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Sample records for at1 receptor supports

  1. The human angiotensin AT(1) receptor supports G protein-independent extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation and cellular proliferation

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    Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Aplin, Mark; Hansen, Jonas Tind

    2008-01-01

    The angiotensin AT(1) receptor is a key regulator of blood pressure and body fluid homeostasis, and it plays a key role in the pathophysiology of several cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, congestive heart failure, and arrhythmia. The importance of human angiotensi...

  2. Sympatho-inhibitory properties of various AT1 receptor antagonists

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    Balt, Jippe C.; Mathy, Marie-Jeanne; Pfaffendorf, Martin; van Zwieten, Peter A.

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that angiotensin II (Ang II) can facilitate the effects of sympathetic neurotransmission. In the present study, using various experimental models, we investigated the inhibitory effects of several Ang II subtype 1 receptor (AT1) antagonists on this Ang II-induced facilitation. We

  3. Functionally Selective AT(1) Receptor Activation Reduces Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

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    Hostrup, Anders; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Bentzen, Bo Hjort

    2012-01-01

    of the physiological functions of AngII. The AT(1)R mediates its effects through both G protein-dependent and independent signaling, which can be separated by functionally selective agonists. In the present study we investigate the effect of AngII and the ß-arrestin biased agonist [SII]AngII on ischemia......]AngII had a protective effect. Together these results demonstrate a cardioprotective effect of simultaneous blockade of G protein signaling and activation of G protein independent signaling through AT(1 )receptors....

  4. Pharmacological significance of the interplay between angiotensin receptors: MAS receptors as putative final mediators of the effects elicited by angiotensin AT1 receptors antagonists.

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    Pernomian, Larissa; Pernomian, Laena; Gomes, Mayara S; da Silva, Carlos H T P

    2015-12-15

    The interplay between angiotensin AT1 receptors and MAS receptors relies on several inward regulatory mechanisms from renin-angiotensin system (RAS) including the functional crosstalk between angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-7), the competitive AT1 antagonism exhibited by angiotensin-(1-7), the antagonist feature assigned to AT1/MAS heterodimerization on AT1 signaling and the AT1-mediated downregulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Recently, such interplay has acquired an important significance to RAS Pharmacology since a few studies have supporting strong evidences that MAS receptors mediate the effects elicited by AT1 antagonists. The present Perspective provides an overview of the regulatory mechanisms involving AT1 and MAS receptors, their significance to RAS Pharmacology and the future directions on the interplay between angiotensin receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. AT1 Receptor Gene Polymorphisms in relation to Postprandial Lipemia

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    B. Klop

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recent data suggest that the renin-angiotensin system may be involved in triglyceride (TG metabolism. We explored the effect of the common A1166C and C573T polymorphisms of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R gene on postprandial lipemia. Methods. Eighty-two subjects measured daytime capillary TG, and postprandial lipemia was estimated as incremental area under the TG curve. The C573T and A1166C polymorphisms of the AT1R gene were determined. Results. Postprandial lipemia was significantly higher in homozygous carriers of the 1166-C allele (9.39±8.36 mM*h/L compared to homozygous carriers of the 1166-A allele (2.02±6.20 mM*h/L (P<0.05. Postprandial lipemia was similar for the different C573T polymorphisms. Conclusion. The 1166-C allele of the AT1R gene seems to be associated with increased postprandial lipemia. These data confirm the earlier described relationships between the renin-angiotensin axis and triglyceride metabolism.

  6. The non-biphenyl-tetrazole angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonist eprosartan is a unique and robust inverse agonist of the active state of the AT1 receptor.

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    Takezako, Takanobu; Unal, Hamiyet; Karnik, Sadashiva S; Node, Koichi

    2018-03-23

    Conditions such as hypertension and renal allograft rejection are accompanied by chronic, agonist-independent, signalling by angiotensin II AT 1 receptors. The current treatment paradigm for these diseases entails the preferred use of inverse agonist AT 1 receptor blockers (ARBs). However, variability in the inverse agonist activities of common biphenyl-tetrazole ARBs for the active state of AT 1 receptors often leads to treatment failure. Therefore, characterization of robust inverse agonist ARBs for the active state of AT 1 receptors is necessary. To identify the robust inverse agonist for active state of AT 1 receptors and its molecular mechanism, we performed site-directed mutagenesis, competition binding assay, inositol phosphate production assay and molecular modelling for both ground-state wild-type AT 1 receptors and active-state N111G mutant AT 1 receptors. Although candesartan and telmisartan exhibited weaker inverse agonist activity for N111G- compared with WT-AT 1 receptors, only eprosartan exhibited robust inverse agonist activity for both N111G- and WT- AT 1 receptors. Specific ligand-receptor contacts for candesartan and telmisartan are altered in the active-state N111G- AT 1 receptors compared with the ground-state WT-AT 1 receptors, suggesting an explanation of their attenuated inverse agonist activity for the active state of AT 1 receptors. In contrast, interactions between eprosartan and N111G-AT 1 receptors were not significantly altered, and the inverse agonist activity of eprosartan was robust. Eprosartan may be a better therapeutic option than other ARBs. Comparative studies investigating eprosartan and other ARBs for the treatment of diseases caused by chronic, agonist-independent, AT 1 receptor activation are warranted. © 2018 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Immunohistochemical Localization of AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 Angiotensin II Receptor Subtypes in the Rat Adrenal, Pituitary, and Brain with a Perspective Commentary

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    Courtney Premer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II increases blood pressure and stimulates thirst and sodium appetite in the brain. It also stimulates secretion of aldosterone from the adrenal zona glomerulosa and epinephrine from the adrenal medulla. The rat has 3 subtypes of angiotensin II receptors: AT1a, AT1b, and AT2. mRNAs for all three subtypes occur in the adrenal and brain. To immunohistochemically differentiate these receptor subtypes, rabbits were immunized with C-terminal fragments of these subtypes to generate receptor subtype-specific antibodies. Immunofluorescence revealed AT1a and AT2 receptors in adrenal zona glomerulosa and medulla. AT1b immunofluorescence was present in the zona glomerulosa, but not the medulla. Ultrastructural immunogold labeling for the AT1a receptor in glomerulosa and medullary cells localized it to plasma membrane, endocytic vesicles, multivesicular bodies, and the nucleus. AT1b and AT2, but not AT1a, immunofluorescence was observed in the anterior pituitary. Stellate cells were AT1b positive while ovoid cells were AT2 positive. In the brain, neurons were AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 positive, but glia was only AT1b positive. Highest levels of AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 receptor immunofluorescence were in the subfornical organ, median eminence, area postrema, paraventricular nucleus, and solitary tract nucleus. These studies complement those employing different techniques to characterize Ang II receptors.

  8. Sympatholytic properties of several AT(1)-receptor antagonists in the isolated rabbit thoracic aorta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nap, Alexander; Balt, Jippe C.; Pfaffendorf, Martin; van Zwieten, Pieter A.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the facilitating effect of angiotensin II on sympathetic neurotransmission to quantitatively compare the sympatho-inhibitory potencies of the selective AT(1)-receptor antagonists losartan, irbesartan and telmisartan in the isolated rabbit thoracic aorta. Design To investigate

  9. Characterization of Angiotensin II Molecular Determinants Involved in AT1 Receptor Functional Selectivity.

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    Domazet, Ivana; Holleran, Brian J; Richard, Alexandra; Vandenberghe, Camille; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel; Leduc, Richard; Guillemette, Gaétan

    2015-06-01

    The octapeptide angiotensin II (AngII) exerts a variety of cardiovascular effects through the activation of the AngII type 1 receptor (AT1), a G protein-coupled receptor. The AT1 receptor engages and activates several signaling pathways, including heterotrimeric G proteins Gq and G12, as well as the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 pathway. Additionally, following stimulation, βarrestin is recruited to the AT1 receptor, leading to receptor desensitization. It is increasingly recognized that specific ligands selectively bind and favor the activation of some signaling pathways over others, a concept termed ligand bias or functional selectivity. A better understanding of the molecular basis of functional selectivity may lead to the development of better therapeutics with fewer adverse effects. In the present study, we developed assays allowing the measurement of six different signaling modalities of the AT1 receptor. Using a series of AngII peptide analogs that were modified in positions 1, 4, and 8, we sought to better characterize the molecular determinants of AngII that underlie functional selectivity of the AT1 receptor in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. The results reveal that position 1 of AngII does not confer functional selectivity, whereas position 4 confers a bias toward ERK signaling over Gq signaling, and position 8 confers a bias toward βarrestin recruitment over ERK activation and Gq signaling. Interestingly, the analogs modified in position 8 were also partial agonists of the protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent ERK pathway via atypical PKC isoforms PKCζ and PKCι. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  10. Heterogeneous Downregulation of Angiotensin II AT1-A and AT1-B Receptors in Arterioles in STZ-Induced Diabetic Rat Kidneys

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    Zsolt Razga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The renin granulation of kidney arterioles is enhanced in diabetes despite the fact that the level of angiotensin II in the diabetic kidney is elevated. Therefore, the number of angiotensin II AT1-A and AT1-B receptors in afferent and efferent arteriole’s renin-positive and renin-negative smooth muscle cells (SMC was estimated. Method. Immunohistochemistry at the electron microscopic level was combined with 3D stereological sampling techniques. Results. In diabetes the enhanced downregulation of AT1-B receptors in the renin-positive than in the renin-negative SMCs in both arterioles was resulted: the significant difference in the number of AT1 (AT1-A + AT1-B receptors between the two types of SMCs in the normal rats was further increased in diabetes and in contrast with the significant difference observed between the afferent and efferent arterioles in the normal animals, there was no such difference in diabetes. Conclusions. The enhanced downregulation of the AT1-B receptors in the renin-negative SMCs in the efferent arterioles demonstrates that the regulation of the glomerular filtration rate by the pre- and postglomerular arterioles is changed in diabetes. The enhanced downregulation of the AT1-B receptors in the renin-positive SMCs in the arterioles may result in an enhanced level of renin granulation in the arterioles.

  11. Evidence of changes in alpha-1/AT1 receptor function generated by diet-induced obesity.

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    Juarez, Esther; Tufiño, Cecilia; Querejeta, Enrique; Bracho-Valdes, Ismael; Bobadilla-Lugo, Rosa A

    2017-11-01

    To study whether hypercaloric diet-induced obesity deteriorates vascular contractility of rat aorta through functional changes in α 1 adrenergic and/or AT1 Angiotensin II receptors. Angiotensin II- or phenylephrine-induced contraction was tested on isolated aorta rings with and without endothelium from female Wistar rats fed for 7 weeks with hypercaloric diet or standard diet. Vascular expression of Angiotensin II Receptor type 1 (AT1R), Angiotensin II Receptor type 2 (AT2R), Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS) and endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS), as well as blood pressure, glucose, insulin and angiotensin II blood levels were measured. Diet-induced obesity did not significantly change agonist-induced contractions (Emax and pD 2 hypercaloric diet vs standard diet n.s.d.) of both intact (e+) or endothelium free (e-) vessels but significantly decrease both phenylephrine and angiotensin II contraction (Emax p obesity did not change angiotensin II AT1, AT2 receptor proteins expression but reduced COX-1 and NOS2 ( p obesity produces alterations in vascular adrenergic and angiotensin II receptor dynamics that suggest an endothelium-dependent adrenergic/angiotensin II crosstalk. These changes reflect early-stage vascular responses to obesity.

  12. The physiological role of AT1 receptors in the ventrolateral medulla

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    T. Tagawa

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurons in the rostral and caudal parts of the ventrolateral medulla (VLM play a pivotal role in the regulation of sympathetic vasomotor activity and blood pressure. Studies in several species, including humans, have shown that these regions contain a high density of AT1 receptors specifically associated with neurons that regulate the sympathetic vasomotor outflow, or the secretion of vasopressin from the hypothalamus. It is well established that specific activation of AT1 receptors by application of exogenous angiotensin II in the rostral and caudal VLM excites sympathoexcitatory and sympathoinhibitory neurons, respectively, but the physiological role of these receptors in the normal synaptic regulation of VLM neurons is not known. In this paper we review studies which have defined the effects of specific activation or blockade of these receptors on cardiovascular function, and discuss what these findings tell us with regard to the physiological role of AT1 receptors in the VLM in the tonic and phasic regulation of sympathetic vasomotor activity and blood pressure.

  13. Blockade of AT1 receptors by losartan did not affect renin gene expression in kidney medulla

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tybitanclová, K.; Szabová, L.; Grima, M.; Ingert, C.; Železná, Blanka; Zórad, Š.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2006), s. 43-51 ISSN 0231-5882 Grant - others:VEGA(SK) 2/5090/25 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : AT1 receptor * renin-angiotensin system * kidneys Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.771, year: 2006

  14. Prevention of atherosclerosis by specific AT1-receptor blockade with candesartan cilexetil

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    Vasilios Papademetriou

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Several studies indicate that blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS can prevent atherosclerosis and vascular events, but the precise mechanisms involved are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of the AT 1-receptor blocker, candesartan, in the prevention of atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidaemic (WHHL rabbits and also the effect of AT1-receptor blockade in the uptake of oxidised LDL by macrophage cell cultures. In the first set of experiments, 12 WHHL rabbits were randomly assigned to three groups: placebo, atenolol 5 mg/kg daily or candesartan 2 mg/kg daily for six months. Compared with controls and atenolol-treated rabbits, candesartan treatment resulted in a significant 50—60% reduction of atherosclerotic plaque formation and a 66% reduction in cholesterol accumulation in the thoracic aorta.Studies in macrophage cultures indicated that candesartan prevented uptake of oxidised LDL-(oxLDL-cholesterol by cultured macrophages. Candesartan inhibited the uptake of oxLDL in a dose-dependent manner, reaching a maximum inhibition of 70% at concentrations of 5.6 µg/ml. Further studies in other animal models and well-designed trials in humans are warranted to further explore the role of AT1-receptor blockade in the prevention of atherosclerosis.

  15. Two distinct calmodulin binding sites in the third intracellular loop and carboxyl tail of angiotensin II (AT(1A receptor.

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    Renwen Zhang

    Full Text Available In this study, we present data that support the presence of two distinct calmodulin binding sites within the angiotensin II receptor (AT(1A, at juxtamembrane regions of the N-terminus of the third intracellular loop (i3, amino acids 214-231 and carboxyl tail of the receptor (ct, 302-317. We used bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays to document interactions of calmodulin with the AT(1A holo-receptor and GST-fusion protein pull-downs to demonstrate that i3 and ct interact with calmodulin in a Ca²⁺-dependent fashion. The former is a 1-12 motif and the latter belongs to 1-5-10 calmodulin binding motif. The apparent Kd of calmodulin for i3 is 177.0±9.1 nM, and for ct is 79.4±7.9 nM as assessed by dansyl-calmodulin fluorescence. Replacement of the tryptophan (W219 for alanine in i3, and phenylalanine (F309 or F313 for alanine in ct reduced their binding affinities for calmodulin, as predicted by computer docking simulations. Exogenously applied calmodulin attenuated interactions between G protein βγ subunits and i3 and ct, somewhat more so for ct than i3. Mutations W219A, F309A, and F313A did not alter Gβγ binding, but reduced the ability of calmodulin to compete with Gβγ, suggesting that calmodulin and Gβγ have overlapping, but not identical, binding requirements for i3 and ct. Calmodulin interference with the Gβγ binding to i3 and ct regions of the AT(1A receptor strongly suggests that calmodulin plays critical roles in regulating Gβγ-dependent signaling of the receptor.

  16. Two Distinct Calmodulin Binding Sites in the Third Intracellular Loop and Carboxyl Tail of Angiotensin II (AT1A) Receptor

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    Zhang, Renwen; Liu, Zhijie; Qu, Youxing; Xu, Ying; Yang, Qing

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we present data that support the presence of two distinct calmodulin binding sites within the angiotensin II receptor (AT1A), at juxtamembrane regions of the N-terminus of the third intracellular loop (i3, amino acids 214–231) and carboxyl tail of the receptor (ct, 302–317). We used bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays to document interactions of calmodulin with the AT1A holo-receptor and GST-fusion protein pull-downs to demonstrate that i3 and ct interact with calmodulin in a Ca2+-dependent fashion. The former is a 1–12 motif and the latter belongs to 1-5-10 calmodulin binding motif. The apparent Kd of calmodulin for i3 is 177.0±9.1 nM, and for ct is 79.4±7.9 nM as assessed by dansyl-calmodulin fluorescence. Replacement of the tryptophan (W219) for alanine in i3, and phenylalanine (F309 or F313) for alanine in ct reduced their binding affinities for calmodulin, as predicted by computer docking simulations. Exogenously applied calmodulin attenuated interactions between G protein βγ subunits and i3 and ct, somewhat more so for ct than i3. Mutations W219A, F309A, and F313A did not alter Gβγ binding, but reduced the ability of calmodulin to compete with Gβγ, suggesting that calmodulin and Gβγ have overlapping, but not identical, binding requirements for i3 and ct. Calmodulin interference with the Gβγ binding to i3 and ct regions of the AT1A receptor strongly suggests that calmodulin plays critical roles in regulating Gβγ-dependent signaling of the receptor. PMID:23755207

  17. Estimation of the number of angiotensin II AT1 receptors in rat kidney afferent and efferent arterioles

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    Razga, Zsolt; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2007-01-01

    of angiotensin II AT1 receptors along the length of the arterioles and per arteriole, we combined immunoelectron microscopy with stereology. RESULTS: The number of AT1 receptor molecules was significantly lower in the renin-positive smooth muscle cells (SMCs) than in the renin-negative SMCs of the afferent...

  18. Cross talk between AT1 receptors and Toll-like receptor 4 in microglia contributes to angiotensin II-derived ROS production in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus.

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    Biancardi, Vinicia Campana; Stranahan, Alexis M; Krause, Eric G; de Kloet, Annette D; Stern, Javier E

    2016-02-01

    ANG II is thought to increase sympathetic outflow by increasing oxidative stress and promoting local inflammation in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus. However, the relative contributions of inflammation and oxidative stress to sympathetic drive remain poorly understood, and the underlying cellular and molecular targets have yet to be examined. ANG II has been shown to enhance Toll-like receptor (TLR)4-mediated signaling on microglia. Thus, in the present study, we aimed to determine whether ANG II-mediated activation of microglial TLR4 signaling is a key molecular target initiating local oxidative stress in the PVN. We found TLR4 and ANG II type 1 (AT1) receptor mRNA expression in hypothalamic microglia, providing molecular evidence for the potential interaction between these two receptors. In hypothalamic slices, ANG II induced microglial activation within the PVN (∼65% increase, P receptors and TLR4 in mediating ANG II-dependent microglial activation and oxidative stress within the PVN. More broadly, our results support a functional interaction between the central renin-angiotensin system and innate immunity in the regulation of neurohumoral outflows from the PVN. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Angiotensin II-AT1receptor signaling is necessary for cyclooxygenase-2–dependent postnatal nephron generation

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    Frölich, Stefanie; Slattery, Patrick; Thomas, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    was achievable. Plasma renin concentration in mouse pups showed a birth peak and a second peak around day P8 during the first 10 days post birth. Administration of the angiotensin II receptor AT1 antagonist telmisartan from day P1 to P3 did not result in cortical damage. However, telmisartan treatment from day P...... development. Inhibition of the renin angiotensin system by aliskiren and enalapril caused similar glomerular defects as telmisartan. Administration of the AT1 receptor agonist L162313 to COX-2-/- pups improved kidney growth, ameliorated renal defects, but had no beneficial effect on reduced cortical mass. L...

  20. The effects of repeated delivery of angiotensin II AT1 receptor antisense on distinct vasoactive systems in Ren-2 transgenic rats: young vs. adult animals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaněčková, Ivana; Dobešová, Zdenka; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Zicha, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 7 (2012), s. 761-768 ISSN 0916-9636 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110902; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/0259 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : AT(1) receptor * BP regulation * gene therapy * oligodeoxynucleotides * vasodilator and vasoconstrictor systems Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 2.791, year: 2012

  1. Edaravone inhibits pressure overload-induced cardiac fibrosis and dysfunction by reducing expression of angiotensin II AT1 receptor

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    Zhang WW

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wei-Wei Zhang,1,2 Feng Bai,1 Jin Wang,1 Rong-Hua Zheng,1 Li-Wang Yang,1 Erskine A James,3 Zhi-Qing Zhao1,4 1Department of Physiology, Shanxi Medical University, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Shanxi Provincial People’s Hospital, Taiyuan, Shanxi, China; 3Department of Internal Medicine, Navicent Health, Macon, 4Department of Basic Biomedical Sciences, Mercer University School of Medicine, Savannah, GA, USA Abstract: Angiotensin II (Ang II is known to be involved in the progression of ventricular dysfunction and heart failure by eliciting cardiac fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate whether treatment with an antioxidant compound, edaravone, reduces cardiac fibrosis and improves ventricular function by inhibiting Ang II AT1 receptor. The study was conducted in a rat model of transverse aortic constriction (TAC. In control, rats were subjected to 8 weeks of TAC. In treated rats, edaravone (10 mg/kg/day or Ang II AT1 receptor blocker, telmisartan (10 mg/kg/day was administered by intraperitoneal injection or gastric gavage, respectively, during TAC. Relative to the animals with TAC, edaravone reduced myocardial malonaldehyde level and increased superoxide dismutase activity. Protein level of the AT1 receptor was reduced and the AT2 receptor was upregulated, as evidenced by the reduced ratio of AT1 over AT2 receptor (0.57±0.2 vs 3.16±0.39, p<0.05 and less locally expressed AT1 receptor in the myocardium. Furthermore, the protein level of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 was upregulated. In coincidence with these changes, edaravone significantly decreased the populations of macrophages and myofibroblasts in the myocardium, which were accompanied by reduced levels of transforming growth factor beta 1 and Smad2/3. Collagen I synthesis was inhibited and collagen-rich fibrosis was attenuated. Relative to the TAC group, cardiac systolic function was preserved, as shown by increased left ventricular systolic pressure (204±51 vs 110±19

  2. Effects of LHRH and ANG II on prolactin stimulation are mediated by hypophysial AT1 receptor subtype.

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    Becú-Villalobos, D; Lacau-Mengido, I M; Thyssen, S M; Díaz-Torga, G S; Libertun, C

    1994-02-01

    We have used the nonpeptide angiotensin II (ANG II) receptor antagonists losartan (receptor subtype AT1) and PD-123319 (AT2) to determine the participation of ANG II receptor subtypes in luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH)-induced prolactin release in a perifusion study using intact pituitaries in vitro. LHRH (1.85 x 10(-7) M) released prolactin consistently, whereas losartan (10(-5) M) abolished prolactin response without modifying basal prolactin or luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) release. PD-123319 (10(-5) M) had no effect on basal or LHRH-induced prolactin, LH, or FSH release. We also determined that the effect of ANG II on prolactin release was mediated by the same receptor subtype. In adenohypophysial cells dispersed in vitro ANG II (10(-8) M) released prolactin. Losartan (10(-7) and 10(-6) M), but not PD-123319, inhibited this effect. We conclude that in intact hypophyses of 15-day-old female rats the effect of LHRH on prolactin release is readily demonstrated. LHRH-induced prolactin release appears to be mediated by ANG II acting in a paracrine manner on AT1 receptors located on lactotrophs.

  3. Interaction of a non-peptide agonist with angiotensin II AT1 receptor mutants

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    Costa-Neto, Claudio M; Miyakawa, Ayumi A; Pesquero, João B

    2002-01-01

    and inositol phosphate turnover assays in COS-7 cells transiently transfected with the wild-type and mutant forms of the receptor. Mutant receptors bore modifications in the extracellular region: T88H, Y92H, G1961, G196W, and D278E. Compound L-162,313 displaced [125I]-Sar1,Leu8-AngII from the mutants G196I...... and G196W with IC50 values similar to that of the wild-type. The affinity was, however, slightly affected by the D278E mutation and more significantly by the T88H and Y92H mutations. In inositol phosphate turnover assays, the ability of L-162,313 to trigger the activation cascade was compared...... with that of angiotensin II. These assays showed that the G196W mutant reached a relative maximum activation exceeding that of the wild-type receptor; the efficacy was slightly reduced in the G1961 mutant and further reduced in the T88H, Y92H, and D278E mutants. Our data suggest that residues of the extracellular domain...

  4. Evidence for a cyclic AMP-dependent pathway in angiotensin AT1-receptor activation of human omental arteries

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    Hoa Ytterberg

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced responses to vasoconstriction induced by neuropeptide Y and α2-adrenoceptor agonists have been seen following pharmacological activation of the adenylyl cyclase (AC system. Since preliminary studies revealed only minor responses to angiotensin II (Ang II in human omental arteries, we have investigated whether enhanced activity of AC may unravel further functional Ang II receptors. Human omental arteries were obtained in conjunction with elective gut surgery. After dissection of the vessel, the endothelium was removed by 10 sec of Triton X-100 treatment. Ring segments (1—2 mm long were mounted on a myograph and studied. Ang II produced small contractions, 27±5% relative to the response elicited by 60 mM K+. However, enhanced Ang II (105±10%, p<0.001 responses were seen during AC activation by forskolin (0.1—1 µM. This enhanced contractile response to Ang II was not inhibited by the angiotensin II type 2 (AT2-receptor antagonist PD 123319 (0.1 µM, but was blocked in an insurmountable way by the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1-receptor antagonist candesartan (1 nM and in a surmountable manner by losartan (0.1 µM and irbesartan (0.1 µM. Pertussis toxin (a Gi-protein blocker and the protein kinase C inhibitor, RO31—8220 (0.01, 0.1 and 1 µM, markedly reduced this response, while the protein kinase A inhibitor, H89 (1, 10 µM, had no effect. RT-PCR provided evidence for the presence of mRNA for both AT1- and AT2-receptors. The results suggest that both a cAMP-dependent and a cAMP-independent mechanism are involved in the contractile responses to Ang II in human omental arteries and that both responses are mediated via the AT1-receptor.

  5. Modeling of the Renal Kinetics of the AT1 Receptor Specific PET Radioligand [11C]KR31173

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    Nedim C. M. Gulaldi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The radioligand [11C]KR31173 has been introduced for PET imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor (AT1R. The purpose of the present project was to employ and validate a compartmental model for quantification of the kinetics of this radioligand in a porcine model of renal ischemia followed by reperfusion (IR. Procedures. Ten domestic pigs were included in the study: five controls and five experimental animals with IR of the left kidney. To achieve IR, acute ischemia was created with a balloon inserted into the left renal artery and inflated for 60 minutes. Reperfusion was achieved by deflation and removal of the balloon. Blood chemistries, urine specific gravity and PH values, and circulating hormones of the renin angiotensin system were measured and PET imaging was performed one week after IR. Cortical time-activity curves obtained from a 90 min [11C]KR31173 dynamic PET study were processed with a compartmental model that included two tissue compartments connected in parallel. Radioligand binding quantified by radioligand retention (80 min value to maximum value ratio was compared to the binding parameters derived from the compartmental model. A binding ratio was calculated as DVR=DVS/DVNS, where DVS and DVNS represented the distribution volumes of specific binding and nonspecific binding. Receptor binding was also determined by autoradiography in vitro. Results. Correlations between rate constants and binding parameters derived by the convolution and deconvolution curve fittings were significant (r>0.9. Also significant was the correlation between the retention parameter derived from the tissue activity curve (Yret and the retention parameter derived from the impulse response function (fret. Furthermore, significant correlations were found between these two retention parameters and DVR. Measurements with PET showed no significant changes in the radioligand binding parameters caused by IR, and these in vivo findings were

  6. Angiotensin II promotes development of the renal microcirculation through AT1 receptors

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    Madsen, Kirsten; Marcussen, Niels; Pedersen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacologic or genetic deletion of components of the renin-angiotensin system leads to postnatal kidney injury, but the roles of these components in kidney development are unknown. To test the hypothesis that angiotensin II supports angiogenesis during postnatal kidney development, we quantifie...

  7. A cleavable signal peptide enhances cell surface delivery and heterodimerization of Cerulean-tagged angiotensin II AT1 and bradykinin B2 receptor

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    Quitterer, Ursula, E-mail: ursula.quitterer@pharma.ethz.ch [Molecular Pharmacology Unit, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Pohl, Armin; Langer, Andreas; Koller, Samuel; AbdAlla, Said [Molecular Pharmacology Unit, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} A new FRET-based method detects AT1/B2 receptor heterodimerization. {yields} First time application of AT1-Cerulean as a FRET donor. {yields} Method relies on signal peptide-enhanced cell surface delivery of AT1-Cerulean. {yields} A high FRET efficiency revealed efficient heterodimerization of AT1/B2R proteins. {yields} AT1/B2R heterodimers were functionally coupled to desensitization mechanisms. -- Abstract: Heterodimerization of the angiotensin II AT1 receptor with the receptor for the vasodepressor bradykinin, B2R, is known to sensitize the AT1-stimulated response of hypertensive individuals in vivo. To analyze features of that prototypic receptor heterodimer in vitro, we established a new method that uses fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and applies for the first time AT1-Cerulean as a FRET donor. The Cerulean variant of the green fluorescent protein as donor fluorophore was fused to the C-terminus of AT1, and the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) as acceptor fluorophore was fused to B2R. In contrast to AT1-EGFP, the AT1-Cerulean fusion protein was retained intracellularly. To facilitate cell surface delivery of AT1-Cerulean, a cleavable signal sequence was fused to the receptor's amino terminus. The plasma membrane-localized AT1-Cerulean resembled the native AT1 receptor regarding ligand binding and receptor activation. A high FRET efficiency of 24.7% between membrane-localized AT1-Cerulean and B2R-EYFP was observed with intact, non-stimulated cells. Confocal FRET microscopy further revealed that the AT1/B2 receptor heterodimer was functionally coupled to receptor desensitization mechanisms because activation of the AT1-Cerulean/B2R-EYFP heterodimer with a single agonist triggered the co-internalization of AT1/B2R. Receptor co-internalization was sensitive to inhibition of G protein-coupled receptor kinases, GRKs, as evidenced by a GRK-specific peptide inhibitor. In agreement with efficient AT1/B2R

  8. A cleavable signal peptide enhances cell surface delivery and heterodimerization of Cerulean-tagged angiotensin II AT1 and bradykinin B2 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quitterer, Ursula; Pohl, Armin; Langer, Andreas; Koller, Samuel; AbdAlla, Said

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A new FRET-based method detects AT1/B2 receptor heterodimerization. → First time application of AT1-Cerulean as a FRET donor. → Method relies on signal peptide-enhanced cell surface delivery of AT1-Cerulean. → A high FRET efficiency revealed efficient heterodimerization of AT1/B2R proteins. → AT1/B2R heterodimers were functionally coupled to desensitization mechanisms. -- Abstract: Heterodimerization of the angiotensin II AT1 receptor with the receptor for the vasodepressor bradykinin, B2R, is known to sensitize the AT1-stimulated response of hypertensive individuals in vivo. To analyze features of that prototypic receptor heterodimer in vitro, we established a new method that uses fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and applies for the first time AT1-Cerulean as a FRET donor. The Cerulean variant of the green fluorescent protein as donor fluorophore was fused to the C-terminus of AT1, and the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) as acceptor fluorophore was fused to B2R. In contrast to AT1-EGFP, the AT1-Cerulean fusion protein was retained intracellularly. To facilitate cell surface delivery of AT1-Cerulean, a cleavable signal sequence was fused to the receptor's amino terminus. The plasma membrane-localized AT1-Cerulean resembled the native AT1 receptor regarding ligand binding and receptor activation. A high FRET efficiency of 24.7% between membrane-localized AT1-Cerulean and B2R-EYFP was observed with intact, non-stimulated cells. Confocal FRET microscopy further revealed that the AT1/B2 receptor heterodimer was functionally coupled to receptor desensitization mechanisms because activation of the AT1-Cerulean/B2R-EYFP heterodimer with a single agonist triggered the co-internalization of AT1/B2R. Receptor co-internalization was sensitive to inhibition of G protein-coupled receptor kinases, GRKs, as evidenced by a GRK-specific peptide inhibitor. In agreement with efficient AT1/B2R heterodimerization, confocal FRET imaging of

  9. Modelling of absorption, distribution and physicochemical properties of AT1 receptor antagonists / Modelovanie absorpcie, distribúcie a fyzikálnochemických vlastnosti antagonistov AT1 receptorov

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    Ježko Pavol

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical chemistry methods were used to elucidate absorption, distribution and physicochemical properties of AT1 receptor antagonists and dual angiotensin II and endothelin A receptor antagonist (PS-433540. Computed partition coefficients (ALOGPS method studied for drugs varied between 2.98 and 6.66. Neutral compounds are described as lipophilic drugs. Telmisartan is a drug with the highest lipophilicity. The neutral forms of the studied AT1 receptor antagonists are practically insoluble in water, and their computed solubilities is in interval between 2.04 and 22.65 mg/l (ALOGpS method. The calculated pKa values for tetrazolyle moiety are in the range 3.92-5.00 and for carboxylic moiety 3.12-5.50. Telmisartan (polar surface area = 72.95 A and irbesartan (polar surface area = 87.14 A belong to the AT1 receptor antagonists with increased absorption.

  10. Memory is preserved in older adults taking AT1 receptor blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jean K; Nation, Daniel A

    2017-04-26

    Prior work suggests that some but not all antihypertensive treatments may benefit cognition and risk for Alzheimer's disease, independent of stroke. Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) have been highlighted as one antihypertensive drug class that may confer greatest benefit. The participants comprised 1626 nondemented adults, aged 55-91 years, recruited from Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative sites. Three groups were compared: ARB users (HTN-ARBs), other antihypertensive drug users (HTN-Other), and normotensives. In post hoc analyses, we also examined (1) users of ARBs and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), (2) users of blood-brain barrier (BBB)-crossing ARBs and users of non-BBB-crossing ARBs, and (3) users of BBB-crossing ARBs and ACEIs (BBB crossers) and users of non-BBB-crossing ARBs and ACEIs (BBB noncrossers). Groups were compared regarding cognition and magnetic resonance imaging measures of brain volume and white matter hyperintensities (WMH), using analysis of covariance and multilevel models. At baseline, the HTN-Other group performed worse than normotensives on Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) Immediate Recall (p = 0.002), Delayed Recall (p Memory (p = 0.001), and Trails A (p Memory (p = 0.04) and worse than normotensives on Trails A (p = 0.04). The HTN-Other group performed worse than normotensives on Logical Memory Immediate (p = 0.02) and Delayed Recall over the 3-year follow-up (p = 0.007). Over the follow-up period, those taking BBB-crossing ARBs performed better than the HTN-Other group on AVLT Delayed Recall (p = 0.04), Logical Memory Immediate (p = 0.02), and Delayed Recall (p = 0.05). They also had fewer WMH than the HTN-Other group (p = 0.008) and those taking non-BBB-crossing ARBs (p = 0.05). There were no group differences in brain volume. Users of BBB-crossing medications (ARBs or ACEIs) showed better performance on AVLT Delayed Recall over time than all

  11. Functional enhancement of AT1R potency in the presence of the TPαR is revealed by a comprehensive 7TM receptor co-expression screen.

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    Jonas Tind Hansen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Functional cross-talk between seven transmembrane (7TM receptors can dramatically alter their pharmacological properties, both in vitro and in vivo. This represents an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutics that potentially target more specific biological effects while causing fewer adverse events. Although several studies convincingly have established the existence of 7TM receptor cross-talk, little is known about the frequencey and biological significance of this phenomenon. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate the extent of synergism in 7TM receptor signaling, we took a comprehensive approach and co-expressed 123 different 7TM receptors together with the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R and analyzed how each receptor affected the angiotensin II (AngII response. To monitor the effect we used integrative receptor activation/signaling assay called Receptor Selection and Amplification Technology (R-SAT. In this screen the thromboxane A2α receptor (TPαR was the only receptor which significantly enhanced the AngII-mediated response. The TPαR-mediated enhancement of AngII signaling was significantly reduced when a signaling deficient receptor mutant (TPαR R130V was co-expressed instead of the wild-type TPαR, and was completely blocked both by TPαR antagonists and COX inhibitors inhibiting formation of thromboxane A2 (TXA2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found a functional enhancement of AT1R only when co-expressed with TPαR, but not with 122 other 7TM receptors. In addition, the TPαR must be functionally active, indicating the AT1R enhancement is mediated by a paracrine mechanism. Since we only found one receptor enhancing AT1R potency, our results suggest that functional augmentation through 7TM receptor cross-talk is a rare event that may require specific conditions to occur.

  12. Changes in angiotensin AT1 receptor mRNA levels in the rat brain after immobilization stress and inhibition of central nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, A; Jurkovicova, D; Jezova, D; Krizanova, O

    2001-06-01

    To study functional interactions between angiotensin II AT1 receptors and nitric oxide (NO) activity in different brain areas in rats exposed to immobilization stress. Central inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was provided by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of (N-omega-nitro-L-arginine-methylester) L-NAME and analysis of AT1 receptor mRNA was performed using semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. The immobilization in prone position lasted 2 hrs and the rats were sacrificed 24 hr later. The hypothalamus, hippocampus, thalamus, and cortex were isolated from fresh brains. In the cortex, gene expression of AT1 receptors was unaffected either by L-NAME treatment, or by a single exposure to immobilization stress for 2 hours followed by 24 hours of rest. In the hippocampus, the repeated treatment with L-NAME increased mRNA levels of AT1 receptors approximately 9-times compared to those in the control (untreated) group. Immobilization also increased AT1 receptor mRNA levels in the hippocampus which was similar to that induced by the L-NAME. The increase of AT1 receptor mRNA levels in the hippocampus of immobilized rats was not further altered when the animals were pretreated with L-NAME. In control rats, exposure to immobilization resulted in a significant rise in mRNA levels coding for AT1 receptors in the hypothalamus, but not in the thalamus. L-NAME treatment showed a tendency of increase in AT1 receptor mRNA levels in the hypothalamus. Moreover, when animals treated with L-NAME were subjected to immobilization, a further increase in AT1 receptor mRNA levels was observed in the hypothalamus in comparison with corresponding controls. The present data indicate that a single immobilization stress results in increased gene expression of AT1 receptors in the hypothalamus and hippocampus. The rise in AT1 mRNA levels in the same brain structures after repeated treatment with L-NAME allow to suggest an

  13. Autoantibodies Targeting AT1 Receptor from Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome Upregulate Proinflammatory Cytokines Expression in Endothelial Cells Involving NF-κB Pathway

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    Weijuan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our study intended to prove whether agonistic autoantibodies to angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-AAs exist in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD and affect the human endothelial cell (HEC by upregulating proinflammatory cytokines expression involved in NF-κB pathway. Antibodies were determined by chronotropic responses of cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes coupled with receptor-specific antagonists (valsartan and AT1-EC2 as described previously. Interleukin-6 (IL-6, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1 expression were improved at both mRNA and protein levels in HEC, while NF-κB in the DNA level was improved detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA. These improvements could be inhibited by specific AT1 receptor blocker valsartan, NF-κB blocker pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, and specific short peptides from the second extracellular loop of AT1 receptor. These results suggested that AT1-AAs, via the AT1 receptor, induce expression of proinflammatory cytokines involved in the activation of NF-κB. AT1-AAs may play a great role in the pathogenesis of the acute coronary syndrome by mediating vascular inflammatory effects involved in the NF-κB pathway.

  14. AT1-receptor mediated vascular damage in myocardium, kidneys and liver in rats Lesão vascular mediada pelo receptor AT1 esses efeitos em miocárdio, rins e fígado de ratos

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    Maria do Carmo Fernandez Vailati

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The systemic aspect of vascular damage induced by angiotensin II (ANG II has been poorly explored in the literature. Considering the presence of ANG II and its specific receptor AT1, in several organs, all tissues might be potentially affected by its effects. The aims of this study were: To evaluate the early histological changes in the heart, liver and kidneys, produced by ANG II infusion, to evaluate the protective effect of losartan. Wistar rats were distributed into three groups: control (no treatment, treated with ANG II, and treated with ANG II + losartan. ANG II was continuously infused over 72 hours by subcutaneous osmotic pumps. Histological sections of the myocardium, kidneys and liver were stained and observed for the presence of necrosis. There were ANG II-induced perivascular inflammation and necrosis of the arteriolar wall in the myocardium, kidney, and liver by, which were partially prevented by losartan. There was no significant correlation between heart and kidney damage. Tissue lesion severity was lower than that of vascular lesions, without statistical difference between groups. ANG II causes vascular injury in the heart, kidneys and liver, indicating a systemic vasculotoxic effect; the mechanisms of damage/protection vary depending on the target organ; perivascular lesions may occur even when anti-hypertensive doses of losartan are used.O aspecto sistêmico da lesão vascular induzida pela angiotensina II (ANG II tem sido pouco explorada na literatura. Considerando a presença de ANG II e de seu receptor AT1 em diversos órgãos, todos os tecidos poderiam ser potencialmente afetados por esses efeitos. Os objetivos deste estudo foram: avaliar as alterações histológicas iniciais no coração, fígado e rins, produzidas pela infusão de ANG II, e avaliar o efeito protetor do losartan. Ratos Wistar foram divididos em três grupos: controle (sem tratamento, tratados com ANG II, e tratados com ANG II + losartan. A ANG II foi

  15. Pharmacogenetic Aspects of the Interaction of AT1 Receptor Antagonists With ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter ABCG2

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    Anne Ripperger

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 (BCRP and MXR is involved in the absorption, distribution, and elimination of numerous drugs. Thus, drugs that are able to reduce the activity of ABCG2, e.g., antihypertensive AT1 receptor antagonists (ARBs, may cause drug-drug interactions and compromise drug safety and efficacy. In addition, genetic variability within the ABCG2 gene may influence the ability of the transporter to interact with ARBs. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize the ARB-ABCG2 interaction in the light of naturally occurring variations (F489L, R482G or amino acid substitutions with in silico-predicted relevance for the ARB-ABCG2 interaction (Y469A; M483F; Y570A. For this purpose, ABCG2 variants were expressed in HEK293 cells and the impact of ARBs on ABCG2 activity was studied in vitro using the pheophorbide A (PhA efflux assay. First, we demonstrated that both the F489L and the Y469A substitution, respectively, reduced ABCG2 protein levels in these cells. Moreover, both substitutions enhanced the inhibitory effect of candesartan cilexetil, irbesartan, losartan, and telmisartan on ABCG2-mediated PhA efflux, whereas the R482G substitution blunted the inhibitory effect of candesartan cilexetil and telmisartan in this regard. In contrast, the ARB-ABCG2 interaction was not altered in cells expressing either the M483F or the Y570A variant, respectively. In conclusion, our data indicate that the third transmembrane helix and adjacent regions of ABCG2 may be of major importance for the interaction of ARBs with the ABC transporter. Moreover, we conclude from our data that individuals carrying the F489L polymorphism may be at increased risk of developing ABCG2-related drug-drug interactions in multi-drug regimens involving ARBs.

  16. Glucocorticoid effects on the programming of AT1b angiotensin receptor gene methylation and expression in the rat.

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    Irina Bogdarina

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Adverse events in pregnancy may 'programme' offspring for the later development of cardiovascular disease and hypertension. Previously, using a rodent model of programmed hypertension we have demonstrated the role of the renin-angiotensin system in this process. More recently we showed that a maternal low protein diet resulted in undermethylation of the At1b angiotensin receptor promoter and the early overexpression of this gene in the adrenal of offspring. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that maternal glucocorticoid modulates this effect on fetal DNA methylation and gene expression. We investigated whether treatment of rat dams with the 11beta-hydroxylase inhibitor metyrapone, could prevent the epigenetic and gene expression changes we observed. Offspring of mothers subjected to a low protein diet in pregnancy showed reduced adrenal Agtr1b methylation and increased adrenal gene expression as we observed previously. Treatment of mothers with metyrapone for the first 14 days of pregnancy reversed these changes and prevented the appearance of hypertension in the offspring at 4 weeks of age. As a control for non-specific effects of programmed hypertension we studied offspring of mothers treated with dexamethasone from day 15 of pregnancy and showed that, whilst they had raised blood pressure, they failed to show any evidence of Agtr1b methylation or increase in gene expression. We conclude that maternal glucocorticoid in early pregnancy may induce changes in methylation and expression of the Agtr1b gene as these are clearly reversed by an 11 beta-hydroxylase inhibitor. However in later pregnancy a converse effect with dexamethasone could not be demonstrated and this may reflect either an alternative mechanism of this glucocorticoid or a stage-specific influence.

  17. Effect of the AT1-receptor antagonists losartan, irbesartan, and telmisartan on angiotensin II-induced facilitation of sympathetic neurotransmission in the rat mesenteric artery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balt, J. C.; Mathy, M. J.; Nap, A.; Pfaffendorf, M.; van Zwieten, P. A.

    2001-01-01

    SUMMARY: The effect of the AT1-receptor antagonists losartan, irbesartan, and telmisartan on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced facilitation of noradrenergic neurotransmission was investigated in the isolated rat mesenteric artery under isometric conditions. Electrical field stimulation (2, 4, and 8

  18. Angiotensin II Type 1 receptor (AT1) signaling in astrocytes regulates synaptic degeneration-induced leukocyte entry to the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Füchtbauer, L; Groth-Rasmussen, Maria; Holm, Thomas Hellesøe

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes are the major cellular component of the blood-brain barrier glia limitans and act as regulators of leukocyte infiltration via chemokine expression. We have studied angiotensin-II receptor Type 1 (AT1) and related NF-κB signaling in astrocytes. Angiotensin II derives from cleavage of an...

  19. Angiotensin II receptor one (AT1) mediates dextrose induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and superoxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Michael J; Onstead-Haas, Luisa; Lee, Tracey; Torfah, Maisoon; Mooradian, Arshag D

    2016-10-01

    Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) has been implicated in diabetes-related vascular complications partly through oxidative stress. To determine the role of angiotensin II receptor subtype one (AT1) in dextrose induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, another cellular stress implicated in vascular disease. Human coronary artery endothelial cells with or without AT1 receptor knock down were treated with 27.5mM dextrose for 24h in the presence of various pharmacologic blockers of RAAS and ER stress and superoxide (SO) production were measured. Transfection of cells with AT1 antisense RNA knocked down cellular AT1 by approximately 80%. The ER stress was measured using the placental alkaline phosphatase (ES-TRAP) assay and western blot analysis of glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78), c-jun-N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1), phospho-JNK1, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) and phospho-eIF2α measurements. Superoxide (SO) generation was measured using the superoxide-reactive probe 2-methyl-6-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3,7-dihydroimidazo[1,2-A]pyrazin-3-one hydrochloride (MCLA) chemiluminescence. In cells with AT1 knock down, dextrose induced ER stress was significantly blunted and treatment with 27.5mM dextrose resulted in significantly smaller increase in SO production compared to 27.5mM dextrose treated and sham transfected cells. Dextrose induced ER stress was reduced with pharmacologic blockers of AT1 (losartan and candesartan) and mineralocorticoid receptor blocker (spironolactone) but not with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (captopril and lisinopril). The dextrose induced SO generation was inhibited by all pharmacologic blockers of RAAS tested. The results indicate that dextrose induced ER stress and SO production in endothelial cells are mediated at least partly through AT1 receptor activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Conformational Profiling of the AT1 Angiotensin II Receptor Reflects Biased Agonism, G Protein Coupling, and Cellular Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devost, Dominic; Sleno, Rory; Pétrin, Darlaine; Zhang, Alice; Shinjo, Yuji; Okde, Rakan; Aoki, Junken; Inoue, Asuka; Hébert, Terence E

    2017-03-31

    Here, we report the design and use of G protein-coupled receptor-based biosensors to monitor ligand-mediated conformational changes in receptors in intact cells. These biosensors use bioluminescence resonance energy transfer with Renilla luciferase (RlucII) as an energy donor, placed at the distal end of the receptor C-tail, and the small fluorescent molecule FlAsH as an energy acceptor, its binding site inserted at different positions throughout the intracellular loops and C-terminal tail of the angiotensin II type I receptor. We verified that the modifications did not compromise receptor localization or function before proceeding further. Our biosensors were able to capture effects of both canonical and biased ligands, even to the extent of discriminating between different biased ligands. Using a combination of G protein inhibitors and HEK 293 cell lines that were CRISPR/Cas9-engineered to delete Gα q , Gα 11 , Gα 12 , and Gα 13 or β-arrestins, we showed that Gα q and Gα 11 are required for functional responses in conformational sensors in ICL3 but not ICL2. Loss of β-arrestin did not alter biased ligand effects on ICL2P2. We also demonstrate that such biosensors are portable between different cell types and yield context-dependent readouts of G protein-coupled receptor conformation. Our study provides mechanistic insights into signaling events that depend on either G proteins or β-arrestin. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Antibodies against AT1 receptors are associated with vascular endothelial and smooth muscle function impairment: protective effects of hydroxysafflor yellow A.

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    Zhu Jin

    Full Text Available Ample evidence has shown that autoantibodies against AT1 receptors (AT1-AA are closely associated with human cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate mechanisms underlying AT1-AA-induced vascular structural and functional impairments in the formation of hypertension, and explore ways for preventive treatment. We used synthetic peptide corresponding to the sequence of the second extracellular loop of the AT1 receptor (165-191 to immunize rats and establish an active immunization model. Part of the model received preventive therapy by losartan (20 mg/kg/day and hyroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA (10 mg/kg/day. The result show that systolic blood pressure (SBP and heart rate (HR of immunized rats was significantly higher, and closely correlated with the plasma AT1-Ab titer. The systolic response of thoracic aortic was increased, but diastolic effects were attenuated markedly. Histological observation showed that the thoracic aortic endothelium of the immunized rats became thinner or ruptured, inflammatory cell infiltration, medial smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration, the vascular wall became thicker. There was no significant difference in serum antibody titer between losartan and HSYA groups and the immunized group. The vascular structure and function were reversed, and plasma biochemical parameters were also improved significantly in the two treatment groups. These results suggest that AT1-Ab could induce injury to vascular endothelial cells, and proliferation of smooth muscle cells. These changes were involved in the formation of hypertension. Treatment with AT1 receptor antagonists and anti oxidative therapy could block the pathogenic effect of AT1-Ab on vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells.

  2. Attenuation of myocardial fibrosis with curcumin is mediated by modulating expression of angiotensin II AT1/AT2 receptors and ACE2 in rats

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    Pang XF

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Xue-Fen Pang,1 Li-Hui Zhang,2 Feng Bai,1 Ning-Ping Wang,3 Ron E Garner,3 Robert J McKallip,4 Zhi-Qing Zhao1,3 1Department of Physiology, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Cardiology, Shanxi Academy of Medical Sciences and Shanxi Dayi Hospital, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Basic Biomedical Sciences, Mercer University School of Medicine, Savannah, GA, USA; 4Division of Basic Biomedical Sciences, Mercer University School of Medicine, Macon, GA, USA Abstract: Curcumin is known to improve cardiac function by balancing degradation and synthesis of collagens after myocardial infarction. This study tested the hypothesis that inhibition of myocardial fibrosis by curcumin is associated with modulating expression of angiotensin II (Ang II receptors and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2. Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to Ang II infusion (500 ng/kg/min using osmotic minipumps for 2 and 4 weeks, respectively, and curcumin (150 mg/kg/day was fed by gastric gavage during Ang II infusion. Compared to the animals with Ang II infusion, curcumin significantly decreased the mean arterial blood pressure during the course of the observation. The protein level of the Ang II type 1 (AT1 receptor was reduced, and the Ang II type 2 (AT2 receptor was up-regulated, evidenced by an increased ratio of the AT2 receptor over the AT1 receptor in the curcumin group (1.2±0.02% vs in the Ang II group (0.7±0.03%, P<0.05. These changes were coincident with less locally expressed AT1 receptor and enhanced AT2 receptor in the intracardiac vessels and intermyocardium. Along with these modulations, curcumin significantly decreased the populations of macrophages and alpha smooth muscle actin-expressing myofibroblasts, which were accompanied by reduced expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 and phosphorylated-Smad2/3. Collagen I synthesis was

  3. Left ventricular wall stress and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase gene expression in renal hypertensive rats: dose-dependent effects of ACE inhibition and AT1-receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierhut, W; Studer, R; Laurent, D; Kästner, S; Allegrini, P; Whitebread, S; Cumin, F; Baum, H P; de Gasparo, M; Drexler, H

    1996-05-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is associated with altered Ca2+ handling and may predispose to the development of LV dysfunction and cardiac failure. At the cellular level, the re-expression of ANF represents a well-established marker of myocyte hypertrophy while the decreased expression of the sarcoplasmatic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-ATPase is thought o play a crucial role in the alterations of Ca2+ handling and LV function. We assessed the dose-dependent effect of chronic ACE inhibition or AT1 receptor blockade on cardiac function in relation to the cardiac expression of the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase and ANF. Renal hypertensive rats (2K-1C) were treated for 12 weeks with three different doses of the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the AT1-receptor antagonist valsartan (each drug 0.3, 3, and 10 mg/kg per day i.p.) or placebo. LV dimensions, hypertrophy and wall stress were determined in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging and the gene expressions of ANF and SR Ca(2+)-ATPase were quantified by Northern blot. Low doses of both drugs did not affect blood pressure, hypertrophy, systolic wall stress and the ANF and SR Ca(2+)-ATPase gene expression. High doses of each drug reduced systolic blood pressure, wall stress, and LV hypertrophy to a similar extent and to values comparable to normotensive, age-matched rats. In addition, high dose treatment reduced LV end-systolic and end-diastolic volume as compared to untreated 2K-1C animals and normalized the mRNA levels of both ANF and SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (as compared to normotensive animals). We conclude that in this model, high doses of ACE inhibition and AT1-receptor blockade are necessary to normalize systolic blood pressure, LV hypertrophy and systolic LV wall stress which, in turn, is associated with restoration of a normal cardiac phenotype with respect to SR Ca(2+)-ATPase and ANF and normalization of cardiac function.

  4. Imidazole derivatives as angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockers: Benchmarks, drug-like calculations and quantitative structure-activity relationships modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloui, Mebarka; Belaidi, Salah; Othmani, Hasna; Jaidane, Nejm-Eddine; Hochlaf, Majdi

    2018-03-01

    We performed benchmark studies on the molecular geometry, electron properties and vibrational analysis of imidazole using semi-empirical, density functional theory and post Hartree-Fock methods. These studies validated the use of AM1 for the treatment of larger systems. Then, we treated the structural, physical and chemical relationships for a series of imidazole derivatives acting as angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockers using AM1. QSAR studies were done for these imidazole derivatives using a combination of various physicochemical descriptors. A multiple linear regression procedure was used to design the relationships between molecular descriptor and the activity of imidazole derivatives. Results validate the derived QSAR model.

  5. Valsartan independent of AT1 receptor inhibits tissue factor, TLR-2 and-4 expression by regulation of Egr-1 through activation of AMPK in diabetic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Yu Mi; Park, Eun Jung; Kang, Young Jin; Park, Sang Won; Kim, Hye Jung; Chang, Ki Churl

    2014-01-01

    Patients suffering from diabetes mellitus (DM) are at a severe risk of atherothrombosis. Early growth response (Egr)-1 is well characterized as a central mediator in vascular pathophysiology. We tested whether valsartan independent of Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) can reduce tissue factor (TF) and toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 and-4 by regulating Egr-1 in THP-1 cells and aorta in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. High glucose (HG, 15 mM) increased expressions of Egr-1, TF, TLR-2 and-4 which were significantly reduced by valsartan. HG increased Egr-1 expression by activation of PKC and ERK1/2 in THP-1 cells. Valsartan increased AMPK phosphorylation in a concentration and time-dependent manner via activation of LKB1. Valsartan inhibited Egr-1 without activation of PKC or ERK1/2. The reduced expression of Egr-1 by valsartan was reversed by either silencing Egr-1, or compound C, or DN-AMPK-transfected cells. Valsartan inhibited binding of NF-κB and Egr-1 to TF promoter in HG condition. Furthermore, valsartan reduced inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β) production and NF-κB activity in HG-activated THP-1 cells. Interestingly, these effects of valsartan were not affected by either silencing AT1R in THP-1 cells or CHO cells, which were devoid of AT1R. Importantly, administration of valsartan (20 mg/kg, i.p) for 8 weeks significantly reduced plasma TF activity, expression of Egr-1, TLR-2,-4 and TF in thoracic aorta and improved glucose tolerance of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Taken together, we concluded that valsartan may reduce atherothrombosis in diabetic conditions through AMPK/Egr-1 regulation. PMID:25109475

  6. Angiotensin II reduces cardiac AdipoR1 expression through AT1 receptor/ROS/ERK1/2/c-Myc pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    Full Text Available Adiponectin, an abundant adipose tissue-derived protein, exerts protective effect against cardiovascular disease. Adiponectin receptors (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 mediate the beneficial effects of adiponectin on the cardiovascular system. However, the alteration of AdipoRs in cardiac remodeling is not fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of angiotensin II (AngII on cardiac AdipoRs expression and explored the possible molecular mechanism. AngII infusion into rats induced cardiac hypertrophy, reduced AdipoR1 but not AdipoR2 expression, and attenuated the phosphorylations of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase, and those effects were all reversed by losartan, an AngII type 1 (AT1 receptor blocker. AngII reduced expression of AdipoR1 mRNA and protein in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, which was abolished by losartan, but not by PD123319, an AT2 receptor antagonist. The antioxidants including reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenger NAC, NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin, Nox2 inhibitor peptide gp91 ds-tat, and mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I inhibitor rotenone attenuated AngII-induced production of ROS and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2. AngII-reduced AdipoR1 expression was reversed by pretreatment with NAC, apocynin, gp91 ds-tat, rotenone, and an ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that AngII provoked the recruitment of c-Myc onto the promoter region of AdipoR1, which was attenuated by PD98059. Moreover, AngII-induced DNA binding activity of c-Myc was inhibited by losartan, NAC, apocynin, gp91 ds-tat, rotenone, and PD98059. c-Myc small interfering RNA abolished the inhibitory effect of AngII on AdipoR1 expression. Our results suggest that AngII inhibits cardiac AdipoR1 expression in vivo and in vitro and AT1 receptor/ROS/ERK1/2/c-Myc pathway is required for the downregulation of AdipoR1 induced by AngII.

  7. Angiotensin AT1-receptor blockers and cerebrovascular protection: do they actually have a cutting edge over angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oprisiu-Fournier, Roxana; Faure, Sébastien; Mazouz, Hakim

    2009-01-01

    First, an update of the vascular systemic and tissue renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is provided to explain how it is regulated at the systemic and tissue levels, and how many angiotensin peptides and receptors can be modulated by the various antihypertensive drugs. Second, experimental data...... stroke prevention trial PRoFESS, most trials support the hypothesis that angiotensin II-increasing drugs confer specific blood pressure-independent brain ischemia protection when compared with angiotensin II-decreasing drugs or placebo. A careful analysis of the PRoFESS trial, however, reveals study...

  8. Insight into the structural requirement of substituted quinazolinone biphenyl acylsulfonamides derivatives as Angiotensin II AT1 receptor antagonist: 2D and 3D QSAR approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh C. Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of 19 molecules substituted quinazolinone biphenyl acylsulfonamides derivatives displaying variable inhibition of Angiotensin II receptor AT1 activity were selected to develop models for establishing 2D and 3D QSAR. The compounds in the selected series were characterized by spatial, molecular and electro topological descriptors using QSAR module of Molecular Design Suite (VLife MDS™ 3.5. The best 2D QSAR model was selected, having correlation coefficient r2 (0.8056 and cross validated squared correlation coefficient q2 (0.6742 with external predictive ability of pred_r2 0.7583 coefficient of correlation of predicted data set (pred_r2se 0.2165. The results obtained from QSAR studies could be used in designing better Ang II activity among the congeners in future. The optimum QSAR model showed that the parameters SsssCHE index, SddCE-index, T_2_Cl_4, and SssNHE-index contributed in the model. 3D QSAR analysis by kNN-molecular field analysis approach developed based on principles of the k-nearest neighbor method combined with Genetic algorithms, stepwise forward variable selection approach; a leave-one-out cross-validated correlation coefficient (q2 of 0.6516 and a non-cross-validated correlation coefficient (r2 of 0.8316 and pred_r2 0.6954 were obtained. Contour maps using this approach showed that steric, electrostatic, and hydrophobic field effects dominantly determine binding affinities. The information rendered by 3D QSAR models may lead to a better understanding of structural requirements of Angiotensin II receptor and can help in the design of novel potent antihypertensive molecules.

  9. The AT1 Receptor Antagonist, L-158,809, Prevents or Ameliorates Fractionated Whole-Brain Irradiation-Induced Cognitive Impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, Mike E.; Payne, Valerie B.S.; Tommasi, Ellen B.S.; Diz, Debra I.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Brown, William R.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Olson, John; Zhao Weiling

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: We hypothesized that administration of the angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist, L-158,809, to young adult male rats would prevent or ameliorate fractionated whole-brain irradiation (WBI)-induced cognitive impairment. Materials and Methods: Groups of 80 young adult male Fischer 344 x Brown Norway (F344xBN) rats, 12-14 weeks old, received either: (1) fractionated WBI; 40 Gy of γ rays in 4 weeks, 2 fractions/week, (2) sham-irradiation; (3) WBI plus L-158,809 (20 mg/L drinking water) starting 3 days prior, during, and for 14, 28, or 54 weeks postirradiation; and (4) sham-irradiation plus L-158,809 for 14, 28, or 54 weeks postirradiation. An additional group of rats (n = 20) received L-158,809 before, during, and for 5 weeks postirradiation, after which they received normal drinking water up to 28 weeks postirradiation. Results: Administration of L-158,809 before, during, and for 28 or 54 weeks after fractionated WBI prevented or ameliorated the radiation-induced cognitive impairment observed 26 and 52 weeks postirradiation. Moreover, giving L-158,809 before, during, and for only 5 weeks postirradiation ameliorated the significant cognitive impairment observed 26 weeks postirradiation. These radiation-induced cognitive impairments occurred without any changes in brain metabolites or gross histologic changes assessed at 28 and 54 weeks postirradiation, respectively. Conclusions: Administering L-158,809 before, during, and after fractionated WBI can prevent or ameliorate the chronic, progressive, cognitive impairment observed in rats at 26 and 52 weeks postirradiation. These findings offer the promise of improving the quality of life for brain tumor patients

  10. Pharmacovigilance database search discloses ClC-K channels as a novel target of the AT1 receptor blockers valsartan and olmesartan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbrici, Paola; Tricarico, Domenico; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe Felice; Nicolotti, Orazio; Lograno, Marcello Diego; Conte, Diana; Liantonio, Antonella

    2017-07-01

    Human ClC-K chloride channels are highly attractive targets for drug discovery as they have a variety of important physiological functions and are associated with genetic disorders. These channels are crucial in the kidney as they control chloride reabsorption and water diuresis. In addition, loss-of-function mutations of CLCNKB and BSND genes cause Bartter's syndrome (BS), whereas CLCNKA and CLCNKB gain-of-function polymorphisms predispose to a rare form of salt sensitive hypertension. Both disorders lack a personalized therapy that is in most cases only symptomatic. The aim of this study was to identify novel ClC-K ligands from drugs already on the market, by exploiting the pharmacological side activity of drug molecules available from the FDA Adverse Effects Reporting System database. We searched for drugs having a Bartter-like syndrome as a reported side effect, with the assumption that BS could be causatively related to the block of ClC-K channels. The ability of the selected BS-causing drugs to bind and block ClC-K channels was then validated through an integrated experimental and computational approach based on patch clamp electrophysiology in HEK293 cells and molecular docking simulations. Valsartan and olmesartan were able to block ClC-Ka channels and the molecular requirements for effective inhibition of these channels have been identified. These results suggest additional mechanisms of action for these sartans further to their primary AT 1 receptor antagonism and propose these compounds as leads for designing new potent ClC-K ligands. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. Increased expression of endothelin ET(B) and angiotensin AT(1) receptors in peripheral resistance arteries of patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrijevic, Ivan; Ekelund, Ulf; Edvinsson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    of arterial vasoconstrictor endothelin (ET) and angiotensin (AT) receptors. Our aim was to investigate if the arterial expressions of these receptors are changed in patients with suspected but ruled out acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Small subcutaneous arteries (diameter of 100 microm) were surgically removed...... in the regulation of coronary tone and in the development of atherosclerosis, and may be related to increased cardiovascular risk....

  12. Permanent Distal Occlusion of Middle Cerebral Artery in Rat Causes Local Increased ETB, 5-HT1B and AT1 Receptor-Mediated Contractility Downstream of Occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marianne N P; Hornbak, Malene; Larsen, Stine S

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims: In response to experimental stroke, a characteristic functional and expressional upregulation of contractile G-protein-coupled receptors has been uncovered in the affected cerebral vasculature; however, the mechanism initiating this phenomenon remains unknown. Methods: Using...... a model of permanent distal occlusion of rat middle cerebral arteries, we investigated whether there was a regional difference in receptor-mediated contractility of segments located upstream and downstream of the occlusion site. The contractile response to endothelin, angiotensin and 5-hydroxytryptamine...... receptor stimulation was studied by sensitive wire myograph. Results: Only downstream segments exhibited an augmented contractile response to stimulation with each of the three ligands, with the response towards sarafotoxin 6c being especially augmented compared to sham, upstream and contralateral controls...

