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Sample records for at1 receptor supports

  1. The human angiotensin AT(1) receptor supports G protein-independent extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation and cellular proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Aplin, Mark; Hansen, Jonas Tind

    2008-01-01

    The angiotensin AT(1) receptor is a key regulator of blood pressure and body fluid homeostasis, and it plays a key role in the pathophysiology of several cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, congestive heart failure, and arrhythmia. The importance of human angiotensin...

  2. Functionally Selective AT(1) Receptor Activation Reduces Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hostrup, Anders; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Bentzen, Bo Hjort

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is a key peptide in cardiovascular homeostasis and is a ligand for the Angiotensin II type 1 and 2 seven transmembrane receptors (AT(1)R and AT(2)R). The AT(1 )receptor is a seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) mediating the majority of the physiologi...

  3. AT1 receptor signaling pathways in the cardiovascular system.

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    Kawai, Tatsuo; Forrester, Steven J; O'Brien, Shannon; Baggett, Ariele; Rizzo, Victor; Eguchi, Satoru

    2017-11-01

    The importance of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology has been well described whereas the detailed molecular mechanisms remain elusive. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1 receptor) is one of the key players in the renin angiotensin aldosterone system. The AT1 receptor promotes various intracellular signaling pathways resulting in hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, vascular remodeling and end organ damage. Accumulating evidence shows the complex picture of AT1 receptor-mediated signaling; AT1 receptor-mediated heterotrimeric G protein-dependent signaling, transactivation of growth factor receptors, NADPH oxidase and ROS signaling, G protein-independent signaling, including the β-arrestin signals and interaction with several AT1 receptor interacting proteins. In addition, there is functional cross-talk between the AT1 receptor signaling pathway and other signaling pathways. In this review, we will summarize an up to date overview of essential AT1 receptor signaling events and their functional significances in the cardiovascular system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cerebrovascular angiotensin AT1 receptor regulation in cerebral ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, L.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism behind the positive response to the inhibition of the angiotensin II receptor AT(1) in conjunction with stroke is elusive. Here we demonstrate that cerebrovascular AT(1) receptors show increased expression (upregulation) after cerebral ischemia via enhanced translation. This enhanced...

  5. AT1 Receptor Gene Polymorphisms in relation to Postprandial Lipemia

    OpenAIRE

    Klop, B.; van den Berg, T. M.; Rietveld, A.P.; Chaves, J.; Real, J. T.; Ascaso, J. F.; Carmena, R.; Elte, J W F; Manuel Castro Cabezas

    2012-01-01

    Background. Recent data suggest that the renin-angiotensin system may be involved in triglyceride (TG) metabolism. We explored the effect of the common A1166C and C573T polymorphisms of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) gene on postprandial lipemia. Methods. Eighty-two subjects measured daytime capillary TG, and postprandial lipemia was estimated as incremental area under the TG curve. The C573T and A1166C polymorphisms of the AT1R gene were determined. Results. Postprandial lipemia w...

  6. Pharmacological significance of the interplay between angiotensin receptors: MAS receptors as putative final mediators of the effects elicited by angiotensin AT1 receptors antagonists.

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    Pernomian, Larissa; Pernomian, Laena; Gomes, Mayara S; da Silva, Carlos H T P

    2015-12-15

    The interplay between angiotensin AT1 receptors and MAS receptors relies on several inward regulatory mechanisms from renin-angiotensin system (RAS) including the functional crosstalk between angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-7), the competitive AT1 antagonism exhibited by angiotensin-(1-7), the antagonist feature assigned to AT1/MAS heterodimerization on AT1 signaling and the AT1-mediated downregulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Recently, such interplay has acquired an important significance to RAS Pharmacology since a few studies have supporting strong evidences that MAS receptors mediate the effects elicited by AT1 antagonists. The present Perspective provides an overview of the regulatory mechanisms involving AT1 and MAS receptors, their significance to RAS Pharmacology and the future directions on the interplay between angiotensin receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. AT1 Receptor Gene Polymorphisms in relation to Postprandial Lipemia

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    B. Klop

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recent data suggest that the renin-angiotensin system may be involved in triglyceride (TG metabolism. We explored the effect of the common A1166C and C573T polymorphisms of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R gene on postprandial lipemia. Methods. Eighty-two subjects measured daytime capillary TG, and postprandial lipemia was estimated as incremental area under the TG curve. The C573T and A1166C polymorphisms of the AT1R gene were determined. Results. Postprandial lipemia was significantly higher in homozygous carriers of the 1166-C allele (9.39±8.36 mM*h/L compared to homozygous carriers of the 1166-A allele (2.02±6.20 mM*h/L (P<0.05. Postprandial lipemia was similar for the different C573T polymorphisms. Conclusion. The 1166-C allele of the AT1R gene seems to be associated with increased postprandial lipemia. These data confirm the earlier described relationships between the renin-angiotensin axis and triglyceride metabolism.

  8. Binding of Losartan to Angiotensin AT1 Receptors Increases Dopamine D1 Receptor Activation

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    Li, Dong; Scott, Lena; Crambert, Susanne; Zelenin, Sergey; Eklöf, Ann-Christine; Di Ciano, Luis; Ibarra, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Signaling through both angiotensin AT1 receptors (AT1R) and dopamine D1 receptors (D1R) modulates renal sodium excretion and arterial BP. AT1R and D1R form heterodimers, but whether treatment with AT1R antagonists functionally modifies D1R via allosterism is unknown. In this study, the AT1R antagonist losartan strengthened the interaction between AT1R and D1R and increased expression of D1R on the plasma membrane in vitro. In rat proximal tubule cells that express endogenous AT1R and D1R, losartan increased cAMP generation. Losartan increased cAMP in HEK 293a cells transfected with both AT1R and D1R, but it did not increase cAMP in cells transfected with either receptor alone, suggesting that losartan induces D1R activation. Furthermore, losartan did not increase cAMP in HEK 293a cells expressing AT1R and mutant S397/S398A D1R, which disrupts the physical interaction between AT1R and D1R. In vivo, administration of a D1R antagonist significantly attenuated the antihypertensive effect of losartan in rats with renal hypertension. Taken together, these data imply that losartan might exert its antihypertensive effect both by inhibiting AT1R signaling and by enhancing D1R signaling. PMID:22193384

  9. Insulin induces upregulation of vascular AT1 receptor gene expression by posttranscriptional mechanisms.

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    Nickenig, G; Röling, J; Strehlow, K; Schnabel, P; Böhm, M

    1998-12-01

    An interaction of insulin with angiotensin II effects could be pathophysiologically important for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and hypertension. We examined the effect of insulin on AT1 receptor gene expression in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). A 24-hour incubation with insulin (100 nmol/L) produced a 2-fold increase in AT1 receptor density on VSMCs, as assessed by radioligand binding assays. This enhanced AT1 receptor expression was caused by a time- and concentration-dependent upregulation of the AT1 receptor mRNA levels, as assessed by Northern analysis. The maximal effect was detected after a 24-hour incubation of cells with 100 nmol/L insulin (270+/-20%). AT1 receptor upregulation was caused by a stabilization of the AT1 receptor mRNA, because the AT1 receptor mRNA half-life was prolonged from 5 hours under basal conditions to 10 hours after insulin stimulation. In contrast, insulin had no influence on AT1 receptor gene transcription, as assessed by nuclear run-on assays. The insulin-induced AT1 receptor upregulation was followed by an increased functional response, because angiotensin II evoked a significantly elevated intracellular release of calcium in cells that were preincubated with 100 nmol/L insulin for 24 hours. The insulin-induced AT1 receptor upregulation was dependent on tyrosine kinases, as assessed by experiments with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. Furthermore, experiments using the intracellular calcium chelator bis(2-amino-5-methylphenoxy)ethane-N, N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetraacetoxymethyl ester suggest that intracellular calcium release may be involved in AT1 receptor regulation. Insulin-induced upregulation of the AT1 receptor by posttranscriptional mechanisms may explain the association of hyperinsulinemia with hypertension and arteriosclerosis, because activation of the AT1 receptor plays a key role in the regulation of blood pressure and fluid homeostasis.

  10. Abilities of candesartan and other AT1 receptor blockers to impair angiotensin II-induced AT1 receptor activation after wash-out

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    Kiya, Yoshihiro; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Matsuo, Yoshino; Karnik, Sadashiva S; Saku, Keijiro

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) binds to Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor and evokes cell signaling, and subsequently stimulates vasoconstriction and cell proliferation, which eventually lead to cardiovascular disease. Since most AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs) have molecular (differential) effects, we evaluated the specific features of candesartan and compared the abilities of candesartan and other ARBs (olmesartan, telmisartan, valsartan, irbesartan and losartan) to bind to and activate AT1 receptors using a cell-based wash-out assay. Each ARB blocked Ang II-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation and inositol phosphate production to different degrees after wash-out. In addition, a small difference in the molecular structure, i.e. a carboxyl group, between candesartan and candesartan-7H was associated with a difference in the degree of this blocking effect. In addition, interaction between Gln257 in the AT1 receptor and the carboxyl group of candesartan may be partially associated with the effect of candesartan after wash-out. Although our findings regarding the molecular effects of ARB are based on basic research, these findings may lead to an exciting new area in the clinical application of ARBs. PMID:21824992

  11. Abilities of candesartan and other AT(1) receptor blockers to impair angiotensin II-induced AT(1) receptor activation after wash-out.

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    Kiya, Yoshihiro; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Matsuo, Yoshino; Karnik, Sadashiva S; Saku, Keijiro

    2012-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) binds to Ang II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor and evokes cell signaling, and subsequently stimulates vasoconstriction and cell proliferation, which eventually lead to cardiovascular disease. Since most AT(1) receptor blockers (ARBs) have molecular (differential) effects, we evaluated the specific features of candesartan and compared the abilities of candesartan and other ARBs (olmesartan, telmisartan, valsartan, irbesartan and losartan) to bind to and activate AT(1) receptors using a cell-based wash-out assay. Each ARB blocked Ang II-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation and inositol phosphate production to different degrees after wash-out. In addition, a small difference in the molecular structure, i.e. a carboxyl group, between candesartan and candesartan-7H was associated with a difference in the degree of this blocking effect. In addition, interaction between Gln(257) in the AT(1) receptor and the carboxyl group of candesartan may be partially associated with the effect of candesartan after wash-out. Although our findings regarding the molecular effects of ARB are based on basic research, these findings may lead to an exciting new area in the clinical application of ARBs.

