataxias, spastic parapareses and neuropathies as well as contribute to the uncovering of their mutated genes. We have summarized our current knowledge of the various hereditary ataxias, spastic parapareses and neuropathies in Eastern Canada. The study of the more common and homogenous features of these diseases has been largely completed.

  11. 遗传性共济失调%Hereditary ataxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿德勤; 刘春风

    2006-01-01

    @@ 共济失调是患者不能按一定的形式维持精细步态、完成精确动作的一种病理状态,任何累及小脑传入或传出途径的病变都可能导致共济失调,其中多数由遗传因素所致,故统称为遗传性共济失调(hereditary ataxia,HA).HA包括一组比较接近的变性疾病.病变部位主要在脊髓、小脑和脑干,故也称为脊髓-小脑-脑干疾病,或称为脊髓小脑共济失调( spinocerebellar ataxia, SCA) .

  12. Inherited Ataxias%遗传性共济失调

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋雨平; 邬剑军

    2011-01-01

    Inherited ataxia consists of spinal cord, cerebellum and brainstem degeneration. It also involves the peripheral nerves, optic nerve, brain and other regions. Although the causes of inherited ataxia were unknown, genetic, biochemical, metabolic abnormalities or other endogenous factors caused specific cell degeneration. Thisarticledescribedtheclinicalclassificationofhereditaryataxiaandsomeinterestingproblems.%遗传性共济失调是一组以脊髓、小脑、脑干为主的变性病,有时也累及周围神经、视神经、大脑等区域,病因不明.可能与遗传、生化代谢异常或尚未明确的内源性因素造成细胞变性有关.本文对遗传性共济失调的临床症状、分型和研究进展予以介绍.

  13. Altered corticomotor-cerebellar integrity in young ataxia telangiectasia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahama, Ishani; Sinclair, Kate; Fiori, Simona; Pannek, Kerstin; Lavin, Martin; Rose, Stephen

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) research in identifying altered brain structure and function in ataxia-telangiectasia, an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, is limited. Diffusion-weighted MRI were obtained from 11 ataxia telangiectasia patients (age range, 7-22 years; mean, 12 years) and 11 typically developing age-matched participants (age range, 8-23 years; mean, 13 years). Gray matter volume alterations in patients were compared with those of healthy controls using voxel-based morphometry, whereas tract-based spatial statistics was employed to elucidate white matter microstructure differences between groups. White matter microstructure was probed using quantitative fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity measures. Reduced gray matter volume in both cerebellar hemispheres and in the precentral-postcentral gyrus in the left cerebral hemisphere was observed in ataxia telangiectasia patients compared with controls (P < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). A significant reduction in fractional anisotropy in the cerebellar hemispheres, anterior/posterior horns of the medulla, cerebral peduncles, and internal capsule white matter, particularly in the left posterior limb of the internal capsule and corona radiata in the left cerebral hemisphere, was observed in patients compared with controls (P < 0.05). Mean diffusivity differences were observed within the left cerebellar hemisphere and the white matter of the superior lobule of the right cerebellar hemisphere (P < 0.05). Cerebellum-localized gray matter changes are seen in young ataxia telangiectasia patients along with white matter tract degeneration projecting from the cerebellum into corticomotor regions. The lack of cortical involvement may reflect early-stage white matter motor pathway degeneration within young patients. PMID:25042086

  14. A case of Spinocerebellar Ataxia from ethnic tribe of Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayal Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we present the case of a 17-year-old girl belonging to an ethnic tribe (Bodo tribe of Assam, presenting with bilateral cerebellar signs and with history suggestive of an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance, who was found to have spinocerebellar ataxia 7 on genetic testing. This case throws light on the probability of more such cases in the multi-ethnic society of the North-Eastern Indian states, which are not studied or reported till date.

  15. Clinical and genetic analysis of hereditary and sporadic ataxia in central Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellini, E; Forleo, P; Nacmias, B; Tedde, A; Latorraca, S; Piacentini, S; Parnetti, L; Gallai, V; Sorbi, S

    We have clinically and genetically evaluated 24 affected patients belonging to 22 Italian Friedreich ataxia (FA) families, 52 patients from 32 kindreds with proven autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA), 9 patients belonging to 5 families with autosomal recessive hereditary ataxia (ARCA) and 103 sporadic cases, 89 of which affected by idiopathic late onset cerebellar ataxia (ILOCA). Genotype-phenotype correlation analyses in FA patients have evidenced an inverse relationship between GAA repeat expansion length and age of onset, disease duration, and presence of cardiomyopathy. Among autosomal dominant types, spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2) genotype has been found in 31% of our ADCA families, resulting the most frequent form of ataxia. Phenotypic analysis of the various SCA subtypes evidenced a marked heterogeneity of symptoms with a substantial overlap between different syndromes. PMID:11719273

  16. Effect of Long-Term Climbing Training on Cerebellar Ataxia: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Marianne Anke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Efficient therapy for both limb and gait ataxia is required. Climbing, a complex task for the whole motor system involving balance, body stabilization, and the simultaneous coordination of all 4 limbs, may have therapeutic potential. Objective. To investigate whether long-term climbing training improves motor function in patients with cerebellar ataxia. Methods. Four patients suffering from limb and gait ataxia underwent a 6-week climbing training. Its effect on ataxia was evaluated with validated clinical balance and manual dexterity tests and with a kinematic analysis of multijoint arm and leg pointing movements. Results. The patients increased their movement velocity and achieved a more symmetric movement speed profile in both arm and leg pointing movements. Furthermore, the 2 patients who suffered the most from gait ataxia improved their balance and 2 of the 4 patients improved manual dexterity. Conclusion. Climbing training has the potential to serve as a new rehabilitation method for patients with upper and lower limb ataxia.

  17. Ataxia-telangiectasia: some historic, clinical and pathologic observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boder, E

    1975-01-01

    Although an isolated clinical case report was published in 1926 and another in 1941, ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) was not established as a distinct entity until 1957, when it was first delineated clinicopathologically. Susceptibility to sinopulmonary infection was identified as the main cause of death and as the third major component of the syndrome; its heredofamilial nature was documented, and it was designated "ataxia-telangiectasia." In a later review of 101 published cases, lymphoreticular malignancy emerged as the second most frequent cause of death. Although the thymus was found to be absent in the first reported autopsy in 1957 and the serum IgA deficiency was first recorded in 1961, A-T was not established as an immunodeficiency disease until 1963. Thymic abnormality and dysgammaglobulinemia explain the 2 main causes of death, sinopulmonary and neoplastic, but the immunodeficiency is probably not the central defect. It does not appear to explain either of the 2 main clinical diagnostic keys, the ataxia and the telangiectasia, or any of the other seemingly unrealted multisystemic facets of this complex disorder. Some of our most provocative long-term clinical observations and recent pathologic findings in our series of 9 autopsies are discussed.

  18. Possible role of chromatin alteration in the radiosensitivity of ataxia-telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hittelman, W.N. [Anderson (M.D.) Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Pandita, T.K. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    1994-12-01

    Cells derived from individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) are known to exhibit increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation and certain radiomimetic chemical agents. Here we summarize our findings regarding the role of chromosome damage and repair in this radiosensitivity. Lymphoblastoid cells derived from A-T homozygotes were characterized for initial chromosome (premature chromosome condensation) and DNA (neutral filter elution) damage and repair kinetics in cells from G1 and G2 cell cycle phases. Despite initial levels of DNA damage being similar to normal controls, A-T cells exhibited nearly a two-fold higher initial amount of chromosome damage. Different A-T cell lines exhibited differing chromosome repair capacities compared with control lymphoblastoid cell lines. These results suggest that A-T cells have an altered chromatin structure whereby DNA double-strand breaks are apparently more efficiently converted into chromosome breaks. (author).

  19. Possible role of chromatin alteration in the radiosensitivity of ataxia-telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells derived from individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) are known to exhibit increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation and certain radiomimetic chemical agents. Here we summarize our findings regarding the role of chromosome damage and repair in this radiosensitivity. Lymphoblastoid cells derived from A-T homozygotes were characterized for initial chromosome (premature chromosome condensation) and DNA (neutral filter elution) damage and repair kinetics in cells from G1 and G2 cell cycle phases. Despite initial levels of DNA damage being similar to normal controls, A-T cells exhibited nearly a two-fold higher initial amount of chromosome damage. Different A-T cell lines exhibited differing chromosome repair capacities compared with control lymphoblastoid cell lines. These results suggest that A-T cells have an altered chromatin structure whereby DNA double-strand breaks are apparently more efficiently converted into chromosome breaks. (author)

  20. Expression of Caytaxin protein in Cayman Ataxia mouse models correlates with phenotype severity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine M Sikora

    Full Text Available Caytaxin is a highly-conserved protein, which is encoded by the Atcay/ATCAY gene. Mutations in Atcay/ATCAY have been identified as causative of cerebellar disorders such as the rare hereditary disease Cayman ataxia in humans, generalized dystonia in the dystonic (dt rat, and marked motor defects in three ataxic mouse lines. While several lines of evidence suggest that Caytaxin plays a critical role in maintaining nervous system processes, the physiological function of Caytaxin has not been fully characterized. In the study presented here, we generated novel specific monoclonal antibodies against full-length Caytaxin to examine endogenous Caytaxin expression in wild type and Atcay mutant mouse lines. Caytaxin protein is absent from brain tissues in the two severely ataxic Atcay(jit (jittery and Atcay(swd (sidewinder mutant lines, and markedly decreased in the mildly ataxic/dystonic Atcay(ji-hes (hesitant line, indicating a correlation between Caytaxin expression and disease severity. As the expression of wild type human Caytaxin in mutant sidewinder and jittery mice rescues the ataxic phenotype, Caytaxin's physiological function appears to be conserved between the human and mouse orthologs. Across multiple species and in several neuronal cell lines Caytaxin is expressed as several protein isoforms, the two largest of which are caused by the usage of conserved methionine translation start sites. The work described in this manuscript presents an initial characterization of the Caytaxin protein and its expression in wild type and several mutant mouse models. Utilizing these animal models of human Cayman Ataxia will now allow an in-depth analysis to elucidate Caytaxin's role in maintaining normal neuronal function.

  1. IMMUNOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    5.1 Autoimmune disease2004189 Serum levels of matrix metallopro-teinases-9 in patients with systemic lupus erythemato-sus. YIN Wenhao (殷文浩), et al. Dept Dermatol 2nd Affili Hosp, Med Sch Zhejiang Univ, Hangzhou 310009. Chin J Dermatol 2004;37(2):77-79.Objective: To determine the serum levels of matrix

  2. IMMUNOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    3.1 Autoimmune disease2004022 BL-2, IL-6 and their receptors in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. QIAN Qihong (钱齐宏), et al. Dept Dermatol & Venereol, 1st Affili Hosp, Suzhou Univ, Suzhou 215006. Chin J Dermatol 2003; 36 (12): 696-698.

  3. Immunology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    3.1 Autoimmume disease 2006019 The study of inhibitory peptides on T cell activation in rheumatoid arthritis LI Xia(李霞) , Dept Rheumatol & Immunol, People’s Hosp, Peking Univ, Beijing 100044. Natl Med J China 2005;85(24) :1679 -1682. Objective:To study the inhibitory role of altered HA308 -317 peptides in T cell responses in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods :Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained from 27 HLA -

  4. IMMUNOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    5.1 Autoimmune disease2003029 A linkage study of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 gene and Graves’ disease in northern Chinese Han ethnic. JIN Ying ( 金迎 ), et al. Dept Endocrinol, 1st Affili Hosp, China Med Univ, Shenyang 110001. Chin J Intern Med 2002; 41 (12): 809-812. Objective: To determine if the cytotoxic T lympho-

  5. BIOCHEMICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE 200kD SCHISTOSOMULUM SURFACE ANTIGEN COMMON TO SCHISTOSOMA MANSONI AND SCHISTOSOMA JAPONICUM%曼氏和日本血吸虫童虫体表200kD共同抗原的生化与免疫学特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易新元; 周金春; 王庆林

    2000-01-01

    Objective To study the biochemecal and immunological characterization of the 200 kD schistosomulum surface antigen Method and results A very high molecular weight schistosomulum surface antigen of Mr>200kD was identified and characterized using monoclonal antibodies. Carbohydrate modification experiments followed by radioimmunobinding assays demonstrated that the epitope recognised by the mAbs on this antigen was carbohydrate in nature, while protein digestion experiments followed by SDS-PAGE indicated that this antigen also contained protein. Immunoprecipitation of 125I-labelled cercarial, schistosomulum, adult worm and miracidial surface antigens followed by gel analysis showed the carbohydrate epitope to be present on 5 cercarial, 2 schistosomulum and 5 miracidial surface molecules, and suggested a possible ecological function involved in adapting the parasite to the aquatic free-living stages of its life cycle and possibly also in protecting the early schistosomula from host immune damage. The 5 cercarial surfacs antigens proved to be associated with the CHR, since all the mAbs which recognised those antigens could induce a strong CHR. A kinetic investigation of the carbohydrate epitope on schistosomula of different ages demonstrated a gradual and possibly irreversible loss during the culture period. The epitope completely disappeared from the surface of adult worms. Conclusion To demonstrate an epitope common to a number of surface molecules of various developmental stages of schistosome and therefore explains the immunological cross - reactivity among different stages at the molecular level.

  6. Immunologic and inflammatory mechanisms that drive asthma progression to remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Broide, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Although histologic features of airway remodeling have been well characterized in asthma, the immunologic and inflammatory mechanisms that drive progression of asthma to remodeling are still incompletely understood. Conceptually, airway remodeling may be due to persistent inflammation and/or aberrant tissue repair mechanisms. It is likely that several immune and inflammatory cell types and mediators are involved in mediating airway remodeling. In addition, different features of airway remodel...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5040 - Albumin immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Albumin immunological test system. 866.5040... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5040 Albumin immunological test system. (a) Identification. An albumin immunological test system is a device that consists...

  8. The gene for the ataxia-telagiectasia variant, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, maps to a 1-cM interval on chromosome 8q21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saar, K.; Stumm, M.; Wegner, R.D. [Humboldt Univ. (Germany)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS; Seemanova II syndrome) and Berlin breakage syndrome (BBS), also known as ataxia-telangiectasia variants, are two clinically indistinguishable autosomal recessive familial cancer syndromes that share with ataxia-telangiectasia similar cellular, immunological, and chromosomal but not clinical findings. Classification in NBS and BBS was based on complementation of their hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation in cell-fusion experiments. Recent investigations have questioned the former classification into two different disease entities, suggesting that NBS/BBS is caused by mutations in a single radiosensitivity gene. We now have performed a whole-genome screen in 14 NBS/BBS families and have localized the gene for NBS/BBS to a 1-cM interval on chromosome 8q21, between markers D8S271 and D8S270, with a peak LOD score of 6.86 at D8S1811. This marker also shows strong allelic association to both Slavic NBS and German BBS patients, suggesting the existence of one major mutation of Slavic origin. Since the same allele is seen in both former complementation groups, genetic homogeneity of NBS/BBS can be considered as proved. 21 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Immunologic profile of patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, P A; Waylonis, G W; Hackshaw, K V

    1997-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a musculoskeletal disorder characterized by generalized myalgias, arthralgias widespread tender points in discreet areas on examination. It is frequently accompanied by fatigue, stiffness, and a nonrestorative sleep pattern. These patients generally have a normal blood count and chemistry profile. There is a subset of people with fibromyalgia (FM) who test positive for the antinuclear antibody (ANA) and have constitutional symptoms that resemble those of patients with early lupus. We studied the immunologic profile of patients with FM who are ANA-positive (+). A retrospective review of patient records in a university-based rheumatology practice was conducted. In a group of 66 FM patients, 30% (20) were ANA+, with a 75% preponderance of the speckled pattern and 20% diffuse pattern. The remaining 5% were equally split between diffuse-speckled and speckled-nucleolar patterns. All had negative staining for extractable nuclear antibodies. The Smart Index (SI), a ratio of the sedimentation rate to one-half the patient's age, was developed to characterize each patient's inflammatory response. The FM patients who were ANA negative (-) had a mean SI of 0.55, whereas the FM patient's who were ANA+ had a SI of 1.07. These ANA+ patients represent a subgroup of patients who have FM with an inflammatory response profile larger than that of the ANA-patients. PMID:9207710

  10. Temporal retinal nerve fiber loss in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Stricker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 is an adult onset progressive disorder with well characterized neurodegeneration in the cerebellum and brainstem. Beyond brain atrophy, few data exist concerning retinal and optic nerve involvement. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate retinal changes in SCA1 patients compared to age and gender matched healthy controls. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Nine patients with SCA1 were prospectively recruited from the ataxia clinic and were compared to nine age and gender matched healthy controls. Both cohorts received assessment of visually evoked potentials and eye examination by optical coherence tomography to determine retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and total macular volume. While no differences were found in visually evoked potentials, SCA1 patients showed a significant reduction of mean retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT compared to healthy controls (84±13 µm vs. 97±8 µm, p = 0.004. Temporal areas showed the most prominent RNFLT reduction with high statistical significances (temporal-inferior: p<0.001, temporal: p<0.001, temporal-superior: p = 0.005 whereas RNFLT in nasal areas was in the range of the control group. From six SCA1 patients an additional macular scan was obtained. The comparison to the corresponding healthy control showed a slight but not significant reduction in TMV (8.22±0.68 mm(3 vs. 8.61±0.41 mm(3, p = 0.15. CONCLUSION: In SCA1 patients, we found evidence for degeneration of retinal nerve fibers. The temporal focus of the observed retinal nerve fiber layer reduction suggests an involvement of the papillo-macular bundle which resembles pathology found in toxic or mitochondrial optic nerve disease such as Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON or dominant optic atrophy (DOA.

  11. Guidelines and quality measures for the diagnosis of optic ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenja eBorchers

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the first description of a systematic mis-reaching by Bálint in 1909, a reasonable number of patients showing a similar phenomenology, later termed optic ataxia (OA, has been described. However, there is surprising inconsistency regarding the behavioral measures that are used to detect OA in experimental and clinical reports, if the respective measures are reported at all. A typical screening method, that was presumably used by most researchers and clinicians, reaching for a target object in the peripheral visual space, has never been evaluated. We developed a set of instructions and evaluation criteria for the scoring of a semi-standardized version of this reaching task. We tested 36 healthy participants, a group of 52 acute and chronic stroke patients, and 24 patients suffering from cerebellar ataxia. We found a high interrater reliability and a moderate test-retest reliability comparable to other clinical instruments in the stroke sample. The calculation of cut-off thresholds based on healthy control and cerebellar patient data showed an unexpected high number of false positives in these samples due to individual outliers that made a considerable number of errors in peripheral reaching. This study provides first empirical data from large control and patient groups for a screening procedure that seems to be widely used but rarely explicity reported and prepares the grounds for its use as a standard tool for the description of patients who are included in single case or group studies addressing optic ataxia similar to the use of neglect, extinction, or apraxia screening tools.

  12. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia caused by mutations in the PEX2 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Sevin; S. Ferdinandusse; H.R. Waterham; R.J. Wanders; P. Aubourg

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To expand the spectrum of genetic causes of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia (ARCA). Case report: Two brothers are described who developed progressive cerebellar ataxia at 3 1/2 and 18 years, respectively. After ruling out known common genetic causes of ARCA, analysis of bl

  13. EFNS/ENS Consensus on the diagnosis and management of chronic ataxias in adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Gaalen, J. van; Boesch, S.; Burgunder, J.M.; Durr, A.; Giunti, P.; Klockgether, T.; Mariotti, C.; Pandolfo, M.; Riess, O.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The ataxias are a challenging group of neurological diseases due the aetiological heterogeneity and the complexity of the genetic subtypes. This guideline focuses on the heredodegenerative ataxias. The aim is to provide a peer-reviewed evidence-based guideline for clinical

  14. Two sisters with mental retardation, cataract, ataxia, progressive hearing loss, and polyneuropathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Begeer, J H; Scholte, F A; van Essen, A J

    1991-01-01

    Two sisters are described with a disorder characterised by mental retardation, congenital cataract, progressive spinocerebellar ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and signs of peripheral neuropathy. Progressive hearing loss, ataxia, and polyneuropathy became evident in the third decade. The differential diagnosis of this syndrome is discussed including the syndromes described by Berman et al and Koletzko et al.

  15. Prepulse Inhibition in Patients with Fragile X-associated Tremor Ataxia Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Andrea; Ballinger, Elizabeth; Chavez, Alyssa; Tassone, Flora; Randi J Hagerman; Hessl, David

    2010-01-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder that affects carriers of the fragile X premutation, typically after age 50. Common symptoms include intention tremor, ataxia, neuropathy, autonomic dysfunction, cognitive decline, and dementia.

  16. Involvement of the cholinergic basal forebrain nuclei in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueb, U.; Farrag, K.; Seidel, K.; Brunt, E. R.; Heinsen, H.; Buerk, K.; Melegh, B.; von Gall, C.; Auburger, G.; Bohl, J.; Korf, H. W.; Hoche, F.; den Dunnen, W.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) belongs to the CAG repeat or polyglutamine diseases. Along with a large variety of motor, behavioural and neuropsychological symptoms the clinical picture of patients suffering from this autosomal dominantly inherited ataxia may also include deficits of att

  17. A GENE FOR EPISODIC ATAXIA/MYOKYMIA MAPS TO CHROMOSOME 12P13

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LITT, M; KRAMER, P; BROWNE, D; GANCHER, S; BRUNT, ERP; ROOT, D; PHROMCHOTIKUL, T; DUBAY, CJ; NUTT, J

    1994-01-01

    Episodic ataxia (EA) is a rare, familial disorder producing attacks of generalized ataxia, with normal or near-normal neurological function between attacks. Families with autosomal dominant EA represent at least two distinct clinical syndromes. One clinical type of EA (MIM 160120) includes individua

  18. HEREDITARY MYOKYMIA AND PAROXYSMAL ATAXIA LINKED TO CHROMOSOME-12 IS RESPONSIVE TO ACETAZOLAMIDE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LUBBERS, WJ; BRUNT, ERP; SCHEFFER, H; LITT, M; STULP, R; BROWNE, DL; VANWEERDEN, TW

    1995-01-01

    A sixth family with autosomal dominantly inherited myokymia and paroxysmal ataxia is described. The syndrome in this family is linked to the recently discovered locus for inherited myokymia and paroxysmal ataxia on the human chromosome 12p, and a missense mutation is shown in the KCNA1 gene. The att

  19. There May Be More to Reaching than Meets the Eye: Re-Thinking Optic Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Stephen R.; Newport, Roger; Husain, Masud; Fowlie, Jane E.; O'Donoghue, Michael; Bajaj, Nin

    2009-01-01

    Optic ataxia (OA) is generally thought of as a disorder of visually guided reaching movements that cannot be explained by any simple deficit in visual or motor processing. In this paper we offer a new perspective on optic ataxia; we argue that the popular characterisation of this disorder is misleading and is unrepresentative of the pattern of…

  20. Disturbed calcium signaling in spinocerebellar ataxias and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, Polina; Popugaeva, Elena; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2015-04-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders, such as spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) represent a huge scientific and medical question, but the molecular mechanisms of these diseases are still not clear. There is increasing evidence that neuronal calcium signaling is abnormal in many neurodegenerative disorders. Abnormal neuronal calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum may result in disturbances of cell homeostasis, synaptic dysfunction, and eventual cell death. Neuronal loss is observed in most cases of neurodegenerative diseases. Recent experimental evidence supporting the role of neuronal calcium signaling in the pathogenesis of SCAs and AD is discussed in this review.