  13. A case with concurrent duplication, triplication, and uniparental isodisomy at 1q42.12-qter supporting microhomology-mediated break-induced replication model for replicative rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Nana; Naruto, Takuya; Murata, Chie; Ouchi, Yuya; Fujita, Naoko; Inagaki, Hidehito; Satomura, Shigeko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Saito, Masako; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Imoto, Issei

    2017-01-01

    Complex genomic rearrangements (CGRs) consisting of interstitial triplications in conjunction with uniparental isodisomy (isoUPD) have rarely been reported in patients with multiple congenital anomalies (MCA)/intellectual disability (ID). One-ended DNA break repair coupled with microhomology-mediated break-induced replication (MMBIR) has been recently proposed as a possible mechanism giving rise to interstitial copy number gains and distal isoUPD, although only a few cases providing supportive evidence in human congenital diseases with MCA have been documented. Here, we report on the chromosomal microarray (CMA)-based identification of the first known case with concurrent interstitial duplication at 1q42.12-q42.2 and triplication at 1q42.2-q43 followed by isoUPD for the remainder of chromosome 1q (at 1q43-qter). In distal 1q duplication/triplication overlapping with 1q42.12-q43, variable clinical features have been reported, and our 25-year-old patient with MCA/ID presented with some of these frequently described features. Further analyses including the precise mapping of breakpoint junctions within the CGR in a sequence level suggested that the CGR found in association with isoUPD in our case is a triplication with flanking duplications, characterized as a triplication with a particularly long duplication-inverted triplication-duplication (DUP-TRP/INV-DUP) structure. Because microhomology was observed in both junctions between the triplicated region and the flanking duplicated regions, our case provides supportive evidence for recently proposed replication-based mechanisms, such as MMBIR, underlying the formation of CGRs + isoUPD implicated in chromosomal disorders. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of CGRs + isoUPD observed in 1q and having DUP-TRP/INV-DUP structure with a long proximal duplication, which supports MMBIR-based model for genomic rearrangements. Molecular cytogenetic analyses using CMA containing single

  14. Suppression of WIF-1 through promoter hypermethylation causes accelerated proliferation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) overexpressing MCF10AT1 breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Dalei; Wong, Patrick; Li, Wen; Vogel, Christoph F.; Matsumura, Fumio

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (AZ) causes proliferation suppression and ERα recovery. → AZ down-regulates Wnt/β-catenin pathway mainly by increasing WIF-1 expression. → Both ERα and AhR have some effects on DNA methylation in breast cancer cells. → Artificial overexpression of ERα in ER negative cells increases WIF-1 expression. → WIF-1 promoter hypermethylation is one of the major causes for accelerated proliferation. -- Abstract: The cause for increased cell proliferation in AHR overexpressing breast cancer cells still remains unknown. Here we studied the molecular basis of aggressive cell proliferation of an AHR overexpressing and ERα functionally down-regulated MCF10AT1 cell line, designated as P20E, in comparison to a matched sub-line, P20C with normal AHR expression and ERα function. We found that a 4-day treatment of P20E cells with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (AZ) caused a significant suppression of cell proliferation. Such an effect of AZ was accompanied with the significant recovery of ERα function. Among diagnostic markers of AZ-induced cellular changes we found conspicuous up-regulation of mRNA expression of Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF-1), particularly in P20E. The possibility of AZ-induced demethylation on the promoter of WIF-1 gene was confirmed through methylation specific PCR assay. Such AZ-induced changes in P20E cells were also accompanied with the decrease in the binding of nuclear proteins to the 32 P labeled TRE (TCF response element) and the reduced accumulation of β-catenin protein in the cell nucleus, indicating the importance of Wnt/β-catenin pathway in maintaining the increased cell proliferation in P20E line over P20C line. The importance of WIF-1 in this regard has been validated by transfecting cells with siRNA against WIF-1, which caused an increase in cell proliferation. Moreover, artificial overexpression of ERα in both P20E as well as MDA-MB-231 cells increased the mRNA expression of WIF-1. Together these

  15. Increased perfusion pressure enhances the expression of endothelin (ETB) and angiotensin II (AT1, AT2) receptors in rat mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstedt, Isak; Xu, Cang-Bao; Zhang, Yaping

    2009-01-01

    and luminally perfused in a perfusion chamber. After either exposure to no ("organ culture" (0 mmHg)), normal (85/75 mmHg) or high pressure (160/150 mmHg) at constant flow for 1-17 h, the vessel segments were snap frozen and real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to quantify the ET- and AT-receptor m...

  16. Angiotensin type 2 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumners, Colin; de Kloet, Annette D; Krause, Eric G

    2015-01-01

    In most situations, the angiotensin AT2-receptor (AT2R) mediates physiological actions opposing those mediated by the AT1-receptor (AT1R), including a vasorelaxant effect. Nevertheless, experimental evidence vastly supports that systemic application of AT2R-agonists is blood pressure neutral...

  17. Discovery of novel, potent and low-toxicity angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) blockers: Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of 6-substituted aminocarbonyl benzimidazoles with a chiral center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao-Feng; He, Xing; Wang, Miao; Xu, Di; Hao, Li-Ping; Liang, Ai-Hua; Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Zhi-Ming

    2015-10-20

    Novel angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) blockers bearing 6-substituted carbamoyl benzimidazoles with a chiral center were designed and synthesized as the first step to develop new antihypertensive agents and understand their pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties. The newly synthesized compounds were tested for their potential ability to displace [(125)I] Sar(1) Ile(8)-Ang II, which was specifically bound to human AT1 receptor. Radioligand binding assays revealed nanomolar affinity in several compounds under study. The IC50 values of nine ligands were higher than those of Losartan. The screening of decreased blood pressure in spontaneous hypertensive rats displayed that compound 8S (IC₅₀ = 5.0 nM) was equipotent with Losartan, whereas compounds 13R (IC₅₀ = 7.3 nM), 14R (IC₅₀ = 6.3 nM), and 14S (IC₅₀ = 3.5 nM) were slightly ahead of Losartan, and the most significant activity was demonstrated by compound 8R (IC₅₀ = 1.1 nM). Candidate 8R was identified for its excellent efficacy in antihypertension and fairly low toxicity based on plasma analyses, toxicology studies, and chronic oral tests. Finally, compound 8R exhibited strong and multiple interactions with target active sites of the theoretical AT1 receptor model in docking study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Blockade of AT1 type receptors for angiotensin II prevents cardiac microvascular fibrosis induced by chronic stress in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firoozmand, Lília Taddeo; Sanches, Andrea; Damaceno-Rodrigues, Nilsa Regina; Perez, Juliana Dinéia; Aragão, Danielle Sanches; Rosa, Rodolfo Mattar; Marcondes, Fernanda Klein; Casarini, Dulce Elena; Caldini, Elia Garcia; Cunha, Tatiana Sousa

    2018-04-20

    To test the effects of chronic-stress on the cardiovascular system, the model of chronic mild unpredictable stress (CMS) has been widely used. The CMS protocol consists of the random, intermittent, and unpredictable exposure of laboratory animals to a variety of stressors, during 3 consecutive weeks. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that exposure to the CMS protocol leads to left ventricle microcirculatory remodeling that can be attenuated by angiotensin II receptor blockade. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into four groups: Control, Stress, Control + losartan, and Stress + losartan (N = 6, each group, losartan: 20 mg/kg/day). The rats were euthanized 15 days after CMS exposure, and blood samples and left ventricle were collected. Rats submitted to CMS presented increased glycemia, corticosterone, noradrenaline and adrenaline concentration, and losartan reduced the concentration of the circulating amines. Cardiac angiotensin II, measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), was significantly increased in the CMS group, and losartan treatment reduced it, while angiotensin 1-7 was significantly higher in the CMS losartan-treated group as compared with CMS. Histological analysis, verified by transmission electron microscopy, showed that rats exposed to CMS presented increased perivascular collagen and losartan effectively prevented the development of this process. Hence, CMS induced a state of microvascular disease, with increased perivascular collagen deposition, that may be the trigger for further development of cardiovascular disease. In this case, CMS fibrosis is associated with increased production of catecholamines and with a disruption of renin-angiotensin system balance, which can be prevented by angiotensin II receptor blockade.

  19. Metabolic effects of an AT1-receptor blockade combined with HCTZ in cardiac risk patients: a non interventional study in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schönrock Eleonore

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reduction of blood pressure alone does not eliminate the increased risk of arterial hypertension. Whilst concomitant metabolic risk factors have been shown to be responsible, the available pharmacotherapy has differential effects on these metabolic risk factors. For example, diuretics and betablockers worsen glucose metabolism, hence the starting point of the current subanalysis of the CHILI (Candesartan in patients with HIgher cardiovascuLar rIsk study was the assumption that an angiotensin receptor blocker may counterbalance the metabolic effects of a low dose diuretic in patients with several metabolic risk factors. Methods The present study was performed as a non-interventional observational study in Germany. Patients with previously uncontrolled hypertension with at least one further risk factor in which physicians deemed a treatment with 16 mg Candesartan/12.5 mg HCTZ to be necessary were included. The risk factors were calculated in patient subgroups with diabetes, the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn and neither condition (control. The risk of cardiovascular mortality within the next 10 years was calculated using the SCORE algorithm of the ESC. Results Between August 2006 and February 2007 a total of 3,787 patients were included into the non-interventional trial. Patients were 62.2 ± 11.3 years old, 48.1% were female, 97.5% had at least one additional risk factor. Blood pressure was reduced by -27.2/-13.4 mmHg with only minor non significant variations between patient groups. Waist circumference was reduced (P Conclusion The present study demonstrates that a 16 mg candesartan/12.5 mg HCTZ based treatment results in a pronounced blood pressure reduction and was associated with a favourable change in metabolic risk factors such as HDL cholesterol, triglycerides and blood glucose. These data indicate that metabolic effects observed in clinical trials like ALPINE, SCOPE or CHARM can also be observed in an unselected

  20. TAM receptors support neural stem cell survival, proliferation and neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Rui; Meng, Lingbin; Jiang, Xin; Cvm, Naresh Kumar; Ding, Jixiang; Li, Qiutang; Lu, Qingxian

    2014-01-01

    Tyro3, Axl and Mertk (TAM) receptor tyrosine kinases play multiple functional roles by either providing intrinsic trophic support for cell growth or regulating the expression of target genes that are important in the homeostatic regulation of immune responses. TAM receptors have been shown to regulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis by negatively regulation of glial cell activation in central nervous system (CNS). In the present study, we further demonstrated that all three TAM receptors were expressed by cultured primary neural stem cells (NSCs) and played a direct growth trophic role in NSCs proliferation, neuronal differentiation and survival. The cultured primary NSCs lacking TAM receptors exhibited slower growth, reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis as shown by decreased BrdU incorporation and increased TUNEL labeling, than those from the WT NSCs. In addition, the neuronal differentiation and maturation of the mutant NSCs were impeded, as characterized by less neuronal differentiation (β-tubulin III+) and neurite outgrowth than their WT counterparts. To elucidate the underlying mechanism that the TAM receptors play on the differentiating NSCs, we examined the expression profile of neurotrophins and their receptors by real-time qPCR on the total RNAs from hippocampus and primary NSCs; and found that the TKO NSC showed a significant reduction in the expression of both nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), but accompanied by compensational increases in the expression of the TrkA, TrkB, TrkC and p75 receptors. These results suggest that TAM receptors support NSCs survival, proliferation and differentiation by regulating expression of neurotrophins, especially the NGF.

  1. Culture, distress, and oxytocin receptor polymorphism (OXTR) interact to influence emotional support seeking

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Heejung S.; Sherman, David K.; Sasaki, Joni Y.; Xu, Jun; Chu, Thai Q.; Ryu, Chorong; Suh, Eunkook M.; Graham, Kelsey; Taylor, Shelley E.

    2010-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that certain genotypes are expressed in different forms, depending on input from the social environment. To examine sensitivity to cultural norms regarding emotional support seeking as a type of social environment, we explored the behavioral expression of oxytocin receptor polymorphism (OXTR) rs53576, a gene previously related to socio-emotional sensitivity. Seeking emotional support in times of distress is normative in American culture but not in Korean culture. Con...

  2. Airborne lidar reflectance measurements at 1.57 μm in support of the A-SCOPE mission for atmospheric CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Caron

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the lidar reflectance of the Earth's surface is an important issue for the IPDA lidar technique (integrated path differential absorption lidar which is the proposed method for the spaceborne measurement of atmospheric carbon dioxide within the framework of ESA's A-SCOPE project. Both, the absolute reflectance of the ground and its variations have an impact on the measurement sensitivity. The first aspect influences the instrument's signal to noise ratio, the second one can lead to retrieval errors, if the ground reflectance changes are strong on small scales. The investigation of the latter is the main purpose of this study. Airborne measurements of the lidar ground reflectance at 1.57 μm wavelength were performed in Central and Western Europe, including many typical land surface coverages as well as the open sea. The analyses of the data show, that the lidar ground reflectance is highly variable on a wide range of spatial scales. However, by means of the assumption of laser footprints in the order of several tens of meters, as planned for spaceborne systems, and by means of an averaging of the data it was shown, that this specific retrieval error is well below 1 ppm (CO2 column mixing ratio, and so compatible with the sensitivity requirements of spaceborne CO2 measurements. Several approaches for upscaling the data in terms of the consideration of larger laser footprints, compared to the one used here, are shown and discussed. Furthermore, the collected data are compared to MODIS ground reflectance data.

  3. New zircon data supporting models of short-lived igneous activity at 1.89 Ga in the western Skellefte District, central Fennoscandian Shield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Skyttä

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available New U-Th-Pb zircon data (SIMS from three intrusive phases of the Palaeoproterozoic Viterliden intrusion in the western Skellefte District, central Fennoscandian Shield, dates igneous emplacement in a narrow time interval at about 1.89 Ga. A locally occurring quartz-plagioclase porphyritic tonalite, here dated at 1889 ± 3 Ma, is considered the youngest of the intrusive units, based on the new age data and field evidence. This supports an existing interpretation of its fault-controlled emplacement after intrusion of the dominating hornblende-tonalite units, in this study dated at 1892 ± 3 Ma. The Viterliden magmatism was synchronous with the oldest units of the Jörn type early-orogenic intrusions in the eastern part of the district (1.89–1.88 Ga; cf. Gonzàles Roldán, 2010. A U-Pb zircon age for a felsic metavolcanic rock from the hanging-wall to the Kristineberg VMS deposit, immediately south of the Viterliden intrusion, is constrained at 1883 ± 6 Ma in this study. It provides a minimum age for the Kristineberg ore deposit and suggests contemporaneous igneous/volcanic activity throughout the Skellefte District. Furthermore, it supports the view that the Skellefte Group defines a laterally continuous belt throughout this "ore district". Tentative correlation of the 1889 ± 3 Ma quartz-plagioclase porphyritic tonalite with the Kristineberg "mine porphyry" suggests that these units are coeval at about 1.89 Ga. Based on the new age determinations, the Viterliden intrusion may equally well have intruded into or locally acted as a basement for the ore-hosting Skellefte Group volcanic rocks.

  4. Circuit Analysis of a Drosophila Dopamine Type 2 Receptor That Supports Anesthesia-Resistant Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz-Kornehl, Sabrina; Schwärzel, Martin

    2016-07-27

    Dopamine is central to reinforcement processing and exerts this function in species ranging from humans to fruit flies. It can do so via two different types of receptors (i.e., D1 or D2) that mediate either augmentation or abatement of cellular cAMP levels. Whereas D1 receptors are known to contribute to Drosophila aversive odor learning per se, we here show that D2 receptors are specific for support of a consolidated form of odor memory known as anesthesia-resistant memory. By means of genetic mosaicism, we localize this function to Kenyon cells, the mushroom body intrinsic neurons, as well as GABAergic APL neurons and local interneurons of the antennal lobes, suggesting that consolidated anesthesia-resistant memory requires widespread dopaminergic modulation within the olfactory circuit. Additionally, dopaminergic neurons themselves require D2R, suggesting a critical role in dopamine release via its recognized autoreceptor function. Considering the dual role of dopamine in balancing memory acquisition (proactive function of dopamine) and its "forgetting" (retroactive function of dopamine), our analysis suggests D2R as central player of either process. Dopamine provides different information; while it mediates reinforcement during the learning act (proactive function), it balances memory performance between two antithetic processes thereafter (retroactive function) (i.e., forgetting and augmentation). Such bidirectional design can also be found at level of dopamine receptors, where augmenting D1 and abating D2 receptors are engaged to balance cellular cAMP levels. Here, we report that consolidated anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM), but not other concomitant memory phases, are sensitive to bidirectional dopaminergic signals. By means of genetic mosaicism, we identified widespread dopaminergic modulation within the olfactory circuit that suggests nonredundant and reiterating functions of D2R in support of ARM. Our results oppose ARM to its concomitant memory phases

  5. Tailored Polymer-Supported Templates in Dynamic Combinatorial Libraries : Simultaneous Selection, Amplification and Isolation of Synthetic Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besenius, Pol; Cormack, Peter A.G.; Liu, Jingyuan; Otto, Sijbren; Sanders, Jeremy K.M.; Sherrington, David C.

    2008-01-01

    The thermodynamically controlled synthesis and isolation of macrocyclic receptors from dynamic combinatorial libraries has been achieved in a single step using a polymer-supported template. The templates were cinchona alkaloids which show interesting enantio- and diastereoselective molecular

  6. Tyrosine Kinase Ligand-Receptor Pair Prediction by Using Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Yarimizu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Receptor tyrosine kinases are essential proteins involved in cellular differentiation and proliferation in vivo and are heavily involved in allergic diseases, diabetes, and onset/proliferation of cancerous cells. Identifying the interacting partner of this protein, a growth factor ligand, will provide a deeper understanding of cellular proliferation/differentiation and other cell processes. In this study, we developed a method for predicting tyrosine kinase ligand-receptor pairs from their amino acid sequences. We collected tyrosine kinase ligand-receptor pairs from the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP and UniProtKB, filtered them by removing sequence redundancy, and used them as a dataset for machine learning and assessment of predictive performance. Our prediction method is based on support vector machines (SVMs, and we evaluated several input features suitable for tyrosine kinase for machine learning and compared and analyzed the results. Using sequence pattern information and domain information extracted from sequences as input features, we obtained 0.996 of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. This accuracy is higher than that obtained from general protein-protein interaction pair predictions.

  7. Culture, distress, and oxytocin receptor polymorphism (OXTR) interact to influence emotional support seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heejung S; Sherman, David K; Sasaki, Joni Y; Xu, Jun; Chu, Thai Q; Ryu, Chorong; Suh, Eunkook M; Graham, Kelsey; Taylor, Shelley E

    2010-09-07

    Research has demonstrated that certain genotypes are expressed in different forms, depending on input from the social environment. To examine sensitivity to cultural norms regarding emotional support seeking as a type of social environment, we explored the behavioral expression of oxytocin receptor polymorphism (OXTR) rs53576, a gene previously related to socio-emotional sensitivity. Seeking emotional support in times of distress is normative in American culture but not in Korean culture. Consequently, we predicted a three-way interaction of culture, distress, and OXTR genotype on emotional support seeking. Korean and American participants (n = 274) completed assessments of psychological distress and emotional support seeking and were genotyped for OXTR. We found the predicted three-way interaction: among distressed American participants, those with the GG/AG genotypes reported seeking more emotional social support, compared with those with the AA genotype, whereas Korean participants did not differ significantly by genotype; under conditions of low distress, OXTR groups did not differ significantly in either cultural group. These findings suggest that OXTR rs53576 is sensitive to input from the social environment, specifically cultural norms regarding emotional social support seeking. These findings also indicate that psychological distress and culture are important moderators that shape behavioral outcomes associated with OXTR genotypes.

  8. Design and Synthesis of 11C-Labelled Compound Libraries for the Molecular Imaging of EGFr, VEGFr-2, AT1 and AT2 Receptors: Transition-Metal Mediated Carbonylations Using [11C]Carbon Monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaberg, Ola

    2009-01-01

    This work deals with radiochemistry and new approaches to develop novel PET tracers labelled with the radionuclide 11 C. Two methods for the synthesis of 11 C-labelled acrylamides have been explored. First, [1- 11 C]-acrylic acid was obtained from a palladium(0)-mediated 11 C-carboxylation of acetylene with [ 11 C]carbon monoxide; this could be converted to the corresponding acyl chloride and then combined with benzylamine to form N-benzyl[carbonyl- 11 C]acrylamide. In the second method, the palladium(0)-mediated carbonylation of vinyl halides with [ 11 C]carbon monoxide was explored. This latter method, yielded labelled acrylamides in a single step with retention of configuration at the C=C double bond, and required less amine compared to the acetylene method. The vinyl halide method was used to synthesize a library of 11 C-labelled EGFr-inhibitors in 7-61% decay corrected radiochemical yield via a combinatorial approach. The compounds were designed to target either the active or the inactive form of EGFr, following computational docking studies. The rhodium(I)-mediated carbonylative cross-coupling of an azide and an amine was shown to be a very general reaction and was used to synthesize a library of dual VEGFr-2/PDGFrβ inhibitors that were 11 C-labelled at the urea position in 38-78% dc rcy. The angiotensin II AT 1 receptor antagonist eprosartan was 11 C-labelled at one of the carboxyl groups in one step using a palladium(0)-mediated carboxylation. Autoradiography shows specific binding in rat kidney, lung and adrenal cortex, and organ distribution shows a high accumulation in the intestines, kidneys and liver. Specific binding in frozen sections of human adrenal incidentalomas warrants further investigations of this tracer. Three angiotensin II AT 2 ligands were 11 C-labelled at the amide group in a palladium(0)-mediated aminocarbonylation in 16-36% dc rcy. One of the compounds was evaluated using in vitro using autoradiography, and in vivo using organ

  9. The Dopamine D2 Receptor Gene, Perceived Parental Support, and Adolescent Loneliness: Longitudinal Evidence for Gene-Environment Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roekel, Eeske; Goossens, Luc; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Verhagen, Maaike

    2011-01-01

    Background: Loneliness is a common problem in adolescence. Earlier research focused on genes within the serotonin and oxytocin systems, but no studies have examined the role of dopamine-related genes in loneliness. In the present study, we focused on the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2). Methods: Associations among the DRD2, sex, parental support,…

  10. Efficient Prediction of Progesterone Receptor Interactome Using a Support Vector Machine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Long Liu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interaction (PPI is essential for almost all cellular processes and identification of PPI is a crucial task for biomedical researchers. So far, most computational studies of PPI are intended for pair-wise prediction. Theoretically, predicting protein partners for a single protein is likely a simpler problem. Given enough data for a particular protein, the results can be more accurate than general PPI predictors. In the present study, we assessed the potential of using the support vector machine (SVM model with selected features centered on a particular protein for PPI prediction. As a proof-of-concept study, we applied this method to identify the interactome of progesterone receptor (PR, a protein which is essential for coordinating female reproduction in mammals by mediating the actions of ovarian progesterone. We achieved an accuracy of 91.9%, sensitivity of 92.8% and specificity of 91.2%. Our method is generally applicable to any other proteins and therefore may be of help in guiding biomedical experiments.

  11. The discovery of new potent non-peptide Angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockers: A concise synthesis, molecular docking studies and biological evaluation of N-substituted 5-butylimidazole derivatives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Agelis, G.; Resvani, A.; Durdagi, S.; Spyridaki, K.; Tůmová, Tereza; Slaninová, Jiřina; Giannopoulos, P.; Vlahakos, D.; Liapakis, G.; Mavromoustakos, T.; Matsoukas, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 55, Sep (2012), s. 358-374 ISSN 0223-5234 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : synthesis * angiotensin II receptor blockers * N-substituted 5-butylimidazole derivatives * antihypertensive activity * molecular docking Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.499, year: 2012

  12. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  13. The P2X7 Receptor Supports Both Life and Death in Fibrogenic Pancreatic Stellate Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haanes, Kristian; Schwab, Albrecht; Novak, Ivana

    2012-01-01

    The pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) have complex roles in pancreas, including tissue repair and fibrosis. PSCs surround ATP releasing exocrine cells, but little is known about purinergic receptors and their function in PSCs. Our aim was to resolve whether PSCs express the multifunctional P2X7...... versions of the receptor. In culture, the proliferation rate of the KO PSCs was significantly lower. Inclusion of apyrase reduced the proliferation rate in both WT and KO PSCs, indicating importance of endogenous ATP. Exogenous ATP had a two-sided effect. Proliferation of both WT and KO cells...... inhibitor az10606120. The P2X7 receptor-pore inhibitor A438079 partially prevented cell death induced by millimolar ATP concentrations. This study shows that ATP and P2X7 receptors are important regulators of PSC proliferation and death, and therefore might be potential targets for treatments of pancreatic...

  14. Pulling-induced rupture of ligand-receptor bonds between a spherically shaped bionanoparticle and the support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2018-04-01

    Contacts of biological or biologically-inspired spherically shaped nanoparticles (e.g., virions or lipid nanoparticles used for intracellular RNA delivery) with a lipid membrane of cells are often mediated by multiple relatively weak ligand-receptor bonds. Such contacts can be studied at a supported lipid bilayer. The rupture of bonds can be scrutinized by using force spectroscopy. Bearing a supported lipid bilayer in mind, the author shows analytically that the corresponding dependence of the force on the nanoparticle displacement and the effect of the force on the bond-rupture activation energy are qualitatively different compared to what is predicted by the conventional Bell approximation.

  15. EEG with extreme delta brush in young female with methotrexate neurotoxicity supports NMDA receptor involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lisbeth Samsø; Kjær, Troels W; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2017-01-01

    Sub-acute neurotoxicity is a well-known complication to high-dose and intrathecal methotrexate (MTX) treatment of children with leukemia. Symptoms can be treated safely by dextromethorphan, a non-competitive antagonist to N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR). In a female with subacute MTX...

  16. Caffeine May Reduce Perceived Sweet Taste in Humans, Supporting Evidence That Adenosine Receptors Modulate Taste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Ezen; Picket, Benjamin; Dando, Robin

    2017-09-01

    Multiple recent reports have detailed the presence of adenosine receptors in sweet sensitive taste cells of mice. These receptors are activated by endogenous adenosine in the plasma to enhance sweet signals within the taste bud, before reporting to the primary afferent. As we commonly consume caffeine, a powerful antagonist for such receptors, in our daily lives, an intriguing question we sought to answer was whether the caffeine we habitually consume in coffee can inhibit the perception of sweet taste in humans. 107 panelists were randomly assigned to 2 groups, sampling decaffeinated coffee supplemented with either 200 mg of caffeine, about the level found in a strong cup of coffee, or an equally bitter concentration of quinine. Participants subsequently performed sensory testing, with the session repeated in the alternative condition in a second session on a separate day. Panelists rated both the sweetened coffee itself and subsequent sucrose solutions as less sweet in the caffeine condition, despite the treatment having no effect on bitter, sour, salty, or umami perception. Panelists were also unable to discern whether they had consumed the caffeinated or noncaffeinated coffee, with ratings of alertness increased equally, but no significant improvement in reaction times, highlighting coffee's powerful placebo effect. This work validates earlier observations in rodents in a human population. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  17. Glycine receptors support excitatory neurotransmitter release in developing mouse visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Portia A; Burette, Alain C; Weinberg, Richard J; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2012-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are found in most areas of the brain, and their dysfunction can cause severe neurological disorders. While traditionally thought of as inhibitory receptors, presynaptic-acting GlyRs (preGlyRs) can also facilitate glutamate release under certain circumstances, although the underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. In the current study, we sought to better understand the role of GlyRs in the facilitation of excitatory neurotransmitter release in mouse visual cortex. Using whole-cell recordings, we found that preGlyRs facilitate glutamate release in developing, but not adult, visual cortex. The glycinergic enhancement of neurotransmitter release in early development depends on the high intracellular to extracellular Cl− gradient maintained by the Na+–K+–2Cl− cotransporter and requires Ca2+ entry through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. The glycine transporter 1, localized to glial cells, regulates extracellular glycine concentration and the activation of these preGlyRs. Our findings demonstrate a developmentally regulated mechanism for controlling excitatory neurotransmitter release in the neocortex. PMID:22988142

  18. The impact of luteal phase support on endometrial estrogen and progesterone receptor expression: a randomized control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brezina Paul R

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the impact of luteal phase support on the expression of estrogen receptor (ER alpha and progesterone receptors B (PR-B on the endometrium of oocyte donors undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH. Methods A prospective, randomized study was conducted in women undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation for oocyte donation. Participants were randomized to receive no luteal support, vaginal progesterone alone, or vaginal progesterone plus orally administered 17 Beta estradiol. Endometrial biopsies were obtained at 4 time points in the luteal phase and evaluated by tissue microarray for expression of ER alpha and PR-B. Results One-hundred and eight endometrial tissue samples were obtained from 12 patients. No differences were found in expression of ER alpha and PR-B among all the specimens with the exception of one sample value. Conclusions The administration of progesterone during the luteal phase of COH for oocyte donor cycles, either with or without estrogen, does not significantly affect the endometrial expression of ER alpha and PR.

  19. Three neuropeptide Y receptor genes in the spiny dogfish, Squalus acanthias, support en bloc duplications in early vertebrate evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaneck, Erik; Ardell, David H; Larson, Earl T; Larhammar, Dan

    2003-08-01

    It has been debated whether the increase in gene number during early vertebrate evolution was due to multiple independent gene duplications or synchronous duplications of many genes. We describe here the cloning of three neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor genes belonging to the Y1 subfamily in the spiny dogfish, Squalus acanthias, a cartilaginous fish. The three genes are orthologs of the mammalian subtypes Y1, Y4, and Y6, which are located in paralogous gene regions on different chromosomes in mammals. Thus, these genes arose by duplications of a chromosome region before the radiation of gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates). Estimates of duplication times from linearized trees together with evidence from other gene families supports two rounds of chromosome duplications or tetraploidizations early in vertebrate evolution. The anatomical distribution of mRNA was determined by reverse-transcriptase PCR and was found to differ from mammals, suggesting differential functional diversification of the new gene copies during the radiation of the vertebrate classes.

  20. Evidence Supporting a Role for Constitutive Ghrelin Receptor Signaling in Fasting-Induced Hyperphagia in Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Gimena; Cabral, Agustina; Andreoli, María F; Labarthe, Alexandra; M'Kadmi, Céline; Ramos, Jorge G; Marie, Jacky; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Epelbaum, Jacques; Tolle, Virginie; Perello, Mario

    2018-02-01

    Ghrelin is a potent orexigenic peptide hormone that acts through the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), a G protein-coupled receptor highly expressed in the hypothalamus. In vitro studies have shown that GHSR displays a high constitutive activity, whose physiological relevance is uncertain. As GHSR gene expression in the hypothalamus is known to increase in fasting conditions, we tested the hypothesis that constitutive GHSR activity at the hypothalamic level drives the fasting-induced hyperphagia. We found that refed wild-type (WT) mice displayed a robust hyperphagia that continued for 5 days after refeeding and changed their food intake daily pattern. Fasted WT mice showed an increase in plasma ghrelin levels, as well as in GHSR expression levels and ghrelin binding sites in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. When fasting-refeeding responses were evaluated in ghrelin- or GHSR-deficient mice, only the latter displayed an ∼15% smaller hyperphagia, compared with WT mice. Finally, fasting-induced hyperphagia of WT mice was significantly smaller in mice centrally treated with the GHSR inverse agonist K-(D-1-Nal)-FwLL-NH2, compared with mice treated with vehicle, whereas it was unaffected in mice centrally treated with the GHSR antagonists D-Lys3-growth hormone-releasing peptide 6 or JMV2959. Taken together, genetic models and pharmacological results support the notion that constitutive GHSR activity modulates the magnitude of the compensatory hyperphagia triggered by fasting. Thus, the hypothalamic GHSR signaling system could affect the set point of daily food intake, independently of plasma ghrelin levels, in situations of negative energy balance. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society.

  1. Individual receptor profiling as a novel tool to support diagnosis of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Jochen; Schulte-Baukloh, Heinrich; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Speroni di Fenizio, Pietro; Horn, Lars-Christian; Rüffert, Henrik; Hartenstein, Siegurd; Burger, Maximilian; Schulze, Matthias; Schwalenberg, Thilo

    2012-10-01

    Dysregulation of neurotransmitter receptors may contribute to bladder overactivity (OAB) symptoms. To address the question whether specific receptor expression patterns are associated with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC), we examined the expression of muscarinic, purinergic and histamine receptors in the detrusor. Detrusor receptor expression was investigated in bladder biopsies of female BPS/IC patients (n = 44; age 60.64 ± 13.78, mean ± SD) and carcinoma patients (n = 11; age 58.91 ± 12.72) undergoing cystectomy. Protein expression of muscarinic (M2, M3), purinergic (P2X1-3) and histamine receptors (H1, H2) was analysed by confocal immunofluorescence, and gene expression was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). M2, P2X1, P2X2 and H1 receptor immunoreactivity (-IR) was significantly enhanced in BPS/IC compared to the control group, while there was no difference for M3-, P2X3- and H2-IR. We calculated a score, which separated BPS/IC from control patients with an AUC of 89.46%, showing 84.09% sensitivity and 90.91% specificity. Patients had a 9.25 times enhanced calculated risk for BPS/IC. In addition, two patient subgroups (M2 > M3 and M3 > M2) were observed, which differed in associated purinergic and histamine receptor expression. M2, P2X1, P2X2 and H1 were significantly upregulated in BPS/IC patients, and H2 was occasionally highly overexpressed. There was no significant correlation between receptor protein and gene expression, implying posttranslational mechanisms being responsible for the altered receptor expressions. On the basis of individual receptor profiles, upregulated receptors could be targeted by monotherapy or combination therapy with already approved receptor inhibitors, thereby promoting tailored therapy for patients suffering from BPS/IC-like symptoms.

  2. Transcytosis of F4 fimbriae by villous and dome epithelia in F4-receptor positive pigs supports importance of receptor-dependent endocytosis in oral immunization strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeck, Veerle; Van den Broeck, Wim; De Colvenaer, Veerle; Verdonck, Frank; Goddeeris, Bruno; Cox, Eric

    2008-07-15

    Very few antigens have been described that induce an intestinal immunity when given orally. Our laboratory demonstrated that oral administration of isolated F4 (K88) fimbriae of Escherichia coli to F4-receptor positive (F4R(+)) pigs induces protective mucosal immunity against challenge infection. However, presence of F4-receptors (F4R) on villous enterocytes is a prerequisite for inducing the immune response, as no F4-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASC) can be induced in F4R(-) pigs. In this study, the in vivo binding of isolated F4 fimbriae (F4) to the gut epithelium was examined in F4R(+) and F4R(-) pigs. It was further investigated whether binding of F4 to the F4R results in endocytosis in and translocation across the gut epithelium using microscopy. F4 did not adhere to the intestinal epithelium of F4R(-) pigs, whereas it strongly adhered to the villous epithelium and the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) of the jejunum and ileum of F4R(+) pigs. Following binding to F4R, F4 was endocytosed by villous enterocytes, follicle-associated enterocytes and M cells. Transcytosis of F4 across the epithelium resulted in the appearance of F4 in the lamina propria and dome region of the jejunal and ileal PP. This is the first study showing transcytosis of fimbriae across the gut epithelium. This receptor-dependent transcytosis can explain the success of F4 fimbriae as oral immunogen for inducing protective immunity in F4R(+) pigs strengthening the importance of receptor-dependent endocytosis and translocation in oral vaccine strategies. Further identification of the receptor responsible for this transport is in progress.

  3. The Fifth Transmembrane Domain of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Participates in the Formation of the Ligand-binding Pocket and Undergoes a Counterclockwise Rotation upon Receptor Activation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domazet, Ivana; Martin, Stéphane S.; Holleran, Brian J.; Morin, Marie-Ève; Lacasse, Patrick; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel; Leduc, Richard; Guillemette, Gaétan

    2009-01-01

    The octapeptide hormone angiotensin II exerts a wide variety of cardiovascular effects through the activation of the angiotensin II Type 1 (AT1) receptor, which belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. Like other G protein- coupled receptors, the AT1 receptor possesses seven transmembrane domains that provide structural support for the formation of the ligand-binding pocket. The role of the fifth transmembrane domain (TMD5) was investigated using the substituted cysteine accessibility method. All of the residues within Thr-190 to Leu-217 region were mutated one at a time to cysteine, and after expression in COS-7 cells, the mutant receptors were treated with the sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agent methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA). MTSEA reacts selectively with water-accessible, free sulfhydryl groups of endogenous or introduced point mutation cysteines. If a cysteine is found in the binding pocket, the covalent modification will affect the binding kinetics of the ligand. MTSEA substantially decreased the binding affinity of L197C-AT1, N200C-AT1, I201C-AT1, G203C-AT1, and F204C-AT1 mutant receptors, which suggests that these residues orient themselves within the water-accessible binding pocket of the AT1 receptor. Interestingly, this pattern of acquired MTSEA sensitivity was altered for TMD5 reporter cysteines engineered in a constitutively active N111G-AT1 receptor background. Indeed, mutant I201C-N111G-AT1 became more sensitive to MTSEA, whereas mutant G203C-N111G-AT1 lost some sensitivity. Our results suggest that constitutive activation of AT1 receptor causes an apparent counterclockwise rotation of TMD5 as viewed from the extracellular side. PMID:19773549

  4. The fifth transmembrane domain of angiotensin II Type 1 receptor participates in the formation of the ligand-binding pocket and undergoes a counterclockwise rotation upon receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domazet, Ivana; Martin, Stéphane S; Holleran, Brian J; Morin, Marie-Eve; Lacasse, Patrick; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel; Leduc, Richard; Guillemette, Gaétan

    2009-11-13

    The octapeptide hormone angiotensin II exerts a wide variety of cardiovascular effects through the activation of the angiotensin II Type 1 (AT(1)) receptor, which belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. Like other G protein- coupled receptors, the AT(1) receptor possesses seven transmembrane domains that provide structural support for the formation of the ligand-binding pocket. The role of the fifth transmembrane domain (TMD5) was investigated using the substituted cysteine accessibility method. All of the residues within Thr-190 to Leu-217 region were mutated one at a time to cysteine, and after expression in COS-7 cells, the mutant receptors were treated with the sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agent methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA). MTSEA reacts selectively with water-accessible, free sulfhydryl groups of endogenous or introduced point mutation cysteines. If a cysteine is found in the binding pocket, the covalent modification will affect the binding kinetics of the ligand. MTSEA substantially decreased the binding affinity of L197C-AT(1), N200C-AT(1), I201C-AT(1), G203C-AT(1), and F204C-AT(1) mutant receptors, which suggests that these residues orient themselves within the water-accessible binding pocket of the AT(1) receptor. Interestingly, this pattern of acquired MTSEA sensitivity was altered for TMD5 reporter cysteines engineered in a constitutively active N111G-AT(1) receptor background. Indeed, mutant I201C-N111G-AT(1) became more sensitive to MTSEA, whereas mutant G203C-N111G-AT(1) lost some sensitivity. Our results suggest that constitutive activation of AT(1) receptor causes an apparent counterclockwise rotation of TMD5 as viewed from the extracellular side.

  5. A novel fractal approach for predicting G-protein-coupled receptors and their subfamilies with support vector machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Guoping; Li, Yong; Wang, Feichi; Wang, Siwen; Hu, Xuehai

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven membrane-spanning proteins and regulate many important physiological processes, such as vision, neurotransmission, immune response and so on. GPCRs-related pathways are the targets of a large number of marketed drugs. Therefore, the design of a reliable computational model for predicting GPCRs from amino acid sequence has long been a significant biomedical problem. Chaos game representation (CGR) reveals the fractal patterns hidden in protein sequences, and then fractal dimension (FD) is an important feature of these highly irregular geometries with concise mathematical expression. Here, in order to extract important features from GPCR protein sequences, CGR algorithm, fractal dimension and amino acid composition (AAC) are employed to formulate the numerical features of protein samples. Four groups of features are considered, and each group is evaluated by support vector machine (SVM) and 10-fold cross-validation test. To test the performance of the present method, a new non-redundant dataset was built based on latest GPCRDB database. Comparing the results of numerical experiments, the group of combined features with AAC and FD gets the best result, the accuracy is 99.22% and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) is 0.9845 for identifying GPCRs from non-GPCRs. Moreover, if it is classified as a GPCR, it will be further put into the second level, which will classify a GPCR into one of the five main subfamilies. At this level, the group of combined features with AAC and FD also gets best accuracy 85.73%. Finally, the proposed predictor is also compared with existing methods and shows better performances.

  6. Mechanical circulatory support is associated with loss of platelet receptors glycoprotein Ibα and glycoprotein VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukito, P; Wong, A; Jing, J; Arthur, J F; Marasco, S F; Murphy, D A; Bergin, P J; Shaw, J A; Collecutt, M; Andrews, R K; Gardiner, E E; Davis, A K

    2016-11-01

    Essentials Relationship of acquired von Willebrand disease (VWD) and platelet dysfunction is explored. Patients with ventricular assist devices and on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation are investigated. Acquired VWD and platelet receptor shedding is demonstrated in the majority of patients. Loss of platelet adhesion receptors glycoprotein (GP) Ibα and GPVI may increase bleeding risk. Background Ventricular assist devices (VADs) and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) are associated with bleeding that is not fully explained by anticoagulant or antiplatelet use. Exposure of platelets to elevated shear in vitro leads to increased shedding. Objectives To investigate whether loss of platelet receptors occurs in vivo, and the relationship with acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS). Methods Platelet counts, coagulation tests and von Willebrand factor (VWF) analyses were performed on samples from 21 continuous flow VAD (CF-VAD), 20 ECMO, 12 heart failure and seven aortic stenosis patients. Levels of platelet receptors were measured by flow cytometry or ELISA. Results The loss of high molecular weight VWF multimers was observed in 18 of 19 CF-VAD and 14 of 20 ECMO patients, consistent with AVWS. Platelet receptor shedding was demonstrated by elevated soluble glycoprotein (GP) VI levels in plasma and significantly reduced surface GPIbα and GPVI levels in CF-VAD and ECMO patients as compared with healthy donors. Platelet receptor levels were also significantly reduced in heart failure patients. Conclusions These data link AVWS and increased platelet receptor shedding in patients with CF-VADs or ECMO for the first time. Loss of the platelet surface receptors GPIbα and GPVI in heart failure, CF-VAD and ECMO patients may contribute to ablated platelet adhesion/activation, and limit thrombus formation under high/pathologic shear conditions. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  7. Personal and clinical social support and adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy among hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients in an integrated health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroenke, Candyce H; Hershman, Dawn L; Gomez, Scarlett L; Adams, Sara R; Eldridge, Elizabeth H; Kwan, Marilyn L; Ergas, Isaac J; Kubo, Ai; Kushi, Lawrence H

    2018-04-18

    We evaluated associations between personal and clinical social support and non-adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) in a large, Northern California breast cancer (BC) cohort from an integrated healthcare network. This study included 3382 women from the Pathways Study diagnosed from 2005 to 2013 with stages I-III hormone receptor-positive BC and who responded to the Medical Outcomes Study Social Support and Interpersonal Processes of Care surveys, approximately 2 months post-diagnosis. We used logistic regression to evaluate associations between tertiles of social support and non-initiation (social support (P trend = 0.02). Women with moderate (HR 1.20, 95% CI 0.99-1.45) or low (HR 1.32, 95% CI 1.09-1.60) personal social support were also more likely to discontinue treatment (P trend = 0.01). Furthermore, women with moderate (HR 1.25, 95% CI 1.02-1.53) or low (HR 1.38, 95% CI 1.12-1.70) personal social support had higher non-adherence (P trend = 0.007). Associations with clinical social support and outcomes were similar. Notably, high clinical social support mitigated the risk of discontinuation when patients' personal support was moderate or low (P value = 0.04). Women with low personal or clinical social support had higher AET non-adherence. Clinician teams may need to fill support gaps that compromise treatment adherence.

  8. The dopamine D2 receptor gene, perceived parental support, and adolescent loneliness : longitudinal evidence for gene-environment interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roekel, Eeske; Goossens, Luc; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Verhagen, Maaike

    2011-01-01

    Background: Loneliness is a common problem in adolescence. Earlier research focused on genes within the serotonin and oxytocin systems, but no studies have examined the role of dopamine-related genes in loneliness. In the present study, we focused on the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2). Methods:

  9. Oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) variant rs1042778 moderates the influence of family environment on changes in perceived social support over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobewall, Henrik; Hakulinen, Christian; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Seppälä, Ilkka; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli T; Hintsanen, Mirka

    2018-08-01

    Lack of social support is an established risk factor across health outcomes, making it important to examine its family environmental and genetic determinants. In a 27-year follow-up of the Young Finns Study (N = 2341), we examined with a latent growth curve model whether genes involved in the oxytocin signaling pathway-namely, oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) variants rs1042778, rs2254298, and rs53576-moderate the effect of early-life social experiences on perceived social support across the life span. Mothers reported the emotional warmth and acceptance towards their children at baseline when the participants were from 3 to 18 years old (1980). Perceived family support and support from friends and peripheral sources were assessed in five follow-ups 18 years apart (1989-2007). Maternal emotional warmth and acceptance predicted the initial level of perceived social support across subscales, while the rate of change in family support was affected by the family environment only if participants carried the T-allele of OXTR rs1042778. This gene-environment interaction was not found for the rate of change in support from friends and peripheral sources and we also did not find associations between latent growth in perceived social support and OXTR variants rs53576 and rs2254298. Selective attrition in perceived social support, maternal emotional warmth and acceptance, gender, and SES. Family environment was assessed by a non-standardized measure. OXTR rs1042778 polymorphism seems to contribute to changes in perceived family support in that way that some individuals (T-allele carriers) 'recover', to some extent, from the effects of early-life social experiences, whereas others (G/G genotype carriers) do not. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Investigation of a thiazolidinone derivative as an allosteric modulator of follicle stimulating hormone receptor: evidence for its ability to support follicular development and ovulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriraman, Venkataraman; Denis, Deborah; de Matos, Daniel; Yu, Henry; Palmer, Stephen; Nataraja, Selva

    2014-05-15

    FSH signalling through its cognate receptor is critical for follicular development and ovulation. An earlier study had documented thiazolidinone derivatives to activate FSH receptor expressed in CHO cells and rat granulosa cells; however development of this compound for clinical use was halted for unobvious reasons. The objective of the current study is to extend the previous investigations in detail on the ability of thiazolidinone derivative (henceforth referred to as Compound 5) to activate FSH signalling and learn the barriers that preclude development of this derivative for clinical purposes. Our results demonstrate that the Compound 5 in a dose-dependent manner stimulated cAMP production, activated AKT and ERK signalling pathways and induced estradiol production in cultured rat granulosa cells. Compound 5 also caused dose-dependent increase in estradiol production from human granulosa cells. In increasingly more complex in vitro systems, Compound 5 was able to induce the expansion of mouse cumulus-oocyte-complex and support in vitro development of mouse preantral follicle to preovulatory stage and release of oocyte from the follicle. In vivo, the compound stimulated preovulatory follicular development and ovulation in immature rats. Pharmacokinetic and safety investigations reveal poor oral availability and genotoxicity. Together, our results document Compound 5 to act as a FSHR allosteric modulator but have poor pharmacological properties for development of an oral FSH receptor modulator. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Extended and structurally supported insights into extracellular hormone binding, signal transduction and organization of the thyrotropin receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerd Krause

    Full Text Available The hormone thyrotropin (TSH and its receptor (TSHR are crucial for the growth and function of the thyroid gland. The TSHR is evolutionary linked with the receptors of follitropin (FSHR and lutropin/choriogonadotropin (LHR and their sequences and structures are similar. The extracellular region of TSHR contains more than 350 amino acids and binds hormone and antibodies. Several important questions related to functions and mechanisms of TSHR are still not comprehensively understood. One major reason for these open questions is the lack of any structural information about the extracellular segment of TSHR that connects the N-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain (LRRD with the transmembrane helix (TMH 1, the hinge region. It has been shown experimentally that this segment is important for fine tuning of signaling and ligand interactions. A new crystal structure containing most of the extracellular hFSHR region in complex with hFSH has recently been published. Now, we have applied these new structural insights to the homologous TSHR and have generated a structural model of the TSHR LRRD/hinge-region/TSH complex. This structural model is combined and evaluated with experimental data including hormone binding (bTSH, hTSH, thyrostimulin, super-agonistic effects, antibody interactions and signaling regulation. These studies and consideration of significant and non-significant amino acids have led to a new description of mechanisms at the TSHR, including ligand-induced displacements of specific hinge region fragments. This event triggers conformational changes at a convergent center of the LRRD and the hinge region, activating an "intramolecular agonistic unit" close to the transmembrane domain.

  12. Extended and structurally supported insights into extracellular hormone binding, signal transduction and organization of the thyrotropin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Gerd; Kreuchwig, Annika; Kleinau, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    The hormone thyrotropin (TSH) and its receptor (TSHR) are crucial for the growth and function of the thyroid gland. The TSHR is evolutionary linked with the receptors of follitropin (FSHR) and lutropin/choriogonadotropin (LHR) and their sequences and structures are similar. The extracellular region of TSHR contains more than 350 amino acids and binds hormone and antibodies. Several important questions related to functions and mechanisms of TSHR are still not comprehensively understood. One major reason for these open questions is the lack of any structural information about the extracellular segment of TSHR that connects the N-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain (LRRD) with the transmembrane helix (TMH) 1, the hinge region. It has been shown experimentally that this segment is important for fine tuning of signaling and ligand interactions. A new crystal structure containing most of the extracellular hFSHR region in complex with hFSH has recently been published. Now, we have applied these new structural insights to the homologous TSHR and have generated a structural model of the TSHR LRRD/hinge-region/TSH complex. This structural model is combined and evaluated with experimental data including hormone binding (bTSH, hTSH, thyrostimulin), super-agonistic effects, antibody interactions and signaling regulation. These studies and consideration of significant and non-significant amino acids have led to a new description of mechanisms at the TSHR, including ligand-induced displacements of specific hinge region fragments. This event triggers conformational changes at a convergent center of the LRRD and the hinge region, activating an "intramolecular agonistic unit" close to the transmembrane domain.

  13. Do TRPC channels support working memory? Comparing modulations of TRPC channels and working memory through G-protein coupled receptors and neuromodulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboreda, Antonio; Theissen, Frederik M; Valero-Aracama, Maria J; Arboit, Alberto; Corbu, Mihaela A; Yoshida, Motoharu

    2018-03-01

    Working memory is a crucial ability we use in daily life. However, the cellular mechanisms supporting working memory still remain largely unclear. A key component of working memory is persistent neural firing which is believed to serve short-term (hundreds of milliseconds up to tens of seconds) maintenance of necessary information. In this review, we will focus on the role of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels as a mechanism underlying persistent firing. Many years of in vitro work have been suggesting a crucial role of TRPC channels in working memory and temporal association tasks. If TRPC channels are indeed a central mechanism for working memory, manipulations which impair or facilitate working memory should have a similar effect on TRPC channel modulation. However, modulations of working memory and TRPC channels were never systematically compared, and it remains unanswered whether TRPC channels indeed contribute to working memory in vivo or not. In this article, we review the effects of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) and neuromodulators, including acetylcholine, noradrenalin, serotonin and dopamine, on working memory and TRPC channels. Based on comparisons, we argue that GPCR and downstream signaling pathways that activate TRPC, generally support working memory, while those that suppress TRPC channels impair it. However, depending on the channel types, areas, and systems tested, this is not the case in all studies. Further work to clarify involvement of specific TRPC channels in working memory tasks and how they are affected by neuromodulators is still necessary in the future. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Preservation of methane hydrate at 1 atm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    A "pressure-release" method that enables reproducible bulk preservation of pure, porous, methane hydrate at conditions 50 to 75 K above its equilibrium T (193 K) at 1 atm is refined. The amount of hydrate preserved by this method appears to be greatly in excess of that reported in the previous citations, and is likely the result of a mechanism different from ice shielding.

  15. DNA Methylation at the Neonatal State and at the Time of Diagnosis: Preliminary Support for an Association with the Estrogen Receptor 1, Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor 1, and Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein in Female Adolescent Patients with OCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Judith Becker; Hansen, Christine Søholm; Starnawska, Anna; Mattheisen, Manuel; Børglum, Anders Dupont; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hollegaard, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder. Non-genetic factors and their interaction with genes have attracted increasing attention. Epigenetics is regarded an important interface between environmental signals and activation/repression of genomic responses. Epigenetic mechanisms have not previously been examined in OCD in children and adolescents. The aim of the present study was to examine the DNA methylation profile of selected genes in blood spots from neonates later diagnosed with OCD and in the same children/adolescents at the time of diagnosis compared with age- and sex-matched controls. Furthermore, we wanted to characterize the association of the differential methylation profiles with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome. Dried and new blood spot samples were obtained from 21 female children/adolescents with verified OCD and 12 female controls. The differential methylation was analyzed using a linear model and the correlation with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome was analyzed using the Pearson correlation. We evaluated selected Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip probes within and up to 100,000 bp up- and downstream of 14 genes previously associated with OCD (SLC1A1, SLC25A12, GABBR1, GAD1, DLGAP1, MOG, BDNF, OLIG2, NTRK2 and 3, ESR1, SL6A4, TPH2, and COMT). The study found no significantly differential methylation. However, preliminary support for a difference was found for the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) B receptor 1 (cg10234998, cg17099072) in blood samples at birth and for the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) (cg10939667), the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) (cg16650906), and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (cg14080521) in blood samples at the time of diagnosis. Preliminary support for an association was observed between the methylation profiles of GABBR1 and MOG and baseline severity, treatment effect, and responder status; and between the methylation profile of ESR1 and baseline

  16. Support vector regression scoring of receptor-ligand complexes for rank-ordering and virtual screening of chemical libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liwei; Wang, Bo; Meroueh, Samy O

    2011-09-26

    The community structure-activity resource (CSAR) data sets are used to develop and test a support vector machine-based scoring function in regression mode (SVR). Two scoring functions (SVR-KB and SVR-EP) are derived with the objective of reproducing the trend of the experimental binding affinities provided within the two CSAR data sets. The features used to train SVR-KB are knowledge-based pairwise potentials, while SVR-EP is based on physicochemical properties. SVR-KB and SVR-EP were compared to seven other widely used scoring functions, including Glide, X-score, GoldScore, ChemScore, Vina, Dock, and PMF. Results showed that SVR-KB trained with features obtained from three-dimensional complexes of the PDBbind data set outperformed all other scoring functions, including best performing X-score, by nearly 0.1 using three correlation coefficients, namely Pearson, Spearman, and Kendall. It was interesting that higher performance in rank ordering did not translate into greater enrichment in virtual screening assessed using the 40 targets of the Directory of Useful Decoys (DUD). To remedy this situation, a variant of SVR-KB (SVR-KBD) was developed by following a target-specific tailoring strategy that we had previously employed to derive SVM-SP. SVR-KBD showed a much higher enrichment, outperforming all other scoring functions tested, and was comparable in performance to our previously derived scoring function SVM-SP.

  17. Maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS Proteins Interact with Ethylene Receptor Signaling Complex, Supporting a Regulatory Role for ARGOS in Ethylene Signal Transduction[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinrui; Wang, Hongyu; Habben, Jeffrey E.

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone ethylene regulates plant growth and development as well as plant response to environmental cues. ARGOS genes reduce plant sensitivity to ethylene when overexpressed in transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). A previous genetic study suggested that the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi-localized maize ARGOS1 targets the ethylene signal transduction components at or upstream of CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1, but the mechanism of ARGOS modulating ethylene signaling is unknown. Here, we demonstrate in Arabidopsis that ZmARGOS1, as well as the Arabidopsis ARGOS homolog ORGAN SIZE RELATED1, physically interacts with Arabidopsis REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 (RTE1), an ethylene receptor interacting protein that regulates the activity of ETHYLENE RESPONSE1. The protein-protein interaction was also detected with the yeast split-ubiquitin two-hybrid system. Using the same yeast assay, we found that maize RTE1 homolog REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 LIKE4 (ZmRTL4) and ZmRTL2 also interact with maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS proteins. Like AtRTE1 in Arabidopsis, ZmRTL4 and ZmRTL2 reduce ethylene responses when overexpressed in maize, indicating a similar mechanism for ARGOS regulating ethylene signaling in maize. A polypeptide fragment derived from ZmARGOS8, consisting of a Pro-rich motif flanked by two transmembrane helices that are conserved among members of the ARGOS family, can interact with AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins in Arabidopsis. The conserved domain is necessary and sufficient to reduce ethylene sensitivity in Arabidopsis and maize. Overall, these results suggest a physical association between ARGOS and the ethylene receptor signaling complex via AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins, supporting a role for ARGOS in regulating ethylene perception and the early steps of signal transduction in Arabidopsis and maize. PMID:27268962

  18. Insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, C.R.; Harrison, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on insulin receptors. Part A: Methods for the study of structure and function. Topics covered include: Method for purification and labeling of insulin receptors, the insulin receptor kinase, and insulin receptors on special tissues

  19. Extreme interplanetary rotational discontinuities at 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C.-C.

    2005-11-01

    This study is concerned with the identification and description of a special subset of four Wind interplanetary rotational discontinuities (from an earlier study of 134 directional discontinuities by Lepping et al. (2003)) with some "extreme" characteristics, in the sense that every case has (1) an almost planar current sheet surface, (2) a very large discontinuity angle (ω), (3) at least moderately strong normal field components (>0.8 nT), and (4) the overall set has a very broad range of transition layer thicknesses, with one being as thick as 50 RE and another at the other extreme being 1.6 RE, most being much thicker than are usually studied. Each example has a well-determined surface normal (n) according to minimum variance analysis and corroborated via time delay checking of the discontinuity with observations at IMP 8 by employing the local surface planarity. From the variance analyses, most of these cases had unusually large ratios of intermediate-to-minimum eigenvalues (λI/λmin), being on average 32 for three cases (with a fourth being much larger), indicating compact current sheet transition zones, another (the fifth) extreme property. For many years there has been a controversy as to the relative distribution of rotational (RDs) to tangential discontinuities (TDs) in the solar wind at 1 AU (and elsewhere, such as between the Sun and Earth), even to the point where some authors have suggested that RDs with large ∣Bn∣s are probably not generated or, if generated, are unstable and therefore very rare. Some of this disagreement apparently has been due to the different selection criteria used, e.g., some allowed eigenvalue ratios (λI/λmin) to be almost an order of magnitude lower than 32 in estimating n, usually introducing unacceptable error in n and therefore also in ∣Bn∣. However, we suggest that RDs may not be so rare at 1 AU, but good quality cases (where ∣Bn∣ confidently exceeds the error in ∣Bn∣) appear to be uncommon, and further

  20. Dehydration kinetics of talc at 1 bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, J.; Bose, K.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental results on the dehydration kinetics of talc, which is likely to be a major potential resource for water and hydrogen in carbonaceous chondrites, is presented. The rate of dehydration of an essentially pure Mg-end member natural talc, (Mg(.99)Fe(.01))3Si4O10(OH)2, was studied by measuring in situ weight change under isothermal condition at 1 bar as a function of time in the temperature range 775 to 985 C. The grain size of the starting material was 0.7 to 1 micron. It was found that the data up to 50 to 60 percent dehydration can be fitted by an equation of the form alpha = exp(-Kt(exp n)), where alpha is the weight fraction of talc remaining, K is a rate constant and n is a numerical constant for a given temperature. For any set of isothermal data, there is a major change in the value of n for larger dehydration. For up to approximately 50 percent dehydration, all rate constants can be described by an Arrheniun relation with an activation energy of 432 (+/- 30) kJ/mol; n has a nearly constant value of 0.54 between 775 and 875 C, but increases almost linearly according to n = -10.77 + 0.012T C at T greater than or equal to 875 C.

  1. An evolutionary conserved region (ECR in the human dopamine receptor D4 gene supports reporter gene expression in primary cultures derived from the rat cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haddley Kate

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detecting functional variants contributing to diversity of behaviour is crucial for dissecting genetics of complex behaviours. At a molecular level, characterisation of variation in exons has been studied as they are easily identified in the current genome annotation although the functional consequences are less well understood; however, it has been difficult to prioritise regions of non-coding DNA in which genetic variation could also have significant functional consequences. Comparison of multiple vertebrate genomes has allowed the identification of non-coding evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs, in which the degree of conservation can be comparable with exonic regions suggesting functional significance. Results We identified ECRs at the dopamine receptor D4 gene locus, an important gene for human behaviours. The most conserved non-coding ECR (D4ECR1 supported high reporter gene expression in primary cultures derived from neonate rat frontal cortex. Computer aided analysis of the sequence of the D4ECR1 indicated the potential transcription factors that could modulate its function. D4ECR1 contained multiple consensus sequences for binding the transcription factor Sp1, a factor previously implicated in DRD4 expression. Co-transfection experiments demonstrated that overexpression of Sp1 significantly decreased the activity of the D4ECR1 in vitro. Conclusion Bioinformatic analysis complemented by functional analysis of the DRD4 gene locus has identified a a strong enhancer that functions in neurons and b a transcription factor that may modulate the function of that enhancer.

  2. Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 mediate the capacity of mesenchymal stromal cells to support the proliferation and differentiation of CD34{sup +} cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xingbing, E-mail: wangxingbing91@hotmail.com [Department of Hematology of Anhui Provincial Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui (China); Cheng, Qiansong; Li, Lailing; Wang, Jian; Xia, Liang [Department of Hematology of Anhui Provincial Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui (China); Xu, Xiucai [The Center Laboratory of Anhui Provincial Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui (China); Sun, Zimin [Department of Hematology of Anhui Provincial Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui (China)

    2012-02-01

    Bone marrow derived-mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) are multipotent, nonhematopoietic progenitors in a hematopoietic microenvironment and indispensable for regulating hematopoiesis. Several studies have reported that toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed in mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to modulate their biological functions. In this study, we investigated the possible role(s) of TLRs in mediating the hematopoiesis-supporting role of human BM-MSCs. Human BM-MSCs were analyzed for mRNA expression of TLR1-10 by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. TLR1-6, but not TLR7-10 were expressed by BM-MSCs. The protein expression of TLR2 and TLR4 was also confirmed by flow cytometry. We further explored the role of TLR2 and TLR4 in mediating the capacity of BM-MSCs to support the proliferation and differentiation of CD34{sup +} hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells obtained from cord blood. BM-MSCs increased proliferation of CD34{sup +} cells and promoted the differentiation towards the myeloid lineage 7 or 14 days after co-culture, as well as colony formation by those cells and the production of interleukin 1 (IL-1), IL-8, IL-11, stem cell factor (SCF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (CSF), macrophage CSF and granulocyte-macrophage CSF, if MSCs had been stimulated with TLR2 agonist (PAM{sub 3}CSK{sub 4}) or TLR4 agonist (LPS). Interestingly, although these effects were elevated in a different degree, a synergistic effect was not observed in BM-MSCs co-stimulated with PAM{sub 3}CSK{sub 4} and LPS. Together, our findings suggest that TLR2 and TLR4 signaling may indirectly regulate hematopoiesis by modulating BM-MSCs' functions. The increased hematopoietic proliferation and differentiation could be mediated, at least in part, by augmented hematopoiesis-related cytokine production of BM-MSCs.

  3. Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 mediate the capacity of mesenchymal stromal cells to support the proliferation and differentiation of CD34+ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xingbing; Cheng, Qiansong; Li, Lailing; Wang, Jian; Xia, Liang; Xu, Xiucai; Sun, Zimin

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow derived-mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) are multipotent, nonhematopoietic progenitors in a hematopoietic microenvironment and indispensable for regulating hematopoiesis. Several studies have reported that toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed in mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to modulate their biological functions. In this study, we investigated the possible role(s) of TLRs in mediating the hematopoiesis-supporting role of human BM-MSCs. Human BM-MSCs were analyzed for mRNA expression of TLR1–10 by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. TLR1–6, but not TLR7–10 were expressed by BM-MSCs. The protein expression of TLR2 and TLR4 was also confirmed by flow cytometry. We further explored the role of TLR2 and TLR4 in mediating the capacity of BM-MSCs to support the proliferation and differentiation of CD34 + hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells obtained from cord blood. BM-MSCs increased proliferation of CD34 + cells and promoted the differentiation towards the myeloid lineage 7 or 14 days after co-culture, as well as colony formation by those cells and the production of interleukin 1 (IL-1), IL-8, IL-11, stem cell factor (SCF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (CSF), macrophage CSF and granulocyte-macrophage CSF, if MSCs had been stimulated with TLR2 agonist (PAM 3 CSK 4 ) or TLR4 agonist (LPS). Interestingly, although these effects were elevated in a different degree, a synergistic effect was not observed in BM-MSCs co-stimulated with PAM 3 CSK 4 and LPS. Together, our findings suggest that TLR2 and TLR4 signaling may indirectly regulate hematopoiesis by modulating BM-MSCs' functions. The increased hematopoietic proliferation and differentiation could be mediated, at least in part, by augmented hematopoiesis-related cytokine production of BM-MSCs.