  12. Immunohistochemical Localization of AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 Angiotensin II Receptor Subtypes in the Rat Adrenal, Pituitary, and Brain with a Perspective Commentary

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    Courtney Premer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II increases blood pressure and stimulates thirst and sodium appetite in the brain. It also stimulates secretion of aldosterone from the adrenal zona glomerulosa and epinephrine from the adrenal medulla. The rat has 3 subtypes of angiotensin II receptors: AT1a, AT1b, and AT2. mRNAs for all three subtypes occur in the adrenal and brain. To immunohistochemically differentiate these receptor subtypes, rabbits were immunized with C-terminal fragments of these subtypes to generate receptor subtype-specific antibodies. Immunofluorescence revealed AT1a and AT2 receptors in adrenal zona glomerulosa and medulla. AT1b immunofluorescence was present in the zona glomerulosa, but not the medulla. Ultrastructural immunogold labeling for the AT1a receptor in glomerulosa and medullary cells localized it to plasma membrane, endocytic vesicles, multivesicular bodies, and the nucleus. AT1b and AT2, but not AT1a, immunofluorescence was observed in the anterior pituitary. Stellate cells were AT1b positive while ovoid cells were AT2 positive. In the brain, neurons were AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 positive, but glia was only AT1b positive. Highest levels of AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 receptor immunofluorescence were in the subfornical organ, median eminence, area postrema, paraventricular nucleus, and solitary tract nucleus. These studies complement those employing different techniques to characterize Ang II receptors.

  13. Immunohistochemical Localization of AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 Angiotensin II Receptor Subtypes in the Rat Adrenal, Pituitary, and Brain with a Perspective Commentary

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    Premer, Courtney; Lamondin, Courtney; Mitzey, Ann; Speth, Robert C.; Brownfield, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II increases blood pressure and stimulates thirst and sodium appetite in the brain. It also stimulates secretion of aldosterone from the adrenal zona glomerulosa and epinephrine from the adrenal medulla. The rat has 3 subtypes of angiotensin II receptors: AT1a, AT1b, and AT2. mRNAs for all three subtypes occur in the adrenal and brain. To immunohistochemically differentiate these receptor subtypes, rabbits were immunized with C-terminal fragments of these subtypes to generate receptor subtype-specific antibodies. Immunofluorescence revealed AT1a and AT2 receptors in adrenal zona glomerulosa and medulla. AT1b immunofluorescence was present in the zona glomerulosa, but not the medulla. Ultrastructural immunogold labeling for the AT1a receptor in glomerulosa and medullary cells localized it to plasma membrane, endocytic vesicles, multivesicular bodies, and the nucleus. AT1b and AT2, but not AT1a, immunofluorescence was observed in the anterior pituitary. Stellate cells were AT1b positive while ovoid cells were AT2 positive. In the brain, neurons were AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 positive, but glia was only AT1b positive. Highest levels of AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 receptor immunofluorescence were in the subfornical organ, median eminence, area postrema, paraventricular nucleus, and solitary tract nucleus. These studies complement those employing different techniques to characterize Ang II receptors. PMID:23573410

  14. Analysis of Transmembrane Domains 1 and 4 of the Human Angiotensin II AT1 Receptor by Cysteine-scanning Mutagenesis*

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    Yan, Liping; Holleran, Brian J.; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel; Guillemette, Gaétan; Leduc, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The octapeptide hormone angiotensin II (AngII) exerts a wide variety of cardiovascular effects through the activation of the AT1 receptor, which belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. Like other G protein-coupled receptors, the AT1 receptor possesses seven transmembrane domains that provide structural support for the formation of the ligand-binding pocket. Here, we investigated the role of the first and fourth transmembrane domains (TMDs) in the formation of the binding pocket of the human AT1 receptor using the substituted-cysteine accessibility method. Each residue within the Phe-28(1.32)–Ile-53(1.57) fragment of TMD1 and Leu-143(4.40)–Phe-170(4.67) fragment of TMD4 was mutated, one at a time, to a cysteine. The resulting mutant receptors were expressed in COS-7 cells, which were subsequently treated with the charged sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agent methanethiosulfonate ethylammonium (MTSEA). This treatment led to a significant reduction in the binding affinity of TMD1 mutants M30C(1.34)-AT1 and T33C(1.37)-AT1 and TMD4 mutant V169C(4.66)-AT1. Although this reduction in binding of the TMD1 mutants was maintained when examined in a constitutively active receptor (N111G-AT1) background, we found that V169C(4.66)-AT1 remained unaffected when treated with MTSEA compared with untreated in this context. Moreover, the complete loss of binding observed for R167C(4.64)-AT1 was restored upon treatment with MTSEA. Our results suggest that the extracellular portion of TMD1, particularly residues Met-30(1.34) and Thr-33(1.37), as well as residues Arg-167(4.64) and Val-169(4.66) at the junction of TMD4 and the second extracellular loop, are important binding determinants within the AT1 receptor binding pocket but that these TMDs undergo very little movement, if at all, during the activation process. PMID:19940150

  15. Immunohistochemical detection of angiotensin AT 1 and AT 2 receptors in prostate cancer

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    Pawlikowski, Marek; Minias, Radosław; Zieliński, Krzysztof W.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The human prostate gland contains all the compounds of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), including AT1 and AT2 angiotensin receptors. The role of local RAS in the prostate pathology is recently discussed. The aim of the present study was the evaluation of AT1 and AT2 expressions in human prostate cancers. Material and methods The investigation was performed in 20 paraffin-embedded needle biopsy specimens from routine diagnostic prostate cancer biopsies. The specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and immunostained with anti-AT1 and anti-AT2 antibodies. For visualization of primary antibodies, the streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase technique was applied. The expression of both receptor proteins was evaluated quantitatively using image analysis method. Results The positive immunostaining with both anti- AT1 and anti-AT2 antibodies can be found in stromal as well as epithelial structures. The results of quantitative evaluation showed the positive correlation between AT1 and AT2 expressions in neoplastic epithelium and overexpression of both AT1 and AT2 in neoplastic epithelium of Gleason grade 2, but not in cancerous structures of Gleason grades 3-5. Conclusions The data on AT1 and AT2 receptor expressions may suggest the involvement of RAS in prostate cancerogenesis. Moreover, the persistence of AT1 receptors in prostate cancer speaks in favor of attempts to use of AT1 receptor blockers (i.e. sartanes) and/or AT2 agonists in prostate cancer prophylaxis and/or treatment. PMID:24578905

  16. Distinctions between non-peptide angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists

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    Georges Vauquelin

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available A far-reaching understanding of the molecular action mechanism of AT1-receptor antagonists (AIIAs was obtained by using CHO cells expressing transfected human AT 1-receptors. In this model, direct [3H]-antagonist binding and inhibition of agonist-induced responses (inositol phosphate accumulation can be measured under identical experimental conditions. Whereas preincubation with a surmountable AIIA (losartan causes parallel shifts of the angiotensin II (Ang II concentration-response curve, insurmountable antagonists also cause partial (i.e., 30% for irbesartan, 50% for valsartan, 70% for EXP3174, to almost complete (95% for candesartan reductions of the maximal response. The main conclusions are that all investigated antagonists are competitive with respect to Ang II. They bind to a common or overlapping site on the receptor in a mutually exclusive way. Insurmountable inhibition is related to the slow dissociation rate of the antagonist-receptor complex (t 1/2 of 7 minutes for irbesartan, 17 minutes for valsartan, 30 minutes for EXP3174 and 120 minutes for candesartan. Antagonist-bound AT1-receptors can adopt a fast and a slow reversible state. This is responsible for the partial nature of the insurmountable inhibition. The long-lasting effect of candesartan, the active metabolite of candesartan cilexetil, in vascular smooth muscle contraction studies, as well as in in vivo experiments on rat and in clinical studies, is compatible with its slow dissociation from, and continuous recycling between AT1-receptors. This recycling, or `rebinding' takes place because of the very high affinity of candesartan for the AT1-receptor.

  17. Characterization of Angiotensin II Molecular Determinants Involved in AT1 Receptor Functional Selectivity.

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    Domazet, Ivana; Holleran, Brian J; Richard, Alexandra; Vandenberghe, Camille; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel; Leduc, Richard; Guillemette, Gaétan

    2015-06-01

    The octapeptide angiotensin II (AngII) exerts a variety of cardiovascular effects through the activation of the AngII type 1 receptor (AT1), a G protein-coupled receptor. The AT1 receptor engages and activates several signaling pathways, including heterotrimeric G proteins Gq and G12, as well as the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 pathway. Additionally, following stimulation, βarrestin is recruited to the AT1 receptor, leading to receptor desensitization. It is increasingly recognized that specific ligands selectively bind and favor the activation of some signaling pathways over others, a concept termed ligand bias or functional selectivity. A better understanding of the molecular basis of functional selectivity may lead to the development of better therapeutics with fewer adverse effects. In the present study, we developed assays allowing the measurement of six different signaling modalities of the AT1 receptor. Using a series of AngII peptide analogs that were modified in positions 1, 4, and 8, we sought to better characterize the molecular determinants of AngII that underlie functional selectivity of the AT1 receptor in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. The results reveal that position 1 of AngII does not confer functional selectivity, whereas position 4 confers a bias toward ERK signaling over Gq signaling, and position 8 confers a bias toward βarrestin recruitment over ERK activation and Gq signaling. Interestingly, the analogs modified in position 8 were also partial agonists of the protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent ERK pathway via atypical PKC isoforms PKCζ and PKCι. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  18. Heterogeneous Downregulation of Angiotensin II AT1-A and AT1-B Receptors in Arterioles in STZ-Induced Diabetic Rat Kidneys

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    Zsolt Razga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The renin granulation of kidney arterioles is enhanced in diabetes despite the fact that the level of angiotensin II in the diabetic kidney is elevated. Therefore, the number of angiotensin II AT1-A and AT1-B receptors in afferent and efferent arteriole’s renin-positive and renin-negative smooth muscle cells (SMC was estimated. Method. Immunohistochemistry at the electron microscopic level was combined with 3D stereological sampling techniques. Results. In diabetes the enhanced downregulation of AT1-B receptors in the renin-positive than in the renin-negative SMCs in both arterioles was resulted: the significant difference in the number of AT1 (AT1-A + AT1-B receptors between the two types of SMCs in the normal rats was further increased in diabetes and in contrast with the significant difference observed between the afferent and efferent arterioles in the normal animals, there was no such difference in diabetes. Conclusions. The enhanced downregulation of the AT1-B receptors in the renin-negative SMCs in the efferent arterioles demonstrates that the regulation of the glomerular filtration rate by the pre- and postglomerular arterioles is changed in diabetes. The enhanced downregulation of the AT1-B receptors in the renin-positive SMCs in the arterioles may result in an enhanced level of renin granulation in the arterioles.