  1. The ninth international veterinary immunology symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Introduction to the special issue of Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology summarizes the Proceedings of the 9th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (9th IVIS) held August, 2010, in Tokyo, Japan. Over 340 delegates from 30 countries discussed research progress analyzing the immune...

  2. The cognitive paradigm and the immunological homunculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I R

    1992-12-01

    In last month's issue of Immunology Today, Irun Cohen discussed the inadequacies of the clonal selection paradigm and proposed a cognitive paradigm in which preformed internal images guide and restrict the process of clonal activation. Here he clarifies the nature of these internal images, during on concrete examples from the image of infection and the image of self, the immunological homunculus.

  3. Evolution and conservation of immunological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, N M

    2006-12-01

    Paraphrasing what Gregory Bateson says on evolution, we might say that: "Immunology has long been badly taught. In particular, students--and even professional immunologists--acquire theories of immunological activity without any deep understanding of what problems these theories attempt to solve."

  4. Evolution and conservation of immunological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.M. Vaz

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Paraphrasing what Gregory Bateson says on evolution, we might say that: "Immunology has long been badly taught. In particular, students - and even professional immunologists - acquire theories of immunological activity without any deep understanding of what problems these theories attempt to solve."

  5. [Immunological changes in chronic osteomyelitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensi Alvarez, V; Cartón Sánchez, J A; Maradona Hidalgo, J A; López-Larrea, C; Arribas Castrillo, J M

    1992-11-01

    We have studied several aspects of cellular and humoral immunity in 19 patients with chronic osteomyelitis (CO) compared with 11 healthy controls of similar characteristics. Patients with CO showed significantly higher values of GSR, reactive protein C (RPC), IgG and lymphocytes CD3+ and lower values of the CD4+/CD3+ ratio, as well as an hypoergic response to 7 antigens in the different cutaneous hypersensibility tests, compared with healthy controls. The rate of "in vitro" blastic stimulation by different lectins was significantly lower in the group of patients, compared with controls. These changes in the cellular immunity are not correlated with the extent, chronicity and prognosis of the disease, although we did not performed sequential studies of the immunitary condition. None of these immunological markers seem to be a better predictor of the bone infectious activity than the traditional GSR or RPC. PMID:1467399

  6. Immunological treatment of liver tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maurizio Chiriva-Internati; Fabio Grizzi; Cynthia A Jumper; Everardo Cobos; Paul L Hermonat; Eldo E Frezza

    2005-01-01

    Although multiple options for the treatment of liver tumors have often been described in the past, including liver resection, radiofrequency ablation with or without hepatic pump insertion, laparoscopic liver resection and the use of chemotherapy, the potential of immunotherapy and gene manipulation is still largely unexplored.Immunological therapy by gene manipulation is based on the interaction between virus-based gene delivery systems and dendritic cells. Using viruses as vectors, it is possible to transduce dendritic cells with genes encoding tumor-associated antigens, thus inducing strong humoral and cellular immunity against the antigens themselves.Both chemotherapy and radiation therapy have the disadvantage of destroying healthy cells, thus causing severe side-effects. We need more precisely targeted therapies capable of killing cancer cells while sparing healthy cells. Our goal is to establish a new treatment for solid liver tumors based on the concept of cytoreduction,and propose an innovative algorithm.

  7. Spectrum of centrosome autoantibodies in childhood varicella and post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stinton Laura M

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sera from children with post-varicella infections have autoantibodies that react with centrosomes in brain and tissue culture cells. We investigated the sera of children with infections and post-varicella ataxia and related conditions for reactivity to five recombinant centrosome proteins: γγ-enolase, pericentrin, ninein, PCM-1, and Mob1. Methods Sera from 12 patients with acute post-varicella ataxia, 1 with post-Epstein Barr virus (EBV ataxia, 5 with uncomplicated varicella infections, and other conditions were tested for reactivity to cryopreserved cerebellum tissue and recombinant centrosome proteins. The distribution of pericentrin in the cerebellum was studied by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF using rabbit antibodies to the recombinant protein. Antibodies to phospholipids (APL were detected by ELISA. Results Eleven of 12 children with post-varicella ataxia, 4/5 children with uncomplicated varicella infections, 1/1 with post-EBV ataxia, 2/2 with ADEM, 1/2 with neuroblastoma and ataxia, and 2/2 with cerebellitis had antibodies directed against 1 or more recombinant centrosome antigens. Antibodies to pericentrin were seen in 5/12 children with post-varicella ataxia but not in any of the other sera tested. IIF demonstrated that pericentrin is located in axons and centrosomes of cerebellar cells. APL were detected in 75% of the sera from children with post-varicella ataxia and 50% of children with varicella without ataxia and in none of the controls. Conclusion This is the first study to show the antigen specificity of anti-centrosome antibodies in children with varicella. Our data suggest that children with post-varicella ataxia have unique autoantibody reactivity to pericentrin.

  8. Urinary Symptoms and Urodynamics Findings in Patients with Friedreich's Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre F. A. Musegante

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To assess the prevalence of LUTS, urinary tract and urodynamics changes in patients with Friedreich's Ataxia (FA, the most common form of hereditary ataxia. Materials and Methods This study evaluated 258 patients with genetically confirmed diagnoses of FA. Of the patients, 158 responded to a questionnaire which assessed their urinary symptoms. Patients with clinical changes underwent renal function examinations, ultrasound, and urodynamic studies (UDS. Results The sample analyzed showed that 82% of the patients complained of LUTS, although only 22% related the symptoms with quality of life impairment. Twenty eight (18% of them agreed to undergo urodynamic evaluation. Urgency was the most common symptom. The exam was normal in 4 (14% and detrusor underactivity was the most common finding. 14% (4 patients presented with dilatation of the upper urinary tract at ultrasound scans. None of them had creatinine alterations. Conclusions LUTS was found in a large percentage of patients with FA, but only a few related it to their quality of life impairment. Although creatinine levels was normal in this sample, some patients may show upper urinary tract abnormalities, with deserves close observation and proper care.

  9. Enfermedad cardiovascular en pacientes cubanos afectados por Ataxia de Friedreich.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Cruz Mariño

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Al describir la ataxia de Friedreich, Nicholaus hizo referencia a la patología cardiaca. Esta enfermedad autosómica recesiva se debe a una mutación dinámica en el gen FRDA, codificándose deficientemente la proteína Frataxina, conduciendo a estrés oxidativo y muerte celular cardiaca. La presente investigación se desarrolló con el objetivo de describir las anomalías cardiovasculares presentes en los pacientes cubanos afectados por ataxia de Friedreich. A los individuos con diagnóstico molecular confirmatorio de la enfermedad se les realizó electrocardiograma y ecocardiograma, así como evaluación clínica mediante escalas validadas internacionalmente: ICARS y SARA. Los trastornos de repolarización ventricular difusos, los trastornos de conducción intraauricular, así como los trastornos de la función diastólica resultaron hallazgos frecuentes. El patrón restrictivo apreciado provee evidencia invivo de que la enfermedad conduce a disfunción diastólica del ventrículo izquierdo. La ocurrencia de un Infarto Agudo del Miocardio silente indica la importancia de identificar formas incipientes de afectación miocárdica.

  10. Ataxia-telangiectasia: the pattern of cerebellar atrophy on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe MRI of the brain in 19 patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) and correlate the appearances with the degree of neurologic deficit. We examined 10 male and nine female patients; 17 were aged between 2 and 12 years (mean 8 years) but a woman and her brother were 35 and 38 years old, and had a variant of AT. Ataxia was the first recognized sign of the disease in every patient. We detected the following patterns of cerebellar atrophy: in the youngest patient, aged 2 years, the study was normal; in the five next youngest patients 3-7 years of age, the lateral cerebellum and superior vermis showed the earliest changes of atrophy; and all but one of the other patients had moderate to marked diffuse atrophy of vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. There were 12 patients aged 9 years and above; one, who was normal, was 9 years old. The five patients who at the time of examination were unable to walk all had diffuse atrophy involving both vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. (orig.)

  11. Clinical and genetic features of ataxia-telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bundey, S. [Birmingham Maternity Hospital (United Kingdom). Clinical Genetics Unit

    1994-12-01

    There are several variants of ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T): classical A-T with marked radiation sensitivity; classical A-T with intermediate levels of radiation sensitivity; mild A-T with intermediate levels of radiation sensitivity; A-T without telangiectasia; A-T without oculomoto apraxia; and A-T with microcephaly. These disorders are probably caused by different allelic mutations, because affected sibs resemble the index patients, and because there is an association of certain haplo-types of 11q22-23 with specific phenotypes. The Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome, with its lack of ataxia, seems on clinical grounds to be a different disorder. Although A-T is almost always inherited as an autosomal recessive, there are some unusual features; an unexpectedly low parental consanguinity rate, an incidence in sibs that is < 0.25, and occurrence of disease in many different races and in the offspring of mixed race unions. Moreover, looking at haplotypes from 63 UK patients, there is a remarkably low incidence of homozygosity. An autosomal recessive condition that is deficient in parental consanguinity, and in homozygosity for the region around the gene, can be explained by J.H. Edwards` hypothesis that homozygosity for alleles at a neighbouring locus are lethal early in embryogenesis. Other possible mechanisms to explain the unusual genetic features are discussed. (author).

  12. Altered lipid metabolism in a Drosophila model of Friedreich's ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Juan A; Ohmann, Elisabeth; Sanchez, Diego; Botella, José A; Liebisch, Gerhard; Moltó, María D; Ganfornina, María D; Schmitz, Gerd; Schneuwly, Stephan

    2010-07-15

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is the most common form of autosomal recessive ataxia caused by a deficit in the mitochondrial protein frataxin. Although demyelination is a common symptom in FRDA patients, no multicellular model has yet been developed to study the involvement of glial cells in FRDA. Using the recently established RNAi lines for targeted suppression of frataxin in Drosophila, we were able to study the effects of general versus glial-specific frataxin downregulation. In particular, we wanted to study the interplay between lowered frataxin content, lipid accumulation and peroxidation and the consequences of these effects on the sensitivity to oxidative stress and fly fitness. Interestingly, ubiquitous frataxin reduction leads to an increase in fatty acids catalyzing an enhancement of lipid peroxidation levels, elevating the intracellular toxic potential. Specific loss of frataxin in glial cells triggers a similar phenotype which can be visualized by accumulating lipid droplets in glial cells. This phenotype is associated with a reduced lifespan, an increased sensitivity to oxidative insult, neurodegenerative effects and a serious impairment of locomotor activity. These symptoms fit very well with our observation of an increase in intracellular toxicity by lipid peroxides. Interestingly, co-expression of a Drosophila apolipoprotein D ortholog (glial lazarillo) has a strong protective effect in our frataxin models, mainly by controlling the level of lipid peroxidation. Our results clearly support a strong involvement of glial cells and lipid peroxidation in the generation of FRDA-like symptoms.

  13. Ataxia-telangiectasia: the pattern of cerebellar atrophy on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavani, F. [Department of Radiology, University of Modena (Italy); Zimmerman, R.A.; Gatti, R.; Bingham, P. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Berry, G.T. [Department of Endocrinology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Sullivan, K. [Department of Immunology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States)

    2003-05-01

    We describe MRI of the brain in 19 patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) and correlate the appearances with the degree of neurologic deficit. We examined 10 male and nine female patients; 17 were aged between 2 and 12 years (mean 8 years) but a woman and her brother were 35 and 38 years old, and had a variant of AT. Ataxia was the first recognized sign of the disease in every patient. We detected the following patterns of cerebellar atrophy: in the youngest patient, aged 2 years, the study was normal; in the five next youngest patients 3-7 years of age, the lateral cerebellum and superior vermis showed the earliest changes of atrophy; and all but one of the other patients had moderate to marked diffuse atrophy of vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. There were 12 patients aged 9 years and above; one, who was normal, was 9 years old. The five patients who at the time of examination were unable to walk all had diffuse atrophy involving both vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. (orig.)

  14. Ataxia cerebelosa persistente despues de la administracion toxica de difenilhidantoina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés M. Villa

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available La intoxicacion cronica con difenilhidantoina (DFH es bien conocida como causa de ataxia irreversible en pacientes epilépticos debida a atrofia cerebelosa con perdida de células de Purkinje. No es asi con la intoxicación aguda, puesto que sus signos y síntomas son reversibles. Presentamos un paciente con convulsiones parciales complejas, secundarias a un quiste temporal, que habia sido tratado irregularmente con DFH durante dos años con dosis variables que oscilaban en los 100 mg/dia. Dada la refractariedad de su cuadro convulsivo en una entrevista previa a su ingreso se le indico un aumento brusco de la dosis del fármaco que alcanzo a los 400 mg/dia. Ello ocasiono un sindrome pancerebeloso severo que motivo su internación. Posteriormente a la suspension de la DFH y la exeresis del quiste temporal mejoro su cuadro convulsivo, aunque quedo con ataxia de miembros inferiores y asinergia de tronco, cuadro con el que fue dado de alta. Un año despues, el paciente se encontraba libre de convulsiones, pero su sindrome cerebeloso no se habia modificado. El estudio por imágenes no evidencio atrofia cerebelosa.

  15. Birth of the science of immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalstieg, Frank C; Goldman, Armond S

    2010-05-01

    The science of immunology emerged in the last of the 19th and the first of the 20th century. Substantial progress in physics, chemistry and microbiology was essential for its development. Indeed, microorganisms became one of the principal investigative tools of the major founders of that science - Louis Pasteur, Robert Koch, Ilya Ilich Metchnikoff, Paul Ehrlich and Jules Bordet. It is pertinent that these pioneering scientists were born when questioning and exploration were encouraged because of the legacies of the previous century of enlightenment. Mentors greatly aided their development. Their discoveries were shaped by their individual personalities. In turn they developed other contributors to the nascent field. Their discoveries included the types of leukocytes, the roles of neutrophils in inflammation and defence, cellular lysis due to complement, the principles of humoral and cellular immunology, passive and active immunization, tissue antigens, anaphylaxis, anaphylactoid reactions and autoimmunity. Their work formed the basis of modern immunology that developed many decades later. Immunology has enormously impacted our understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of infections, immune-mediated disorders and inflammation. Burgeoning advances forecast further important clinical applications of immunology. Yet, their applications will be problematic because few physicians sufficiently understand the science. We propose that understanding modern immunology requires a grasp of how that science developed - who made the discoveries, how they were made, their successes and failures, their interactions and debates all reveal the foundation of modern immunology.

  16. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Gülfem; Bakirtas, Arzu; Sackesen, Cansin; Reisli, Ismail; Tuncer, Ayfer

    2011-06-01

    Allergic diseases constitute a significant health problem in Turkey. According to a recent multicenter study, which used the ISAAC questionnaire, the mean prevalence of wheezing, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema in 10-yr-old school children during the past year was 15.8%, 23.5%, and 8.1%, respectively. A healthcare level system, regulated by Ministry of Health, is available in Turkey. Pediatric allergists and pediatric immunologists provide patient care at the tertiary level. Currently, 48 centers deliver care for allergic and immunologic diseases in children. There are 136 pediatric and 61 adult allergists/immunologists. Although the number of allergy/clinical immunology specialists is limited, these centers are capable of delivering many of the procedures required for the proper management and diagnosis of allergy/immunology. Pediatric allergy and/or immunology is a subspecialty lasting 3 yr and follows a 4-yr pediatric specialist training. Fellow training involves gaining knowledge in basic and clinical allergy and immunology as well as the performance and interpretation of laboratory procedures in the field of allergy and clinical immunology. The Turkish National Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (TNSACI) was officially established in 1989 and currently has 356 members. The society organizes a national congress annually and winter schools for fellowship training as well as training courses for patients and their relatives. TNSACI also has a strong representation in European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) and European Society for Immunodeficiencies (ESID) through its participation in the executive committee, consensus reports, and initiatives in the diagnosis of allergic and immunologic diseases of children. The 30th Congress of the EAACI is also due to be held in Istanbul, Turkey, between June 11 and 15, 2011.

  17. Clinical spectrum of early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes: an autosomal recessive ataxia not to be missed Espectro clínico da ataxia cerebelar de início precoce com reflexos mantidos: uma ataxia autossômica recessiva para não ser esquecida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Pedroso

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias are a heterogeneous group of neurological disorders. In 1981, a neurological entity comprised by early onset progressive cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, pyramidal weakness of the limbs and retained or increased upper limb reflexes and knee jerks was described. This disorder is known as early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes. In this article, we aimed to call attention for the diagnosis of early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes as the second most common cause of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias, after Friedreich ataxia, and also to perform a clinical spectrum study of this syndrome. In this data, 12 patients from different families met all clinical features for early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes. Dysarthria and cerebellar atrophy were the most common features in our sample. It is uncertain, however, whether early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes is a homogeneous disease or a group of phenotypically similar syndromes represented by different genetic entities. Further molecular studies are required to provide definitive answers to the questions that remain regarding early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes.As ataxias cerebelares autossômicas recessivas são um grupo heterogêneo de doenças neurológicas. Em 1981, foi descrita uma entidade neurológica incluindo ataxia cerebelar progressiva de início precoce, disartria, liberação piramidal e manutenção ou aumento dos reflexos tendíneos nos membros superiores e inferiores. Essa síndrome é conhecida como ataxia cerebelar de início precoce com reflexos mantidos. Neste artigo, o objetivo foi chamar a atenção para o diagnóstico de ataxia cerebelar de início precoce com reflexos mantidos como a segunda causa mais comum de ataxia cerebelar autossômica recessiva, após a ataxia de Friedreich, e também realizar um estudo do espectro cl

  18. Patients with autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia have more risk of falls, important balance impairment, and decreased ability to function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Yuri P. Aizawa

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess balance and ability to function in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia. METHODS: A total of 44 patients with different spinocerebellar ataxia types 1, 2, 3, and 6 were evaluated using the Tinetti balance and gait assessment and the functional independence measure. The scale for the assessment and rating of ataxia and the international cooperative ataxia rating scale were used to evaluate disease severity. RESULTS: Most patients showed significant risk of falls. The balance scores were significantly different in spinocerebellar ataxia types. A significant positive correlation between balance and disease severity was found. CONCLUSION: Patients with spinocerebellar ataxia have important balance impairment and risk of falls that influence the ability to function such as self-care, transfers, and locomotion. Furthermore, the more severe ataxia is, the more compromised are postural balance, risk of falls, and ability to function.

  19. IMMUNOLOGICAL STUDY OF SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES

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    J. Meenupriya

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Spongiform encephalopathies, categorized as a subclass of neuro-degenerative diseases and commonly known as prion diseases, are a group of progressive conditions that affect the brain and nervous system of many animals, including humans. Prion diseases are common among cannibalistic communities; further research has revealed that the infected or malformed prion protein (named PrPsc spreads its virulence to the normal, healthy prion protein (named PrPc when people consume infected tissues. Knowing that a small interaction between normal and infected prion protein creates virulence, this relationship can be studied as a simple antigen-antibody interaction to understand the series of events that transform a normal prion protein into a virulent misfolded protein. Thoroughly modeled and validated structures of both PrPsc and PrPc can be effectively used to map the epitopes and thereby screen the antigen-antibody interaction using docking studies for a particular organism of concern. This simple immunological approach is used to understand the vital interaction between the normal and malformed proteins that is involved in the disease-spreading mechanism. Clarification of this mechanism could be used in various immune- and bioinformatics algorithms to map the interaction epitopes, furthering an understanding of these pathologies.

  20. The immunological barriers to xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadori, M; Cozzi, E

    2015-10-01

    The availability of cells, tissues and organs from a non-human species such as the pig could, at least in theory, meet the demand of organs necessary for clinical transplantation. At this stage, the important goal of getting over the first year of survival has been reported for both cellular and solid organ xenotransplantation in relevant preclinical primate models. In addition, xenotransplantation is already in the clinic as shown by the broad use of animal-derived medical devices, such as bioprosthetic heart valves and biological materials used for surgical tissue repair. At this stage, however, prior to starting a wide-scale clinical application of xenotransplantation of viable cells and organs, the important obstacle represented by the humoral immune response will need to be overcome. Likewise, the barriers posed by the activation of the innate immune system and coagulative pathway will have to be controlled. As far as xenogeneic nonviable xenografts, increasing evidence suggests that considerable immune reactions, mediated by both innate and adaptive immunity, take place and influence the long-term outcome of xenogeneic materials in patients, possibly precluding the use of bioprosthetic heart valves in young individuals. In this context, the present article provides an overview of current knowledge on the immune processes following xenotransplantation and on the possible therapeutic interventions to overcome the immunological drawbacks involved in xenotransplantation.

  1. Modeling-Enabled Systems Nutritional Immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghna eVerma

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the fundamental role of nutrition in the maintenance of health, the immune response and disease prevention. Emerging global mechanistic insights in the field of nutritional immunology cannot be gained through reductionist methods alone or by analyzing a single nutrient at a time. We propose to investigate nutritional immunology as a massively interacting system of interconnected multistage and multiscale networks that encompass hidden mechanisms by which nutrition, microbiome, metabolism, genetic predisposition and the immune system interact to delineate health and disease. The review sets an unconventional path to applying complex science methodologies to nutritional immunology research, discovery and development through ‘use cases’ centered around the impact of nutrition on the gut microbiome and immune responses. Our systems nutritional immunology analyses, that include modeling and informatics methodologies in combination with pre-clinical and clinical studies, have the potential to discover emerging systems-wide properties at the interface of the immune system, nutrition, microbiome, and metabolism.

  2. Multiscale modelling in immunology: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappuccio, Antonio; Tieri, Paolo; Castiglione, Filippo

    2016-05-01

    One of the greatest challenges in biomedicine is to get a unified view of observations made from the molecular up to the organism scale. Towards this goal, multiscale models have been highly instrumental in contexts such as the cardiovascular field, angiogenesis, neurosciences and tumour biology. More recently, such models are becoming an increasingly important resource to address immunological questions as well. Systematic mining of the literature in multiscale modelling led us to identify three main fields of immunological applications: host-virus interactions, inflammatory diseases and their treatment and development of multiscale simulation platforms for immunological research and for educational purposes. Here, we review the current developments in these directions, which illustrate that multiscale models can consistently integrate immunological data generated at several scales, and can be used to describe and optimize therapeutic treatments of complex immune diseases.