  4. The Second Transmembrane Domain of the Human Type 1 Angiotensin II Receptor Participates in the Formation of the Ligand Binding Pocket and Undergoes Integral Pivoting Movement during the Process of Receptor Activation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domazet, Ivana; Holleran, Brian J.; Martin, Stéphane S.; Lavigne, Pierre; Leduc, Richard; Escher, Emanuel; Guillemette, Gaétan

    2009-01-01

    The octapeptide hormone angiotensin II (AngII) exerts a wide variety of cardiovascular effects through the activation of the angiotensin II type-1 (AT1) receptor, which belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. Like other G protein-coupled receptors, the AT1 receptor possesses seven transmembrane domains that provide structural support for the formation of the ligand-binding pocket. In order to identify those residues in the second transmembrane domain (TMD2) that contribute to the formation of the binding pocket of the AT1 receptor, we used the substituted cysteine accessibility method. All of the residues within the Leu-70 to Trp-94 region were mutated one at a time to a cysteine, and, after expression in COS-7 cells, the mutant receptors were treated with the sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agent methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA). MTSEA reacts selectively with water-accessible, free sulfhydryl groups of endogenous or introduced point mutation cysteines. If a cysteine is found in the binding pocket, the covalent modification will affect the binding kinetics of the ligand. MTSEA substantially decreased the binding affinity of D74C-AT1, L81C-AT1, A85C-AT1, T88C-AT1, and A89C-AT1 mutant receptors, which suggests that these residues orient themselves within the water-accessible binding pocket of the AT1 receptor. Interestingly, this pattern of acquired MTSEA sensitivity was altered for TMD2 reporter cysteines engineered in a constitutively active N111G-AT1 receptor background. Indeed, mutant D74C-N111G-AT1 became insensitive to MTSEA, whereas mutant L81C-N111G-AT1 lost some sensitivity and mutant V86C-N111G-AT1 became sensitive to MTSEA. Our results suggest that constitutive activation of the AT1 receptor causes TMD2 to pivot, bringing the top of TMD2 closer to the binding pocket and pushing the bottom of TMD2 away from the binding pocket. PMID:19276075

  5. The second transmembrane domain of the human type 1 angiotensin II receptor participates in the formation of the ligand binding pocket and undergoes integral pivoting movement during the process of receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domazet, Ivana; Holleran, Brian J; Martin, Stéphane S; Lavigne, Pierre; Leduc, Richard; Escher, Emanuel; Guillemette, Gaétan

    2009-05-01

    The octapeptide hormone angiotensin II (AngII) exerts a wide variety of cardiovascular effects through the activation of the angiotensin II type-1 (AT(1)) receptor, which belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. Like other G protein-coupled receptors, the AT(1) receptor possesses seven transmembrane domains that provide structural support for the formation of the ligand-binding pocket. In order to identify those residues in the second transmembrane domain (TMD2) that contribute to the formation of the binding pocket of the AT(1) receptor, we used the substituted cysteine accessibility method. All of the residues within the Leu-70 to Trp-94 region were mutated one at a time to a cysteine, and, after expression in COS-7 cells, the mutant receptors were treated with the sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agent methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA). MTSEA reacts selectively with water-accessible, free sulfhydryl groups of endogenous or introduced point mutation cysteines. If a cysteine is found in the binding pocket, the covalent modification will affect the binding kinetics of the ligand. MTSEA substantially decreased the binding affinity of D74C-AT(1), L81C-AT(1), A85C-AT(1), T88C-AT(1), and A89C-AT(1) mutant receptors, which suggests that these residues orient themselves within the water-accessible binding pocket of the AT(1) receptor. Interestingly, this pattern of acquired MTSEA sensitivity was altered for TMD2 reporter cysteines engineered in a constitutively active N111G-AT(1) receptor background. Indeed, mutant D74C-N111G-AT(1) became insensitive to MTSEA, whereas mutant L81C-N111G-AT(1) lost some sensitivity and mutant V86C-N111G-AT(1) became sensitive to MTSEA. Our results suggest that constitutive activation of the AT(1) receptor causes TMD2 to pivot, bringing the top of TMD2 closer to the binding pocket and pushing the bottom of TMD2 away from the binding pocket.

  6. Clathrin-dependent internalization of the angiotensin II AT₁A receptor links receptor internalization to COX-2 protein expression in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinelli, Thomas A; Walker, Linda P; Velez, Juan Carlos Q; Ullian, Michael E

    2015-02-05

    The major effects of Angiotensin II (AngII) in vascular tissue are mediated by AngII AT1A receptor activation. Certain effects initiated by AT1A receptor activation require receptor internalization. In rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (RASMC), AngII stimulates cyclooxygenase 2 protein expression. We have previously shown this is mediated by β-arrestin-dependent receptor internalization and NF-κB activation. In this study, a specific inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), pitstop-2, was used to test the hypothesis that clathrin-dependent internalization of activated AT1A receptor mediates NF-κB activation and subsequent cyclooxygenase 2 expression. Radioligand binding assays, real time qt-PCR and immunoblotting were used to document the effects of pitstop-2 on AngII binding and signaling in RASMC. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) was used to image pitstop-2׳s effects on AT1 receptor/GFP internalization in HEK-293 cells and p65 NF-κB nuclear localization in RASMC. Pitstop-2 significantly inhibited internalization of AT1A receptor (44.7% ± 3.1% Control vs. 13.2% ± 8.3% Pitstop-2; n=3) as determined by radioligand binding studies in RASMC. Studies utilizing AT1A receptor/GFP expressed in HEK 293 cells and LSCM confirmed these findings. Pitstop-2 significantly inhibited AngII-induced p65 NF-κB phosphorylation and nuclear localization, COX-2 message and protein expression in RASMC without altering activation of p42/44 ERK or TNFα signaling. Pitstop-2, a specific inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, confirms that internalization of activated AT1A receptor mediates AngII activation of cyclooxygenase 2 expression in RASMC. These data provide support for additional intracellular signaling pathways activated through β-arrestin mediated internalization of G protein-coupled receptors, such as AT1A receptors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Beta-adrenergic receptors support attention to extinction learning that occurs in the absence, but not the presence, of a context change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Emma André

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The noradrenergic (NA-system is an important regulator of cognitive function. It contributes to extinction learning(EL, and in disorders where EL is impaired NA-dysfunction has been postulated. We explored whether NA acting on beta-adrenergic-receptors (β-AR, regulates EL that depends on context, but is not fear-associated. We assessed behaviour in an ‘AAA’ or ‘ABA’ paradigm: rats were trained for 3 days in a T-maze(context-A to learn that a reward is consistently found in the goal arm, despite low reward probability. This was followed on day 4 by EL(unrewarded, whereby in the ABA-paradigm, EL was reinforced by a context change (B, and in the AAA-paradigm, no context change occurred. On day 5, re-exposure to the A-context (unrewarded occurred. Typically, in control ‘AAA’ animals EL occurred on day 4 that progressed further on day 5. In control ‘ABA’ animals, EL also occurred on day 4, followed by renewal of the previously learned (A behavior on day 5, that was followed (in day 5 by extinction of this behavior, as the animals realised that no food reward would be given.Treatment with the β-AR-antagonist, propranolol, prior to EL on day 4, impaired EL in the AAA-paradigm. In the ‘ABA’ paradigm, antagonist treatment on day 4, had no effect on extinction that was reinforced by a context change (B. Furthermore, β-AR-antagonism prior to renewal testing (on day 5 in the ABA-paradigm, resulted in normal renewal behavior, although subsequent extinction of responses during day 5 was prevented by the antagonist. Thus, under both treatment conditions, β-AR-antagonism prevented extinction of the behavior learned in the ‘A’ context.β-AR-blockade during an overt context change did not prevent EL, whereas β-AR were required for EL in an unchanging context. These data suggest that β-AR may support EL by reinforcing attention towards relevant changes in the previously learned experience, and that this process supports extinction

  8. Beta-adrenergic receptors support attention to extinction learning that occurs in the absence, but not the presence, of a context change

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Marion Agnès Emma; Wolf, Oliver T.; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The noradrenergic (NA)-system is an important regulator of cognitive function. It contributes to extinction learning (EL), and in disorders where EL is impaired NA-dysfunction has been postulated. We explored whether NA acting on beta-adrenergic-receptors (β-AR), regulates EL that depends on context, but is not fear-associated. We assessed behavior in an “AAA” or “ABA” paradigm: rats were trained for 3 days in a T-maze (context-A) to learn that a reward is consistently found in the goal arm, despite low reward probability. This was followed on day 4 by EL (unrewarded), whereby in the ABA-paradigm, EL was reinforced by a context change (B), and in the AAA-paradigm, no context change occurred. On day 5, re-exposure to the A-context (unrewarded) occurred. Typically, in control “AAA” animals EL occurred on day 4 that progressed further on day 5. In control “ABA” animals, EL also occurred on day 4, followed by renewal of the previously learned (A) behavior on day 5, that was succeeded (on day 5) by extinction of this behavior, as the animals realised that no food reward would be given. Treatment with the β-AR-antagonist, propranolol, prior to EL on day 4, impaired EL in the AAA-paradigm. In the “ABA” paradigm, antagonist treatment on day 4, had no effect on extinction that was reinforced by a context change (B). Furthermore, β-AR-antagonism prior to renewal testing (on day 5) in the ABA-paradigm, resulted in normal renewal behavior, although subsequent extinction of responses during day 5 was prevented by the antagonist. Thus, under both treatment conditions, β-AR-antagonism prevented extinction of the behavior learned in the “A” context. β-AR-blockade during an overt context change did not prevent EL, whereas β-AR were required for EL in an unchanging context. These data suggest that β-AR may support EL by reinforcing attention towards relevant changes in the previously learned experience, and that this process supports extinction

  9. Glucocorticoid receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Onno C; Koorneef, Lisa L; Kroon, Jan

    2018-06-01

    The glucocorticoid hormone cortisol acts throughout the body to support circadian processes and adaptation to stress. The glucocorticoid receptor is the target of cortisol and of synthetic glucocorticoids, which are used widely in the clinic. Both agonism and antagonism of the glucocorticoid receptor may be beneficial in disease, but given the wide expression of the receptor and involvement in various processes, beneficial effects are often accompanied by unwanted side effects. Selective glucocorticoid receptor modulators are ligands that induce a receptor conformation that allows activation of only a subset of downstream signaling pathways. Such molecules thereby combine agonistic and antagonistic properties. Here we discuss the mechanisms underlying selective receptor modulation and their promise in treating diseases in several organ systems where cortisol signaling plays a role. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Parcels and Land Ownership, Contains parcels, subdivisions, CSMs, Condominiums, Rights of Way and supporting annotation. Data within the City of West Bend are maintained by the City. Some areas are mapped at 1:1200, Published in 2013, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Washington County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Parcels and Land Ownership dataset current as of 2013. Contains parcels, subdivisions, CSMs, Condominiums, Rights of Way and supporting annotation. Data within the...

  11. Somatostatin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lars Neisig; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard; Hartmann, Bolette

    2003-01-01

    functional units, receptors co-operate. The total receptor apparatus of individual cell types is composed of different-ligand receptors (e.g. SRIF and non-SRIF receptors) and co-expressed receptor subtypes (e.g. sst(2) and sst(5) receptors) in characteristic proportions. In other words, levels of individual......-peptides, receptor agonists and antagonists. Relatively long half lives, as compared to those of the endogenous ligands, have been paramount from the outset. Motivated by theoretical puzzles or the shortcomings of present-day diagnostics and therapy, investigators have also aimed to produce subtype...

  12. Activation of adenosine A3 receptors supports hematopoiesis-stimulating effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in sublethally irradiated mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Šefc, L.; Dušek, L.; Vacek, Antonín; Holá, Jiřina; Hoferová, Zuzana; Štreitová, Denisa

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 8 (2010), s. 649-656 ISSN 0955-3002 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/08/0158 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : ionising radiation * hematopoiesis * adenosine A3 receptors Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.861, year: 2010

  13. Oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) in relation to loneliness in adolescence : interactions with sex, parental support, and DRD2 and 5-HTTLPR genotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roekel, Eeske; Verhagen, Maaike; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Goossens, Luc; Scholte, Ron H. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent research has shown that loneliness, a common problem in adolescence, may have a genetic basis. The evidence, though, was limited mostly to serotonin-related and dopamine-related genes. In the present study, we focused on the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR).Methods Associations were

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum stress increases AT1R mRNA expression via TIA-1-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backlund, Michael; Paukku, Kirsi; Kontula, Kimmo K; Lehtonen, Jukka Y A

    2016-04-20

    As the formation of ribonucleoprotein complexes is a major mechanism of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) regulation, we sought to identify novel AT1R mRNA binding proteins. By affinity purification and mass spectroscopy, we identified TIA-1. This interaction was confirmed by colocalization of AT1R mRNA and TIA-1 by FISH and immunofluorescence microscopy. In immunoprecipitates of endogenous TIA- 1, reverse transcription-PCR amplified AT1R mRNA. TIA-1 has two binding sites within AT1R 3'-UTR. The binding site proximal to the coding region is glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)-dependent whereas the distal binding site is not. TIA-1 functions as a part of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response leading to stress granule (SG) formation and translational silencing. We and others have shown that AT1R expression is increased by ER stress-inducing factors. In unstressed cells, TIA-1 binds to AT1R mRNA and decreases AT1R protein expression. Fluorescence microscopy shows that ER stress induced by thapsigargin leads to the transfer of TIA-1 to SGs. In FISH analysis AT1R mRNA remains in the cytoplasm and no longer colocalizes with TIA-1. Thus, release of TIA-1-mediated suppression by ER stress increases AT1R protein expression. In conclusion, AT1R mRNA is regulated by TIA-1 in a ER stress-dependent manner. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Role and mechanism of AT1-AA in the pathogenesis of HELLP syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Shurui; Wang, Yuxian; Sun, Shuqing; Zheng, Yanqian; Jin, Zhu; Zhi, Jianming

    2018-01-10

    HELLP syndrome remains a leading cause of maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity worldwide, which symptoms include hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count. The objective of this study was to determine whether HELLP is associated with AT1-AA. The positive rate and titer of AT1-AA in plasma from pregnant women were determined, and the correlation of AT1-AA titer with the grade of HELLP was analyzed. A HELLP rat model established by intravenous injection of AT1-AA. Our experimental results show the AT1-AA titer and positive rate were significantly higher in HELLP group, and AT1-AA titer were positively correlated with the level of TNF-α and ET-1 in plasma and the grade of HELLP syndrome. The results of animal experiments showed that the typical features of HELLP in the pregnant rats after AT1-AA injection. The levels of TNF-α and ET-1 in plasma and liver tissue were significantly increased in AT1-AA-treated rats compared with control rats. The HELLP syndrome induced by AT1-AA was attenuated markedly after administration of losartan. These data support the hypothesis that one the potential pathway that AT1-AA induce damage to capillary endothelial cells and liver during pregnancy is through activation of TNF-α and ET-1.

  16. Evolutionary reconstructions of the transferrin receptor of Caniforms supports canine parvovirus being a re-emerged and not a novel pathogen in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason T Kaelber

    Full Text Available Parvoviruses exploit transferrin receptor type-1 (TfR for cellular entry in carnivores, and specific interactions are key to control of host range. We show that several key mutations acquired by TfR during the evolution of Caniforms (dogs and related species modified the interactions with parvovirus capsids by reducing the level of binding. These data, along with signatures of positive selection in the TFRC gene, are consistent with an evolutionary arms race between the TfR of the Caniform clade and parvoviruses. As well as the modifications of amino acid sequence which modify binding, we found that a glycosylation site mutation in the TfR of dogs which provided resistance to the carnivore parvoviruses which were in circulation prior to about 1975 predates the speciation of coyotes and dogs. Because the closely-related black-backed jackal has a TfR similar to their common ancestor and lacks the glycosylation site, reconstructing this mutation into the jackal TfR shows the potency of that site in blocking binding and infection and explains the resistance of dogs until recent times. This alters our understanding of this well-known example of viral emergence by indicating that canine parvovirus emergence likely resulted from the re-adaptation of a parvovirus to the resistant receptor of a former host.

  17. Evolutionary reconstructions of the transferrin receptor of Caniforms supports canine parvovirus being a re-emerged and not a novel pathogen in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaelber, Jason T; Demogines, Ann; Harbison, Carole E; Allison, Andrew B; Goodman, Laura B; Ortega, Alicia N; Sawyer, Sara L; Parrish, Colin R

    2012-01-01

    Parvoviruses exploit transferrin receptor type-1 (TfR) for cellular entry in carnivores, and specific interactions are key to control of host range. We show that several key mutations acquired by TfR during the evolution of Caniforms (dogs and related species) modified the interactions with parvovirus capsids by reducing the level of binding. These data, along with signatures of positive selection in the TFRC gene, are consistent with an evolutionary arms race between the TfR of the Caniform clade and parvoviruses. As well as the modifications of amino acid sequence which modify binding, we found that a glycosylation site mutation in the TfR of dogs which provided resistance to the carnivore parvoviruses which were in circulation prior to about 1975 predates the speciation of coyotes and dogs. Because the closely-related black-backed jackal has a TfR similar to their common ancestor and lacks the glycosylation site, reconstructing this mutation into the jackal TfR shows the potency of that site in blocking binding and infection and explains the resistance of dogs until recent times. This alters our understanding of this well-known example of viral emergence by indicating that canine parvovirus emergence likely resulted from the re-adaptation of a parvovirus to the resistant receptor of a former host.

  18. Lack of evidence for AT1R/B2R heterodimerization in COS-7, HEK293, and NIH3T3 cells: how common is the AT1R/B2R heterodimer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob L; Hansen, Jonas T; Speerschneider, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    dimerization using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and regulated secretion/aggregation technology. However, although both the AT1Rs and B2Rs were functional in our systems and the systems were fine tuned to detect small changes in receptor function, we failed to detect any functional modulation...

  19. Computational Study of Estrogen Receptor-Alpha Antagonist with Three-Dimensional Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship, Support Vector Regression, and Linear Regression Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hsin Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human estrogen receptor (ER isoforms, ERα and ERβ, have long been an important focus in the field of biology. To better understand the structural features associated with the binding of ERα ligands to ERα and modulate their function, several QSAR models, including CoMFA, CoMSIA, SVR, and LR methods, have been employed to predict the inhibitory activity of 68 raloxifene derivatives. In the SVR and LR modeling, 11 descriptors were selected through feature ranking and sequential feature addition/deletion to generate equations to predict the inhibitory activity toward ERα. Among four descriptors that constantly appear in various generated equations, two agree with CoMFA and CoMSIA steric fields and another two can be correlated to a calculated electrostatic potential of ERα.

  20. A bioluminescence resonance energy transfer 2 (BRET2) assay for monitoring seven transmembrane receptor and insulin receptor crosstalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanni, Samra Joke; Kulahin, Nikolaj; Jorgensen, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    The angiotensin AT1 receptor is a seven transmembrane (7TM) receptor, which mediates the regulation of blood pressure. Activation of angiotensin AT1 receptor may lead to impaired insulin signaling indicating crosstalk between angiotensin AT1 receptor and insulin receptor signaling pathways....... To elucidate the molecular mechanisms behind this crosstalk, we applied the BRET2 technique to monitor the effect of angiotensin II on the interaction between Rluc8 tagged insulin receptor and GFP2 tagged insulin receptor substrates 1, 4, 5 (IRS1, IRS4, IRS5) and Src homology 2 domain-containing protein (Shc......). We demonstrate that angiotensin II reduces the interaction between insulin receptor and IRS1 and IRS4, respectively, while the interaction with Shc is unaffected, and this effect is dependent on Gαq activation. Activation of other Gαq-coupled 7TM receptors led to a similar reduction in insulin...

  1. Receptor assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, K; Ibayashi, H [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1975-05-01

    This paper summarized present status and problems of analysis of hormone receptor and a few considerations on clinical significance of receptor abnormalities. It was pointed that in future clinical field quantitative and qualitative analysis of receptor did not remain only in the etiological discussion, but that it was an epoch-making field of investigation which contained the possiblity of artificial change of sensitivity of living body on drugs and the development connected directly with treatment of various diseases.

  2. Rational design, efficient syntheses and biological evaluation of N,N '-symmetrically bis-substituted butylimidazole analogs as a new class of potent Angiotensin II receptor blockers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Agelis, G.; Resvani, A.; Koukoulitsa, C.; Tůmová, Tereza; Slaninová, Jiřina; Kalavrizioti, D.; Spyridaki, K.; Afantitis, A.; Melagraki, G.; Siafaka, A.; Gkini, E.; Megariotis, G.; Grdadolnik, S. G.; Papadopoulos, M. G.; Vlahakos, D.; Maragoudakis, M.; Liapakis, G.; Mavromoustakos, T.; Matsoukas, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 62, Apr (2013), s. 352-370 ISSN 0223-5234 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : AT1 receptor blockers * N,N '-Bis-alkylated butylimidazole analogs * synthesis * Wittig reaction * hydroxymethylation * structure elucidation Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.432, year: 2013

  3. Differential extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 activation by the angiotensin type 1 receptor supports distinct phenotypes of cardiac myocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aplin, Mark; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Schneider, Mikael

    2007-01-01

    that phosphorylates p90 Ribosomal S6 Kinase, a ubiquitous and versatile mediator of ERK1/2 signal transduction. Moreover, the beta-arrestin2-dependent ERK1/2 signal supports intact proliferation of cardiac myocytes. In contrast to G(q)-activated ERK1/2, and in keeping with its failure to translocate to the nucleus...

  4. High molecular weight FGF2 isoforms demonstrate canonical receptor-mediated activity and support human embryonic stem cell self-renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Kole

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2 is a highly pleiotropic member of a large family of growth factors with a broad range of activities, including mitogenesis and angiogenesis (Ornitz et al., 1996; Zhang et al., 2006, and it is known to be essential for maintenance of balance between survival, proliferation, and self-renewal in human pluripotent stem cells (Eiselleova et al., 2009; Zoumaro-Djayoon et al., 2011. A single FGF2 transcript can be translated into five FGF2 protein isoforms, an 18 kDa low molecular weight (LMW isoform and four larger high molecular weight (HMW isoforms (Arese et al., 1999; Arnaud et al., 1999. As they are not generally secreted, high molecular weight (HMW FGF2 isoforms have predominantly been investigated intracellularly; only a very limited number of studies have investigated their activity as extracellular factors. Here we report over-expression, isolation, and biological activity of all recombinant human FGF2 isoforms. We show that HMW FGF2 isoforms can support self-renewal of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs in vitro. Exogenous supplementation with HMW FGF2 isoforms also activates the canonical FGFR/MAPK pathway and induces mitogenic activity in a manner similar to that of the 18 kDa FGF2 isoform. Though all HMW isoforms, when supplemented exogenously, are able to recapitulate LMW FGF2 activity to some degree, it appears that certain isoforms tend to do so more poorly, demonstrating a lesser functional response by several measures. A better understanding of isoform-specific FGF2 effects will lead to a better understanding of developmental and pathological FGF2 signaling.

  5. Quantitative receptor radioautography in the study of receptor-receptor interactions in the nucleus tractus solitarii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fior-Chadi D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS in the dorsomedial medulla comprises a wide range of neuropeptides and biogenic amines. Several of them are related to mechanisms of central blood pressure control. Angiotensin II (Ang II, neuropeptide Y (NPY and noradrenaline (NA are found in the NTS cells, as well as their receptors. Based on this observation we have evaluated the modulatory effect of these peptide receptors on a2-adrenoceptors in the NTS. Using quantitative receptor radioautography, we observed that NPY and Ang II receptors decreased the affinity of a2-adrenoceptors for their agonists in the NTS of the rat. Cardiovascular experiments agreed with the in vitro data. Coinjection of a threshold dose of Ang II or of the NPY agonists together with an ED50 dose of adrenergic agonists such as NA, adrenaline and clonidine counteracted the depressor effect produced by the a2-agonist in the NTS. The results provide evidence for the existence of an antagonistic interaction between Ang II at1 receptors and NPY receptor subtypes with the a2-adrenoceptors in the NTS. This receptor interaction may reduce the transduction over the a2-adrenoceptors which can be important in central cardiovascular regulation and in the development of hypertension

  6. Multiple adrenal masses: MRI tissue differentiation of pheochromocytoma and adenoma at 1.5 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slapa, R.Z.; Jakubowski, W.; Feltynowski, T.; Januszewicz, A.

    1997-01-01

    We present the case of 38-year-old hypertensive patient with bilateral adrenal masses and with clinical and biochemical suspicion of pheochromocytoma. Magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 T established correct diagnosis of coexisting adrenal pheochromocytoma and adenoma (nonhyperfunctioning). The case supports the usefulness of MRI for definitive evaluation of bilateral adrenal masses in patients with suspicion of pheochromocytoma. (orig.). With 2 figs

  7. Target injection and engagement for neutron generation at 1 Hz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komeda, Osamu; Mori, Yoshitaka; Nishimura, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Target injection is a key technology to realizing inertial fusion energy. Here we present the first demonstration of target injection and neutron generation. We injected more than 600 spherical deuterated polystyrene (C 8 D 8 ) bead targets during 10 minutes at 1 Hz. After the targets fell for a distance of 18 cm, we applied the synchronized laser-diode-pumped ultra-intense laser HAMA and successfully generated neutrons repeatedly. The result is a step toward fusion power and also suggests possible industrial neutron sources. (author)

  8. Effects of a novel bradykinin B1 receptor antagonist and angiotensin II receptor blockade on experimental myocardial infarction in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongmei Wu

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cardiovascular effects of the novel bradykinin B1 receptor antagonist BI-113823 following myocardial infarction (MI and to determine whether B1 receptor blockade alters the cardiovascular effects of an angiotensin II type 1 (AT1 receptor antagonist after MI in rats.Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to permanent occlusion of the left descending coronary artery. Cardiovascular function was determined at 7 days post MI. Treatment with either B1 receptor antagonist (BI-113823 or AT1 receptor antagonist (irbesartan alone or in combination improved post-MI cardiac function as evidenced by attenuation of elevated left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP; greater first derivative of left ventricular pressure (± dp/dt max, left ventricle ejection fraction, fractional shorting, and better wall motion; as we as reductions in post-MI up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases 2 (MMP-2 and collagen III. In addition, the cardiac up-regulation of B1 receptor and AT1 receptor mRNA were markedly reduced in animals treated with BI 113823, although bradykinin B2 receptor and angiotensin 1 converting enzyme (ACE1 mRNA expression were not significantly affected by B1 receptor blockade.The present study demonstrates that treatment with the novel B1 receptor antagonist, BI-113823 improves post-MI cardiac function and does not influence the cardiovascular effects of AT1 receptor antagonist following MI.

  9. High-speed solar wind flow parameters at 1 AU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, W.C.; Asbridge, J.R.; Bame, S.J.; Gosling, J.T.

    1976-01-01

    To develop a set of constraints for theories of solar wind high-speed streams, a detailed study was made of the fastest streams observed at 1 AU during the time period spanning March 1971 through July 1974. Streams were accepted for study only if (1) the maximum speed exceeded 650 km s -1 ; (2) effects of stream-stream dynamical interaction on the flow parameters could be safely separated from the intrinsic characteristics of the high-speed regions; (3) the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the stream when mapped back to 20 solar radii by using a constant speed approximation was greater than 45degree in Carrington longitude; and (4) there were no obvious solar-activity-induced contaminating effects. Nineteen streams during this time interval satisfied these criteria. Average parameters at 1 AU for those portions of these streams above V=650 km s -1 are given.Not only is it not presently known why electrons are significantly cooler than the protons within high-speed regions, but also observed particle fluxes and convected energy fluxes for speed greater than 650 km s -1 are substantially larger than those values predicted by any of the existing theories of solar wind high-speed streams. More work is therefore needed in refining present solar wind models to see whether suitable modifications and/or combinations of existing theories based on reasonable coronal conditions can accommodate the above high-speed flow parameters

  10. Observational Signatures of Parametric Instability at 1AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, T. A.; Bale, S. D.; Badman, S.

    2017-12-01

    Observations and simulations of inertial compressive turbulence in the solar wind are characterized by density structures anti-correlated with magnetic fluctuations parallel to the mean field. This signature has been interpreted as observational evidence for non-propagating pressure balanced structures (PBS), kinetic ion acoustic waves, as well as the MHD slow mode. Recent work, specifically Verscharen et al. (2017), has highlighted the unexpected fluid like nature of the solar wind. Given the high damping rates of parallel propagating compressive fluctuations, their ubiquity in satellite observations is surprising and suggests the presence of a driving process. One possible candidate for the generation of compressive fluctuations in the solar wind is the parametric instability, in which large amplitude Alfvenic fluctuations decay into parallel propagating compressive waves. This work employs 10 years of WIND observations in order to test the parametric decay process as a source of compressive waves in the solar wind through comparing collisionless damping rates of compressive fluctuations with growth rates of the parametric instability. Preliminary results suggest that generation of compressive waves through parametric decay is overdamped at 1 AU. However, the higher parametric decay rates expected in the inner heliosphere likely allow for growth of the slow mode-the remnants of which could explain density fluctuations observed at 1AU.

  11. Magnetic shape memory effect at 1.7 K

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heczko, Oleg; Kopecký, Vít; Sozinov, A.; Straka, L.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 7 (2013), "072405-1"-"072405-4" ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP107/11/0391 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : shape memory alloys Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.515, year: 2013 http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4817941

  12. On interplanetary coronal mass ejection identification at 1 AU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulligan, T.; Russell, C.T.; Gosling, J.T.

    1999-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections are believed to be produced in the corona from closed magnetic regions not previously participating in the solar wind expansion. At 1 AU their interplanetary counterparts (ICMEs) generally have a number of distinct plasma and field signatures that distinguish them from the ambient solar wind. These include heat flux dropouts, bi-directional streaming, enhanced alpha particle events, times of depressed proton temperatures, intervals of distorted or enhanced magnetic field, and times of large magnetic field rotations characteristic of magnetic clouds. The first three of these signatures are phenomena that occur at some point within the ICME, but do not necessarily persist throughout the entire ICME. The large scale magnetic field rotations, distortions and enhancements, and the proton temperature depressions tend to mark more accurately the beginning and end of the ICME proper. We examine herein the reliability with which each of these markers identifies ICMEs utilizing ISEE-3 data from 1978 - 1980. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  13. Angiotensin receptors and norepinephrine neuromodulation: implications of functional coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelband, C H; Sumners, C; Lu, D; Raizada, M K

    1998-02-27

    The objective of this review is to examine the role of neuronal angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors in vitro. Two types of G protein-coupled Ang II receptors have been identified in cardiovascularly relevant areas of the brain: the AT1 and the AT2. We have utilized neurons in culture to study the signaling mechanisms of AT1 and AT2 receptors. Neuronal AT1 receptors are involved in norepinephrine (NE) neuromodulation. NE neuromodulation can be either evoked or enhanced. Evoked NE neuromodulation involves AT1 receptor-mediated, losartan-dependent, rapid NE release, inhibition of K+ channels and stimulation of Ca2+ channels. AT1 receptor-mediated enhanced NE neuromodulation involves the Ras-Raf-MAP kinase cascade and ultimately leads to an increase in NE transporter, tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine beta-hydroxylase mRNA transcription. Neuronal AT2 receptors signal via a Gi protein and are coupled to activation of PP2A and PLA2 and stimulation of K+ channels. Finally, putative cross-talk pathways between AT1 and AT2 receptors will be discussed.

  14. Preoperative psychosocial risk factors for poor outcomes at 1 and 5 years after total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylde, Vikki; Trela-Larsen, Lea; Whitehouse, Michael R; Blom, Ashley W

    2017-10-01

    Background and purpose - Psychosocial factors are important risk factors for poor outcomes in the first year after total knee replacement (TKR), however their impact on long-term outcomes is unclear. We aimed to identify preoperative psychosocial risk factors for poor outcomes at 1 year and 5 years after TKR. Patients and methods - 266 patients were recruited prior to TKR surgery. Knee pain and function were assessed preoperatively and at 1 and 5 years postoperative using the WOMAC Pain score, WOMAC Function score and American Knee Society Score (AKSS) Knee score. Preoperative depression, anxiety, catastrophizing, pain self-efficacy and social support were assessed. Statistical analyses involved multiple linear regression and mixed effect linear regression. Results - Higher anxiety was a risk factor for worse pain at 1 year postoperative. No psychosocial factors were associated with any outcomes at 5 years postoperative. Analysis of change over time found that patients with higher pain self-efficacy had lower preoperative pain and experienced less improvement in pain up to 1 year postoperative. Higher pain self-efficacy was associated with less improvement in the AKSS up to 1 year postoperative but more improvement between 1 and 5 years postoperative. Interpretation - Preoperative anxiety was found to influence pain at 1 year after TKR. However, none of the psychosocial variables were risk factors for a poor outcome at 5 years post-operative, suggesting that the negative effects of anxiety on outcome do not persist in the longer-term.

  15. Stargazin Modulation of AMPA Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana A. Shaikh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fast excitatory synaptic signaling in the mammalian brain is mediated by AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors. In neurons, AMPA receptors co-assemble with auxiliary proteins, such as stargazin, which can markedly alter receptor trafficking and gating. Here, we used luminescence resonance energy transfer measurements to map distances between the full-length, functional AMPA receptor and stargazin expressed in HEK293 cells and to determine the ensemble structural changes in the receptor due to stargazin. In addition, we used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer to study the structural and conformational distribution of the receptor and how this distribution is affected by stargazin. Our nanopositioning data place stargazin below the AMPA receptor ligand-binding domain, where it is well poised to act as a scaffold to facilitate the long-range conformational selection observations seen in single-molecule experiments. These data support a model of stargazin acting to stabilize or select conformational states that favor activation.

  16. Valsartan reduces AT1-AA-induced apoptosis through suppression oxidative stress mediated ER stress in endothelial progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z-C; Qi, J; Liu, L-M; Li, J; Xu, H-Y; Liang, B; Li, B

    2017-03-01

    Valsartan has been reported to have the function of treating hypertension and improving the prognosis of patients. Many studies indicated that valsartan can also increase angiotensin II, andosterone and plasma renin activity (PRA). Autoantibodies against the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-AA) have been showed to increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium (Ca2+) and result in apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells. In this study, we attempted to explore the effect of valsartan on AT1-AA-induced apoptosis in endothelial progenitor cells. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were cultured. The cytotoxicity was determined by MTT assay. EPCs apoptosis was determined by DAPI staining and flow cytometry. Reactive oxygen species, intracellular calcium concentration and calpain activity were measured using Fluostar Omega Spectrofluorimeter. The expression of p-ERK, p-eIF-2a, CHOP, Bcl-2 and caspase-3 were detected by Western blot. MTT assays showed valsartan significantly inhibited AT1-AA- induced decline of the viability of EPCs. DAPI staining and flow cytometry results indicated valsartan inhibited AT1-AA-induced decline of the viability of EPCs via inhibiting AT1-AA-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, the increasing of reactive oxygen species, intracellular calcium and calpain activity induced by AT1-AA in EPCs were also recovered after pre-treated with valsartan. Meanwhile, the upregulation of p-ERK, p-eIF-2a and CHOP, downregulation of Bcl-2, and activation of Caspase-3 caused by AT1-AA were reversed after pre-incubated with valsartan. Valsartan could inhibit AT1-AA-induced apoptosis through inhibiting oxidative stress mediated ER stress in EPCs.

  17. AT2 Receptor and Tissue Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Namsolleck, Pawel; Recarti, Chiara; Foulquier, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in the initiation and progression of tissue injuries in the cardiovascular and nervous systems. The detrimental actions of the AT1 receptor (AT1R) in hypertension and vascular injury, myocardial infarction and brain ischemia are well...... established. In the past twenty years, protective actions of the RAS, not only in the cardiovascular, but also in the nervous system, have been demonstrated. The so-called protective arm of the RAS includes AT2-receptors and Mas receptors (AT2R and MasR) and is characterized by effects different from...... and often opposing those of the AT1R. These include anti-inflammation, anti-fibrosis, anti-apoptosis and neuroregeneration that can counterbalance pathological processes and enable recovery from disease. The recent development of novel, small-molecule AT2R agonists offers a therapeutic potential in humans...

  18. Microwave differential dilatometer measures 10 - 12 m, at 1 Hz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschero, G.; Mango, F.; Gizdulich, P.

    1996-12-01

    To check and measure the converse piezoelectric effect in bone samples, we had to detect displacements in the range of 1-100 pm with three kinds of restrictions: (1) the biological nature of the samples imposes severe limits in selecting a suitable device and method; (2) such a method has to take into account some clinical applications to which the experiment is devoted; (3) the piezoelectric behavior of bone samples is particularly interesting at low frequencies, around 1 Hz. For such reasons we modified an existing dilatometer based on a microwave differential spectrometer. A 14 GHz klystron, linearly modulated in frequency by a triangular 50 Hz voltage applied to the repeller, is connected, via magic T, to two identical cavities tunable around 14 GHz and whose resonance curves are recorded by crystal detectors. When one of the two cavities changes its height according to the length variations of the sample, its resonance frequency varies resulting in a shift of the resonant curve with respect to the resonance curve of the other cavity acting as reference. The comparison between the cavities' responses is performed by a pulse technique transforming the frequency shifts into time intervals, that are then converted into dc voltages. The differential character of this measurement avoids the need for the microwave source stabilization. The relative shift in frequency is measured with an accuracy better than 500 Hz. This accuracy allows us to measure displacements smaller than 7 nm in the cavity's height. After 2 h of warmup, thanks to the differential arrangement of the system, thermal or other drifts are not detectable within a lapse of time of 12 h. This feature allows coherent signal averaging over long periods. With a piezoelectric ceramic stack moving 100 pm in square wave fashion at 50 mHz we found that the signal to noise ratio was 20 dB after 1000 cycles of signal averaging, when our bandpass filter was tuned at 1 Hz. In conclusion, this system can detect

  19. C4d-negative antibody-mediated rejection with high anti-angiotensin II type I receptor antibodies in absence of donor-specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, Alexander; Hope, Christopher M; Deayton, Susan; Bennett, Greg Donald; Holdsworth, Rhonda; Carroll, Robert P; Coates, P Toby H

    2015-07-01

    Acute antibody-mediated rejection can occur in absence of circulating donor-specific antibodies. Agonistic antibodies targeting the anti-angiotensin II type 1 receptor (anti-AT1 R) are emerging as important non-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Elevated levels of anti-angiotensin II receptor antibodies were first observed in kidney transplant recipients with malignant hypertension and allograft rejection. They have now been studied in three separate kidney transplant populations and associate to frequency of rejection, severity of rejection and graft failure. We report 11 cases of biopsy-proven, Complement 4 fragment d (C4d)-negative, acute rejection occurring without circulating donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies. In eight cases, anti-angiotensin receptor antibodies were retrospectively examined. The remaining three subjects were identified from our centre's newly instituted routine anti-angiotensin receptor antibody screening. All subjects fulfilled Banff 2013 criteria for antibody-mediated rejection and all responded to anti-rejection therapy, which included plasma exchange and angiotensin receptor blocker therapy. These cases support the routine assessment of anti-AT1 R antibodies in kidney transplant recipients to identify subjects at risk. Further studies will need to determine optimal assessment protocol and the effectiveness of pre-emptive treatment with angiotensin receptor blockers. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  20. Influence of Active Immunization Against Angiotensin AT1 or AT2 Receptor on Hypertension Development in Young and Adult SHR

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Železná, Blanka; Veselský, Leopold; Velek, Jiří; Dobešová, Zdenka; Zicha, Josef; Kuneš, Jaroslav

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 4 (1999), s. 259-265 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OK 170; GA AV ČR IAA7011711; GA AV ČR IPP2020702 Grant - others:Coperincus(FR) CT94-0239 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.521, year: 1999

  1. Acute AT1-receptor blockade reverses the hemodynamic and baroreflex impairment in adult sheep exposed to antenatal betamethasone

    OpenAIRE

    Shaltout, Hossam A.; Rose, James C.; Figueroa, Jorge P.; Chappell, Mark C.; Diz, Debra I.; Averill, David B.

    2010-01-01

    To accelerate lung development and protect neonates from other early developmental problems, synthetic steroids are administered maternally in the third trimester, exposing fetuses that are candidates for premature delivery to them. However, steroid exposure at this point of gestation may lead to elevated blood pressure [mean arterial pressure (MAP)] during adolescence. We hypothesize that fetal exposure to steroids activates the renin-angiotensin system, inducing an elevation in blood pressu...

  2. Cerebrovascular ETB, 5-HT1B, and AT1 receptor upregulation correlates with reduction in regional CBF after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansar, Saema; Vikman, Petter; Nielsen, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    with the reduction in regional and global cerebral blood flow (CBF) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). SAH was induced by injecting 250 microl blood into the prechiasmatic cistern in rats. The cerebral arteries were removed 0, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after the SAH for functional and molecular studies...

  3. The linear electric motor: Instability at 1,000 g's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, S.

    1997-01-01

    When fluid of high density is supported against gravity by a less dense liquid, the system is unstable, and microscopic perturbations grow at the interface between the fluids. This phenomenon, called the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, also occurs when a bottle of oil-and-vinegar salad dressing is turned upside down. The instability causes spikes of the dense fluid to penetrate the light fluid, while bubbles of the lighter fluid rise into the dense fluid. The same phenomenon occurs when a light fluid is used to accelerate a dense fluid, causing the two fluids to mix at a very high rate. For example, during the implosion of an ICF capsule, this instability can cause enough mixing to contaminate, cool, and degrade the yield of the thermonuclear fuel. The LEM is an excellent tool for studying this instability, but what is it? Think of a miniature high-speed electric train (the container) hurtling down a track (the electrodes) while diagnostic equipment (optical and laser) photographs it. The LEM, consists of four linear electrodes, or rails, that carry an electrical current to a pair of sliding armatures on the container. A magnetic field is produced that works in concert with the rail-armature current to accelerate the container--just as in an electric motor, but in a linear fashion rather than in rotation. The magnetic field is augmented with elongated coils just as in a conventional electric motor. This configuration also helps hold the armatures against the electrodes to prevent arcing. The electrical energy (0.6 megajoules) is provided by 16 capacitor banks that can be triggered independently to produce different acceleration profiles (i.e., how the acceleration varies with time)

  4. Differences in recurrent prolapse at 1 year after total vs supracervical hysterectomy and robotic sacrocolpopexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Erinn M; Siff, Lauren; Osmundsen, Blake; Geller, Elizabeth; Matthews, Catherine A

    2015-04-01

    Optimal management of the cervix at the time of hysterectomy and sacrocolpopexy for primary uterovaginal prolapse is unknown. Our hypothesis was that recurrent prolapse at 1 year would be more likely after a supracervical robotic hysterectomy (SRH) compared with a total robotic hysterectomy (TRH) at the time of robotic sacrocolpopexy (RSCP) for uterovaginal prolapse. This was a retrospective cohort analysis of 83 women who underwent hysterectomy with RSCP over a 24-month period (40 with TRH and 43 with SRH). At 1 year post-procedure, subjects completed validated questionnaires regarding pelvic floor symptoms, sexual function, and global satisfaction, and underwent a pelvic examination to identify mesh exposure and evaluate pelvic floor support. Demographics of the two groups were similar, except for a higher mean body mass index in the TRH group (31.9 TRH vs 25.8 SRH kg/m(2), p measure of success was used (30 out of 40 [75 %] TRH vs 29 out of 43 [67.4 %] SRH, p = 0.45). Women who underwent an SRH were 2.8 times more likely to have a recurrent prolapse, ≥ stage II, at 1 year, compared with those who underwent a TRH, but when composite assessment scores were used there was no difference between the groups.

  5. Characteristic molecular vibrations of adenosine receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Hyun Keun; Yang, Jin-San; Joung, Je-Gun; Zhang, Byoung-Tak; Oh, S June

    2015-02-13

    Although the regulation of membrane receptor activation is known to be crucial for molecular signal transduction, the molecular mechanism underlying receptor activation is not fully elucidated. Here we study the physicochemical nature of membrane receptor behavior by investigating the characteristic molecular vibrations of receptor ligands using computational chemistry and informatics methods. By using information gain, t-tests, and support vector machines, we have identified highly informative features of adenosine receptor (AdoR) ligand and corresponding functional amino acid residues such as Asn (6.55) of AdoR that has informative significance and is indispensable for ligand recognition of AdoRs. These findings may provide new perspectives and insights into the fundamental mechanism of class A G protein-coupled receptor activation. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The LDL receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Joseph L; Brown, Michael S

    2009-04-01

    In this article, the history of the LDL receptor is recounted by its codiscoverers. Their early work on the LDL receptor explained a genetic cause of heart attacks and led to new ways of thinking about cholesterol metabolism. The LDL receptor discovery also introduced three general concepts to cell biology: receptor-mediated endocytosis, receptor recycling, and feedback regulation of receptors. The latter concept provides the mechanism by which statins selectively lower plasma LDL, reducing heart attacks and prolonging life.

  7. Localization of mineralocorticoid receptors at mammalian synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M Prager

    Full Text Available In the brain, membrane associated nongenomic steroid receptors can induce fast-acting responses to ion conductance and second messenger systems of neurons. Emerging data suggest that membrane associated glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors may directly regulate synaptic excitability during times of stress when adrenal hormones are elevated. As the key neuron signaling interface, the synapse is involved in learning and memory, including traumatic memories during times of stress. The lateral amygdala is a key site for synaptic plasticity underlying conditioned fear, which can both trigger and be coincident with the stress response. A large body of electrophysiological data shows rapid regulation of neuronal excitability by steroid hormone receptors. Despite the importance of these receptors, to date, only the glucocorticoid receptor has been anatomically localized to the membrane. We investigated the subcellular sites of mineralocorticoid receptors in the lateral amygdala of the Sprague-Dawley rat. Immunoblot analysis revealed the presence of mineralocorticoid receptors in the amygdala. Using electron microscopy, we found mineralocorticoid receptors expressed at both nuclear including: glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons and extra nuclear sites including: presynaptic terminals, neuronal dendrites, and dendritic spines. Importantly we also observed mineralocorticoid receptors at postsynaptic membrane densities of excitatory synapses. These data provide direct anatomical evidence supporting the concept that, at some synapses, synaptic transmission is regulated by mineralocorticoid receptors. Thus part of the stress signaling response in the brain is a direct modulation of the synapse itself by adrenal steroids.

  8. beta-Arrestin 1 and 2 stabilize the angiotensin II type I receptor in distinct high-affinity conformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanni, S J; Hansen, J T; Bonde, M M

    2010-01-01

    The angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor belongs to family A of 7 transmembrane (7TM) receptors. The receptor has important roles in the cardiovascular system and is commonly used as a drug target in cardiovascular diseases. Interaction of 7TM receptors with G proteins or beta-arrestins often...

  9. Gβ promotes pheromone receptor polarization and yeast chemotropism by inhibiting receptor phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismael, Amber; Tian, Wei; Waszczak, Nicholas; Wang, Xin; Cao, Youfang; Suchkov, Dmitry; Bar, Eli; Metodiev, Metodi V; Liang, Jie; Arkowitz, Robert A; Stone, David E

    2016-04-12

    Gradient-directed cell migration (chemotaxis) and growth (chemotropism) are processes that are essential to the development and life cycles of all species. Cells use surface receptors to sense the shallow chemical gradients that elicit chemotaxis and chemotropism. Slight asymmetries in receptor activation are amplified by downstream signaling systems, which ultimately induce dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton. During the mating response of budding yeast, a model chemotropic system, the pheromone receptors on the plasma membrane polarize to the side of the cell closest to the stimulus. Although receptor polarization occurs before and independently of actin cable-dependent delivery of vesicles to the plasma membrane (directed secretion), it requires receptor internalization. Phosphorylation of pheromone receptors by yeast casein kinase 1 or 2 (Yck1/2) stimulates their internalization. We showed that the pheromone-responsive Gβγ dimer promotes the polarization of the pheromone receptor by interacting with Yck1/2 and locally inhibiting receptor phosphorylation. We also found that receptor phosphorylation is essential for chemotropism, independently of its role in inducing receptor internalization. A mathematical model supports the idea that the interaction between Gβγ and Yck1/2 results in differential phosphorylation and internalization of the pheromone receptor and accounts for its polarization before the initiation of directed secretion. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. The AT2 Receptor and Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esquitino, Veronica Valero; Danyel, Leon Alexander; Steckelings, Ulrike M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter summarizes current knowledge about the role of the angiotensin type 2 (AT2) receptor in inflammation. The first section provides an overview about molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory action of the AT2 receptor. This section is followed...... by a review of the existing literature addressing the role of the AT2 receptor in a wide range of disorders, in which acute or chronic inflammation is an essential contributor to the pathology. These disorders comprise cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, renal, and autoimmune diseases.Taken as a whole......, the vast majority of data support an anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory role of the AT2 receptor. In light of the current development of AT2 receptor agonists as future drugs for clinical use, diseases with a marked inflammatory component may become a major area of therapeutic use...

  11. Receptor-receptor interactions within receptor mosaics. Impact on neuropsychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxe, K; Marcellino, D; Rivera, A; Diaz-Cabiale, Z; Filip, M; Gago, B; Roberts, D C S; Langel, U; Genedani, S; Ferraro, L; de la Calle, A; Narvaez, J; Tanganelli, S; Woods, A; Agnati, L F

    2008-08-01

    Future therapies for diseases associated with altered dopaminergic signaling, including Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and drug addiction or drug dependence may substantially build on the existence of intramembrane receptor-receptor interactions within dopamine receptor containing receptor mosaics (RM; dimeric or high-order receptor oligomers) where it is believed that the dopamine D(2) receptor may operate as the 'hub receptor' within these complexes. The constitutive adenosine A(2A)/dopamine D(2) RM, located in the dorsal striato-pallidal GABA neurons, are of particular interest in view of the demonstrated antagonistic A(2A)/D(2) interaction within these heteromers; an interaction that led to the suggestion and later demonstration that A(2A) antagonists could be used as novel anti-Parkinsonian drugs. Based on the likely existence of A(2A)/D(2)/mGluR5 RM located both extrasynaptically on striato-pallidal GABA neurons and on cortico-striatal glutamate terminals, multiple receptor-receptor interactions within this RM involving synergism between A(2A)/mGluR5 to counteract D(2) signaling, has led to the proposal of using combined mGluR5 and A(2A) antagonists as a future anti-Parkinsonian treatment. Based on the same RM in the ventral striato-pallidal GABA pathways, novel strategies for the treatment of schizophrenia, building on the idea that A(2A) agonists and/or mGluR5 agonists will help reduce the increased dopaminergic signaling associated with this disease, have been suggested. Such treatment may ensure the proper glutamatergic drive from the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus to the prefrontal cortex, one which is believed to be reduced in schizophrenia due to a dominance of D(2)-like signaling in the ventral striatum. Recently, A(2A) receptors also have been shown to counteract the locomotor and sensitizing actions of cocaine and increases in A(2A) receptors have also been observed in the nucleus accumbens after extended cocaine self-administration, probably

  12. Kupffer cell complement receptor clearance function and host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loegering, D J

    1986-01-01

    Kupffer cells are well known to be important for normal host defense function. The development of methods to evaluate the in vivo function of specific receptors on Kupffer cells has made it possible to assess the role of these receptors in host defense. The rationale for studying complement receptors is based on the proposed important role of these receptors in host defense and on the observation that the hereditary deficiency of a complement receptor is associated with recurrent severe bacterial infections. The studies reviewed here demonstrate that forms of injury that are associated with depressed host defense including thermal injury, hemorrhagic shock, trauma, and surgery also cause a decrease in complement receptor clearance function. This decrease in Kupffer cell receptor clearance function was shown not to be the result of depressed hepatic blood flow or depletion of complement components. Complement receptor function was also depressed following the phagocytosis of particulates that are known to depress Kupffer cell host defense function. Endotoxemia and bacteremia also were associated with a depression of complement receptor function. Complement receptor function was experimentally depressed in uninjured animals by the phagocytosis of IgG-coated erythrocytes. There was a close association between the depression of complement receptor clearance function and increased susceptibility to the lethal effects of endotoxin and bacterial infection. These studies support the hypotheses that complement receptors on Kupffer cells are important for normal host defense and that depression of the function of these receptors impairs host defense.

  13. N-glycosylation of the β2 adrenergic receptor regulates receptor function by modulating dimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaona; Zhou, Mang; Huang, Wei; Yang, Huaiyu

    2017-07-01

    N-glycosylation is a common post-translational modification of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). However, it remains unknown how N-glycosylation affects GPCR signaling. β 2 adrenergic receptor (β 2 AR) has three N-glycosylation sites: Asn6, Asn15 at the N-terminus, and Asn187 at the second extracellular loop (ECL2). Here, we show that deletion of the N-glycan did not affect receptor expression and ligand binding. Deletion of the N-glycan at the N-terminus rather than Asn187 showed decreased effects on isoproterenol-promoted G-protein-dependent signaling, β-arrestin2 recruitment, and receptor internalization. Both N6Q and N15Q showed decreased receptor dimerization, while N187Q did not influence receptor dimerization. As decreased β 2 AR homodimer accompanied with reduced efficiency for receptor function, we proposed that the N-glycosylation of β 2 AR regulated receptor function by influencing receptor dimerization. To verify this hypothesis, we further paid attention to the residues at the dimerization interface. Studies of Lys60 and Glu338, two residues at the receptor dimerization interface, exhibited that the K60A/E338A showed decreased β 2 AR dimerization and its effects on receptor signaling were similar to N6Q and N15Q, which further supported the importance of receptor dimerization for receptor function. This work provides new insights into the relationship among glycosylation, dimerization, and function of GPCRs. Peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase F, EC 3.2.2.11); endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase A (Endo-A, EC 3.2.1.96). © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood of ...

  15. Nuclear receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, Matthew C.; Clair, Heather B.; Hardesty, Josiah E.; Falkner, K. Cameron; Feng, Wenke; Clark, Barbara J.; Sidey, Jennifer; Shi, Hongxue; Aqel, Bashar A.; McClain, Craig J.; Prough, Russell A.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors which sense changing environmental or hormonal signals and effect transcriptional changes to regulate core life functions including growth, development, and reproduction. To support this function, following ligand-activation by xenobiotics, members of subfamily 1 nuclear receptors (NR1s) may heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) to regulate transcription of genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Several of these receptors including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), the pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR), the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the liver X receptor (LXR) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are key regulators of the gut:liver:adipose axis and serve to coordinate metabolic responses across organ systems between the fed and fasting states. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease and may progress to cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is associated with inappropriate nuclear receptor function and perturbations along the gut:liver:adipose axis including obesity, increased intestinal permeability with systemic inflammation, abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance. Environmental chemicals may compound the problem by directly interacting with nuclear receptors leading to metabolic confusion and the inability to differentiate fed from fasting conditions. This review focuses on the impact of nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. Clinical trials including PIVENS and FLINT demonstrate that nuclear receptor targeted therapies may lead to the paradoxical dissociation of steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Novel strategies currently under development (including tissue-specific ligands and dual receptor agonists) may be required to separate the beneficial effects of nuclear receptor activation from unwanted metabolic

  16. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist Losartan binds and activates bradykinin B2 receptor signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Olsen, Kristine Boisen; Erikstrup, Niels

    2011-01-01

    The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker (ARB) Losartan has cardioprotective effects during ischemia-reperfusion injury and inhibits reperfusion arrhythmias -effects that go beyond the benefits of lowering blood pressure. The renin-angiotensin and kallikrein-kinin systems are intricately...

  17. Cooperative ethylene receptor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Qian; Wen, Chi-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    The gaseous plant hormone ethylene is perceived by a family of five ethylene receptor members in the dicotyledonous model plant Arabidopsis. Genetic and biochemical studies suggest that the ethylene response is suppressed by ethylene receptor complexes, but the biochemical nature of the receptor signal is unknown. Without appropriate biochemical measures to trace the ethylene receptor signal and quantify the signal strength, the biological significance of the modulation of ethylene responses ...

  18. β-Arrestin regulation of myosin light chain phosphorylation promotes AT1aR-mediated cell contraction and migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie Simard

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, it has been established that G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs signal not only through canonical G-protein-mediated mechanisms, but also through the ubiquitous cellular scaffolds β-arrestin-1 and β-arrestin-2. Previous studies have implicated β-arrestins as regulators of actin reorganization in response to GPCR stimulation while also being required for membrane protrusion events that accompany cellular motility. One of the most critical events in the active movement of cells is the cyclic phosphorylation and activation of myosin light chain (MLC, which is required for cellular contraction and movement. We have identified the myosin light chain phosphatase Targeting Subunit (MYPT-1 as a binding partner of the β-arrestins and found that β-arrestins play a role in regulating the turnover of phosphorylated myosin light chain. In response to stimulation of the angiotensin Type 1a Receptor (AT1aR, MLC phosphorylation is induced quickly and potently. We have found that β-arrestin-2 facilitates dephosphorylation of MLC, while, in a reciprocal fashion, β-arrestin 1 limits dephosphorylation of MLC. Intriguingly, loss of either β-arrestin-1 or 2 blocks phospho-MLC turnover and causes a decrease in the contraction of cells as monitored by atomic force microscopy (AFM. Furthermore, by employing the β-arrestin biased ligand [Sar(1,Ile(4,Ile(8]-Ang, we demonstrate that AT1aR-mediated cellular motility involves a β-arrestin dependent component. This suggests that the reciprocal regulation of MLC phosphorylation status by β-arrestins-1 and 2 causes turnover in the phosphorylation status of MLC that is required for cell contractility and subsequent chemotaxic motility.

  19. Receptor Autoradiography Protocol for the Localized Visualization of Angiotensin II Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Andrea; Couling, Leena E; Carrera, Eduardo J; Speth, Robert C

    2016-06-07

    This protocol describes receptor binding patterns for Angiotensin II (Ang II) in the rat brain using a radioligand specific for Ang II receptors to perform receptor autoradiographic mapping. Tissue specimens are harvested and stored at -80 °C. A cryostat is used to coronally section the tissue (brain) and thaw-mount the sections onto charged slides. The slide-mounted tissue sections are incubated in (125)I-SI-Ang II to radiolabel Ang II receptors. Adjacent slides are separated into two sets: 'non-specific binding' (NSP) in the presence of a receptor saturating concentration of non-radiolabeled Ang II, or an AT1 Ang II receptor subtype (AT1R) selective Ang II receptor antagonist, and 'total binding' with no AT1R antagonist. A saturating concentration of AT2 Ang II receptor subtype (AT2R) antagonist (PD123319, 10 µM) is also present in the incubation buffer to limit (125)I-SI-Ang II binding to the AT1R subtype. During a 30 min pre-incubation at ~22 °C, NSP slides are exposed to 10 µM PD123319 and losartan, while 'total binding' slides are exposed to 10 µM PD123319. Slides are then incubated with (125)I-SI-Ang II in the presence of PD123319 for 'total binding', and PD123319 and losartan for NSP in assay buffer, followed by several 'washes' in buffer, and water to remove salt and non-specifically bound radioligand. The slides are dried using blow-dryers, then exposed to autoradiography film using a specialized film and cassette. The film is developed and the images are scanned into a computer for visual and quantitative densitometry using a proprietary imaging system and a spreadsheet. An additional set of slides are thionin-stained for histological comparisons. The advantage of using receptor autoradiography is the ability to visualize Ang II receptors in situ, within a section of a tissue specimen, and anatomically identify the region of the tissue by comparing it to an adjacent histological reference section.

  20. Angiotensin receptors in Dupuytren's disease: a target for pharmacological treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Christopher; Touil, Leila; Vaiude, Partha; Singh, Jaipaul; McKirdy, Stuart

    2018-02-01

    Attempts at the pharmacological treatment of Dupuytren's disease have so far been unsuccessful, and the disease is not yet fully understood on a cellular level. The Renin-Angiotensin System has long been understood to play a circulating hormonal role. However, there is much evidence showing Angiotensin II to play a local role in wound healing and fibrosis, with ACE inhibitors being widely used as an anti-fibrotic agent in renal and cardiac disease. This study was designed to investigate the presence of Angiotensin II receptors 1 (AT1) and 2 (AT2) in Dupuytren's tissue to form a basis for further study into the pharmacological treatment of this condition. Tissue was harvested from 11 patients undergoing surgery for Dupuytren's disease. Each specimen was processed into frozen sections and immunostaining was employed to identify AT1 and AT2 receptors. Immunostaining for AT1 receptors was mildly positive in one patient and negative in all the remaining patients. However, all specimens stained extensively for AT2 receptors. This suggests that the expression of AT2 receptors is more prominent than AT1 receptors in Dupuytren's disease. These findings have opened a new avenue for future research involving ACE inhibitors, AT2 agonists, and AT2 antagonists in Dupuytren's disease.

  1. Ethanol potentiates the genotoxicity of the food-derived mammary carcinogen PhIP in human estrogen receptor-positive mammary cells: mechanistic support for lifestyle factors (cooked red meat and ethanol) associated with mammary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Durr-E-Shahwar; David, Rhiannon M; Gooderham, Nigel J

    2018-04-01

    Consumption of cooked/processed meat and ethanol are lifestyle risk factors in the aetiology of breast cancer. Cooking meat generates heterocyclic amines such as 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP). Epidemiology, mechanistic and animal studies indicate that PhIP is a mammary carcinogen that could be causally linked to breast cancer incidence; PhIP is DNA damaging, mutagenic and oestrogenic. PhIP toxicity involves cytochrome P450 (CYP1 family)-mediated metabolic activation to DNA-damaging species, and transcriptional responses through Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and estrogen-receptor-α (ER-α). Ethanol consumption is a modifiable lifestyle factor strongly associated with breast cancer risk. Ethanol toxicity involves alcohol dehydrogenase metabolism to reactive acetaldehyde, and is also a substrate for CYP2E1, which when uncoupled generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage. Here, using human mammary cells that differ in estrogen-receptor status, we explore genotoxicity of PhIP and ethanol and mechanisms behind this toxicity. Treatment with PhIP (10 -7 -10 -4 M) significantly induced genotoxicity (micronuclei formation) preferentially in ER-α positive human mammary cell lines (MCF-7, ER-α+) compared to MDA-MB-231 (ER-α-) cells. PhIP-induced CYP1A2 in both cell lines but CYP1B1 was selectively induced in ER-α(+) cells. ER-α inhibition in MCF-7 cells attenuated PhIP-mediated micronuclei formation and CYP1B1 induction. PhIP-induced CYP2E1 and ROS via ER-α-STAT-3 pathway, but only in ER-α (+) MCF-7 cells. Importantly, simultaneous treatments of physiological concentrations ethanol (10 -3 -10 -1 M) with PhIP (10 -7 -10 -4 M) increased oxidative stress and genotoxicity in MCF-7 cells, compared to the individual chemicals. Collectively, these data offer a mechanistic basis for the increased risk of breast cancer associated with dietary cooked meat and ethanol lifestyle choices.

  2. Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) receptor in locally advanced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, L.A.; Hegg, R.; Freitas, F.R.; Tavares, E.R.; Almeida, C.P.; Baracat, E.C.; Maranhão, R.C.

    2012-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors are overexpressed in most neoplastic cell lines and provide a mechanism for the internalization and concentration of drug-laden nanoemulsions that bind to these receptors. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the administration of standard chemotherapeutic schemes can alter the expression of LDL and LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) receptors in breast carcinoma. Fragments of tumoral and normal breast tissue from 16 consecutive volunteer women with breast cancer in stage II or III were obtained from biopsies before the beginning of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and after chemotherapy, from fragments excised during mastectomy. Tissues were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for both receptors. Because complete response to treatment was achieved in 4 patients, only the tumors from 12 were analyzed. Before chemotherapy, there was overexpression of LDL receptor in the tumoral tissue compared to normal breast tissue in 8 of these patients. LRP-1 receptor overexpression was observed in tumors of 4 patients. After chemotherapy, expression of both receptors decreased in the tumors of 6 patients, increased in 4 and was unchanged in 2. Nonetheless, even when chemotherapy reduced receptors expression, the expression was still above normal. The fact that chemotherapy does not impair LDL receptors expression supports the use of drug carrier systems that target neoplastic cells by the LDL receptor endocytic pathway in patients on conventional chemotherapy

  3. Family C 7TM receptor dimerization and activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Sheikh, Søren P; Hansen, Jakob Lerche

    2006-01-01

    The family C seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors constitutes a small and especially well characterized subfamily of the large 7TM receptor superfamily. Approximately 50% of current prescription drugs target 7TM receptors, this biologically important family represents the largest class of drug...... to be fully defined. This review presents the biochemical support for family C 7TM receptor dimerization and discusses its importance for receptor biosynthesis, surface expression, ligand binding and activation, since lessons learnt here may well be applicable to the whole superfamily of 7TM receptors.......-targets today. It is well established that family C 7TM receptors form homo- or hetero-dimers on the cell surface of living cells. The large extra-cellular domains (ECD) have been crystallized as a dimer in the presence and absence of agonist. Upon agonist binding, the dimeric ECD undergoes large conformational...

  4. Neurokinin-1 receptor activation in globus pallidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The undecapeptide substance P has been demonstrated to modulate neuronal activity in a number of brain regions by acting on neurokinin-1 receptors. Anatomical studies revealed a moderate level of neurokinin-1 receptor in rat globus pallidus. To determine the electrophysiological effects of neurokinin-1 receptor activation in globus pallidus, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed in the present study. Under current-clamp recordings, neurokinin-1 receptor agonist, [Sar9, Met(O211] substance P (SM-SP at 1 μM, depolarized globus pallidus neurons and increased their firing rate. Consistently, SM-SP induced an inward current under voltage-clamp recording. The depolarization evoked by SM-SP persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin, glutamate and GABA receptor antagonists, indicating its direct postsynaptic effects. The neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist, SR140333B, could block SM-SP-induced depolarization. Further experiments showed that suppression of potassium conductance was the predominant ionic mechanism of SM-SP-induced depolarization. To determine if neurokinin-1 receptor activation exerts any effects on GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission, the action of SM-SP on synaptic currents was studied. SM-SP significantly increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents, but only induced a transient increase in the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents. No change was observed in both spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents. Based on the direct excitatory effects of SM-SP on pallidal neurons, we hypothesize that neurokinin-1 receptor activation in globus pallidus may be involved in the beneficial effect of substance P in Parkinson’s disease.

  5. Are interplanetary magnetic clouds manifestations of coronal transients at 1 AU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.M.; Hildner, E.