  19. Evidence of changes in alpha-1/AT1 receptor function generated by diet-induced obesity.

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    Juarez, Esther; Tufiño, Cecilia; Querejeta, Enrique; Bracho-Valdes, Ismael; Bobadilla-Lugo, Rosa A

    2017-11-01

    To study whether hypercaloric diet-induced obesity deteriorates vascular contractility of rat aorta through functional changes in α 1 adrenergic and/or AT1 Angiotensin II receptors. Angiotensin II- or phenylephrine-induced contraction was tested on isolated aorta rings with and without endothelium from female Wistar rats fed for 7 weeks with hypercaloric diet or standard diet. Vascular expression of Angiotensin II Receptor type 1 (AT1R), Angiotensin II Receptor type 2 (AT2R), Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS) and endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS), as well as blood pressure, glucose, insulin and angiotensin II blood levels were measured. Diet-induced obesity did not significantly change agonist-induced contractions (Emax and pD 2 hypercaloric diet vs standard diet n.s.d.) of both intact (e+) or endothelium free (e-) vessels but significantly decrease both phenylephrine and angiotensin II contraction (Emax p obesity did not change angiotensin II AT1, AT2 receptor proteins expression but reduced COX-1 and NOS2 ( p obesity produces alterations in vascular adrenergic and angiotensin II receptor dynamics that suggest an endothelium-dependent adrenergic/angiotensin II crosstalk. These changes reflect early-stage vascular responses to obesity.

  20. The physiological role of AT1 receptors in the ventrolateral medulla

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    T. Tagawa

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurons in the rostral and caudal parts of the ventrolateral medulla (VLM play a pivotal role in the regulation of sympathetic vasomotor activity and blood pressure. Studies in several species, including humans, have shown that these regions contain a high density of AT1 receptors specifically associated with neurons that regulate the sympathetic vasomotor outflow, or the secretion of vasopressin from the hypothalamus. It is well established that specific activation of AT1 receptors by application of exogenous angiotensin II in the rostral and caudal VLM excites sympathoexcitatory and sympathoinhibitory neurons, respectively, but the physiological role of these receptors in the normal synaptic regulation of VLM neurons is not known. In this paper we review studies which have defined the effects of specific activation or blockade of these receptors on cardiovascular function, and discuss what these findings tell us with regard to the physiological role of AT1 receptors in the VLM in the tonic and phasic regulation of sympathetic vasomotor activity and blood pressure.

  1. Hemodynamic and biochemical effects of the AT1 receptor antagonist irbesartan in hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.J. Admiraal (Peter Jan Jacobus); J.A.M.J.L. Janssen (Joseph); J.M. Kroodsma; W.A. de Ronde (Willem); F. Boomsma (Frans); J. Sissmann; P.J. Blankestijn (Peter); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul); A.J. Man in 't Veld (Arie); A.H. van den Meiracker (Anton)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWe studied the hemodynamic, neurohumoral, and biochemical effects of the novel angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist irbesartan in 86 untreated patients with essential hypertension on a normal sodium diet. According to a double-blind parallel group trial,

  2. Prevention of atherosclerosis by specific AT1-receptor blockade with candesartan cilexetil

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    Vasilios Papademetriou

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Several studies indicate that blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS can prevent atherosclerosis and vascular events, but the precise mechanisms involved are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of the AT 1-receptor blocker, candesartan, in the prevention of atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidaemic (WHHL rabbits and also the effect of AT1-receptor blockade in the uptake of oxidised LDL by macrophage cell cultures. In the first set of experiments, 12 WHHL rabbits were randomly assigned to three groups: placebo, atenolol 5 mg/kg daily or candesartan 2 mg/kg daily for six months. Compared with controls and atenolol-treated rabbits, candesartan treatment resulted in a significant 50—60% reduction of atherosclerotic plaque formation and a 66% reduction in cholesterol accumulation in the thoracic aorta.Studies in macrophage cultures indicated that candesartan prevented uptake of oxidised LDL-(oxLDL-cholesterol by cultured macrophages. Candesartan inhibited the uptake of oxLDL in a dose-dependent manner, reaching a maximum inhibition of 70% at concentrations of 5.6 µg/ml. Further studies in other animal models and well-designed trials in humans are warranted to further explore the role of AT1-receptor blockade in the prevention of atherosclerosis.

  3. Endogenous angiotensin II suppresses stretch-induced ANP secretion via AT1 receptor pathway.

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    Oh, Young-Bin; Gao, Shan; Shah, Amin; Kim, Jong Hun; Park, Woo Hyun; Kim, Suhn Hee

    2011-02-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is released by stretch of cardiac myocytes and has paracrine and autocrine effects on cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts. However, the direct effect of Ang II on the secretion of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is unclear. The aim of the present study is to test whether Ang II affects stretch-induced ANP secretion. The isolated perfused beating atria were used from control and two-kidney one-clip hypertensive (2K1C) rats. The volume load was achieved by elevating the height of outflow catheter connected with isolated atria from 5cmH(2)O to 7.5cmH(2)O. Atrial stretch by volume load caused increases in atrial contractility by 60% and in ANP secretion by 100%. Ang II suppressed stretch-induced ANP secretion and tended to increase atrial contractility whereas losartan stimulated stretch-induced ANP secretion. Neither PD123319 nor A779 had direct effect on stretch-induced ANP secretion. The suppressive effect of Ang II on stretch-induced ANP secretion was blocked by the pretreatment of losartan but not by the pretreatment of PD123319 or A779. In hypertrophied atria from 2K1C rats, stretch-induced ANP concentration attenuated and atrial contractility augmented. The response of stretch-induced ANP secretion to Ang II and losartan augmented. The expression of AT1 receptor protein and mRNA increased but AT2 and Mas receptor mRNA did not change in 2K1C rat atria. Therefore, we suggest that Ang II generated endogenously by atrial stretch suppresses stretch-induced ANP secretion through the AT1 receptor and alteration of Ang II effect in 2K1C rat may be due to upregulation of AT1 receptor. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The angiotensin II-AT1 receptor stimulates reactive oxygen species within the cell nucleus

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    Pendergrass, Karl D.; Gwathmey, TanYa M. [The Hypertension and Vascular Research Center, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Michalek, Ryan D.; Grayson, Jason M. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Chappell, Mark C., E-mail: mchappel@wfubmc.edu [The Hypertension and Vascular Research Center, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States)

    2009-06-26

    We and others have reported significant expression of the Ang II Type 1 receptor (AT1R) on renal nuclei; thus, the present study assessed the functional pathways and distribution of the intracellular AT1R on isolated nuclei. Ang II (1 nM) stimulated DCF fluorescence, an intranuclear indicator of reactive oxygen species (ROS), while the AT1R antagonist losartan or the NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibitor DPI abolished the increase in ROS. Dual labeling of nuclei with antibodies against nucleoporin 62 (Nup62) and AT1R or the NADPH oxidase isoform NOX4 revealed complete overlap of the Nup62 and AT1R (99%) by flow cytometry, while NOX4 was present on 65% of nuclei. Treatment of nuclei with a PKC agonist increased ROS while the PKC inhibitor GF109203X or PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 abolished Ang II stimulation of ROS. We conclude that the Ang II-AT1R-PKC axis may directly influence nuclear function within the kidney through a redox sensitive pathway.

  5. CB1 receptor inhibition leads to decreased vascular AT1 receptor expression, inhibition of oxidative stress and improved endothelial function.

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    Tiyerili, Vedat; Zimmer, Sebastian; Jung, Suzin; Wassmann, Kerstin; Naehle, Claas P; Lütjohann, Dieter; Zimmer, Andreas; Nickenig, Georg; Wassmann, Sven

    2010-07-01

    Inhibition of the cannabinoid receptor CB(1) (CB(1)-R) exerts numerous positive cardiovascular effects such as modulation of blood pressure, insulin sensitivity and serum lipid concentrations. However, direct vascular effects of CB(1)-R inhibition remain unclear. CB(1)-R expression was validated in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and aortic tissue of mice. Apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice were treated with cholesterol-rich diet and the selective CB(1)-R antagonist rimonabant or vehicle for 7 weeks. CB(1)-R inhibition had no effect on atherosclerotic plaque development, collagen content and macrophage infiltration but led to improved aortic endothelium-dependent vasodilation and decreased aortic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and NADPH oxidase activity. Treatment of cultured VSMC with rimonabant resulted in reduced angiotensin II-mediated but not basal ROS production and NADPH oxidase activity. CB(1)-R inhibition with rimonabant and AM251 led to down-regulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-R) expression, whereas stimulation with the CB(1)-R agonist CP 55,940 resulted in AT1-R up-regulation, indicating that AT1-R expression is directly regulated by the CB(1)-R. CB(2)-R inhibition had no impact on AT1-R expression in VSMC. Consistently, CB(1)-R inhibition decreased aortic AT1-R expression in vivo. CB(1)-R inhibition leads to decreased vascular AT1-R expression, NADPH oxidase activity and ROS production in vitro and in vivo. This antioxidative effect is associated with improved endothelial function in ApoE-/- mice, indicating beneficial direct vascular effects of CB(1)-R inhibition.

  6. Comparison of the AT1-receptor blockers candesartan, irbesartan and losartan for inhibiting renal microvascular constriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William F van Rodijnen

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (Ang II type 1 (AT1 receptor blockers differ in their affinity for the AT1-receptor, suggesting a dissimilar potency for inhibiting Ang II-induced vascular constriction. In the present study, we compared the effects of candesartan, irbesartan and losartan on the renal microvascular constriction to locally-formed Ang II, using isolated, perfused hydronephrotic rat kidneys. Addition of 1 nmol/L angiotensin I (Ang I, the precursor of Ang II significantly reduced the diameters of interlobular arteries (ILAs; -47.6±2.6%, afferent arterioles (AAs; -43.6±2.3% and efferent arterioles (EAs; -31.6±2.4%. Candesartan and irbesartan were more potent in antagonising the constriction to Ang I than losartan. By contrast, candesartan and irbesartan differed only slightly in potency. After a washing period of 60 minutes with drug-free medium, a second application of Ang I failed to induce vasoconstriction only in candesartan-treated kidneys. Pretreatment of hydronephrotic kidneys with candesartan, to further explore its antagonistic properties, shifted the dose-response curves of Ang II approximately 2 log units to the right without reducing the maximal Ang II-induced constriction of ILAs, AAs or EAs. Additionally, dose-response curves of Ang II were similar after short (10 minutes and prolonged (60 minutes preincubation with candesartan. Our findings indicate that candesartan and irbesartan are more potent inhibitors of renal microvascular constriction to locally-formed Ang II than losartan. The inhibitory effect of candesartan is more prolonged, suggesting a slow dissociation from the AT1-receptor. Additionally, candesartan was found to block the Ang II-induced constriction of renal microvessels in a surmountable manner.