  3. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing Revealed Novel Mutations in Chinese Ataxia Telangiectasia Patients: A Precision Medicine Perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Chen

    Full Text Available Ataxia telangiectasia (AT is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia, oculocutaneous telangiectasia and immunodeficiency due to mutations in the ATM gene. We performed targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS on three unrelated patients and identified five disease-causing variants in three probands, including two pairs of heterozygous variants (FAT-1:c.4396C>T/p.R1466X, c.1608-2A>G; FAT-2:c.4412_4413insT/p.L1472Ffs*19, c.8824C>T/p.Q2942X and one pair of homozygous variants (FAT-3: c.8110T>G/p.C2704G, Hom. With regard to precision medicine for rare genetic diseases, targeted NGS currently enables the rapid and cost-effective identification of causative mutations and is an updated molecular diagnostic tool that merits further optimization. This high-throughput data-based strategy would propel the development of precision diagnostic methods and establish a foundation for precision medicine.

  4. Immunologic, hemodynamic, and adrenal incompetence in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Louise Madeleine; Bendtsen, Flemming; Møller, Søren

    2015-01-01

    dysfunction, but is not responsive to volume expansion. Recent research indicates that development of hepatic nephropathy represents a continuous spectrum of functional and structural dysfunction and may be precipitated by the inherent immunologic, adrenal, and hemodynamic incompetence in cirrhosis. New...... research explores several new markers of renal dysfunction that may replace serum creatinine in the future and give new insight on the hepatic nephropathy. Our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms causing the immunologic, adrenal, and hemodynamic incompetence, and the impact on renal...

  5. Immunology of root resorption: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Luciano

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Root resorption seems to be related to a complex combination of mechanical factors and biological activity, which comprehends the role of immunologic structures including specialized cells. The aim of this research was to explain the development of the process - from mineralization to the destruction of hard tissues - and the possible relationship between root resorption and immunology, along with discussing current concepts described in the literature.

  6. Kidney infarction in Friedreich's ataxia with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios Stergios; Pirvu, Tatiana Nataly; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis; Kohl, Sandro

    2012-09-30

    A 37-year-old man with advanced Friedreich's ataxia was referred to our emergency department with acute exacerbated abdominal pain of unclear aetiology. Laboratory tests showed slightly increased inflammatory parameters, elevated troponin and B-type natriuretic peptide, as well as minimal proteinuria. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a pre-existing dilated cardiomyopathy. Abdominal sonography showed no pathological alterations. Owing to persistent pain under analgesia, a contrast-enhanced CT-abdomen was performed, which revealed a non-homogeneous perfusion deficit of the right kidney, although neither abdominal vascular alteration, cardiac thrombus, deep vein thrombosis nor a patent foramen ovale could be detected. Taking all clinical and radiological results into consideration, the current incident was diagnosed as a thromboembolic kidney infarction. As a consequence, lifelong oral anticoagulation was initiated.

  7. ERS statement on the multidisciplinary respiratory management of ataxia telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Jayesh M; Bush, Andrew; van Gerven, Marjo; Nissenkorn, Andreea; Renke, Michael; Yarlett, Lian; Taylor, Malcolm; Tonia, Thomy; Warris, Adilia; Zielen, Stefan; Zinna, Shairbanu; Merkus, Peter J F M

    2015-12-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare, progressive, multisystem disease that has a large number of complex and diverse manifestations which vary with age. Patients with A-T die prematurely with the leading causes of death being respiratory diseases and cancer. Respiratory manifestations include immune dysfunction leading to recurrent upper and lower respiratory infections; aspiration resulting from dysfunctional swallowing due to neurodegenerative deficits; inefficient cough; and interstitial lung disease/pulmonary fibrosis. Malnutrition is a significant comorbidity. The increased radiosensitivity and increased risk of cancer should be borne in mind when requesting radiological investigations. Aggressive proactive monitoring and treatment of these various aspects of lung disease under multidisciplinary expertise in the experience of national multidisciplinary clinics internationally forms the basis of this statement on the management of lung disease in A-T. Neurological management is outwith the scope of this document. PMID:26621971

  8. ERS statement on the multidisciplinary respiratory management of ataxia telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayesh M. Bhatt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T is a rare, progressive, multisystem disease that has a large number of complex and diverse manifestations which vary with age. Patients with A-T die prematurely with the leading causes of death being respiratory diseases and cancer. Respiratory manifestations include immune dysfunction leading to recurrent upper and lower respiratory infections; aspiration resulting from dysfunctional swallowing due to neurodegenerative deficits; inefficient cough; and interstitial lung disease/pulmonary fibrosis. Malnutrition is a significant comorbidity. The increased radiosensitivity and increased risk of cancer should be borne in mind when requesting radiological investigations. Aggressive proactive monitoring and treatment of these various aspects of lung disease under multidisciplinary expertise in the experience of national multidisciplinary clinics internationally forms the basis of this statement on the management of lung disease in A-T. Neurological management is outwith the scope of this document.

  9. Expanding the ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 4 phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paucar, Martin; Malmgren, Helena; Taylor, Malcolm; Reynolds, John J; Svenningsson, Per; Press, Rayomand; Nordgren, Ann

    2016-02-01

    Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 4 (AOA4) is an autosomal recessive (AR) disorder recently delineated in a Portuguese cohort and caused by mutations in the PNKP (polynucleotide kinase 3'-phosphatase) gene.(1) AOA4 is a progressive, complex movement disorder that includes hyperkinetic features, eye movement abnormalities, polyneuropathy, varying degrees of cognitive impairment, and obesity. PNKP mutations were initially discovered to be the cause of the severe nonprogressive syndrome microcephaly, early-onset intractable seizures, and developmental delay (MCSZ).(2) Here we describe a patient with compound heterozygous PNKP mutations presenting with an AOA4 phenotype. New features that we report include both mutations, presence of chorea, absence of oculomotor apraxia (OMA), and slow disease progression. PMID:27066586

  10. Vitamin B12 deficiency presenting as acute ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, John Ross; Say, Daphne

    2013-03-26

    A previously healthy 7-year-old Caucasian boy was hospitalised for evaluation of acute ataxia and failure to thrive, initially suspicious for an intracranial mass. Weight and body mass index were below the third percentile and he demonstrated loss of joint position and vibratory sense on examination. Laboratory studies revealed megaloblastic anaemia while an initial MRI of the brain showed no evidence of mass lesions or other abnormalities. A dietary history revealed the child subscribed to a restrictive vegan diet with little to no intake of animal products or other fortified foods. The child was diagnosed with presumed vitamin B12 deficiency and was treated with intramuscular B12 injections. Neurological symptoms resolved promptly within several days after starting therapy. This case underlines the importance of assessing nutritional status in the evaluation of neurological dysfunction in the pediatric patient.

  11. 21 CFR 866.5180 - Fecal calprotectin immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fecal calprotectin immunological test system. 866.5180 Section 866.5180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5180 Fecal calprotectin immunological...

  12. Ethanol-Induced Cerebellar Ataxia: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, M Saeed

    2015-08-01

    The cerebellum is an important target of ethanol toxicity given that cerebellar ataxia is the most consistent physical manifestation of acute ethanol consumption. Despite the significance of the cerebellum in ethanol-induced cerebellar ataxia (EICA), the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying EICA are incompletely understood. However, two important findings have shed greater light on this phenomenon. First, ethanol-induced blockade of cerebellar adenosine uptake in rodent models points to a role for adenosinergic A1 modulation of EICA. Second, the consistent observation that intracerebellar administration of nicotine in mice leads to antagonism of EICA provides evidence for a critical role of cerebellar nitric oxide (NO) in EICA reversal. Based on these two important findings, this review discusses the potential molecular events at two key synaptic sites (mossy fiber-granule cell-Golgi cell (MGG synaptic site) and granule cell parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (GPP synaptic site) that lead to EICA. Specifically, ethanol-induced neuronal NOS inhibition at the MGG synaptic site acts as a critical trigger for Golgi cell activation which leads to granule cell deafferentation. Concurrently, ethanol-induced inhibition of adenosine uptake at the GPP synaptic site produces adenosine accumulation which decreases glutamate release and leads to the profound activation of Purkinje cells (PCs). These molecular events at the MGG and GPP synaptic sites are mutually reinforcing and lead to cerebellar dysfunction, decreased excitatory output of deep cerebellar nuclei, and EICA. The critical importance of PCs as the sole output of the cerebellar cortex suggests normalization of PC function could have important therapeutic implications.

  13. Ayurvedic approach in the management of spinocerebellar ataxia-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rajoria, Kshipra

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia -2 is a progressive, degenerative genetic disease caused by an expanded (CAG) trinucleotide repetition on the chromosome 12 resulting in production of an abnormal protein called ataxin-2. There is no known effective management or cure in biomedicine for this genetic disease. In the present study a case of SCA2 that was treated with Ayurvedic intervention is reported. Ayurvedic treatments in this case were directed towards alleviating symptoms and to reduce severe disability due to progressive nature of disease. A 42 year old male patient was diagnosed for Vāta vyādhi (group of various neurological disorders) and was- treated with Śālisastika pinda svedana (sudation with bolus of medicated cooked rice) for 30 days-, Śirobasti (sudation of head with the help of a cap on head) with Aśvagandhā taila for 45 days and Balādi ksīra basti (enema with medicated milk) with Aśvagandhā taila anuvāsana (enema with oil) for 30 days in Karma basti krama (30 days regime of purification and oleation enema) along with a combination of Ayurvedic oral drugs which consisted of Brahadvātacintāmanirasa - 125 mg, Vasantāmaltī rasa- 125 mg, Daśamūla kvātha- 40 ml, Aśvagandhā cūrṇa (powder of Withania somnifera DUNAL)- 3g, Amrtā cūrṇa (powder of Tinospora cordifolia Willd.)- 500 mg, Muktāśukti pisti - 500 mg, Yogarāja Guggulu - 500 mg twice a day for 2 months. Patient's condition was assessed on the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Before treatment, mean SARA score was 35. This reduced to 15 after treatment. Good relief in dysarthria, fasciculation, heaviness in eye, blurred vision, axial tremor; constipation and quality of life were observed in this case. PMID:27143801

  14. An immunologic portrait of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stroncek David F

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The advent of high-throughput technology challenges the traditional histopathological classification of cancer, and proposes new taxonomies derived from global transcriptional patterns. Although most of these molecular re-classifications did not endure the test of time, they provided bulk of new information that can reframe our understanding of human cancer biology. Here, we focus on an immunologic interpretation of cancer that segregates oncogenic processes independent from their tissue derivation into at least two categories of which one bears the footprints of immune activation. Several observations describe a cancer phenotype where the expression of interferon stimulated genes and immune effector mechanisms reflect patterns commonly observed during the inflammatory response against pathogens, which leads to elimination of infected cells. As these signatures are observed in growing cancers, they are not sufficient to entirely clear the organism of neoplastic cells but they sustain, as in chronic infections, a self-perpetuating inflammatory process. Yet, several studies determined an association between this inflammatory status and a favorable natural history of the disease or a better responsiveness to cancer immune therapy. Moreover, these signatures overlap with those observed during immune-mediated cancer rejection and, more broadly, immune-mediated tissue-specific destruction in other immune pathologies. Thus, a discussion concerning this cancer phenotype is warranted as it remains unknown why it occurs in immune competent hosts. It also remains uncertain whether a genetically determined response of the host to its own cancer, the genetic makeup of the neoplastic process or a combination of both drives the inflammatory process. Here we reflect on commonalities and discrepancies among studies and on the genetic or somatic conditions that may cause this schism in cancer behavior.

  15. Machado-Joseph disease is genetically different from Holguin dominant ataxia (SCA2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveria, I.; Manaia, A. (Univ. Porto (Portugal) Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris (France)); Melki, J.; Burlet, P.; Rozet, J.M.; Munnich, A. (Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris (France)); Magarino, C.; Gispert, S. (Univ. Porto (Portugal) Centro Nacional Genetica Medica, Havana (Cuba)); Lunkes, A.; Auburger, G. (Univ. Hospital, Duesseldorf (Germany))

    1993-09-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) and Holguin ataxia (SCA2) are autosomal dominant multisystem degenerations with spinocerebellar involvement that are predominant among people of Portuguese-Azorean and of Cuban descent, respectively. Their clinical distinction may at times be difficult to make in individual patients, due to significant phenotypic overlapping (similar overall age-of-onset and duration of cerebellar ataxia, eye movement, and, often, other common problems). The recent mapping of SCA2 to chromosome 12q provided another candidate region for linkage studies of MJD. Original data on 10 families with Holguin ataxia show that the locus of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) on chromosome 12q is linked to SCA2 at 4 cM and is thus far its closest marker. The exclusion of linkage 15 cM on each side of PAH in 16 families with MJD shows that these two forms of dominant ataxia are genetically distinct and at different chromosomal locations (nonallelic). 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. 4-aminopyridine reverses ataxia and cerebellar firing deficiency in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayabal, Sriram; Chang, Hui Ho Vanessa; Cullen, Kathleen E; Watt, Alanna J

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is a devastating midlife-onset autosomal dominant motor control disease with no known treatment. Using a hyper-expanded polyglutamine (84Q) knock-in mouse, we found that cerebellar Purkinje cell firing precision was degraded in heterozygous (SCA6(84Q/+)) mice at 19 months when motor deficits are observed. Similar alterations in firing precision and motor control were observed at disease onset at 7 months in homozygous (SCA6(84Q/84Q)) mice, as well as a reduction in firing rate. We further found that chronic administration of the FDA-approved drug 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), which targets potassium channels, alleviated motor coordination deficits and restored cerebellar Purkinje cell firing precision to wildtype (WT) levels in SCA6(84Q/84Q) mice both in acute slices and in vivo. These results provide a novel therapeutic approach for treating ataxic symptoms associated with SCA6. PMID:27381005

  17. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of the Trinucleotide-Repeat Spinocerebellar Ataxias

    OpenAIRE

    Ingram, Melissa A.C.; Harry T Orr; Clark, H. Brent

    2011-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are dominantly inherited disorders that primarily affect coordination of motor function but also frequently involve other brain functions. The models described in this review address mechanisms of trinucleotide-repeat expansions, particularly those relating to polyglutamine expression in the mutant proteins. Modeling chronic late-onset human ataxias in mice is difficult because of their short life-span. While this potential hindrance has been partially overco...

  18. Avances en el tratamiento de las ataxias crónicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Celeste Buompadre

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Las ataxias crónicas cerebelosas autosómicas recesivas constituyen el grupo más amplio de ataxias hereditarias, con presentación principalmente en la edad pediátrica, se caracterizan por degeneración o desarrollo anormal del cerebelo y de la médula espinal. Hasta el momento el tratamiento etiológico está disponible sólo para algunas formas: aquellas con defecto metabólico conocido como la abetalipoproteinemia, la ataxia con deficiencia de vitamina E y la xantomatosis cerebrotendinosa. En estas entidades la modificación de la dieta, el suplemento con vitaminas E y A principalmente y la administración de ácido quenodexocicólico pueden cambiar el curso de la enfermedad. En la mayoría de los otros tipos de ataxia el tratamiento es solo de soporte, como por ejemplo el uso de antioxidantes y quelantes del hierro en la ataxia de Friederich con el objetivo de disminuir los depósitos de hierro mitocondriales, de corticoides en la ataxia telangiectasia y de ubiquinona /coenzima Q10 en la ataxia por deficiencia de coenzima Q-10. Si bien hasta el momento ningún tratamiento es curativo para la mayoría de las ataxias crónicas autosómico recesivas, el diagnóstico precoz de estas entidades se asocia con una mejor respuesta a las diferentes drogas.

  19. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Truncal Ataxia and HINTS as Cardinal Signs for Acute Vestibular Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Sergio; Martínez, Carlos; Zalazar, Guillermo; Moro, Marcela; Batuecas-Caletrio, Angel; Luis, Leonel; Gordon, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The head impulse, nystagmus type, test of skew (HINTS) protocol set a new paradigm to differentiate peripheral vestibular disease from stroke in patients with acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). The relationship between degree of truncal ataxia and stroke has not been systematically studied in patients with AVS. We studied a group of 114 patients who were admitted to a General Hospital due to AVS, 72 of them with vestibular neuritis (based on positive head impulse, abnormal caloric tests, and negative MRI) and the rest with stroke: 32 in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) territory (positive HINTS findings, positive MRI) and 10 in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) territory (variable findings and grade 3 ataxia, positive MRI). Truncal ataxia was measured by independent observers as grade 1, mild to moderate imbalance with walking independently; grade 2, severe imbalance with standing, but cannot walk without support; and grade 3, falling at upright posture. When we applied the HINTS protocol to our sample, we obtained 100% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity, similar to previously published findings. Only those patients with stroke presented with grade 3 ataxia. Of those with grade 2 ataxia (n = 38), 11 had cerebellar stroke and 28 had vestibular neuritis, not related to the patient's age. Grade 2-3 ataxia was 92.9% sensitive and 61.1% specific to detect AICA/PICA stroke in patients with AVS, with 100% sensitivity to detect AICA stroke. In turn, two signs (nystagmus of central origin and grade 2-3 Ataxia) had 100% sensitivity and 61.1% specificity. Ataxia is less sensitive than HINTS but much easier to evaluate. PMID:27551274

  20. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Truncal Ataxia and HINTS as Cardinal Signs for Acute Vestibular Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Sergio; Martínez, Carlos; Zalazar, Guillermo; Moro, Marcela; Batuecas-Caletrio, Angel; Luis, Leonel; Gordon, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The head impulse, nystagmus type, test of skew (HINTS) protocol set a new paradigm to differentiate peripheral vestibular disease from stroke in patients with acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). The relationship between degree of truncal ataxia and stroke has not been systematically studied in patients with AVS. We studied a group of 114 patients who were admitted to a General Hospital due to AVS, 72 of them with vestibular neuritis (based on positive head impulse, abnormal caloric tests, and negative MRI) and the rest with stroke: 32 in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) territory (positive HINTS findings, positive MRI) and 10 in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) territory (variable findings and grade 3 ataxia, positive MRI). Truncal ataxia was measured by independent observers as grade 1, mild to moderate imbalance with walking independently; grade 2, severe imbalance with standing, but cannot walk without support; and grade 3, falling at upright posture. When we applied the HINTS protocol to our sample, we obtained 100% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity, similar to previously published findings. Only those patients with stroke presented with grade 3 ataxia. Of those with grade 2 ataxia (n = 38), 11 had cerebellar stroke and 28 had vestibular neuritis, not related to the patient’s age. Grade 2–3 ataxia was 92.9% sensitive and 61.1% specific to detect AICA/PICA stroke in patients with AVS, with 100% sensitivity to detect AICA stroke. In turn, two signs (nystagmus of central origin and grade 2–3 Ataxia) had 100% sensitivity and 61.1% specificity. Ataxia is less sensitive than HINTS but much easier to evaluate. PMID:27551274

  1. Reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Song; NIU Hui-xia; ZHAO Lu; GAO Yuan; LU Jia-meng; SHI Chang-he; Chandra Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Background The Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) was shown to be a reliable and valid measurement for patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA).The Brazilian version and the Japanese version of SARAwere favorable for good reliability and validity.This study aimed to translate SARA into Chinese and test its reliability and validity in measurement of cerebellar ataxia.Methods SARA was translated into Chinese.A total 39 patients with degeneration cerebellar ataxia were evaluated independently by two neurologists with the Chinese version of SARA.Then the patients were evaluated by one of above neurologists with International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS).The statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 17.0 for Windows.Results The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the Chinese version of SARA was 0.78,which represents a good internal consistence.The correlation coefficient of the Chinese version of SARA scores between the two evaluators was 0.86,illustrating that the inter-rater reliability of Chinese version of SARA was good.The correlation coefficient between the Chinese version of SARA and ICARS was 0.91,illustrating that the criterion validity of Chinese version of SARA was not bad.Conclusions The Chinese version of SARA is reliable and effective for the assessment of degeneration cerebellar ataxia.Compared with ICARS,the evaluation of Chinese version of SARA is more objective,the assessment time is shortened,and the maneuverability is better.

  2. 100 CHILDREN WITH ACUTE ATAXIA; A SURVEY IN MOFID CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Karimzadeh

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The term "Ataxia" refers to disturbances of body posture and movementthat are normally controlled by the cerebellum, frontal lobes and theposterior columns of the spinal cord. The primary symptom and themost prominent feature of ataxia is abnormal gait which is characterizedby lurching and wide base walking.Ataxia was considered acute, if it had occurred within the two precedingweeks. Knowing how frightening acute-onset Ataxia is for the familyis not surprising that the condition prompts an immediate visit to thephysician.Material & Methods:In view of the lack of information in our country, on the etiology ofsudden-onset Ataxia, the authors enrolled 100 children with the chiefcomplaint of acute loss of equilibrium, who came to the attention ofthe Pediatric Neurology Department over a two year duration(Sept.2001-Sept 2003; they were admitted to the Mofid Childrens'Hospital and all necessary investigations were carried out.Results & Conclusion:The results revealed that Acute Cerebellar Ataxia was the most commoncause of the problem, the second most frequent being drug intoxication,which most commonly occurred in patients, 2-4years old. The remainingcausative factors in order of descending frequency consisted ofinfectious polyneuropathy, migraine, opsoclonus-myoclonus, braintumor, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, multiple sclerosis, andepilepsy.

  3. Reversibility of symptoms in a conditional mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boy, Jana; Schmidt, Thorsten; Wolburg, Hartwig; Mack, Andreas; Nuber, Silke; Böttcher, Martin; Schmitt, Ina; Holzmann, Carsten; Zimmermann, Frank; Servadio, Antonio; Riess, Olaf

    2009-11-15

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat tract that affects the MJD1 gene which encodes the ataxin-3 protein. In order to analyze whether symptoms caused by ataxin-3 with an expanded repeat are reversible in vivo, we generated a conditional mouse model of SCA3 using the Tet-Off system. We used a full-length human ataxin-3 cDNA with 77 repeats in order to generate the responder mouse line. After crossbreeding with a PrP promoter mouse line, double transgenic mice developed a progressive neurological phenotype characterized by neuronal dysfunction in the cerebellum, reduced anxiety, hyperactivity, impaired Rotarod performance and lower body weight gain. When ataxin-3 expression was turned off in symptomatic mice in an early disease state, the transgenic mice were indistinguishable from negative controls after 5 months of treatment. These results show that reducing the production of pathogenic ataxin-3 indeed may be a promising approach to treat SCA3, provided that such treatment is applied before irreversible damage has taken place and that it is continued for a sufficiently long time. PMID:19666958

  4. Characteristics of gait ataxia in δ2 glutamate receptor mutant mice, ho15J.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Takeuchi

    Full Text Available The cerebellum plays a fundamental, but as yet poorly understood, role in the control of locomotion. Recently, mice with gene mutations or knockouts have been used to investigate various aspects of cerebellar function with regard to locomotion. Although many of the mutant mice exhibit severe gait ataxia, kinematic analyses of limb movements have been performed in only a few cases. Here, we investigated locomotion in ho15J mice that have a mutation of the δ2 glutamate receptor. The cerebellum of ho15J mice shows a severe reduction in the number of parallel fiber-Purkinje synapses compared with wild-type mice. Analysis of hindlimb kinematics during treadmill locomotion showed abnormal hindlimb movements characterized by excessive toe elevation during the swing phase, and by severe hyperflexion of the ankles in ho15J mice. The great trochanter heights in ho15J mice were lower than in wild-type mice throughout the step cycle. However, there were no significant differences in various temporal parameters between ho15J and wild-type mice. We suggest that dysfunction of the cerebellar neuronal circuits underlies the observed characteristic kinematic abnormality of hindlimb movements during locomotion of ho15J mice.