    1984-01-01

    Using proxy data for the occurrence of those mass ejections from the solar corona which are directed earthward, we investigate the association between the post-1970 interplanetary magnetic clouds of Klein and Burlaga (1982) and coronal mass ejections. The evidence linking magnetic clouds following shocks with coronal mass ejections is striking; six of nine clouds observed at Earth were preceded an appropriate time earlier by meter-wave type II radio bursts indicative of coronal shock waves and coronal mass ejections occurring near central meridian. During the selected control periods when no clouds were detected near Earth, the only type II bursts reported were associated with solar activity near the limbs. Where the proxy solar data to be sought are not so clearly suggested, that is, for clouds preceding interaction regions and clouds within cold magnetic enhancements, the evidence linking the clouds and coronal mass ejections is not as clear; proxy data usually suggest many candidate mass-ejection events for each cloud. Overall, the data are consistent with and support the hypothesis suggested by Klein and Burlaga that magnetic clouds observed with spacecraft at 1 AU are manifestations of solar coronal mass ejection transients. (orig.)

  6. Internal plasma state of the high speed solar wind at 1 AU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, W.C.; Abraham--Shrauner, B.; Asbridge, J.R.; Bame, S.J.

    1976-01-01

    The character of particle velocity distributions in the high speed solar wind is presented. It is found that electron distribution shapes differ from simple bi-Maxwellians in that a hot, strongly beamed, high energy electron component is always present and is observed to move relative to a distinct low energy electron component along the magnetic field direction, B, away from the sun. The velocity difference between hot and cold electron components appears, at times, to be strongly correlated with the local Alfven speed. This correlation suggests that the solar wind heat flux is being limited some of the time in the neighborhood of 1 AU. Proton velocity distributions are also best described in terms of two relatively convecting, unresolved components. The velocity of the lower density proton beam component is generally larger than that of the main component and the temperature of the main component perpendicular to B is typically 2 to 3 times larger than its parallel temperature. Alpha particles as a whole generally move faster than the protons along B and have a temperature which is, on the average, 6 times higher than the temperature of the total proton population. Evidence is presented which supports the idea that the two-component proton structure observed in high speed regions is intimately related to fine scale velocity variations at 1 AU, and hence by inference, to prominent spatial and/or temporal structures present throughout that part of the corona from which the solar wind evolves

  7. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von, E-mail: evonrose@medicine.umaryland.edu; Raufman, Jean-Pierre [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 22 S. Greene Street, N3W62, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Maryland Health Care System, 10 North Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-03-02

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  8. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von; Raufman, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer

  9. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  10. GABA receptor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Doo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABA{sub A}-receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABA{sub B}-receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABA{sub A}-receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABA{sub A}-receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with {sup 11}C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, {sup 18}F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome {sup 11}C's short half-life. {sup 18}F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '1{sup 1}C-FMZ PET instead of {sup 18}F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABA{sub A} receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas.

  11. GABA receptor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Doo

    2007-01-01

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABA A -receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABA B -receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABA A -receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABA A -receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with 11 C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, 18 F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome 11 C's short half-life. 18 F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '1 1 C-FMZ PET instead of 18 F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABA A receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas

  12. Overexpression of the human angiotensin II type 1 receptor in the rat heart augments load induced cardiac hypertrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, S.; Krause, T.; van Geel, P. P.; Willenbrock, R.; Pagel, I.; Pinto, Y. M.; Buikema, H.; van Gilst, W. H.; Lindschau, C.; Paul, M.; Inagami, T.; Ganten, D.; Urata, H.

    2001-01-01

    Angiotensin II is known to stimulate cardiac hypertrophy and contractility. Most angiotensin II effects are mediated via membrane bound AT1 receptors. However, the role of myocardial AT1 receptors in cardiac hypertrophy and contractility is still rarely defined. To address the hypothesis that

  13. Overexpression of the human angiotensin II type 1 receptor in the rat heart augments load induced cardiac hypertrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, S; van Geel, PP; Willenbrock, R; Pagel, [No Value; Pinto, YM; Buikema, H; van Gilst, WH; Lindschau, C; Paul, M; Inagami, T; Ganten, D; Urata, H

    2001-01-01

    Angiotensin II is known to stimulate cardiac hypertrophy and contractility. Most angiotensin II effects are mediated via membrane bound AT(1) receptors. However, the role of myocardial AT(1) receptors in cardiac hypertrophy and contractility is still rarely defined. To address the hypothesis that

  14. The mechanisms behind decreased internalization of angiotensin II type 1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Jingwei; Zhang, Suli; Yi, Ming; Yue, Mingming; Liu, Huirong

    2018-04-01

    The internalization of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT 1 R) plays an important role in maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis. Decreased receptor internalization is closely related to cardiovascular diseases induced by the abnormal activation of AT 1 R, such as hypertension. However, the mechanism behind reduced AT 1 R internalization is not fully understood. This review focuses on four parts of the receptor internalization process (the combination of agonists and receptors, receptor phosphorylation, endocytosis, and recycling) and summarizes the possible mechanisms by which AT 1 R internalization is reduced based on these four parts of the process. (1) The agonist has a large molecular weight or a stronger ability to hydrolyze phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns (4,5) P 2 ), which can increase the consumption of PtdIns (4,5) P 2 . (2) AT 1 R phosphorylation is weakened because of an abnormal function of phosphorylated kinase or changes in phospho-barcoding and GPCR-β-arrestin complex conformation. (3) The abnormal formation of vesicles or AT 1 R heterodimers with fewer endocytic receptors results in less AT 1 R endocytosis. (4) The enhanced activity and upregulated expression of small GTP-binding protein 4 (Rab4) and 11 (Rab11), which regulate receptor recycling, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase increase AT 1 R recycling. In addition, lower expression of AT 1 R-associated protein (ATRAP) or higher expression of AT 1 R-associated protein 1 (ARAP1) can reduce receptor internalization. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Crystal structure of human interferon-gamma receptor 2 reveals the structural basis for receptor specificity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulecký, Pavel; Zahradník, Jiří; Kolenko, Petr; Černý, Jiří; Charnavets, Tatsiana; Kolářová, Lucie; Nečasová, Iva; Pham, Phuong Ngoc; Schneider, Bohdan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 9 (2016), s. 1017-1025 ISSN 2059-7983 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-20507S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : interferon-gamma receptor 2 * fibronectin type III domain * class 2 cytokine receptors Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.114, year: 2016

  16. A photoaffinity ligand for dopamine D2 receptors: azidoclebopride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niznik, H B; Guan, J H; Neumeyer, J L; Seeman, P

    1985-02-01

    In order to label D2 dopamine receptors selectively and covalently by means of a photosensitive compound, azidoclebopride was synthesized directly from clebopride. The dissociation constant (KD) of clebopride for the D2 dopamine receptor (canine brain striatum) was 1.5 nM, while that for azidoclebopride was 21 nM. The affinities of both clebopride and azidoclebopride were markedly reduced in the absence of sodium chloride. In the presence of ultraviolet light, azidoclebopride inactivated D2 dopamine receptors irreversibly, as indicated by the inability of the receptors to bind [3H]spiperone. Maximal photoinactivation of about 60% of the D2 dopamine receptors occurred at 1 microM azidoclebopride; 30% of the receptors were inactivated at 80 nM azidoclebopride (pseudo-IC50). Dopamine agonists selectively protected the D2 receptors from being inactivated by azidoclebopride, the order of potency being (-)-N-n-propylnorapomorphine greater than apomorphine greater than (+/-)-6,7-dihydroxy-2-aminotetralin greater than (+)-N-n-propylnorapomorphine greater than dopamine greater than noradrenaline greater than serotonin. Similarly, dopaminergic antagonists prevented the photoinactivation of D2 receptors by azidoclebopride with the following order of potency: spiperone greater than (+)-butaclamol greater than haloperidol greater than clebopride greater than (-)-sulpiride greater than (-)-butaclamol. The degree of D2 dopamine receptor photoinduced inactivation by azidoclebopride was not significantly affected by scavengers such as p-aminobenzoic acid and dithiothreitol. Furthermore, irradiation of striatal membranes with a concentration of azidoclebopride sufficient to inactivate dopamine D2 receptors by 60% did not significantly reduce dopamine D1, serotonin (S2), benzodiazepine, alpha 1- or beta-noradrenergic receptors. This study describes the use of a novel and selective photoaffinity ligand for brain dopamine D2 receptors. The molecule, in radiolabeled form, may aid in the

  17. Tech Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beem, Kate

    2002-01-01

    Discusses technology-support issues, including staff training, cost, and outsourcing. Describes how various school districts manage technology-support services. Features the Technology Support Index, developed by the International Society for Technology in Education, to gauge the operation of school district technology-support programs. (PKP)

  18. Lipid raft integrity affects GABAA receptor, but not NMDA receptor modulation by psychopharmacological compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothdurfter, Caroline; Tanasic, Sascha; Di Benedetto, Barbara; Uhr, Manfred; Wagner, Eva-Maria; Gilling, Kate E; Parsons, Chris G; Rein, Theo; Holsboer, Florian; Rupprecht, Rainer; Rammes, Gerhard

    2013-07-01

    Lipid rafts have been shown to play an important role for G-protein mediated signal transduction and the function of ligand-gated ion channels including their modulation by psychopharmacological compounds. In this study, we investigated the functional significance of the membrane distribution of NMDA and GABAA receptor subunits in relation to the accumulation of the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine (DMI) and the benzodiazepine diazepam (Diaz). In the presence of Triton X-100, which allowed proper separation of the lipid raft marker proteins caveolin-1 and flotillin-1 from the transferrin receptor, all receptor subunits were shifted to the non-raft fractions. In contrast, under detergent-free conditions, NMDA and GABAA receptor subunits were detected both in raft and non-raft fractions. Diaz was enriched in non-raft fractions without Triton X-100 in contrast to DMI, which preferentially accumulated in lipid rafts. Impairment of lipid raft integrity by methyl-β-cyclodextrine (MβCD)-induced cholesterol depletion did not change the inhibitory effect of DMI at the NMDA receptor, whereas it enhanced the potentiating effect of Diaz at the GABAA receptor at non-saturating concentrations of GABA. These results support the hypothesis that the interaction of benzodiazepines with the GABAA receptor likely occurs outside of lipid rafts while the antidepressant DMI acts on ionotropic receptors both within and outside these membrane microdomains.

  19. The meth brain: methamphetamines alter brain functions via NMDA receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Proft, Juliane; Weiss, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 1 (2015), s. 1-3 ISSN 0231-5882 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13556S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ion channel * methamphetamine * piriform cortex * NMDA receptor * AMPA receptor Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.892, year: 2015

  20. Dengue virus receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Hidari, Kazuya I.P.J.; Suzuki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus is an arthropod-borne virus transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue virus causes fever and hemorrhagic disorders in humans and non-human primates. Direct interaction of the virus introduced by a mosquito bite with host receptor molecule(s) is crucial for virus propagation and the pathological progression of dengue diseases. Therefore, elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between dengue virus and its receptor(s) in both humans and mosquitoes is essent...

  1. A novel human gene encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR15) is located on chromosome 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiber, M.; Marchese, A.; O`Dowd, B.F. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1996-03-05

    We used sequence similarities among G-protein-coupled receptor genes to discover a novel receptor gene. Using primers based on conserved regions of the opioid-related receptors, we isolated a PCR product that was used to locate the full-length coding region of a novel human receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor encoded by GPR15 with other receptors revealed that it shared sequence identity with the angiotensin II AT1 and AT2 receptors, the interleukin 8b receptor, and the orphan receptors GPR1 and AGTL1. GPR15 was mapped to human chromosome 3q11.2-q13.1. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Associations of common variants at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) with breast cancer risk and heterogeneity by tumor subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueroa, Jonine D; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Humphreys, Manjeet

    2011-01-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) as breast cancer susceptibility loci. The initial GWAS suggested stronger effects for both loci for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors. Using data from the Breast Cancer As...

  3. "Assessment of human AT1 Binding Affinity of Some Novel 2-alkylthio-1-[4-(N-α-ethoxycarbonyl-nzylaminobenzyl-5-hydroxymethylimidazoles "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Badakhshannoory

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Antagonists of various components of the renin-angiotensin system have been the subject of many studies for the control of blood pressure. Compounds with a phenoxyphenylacetic acid moiety that mimic the structure of losartan which is a powerful competitive antagonist of angiotensin receptor, have shown to be effective. In this study, the affinity of some 2-alkylthio-1-[4-(N-α-ethoxycarbonylbenzylaminobenzyl]-5-hydroxymethyl imidazoles for the human AT1 receptor was assessed in a radioligand binding assay. It was found that an alkyl chain of appropriate length would be most suitable if situated on the imidazole ring. Furthermore, variations of the lower phenyl rings demonstrated that introduction of a methyl group in this position will account for the most desired effect.

  4. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad eKhanfar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®, the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures.

  5. A new putative plasmodesmata-associated protein, At1g19190, in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-30

    Nov 30, 2011 ... In this paper, GFP:At1g19190 fusion protein was constructed and compared to. AtRGP2:YFP. ..... Pds are symplasmic channels that can establish dynamic ... molecular weight of GFP: At1g19190 is about 63 kDa, whereas that ...

  6. Nutritional Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutritional support is therapy for people who cannot get enough nourishment by eating or drinking. You may need ... absorb nutrients through your digestive system You receive nutritional support through a needle or catheter placed in your ...

  7. Glutamate receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine Byskov; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Bunch, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    The neurotransmitter (S)-glutamate [(S)-Glu] is responsible for most of the excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The effect of (S)-Glu is mediated by both ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. Glutamate receptor agonists are generally a-amino acids with one or more...... stereogenic centers due to strict requirements in the agonist binding pocket of the activated state of the receptor. By contrast, there are many examples of achiral competitive antagonists. The present review addresses how stereochemistry affects the activity of glutamate receptor ligands. The review focuses...... mainly on agonists and discusses stereochemical and conformational considerations as well as biostructural knowledge of the agonist binding pockets, which is useful in the design of glutamate receptor agonists. Examples are chosen to demonstrate how stereochemistry not only determines how the agonist...

  8. AMPA receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Mellor, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPAR), subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs), mediate fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS), and are involved in many neurological disorders, as well as being a key player in the f......Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPAR), subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs), mediate fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS), and are involved in many neurological disorders, as well as being a key player...... in the formation of memory. Hence, ligands affecting AMPARs are highly important for the study of the structure and function of this receptor, and in this regard polyamine-based ligands, particularly polyamine toxins, are unique as they selectively block Ca2+ -permeable AMPARs. Indeed, endogenous intracellular...

  9. Lipophorin Receptor: The Insect Lipoprotein Receptor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Director of ... function of the Lp is to deliver lipids throughout the insect body for metabolism ... Lipid is used as a major energy source for development as well as other metabolic .... LpR4 receptor variant was expressed exclusively in the brain and.

  10. High-resolution observation of phase contrast at 1MeV. Amorphous or crystalline objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourret, A.; Desseaux, J.

    1975-01-01

    Many authors have stressed the possibilities of high voltage to improve resolution, but owing to numerous experimental difficulties the resolution limit at 1MeV, which lies around 1A for conventional lenses, has so far been unattainable. Thus the phase contrast at 1MeV has not been studied on evaporated objects. On the other hand the fringes of crystal planes have been observed at 1MeV. the CEN-G microscope having been considerably modified it has been possible to observe the phase contrast of amorphous or crystalline objects [fr

  11. Does protein binding modulate the effect of angiotensin II receptor antagonists?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc P Maillard

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionAngiotensin II AT 1-receptor antagonists are highly bound to plasma proteins (≥ 99%. With some antagonists, such as DuP-532, the protein binding was such that no efficacy of the drug could be demonstrated clinically. Whether protein binding interferes with the efficacy of other antagonists is not known. We have therefore investigated in vitro how plasma proteins may affect the antagonistic effect of different AT1-receptor antagonists.MethodsA radio-receptor binding assay was used to analyse the interaction between proteins and the ability of various angiotensin II (Ang II antagonists to block AT1-receptors. In addition, the Biacore technology, a new technique which enables the real-time monitoring of binding events between two molecules, was used to evaluate the dissociation rate constants of five AT1-receptor antagonists from human serum albumin.ResultsThe in vitro AT 1-antagonistic effects of different Ang II receptor antagonists were differentially affected by the presence of human plasma, with rightward shifts of the IC50 ranging from one to several orders of magnitude. The importance of the shift correlates with the dissociation rate constants of these drugs from albumin. Our experiments also show that the way that AT1-receptor antagonists bind to proteins differs from one compound to another. These results suggest that the interaction with plasma proteins appears to modulate the efficacy of some Ang II antagonists.ConclusionAlthough the high binding level of Ang II receptor antagonist to plasma proteins appears to be a feature common to this class of compounds, the kinetics and characteristics of this binding is of great importance. With some antagonists, protein binding interferes markedly with their efficacy to block AT1-receptors.

  12. NMDA receptor antagonists inhibit catalepsy induced by either dopamine D1 or D2 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, N A; Blackman, A; Awere, S; Leander, J D

    1993-06-11

    In the present study, we investigated the ability of NMDA receptor antagonists to inhibit catalepsy induced by haloperidol, or SCH23390 and clebopride, selective dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonists respectively. Catalepsy was measured by recording the time the animal remained with its forepaws placed over a rod 6 cm above the bench. Pretreatment with either the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (0.25-0.5 mg/kg i.p.) or the competitive antagonist, LY274614 (10-20 mg/kg i.p.) reduced the cataleptic response produced by haloperidol (10 mg/kg), SCH23390 (2.5-10 mg/kp i.p.) or clebopride (5-20 mg/kg i.p.). This demonstrates that NMDA receptor antagonists will reduce both dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonist-induced catalepsy. Muscle relaxant doses of chlordiazepoxide (10 mg/kg i.p.) failed to reduce the catalepsy induced by haloperidol, suggesting that the anticataleptic effect of the NMDA receptor antagonists was not due to a non-specific action. These results support the hypothesis that NMDA receptor antagonists may have beneficial effects in disorders involving reduced dopaminergic function, such as Parkinson's disease.

  13. Supporting Families to Support Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John; Rossen, Eric; Cowan, Katherine C.

    2018-01-01

    Collaboration between students' families and the school is an essential component to promoting student mental and behavioral health. Many schools structure their mental health services using a Multi-Tiered System of Supports that offers three different tiers of support from universal supports to personalized help for students with serious…

  14. Predictors of depressive symptoms in older Japanese primiparas at 1 month post-partum: A risk-stratified analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Hiroko; Mori, Emi; Tsuchiya, Miyako; Sakajo, Akiko; Maehara, Kunie; Ozawa, Harumi; Morita, Akiko; Maekawa, Tomoko; Aoki, Kyoko; Tamakoshi, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Older maternal age has become more common in Japan. Studies suggest that older maternal age and primiparity are associated with post-partum depression. The present study aimed to identify predictors of post-partum depression in older Japanese primiparas at 1 month post-partum. Participants were 479 primiparas aged 35 years and over, drawn from a prospective cohort study. Data were collected using self-report questionnaires. Depression was measured with the Japanese version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Stepwise logistic regression analysis was conducted on binary outcome variables of depression at 1 month post-partum, along with a stratified analysis based on the risk status of depression. Five predictors were identified: (i) the depression score during hospital stay; (ii) financial burden; (iii) dissatisfaction with appraisal support; (iv) physical burden in daily life; and (v) concerns about infant caretaking. Stratified analysis identified dissatisfaction with instrumental support in the low-risk group, and the Child-care Value Scale score as unique predictors in the high-risk group. These results highlight the importance of early assessment of depressive symptoms and the provision of continuous care. © 2015 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  15. Effect of Exclusive Breastfeeding Among Overweight and Obese Mothers on Infant Weight-for-Length Percentile at 1 Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Hui; Leff, Michelle; Rhee, Kyung E

    Breastfeeding is associated with decreased risk of childhood obesity. However, there is a strong correlation between maternal weight status and childhood obesity, and it is unclear whether or not breastfeeding among overweight mothers could mitigate this risk. Our goal was to examine whether or not exclusive breastfeeding (compared to formula feeding) among overweight and obese mothers is associated with lower weight-for-length (W/L) percentile at 1 year. Data from the Infant Feeding Practices II study were used. Infants who were preterm or underweight at 1 year, and mothers who were underweight before pregnancy, were excluded from analysis. There was a significant interaction between exclusive breastfeeding for 4 months and maternal prepregnancy weight status (normal weight, overweight, obese) on infant W/L percentile at 1 year. Stratified linear mixed-effects growth modeling controlling for covariates was created to test the relationship between exclusive breastfeeding and infant W/L percentile within each maternal weight category. A total of 915 subjects met inclusion criteria. Normal weight and obese mothers who exclusively breastfed for 4 months had infants with a smaller rate of increase in W/L percentile during the first year compared with those who used formula. Infants of overweight and obese mothers who exclusively breastfed for 4 months had lower W/L percentile at 1 year than those who used formula. Exclusive breastfeeding for 4 months among normal weight and obese mothers resulted in less increase in W/L percentiles in the first year. Obese mothers often have a difficult time initiating and maintaining breastfeeding. Concerted efforts are needed to support this population with breastfeeding.

  16. Narrow Wavelength, Frequency Modulated Source at 1.5 Wavelength, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ultrastable, narrow linewidth, tunable, high reliability sources at 1.5 or 2mm are needed for high performance LIDARs for several NASA applications, including wind...

  17. No effect of angiotensin II AT(2)-receptor antagonist PD 123319 on cerebral blood flow autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estrup, T M; Paulson, O B; Strandgaard, S

    2001-01-01

    Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) or angiotensin AT1-receptor antagonists shift the limits of autoregulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) towards lower blood pressure (BP). The role of AT2-receptors in the regulation of the cerebral cir...

  18. SGIP1 alters internalization and modulates signaling of activated cannabinoid receptor 1 in a biased manner

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájková, Alena; Techlovská, Šárka; Dvořáková, Michaela; Chambers, Jayne Nicole; Kumpošt, Jiří; Hubálková, Pavla; Prezeau, L.; Blahoš, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 107, léto (2016), s. 201-214 ISSN 0028-3908 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP303/12/2408 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Seven transmembrane receptors * G-protein coupled receptors * Cannabinoid receptor 1 * Protein-protein interactions * Bias signaling * Receptor endocytosis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.012, year: 2016

  19. Roadway supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stassen, P

    1980-01-01

    Support systems in stone drifts and tunnels are discussed. Timber supports, steel arches, cold-bent sheet-metal arches, shotcrete and combined support arrangements are described. Brickwork and reinforced concrete are also covered. Supports in roadways leading to the face and in-seam roads are discussed including timber supports, steel arches, articulated arches on timber chocks, support accessories and the withdrawal and reshaping of arches. The subject of strata bolting, the aims of strata bolting, methods of strata bolting, systems of rock-bolting, end plates and wire mesh, and bolt and anchorage monitoring are also discussed. Injection techniques, injection parameters, injection methods, grouts, includes an example of the application of injection techniques are covered and combined injection/dowelling arrangements are examined. (55 refs.) (In French)

  20. Photoaffinity ligand for dopamine D2 receptors: azidoclebopride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niznik, H.B.; Guan, J.H.; Neumeyer, J.L.; Seeman, P.

    1985-01-01

    In order to label D2 dopamine receptors selectively and covalently by means of a photosensitive compound, azidoclebopride was synthesized directly from clebopride. The dissociation constant (KD) of clebopride for the D2 dopamine receptor (canine brain striatum) was 1.5 nM, while that for azidoclebopride was 21 nM. The affinities of both clebopride and azidoclebopride were markedly reduced in the absence of sodium chloride. In the presence of ultraviolet light, azidoclebopride inactivated D2 dopamine receptors irreversibly, as indicated by the inability of the receptors to bind [ 3 H]spiperone. Maximal photoinactivation of about 60% of the D2 dopamine receptors occurred at 1 microM azidoclebopride; 30% of the receptors were inactivated at 80 nM azidoclebopride (pseudo-IC50). Dopamine agonists selectively protected the D2 receptors from being inactivated by azidoclebopride, the order of potency being (-)-N-n-propylnorapomorphine greater than apomorphine greater than (+/-)-6,7-dihydroxy-2-aminotetralin greater than (+)-N-n-propylnorapomorphine greater than dopamine greater than noradrenaline greater than serotonin. Similarly, dopaminergic antagonists prevented the photoinactivation of D2 receptors by azidoclebopride with the following order of potency: spiperone greater than (+)-butaclamol greater than haloperidol greater than clebopride greater than (-)-sulpiride greater than (-)-butaclamol

  1. Dielectron spectroscopy at 1-2 AGeV with HADES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spataro, S.; Agakishiev, G.; Destefanis, M.; Gilardi, C.; Kirschner, D.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J.S.; Metag, V.; Mishra, D.; Novotny, R.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Perez Cavalcanti, T.; Spruck, B.; Wen, H.; Agodi, C.; Bellia, G.; Finocchiaro, P.; Balanda, A.; Dybczak, A.; Kozuch, A.; Michalska, B.; Otwinowski, J.; Przygoda, W.; Salabura, P.; Trebacz, R.; Wisniowski, M.; Wojcik, T.; Belver, D.; Cabanelas, P.; Castro, E.; Garzon, J.A.; Lamas-Valverde, J.; Marin, J.; Belyaev, A.; Chernenko, S.; Fateev, O.; Ierusalimov, A.; Zanevsky, Y.; Blanco, A.; Fonte, P.; Lopes, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Boehmer, M.; Christ, T.; Eberl, T.; Fabbietti, L.; Friese, J.; Gernhaeuser, R.; Jurkovic, M.; Kruecken, R.; Maier, L.; Sailer, B.; Boyard, J.L.; Hennino, T.; Moriniere, E.; Ramstein, B.; Roy-Stephan, M.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Galatyuk, T.; Gonzalez-Diaz, D.; Holzmann, R.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B.W.; Lang, S.; Palka, M.; Pietraszko, J.; Rustamov, A.; Schmah, A.; Simon, R.; Sudol, M.; Traxler, M.; Yurevich, S.; Zumbruch, P.; Diaz, J.; Gil, A.; Dohrmann, F.; Grosse, E.; Kaempfer, B.; Kanaki, K.; Kotte, R.; Naumann, L.; Wuestenfeld, J.; Zhou, P.; Froehlich, I.; Heilmann, M.; Lorenz, M.; Markert, J.; Micel, J.; Muentz, C.; Pachmayer, Y.C.; Stroebele, H.; Sturm, C.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Golubeva, M.; Guber, F.; Ivashkin, A.; Karavicheva, T.; Kurepin, A.; Lapidus, K.; Reshetin, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Veretenkin, I.; Iori, I.; Krasa, A.; Krizek, F.; Kugler, A.; Sobolev, Yu.G.; Tlusty, P.; Wagner, V.; Mousa, J.; Parpottas, Y.; Tsertos, H.; Stroth, J.

    2008-01-01

    The HADES spectrometer at GSI (Darmstadt) is investigating the e + e - pair production in p+p, p+A and A+A collisions. In this contribution we would like to highlight the physics motivations and the experiments performed so far, focusing mainly on the first results coming from 12 C+ 12 C collisions at 1 and 2 AGeV, and on preliminary results from p+p/d+p collisions at 1.25 AGeV. (orig.)

  2. Promotion of breast cancer by β-Hexachlorocyclohexane in MCF10AT1 cells and MMTV-neu mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Patrick S; Matsumura, Fumio

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to β-Hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH), a contaminant of the hexachlorohexane pesticide lindane, has been implicated as a risk factor in the development of breast cancers in epidemiological studies. Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated the ability of β-HCH to elicit its actions via a ligand-independent activation of the estrogen receptor through increased c-Neu (= erbB 2 or HER-2) expression and kinase activation in both the BG-1 and MCF-7 cell lines. In addition, long term exposure (33 passages) to β-HCH was shown to promote the selection of MCF-7 cells which exhibit a more metastatic phenotype. In this current study, we decided to investigate the long-term effects of β-HCH in both the MCF10AT1 cell line which was derived from a normal epithelial cell line by stably transfecting a mutated c-Ha-ras and a MMTV-Neu mouse model for mammary cancer in vivo. MCF10AT1 cells were exposed for 20 passages with β-HCH, 4-OH-Tamoxifen (Tam), or 17-β-estradiol (E 2 ) after which cells were analyzed for proliferation rates and mRNA expression by RT-PCR. In our in vivo studies, MMTV-Neu mice were injected with β-HCH and observed for tumor formation over a 70 week period. β-HCH and Tam selected MCF10AT1 cells demonstrated increased mRNA expression of MMP-13 (collagenase-3) a marker of increased invasiveness. β-HCH treatment was also seen to increase the expression in a number of proto-oncogenes (c-Neu, Cyclin D1, p27), cell status markers (Met-1, CK19), and the inflammatory marker NFκB. Previous studies, have demonstrated the role of these markers as evidence of malignant transformations, and further illustrate the ability of β-HCH to be carcinogenic. To demonstrate β-HCH's tumorigenic properties in an in vivo system, we used an MMTV-Neu mouse model. MMTV-Neu is a c-Neu overexpressing strain which has been shown to spontaneously develop mammary tumors at later stages of aging. In this experiment, β-HCH exposure was shown to both accelerate

  3. Serotonin Receptors in Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berumen, Laura Cristina; Rodríguez, Angelina; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is an ancient molecular signal and a recognized neurotransmitter brainwide distributed with particular presence in hippocampus. Almost all serotonin receptor subtypes are expressed in hippocampus, which implicates an intricate modulating system, considering that they can be localized as autosynaptic, presynaptic, and postsynaptic receptors, even colocalized within the same cell and being target of homo- and heterodimerization. Neurons and glia, including immune cells, integrate a functional network that uses several serotonin receptors to regulate their roles in this particular part of the limbic system. PMID:22629209

  4. Evidence for Heterodimerization and Functional Interaction of the Angiotensin Type 2 Receptor and the Receptor MAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Julia; Villela, Daniel C; Teichmann, Anke; Münter, Lisa-Marie; Mayer, Magnus C; Mardahl, Maibritt; Kirsch, Sebastian; Namsolleck, Pawel; Lucht, Kristin; Benz, Verena; Alenina, Natalia; Daniell, Nicholas; Horiuchi, Masatsugu; Iwai, Masaru; Multhaup, Gerhard; Schülein, Ralf; Bader, Michael; Santos, Robson A; Unger, Thomas; Steckelings, Ulrike Muscha

    2017-06-01

    The angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) and the receptor MAS are receptors of the protective arm of the renin-angiotensin system. They mediate strikingly similar actions. Moreover, in various studies, AT2R antagonists blocked the effects of MAS agonists and vice versa. Such cross-inhibition may indicate heterodimerization of these receptors. Therefore, this study investigated the molecular and functional interplay between MAS and the AT2R. Molecular interactions were assessed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and by cross correlation spectroscopy in human embryonic kidney-293 cells transfected with vectors encoding fluorophore-tagged MAS or AT2R. Functional interaction of AT2R and MAS was studied in astrocytes with CX3C chemokine receptor-1 messenger RNA expression as readout. Coexpression of fluorophore-tagged AT2R and MAS resulted in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency of 10.8 ± 0.8%, indicating that AT2R and MAS are capable to form heterodimers. Heterodimerization was verified by competition experiments using untagged AT2R and MAS. Specificity of dimerization of AT2R and MAS was supported by lack of dimerization with the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily C-member 6. Dimerization of the AT2R was abolished when it was mutated at cysteine residue 35. AT2R and MAS stimulation with the respective agonists, Compound 21 or angiotensin-(1-7), significantly induced CX3C chemokine receptor-1 messenger RNA expression. Effects of each agonist were blocked by an AT2R antagonist (PD123319) and also by a MAS antagonist (A-779). Knockout of a single of these receptors made astrocytes unresponsive for both agonists. Our results suggest that MAS and the AT2R form heterodimers and that-at least in astrocytes-both receptors functionally depend on each other. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Efficacy Trial of a Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Depression Prevention Program for High-Risk Adolescents: Effects at 1- and 2-Year Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Gau, Jeff M.; Wade, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of a brief group cognitive-behavioral (CB) depression prevention program for high-risk adolescents with elevated depressive symptoms at 1- and 2-year follow-up. Method: In this indicated prevention trial, 341 at-risk youths were randomized to a group CB intervention, group supportive expressive intervention, CB…

  6. A molecular receptor selective for zwitterionic alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Omayra H; Taouil, Rachid; Muñiz, Francisco M; Monleón, Laura M; Simón, Luis; Sanz, Francisca; Morán, Joaquín R

    2017-01-04

    A molecular receptor has been synthesized joining an aza-crown ether with a chiral chromane which mimics the oxyanion hole of the enzymes. With this receptor an apolar host-guest complex with zwitterionic alanine has been achieved through the formation of up to seven H-bonds. This complex allows the extraction of aqueous alanine to a chloroform phase, while other natural amino acids are poorly extracted or are not extracted at all. Due to the chiral nature of the receptor, enantioselective extraction from the aqueous alanine solution to a chloroform phase takes place. X-Ray analysis combined with anisotropic effects, NOE and CD studies revealed the absolute configuration of both strong and weak complexes. Modelling studies also support the proposed structures. The presence of an oxyanion-hole motif in this structure was corroborated by X-ray diffraction studies.

  7. Multiple Receptor Subtypes for the CGRP Super-Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Quirion

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular evidence for the existence of multiple receptors for CGRP has been rather difficult to obtain. Over 10 years after suggesting the existence of at least two classes (CGRP1 and CGRP2 of CGRP receptors on the basis of pharmacological data[1], molecular data on the CGRP2 receptor subtype are still lacking as well as potent and selective antagonists. The situation is somewhat different for the functional CGRP1 subtype which is likely composed of diverse subunits CRLR, RAMP1 and possibly RCP[2]. Moreover, BIBN 4096BS was recently reported as the first nonpeptide highly potent CGRP1 receptor antagonist[3]. However, in situ hybridization and receptor autoradiographic data have clearly shown the existence of major mismatches (e.g., cerebellum between the discrete localization of CRLR, RAMP1, and specific CGRP binding sites supporting the existence of CGRP receptor subtypes. Functional studies have also provided evidence in that regard (for a recent review: [4]. Accordingly, additional studies aiming at cloning additional CGRP receptors are certainly warranted. Similarly, recent evidence from various laboratories including ours suggests the existence of more than one class (CRLR and RAMP2 of adrenomedullin receptors at least in the rat brain. In contrast, most evidence suggests the existence of a single class of amylin receptors. In brief, it appears that multiple receptors or receptor complexes do exist for CGRP and related peptides but their composition is apparently unique among the GPCR super-family and additional data are needed to fully establish the molecular organization of each subtype. Supported by CIHR of Canada.

  8. Evaluation of crosstalk effect on spin-echo images at 1.5 and 3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajisako, Masaaki; Taniguchi, Masahiro; Koizumi, Koji; Hiraga, Akira; Miyati, Tosiaki; Syakudo, Yuko; Miki, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the crosstalk effect on spin-echo (SE) images at 1.5 and 3 T MRI. We examined the influence of crosstalk by comparing the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) and slice profile of images of a wedge-shaped phantom for various slice gaps. We also assessed crosstalk effect in the brain by comparing image contrast among healthy volunteers (n=8). Among the subjects, the shapes of the slice profiles at 1.5 T were similar to those at 3 T for long repetition times (TRs); however, at shorter TRs, differences in slice profiles were observed among the subjects and were more apparent at 3 than at 1.5 T. The relative contrast between white matter and gray matter on T 1 -weighted images was lower at 3 than at 1.5 T. The crosstalk effect was strongest when the TR of the excitation pulse was short. The influence of the adjacent excitation pulse is important in the process of T 1 relaxation because T 1 values are greater at 3 T. In conclusion, the influence of crosstalk on SE T 1 -weighted images is greater at 3 than at 1.5 T. (author)

  9. Role of angiotensin II and vasopressin receptors within the supraoptic nucleus in water and sodium intake induced by the injection of angiotensin II into the medial septal area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antunes V.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the effects of the injection into the supraoptic nucleus (SON of non-peptide AT1- and AT2-angiotensin II (ANG II receptor antagonists, DuP753 and PD123319, as well as of the arginine-vasopressin (AVP receptor antagonist d(CH25-Tyr(Me-AVP, on water and 3% NaCl intake induced by the injection of ANG II into the medial septal area (MSA. The effects on water or 3% NaCl intake were assessed in 30-h water-deprived or in 20-h water-deprived furosemide-treated adult male rats, respectively. The drugs were injected in 0.5 ml over 30-60 s. Controls were injected with a similar volume of 0.15 M NaCl. Antagonists were injected at doses of 20, 80 and 180 nmol. Water and sodium intake was measured over a 2-h period. Previous administration of the AT1 receptor antagonist DuP753 into the SON decreased water (65%, N = 10, P<0.01 and sodium intake (81%, N = 8, P<0.01 induced by the injection of ANG II (10 nmol into the MSA. Neither of these responses was significantly changed by injection of the AT2-receptor antagonist PD123319 into the SON. On the other hand, while there was a decrease in water intake (45%, N = 9, P<0.01, ANG II-induced sodium intake was significantly increased (70%, N = 8, P<0.01 following injection of the V1-type vasopressin antagonist d(CH25-Tyr(Me-AVP into the SON. These results suggest that both AT1 and V1 receptors within the SON may be involved in water and sodium intake induced by the activation of ANG II receptors within the MSA. Furthermore, they do not support the involvement of MSA AT2 receptors in the mediation of these responses.

  10. Biochemical and immunological studies of the Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gainer, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors were solubilized from bovine brain membranes with 3[3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]propanesulfonate (CHAPS). A combination of 10 mM CHAPS and 1 M NaCl solubilized 15-40% of the specific receptor binding sites from these membranes. The solubilized receptors displayed high affinity binding of the muscarinic antagonist, [ 3 H]quinuclidinyl benzilate with a K/sub D/ = 300 pM. In addition, the solubilized and retained guanyl nucleotide regulation of agonist binding characteristic of membrane bound receptors. Gel filtration experiments showed that solubilized receptors from cortex and cerebellum had different elution profiles. Analysis by sucrose density gradient centrifugation showed that receptors in the lower molecular weight peak sedimented with a coefficient of 5S. Receptors in the larger molecular weight peak sedimented to the bottom of the gradient. Attempts to purify receptors by chromatography on propylbenzilycholine Sepharose were unsuccessful. The technique used to attach the ligand to the solid support, however, was used to synthesize a PrBCM-BSA conjugate and the conjugate used as an antigen in the production of anti-ligand antibodies. Two anti-PrBCM monoclonal antibodies were isolated that recognize muscarinic but not nicotinic cholinergic ligands. The abilities of the antibodies to recognize other muscarinic ligands indicated the antibodies recognized a portion of PrBCM involved in binding to the receptor. Construction of an antibody affinity resin resulted in the purification of this fragment a minimum of 170 fold

  11. Inhibition of Estrogen Receptor Action by the Orphan Receptors, SHP and DAX-1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DiRenzo, James

    2002-01-01

    In support of DoD grant # DAMD17-99-1-9163, we present our progress towards understanding the function of mechanisms of action of two orphan nuclear receptors, SHP and DAX-I as inhibitors of ER alpha and ER beta action...

  12. Inhibition of Estrogen Receptor Action by the Orphan Receptors, SHP and DAX-1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DiRenzo, James

    2003-01-01

    .... In support of DoD grant # DAMD17-99-1-9163, we present our findings regarding the mechanisms by which two orphan nuclear receptors, SHP and DAX-1 inhibit the actions of ER-alpha and ER-beta action...

  13. Dissociated incretin response to oral glucose at 1 year after restrictive vs. malabsorptive bariatric surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldstrand, M; Ahrén, B; Näslund, E

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Compare the response to oral glucose of the two incretin hormones, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) at 1 year after restrictive vs. malabsorptive bariatric surgery. METHODS: Vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG, n = 7) or jejunoileal bypass...... (JIB, n = 5) was performed in 12 women, aged 26-39 years, with severe obesity [body mass index (BMI) 46.6 +/- 2.3 kg/m(2)]. After 1 year, 75 g glucose was administered and plasma levels of glucose, insulin, GIP and GLP-1 were determined regularly during the following 2 h. RESULTS: At 1 year after...

  14. Dielectron spectroscopy at 1-2 AGeV with HADES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spataro, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lab. Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)]|[Justus Liebig Univ. Giessen, II.Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Agakishiev, G.; Destefanis, M.; Gilardi, C.; Kirschner, D.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J.S.; Metag, V.; Mishra, D.; Novotny, R.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Perez Cavalcanti, T.; Spruck, B.; Wen, H. [Justus Liebig Univ. Giessen, II.Physikalisches Inst., Giessen (Germany); Agodi, C.; Bellia, G.; Finocchiaro, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lab. Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Balanda, A.; Dybczak, A.; Kozuch, A.; Michalska, B.; Otwinowski, J.; Przygoda, W.; Salabura, P.; Trebacz, R.; Wisniowski, M.; Wojcik, T. [Jagiellonian Univ. of Cracow, Smoluchowski Inst. of Physics, Krakow (Poland); Belver, D.; Cabanelas, P.; Castro, E.; Garzon, J.A.; Lamas-Valverde, J.; Marin, J. [Univ. of Santiago de Compostela, Dept. de Fisica de Particulas, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Belyaev, A.; Chernenko, S.; Fateev, O.; Ierusalimov, A.; Zanevsky, Y. [Joint Inst. of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Blanco, A.; Fonte, P.; Lopes, L.; Mangiarotti, A. [LIP-Lab. de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, Coimbra (Portugal); Boehmer, M.; Christ, T.; Eberl, T.; Fabbietti, L.; Friese, J.; Gernhaeuser, R.; Jurkovic, M.; Kruecken, R.; Maier, L.; Sailer, B. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Physik Department E12, Muenchen (Germany); Boyard, J.L.; Hennino, T.; Moriniere, E.; Ramstein, B.; Roy-Stephan, M. [Univ. Paris Sud, Inst. de Physique Nucleaire (UMR 8608), CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay Cedex (France); Braun-Munzinger, P.; Galatyuk, T.; Gonzalez-Diaz, D.; Holzmann, R.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B.W.; Lang, S.; Palka, M.; Pietraszko, J.; Rustamov, A.; Schmah, A.; Simon, R.; Sudol, M.; Traxler, M.; Yurevich, S.; Zumbruch, P. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Diaz, J.; Gil, A. [Univ. de Valencia-CSIC, Inst. de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain)] [and others

    2008-11-15

    The HADES spectrometer at GSI (Darmstadt) is investigating the e {sup +}e{sup -} pair production in p+p, p+A and A+A collisions. In this contribution we would like to highlight the physics motivations and the experiments performed so far, focusing mainly on the first results coming from {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C collisions at 1 and 2 AGeV, and on preliminary results from p+p/d+p collisions at 1.25 AGeV. (orig.)

  15. Supporting Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is the supporting information for the journal article. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Rankin, K., S. Mabury, T. Jenkins, and J....

  16. Supporting Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Supporting Info. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Washington , J., and T. Jenkins. Abiotic Hydrolysis of Fluorotelomer-Based Polymers as a...

  17. Supporting Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Supporting Information. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Washington , J., T. Jenkins, and E. Weber. Identification of Unsaturated and 2H...

  18. Design, synthesis and biological activity of 6-substituted carbamoyl benzimidazoles as new nonpeptidic angiotensin II AT₁ receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jin-Liang; Zhou, Zhi-Ming; Li, Zhi-Huai; Xue, Wei-Zhe; Xu, Di; Hao, Li-Ping; Han, Xiao-Feng; Fei, Fan; Liu, Ting; Liang, Ai-Hua

    2012-07-15

    A series of 6-substituted carbamoyl benzimidazoles were designed and synthesised as new nonpeptidic angiotensin II AT(1) receptor antagonists. The preliminary pharmacological evaluation revealed a nanomolar AT(1) receptor binding affinity for all compounds in the series, and a potent antagonistic activity in an isolated rabbit aortic strip functional assay for compounds 6f, 6g, 6h and 6k was also demonstrated. Furthermore, evaluation in spontaneous hypertensive rats and a preliminary toxicity evaluation showed that compound 6g is an orally active AT(1) receptor antagonist with low toxicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pr3 + -doped GeSx-based glasses for fiber amplifiers at 1.3 µm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, D. R.; Faber, A. J.; de Waal, H.

    1995-03-01

    The photoluminescence properties of Pr3+ -doped GeS x -based glasses are studied and compared with those of other sulfide and fluoride glasses. The possibility of highly pump-power-efficient fiber amplifiers based on these GeSx-containing glasses in the telecommunications window at 1.3 mu m is discussed.

  20. Pr3+-doped GeSx-based glasses for fiber amplifiers at 1.3 mm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, D.R.; Faber, A.J.; Waal, de H.

    1995-01-01

    The luminescence of Pr3+-doped GeSx-based glasses were studied and compared with those of other sulfide and fluoride glasses. The possibility of highly pump-power-efficient fiber amplifiers based on these GeSx-contg. glasses in the telecommunications window at 1.3 mm is discussed. [on SciFinder (R)

  1. Cellular Imaging at 1.5 T: Detecting Cells in Neuroinflammation using Active Labeling with Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman J. Oweida

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability to visualize cell infiltration in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a well-known animal model for multiple sclerosis in humans, was investigated using a clinical 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scanner, a custom-built, high-strength gradient coil insert, a 3-D fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA imaging sequence and a superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO contrast agent. An “active labeling” approach was used with SPIO administered intravenously during inflammation in EAE. Our results show that small, discrete regions of signal void corresponding to iron accumulation in EAE brain can be detected using FIESTA at 1.5 T. This work provides early evidence that cellular abnormalities that are the basis of diseases can be probed using cellular MRI and supports our earlier work which indicates that tracking of iron-labeled cells will be possible using clinical MR scanners.

  2. MeV electron acceleration at 1kHz with <10 mJ laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Fatholah; Goers, Andy; Hine, George; Feder, Linus; Kuk, Donghoon; Kim, Ki-Yong; Milchberg, Howard

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate laser driven acceleration of electrons at 1 kHz repetition rate with pC charge above 1MeV per shot using required for relativistic self-focusing low enough for mJ scale laser pulses to self- focus and drive strong wakefields. Experiments and particle-in-cell simulations show that optimal drive pulse duration and chirp for maximum electron bunch charge and energy depends on the target gas species. High repetition rate, high charge, and short duration electron bunches driven by very modest pulse energies constitutes an ideal portable electron source for applications such as ultrafast electron diffraction experiments and high rep. rate γ-ray production. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  3. Regulation of inward rectifier potassium current ionic channel remodeling by AT1 -Calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathway in stretch-induced hypertrophic atrial myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jionghong; Xu, Yanan; Yang, Long; Xia, Guiling; Deng, Na; Yang, Yongyao; Tian, Ye; Fu, Zenan; Huang, Yongqi

    2018-05-02

    Previous studies have shown that the activation of angiotensin II receptor type I (AT 1 ) is attributed to cardiac remodeling stimulated by increased heart load, and that it is followed by the activation of the calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) signaling pathway. Additionally, AT 1 has been found to be a regulator of cardiocyte ionic channel remodeling, and calcineurin-NFAT signals participate in the regulation of cardiocyte ionic channel expression. A hypothesis therefore follows that stretch stimulation may regulate cardiocyte ionic channel remodeling by activating the AT 1 -calcineurin-NFAT pathway. Here, we investigated the role of the AT 1 -calcineurin-NFAT pathway in the remodeling of inward rectifier potassium (I k1 ) channel, in addition to its role in changing action potential, in stretch-induced hypertrophic atrial myocytes of neonatal rats. Our results showed that increased stretch significantly led to atrial myocytes hypertrophy; it also increased the activity of calcineurin enzymatic activity, which was subsequently attenuated by telmisartan or cyclosporine-A. The level of NFAT 3 protein in nuclear extracts, the mRNA and protein expression of Kir2.1 in whole cell extracts, and the density of I k1 were noticeably increased in stretched samples. Stretch stimulation significantly shortened the action potential duration (APD) of repolarization at the 50% and 90% level. Telmisartan, cyclosporine-A, and 11R-VIVIT attenuated stretch-induced alterations in the levels of NFAT 3 , mRNA and protein expression of Kir2.1, the density of I k1 , and the APD. Our findings suggest that the AT 1 -calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathway played an important role in regulating I k1 channel remodeling and APD change in stretch-induced hypertrophic atrial myocytes of neonatal rats. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Ionotropic crustacean olfactory receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Corey

    Full Text Available The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs, the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs, as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling.

  5. Pipe support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollono, L.P.

    1979-01-01

    A pipe support for high temperature, thin-walled piping runs such as those used in nuclear systems is described. A section of the pipe to be suppported is encircled by a tubular inner member comprised of two walls with an annular space therebetween. Compacted load-bearing thermal insulation is encapsulated within the annular space, and the inner member is clamped to the pipe by a constant clamping force split-ring clamp. The clamp may be connected to pipe hangers which provide desired support for the pipe

  6. NMDA Receptors in Glial Cells: Pending Questions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Džamba, Dávid; Honsa, Pavel; Anděrová, Miroslava

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2013), s. 250-262 ISSN 1570-159X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/08/1381; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Grant - others:GA UK(CZ) 604212 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : astrocytes * ischemia * NMDA receptors Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.347, year: 2013

  7. Crystal structure of the sweet-tasting protein thaumatin II at 1.27 A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Ohta, Keisuke; Tani, Fumito; Mikami, Bunzo; Kitabatake, Naofumi

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → X-ray crystallographic structure of sweet-tasting protein, thaumatin II, was determined at a resolution of 1.27 A. → The overall structure of thaumatin II is similar to that of thaumatin I, but a slight shift of the Cα atom of G96 in thaumatin II was observed. → The side chain of two critical residues, 67 and 82, for sweetness was modeled in two alternative conformations. → The flexibility and fluctuation of side chains at 67 and 82 seems to be suitable for interaction of thaumatin molecules with sweet receptors. -- Abstract: Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting protein, elicits a sweet taste sensation at 50 nM. Here the X-ray crystallographic structure of one of its variants, thaumatin II, was determined at a resolution of 1.27 A. Overall structure of thaumatin II is similar to thaumatin I, but a slight shift of the Cα atom of G96 in thaumatin II was observed. Furthermore, the side chain of residue 67 in thaumatin II is highly disordered. Since residue 67 is one of two residues critical to the sweetness of thaumatin, the present results suggested that the critical positive charges at positions 67 and 82 are disordered and the flexibility and fluctuation of these side chains would be suitable for interaction of thaumatin molecules with sweet receptors.

  8. Crystal structure of the sweet-tasting protein thaumatin II at 1.27 A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Tetsuya, E-mail: t2masuda@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Department Natural Resources, Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Ohta, Keisuke; Tani, Fumito [Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Department Natural Resources, Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Mikami, Bunzo [Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kitabatake, Naofumi [Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Department Natural Resources, Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} X-ray crystallographic structure of sweet-tasting protein, thaumatin II, was determined at a resolution of 1.27 A. {yields} The overall structure of thaumatin II is similar to that of thaumatin I, but a slight shift of the C{alpha} atom of G96 in thaumatin II was observed. {yields} The side chain of two critical residues, 67 and 82, for sweetness was modeled in two alternative conformations. {yields} The flexibility and fluctuation of side chains at 67 and 82 seems to be suitable for interaction of thaumatin molecules with sweet receptors. -- Abstract: Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting protein, elicits a sweet taste sensation at 50 nM. Here the X-ray crystallographic structure of one of its variants, thaumatin II, was determined at a resolution of 1.27 A. Overall structure of thaumatin II is similar to thaumatin I, but a slight shift of the C{alpha} atom of G96 in thaumatin II was observed. Furthermore, the side chain of residue 67 in thaumatin II is highly disordered. Since residue 67 is one of two residues critical to the sweetness of thaumatin, the present results suggested that the critical positive charges at positions 67 and 82 are disordered and the flexibility and fluctuation of these side chains would be suitable for interaction of thaumatin molecules with sweet receptors.

  9. Behavioral effects of D3 receptor inhibition and 5-HT4 receptor activation on animals undergoing chronic cannabinoid exposure during adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboussi, Oualid; Said, Nadia; Fifel, Karim; Lakehayli, Sara; Tazi, Abdelouahhab; El Ganouni, Soumaya

    2016-04-01

    Chronic exposure to cannabinoids during adolescence results in long-lasting behavioral deficits that match some symptomatologic aspects of schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to investigate the reversibility of the emotional and the cognitive effects of chronic exposure to cannabinoids during adolescence, via subsequent modulation of the serotoninergic 5-HT4 and dopaminergic D3 receptors. RS67333 as a 5-HT4 agonist and U-99194A as a D3 antagonist were administered separately at 1 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg, and in combination at 0.5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg to adult animals undergoing chronic treatment with the synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (1 mg/kg) during adolescence. Animals were tested for anxiety-like behavior and episodic-like memory in the open field and novel object recognition tests respectively 30 minutes after the last drug administration. Chronic WIN55,212-2 treated animals exhibited a lasting disruption of episodic memory and increased anxiety levels. The effect on episodic-like memory were partially restored by acute administration of RS67333 and U-99194A and completely by administration of both drugs in combination at lower doses. However, only RS67333 (20 mg/kg) improved the anxiogenic-like effect of WIN55,212-2. These findings give further support that chronic exposure to cannabinoids during adolescence may be used as an animal model for schizophrenia, and highlight D3 and 5-HT4 receptors as potential targets for an enhanced treatment of the cognitive aspect of this disease.

  10. Assays for calcitonin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teitelbaum, A.P.; Nissenson, R.A.; Arnaud, C.D.

    1985-01-01

    The assays for calcitonin receptors described focus on their use in the study of the well-established target organs for calcitonin, bone and kidney. The radioligand used in virtually all calcitonin binding studies is 125 I-labelled salmon calcitonin. The lack of methionine residues in this peptide permits the use of chloramine-T for the iodination reaction. Binding assays are described for intact bone, skeletal plasma membranes, renal plasma membranes, and primary kidney cell cultures of rats. Studies on calcitonin metabolism in laboratory animals and regulation of calcitonin receptors are reviewed

  11. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    maximilien brice

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator.

  12. Supporting Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Asima; Petrucco, James

    2018-01-01

    Meadowbrook Primary School has explored the use of The Teacher Assessment in Primary Science (TAPS) to support transition, initially for transfer to secondary school and now for transition from Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) into Key Stage 1 (ages 5-7). This article will consider an example of a secondary transition project and discuss the…

  13. In vivo analysis of the Notch receptor S1 cleavage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Lake

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A ligand-independent cleavage (S1 in the extracellular domain of the mammalian Notch receptor results in what is considered to be the canonical heterodimeric form of Notch on the cell surface. The in vivo consequences and significance of this cleavage on Drosophila Notch signaling remain unclear and contradictory. We determined the cleavage site in Drosophila and examined its in vivo function by a transgenic analysis of receptors that cannot be cleaved. Our results demonstrate a correlation between loss of cleavage and loss of in vivo function of the Notch receptor, supporting the notion that S1 cleavage is an in vivo mechanism of Notch signal control.

  14. The PACAP receptor: a novel target for migraine treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik W; Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2010-01-01

    The origin of migraine pain has not yet been clarified, but accumulating data point to neuropeptides present in the perivascular space of cranial vessels as important mediators of nociceptive input during migraine attacks. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is present in s......) receptor, which suggests a possible signaling pathway implicated in migraine pain. This review summarizes the current evidence supporting the involvement of PACAP in migraine pathophysiology and the PAC(1) receptor as a possible novel target for migraine treatment....

  15. Convulsant bicuculline modifies CNS muscarinic receptor affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez de Lores Arnaiz Georgina

    2006-04-01

    itself. Findings support the notion that the muscarinic receptors play a major role in experimental epilepsy and provide a new example of differential neuronal plasticity.

  16. SM-like Higgs decay into two muons at 1.4 TeV CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Milutinovic-Dumbelovic, Gordana

    2016-06-02

    The branching fraction measurement of the SM-like Higgs boson decay into two muons at 1.4 TeV CLIC will be described in this paper contributed to the LCWS13. The study is performed in the fully simulated ILD detector concept for CLIC, taking into consideration all the relevant physics and the beam-induced backgrounds, as well as the instrumentation of the very forward region to tag the high-energy electrons. Higgs couplings are known to be sensitive to BSM physics and we prove that BR times the Higgs production cross section can be measured with approximately 35.5% statistical accuracy in four years of the CLIC operation at 1.4 TeV centre-of-mass energy with unpolarised beams. The result is preliminary as the equivalent photon approximation is not considered in the cross-section calculations. This study complements the Higgs physics program foreseen at CLIC.

  17. Final state interaction in the pd → pnp reaction at 1 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deloff, A.

    1992-09-01

    The pd → pnp reaction at 1 GeV in both the direct and charge exchange channel has been investigated. The experimental data come from a line reversed beam-target experiment with 3.3 GeV/c deuterons incident on a proton target. In the direct channel data exhibit narrow structures in the np effective mass spectra: at threshold, at 2.02 GeV and at 2.12 GeV which have been seen before and we report on a new narrow enhancement at 1.95 GeV. In charge exchange channel the data show somewhat broader peak at 2.18 GeV. The data are explained by using a conventional approach, i.e. without sub-nucleonic degrees of freedom, but including the ΔN channel in NN scattering. 29 figs., 1 tab., 36 refs. (author)

  18. Correlated Photon Pair Generation in Silicon Wire Waveguides at 1.5 μm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Jie-Rong; Zhang Wei; Zhou Qiang; Feng Xue; Huang Yi-Dong; Peng Jiang-De

    2010-01-01

    Correlated photon pairs at 1.5μm are generated in a silicon wire waveguide (SWW) with a length of only 1.6mm. Experimental results show that the single-side count rates on both sides increase quadratically with pump light, indicating that photons are generated from the spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) processes. The quantum correlation property of the generated photons is demonstrated by the ratio between coincident and accidental coincident count rates. The highest ratio measured at room temperature is to be about 19, showing that generated photon pairs have strong quantum correlation property and low noise. What is more, the wavelength correlation property of the coincident count is also measured to demonstrate the correlated photon pair generation. The experimental results demonstrate that SWWs have great potential in on-chip integrated low-noise correlated photon pair sources at 1.5 μm. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  19. Agonist Binding to Chemosensory Receptors: A Systematic Bioinformatics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Fierro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Human G-protein coupled receptors (hGPCRs constitute a large and highly pharmaceutically relevant membrane receptor superfamily. About half of the hGPCRs' family members are chemosensory receptors, involved in bitter taste and olfaction, along with a variety of other physiological processes. Hence these receptors constitute promising targets for pharmaceutical intervention. Molecular modeling has been so far the most important tool to get insights on agonist binding and receptor activation. Here we investigate both aspects by bioinformatics-based predictions across all bitter taste and odorant receptors for which site-directed mutagenesis data are available. First, we observe that state-of-the-art homology modeling combined with previously used docking procedures turned out to reproduce only a limited fraction of ligand/receptor interactions inferred by experiments. This is most probably caused by the low sequence identity with available structural templates, which limits the accuracy of the protein model and in particular of the side-chains' orientations. Methods which transcend the limited sampling of the conformational space of docking may improve the predictions. As an example corroborating this, we review here multi-scale simulations from our lab and show that, for the three complexes studied so far, they significantly enhance the predictive power of the computational approach. Second, our bioinformatics analysis provides support to previous claims that several residues, including those at positions 1.50, 2.50, and 7.52, are involved in receptor activation.

  20. Comparison of the bactericidal activity of ozone and chlorine against Escherichia coli at 1/sup 0/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetner, R H; Ingols, R S

    1956-01-01

    The bactericidal effects of ozone solutions were tested against Escherichia coli suspensions at 1/sup 0/, and the lethal concentration was found to be that quantity of ozone necessary to produce a detectable residue in the suspension; under the conditions of these experiments this was 0.4-0.5 mg/l. A comparison of the bactericidal activity of chlorine under similar conditions emphasized the different modes of action of the two agents.

  1. Flat-topped emission centred at 1 250 nm from quantum dot superluminescent diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Hogg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a method for tailoring a broadband and flat-topped emission spectrum in quantum dot superluminescent diodes based upon modification of the dots-in-compositionally-modulated-well (DCMWELL technique. We demonstrate flat-topped emission with 95 nm full width at half maximum (FWHM, centred at 1 250 nm, and with output power in excess of 8 mW.

  2. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockade decreases vasopressin-induced water reabsorption and AQP2 levels in NaCl-restricted rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwon, Tae-Hwan; Nielsen, Jakob; Knepper, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Vasopressin and ANG II, which are known to play a major role in renal water and sodium reabsorption, are mainly coupled to the cAMP/PKA and phosphoinositide pathways, respectively. There is evidence for cross talk between these intracellular signaling pathways. We therefore hypothesized that vaso......Vasopressin and ANG II, which are known to play a major role in renal water and sodium reabsorption, are mainly coupled to the cAMP/PKA and phosphoinositide pathways, respectively. There is evidence for cross talk between these intracellular signaling pathways. We therefore hypothesized...

  3. The influence of antibody against angiotensin 2 receptor AT-1 and AT-2 type on hypertension development in young and adult

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Železná, Blanka; Veselský, Leopold; Velek, Jiří; Dobešová, Zdenka; Zicha, Josef; Kuneš, Jaroslav

    1998-01-01

    Roč. 16, Suppl.2 (1998), s. S26 ISSN 0263-6352. [Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Hypertension /17./. 07.06.1998-11.06.1998, Amsterdam] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OK 170 Grant - others:EU Copernicus(BE) Cipa CT 94-0239 Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  4. The anticancer estrogen receptor antagonist tamoxifen impairs consolidation of inhibitory avoidance memory through estrogen receptor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenfels, Martina; Dornelles, Arethuza da Silva; Petry, Fernanda Dos Santos; Blank, Martina; de Farias, Caroline Brunetto; Roesler, Rafael; Schwartsmann, Gilberto

    2017-11-01

    Over two-thirds of women with breast cancer have positive tumors for hormone receptors, and these patients undergo treatment with endocrine therapy, tamoxifen being the most widely used agent. Despite being very effective in breast cancer treatment, tamoxifen is associated with side effects that include cognitive impairments. However, the specific aspects and mechanisms underlying these impairments remain to be characterized. Here, we have investigated the effects of tamoxifen and interaction with estrogen receptors on formation of memory for inhibitory avoidance conditioning in female rats. In the first experiment, Wistar female rats received a single oral dose of tamoxifen (1, 3, or 10 mg/kg) or saline by gavage immediately after training and were tested for memory consolidation 24 h after training. In the second experiment, rats received a single dose of 1 mg/kg tamoxifen or saline by gavage 3 h after training and were tested 24 h after training for memory consolidation. In the third experiment, rats received a subcutaneous injection with estrogen receptor α agonist or estrogen receptor beta agonist 30 min before the training. After training, rats received a single oral dose of tamoxifen 1 mg/kg or saline and were tested 24 h after training. In the fourth experiment, rats were trained and tested 24 h later. Immediately after test, rats received a single dose of tamoxifen (1 mg/kg) or saline by gavage and were given four additional daily test trials followed by a re-instatement. Tamoxifen at 1 mg/kg impaired memory consolidation when given immediately after training and the estrogen receptor alpha agonist improved the tamoxifen-related memory impairment. Moreover, tamoxifen impairs memory consolidation of the test. These findings indicate that estrogen receptors regulate the early phase of memory consolidation and the effects of tamoxifen on memory consolidation.

  5. Correlation of radiation response with tumor oxygenation in the Dunning prostate R3327-AT1 tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, Vincent A.; Zhao Dawen; Gilio, Joseph; Chang, C.-H.; Jiang Lan; Hahn, Eric W.; Mason, Ralph P.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the application of pretreatment oxygenation to the AT1 subline of the Dunning R3327 prostate tumor, which is more hypoxic and faster growing than the H1 subline previously studied. Methods and Materials: Dunning prostate R3327-AT1 tumors growing on Copenhagen rats were administered 30 Gy of X-ray radiation either with or without oxygen inhalation. Tumor oxygenation was sampled by 19 F nuclear magnetic resonance echo planar imaging relaxometry of the reporter molecule hexafluorobenzene, no more than 24 h before irradiation. Results: Large tumors (>3.0 cm 3 ) exhibited significantly greater hypoxic fractions and lower mean partial pressure of oxygen (pO 2 ) than their smaller counterparts ( 3 ). However, unlike the R3327-HI subline, large AT1 tumors generally did not respond to oxygen inhalation in terms of altered hypoxic fraction or response to irradiation. Although the tumors did not respond to oxygen inhalation, each tumor had a different pO 2 , and there was a clear trend between level of oxygenation at time of irradiation and tumor growth delay, with considerably better outcome when mean pO 2 > 10 mm Hg. The comparatively small baseline hypoxic fraction in the group of small tumors was virtually eliminated by breathing oxygen, and the growth rate was significantly reduced for tumors on rats breathing oxygen during irradiation. Conclusions: These results further validate the usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance oximetry as a predictor of response to radiation therapy

  6. LOCAL INTERSTELLAR HYDROGEN'S DISAPPEARANCE AT 1 AU: FOUR YEARS OF IBEX IN THE RISING SOLAR CYCLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saul, Lukas; Rodríguez, Diego; Scheer, Juergen; Wurz, Peter; Bzowski, Maciej; Kubiak, Marzena; Sokół, Justina; Fuselier, Stephen; McComas, Dave; Möbius, Eberhard

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission has recently opened a new window on the interstellar medium (ISM) by imaging neutral atoms. One ''bright'' feature in the sky is the interstellar wind flowing into the solar system. Composed of remnants of stellar explosions as well as primordial gas and plasma, the ISM is by no means uniform. The interaction of the local ISM with the solar wind shapes our heliospheric environment with hydrogen being the dominant component of the very local ISM. In this paper, we report on direct sampling of the neutral hydrogen of the local ISM over four years of IBEX observations. The hydrogen wind observed at 1 AU has decreased and nearly disappeared as the solar activity has increased over the last four years; the signal at 1 AU has dropped off in 2012 by a factor of ∼8 to near background levels. The longitudinal offset has also increased with time presumably due to greater radiation pressure deflecting the interstellar wind. We present longitudinal and latitudinal arrival direction measurements of the bulk flow as measured over four years beginning at near solar minimum conditions. The H distribution we observe at 1 AU is expected to be different from that outside the heliopause due to ionization, photon pressure, gravity, and filtration by interactions with heliospheric plasma populations. These observations provide an important benchmark for modeling of the global heliospheric interaction. Based on these observations we suggest a further course of scientific action to observe neutral hydrogen over a full solar cycle with IBEX.