  7. AT1 receptor blockade regulates the local angiotensin II system in cerebral microvessels from spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Pavel, Jaroslav; Macova, Miroslava; Yu, Zu-Xi; Imboden, Hans; Ge, Linna; Nishioku, Tsuyoshi; Dou, Jingtao; Delgiacco, Elizabeth; Saavedra, Juan M

    2006-05-01

    Blockade of angiotensin II AT1 receptors in cerebral microvessels protects against brain ischemia and inflammation. In this study, we tried to clarify the presence and regulation of the local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in brain microvessels in hypertension. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) controls were treated with an AT1 receptor antagonist (candesartan, 0.3 mg/kg per day) via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps for 4 weeks. The expression and localization of RAS components and the effect of AT1 receptor blockade were assessed by Affymetrix microarray, qRT-PCR, Western blots, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. We found transcripts of most of RAS components in our microarray database, and confirmed their expression by qRT-PCR. Angiotensinogen (Aogen), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and AT1 receptors were localized to the endothelium. There was no evidence of AT2 receptor localization in the microvascular endothelium. In SHR, (pro)renin receptor mRNA and AT1 receptor mRNA and protein expression were higher, whereas Aogen, ACE mRNA and AT2 receptor mRNA and protein expression were lower than in WKY rats. Candesartan treatment increased Aogen, ACE and AT2 receptor in SHR, and increased ACE and decreased Aogen in WKY rats, without affecting the (pro)renin and AT1 receptors. Increased (pro)renin and AT1 receptor expression in SHR substantiates the importance of the local RAS overdrive in the cerebrovascular pathophysiology in hypertension. AT1 receptor blockade and increased AT2 receptor stimulation after administration of candesartan may contribute to the protection against brain ischemia and inflammation.

  8. Cross talk between AT1 receptors and Toll-like receptor 4 in microglia contributes to angiotensin II-derived ROS production in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancardi, Vinicia Campana; Stranahan, Alexis M; Krause, Eric G; de Kloet, Annette D; Stern, Javier E

    2016-02-01

    ANG II is thought to increase sympathetic outflow by increasing oxidative stress and promoting local inflammation in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus. However, the relative contributions of inflammation and oxidative stress to sympathetic drive remain poorly understood, and the underlying cellular and molecular targets have yet to be examined. ANG II has been shown to enhance Toll-like receptor (TLR)4-mediated signaling on microglia. Thus, in the present study, we aimed to determine whether ANG II-mediated activation of microglial TLR4 signaling is a key molecular target initiating local oxidative stress in the PVN. We found TLR4 and ANG II type 1 (AT1) receptor mRNA expression in hypothalamic microglia, providing molecular evidence for the potential interaction between these two receptors. In hypothalamic slices, ANG II induced microglial activation within the PVN (∼65% increase, P < 0.001), an effect that was blunted in the absence of functional TLR4. ANG II increased ROS production, as indicated by dihydroethidium fluorescence, within the PVN of rats and mice (P < 0.0001 in both cases), effects that were also dependent on the presence of functional TLR4. The microglial inhibitor minocycline attenuated ANG II-mediated ROS production, yet ANG II effects persisted in PVN single-minded 1-AT1a knockout mice, supporting the contribution of a non-neuronal source (likely microglia) to ANG II-driven ROS production in the PVN. Taken together, these results support functional interactions between AT1 receptors and TLR4 in mediating ANG II-dependent microglial activation and oxidative stress within the PVN. More broadly, our results support a functional interaction between the central renin-angiotensin system and innate immunity in the regulation of neurohumoral outflows from the PVN. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Characterization of 18F-FPyKYNE-Losartan for Imaging AT1 Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachem, Maryam; Tiberi, Mario; Ismail, Basma; Hunter, Chad R; Arksey, Natasha; Hadizad, Tayebeh; Beanlands, Rob S; deKemp, Robert A; DaSilva, Jean N

    2016-10-01

    Most physiologic effects of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) are mediated via the angiotensin (Ang) type 1 receptor (AT1R). The 18F-FPyKYNE derivative of the clinically used AT1R blocker losartan exhibits high binding selectivity for kidney AT1R and rapid metabolism in rats. The aim of this study was to further assess the binding profile of this novel PET agent for imaging AT1R in rats and pigs. In vitro binding assays were performed with 18F-FPyKYNE-losartan in rat kidneys. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used to assess dosimetry, antagonistic efficacy via blood pressure measurements, and presence of labeled metabolites in kidneys. Test-retest PET imaging, blocking with AT1R antagonist candesartan (10 mg/kg), and plasma metabolism analysis were performed in female Yorkshire pigs. 18F-FPyKYNE-losartan bound with high affinity (dissociation constant of 49.4 ± 18.0 nM and maximal binding of 348 ± 112 fmol/mm2) to rat kidney AT1R. It bound strongly to plasma proteins in rats (97%), and its labeled metabolites displayed minimal interference on renal AT1R binding. FPyKYNE-losartan fully antagonized the Ang II pressor effect, albeit with 4-fold potency reduction (the effective dose inhibiting 50% of the Ang II-induced maximal pressor response of 25.5 mg/kg) relative to losartan. PET imaging exhibited high kidney-to-blood contrast and slow renal clearance, with an SUV of 14.1 ± 6.2. Excellent reproducibility was observed in the calculated test-retest variability (7.2% ± 0.75%). Only hydrophilic-labeled metabolites were present in plasma samples, and renal retention was reduced (-60%) at 10-15 min after blockade with candesartan. 18F-FPyKYNE-losartan has a favorable binding profile and displays high potential for translational work in humans as an AT1R PET imaging agent. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  10. Influence of autoantibodies against AT1 receptor and AGTR1 polymorphisms on candesartan-based antihypertensive regimen: results from the study of optimal treatment in hypertensive patients with anti-AT1-receptor autoantibodies trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanxiang; Liao, Yuhua; Yuan, Yong; Feng, Li; Ma, Shihui; Wei, Feng; Wang, Min; Zhu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    The autoantibodies against angiotensin AT1 receptors (AT1-AAs) in patients with essential hypertension exhibited an agonistic action like angiotensin II and maintained high blood pressure (BP). Angiotensin II receptor gene (AGTR1) polymorphisms were associated with BP response to RAS inhibition in the hypertensive population. Furthermore, the BP response to AT1 receptor blockers varied significantly among individuals with hypertension. We hypothesized that the polymorphisms of the AGTR1 and AT1-AAs might affect antihypertensive response to AT1 receptor blockers based in patients with primary hypertension. Patients who received a candesartan-based regimen came from the SOT-AT1 study (Study of Optimal Treatment in Hypertensive Patients with Anti-AT1-Receptor Autoantibodies). The established enzyme-labeled immunosorbent assay was used to detect AT1-AAs in the sera of the patients. Genotype 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms in AGTR1 gene was used by DNA sequencing. The correlations among AT1-AAs, AGTR1 gene polymorphisms or haplotypes, and the antihypertensive effect candesartan-based were analyzed using SPSS. The percentage of systolic BP reduction that was candesartan-based was greater in AT1-AA positive groups than in AT1-AA negative ones (21 ± 8 vs. 18 ± 9; P = .001). Meanwhile, systolic BP reduction that was candesartan-based was more significant in the group of rs5186 AC genotypes than AA homozygotes after adjusting for other confounding factors (37.55 ± 13.7 vs. 32.47 ± 17.27 mm Hg; adjusted P = .028). Furthermore, haplotypes (GCC) and (AAC) had impacts on the antihypertensive effect of candesartan therapy. The AT1-AAs, AGTR1 gene polymorphisms and haplotypes solely or jointly have influences on candesartan-based antihypertensive response in patients with primary hypertension. Copyright © 2014 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. AT1 receptor blocker losartan protects against mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh Sung; Smuder, Ashley J.; Wiggs, Michael P.; Hall, Stephanie E.; Sollanek, Kurt J.; Morton, Aaron B.; Talbert, Erin E.; Toklu, Hale Z.; Tumer, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a life-saving intervention for patients in respiratory failure. Unfortunately, prolonged ventilator support results in diaphragmatic atrophy and contractile dysfunction leading to diaphragm weakness, which is predicted to contribute to problems in weaning patients from the ventilator. While it is established that ventilator-induced oxidative stress is required for the development of ventilator-induced diaphragm weakness, the signaling pathway(s) that trigger oxidant production remain unknown. However, recent evidence reveals that increased plasma levels of angiotensin II (ANG II) result in oxidative stress and atrophy in limb skeletal muscles. Using a well-established animal model of mechanical ventilation, we tested the hypothesis that increased circulating levels of ANG II are required for both ventilator-induced diaphragmatic oxidative stress and diaphragm weakness. Cause and effect was determined by administering an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (enalapril) to prevent ventilator-induced increases in plasma ANG II levels, and the ANG II type 1 receptor antagonist (losartan) was provided to prevent the activation of ANG II type 1 receptors. Enalapril prevented the increase in plasma ANG II levels but did not protect against ventilator-induced diaphragmatic oxidative stress or diaphragm weakness. In contrast, losartan attenuated both ventilator-induced oxidative stress and diaphragm weakness. These findings indicate that circulating ANG II is not essential for the development of ventilator-induced diaphragm weakness but that activation of ANG II type 1 receptors appears to be a requirement for ventilator-induced diaphragm weakness. Importantly, these experiments provide the first evidence that the Food and Drug Administration-approved drug losartan may have clinical benefits to protect against ventilator-induced diaphragm weakness in humans. PMID:26359481

  12. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockade abolishes brain microvascular inflammation and heat shock protein responses in hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Ando, Hiromichi; Macova, Miroslava; Dou, Jingtao; Saavedra, Juan M

    2005-07-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and inflammation enhance vulnerability to hypertensive brain damage. To explore the participation of Angiotensin II (Ang II) in the mechanism of vulnerability to cerebral ischemia during hypertension, we examined the expression of inflammatory factors and the heat shock protein (HSP) response in cerebral microvessels from spontaneously hypertensive rats and their normotensive controls, Wistar Kyoto rats. We treated animals with vehicle or the Ang II AT(1) receptor antagonist candesartan, 0.3 mg/kg/day, via subcutaneously implanted osmotic minipumps for 4 weeks. Spontaneously hypertensive rats expressed higher Angiotensin II AT(1) receptor protein and mRNA than normotensive controls. Candesartan decreased the macrophage infiltration and reversed the enhanced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta mRNA and nuclear factor-kappaB in microvessels in hypertensive rats. The transcription of many HSP family genes, including HSP60, HSP70 and HSP90, and heat shock factor-1 was higher in hypertensive rats and was downregulated by AT(1) receptor blockade. Our results suggest a proinflammatory action of Ang II through AT(1) receptor stimulation in cerebral microvessels during hypertension, and very potent antiinflammatory effects of the Ang II AT(1) receptor antagonist. These compounds might be considered as potential therapeutic agents against ischemic and inflammatory diseases of the brain.