  5. A single ataxia telangiectasia gene with a product similar to PI-3 kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savitsky, K.; Bar-Shira, A.; Gilad, S.; Rotman, G.; Ziv, Y.; Vanagaite, L.; Smith, S.; Uziel, T.; Sfez, S.; Ashkenazi, M. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)] [and others

    1995-06-23

    A gene, ATM, that is mutated in the autosomal recessive disorder ataxia telangiectasia (AT) was identified by positional cloning on chromosome 11q22-23. AT is characterized by cerebellar degeneration, immunodeficiency, chromosomal instability, cancer predisposition, radiation sensitivity, and cell cycle abnormalities. The disease is genetically heterogeneous, with four complementation groups that have been suspected to represent different genes. ATM, which has a transcript of 12 kilobases, was found to be mutated in AT patients from all complementation groups, indicating that it is probably the sole gene responsible for this disorder. A partial ATM complementary DNA clone of 5.9 kilobases encoded a putative protein that is similar to several yeast and mammalian phosphatidylinositol-3{prime} kinases that are involved in mitogenic signal transduction, meiotic recombination, and cell cycle control. The discovery of ATM should enhance understanding of AT and related syndromes and may allow the identification of AT heterozygotes, who are at increased risk of cancer. 54 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller-Bernstein, Carmi; Etzioni, Amos

    2013-03-01

    After the geographic and sociodemographic settings as well as the health care in Israel are briefly described, the scope of pediatric allergy and immunology in Israel is presented. This includes specific disorders commonly encountered, the environment that induces symptoms, the specialists who treat them, and the common challenges of patients, parents, doctors, and allied health personnel who collaborate to manage the maladies and patient care. Allergies usually affect some overall 15-20% of the pediatric population. The main allergens are inhaled, ingested, or injected (insects stings). Generally, the incidence of the various allergens affecting children in Israel, is similar to other parts of the Western world. Owing to the high consanguinity rate in the Israeli population, the prevalence of the various immunodeficiency conditions (in the adaptive as well as the innate system) is higher than that reported worldwide. Pediatric allergists/immunologists also treat autoimmune disorders affecting the pediatric group. Pediatric allergy and clinical immunology are not separate specialties. The 25 specialists who treat children with allergic/immunologic diseases have undergone a basic training in Pediatrics. They also received an additional 2-yr training in allergy and clinical immunology and then have to pass the board examinations. They work mainly in pediatric allergy units, in several hospitals that are affiliated to the five medical schools in the country. Aside from clinical work, most of the centers are also heavily involved in clinical and basic research in allergy and immunology.

  7. Ataxia episódica não familiar possivelmente associada com o uso de nicotina: relato de caso Non-familial episodic ataxia possibly associated with the use of nicotine: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDERSON KUNTZ GRZESIUK

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available O autor relata um caso clínico de ataxia episódica não familiar responsiva a acetazolamida, semelhante clinicamente a ataxia episódica tipo 2 (EA-2, no qual a nicotina pode representar ser um possível fator na gênese dos episódios atáxicos.The author reports a case of non-familial episodic ataxia responsive to acetazolamide, clinically similar to episodic ataxia type 2 (EA-2, in which nicotine is a possible factor in the origin of the ataxic episodes.

  8. Cytokines in Machado Joseph Disease/Spinocerebellar Ataxia 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Carvalho, Gerson; Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; Haas, Clarissa Branco; Torrez, Vitor Rocco; Brochier, Andressa Wigner; Souza, Gabriele Nunes; Furtado, Gabriel Vasata; Gheno, Tailise; Russo, Aline; Monte, Thais Lampert; Schumacher-Schuh, Artur; D'Avila, Rui; Donis, Karina Carvalho; Castilhos, Raphael Machado; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Torman, Vanessa Leotti; Camey, Suzi; Portela, Luis Valmor; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study is to describe the serum concentrations of a broad spectrum of cytokines in symptomatic and asymptomatic carriers of Machado Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD) CAG expansions. Molecularly confirmed carriers and controls were studied. Age at onset, disease duration, and clinical scales Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA), Neurological Examination Score for Spinocerebellar Ataxias (NESSCA), SCA Functional Index (SCAFI), and Composite Cerebellar Functional Score (CCFS) were obtained from the symptomatic carriers. Serum was obtained from all individuals and a cytokine panel "consisted of" eotaxin, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interferon (IFN)-α, IFN-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1RA, IL-2, IL-2R, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17, interferon gamma-induced protein (IP)-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-a, MIP-b, regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was analyzed. In a subgroup of symptomatic carriers, the cytokine panel was repeated after 360 days. Cytokine distribution among groups was studied by discriminant analysis; changes in serum levels after 360 days were studied by generalized estimation equation. Sixty-six symptomatic carriers, 13 asymptomatic carriers, and 43 controls were studied. No differences in cytokine patterns were found between controls and carriers of the CAG expansions or between controls and symptomatic carriers only. In contrast, eotaxin concentrations were significantly higher in asymptomatic than in symptomatic carriers or in controls (p = 0.001, ANCOVA). Eotaxin did not correlate with age, disease duration, CAG expansion, NESSCA score, and SARA score. Among symptomatic carriers, eotaxin dropped after 360 days (p = 0.039, GEE). SCA3/MJD patients presented a benign pattern of

  9. Sensing Danger: Innate Immunology for Intrusion Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Uwe, Aickelin

    2008-01-01

    The immune system provides an ideal metaphor for anomaly detection in general and computer security in particular. Based on this idea, artificial immune systems have been used for a number of years for intrusion detection, unfortunately so far with little success. However, these previous systems were largely based on immunological theory from the 1970s and 1980s and over the last decade our understanding of immunological processes has vastly improved. In this paper we present two new immune inspired algorithms based on the latest immunological discoveries, such as the behaviour of Dendritic Cells. The resultant algorithms are applied to real world intrusion problems and show encouraging results. Overall, we believe there is a bright future for these next generation artificial immune algorithms.

  10. [Immunological surrogate endpoints to evaluate vaccine efficacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Pengfei; Li, Jingxin; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Fengcai

    2015-12-01

    An immunological surrogate endpoints is a vaccine-induced immune response (either humoral or cellular immune) that predicts protection against clinical endpoints (infection or disease), and can be used to evaluate vaccine efficacy in clinical vaccine trials. Compared with field efficacy trials observing clinical endpoints, immunological vaccine trials could reduce the sample size or shorten the duration of a trial, which promote the license and development of new candidate vaccines. For these reasons, establishing immunological surrogate endpoints is one of 14 Grand Challenges of Global Health of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. From two parts of definition and statistical methods for evaluation of surrogate endpoints, this review provides a more comprehensive description. PMID:26887309

  11. Comparative anatomy of phagocytic and immunological synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence eNiedergang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The generation of phagocytic cups and immunological synapses are crucial events of the innate and adaptive immune responses, respectively. They are triggered by distinct immune receptors and performed by different cell types. However, growing experimental evidence shows that a very close series of molecular and cellular events control these two processes. Thus, the tight and dynamic interplay between receptor signaling, actin and microtubule cytoskeleton, and targeted vesicle traffic are all critical features to build functional phagosomes and immunological synapses. Interestingly, both phagocytic cups and immunological synapses display particular spatial and temporal patterns of receptors and signaling molecules, leading to the notion of phagocytic synapse. Here we discuss both types of structures, their organization and the mechanisms by which they are generated and regulated.

  12. Genetic and immunological features of aggressive periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel MUÑOZ

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available clinicians and researchers due to its rapid progression and its evidences of genetic character. Different theories have tried to explain the individual differences in susceptibility, where genetic and immunological assays have assumed great importance. The purpose of this study was to review the literature in order to comprehend the genetic and immunological features of aggressive periodontitis. Literature review: Articles were examined, specifically the ones dealing with information regarding genetic and/or immunological studies of individuals related to their disease susceptibility. Conclusions: In the presence of dental biofilm, host susceptibility to aggressive periodontitis varies among regions, countries and races. Immune-inflammatory processes that seem to be modified in aggressive periodontitis patients may be transmitted vertically, explaining familial aggregation associated with this disease.

  13. Immunological and gene expression responses to a Salmonella infection in the chicken intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemert, van S.; Hoekman, A.J.W.; Smits, M.A.; Rebel, J.M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Besides infection in humans, Salmonella enteritidis can also cause serious illness in young chickens. However, the genetic and immunological parameters important for the disease in chickens are not well characterized. In this study, processes in the chicken intestine in response to a Salmonella infe

  14. Immunological studies on synthetic rat and guinea pig C-peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioimmunoassay systems are developed for rat and guinea pig C-peptides, as part of a immunological study. The importance of using well-characterized antisera is indicated. Specific systems are established capable of discriminating between 2 kinds of rat C-peptides. (C.F.)

  15. A Mutation in the Golgi Qb-SNARE Gene GOSR2 Causes Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy with Early Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Mark A.; Schwake, Michael; Bahlo, Melanie; Dibbens, Leanne M.; Lin, Meng; Gandolfo, Luke C.; Vears, Danya F.; O'Sullivan, John D.; Robertson, Thomas; Bayly, Marta A.; Gardner, Alison E.; Vlaar, Annemarie M.; Korenke, G. Christoph; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; de Coo, Irenaeus F.; Verhagen, Judith M.A.; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Gecz, Jozef; Berkovic, Samuel F.

    2011-01-01

    The progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PMEs) are a group of predominantly recessive disorders that present with action myoclonus, tonic-clonic seizures, and progressive neurological decline. Many PMEs have similar clinical presentations yet are genetically heterogeneous, making accurate diagnosis difficult. A locus for PME was mapped in a consanguineous family with a single affected individual to chromosome 17q21. An identical-by-descent, homozygous mutation in GOSR2 (c.430G>T, p.Gly144Trp), a Golgi vesicle transport gene, was identified in this patient and in four apparently unrelated individuals. A comparison of the phenotypes in these patients defined a clinically distinct PME syndrome characterized by early-onset ataxia, action myoclonus by age 6, scoliosis, and mildly elevated serum creatine kinase. This p.Gly144Trp mutation is equivalent to a loss of function and results in failure of GOSR2 protein to localize to the cis-Golgi. PMID:21549339

  16. Absence of the Autophagy Adaptor SQSTM1/p62 Causes Childhood-Onset Neurodegeneration with Ataxia, Dystonia, and Gaze Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Tobias B; Ignatius, Erika; Calvo-Garrido, Javier; Iuso, Arcangela; Isohanni, Pirjo; Maffezzini, Camilla; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Suomalainen, Anu; Gorza, Matteo; Kremer, Laura S; Graf, Elisabeth; Hartig, Monika; Berutti, Riccardo; Paucar, Martin; Svenningsson, Per; Stranneheim, Henrik; Brandberg, Göran; Wedell, Anna; Kurian, Manju A; Hayflick, Susan A; Venco, Paola; Tiranti, Valeria; Strom, Tim M; Dichgans, Martin; Horvath, Rita; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Freyer, Christoph; Meitinger, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; Senderek, Jan; Wredenberg, Anna; Carroll, Christopher J; Klopstock, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    SQSTM1 (sequestosome 1; also known as p62) encodes a multidomain scaffolding protein involved in various key cellular processes, including the removal of damaged mitochondria by its function as a selective autophagy receptor. Heterozygous variants in SQSTM1 have been associated with Paget disease of the bone and might contribute to neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Using exome sequencing, we identified three different biallelic loss-of-function variants in SQSTM1 in nine affected individuals from four families with a childhood- or adolescence-onset neurodegenerative disorder characterized by gait abnormalities, ataxia, dysarthria, dystonia, vertical gaze palsy, and cognitive decline. We confirmed absence of the SQSTM1/p62 protein in affected individuals' fibroblasts and found evidence of a defect in the early response to mitochondrial depolarization and autophagosome formation. Our findings expand the SQSTM1-associated phenotypic spectrum and lend further support to the concept of disturbed selective autophagy pathways in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27545679

  17. Current research status of immunology in the genomic era

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI HaoWen; LI dinZhi; ZHAO GuoPing; WANG Ying

    2009-01-01

    This review updates the current status of immunology research under the influence of genomics, both conceptually and technologically. It particularly highlights the advantages of employing the high-throughput and large-scale technology, the large genomic database, and bioinformatic power in the immunology research. The fast development in the fields of basic immunology, clinical immunology (tumor and infectious immunology) and vaccine designing is illustrated with respect to the successful usage of genomic strategy. We also speculate the future research directions of immunology in the era of genomics and post-genomics.

  18. Current research status of immunology in the genomic era

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This review updates the current status of immunology research under the influence of genomics,both conceptually and technologically.It particularly highlights the advantages of employing the high-throughput and large-scale technology,the large genomic database,and bioinformatic power in the immunology research.The fast development in the fields of basic immunology,clinical immunology(tumor and infectious immunology) and vaccine designing is illustrated with respect to the successful usage of genomic strategy.We also speculate the future research directions of immunology in the era of genomics and post-genomics.

  19. What Can Vampires Teach Us about Immunology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, David S

    2016-04-01

    Speculative fiction examines the leading edge of science and can be used to introduce ideas into the classroom. For example, most students are already familiar with the fictional infectious diseases responsible for vampire and zombie outbreaks. The disease dynamics of these imaginary ailments follow the same rules we see for real diseases and can be used to remind students that they already understand the basic rules of disease ecology and immunology. By engaging writers of this sort of fiction in an effort to solve problems in immunology we may be able to perform a directed evolution experiment where we follow the evolution of plots rather than genetic traits. PMID:26968492

  20. Clinical immunology--autoimmunity in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervaert, Jan Willem Cohen; Kallenberg, Cees G M

    2014-12-01

    Clinical immunology is in the Netherlands a separate clinical specialty within internal medicine and pediatrics. Clinical immunologists work closely together with nephrologists, rheumatologists and many other medical specialists. Apart from research and teaching, clinical immunologists are taking care of patients with immune-deficiencies, vasculitides and systemic auto-immune diseases. Clinical immunology in the Netherlands has always been an important contributor to basic and clinical science in the Netherlands. Major scientific contributions were made in the field of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and ANCA associated vasculitis. These Dutch contributions will be reviewed in this article.

  1. Synthetic immunology: modulating the human immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geering, Barbara; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Humans have manipulated the immune system to dampen or boost the immune response for thousands of years. As our understanding of fundamental immunology and biotechnological methodology accumulates, we can capitalize on this combined knowledge to engineer biological devices with the aim of rationally manipulating the immune response. We address therapeutic approaches based on the principles of synthetic immunology that either ameliorate disorders of the immune system by interfering with the immune response, or improve diverse pathogenic conditions by exploiting immune cell effector functions. We specifically highlight synthetic proteins investigated in preclinical and clinical trials, summarize studies that have used engineered immune cells, and finish with a discussion of possible future therapeutic concepts.

  2. Immunologic Abnormalities, Treatments, and Recurrent Pregnancy Loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Nathalie F; Kolte, Astrid M; Larsen, Elisabeth C;

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent pregnancy loss, depending on the definition, affects 1% to 3% of women aiming to have a child. Little is known about the direct causes of recurrent pregnancy loss, and the condition is considered to have a multifactorial and complex pathogenesis. The aim of this review was to summarize ...... the evaluation and the management of the condition with specific emphasis on immunologic biomarkers identified as risk factors as well as current immunologic treatment options. The review also highlights and discusses areas in need of further research....

  3. Kv3.3 potassium channels and spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yalan; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2016-08-15

    The voltage-dependent potassium channel subunit Kv3.3 is expressed at high levels in cerebellar Purkinje cells, in auditory brainstem nuclei and in many other neurons capable of firing at high rates. In the cerebellum, it helps to shape the very characteristic complex spike of Purkinje cells. Kv3.3 differs from other closely related channels in that human mutations in the gene encoding Kv3.3 (KCNC3) result in a unique neurodegenerative disease termed spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13). This primarily affects the cerebellum, but also results in extracerebellar symptoms. Different mutations produce either early onset SCA13, associated with delayed motor and impaired cognitive skill acquisition, or late onset SCA13, which typically produces cerebellar degeneration in middle age. This review covers the localization and physiological function of Kv3.3 in the central nervous system and how the normal function of the channel is altered by the disease-causing mutations. It also describes experimental approaches that are being used to understand how Kv3.3 mutations are linked to neuronal survival, and to develop strategies for treatment. PMID:26442672

  4. Ataxia and deafness in a young male: An unusual aetiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash A

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here a case of 18 year old male with tremors of hands, deafness, tendency to fall while walking, drowsiness and double vision of total duration 1½ years. He had internuclear ophthalmoplegia, broken saccades, hypertonia and hyperreflexia of all four limbs, intention tremors, signs of gait and limb ataxia. Pupillary reactions and fundus examination were normal and signs of meningeal irritation or sensory neurological deficit were absent. MRI head and cervical spine with gadolinium enhancement revealed demyelination as evident from multiple oblong foci isointense on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on T2-weighted and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences in corpus callosum, sub-cortical white matter, right thalamus, pons and periaqueductal region of midbrain. Ill-defined linear hyperintense signals were observed in cervical spinal cord. No skeletal abnormality was noted in the skull or cervical spine. Oligoclonal bands were present in the cerebrospinal fluid. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials were abnormal, although visual evoked potentials were in normal range. A diagnosis of primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS was made fulfilling the revised criteria as laid down. In view of its presentation, it is a unique case of PPMS from India.

  5. Neurodegeneration in ataxia-telangiectasia is caused by horror autotoxicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuljis, R O; Aguila, M C

    1999-05-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a pleiotropic, multi-system disorder with manifestations that include immune deficiency, sensitivity to ionizing radiation and neoplasms. Many of these manifestations are understood in principle since the identification in A-T patients of mutations in a gene encoding a protein kinase that plays a key role in signaling and repair of DNA damage. However, the cause of the neurodegeneration that afflicts patients with A-T for at least a decade before they succumb to overwhelming infections or malignancy remains mysterious. Based on our work in a mouse model of A-T and previous evidence of extra-neural autoimmune disorders in A-T, we postulate that the neurodegenerative process in A-T is not due to a function for A-T mutated (ATM) essential for the postnatal brain, but to an autoimmune process (hence 'horror autotoxicus', Paul Ehrlich's term for autoimmune disorder). This hypothetical mechanism may be analogous to that in the so-called 'paraneoplastic' neurodegenerative syndromes in patients with various malignancies. Thus, alterations in the balance between cellular and humoral immunity in A-T probably result in autoantibodies to cerebral epitopes shared with cells of the immune system. This hypothesis has important implications for the understanding and development of effective palliative and even preventative strategies for A-T, and probably for other so far relentlessly progressive neurodegenerative disorders.

  6. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 in eastern India: Some new observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyan B Bhattacharyya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs are hereditary, autosomal dominant progressive neurodegenerative disorders showing clinical and genetic heterogeneity. They are usually manifested clinically in the third to fifth decade of life although there is a wide variability in the age of onset. More than 36 different types of SCAs have been reported so far and about half of them are caused by pathological expansion of the trinucleotide, Cytosine Alanine Guanine (CAG repeat. The global prevalence of SCA is 0.3-2 per 100,000 population, SCA3 being the commonest variety worldwide, accounting for 20-50 per cent of all cases, though SCA 2 is generally considered as the commonest one in India. However, SCA6 has not been addressed adequately from India though it is common in the eastern Asian countries like, Japan, Korea and Thailand. Objective: The present study was undertaken to identify the prevalence of SCA6 in the city of Kolkata and the eastern part of India. Materials and Methods: 83 consecutive patients were recruited for the study of possible SCAs and their clinical features and genotype were investigated. Results: 6 of the 83 subjects turned out positive for SCA6, constituting therefore, 13.33% of the patient pool. Discussion: SCA6 is prevalent in the eastern part of India, though not as frequent as the other common varieties. Conclusions: Further community based studies are required in order to understand the magnitude of SCA6 in the eastern part, as well as in other regions of India.

  7. Chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells exposed to heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, T.; Cucinotta, F.; George, K.; Wu, H.; Shigematsu, N.; Furusawa, Y.; Uno, T.; Isobe, K.; Ito, H.

    Understanding of biological effects of heavy ions is important to assess healt h risk in space. One of the most important issues may be to take into account individual susceptibility. Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) cells are known to exhibit abnormal responses to radiations but the mechanism of hyper radiosensitivity of A-T still remains unknown. We report chromosome aberrations in normal human fibroblasts and AT fibroblasts exposed to low- and high-LET radiations. A chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique combined with chromosome- painting technique was applied to score chromosome aberrations in G2/M-phase cells. Following gamma irradiation, GM02052 cells were approximately 5 times more sensitive to g-rays than AG1522 cells. GM02052 cells had a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. When the frequency of complex type aberrations was compared, GM02052 cells showed more than 10 times higher frequency than AG1522 cells. The results will be compared with those obtained from high-LET irradiations.

  8. False-positive head-impulse test in cerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olympia eKremmyda

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The objective of this study was to compare the findings of the bedside head impulse test (HIT, passive head rotation gain, and caloric irrigation in patients with cerebellar ataxia (CA. In 16 patients with CA and bilaterally pathological bedside HIT, VOR gains were measured during HIT and passive head rotation by scleral search coil technique. Eight of the patients had pathologically reduced caloric responsiveness, while the other eight had normal caloric responses. Those with normal calorics showed a slightly reduced HIT gain (mean±SD: 0.73±0.15. In those with pathological calorics, gains 80ms and 100 ms after the HIT as well as the passive rotation VOR gains were significantly lower. The corrective saccade after head turn occurred earlier in patients with pathological calorics (111±62 ms after onset of the HIT than in those with normal calorics. (191±17 ms, p=0.0064 We indentified two groups of patients with CA: those with an isolated moderate HIT deficit only, probably due to floccular dysfunction, and those with combined HIT, passive rotation and caloric deficit, probably due to a peripheral vestibular deficit. From a clinical point of view, these results show that the bedside HIT alone can be false positive for establishing a diagnosis of a bilateral peripheral vestibular deficit in patients with CA.