  7. The 400W at 1.8K Test Facility at CEA-Grenoble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, P.; Girard, A.; Jager, B.; Rousset, B.; Bonnay, P.; Millet, F.; Gully, P.

    2006-04-01

    A new test facility with a cooling capacity respectively of 400W at 1.8K or 800W at 4.5K, is now under nominal operation in SBT (Low Temperature Department) at CEA Grenoble. It has been recently used for thermohydraulic studies of two phase superfluid helium in autumn 2004. In the near future, this test bench will allow: - to test industrial components at 1.8K (magnets, cavities of accelerators) - to continue the present studies on thermohydraulics of two phase superfluid helium - to develop and simulate new cooling loops for ITER Cryogenics, and other applications such as high Reynolds number flows This new facility consists of a cold box connected to a warm compressor station (one subatmospheric oil ring pump in series with two screw compressors). The cold box, designed by AIR LIQUIDE, comprises two centrifugal cold compressors, a cold turbine, a wet piston expander, counter flow heat exchangers and two phase separators at 4.5K and 1.8K. The new facility uses a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) connected to a bus for the measurements. The design is modular and will allow the use of saturated fluid flow (two phase flow at 1.8K or 4.5K) or single phase fluid forced flow. Experimental results and cooling capacity in different operation modes are detailed.

  8. Angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) and receptor Mas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villela, Daniel; Leonhardt, Julia; Patel, Neal

    2015-01-01

    The angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) and the receptor Mas are components of the protective arms of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), i.e. they both mediate tissue protective and regenerative actions. The spectrum of actions of these two receptors and their signalling mechanisms display striki...

  9. Promotion of breast cancer by β-Hexachlorocyclohexane in MCF10AT1 cells and MMTV-neu mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsumura Fumio

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to β-Hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH, a contaminant of the hexachlorohexane pesticide lindane, has been implicated as a risk factor in the development of breast cancers in epidemiological studies. Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated the ability of β-HCH to elicit its actions via a ligand-independent activation of the estrogen receptor through increased c-Neu (= erbB2 or HER-2 expression and kinase activation in both the BG-1 and MCF-7 cell lines. In addition, long term exposure (33 passages to β-HCH was shown to promote the selection of MCF-7 cells which exhibit a more metastatic phenotype. Methods In this current study, we decided to investigate the long-term effects of β-HCH in both the MCF10AT1 cell line which was derived from a normal epithelial cell line by stably transfecting a mutated c-Ha-ras and a MMTV-Neu mouse model for mammary cancer in vivo. MCF10AT1 cells were exposed for 20 passages with β-HCH, 4-OH-Tamoxifen (Tam, or 17-β-estradiol (E2 after which cells were analyzed for proliferation rates and mRNA expression by RT-PCR. In our in vivo studies, MMTV-Neu mice were injected with β-HCH and observed for tumor formation over a 70 week period. Results β-HCH and Tam selected MCF10AT1 cells demonstrated increased mRNA expression of MMP-13 (collagenase-3 a marker of increased invasiveness. β-HCH treatment was also seen to increase the expression in a number of proto-oncogenes (c-Neu, Cyclin D1, p27, cell status markers (Met-1, CK19, and the inflammatory marker NFκB. Previous studies, have demonstrated the role of these markers as evidence of malignant transformations, and further illustrate the ability of β-HCH to be carcinogenic. To demonstrate β-HCH's tumorigenic properties in an in vivo system, we used an MMTV-Neu mouse model. MMTV-Neu is a c-Neu overexpressing strain which has been shown to spontaneously develop mammary tumors at later stages of aging. In this experiment,

  10. TLX: An elusive receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benod, Cindy; Villagomez, Rosa; Webb, Paul

    2016-03-01

    TLX (tailless receptor) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and belongs to a class of nuclear receptors for which no endogenous or synthetic ligands have yet been identified. TLX is a promising therapeutic target in neurological disorders and brain tumors. Thus, regulatory ligands for TLX need to be identified to complete the validation of TLX as a useful target and would serve as chemical probes to pursue the study of this receptor in disease models. It has recently been proved that TLX is druggable. However, to identify potent and specific TLX ligands with desirable biological activity, a deeper understanding of where ligands bind, how they alter TLX conformation and of the mechanism by which TLX mediates the transcription of its target genes is needed. While TLX is in the process of escaping from orphanhood, future ligand design needs to progress in parallel with improved understanding of (i) the binding cavity or surfaces to target with small molecules on the TLX ligand binding domain and (ii) the nature of the TLX coregulators in particular cell and disease contexts. Both of these topics are discussed in this review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Glutamate receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldbrandt, Mette; Johansen, Tommy N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Homologation and substitution on the carbon backbone of (S)-glutamic acid [(S)-Glu, 1], as well as absolute stereochemistry, are structural parameters of key importance for the pharmacological profile of (S)-Glu receptor ligands. We describe a series of methyl-substituted 2-aminoadipic acid (AA...

  12. Ginkgolides and glycine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaracz, Stanislav; Nakanishi, Koji; Jensen, Anders A.

    2004-01-01

    Ginkgolides from the Ginkgo biloba tree are diterpenes with a cage structure consisting of six five-membered rings and a unique tBu group. They exert a variety of biological properties. In addition to being antagonists of the platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR), it has recently been shown ...

  13. adrenergic receptor with preeclampsia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-05-09

    May 9, 2011 ... due to a post- receptor defect (Karadas et al., 2007). Several polymorphisms have ... the detection of the Arg16Gly polymorphism, overnight digestion at. 37°C with 10 U ..... DW, Wood AJ, Stein CM (2004). Beta2-adrenoceptor ...

  14. Metformin and insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigneri, R.; Gullo, D.; Pezzino, V.

    1984-01-01

    The authors evaluated the effect of metformin (N,N-dimethylbiguanide), a biguanide known to be less toxic than phenformin, on insulin binding to its receptors, both in vitro and in vivo. Specific 125 I-insulin binding to cultured IM-9 human lymphocytes and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells was determined after preincubation with metformin. Specific 125 I-insulin binding to circulating monocytes was also evaluated in six controls, eight obese subjects, and six obese type II diabetic patients before and after a short-term treatment with metformin. Plasma insulin levels and blood glucose were also measured on both occasions. Metformin significantly increased insulin binding in vitro to both IM-9 lymphocytes and MCF-7 cells; the maximum increment was 47.1% and 38.0%, respectively. Metformin treatment significantly increased insulin binding in vivo to monocytes of obese subjects and diabetic patients. Scatchard analysis indicated that the increased binding was mainly due to an increase in receptor capacity. Insulin binding to monocytes of normal controls was unchanged after metformin as were insulin levels in all groups; blood glucose was significantly reduced after metformin only in diabetic patients. These data indicate that metformin increases insulin binding to its receptors in vitro and in vivo. The effect in vivo is observed in obese subjects and in obese type II diabetic patients, paralleling the clinical effectiveness of this antidiabetic agent, and is not due to receptor regulation by circulating insulin, since no variation in insulin levels was recorded

  15. The Role of Adenosine Receptors in Psychostimulant Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Ballesteros-Yáñez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine receptors (AR are a family of G-protein coupled receptors, comprised of four members, named A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 receptors, found widely distributed in almost all human body tissues and organs. To date, they are known to participate in a large variety of physiopathological responses, which include vasodilation, pain, and inflammation. In particular, in the central nervous system (CNS, adenosine acts as a neuromodulator, exerting different functions depending on the type of AR and consequent cellular signaling involved. In terms of molecular pathways and second messengers involved, A1 and A3 receptors inhibit adenylyl cyclase (AC, through Gi/o proteins, while A2A and A2B receptors stimulate it through Gs proteins. In the CNS, A1 receptors are widely distributed in the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum, A2A receptors are localized mainly in the striatum and olfactory bulb, while A2B and A3 receptors are found at low levels of expression. In addition, AR are able to form heteromers, both among themselves (e.g., A1/A2A, as well as with other subtypes (e.g., A2A/D2, opening a whole range of possibilities in the field of the pharmacology of AR. Nowadays, we know that adenosine, by acting on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors, is known to antagonistically modulate dopaminergic neurotransmission and therefore reward systems, being A1 receptors colocalized in heteromeric complexes with D1 receptors, and A2A receptors with D2 receptors. This review documents the present state of knowledge of the contribution of AR, particularly A1 and A2A, to psychostimulants-mediated effects, including locomotor activity, discrimination, seeking and reward, and discuss their therapeutic relevance to psychostimulant addiction. Studies presented in this review reinforce the potential of A1 agonists as an effective strategy to counteract psychostimulant-induced effects. Furthermore, different experimental data support the hypothesis that A2A/D2 heterodimers are

  16. NFAD Arrays for Single Photon Optical Communications at 1.5 um, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For this program, we propose to develop large pixel-count single photon counting detector arrays suitable for deployment in spacecraft terminal receivers supporting...

  17. Olfactory Receptor Database: a sensory chemoreceptor resource

    OpenAIRE

    Skoufos, Emmanouil; Marenco, Luis; Nadkarni, Prakash M.; Miller, Perry L.; Shepherd, Gordon M.

    2000-01-01

    The Olfactory Receptor Database (ORDB) is a WWW-accessible database that has been expanded from an olfactory receptor resource to a chemoreceptor resource. It stores data on six classes of G-protein-coupled sensory chemoreceptors: (i) olfactory receptor-like proteins, (ii) vomeronasal receptors, (iii) insect olfactory receptors, (iv) worm chemoreceptors, (v) taste papilla receptors and (vi) fungal pheromone receptors. A complementary database of the ligands of these receptors (OdorDB) has bee...

  18. Self-Perceived Participation and Autonomy at 1-Year Post Stroke: A Part of the Stroke Arm Longitudinal Study at the University of Gothenburg (SALGOT Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Törnbom, Karin; Hadartz, Kristin; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S

    2018-04-01

    Identifying factors predicting the long-term outcome of participation and autonomy after stroke is essential for developing individualized rehabilitation interventions. The aim was to describe self-assessed participation and autonomy and to explore factors associated with the same at 1 year post stroke. Participants consisted of 79 persons (mean age = 67) with a first-time stroke at the 1-year follow-up. To investigate perceived participation and autonomy at 1 year, a self-assessment questionnaire, the Impact on Participation and Autonomy-English version (IPA-E) was used. Multivariate logistic regression models were performed using age, gender, stroke severity, and functional dependency at discharge as potential contributors to the perceived level of participation and autonomy. A high percentage (70%-88%) evaluated their functions as fair to very good within all domains of the IPA-E at 1 year post stroke. However, around a fifth experienced their Family role as poor to very poor. Participants' functional dependency at discharge significantly influenced the outcome for the domains of Family role (odds ratio [OR] = 5.66, P Autonomy indoors (OR = 3.44, P autonomy at 1 year post stroke. The results also indicate that supporting indoor autonomy and social relations of persons with stroke during the acute rehabilitation is important to enhance participation and autonomy at 1 year post stroke. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dilepton spectroscopy at intermediate energies; the carbon - carbon reaction at 1 GeV/A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prunet, M.

    1995-01-01

    The Physics context of this work is heavy ion collisions at relativistic energies where di-electron provide informations on the produced hot and dense nuclear matter. The experiment is performed by the DiLepton Spectrometer (DLS) Collaboration at the Lawrence Berkeley's Bevalac. After a description of the apparatus, we review the whole program and the main results so far obtained: first evidence of a significant di-electron signal at energies above 1 GeV/A; improvement of the understanding of di-electron production (electromagnetic decays of hadrons, π + π - annihilation and hadronic Bremsstrahlung). The results of p-p, p-d reactions from 1 to 4.9 GeV/A show that hadronic Bremsstrahlung (pp, pn) should be reformulated. Our analysis, optimized on the reaction Carbon-Carbon at 1 GeV/A, has been applied to α-Ca and d-Ca. We have developed two main aspects: improvement of the time resolution (500 ps) in order to eliminate all of the protons. Improvement of the space resolution (300 μ) for better mass resolution, in particular in the ρ region. We obtain the cross section of di-electron production as a function of mass, transverse momentum and rapidity from the C-C, α-Ca and d-Ca reactions at 1 GeV/A. We also compare the cross section for all of the measured systems at 1 GeV/A, including Ca-Ca, and we show a (ApAt) α dependence with α ≅ 1.1. A study of the associated multiplicity has also been performed. Nevertheless, the limited acceptance of the DLS and its poor mass resolution to identify the ρ, ω vector mesons, do not allow to conclude on hadron behaviour in nuclear matter. This point is one of the main goal of the HADES project at GSI (Darmstadt), which we give a brief description of the main features. (authors). 60 refs

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5-T in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naehle, Claas P; Strach, Katharina; Thomas, Daniel; Meyer, Carsten; Linhart, Markus; Bitaraf, Sascha; Litt, Harold; Schwab, Jörg Otto; Schild, Hans; Sommer, Torsten

    2009-08-04

    Our aim was to establish and evaluate a strategy for safe performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1.5-T in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). Expanding indications for ICD placement and MRI becoming the imaging modality of choice for many indications has created a growing demand for MRI in ICD patients, which is still considered an absolute contraindication. Non-pacemaker-dependent ICD patients with a clinical need for MRI were included in the study. To minimize radiofrequency-related lead heating, the specific absorption rate was limited to 2 W/kg. ICDs were reprogrammed pre-MRI to avoid competitive pacing and potential pro-arrhythmia: 1) the lower rate limit was programmed as low as reasonably achievable; and 2) arrhythmia detection was programmed on, but therapy delivery was programmed off. Patients were monitored using electrocardiography and pulse oximetry. All ICDs were interrogated before and after the MRI examination and after 3 months, including measurement of pacing capture threshold, lead impedance, battery voltage, and serum troponin I. Eighteen ICD patients underwent a total of 18 MRI examinations at 1.5-T; all examinations were completed safely. All ICDs could be interrogated and reprogrammed normally post-MRI. No significant changes of pacing capture threshold, lead impedance, and serum troponin I were observed. Battery voltage decreased significantly from pre- to post-MRI. In 2 MRI examinations, oversensing of radiofrequency noise as ventricular fibrillation occurred. However, no attempt at therapy delivery was made. MRI of non-pacemaker-dependent ICD patients can be performed with an acceptable risk/benefit ratio under controlled conditions by taking both MRI- and pacemaker-related precautions. (Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Heart at 1.5-Tesla; NCT00356239).

  1. Correlation of radiation response with tumor oxygenation in the Dunning prostate R3327-AT1 tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourke, Vincent A [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Dawen, Zhao [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Gilio, Joseph [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Chang, C -H [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Lan, Jiang [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Hahn, Eric W [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Mason, Ralph P [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the application of pretreatment oxygenation to the AT1 subline of the Dunning R3327 prostate tumor, which is more hypoxic and faster growing than the H1 subline previously studied. Methods and Materials: Dunning prostate R3327-AT1 tumors growing on Copenhagen rats were administered 30 Gy of X-ray radiation either with or without oxygen inhalation. Tumor oxygenation was sampled by {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance echo planar imaging relaxometry of the reporter molecule hexafluorobenzene, no more than 24 h before irradiation. Results: Large tumors (>3.0 cm{sup 3}) exhibited significantly greater hypoxic fractions and lower mean partial pressure of oxygen (pO{sub 2}) than their smaller counterparts (<1.5 cm{sup 3}). However, unlike the R3327-HI subline, large AT1 tumors generally did not respond to oxygen inhalation in terms of altered hypoxic fraction or response to irradiation. Although the tumors did not respond to oxygen inhalation, each tumor had a different pO{sub 2}, and there was a clear trend between level of oxygenation at time of irradiation and tumor growth delay, with considerably better outcome when mean pO{sub 2} > 10 mm Hg. The comparatively small baseline hypoxic fraction in the group of small tumors was virtually eliminated by breathing oxygen, and the growth rate was significantly reduced for tumors on rats breathing oxygen during irradiation. Conclusions: These results further validate the usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance oximetry as a predictor of response to radiation therapy.

  2. Persistence of Upper-Airway Symptoms During CPAP Compromises Adherence at 1 Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreivi, Hanna-Riikka; Maasilta, Paula; Bachour, Adel

    2016-05-01

    The most common adverse effects of CPAP are related to the upper airways. We evaluated upper-airway symptoms before and after a CPAP trial as well as their effect on CPAP adherence. We also evaluated the effect of humidification added to CPAP therapy on upper-airway symptoms. We followed for 1 y 536 subjects with obstructive sleep apnea scheduled consecutively for CPAP initiation. Subjects completed visual analog questionnaires on nasal stuffiness, rhinorrhea, and mouth dryness (0 = no symptoms, 100 = severe symptoms). Before CPAP initiation, mean nasal stuffiness score was 29.6 ± 24.9, rhinorrhea score was 16.0 ± 21.7, and mouth dryness score was 43.8 ± 33.1. In subjects who quit CPAP treatment before the 1-y follow-up, the increase in rhinorrhea score during CPAP initiation was significant, 5.3 (95% CI 0.5-9.5, P = .02), and in those using CPAP at 1 y, nasal stuffiness score and mouth dryness score decreased significantly during initiation, -5.1 (95% CI -7.9 to -2.4, P CPAP regardless of humidification: change with humidification, -18.1 (95% CI -22.1 to -14.3), P CPAP, whereas its absence induced a significant rise in symptom scores: change in rhinorrhea, 11.5 (95% CI 7.1-16.7), P CPAP does not predict CPAP use at 1 y, whereas CPAP non-users at 1 y had smaller or no alleviation in symptom scores during initiation compared with those who continued CPAP treatment. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  3. Brain penetration of telmisartan, a unique centrally acting angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, studied by PET in conscious rhesus macaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Akihiro; Fushiki, Hiroshi; Murakami, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Sosuke; Kakuta, Hirotoshi; Nishimura, Shintaro

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Telmisartan is a widely used, long-acting antihypertensive agent. Known to be a selective angiotensin II type 1 (AT 1 ) receptor (AT 1 R) blocker (ARB), telmisartan acts as a partial agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ) and inhibits centrally mediated effects of angiotensin II in rats following peripheral administration, although the brain penetration of telmisartan remains unclear. We investigated the brain concentration and localization of telmisartan using 11 C-labeled telmisartan and positron emission tomography (PET) in conscious rhesus macaques. Methods: Three male rhesus macaques were bolus intravenously administered [ 11 C]telmisartan either alone or as a mixture with unlabeled telmisartan (1 mg/kg). Dynamic PET images were acquired for 95 min following administration. Blood samples were collected for the analysis of plasma concentration and metabolites, and brain and plasma concentrations were calculated from detected radioactivity using the specific activity of the administered drug preparation, in which whole blood radioactivity was used for the correction of intravascular blood radioactivity in brain. Results: Telmisartan penetrated into the brain little but enough to block AT 1 R and showed a consistently increasing brain/plasma ratio within the PET scanning period, suggesting slow clearance of the compound from the brain compared to the plasma clearance. Brain/plasma ratios at 30, 60, and 90 min were 0.06, 0.13, and 0.18, respectively. No marked localization according to the AT 1 R distribution was noted over the entire brain, even on tracer alone dosing. Conclusions: Telmisartan penetrated into the brain enough to block AT 1 R and showed a slow clearance from the brain in conscious rhesus macaques, supporting the long-acting and central responses of telmisartan as a unique property among ARBs.

  4. Activation-induced proteolysis of cytoplasmic domain of zeta in T cell receptors and Fc receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, J L; Anderson, P

    1994-12-01

    The CD3-T cell receptor (TCR) complex on T cells and the Fc gamma receptor type III (Fc gamma RIII)-zeta-gamma complex on natural killer cells are functionally analogous activation receptors that associate with a family of disulfide-linked dimers composed of the related subunits zeta and gamma. Immunochemical analysis of receptor complexes separated on two-dimensional diagonal gels allowed the identification of a previously uncharacterized zeta-p14 heterodimer. zeta-p14 is a component of both CD3-TCR and Fc gamma RIII-zeta-gamma. Peptide mapping analysis shows that p14 is structurally related to zeta, suggesting that it is either: (i) derived from zeta proteolytically or (ii) the product of an alternatively spliced mRNA. The observation that COS cells transformed with a cDNA encoding zeta express zeta-p14 supports the former possibility. The expression of CD3-TCR complexes including zeta-p14 increases following activation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or concanavalin A, suggesting that proteolysis of zeta may contribute to receptor modulation or desensitization.

  5. Sigma opioid receptor: characterization and co-identity with the phencyclidine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelsohn, L.G.; Kalra, V.; Johnson, B.G.; Kerchner, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of the sigma opioid receptor of rat brain cortex have been characterized using the prototypic ligand (+)-[ 3 H] SKF 10,047. Binding to this receptor was rapid, and equilibrium was obtained within 30 min at 37 degrees C. Specific binding was linear with protein concentration up to 500 micrograms/2 ml and was dependent upon protein integrity. Denaturation by boiling destroyed over 95% of the specific binding. A high-affinity binding site with a KD of 150 +/- 40 nM and a maximum binding of 2.91 +/- 0.84 pmol/mg of protein was determined from a Scatchard plot of the binding data. The addition of salt, either NaCl or CaCl 2 , to the buffers markedly decreased binding, with CaCl 2 being more potent than NaCl. A broad pH optimum for specific binding was observed; maximum binding was at pH 9.0. The affinity of a number of ligands for the sigma site and the phencyclidine receptor were compared. The binding (IC50) of 13 ligands to the sigma site showed a correlation of 0.86 (P less than .01) with binding to the phencyclidine site. The data demonstrate that the biochemical properties of the sigma and phencyclidine receptors are similar and support the view that these receptors are one and the same site

  6. Optimum copper to superconductor ratio in cables for superconducting magnets at 1.9 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, R.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the optimum copper to superconducting ratio is calculated to prevent quenching for superconducting cables used in accelerator magnets like the LHC dipoles, operating in superfluid helium at 1.9K. The duration of the perturbations leading to a quench are estimated from flux measurements made with pickup coils in the LHC dipole models. The optimum copper to superconducting ratio is then found by studying the minimum quench energy and the influence of the length and the duration or the perturbation and heat transfer to the surroundings. A comparison is made of the behavior at temperatures of 1.9 and 4.3 K

  7. Test Results of the LARP HQ02b Magnet at 1.9 K

    OpenAIRE

    Bajas, H; Bajko, M; Bottura, L; Chiuchiolo, A; Dunkel, O; Ferracin, P; Feuvrier, J; Giloux, Chr; Todesco, E; Ravaioli, E; Caspi, S; Dietderich, D; Felice, H; Hafalia, A R; Marchevsky, M

    2015-01-01

    The HQ magnet is a 120 mm aperture, 1-meter-long Nb3Sn quadrupole developed by the LARP collaboration in the framework of the High-Luminosity LHC project. A first series of coils was assembled and tested in 5 assemblies of the HQ01 series. The HQ01e model achieved a maximum gradient of 170 T/m at 4.5 K at LBNL in 2010-2011 and reached 184 T/m at 1.9 K at CERN in 2012. A new series of coils incorporating major design changes was fabricated for the HQ02 series. The first model, HQ02a, was teste...

  8. Fragmentation of the 56Fe in Al at 1.88A GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, D.P.; Pal, P.; Basu, B.; Rakshit, R.; Mukherjee, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    The production of fragmented nuclei from relativistic 56 Fe beam available from LBL Bevalac at 1.88A GeV has been studied using CR-39 (DOP) passive detector placed at an angle of 60 degrees with respect to the beam. The histogram showing the experimental frequency distribution of minor axes of the elliptic etch pit shows the presence of the fragmented nuclei produced with charge number Z from 25 up to 21. The histogram further reveals the presence of nuclei with Z=27 and 28. The production of nuclei heavier than 56 Fe is possibly due to the charge exchange or pick-up phenomena

  9. Azimuthal correlations of pions in relativistic heavy ion collisions at 1 GeV/nucl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, S.A.; Hartnack, C.; Nantes Univ., 44; Stoecker, H.; Greiner, W.

    1995-01-01

    Triple differential cross sections of pions in heavy ion collisions at 1 GeV/nucl. are studied with the IQMD model. After discussing general properties of Δ resonance and pion production we focus an azimuthal correlations: At projectile- and target-rapidities we observe an anticorrelation in the in-plane transverse momentum between pions and protons. At c.m.-rapidity, however, we find that high p t pions are being preferentially emitted perpendicular to the event-plane. We investigate the causes of those correlations and their sensitivity on the density and momentum dependence of the real and imaginary part of the nucleon and pion optical potential. (orig.)

  10. Is there Δ-matter at 1 GeV/nucleon?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, S.A.; Hofmann, M.; Hartnack, C.; Nantes Univ.; Stoecker, H.; Greiner, W.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of creating a new form of highly excited nuclear matter, Δ-matter, in heavy ion collisions at 1 GeV/nucleon. At this incident energy, which is accessible through the SIS accelerator facility, enough Δ-resonances are produced to show collective effects. Maximum densities for the resonances around 50% ground state density of nuclear matter are reached. However, the multiplicity of Δ-resonances reaches only 20% of the baryon multiplicity and therefore is not high enough to justify the term Δ-matter. (orig.)

  11. Mechanisms of alpha emitter production in 12C induced reactions at 1 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufour, J.P.; Delagrange, H.; Del Moral, R.

    1982-01-01

    We present cross sections, mean projected recoil ranges and angular distributions of radioactive alpha emitters produced in 12 C-induced reactions at 1 GeV on targets ranging from Gd to Pb. We use a new technique of on-line electrostatic collection. The wide spectrum of produced isotopes corresponds to nuclei close to the target up to nuclei with as much as 60 nucleons less than the target. The intranuclear cascade calculations can reproduce the main features of nuclei having lost up

  12. On the collective mode spectrum for composite fermions at 1/3 filling factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Martinez, A.; Guerra, V.

    1995-09-01

    The collective mode spectrum of the composite fermion state at 1/3 filling factor is evaluated. At zero momentum, the result coincides with the cyclotron energy at the external magnetic field value, and not at the effective field, in spite of the fact that only the former enter in the equations, thus, the Kohn theorem is satisfied. Unexpectedly, in place of the magneto-roton minimum, the collective mode gets a threshold indicating the instability of the mean field composite fermion state under the formation of crystalline structures. However, the question about if this outcome only appears within the mean field approximation should be further considered. (author). 9 refs, 1 fig

  13. Quantitative comparisons of type III radio burst intensity and fast electron flux at 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzenreiter, R. J.; Evans, L. G.; Lin, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    We compare the flux of fast solar electrons and the intensity of the type III radio emission generated by these particles at 1 AU. We find that there are two regimes in the generation of type III radiation: one where the radio intensity is linearly proportional to the electron flux, and the second regime, which occurs above a threshold electron flux, where the radio intensity is proportional to the approximately 2.4 power of the electron flux. This threshold appears to reflect a transition to a different emission mechanism.

  14. Increased amphetamine-induced locomotor activity, sensitization, and accumbal dopamine release in M5 muscarinic receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lene S; Miller, Anthony D; Lester, Deranda B

    2010-01-01

    showed that M(5) receptor knockout (M (5) (-/-) ) mice are less sensitive to the reinforcing properties of addictive drugs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Here, we investigate the role of M(5) receptors in the effects of amphetamine and cocaine on locomotor activity, locomotor sensitization, and dopamine release......-induced hyperactivity and dopamine release as well as amphetamine sensitization are enhanced in mice lacking the M(5) receptor. These results support the concept that the M(5) receptor modulates effects of addictive drugs....

  15. Effects of muscarinic receptor antagonists on cocaine discrimination in wild-type mice and in muscarinic receptor M1, M2, and M4 receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Lauren; Thomsen, Morgane

    2017-06-30

    Muscarinic M 1 /M 4 receptor stimulation can reduce abuse-related effects of cocaine and may represent avenues for treating cocaine addiction. Muscarinic antagonists can mimic and enhance effects of cocaine, including discriminative stimulus (S D ) effects, but the receptor subtypes mediating those effects are not known. A better understanding of the complex cocaine/muscarinic interactions is needed to evaluate and develop potential muscarinic-based medications. Here, knockout mice lacking M 1 , M 2 , or M 4 receptors (M 1 -/- , M 2 -/- , M 4 -/- ), as well as control wild-type mice and outbred Swiss-Webster mice, were trained to discriminate 10mg/kg cocaine from saline. Muscarinic receptor antagonists with no subtype selectivity (scopolamine), or preferential affinity at the M 1 , M 2 , or M 4 subtype (telenzepine, trihexyphenidyl; methoctramine, AQ-RA 741; tropicamide) were tested alone and in combination with cocaine. In intact animals, antagonists with high affinity at M 1 /M 4 receptors partially substituted for cocaine and increased the S D effect of cocaine, while M 2 -preferring antagonists did not substitute, and reduced the S D effect of cocaine. The cocaine-like effects of scopolamine were absent in M 1 -/- mice. The cocaine S D attenuating effects of methoctramine were absent in M 2 -/- mice and almost absent in M 1 -/- mice. The findings indicate that the cocaine-like S D effects of muscarinic antagonists are primarily mediated through M 1 receptors, with a minor contribution of M 4 receptors. The data also support our previous findings that stimulation of M 1 receptors and M 4 receptors can each attenuate the S D effect of cocaine, and show that this can also be achieved by blocking M 2 autoreceptors, likely via increased acetylcholine release. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Climate extremes in Europe at 1.5 and 2 degrees of global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Andrew D.; Karoly, David J.

    2017-11-01

    There is an international effort to attempt to limit global warming to 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels, however, there is a lack of quantitative analysis on the benefits of holding global warming to such a level. In this study, coupled climate model simulations are used to form large ensembles of simulated years at 1.5 °C and 2 °C of global warming. These ensembles are used to assess projected changes in the frequency and magnitude of European climate extremes at these warming levels. For example, we find that events similar to the European record hot summer of 2003, which caused tens of thousands of excess deaths, would be very likely at least 24% less frequent in a world at 1.5 °C global warming compared to 2 °C global warming. Under 2 °C of global warming, we could expect such extreme summer temperatures in the historical record to become commonplace, occurring in at least one-in-every-two years. We find that there are very clear benefits to limiting global warming for the European continent, including fewer and less intense heat and rainfall extremes when compared with higher levels of global warming.

  17. Test Results of the LARP HQ02b Magnet at 1.9 K

    CERN Document Server

    Bajas, H; Bottura, L; Chiuchiolo, A; Dunkel, O; Ferracin, P; Feuvrier, J; Giloux, Chr; Todesco, E; Ravaioli, E; Caspi, S; Dietderich, D; Felice, H; Hafalia, A R; Marchevsky, M; Sabbi, G L; Wang, X; Salmi, T; Ghosh, A; Schmalzle, J; Wanderer, P; Anerella, M; Ambrosio, G; Bossert, R; Chlachidze, G; Yu, M

    2015-01-01

    The HQ magnet is a 120 mm aperture, 1-meter-long Nb$_{3}$Sn quadrupole developed by the LARP collaboration in the framework of the High-Luminosity LHC project. A first series of coils was assembled and tested in 5 assemblies of the HQ01 series. The HQ01e model achieved a maximum gradient of 170 T/m at 4.5 K at LBNL in 2010-2011 and reached 184 T/m at 1.9 K at CERN in 2012. A new series of coils incorporating major design changes was fabricated for the HQ02 series. The first model, HQ02a, was tested at Fermilab where it reached 98% of the short sample limit at 4.5 K with a gradient of 182 T/m in 2013. However, the full training of the coils at 1.9 K could not be performed due to a current limit of 15 kA. Following this test, the azimuthal coil pre-load was increased by about 30 MPa and an additional current lead was installed at the electrical center of the magnet for quench protection studies. The test name of this magnet changed to HQ02b. In 2014, HQ02b was then shipped to CERN as the first opportunity for f...

  18. Radio variability in the Phoenix Deep Survey at 1.4 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, P. J.; Drury, J. A.; Bell, M. E.; Murphy, T.; Gaensler, B. M.

    2016-09-01

    We use archival data from the Phoenix Deep Survey to investigate the variable radio source population above 1 mJy beam-1 at 1.4 GHz. Given the similarity of this survey to other such surveys we take the opportunity to investigate the conflicting results which have appeared in the literature. Two previous surveys for variability conducted with the Very Large Array (VLA) achieved a sensitivity of 1 mJy beam-1. However, one survey found an areal density of radio variables on time-scales of decades that is a factor of ˜4 times greater than a second survey which was conducted on time-scales of less than a few years. In the Phoenix deep field we measure the density of variable radio sources to be ρ = 0.98 deg-2 on time-scales of 6 months to 8 yr. We make use of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer infrared cross-ids, and identify all variable sources as an active galactic nucleus of some description. We suggest that the discrepancy between previous VLA results is due to the different time-scales probed by each of the surveys, and that radio variability at 1.4 GHz is greatest on time-scales of 2-5 yr.

  19. Prostaglandin Receptor Signaling in Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Matsuoka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostanoids, consisting of the prostaglandins (PGs and the thromboxanes (TXs, are a group of lipid mediators formed in response to various stimuli. They include PGD2, PGE2, PGF2α, PGI2, and TXA2. They are released outside of the cells immediately after synthesis, and exert their actions by binding to a G-protein coupled rhodopsin-type receptor on the surface of target cells. There are eight types of the prostanoid receptors conserved in mammals from mouse to human. They are the PGD receptor (DP, four subtypes of the PGE receptor (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4, the PGF receptor (FP, PGI receptor (IP, and TXA receptor (TP. Recently, mice deficient in each of these prostanoid receptors were generated and subjected to various experimental models of disease. These studies have revealed the roles of PG receptor signaling in various pathological conditions, and suggest that selective manipulation of the prostanoid receptors may be beneficial in treatment of the pathological conditions. Here we review these recent findings of roles of prostanoid receptor signaling and their therapeutic implications.

  20. GABAA receptors, but not dopamine, serotonin or NMDA receptors, are increased in the frontal cortex from schizophrenic subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daen, B.; Hussain, T.; Scarr, E.; Tomaskovic, E.; Kitsoulis, S.; Pavey, G.; Hill, C.; Keks, N.; Opeskin, K.; Copolov, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Having shown changed 5HT 2A receptor density in the frontal cortex (FC) from schizophrenic subjects (1) we now report on further studies of the molecular neuroanatomy of the FC in schizophrenia. We used in situ radioligand binding and autoradiography to measure the density of [ 3 H]8OH-DPAT (1 nM) binding (5HT 1A receptors) and [ 3 H]GR113808 (2.4nM) binding (5HT 4 receptors) in Brodmann's areas (BA) 8, 9 and 10 from 10 schizophrenic and 10 controls subjects. In addition, [ 3 H]muscimol (100 nM) binding (GABA A receptors), [ 3 H]TCP (20nM) binding (NMDA receptors), [ 3 H]SCH 23390 (3nM) binding (DA D 1 like receptors) and [ 3 H]YM-09151-2 (4nM) binding (DA D 2 -like receptors) was measured in BA 9 from 17 schizophrenic and 17 control subjects. Subjects were matched for age and sex and the post-mortem interval for tissue collection did not differ. There was a significant increase (18%) in the density of GABA A receptors in BA 9 from subjects with schizophrenia (p<0.05) with no change in NMDA, dopamine or serotonin receptors. These data support the hypothesis that there are selective changes in neurotransmitter receptors in the FC of subjects with schizophrenia. It is not yet clear if such changes contribute to the pathology of the illness. Copyright (1998) Australian Neuroscience Society

  1. The interleukin-4 receptor: signal transduction by a hematopoietin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, A D; Pierce, J H

    1994-02-01

    Over the last several years, the receptors for numerous cytokines have been molecularly characterized. Analysis of their amino acid sequences shows that some of these receptors bear certain motifs in their extracellular domains that define a family of receptors called the Hematopoietin receptor superfamily. Significant advances in characterizing the structure, function, and mechanisms of signal transduction have been made for several members of this family. The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent advances made for one of the family members, the interleukin (IL) 4 receptor. Other receptor systems have recently been reviewed elsewhere. The IL-4 receptor consists of, at the minimum, the cloned 140 kDa IL-4-binding chain with the potential for associating with other chains. The IL-4 receptor transduces its signal by activating a tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates cellular substrates, including the receptor itself, and the 170 kDa substrate called 4PS. Phosphorylated 4PS interacts with the SH2 domain of the enzyme PI-3'-kinase and increases its enzymatic activity. These early events in the IL-4 receptor initiated signaling pathway may trigger a series of signals that will ultimately lead to an IL-4 specific biologic outcome.

  2. Meeting report: nuclear receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuckermann, Jan; Bourguet, William; Mandrup, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    The biannual European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) conference on nuclear receptors was organized by Beatrice Desvergne and Laszlo Nagy and took place in Cavtat near Dubrovnik on the Adriatic coast of Croatia September 25-29, 2009. The meeting brought together researchers from all over...... the world covering a wide spectrum from fundamental mechanistic studies to metabolism, clinical studies, and drug development. In this report, we summarize the recent and exciting findings presented by the speakers at the meeting....

  3. Neurotransmitter receptor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordes, M.; Hierholzer, J.; Nikolai-Beyer, K.

    1993-01-01

    The importance of neuroreceptor imaging in vivo using single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) has increased enormously. The principal neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, GABA/benzodiazepine, acetylcholine, and serotonin, are presented with reference to anatomical, biochemical, and physiological features. The main radioligands for SPECT and PET are introduced, and methodological characteristics of both PET and SPECT presented. Finally, the results of neurotransmitter receptor imaging obtained so far will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  4. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Tuncel

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR plays a pivotal role in thyroid hormone metabolism. It is a major controller of thyroid cell function and growth. Mutations in TSHR may lead to several thyroid diseases, most commonly hyperthyroidism. Although its genetic and epigenetic alterations do not directly lead to carcinogenesis, it has a crucial role in tumor growth, which is initiated by several oncogenes. This article will provide a brief review of TSHR and related diseases.

  5. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator. The installation of the feet is scheduled to finish during January 2004 with an installation precision at the 1 mm level despite their height of 5.3 metres. The manufacture was carried out in Russia (Company Izhorskiye Zavody in St. Petersburg), as part of a Russian and JINR Dubna in-kind contribution to ATLAS. Involved in the installation is a team from IHEP-Protvino (Russia), the ATLAS technical co-ordination team at CERN, and the CERN survey team. In all, about 15 people are involved. After the feet are in place, the barrel toroid magnet and the barrel calorimeters will be installed. This will keep the ATLAS team busy for the entire year 2004.

  6. Hydronephrosis alters cardiac ACE2 and Mas receptor expression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanling; Ma, Lulu; Wu, Junyan; Chen, Tingting

    2015-06-01

    Hydronephrosis is characterized by substantial loss of tubules and affects renin secretion in the kidney. However, whether alterations of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), ACE2 and Mas receptor in the heart are observed in hydronephrosis is unknown. Thus, we assessed these components in hydronephrotic mice treated with AT1 receptor blockade and ACE inhibitor. Hydronephrosis was induced by left ureteral ligation in Balb/C mice except sham-operated animals. The levels of cardiac ACE, ACE2 and Mas receptor were measured after treatment of losartan or enalapril. Hydronephrosis led to an increase of ACE level and a decrease of ACE2 and Mas receptor in the heart. Losartan decreased cardiac ACE level, but ACE2 and Mas receptor levels significantly increased in hydronephrotic mice (p Hydronephrosis increased cardiac ACE and suppressed ACE2 and Mas receptor levels. AT1 blockade caused sustained activation of cardiac ACE2 and Mas receptor, but ACE inhibitor had the limitation of such activation of Mas receptor in hydronephrotic animals. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Relaxivity of Ferumoxytol at 1.5 T and 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Gesine; Colgan, Timothy; Wiens, Curtis N; Wang, Xiaoke; Schubert, Tilman; Hernando, Diego; Sharma, Samir D; Reeder, Scott B

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relaxation properties of ferumoxytol, an off-label alternative to gadolinium-based contrast agents, under physiological conditions at 1.5 T and 3.0 T. Ferumoxytol was diluted in gradually increasing concentrations (0.26-4.2 mM) in saline, human plasma, and human whole blood. Magnetic resonance relaxometry was performed at 37°C at 1.5 T and 3.0 T. Longitudinal and transverse relaxation rate constants (R1, R2, R2*) were measured as a function of ferumoxytol concentration, and relaxivities (r1, r2, r2*) were calculated. A linear dependence of R1, R2, and R2* on ferumoxytol concentration was found in saline and plasma with lower R1 values at 3.0 T and similar R2 and R2* values at 1.5 T and 3.0 T (1.5 T: r1saline = 19.9 ± 2.3 smM; r1plasma = 19.0 ± 1.7 smM; r2saline = 60.8 ± 3.8 smM; r2plasma = 64.9 ± 1.8 smM; r2*saline = 60.4 ± 4.7 smM; r2*plasma = 64.4 ± 2.5 smM; 3.0 T: r1saline = 10.0 ± 0.3 smM; r1plasma = 9.5 ± 0.2 smM; r2saline = 62.3 ± 3.7 smM; r2plasma = 65.2 ± 1.8 smM; r2*saline = 57.0 ± 4.7 smM; r2*plasma = 55.7 ± 4.4 smM). The dependence of relaxation rates on concentration in blood was nonlinear. Formulas from second-order polynomial fittings of the relaxation rates were calculated to characterize the relationship between R1blood and R2 blood with ferumoxytol. Ferumoxytol demonstrates strong longitudinal and transverse relaxivities. Awareness of the nonlinear relaxation behavior of ferumoxytol in blood is important for ferumoxytol-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging applications and for protocol optimization.

  8. Predominance of AT1 Blockade Over Mas–Mediated Angiotensin-(1–7) Mechanisms in the Regulation of Blood Pressure and Renin–Angiotensin System in mRen2.Lewis Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND We investigated whether the antihypertensive actions of the angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor (AT1-R) blocker, olmesartan medoxomil, may in part be mediated by increased Ang-(1–7) in the absence of significant changes in plasma Ang II. METHODS mRen2.Lewis congenic hypertensive rats were administered either a vehicle (n = 14) or olmesartan (0.5mg/kg/day; n = 14) by osmotic minipumps. Two weeks later, rats from both groups were further randomized to receive either the mas receptor antagonist A-779 (0.5mg/kg/day; n = 7 per group) or its vehicle (n = 7 per group) for the next 4 weeks. Blood pressure was monitored by telemetry, and circulating and tissue components of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) were measured at the completion of the experiments. RESULTS Antihypertensive effects of olmesartan were associated with an increase in plasma renin concentration, plasma Ang I, Ang II, and Ang-(1–7), whereas serum aldosterone levels and kidney Ang II content were reduced. Preserved Ang-(1–7) content in kidneys was associated with increases of ACE2 protein but not activity and no changes on serum and kidney ACE activity. There was no change in cardiac peptide levels after olmesartan treatment. The antihypertensive effects of olmesartan were not altered by concomitant administration of the Ang-(1–7) receptor antagonist except for a mild further increase in plasma renin concentration. CONCLUSIONS Our study highlights the independent regulation of RAS among plasma, heart, and kidney tissue in response to AT1-R blockade. Ang-(1–7) through the mas receptor does not mediate long-term effects of olmesartan besides counterbalancing renin release in response to AT1-R blockade. PMID:23459599

  9. A regulatory code for neuron-specific odor receptor expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anandasankar Ray

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs must select-from a large repertoire-which odor receptors to express. In Drosophila, most ORNs express one of 60 Or genes, and most Or genes are expressed in a single ORN class in a process that produces a stereotyped receptor-to-neuron map. The construction of this map poses a problem of receptor gene regulation that is remarkable in its dimension and about which little is known. By using a phylogenetic approach and the genome sequences of 12 Drosophila species, we systematically identified regulatory elements that are evolutionarily conserved and specific for individual Or genes of the maxillary palp. Genetic analysis of these elements supports a model in which each receptor gene contains a zip code, consisting of elements that act positively to promote expression in a subset of ORN classes, and elements that restrict expression to a single ORN class. We identified a transcription factor, Scalloped, that mediates repression. Some elements are used in other chemosensory organs, and some are conserved upstream of axon-guidance genes. Surprisingly, the odor response spectra and organization of maxillary palp ORNs have been extremely well-conserved for tens of millions of years, even though the amino acid sequences of the receptors are not highly conserved. These results, taken together, define the logic by which individual ORNs in the maxillary palp select which odor receptors to express.

  10. Host factors that modify Plasmodium falciparum adhesion to endothelial receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamar, Almahamoudou; Attaher, Oumar; Swihart, Bruce; Barry, Amadou; Diarra, Bacary S; Kanoute, Moussa B; Cisse, Kadidia B; Dembele, Adama B; Keita, Sekouba; Gamain, Benoît; Gaoussou, Santara; Issiaka, Djibrilla; Dicko, Alassane; Duffy, Patrick E; Fried, Michal

    2017-10-24

    P. falciparum virulence is related to adhesion and sequestration of infected erythrocytes (IE) in deep vascular beds, but the endothelial receptors involved in severe malaria remain unclear. In the largest ever study of clinical isolates, we surveyed adhesion of freshly collected IE from children under 5 years of age in Mali to identify novel vascular receptors, and examined the effects of host age, hemoglobin type, blood group and severe malaria on levels of IE adhesion to a panel of endothelial receptors. Several novel molecules, including integrin α3β1, VE-cadherin, ICAM-2, junctional adhesion molecule-B (JAM-B), laminin, and cellular fibronectin, supported binding of IE from children. Severe malaria was not significantly associated with levels of IE adhesion to any of the 19 receptors. Hemoglobin AC, which reduces severe malaria risk, reduced IE binding to the receptors CD36 and integrin α5β1, while hemoglobin AS did not modify IE adhesion to any receptors. Blood groups A, AB and B significantly reduced IE binding to ICAM-1. Severe malaria risk varies with age, but age significantly impacted the level of IE binding to only a few receptors: IE binding to JAM-B decreased with age, while binding to CD36 and integrin α5β1 significantly increased with age.

  11. Solar Wind Protons at 1 AU: Trends and Bounds, Constraints and Correlations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hellinger, Petr; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 784, č. 1 (2014), L15/1-L15/5 ISSN 2041-8205 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/12/2023 Grant - others:EU(XE) SHOCK Project No. 284515 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : instabilities * plasmas * solar wind Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.339, year: 2014

  12. Standoff Detection of Explosives at 1 m using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Junjuri, R.; Myakalwar, A.K.; Gundawar, M.K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 6 (2017), s. 623-630 ISSN 0011-748X Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy * Multivariate analysis * Principal component analysis * Explosive detection Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation OBOR OECD: Electrical and electronic engineering Impact factor: 0.500, year: 2016

  13. Ion collisional transport coefficients in the solar wind at 1 au

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hellinger, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 825, č. 2 (2016), 120/1-120/5 ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-10057S Grant - others:European Commission(XE) 284515 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : solar wind Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.533, year: 2016

  14. QCD analysis of first b cross section data at 1.96 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciari, M.; Frixione, S.; Nason, P.; Ridolfi, G.; Mangano, M.L.

    2004-01-01

    The first data on bottom quark production in pp-bar collisions at 1.96 TeV have recently been obtained by the CDF collaboration. These data probe the region of p T ∼ 0, providing a new invaluable input on the issue of the compatibility between next-to-leading-order (NLO) QCD and data. We reconsider the evaluation of the b cross section, in view of recent theoretical developments, and of the latest inputs on structure function fits. We show that the new CDF measurements are in good agreement with NLO QCD. If CDF preliminary data are confirmed, a long-standing discrepancy between NLO QCD predictions and hadron-collider data can be settled. (author)

  15. QCD analysis of first b cross section data at 1.96 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Cacciari, M; Mangano, Michelangelo L; Nason, P; Ridolfi, G

    2004-01-01

    The first data on bottom quark production in p-pbar collisions at 1.96 TeV have recently been obtained by the CDF collaboration. These data probe the region of pt~0, providing a new invaluable input on the issue of the compatibility between next-to-leading-order (NLO) QCD and data. We reconsider the evaluation of the $b$ cross section, in view of recent theoretical developments, and of the latest inputs on structure function fits. We show that the new CDF measurements are in good agreement with NLO QCD. If CDF preliminary data are confirmed, a long-standing discrepancy between NLO QCD predictions and hadron-collider data can be settled.

  16. Gold nanorod saturable absorber for passive mode-locking at 1 μm wavelength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Z; Li, Q; Gao, X J; Jia, Z X; Qin, G S; Qin, W P; Zhang, L; Feng, Y

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanorods (GNRs) were used as a saturable absorber (SA) for passive mode-locking at 1 μm wavelength. The GNR-SA film was fabricated by mixing GNRs with sodium carboxymethylcellulose. The longitudinal surface plasmon resonance absorption of GNRs was used to induce mode-locking. By using the GNR-SA film, stable passive mode-locking at 1039 nm was experimentally demonstrated in an ytterbium-doped fiber laser cavity pumped by a 980 nm laser diode. The laser produced ∼440 ps pulses with a repetition rate of 36.6 MHz and an average output power of ∼1.25 mW for a pump power of ∼82 mW. (letter)

  17. Polarimetry at 1.3 mm using MILLIPOL - methods and preliminary results for Orion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barvainis, R.; Clemens, D.P.; Leach, R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a polarimeter for use at wavelengths near 1 mm, designed to be self-contained and portable. Only minor modifications should be required to adapt this instrument for use on any of several millimeter and submillimeter telescopes. The polarimeter system and data-taking techniques are described, and a preliminary measurement is reported of the polarized dust emission from the Orion KL region at 1.3 mm using the NRAO 12 m telescope. The results are similar to previous polarization measurements of Orion at far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. The magnetic field direction implied by the polarization position angle is parallel to that found in the surrounding Orion region using optical and near- to midinfrared polarimetric techniques. 17 references

  18. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background temperature at 1.47 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensadoun, M.; Bersanelli, M.; De Amici, G.; Kogut, A.; Levin, S. M.; Limon, M.; Smoot, G. F.; Witebsky, C.

    1993-01-01

    We have used a radio-frequency-gain total-power radiometer to measure the intensity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at a frequency of 1.47 GHz (20.4 cm wavelength) from White Mountain, California in 1988 September and from the South Pole in 1989 December. The CMB thermodynamic temperature, T(CMB), is 2.27 +/- 0.25 K (68 percent confidence limit) measured from White Mountain and 2.26 +/- 0.20 K from the South Pole site. The combined result is 2.26 +/- 0.19 K. The correction for Galactic emission has been derived from scaled low-frequency maps and constitutes the main source of error. The atmospheric signal is extrapolated from our zenith scan measurements at higher frequencies. These results are consistent with our previous measurement at 1.41 GHz and about 2.5 sigma from the 2.74 +/- 0.01 K global average CMB temperature.

  19. Three-dimensional structure of the enzyme dimanganese catalase from thermus thermophilus at 1 A resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonyuk, S.V.; Melik-Adamyan, V.R.; Popov, A.N.; Lamzin, V.S.; Hempstead, P.D.; Harrison, P.M.; Artymyuk, P.J.; Barynin, V.V.

    2000-01-01

    The crystal structures of two forms of the enzyme dimanganese catalase from Thermus Thermophilus (native and inhibited by chloride) were studied by X-ray diffraction analysis at 1.05 and 0.98 A resolution, respectively. The atomic models of the molecules were refined to the R factors 9.8 and 10%, respectively. The three-dimensional molecular structures are characterized in detail. The analysis of electron-density distributions in the active centers of the native and inhibited enzyme forms revealed that the most flexible side chains of the amino acid residues Lys162 and Glu36 exist in two interrelated conformations. This allowed us to obtain the structural data necessary for understanding the mechanism of enzymatic activity of the dimanganese catalase

  20. Centrality determination in Au-Au collisions at 1.23 AGeV with HADES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuschke, Maximilian [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: HADES-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    An important characterization of events in heavy-ion physics is the centrality. It classifies events by considering the collision's cross section relative to the total cross section of the system. This characteristics is needed for many analyses, as it provides indirect information about the initial geometrical reaction properties. As the production rate of particles is a function of the deposited energy, which itself depends on the centrality, quantities based on measured multiplicities allow to draw conclusions about the centrality of a collision. Estimators used to determine the centrality for Au-Au collisions at 1.23 AGeV recorded with HADES include the charged particle multiplicity and hit multiplicities measured with various detectors, such as the TOF/RPC or forward wall. Calibration methods accounting for variations in the acceptance of the detectors are introduced and verified by comparison with the theoretical expectations, as obtained by calculations with the Glauber-Model.

  1. Study of the pp-> np+ reaction at 1.25 GeV with HADES

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, T; Agakishiev, G; Agodi, C; Balanda, A; Bellia, G; Belver, D; Belyaev, A; Blanco, A; Böhmer, M; Boyard, J L; Braun-Munzinger, P; Cabanelas, P; Castro, E; Christ, T; Destefanis, M; Díaz, J; Dohrmann, F; Dybczak, A; Fabbietti, L; Fateev, O; Finocchiaro, P; Fonte, P; Friese, J; Fröhlich, I; Galatyuk, T; Garzón, J A; Gernhäuser, R; Gil, A; Gilardi, C; Golubeva, M; González-Díaz, D; Grosse, E; Guber, F; Heilmann, M; Hennino, T; Holzmann, R; Ierusalimov, A; Iori, I; Ivashkin, A; Jurkovic, M; Kämpfer, B; Kanaki, K; Karavicheva, T; Kirschner, D; Koenig, I; Koenig, W; Kolb, B W; Kotte, R; Kozuch, A; Krása, A; Krížek, F; Krücken, R; Kühn, W; Kugler, A; Kurepin, A; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lang, S; Lange, J S; Lapidus, K; Lopes, L; Lorenz, M; Maier, L; Mangiarotti, A; Marín, J; Markert, J; Metag, V; Michalska, B; Michel, J; Mishra, D; Moriničre, E; Mousa, J; Müntz, C; Naumann, L; Novotny, R; Otwinowski, J; Pachmayer, Y C; Palka, M; Parpottas, Y; Pechenov, V; Pechenova, O; Pérez Cavalcanti, T; Pietraszko, J; Przygoda, W; Ramstein, B; Reshetin, A; Rustamov, A; Sadovsky, A; Salabura, P; Schmah, A; Simon, R; Sobolev, Yu G; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Ströbele, H; Stroth, J; Sturm, C; Sudol, M; Tarantola, A; Teilab, K; Tlustý, P; Traxler, M; Trebacz, R; Tsertos, H; Veretenkin, I; Wagner, V; Weber, M; Wisniowski, M; Wüstenfeld, J; Yurevich, S; Zanevsky, Y V; Zhou, P; Zumbruch, P

    2010-01-01

    In pp collisions at 1.25 GeV kinetic energy, the HADES collaboration aimed at investigating the di-electron production related to (1232) Dalitz decay ( + ! pe+e−). In order to constrain the models predicting the cross section and the production mechanisms of resonance, the hadronic channels have been measured and studied in parallel to the leptonic channels. The analyses of pp ! np + and pp ! pp 0 channels and the comparison to simulations are presented in this contribution, in particular the angular distributions being sensitive to production and decay. The accurate acceptance corrections have been performed as well, which could be tested in all the phase space region thanks to the high statistic data. These analyses result in an overall agreement with the one- exchange model and previous data.

  2. Correlation of Magnetic Fields with Solar Wind Plasma Parameters at 1AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, F.

    2017-12-01

    The physical parameters of the solar wind observed in-situ near 1AU have been studied for several decades, and relationships between them, such as the positive correlation between the solar wind plasma temperature T and velocity V, and the negative correlation between density N and velocity V, are well known. However, the magnetic field intensity does not appear to be well correlated with any individual plasma parameter. In this paper, we discuss previously under-reported correlations between B and the combined plasma parameters √NV2 as well as between B and √NT. These two correlations are strong during the periods of corotating interaction regions and high speed streams, moderate during intervals of slow solar wind, and rather poor during the passage of interplanetary coronal mass ejections. The results indicate that the magnetic pressure in the solar wind is well correlated both with the plasma dynamic pressure and the thermal pressure. Then, we employ a 3D MHD model to simulate the formation of the relationships between the magnetic strength B and √NV2 as well as √NT observed at 1AU. The inner boundary condition is derived by empirical models, with the magnetic field and density are optional. Five kinds of boundary conditions at the inner boundary of heliosphere are tested. In the cases that the magnetic field is related to speed at the inner boundary, the correlation coefficients between B and √NV2 as well as between B and √NT are even higher than that in the observational results. At 1AU the simulated radial magnetic field shows little latitude dependence, which matches the observation of Ulysses. Most of the modeled characters in these cases are closer to observation than others. This inner boundary condition may more accurately characterize Sun's magnetic influence on the heliosphere. The new input may be able to improve the simulation of CME propagation in the inner heliosphere and the space weather forecasting.

  3. Quantification of dextrose in model solution by 1H MR spectroscopy at 1.5T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu; Kim, Hyung Jin; Suh, Chang Hae; Kim, Yong Seong; Lee, Jung Hee

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) using a 1.5T magnetic resonance (MR) imager for quantification of the contents of model solutions. We prepared model solutions of dextrose +water and dextrose +water + ethanol at dextrose concentrations of 0.01% to 50% and 0.01% to 20%, respectively. Using these solutions and a 1.5T MR imager together with a high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscope, we calculated the ratios of dextrose to water peak, (dextrose +ethanol) to water peak, and (dextrose + ethanol) to ethanol peak, as seen on MR and NMR spectra, analysing the relationships between dextrose concentration and the ratios of peaks, and between the ratios of the peaks seen on MR spectra and those seen on NMR spectra. Changes in the ratios between dextrose concentration and dextrose to water peak, (dextrose + ethanol) to water peak and (dextrose + ethanol) to ethanol peak, as seen on MR spectra, were statistically significant, and there was good linear regression. There was also close correlation between the ratios of the observed on MR and NMR spectra. The results depict the quantification of dextrose concentration according to the ratios of spectral peaks obtained by proton MRS at 1.5T. Using proton MRS at 1.5T, and on the basis of the ratios of spectcal peaks, it was possible to quantify the concentration of dextrose in model solutions of dextrose + water and dextrose + water+ ethanol. The results of this study suggest that for quantifying the contents of biofluids, the use of low-tesla 1 H-MRS is feasible

  4. Particle acceleration at quasi-perpendicular shock waves: Theory and observations at 1 AU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.; Hu, Q.

    2014-01-01

    The injection of particles into the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism at highly perpendicular (where θ Bn > 70°) interplanetary shocks is investigated. This extends the previous study of Neergaard Parker and Zank which focused on the injection problem at quasi-parallel interplanetary shocks. We use observations at 1 AU to construct upstream Maxwellian and κ-distributions that are then diffusively accelerated by the shock, thus yielding the downstream accelerated particle distribution. We compare the theoretical accelerated particle distribution to observations at 1 AU using Advanced Composition Explorer data. We classify our results for quasi-perpendicular shocks into three subcategories: those with ratios of the theoretical spectral index to observed power law of >1, ∼ 1, and <1, and compare the magnetic power spectral density plots of these categories. We find that in general the assumed upstream particle distribution that best fits the energetic particle observations is best represented by a κ-distribution, with κ = 4. The magnetic field fluctuations were representative of quasi-perpendicular shocks and showed no particular bias toward our spectral ratio subcategories. The subcategory with spectral ratio <0.9 yielded the largest injection energies for all groups. In all but two of the cases in this study, there were enough particles in the solar wind thermal core to account for the accelerated distribution, thereby giving a lower limit to the required injection energy needed to diffusively accelerate particles at a quasi-perpendicular interplanetary shock. In the remaining two cases, an additional population of particles was required to match the appropriate amplitude of the spectral index. For these cases, we used a low energy (1-50 keV) v –5 spectrum advocated by Fisk and Gloeckler.

  5. New Dielectric Measurement Data to Determine the Permittivity of Seawater at 1.4313 Hz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, R.; Zhou, Y.; Utku, C.; Levine, D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the new measurements - made in 2010-2011 - of the dielectric constant of seawater at 1.413 GHz using a resonant cavity technique. The purpose of these measurements is to develop an accurate relationship concerning the dependence of the dielectric constant of seawater on temperature and salinity for use by the Aquarius inversion algorithm. Aquarius is a NASA/CONAE satellite mission launched in June of 2011 with the primary mission of measuring global sea surface salinity with a 1.413 GHz radiometer to an accuracy of 0.2 psu. A brass microwave cavity resonant at 1.413 GHz has been used to measure the dielectric constant of seawater. The seawater is introduced into the cavity through a capillary glass tube having an inner diameter of 0.1 mm. The change of resonant frequency and the cavity Q value are used to determine the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant of seawater. Measurements are automated with Visual Basic software developed at the George Washington University. In this paper, new results from measurements made since September 2010 will be presented for salinities of 30, 35 and 38 psu with a temperature range of 0 C to 35 C in intervals of 5 C. These measurements are more accurate than earlier measurements made in 2008. The new results will be compared to the Klein-Swift (KS) and Meissner-Wentz (MW) model functions. The importance of an accurate model function will be illustrated by using these model functions to invert the Aquarius brightness temperature to retrieve the salinity values. The salinity values will be compared to co-located in situ data collected by Argo buoys.

  6. Phrenic motor neuron adenosine 2A receptors elicit phrenic motor facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seven, Yasin B; Perim, Raphael R; Hobson, Orinda R; Simon, Alec K; Tadjalli, Arash; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2018-04-15

    Although adenosine 2A (A 2A ) receptor activation triggers specific cell signalling cascades, the ensuing physiological outcomes depend on the specific cell type expressing these receptors. Cervical spinal adenosine 2A (A 2A ) receptor activation elicits a prolonged facilitation in phrenic nerve activity, which was nearly abolished following intrapleural A 2A receptor siRNA injections. A 2A receptor siRNA injections selectively knocked down A 2A receptors in cholera toxin B-subunit-identified phrenic motor neurons, sparing cervical non-phrenic motor neurons. Collectively, our results support the hypothesis that phrenic motor neurons express the A 2A receptors relevant to A 2A receptor-induced phrenic motor facilitation. Upregulation of A 2A receptor expression in the phrenic motor neurons per se may potentially be a useful approach to increase phrenic motor neuron excitability in conditions such as spinal cord injury. Cervical spinal adenosine 2A (A 2A ) receptor activation elicits a prolonged increase in phrenic nerve activity, an effect known as phrenic motor facilitation (pMF). The specific cervical spinal cells expressing the relevant A 2A receptors for pMF are unknown. This is an important question since the physiological outcome of A 2A receptor activation is highly cell type specific. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that the relevant A 2A receptors for pMF are expressed in phrenic motor neurons per se versus non-phrenic neurons of the cervical spinal cord. A 2A receptor immunostaining significantly colocalized with NeuN-positive neurons (89 ± 2%). Intrapleural siRNA injections were used to selectively knock down A 2A receptors in cholera toxin B-subunit-labelled phrenic motor neurons. A 2A receptor knock-down was verified by a ∼45% decrease in A 2A receptor immunoreactivity within phrenic motor neurons versus non-targeting siRNAs (siNT; P phrenic motor neurons. In rats that were anaesthetized, subjected to neuromuscular blockade and ventilated, p

  7. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Dong Yin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C, has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor.

  8. In vitro binding and receptor-mediated activity of terlipressin at vasopressin receptors V1 and V2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Khurram; Pappas, Stephen Chris; Devarakonda, Krishna R

    2018-01-01

    Terlipressin, a synthetic, systemic vasoconstrictor with selective activity at vasopressin-1 (V 1 ) receptors, is a pro-drug for the endogenous/natural porcine hormone [Lys 8 ]-vasopressin (LVP). We investigated binding and receptor-mediated cellular activities of terlipressin, LVP, and endogenous human hormone [Arg 8 ]-vasopressin (AVP) at V 1 and vasopressin-2 (V 2 ) receptors. Cell membrane homogenates of Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing human V 1 and V 2 receptors were used in competitive binding assays to measure receptor-binding activity. These cells were used in functional assays to measure receptor-mediated cellular activity of terlipressin, LVP, and AVP. Binding was measured by [ 3 H]AVP counts, and the activity was measured by fluorometric detection of intracellular calcium mobilization (V 1 ) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (V 2 ). Binding potency at V 1 and V 2 was AVP>LVP>terlipressin. LVP and terlipressin had approximately sixfold higher affinity for V 1 than for V 2 . Cellular activity potency was also AVP>LVP>terlipressin. Terlipressin was a partial agonist at V 1 and a full agonist at V 2 ; LVP was a full agonist at both V 1 and V 2 . The in vivo response to terlipressin is likely due to the partial V 1 agonist activity of terlipressin and full V 1 agonist activity of its metabolite, LVP. These results provide supportive evidence for previous findings and further establish terlipressin pharmacology for vasopressin receptors.