  13. Angiotensin AT1 Receptor-associated protein Arap1 in the Kidney Vasculature is Suppressed by Angiotensin II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doblinger, Elisabeth; Hoecherl, Klaus; Mederle, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Arap1 is a protein that interacts with angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptors and facilitates increased AT1 receptor surface expression in vitro. In the present study we assessed the tissue localization and regulation of Arap1 in vivo. Arap1 was found in various mouse organs with highest expression...... in the heart, kidney, aorta, and adrenal gland. Renal Arap1 protein was restricted to the vasculature and to glomerular mesangial cells and was absent from tubular epithelia. A similar localization was found in human kidneys. To test the hypothesis that angiotensin II may control renal Arap1 expression, mice...

  14. Differential mechanisms of activation of the Ang peptide receptors AT1, AT2, and MAS: using in silico techniques to differentiate the three receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy W Prokop

    Full Text Available The renin-angiotensin system is involved in multiple conditions ranging from cardiovascular disorders to cancer. Components of the pathway, including ACE, renin and angiotensin receptors are targets for disease treatment. This study addresses three receptors of the pathway: AT1, AT2, and MAS and how the receptors are similar and differ in activation by angiotensin peptides. Combining biochemical and amino acid variation data with multiple species sequence alignments, structural models, and docking site predictions allows for visualization of how angiotensin peptides may bind and activate the receptors; allowing identification of conserved and variant mechanisms in the receptors. MAS differs from AT1 favoring Ang-(1-7 and not Ang II binding, while AT2 recently has been suggested to preferentially bind Ang III. A new model of Ang peptide binding to AT1 and AT2 is proposed that correlates data from site directed mutagenesis and photolabled experiments that were previously considered conflicting. Ang II binds AT1 and AT2 through a conserved initial binding mode involving amino acids 111 (consensus 325 of AT1 (Asn interacting with Tyr (4 of Ang II and 199 and 256 (consensus 512 and 621, a Lys and His respectively interacting with Phe (8 of Ang II. In MAS these sites are not conserved, leading to differential binding and activation by Ang-(1-7. In both AT1 and AT2, the Ang II peptide may internalize through Phe (8 of Ang II propagating through the receptors' conserved aromatic amino acids to the final photolabled positioning relative to either AT1 (amino acid 294, Asn, consensus 725 or AT2 (138, Leu, consensus 336. Understanding receptor activation provides valuable information for drug design and identification of other receptors that can potentially bind Ang peptides.

  15. Blockade of angiotensin AT1-receptors in the rostral ventrolateral medulla of spontaneously hypertensive rats reduces blood pressure and sympathetic nerve discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Allen

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Microinjections of angiotensin II (Ang II into the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM induce a sympathetically-mediated increase in blood pressure (BP, through an interaction with AT1-receptors. Under basal conditions in anaesthetised animals, microinjections of AT 1-receptor antagonists into the RVLM have little, or no effect on BP, suggesting that the angiotensin input to this nucleus is not tonically active. In contrast, microinjections of AT1-receptor antagonists into the RVLM of sodium-deplete rats and TGR(mRen227 rats, induce a depressor response through sympatho-inhibition. This indicates that when the renin-angiotensin system is activated, angiotensin can act in the RVLM to support sympathetic nerve discharge and BP. This study examined whether angiotensin inputs to the RVLM are activated in the spontaneously hypertensive rat — a pathophysiological model which displays increases in both brain angiotensin levels and sympathetic nerve activity. Bilateral microinjections of the AT 1-receptor antagonist candesartan cilexetil, (1 nmol in 100 nl, into the RVLM of the spontaneously hypertensive rat induced a significant decrease in lumbar sympathetic nerve discharge (-18±2% and BP (140±6 to 115±6 mmHg. In contrast, similar microinjections in the Wistar-Kyoto (WKY rat had no effect on BP or sympathetic nerve discharge. These results are interpreted to suggest that Ang II inputs to the RVLM are activated in the spontaneously hypertensive rat to maintain an elevated level of sympathetic nerve discharge, even in the face of increased BP.

  16. Angiotensin-2 receptors (AT1-R and AT2-R), new prognostic factors for renal clear-cell carcinoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolley-Hitze, T; Jouan, F; Martin, B; Mottier, S; Edeline, J; Moranne, O; Le Pogamp, P; Belaud-Rotureau, M-A; Patard, J-J; Rioux-Leclercq, N; Vigneau, C

    2010-11-23

    The growth factor Angiotensin-2 signals through Angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1-R) in a broad range of cell types and tumours and through the type-2 receptor (AT2-R) in a more restricted group of cell types. Although numerous forms of cancer have been shown to overexpress AT1-R, expression of AT1-R and AT2-R by human renal clear-cell carcinoma (RCCC) is not well understood. In this study, the expression of both angiotensin receptors was quantified in a retrospective series of RCCC and correlated with prognostic factors. Angiotensin receptor type 1 and AT2-R expressions were quantified on tumour tissues by immunohistochemistry (IHC), western blot and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). IHC results were correlated to Fuhrman's grade and patient progression-free survival (PFS). A total of 84 RCCC were analysed. By IHC, AT1-R and AT2-R were expressed to a greater level in high-grade tumours (AT1-R: PR: PR or AT2-R expression (P=0.001). By multivariate analysis, only AT2-R expression correlated with PFS (HR 1.021, P=0.006) and cancer stage (PR and AT1-R were also found to be overexpressed in higher Fuhrman's grade (PR but not AT2-R mRNA were downregulated (P=0.001 and P=0.118, respectively). Our results show that AT1-R and AT2-R proteins are overexpressed in the most aggressive forms of RCCC and that AT2-R expression correlates with PFS. AT1-R or AT2-R blockage could, therefore, offer novel directions for anti-RCCC therapy.

  17. Regional variation in aortic AT1b receptor mRNA abundance is associated with contractility but unrelated to atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Poduri

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (AngII, the main bioactive peptide of the renin angiotensin system, exerts most of its biological actions through stimulation of AngII type 1 (AT1 receptors. This receptor is expressed as 2 structurally similar subtypes in rodents, termed AT1a and AT1b. Although AT1a receptors have been studied comprehensively, roles of AT1b receptors in the aorta have not been defined.We initially compared the regional distribution of AT1b receptor mRNA with AT1a receptor mRNA in the aorta. mRNA abundance of both subtypes increased from the proximal to the distal aorta, with the greatest abundance in the infra-renal region. Corresponding to the high mRNA abundance for both receptors, only aortic rings from the infra-renal aorta contracted in response to AngII stimulation. Despite the presence of both receptor transcripts, deletion of AT1b receptors, but not AT1a receptors, diminished AngII-induced contractility. To determine whether absence of AT1b receptors influenced aortic pathologies, we bred AT1b receptor deficient mice into an LDL receptor deficient background. Mice were fed a diet enriched in saturated fat and infused with AngII (1,000 ng/kg/min. Parameters that could influence development of aortic pathologies, including systolic blood pressure and plasma cholesterol concentrations, were not impacted by AT1b receptor deficiency. Absence of AT1b receptors also had no effect on size of aortic atherosclerotic lesions and aortic aneurysms in both the ascending and abdominal regions.Regional abundance of AT1b receptor mRNA coincided with AngII-induced regional contractility, but it was not associated with AngII-induced aortic pathologies.

  18. Enhanced water and salt intake in transgenic mice with brain-restricted overexpression of angiotensin (AT1) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazartigues, Eric; Sinnayah, Puspha; Augoyard, Ginette; Gharib, Claude; Johnson, Alan Kim; Davisson, Robin L

    2008-11-01

    To address the relative contribution of central and peripheral angiotensin II (ANG II) type 1A receptors (AT(1A)) to blood pressure and volume homeostasis, we generated a transgenic mouse model [neuron-specific enolase (NSE)-AT(1A)] with brain-restricted overexpression of AT(1A) receptors. These mice are normotensive at baseline but have dramatically enhanced pressor and bradycardic responses to intracerebroventricular ANG II or activation of endogenous ANG II production. Here our goal was to examine the water and sodium intake in this model under basal conditions and in response to increased ANG II levels. Baseline water and NaCl (0.3 M) intakes were significantly elevated in NSE-AT(1A) compared with nontransgenic littermates, and bolus intracerebroventricular injections of ANG II (200 ng in 200 nl) caused further enhanced water intake in NSE-AT(1A). Activation of endogenous ANG II production by sodium depletion (10 days low-sodium diet followed by furosemide, 1 mg sc) enhanced NaCl intake in NSE-AT(1A) mice compared with wild types. Fos immunohistochemistry, used to assess neuronal activation, demonstrated sodium depletion-enhanced activity in the anteroventral third ventricle region of the brain in NSE-AT(1A) mice compared with control animals. The results show that brain-selective overexpression of AT(1A) receptors results in enhanced salt appetite and altered water intake. This model provides a new tool for studying the mechanisms of brain AT(1A)-dependent water and salt consumption.

  19. Calcium dependency of the AT1-receptor mediated effects in the rat portal vein: influence of calcium antagonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, J. S.; van Meel, J. C.; Pfaffendorf, M.; Zhang, J.; van Zwieten, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    The calcium dependency of AT1-receptor mediated contractions was studied in isolated rat portal vein preparations. The spontaneous phasic contractile force of the rat portal vein was increased (ED50 = 1.76 mmol/l) and the frequency of contractions decreased by raising the extracellular calcium

  20. Renal proximal tubule angiotensin AT1A receptors regulate blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiping; Weatherford, Eric T; Davis, Deborah R; Keen, Henry L; Grobe, Justin L; Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A; Allen, Andrew M; Sigmund, Curt D

    2011-10-01

    All components of the renin angiotensin system necessary for ANG II generation and action have been reported to be present in renal proximal convoluted tubules. Given the close relationship between renal sodium handling and blood pressure regulation, we hypothesized that modulating the action of ANG II specifically in the renal proximal tubules would alter the chronic level of blood pressure. To test this, we used a proximal tubule-specific, androgen-dependent, promoter construct (KAP2) to generate mice with either overexpression of a constitutively active angiotensin type 1A receptor transgene or depletion of endogenous angiotensin type 1A receptors. Androgen administration to female transgenic mice caused a robust induction of the transgene in the kidney and increased baseline blood pressure. In the receptor-depleted mice, androgen administration to females resulted in a Cre recombinase-mediated deletion of angiotensin type 1A receptors in the proximal tubule and reduced blood pressure. In contrast to the changes observed at baseline, there was no difference in the blood pressure response to a pressor dose of ANG II in either experimental model. These data, from two separate mouse models, provide evidence that ANG II signaling via the type 1A receptor in the renal proximal tubule is a regulator of systemic blood pressure under baseline conditions.