  9. House dust extracts contain potent immunological adjuvants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukelman, C.J.; Dijk, H. van; Aerts, P.C.; Rademaker, P.M.; Berrens, L.; Willers, J.M.N.

    1987-01-01

    A crude aqueous extract of house dust and two house dust subfractions were tested for adjuvant activity in a sensitivity assay performed in mice. Evidence is presented that house dust contains at least two potent immunological adjuvants. One of these, present in both subfractions, was probably endot

  10. IP-I0 BASED IMMUNOLOGICAL MONITORING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to an immunological method and, more particularly, a method for measuring cell-mediated immune reactivity (CMI) in mammals based on the production of IP-10.The invention further discloses an assay and a kit for measuring CMI to an antigen using whole blood or other...

  11. What's so special about chicken immunology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    What’s so special about chickens? Firstly, chickens are not only an invaluable model for studying immunology, they also provide the world’s main source of meat and will be a key protein source needed to feed the growing human population into the future. Poultry meat production is highly efficient ...

  12. Immunological Effects of Silica and Asbestos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takemi Otsuki; Fuminori Hyodoh; Ayako Ueki; Yasumitsu Nishimura; Megumi Maeda; Shuko Murakami; Hiroaki Hayashi; Yoshie Miura; Masayasu Kusaka; Takashi Nakano; Kazuya Fukuoka; Takumi Kishimoto

    2007-01-01

    Silicosis patients (SILs) and patients who have been exposed to asbestos develop not only respiratory diseases but also certain immunological disorders. In particular, SIL sometimes complicates autoimmune diseases such as systemic scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis (known as Caplan syndrome), and systemic lupus erythematoses. In addition, malignant complications such as lung cancer and malignant mesothelioma often occurr in patients exposed to asbestos, and may be involved in the reduction of tumor immunity. Although silica-induced disorders of autoimmunity have been explained as adjuvant-type effects of silica, more precise analyses are needed and should reflect the recent progress in immunomolecular findings. A brief summary of our investigations related to the immunological effects of silica/asbestos is presented. Recent advances in immunomolecular studies led to detailed analyses of the immunological effects of asbestos and silica. Both affect immuno-competent cells and these effects may be associated with the pathophysiological development of complications in silicosis and asbestos-exposed patients such as the occurrence of autoimmune disorders and malignant tumors, respectively. In addition,immunological analyses may lead to the development of new clinical tools for the modification of the pathophysiological aspects of diseases such as the regulation of autoimmunity or tumor immunity using cellmediated therapies, various cytokines, and molecule-targeting therapies. In particular, as the incidence of asbestosrelated malignancies is increasing and such malignancies have been a medical and social problem since the summer of 2005 in Japan, efforts should be focused on developing a cure for these diseases to eliminate nationwide anxiety.

  13. Frontiers in Clinical Immunology and Immunoregulation 2010: The Highlight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiming Fan; Song Guo Zheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ The 10th meeting of the Federation of Clinical Immunology Societies (FOCIS) was held in Boston during 23-27 June 2010. As usual, this conference hightights the greatest advancements in the field of clinical immunology over the previous year.

  14. Polarized release of T-cell-receptor-enriched microvesicles at the immunological synapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, Kaushik; Llodrá, Jaime; Roth, Eric W.; Tsai, Jones; Gordo, Susana; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.; Kam, Lance C.; Stokes, David L.; Dustin, Michael L.

    2014-03-01

    The recognition events that mediate adaptive cellular immunity and regulate antibody responses depend on intercellular contacts between T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). T-cell signalling is initiated at these contacts when surface-expressed T-cell receptors (TCRs) recognize peptide fragments (antigens) of pathogens bound to major histocompatibility complex molecules (pMHC) on APCs. This, along with engagement of adhesion receptors, leads to the formation of a specialized junction between T cells and APCs, known as the immunological synapse, which mediates efficient delivery of effector molecules and intercellular signals across the synaptic cleft. T-cell recognition of pMHC and the adhesion ligand intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on supported planar bilayers recapitulates the domain organization of the immunological synapse, which is characterized by central accumulation of TCRs, adjacent to a secretory domain, both surrounded by an adhesive ring. Although accumulation of TCRs at the immunological synapse centre correlates with T-cell function, this domain is itself largely devoid of TCR signalling activity, and is characterized by an unexplained immobilization of TCR-pMHC complexes relative to the highly dynamic immunological synapse periphery. Here we show that centrally accumulated TCRs are located on the surface of extracellular microvesicles that bud at the immunological synapse centre. Tumour susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) sorts TCRs for inclusion in microvesicles, whereas vacuolar protein sorting 4 (VPS4) mediates scission of microvesicles from the T-cell plasma membrane. The human immunodeficiency virus polyprotein Gag co-opts this process for budding of virus-like particles. B cells bearing cognate pMHC receive TCRs from T cells and initiate intracellular signals in response to isolated synaptic microvesicles. We conclude that the immunological synapse orchestrates TCR sorting and release in extracellular microvesicles. These

  15. Clinical and molecular effect on offspring of a marriage of consanguineous spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 mutation carriers: a family case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaña, Jonathan J; Tapia-Guerrero, Yessica S; Velázquez-Pérez, Luis; Cruz-Mariño, Tania; Cerecedo-Zapata, Cesar M; Gómez, Rocío; Murillo-Melo, Nadia M; González-Piña, Rigoberto; Hernández-Hernández, Oscar; Cisneros, Bulmaro

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) is a genetic disorder characterized by degeneration of the cerebellum, brainstem, and retina that is caused by abnormal expansion of a CAG repeat located in the ATXN7 gene encoding sequence on chromosome 3p21.1. Although SCA7 is an uncommon autosomal dominant ataxia, we previously found increased prevalence of the disease in a Southeastern Mexican population. In this study, we described to our knowledge for the first time a marriage of consanguineous SCA7 mutation carriers and their offspring effect. We characterized a severely affected infantile-onset female patient whose parents and two siblings exhibited no symptoms of the disease at time of diagnosis. A comprehensive clinical analysis of the proband showed a progressive cerebellar syndrome, including gait ataxia, movement disorders, and saccadic movements, as well as hyperreflexia, visual deterioration, urinary and cardiovascular dysfunction, and impaired nerve conduction. The SCA7 mutation was detected in the proband patient. Subsequently, genetic examination using four ATXN7 gene-linked markers (three centromeric microsatellite markers [D3S1228, D3S1287, and D3S3635] and an intragenic Single Nucleotide Polymorphism [SNP-3145G/A]) revealed that the proband descends from a couple of consanguineous SCA7 mutation carriers. Genotyping analysis demonstrated that all offspring inherited only one mutant allele, and that the severe infantile-onset phenotype is caused by germinal expansion (from 37 to 72 CAG repeats) of the paternal mutant allele. Interestingly, the couple also referred a miscarriage. Finally, we found no CAA interruptions in the ATXN7 gene CAG repeats tract in this family, which might explain, at least in part, the triplet instability in the proband. PMID:25664129

  16. 21 CFR 866.5340 - Ferritin immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-storing protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurements of ferritin aid in the diagnosis of diseases... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferritin immunological test system. 866.5340... Ferritin immunological test system. (a) Identification. A ferritin immunological test system is a...

  17. 42 CFR 493.833 - Condition: Diagnostic immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Diagnostic immunology. 493.833 Section..., Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.833 Condition: Diagnostic immunology. The specialty of diagnostic immunology includes for purposes of proficiency testing the subspecialties of syphilis...

  18. 42 CFR 493.1208 - Condition: General immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: General immunology. 493.1208 Section 493....1208 Condition: General immunology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of General immunology, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, and §§...

  19. Preface to the Publication of Cellular & Molecular Immunology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Feng Chen; Kuang-Yen Chou

    2004-01-01

    @@ Immunology has made numerous important advances over the past decades and is at the forefront in uncovering the mechanisms of human immunological disorders and in eradicating pandemic infectious diseases. Immunological advances have also revealed the mystery of life and death and provided insights into creating a better environment for contemporary human existence.

  20. Preface to the Publication of Cellular & Molecular Immunology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-FengChen; Kuang-YenChou

    2004-01-01

    Immunology has made numerous important advances over the past decades and is at the forefront in uncovering the mechanisms of human immunological disorders and in eradicating pandemic infectious diseases. Immunological advances have also revealed the mystery of life and death and

  1. Immunology and Genetic of Preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma C. Serrano

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a disease characterized by hypertension and proteinuria in the third trimester of pregnancy. Preeclampsia is a major cause of maternal mortality, and fetal death, especially in developing countries, but its aetiology remains unclear. Key findings support a causal role of superficial placentation driven by immune mal maladaptation, which then lead to reduced concentrations of angiogenic growth factors and to an increase in placental debris in the maternal circulation resulting in a maternal inflammatory response. Epidemiological research has consistently demonstrated a substantial familial predisposition to preeclampsia. Unfortunately, the conquest of the genes explaining such a individual susceptibility has been proved to be a hard task. However, genetics will also inform us about causality of environmental factors, and then serve as a tool to prioritize therapeutic targets for preventive strategies.

  2. An immunological insight into premature ovarian failure (POF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragojević-Dikić, Svetlana; Marisavljević, Dragomir; Mitrović, Ana; Dikić, Srdjan; Jovanović, Tomislav; Janković-Raznatović, Svetlana

    2010-09-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF), a serious life-changing condition that affects young women, remains an enigma and the researchers' challenge. The term POF generally describes a syndrome of gonadal failure before the age of 40, characterized by amenorrhea, sex steroid deficiency and elevated levels of gonadotropins. Infertility and psychological stress are common consequences of this entity the prevalence of which is 0.9-3%. The known cause of this condition includes: genetic aberrations, autoimmune ovarian damage, iatrogenic and environmental factors, although in majority of cases the underlying cause is not identified. For many women in whom the cause of ovarian failure is unknown, autoimmunity may be the pathogenic mechanism. There is currently evidence that some cases of POF are due to faulty recognition of self in the ovary by the immune system, possibly provoked by genetic or environmental factors initiating such immune response. Numerous evidence, including association with multiple autoimmune endocrine disorders, clinical reversibility, transitory estrogen deficiency, histological and immunological features and the demonstration of circulating ovarian antibodies in serum samples from women with POF, have suggested its immunological origin. We discuss the possible role of such an autoimmune process as a cause or consequence of POF including treatment strategies in POF patients.

  3. The history of spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 in Brazil: travels of a gene A história da ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 10 no Brasil: as viagens de um gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio A.G. Teive

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors report the history of spinocerebellar ataxia 10 (SCA10, since its first report in a large Portuguese-ancestry Family with autosomal dominant pure cerebellar ataxia, till the final identification of further families without Mexican ancestry. These families present a quite different phenotype from those SCA10 families described in Mexico.Os autores apresentam a história da descoberta da ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 10 (AEC10 no Brasil, desde o primeiro relato em uma família com ancestrais portugueses com ataxia cerebelar pura, autossômica dominante, até a identificação de famílias sem ancestrais mexicanos. Essas famílias apresentam um fenótipo de AEC10, com ataxia cerebelar "pura", distinta daquele descrito nas famílias no México.

  4. Friedreich's ataxia reveals a mechanism for coordinate regulation of oxidative metabolism via feedback inhibition of the SIRT3 deacetylase

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Gregory R.; Pride, P. Melanie; Babbey, Clifford M.; Payne, R. Mark

    2012-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is the most common inherited human ataxia and is caused by a deficiency in the mitochondrial protein frataxin. Clinically, patients suffer from progressive spinocerebellar degeneration, diabetes and a fatal cardiomyopathy, associated with mitochondrial respiratory chain defects. Recent findings have shown that lysine acetylation regulates mitochondrial function and intermediary metabolism. However, little is known about lysine acetylation in the setting of pathologi...

  5. Location of the 9257 and ataxia mutations on mouse chromosome 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, A J; Radice, G L; Burgess, D L; Kohrman, D C; Hansen, G M; Justice, M J; Johnson, K R; Davisson, M T; Meisler, M H

    1996-06-01

    The location of three mutations on proximal Chromosome (Chr) 18 was determined by analysis of the offspring of several backcrosses. The results demonstrate that ataxia and the insertional mutation TgN9257Mm are separated by less than 1 cM and are located approximately 3 cM from the centromere, while the balding locus is 7 cM more distal. Previous data demonstrated that the twirler locus also maps within 1 cM of ataxia. The corrected locations will contribute to identification of appropriate candidate genes for these mutations. Two polymorphic microsatellite markers for proximal Chr 18 are described, D18Umi1 and D18Umi2. The Lama3 locus encoding the alpha 3 subunit of nicein was mapped distal to ataxia and did not recombine with Tg9257. PMID:8662222

  6. An elderly man with progressive ataxia and palatal tremor presenting with dizziness and oculopalatal tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukahara, Yuka; Suzuki, Keisuke; Kokubun, Norito; Nakamura, Toshiki; Takekawa, Hidehiro; Hirata, Koichi

    2016-08-31

    A 74-year-old man was referred to our department for dizziness and progressive unsteady gait over 6 years. His family history was unremarkable. Neurological examination showed dysarthria, saccadic eye movement, palatal tremor (1.7 Hz)-synchronous with rotational ocular movement, and truncal ataxia. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed hyperintense and hypertrophic bilateral inferior olivary nuclei at the medulla and mild cerebellar atrophy. On the basis of neurological findings of oculopalatal tremor and cerebellar ataxia with brain MRI findings, the diagnosis of progressive ataxia and palatal tremor (PAPT) was made. PAPT should be included in differential diagnosis of dizziness observed in elderly individuals. PMID:27477579

  7. Impact of Dual Task on Parkinson's Disease, Stroke and Ataxia Patients' Gait: A Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelly Arjona Maciel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Performing dual task for neurological patients is complex and it can be influenced by the localization of the neurological lesion. Objective: Comparing the impact of dual task on gait in patients with Parkinson's disease, stroke and ataxia. Method: Subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD in initial phase, stroke and ataxia, with independent gait, were evaluated while doing simple gait, with cognitive, motor and cognitive-motor gait demand, assessing average speed and number of steps. Results: Ataxia and stroke patients, compared with PD, showed an increase in the number of steps and decrease the average speed on the march with cognitive demand. Subjects with PD performed better on tasks when compared to others. Conclusion: In this study the impact of dual task was lower in Parkinson's disease patients.

  8. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Alberto E; Armenio, Lucio; Bernardini, Roberto; Boner, Attilio; Calvani, Mauro; Cardinale, Fabio; Cavagni, Giovanni; Dondi, Arianna; Duse, Marzia; Fiocchi, Alessandro; Marseglia, Gian L; del Giudice, Michele Miraglia; Muraro, Antonella; Pajno, Giovanni B; Paravati, Francesco; Peroni, Diego; Tripodi, Salvatore; Ugazio, Alberto G; Indinnimeo, Luciana

    2011-05-01

    In Italy, according to the International Study on Asthma and Allergies in Childhood study, the prevalence of current asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and atopic eczema in 2006 was 7.9%, 6.5%, and 10.1% among children aged 6-7 and 8.4%, 15.5%, and 7.75% among children aged 13-14 yr. University education in this field is provided by the Postgraduate Schools of Pediatrics and those of Allergology and Clinical Immunology, as well as several annual Master courses. The Italian Society of Pediatric Allergology and Immunology (SIAIP) was founded in 1996 and counts about 1000 members. SIAIP promotes evidence-based management of allergic children and disseminates information to patients and their families through a quite innovative website and the National Journal 'Rivista Italiana di Allergologia Pediatrica'. In the last decade, four major regional, inter-regional, and national web-based networks have been created to link pediatric allergy centers and to share their clinical protocols and epidemiologic data. In addition, National Registers of Primary Immune-deficiencies and on Pediatric HIV link all clinical excellence centers. Research projects in the field of pediatric allergy and immunology are founded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR) and by the National Research Council (CNR), but the overall investments in this research area are quite low. Only a handful Italian excellence centers participate in European Projects on Pediatric Allergy and Immunology within the 7th Framework Program. The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology currently hosts two Italians in its Executive Committee (EC) and one in the EC of the Pediatric Section; moreover, major European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology meetings and courses in the area of pediatrics (e.g., PAAM, Venice, 2009) have been held in Italy in the last 3 yr. Italian hallmarks in the management of allergic diseases in childhood are a quite alive and spread interest in

  9. The interrelationship between disease severity, dynamic stability, and falls in cerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schniepp, Roman; Schlick, Cornelia; Pradhan, Cauchy; Dieterich, Marianne; Brandt, Thomas; Jahn, Klaus; Wuehr, Max

    2016-07-01

    Cerebellar ataxia (CA) results in discoordination of body movements (ataxia), a gait disorder, and falls. All three aspects appear to be obviously interrelated; however, experimental evidence is sparse. This study systematically correlated the clinical rating of the severity of ataxia with dynamic stability measures and the fall frequency in patients with CA. Clinical severity of CA in patients with sporadic (n = 34) and hereditary (n = 24) forms was assessed with the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Gait performance was examined during slow, preferred, and maximally fast walking speeds. Spatiotemporal variability parameters in the fore-aft and medio-lateral directions were analyzed. The fall frequency was assessed using a standardized interview about fall events within the last 6 months. Fore-aft gait variability showed significant speed-dependent characteristics with highest magnitudes during slow and fast walking. The SARA score correlated positively with fore-aft gait variability, most prominently during fast walking. The fall frequency was significantly associated to fore-aft gait variability during slow walking. Severity of ataxia, dynamic stability, and the occurrence of falls were interrelated in a speed-dependent manner: (a) Severity of ataxia symptoms was closely related to instability during fast walking. (b) Fall frequency was associated with instability during slow walking. These findings suggest the presence of a speed-dependent, twofold cerebellar locomotor control. Assessment of gait performance during non-preferred, slow and fast walking speeds provides novel insights into the pathophysiology of cerebellar locomotor control and may become a useful approach in the clinical evaluation of patients with CA. PMID:27159995

  10. Novel Point Mutations in Frataxin Gene in Iranian Patients with Friedreich’s Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi HEIDARI*

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Heidari MM , Khatami M, Pourakrami J. Novel Point Mutations in Frataxin Gene in Iranian Patients withFriedreich’s Ataxia. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1:32-36. ObjectiveFriedreich’s ataxia is the most common form of hereditary ataxia with autosomal recessive pattern. More than 96% of patients are homozygous for GAA repeat extension on both alleles in the first intron of FXN gene and the remainingpatients have been shown to be heterozygous for a GAA extension in one allele and point mutation in other allele.Materials & MethodsIn this study, exons of 1, 2, 3, and 5 of frataxin gene were searched by single strand conformation polymorphism polymerase chain reaction (PCR-SSCP in 5 patients with GAA extension in one allele. For detection of exact mutation,samples with band shifts were sent for DNA sequencing.Results Three novel point mutations were found in patients heterozygous for the GAA repeat expansion, p.S81A, p.Y123D, and p.S192C. ConclusionOur results showed that these point mutations in one allele with GAA extension in another allele are associated with FRDA signs. Thus, these results emphasize the importance of performing molecular genetic analysis for point mutations inFRDA patients. References:Delatycki MB, Williamson R, Forrest SM. Friedreich ataxia: an overview. J Med Genet 2000;37(1:1-8.Harding AE, Zilkha KJ. ‘Pseudo-dominant’ inheritance in Friedreich’s ataxia. J Med Genet 1981;18(4:285-7.Schulz JB, Boesch S, Burk K, Durr A, Giunti P, Mariotti C, et al. Diagnosis and treatment of Friedreich ataxia: a European perspective. Nat Rev Neurol 2009;5(4:222-34.Campuzano V, Montermini L, Lutz Y, Cova L, Hindelang C, Jiralerspong S, et al. Frataxin is reduced in Friedreich ataxia patients and is associated with mitochondrial membranes. Hum Mol Genet 1997;6(11:1771-80.Sharma R, De Biase I, Gomez M, Delatycki MB, Ashizawa T, Bidichandani SI. Friedreich ataxia in carriers of unstable borderline

  11. Population-based study of acquired cerebellar ataxia in Al-Kharga district, New Valley, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Farghaly WMA; El-Tallawy HN; Shehata GA; Rageh TA; Abdel Hakeem N; Abo-Elfetoh NM

    2011-01-01

    Wafaa MA Farghaly1, Hamdy N El-Tallawy1, Ghaydaa A Shehata1, Tarek A Rageh1, Nabil Abdel Hakeem2, Noha M Abo-Elfetoh11Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt; 2Al Azhar University, Assiut Branch, EgyptBackground: The aim of this research was to determine the prevalence and etiology of acquired ataxia in Al-Kharga district, New Valley, Egypt.Methods: A population-based study of acquired ataxia was conducted in a defined geographical region with a total populati...

  12. Childhood Ataxia with Cerebral Hypomyelination (CACH syndrome: A study of three siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidya Sachin

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a family of three siblings with Childhood Ataxia with Cerebral Hypomyelination. All the siblings presented with early onset cerebellar ataxia beginning around five years of age with mild mental retardation. MRI showed diffuse white matter signal changes in all three patients with cerebellar atrophy while the spectroscopy was abnormal only in the eldest who was the most severely affected. The cases are reported for their rarity as well as for an opportunity of observing this uncommon disease in its stages of evolution in three siblings.

  13. Parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synaptic impairment in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 27

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo eTempia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetically inherited mutations in the fibroblast growth factor 14 (FGF14 gene lead to spinocerebellar ataxia type 27 (SCA27, an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by severe heterogeneous motor and cognitive impairments. Consistently, genetic deletion of Fgf14 in Fgf14-/- mice recapitulates salient features of the SCA27 human disease. In vitro molecular studies in cultured neurons indicate that the FGF14F145S SCA27 allele acts as a dominant negative mutant suppressing the FGF14 wild type function and resulting in inhibition of voltage-gated Na+ and Ca2+ channels. To gain insights in the cerebellar deficits in the animal model of the human disease, we applied whole-cell voltage-clamp in the acute cerebellar slice preparation to examine the properties of parallel fibers (PF to Purkinje neuron synapses in Fgf14-/- mice and wild type littermates. We found that the AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents evoked by PF stimulation (PF-EPSCs were significantly reduced in Fgf14-/- animals, while short-term plasticity, measured as paired-pulse facilitation (PPF, was enhanced. Measuring Sr2+-induced release of quanta from stimulated synapses, we found that the size of the PF-EPSCs was unchanged, ruling out a postsynaptic deficit. This phenotype was corroborated by decreased expression of VGLUT1, a specific presynaptic marker at PF-Purkinje neuron synapses. We next examined the mGluR1 receptor-induced response (mGluR1-EPSC that under normal conditions requires a gradual build-up of glutamate concentration in the synaptic cleft, and found no changes in these responses in Fgf14-/- mice. These results provide evidence of a critical role of FGF14 in maintaining presynaptic function at PF-Purkinje neuron synapses highlighting critical target mechanisms to recapitulate the complexity of the SCA27 disease.