  9. Support facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, F.S.; Blomquist, J.A.; Fox, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    Computer support is centered on the Remote Access Data Station (RADS), which is equipped with a 1000 lpm printer, 1000 cpm reader, and a 300 cps paper tape reader with 500-foot spools. The RADS is located in a data preparation room with four 029 key punches (two of which interpret), a storage vault for archival magnetic tapes, card files, and a 30 cps interactive terminal principally used for job inquiry and routing. An adjacent room provides work space for users, with a documentation library and a consultant's office, plus file storage for programs and their documentations. The facility has approximately 2,600 square feet of working laboratory space, and includes two fully equipped photographic darkrooms, sectioning and autoradiographic facilities, six microscope cubicles, and five transmission electron microscopes and one Cambridge scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray energy dispersive analytical system. Ancillary specimen preparative equipment includes vacuum evaporators, freeze-drying and freeze-etching equipment, ultramicrotomes, and assorted photographic and light microscopic equipment. The extensive physical plant of the animal facilities includes provisions for holding all species of laboratory animals under controlled conditions of temperature, humidity, and lighting. More than forty rooms are available for studies of the smaller species. These have a potential capacity of more than 75,000 mice, or smaller numbers of larger species and those requiring special housing arrangements. There are also six dog kennels to accommodate approximately 750 dogs housed in runs that consist of heated indoor compartments and outdoor exercise areas

  10. Dynamics of nanoparticules detected at 1 AU by S/WAVES onboard STEREO spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belheouane, Soraya; Issautier, Karine; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Le Chat, Gaétan; Czechowski, Andrzej; Zaslavsky, Arnaud; Zouganelis, Yannis; Mann, Ingrid

    In order to interpret in detail the S/WAVES data on the interplanetary nanodust discovered by STEREO at 1 AU [Meyer-Vernet et al., 2009], we study the dynamics of nanoparticles in the inner interplanetary medium as well as the distribution of their velocities and directions of arrival, with a model based on [Czechowski and Mann, 2012]. We deduce the charges released by their impacts on the STEREO spacecraft at 1 AU and their dependence on the position of the spacecraft on their orbits. The model studies nanoparticles of size equal or smaller than about 70 nm, assumed to be created via collisional fragmentation of dust grains of larger size moving on keplerian orbits, and sublimation of dust, meteoroids and comets. The nanoparticles are released near the Sun with initial velocities close to keplerian, and mainly subjected to the Lorentz force calculated with a simple solar wind model. A part of the nanoparticles is accelerated to high speeds of the order of 300 km/s, thereby providing impact charges between 10(-14) and 10(-11) Cb [Belheouane, 2014] which enable them to be detected by S/WAVES, whereas another part is trapped within about 0.2 AU from the Sun. We discuss how the fluxes and direction of arrival at 1 AU are expected to change in function of the solar cycle. These results enable us to interpret in detail the STEREO/WAVES observations [Zaslavsky et al., 2012]; [Pantellini et al., 2013]; [Le Chat et al., 2013]. Belheouane, S. (2014). Nanoparticules dans le vent solaire, observations spatiales et theorie. PhD thesis, Pierre and Marie Curie University UPMC. Czechowski, A. and Mann, I. (2012). Nanodust Dynamics in Interplanetary Space, chapter Nanodust Dynamics in Interplanetary Space. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. Le Chat, G., Zaslavsky, A., Meyer-Vernet, N., Issautier, K., Belheouane, S., Pantellini, F., Maksimovic, M., Zouganelis, I., Bale, S., and Kasper, J. (2013). Interplanetary Nanodust Detection by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory/WAVES Low

  11. Differences in both glycosylation and binding properties between rat and mouse liver prolactin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascols, O; Cherqui, G; Munier, A; Picard, J; Capeau, J

    1994-05-01

    To investigate whether glycanic chains of prolactin receptors (PRL-R) play a role in hormone binding activity, comparison was made of rat and mouse liver solubilized receptors with respect to both their affinity for the hormone and their glycosylation properties. As compared with rat receptors, mouse receptors exhibited a 2-fold higher affinity for human growth hormone (hGH), the hormone being bound by both tissues with a lactogenic specificity. Along with this increased affinity, mouse receptors had a 2 lower M(r) relative to rat receptors (62 kDa versus 64 kDa as measured on hGH cross-linked receptors). These differences could be ascribed to different glycosylation properties of the receptors from the two species, as supported by the followings. 1) After treatment with endoglycosidase F (endo F), rat and mouse PRL-R no longer exhibited any difference in their M(r) (54 kDa for both cross-linked receptors). 2) Neuraminidase treatment increased by 37% the binding of hGH to mouse receptors, but was ineffective on the hormone-binding to rat receptors. Conversely, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), another sialic acid specific probe, decreased hGH binding to rat receptors by 25%, but had no effect on this process for mouse ones. 3) Marked differences were observed in the recoveries of rat and mouse hormone-receptor (HR) complexes from ricin-1- (RCA1-), concanavalin A- (ConA-) and WGA-immobilized lectins. These differences were reduced (RCA1 and ConA) or abolished (WGA) after rat and mouse receptor desialylation by neuraminidase, a treatment which decreased the M(r) of both receptors by 2 kDa. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the PRL-R from rat and mouse liver contain biantennary N-linked oligosaccharidic chains with distinct type of sialylation, which may account for their differential hormone-binding affinities.

  12. Functional Analyses of Bitter Taste Receptors in Domestic Cats (Felis catus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Lei

    Full Text Available Cats are obligate carnivores and under most circumstances eat only animal products. Owing to the pseudogenization of one of two subunits of the sweet receptor gene, they are indifferent to sweeteners, presumably having no need to detect plant-based sugars in their diet. Following this reasoning and a recent report of a positive correlation between the proportion of dietary plants and the number of Tas2r (bitter receptor genes in vertebrate species, we tested the hypothesis that if bitter perception exists primarily to protect animals from poisonous plant compounds, the genome of the domestic cat (Felis catus should have lost functional bitter receptors and they should also have reduced bitter receptor function. To test functionality of cat bitter receptors, we expressed cat Tas2R receptors in cell-based assays. We found that they have at least 7 functional receptors with distinct receptive ranges, showing many similarities, along with some differences, with human bitter receptors. To provide a comparative perspective, we compared the cat repertoire of intact receptors with those of a restricted number of members of the order Carnivora, with a range of dietary habits as reported in the literature. The numbers of functional bitter receptors in the terrestrial Carnivora we examined, including omnivorous and herbivorous species, were roughly comparable to that of cats thereby providing no strong support for the hypothesis that a strict meat diet influences bitter receptor number or function. Maintenance of bitter receptor function in terrestrial obligate carnivores may be due to the presence of bitter compounds in vertebrate and invertebrate prey, to the necessary role these receptors play in non-oral perception, or to other unknown factors. We also found that the two aquatic Carnivora species examined had fewer intact bitter receptors. Further comparative studies of factors driving numbers and functions of bitter taste receptors will aid in

  13. Functional Analyses of Bitter Taste Receptors in Domestic Cats (Felis catus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Weiwei; Ravoninjohary, Aurore; Li, Xia; Margolskee, Robert F; Reed, Danielle R; Beauchamp, Gary K; Jiang, Peihua

    2015-01-01

    Cats are obligate carnivores and under most circumstances eat only animal products. Owing to the pseudogenization of one of two subunits of the sweet receptor gene, they are indifferent to sweeteners, presumably having no need to detect plant-based sugars in their diet. Following this reasoning and a recent report of a positive correlation between the proportion of dietary plants and the number of Tas2r (bitter receptor) genes in vertebrate species, we tested the hypothesis that if bitter perception exists primarily to protect animals from poisonous plant compounds, the genome of the domestic cat (Felis catus) should have lost functional bitter receptors and they should also have reduced bitter receptor function. To test functionality of cat bitter receptors, we expressed cat Tas2R receptors in cell-based assays. We found that they have at least 7 functional receptors with distinct receptive ranges, showing many similarities, along with some differences, with human bitter receptors. To provide a comparative perspective, we compared the cat repertoire of intact receptors with those of a restricted number of members of the order Carnivora, with a range of dietary habits as reported in the literature. The numbers of functional bitter receptors in the terrestrial Carnivora we examined, including omnivorous and herbivorous species, were roughly comparable to that of cats thereby providing no strong support for the hypothesis that a strict meat diet influences bitter receptor number or function. Maintenance of bitter receptor function in terrestrial obligate carnivores may be due to the presence of bitter compounds in vertebrate and invertebrate prey, to the necessary role these receptors play in non-oral perception, or to other unknown factors. We also found that the two aquatic Carnivora species examined had fewer intact bitter receptors. Further comparative studies of factors driving numbers and functions of bitter taste receptors will aid in understanding the forces

  14. Evidence for Alpha Receptors in the Human Ureter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeb, Ralph; Knopf, Joy; Golijanin, Dragan; Bourne, Patricia; Erturk, Erdal

    2007-04-01

    immunohistochemistry and molecular techniques. These findings may lend support to the preliminary studies of the effectiveness of alpha-receptor blockade on ureteral colic and stone passage.

  15. The world at 1.5°C: Understanding its regional dimensions and driving processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, S. I.; Wartenburger, R.; Vogel, M.; Hirsch, A.; Guillod, B.; Donat, M.; Pitman, A. J.; Davin, E.; Greve, P.; Hirschi, M.

    2017-12-01

    This presentation reviews the available evidence regarding projected regional changes in climate extremes at 1.5°C vs higher levels of warming based on recent analyses (Seneviratne et al. 2016; Wartenburger et al., submitted; Greve et al., submitted). In several regions, significant differences in the occurrence of climate extremes can be identified already for half a degree of warming when assessing changes at 1.5°C vs 2°C global warming. An important feature is the much stronger warming of hot extremes in several continental regions compared to the global mean warming, which implies that temperature extremes can warm regionally by much more than 1.5°C, even if global temperature warming is stabilized at this level (e.g. up to 6°C for certain models in the Arctic). This feature is due to a combination of feedbacks and internal climate variability. We highlight in particular the importance of land-climate feedbacks for projected changes in hot extremes in mid-latitude regions (Vogel et al. 2017). Because of the strong effects of land processes on regional changes in temperature extremes, changes in land surface properties, including land use changes, are found to be particularly important for projections in low-emissions scenarios (Hirsch et al. 2017; Guillod et al., submitted). References: Greve, P., et al.: Regional scaling of annual mean precipitation and water availability with global temperature change. Submitted. Guillod, B.P., et al.: Land use in low climate warming targets critical for hot extreme projections. Submitted. Hirsch, A.L., et al., 2017: Can climate-effective land management reduce regional warming? J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 122, 2269-2288, doi:10.1002/2016JD026125. Seneviratne, S.I., et al., 2016: Allowable CO2 emissions based on regional and impact-related climate targets. Nature, 529, 477-483, doi:10.1038/nature16542. Vogel, M.M., et al., 2017: Regional amplification of projected changes in extreme temperatures strongly controlled by soil

  16. Increased Accuracy in the Measurement of the Dielectric Constant of Seawater at 1.413 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.; Lang R.; Drego, C.; Utku, C.; LeVine, D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the latest results for the measurements of the dielectric constant at 1.413 GHz by using a resonant cavity technique. The purpose of these measurements is to develop an accurate relationship for the dependence of the dielectric constant of sea water on temperature and salinity which is needed by the Aquarius inversion algorithm to retrieve salinity. Aquarius is the major instrument on the Aquarius/SAC-D observatory, a NASA/CONAE satellite mission launched in June of20ll with the primary mission of measuring global sea surface salinity to an accuracy of 0.2 psu. Aquarius measures salinity with a 1.413 GHz radiometer and uses a scatterometer to compensate for the effects of surface roughness. The core part of the seawater dielectric constant measurement system is a brass microwave cavity that is resonant at 1.413 GHz. The seawater is introduced into the cavity through a capillary glass tube having an inner diameter of 0.1 mm. The change of resonance frequency and the cavity Q value are used to determine the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant of seawater introduced into the thin tube. Measurements are automated with the help of software developed at the George Washington University. In this talk, new results from measurements made since September 2010 will be presented for salinities 30, 35 and 38 psu with a temperature range of O C to 350 C in intervals of 5 C. These measurements are more accurate than earlier measurements made in 2008 because of a new method for measuring the calibration constant using methanol. In addition, the variance of repeated seawater measurements has been reduced by letting the system stabilize overnight between temperature changes. The new results are compared to the Kline Swift and Meissner Wentz model functions. The importance of an accurate model function will be illustrated by using these model functions to invert the Aquarius brightness temperature to get the salinity values. The salinity values

  17. Flavivirus Entry Receptors: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Perera-Lecoin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses enter host cells by endocytosis initiated when the virus particles interact with cell surface receptors. The current model suggests that flaviviruses use at least two different sets of molecules for infectious entry: attachment factors that concentrate and/or recruit viruses on the cell surface and primary receptor(s that bind to virions and direct them to the endocytic pathway. Here, we present the currently available knowledge regarding the flavivirus receptors described so far with specific attention to C-type lectin receptors and the phosphatidylserine receptors, T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM and TYRO3, AXL and MER (TAM. Their role in flavivirus attachment and entry as well as their implication in the virus biology will be discussed in depth.

  18. Lack of adenosine A(3) receptors causes defects in mouse peripheral blood parameters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Dušek, L.; Hoferová, Zuzana; Komůrková, Denisa

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 3 (2014), s. 509-514 ISSN 1573-9538 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0128 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Adenosine A(3) receptor * Adenosine A(3) receptor knockout mice * Hematopoiesis Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.886, year: 2014

  19. Neurotrophin receptor immunoreactivity in the hippocampus of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozbas-Gerceker, F.; Gorter, J.A.; Redeker, S.; Ramkema, M.; van der Valk, P.; Baayen, J.C.; Ozguc, M.; Saygi, S.; Soylemezoglu, F.; Akalin, N.; Troost, D.; Aronica, E.

    2004-01-01

    Recent evidence supports a critical role of neurotrophins in the regulation of both neuronal survival and synaptic transmission during epileptogenesis. We have examined the immunohistochemical expression of high- (tyrosine kinase receptors, trk) and low-affinity (p75) neurotrophin receptors (NTRs)

  20. Altered expression patterns of group I and II metabotropic glutamate receptors in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, J. J. G.; Wolswijk, G.; Bö, L.; van der Valk, P.; Polman, C. H.; Troost, D.; Aronica, E.

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence supports a role for glutamate receptors in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis. In the present study, we have focused specifically on the expression of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in multiple sclerosis brain tissue. The expression of group I (mGluR1alpha and

  1. Local angiotensin II promotes adipogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells through type 2 angiotensin receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Y. Sysoeva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is often associated with high systemic and local activity of renin-angiotensin system (RAS. Mesenchymal stem cells of adipose tissue are the main source of adipocytes. The aim of this study was to clarify how local RAS could control adipose differentiation of human adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs. We examined the distribution of angiotensin receptor expressing cells in human adipose tissue and found that type 1 and type 2 receptors are co-expressed in its stromal compartment, which is known to contain mesenchymal stem cells. To study the expression of receptors specifically in ADSCs we have isolated them from adipose tissue. Up to 99% of cultured ADSCs expressed angiotensin II (AngII receptor type 1 (AT1. Using the analysis of Ca2+ mobilization in single cells we found that only 5.2 ± 2.7% of ADSCs specifically respond to serial Ang II applications via AT1 receptor and expressed this receptor constantly. This AT1const ADSCs subpopulation exhibited increased adipose competency, which was triggered by endogenous AngII. Inhibitory and expression analyses showed that AT1const ADSCs highly co-express AngII type 2 receptor (AT2, which was responsible for increased adipose competency of this ADSC subpopulation.

  2. X-ray structure of imidazolonepropionase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens at 1.87 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, Rajiv; Kumaran, Desigan; Burley, Stephen K.; Swaminathan, Subramanyam (SGX); (BNL)

    2010-01-12

    Histidine degradation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens involves four enzymes, including histidase (EC 4.3.1.3), urocanase (EC 4.2.1.49), imidazolonepropionase (EC 3.5.2.7), and N-formylglutamate amidohydrolase (EC 3.5.3.8). The third enzyme of the pathway, imidazolone-propionase, a 45.6 kDa protein, catalyzes conversion of imidazolone-5-propanoate to N-forminio-L-glutamate. Initial studies of the role of imidazolonepropionase in histidine degradation were published in 1953. Subsequent publications have been limited to enzyme kinetics, crystallization, and a recently reported structure determination. The imidazolonepropionases are members of metallodepenent-hydrolases (or amidohydroase) superfamily, which includs ureases, adenosine deaminases, phosphotriesterases, dihydroorotases, allantoinases, hydantoinases, adenine and cytosine deaminases, imidazolonepropionases, aryldial-kylphosphatases, chlorohydrolases, and formylmethanofuran dehydroases. Proteins belonging to this large group share a common three-dimensional structural motif (an eightfold {alpha}/{beta} or TIM barrel) with similar active sites. Most superfamily members also share a conserved metal binding site, involving four histidine residues and one aspartic acid. Imidazolonepropionase is one of the targets selected for X-ray crystallpgrahpic structure determination by the New York Structural GenomiX Research Consortium (NYSGXRC) Target ID: 9252b to correlate the structure function relationship of poorly studied by important enzyme. Here they report the crystal structure of imidazolonepropionase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens determined at 1.87 {angstrom} resolution.

  3. Compact self-Q-switched Tm:YLF laser at 1.91 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B.; Li, L.; He, C. J.; Tian, F. J.; Yang, X. T.; Cui, J. H.; Zhang, J. Z.; Sun, W. M.

    2018-03-01

    We report self-Q-switching operation in a diode-pumped Tm:YLF bulk laser by exploiting saturable re-absorption under the quasi-three-level regime. Robust self-Q-switched pulse output at 1.91 μm in fundamental mode is demonstrated experimentally with 1.5 at.% doped Tm:YLF crystal. At maximum absorbed pump power of 4.5 W, the average output power and pulse energy are obtained as high as 610 mW and 29 μJ, respectively, with the corresponding slope efficiency of 22%. Pulse repetition rate is tunable in the range of 3-21 kHz with changing the pump power. The dynamics of self-Q-switching of Tm:YLF laser are discussed with the help of a rate equation model showing good agreement with the experiment. The compact self-Q-switched laser near 2 μm has potential application in laser radar systems for accurate wind velocity measurements.

  4. Dilepton reconstruction in Au+Au collisions at 1.23 AGeV with HADES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellheim, Patrick [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: HADES-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    In continuation of a systematic investigation of the emissivity of strongly interacting matter, HADES has recently measured the di-electron emission in Au+Au collisions at 1.23 AGeV beam energy. Due to the high track density reached for this collision system, different reconstruction strategies have been pursued to achieve optimal reconstruction efficiencies and purities. Electron (positron) candidates have been identified by means of an multi-variate analysis, where the neural network has been trained alternatively based on clean signal and background tracks from data and by simulated tracks. Moreover, the electron track candidates have been matched to rings using ring parameters of found rings or, alternatively, track candidates identified by time-of-flight only have been matched to ring signatures without running the ring finder before. This contribution presents the results of these analysis procedures and will discuss systematic uncertainties obtained. The statistics is sufficient to investigate double-differential distributions, like centrality dependence covering 45% most central events or transverse momentum distributions for different regions in invariant mass. Special emphasis will be given to the extraction of the radiation from the dense phase of the collision.

  5. Femtosecond Mode-locked Fiber Laser at 1 μm Via Optical Microfiber Dispersion Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lizhen; Xu, Peizhen; Li, Yuhang; Han, Jize; Guo, Xin; Cui, Yudong; Liu, Xueming; Tong, Limin

    2018-03-16

    Mode-locked Yb-doped fiber lasers around 1 μm are attractive for high power applications and low noise pulse train generation. Mode-locked fiber lasers working in soliton and stretched-pulse regime outperform others in terms of the laser noise characteristics, mechanical stability and easy maintenance. However, conventional optical fibers always show a normal group velocity dispersion around 1 μm, leading to the inconvenience for necessary dispersion management. Here we show that optical microfibers having a large anomalous dispersion around 1 μm can be integrated into mode-locked Yb-doped fiber lasers with ultralow insertion loss down to -0.06 dB, enabling convenient dispersion management of the laser cavity. Besides, optical microfibers could also be adopted to spectrally broaden and to dechirp the ultrashort pulses outside the laser cavity, giving rise to a pulse duration of about 110 fs. We believe that this demonstration may facilitate all-fiber format high-performance ultrashort pulse generation at 1 μm and may find applications in precision measurements, large-scale facility synchronization and evanescent-field-based optical sensing.

  6. Unveiling the Galaxy Population at 1.3 < z < 4: the HUDF05 NICMOS Parallel Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Sara M.; deMello, Duilia F.; Wiklind, Tomy; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Mountain, Matt

    2010-01-01

    Using the Hubble Ultra Deep Field Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (HUDF-NICMOS) UDF05 parallel fields, we cross-matched 301 out of 630 galaxies with the ACS filters V606 and z850, NICMOS filters J110 and H160, and Spitzer IRAC filters at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 , and 8.0 (mu)m. We modeled the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to estimate: photometric redshifts, dust extinction, stellar mass, bolometric luminosity, starburst age and metallicity. To validate the photometric redshifts, comparisons with 16 spectroscopic redshifts give 75% within Delta or approx. 1.3. Based on the robustness of the photometric redshifts, we analyze a subsample of the 301 galaxies at 1.3 < or = z < or = 2 (35 objects) and 3 < or = z < or = 4 (31 objects) and determine that L(BoI) and the star formation rate increase significantly from z approx. 1.5 to 4. The Balmer decrement is indicative of more evolved galaxies, and at high redshifts, they serve as records of some of the first galaxies. Therefore, the galaxies in this sample are great candidates for future surveys with the James Webb Space Telescope and Atacama Large Millimeter Array.

  7. Evaluation of cumulative effects of MR imaging on pacemaker systems at 1.5 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naehle, Claas P; Zeijlemaker, Volkert; Thomas, Daniel; Meyer, Carsten; Strach, Katharina; Fimmers, Rolf; Schild, Hans; Sommer, Torsten

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate possible cumulative effects of repeated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations on pacemaker systems in patients with cardiac pacemakers. The records of pacemaker patients who underwent repetitive MRI examinations in our institution were reviewed to identify patients who underwent two or more MRI examinations at 1.5T of any anatomical region. Using these criteria, a total of 47 patients who underwent a total 171 MRI examinations were identified and included in this study. Institutional Review Board approval for all pacemaker investigations was obtained. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Pacemakers were interrogated immediately before and after MR imaging, and after 3 months, including measurement of pacing capture threshold (PCT), lead impedance (LI), and battery voltage (BV). PCT, LI, and BV were analyzed for changes dependant on the number of MRI exams performed. Mean changes over time and changes between first and last pacemaker interrogation of PCT, LI, and BV were calculated. A statistically significant (P < 0.05), but clinically irrelevant trend for decrease in PCT and BV was found. No significant or clinically relevant changes in LI were observed. In this first study, no clinically relevant, cumulative changes in PCT, LI, or BV could be detected in PM patients who underwent two or more MRI examinations. However, a careful benefit/risk evaluation, among other MRI- and pacemaker-related safety precautions, remains mandatory, as clinically relevant alterations to the PM system cannot be excluded by all means.

  8. Craniopharyngiomas - the utility of contrast medium enhancement for MR imaging at 1.5 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hald, J.K.; Eldevik, O.P.; Brunberg, J.A.; Chandler, W.F.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of i.v. contrast medium administration in MR imaging at 1.5 T in patients with craniopharyngiomas, MR studies of 10 men and 6 women with pathologically proven craniopharyngiomas were made. The MR images were obtained as 3- to 5-mm-thick coronal (n=13) or axial (n=3) T1-weighted images (T1WI) prior to an following i.v. Gd-DTPA administration. Proton density-(PD) and T2-weighted images (T2WI) were also obtained. Conspicuity of tumor margins, cystic versus solid components, size, location and effect upon adjacent structures were separately characterized in all imaging sequences. In 6 patients contrast medium-enhanced T1WI, PD and T2WI demonstrated cystic tumor components not seen on unenhanced T1WI. There were significant differences (p<0.004) on 2-tailed Student's t-test comparing tumor conspicuity on contrast medium-enhanced T1WI with unenhanced T1WI, PD and T2WI. Optimal tumor delineation on MR imaging of patients with craniopharyngiomas justifies the use of i.v. contrast medium. (orig.)

  9. Climate impacts on human livelihoods at 1.5° and 2° of warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissner, Tabea

    2017-04-01

    The measurement of impacts of climate change on socio-economic systems remains challenging and especially multi-dimensional outcome measures remain scarce. Climate impacts can directly affect many dimensions of human livelihoods, which cannot be addressed by monetary assessments alone. Multi-dimensional measures are essential in order to understand the full range of consequences of climate change and to understand the costs that higher levels of warming may have, not only in economic terms, but also in terms of non-market impacts on human livelihood. The AHEAD framework aims at measuring "Adequate Human livelihood conditions for wEll-being And Development" in a multi-dimensional framework, allowing to focus on resources and conditions which are a requirement to attain well-being. In this contribution we build on previous implementations of AHEAD and focus on differences in climate impacts at 1.5° and 2° of warming in order to improve our understanding of the societal consequences of these different warming levels.

  10. Regional Climate Impacts of Stabilizing Global Warming at 1.5 K Using Solar Geoengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Anthony C.; Hawcroft, Matthew K.; Haywood, James M.; Jones, Andy; Guo, Xiaoran; Moore, John C.

    2018-02-01

    The 2015 Paris Agreement aims to limit global warming to well below 2 K above preindustrial levels, and to pursue efforts to limit global warming to 1.5 K, in order to avert dangerous climate change. However, current greenhouse gas emissions targets are more compatible with scenarios exhibiting end-of-century global warming of 2.6-3.1 K, in clear contradiction to the 1.5 K target. In this study, we use a global climate model to investigate the climatic impacts of using solar geoengineering by stratospheric aerosol injection to stabilize global-mean temperature at 1.5 K for the duration of the 21st century against three scenarios spanning the range of plausible greenhouse gas mitigation pathways (RCP2.6, RCP4.5, and RCP8.5). In addition to stabilizing global mean temperature and offsetting both Arctic sea-ice loss and thermosteric sea-level rise, we find that solar geoengineering could effectively counteract enhancements to the frequency of extreme storms in the North Atlantic and heatwaves in Europe, but would be less effective at counteracting hydrological changes in the Amazon basin and North Atlantic storm track displacement. In summary, solar geoengineering may reduce global mean impacts but is an imperfect solution at the regional level, where the effects of climate change are experienced. Our results should galvanize research into the regionality of climate responses to solar geoengineering.

  11. Radiological survey results at 1 Shady Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ095)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action at the Stepan property in Maywood, New Jersey and several vicinity properties in Lodi, New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS), adjacent to the former Maywood Chemical Works facility. The property at One Shady Lane, Lodi, New Jersey was not one of these vicinity properties but was surveyed by DOE at the request of the owner. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted in November 1994, was to confirm whether remedial actions were to be performed on the property in order to be in compliance with the identified Guidelines. The radiological survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, and the collection of soil samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at One Shady Lane, Lodi, New Jersey, were comparable to background levels in the area, and well within the limits prescribed by DOE radiological guidelines. Based on the results of the radiological survey data, this property does not meet guidelines for inclusion under FUSRAP

  12. Rare hadronic probes from Au+Au collisions at 1.23 AGeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheib, Timo [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: HADES-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    Over the years an extensive amount of data in the 1-2 AGeV energy regime has been collected leading to enormous improvements of our understanding of particle production mechanisms and HIC dynamics. At these beam energies, however, the production of hadrons is observed below or slightly above their free elementary production threshold. Due to this fact a comparison to reference data from elementary collisions is not straightforward and phenomenological models are mandatory. Through rapidly advancing detector technologies and analysis techniques more and more precise data sets can be recorded and analyzed. In April 2012 HADES took data from Au+Au collisions at 1.23 AGeV with a - for this system size and energy - so far unreached precision and statistics (about 7 billion events). By determining the yields and spectra of a comprehensive set of hadrons produced in this system (π{sup +/-},K{sup +/-},K{sup 0}{sub S},Λ,φ) a detailed comparison with phenomenological models can be drawn, allowing to further deepen our understanding of hadron production in HIC.

  13. Sr isotope geochemistry of voluminous acidic pyroclastics erupted at 1-3 Ma in Northeast Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirahase, Teruo; Tamanyu, Shiro; Togashi, Shigeko

    1989-01-01

    Sr isotope ratios are analyzed for voluminous acidic pyroclastics erupted at 1 - 3 Ma in five areas on the volcanic front of Northeast Japan. The initial values of 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios range from 0.7040 to 0.7055. There is no significant difference in ratios between 1 - 3 Ma acidic pyroclastics and 0 - 1 Ma andesitic volcanics in each area in spite of differences in age and in mean SiO 2 content. On the other hand, the ratios in both of 1 - 3 Ma and 0 - 1 Ma volcanics vary along arc in the same manner. The changes of Sr and Rb contents in each area are consistent with systematic changes by fractional crystallization. The low 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios and chemistry suggest that 1 - 3 Ma acidic pyroclastics of Northeast Japan formed by a high degree of fractional crystallization from basic magma which is common in genesis with young andesitic volcanism. The mechanisms of the formation of the basic magma and the character of mantle source in each area have not changed for the past 3 Ma. Degrees of fractional crystallization changed with changes of the tectonic condition of shallow magma chamber from a weak horizontal compression stress field to a strong one. (author)

  14. Dielectron production in 12C+12C collisions at 1 GeV per nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pachmayer, Yvonne C.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis contains the experimental results on dielectron production in 12 C+ 12 C collisions at 1 GeV/u recorded with HADES. Within this work, the analysis is demonstrated, showing that leptons are efficiently reconstructed and hadrons very well discriminated. The described pair analysis shows that the combinatorial background is successfully reduced and the amount of true electron-positron pairs is not decreased. After subtracting the combinatorial background, the efficiency-corrected and normalized invariant-mass, transverse momentum and rapidity distributions of the dileptons are investigated. In the invariant-mass region 0.2-0.6 GeV/c 2 the measured pair yield shows a strong excess above the contribution expected from hadron decays after freeze-out according to predictions. Together with the results obtained in 12 C+ 12 C at 2 GeV/u it becomes evident that the overshoot of the data increases with decreasing beam energy. A detailed analysis shows that the beam energy dependence of the excess yield, i.e. the pair yield above the known eta contribution, integrated over the 0.15-0.5 GeV/c 2 mass range, scales like pion production. (orig.)

  15. Large-scale Star-formation-driven Outflows at 1 3D-HST Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Britt F.; Brammer, Gabriel; van Dokkum, Pieter; Bezanson, Rachel; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Wake, David; Whitaker, Katherine; da Cunha, Elizabete; Erb, Dawn K.; Fan, Xiaohui; Kriek, Mariska; Labbé, Ivo; Marchesini, Danilo; Patel, Shannon; Rix, Hans Walter; Schmidt, Kasper; van der Wel, Arjen

    2012-11-01

    We present evidence of large-scale outflows from three low-mass (log(M */M ⊙) ~ 9.75) star-forming (SFR > 4 M ⊙ yr-1) galaxies observed at z = 1.24, z = 1.35, and z = 1.75 in the 3D-HST Survey. Each of these galaxies is located within a projected physical distance of 60 kpc around the sight line to the quasar SDSS J123622.93+621526.6, which exhibits well-separated strong (W λ2796 r >~ 0.8 Å) Mg II absorption systems matching precisely to the redshifts of the three galaxies. We derive the star formation surface densities from the Hα emission in the WFC3 G141 grism observations for the galaxies and find that in each case the star formation surface density well exceeds 0.1 M ⊙ yr-1 kpc-2, the typical threshold for starburst galaxies in the local universe. From a small but complete parallel census of the 0.65 0.8 Å Mg II covering fraction of star-forming galaxies at 1 0.4 Å Mg II absorbing gas around star-forming galaxies may evolve from z ~ 2 to the present, consistent with recent observations of an increasing collimation of star-formation-driven outflows with time from z ~ 3.

  16. New long-wavelength Nd:YAG laser at 1.44 micron: effect on brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiniuk, R; Bauer, J A; McKean, J D; Tulip, J; Mielke, B W

    1989-02-01

    A wavelength-shifted Nd:YAG laser, tuned to coincide with the infrared absorption peak of water at 1.44 microns, was used to make lesions in normal rabbit brain. A total of 48 lesions were made with power up to 20 W, with energy up to 40 joules, and with two different spot sizes. These lesions were compared to lesions made with 1.06 microns radiation from an Nd:YAG laser under identical operating conditions. Measurements of blood-brain barrier damage and width, depth, and volume of tissue affected were obtained 30 minutes after placement of the lesions. It was found that 1.44-microns lesions produced photoevaporative tissue loss at the highest intensities used. The layer of coagulated tissue remaining after photovaporization had a mean thickness of 0.6 mm irrespective of the volume of tissue removed. There was no photovaporization in the 1.06-microns lesions. In addition, the amount of peripheral edema per unit volume of tissue coagulated was approximately half at the 1.44-microns wavelength. These findings suggest that the 1.44-microns Nd:YAG laser may be a useful surgical instrument since it combines the photoevaporative effect of the CO2 laser while maintaining the advantages of the conventional Nd:YAG laser (quartz fiber delivery and effective hemostasis).

  17. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background temperature at 1.47 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensadoun, Marc John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    A radiofrequency-gain total power radiometer measured the intensity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at a frequency of 1.47 GHz (20.4 cm wavelength) from White Mountain, California, in September 1988 and from the South Pole, Antarctica, in December 1989. The CMB thermodynamic temperature, TCMB, is 2.27 ± 0.25 K (68% C.L.) measured from White Mountain and 2.26 ± 0.21 K from the South Pole site. The combined result is 2.27 ± 0.19 K. The correction for galactic emission has been derived from scaled low-frequency maps and constitutes the main source, of error. The atmospheric signal is found by extrapolation from zenith scan measurements at higher frequencies. The result is consistent with previous low-frequency measurements, including a measurement at 1.41 GHz (Levin et al. 1988) made with an earlier version of this instrument. The result is ~2.5 σ (~l% probability) from the 2.74 ± 0.02,K global average CMB temperature.

  18. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background temperature at 1. 47 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensadoun, M.J.

    1991-11-01

    A radiofrequency-gain total power radiometer measured the intensity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at a frequency of 1.47 GHz (20.4 cm wavelength) from White Mountain, California, in September 1988 and from the South Pole, Antarctica, in December 1989. The CMB thermodynamic temperature, TCMB, is 2.27 {plus minus} 0.25 K (68% C.L.) measured from White Mountain and 2.26 {plus minus} 0.21 K from the South Pole site. The combined result is 2.27 {plus minus} 0.19 K. The correction for galactic emission has been derived from scaled low-frequency maps and constitutes the main source, of error. The atmospheric signal is found by extrapolation from zenith scan measurements at higher frequencies. The result is consistent with previous low-frequency measurements, including a measurement at 1.41 GHz (Levin et al. 1988) made with an earlier version of this instrument. The result is {approximately}2.5 {sigma} ({approximately}l% probability) from the 2.74 {plus minus} 0.02,K global average CMB temperature.

  19. A different role of angiotensin II type 1a receptor in the development and hypertrophy of plantaris muscle in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zempo, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Ogawa, Masahito; Watanabe, Ryo; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2016-02-01

    The role of angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptors in muscle development and hypertrophy remains unclear. This study was designed to reveal the effects that a loss of AT1 receptors has on skeletal muscle development and hypertrophy in mice. Eight-week-old male AT1a receptor knockout (AT1a(-/-)) mice were used for this experiment. The plantaris muscle to body weight ratio, muscle fiber cross-sectional area, and number of muscle fibers of AT1a(-/-) mice was significantly greater than wild type (WT) mice in the non-intervention condition. Next, the functional overload (OL) model was used to induce plantaris muscle hypertrophy by surgically removing the two triceps muscles consisting of the calf, soleus, and gastrocnemius muscles in mice. After 14 days of OL intervention, the plantaris muscle weight, the amount of fiber, and the fiber area increased. However, the magnitude of the increment of plantaris weight was not different between the two strains. Agtr1a mRNA expression did not change after OL in WT muscle. Actually, the Agt mRNA expression level of WT-OL was lower than WT-Control (C) muscle. An atrophy-related gene, atrogin-1 mRNA expression levels of AT1a(-/-)-C, WT-OL, and AT1a(-/-)-OL muscle were lower than that of WT-C muscle. Our findings suggest that AT1 receptor contributes to plantaris muscle development via atrogin-1 in mice.

  20. Adenosine Receptors and Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce N. Cronstein

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that application of topical adenosine A2A receptor agonists promotes more rapid wound closure and clinical studies are currently underway to determine the utility of topical A2A adenosine receptor agonists in the therapy of diabetic foot ulcers. The effects of adenosine A2A receptors on the cells and tissues of healing wounds have only recently been explored. We review here the known effects of adenosine A2A receptor occupancy on the cells involved in wound healing.

  1. Virally encoded 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Waldhoer, M; Lüttichau, H R

    2001-01-01

    expression of this single gene in certain lymphocyte cell lineages leads to the development of lesions which are remarkably similar to Kaposi's sarcoma, a human herpesvirus 8 associated disease. Thus, this and other virally encoded 7TM receptors appear to be attractive future drug targets.......A number of herpes- and poxviruses encode 7TM G-protein coupled receptors most of which clearly are derived from their host chemokine system as well as induce high expression of certain 7TM receptors in the infected cells. The receptors appear to be exploited by the virus for either immune evasion...

  2. Adenosine receptor desensitization and trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, Stuart; Kelly, Eamonn

    2011-05-01

    As with the majority of G-protein-coupled receptors, all four of the adenosine receptor subtypes are known to undergo agonist-induced regulation in the form of desensitization and trafficking. These processes can limit the ability of adenosine receptors to couple to intracellular signalling pathways and thus reduce the ability of adenosine receptor agonists as well as endogenous adenosine to produce cellular responses. In addition, since adenosine receptors couple to multiple signalling pathways, these pathways may desensitize differentially, while the desensitization of one pathway could even trigger signalling via another. Thus, the overall picture of adenosine receptor regulation can be complex. For all adenosine receptor subtypes, there is evidence to implicate arrestins in agonist-induced desensitization and trafficking, but there is also evidence for other possible forms of regulation, including second messenger-dependent kinase regulation, heterologous effects involving G proteins, and the involvement of non-clathrin trafficking pathways such as caveolae. In this review, the evidence implicating these mechanisms is summarized for each adenosine receptor subtype, and we also discuss those issues of adenosine receptor regulation that remain to be resolved as well as likely directions for future research in this field. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental study of radium partitioning between anorthite and melt at 1 atm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, S; Burnett, D; Asimow, P; Phinney, D; Hutcheon, I

    2007-03-08

    We present the first experimental radium mineral/melt partitioning data, specifically between anorthite and a CMAS melt at atmospheric pressure. Ion microprobe measurement of coexisting anorthite and glass phases produces a molar D{sub Ra} = 0.040 {+-} 0.006 and D{sub Ra}/D{sub Ba} = 0.23 {+-} 0.05 at 1400 C. Our results indicate that lattice strain partitioning models fit the divalent (Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra) partition coefficient data of this study well, supporting previous work on crustal melting and magma chamber dynamics that has relied on such models to approximate radium partitioning behavior in the absence of experimentally determined values.

  4. Enhanced expressions of microvascular smooth muscle receptors after focal cerebral ischemia occur via the MAPK MEK/ERK pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maddahi, A.; Edvinsson, L.

    2008-01-01

    ), the enhanced vascular receptor expression, and attenuated the cerebral infarct and improved neurology score. CONCLUSION: Our results show that MCAO results in upregulation of cerebrovascular ETB, AT1 and 5-HT1B receptors. Blockade of this event with a MEK1 inhibitor as late as 6 h after the insult reduced...... the role of the MEK/ERK pathway in receptor expression following ischemic brain injury using the specific MEK1 inhibitor U0126. METHODS AND RESULT: Rats were subjected to a 2-h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) followed by reperfusion for 48-h and the ischemic area was calculated. The expression...... of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and Elk-1, and of endothelin ETA and ETB, angiotensin AT1, and 5-hydroxytryptamine 5-HT1B receptors were analyzed with immunohistochemistry using confocal microscopy in cerebral arteries, microvessels and in brain tissue. The expression of endothelin ETB receptor was analyzed...

  5. Pharmacologic perspectives of functional selectivity by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aplin, Mark; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Hansen, Jakob Lerche

    2008-01-01

    and to sudden injury occurring in the circulatory system. Hence, current drugs that block all AT(1) receptor actions most likely leave room for improvement. Recent developments show that two major signaling pathways used by the AT(1) receptor may be dissected by pharmacologic means. Key pathologic responses...... protein actions and simultaneous activation of G protein-dependent or -independent signaling could therefore be desirable in certain situations. The previously unappreciated concept of "functional selectivity" makes this exact strategy feasible and may yield improved drugs for cardiovascular therapy....

  6. Axonal GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, Federico F; Marty, Alain; Stell, Brandon M

    2008-09-01

    Type A GABA receptors (GABA(A)Rs) are well established as the main inhibitory receptors in the mature mammalian forebrain. In recent years, evidence has accumulated showing that GABA(A)Rs are prevalent not only in the somatodendritic compartment of CNS neurons, but also in their axonal compartment. Evidence for axonal GABA(A)Rs includes new immunohistochemical and immunogold data: direct recording from single axonal terminals; and effects of local applications of GABA(A)R modulators on action potential generation, on axonal calcium signalling, and on neurotransmitter release. Strikingly, whereas presynaptic GABA(A)Rs have long been considered inhibitory, the new studies in the mammalian brain mostly indicate an excitatory action. Depending on the neuron that is under study, axonal GABA(A)Rs can be activated by ambient GABA, by GABA spillover, or by an autocrine action, to increase either action potential firing and/or transmitter release. In certain neurons, the excitatory effects of axonal GABA(A)Rs persist into adulthood. Altogether, axonal GABA(A)Rs appear as potent neuronal modulators of the mammalian CNS.

  7. The galaxy cluster mid-infrared luminosity function at 1.3 < z < 3.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Vernet, Joël; De Breuck, Carlos [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschildstr.2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Galametz, Audrey [INAF-Osservatorio di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040, Monteporzio (Italy); Gonzalez, Anthony H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Jarvis, Matt [Astrophysics, Department of Physics, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Hatch, Nina [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Seymour, Nick [CASS, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW, 1710 (Australia); Stanford, Spencer A. [Physics Department, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    We present 4.5 μm luminosity functions for galaxies identified in 178 candidate galaxy clusters at 1.3 < z < 3.2. The clusters were identified as Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) color-selected overdensities in the Clusters Around Radio-Loud AGN project, which imaged 420 powerful radio-loud active galactic nuclei (RLAGNs) at z > 1.3. The luminosity functions are derived for different redshift and richness bins, and the IRAC imaging reaches depths of m* + 2, allowing us to measure the faint end slopes of the luminosity functions. We find that α = –1 describes the luminosity function very well in all redshift bins and does not evolve significantly. This provides evidence that the rate at which the low mass galaxy population grows through star formation gets quenched and is replenished by in-falling field galaxies does not have a major net effect on the shape of the luminosity function. Our measurements for m* are consistent with passive evolution models and high formation redshifts (z{sub f} ∼ 3). We find a slight trend toward fainter m* for the richest clusters, implying that the most massive clusters in our sample could contain older stellar populations, yet another example of cosmic downsizing. Modeling shows that a contribution of a star-forming population of up to 40% cannot be ruled out. This value, found from our targeted survey, is significantly lower than the values found for slightly lower redshift, z ∼ 1, clusters found in wide-field surveys. The results are consistent with cosmic downsizing, as the clusters studied here were all found in the vicinity of RLAGNs—which have proven to be preferentially located in massive dark matter halos in the richest environments at high redshift—and they may therefore be older and more evolved systems than the general protocluster population.

  8. The impact of prenatal employment on breastfeeding intentions and breastfeeding status at 1 week postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanasio, Laura; Kozhimannil, Katy B; McGovern, Patricia; Gjerdingen, Dwenda; Johnson, Pamela Jo

    2013-11-01

    Postpartum employment is associated with non-initiation and early cessation of breastfeeding, but less is known about the relationship between prenatal employment and breastfeeding intentions and behaviors. This study aimed to estimate the relationship between prenatal employment status, a strong predictor of postpartum return to work, and breastfeeding intentions and behaviors. Using data from the Listening to Mothers II national survey (N = 1573), we used propensity score matching methods to account for non-random selection into employment patterns and to measure the impact of prenatal employment status on breastfeeding intentions and behaviors. We also examined whether hospital practices consistent with the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI), assessed based on maternal perception, were differentially associated with breastfeeding by employment status. Women who were employed (vs unemployed) during pregnancy were older, were more educated, were less likely to have had a previous cesarean delivery, and had fewer children. After matching, these differences were eliminated. Although breastfeeding intention did not differ by employment, full-time employment (vs no employment) during pregnancy was associated with decreased odds of exclusive breastfeeding 1 week postpartum (adjusted odds ratio = 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.92; P = .028). Higher BFHI scores were associated with higher odds of breastfeeding at 1 week but did not differentially impact women by employment status. Women employed full-time during pregnancy were less likely to fulfill their intention to exclusively breastfeed, compared to women who were not employed during pregnancy. Clinicians should be aware that employment circumstances may impact women's breastfeeding decisions; this may help guide discussions during clinical encounters.

  9. The galaxy cluster mid-infrared luminosity function at 1.3 < z < 3.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Vernet, Joël; De Breuck, Carlos; Stern, Daniel; Brodwin, Mark; Galametz, Audrey; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Jarvis, Matt; Hatch, Nina; Seymour, Nick; Stanford, Spencer A.

    2014-01-01

    We present 4.5 μm luminosity functions for galaxies identified in 178 candidate galaxy clusters at 1.3 < z < 3.2. The clusters were identified as Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) color-selected overdensities in the Clusters Around Radio-Loud AGN project, which imaged 420 powerful radio-loud active galactic nuclei (RLAGNs) at z > 1.3. The luminosity functions are derived for different redshift and richness bins, and the IRAC imaging reaches depths of m* + 2, allowing us to measure the faint end slopes of the luminosity functions. We find that α = –1 describes the luminosity function very well in all redshift bins and does not evolve significantly. This provides evidence that the rate at which the low mass galaxy population grows through star formation gets quenched and is replenished by in-falling field galaxies does not have a major net effect on the shape of the luminosity function. Our measurements for m* are consistent with passive evolution models and high formation redshifts (z f ∼ 3). We find a slight trend toward fainter m* for the richest clusters, implying that the most massive clusters in our sample could contain older stellar populations, yet another example of cosmic downsizing. Modeling shows that a contribution of a star-forming population of up to 40% cannot be ruled out. This value, found from our targeted survey, is significantly lower than the values found for slightly lower redshift, z ∼ 1, clusters found in wide-field surveys. The results are consistent with cosmic downsizing, as the clusters studied here were all found in the vicinity of RLAGNs—which have proven to be preferentially located in massive dark matter halos in the richest environments at high redshift—and they may therefore be older and more evolved systems than the general protocluster population.

  10. Diffusion tensor imaging of the spinal cord at 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, C. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Tuebingen (Germany). Sektion fuer Experimentelle Radiologie; CNR-INFM CRS-Soft, La Sapienza-Univ. Roma (Italy); Enrico Fern Center, Roma (Italy); Boss, A.; Martirosian, P.; Steidle, G.; Schick, F. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Tuebingen (Germany). Sektion fuer Experimentelle Radiologie; Lindig, T.M. [Enrico Fern Center, Roma (Italy); Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Tuebingen (Germany). Sektion fuer Experimentelle Kernspinresonanz des ZNS; Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Zentrum fuer Neurologie und Hertie-Inst. fuer klinische Hirnforschung; Maetzler, W. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Zentrum fuer Neurologie und Hertie-Inst. fuer klinische Hirnforschung; Claussen, C.D. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Klose, U. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Tuebingen (Germany). Sektion fuer Experimentelle Kernspinresonanz des ZNS

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: The feasibility of highly resolved diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the human cervical spinal cord was tested on a clinical MR unit operating at 3.0 Tesla. DTI parametrical maps and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were compared to results recorded at 1.5 Tesla. Materials and Methods: Eight healthy volunteers and one patient participated in the study. A transverse oriented single-shot ECG-triggered echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence with double spin-echo diffusion preparation was applied for highly resolved DTI of the spinal cord. The signal yield, fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean diffusivity (MD) were compared for both field strengths. The clinical applicability of the protocol was also tested in one patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) at 3.0 T. Results: A mean increase in SNR of 95.7 {+-} 4.6% was found at 3.0 Tesla compared to 1.5 Tesla. Improved quality of the DTI parametrical maps was observed at higher field strength (p < 0.02). Comparable FA and MD (reported in units of 10 - 3 mm2/s) values were computed in the dorsal white matter at both field strengths (1.5 T: FA = 0.75 {+-} 0.08, MD = 0.84 {+-} 0.12, 3.0 T: FA = 0.74 {+-} 0.04, MD = 0.93 {+-} 0.14). The DTI images exhibited diagnostic image quality in the patient. At the site of the diseased corticospinal tract, a decrease of 46.0 {+-} 3.8% in FA (0.40 {+-} 0.03) and an increase of 50.3 {+-} 5.6% in MD (1.40 {+-} 0.05) were found in the ALS patient. (orig.)

  11. Identification of an isomer in 110Ag at 1-keV excitation energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.D.; Kostroun, V.O.; Siems, N.E.

    1975-01-01

    The existence of a new isomeric state in 110 Ag at approx. 1 keV excitation has been established in two experiments using a new instrument, the inner-shell-vacancy (ISV) detector. In the first experiment, a transition with a half-life of 660 plus-or-minus 40 ns was observed to follow the well-known 116-keV M4 transition that depopulates the 6 + 250-day isomeric level in 110 Ag; the energy of the new transition was deduced to be 109 Ag(n, γ) 110 Ag reaction to follow γ transitions previously assigned by others to populate a 1-keV excited state. The two results indicate the existence of a 2 - 660-ns isomer at 1.11 keV. Under the assumption that the newly observed transition is from a 2 - 1.11-keV state to the 1 + ground state, its hindrance factor with respect to the Moszkowski estimate is approx. 2.6 times 10 3 . Possible chemical-state perturbations of the measured half-life are estimated to be much smaller than the measurement error. In both experiments the approx. 1-keV transition was detected with the ISV detector, a new device based on the well-established atomic effect that within approx. 10 -14 s after the formation of an inner shell vacancy an atom will undergo a multiple loss of []lectrons ranging from several to 20 or more, the number being a function of Z and subshell. The emitted electrons, which are very soft, are collected with an accelerating and focusing electrostatic lens and detected with a plastic scintillator and a photomultiplier tube. Nuclear transitions that cause ISVs can thus be sensed. Experiments are described that show the detector is fast, sensitive, selective, and efficient in responding to ISVs.

  12. SPARC: Demonstrate burst-buffer-based checkpoint/restart on ATS-1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldfield, Ron A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ulmer, Craig D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Widener, Patrick [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ward, H. Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Recent high-performance computing (HPC) platforms such as the Trinity Advanced Technology System (ATS-1) feature burst buffer resources that can have a dramatic impact on an application’s I/O performance. While these non-volatile memory (NVM) resources provide a new tier in the storage hierarchy, developers must find the right way to incorporate the technology into their applications in order to reap the benefits. Similar to other laboratories, Sandia is actively investigating ways in which these resources can be incorporated into our existing libraries and workflows without burdening our application developers with excessive, platform-specific details. This FY18Q1 milestone summaries our progress in adapting the Sandia Parallel Aerodynamics and Reentry Code (SPARC) in Sandia’s ATDM program to leverage Trinity’s burst buffers for checkpoint/restart operations. We investigated four different approaches with varying tradeoffs in this work: (1) simply updating job script to use stage-in/stage out burst buffer directives, (2) modifying SPARC to use LANL’s hierarchical I/O (HIO) library to store/retrieve checkpoints, (3) updating Sandia’s IOSS library to incorporate the burst buffer in all meshing I/O operations, and (4) modifying SPARC to use our Kelpie distributed memory library to store/retrieve checkpoints. Team members were successful in generating initial implementation for all four approaches, but were unable to obtain performance numbers in time for this report (reasons: initial problem sizes were not large enough to stress I/O, and SPARC refactor will require changes to our code). When we presented our work to the SPARC team, they expressed the most interest in the second and third approaches. The HIO work was favored because it is lightweight, unobtrusive, and should be portable to ATS-2. The IOSS work is seen as a long-term solution, and is favored because all I/O work (including checkpoints) can be deferred to a single library.

  13. Diffusion tensor imaging of the spinal cord at 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, C.; Boss, A.; Martirosian, P.; Steidle, G.; Schick, F.; Lindig, T.M.; Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Tuebingen; Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen; Maetzler, W.; Claussen, C.D.; Klose, U.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The feasibility of highly resolved diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the human cervical spinal cord was tested on a clinical MR unit operating at 3.0 Tesla. DTI parametrical maps and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were compared to results recorded at 1.5 Tesla. Materials and Methods: Eight healthy volunteers and one patient participated in the study. A transverse oriented single-shot ECG-triggered echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence with double spin-echo diffusion preparation was applied for highly resolved DTI of the spinal cord. The signal yield, fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean diffusivity (MD) were compared for both field strengths. The clinical applicability of the protocol was also tested in one patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) at 3.0 T. Results: A mean increase in SNR of 95.7 ± 4.6% was found at 3.0 Tesla compared to 1.5 Tesla. Improved quality of the DTI parametrical maps was observed at higher field strength (p < 0.02). Comparable FA and MD (reported in units of 10 - 3 mm2/s) values were computed in the dorsal white matter at both field strengths (1.5 T: FA = 0.75 ± 0.08, MD = 0.84 ± 0.12, 3.0 T: FA 0.74 ± 0.04, MD = 0.93 ± 0.14). The DTI images exhibited diagnostic image quality in the patient. At the site of the diseased corticospinal tract, a decrease of 46.0 ± 3.8% in FA (0.40 ± 0.03) and an increase of 50.3 ± 5.6% in MD (1.40 ± 0.05) were found in the ALS patient. (orig.)

  14. P2X receptor channels in endocrine glands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stojilkovic, S. S.; Zemková, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 4 (2013), s. 173-180 ISSN 2190-460X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : ATP * purinergic P2X receptor channels * pituitary * endocrine glands Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  15. Membrane cholesterol access into a G-protein-coupled receptor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guixa-González, R.; Albasanz, J. L.; Rodriguez-Espigares, I.; Pastor, M.; Sanz, F.; Martí-Solano, M.; Manna, M.; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Hildebrand, P. W.; Martín, M.; Selent, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, Feb 21 (2017), č. článku 14505. ISSN 2041-1723 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : postmortem orbitofrontal cortex * A(2A) adenosine receptor * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 12.124, year: 2016 https://www.nature.com/ articles /ncomms14505

  16. Possible Relevance of Receptor-Receptor Interactions between Viral- and Host-Coded Receptors for Viral-Induced Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi F. Agnati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that some viruses, such as the cytomegalovirus, code for G-protein coupled receptors not only to elude the immune system, but also to redirect cellular signaling in the receptor networks of the host cells. In view of the existence of receptor-receptor interactions, the hypothesis is introduced that these viral-coded receptors not only operate as constitutively active monomers, but also can affect other receptor function by interacting with receptors of the host cell. Furthermore, it is suggested that viruses could also insert not single receptors (monomers, but clusters of receptors (receptor mosaics, altering the cell metabolism in a profound way. The prevention of viral receptor-induced changes in host receptor networks may give rise to novel antiviral drugs that counteract viral-induced disease.

  17. Receptor studies in biological psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Yutaka

    1992-01-01

    Recent advances in the pharmacological treatment of endogenous psychosis have led to the development of biological studies in psychiatry. Studies on neurotransmitter receptors were reviewed in order to apply positron-emission tomograph (PET) for biological psychiatry. The dopamine (DA) hypothesis for schizophrenia was advanced on the basis of the observed effects of neuroleptics and methamphetamine, and DA(D 2 ) receptor supersensitivity measured by PET and receptor binding in the schizophrenic brain. The clinical potencies of neuroleptics for schizophrenia were correlated with their abilities to inhibit the D 2 receptor, and not other receptors. The σ receptor was expected to be a site of antipsychotic action. However, the potency of drugs action on it was not correlated with clinical efficacy. Haloperidol binds with high affinity to the σ receptor, which may mediate acute dystonia, an extrapyramidal side effect of neuroleptics. Behavioral and neurochemical changes induced by methamphetamine treatment were studied as an animal model of schizophrenia, and both a decrease of D 2 receptor density and an increase of DA release were detected. The monoamine hypothesis for manic-depressive psychosis was advanced on the basis of the effect of reserpine, monoamine oxidase inhibitor and antidepressants. 3 H-clonidine binding sites were increased in platelet membranes of depressive patients, 3 H-imipramine binding sites were decreased. The GABA A receptor is the target site for the action of anxiolytics and antiepileptics such as benzodiazepines and barbiturates. Recent developments in molecular biology techniques have revealed the structure of receptor proteins, which are classified into two receptor families, the G-protein coupled type (D 2 ) and the ion-channel type (GABA A ). (J.P.N.)

  18. GABA(B) receptor phosphorylation regulates KCTD12-induced K+ current desensitization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adelfinger, L.; Tureček, Rostislav; Ivankova, K.; Jensen, A. A.; Moss, S. J.; Gassmann, M.; Bettler, B.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 3 (2014), s. 369-379 ISSN 0006-2952 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : GABA-B * G-protein coupled receptor * GPCR Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.009, year: 2014

  19. Complexation of the strontium cation with a macrocyclic lactam receptor: Experimental and theoretical study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Makrlík, E.; Záliš, Stanislav; Vaňura, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 214, FEB 2016 (2016), s. 171-174 ISSN 0167-7322 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : strontium cation * macrocyclic lactam receptor Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.648, year: 2016

  20. Platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in major depressive disorder. Binding of tritiated clonidine before and after tricyclic antidepressant drug treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Sevilla, J.A.; Zis, A.P.; Hollingsworth, P.J.; Greden, J.F.; Smith, C.B.

    1981-01-01

    The specific binding of tritiated (3H)-clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor agonist, to platelet membranes was measured in normal subjects and in patients with major depressive disorder. The number of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors from the depressed group was significantly higher than that found in platelets obtained from the control population. Treatment with tricyclic antidepressant drugs led to significant decreases in the number of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors. These results support the hypothesis that the depressive syndrome is related to an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor supersensitivity and that the clinical effectiveness of tricyclic antidepressant drugs is associated with a decrease in the number of these receptors

  1. Adolescents at clinical-high risk for psychosis: Circadian rhythm disturbances predict worsened prognosis at 1-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsford-Avery, Jessica R; Gonçalves, Bruno da Silva Brandão; Brietzke, Elisa; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Gadelha, Ary; Auerbach, Randy P; Mittal, Vijay A

    2017-11-01

    Individuals with psychotic disorders experience disruptions to both the sleep and circadian components of the sleep/wake cycle. Recent evidence has supported a role of sleep disturbances in emerging psychosis. However, less is known about how circadian rhythm disruptions may relate to psychosis symptoms and prognosis for adolescents with clinical high-risk (CHR) syndromes. The present study examines circadian rest/activity rhythms in CHR and healthy control (HC) youth to clarify the relationships among circadian rhythm disturbance, psychosis symptoms, psychosocial functioning, and the longitudinal course of illness. Thirty-four CHR and 32 HC participants were administered a baseline evaluation, which included clinical interviews, 5days of actigraphy, and a sleep/activity diary. CHR (n=29) participants were re-administered clinical interviews at a 1-year follow-up assessment. Relative to HC, CHR youth exhibited more fragmented circadian rhythms and later onset of nocturnal rest. Circadian disturbances (fragmented rhythms, low daily activity) were associated with increased psychotic symptom severity among CHR participants at baseline. Circadian disruptions (lower daily activity, rhythms that were more fragmented and/or desynchronized with the light/dark cycle) also predicted severity of psychosis symptoms and psychosocial impairment at 1-year follow-up among CHR youth. Circadian rhythm disturbances may represent a potential vulnerability marker for emergence of psychosis, and thus, rest/activity rhythm stabilization has promise to inform early-identification and prevention/intervention strategies for CHR youth. Future studies with longer study designs are necessary to further examine circadian rhythms in the prodromal period and rates of conversion to psychosis among CHR teens. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Therapeutic effects of Fuzhenghuayu decoction on nonalcoholic steatohepatic fibrosis rats by regulating ACE-Ang Ⅱ-AT1R axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao-miao HUO

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the influence of Fuzhenghuayu decoction on fibrotic liver tissue and angiotensin- converting enzyme- angiotensin Ⅱ- angiotensin Ⅱ 1 receptor (ACE-Ang Ⅱ-AT1R axis using a nonalcoholic fatty liver fibrosis rat model system. Methods Forty male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were randomly divided into the following groups: normal control group, liver fibrosis model group, and liver fibrosis model Fuzhenghuayu drug intervention at low-dose [0.75g/(kg.d] group and high-dose [1.5g/(kg.d] group. Except the normal control group, the other three groups were fed high-fat diet for 24 weeks to induce nonalcoholic hepatic fibrosis model. The drug intervention was administered via oral-gastric irrigation once daily for 6 times per week over a 6-week period. The rats were sacrificed at the end of 6 weeks for serum and liver tissue collection. The levels of serum total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST were measured by standard biochemical assays. The Ang Ⅱ contents of plasma and liver tissue were surveyed and evaluated by the radioimmunoassay method. Liver pathology was detected using HE staining and Masson trichrome staining. The mRNA and protein expressions of ACE, AT1R, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA in the liver tissue were evaluated with real time-PCR, immunohistochemical staining, respectively. Results Compared with the model group, the levels of serum ALT and AST in the low-dose group and high-dose group decreased conspicuously, especially in the high-dose group, with a statistically significant difference (P0.05; While the level of liver tissue Ang Ⅱ decreased significantly in the low-dose group and high-dose group than that in model group (P<0.05. Compared with the model group, the extent of pathological changes in hepatic tissues ameliorated after Fuzhenghuayu intervention according to HE and Masson staining, especially in the high-dose group. According to real

  3. Strangeness production in Ni+Ni collisions at 1.93 AGeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, X.

    2004-12-01

    This work deals with the production of strange particles in Ni + Ni collisions at 1.93 A GeV detected with the Fopi (four pi) detector at the heavy ion synchrotron SIS (GSI - Germany). We have limited our investigation to the study of Λ and Ξ hyperons. The first chapter presents the models used to describe ultra-relativistic heavy ions collisions. In the second chapter we present the main experimental results concerning the production and transport of strange particles in an energy domain ranging from SIS to RHIC (relativistic heavy ion collider) energies. The third chapter is dedicated to the specificities of the Fopi detector. The fourth chapter deals with the production of Λ particles in Ni + Ni collisions. An analysis method based on neuron network has been used in parallel with a more classical method. The production rate and temperature of Λ have been deduced from both methods. The neuron network method gives a statistical gain and allows a better identification of particles with low transverse impulses. The fifth chapter is dedicated to the detection of the doubly strange Ξ - particle. A detailed study about the stability of the signal is presented. In the last chapter all our experimental results are confronted with theoretical predictions. The UrQMD model that uses a hard equation of state, can simulate satisfactorily the production rates of Λ and K + as well as their dependency on collision centrality despite the fact that this model does not use a potential linked to the medium density. The comparison between experimental results and predictions given by the IQMD model (that is based on a soft equation of state) is better when the version of the model that does not take into account the effects of the media is used. We see that the choices for the nuclear matter compressibility, for the particles involved in Kaon and Λ creation process, or for the interaction potential with dense medium, appear to be degrees of freedom that are difficult to adjust

  4. On the twists of interplanetary magnetic flux ropes observed at 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuming; Zhuang, Bin; Hu, Qiang; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong; Chi, Yutian

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) are one kind of fundamental structures in the solar/space physics and involved in various eruption phenomena. Twist, characterizing how the magnetic field lines wind around a main axis, is an intrinsic property of MFRs, closely related to the magnetic free energy and stableness. Although the effect of the twist on the behavior of MFRs had been widely studied in observations, theory, modeling, and numerical simulations, it is still unclear how much amount of twist is carried by MFRs in the solar atmosphere and in heliosphere and what role the twist played in the eruptions of MFRs. Contrasting to the solar MFRs, there are lots of in situ measurements of magnetic clouds (MCs), the large-scale MFRs in interplanetary space, providing some important information of the twist of MFRs. Thus, starting from MCs, we investigate the twist of interplanetary MFRs with the aid of a velocity-modified uniform-twist force-free flux rope model. It is found that most of MCs can be roughly fitted by the model and nearly half of them can be fitted fairly well though the derived twist is probably overestimated by a factor of 2.5. By applying the model to 115 MCs observed at 1 AU, we find that (1) the twist angles of interplanetary MFRs generally follow a trend of about 0.6l/R radians, where l/R is the aspect ratio of a MFR, with a cutoff at about 12π radians AU-1, (2) most of them are significantly larger than 2.5π radians but well bounded by 2l/R radians, (3) strongly twisted magnetic field lines probably limit the expansion and size of MFRs, and (4) the magnetic field lines in the legs wind more tightly than those in the leading part of MFRs. These results not only advance our understanding of the properties and behavior of interplanetary MFRs but also shed light on the formation and eruption of MFRs in the solar atmosphere. A discussion about the twist and stableness of solar MFRs are therefore given.