  1. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor blocker candesartan prevents the fast up-regulation of cerebrocortical benzodiazepine-1 receptors induced by acute inflammatory and restraint stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lemus, Enrique; Honda, Masaru; Saavedra, Juan M.

    2012-01-01

    Centrally acting Angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs) protect from stress-induced disorders and decrease anxiety in a model of inflammatory stress, the systemic injection of bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In order to better understand the anxiolytic effect of ARBs, we treated rats with LPS (50 µg/kg) with or without three days of pretreatment with the ARB candesartan (1 mg/kg/day), and studied cortical benzodiazepine (BZ) and corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors. We compared the cortical BZ and CRF receptors expression pattern induced by LPS with that produced in restraint stress. Inflammation stress produced a generalized increase in cortical BZ1 receptors and reduced mRNA expression of the GABAA receptor γ2 subunit in cingulate cortex; changes were prevented by candesartan pretreatment. Moreover, restraint stress produced similar increases in cortical BZ1 receptor binding, and candesartan prevented these changes. Treatment with candesartan alone increased cortical BZ1 binding, and decreased γ2 subunit mRNA expression in the cingulate cortex. Conversely, we did not find changes in CRF1 receptor expression in any of the cortical areas studied, either after inflammation or restraint stress. Cortical CRF2 receptor binding was undetectable, but CRF2 mRNA expression was decreased by inflammation stress, a change prevented by candesartan. We conclude that stress promotes rapid and widespread changes in cortical BZ1 receptor expression; and that the stress-induced BZ1 receptor expression is under the control of AT1 receptor activity. The results suggest that the anti-anxiety effect of ARBs may be associated with their capacity to regulate stress-induced alterations in cortical BZ1 receptors. PMID:22503782

  2. Hypoxia and high glucose upregulate AT1 receptor expression and potentiate ANG II-induced proliferation in VSM cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Chhinder P; Kanwar, Yashpal S; Sahai, Atul

    2003-03-01

    We examined the effect of hypoxia and high glucose (HG) on ANG II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor expression and proliferation in cultured vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. Exposure of quiescent cells to hypoxia in a serum-free DME-Ham's F-12 medium for 6-24 h induced a progressive increase in AT(1) mRNA expression. Exposure of cells to 24 h of hypoxia also resulted in a significant increase in ANG II receptor binding as assessed with (125)I-labeled ANG II. Treatment with ANG II (1 microM) for 24 h under normoxic conditions caused an approximately 1.5-fold increase in both DNA synthesis and cell number, which was enhanced to approximately 3.0-fold under hypoxic conditions. An AT(1) receptor antagonist (losartan, 10 microM) blocked the ANG II-induced increase in DNA synthesis under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Incubations in HG medium (25 mM) for 12-24 h under normoxic conditions induced an approximately 2.5-fold increase in AT(1) mRNA levels, which was markedly enhanced by hypoxia to approximately 5.5-fold at 12 h and approximately 8.5-fold at 24 h. ANG II under HG-normoxic conditions caused a complete downregulation of AT(1) expression, which was prevented by hypoxia. These results demonstrate an upregulation of AT(1) receptor expression by hypoxia and HG in cultured VSM cells and suggest a mechanism for enhanced ANG II-induced VSM cell proliferation and the development of atherosclerosis in diabetes.

  3. Pre- and postsynaptic inhibitory potencies of the angiotensin AT(1) receptor antagonists eprosartan and candesartan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nap, Alexander; Mathy, Marie-Jeanne; Balt, Jippe C.; Pfaffendorf, Martin; van Zwieten, Pieter A.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the inhibitory potency of two selective angiotensin AT, receptor antagonists, eprosartan and candesartan, at the level of the sympathetic nerve terminal and the vascular smooth muscle. Male New Zealand White rabbits, weighing 2100-2550 g, were used. To

  4. Ontogeny and regulation of the AT1 and AT2 receptors in the ovine fetal adrenal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintour, E M; Moritz, K; Butkus, A; Baird, R; Albiston, A; Tenis, N

    1999-11-25

    The expression and regulation of the receptors for angiotensin II (both AT1 and AT2) were examined in the ovine fetal adrenal gland by RNase protection assay (RPA), in situ hybridisation histochemistry, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Both mRNA and protein for the AT1 receptor were present in the zona glomerulosa and zona fasciculata of the cortex, but not in the medulla, from as early as these zonas were distinguishable (60 days of gestation; term is 145-150 days), and even present in the steroidogenic cells of the unzoned gland at 40 days. The mRNA for the AT2 receptor was present in the same locations (but never in the medulla) from 40-130 days, and declined to extremely low levels after 140 days. The infusion of ang II, 1 microg/h, for 3 days, at mid-gestation (76 +/- 2 days) caused a significant decrease in mRNA for AT1 but no change in AT2 levels. Thus, the biologically active receptor (in terms of aldosterone stimulation) is present in the ovine fetal adrenal from very early in development, and can be down-regulated by mid-gestation.

  5. Edaravone inhibits pressure overload-induced cardiac fibrosis and dysfunction by reducing expression of angiotensin II AT1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Bai, Feng; Wang, Jin; Zheng, Rong-Hua; Yang, Li-Wang; James, Erskine A; Zhao, Zhi-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is known to be involved in the progression of ventricular dysfunction and heart failure by eliciting cardiac fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate whether treatment with an antioxidant compound, edaravone, reduces cardiac fibrosis and improves ventricular function by inhibiting Ang II AT1 receptor. The study was conducted in a rat model of transverse aortic constriction (TAC). In control, rats were subjected to 8 weeks of TAC. In treated rats, edaravone (10 mg/kg/day) or Ang II AT1 receptor blocker, telmisartan (10 mg/kg/day) was administered by intraperitoneal injection or gastric gavage, respectively, during TAC. Relative to the animals with TAC, edaravone reduced myocardial malonaldehyde level and increased superoxide dismutase activity. Protein level of the AT1 receptor was reduced and the AT2 receptor was upregulated, as evidenced by the reduced ratio of AT1 over AT2 receptor (0.57±0.2 vs 3.16±0.39, preceptor in the myocardium. Furthermore, the protein level of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 was upregulated. In coincidence with these changes, edaravone significantly decreased the populations of macrophages and myofibroblasts in the myocardium, which were accompanied by reduced levels of transforming growth factor beta 1 and Smad2/3. Collagen I synthesis was inhibited and collagen-rich fibrosis was attenuated. Relative to the TAC group, cardiac systolic function was preserved, as shown by increased left ventricular systolic pressure (204±51 vs 110±19 mmHg, preceptor-mediated signaling pathways. These data indicate that edaravone might be selected in combination with other existing drugs in preventing progression of cardiac dysfunction in heart failure.

  6. Angiotensin AT1 receptors modulate the anxiogenic effects of angiotensin (5-8) injected into the rat ventrolateral periaqueductal gray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genaro, Karina; Fabris, Débora; Fachim, Helene A; Prado, Wiliam A

    2017-10-01

    Losartan and PD 123,319 are non-peptide angiotensin (Ang) receptor antagonists for the AT1 and AT2 subtypes of Ang II receptors, respectively. The tetrapeptide Ang (5-8) is the smallest Ang-peptide that elicits anxiogenic effects on unconditioned and conditioned experimental models upon injection into the ventrolateral column of the periaqueductal gray (vlPAG), and Ang (5-8) can be synthesized (from Ang II or Ang III) and inactivated in this mesencephalic structure. The vlPAG is also known to play a central role in mechanisms of fear and anxiety. We therefore utilized male Wistar rats to examine the effects of losartan and PD 123,319 injections, selective antagonists of the AT1 and AT2 receptors, respectively, into the vlPAG in the elevated plus-maze, a classic rat model of anxiety, and against the anxiogenic effect of Ang (5-8) (0.4 nmol/0.25μL) upon injection into the same region. The anxiolytic profile was dependent on the dose of intra-vlPAG losartan, whereas no effects on experimental anxiety were observed in the plus-maze following PD 123,319 injection. The anxiogenic effect of Ang (5-8) injection into the vlPAG remained unchanged in the PD 123,319-pretreated rats, but the effect did not occur in losartan-pretreated rats. The results led us to suggest that the anxiogenic effect of Ang (5-8) injection into the vlPAG may depend on the local activation of AT1, but not AT2 receptors. Activation of AT1 receptors in structures nearby vlPAG may be tonically involved in fear and experimental anxiety. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Glomerular and tubular function during AT1 receptor blockade in pigs with neonatal induced partial ureteropelvic obstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskild-Jensen, Anni; Thomsen, Karsten; Rungø, Christine

    2007-01-01

    and in the present study we examined the effects of chronic AT1 receptor blockade using CV-11974 (0.12 mg/h candesartan from age 23 to 30 days) on kidney function development after PUUO was induced in 2-day-old piglets. Moreover, the effect of superimposed acute NO inhibition using N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester...... (l-NAME; 15 mg/kg) was examined to identify if this has diagnostic potential. PUUO significantly increased GFR in the nonobstructed contralateral kidney independent of candesartan. In candesartan-treated piglets, the l-NAME-induced GFR reduction seen in normal and nonobstructed kidneys was absent...... by PUUO evidenced by an increased fractional excretion of sodium which was enhanced by candesartan treatment. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the counterbalance between AT1 receptor-mediated vasoconstriction and NO-mediated vasodilatation which maintain GFR in normal young porcine kidneys...

  8. Evidence for a cyclic AMP-dependent pathway in angiotensin AT1-receptor activation of human omental arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoa Ytterberg

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced responses to vasoconstriction induced by neuropeptide Y and α2-adrenoceptor agonists have been seen following pharmacological activation of the adenylyl cyclase (AC system. Since preliminary studies revealed only minor responses to angiotensin II (Ang II in human omental arteries, we have investigated whether enhanced activity of AC may unravel further functional Ang II receptors. Human omental arteries were obtained in conjunction with elective gut surgery. After dissection of the vessel, the endothelium was removed by 10 sec of Triton X-100 treatment. Ring segments (1—2 mm long were mounted on a myograph and studied. Ang II produced small contractions, 27±5% relative to the response elicited by 60 mM K+. However, enhanced Ang II (105±10%, p<0.001 responses were seen during AC activation by forskolin (0.1—1 µM. This enhanced contractile response to Ang II was not inhibited by the angiotensin II type 2 (AT2-receptor antagonist PD 123319 (0.1 µM, but was blocked in an insurmountable way by the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1-receptor antagonist candesartan (1 nM and in a surmountable manner by losartan (0.1 µM and irbesartan (0.1 µM. Pertussis toxin (a Gi-protein blocker and the protein kinase C inhibitor, RO31—8220 (0.01, 0.1 and 1 µM, markedly reduced this response, while the protein kinase A inhibitor, H89 (1, 10 µM, had no effect. RT-PCR provided evidence for the presence of mRNA for both AT1- and AT2-receptors. The results suggest that both a cAMP-dependent and a cAMP-independent mechanism are involved in the contractile responses to Ang II in human omental arteries and that both responses are mediated via the AT1-receptor.