  14. Development of frataxin gene expression measures for the evaluation of experimental treatments in Friedreich's ataxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L Plasterer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Friedreich ataxia is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by GAA triplet repeat expansions or point mutations in the FXN gene and, ultimately, a deficiency in the levels of functional frataxin protein. Heterozygous carriers of the expansion express approximately 50% of normal frataxin levels yet manifest no clinical symptoms, suggesting that therapeutic approaches that increase frataxin may be effective even if frataxin is raised only to carrier levels. Small molecule HDAC inhibitor compounds increase frataxin mRNA and protein levels, and have beneficial effects in animal models of FRDA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To gather data supporting the use of frataxin as a therapeutic biomarker of drug response we characterized the intra-individual stability of frataxin over time, determined the contribution of frataxin from different components of blood, compared frataxin measures in different cell compartments, and demonstrated that frataxin increases are achieved in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Frataxin mRNA and protein levels were stable with repeated sampling over four and 15 weeks. In the 15-week study, the average CV was 15.6% for protein and 18% for mRNA. Highest levels of frataxin in blood were in erythrocytes. As erythrocytes are not useful for frataxin assessment in many clinical trial situations, we confirmed that PBMCs and buccal swabs have frataxin levels equivalent to those of whole blood. In addition, a dose-dependent increase in frataxin was observed when PBMCs isolated from patient blood were treated with HDACi. Finally, higher frataxin levels predicted less severe neurological dysfunction and were associated with slower rates of neurological change. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data support the use of frataxin as a biomarker of drug effect. Frataxin levels are stable over time and as such a 1.5 to 2-fold change would be detectable over normal biological fluctuations. Additionally, our data support

  15. Engineering antigen-specific immunological tolerance.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontos, Stephan; Grimm, Alizee J.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-05-01

    Unwanted immunity develops in response to many protein drugs, in autoimmunity, in allergy, and in transplantation. Approaches to induce immunological tolerance aim to either prevent these responses or reverse them after they have already taken place. We present here recent developments in approaches, based on engineered peptides, proteins and biomaterials, that harness mechanisms of peripheral tolerance both prophylactically and therapeutically to induce antigenspecific immunological tolerance. These mechanisms are based on responses of B and T lymphocytes to other cells in their immune environment that result in cellular deletion or ignorance to particular antigens, or in development of active immune regulatory responses. Several of these approaches are moving toward clinical development, and some are already in early stages of clinical testing.

  16. [Immunological background and pathomechanisms of food allergies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schülke, Stefan; Scheurer, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in immunology have greatly improved our understanding of the pathomechanisms of food allergies. Food allergies are caused and maintained by complex interactions of the innate and adaptive immune system involving antigen-presenting cells (APC), T cells, group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2), epithelial cells (EC) and effectors cells. Additionally, epigenetic factors, the intestinal microbiome and nutritional factors modulating the gastrointestinal lymphatic tissue probably have a significant impact on allergy development. However, why certain individuals develop tolerance while others mount allergic responses, the factors defining the allergenicity of food proteins, as well as the immunological mechanisms triggering allergy development have yet to be analyzed in detail. PMID:27177897

  17. Pelagra endógena e ataxia cerebelar sem aminoacidúria: doença de Hartnup? Endogenous pellagra and cerebellar ataxia without aminoaciduria: Hartnup disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Júlio César Possati Resende; Leonardo Rodrigues de Oliveira; Luciano Carvalho Dias; Lívia das Graças Vieito L. Teodoro; Luciano Borges Santiago

    2006-01-01

    Menino, 7 anos, com história de convulsão, hiperpigmentação cutânea em áreas de exposição solar e episódios recorrentes de ataxia cerebelar. Estabelecido diagnóstico clínico de doença de Hartnup, foi tratado com nicotinamida, com melhora. Análises não confirmaram aminoacidúria ou outras alterações metabólicas. Na doença de Hartnup ocorre defeito no transporte renal e intestinal de aminoácidos neutros, reduzindo triptofano disponível para produção de niacina. Cursa com ataxia cerebelar intermi...

  18. Immunological aspects of host-schistosome relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond T. Damian

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available The complex immunological relationships between schistosomes and their vertebrate hosts are considered to be conveniently divisible into four distinct, though interrelated categories: the parasite's vulnerability to, its evasion of, and its exploitation of the host's immune response, and its stimulation of the host's immune response to produce immunopathology. Some significant recent advances in the first three categories are discussed, as well as their relationships to the fourth category of immunopathology.

  19. IMMUNOLOGICAL MONITORING OF SLOW DOWN OSTHEOGENESIS

    OpenAIRE

    O. V. Berdugina

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We have performed clinical and immunological investigation in the patients with trauma of face bones before and after stable mandibular ostheosynthesis. Blood samples for analysis were taken upon admission of the patient to clinics, and following treatment (3, 10, and 1-2 months). The patients with initially retarded bone consolidation exhibited low levels of monocytes and lactoferrine before surgical treatment. It was shown that the consecutive stages of bone regeneration (inflamma...

  20. Can myofascial techniques modify immunological parameters?

    OpenAIRE

    Fern??ndez-P??rez, Antonio Manuel; Peralta-Ram??rez, Mar??a Isabel; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen; Pilat, Andrzej; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel; Villaverde-Guti??rrez, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The objective was to determine the effect of myofascial techniques on the modulation of immunological variables. Design: Thirty-nine healthy male volunteers were randomly assigned to an experimental or control group. Interventions: The experimental group underwent three manual therapy modalities: suboccipital muscle release, so-called fourth intracranial ventricle compression, and deep cervical fascia release. The control group remained in a resting position for the sa...

  1. Elastohydrodynamics and kinetics of protein patterning in the immunological synapse

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The cellular basis for the adaptive immune response during antigen recognition relies on a specialized protein interface known as the immunological synapse (IS). Understanding the biophysical basis for protein patterning by deciphering the quantitative rules for their formation and motion is an important aspect of characterizing immune cell recognition and thence the rules for immune system activation. We propose a minimal mathematical model for the physical basis of membrane protein patterning in the IS, which encompass membrane mechanics, protein binding kinetics and motion, and fluid flow in the synaptic cleft. Our theory leads to simple predictions for the spatial and temporal scales of protein cluster formation, growth and arrest as a function of membrane stiffness, rigidity and kinetics of the adhesive proteins, and the fluid in the synaptic cleft. Numerical simulations complement these scaling laws by quantifying the nucleation, growth and stabilization of proteins domains on the size of the cell. Dire...

  2. Imunologia da hanseníase Immunology of leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Amaral Mendonça

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A hanseníase é doença crônica infecciosa que se caracteriza por apresentar formas clínicas contrastantes, que são dependentes da interação do bacilo com a resposta imune do hospedeiro. O estudo dos processos imunológicos torna-se fundamental para o entendimento dos mecanismos envolvidos na apresentação e no desenvolvimento da doença. Neste artigo, é revisada a imunopatogênese da hanseníase.Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease characterized by contrasting clinical forms that are dependent on the interactions between the bacillus and the host immune response. Thus, the study of the immunological process is extremely relevant for the comprehension of the mechanisms involved in leprosy presentation and development. In this paper, the immunopathogenesis of leprosy is reviewed.

  3. Immunological Mechanisms in the Pathophysiology of Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Francque

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH is characterized by the presence of steatosis, inflammation and hepatocyte injury and constitutes hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The pathogenesis of NASH is complex and implicates cross-talk between different metabolically active sites, such as liver and adipose tissue. Obesity is considered a chronic low-grade inflammatory state and the liver has been recognized as being an “immunological organ”. The complex role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of NASH is currently raising great interest, also in view of the possible therapeutic potential of immunotherapy in NASH. This review focuses on the disturbances of the cells constituting the innate and adaptive immune system in the liver and in adipose tissue.

  4. Enhancement of immunological activity after mild hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, Kenichi; Hasegawa, Takeo; Takahashi, Tohru [Graduate School of Health Science, Suauka (Japan)] [and others

    2002-07-01

    At present, hyperthermia is clinically very important as interdisciplinary therapeutic method, and studies are being performed on combined effects with surgical treatment, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and gene therapy for the treatment of malignant tumors. We evaluated the effects of hyperthermia under temperature of 42.5C and demonstrated that the activation of immunological response is increased and anti-tumor effect cabn be obtained in this studies. We used animals were C3H mice (male,7W) bearing SCC-VII tumor on femur skin. Then, the mice were divided to 10 mice in each group, and only femur region was immersed in warm water for thermal treatment. Also we measured the tumor growth, changes of blood cell fraction and NK cell activity. The results of the present study confirmed: (1) Anti-tumor effect can be given by thermal treatment at relatively mild temperature (mild temperature at 39C-42C); (2) The increase of neutrophils is dependent on the quantity of heat added; (3) Immunological response of monocytes and lymphocytes is associated with it; (4) Activity of the immunological potency as a whole such as activation of NK cells was also confirmed.

  5. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario-Filho, Nelson A; Jacob, Cristina M; Sole, Dirceu; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Arruda, Luisa K; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz; Cocco, Renata R; Camelo-Nunes, Inês; Chong-Neto, Herberto J; Wandalsen, Gustavo F; Castro, Ana P M; Yang, Ariana C; Pastorino, Antonio C; Sarinho, Emanuel S

    2013-06-01

    The subspecialty of pediatric allergy and immunology in Brazil is in its early years and progressing steadily. This review highlights the research developed in the past years aiming to show the characteristics of allergic and immunologic diseases in this vast country. Epidemiologic studies demonstrated the high prevalence of asthma in infants, children, and adolescents. Mortality rates and average annual variation of asthma hospitalization have reduced in all pediatric age groups. Indoor aeroallergen exposure is excessively high and contributes to the high rates of allergy sensitization. Prevalence of food allergy has increased to epidemic levels. Foods (35%), insect stings (30%), and drugs (23%) are the main etiological agents of anaphylaxis in children and adolescents. Molecular diagnosis of primary immunodeficiencies (PID) showed a high incidence of fungal infections including paracoccidioidomycosis in X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome, and the occurrence of BCG adverse reactions or other mycobacterial infections in patients with chronic granulomatous disease. Education in pediatric allergy and immunology is deficient for medical students, but residency programs are effective in training internists and pediatricians for the practice of allergy. The field of PID requires further training. Last, this review is a tribute to Prof. Dr. Charles Naspitz, one of the pioneers of our specialty in Brazil.

  6. Pelagra endógena e ataxia cerebelar sem aminoacidúria: doença de Hartnup? Endogenous pellagra and cerebellar ataxia without aminoaciduria: Hartnup disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio César Possati Resende

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Menino, 7 anos, com história de convulsão, hiperpigmentação cutânea em áreas de exposição solar e episódios recorrentes de ataxia cerebelar. Estabelecido diagnóstico clínico de doença de Hartnup, foi tratado com nicotinamida, com melhora. Análises não confirmaram aminoacidúria ou outras alterações metabólicas. Na doença de Hartnup ocorre defeito no transporte renal e intestinal de aminoácidos neutros, reduzindo triptofano disponível para produção de niacina. Cursa com ataxia cerebelar intermitente, erupções cutâneas pelagróides e distúrbios mentais. Aminoacidúria em cromatografia urinária confirma diagnóstico, porém são descritos casos compatíveis com doença de Hartnup sem aminoacidúria.A seven-year-old boy with history of convulsion, cutaneous hyperpigmentation in sun-exposed areas and recurrent episodes of cerebellar ataxia is presented. Once established the clinical diagnosis of Hartnup disease, treatment with nicotinamide was started, with improvement. Laboratorial results did not confirm aminoaciduria nor other identified metabolic changes. In Hartnup disease, defective renal and intestinal transport of neutral amino acids occurrs, resulting in reduction of tryptophan to produce to nicotinamide. Symptomatic cases present with intermittent episodes of cerebellar ataxia, pellagra-like skin rash and mental disturbances. Urinary chromatographic amino acid pattern confirms diagnosis; however, cases compatible with Hartnup disease, but without aminoaciduria, have been reported.

  7. Epstein-Barr serology in immunodeficiencies: an attempt to correlate with immune abnormalities in Wiskott-Aldrich and Chediak-Higashi syndromes and ataxia telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilmer, E; Lenoir, G M; Virelizier, J L; Griscelli, C

    1984-01-01

    Epstein-Barr (EB) virus serology was correlated with the results of immunological investigations of three inherited immunodeficiency diseases, in an attempt to understand the immune mechanisms controlling EB virus infection. In nine patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), the constant lack of anti-EB virus associated nuclear antigen (EBNA) was accompanied by a consistent impairment of allogeneic cytotoxicity. We confirmed a frequent absence of anti-EBNA antibody in ataxia telangiectasia (AT), and we showed a correlation between the level of anti-EBNA response and the mixed leucocyte response (MLR), i.e., an absence of anti-EBNA antibody correlated with a decreased MLR. In two of three untreated patients with Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS), high persistent titres of anti-EA antibodies were observed, which were possibly related to a defective natural killer (NK) cell activity. In spite of previous infection with EB virus, none of the 41 patients exhibited clinical signs attributable to the virus, suggesting that residual or compensatory mechanisms must have limited activation of the virus. In patients with AT and WAS these mechanisms may include NK cell activity, which is not depressed in these syndromes, whereas in patients with CHS, they may involve T cell cytotoxicity. PMID:6321070

  8. Studies on Immunological Effect and Immunological Mechanism Avian Encephalomyelitis Oil Emulsion Inactivated Vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Zi-qiang; ZHAO Zhen-hua; RI Mudema

    2002-01-01

    Oil emulsion inactivated vaccine was prepared by susceptible embryos, with different strains of AEV. Four groups of normal chickens of 2 - 7 days of age were given injections for immunization, respectively. Another group was used as control. This study was expected to evaluate the immunological effect and discuss the immunological mechanism by means of five different experiments, i.e. the agar-gel precipitin test,the isolation of lymphokine, the isolation, purification and analysis of blood serum IgG, embryo-susceptibility test, and clinical and pathological examination. The results of these experiments indicated that oil emulsion inactivated vaccine is safe and effective. The chickens were normal when inoculated with AE strong virus after immunity at 4 and 37 weeks. Immunological mechanism is that the humoral immunity played an important role and celluar immunity exists, but it is not important in the process of the resistance to AEV.

  9. Induced pluripotent stem cell - derived neurons for the study of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne K; Stummann, Tina C; Borland, Helena;

    2016-01-01

    The neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is caused by a CAG-repeat expansion in the ATXN3 gene. In this study, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines were established from two SCA3 patients. Dermal fibroblasts were reprogrammed using an integration-free method...

  10. Overexpression of cystathionine γ-lyase suppresses detrimental effects of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, Pauline M; Baratashvili, Madina; Grzeschik, Nicola A; Leuvenink, Henri G D; Kuijpers, Lucas; Huitema, Sippie; Schaap, Onno; Giepmans, Ben N G; Kuipers, Jeroen; Miljkovic, Jan Lj; Mitrovic, Aleksandra; Bos, Eelke M; Szabó, Csaba; Kampinga, Harm H; Dijkers, Pascale F; Den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; Filipovic, Milos R; van Goor, Harry; Sibon, Ody C M

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is a polyglutamine (polyQ) disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the ATXN3 gene resulting in toxic protein aggregation. Inflammation and oxidative stress are considered secondary factors contributing to the progression of this neurodegenerative disease. Th

  11. Overexpression of Cystathionine gamma-Lyase Suppresses Detrimental Effects of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, Pauline M.; Baratashvili, Madina; Grzeschik, Nicola A.; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; Kuijpers, Lucas; Huitema, Sippie; Schaap, Onno; Giepmans, Ben N. G.; Kuipers, Jeroen; Miljkovic, Jan Lj; Mitrovic, Aleksandra; Bos, Eelke M.; Szabo, Csaba; Kampinga, Harm H.; Dijkers, Pascale F.; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.; Filipovic, Milos R.; Goor, van Harry; Sibon, Ody C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is a polyglutamine (polyQ) disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the ataxin-3 (ATXN3) gene resulting in toxic protein aggregation. Inflammation and oxidative stress are considered secondary factors contributing to the progression of this neurodegenerative

  12. Clinical, psychological, and genetic characteristics of spinocerebellar ataxia type 19 (SCA19).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelhaas, H.J.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2005-01-01

    The SCA19 locus on chromosome 1p21-q21 was identified in a Dutch family in 2002. Affected individuals displayed a lateonset slowly progressive mild cerebellar ataxia, hyporeflexia, and signs of frontal lobe dysfunction. A postural head tremor and myoclonic movements were observed occasionally. Befor

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients presenting with (sub)acute cerebellar ataxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Tanja [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Thomalla, Goetz [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Neurology, Hamburg (Germany); Goebell, Einar [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); Piotrowski, Anna [The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yousem, David Mark [The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-02-17

    Acute or subacute cerebellar inflammation is mainly caused by postinfectious, toxic, neoplastic, vascular, or idiopathic processes and can result in cerebellar ataxia. Previous magnetic resonance (MR) studies in single patients who developed acute or subacute ataxia showed varying imaging features. Eighteen patients presenting with acute and subacute onset of ataxia were included in this study. Cases of chronic-progressive/hereditary and noncerebellar causes (ischemia, multiple sclerosis lesions, metastasis, bleedings) were excluded. MR imaging findings were then matched with the clinical history of the patient. An underlying etiology for ataxic symptoms were found in 14/18 patients (postinfectious/infectious, paraneoplastic, autoimmune, drug-induced). In two of five patients without MR imaging findings and three of eight patients with minimal imaging features (cerebellar atrophy, slight signal alterations, and small areas of restricted diffusion), adverse clinical outcomes were documented. Of the five patients with prominent MR findings (cerebellar swelling, contrast enhancement, or broad signal abnormalities), two were lost to follow-up and two showed long-term sequelae. No correlation was found between the presence of initial MRI findings in subacute or acute ataxia patients and their long-term clinical outcome. MR imaging was more flagrantly positive in cases due to encephalitis. (orig.)

  14. Contactin 1 IgG4 associates to chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with sensory ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Miura, Yumako; Devaux, Jérôme J.; Fukami, Yuki; Manso, Constance; Belghazi, Maya; Wong, Anna Hiu Yi; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is clinically heterogeneous and shows varying responses to immunotherapy. In a cohort of 533 Japanese patients with CIDP, Miura et al. identify 13 patients with IgG4 antibodies against the axonal adhesion molecule, contactin-1. Antibodies are associated with subacute onset, sensory ataxia and good response to corticosteroids.

  15. Ataxia with loss of Purkinje cells in a mouse model for Refsum disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferdinandusse, S.; Zomer, A.W.M.; Komen, J.C.; van den Brink, C.; Thanos, M.; Hamers, F.P.T.; Wanders, R.J.A.T.; van der Saag, P.T.; Poll-The, B.T.; Brites, P.

    2008-01-01

    Refsum disease is caused by a deficiency of phytanoyl-CoA hydroxylase (PHYH), the first enzyme of the peroxisomal alpha-oxidation system, resulting in the accumulation of the branched-chain fatty acid phytanic acid. The main clinical symptoms are polyneuropathy, cerebellar ataxia, and retinitis pigm

  16. Oculomotor abnormalities in myoclonic tremor : a comparison with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bour, L. J.; van Rootselaar, A. F.; Koelman, J. H. T. M.; Tijssen, M. A. J.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, eye movements are recorded in two patient groups with an autosomal dominantly inherited cerebellar disorder, i.e. spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) and familial cortical myoclonic tremor with epilepsy (FCMTE). In SCA6 and FCMTE patients striking similarities with the extensi

  17. Fatigue in spinocerebellar ataxia: Patient self-assessment of an early and disabling symptom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Brusse (Esther); M.G.J. Brusse-Keizer (Marjolein G.J.); H.J. Duivenvoorden (Hugo); J.C. van Swieten (John)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To identify the prevalence and severity of fatigue and predicting factors for severe fatigue in autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). Methods: We studied a cross-section of 123 patients with SCA. Six functional scales were used in a self-assessment: the Fatigue Seve

  18. Motor pathway degeneration in young ataxia telangiectasia patients: A diffusion tractography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishani Sahama

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Whole tract analysis of the corticomotor, corticospinal and somatosensory pathways in ataxia telangiectasia showed significant white matter degeneration along the entire length of motor circuits, highlighting that ataxia–telangiectasia gene mutation impacts the cerebellum and multiple other motor circuits in young patients.

  19. Protein kinase C gamma mutations in spinocerebellar ataxia 14 increase kinase activity and alter membrane targeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, D. S.; Knight, M. A.; Harmison, G. G.; Fischbeck, K. H.; Howell, B. W.

    2005-01-01

    The protein kinase C gamma (PKCgamma) gene is mutated in spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14). In this study, we investigated the effects of two SCA14 missense mutations, G118D and C150F, on PKCgamma function. We found that these mutations increase the intrinsic activity of PKCgamma. Direct visual

  20. Characteristic brain MRI findings in ataxia-neuropathy spectrum related to POLG mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henao, Adriana I; Pira, Sonia; Herrera, Diego A; Vargas, Sergio A; Montoya, Jorge; Castillo, Mauricio

    2016-02-01

    Patients with mutations in the polymerase gamma gene (POLG) may present with progressive ataxia and in such situations neuroimaging findings may suggest the diagnosis. Herein we report a patient with a POLG gene W748S homozygous mutation and characteristic lesions in the thalamus, cerebellum and inferior olivary nucleus seen on magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26755490

  1. The effectiveness of allied health care in patients with ataxia: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonteyn, E.M.R.; Keus, S.H.J.; Verstappen, C.C.P.; Schols, L.; Groot, I.J.M. de; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with cerebellar ataxia have serious disabilities in daily life, while pharmacological treatment options are absent. Therefore, allied health care is considered to be important in the management of these patients. The goal of this review is to evaluate scientific evidence for allied hea

  2. Physiotherapy in degenerative cerebellar ataxias: utilisation, patient satisfaction, and professional expertise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonteyn, E.M.R.; Keus, S.H.J.; Verstappen, C.C.P.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de

    2013-01-01

    Physiotherapy plays an important role in the management of patients with degenerative cerebellar ataxias. However, our insight in the quantity and quality of physiotherapy prescription in this group of patients is incomplete. The purposes of this study were to investigate the utilization of physioth

  3. Landmark based shape analysis for cerebellar ataxia classification and cerebellar atrophy pattern visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules.

  4. Cerebellar Ataxia with Bilateral Vestibulopathy: Description of a Syndrome and Its Characteristic Clinical Sign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, Americo A.; Halmagyi, G. Michael; McGarvie, Leigh A.; Cremer, Phillip D.