  5. Quantitative analysis of receptor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Zhanli; Wang Rongfu

    2004-01-01

    Model-based methods for quantitative analysis of receptor imaging, including kinetic, graphical and equilibrium methods, are introduced in detail. Some technical problem facing quantitative analysis of receptor imaging, such as the correction for in vivo metabolism of the tracer and the radioactivity contribution from blood volume within ROI, and the estimation of the nondisplaceable ligand concentration, is also reviewed briefly

  6. Coronavirus spike-receptor interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mou, H.

    2015-01-01

    Coronaviruses cause important diseases in humans and animals. Coronavirus infection starts with the virus binding with its spike proteins to molecules present on the surface of host cells that act as receptors. This spike-receptor interaction is highly specific and determines the virus’ cell, tissue

  7. Neurobeachin regulates neurotransmitter receptor trafficking to synapses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nair, R.; Lauks, J.; Jung, S; Cooke, N.E.; de Wit, H.; Brose, N.; Kilimann, M.W.; Verhage, M.; Rhee, J.

    2013-01-01

    The surface density of neurotransmitter receptors at synapses is a key determinant of synaptic efficacy. Synaptic receptor accumulation is regulated by the transport, postsynaptic anchoring, and turnover of receptors, involving multiple trafficking, sorting, motor, and scaffold proteins. We found

  8. A Novel Mechanism of Androgen Receptor Action

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roberts, Jr, Charles T

    2006-01-01

    .... Specifically, the authors had determined that the androgen receptor controls the expression of the cell-surface receptor for the hormone IGF-1 at the level of translation of the IGF-1 receptor mRNA...

  9. Structural and electrooptical characteristics of quantum dots emitting at 1.3 μm on gallium arsenide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiore, A.; Oesterle, U.; Stanley, R.P.

    2001-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the structural and emission properties of self-assembled InAs quantum dots emitting at 1.3 mum. The dots are grown by molecular beam epitaxy on gallium arsenide substrates. Room-temperature emission at 1.3 mum is obtained by embedding the dots in an InGaAs layer...

  10. Quantitative densitometry of neurotransmitter receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainbow, T.C.; Bleisch, W.V.; Biegon, A.; McEwen, B.S.

    1982-01-01

    An autoradiographic procedure is described that allows the quantitative measurement of neurotransmitter receptors by optical density readings. Frozen brain sections are labeled in vitro with [ 3 H]ligands under conditions that maximize specific binding to neurotransmitter receptors. The labeled sections are then placed against the 3 H-sensitive LKB Ultrofilm to produce the autoradiograms. These autoradiograms resemble those produced by [ 14 C]deoxyglucose autoradiography and are suitable for quantitative analysis with a densitometer. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat and zebra finch brain and 5-HT receptors in rat brain were visualized by this method. When the proper combination of ligand concentration and exposure time are used, the method provides quantitative information about the amount and affinity of neurotransmitter receptors in brain sections. This was established by comparisons of densitometric readings with parallel measurements made by scintillation counting of sections. (Auth.)

  11. Dopamine Receptors and Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Hisahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive extrapyramidal motor disorder. Pathologically, this disease is characterized by the selective dopaminergic (DAergic neuronal degeneration in the substantia nigra. Correcting the DA deficiency in PD with levodopa (L-dopa significantly attenuates the motor symptoms; however, its effectiveness often declines, and L-dopa-related adverse effects emerge after long-term treatment. Nowadays, DA receptor agonists are useful medication even regarded as first choice to delay the starting of L-dopa therapy. In advanced stage of PD, they are also used as adjunct therapy together with L-dopa. DA receptor agonists act by stimulation of presynaptic and postsynaptic DA receptors. Despite the usefulness, they could be causative drugs for valvulopathy and nonmotor complication such as DA dysregulation syndrome (DDS. In this paper, physiological characteristics of DA receptor familyare discussed. We also discuss the validity, benefits, and specific adverse effects of pharmaceutical DA receptor agonist.

  12. Molecular characterization of opioid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this research was to purify and characterize active opioid receptors and elucidate molecular aspects of opioid receptor heterogeneity. Purification to apparent homogeneity of an opioid binding protein from bovine caudate was achieved by solubilization in the non-ionic detergent, digitonin, followed by sequential chromatography on the opiate affinity matrix, ..beta..-naltrexylethylenediamine-CH-Sepharose 4B, and on the lectine affinity matrix, wheat germ agglutinin-agarose. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE) followed by autoradiography revealed that radioiodinated purified receptor gave a single band. Purified receptor preparations showed a specific activity of 12,000-15,000 fmol of opiate bound per mg of protein. Radioiodinated human beta-endorphin (/sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/) was used as a probe to investigate the ligand binding subunits of mu and delta opioid receptors. /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ was shown to bind to a variety of opioid receptor-containing tissues with high affinity and specificity with preference for mu and delta sites, and with little, if any, binding to kappa sites. Affinity crosslinking techniques were employed to covalently link /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ to opioid receptors, utilizing derivatives of bis-succinimidyl esters that are bifunctional crosslinkers with specificities for amino and sulfhydryl groups. This, and competition experiments with high type-selective ligands, permitted the assignment of two labeled peptides to their receptor types, namely a peptide of M/sub r/ = 65,000 for mu receptors and one of M/sub r/ = 53,000 for delta receptors.

  13. VIP receptors from porcine liver: High yield solubilization in a GTP-insensitive form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voisin, T.; Couvineau, A.; Guijarro, L.; Laburthe, M.

    1990-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors were solubilized from porcine liver membranes using CHAPS. The binding of 125 I-VIP to solubilized receptors was reversible, saturable and specific. Scatchard analysis indicated the presence of one binding site with a Kd of 6.5 ± 0.3 nM and a Bmax of 1.20 ± 0.15 pmol/mg protein. Solubilized and membrane-bound receptors displayed the same pharmacological profile since VIP and VIP-related peptides inhibited 125 I-VIP binding to both receptor preparations with the same rank order of potency e.g. VIP>helodermin>rat GRF>rat PHI>secretin>human GRF. GTP inhibited 125 I-VIP binding to membrane-bound receptors but not to solubilized receptors supporting functional uncoupling of VIP receptor and G protein during solubilization. Affinity labeling of solubilized and membrane-bound VIP receptors with 125 I-VIP revealed the presence of a single molecular component with Mr 55,000 in both cases. It is concluded that VIP receptors from porcine liver can be solubilized with a good yield, in a GTP-insensitive, G protein-free form. This represents a major advance towards the purification of VIP receptors

  14. Ethylene Regulates Levels of Ethylene Receptor/CTR1 Signaling Complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeel, Samina N.; Gao, Zhiyong; Amir, Madiha; Chen, Yi-Feng; Rai, Muneeza Iqbal; Haq, Noor Ul; Schaller, G. Eric

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone ethylene is perceived by a five-member family of receptors in Arabidopsis thaliana. The receptors function in conjunction with the Raf-like kinase CTR1 to negatively regulate ethylene signal transduction. CTR1 interacts with multiple members of the receptor family based on co-purification analysis, interacting more strongly with receptors containing a receiver domain. Levels of membrane-associated CTR1 vary in response to ethylene, doing so in a post-transcriptional manner that correlates with ethylene-mediated changes in levels of the ethylene receptors ERS1, ERS2, EIN4, and ETR2. Interactions between CTR1 and the receptor ETR1 protect ETR1 from ethylene-induced turnover. Kinetic and dose-response analyses support a model in which two opposing factors control levels of the ethylene receptor/CTR1 complexes. Ethylene stimulates the production of new complexes largely through transcriptional induction of the receptors. However, ethylene also induces turnover of receptors, such that levels of ethylene receptor/CTR1 complexes decrease at higher ethylene concentrations. Implications of this model for ethylene signaling are discussed. PMID:25814663

  15. EVIDENCE FOR NEWLY INITIATED RECONNECTION IN THE SOLAR WIND AT 1 AU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Xiaojun; Ma, Yonghui; Wong, Hon-Cheng; Wang, Yi; Zuo, Pingbing; Wei, Fengsi; Feng, Xueshang; Zhou, Meng; Deng, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    We report the first evidence for a large-scale reconnection exhaust newly initiated in the solar wind using observations from three spacecraft: ACE, Wind, and ARTEMIS P2. We identified a well-structured X-line exhaust using measurements from ARTEMIS P2 in the downstream solar wind. However, in the upstream solar wind, ACE detected the same current sheet that corresponds to the exhaust identified by ARTEMIS P2 data without showing any reconnection signals. We cannot find any reconnection signals from Wind located between ACE and ARTEMIS P2. Within the exhaust, a magnetic island is identified, which is not consistent with the quasi-steady feature as previously reported and provides further evidence that the reconnection is newly initiated. Our observations show that the entering of energetic particles, probably from Earth's bow shock, makes the crucial difference between the non-reconnecting current sheet and the exhaust. Since no obvious driving factors are responsible for the reconnection initiation, we infer that these energetic particles probably play an important role in the reconnection initiation. Theoretical analysis also shows support for this potential mechanism

  16. Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2010. Mann JFE, et al. Renin-angiotensin system inhibition in the treatment of hypertension. http://www.uptodate. ... profit organization and proceeds from Web advertising help support our mission. Mayo Clinic does not endorse any ...

  17. GLP-1 Receptor Agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peer Support Resources Diseases and Conditions Adrenal Disorders Osteoporosis and Bone Health Children and Teen Health Diabetes Heart Health Men's Health Rare Diseases Pituitary Disorders Thyroid Disorders Transgender Health Obesity and Weight Management Women's Health You and Your ...

  18. Expression of Angiotensin II Types 1 and 2 Receptors in Endometriotic Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Takehiro; Chishima, Fumihisa; Sugitani, Masahiko; Tsujimura, Ryusuke; Hayashi, Chuyu; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the gene and protein expression of angiotensin type (AT) 1, AT2 receptors in endometriotic lesions and its relation to prostaglandin (PG) synthases. Endometriosis samples were obtained from 32 patients with endometriotic cysts. Endometrial tissues were obtained during operations for benign gynecological conditions. The expression of the AT1 and AT2 receptor mRNA and that of PG-endoperoxide synthase 2 and microsomal PGE2 synthase-1 (mPGES-1) was examined by quantitative RT-PCR. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for these receptors. AT1 and AT2 receptor proteins were mostly located in endometrial glandular epithelium and some stromal cells. Immunoreactivity of the receptor proteins was observed in both the eutopic endometrium and endometriotic lesions. The AT1/AT2 ratio in endometriotic cysts (median 7.29, range 1.88-187.60) was significantly increased compared with that in the eutopic endometrium in the proliferative-phase in controls (median 1.01, range 0.37-2.09, p < 0.001). There was a relationship between the AT1 mRNA expression and that of mPGES-1 mRNA in the endometriotic cysts (r = 0.394089, p < 0.05). There was a significant relationship between the mRNA expression of the AT2 receptor and that of mPGES-1 in eutopic endometrium of non-endometriotic control (r = 0.610714, p < 0.05). Renin-angiotensin system may play an important role in the pathophysiology of endometriosis. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Arabidopsis ETR1 and ERS1 Differentially Repress the Ethylene Response in Combination with Other Ethylene Receptor Genes1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Wen, Chi-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    The ethylene response is negatively regulated by a family of five ethylene receptor genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The five members of the ethylene receptor family can physically interact and form complexes, which implies that cooperativity for signaling may exist among the receptors. The ethylene receptor gene mutations etr1-1(C65Y)(for ethylene response1-1), ers1-1(I62P) (for ethylene response sensor1-1), and ers1C65Y are dominant, and each confers ethylene insensitivity. In this study, the repression of the ethylene response by these dominant mutant receptor genes was examined in receptor-defective mutants to investigate the functional significance of receptor cooperativity in ethylene signaling. We showed that etr1-1(C65Y), but not ers1-1(I62P), substantially repressed various ethylene responses independent of other receptor genes. In contrast, wild-type receptor genes differentially supported the repression of ethylene responses by ers1-1(I62P); ETR1 and ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE4 (EIN4) supported ers1-1(I62P) functions to a greater extent than did ERS2, ETR2, and ERS1. The lack of both ETR1 and EIN4 almost abolished the repression of ethylene responses by ers1C65Y, which implied that ETR1 and EIN4 have synergistic effects on ers1C65Y functions. Our data indicated that a dominant ethylene-insensitive receptor differentially repressed ethylene responses when coupled with a wild-type ethylene receptor, which supported the hypothesis that the formation of a variety of receptor complexes may facilitate differential receptor signal output, by which ethylene responses can be repressed to different extents. We hypothesize that plants can respond to a broad ethylene concentration range and exhibit tissue-specific ethylene responsiveness with differential cooperation of the multiple ethylene receptors. PMID:22227969

  20. Synthesis of new PET radiotracer 18F-Fluoro Ethyl Losartan for molecular imaging of AT1R in tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega Pijeira, Martha Sahylí; Rodríguez Riera, Zalua; Pérez Nario, Arian; Soares Bernardes, Emerson; Gonçalves Nunes, Paulo; Sérgio Ivone Carvalho; Chammas, Roger; Elsinga, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Losartan is an antagonist of type 1 angiotensin II receptor (AT1R) and a drug widely used for the treatment of hypertension. Several studies have shown that losartan derivatives radiolabelled beta and gamma detect and quantify the expression of AT1R in some organs such as the heart and kidneys through the use of molecular imaging techniques. Furthermore, an expression of the AT1 receptor has been described in various types of tumors and correlates with an increased proliferation index and angiogenesis. Several groups have confirmed the antitumor effect of losartan potential, for example, in reducing tumor growth of a subtype of breast cancer. In this paper the synthesis of new radiotracer 18 F-fluoroethyl Losartan, and its standard compound is described. The standard compound was synthesized via fluoroethyl losartan reaction between losartan and fluoroethyl tosylate potassium in dimethylformamide at 80 ° C for 2 hours under argon. The base used in the reaction was sodium hydride. a complex mixture of products including the desired product fluoroethyl losartan with 14% yield was obtained. This compound was analyzed by HPLC and characterized by widely different spectroscopic techniques: 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 19F NMR, HSQC, HMBC and mass spectroscopy. 18 F synthesis losartan-fluoroethyl by indirect labeling of losartan potassium with 18 F-fluoroethyl prosthetic group tosylate to 80°C for 20 min under nitrogen is achieved manually, using hydrate of sodium as base. The compound was purified by preparative HPLC semi-(Acetonitrile (A) / agua 0 ,1% TFA (B), 60-80% A for 30 min, 4 mL / min, tR 8.9 min) and was obtained in 8 -21% (n = 5) and higher yield 99% radiochemical purity. The product identity was confirmed by comparison of residence times of the labeled product and the standard compound, HPLC analysis obtained under the same conditions: Acetonitrile (A) / agua 0 ,1% TFA (B), 55:45 A / B , 1 mL / min, tR 9.6 min. The 18 F-labeled prosthetic group fluoroethyl tosylate was

  1. Channel opening of γ-aminobutyric acid receptor from rat brain: molecular mechanisms of the receptor responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cash, D.J.; Subbarao, K.

    1987-01-01

    The function of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, which mediate transmembrane chloride flux, can be studied by use of 36 Cl - isotope tracer with membrane from mammalian brain by quench-flow technique, with reaction times that allow resolution of the receptor desensitization rates from the ion flux rates. The rates of chloride exchange into the vesicles in the absence and presence of GABA were characterized with membrane from rat cerebral cortex. Unspecific 36 Cl - influx was completed in three phases of ca. 3% (t/sub 1/2/ = 0.6 s), 56% (t/sub 1/2 = 82 s), and 41% (t/sub 1/2 = 23 min). GABA-mediated, specific chloride exchange occurred with 6.5% of the total vesicular internal volume. The GABA-dependent 36 Cl - influx proceeded in two phases, each progressively slowed by desensitization. The measurements supported the presence of two distinguishable active GABA receptors on the same membrane mediating chloride exchange into the vesicles. The half-response concentrations were similar for both receptors. The two receptors were present in the activity ratio of ca. 4/1, similar to the ratio of low affinity to high-affinity GABA sites found in ligand binding experiments. The desensitization rates have a different dependence on GABA concentration than the channel-opening equilibria. For both receptors, the measurements over a 2000-fold GABA concentration range required a minimal mechanism involving the occupation of both of the two GABA binding sites for significant channel opening; then the receptors were ca. 80% open. Similarly for both receptors, desensitization was mediated by a different pair of binding sites, although desensitization with only one ligand molecule bound could occur at a 20-fold slower rate

  2. New evidence for hominin carcass processing strategies at 1.5 Ma, Koobi Fora, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pobiner, Briana L; Rogers, Michael J; Monahan, Christopher M; Harris, John W K

    2008-07-01

    Reconstruction of early Pleistocene hominin carcass acquisition and processing behaviors are necessarily based at least in part on butchered fossil bones. This paper provides zooarchaeological and taphonomic analyses and behavioral interpretations of three approximately 1.5 million-year-old archaeofaunas from areas 1A and 103 in the Okote Member of the Koobi Fora Formation, northern Kenya: FwJj14A, FwJj14B, and GaJi14. These sites are all located in similar paleoenvironmental contexts, near shallow water with swampy, seasonally flooded areas, and some evidence for more wooded or gallery forest settings. Both individual specimen--and assemblage-level analyses of butchery-marked bones indicate that the hominins appear to have practiced similar butchery strategies at all of these sites, with butchery (defleshing, disarticulation, and marrow extraction) of both high- and low-ranked skeletal elements with no apparent preference for prey size, skeletal region, limb class, or limb portion. Only four tooth-marked specimens, including one likely crocodile-tooth-marked bone, are preserved in all three archaeofaunas. A paucity of limb epiphyses suggests that bone-crunching hyenids may have deleted these portions subsequent to hominin butchery. Strangely, there are no stone tools preserved with the 292 cut-marked and 27 percussion-marked faunal specimens (out of a total of 6,039 specimens), suggesting that raw material availability may have conditioned hominin lithic discard patterns at these locales. These assemblages increase our knowledge of the dietary behavior and ecology of Homo erectus, and provide support for variability in early Pleistocene hominin carcass foraging patterns.

  3. Psychological distress among adolescents in Chengdu, Sichuan at 1 month after the 2008 Sichuan earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Joseph T F; Yu, Xiaonan; Zhang, Jianxin; Mak, Winnie W S; Choi, Kai Chow; Lui, Wacy W S; Zhang, Jianxin; Chan, Emily Y Y

    2010-05-01

    A devastating earthquake occurred on May 12, 2008 in Sichuan, China. This study investigated the prevalence and factors in association with psychological problems among secondary school students living in Chengdu (90 km away from the disaster epicenter) in June 2008. In a cross-sectional survey, 3,324 secondary students self-administered a structured questionnaire in classroom setting. Validated scales were used in this study. Among all respondents, 22.3% reported post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); 22.6% were probable depression cases; 10.6% reported suicidal ideation; and 14.1% would like to receive psychological counseling. No gender differences were found. While social/emotional support from teachers or peers (OR from 0.40 to 0.78) and exposure to positive news reports (OR from 0.59 to 0.62) were found protective, prior experience of severe mental distress (OR from 1.60 to 2.68) and corporal punishment (OR from 1.31 to 1.58), worry about future aftershocks (OR from 1.64 to 3.11), absence from school when it was not closed (OR from 1.38 to 1.48), exposures to scary or sorrowful disaster media coverage (OR from 1.39 to 2.07), post-disaster visits to affected sites (OR from 1.51 to 1.59), separation from parents (OR = 1.61), etc., were risk factors predictive of some of the aforementioned psychological problems. Negative mental health impacts were prevalent among the respondents. Teachers, parents, and the mass media are all important in maintaining good mental health among adolescents that are indirectly affected by the severe earthquake. The results have important implications for earthquake preparedness and relief work in the future.

  4. Neurotransmitter receptors as signaling platforms in anterior pituitary cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemková, Hana; Stojilkovic, S. S.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 463, C (2018), s. 49-64 ISSN 0303-7207 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-12695S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : pituitary * ligand-gated receptor channels * G protein -coupled receptors * neurotransmitters * action potentials * calcium signaling * hormone secretion Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 3.754, year: 2016

  5. Receptor units responding to movement in the octopus mantle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, P R

    1976-08-01

    1. A preparation of the mantle of Octopus which is inverted over a solid support and which exposes the stellate ganglion and associated nerves is described. 2. Afferent activity can be recorded from stellar nerves following electrical stimulation of the pallial nerve. The latency and frequency of the phasic sensory response is correlated with the contraction of the mantle musculature. 3. It is proposed that receptors cells located in the muscle, and their activity following mantle contraction, form part of a sensory feedback system in the mantle. Large, multipolar nerve cells that were found between the two main layers of circular muscle in the mantle could be such receptors.

  6. Hormonal receptors and response to treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loven, D.; Rakowsky, E.; Stein, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Response to several types of endocrine therapy or chemotherapy was evaluated in 60 patients with breast cancer. Estrogen and progesterone receptors were determined by radioimmunoassay. Response to endocrine therapy was significantly higher (P<0.01) among estrogen receptor (ER)-positive cases than among ER-negative cases. The response to chemotherapy did not differ significantly between the two groups. The results of this small series support the conclusion that determination of ER is valuable in planning endocrine treatment of the breast cancer patient, whereas response to chemotherapy does not correlate with ER levels. (author)

  7. Use of spiritual coping strategies by gender, race/ethnicity, and religion at 1 and 3 months after infant's/child's intensive care unit death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Dawn M; Youngblut, JoAnne M; Brooten, Dorothy

    2017-10-01

    In the United States, 57,000 children (newborn to 18 years) die annually. Bereaved parents may rely on religious or spiritual beliefs in their grief. The study's purpose was to examine differences in parents' use of spiritual and religious coping practices by gender, race/ethnicity, and religion at 1 and 3 months after infant/ICU death. The sample consisted of 165 bereaved parents, 78% minority. The Spiritual Coping Strategies Scale was used to measure religious and spiritual coping practices, separately. One-way ANOVAs indicated that Black non-Hispanic mothers used significantly more religious coping practices at 3 months than White non-Hispanic mothers. Protestant and Catholic parents used more religious coping practices than the "no" and "other" religion groups at 1 and 3 months. Within the 30 mother-father dyads (paired t-tests), mothers reported significantly greater use of religious coping practices at 1 and 3 months and spiritual coping practices at 3 months than fathers. Religious coping practices were most commonly used by Black mothers and Protestant and Catholic parents. Within dyads, mothers used more spiritual and religious coping practices than fathers. These findings are beneficial for healthcare personnel in providing support to bereaved parents of diverse races/ethnicities and religions. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  8. Involvement of PPAR-γ in the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of angiotensin type 1 receptor inhibition: effects of the receptor antagonist telmisartan and receptor deletion in a mouse MPTP model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrido-Gil Pablo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several recent studies have shown that angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1 antagonists such as candesartan inhibit the microglial inflammatory response and dopaminergic cell loss in animal models of Parkinson's disease. However, the mechanisms involved in the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of AT1 blockers in the brain have not been clarified. A number of studies have reported that AT1 blockers activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR γ. PPAR-γ activation inhibits inflammation, and may be responsible for neuroprotective effects, independently of AT1 blocking actions. Methods We have investigated whether oral treatment with telmisartan (the most potent PPAR-γ activator among AT1 blockers provides neuroprotection against dopaminergic cell death and neuroinflammation, and the possible role of PPAR-γ activation in any such neuroprotection. We used a mouse model of parkinsonism induced by the dopaminergic neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP and co-administration of the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 to study the role of PPAR-γ activation. In addition, we used AT1a-null mice lesioned with MPTP to study whether deletion of AT1 in the absence of any pharmacological effect of AT1 blockers provides neuroprotection, and investigated whether PPAR-γ activation may also be involved in any such effect of AT1 deletion by co-administration of the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662. Results We observed that telmisartan protects mouse dopaminergic neurons and inhibits the microglial response induced by administration of MPTP. The protective effects of telmisartan on dopaminergic cell death and microglial activation were inhibited by co-administration of GW9662. Dopaminergic cell death and microglial activation were significantly lower in AT1a-null mice treated with MPTP than in mice not subjected to AT1a deletion. Interestingly, the protective effects of AT1 deletion were also inhibited by co

  9. Radioiodinated ligands for dopamine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, H.F.

    1994-01-01

    The dopamine receptor system is important for normal brain function; it is also the apparent action site for various neuroleptic drugs for the treatment of schizophrenia and other metal disorders. In the past few years radioiodinated ligands for single photon emission tomography (SPECT) have been successfully developed and tested in humans: [ 123 I]TISCH for D1 dopamine receptors; [ 123 I]IBZM, epidepride, IBF and FIDA2, four iodobenzamide derivatives, for D2/D3 dopamine receptors. In addition, [ 123 I]β-CIT (RTI-55) and IPT, cocaine derivatives, for the dopamine reuptake site are potentially useful for diagnosis of loss of dopamine neurons. The first iodinated ligand, (R)trans-7-OH-PIPAT, for D3 dopamine receptors, was synthesized and characterized with cloned cell lines (Spodoptera frugiperda, Sf9) expressing the D2 and D3 dopamine receptors and with rat basal forebrain membrane preparations. Most of the known iodobenzamides displayed similar potency in binding to both D2 and D3 dopamine receptors expressed in the cell lines. Initial studies appear to suggest that by fine tuning the structures it may be possible to develop agents specific for D2 and D3 dopamine receptors. It is important to investigate D2/D3 selectivity for this series of potent ligands

  10. Labeled receptor ligands for spect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, H.F.

    1989-01-01

    Receptor specific imaging agents for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can potentially be useful in the understanding of basic biochemistry and pharmacology of receptors. SPECT images may also provide tools for evaluation of density and binding kinetics of a specific receptor, information important for diagnosis and patient management. Basic requirements for receptor imaging agents are: (a) they are labeled with short-lived isotopes, (b) they show high selectivity and specific uptake, (c) they exhibit high target/background ratio, and (d) they can be modeled to obtain quantitative information. Several good examples of CNS receptor specific ligands labeled with I-123 have been developed, including iodoQNB, iodoestrogen iodobenzadiazepine, iodobenazepine, iodobenzamides for muscarinic, estrogen benzadiazepine, D-1 and D-2 dopamine receptors. With the advent of newer and faster SPECT imaging devices, it may be feasible to quantitate the receptor density by in vivo imaging techniques. These new brain imaging agents can provide unique diagnostic information, which may not be available through other imaging modalities, such as CT and MRI

  11. Identification of Solar Events Responsible for ICMEs at 1AU - Estimation of Chirality and Helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Roger K.; tran, Tham; Riley, Pete

    2017-08-01

    We start with the table of identified interplanetary magnetic clouds provided by the WIND/SWI project at https://wind.gsfc.nasa.gov/mfi/mag_cloud_S1.html .Our procedure uses the following steps:1) We take candidates observed during the HMI era from the above catalogue.2) We average cloud start and end times.3) We subtract an estimated travel time to get an origin time.4) We find a halo or partial halo CME near the origin time using the CDAW catalogue.5) We estimate a quadrant for the solar event from the CME shape.6) We use the jHelioviewer on AIA 173 differences with a 5 minute cadence to find an ejected loop near the origin time.7) We place the foot points near the locations of maxima and minima of Br (i.e. the strongest fields of opposite sign).8) We find the field gradients such as (curl B)r at these points.The above steps have been applied to the 37 clouds listed in the MFI table for the period 2011 to 2012 with the result that only 7 clouds could be identified and clearly associated with solar surface origination points. The MFI table includes an estimation of the cloud chirality. Transverse magnetic fields on the solar surface can be determinedfrom the observations of the HMI instrument on the SDO spacecraft in two different ways: the standard HMI pipeline or the Ulrich - Boyden method. The Ulrich - Boyden method gives the correct chirality for all 7 cases while the standard pipeline gives the correct chirality for 6 of the 7 clouds.The clouds are belowAR Solar Source HelicityMFI Number Source Day/Hr Coord Pred Obs129 11158 11/02/15:02:24 S22W09-S18W18 L L133 11226 11/06/01:18:36 S21E19-S19E15 R R134 11226-11227 11/06/02:07:41 S20E26-S21E16 R R138 11289-11293 11/09/13:23:12 N23W13-N17W23 L L148 11504 12/06/14:14:12 S16E11-S16E03 R R154 11560-11561 12/09/02:04:00 N01W04-N05W11 L L161 11610 12/11/10:05:12 S24E11-S20E07 R RThis research has been supported by NASA through award NNX15AF39G to Predictive Science, Inc. and subaward to UCLA

  12. Distinct Phosphorylation Clusters Determine the Signaling Outcome of Free Fatty Acid Receptor 4/G Protein-Coupled Receptor 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prihandoko, Rudi; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Hudson, Brian D

    2016-01-01

    of these phosphoacceptor sites to alanine completely prevented phosphorylation of mFFA4 but did not limit receptor coupling to extracellular signal regulated protein kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) activation. Rather, an inhibitor of Gq/11proteins completely prevented receptor signaling to ERK1/2. By contrast, the recruitment...... activation. These unique observations define differential effects on signaling mediated by phosphorylation at distinct locations. This hallmark feature supports the possibility that the signaling outcome of mFFA4 activation can be determined by the pattern of phosphorylation (phosphorylation barcode...

  13. Angiotensin-2-mediated Ca2+ signaling in the retinal pigment epithelium: role of angiotensin-receptor-associated-protein and TRPV2 channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Barro-Soria

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (AngII receptor (ATR is involved in pathologic local events such as neovascularisation and inflammation including in the brain and retina. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE expresses ATR in its AT1R form, angiotensin-receptor-associated protein (Atrap, and transient-receptor-potential channel-V2 (TRPV2. AT1R and Atrap co-localize to the basolateral membrane of the RPE, as shown by immunostaining. Stimulation of porcine RPE (pRPE cells by AngII results in biphasic increases in intracellular free Ca(2+inhibited by losartan. Xestospongin C (xest C and U-73122, blockers of IP3R and PLC respectively, reduced AngII-evoked Ca(2+response. RPE cells from Atrap(-/- mice showed smaller AngII-evoked Ca(2+peak (by 22% and loss of sustained Ca(2+elevation compared to wild-type. The TRPV channel activator cannabidiol (CBD at 15 µM stimulates intracellular Ca(2+-rise suggesting that porcine RPE cells express TRPV2 channels. Further evidence supporting the functional expression of TRPV2 channels comes from experiments in which 100 µM SKF96365 (a TRPV channel inhibitor reduced the cannabidiol-induced Ca(2+-rise. Application of SKF96365 or reduction of TRPV2 expression by siRNA reduced the sustained phase of AngII-mediated Ca(2+transients by 53%. Thus systemic AngII, an effector of the local renin-angiotensin system stimulates biphasic Ca(2+transients in the RPE by releasing Ca(2+from cytosolic IP3-dependent stores and activating ATR/Atrap and TRPV2 channels to generate a sustained Ca(2+elevation.

  14. XMRV: usage of receptors and potential co-receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaddam Durga

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background XMRV is a gammaretrovirus first identified in prostate tissues of Prostate Cancer (PC patients and later in the blood cells of patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS. Although XMRV is thought to use XPR1 for cell entry, it infects A549 cells that do not express XPR1, suggesting usage of other receptors or co-receptors. Methods To study the usage of different receptors and co- receptors that could play a role in XMRV infection of lymphoid cells and GHOST (GFP- Human osteosarcoma cells expressing CD4 along with different chemokine receptors including CCR1, CCR2, etc., were infected with XMRV. Culture supernatants and cells were tested for XMRV replication using real time quantitative PCR. Results Infection and replication of XMRV was seen in a variety of GHOST cells, LNCaP, DU145, A549 and Caski cell lines. The levels of XMRV replication varied in different cell lines showing differential replication in different cell lines. However, replication in A549 which lacks XPR1 expression was relatively higher than DU145 but lower than, LNCaP. XMRV replication varied in GHOST cell lines expressing CD4 and each of the co- receptors CCR1-CCR8 and bob. There was significant replication of XMRV in CCR3 and Bonzo although it is much lower when compared to DU145, A549 and LNCaP. Conclusion XMRV replication was observed in GHOST cells that express CD4 and each of the chemokine receptors ranging from CCR1- CCR8 and BOB suggesting that infectivity in hematopoietic cells could be mediated by use of these receptors.

  15. Oxoanion Recognition by Benzene-based Tripodal Pyrrolic Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bill, Nathan [University of Texas at Austin; Kim, Dae-Sik [University of Texas at Austin; Kim, Sung Kuk [University of Texas at Austin; Park, Jung Su [University of Texas at Austin; Lynch, Vincent M. [University of Texas at Austin; Young, Neil J [ORNL; Hay, Benjamin [ORNL; Yang, Youjun [University of Texas at Austin; Anslyn, Eric [University of Texas at Austin; Sessler, Jonathan L. [University of Texas

    2012-01-01

    Two new tripodal receptors based on pyrrole- and dipyrromethane-functionalised derivatives of a sterically geared precursor, 1,3,5-tris(aminomethyl)-2,4,6-triethylbenzene, are reported; these systems, compounds 1 and 2, display high affinity and selectivity for tetrahedral anionic guests, in particular dihydrogen phosphate, pyrophosphate and hydrogen sulphate, in acetonitrile as inferred from isothermal titration calorimetry measurements. Support for the anion-binding ability of these systems comes from theoretical calculations and a single-crystal X-ray diffraction structure of the 2:2 (host:guest) dihydrogen phosphate complex is obtained in the case of the pyrrole-based receptor system, 1. Keywords anion receptors, dihydrogen phosphate, hydrogen sulphate, X-ray structure, theoretical calculations.

  16. Sex Steroid Hormone Receptor Expression Affects Ovarian Cancer Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Skovbjerg Arildsen, Nicolai; Malander, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Although most ovarian cancers express estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and androgen (AR) receptors, they are currently not applied in clinical decision making. We explored the prognostic impact of sex steroid hormone receptor protein and mRNA expression on survival...... in epithelial ovarian cancer. METHODS: Immunohistochemical stainings for ERα, ERβ, PR, and AR were assessed in relation to survival in 118 serous and endometrioid ovarian cancers. Expression of the genes encoding the four receptors was studied in relation to prognosis in the molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer...... in ovarian cancer and support that tumors should be stratified based on molecular as well as histological subtypes in future studies investigating the role of endocrine treatment in ovarian cancer....

  17. Increased angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in temporal arteries from patients with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrijevic, Ivan; Malmsjö, Malin; Andersson, Christina

    2009-01-01

    -AT(2) antibodies, was performed on formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded temporal arteries. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: AT(1) and AT(2) receptor immunostaining intensity was quantified. RESULTS: Hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections of temporal arteries from patients with GCA showed intimal hyperplasia...

  18. Peripheral adrenergic receptors in hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, M. C.; Brodde, O. E.; Insel, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    Increased sympathoadrenal activity appears to play an important role in the development or maintenance of elevated blood pressure in hypertensive patients and various animal models of hypertension. Alterations of adrenergic receptor number or responsiveness might contribute to this increased

  19. Are olfactory receptors really olfactive?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giorgi, Franco; Maggio, Roberto; Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2011-01-01

    environmental conditions. By adopting this standpoint, the functional attribution as olfactory or chemotactic sensors to these receptors should not be seen neither as a cause conditioning receptor gene expression, nor as a final effect resulting from genetically predetermined programs, but as a direct...... and odor-decoding processes. However, this type of explanation does not entirely justify the role olfactory receptors have played during evolution, since they are also expressed ectopically in different organs and/or tissues. Homologous olfactory genes have in fact been found in such diverse cells and....../or organs as spermatozoa, testis and kidney where they are assumed to act as chemotactic sensors or renin modulators. To justify their functional diversity, homologous olfactory receptors are assumed to share the same basic role: that of conferring a self-identity to cells or tissues under varying...

  20. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) is designed to foster the development of a comprehensive understanding of the structure, function, and role in disease...

  1. Prolactin receptor, growth hormone receptor, and putative somatolactin receptor in Mozambique tilapia: tissue specific expression and differential regulation by salinity and fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, A L; Fox, B K; Davis, L K; Visitacion, N; Kitahashi, T; Hirano, T; Grau, E G

    2007-01-01

    In fish, pituitary growth hormone family peptide hormones (growth hormone, GH; prolactin, PRL; somatolactin, SL) regulate essential physiological functions including osmoregulation, growth, and metabolism. Teleost GH family hormones have both differential and overlapping effects, which are mediated by plasma membrane receptors. A PRL receptor (PRLR) and two putative GH receptors (GHR1 and GHR2) have been identified in several teleost species. Recent phylogenetic analyses and binding studies suggest that GHR1 is a receptor for SL. However, no studies have compared the tissue distribution and physiological regulation of all three receptors. We sequenced GHR2 from the liver of the Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus), developed quantitative real-time PCR assays for the three receptors, and assessed their tissue distribution and regulation by salinity and fasting. PRLR was highly expressed in the gill, kidney, and intestine, consistent with the osmoregulatory functions of PRL. PRLR expression was very low in the liver. GHR2 was most highly expressed in the muscle, followed by heart, testis, and liver, consistent with this being a GH receptor with functions in growth and metabolism. GHR1 was most highly expressed in fat, liver, and muscle, suggesting a metabolic function. GHR1 expression was also high in skin, consistent with a function of SL in chromatophore regulation. These findings support the hypothesis that GHR1 is a receptor for SL. In a comparison of freshwater (FW)- and seawater (SW)-adapted tilapia, plasma PRL was strongly elevated in FW, whereas plasma GH was slightly elevated in SW. PRLR expression was reduced in the gill in SW, consistent with PRL's function in freshwater adaptation. GHR2 was elevated in the kidney in FW, and correlated negatively with plasma GH, whereas GHR1 was elevated in the gill in SW. Plasma IGF-I, but not GH, was reduced by 4 weeks of fasting. Transcript levels of GHR1 and GHR2 were elevated by fasting in the muscle. However

  2. Troglitazone stimulates β-arrestin-dependent cardiomyocyte contractility via the angiotensin II type 1A receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilley, Douglas G.; Nguyen, Anny D.; Rockman, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists are commonly used to treat cardiovascular diseases, and are reported to have several effects on cardiovascular function that may be due to PPARγ-independent signaling events. Select angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) interact with and modulate PPARγ activity, thus we hypothesized that a PPARγ agonist may exert physiologic effects via the angiotensin II type 1 A receptor (AT1 A R). In AT1 A R-overexpressing HEK 293 cells, both angiotensin II (Ang II) and the PPARγ agonist troglitazone (Trog) enhanced AT1 A R internalization and recruitment of endogenous β-arrestin1/2 (βarr1/2) to the AT1 A R. A fluorescence assay to measure diacylglycerol (DAG) accumulation showed that although Ang II induced AT1 A R-G q protein-mediated DAG accumulation, Trog had no impact on DAG generation. Trog-mediated recruitment of βarr1/2 was selective to AT1 A R as the response was prevented by an ARB- and Trog-mediated βarr1/2 recruitment to β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR) was not observed. In isolated mouse cardiomyocytes, Trog increased both % and rate of cell shortening to a similar extent as Ang II, effects which were blocked with an ARB. Additionally, these effects were found to be βarr2-dependent, as cardiomyocytes isolated from βarr2-KO mice showed blunted contractile responses to Trog. These findings show for the first time that the PPARγ agonist Trog acts at the AT1 A R to simultaneously block G q protein activation and induce the recruitment of βarr1/2, which leads to an increase in cardiomyocyte contractility.

  3. L-glutamate Receptor In Paramecium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal-Martínez, Juan; Ortega-Soto, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical experiments were performed in order to establish the presence of a glutamate receptor in the ciliate Paramecium. It was found that an AMPA/KA receptor is functionally expressed in Paramecium and that this receptor is immunologically and fillogenetically related to the AMPA/KA receptor present in vertebrates.

  4. Receptor-targeted metalloradiopharmaceuticals. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    Copper (II) and platinum (II) coordination complexes were prepared and characterized. These complexes were designed to afford structural homology with steroidal and non-steroidal estrogens for possible use as receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals. While weak affinity for the estrogen receptor was detectable, none would appear to have sufficient receptor-affinity for estrogen-receptor-targeted imaging or therapy

  5. [The receptor theory of atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhoded, V G; Bondarenko, V M; Gintsburg, A L

    2010-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacteria can interact with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and induce atheroma formation. The risk of atherosclerosis is decreased in case of TLR4 mutation. Other bacterial ligands and endogenous ligands of TLRs can also be involved in induction of atherogenesis. The general concept of atherosclerosis pathogentsis is presented. According to this concept atherogenesis can be initiated by some reactions resulting from interaction of exogenous and endogenous microbial ligands with Toll-like receptors.

  6. Xenobiotics and the Glucocorticoid Receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulliver, Linda S M

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) is present in virtually every human cell type. Representing a nuclear receptor superfamily, GR has several different isoforms essentially acting as ligand-dependent transcription factors, regulating glucocorticoid-responsive gene expression in both a positive and a negative manner. Although the natural ligand of the Glucocorticoid Receptor, glucocorticoids (GC) represent only some of the multiple ligands for GR. Xenobiotics, ubiquitous in the environment, bind to GR and are also capable of activating or repressing GR gene expression, thereby modulating GR cell and tissue-specific downstream effects in a multitude of ways that include responses to inflammatory, allergic, metabolic, neoplastic and autoimmune processes. Many xenobiotics, if inadequately metabolized by xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and not wholly eliminated, could have deleterious toxic effects with potentially lethal consequences. This review examines GR, the genomic and non-genomic actions of natural and synthetic GC and the body's handling of xenobiotic compounds, before reviewing what is presently known about GR's interactions with many of the more commonly encountered and some of the less well known GR-associated xenobiotics. GR promiscuity and crosstalk with other signaling pathways is discussed, alongside novel roles for GR that include mood disorder and addiction. A knowledge of GR interactions with xenobiotics is increasingly relevant when considering aging populations and the related prevalence of neoplastic disease, together with growing concerns around human exposure to mixtures of chemicals in the environment. Furthermore, escalating rates of obesity, Type 2 diabetes; autoimmune, allergy, addiction and mood disorder-related pathologies, require novel targeted interventions and GR appears a promising pharmacological candidate. - Highlights: • Biological impact of xenobiotics acting through Glucocorticoid Receptor. • Promiscuity of Glucocorticoid

  7. Xenobiotics and the Glucocorticoid Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulliver, Linda S M, E-mail: linda.gulliver@otago.ac.nz

    2017-03-15

    Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) is present in virtually every human cell type. Representing a nuclear receptor superfamily, GR has several different isoforms essentially acting as ligand-dependent transcription factors, regulating glucocorticoid-responsive gene expression in both a positive and a negative manner. Although the natural ligand of the Glucocorticoid Receptor, glucocorticoids (GC) represent only some of the multiple ligands for GR. Xenobiotics, ubiquitous in the environment, bind to GR and are also capable of activating or repressing GR gene expression, thereby modulating GR cell and tissue-specific downstream effects in a multitude of ways that include responses to inflammatory, allergic, metabolic, neoplastic and autoimmune processes. Many xenobiotics, if inadequately metabolized by xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and not wholly eliminated, could have deleterious toxic effects with potentially lethal consequences. This review examines GR, the genomic and non-genomic actions of natural and synthetic GC and the body's handling of xenobiotic compounds, before reviewing what is presently known about GR's interactions with many of the more commonly encountered and some of the less well known GR-associated xenobiotics. GR promiscuity and crosstalk with other signaling pathways is discussed, alongside novel roles for GR that include mood disorder and addiction. A knowledge of GR interactions with xenobiotics is increasingly relevant when considering aging populations and the related prevalence of neoplastic disease, together with growing concerns around human exposure to mixtures of chemicals in the environment. Furthermore, escalating rates of obesity, Type 2 diabetes; autoimmune, allergy, addiction and mood disorder-related pathologies, require novel targeted interventions and GR appears a promising pharmacological candidate. - Highlights: • Biological impact of xenobiotics acting through Glucocorticoid Receptor. • Promiscuity of Glucocorticoid

  8. Molecular Insights into the Transmembrane Domain of the Thyrotropin Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Chantreau

    Full Text Available The thyrotropin receptor (TSHR is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR that is member of the leucine-rich repeat subfamily (LGR. In the absence of crystal structure, the success of rational design of ligands targeting the receptor internal cavity depends on the quality of the TSHR models built. In this subfamily, transmembrane helices (TM 2 and 5 are characterized by the absence of proline compared to most receptors, raising the question of the structural conformation of these helices. To gain insight into the structural properties of these helices, we carried out bioinformatics and experimental studies. Evolutionary analysis of the LGR family revealed a deletion in TM5 but provided no information on TM2. Wild type residues at positions 2.58, 2.59 or 2.60 in TM2 and/or at position 5.50 in TM5 were substituted to proline. Depending on the position of the proline substitution, different effects were observed on membrane expression, glycosylation, constitutive cAMP activity and responses to thyrotropin. Only proline substitution at position 2.59 maintained complex glycosylation and high membrane expression, supporting occurrence of a bulged TM2. The TSHR transmembrane domain was modeled by homology with the orexin 2 receptor, using a protocol that forced the deletion of one residue in the TM5 bulge of the template. The stability of the model was assessed by molecular dynamics simulations. TM5 straightened during the equilibration phase and was stable for the remainder of the simulations. Our data support a structural model of the TSHR transmembrane domain with a bulged TM2 and a straight TM5 that is specific of glycoprotein hormone receptors.

  9. The role of GABAB(1) receptor isoforms in anxiety and depression : genetic and pharmacological studies in the mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobson, Laura Helen

    2007-01-01

    Anxiety and depression disorders represent common, serious and growing health problems world-wide. The neurobiological basis of anxiety and depression, however, remains poorly understood. Further, there is a clear need for the development of better treatments for these disorders. Emerging data with genetic and pharmacological tools supports a role for GABAB receptors in both anxiety and depression. GABAB receptors are metabotropic GABA receptors that are comprised of two subunits, GABAB1 and ...

  10. Post-endocytotic Deubiquitination and Degradation of the MetabotropicAminobutyric Acid Receptor by the Ubiquitin-specific Protease 14

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lahaie, N.; Králíková, Michaela; Prezeau, L.; Blahoš, Jaroslav; Bouvier, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 291, č. 13 (2016), s. 7156-7170 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP303/12/2408 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) * biosensor * deubiquitylation * G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) * GABA receptor * protein degradation * receptor endocytosis * ubiquitination Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.125, year: 2016

  11. Nuclear Receptors, RXR, and the Big Bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ronald M; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2014-03-27

    Isolation of genes encoding the receptors for steroids, retinoids, vitamin D, and thyroid hormone and their structural and functional analysis revealed an evolutionarily conserved template for nuclear hormone receptors. This discovery sparked identification of numerous genes encoding related proteins, termed orphan receptors. Characterization of these orphan receptors and, in particular, of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) positioned nuclear receptors at the epicenter of the "Big Bang" of molecular endocrinology. This Review provides a personal perspective on nuclear receptors and explores their integrated and coordinated signaling networks that are essential for multicellular life, highlighting the RXR heterodimer and its associated ligands and transcriptional mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Rapid synthesis of acetylcholine receptors at neuromuscular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, D A; Drachman, D B; Pestronk, A

    1988-10-11

    The rate of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) degradation in mature, innervated mammalian neuromuscular junctions has recently been shown to be biphasic; up to 20% are rapidly turned over (RTOs; half life less than 1 day) whereas the remainder are lost more slowly ('stable' AChRs; half life 10-12 days). In order to maintain normal junctional receptor density, synthesis and insertion of AChRs should presumably be sufficiently rapid to replace both the RTOs and the stable receptors. We have tested this prediction by blocking pre-existing AChRs in the mouse sternomastoid muscle with alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BuTx), and monitoring the subsequent appearance of 'new' junctional AChRs at intervals of 3 h to 20 days by labeling them with 125I-alpha-BuTx. The results show that new receptors were initially inserted rapidly (16% at 24 h and 28% at 48 h). The rate of increase of 'new' 125I-alpha-BuTx binding sites gradually slowed down during the remainder of the time period studied. Control observations excluded possible artifacts of the experimental procedure including incomplete blockade of AChRs, dissociation of toxin-receptor complexes, or experimentally induced alteration of receptor synthesis. The present demonstration of rapid synthesis and incorporation of AChRs at innervated neuromuscular junctions provides support for the concept of a subpopulation of rapidly turned over AChRs. The RTOs may serve as precursors for the larger population of stable receptors and have an important role in the metabolism of the neuromuscular synapse.

  13. Interaction of Plant Extracts with Central Nervous System Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Lundstrom

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plant extracts have been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of various maladies including neurological diseases. Several central nervous system receptors have been demonstrated to interact with plant extracts and components affecting the pharmacology and thereby potentially playing a role in human disease and treatment. For instance, extracts from Hypericum perforatum (St. John’s wort targeted several CNS receptors. Similarly, extracts from Piper nigrum, Stephania cambodica, and Styphnolobium japonicum exerted inhibition of agonist-induced activity of the human neurokinin-1 receptor. Methods: Different methods have been established for receptor binding and functional assays based on radioactive and fluorescence-labeled ligands in cell lines and primary cell cultures. Behavioral studies of the effect of plant extracts have been conducted in rodents. Plant extracts have further been subjected to mood and cognition studies in humans. Results: Mechanisms of action at molecular and cellular levels have been elucidated for medicinal plants in support of standardization of herbal products and identification of active extract compounds. In several studies, plant extracts demonstrated affinity to a number of CNS receptors in parallel indicating the complexity of this interaction. In vivo studies showed modifications of CNS receptor affinity and behavioral responses in animal models after treatment with medicinal herbs. Certain plant extracts demonstrated neuroprotection and enhanced cognitive performance, respectively, when evaluated in humans. Noteworthy, the penetration of plant extracts and their protective effect on the blood-brain-barrier are discussed. Conclusion: The affinity of plant extracts and their isolated compounds for CNS receptors indicates an important role for medicinal plants in the treatment of neurological disorders. Moreover, studies in animal and human models have confirmed a scientific basis for the

  14. Group Decision Process Support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, John; Hijikata, Masao

    1997-01-01

    Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists.......Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists....

  15. Angiotensin receptor blockers: Focus on cardiac and renal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Somasundaram; Sreedhar, Remya; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Krishnamurthy, Prasanna; Suzuki, Kenji; Nakamura, Masahiko; Watanabe, Kenichi

    2016-04-01

    Angiotensin II, an important component of renin angiotensin system, is a potent vasopressor and its actions are mostly mediated via angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and role of AT2R in counterbalancing the actions of AT1R stimulation are under extensive research. In addition to its physiological actions, angiotensin II plays important roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy, and heart failure. The effects of angiotensin II can be blocked by either suppressing its production by blocking angiotensin converting enzyme or by antagonizing its actions on AT1R using angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs). Instead of the extensive use of ARBs in the treatment of various cardiovascular diseases, proper selection of a particular ARB is crucial as the clinical condition of individual patient is different and also their economic status would play an essential role in medication compliance. Thus a critical review of the proven and promising actions of ARBs against various pathological conditions will be of great importance for the clinicians as well as for the researchers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fibroblast growth factor receptors in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuwei; Ding, Zhongyang

    2017-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors are growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases, exerting their roles in embryogenesis, tissue homeostasis, and development of breast cancer. Recent genetic studies have identified some subtypes of fibroblast growth factor receptors as strong genetic loci associated with breast cancer. In this article, we review the recent epidemiological findings and experiment results of fibroblast growth factor receptors in breast cancer. First, we summarized the structure and physiological function of fibroblast growth factor receptors in humans. Then, we discussed the common genetic variations in fibroblast growth factor receptors that affect breast cancer risk. In addition, we also introduced the potential roles of each fibroblast growth factor receptors isoform in breast cancer. Finally, we explored the potential therapeutics targeting fibroblast growth factor receptors for breast cancer. Based on the biological mechanisms of fibroblast growth factor receptors leading to the pathogenesis in breast cancer, targeting fibroblast growth factor receptors may provide new opportunities for breast cancer therapeutic strategies.

  17. Prognostic Value of Estrogen Receptor alpha and Progesterone Receptor Conversion in Distant Breast Cancer Metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefnagel, Laurien D. C.; Moelans, Cathy B.; Meijer, S. L.; van Slooten, Henk-Jan; Wesseling, Pieter; Wesseling, Jelle; Westenend, Pieter J.; Bart, Joost; Seldenrijk, Cornelis A.; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; Oudejans, Joost; van der Valk, Paul; van Gils, Carla H.; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in the receptor profile of primary breast cancers to their metastases (receptor conversion) have been described for the estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha) and progesterone receptor (PR). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of receptor conversion for ER alpha and

  18. Expression of GABAergic receptors in mouse taste receptor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R Starostik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple excitatory neurotransmitters have been identified in the mammalian taste transduction, with few studies focused on inhibitory neurotransmitters. Since the synthetic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA is expressed in a subset of mouse taste cells, we hypothesized that other components of the GABA signaling pathway are likely expressed in this system. GABA signaling is initiated by the activation of either ionotropic receptors (GABA(A and GABA(C or metabotropic receptors (GABA(B while it is terminated by the re-uptake of GABA through transporters (GATs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR analysis, we investigated the expression of different GABA signaling molecules in the mouse taste system. Taste receptor cells (TRCs in the circumvallate papillae express multiple subunits of the GABA(A and GABA(B receptors as well as multiple GATs. Immunocytochemical analyses examined the distribution of the GABA machinery in the circumvallate papillae. Both GABA(A-and GABA(B- immunoreactivity were detected in the peripheral taste receptor cells. We also used transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP in either the Type II taste cells, which can respond to bitter, sweet or umami taste stimuli, or in the Type III GAD67 expressing taste cells. Thus, we were able to identify that GABAergic receptors are expressed in some Type II and Type III taste cells. Mouse GAT4 labeling was concentrated in the cells surrounding the taste buds with a few positively labeled TRCs at the margins of the taste buds. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of GABAergic receptors localized on Type II and Type III taste cells suggests that GABA is likely modulating evoked taste responses in the mouse taste bud.

  19. Combined Angiotensin Receptor Modulation in the Management of Cardio-Metabolic Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulis, Ludovit; Foulquier, Sébastien; Namsolleck, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, such as hypertension, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia or obesity are linked with chronic low-grade inflammation and dysregulation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Consequently, RAS inhibition by ACE inhibitors or angiotensin AT1 receptor (AT1R...... blockade abolishes the AT1R-linked RAS almost completely with subsequent risk of hypotension and hypotension-related events, i.e. syncope or renal dysfunction. Such complications might be especially prominent in patients with renal impairment or patients with isolated systolic hypertension and normal...

  20. Active site-dependent initiation at 1/sup 0/C by Chymase (CHY) of rat serosal mast cell (RSMC) exocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schick, B.; Austen, K.F.

    1986-03-01

    Exposure of RSMC (> 95% purity) to isolated CHY (0.5-1.5 U/ml), the major secretory granule protease, at 37/sup 0/C results in exocytosis, determined by the release of a soluble secretory granule enzyme, ..beta..-hexosaminidase. CHY-mediated RSMC exocytosis does not occur at 1/sup 0/C. Exposure of RSMC to CHY or ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin (CT) at 1/sup 0/C, removal of buffer and resuspension of RSMC in buffer alone at 37/sup 0/C, yields the same exocytosis as direct exposure of RSMC to those chymotryptic enzymes at 37/sup 0/C. Differences in the interaction of CHY and CT with RSMC at 1/sup 0/C and 37/sup 0/C are dose-dependent, not qualitative. Binding to (< 0.5% of input) and dissociation of /sup 125/I-labeled CT (3-8 x 10/sup 8/ cpm/mg) from RSMC, as determined by spinning through oil, was time independent and saturation of specific binding was not achieved, indicating that the observed binding is nonspecific. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) and lima bean trypsin inhibitor (LBTI) prevent subsequent exocytosis at 37/sup 0/C only if added within the first 10 min of the interaction of RSMC and CHY at 1/sup 0/C. Maximal CHY-mediated RSMC activation at 1/sup 0/C is achieved within 10 min and addition of DFP and LBTI after this period does not affect subsequent exocytosis. The dose- and time-dependent inhibition by DFP and LBTI at 1/sup 0/C of CHY initiation of RSMC exocytosis suggest that an enzymatic action of CHY on RSMC at 1/sup 0/C, not a binding reaction, commits RSMC to exocytosis at 37/sup 0/C.

  1. The Role of Innate Immune System Receptors in Epilepsy Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero-Arreola, Jessica; West, Rachel M; Mendoza-Torreblanca, Julieta; Mendez-Hernandez, Edna; Salas-Pacheco, Jose; Menendez-Gonzalez, Manuel; Freire, Rafael C; Machado, Sergio; Murillo-Rodriguez, Eric; Nardi, Antonio E; Arias-Carrion, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most complex neurological disorders and its study requires a broad knowledge of neurology and neuroscience. It comprises a diverse group of neurological disorders that share the central feature of spontaneous recurrent seizures, and are often accompanied by cognitive deficits and mood disorder. This condition is one of the most common neurological disorders. Until recently, alterations of neuronal activities had been the focus of epilepsy research. This neurocentric emphasis did not address issues that arise in more complex models of epileptogenesis. An important factor in epilepsy that is not regulated directly by neurons is inflammation and the immune response of the brain. Recent evidence obtained in rodent epilepsy models supports the role of immune responses in the initiation and maintenance of epilepsy. Recognition of exogenous pathogens by the innate immune system is mediated by some pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors leading to cell activation and cytokine production. Currently, these receptors have been the focus of epilepsy studies looking to determine whether the innate immune activation is neuroprotective or neurotoxic for the brain. Here, we present the evidence in the literature of the involvement of key innate immune receptors in the development of epilepsy. We address some of the contradictory findings in these studies and also mention possible avenues for research into epilepsy treatments that target these receptors. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Adenosine receptors and caffeine in retinopathy of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Zhang, Shuya; Zhou, Rong; Lin, Zhenlang; Cai, Xiaohong; Lin, Jing; Huo, Yuqing; Liu, Xiaoling

    2017-06-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a major cause of childhood blindness in the world and is caused by oxygen-induced damage to the developing retinal vasculature, resulting in hyperoxia-induced vaso-obliteration and subsequent delayed retinal vascularization and hypoxia-induced pathological neovascularization driven by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway in retina. Current anti-VEGF therapy has shown some effective in a clinical trial, but is associated with the unintended effects on delayed eye growth and retinal vasculature development of preterm infants. Notably, cellular responses to hypoxia are characterized by robust increases in extracellular adenosine production and the markedly induced adenosine receptors, which provide a novel target for preferential control of pathological angiogenesis without affecting normal vascular development. Here, we review the experimental evidence in support of adenosine receptor-based therapeutic strategy for ROP, including the aberrant adenosine signaling in oxygen-induced retinopathy and the role of three adenosine receptor subtypes (A 1 R, A 2A R, A 2B R) in development and treatment of ROP using oxygen-induced retinopathy models. The clinical and initial animal evidence that implicate the therapeutic effect of caffeine (a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist) in treatment of ROP are highlighted. Lastly, we discussed the translational potential as well therapeutic advantage of adenosine receptor- and caffeine-based therapy for ROR and possibly other proliferative retinopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Antiallergic effects of H1-receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroody, F M; Naclerio, R M

    2000-01-01

    The primary mechanism of antihistamine action in the treatment of allergic diseases is believed to be competitive antagonism of histamine binding to cellular receptors (specifically, the H1-receptors), which are present on nerve endings, smooth muscles, and glandular cells. This notion is supported by the fact that structurally unrelated drugs antagonize the H1-receptor and provide clinical benefit. However, H1-receptor antagonism may not be their sole mechanism of action in treating allergic rhinitis. On the basis of in vitro and animal experiments, drugs classified as H1-receptor antagonists have long been recognized to have additional pharmacological properties. Most first-generation H1-antihistamines have anticholinergic, sedative, local anaesthetic, and anti-5-HT effects, which might favourably affect the symptoms of the allergic response but also contribute to side-effects. These additional properties are not uniformly distributed among drugs classified as H1-receptor antagonists. Azatadine, for example, inhibits in vitro IgE-mediated histamine and leukotriene (LT) release from mast cells and basophils. In human challenge models, terfenadine, azatadine, and loratadine reduce IgE-mediated histamine release. Cetirizine reduces eosinophilic infiltration at the site of antigen challenge in the skin, but not the nose. In a nasal antigen challenge model, cetirizine pretreatment did not affect the levels of histamine and prostaglandin D2 recovered in postchallenge lavages, whereas the levels of albumin, N-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester (TAME) esterase activity, and LTs were reduced. Terfenadine, cetirizine, and loratadine blocked allergen-induced hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. In view of the complexity of the pathophysiology of allergy, a number of H1 antagonists with additional properties are currently under development for allergic diseases. Mizolastine, a new H1-receptor antagonist, has been shown to have additional actions that should help reduce the

  4. Toll-like receptors in neonatal sepsis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, Fiona M

    2013-06-01

    Toll-like receptors are vital transmembrane receptors that initiate the innate immune response to many micro-organisms. The discovery of these receptors has improved our understanding of host-pathogen interactions, and these receptors play an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple neonatal conditions such as sepsis and brain injury. Toll-like receptors, especially TLRs 2 and 4, are associated with necrotizing enterocolitis, periventricular leukomalacia and sepsis.

  5. Studies on insulin receptor, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Yukio

    1979-01-01

    The present study is to investigate an influence of starvation and high fat diet on insulin receptor of the plasma membrane by means of radioreceptor assay using 125 I-labelled insulin. Male guinea pigs of Hartley strain were employed for the starvation study, and 125 I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver and kidney was determined at 24, 48 and 72 hours of the fast after the last meal. Male rats of Wistar strain were employed for the high fat study where the diet containing 35% of butter was fed ad libitum for 38 or 68 days. The animals were killed at the fast of 12 hours, and 125 I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver was determined. The results obtained are summarized as follows: 1) An increase in 125 I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver and kidney was observed by the starvation for 24 to 72 hours. 2) The mechanism of the increase by starvation was considered to be different by the organs; it was due to an increase in number of insulin receptor in the liver, and due to an increase in affinity of insulin receptor in the kidney. 3) In non-obese rats fed with high fat diet, the number of insulin receptor on the liver plasma membrane showed a decrease, and this observation clearly indicated that the decrease in number of the receptor did not depend on the obesity. 4) Obese rats also fed with high fat diet presented a decrease in number of insulin receptor without an elevation of insulin levels in the circulating blood. This indicated that at least in the obese rats fed with high fat diet, the decrease in number of the receptor was not due to hyperinsulinemia. (author)

  6. Synthetic Receptors Induce Anti Angiogenic and Stress Signaling on Human First Trimester Cytotrophoblast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed F. Pantho

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The cytotrophoblast (CTB cells of the human placenta have membrane receptors that bind certain cardiotonic steroids (CTS found in blood plasma. One of these, marinobufagenin, is a key factor in the etiology of preeclampsia. Herein, we used synthetic receptors (SR to study their effectiveness on the angiogenic profile of human first trimester CTB cells. The humanextravillous CTB cells (Sw.71 used in this study were derived from first trimester chorionic villus tissue. Culture media of CTB cells treated with ≥1 nM SR level revealed sFlt-1 (Soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 was significantly increased while VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor was significantly decreased in the culture media (* p < 0.05 for each The AT2 receptor (Angiotensin II receptor type 2 expression was significantly upregulated in ≥1 nM SR-treated CTB cells as compared to basal; however, the AT1 (Angiotensin II receptor, type 1 and VEGFR-1 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 receptor expression was significantly downregulated (* p < 0.05 for each. Our results show that the anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effects of SR on CTB cells are similar to the effects of CTS. The observed anti angiogenic activity of SR on CTB cells demonstrates that the functionalized-urea/thiourea molecules may be useful as potent inhibitors to prevent CTS-induced impairment of CTB cells.

  7. Low 5-HT1B receptor binding in the migraine brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deen, Marie; Hansen, Hanne D; Hougaard, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology of migraine may involve dysfunction of serotonergic signaling. In particular, the 5-HT1B receptor is considered a key player due to the efficacy of 5-HT1B receptor agonists for treatment of migraine attacks. Aim To examine the cerebral 5-HT1B receptor binding....... Patients who reported migraine brain regions involved in pain modulation as regions of interest and applied a latent variable model (LVM) to assess the group effect on binding across these regions. Results Our data...... support a model wherein group status predicts the latent variable ( p = 0.038), with migraine patients having lower 5-HT1B receptor binding across regions compared to controls. Further, in a whole-brain voxel-based analysis, time since last migraine attack correlated positively with 5-HT1B receptor...

  8. Vascular Type 1A Angiotensin II Receptors Control BP by Regulating Renal Blood Flow and Urinary Sodium Excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Matthew A; Stegbauer, Johannes; Chen, Daian; Gomez, Jose A; Griffiths, Robert C; Azad, Hooman A; Herrera, Marcela; Gurley, Susan B; Coffman, Thomas M

    2015-12-01

    Inappropriate activation of the type 1A angiotensin (AT1A) receptor contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension and its associated complications. To define the role for actions of vascular AT1A receptors in BP regulation and hypertension pathogenesis, we generated mice with cell-specific deletion of AT1A receptors in smooth muscle cells (SMKO mice) using Loxp technology and Cre transgenes with robust expression in both conductance and resistance arteries. We found that elimination of AT1A receptors from vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) caused a modest (approximately 7 mmHg) yet significant reduction in baseline BP and exaggerated sodium sensitivity in mice. Additionally, the severity of angiotensin II (Ang II)-dependent hypertension was dramatically attenuated in SMKO mice, and this protection against hypertension was associated with enhanced urinary excretion of sodium. Despite the lower BP, acute vasoconstrictor responses to Ang II in the systemic vasculature were largely preserved (approximately 80% of control levels) in SMKO mice because of exaggerated activity of the sympathetic nervous system rather than residual actions of AT1B receptors. In contrast, Ang II-dependent responses in the renal circulation were almost completely eliminated in SMKO mice (approximately 5%-10% of control levels). These findings suggest that direct actions of AT1A receptors in VSMCs are essential for regulation of renal blood flow by Ang II and highlight the capacity of Ang II-dependent vascular responses in the kidney to effect natriuresis and BP control. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  9. Purinergic Receptors in Ocular Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Guzman-Aranguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly “tuned,” can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P1,P4-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A, and P1,P5-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N6-(3-iodobenzyl-5′-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101 have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation.