  9. Angiotensin Mediated Oxidative Stress and Neuroprotective Potential of Antioxidants and AT1 Receptor Blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusty, Shakti Ketan; Sahu, Pratap Kumar; Subudhi, Bharat Bhusan

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress in brain underlies the major neurological disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Peripherally, Angiotensin-II is a major effector of inflammation. Identification of its capacity to access brain during hypertension, as well as location of central renin angiotensin system have led to its recognition as the major effector of oxidative stress in brain. Clinical uses of antioxidants to antagonize this oxidative stress have mostly failed. In this scenario, AT1 blockers have been investigated to prevent neurodegeneration. Although it has shown promise, clinical efficacy is limited to few drugs including telmisartan mainly due to the poor brain availability of others. In this review we aim to analyze the potential of antioxidants to reduce oxidative stress in brain. We have given critical analysis of the approaches for re-purposing of AT1 blockers against oxidative stress induced neurodegeneration. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Protective Effects of Angiotensin II AT1 Receptors Blockade against Brain Injury in Experimental Model of Stroke in Rat

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    Hamdollah Panahpour

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Ischemic stroke remains the third leading cause of invalidism and death in industrialized countries. It is suggested that renin–angiotensin system (RAS may contribute in stroke related pathogenic mechanisms and involve in the ischemic brain damage. This study designed to investigate the role of angiotensin II (Ang II in conjunction with AT1 receptors in treatment of the brain injuries following transient focal cerebral ischemia in rats.   Methods: Forty eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were studied in four groups. Sham group, ischemic control group and two ischemic groups that received candesartan (0.1mg/kg, or 0.5mg/kg at the beginning of reperfusion period. Transient focal cerebral ischemia was induced by 60 minutes occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, followed by 24 hours reperfusion. At the end of the reperfusion period, neurological deficit score (NDS was performed. Total cortical and striatal infarct volumes were determined using triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC staining technique.   Results: Animals in sham operated group had normal motor function and no ischemic lesions were observed in cortical or striatal regions. Occurring ischemia in ischemic control group that received vehicle produced considerable infarction in cortex (253±15mm3 and striatum (92±7mm3, as well as these animals had sever impaired motor dysfunctions. Blocking of AT1 receptors with candesartan (0.1mg/kg or 0.5mg/kg improved neurological outcome and significantly lowered cortical and striatal infarct volumes relative to ischemic control group.   Conclusion: The findings of the present study indicated that stimulation of AT1 receptors by Ang II involved in ischemia/reperfusion injuries and blocking of AT1 receptors can decrease ischemic brain injury and improve neurological outcome.

  11. Angiotensin II AT1 receptors mediate neuronal sensitization and sustained blood pressure response induced by a single injection of amphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchese, N A; Paz, M C; Caeiro, X; Dadam, F M; Baiardi, G; Perez, M F; Bregonzio, C

    2017-01-06

    A single exposure to amphetamine induces neurochemical sensitization in striatal areas. The neuropeptide angiotensin II, through AT1 receptors (AT1-R) activation, is involved in these responses. However, amphetamine-induced alterations can be extended to extra-striatal areas involved in blood pressure control and their physiological outcomes. Our aim for the present study was to analyze the possible role for AT1-R in these events using a two-injection protocol and to further characterize the proposed AT1-R antagonism protocol. Central effect of orally administered AT1-R blocker (Candesartan, 3mg/kg p.o.×5days) in male Wistar rats was analyzed by spontaneous activity of neurons within locus coeruleus. In another group of animals pretreated with the AT1-R blocker or vehicle, sensitization was achieved by a single administration of amphetamine (5mg/kg i.p. - day 6) followed by a 3-week period off drug. On day 27, after receiving an amphetamine challenge (0.5mg/kg i.p.), we evaluated: (1) the sensitized c-Fos expression in locus coeruleus (LC), nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), caudal ventrolateral medulla (A1) and central amygdala (CeAmy); and (2) the blood pressure response. AT1-R blockade decreased LC neurons' spontaneous firing rate. Moreover, sensitized c-Fos immunoreactivity in TH+neurons was found in LC and NTS; and both responses were blunted by the AT1-R blocker pretreatment. Meanwhile, no differences were found neither in CeAmy nor A1. Sensitized blood pressure response was observed as sustained changes in mean arterial pressure and was effectively prevented by AT1-R blockade. Our results extend AT1-R role in amphetamine-induced sensitization over noradrenergic nuclei and their cardiovascular output. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. AT(1) receptor Gαq protein-independent signalling transcriptionally activates only a few genes directly, but robustly potentiates gene regulation from the β2-adrenergic receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Gitte Lund; Knudsen, Steen; Schneider, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1)R) is known to signal through heterotrimeric G proteins, and Gαq protein-independent signalling has only recently gained appreciation for profound impact on a diverse range of biological functions. β-Arrestins, among other central mediators of Gαq protein-...

  13. Losartan suppresses the kainate-induced changes of angiotensin AT1 receptor expression in a model of comorbid hypertension and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasova, Dimitrinka; Tchekalarova, Jana; Ivanova, Natasha; Nenchovska, Zlatina; Pavlova, Ekaterina; Atanassova, Nina; Lazarov, Nikolai

    2017-12-06

    Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that components of renin-angiotensin system are elevated in the hippocampus in epileptogenic conditions. In the present work, we explored the changes in the expression of angiotensin II receptor, type 1 (AT1 receptor) in limbic structures, as well as the effect of the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan in a model of comorbid hypertension and epilepsy. The expression of AT1 receptors was compared between spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and Wistar rats by using immunohistochemistry in the kainate (KA) model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The effect of losartan was studied on AT1 receptor expression in epileptic rats that were treated for a period of 4weeks after status epilepticus. The naive and epileptic SHRs were characterized by stronger protein expression of AT1 receptor than normotensive Wistar rats in the CA1, CA3a, CA3b, CA3c field and the hilus of the dentate gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus but fewer cells were immunostained in the piriform cortex. Increased AT1 immunostaining was observed in the basolateral amygdala of epileptic SHRs but not of epileptic Wistar rats. Losartan exerted stronger and structure-dependent suppression of AT1 receptor expression in SHRs compared to Wistar rats. Our results confirm the important role of AT1 receptor in epilepsy and suggest that the AT1receptor antagonists could be used as a therapeutic strategy for treatment of comorbid hypertension and epilepsy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. AT1 receptor induced alterations in histone H2A reveal novel insights into GPCR control of chromatin remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaganapathi Jagannathan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic activation of angiotensin II (AngII type 1 receptor (AT(1R, a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR induces gene regulatory stress which is responsible for phenotypic modulation of target cells. The AT(1R-selective drugs reverse the gene regulatory stress in various cardiovascular diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms are not clear. We speculate that activation states of AT(1R modify the composition of histone isoforms and post-translational modifications (PTM, thereby alter the structure-function dynamics of chromatin. We combined total histone isolation, FPLC separation, and mass spectrometry techniques to analyze histone H2A in HEK293 cells with and without AT(1R activation. We have identified eight isoforms: H2AA, H2AG, H2AM, H2AO, H2AQ, Q96QV6, H2AC and H2AL. The isoforms, H2AA, H2AC and H2AQ were methylated and H2AC was phosphorylated. The relative abundance of specific H2A isoforms and PTMs were further analyzed in relationship to the activation states of AT(1R by immunochemical studies. Within 2 hr, the isoforms, H2AA/O exchanged with H2AM. The monomethylated H2AC increased rapidly and the phosphorylated H2AC decreased, thus suggesting that enhanced H2AC methylation is coupled to Ser1p dephosphorylation. We show that H2A125Kme1 promotes interaction with the heterochromatin associated protein, HP1α. These specific changes in H2A are reversed by treatment with the AT(1R specific inhibitor losartan. Our analysis provides a first step towards an awareness of histone code regulation by GPCRs.

  15. A cleavable signal peptide enhances cell surface delivery and heterodimerization of Cerulean-tagged angiotensin II AT1 and bradykinin B2 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quitterer, Ursula, E-mail: ursula.quitterer@pharma.ethz.ch [Molecular Pharmacology Unit, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Pohl, Armin; Langer, Andreas; Koller, Samuel; AbdAlla, Said [Molecular Pharmacology Unit, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} A new FRET-based method detects AT1/B2 receptor heterodimerization. {yields} First time application of AT1-Cerulean as a FRET donor. {yields} Method relies on signal peptide-enhanced cell surface delivery of AT1-Cerulean. {yields} A high FRET efficiency revealed efficient heterodimerization of AT1/B2R proteins. {yields} AT1/B2R heterodimers were functionally coupled to desensitization mechanisms. -- Abstract: Heterodimerization of the angiotensin II AT1 receptor with the receptor for the vasodepressor bradykinin, B2R, is known to sensitize the AT1-stimulated response of hypertensive individuals in vivo. To analyze features of that prototypic receptor heterodimer in vitro, we established a new method that uses fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and applies for the first time AT1-Cerulean as a FRET donor. The Cerulean variant of the green fluorescent protein as donor fluorophore was fused to the C-terminus of AT1, and the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) as acceptor fluorophore was fused to B2R. In contrast to AT1-EGFP, the AT1-Cerulean fusion protein was retained intracellularly. To facilitate cell surface delivery of AT1-Cerulean, a cleavable signal sequence was fused to the receptor's amino terminus. The plasma membrane-localized AT1-Cerulean resembled the native AT1 receptor regarding ligand binding and receptor activation. A high FRET efficiency of 24.7% between membrane-localized AT1-Cerulean and B2R-EYFP was observed with intact, non-stimulated cells. Confocal FRET microscopy further revealed that the AT1/B2 receptor heterodimer was functionally coupled to receptor desensitization mechanisms because activation of the AT1-Cerulean/B2R-EYFP heterodimer with a single agonist triggered the co-internalization of AT1/B2R. Receptor co-internalization was sensitive to inhibition of G protein-coupled receptor kinases, GRKs, as evidenced by a GRK-specific peptide inhibitor. In agreement with efficient AT1/B2R

  16. Memory is preserved in older adults taking AT1 receptor blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jean K; Nation, Daniel A