    2004-01-01

    We report four patients with the syndrome of cerebellar ataxia with bilateral vestibulopathy (CABV) and, using search coil oculography, we validate its characteristic clinical sign, namely impairment of the visually enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex (VVOR) or doll's head reflex. In our four patients, CABV began in the sixth decade of life; they are…

  5. Elevated mutant dynorphin A causes Purkinje cell loss and motor dysfunction in spinocerebellar ataxia type 23

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, Cleo J. L. M.; Jezierska, Justyna; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Duarri Pique, Anna; Fokkens, Michiel R.; Meijer, Michel; Zhou, Qin; Yakovleva, Tania; Boddeke, Erik; den Dunnen, Wilfred; van Deursen, Jan; Bakalkin, Georgy; Kampinga, Harm H.; van de Sluis, Bart; Verbeek, Dineke S.

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 is caused by mutations in PDYN, which encodes the opioid neuropeptide precursor protein, prodynorphin. Prodynorphin is processed into the opioid peptides, a-neoendorphin, and dynorphins A and B, that normally exhibit opioid-receptor mediated actions in pain signalling

  6. The fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winarni, T.I.; Mundhofir, F.E.P.; Ediati, A.; Belladona, M.; Nillesen, W.M.; Yntema, H.G.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Faradz, S.M.H.; Hagerman, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    Fragile X-associated disorders caused by the premutation of the FMR1 gene, includes the fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). FXTAS affects more than 40% of premutation males over the age of 50 and 75% over the age of 80. FMR1 molecular analysis was done using PCR and confirmed by Sou

  7. Chemo- and radiosensitivity testing in a patient with ataxia telangiectasia and Hodgkin disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, RYJ; Dolsma, WV; Leeuw, JA; Kampinga, HH

    2002-01-01

    Treatment of Hodgkin disease (HD) in ataxia telangiectasia (AT) patients is hampered by hypersensitivity to radiation and chemotherapy. Most patients die, due to toxicity or rarely, to progressive disease. The authors report on a 9-year-old girl with stage IIA HD and AT She was treated with a tailor

  8. Cognitive and speech-language performance in children with ataxia telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinck, Anja; Verhagen, Mijke M. M.; van Gerven, Marjo; de Groot, Imelda J. M.; Weemaes, Corry M. R.; Maassen, Ben A. M.; Willemsen, Michel A. A. P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe cognitive and speech-language functioning of patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) in relation to their deteriorating (oculo)motor function. Design: Observational case series. Methods: Cognitive functioning, language, speech and oral-motor functioning were examined in eigh

  9. The humanδ2 glutamate receptor gene is not mutated in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinxiang Huang; Aiyu Lin; Haiyan Dong; Chaodong Wang

    2014-01-01

    The human glutamate receptor delta 2 gene (GRID2) shares 90%homology with the orthologous mouse gene. The mouse Grid2 gene is involved with functions of the cerebellum and sponta-neous mutation of Grid2 leads to a spinocerebellar ataxia-like phenotype. To investigate whether such mutations occur in humans, we screened for mutations in the coding sequence of GRID2 in 24 patients with familial or sporadic spinocerebellar ataxia and in 52 normal controls. We de-tected no point mutations or insertion/deletion mutations in the 16 exons of GRID2. However, a polymorphic 4 nucleotide deletion (IVS5-121_-118 GAGT) and two single nucleotide polymor-phisms (c.1251G>T and IVS14-63C>G) were identiifed. The frequency of these polymorphisms was similar between spinocerebellar ataxia patients and normal controls. These data indicate that spontaneous mutations do not occur in GRID2 and that the incidence of spinocerebellar ataxia in humans is not associated with GRID2 mutation or polymorphisms.

  10. Decreased Functional Brain Activation in Friedreich Ataxia Using the Simon Effect Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou-Karistianis, N.; Akhlaghi, H.; Corben, L. A.; Delatycki, M. B.; Storey, E.; Bradshaw, J. L.; Egan, G. F.

    2012-01-01

    The present study applied the Simon effect task to examine the pattern of functional brain reorganization in individuals with Friedreich ataxia (FRDA), using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Thirteen individuals with FRDA and 14 age and sex matched controls participated, and were required to respond to either congruent or incongruent…

  11. The Training and Support Programme for Parents of Children with Ataxia: Parents' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, L. A.; Barlow, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the Training and Support Programme (TSP) among parents of children with ataxia. Twenty-seven parents and their children completed the TSP. Data were collected by home record sheets and observation sheets completed by parents and therapists, respectively, and telephone interviews with 10 parents. Benefits reported…

  12. Acute cerebellar ataxia in a child with transient pontine lesions demonstrated by MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, R.J.M.; Begeer, J H; Wilmink, J T; le Coultre, R

    1991-01-01

    A case of acute cerebellar ataxia with discrete signs of pyramidal and tegmental involvement is reported, several days after recovery from an upper respiratory infection of unknown etiology. Magnetic resonance imaging showed transient pontine lesions, disappearing in the convalescence phase. Laborat

  13. Response of sensitive human ataxia and resistant T-1 cell lines to accelerated heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation dose responses of fibroblast from a patient with Ataxia telangiectasis (AT-2SF) and an established line of human T-1 cells were studied. Nearly monoenergetic accelerated neon and argon ions were used at the Berkeley Bevalac with various residual range values. The LET of the particles varied from 30 keV/μm to over 1000 keV/μm. All Ataxia survival curves were exponential functions of the dose. Their radiosensitivity reached peak values at 100 to 200 keV/μm. Human T-1 cells have effective sublethal damage repair as has been evidenced by split dose experiments, and they are much more resistant to low LET than to high LET radiation. The repair-misrepair model has been used to interpret these results. We have obtained mathematical expressions that describe the cross sections and inactivation coefficients for both human cell lines as a function of the LET and the type of particle used. The results suggest either that high-LET particles induce a greater number of radiolesions per track or that heavy-ions at high LET induce lesions that kill cells more effectively and that are different from those produced at low LET. We assume that the lesions induced in T-1 and Ataxia cells are qualitatively similar and that each cell line attempts to repair these lesions. The result in most irradiated Ataxia cells, however, is either lethal misrepair or incomplete repair leading to cell death. 63 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  14. Immunological alteration and changes of gut microbiota after dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) administration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkansson, Å; Tormo-Badia, N; Baridi, A; Xu, J; Molin, G; Hagslätt, M-L; Karlsson, C; Jeppsson, B; Cilio, C M; Ahrné, S

    2015-02-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the colonic mucosa. Administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) to animals is a frequently used model to mimic human colitis. Deregulation of the immune response to the enteric microflora or pathogens as well as increased intestinal permeability have been proposed as disease-driving mechanisms. To enlarge the understanding of the pathogenesis, we have studied the effect of DSS on the immune system and gut microbiota in mice. Intestinal inflammation was verified through histological evaluation and myeloperoxidase activity. Immunological changes were assessed by flow cytometry in spleen, Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes and through multiplex cytokine profiling. In addition, quantification of the total amount of bacteria on colonic mucosa as well as the total amount of lactobacilli, Akkermansia, Desulfovibrio and Enterobacteriaceae was performed by the use of quantitative PCR. Diversity and community structure were analysed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) patterns, and principal component analysis was utilized on immunological and T-RFLP patterns. DSS-induced colitis show clinical and histological similarities to UC. The composition of the colonic microflora was profoundly changed and correlated with several alterations of the immune system. The results demonstrate a relationship between multiple immunological changes and alterations of the gut microbiota after DSS administration. These data highlight and improve the definition of the immunological basis of the disease and suggest a role for dysregulation of the gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of colitis.

  15. Immunology and immunity against infection: General rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    2005-12-01

    Simplified and generalizable rules of immune responses against infections or vaccines have been summarized into 20 statements previously (Scand. J. Immunol. 60 (2004) 9-13) and are restated in a slightly different form here. The key terms of immunology (e.g. specificity, tolerance and memory) are explained in terms of their co-evolutionary importance in the equilibrium between infectious agents and diseases with higher vertebrate hosts. Specificity is best defined by protective antibodies or protective activated T cells; e.g. serotype specific neutralizing antibodies against polio viruses represent the discriminatory power of an immune response very well indeed. Tolerance is reviewed in terms of reactivity rather than self-nonself discrimination. Immune respones are deleted against antigens expressed at sufficient levels within the lymphoheamopoetic system, but may well exist at both, the T and the B cell level against antigens strictly outside of secondary lymphatic organs. In this respect the immune system behaves identically against virus infections and against self antigens. Persistent virus infections delete responsive T cells, once eliminated immune T cell responses wane, if a virus keeps outside of secondary lymphatic tissues no immune response is induced. Immunological memory is usually defined as earlier and greater responses but this does not correlate with protective immunity stringently. It is summarized here that pre-existing titers of protective neutralizing antibodies or pre-existence of activated T cells are the correlates of protection acute cytopathic lethal infections and toxins or against intracellular parasites. It is concluded that many discrepancies and uncertainties in immunological research derive from model situations and experimental results that are correctly measured but cannot be related to co-evolutionary contexts, i.e. survival.

  16. Marked inhibition of Na+, K(+)- ATPase activity and the respiratory chain by phytanic acid in cerebellum from young rats: possible underlying mechanisms of cerebellar ataxia in Refsum disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Zanatta, Ângela; Tonin, Anelise Miotti; Viegas, Carolina Maso; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Ribeiro, César Augusto João; Wajner, Moacir

    2013-02-01

    Refsum disease is an autosomal recessive disorder of peroxisomal metabolism biochemically characterized by highly elevated concentrations of phytanic acid (Phyt) in a variety of tissues including the cerebellum. Reduction of plasma Phyt levels by dietary restriction intake ameliorates ataxia, a common clinical manifestation of this disorder, suggesting a neurotoxic role for this branched-chain fatty acid. Therefore, considering that the underlying mechanisms of cerebellum damage in Refsum disease are poorly known, in the present study we tested the effects of Phyt on important parameters of bioenergetics, such as the activities of the respiratory chain complexes I to IV, creatine kinase and Na(+), K(+)- ATPase in cerebellum preparations from young rats. The activities of complexes I, II, I-III and II-III and Na(+), K(+)- ATPase were markedly inhibited (65-85%) in a dose-dependent manner by Phyt. In contrast, creatine kinase and complex IV activities were not altered by this fatty acid. Therefore, it is presumed that impairment of the electron flow through the respiratory chain and inhibition of Na(+), K(+)- ATPase that is crucial for synaptic function may be involved in the pathophysiology of the cerebellar abnormalities manifested as ataxia in Refsum disease and in other peroxisomal disorders in which brain Phyt accumulates.

  17. Study on diagnosis and treatment of hereditary ataxia%遗传性共济失调诊断与治疗专家策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐北沙; 江泓

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary ataxia (HA) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders with high mortality and morbidity. It is characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia of gait and limbs variably associated with ophthalmoplegia, pigmentary retinopathy, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, dementia and peripheral neuropathy. The molecular diagnosis process is proposed based on molecular classification. So far, symptomatic treatment is the mainly approach, with the lack of effective therapeutic method.%遗传性共济失调是一大类具有高度临床和遗传异质性、病死率和病残率较高的遗传性神经系统退行性疾病.临床上以小脑共济失调为主要特征,表现为平衡障碍、进行性肢体协调运动障碍、步态不稳、构音障碍、眼球运动障碍等,并可伴有复杂的神经系统损害.本文结合疾病分子分型提出了遗传性共济失调的分子诊断流程.目前此类疾病尚缺乏有效的治疗方法,主要以对症治疗为主.

  18. Exclusion of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene and the human achaete-scute homologue 1 gene as candidate loci for spinal cerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twells, R.; Xu, W. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)]|[Institute of Animal Physiology and Genetics Research, Babraham, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Ball, D. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The autosomal dominant ataxias are a heterogeneous group of disorders, characterized by progressive degeneration of the cerebellum, pons and inferior olives, as well as the spinal cord. We previously mapped the spinal cerebellar ataxia 2 locus (SCA2) to chromosome 12q23-24.1 in a large Cuban founder population, flanked by the markers D12S58 and PLA2. Anticipation is a common feature of this disorder and therefore we have examined genes in this region which contain trinucleotide repeat motifs as candidate loci for SCA2. The neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS) has recently been assigned to chromosome 12q24.2-24.3 by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Neuronal NOS is responsible for the production of nitric oxide, a neurotransmitter expressed in high levels in the cerebellum as well as other regions of the nervous system. We report here the identification and analysis of an (AAT){sub n} repeat motif in an intronic region of the neuronal NOS gene, genetic mapping data and its exclusion from being involved in SCA2. We also report the exclusion of the human achaete-scute homologue 1 gene (HASH1), instrumental in neurosensory development in mouse, from being involved in SCA2 by the analysis of a proximal (CAG){sub n} repeat motif in the Cuban pedigrees, and its genetic location on chromosome 12q.

  19. Update in clinical allergy and immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Gunten, S; Marsland, B J; von Garnier, C; Simon, D

    2012-12-01

    In the recent years, a tremendous body of studies has addressed a broad variety of distinct topics in clinical allergy and immunology. In this update, we discuss selected recent data that provide clinically and pathogenetically relevant insights or identify potential novel targets and strategies for therapy. The role of the microbiome in shaping allergic immune responses and molecular, as well as cellular mechanisms of disease, is discussed separately and in the context of atopic dermatitis, as an allergic model disease. Besides summarizing novel evidence, this update highlights current areas of uncertainties and debates that, as we hope, shall stimulate scientific discussions and research activities in the field.

  20. Basic immunology of antibody targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antibody targeted radiotherapy brings an important new treatment modality to Radiation oncology clinic. Radiation dose to tumor and normal tissues are determined by a complex interplay of antibody, antigen, tumor, radionuclide, and host-related factors. A basic understanding of these immunologic and physiologic factors is important to optimally utilize this therapy in the clinic. Preclinical and clinical studies need to be continued to broaden our understanding and to develop new strategies to further improve the efficacy of this promising form of targeted therapy

  1. Cutaneous drug hypersensitivity : Immunological and genetic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kisalay Ghosh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug hypersensitivity is an unpredictable, immunologically mediated adverse reaction, clustered in a genetically predisposed individual. The role of "hapten concept" in immune sensitization has recently been contested by the "pharmacological interaction" hypothesis. After completion of the "human genome project" and with the availability of high-resolution genotyping, genetic susceptibility to hypersensitivity for certain drugs has been proved beyond doubt though the trend is ethnicity and phenotype dependent. Application of this newly acquired knowledge may reduce or abolish the morbidity and mortality associated with cutaneous drug hypersensitivity.

  2. Immunological characterization of diphtheria toxin recovered from Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Salha Abdelkareem; Mohamed, Farida Hessain; Hessain, Ashgan Mohamed; Moussa, Ihab Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    Diphtheria toxin (DT) is a potent toxin produced by the so-called diphtheria group which includes Corynebacterium diphtheriae (C. diphtheriae), Corynebacterium ulcerans (C. ulcerans), and Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (C. pseudotuberculosis). The present investigation is aimed to study in detail the production of DT by C. pseudotuberculosis. Twenty isolates were obtained from sheep diseased with caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) and twenty-six isolates were obtained from 26 buffaloes diseased with oedematous skin disease (OSD). All isolates were identified by standard microbiological and DT production was assayed serologically by modified Elek test and immunoblotting. All sheep isolates were nitrate negative, failed to hydrolyze starch and could not produce DT, while all buffalo isolates (biotype II) revealed positive results and a specific band of 62 kDa, specific to DT, was resulted in all concentrated cell fractions (CF), but was absent from non-toxigenic biotype I isolates. At the same time, another band of 31 kDa specific to the PLD gene was obtained with all isolates of biotype I and II. Moreover, all isolates showed positive synergistic hemolytic activity and antagonistic hemolysis with β-hemolytic Staphylococci. The obtained results also indicated that C. pseudotuberculosis could be classified into two strains; non-toxigenic biotype I strain, which failed to produce DT as well as being negative to nitrate and starch hydrolysis, and toxigenic biotype II strain, which can reduce nitrate, hydrolyze starch as well as produce DT. PMID:26981011

  3. 50 years of Dutch immunology--founders, institutions, highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmelig-Meyling, Frits H J; Meyaard, Linde; Mebius, Reina E

    2014-12-01

    At the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Dutch Society for Immunology (DSI, de Nederlandse Vereniging voor Immunologie), this contribution deals with some highlights of 50 years of Immunology in the Netherlands. It narrates about the founders and first board members of the DSI, their institutes, progeny and patrimony, describes major centers of immunological activities, mentions key persons in the field, and touches upon some events dear to the Society and its members.

  4. Selected Topics on Mathematical Models in Immunology and Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Mohler, R.R.; Asachenkov, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    In 1988 the new IIASA project on System Immunology was inaugurated. The new activity focuses theoretical and experimental research in immunology and system mathematics to experimental planning and prediction for relevant disease applications and systematic understanding of immunology. IIASA analysis and simulation should lead to an effective plan of successive experiments to identify and to quantify particularly sensitive parameters in this most complex system of information processing, decis...

  5. ANIMAL MODELS FOR THE STUDY OF LEISHMANIASIS IMMUNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsy Nalleli Loria-Cervera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis remains a major public health problem worldwide and is classified as Category I by the TDR/WHO, mainly due to the absence of control. Many experimental models like rodents, dogs and monkeys have been developed, each with specific features, in order to characterize the immune response to Leishmania species, but none reproduces the pathology observed in human disease. Conflicting data may arise in part because different parasite strains or species are being examined, different tissue targets (mice footpad, ear, or base of tail are being infected, and different numbers (“low” 1×102 and “high” 1×106 of metacyclic promastigotes have been inoculated. Recently, new approaches have been proposed to provide more meaningful data regarding the host response and pathogenesis that parallels human disease. The use of sand fly saliva and low numbers of parasites in experimental infections has led to mimic natural transmission and find new molecules and immune mechanisms which should be considered when designing vaccines and control strategies. Moreover, the use of wild rodents as experimental models has been proposed as a good alternative for studying the host-pathogen relationships and for testing candidate vaccines. To date, using natural reservoirs to study Leishmania infection has been challenging because immunologic reagents for use in wild rodents are lacking. This review discusses the principal immunological findings against Leishmania infection in different animal models highlighting the importance of using experimental conditions similar to natural transmission and reservoir species as experimental models to study the immunopathology of the disease.

  6. Animal models for the study of leishmaniasis immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loría-Cervera, Elsy Nalleli; Andrade-Narváez, Fernando José

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis remains a major public health problem worldwide and is classified as Category I by the TDR/WHO, mainly due to the absence of control. Many experimental models like rodents, dogs and monkeys have been developed, each with specific features, in order to characterize the immune response to Leishmania species, but none reproduces the pathology observed in human disease. Conflicting data may arise in part because different parasite strains or species are being examined, different tissue targets (mice footpad, ear, or base of tail) are being infected, and different numbers ("low" 1 × 10(2) and "high" 1 × 10(6)) of metacyclic promastigotes have been inoculated. Recently, new approaches have been proposed to provide more meaningful data regarding the host response and pathogenesis that parallels human disease. The use of sand fly saliva and low numbers of parasites in experimental infections has led to mimic natural transmission and find new molecules and immune mechanisms which should be considered when designing vaccines and control strategies. Moreover, the use of wild rodents as experimental models has been proposed as a good alternative for studying the host-pathogen relationships and for testing candidate vaccines. To date, using natural reservoirs to study Leishmania infection has been challenging because immunologic reagents for use in wild rodents are lacking. This review discusses the principal immunological findings against Leishmania infection in different animal models highlighting the importance of using experimental conditions similar to natural transmission and reservoir species as experimental models to study the immunopathology of the disease. PMID:24553602

  7. Immigrants in immunology: the benefits of lax borders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagaman, Keaton; Martinez, Emily S; Guillemin, Karen

    2015-05-01

    The field of immunology has a long history of illuminating fundamental biological processes of critical importance to human health. From an outsider's perspective, the questions are profoundly philosophical and the experimental approaches are elegantly precise. Yet immunology can also appear impenetrable. Here we recount the experience of two graduate students from the fields of ecology and computer science, who have immigrated into immunological terrain attracted by systems-level questions. We argue that such migrations enrich the field of immunology, and that cultural and institutional changes are needed to promote more interdisciplinary explorations.

  8. Immunological perspectives of temporal lobe seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liimatainen, Suvi; Lehtimäki, Kai; Kai, Lehtimäki; Palmio, Johanna; Johanna, Palmio; Alapirtti, Tiina; Tiina, Alapirtti; Peltola, Jukka; Jukka, Peltola

    2013-10-15

    The temporal lobes are affected in many different neurological disorders, such as neurodegenerative diseases, viral and immunological encephalitides, and epilepsy. Both experimental and clinical evidence suggests a different inflammatory response to seizures in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in comparison to those with extra-TLE (XTLE). Proinflammatory cytokines and several autoantibodies have been shown to be associated with TLE compared to other epilepsy types suggesting the specific role and structure of the temporal lobe. Abundant experience suggests that activation of both innate and adaptive immunity is associated with epilepsy, particularly refractory focal epilepsy. Limbic encephalitis often triggers temporal lobe seizures, and a proportion of these disorders are immune-mediated. Histological evidence shows activation of specific inflammatory pathways in resected temporal lobes of epileptic patients, and certain epileptic disorders have shown increased incidence in patients with autoimmune diseases. Rapid activation of proinflammatory cytokines is observed after single seizures, but there is also evidence of chronic overproduction of cytokines and other inflammatory mediators in patients with TLE, suggesting a neuromodulatory role of inflammation in epilepsy. In this review we summarize current data on the presence and the role of immunological factors in temporal lobe seizures, and their possible involvement in epileptogenesis. PMID:23998423

  9. Immunological aspects on IDDM in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludvigsson, J

    1989-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus in childhood is connected to several immunological phenomena which per se do not prove that immunological mechanisms do cause the beta cell destruction, as such mechanisms could be just secondary. However, there is now evidence which strongly supports the autoimmune hypothesis, like the beta-cell destruction in the transplant given from a healthy twin to the diabetic monozygotic co-twin, the effect in newly-diagnosed diabetes of immunosuppression, the passive transfer in experimental animals of an immune process creating diabetes etc. Several facts such as presence of activated T-cells in the insulitis indicate that the cell-mediated immunity is important, while it is still debatable whether humoral factors, and if so which, alone could be responsible for the beta cell destruction. Recently interleukins and other lymphokines have shown to be of great interest as well as the release of free radicals. This knowledge opens new views on the possibility to put an end to or even prevent the beta cell destruction. Rough immunosuppression with cytostatics or cyclosporin has such severe side-effects that such therapy is contra-indicated at least in children. Until more specific therapies are discovered e.g. vaccination with lymphoblasts or blocking the autoantigens with monoclonal antibodies, supportive measures to protect the beta cells may be one practical way.