  10. Scavenger receptors in homeostasis and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Johnathan; Neculai, Dante; Grinstein, Sergio

    2013-09-01

    Scavenger receptors were originally identified by their ability to recognize and to remove modified lipoproteins; however, it is now appreciated that they carry out a striking range of functions, including pathogen clearance, lipid transport, the transport of cargo within the cell and even functioning as taste receptors. The large repertoire of ligands recognized by scavenger receptors and their broad range of functions are not only due to the wide range of receptors that constitute this family but also to their ability to partner with various co-receptors. The ability of individual scavenger receptors to associate with different co-receptors makes their responsiveness extremely versatile. This Review highlights recent insights into the structural features that determine the function of scavenger receptors and the emerging role that these receptors have in immune responses, notably in macrophage polarization and in the pathogenesis of diseases such as atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Photo-antagonism of the GABAA receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Martin; Iqbal, Favaad; Pandurangan, Arun P; Hannan, Saad; Huckvale, Rosemary; Topf, Maya; Baker, James R; Smart, Trevor G

    2014-07-29

    Neurotransmitter receptor trafficking is fundamentally important for synaptic transmission and neural network activity. GABAA receptors and inhibitory synapses are vital components of brain function, yet much of our knowledge regarding receptor mobility and function at inhibitory synapses is derived indirectly from using recombinant receptors, antibody-tagged native receptors and pharmacological treatments. Here we describe the use of a set of research tools that can irreversibly bind to and affect the function of recombinant and neuronal GABAA receptors following ultraviolet photoactivation. These compounds are based on the competitive antagonist gabazine and incorporate a variety of photoactive groups. By using site-directed mutagenesis and ligand-docking studies, they reveal new areas of the GABA binding site at the interface between receptor β and α subunits. These compounds enable the selected inactivation of native GABAA receptor populations providing new insight into the function of inhibitory synapses and extrasynaptic receptors in controlling neuronal excitation.

  12. Dopamine D1 receptor activation maintains motor coordination and balance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Luna, Alberto; Gálvez-Rosas, Arturo; Durand-Rivera, Alfredo; Ramos-Languren, Laura-Elisa; Ríos, Camilo; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio; Bueno-Nava, Antonio

    2018-02-01

    Dopamine (DA) modulates motor coordination, and its depletion, as in Parkinson's disease, produces motor impairment. The basal ganglia, cerebellum and cerebral cortex are interconnected, have functional roles in motor coordination, and possess dopamine D 1 receptors (D 1 Rs), which are expressed at a particularly high density in the basal ganglia. In this study, we examined whether the activation of D 1 Rs modulates motor coordination and balance in the rat using a beam-walking test that has previously been used to detect motor coordination deficits. The systemic administration of the D 1 R agonist SKF-38393 at 2, 3, or 4 mg/kg did not alter the beam-walking scores, but the subsequent administration of the D 1 R antagonist SCH-23390 at 1 mg/kg did produce deficits in motor coordination, which were reversed by the full agonist SKF-82958. The co-administration of SKF-38393 and SCH-23390 did not alter the beam-walking scores compared with the control group, but significantly prevented the increase in beam-walking scores induced by SCH-23390. The effect of the D 1 R agonist to prevent and reverse the effect of the D 1 R antagonist in beam-walking scores is an indicator that the function of D 1 Rs is necessary to maintain motor coordination and balance in rats. Our results support that D 1 Rs mediate the SCH-23390-induced deficit in motor coordination.

  13. Combining GLP-1 receptor agonists with insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul; Vilsbøll, T

    2013-01-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the emergent trend towards diagnosis in younger patients and the progressive nature of this disease, many more patients than before now require insulin to maintain glycaemic control. However, there is a degree of inertia among...... physicians and patients regarding the initiation and intensification of insulin therapy, in part due to concerns about the associated weight gain and increased risk of hypoglycaemia. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) increase insulin release and suppress glucagon secretion in a glucose......, compared with insulin, the antihyperglycaemic efficacy of GLP-1RAs is limited. The combination of a GLP-1RA and insulin might thus be highly effective for optimal glucose control, ameliorating the adverse effects typically associated with insulin. Data from clinical studies support the therapeutic...

  14. A support shield for a powered support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korczynski, P; Rojicek, P

    1982-08-31

    The subject of this invention is a support shield for a powered support. This shield resists creep of the coal from the longwall face, including an inclined longwall. It involves an arrangement wherein the distributor hinge is separated into upper and lower sections. The lower section holds a second hinge and the end of the rod of the pressure cylinder, one end of which is connected to the roof support. An advantage of the support is that compared to existing supports, it is self-advancing and holds stopes with coal which slopes in its formation or has inrushes. To a certain degree it prevents the stope space from ejecting fine pieces of rock from the longwall roof using an inter-timber support between the powered support and the stope. The support shield is moved by a simple system of levers which makes it possible, using a pressurized cylinder, to transmit a significant force to the coal stope. In this case, when the coal inrushes exceed the designed capabilities of the shield, a wooden extension piece is placed between the support and the face, through which the support pressure is applied.

  15. New Regimes of Implosions of Larger Sized Wire Arrays With and Without Modified Central Plane at 1.5-1.7 MA Zebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Weller, M. E.; Shrestha, I.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Stafford, A.; Keim, S. F.; Petkov, E. E.; Lorance, M.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Coverdale, C. A.; Jones, B.

    2013-10-01

    The recent experiments at 1.5-1.7 MA on Zebra at UNR with larger sized planar wires arrays (compared to the wire loads at 1 MA current) have demonstrated higher linear radiation yield and electron temperatures as well as advantages of better diagnostics access to observable plasma regions. Such multi-planar wire arrays had two outer wire planes from mid-Z material to create a global magnetic field (gmf) and mid-Z plasma flow between them. Also, they included a modified central plane with a few Al wires at the edges to influence gmf and to create Al plasma flow in the perpendicular direction. The stationary shock waves which existed over tens of ns on shadow images and the early x-ray emissions before the PCD peak on time-gated spectra were observed. The most recent experiments with similar loads but without the central wires demonstrated a very different regime of implosion with asymmetrical jets and no precursor formation. This work was supported by NNSA under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-NA0001984 and in part by DE-FC52-06NA27616. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Significant Artifact Reduction at 1.5T and 3T MRI by the Use of a Cochlear Implant with Removable Magnet: An Experimental Human Cadaver Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Franca; Wimmer, Wilhelm; Leidolt, Lars; Vischer, Mattheus; Weder, Stefan; Wiest, Roland; Mantokoudis, Georgios; Caversaccio, Marco D

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are standard treatment for postlingually deafened individuals and prelingually deafened children. This human cadaver study evaluated diagnostic usefulness, image quality and artifacts in 1.5T and 3T magnetic resonance (MR) brain scans after CI with a removable magnet. Three criteria (diagnostic usefulness, image quality, artifacts) were assessed at 1.5T and 3T in five cadaver heads with CI. The brain magnetic resonance scans were performed with and without the magnet in situ. The criteria were analyzed by two blinded neuroradiologists, with focus on image distortion and limitation of the diagnostic value of the acquired MR images. MR images with the magnet in situ were all compromised by artifacts caused by the CI. After removal of the magnet, MR scans showed an unequivocal artifact reduction with significant improvement of the image quality and diagnostic usefulness, both at 1.5T and 3T. Visibility of the brain stem, cerebellopontine angle, and parieto-occipital lobe ipsilateral to the CI increased significantly after magnet removal. The results indicate the possible advantages for 1.5T and 3T MR scanning of the brain in CI carriers with removable magnets. Our findings support use of CIs with removable magnets, especially in patients with chronic intracranial pathologies.

  17. Properties of inclusive W, Z events in bar pp collisions at 1.8 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, T.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary measurement of the properties of W and Z production along with accompanying jets has been made in anti pp collisions at 1.8 TeV using the CDF detector at Fermilab. Distributions of jet multiplicity, and boson E T , with and without selection on jet multiplicity, were obtained. Agreement was found with perturbative QCD predictions

  18. Genetic evaluation of weaning weight and probability of lambing at 1 year of age in Targhee lambs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to investigate genetic control of 120-day weaning weight and the probability of lambing at 1 year of age in Targhee ewe lambs. Records of 5,967 ewe lambs born from 1989 to 2012 and first exposed to rams for breeding at approximately 7 months of age were analyzed. Reco...

  19. Study of the interactionπ+p at 1.2 GeV/c π+ laboratory momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladron de Guevara, P.

    1973-01-01

    We present the main results of a 0.33 events/urban experiment of π + interactions in hydrogen at 1.2 GeV/c, using the 80 cm Saclay bubble chamber. the partial cross sections of the different reactions and the elastic differential cross section are computed by normalizing to the total cross section obtained by other groups. (Author) 34 refs

  20. Enhancement of abdominal structures on MRI at 1.5 and 3 T: a retrospective intraindividual crossover comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlObaidy, Mamdoh [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Department of Radiology, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Radiology, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Ramalho, Miguel; Velloni, Fernanda; Matos, Antonio P.; Herman, Kevin; Semelka, Richard C. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Radiology, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2017-04-15

    To quantitatively compare the extent of enhancement of abdominal structures on MRI in an intraindividual fashion at 1.5 and 3 T. HIPAA-compliant, retrospective, longitudinal, intraindividual, crossover study, with waived informed consent, of consecutive individuals scanned at both 1.5 and 3 T closed-bore magnets using gadobenate dimeglumine during different phases of enhancement at tightly controlled arterial phase timing. Quantitative ROI measurements and qualitative sub-phase arterial phase assignments were independently performed by two radiologists. Qualitative discrepancies were resolved by a senior radiologist. Final population included 60 patients [41 female and 19 male; age, 49.35 ± 18.31 years (range 16-81); weight, 78.88 ± 20.3 kg (range 44.5-136)]. Similar enhancement peak patterns were noted at both field strengths. Interobserver agreement of quantitative evaluations was substantial. Significantly higher amplitudes of enhancement peaks were noted for all abdominal solid organs during all phases at 3 T, except for the pancreas (p = 0.17-0.30). Significantly higher amplitudes of enhancement peaks of the abdominal aorta at 1.5 T were noted. Similar peak patterns of enhancement for abdominal structures were observed at 1.5 and 3 T, with solid abdominal organs showing a higher percentage enhancement at 3 T, while unexpectedly higher aortic higher percentage enhancement was observed at 1.5 T. (orig.)

  1. In vivo 1H spectroscopy of the human brain at 1.5 tesla. Preliminary experience at a clinical installation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O; Larsson, H; Jensen, K M

    1990-01-01

    In vivo localized water suppressed proton spectroscopy of human brain was carried out on 15 healthy volunteers and 2 patients suffering from a brain tumour and an infarction, respectively. The measurements were performed on a whole body MR system, operating at 1.5 tesla using the stimulated echo...

  2. Enhancement effects and relaxivities of gadolinium-DTPA at 1.5 versus 3 tesla. A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Makoto; Shibata, Eri; Kanbara, Yoshiyuki; Ehara, Shigeru

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference in enhancement effects and relaxivities of the gadolinium chelate at 1.5 and 3 Tesla (T) and to elucidate the contribution of the high magnetic field to contrast enhancement in spin-echo (SE) and gradient-echo (GRE) images. Phantoms containing water with or without gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) at different concentrations were scanned using 1.5T and 3T MRI scanners of the same manufacturer and under the same temperature conditions and scanning parameters. Relaxivities of gadolinium, R 1 and R 2 , were estimated from serial T 1 and T 2 values of the phantoms using linear regression. Contrast enhancement ratios in SE and GRE T 1 -weighted images were compared at 1.5 and 3T. The R 1 and R 2 of Gd-DTPA at 1.5 and 3T were 4.79 and 5.14, and 4.50 and 5.09, respectively. Although the relaxivities at 3T were slightly lower than those at 1.5T, the contrast enhancement ratio improved in both SE and GRE images as a result of T 1 prolongation of the water at 3T. The decrease in relaxivities of the Gd-DTPA at 3T appears to be so small that T 1 prolongation of the water improves contrast enhancement, suggesting a potential clinical advantage in administration of Gd-DTPA at high field strength. (author)

  3. Outline of therapeutic interventions with muscarinic receptor-mediated transmission

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Šantrůčková, Eva; Randáková, Alena; Janíčková, Helena; Zimčík, Pavel; Rudajev, Vladimír; Michal, Pavel; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, Suppl.1 (2014), S177-S189 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/0259; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10060 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cholinergic transmission * muscarinic receptors * therapy * Alzheimer's disease, * schizophrenia Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  4. Structural Perspectives of Insulin Receptor Isoform-Selective Insulin Analogs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiráček, Jiří; Žáková, Lenka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, Jul 27 (2017), č. článku 167. ISSN 1664-2392 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19018S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : insulin receptor * insulin binding * analog * diabetes * glucose Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 3.675, year: 2016 http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fendo.2017.00167/full

  5. TAM receptor signaling in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstyn-Cohen, Tal

    2017-01-01

    TYRO3, AXL and MERTK comprise the TAM family of receptor protein tyrosine kinases. Activated by their ligands, protein S (PROS1) and growth-arrest-specific 6 (GAS6), they mediate numerous cellular functions throughout development and adulthood. Expressed by a myriad of cell types and tissues, they have been implicated in homeostatic regulation of the immune, nervous, vascular, bone and reproductive systems. The loss-of-function of TAM signaling in adult tissues culminates in the destruction of tissue homeostasis and diseased states, while TAM gain-of-function in various tumors promotes cancer phenotypes. Combinatorial ligand-receptor interactions may elicit different molecular and cellular responses. Many of the TAM regulatory functions are essentially developmental, taking place both during embryogenesis and postnatally. This review highlights current knowledge on the role of TAM receptors and their ligands during these developmental processes in the immune, nervous, vascular and reproductive systems.

  6. How calcium makes endocytic receptors attractive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian B F; Moestrup, Søren K

    2014-01-01

    of the receptor. Endosomal acidification and calcium efflux lead to the essential ligand-receptor affinity switch and separation. Recent data, including crystal structures of receptor-ligand complexes, now reveal how calcium, in different types of domain scaffolds, functions in a common way as a removable...... 'lynchpin' that stabilizes favorable positioning of ligand-attractive receptor residues. In addition to explaining how calcium depletion can cause ligand-receptor dissociation, the new data add further insight into how acidification contributes to dissociation through structural changes that affect...... the receptor calcium sites....

  7. Lessons from crystal structures of kainate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Pickering, Darryl S

    2017-01-01

    Kainate receptors belong to the family of ionotropic glutamate receptors. These receptors assemble from five subunits (GluK1-5) into tetrameric ion channels. Kainate receptors are located at both pre- and postsynaptic membranes in the central nervous system where they contribute to excitatory...... synaptic transmission and modulate network excitability by regulating neurotransmitter release. Dysfunction of kainate receptors has been implicated in several neurological disorders such as epilepsy, schizophrenia and depression. Here we provide a review on the current understanding of kainate receptor...

  8. Probe-Dependent Negative Allosteric Modulators of the Long-Chain Free Fatty Acid Receptor FFA4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watterson, Kenneth R; Hansen, Steffen V F; Hudson, Brian D

    2017-01-01

    High-affinity and selective antagonists that are able to block the actions of both endogenous and synthetic agonists of G protein-coupled receptors are integral to analysis of receptor function and to support suggestions of therapeutic potential. Although there is great interest in the potential...... of endogenous and synthetic agonists, clear agonist probe dependence in the nature of allosteric modulation was apparent. Although AH-7614 did not antagonize the second long-chain free fatty acid receptor, free fatty acid receptor 1, the simple chemical structure of AH-7614 containing features found in many...

  9. Intraindividual comparison of myocardial delayed enhancement MR imaging using gadobenate dimeglumine at 1.5 T and 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klumpp, Bernhard D.; Seeger, Achim; Fenchel, Michael; Kramer, Ulrich; Claussen, Claus D.; Miller, Stephan [Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Department for Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Sandstede, Joern [Roentgenzentrum, Hamburg (Germany); Lodemann, Klaus P. [Bracco Altana Pharma, Konstanz (Germany); Hoevelborn, Tobias [Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Department for Cardiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    For contrast-enhanced imaging techniques relying on strong T1 weighting, 3 T provides increased contrast compared with 1.5 T. The aim of our study was the intraindividual comparison of delayed enhancement MR imaging at 1.5 T and at 3 T. Twenty patients with myocardial infarction were examined at 1.5 T and 3 T. Fifteen minutes after injection of contrast agent (0.1 mmol gadobenate dimeglumine per kg body weight), inversion recovery gradient recalled echo (IR-GRE) sequences were acquired (1.5 T/3 T: TR 11.0/9.9 ms, TE 4.4/4.9 ms, flip 30 /30 , slice thickness 6/6 mm) to assess myocardial viability. Two observers rated image quality (Wilcoxon signed rank test). Quantification of hyperenhanced myocardium and standardized SNR/CNR measurements were performed (Student's t test). There was no significant difference with respect to image quality (1.5 T/3 T: 3.5/3.3, p = 0.34, reader 1; 2.4/2.7, p = 0.12, reader 2) and infarction size (760 {+-} 566/828 {+-} 677 mm{sup 2} at 1.5 T, 808 {+-} 639/826 {+-} 726 mm{sup 2} at 3 T, reader 1/reader 2, p > 0.05). Mean SNR in hyperenhanced/normal myocardium was 19.2/6.2 at 1.5 T and 29.5/8.8 at 3 T (p < 0.05). Mean CNR was 14.3 at 1.5 T and 26.0 at 3 T (p < 0.05). Delayed enhancement MR imaging at 3 T is a robust procedure yielding superior tissue contrast at 3 T compared with 1.5 T which is, however, not reflected by increased image quality. (orig.)

  10. Calix[4]arenes Containing a Ureido Functionality on the Lower Rim as Highly Efficient Receptors for Anion Recognition.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klejch, T.; Slavíček, J.; Hudeček, O.; Eigner, V.; Gutierrez, Natalia Andrea; Cuřínová, Petra; Lhoták, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 9 (2016), s. 7935-7942 ISSN 1144-0546 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : calix[4]arene * anion recognition * receptors Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.269, year: 2016

  11. Synergistic extraction of some divalent metal cations into nitrobenzene by using strontium dicarbollylcobaltate and electroneutral macrocyclic lactam receptor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Makrlík, E.; Sedláková, Zdeňka; Vaňura, P.; Selucký, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 295, č. 3 (2013), s. 2263-2266 ISSN 0236-5731 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : divalent metal cations * macrocyclic lactam receptor * complexation Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.415, year: 2013

  12. Certification of support services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hroch, A.; Osusky, V.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the process of certification of support services in the Slovenske elektrarne, a. s. is described. The nuclear power plants are also included into support services. Provisions and economic aspects of support services are discussed

  13. Role of membrane cholesterol in differential sensitivity of muscarinic receptor subtypes to persistently bound xanomeline

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Randáková, Alena; Dolejší, Eva; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zimčík, Pavel; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Jakubík, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 133, May 1 (2018), s. 129-144 ISSN 0028-3908 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05696S; GA ČR(CZ) GA17-16182S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * membrane cholesterol * xanomeline * receptor activation * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Physiology (including cytology) Impact factor: 5.012, year: 2016

  14. The human transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 channel is sensitized via the ERK pathway

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vyklická, Lenka; Boukalová, Štěpána; Mačíková, Lucie; Chvojka, Štěpán; Vlachová, Viktorie

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 292, č. 51 (2017), s. 21083-21091 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-15839S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) * extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) * keratinocyte * phosphorylation * transient receptor potential channels * TRP channels Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 4.125, year: 2016

  15. The formation of acetylcholine receptor clusters visualized with quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng H Benjamin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Motor innervation of skeletal muscle leads to the assembly of acetylcholine receptor (AChR clusters in the postsynaptic membrane at the vertebrate neuromuscular junction (NMJ. Synaptic AChR aggregation, according to the diffusion-mediated trapping hypothesis, involves the establishment of a postsynaptic scaffold that "traps" freely diffusing receptors into forming high-density clusters. Although this hypothesis is widely cited to explain the formation of postsynaptic AChR clusters, direct evidence at molecular level is lacking. Results Using quantum dots (QDs and live cell imaging, we provide new measurements supporting the diffusion-trap hypothesis as applied to AChR cluster formation. Consistent with published works, experiments on cultured Xenopus myotomal muscle cells revealed that AChRs at clusters that formed spontaneously (pre-patterned clusters, also called hot spots and at those induced by nerve-innervation or by growth factor-coated latex beads were very stable whereas diffuse receptors outside these regions were mobile. Moreover, despite the restriction of AChR movement at sites of synaptogenic stimulation, individual receptors away from these domains continued to exhibit free diffusion, indicating that AChR clustering at NMJ does not involve an active attraction of receptors but is passive and diffusion-driven. Conclusion Single-molecular tracking using QDs has provided direct evidence that the clustering of AChRs in muscle cells in response to synaptogenic stimuli is achieved by two distinct cellular processes: the Brownian motion of receptors in the membrane and their trapping and immobilization at the synaptic specialization. This study also provides a clearer picture of the "trap" that it is not a uniformly sticky area but consists of discrete foci at which AChRs are immobilized.

  16. Morbillivirus receptors and tropism: multiple pathways for infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki eSato

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Morbilliviruses, which include measles virus (MeV, canine distemper virus, and rinderpest virus, are among the most important pathogens in their respective hosts and cause severe syndromes. Morbilliviruses are enveloped viruses with 2 envelope proteins, one of which is hemagglutinin (H protein, which plays a role in binding to cellular receptors. During morbillivirus infection, the virus initially targets lymphoid cells and replicates efficiently in the lymph nodes. The principal cellular receptor for morbillivirus is signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM, also called CD150, which is exclusively expressed on immune cells. This feature reflects the strong lymphoid cell tropism and viral spread in the infected body. Morbillivirus infection, however, affects various tissues in the body, including the lung, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, vascular endothelium, and brain. Thus, other receptors for morbilliviruses in addition to SLAM might exist. Recently, nectin-4 has been identified as a novel epithelial cell receptor for MeV. The expression of nectin-4 is localized to polarized epithelial cells, and this localization supports the notion of cell tropism since MeV also grows well in the epithelial cells of the respiratory tract. Although 2 major receptors for lymphoid and epithelial cells in natural infection have been identified, morbillivirus can still infect many other types of cells with low infectivity, suggesting the existence of inefficient but ubiquitously expressed receptors. We have identified other molecules that are implicated in morbillivirus infection of SLAM-negative cells by alternative mechanisms. These findings indicate that morbillivirus utilizes multiple pathways for establishment of infection. These studies will advance our understanding of morbillivirus tropism and pathogenesis.

  17. A complex pattern of chemokine receptor expression is seen in osteosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luettichau, Irene von; Huss, Ralf; Nelson, Peter J; Segerer, Stephan; Wechselberger, Alexandra; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Nathrath, Michaela; Kremer, Markus; Henger, Anna; Djafarzadeh, Roghieh; Burdach, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most frequent bone tumor in childhood and adolescence. Patients with primary metastatic disease have a poor prognosis. It is therefore important to better characterize the biology of this tumor to define new prognostic markers or therapeutic targets for tailored therapy. Chemokines and their receptors have been shown to be involved in the development and progression of malignant tumors. They are thought to be active participants in the biology of osteosarcoma. The function of specific chemokines and their receptors is strongly associated with the biological context and microenvironment of their expression. In this report we characterized the expression of a series of chemokine receptors in the complex environment that defines osteosarcoma. The overall level of chemokine receptor mRNA expression was determined using TaqMan RT-PCR of microdissected archival patient biopsy samples. Expression was then verified at the protein level by immunohistochemistry using a series of receptor specific antibody reagents to elucidate the cellular association of expression. Expression at the RNA level was found for most of the tested receptors. CCR1 expression was found on infiltrating mononuclear and polynuclear giant cells in the tumor. Cells associated with the lining of intratumoral vessels were shown to express CCR4. Infiltrating mononuclear cells and tumor cells both showed expression of the receptor CCR5, while CCR7 was predominantly expressed by the mononuclear infiltrate. CCR10 was only very rarely detected in few scattered infiltrating cells. Our data elucidate for the first time the cellular context of chemokine receptor expression in osteosarcoma. This is an important issue for better understanding potential chemokine/chemokine receptor function in the complex biologic processes that underlie the development and progression of osteosarcoma. Our data support the suggested involvement of chemokines and their receptors in diverse aspects of the biology

  18. Dopamine D4 Receptor Counteracts Morphine-Induced Changes in µ Opioid Receptor Signaling in the Striosomes of the Rat Caudate Putamen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Suárez-Boomgaard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mu opioid receptor (MOR is critical in mediating morphine analgesia. However, prolonged exposure to morphine induces adaptive changes in this receptor leading to the development of tolerance and addiction. In the present work we have studied whether the continuous administration of morphine induces changes in MOR protein levels, its pharmacological profile, and MOR-mediated G-protein activation in the striosomal compartment of the rat CPu, by using immunohistochemistry and receptor and DAMGO-stimulated [35S]GTPγS autoradiography. MOR immunoreactivity, agonist binding density and its coupling to G proteins are up-regulated in the striosomes by continuous morphine treatment in the absence of changes in enkephalin and dynorphin mRNA levels. In addition, co-treatment of morphine with the dopamine D4 receptor (D4R agonist PD168,077 fully counteracts these adaptive changes in MOR, in spite of the fact that continuous PD168,077 treatment increases the [3H]DAMGO Bmax values to the same degree as seen after continuous morphine treatment. Thus, in spite of the fact that both receptors can be coupled to Gi/0 protein, the present results give support for the existence of antagonistic functional D4R-MOR receptor-receptor interactions in the adaptive changes occurring in MOR of striosomes on continuous administration of morphine.

  19. Distinct angiotensin II receptor in primary cultures of glial cells from rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raizada, M.K.; Phillips, M.I.; Crews, F.T.; Sumners, C.

    1987-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang-II) has profound effects on the brain. Receptors for Ang-II have been demonstrated on neurons, but no relationship between glial cells and Agn-II has been established. Glial cells (from the hypothalamus and brain stem of 1-day-old rat brains) in primary culture have been used to demonstrate the presence of specific Ang-II receptors. Binding of 125 I-Ang-II to glial cultures was rapid, reversible, saturable, and specific for Ang-II. The rank order of potency of 125 I-Ang-II binding was determined. Scatchard analysis revealed a homogeneous population of high-affinity binding sites with a B/sub max/ of 110 fmol/mg of protein. Light-microscopic autoradiography of 125 I-Ang-II binding supported the kinetic data, documenting specific Ang-II receptors on the glial cells. Ang-II stimulated a dose-dependent hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositols in glial cells, an effect mediated by Ang-II receptors. However, Ang-II failed to influence [ 3 H] norepinephrine uptake, and catecholamines failed to regulate Ang-II receptors, effects that occur in neurons. These observations demonstrate the presence of specific Ang-II receptors on the glial cells in primary cultures derived from normotensive rat brain. The receptors are kinetically similar to, but functionally distinct from, the neuronal Ang-II receptors

  20. Effect of ghrelin receptor agonist and antagonist on the activity of arcuate nucleus tyrosine hydroxylase containing neurons in C57BL/6 male mice exposed to normal or high fat diet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pirník, Z.; Majerčíková, Z.; Holubová, Martina; Pirník, R.; Železná, Blanka; Maletínská, Lenka; Kiss, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 4 (2014), s. 477-486 ISSN 0867-5910 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : growth hormone secretagogue receptor * ghrelin receptor agonist * ghrelin receptor antagonist * high fat diet * tyrosine hydroxylase * arcuate nucleus * food intake Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.386, year: 2014

  1. Preparation and evaluation of an astatine-211-labeled sigma receptor ligand for alpha radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Mizuno, Yoshiaki; Washiyama, Kohshin; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Naruto; Kozaka, Takashi; Watanabe, Shigeki; Shinohara, Atsushi; Odani, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sigma receptors are overexpressed in a variety of human tumors, making them potential targets for radionuclide receptor therapy. We have previously synthesized and evaluated 131 I-labeled (+)-2-[4-(4-iodophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol [(+)-[ 131 I]pIV], which has a high affinity for sigma receptors. Therefore, (+)-[ 131 I]pIV significantly inhibited tumor cell proliferation in tumor-bearing mice. In the present study, we report the synthesis and the in vitro and in vivo characterization of (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV, an 211 At-labeled sigma receptor ligand, that has potential use in alpha-radionuclide receptor therapy. Methods: The radiolabeled sigma receptor ligand (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV was prepared using a standard halogenation reaction generating a 91% radiochemical yield with 98% purity after HPLC purification. The partition coefficient of (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV was measured. Cellular uptake experiments and in vivo biodistribution experiments were performed using a mixed solution of (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV and (+)-[ 125 I]pIV; the human prostate cancer cell line DU-145, which expresses high levels of the sigma receptors, and DU-145 tumor-bearing mice. Results: The lipophilicity of (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV was similar to that of (+)-[ 125 I]pIV. DU-145 cellular uptake and the biodistribution patterns in DU-145 tumor-bearing mice at 1 h post-injection were also similar between (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV and (+)-[ 125 I]pIV. Namely, (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV demonstrated high uptake and retention in tumor via binding to sigma receptors. Conclusion: These results indicate that (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV could function as an new agent for alpha-radionuclide receptor therapy.

  2. Preparation and evaluation of an astatine-211-labeled sigma receptor ligand for alpha radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Mizuno, Yoshiaki; Washiyama, Kohshin; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Naruto; Kozaka, Takashi; Watanabe, Shigeki; Shinohara, Atsushi; Odani, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Sigma receptors are overexpressed in a variety of human tumors, making them potential targets for radionuclide receptor therapy. We have previously synthesized and evaluated (131)I-labeled (+)-2-[4-(4-iodophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol [(+)-[(131)I]pIV], which has a high affinity for sigma receptors. Therefore, (+)-[(131)I]pIV significantly inhibited tumor cell proliferation in tumor-bearing mice. In the present study, we report the synthesis and the in vitro and in vivo characterization of (+)-[(211)At]pAtV, an (211)At-labeled sigma receptor ligand, that has potential use in alpha-radionuclide receptor therapy. The radiolabeled sigma receptor ligand (+)-[(211)At]pAtV was prepared using a standard halogenation reaction generating a 91% radiochemical yield with 98% purity after HPLC purification. The partition coefficient of (+)-[(211)At]pAtV was measured. Cellular uptake experiments and in vivo biodistribution experiments were performed using a mixed solution of (+)-[(211)At]pAtV and (+)-[(125)I]pIV; the human prostate cancer cell line DU-145, which expresses high levels of the sigma receptors, and DU-145 tumor-bearing mice. The lipophilicity of (+)-[(211)At]pAtV was similar to that of (+)-[(125)I]pIV. DU-145 cellular uptake and the biodistribution patterns in DU-145 tumor-bearing mice at 1h post-injection were also similar between (+)-[(211)At]pAtV and (+)-[(125)I]pIV. Namely, (+)-[(211)At]pAtV demonstrated high uptake and retention in tumor via binding to sigma receptors. These results indicate that (+)-[(211)At]pAtV could function as an new agent for alpha-radionuclide receptor therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Channel opening of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor from rat brain: molecular mechanisms of the receptor responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, D J; Subbarao, K

    1987-12-01

    The function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, which mediate transmembrane chloride flux, can be studied by use of 36Cl- isotope tracer with membrane from mammalian brain by quench-flow technique, with reaction times that allow resolution of the receptor desensitization rates from the ion flux rates. The rates of chloride exchange into the vesicles in the absence and presence of GABA were characterized with membrane from rat cerebral cortex. Unspecific 36Cl- influx was completed in three phases of ca. 3% (t 1/2 = 0.6 s), 56% (t 1/2 = 82 s), and 41% (t 1/2 = 23 min). GABA-mediated, specific chloride exchange occurred with 6.5% of the total vesicular internal volume. The GABA-dependent 36Cl- influx proceeded in two phases, each progressively slowed by desensitization. The measurements supported the presence of two distinguishable active GABA receptors on the same membrane mediating chloride exchange into the vesicles with initial first-order rate constants of 9.5 s-1 and 2.3 s-1 and desensitizing with first-order rate constants of 21 s-1 and 1.4 s-1, respectively, at saturation. The half-response concentrations were similar for both receptors, 150 microM and 114 microM GABA for desensitization and 105 microM and 82 microM for chloride exchange, for the faster and slower desensitizing receptors, respectively. The two receptors were present in the activity ratio of ca. 4/1, similar to the ratio of "low-affinity" to "high-affinity" GABA sites found in ligand binding experiments. The desensitization rates have a different dependence on GABA concentration than the channel-opening equilibria.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. The lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81/hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morland, Cecilie; Lauritzen, Knut Huso; Puchades, Maja

    2015-01-01

    We have proposed that lactate is a “volume transmitter” in the brain and underpinned this by showing that the lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81 (GPR81, also known as HCA1 or HCAR1), which promotes lipid storage in adipocytes, is also active in the mammalian brain. This includes......, energy metabolism, and energy substrate availability, including a glucose- and glycogen-saving response. HCAR1 may contribute to optimizing the cAMP concentration. For instance, in the prefrontal cortex, excessively high cAMP levels are implicated in impaired cognition in old age, fatigue, stress...

  5. Stability of solubilized benzodiazepine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.J; Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, R.A

    1997-01-01

    According to the observations of other researchers, benzodiazepine receptors solubilized with sodium deoxycholate are unstable, but stability can be improved by exchanging deoxycholate for Triton X-100. In our experiments we conclude that the choice of detergent is not the restrictive factor for the

  6. Serum transferrin receptor in polycythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manteiga, R; Remacha, A F; Sardà, M P; Ubeda, J

    1998-10-01

    We measured serum transferrin receptor (sTfR) levels in 22 patients with polycythemia vera and in 26 cases of secondary polycythemia. In our study, raised sTfR levels in both polycythemia groups were related to iron deficiency.

  7. FMRFamide receptors of Helix aspersa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payza, K.

    1988-01-01

    A receptor binding assay and an isolated heart bioassay were used to identify and characterize the FMRFamide receptors in Helix. In the heart bioassay, FMRFamide increased myocardial contraction force. A potent FMRFamide analog, desaminoTyr-Phe-norLeu-arg-Phe-amide (daYFnLRFamide), was used as a radioiodinated receptor ligand. The high affinity binding of 125 I-daYFnLRFamide at 0 degree C to Helix brain membranes was reversible, saturable, pH-dependent and specific, with a K D of 13-14 nM. A lower affinity (245 nM) site was also observed. Radioligand binding sites were also identified in the heart, male reproductive organs and digestive organs. The structure-activity relations (SAR) of cardiostimulation correlated with the specificity of 125 I-daYFnLRFamide binding to brain and heart receptors. The SAR were similar to those of other molluscan FMRFamide bioassays, except that they showed a marked preference for some analogs with blocked amino-terminals

  8. Pharmacological approach of the receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puech, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper explains the three main goals for clinical positron emission tomography (PET) studies: detection of receptor abnormalities in groups of patients to propose therapeutic indication of new ligands; validation of current hypothesis of drug effect; rational clinical drug development specially for dose-finding studies. (H.W.)

  9. Uncompetitive antagonism of AMPA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Trine F; Tikhonov, Denis B; Bølcho, Ulrik

    2006-01-01

    Philanthotoxins are uncompetitive antagonists of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors presumed to bind to the pore-forming region, but a detailed molecular mechanism for this interaction is missing. Here a small library of novel philanthotoxins was designed and synthesized using a solid-phase strategy. ...

  10. Collective flow measurements with HADES in Au+Au collisions at 1.23A GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardan, Behruz; Hades Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    HADES has a large acceptance combined with a good mass-resolution and therefore allows the study of dielectron and hadron production in heavy-ion collisions with unprecedented precision. With the statistics of seven billion Au-Au collisions at 1.23A GeV recorded in 2012, the investigation of higher-order flow harmonics is possible. At the BEVALAC and SIS18 directed and elliptic flow has been measured for pions, charged kaons, protons, neutrons and fragments, but higher-order harmonics have not yet been studied. They provide additional important information on the properties of the dense hadronic medium produced in heavy-ion collisions. We present here a high-statistics, multidifferential measurement of v1 and v2 for protons in Au+Au collisions at 1.23A GeV.

  11. NMDA receptors and memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard G M

    2013-11-01

    It is humbling to think that 30 years have passed since the paper by Collingridge, Kehl and McLennan showing that one of Jeff Watkins most interesting compounds, R-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (d-AP5), blocked the induction of long-term potentiation in vitro at synapses from area CA3 of the hippocampus to CA1 without apparent effect on baseline synaptic transmission (Collingridge et al., 1983). This dissociation was one of the key triggers for an explosion of interest in glutamate receptors, and much has been discovered since that collectively contributes to our contemporary understanding of glutamatergic synapses - their biophysics and subunit composition, of the agonists and antagonists acting on them, and their diverse functions in different networks of the brain and spinal cord. It can be fairly said that Collingridge et al.'s (1983) observation was the stimulus that has led, on the one hand, to structural biological work at the atomic scale describing the key features of NMDA receptors that enables their coincidence function to happen; and, on the other, to work with whole animals investigating the contributions that calcium signalling via this receptor can have on rhythmical activities controlled by spinal circuits, memory encoding in the hippocampus (the topic of this article), visual cortical plasticity, sensitization in pain, and other functions. In this article, I lay out how my then interest in long-term potentiation (LTP) as a model of memory enabled me to recognise the importance of Collingridge et al.'s discovery - and how I and my colleagues endeavoured to take things forward in the area of learning and memory. This is in some respects a personal story, and I tell it as such. The idea that NMDA receptor activation is essential for memory encoding, though not for storage, took time to develop and to be accepted. Along the way, there have been confusions, challenges, and surprises surrounding the idea that activation of NMDA receptors can

  12. Double cascade erbium fiber laser at 1.7 µm, 2.7 µm, and 1.6 µm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, J.; Frerichs, Ch.; Carbonnier, C.; Unrau, U.B.; Pollnau, Markus; Lüthy, W.; Weber, H.P.

    The output power of the erbium laser at 2.7 um (4I11/2 -> 4I13/2) is enhanced due to simultaneous laser action at 1.7 um (4S3/2 -> 4I9/2) and 1.6 um (4I13/2 -> 4I15/2) in an Er3+-doped fluorozirconate fiber. The laser cascade overwhelms the saturation effect for the transition at 2.7 um by

  13. Climate extremes, land-climate feedbacks and land-use forcing at 1.5°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, Sonia I; Wartenburger, Richard; Guillod, Benoit P; Hirsch, Annette L; Vogel, Martha M; Brovkin, Victor; van Vuuren, Detlef P; Schaller, Nathalie; Boysen, Lena; Calvin, Katherine V; Doelman, Jonathan; Greve, Peter; Havlik, Petr; Humpenöder, Florian; Krisztin, Tamas; Mitchell, Daniel; Popp, Alexander; Riahi, Keywan; Rogelj, Joeri; Schleussner, Carl-Friedrich; Sillmann, Jana; Stehfest, Elke

    2018-05-13

    This article investigates projected changes in temperature and water cycle extremes at 1.5°C of global warming, and highlights the role of land processes and land-use changes (LUCs) for these projections. We provide new comparisons of changes in climate at 1.5°C versus 2°C based on empirical sampling analyses of transient simulations versus simulations from the 'Half a degree Additional warming, Prognosis and Projected Impacts' (HAPPI) multi-model experiment. The two approaches yield similar overall results regarding changes in climate extremes on land, and reveal a substantial difference in the occurrence of regional extremes at 1.5°C versus 2°C. Land processes mediated through soil moisture feedbacks and land-use forcing play a major role for projected changes in extremes at 1.5°C in most mid-latitude regions, including densely populated areas in North America, Europe and Asia. This has important implications for low-emissions scenarios derived from integrated assessment models (IAMs), which include major LUCs in ambitious mitigation pathways (e.g. associated with increased bioenergy use), but are also shown to differ in the simulated LUC patterns. Biogeophysical effects from LUCs are not considered in the development of IAM scenarios, but play an important role for projected regional changes in climate extremes, and are thus of high relevance for sustainable development pathways.This article is part of the theme issue 'The Paris Agreement: understanding the physical and social challenges for a warming world of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels'. © 2018 The Authors.

  14. Study of proton-deuteron break-up reaction in exclusive experiment at 1 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleshin, N.P.; Belostotskij, S.L.; Dotsenko, Yu.V.

    1987-07-01

    The exclusive proton-deuteron break-up reaction pD yields ppn was studied at 1 GeV. Differential cross sections and polarizations of the final protons were measured in the range of neutron-spectator momenta 0 3 3 <0.2 GeV/c, respectively. The data obtained are well described within the framework of impulse approximation with the Paris wave function of the deuteron. (author)

  15. Climate extremes, land–climate feedbacks and land-use forcing at 1.5°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartenburger, Richard; Guillod, Benoit P.; Hirsch, Annette L.; Vogel, Martha M.; Brovkin, Victor; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Schaller, Nathalie; Boysen, Lena; Calvin, Katherine V.; Doelman, Jonathan; Greve, Peter; Havlik, Petr; Humpenöder, Florian; Krisztin, Tamas; Mitchell, Daniel; Popp, Alexander; Riahi, Keywan; Rogelj, Joeri; Schleussner, Carl-Friedrich; Sillmann, Jana; Stehfest, Elke

    2018-01-01

    This article investigates projected changes in temperature and water cycle extremes at 1.5°C of global warming, and highlights the role of land processes and land-use changes (LUCs) for these projections. We provide new comparisons of changes in climate at 1.5°C versus 2°C based on empirical sampling analyses of transient simulations versus simulations from the ‘Half a degree Additional warming, Prognosis and Projected Impacts’ (HAPPI) multi-model experiment. The two approaches yield similar overall results regarding changes in climate extremes on land, and reveal a substantial difference in the occurrence of regional extremes at 1.5°C versus 2°C. Land processes mediated through soil moisture feedbacks and land-use forcing play a major role for projected changes in extremes at 1.5°C in most mid-latitude regions, including densely populated areas in North America, Europe and Asia. This has important implications for low-emissions scenarios derived from integrated assessment models (IAMs), which include major LUCs in ambitious mitigation pathways (e.g. associated with increased bioenergy use), but are also shown to differ in the simulated LUC patterns. Biogeophysical effects from LUCs are not considered in the development of IAM scenarios, but play an important role for projected regional changes in climate extremes, and are thus of high relevance for sustainable development pathways. This article is part of the theme issue ‘The Paris Agreement: understanding the physical and social challenges for a warming world of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels'. PMID:29610382

  16. Climate extremes, land-climate feedbacks and land-use forcing at 1.5°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, Sonia I.; Wartenburger, Richard; Guillod, Benoit P.; Hirsch, Annette L.; Vogel, Martha M.; Brovkin, Victor; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Schaller, Nathalie; Boysen, Lena; Calvin, Katherine V.; Doelman, Jonathan; Greve, Peter; Havlik, Petr; Humpenöder, Florian; Krisztin, Tamas; Mitchell, Daniel; Popp, Alexander; Riahi, Keywan; Rogelj, Joeri; Schleussner, Carl-Friedrich; Sillmann, Jana; Stehfest, Elke

    2018-05-01

    This article investigates projected changes in temperature and water cycle extremes at 1.5°C of global warming, and highlights the role of land processes and land-use changes (LUCs) for these projections. We provide new comparisons of changes in climate at 1.5°C versus 2°C based on empirical sampling analyses of transient simulations versus simulations from the `Half a degree Additional warming, Prognosis and Projected Impacts' (HAPPI) multi-model experiment. The two approaches yield similar overall results regarding changes in climate extremes on land, and reveal a substantial difference in the occurrence of regional extremes at 1.5°C versus 2°C. Land processes mediated through soil moisture feedbacks and land-use forcing play a major role for projected changes in extremes at 1.5°C in most mid-latitude regions, including densely populated areas in North America, Europe and Asia. This has important implications for low-emissions scenarios derived from integrated assessment models (IAMs), which include major LUCs in ambitious mitigation pathways (e.g. associated with increased bioenergy use), but are also shown to differ in the simulated LUC patterns. Biogeophysical effects from LUCs are not considered in the development of IAM scenarios, but play an important role for projected regional changes in climate extremes, and are thus of high relevance for sustainable development pathways. This article is part of the theme issue `The Paris Agreement: understanding the physical and social challenges for a warming world of 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels'.

  17. New basic science initiatives with the angiotensin II receptor blocker valsartan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc de Gasparo

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary Angiotensin II (Ang II plays a key role in the regulation of blood pressure and fluid homeostasis. Valsartan is a highly selective Ang II receptor blocker that specifically and selectively blocks Ang II at the AT1-receptor. In animal models, valsartan has shown positive effects on vasoconstriction, proliferation, remodelling, endothelial function and thrombogenesis, inflammation and atherosclerosis. These data are likely to be confirmed by the results of current clinical trials and valsartan is set to provide improved cardiovascular therapy in the future.

  18. No effect of angiotensin II AT(2)-receptor antagonist PD 123319 on cerebral blood flow autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estrup, T M; Paulson, O B; Strandgaard, S

    2001-01-01

    Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) or angiotensin AT1-receptor antagonists shift the limits of autoregulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) towards lower blood pressure (BP). The role of AT2-receptors in the regulation of the cerebral...... group. CBF was measured by the intracarotid 133xenon injection method and BP was raised by noradrenaline infusion and lowered by controlled haemorrhage in separate groups of rats. The limits of autoregulation were determined by computed least-sum-of-squares analysis. PD 123319 did not influence baseline...

  19. Ror receptor tyrosine kinases: orphans no more

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Jennifer L.; Kuntz, Steven G.; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2008-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor (Ror) proteins are a conserved family of tyrosine kinase receptors that function in developmental processes including skeletal and neuronal development, cell movement and cell polarity. Although Ror proteins were originally named because the associated ligand and signaling pathway were unknown, recent studies in multiple species have now established that Ror proteins are Wnt receptors. Depending on the cellular context, Ror proteins can either act...

  20. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  1. In vivo (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy of amniotic fluid and fetal lung at 1.5 T: technical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Vahidi, Kiarash; Caughey, Aaron B; Coakley, Fergus V; Vigneron, Daniel B; Kurhanewicz, John; Mow, Ben; Joe, Bonnie N

    2008-10-01

    To identify the major technical challenges associated with in utero single-voxel proton spectroscopy of amniotic fluid and fetal lung and to evaluate the feasibility of performing in utero fetal spectroscopy for fetal lung maturity testing. Fetal magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy of amniotic fluid and fetal lung were performed at 1.5 T in 8 near-term pregnant women. Presence/absence of lactate and choline peaks was tabulated. Ex vivo spectra were obtained from amniotic fluid samples to investigate and refine sequence parameters. Spectroscopy failed in 3 of 8 cases due to maternal discomfort (n = 1) or fetal gastroschisis (n = 2). Both fetal motion and low signal-to-noise ratio were limiting factors for the remaining 5 clinical in vivo studies at 1.5 T. Ex vivo and in vivo studies suggested feasibility for detecting lactate from amniotic fluid within a reasonable clinical scan time (4-5 minutes). Lactate was detected in 3 of 5 patients. Choline detection was limited and was detected in 1 patient. Minor motion effects can be overcome but continuous fetal motion is problematic. Lactate detection seems clinically feasible, but choline detection requires additional technical development and, potentially, further imaging at a higher field strength because of the low signal-to-noise ratio at 1.5 T. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Synaptic Bistability Due to Nucleation and Evaporation of Receptor Clusters

    KAUST Repository

    Burlakov, V. M.; Emptage, N.; Goriely, A.; Bressloff, P. C.

    2012-01-01

    interacting receptors and is stabilized against clustering by a high nucleation barrier. The other state contains a receptor gas in equilibrium with a large cluster of immobile receptors, which is stabilized by the turnover rate of receptors into and out

  3. Repeated blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors, but not of glucocorticoid receptors impairs food rewarded spatial learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, B. R.; Korte, S. M.; Buwalda, B.; La Fleur, S. E.; Bohus, B.; Luiten, P. G.

    1998-01-01

    Corticosteroids from the adrenal cortex influence a variety of behaviours including cognition, learning and memory. These hormones act via two intracellular receptors, the mineralo-corticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). These two receptor types display a high concentration and

  4. Repeated blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors, but not of glucocorticoid receptors impairs food rewarded spatial learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, BRK; Korte, SM; Buwalda, B; la Fleur, SE; Bohus, B; Luiten, PGM

    Corticosteroids from the adrenal cortex influence a variety of behaviours including cognition, learning and memory. These hormones act via two intracellular receptors, the mineralo-corticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). These two receptor types display a high concentration and

  5. Receptores de progesterona en meningioma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herminio Ojeda Di Ninno

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Determinar la presencia de los receptores de progesterona en meningiomas y su frecuencia mediante la inmunohistoquímica. Material y Métodos: Se analizaron 24 muestras provenientes de pacientes intervenidos quirúrgicamente en el Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas entre los años 1990 y 1992 con diagnóstico anatomopatológico de meningioma. La determinación de los receptores se hizo mediante una técnica de inmunohistoquímica rápida que permite el estudio de tejidos fijados previamente en parafina. Resultados: De los 24 casos estudiados, nueve resultaron ser positivos en la determinación de receptores de progesterona (37%. Se pudo observar un marcado predominio dentro del grupo femenino quienes constituyeron 8/9 casos positivos. Conclusiones: El empleo de esta reciente técnica de inmunohistoquímica aplicada a tejido de fijado en parafina, nos ha permitido confirmar la presencia de receptores de progesterona en meningiomas con una frecuencia elevada que creemos amerita un estudio más amplio de manera sistemática que incluya la intervención terapéutica mediante el uso de antiprogestágenos, como el Mifepristone o RU 486. De este estudio podrían beneficiarse no sólo pacientes operados recientemente sino aquellos que, intervenidos en el pasado sean detectados como portadores de receptores de progesterona mediante la aplicación de esta novedosa técnica (Rev Med Hered 1995; 6: 121-130.

  6. A new family of insect tyramine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Klærke, Dan Arne; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P

    2005-01-01

    in the genomic databases from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae and the honeybee Apis mellifera. These four tyramine or tyramine-like receptors constitute a new receptor family that is phylogenetically distinct from the previously identified insect octopamine/tyramine receptors. The Drosophila tyramine...

  7. Imaging of receptors in clinical neurosciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korf, J

    This article deals with the question why should one determine receptors in the brain with positron and single photon emission tomography (PET and SPECT, respectively). Radiopharmaceuticals for a wide variety of receptors are available now. Receptors studies with PET and SPECT have thus far focused

  8. Receptor conversion in distant breast cancer metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefnagel, L.D.C.

    2013-01-01

    The routine pathological work-up of breast cancer includes the evaluation of the estrogen receptor (ERα), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) which reveals biological information about the tumour as well as provides predictive biomarkers regarding hormonal

  9. Molecular pharmacology of human NMDA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Maiken; Hansen, Kasper Bø; Andersen, Karen Toftegaard

    2012-01-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are ionotropic glutamate receptors that mediate excitatory neurotransmission. NMDA receptors are also important drug targets that are implicated in a number of pathophysiological conditions. To facilitate the transition from lead compounds in pre-clinical ani...

  10. Immune receptors involved in Streptococcus suis recognition by dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pier Lecours

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis is an important swine pathogen and an emerging zoonotic agent of septicemia and meningitis. Knowledge on host immune responses towards S. suis, and strategies used by this pathogen for subversion of these responses is scarce. The objective of this study was to identify the immune receptors involved in S. suis recognition by dendritic cells (DCs. Production of cytokines and expression of co-stimulatory molecules by DCs were shown to strongly rely on MyD88-dependent signaling pathways, suggesting that DCs recognize S. suis and become activated mostly through Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling. Supporting this fact, TLR2(-/- DCs were severely impaired in the release of several cytokines and the surface expression of CD86 and MHC-II. The release of IL-12p70 and CXC10, and the expression of CD40 were found to depend on signaling by both TLR2 and TLR9. The release of IL-23 and CXCL1 were partially dependent on NOD2. Finally, despite the fact that MyD88 signaling was crucial for DC activation and maturation, MyD88-dependent pathways were not implicated in S. suis internalization by DCs. This first study on receptors involved in DC activation by S. suis suggests a major involvement of MyD88 signaling pathways, mainly (but not exclusively through TLR2. A multimodal recognition involving a combination of different receptors seems essential for DC effective response to S. suis.

  11. Hair receptor sensitivity to changes in laminar boundary layer shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, B T

    2010-01-01

    Biologists have shown that bat wings contain distributed arrays of flow-sensitive hair receptors. The hair receptors are hypothesized to feedback information on airflows over the bat wing for enhanced stability or maneuverability during flight. Here, we study the geometric specialization of hair-like structures for the detection of changes in boundary layer velocity profiles (shapes). A quasi-steady model that relates the flow velocity profile incident on the longitudinal axis of a hair to the resultant moment and shear force at the hair base is developed. The hair length relative to the boundary layer momentum thickness that maximizes the resultant moment and shear-force sensitivity to changes in boundary layer shape is determined. The sensitivity of the resultant moment and shear force is shown to be highly dependent on hair length. Hairs that linearly taper to a point are shown to provide greater output sensitivity than hairs of uniform cross-section. On an order of magnitude basis, the computed optimal hair lengths are in agreement with the range of hair receptor lengths measured on individual bat species. These results support the hypothesis that bats use hair receptors for detecting changes in boundary layer shape and provide geometric guidelines for artificial hair sensor design and application.

  12. Differential actions of orexin receptors in brainstem cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons revealed by receptor knockouts: implications for orexinergic signaling in arousal and narcolepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi A Kohlmeier

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Orexin neuropeptides influence multiple homeostatic functions and play an essential role in the expression of normal sleep-wake behavior. While their two known receptors (OX1 and OX2 are targets for novel pharmacotherapeutics, the actions mediated by each receptor remain largely unexplored. Using brain slices from mice constitutively lacking either receptor, we used whole-cell and Ca2+ imaging methods to delineate the cellular actions of each receptor within cholinergic (laterodorsal tegmental nucleus; LDT and monoaminergic (dorsal raphe; DR and locus coeruleus; LC brainstem nuclei – where orexins promote arousal and suppress REM sleep. In slices from OX2-/- mice, orexin-A (300 nM elicited wild-type responses in LDT, DR and LC neurons consisting of a depolarizing current and augmented voltage-dependent Ca2+ transients. In slices from OX1-/- mice, the depolarizing current was absent in LDT and LC neurons and was attenuated in DR neurons, although Ca2+-transients were still augmented. Since orexin-A produced neither of these actions in slices lacking both receptors, our findings suggest that orexin-mediated depolarization is mediated by both receptors in DR, but is exclusively mediated by OX1 in LDT and LC neurons, even though OX2 is present and OX2 mRNA appears elevated in brainstems from OX1-/- mice. Considering published behavioral data, these findings support a model in which orexin-mediated excitation of mesopontine cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons contributes little to stabilizing spontaneous waking and sleep bouts, but functions in context-dependent arousal and helps restrict muscle atonia to REM sleep. The augmented Ca2± transients mediated by both receptors appeared mediated by influx via L-type Ca2+ channels, which is often linked to transcriptional signaling. This could provide an adaptive signal to compensate for receptor loss or prolonged antagonism and may contribute to the reduced severity of narcolepsy in single receptor

  13. The role of 5-HT(1A) receptors in learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogren, Sven Ove; Eriksson, Therese M; Elvander-Tottie, Elin; D'Addario, Claudio; Ekström, Joanna C; Svenningsson, Per; Meister, Björn; Kehr, Jan; Stiedl, Oliver

    2008-12-16

    The ascending serotonin (5-HT) neurons innervate the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, septum and amygdala, all representing brain regions associated with various domains of cognition. The 5-HT innervation is diffuse and extensively arborized with few synaptic contacts, which indicates that 5-HT can affect a large number of neurons in a paracrine mode. Serotonin signaling is mediated by 14 receptor subtypes with different functional and transductional properties. The 5-HT(1A) subtype is of particular interest, since it is one of the main mediators of the action of 5-HT. Moreover, the 5-HT(1A) receptor regulates the activity of 5-HT neurons via autoreceptors, and it regulates the function of several neurotransmitter systems via postsynaptic receptors (heteroreceptors). This review assesses the pharmacological and genetic evidence that implicates the 5-HT(1A) receptor in learning and memory. The 5-HT(1A) receptors are in the position to influence the activity of glutamatergic, cholinergic and possibly GABAergic neurons in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and in the septohippocampal projection, thereby affecting declarative and non-declarative memory functions. Moreover, the 5-HT(1A) receptor regulates several transduction mechanisms such as kinases and immediate early genes implicated in memory formation. Based on studies in rodents the stimulation of 5-HT(1A) receptors generally produces learning impairments by interfering with memory-encoding mechanisms. In contrast, antagonists of 5-HT(1A) receptors facilitate certain types of memory by enhancing hippocampal/cortical cholinergic and/or glutamatergic neurotransmission. Some data also support a potential role for the 5-HT(1A) receptor in memory consolidation. Available results also implicate the 5-HT(1A) receptor in the retrieval of aversive or emotional memories, supporting an involvement in reconsolidation. The contribution of 5-HT(1A) receptors in cognitive impairments in various psychiatric disorders is still

  14. Effects of Combined Endothelin A Receptor and Renin-Angiotensin System Blockade on the Course of End-Organ Damage in 5/6 Nephrectomized Ren-2 Hypertensive Rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaněčková, Ivana; Kujal, P.; Husková, Z.; Vaňourková, Z.; Vernerová, Z.; Čertíková; Chábová, V.; Škaroupková, P.; Kramer, H. J.; Tesař, V.; Červenka, L.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 5 (2012), s. 382-392 ISSN 1420-4096 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : 5/6 nephrectomy * Endothelin receptor type A * AT1 receptor blocker * end-organ damage * hypertension Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.596, year: 2012

  15. Hypocretin/Orexin regulation of dopamine signaling and cocaine self-administration is mediated predominantly by hypocretin receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Courtney D; Rau, Andrew R; Yorgason, Jordan T; España, Rodrigo A

    2015-01-21

    Extensive evidence suggests that the hypocretins/orexins influence cocaine reinforcement and dopamine signaling via actions at hypocretin receptor 1. By comparison, the involvement of hypocretin receptor 2 in reward and reinforcement processes has received relatively little attention. Thus, although there is some evidence that hypocretin receptor 2 regulates intake of some drugs of abuse, it is currently unclear to what extent hypocretin receptor 2 participates in the regulation of dopamine signaling or cocaine self-administration, particularly under high effort conditions. To address this, we examined the effects of hypocretin receptor 1, and/or hypocretin receptor 2 blockade on dopamine signaling and cocaine reinforcement. We used in vivo fast scan cyclic voltammetry to test the effects of hypocretin antagonists on dopamine signaling in the nucleus accumbens core and a progressive ratio schedule to examine the effects of these antagonists on cocaine self-administration. Results demonstrate that blockade of either hypocretin receptor 1 or both hypocretin receptor 1 and 2 significantly reduces the effects of cocaine on dopamine signaling and decreases the motivation to take cocaine. In contrast, blockade of hypocretin receptor 2 alone had no significant effects on dopamine signaling or self-administration. These findings suggest a differential involvement of the two hypocretin receptors, with hypocretin receptor 1 appearing to be more involved than hypocretin receptor 2 in the regulation of dopamine signaling and cocaine self-administration. When considered with the existing literature, these data support the hypothesis that hypocretins exert a permissive influence on dopamine signaling and motivated behavior via preferential actions on hypocretin receptor 1.

  16. Evaluation of three immobilization supports and two nutritional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polyurethane foam, Luffa cylindrica sponge and Ca-alginate (3% w/v) were evaluated as immobilization supports for removing reactive black 5 dye using the white rot fungus Trametes versicolor at 1, 4 and 8 days of colonization. According to statistical results, the L. cylindrica sponge was the best support at 4 days of ...

  17. Some theoretical aspects of hormone receptor determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sluiter, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Suitable antisera for determination of hormone receptors are not available for the majority of hormone receptors. Therefore, the determination of hormone receptors is mostly performed in terms of binding capacity for the appropriate hormone, using radioactive hormone labels. Some theoretical aspects of such a receptor determination are discussed including the length of incubation (total or unoccupied receptor concentration), single point or multiple point (Scatchard) analysis (regarding the influence of other specific binders), the correction procedure for non-specific binding and the influence of the circulating hormone level. (Auth.)

  18. Up-regulation of Toll-like receptors 2, 3 and 4 in allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uddman Rolf

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toll-like receptors enable the host to recognize a large number of pathogen-associated molecular patterns such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide, viral RNA, CpG-containing DNA and flagellin. Toll-like receptors have also been shown to play a pivotal role in both innate and adaptive immune responses. The role of Toll-like receptors as a primary part of our microbe defense system has been shown in several studies, but their possible function as mediators in allergy and asthma remains to be established. The present study was designed to examine the expression of Toll-like receptors 2, 3 and 4 in the nasal mucosa of patients with intermittent allergic rhinitis, focusing on changes induced by exposure to pollen. Methods 27 healthy controls and 42 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis volunteered for the study. Nasal biopsies were obtained before and during pollen season as well as before and after allergen challenge. The seasonal material was used for mRNA quantification of Toll-like receptors 2, 3 and 4 with real-time polymerase chain reaction, whereas specimens achieved in conjunction with allergen challenge were used for immunohistochemical localization and quantification of corresponding proteins. Results mRNA and protein representing Toll-like receptors 2, 3 and 4 could be demonstrated in all specimens. An increase in protein expression for all three receptors could be seen following allergen challenge, whereas a significant increase of mRNA only could be obtained for Toll-like receptor 3 during pollen season. Conclusion The up-regulation of Toll-like receptors 2, 3 and 4 in the nasal mucosa of patients with symptomatic allergic rhinitis supports the idea of a role for Toll-like receptors in allergic airway inflammation.

  19. Phorbol ester-induced serine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor decreases its tyrosine kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, S; White, M F; Kahn, C R

    1988-03-05

    The effect of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on the function of the insulin receptor was examined in intact hepatoma cells (Fao) and in solubilized extracts purified by wheat germ agglutinin chromatography. Incubation of ortho[32P]phosphate-labeled Fao cells with TPA increased the phosphorylation of the insulin receptor 2-fold after 30 min. Analysis of tryptic phosphopeptides from the beta-subunit of the receptor by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography and determination of their phosphoamino acid composition suggested that TPA predominantly stimulated phosphorylation of serine residues in a single tryptic peptide. Incubation of the Fao cells with insulin (100 nM) for 1 min stimulated 4-fold the phosphorylation of the beta-subunit of the insulin receptor. Prior treatment of the cells with TPA inhibited the insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation by 50%. The receptors extracted with Triton X-100 from TPA-treated Fao cells and purified on immobilized wheat germ agglutinin retained the alteration in kinase activity and exhibited a 50% decrease in insulin-stimulated tyrosine autophosphorylation and phosphotransferase activity toward exogenous substrates. This was due primarily to a decrease in the Vmax for these reactions. TPA treatment also decreased the Km of the insulin receptor for ATP. Incubation of the insulin receptor purified from TPA-treated cells with alkaline phosphatase decreased the phosphate content of the beta-subunit to the control level and reversed the inhibition, suggesting that the serine phosphorylation of the beta-subunit was responsible for the decreased tyrosine kinase activity. Our results support the notion that the insulin receptor is a substrate for protein kinase C in the Fao cell and that the increase in serine phosphorylation of the beta-subunit of the receptor produced by TPA treatment inhibited tyrosine kinase activity in vivo and in vitro. These data suggest that protein kinase C may regulate the function

  20. P2X receptor-mediated ATP purinergic signaling in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang LH

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Lin-Hua JiangSchool of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, United KingdomAbstract: Purinergic P2X receptors are plasma membrane proteins present in a wide range of mammalian cells where they act as a cellular sensor, enabling cells to detect and respond to extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP, an important signaling molecule. P2X receptors function as ligand-gated Ca2+-permeable cationic channels that open upon ATP binding to elevate intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and cause membrane depolarization. In response to sustained activation, P2X receptors induce formation of a pore permeable to large molecules. P2X receptors also interact with distinct functional proteins and membrane lipids to form specialized signaling complexes. Studies have provided compelling evidence to show that such P2X receptor-mediated ATP-signaling mechanisms determine and regulate a growing number and diversity of important physiological processes, including neurotransmission, muscle contraction, and cytokine release. There is accumulating evidence to support strong causative relationships of altered receptor expression and function with chronic pain, inflammatory diseases, cancers, and other pathologies or diseases. Numerous high throughput screening drug discovery programs and preclinical studies have thus far demonstrated the proof of concepts that the P2X receptors are druggable targets and selective receptor antagonism is a promising therapeutics approach. This review will discuss the recent progress in understanding the mammalian P2X receptors with respect to the ATP-signaling mechanisms, physiological and pathophysiological roles, and development and preclinical studies of receptor antagonists.Keywords: extracellular ATP, ion channel, large pore, signaling complex, chronic pain, inflammatory diseases