  10. Uncertainty of measurement: an immunology laboratory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Sarah C; Lock, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    'Measurement uncertainty of measured quantity values' (ISO15189) requires that the laboratory shall determine the measurement uncertainty for procedures used to report measured quantity values on patients' samples. Where we have numeric data measurement uncertainty can be expressed as the standard deviation or as the co-efficient of variation. However, in immunology many of the assays are reported either as semi-quantitative (i.e. an antibody titre) or qualitative (positive or negative) results. In the latter context, measuring uncertainty is considerably more difficult. There are, however, strategies which can allow us to minimise uncertainty. A number of parameters can contribute to making measurements uncertain. These include bias, precision, standard uncertainty (expressed as standard deviation or coefficient of variation), sensitivity, specificity, repeatability, reproducibility and verification. Closely linked to these are traceability and standardisation. In this article we explore the challenges presented to immunology with regard to measurement uncertainty. Many of these challenges apply equally to other disciplines working with qualitative or semi-quantitative data.

  11. Importance of exercise immunology in health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, J C Rosa; Lira, F S; de Mello, M T; Santos, Ronaldo Vagner T

    2011-11-01

    Chronic physical exercise with adequate intensity and volume associated with sufficient recovery promotes adaptations in several physiological systems. While intense and exhaustive exercise is considered an important immunosuppressor agent and increases the incidence of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), moderate regular exercise has been associated with significant disease protection and is a complementary treatment of many chronic diseases. The effects of chronic exercise occur because physical training can induce several physiological, biochemical and psychological adaptations. More recently, the effect of acute exercise and training on the immunological system has been discussed, and many studies suggest the importance of the immune system in prevention and partial recovery in pathophysiological situations. Currently, there are two important hypotheses that may explain the effects of exercise and training on the immune system. These hypotheses including (1) the effect of exercise upon hormones and cytokines (2) because exercise can modulate glutamine concentration. In this review, we discuss the hypothesis that exercise may modulate immune functions and the importance of exercise immunology in respect to chronic illnesses, chronic heart failure, malnutrition and inflammation. PMID:20976509

  12. Immunological recognition of cuticular transplants in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackie, A M

    1983-01-01

    Transplantation of allogeneic and xenogeneic cuticle onto the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, was carried out in order to compare the specificity of immune recognition of these 'skin grafts' with that of implanted tissues. In order to facilitate interpretation of results, the technique of transplanting cuticle from nymphal donors onto nymphal recipients was adopted - if donor subcuticular epidermis is not recognised as 'foreign', it will grow, fuse with the recipient's epidermal sheet and will be stimulated by the recipient's hormonal signals to produce new cuticle of donor type at the next moult. Neither allogeneic cuticle nor xenogeneic cuticle from Blatta orientalis were recognised as foreign by the immune system of P. americana - dark patches of Blatta-type cuticle were produced at the graft site post-moult. Conversely, xenogeneic cuticle of Blaberus craniifer was not visible post-moult. These results corroborate those from implantation studies, that allogeneic tissues from P. americana and xenogeneic tissues from B. orientalis are immunologically compatible with P. americana, whereas xenogeneic tissue from Blaberus craniifer is incompatible. Whether this incompatibility is immunological or 'positional' has not yet been determined; the observation that xenografts from Nauphoeta cinerea do not reappear on P. americana post-moult, whereas 50% of N. cinerea implants are not recognised as 'foreign', suggests that 'positional incompatibility' (i.e. the signals responsible for formation of cuticular pattern are incorrect for the donor epidermis) may also play an important part in the rejection of N. cinerea cuticular grafts. PMID:6341106

  13. Adsorption orientations and immunological recognition of antibodies on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhena, J. G.; Dumitru, A. C.; Herruzo, Elena T.; Mendieta-Moreno, Jesús I.; Garcia, Ricardo; Serena, P. A.; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid are combined to characterize the adsorption of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies over a hydrophobic surface modeled with a three-layer graphene slab. We consider explicitly the water solvent, simulating systems with massive sizes (up to 770 000 atoms), for four different adsorption orientations. Protocols based on steered MD to speed up the protein diffusion stage and to enhance the dehydration process are combined with long simulation times (>150 ns) in order to make sure that the final adsorption states correspond to actual stable configurations. Our MD results and the AFM images demonstrate that the IgG antibodies are strongly adsorbed, do not unfold, and retain their secondary and tertiary structures upon deposition. Statistical analysis of the AFM images shows that many of the antibodies adopt vertical orientations, even at very small coverages, which expose at least one Fab binding site for recognition events. Single molecule force spectroscopy experiments demonstrate the immunological response of the deposited antibodies by recognizing its specific antigens. The above properties together with the strong anchoring and preservation of the secondary structure, make graphene an excellent candidate for the development of immunosensors.Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid are combined to characterize the adsorption of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies over a hydrophobic surface modeled with a three-layer graphene slab. We consider explicitly the water solvent, simulating systems with massive sizes (up to 770 000 atoms), for four different adsorption orientations. Protocols based on steered MD to speed up the protein diffusion stage and to enhance the dehydration process are combined with long simulation times (>150 ns) in order to make sure that the final adsorption states correspond to actual stable configurations. Our

  14. SNP Analysis and Whole Exome Sequencing: Their Application in the Analysis of a Consanguineous Pedigree Segregating Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Nickerson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia encompasses a large and heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. We employed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP analysis and whole exome sequencing to investigate a consanguineous Maori pedigree segregating ataxia. We identified a novel mutation in exon 10 of the SACS gene: c.7962T>G p.(Tyr2654*, establishing the diagnosis of autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS. Our findings expand both the genetic and phenotypic spectrum of this rare disorder, and highlight the value of high-density SNP analysis and whole exome sequencing as powerful and cost-effective tools in the diagnosis of genetically heterogeneous disorders such as the hereditary ataxias.

  15. Clinical and genetic analysis of a four-generation family with a distinct autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelhaas, H J; Ippel, P F; Hageman, G; Sinke, R J; van der Laan, E N; Beemer, F A

    2001-01-01

    The autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCAs) are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterised by progressive cerebellar dysfunction in combination with a variety of other associative features. Since 1993 ADCAs have been increasingly characterised in terms of their genetic

  16. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia: a complex phenotype associated with a new SPG4 gene mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Johnson, B; Koefoed, Pernille;

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria, unip...... relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations...

  17. The size of the thymus: an important immunological diagnostic tool?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dorthe Lisbeth

    2003-01-01

    of the thymus relevant to its function and could measurement of the thymus be a useful immunological diagnostic tool in the investigation of thymic function in humans with a depressed immune system? Conclusion: Studies using the size of the thymus as an immunological diagnostic tool should be encouraged....

  18. 42 CFR 493.837 - Standard; General immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; General immunology. 493.837 Section 493.837 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.837 Standard; General immunology. (a) Failure to attain a score of at least 80...

  19. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complement components immunological test system....5240 Complement components immunological test system. (a) Identification. A complement components... complement components C1q, C1r, C1s, C2, C3, C4, C5, C6, C7, C8, and C9, in serum, other body fluids,...

  20. X-linked congenital ataxia: a new locus maps to Xq25-q27.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanni, Ginevra; Bertini, Enrico; Bellcross, Cecelia; Nedelec, Brigitte; Froyen, Guy; Neuhäuser, Gerhard; Opitz, John M; Chelly, Jamel

    2008-03-01

    We report clinical and molecular studies on a large American family of Norwegian descent with X-linked nonprogressive congenital ataxia (XCA) in six affected males over three generations. Neuroimaging showed global cerebellar hypoplasia without evidence of supratentorial anomalies. Linkage analysis resulted in a maximum LOD score Z = 3.44 for marker DXS1192 at Theta = 0.0 with flanking markers DXS1047 and DXS1227 defining a region of 12 cM in Xq25-q27.1. The clinical and neuroradiological findings in the present family are very similar to those described in two reported X-linked families [Illarioshkin et al., 1996; Bertini et al., 2000]; however, the newly identified locus does not overlap with the one defined previously, indicating that there are at least two genes responsible for this rare form of X-linked congenital cerebellar ataxia with normal intelligence.

  1. Late onset autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia a family description and linkage analysis with the hla system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter O. Arruda

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available A family suffering an autosomal dominant form of late onset hereditary cerebellar ataxia is described. Eight affected family members were personally studied, and data from another four were obtained through anamnesis. The mean age of onset was 37.1±5.4 years (27-47 years. The clinical picture consisted basically of a pure ataxic cerebellar syndrome. CT-scan disclosed diffuse cerebellar atrophy with relative sparing of the brainstem (and no involvement of supratentorial structures. Neurophysiological studies (nerve conduction, VEP and BAEP were normal. Twenty-six individuals were typed for HLA histocompatibility antigens. Lod scores were calculated with the computer program LINKMAP. Close linkage of the ataxia gene with the HLA system in this family could be excluded - 0==0,02, z=(-2,17 - and the overall analysis of the lod scores suggest another chromossomal location than chromosome 6.

  2. A case of midbrain infarction with acute bilateral cerebellar ataxia visualized by diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, Yuka; Kawabori, Masahito; Oura, Daisuke; Niiya, Yoshimasa; Iwasaki, Motoyuki; Mabuchi, Shoji

    2016-08-31

    An 85-year-old woman with hypertension was admitted with a sudden onset of gait disturbance and dysarthria. On admission, the patient showed severe bilateral cerebellar ataxia with moderate right medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) syndrome. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed an acute infarction in the lower and medial part of midbrain. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) started from both cerebellar peduncles revealed that the lesion of the acute infarction matched the decussation of superior cerebellar peduncle where crossing of tract was seen and a part of its tract was interrupted at the site. Interruption of the cerebellum red nuclear path at the medial part of midbrain was considered to be the reason for bilateral cerebellar ataxia and visualization of cerebellum red nuclear path by DTI can give better understanding of the neurological symptom. PMID:27477572

  3. Familial cosegregation of manic-depressive illness and a form of hereditary cerebellar ataxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piqueras, J.F.; Santos, J.; Puertollano, R. [Universidad Autonoma, Madrid (Spain)] [and others

    1995-06-19

    We report on a Spanish family with co-occurrence of manic-depression and a form of hereditary cerebellar ataxia. All affected individuals in the second generation showed cerebellar ataxia and manic-depression simultaneously. Since anticipation has been described in both disorders and the pattern of segregation may be autosomal as well as X-linked, we have searched for a possible involvement of two candidate genes which are located either on an autosome (SCA1) or on the X-chromosome (GABRA3). We concluded that expansion of trinucleotide repeats at SCA1 gene cannot be considered as a disease-causing mutation, and this gene should be initially discarded. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Medical immunology: two-way bridge connecting bench and bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkers, Ger T; Damoiseaux, Jan G M C; Hooijkaas, Herbert

    2014-12-01

    Medical immunology in The Netherlands is a laboratory specialism dealing with immunological analyses as well as pre- and post-analytical consultation to clinicians (clinical immunologists and other specialists) involved in patients with immune mediated diseases. The scope of medical immunology includes immunodeficiencies, autoimmune diseases, allergy, transfusion and transplantation immunology, and lymphoproliferative disorders plus the monitoring of these patients. The training, professional criteria, quality control of procedures and laboratories is well organized. As examples of the bridge function of medical immunology between laboratory (bench) and patient (bedside) the contribution of medical immunologists to diagnosis and treatment of primary immunodeficiency diseases (in particular: humoral immunodeficiencies) as well as autoantibodies (anti-citrullinated proteins in rheumatoid arthritis) are given.

  5. Immunology of term and preterm labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peltier Morgan R

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During pregnancy there is an alteration in maternal immunity within the uterus where innate, proinflammatory immune responses are tightly regulated to prevent immunological rejection of the fetal allograft. Disruption of the delicate balance of cytokines by bacteria or other factors increases the production of proinflammatory cytokines at the maternal-fetal interface and activates the parturition mechanism prematurely. Despite years of searching, there is still no broadly effective strategy for preventing preterm labor and most therapies are directed at inhibiting myometrial contractions and improving neonatal outcome. Recent studies with progestins and interleukin-10 (IL-10, however, are showing promise in randomized clinical trials and animal studies. Furthermore, the identification of the Toll-like receptors as upstream mediators of inflammation may offer alternative therapeutic targets for preventing this common pregnancy complication.

  6. Immunological parameters in girls with Turner syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnusson Carl GM

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Disturbances in the immune system has been described in Turner syndrome, with an association to low levels of IgG and IgM and decreased levels of T- and B-lymphocytes. Also different autoimmune diseases have been connected to Turner syndrome (45, X, thyroiditis being the most common. Besides the typical features of Turner syndrome (short stature, failure to enter puberty spontaneously and infertility due to ovarian insufficiency ear problems are common (recurrent otitis media and progressive sensorineural hearing disorder. Levels of IgG, IgA, IgM, IgD and the four IgG subclasses as well as T- and B-lymphocyte subpopulations were investigated in 15 girls with Turners syndrome to examine whether an immunodeficiency may be the cause of their high incidence of otitis media. No major immunological deficiency was found that could explain the increased incidence of otitis media in the young Turner girls.

  7. Unifying immunology with informatics and multiscale biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Brian A; Peters, Lauren A; Schadt, Eric E; Dudley, Joel T

    2014-02-01

    The immune system is a highly complex and dynamic system. Historically, the most common scientific and clinical practice has been to evaluate its individual components. This kind of approach cannot always expose the interconnecting pathways that control immune-system responses and does not reveal how the immune system works across multiple biological systems and scales. High-throughput technologies can be used to measure thousands of parameters of the immune system at a genome-wide scale. These system-wide surveys yield massive amounts of quantitative data that provide a means to monitor and probe immune-system function. New integrative analyses can help synthesize and transform these data into valuable biological insight. Here we review some of the computational analysis tools for high-dimensional data and how they can be applied to immunology. PMID:24448569

  8. Overcoming immunological barriers in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewski, Johannes L; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Hubbell, Jeffrey A

    2014-08-01

    Regenerative therapies that use allogeneic cells are likely to encounter immunological barriers similar to those that occur with transplantation of solid organs and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Decades of experience in clinical transplantation hold valuable lessons for regenerative medicine, offering approaches for developing tolerance-induction treatments relevant to cell therapies. Outside the field of solid-organ and allogeneic HSC transplantation, new strategies are emerging for controlling the immune response, such as methods based on biomaterials or mimicry of antigen-specific peripheral tolerance. Novel biomaterials can alter the behavior of cells in tissue-engineered constructs and can blunt host immune responses to cells and biomaterial scaffolds. Approaches to suppress autoreactive immune cells may also be useful in regenerative medicine. The most innovative solutions will be developed through closer collaboration among stem cell biologists, transplantation immunologists and materials scientists. PMID:25093888

  9. The contribution of the cerebellum to cognition in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Freya E.; Manon Grube; Elsegood, Kelly J.; Welch, John L.; Kelly, Thomas P.; Chinnery, Patrick F; Griffiths, Timothy D

    2010-01-01

    This study sought evidence for a specific cerebellar contribution to cognition by characterising the cognitive phenotype of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 (SCA-6); an autosomal dominant genetic disease which causes a highly specific late-onset cerebellar degeneration. A comprehensive neuropsychological assessment was administered to 27 patients with genetically confirmed SCA-6. General intellectual ability, memory and executive function were examined using internationally standardised tests (W...

  10. Congenital malformations and developmental disabilities in ataxia-telangiectasia, Fanconi anemia, and xeroderma pigmentosum families.

    OpenAIRE

    Welshimer, K; Swift, M

    1982-01-01

    Heterozygous carriers of an ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), Fanconi anemia (FA), or xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) gene may be predisposed to some of the same congenital malformations or developmental disabilities that are common among homozygotes. To test this hypothesis, medical records, death certificates, and questionnaires from 27 A-T families, 25 FA families, and 31 XP families were reviewed. Eleven XP blood relatives (out of 1,100) were found with moderate or severe unexplained mental retarda...

  11. Autosomal dominant ataxia: Genetic evidence for locus heterogeneity from a cuban founder-effect population

    OpenAIRE

    Auburger, Georg; Diaz, Guillermo Orozco; Capote, Raul Ferreira; Sanchez, Suzana Gispert; Perez, Marta Paradoa; del Cueto, Marianela Estrada; Meneses, Mirna Garcia; Farrall, Martin; Williamson, Robert; Chamberlain, Susan; Baute, Luis Heredero

    1990-01-01

    The locus for autosomal dominant ataxia with a diagnosis of olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy at autopsy has been previously assigned to chromosome 6p. However, evidence for two alternative locations has been reported. We have recently described a large potential founder-effect population of such patients in the Holguin province of Cuba. With an estimated 1,000 patients available for analysis, this extensive cluster of families provides a unique opportunity for the definitive localization of the...

  12. Conjunctival Telangiectasia in a Patient with Ataxia Telangiectasia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özge Pınar Akarsu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to report a 7-year-old patient who developed bilateral conjunctival hyperemia while being under treatment of pneumonia in Pediatric Infectious Diseases Clinic at Sisli Etfal Training and Research Hospital. Ophthalmological examination revealed bilateral conjunctival telangiectasias which were thought to be the ophthalmologic sign of ataxia telangiectasia after considering the other clinical findings, laboratory and imaging results, and family history. (Turk J Oph thal mol 2012; 42: 75-7

  13. KCNJ10 gene mutations causing EAST syndrome (epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and tubulopathy) disrupt channel function

    OpenAIRE

    Reichold, Markus; Zdebik, Anselm A.; Lieberer, Evelyn; Rapedius, Markus; Schmidt, Katharina; Bandulik, Sascha; Sterner, Christina; Tegtmeier, Ines; Penton, David; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Hulton, Sally-Anne; Witzgall, Ralph; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Howie, Alexander J.; Kleta, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of the KCNJ10 (Kir4.1) K+ channel underlie autosomal recessive epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and (a salt-wasting) renal tubulopathy (EAST) syndrome. We investigated the localization of KCNJ10 and the homologous KCNJ16 in kidney and the functional consequences of KCNJ10 mutations found in our patients with EAST syndrome. Kcnj10 and Kcnj16 were found in the basolateral membrane of mouse distal convoluted tubules, connecting tubules, and cortical collecting ducts. In the hu...

  14. Cluster Analysis of Finger-to-nose Test for Spinocerebellar Ataxia Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Velázquez Mariño, Michel; Atencia, Miguel; García Bermúdez, Rodolfo; Pupo-Ricardo, Daniel; Becerra García, Roberto; Velázquez Pérez, Luis; Sandoval, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    El test Finger-to-nose test (FNT) es una evaluación neurológica para estudiar la coordinación. Se presenta una metodología de análisis de datos de FNT, que permite evaluar la evolución del estado de enfermos de Ataxia Espinocerebral de tipo 2 (SCA2), mediante técnicas de aprendizaje computacional.

  15. Familial cerebellar ataxia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: evidence for hypothalamic LHRH deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berciano, J; Amado, J A; Freijanes, J; Rebollo, M; Vaquero, A

    1982-01-01

    A family with familial cerebellar ataxia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is described. The condition was inherited as an autosomal recessive defect. CT scan in one case revealed cerebellar and brain stem atrophy. Endocrinological tests showed abnormalities only in two patients who were clinically affected. In both cases raised gonadotropic levels were found after repetitive stimulation with luteining hormone-releasing hormone which suggests that the hypogonadism was due to a primary hypothalamic disturbance. Images PMID:6813427

  16. Rehabilitation for Ataxia Following Chemotherapy for Burkitt Lymphoma Involving the Rectum

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyoung Seop; Jung, Chul Oh; Jeon, Ha Ra; Sung, Lee Ho

    2012-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma is a type of B-cell lymphoma that occurs mostly in children, and rarely in adults. The sporadic type is known to occur mostly at the ileum and cecum. Cytarabine, which is used for central nervous system prophylaxis during chemotherapy for Burkitt lymphoma, has known neurotoxicity, and its side effects include motor ataxia due to cerebellar injury, ataxic dysarthria, dysfunction of ocular movement, confusion, somnolence and lethargy. This case report is about a patient diagnos...

  17. Generation and characterisation of Friedreich ataxia YG8R mouse fibroblast and neural stem cell models

    OpenAIRE

    Chiranjeevi Sandi; Madhavi Sandi; Harvinder Jassal; Vahid Ezzatizadeh; Sara Anjomani-Virmouni; Sahar Al-Mahdawi; Pook, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by GAA repeat expansion in the first intron of the FXN gene, which encodes frataxin, an essential mitochondrial protein. To further characterise the molecular abnormalities associated with FRDA pathogenesis and to hasten drug screening, the development and use of animal and cellular models is considered essential. Studies of lower organisms have already contributed to understanding FRDA disease pat...

  18. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) is not required for telomerase-mediated elongation of short telomeres

    OpenAIRE

    Feldser, David; Strong, Margaret A.; Greider, Carol W

    2006-01-01

    Telomerase-mediated telomere addition counteracts telomere shortening due to incomplete DNA replication. Short telomeres are the preferred substrate for telomere addition by telomerase; however, the mechanism by which telomerase recognizes short telomeres is unclear. In yeast, the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) homolog, Tel1, is necessary for normal telomere length regulation likely by altering telomere structure, allowing telomerase recruitment to short telomeres. To examine the role of...

  19. FXN Promoter Silencing in the Humanized Mouse Model of Friedreich Ataxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh K Chutake

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia is caused by an expanded GAA triplet-repeat sequence in intron 1 of the FXN gene that results in epigenetic silencing of the FXN promoter. This silencing mechanism is seen in patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells but it remains unknown if it is a widespread phenomenon affecting multiple cell types and tissues.The humanized mouse model of Friedreich ataxia (YG8sR, which carries a single transgenic insert of the human FXN gene with an expanded GAA triplet-repeat in intron 1, is deficient for FXN transcript when compared to an isogenic transgenic mouse lacking the expanded repeat (Y47R. We found that in YG8sR the deficiency of FXN transcript extended both upstream and downstream of the expanded GAA triplet-repeat, suggestive of deficient transcriptional initiation. This pattern of deficiency was seen in all tissues tested, irrespective of whether they are known to be affected or spared in disease pathogenesis, in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues, and in cultured primary fibroblasts. FXN promoter function was directly measured via metabolic labeling of newly synthesized transcripts in fibroblasts, which revealed that the YG8sR mouse was significantly deficient in transcriptional initiation compared to the Y47R mouse.Deficient transcriptional initiation accounts for FXN transcriptional deficiency in the humanized mouse model of Friedreich ataxia, similar to patient-derived cells, and the mechanism underlying promoter silencing in Friedreich ataxia is widespread across multiple cell types and tissues.

  20. Bladder Wall Telangiectasia in a Patient with Ataxia-Telangiectasia and How to Manage?

    OpenAIRE

    Fatma Deniz Aygün; Serdar Nepesov; Haluk Çokuğraş; Yıldız Camcıoğlu

    2015-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare neurodegenerative, inherited disease causing severe morbidity. Oculocutaneous telangiectasias are almost constant findings among the affected cases as telangiectasia is considered the main clinical finding for diagnosis. Vascular abnormalities in organs have been reported infrequently but bladder wall telangiectasias are extremely rare. We aimed to report recurrent hemorrhage from bladder wall telangiectasia in a 9-year-old boy with A-T who had received i...