    2017-04-26

    Prior work suggests that some but not all antihypertensive treatments may benefit cognition and risk for Alzheimer's disease, independent of stroke. Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) have been highlighted as one antihypertensive drug class that may confer greatest benefit. The participants comprised 1626 nondemented adults, aged 55-91 years, recruited from Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative sites. Three groups were compared: ARB users (HTN-ARBs), other antihypertensive drug users (HTN-Other), and normotensives. In post hoc analyses, we also examined (1) users of ARBs and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), (2) users of blood-brain barrier (BBB)-crossing ARBs and users of non-BBB-crossing ARBs, and (3) users of BBB-crossing ARBs and ACEIs (BBB crossers) and users of non-BBB-crossing ARBs and ACEIs (BBB noncrossers). Groups were compared regarding cognition and magnetic resonance imaging measures of brain volume and white matter hyperintensities (WMH), using analysis of covariance and multilevel models. At baseline, the HTN-Other group performed worse than normotensives on Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) Immediate Recall (p = 0.002), Delayed Recall (p Memory (p = 0.001), and Trails A (p Memory (p = 0.04) and worse than normotensives on Trails A (p = 0.04). The HTN-Other group performed worse than normotensives on Logical Memory Immediate (p = 0.02) and Delayed Recall over the 3-year follow-up (p = 0.007). Over the follow-up period, those taking BBB-crossing ARBs performed better than the HTN-Other group on AVLT Delayed Recall (p = 0.04), Logical Memory Immediate (p = 0.02), and Delayed Recall (p = 0.05). They also had fewer WMH than the HTN-Other group (p = 0.008) and those taking non-BBB-crossing ARBs (p = 0.05). There were no group differences in brain volume. Users of BBB-crossing medications (ARBs or ACEIs) showed better performance on AVLT Delayed Recall over time than all

  17. Blood pressure reactivity to emotional stress is reduced in AT1A-receptor knockout mice on normal, but not high salt intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daian; La Greca, Luisa; Head, Geoffrey A; Walther, Thomas; Mayorov, Dmitry N

    2009-07-01

    Pharmacological evidence suggests that angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptors are involved in the regulation of cardiovascular response to emotional stress and reinforcing effect of dietary salt on this response. In this study, we examined the effect of genetic deletion of AT(1A) receptors on the cardiovascular effects of stress and salt in mice. AT(1A) receptor knockout (AT(1A)(-/-)) and wild-type (AT(1A)(+/+)) mice were implanted with telemetry devices and placed on a normal (0.4%) or high (3.1%) salt diet (HSD). Resting blood pressure (BP) in AT(1A)(-/-) mice (84+/-3 mm Hg) was lower than in AT(1A)(+/+) mice (107+/-2 mm Hg). Negative emotional (restraint) stress increased BP by 33+/-3 mm Hg in AT(1A)(+/+) mice. This response was attenuated by 40% in AT(1A)(-/-) mice (18+/-3 mm Hg). Conversely, the BP increase caused by food presentation and feeding was similar in AT(1A)(-/-) (25+/-3 mm Hg) and AT(1A)(+/+) mice (26+/-3 mm Hg). HSD increased resting BP by 14+/-4 mm Hg in AT(1A)(-/-) mice without affecting it significantly in AT(1A)(+/+) mice. Under these conditions, the pressor response to restraint stress in AT(1A)(-/-) mice (30+/-3 mm Hg) was no longer different from that in wild-type animals (28+/-3 mm Hg). The BP response to feeding was not altered by HSD in either AT(1A)(-/-) or AT(1A)(+/+) mice (25+/-2 and 27+/-3 mm Hg, respectively). These results indicate that AT(1A) receptor deficiency leads to a reduction in BP reactivity to negative emotional stress, but not feeding. HSD can selectively reinforce the cardiovascular response to negative stress in AT(1A)(-/-) mice. However, there is little interaction between AT(1A) receptors, excess dietary sodium and feeding-induced cardiovascular arousal.

  18. Angiotensin II-AT1receptor signaling is necessary for cyclooxygenase-2–dependent postnatal nephron generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frölich, Stefanie; Slattery, Patrick; Thomas, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Deletion of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) causes impairment of postnatal kidney development. Here we tested whether the renin angiotensin system contributes to COX-2–dependent nephrogenesis in mice after birth and whether a rescue of impaired renal development and function in COX-2-/- mice was achieva......Deletion of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) causes impairment of postnatal kidney development. Here we tested whether the renin angiotensin system contributes to COX-2–dependent nephrogenesis in mice after birth and whether a rescue of impaired renal development and function in COX-2-/- mice...... was achievable. Plasma renin concentration in mouse pups showed a birth peak and a second peak around day P8 during the first 10 days post birth. Administration of the angiotensin II receptor AT1 antagonist telmisartan from day P1 to P3 did not result in cortical damage. However, telmisartan treatment from day P...... development. Inhibition of the renin angiotensin system by aliskiren and enalapril caused similar glomerular defects as telmisartan. Administration of the AT1 receptor agonist L162313 to COX-2-/- pups improved kidney growth, ameliorated renal defects, but had no beneficial effect on reduced cortical mass. L...

  19. Evaluation of [(11)C]methyl-losartan and [(11)C]methyl-EXP3174 for PET imaging of renal AT1receptor in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Basma; Hadizad, Tayebeh; Antoun, Rawad; Lortie, Mireille; deKemp, Robert A; Beanlands, Rob S B; DaSilva, Jean N

    2015-11-01

    The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is responsible for the main effects of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), and its expression pattern is altered in several diseases. The [(11)C]methylated derivatives of the clinically used AT1R blocker (ARB) losartan and its active metabolite EXP3174, that binds with higher affinity to AT1R, were evaluated as potential PET imaging tracers in rat kidneys. [(11)C]Methyl-losartan and [(11)C]methyl-EXP3174 were synthesized by [(11)C]methylation of the tetrazole-protected analogs using [11C]methyl iodide. Tissue uptake and binding selectivity of [(11)C]methyl-losartan were assessed by ex-vivo biodistribution and in-vitro autoradiography. Radiolabeled metabolites in rat plasma and kidneys were analysed by column-switch HPLC. Both tracers were evaluated with small animal PET imaging. Due to better pharmacokinetics, [(11)C]methyl-EXP3174 was further investigated via PET by co-injection with AT1R antagonist candesartan or the AT2R antagonist PD123,319. Binding selectivity to renal AT1 over AT2 and Mas receptors was demonstrated for [(11)C]methyl-losartan. Plasma metabolite analysis at 10 min revealed stability of [(11)C]methyl-losartan and [(11)C]methyl-EXP3174 with the presence of unchanged tracer at 70.8 ± 9.9% and 81.4 ± 6.0%, of total radioactivity, respectively. Contrary to [(11)C]methyl-losartan, co-injection of candesartan with [(11)C]methyl-EXP3174 reduced the proportion of unchanged tracer (but not metabolites), indicating that these metabolites do not bind to AT1R in rat kidneys. MicroPET images for both radiotracers displayed high kidney-to-background contrast. Candesartan significantly reduced [(11)C]methyl-EXP3174 uptake in the kidney, whereas no difference was observed following PD123,319 indicating binding selectivity for AT1R. [(11)C]Methyl-EXP3174 displayed a favorable binding profile compared to [(11)C]methyl-losartan for imaging renal AT1Rs supporting further studies to assess its full potential as a

  20. AT1 Receptor Antagonism Improves Structural, Functional and Biomechanical Properties in Resistance Arteries in a Rodent Chronic Kidney Disease Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, K J; Ameer, O Z; Phillips, J K

    2018-02-07

    The renin-angiotensin system, in particular Angiotensin II (AngII), plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of hypertension in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Effects of chronic AT1 receptor antagonism were investigated in a genetic hypertensive rat model of CKD, the Lewis polycystic kidney (LPK) rat. Mixed-sex LPK and Lewis control rats (total n=31) were split between treated (valsartan 60mg/kg/day p.o. from 4-18 weeks) and vehicle groups. Animals were assessed for systolic blood pressure and urine biochemistry, and after euthanasia, blood collected for urea and creatinine analysis, confirming the hypertensive and renal phenotype. Mesenteric resistance vasculature was assessed using pressure myography and histology. Valsartan treatment improved LPK rats vascular structure, increasing internal and external diameter values and reducing wall thickness (untreated vs. treated LPK: 53.19±3.29 vs. 33.93±2.17m) and wall-lumen ratios (untreated vs. treated LPK: 0.52±0.09 vs. 0.16±0.01 (all P<0.0001). Endothelium dysfunction, as measured by maximal response to acetylcholine (Rmax) was normalized with treatment (untreated vs. treated LPK: 69.56±4.34 vs. 103.05±4.13, P<0.05), increasing the relative contributions of nitric oxide and endothelium-derived hyperpolarization to vasorelaxation while down-regulating the prostanoid contribution. Biomechanical properties also improved with treatment, as indicated by an increase in compliance, decrease in intrinsic stiffness, and alterations in the artery wall composition, which included decreases in collagen density and collagen/elastin ratio. Our results highlight the importance of AngII as a driver of resistance vessel structural, functional and biomechanical dysfunction and provide insight as to how AT1 receptor blockade exerts therapeutic efficacy in CKD.

  1. Irreversible renal damage after transient renin-angiotensin system stimulation: involvement of an AT1-receptor mediated immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart F J Heijnen

    Full Text Available Transient activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS induces irreversible renal damage causing sustained elevation in blood pressure (BP in Cyp1a1-Ren2 transgenic rats. In our current study we hypothesized that activation of the AT1-receptor (AT1R leads to a T-cell response causing irreversible impairment of renal function and hypertension. Cyp1a1-Ren2 rats harbor a construct for activation of the RAS by indole-3-carbinol (I3C. Rats were fed a I3C diet between 4-8 weeks of age to induce hypertension. Next, I3C was withdrawn and rats were followed-up for another 12 weeks. Additional groups received losartan (20 mg/kg/day or hydralazine (100 mg/kg/day treatment between 4-8 weeks. Rats were placed for 24h in metabolic cages before determining BP at week 8, 12 and 20. At these ages, subsets of animals were sacrificed and the presence of kidney T-cell subpopulations was investigated by immunohistochemistry and molecular marker analysis. The development of sustained hypertension was completely prevented by losartan, whereas hydralazine only caused a partial decrease in BP. Markers of renal damage: KIM-1 and osteopontin were highly expressed in urine and kidney samples of I3C-treated rats, even until 20 weeks of age. Additionally, renal expression of regulatory-T cells (Tregs was highly increased in I3C-treated rats, whereas the expression of T-helper 1 (Th1 cells demonstrated a strong decrease. Losartan prevented these effects completely, whereas hydralazine was unable to affect these changes. In young Cyp1a1-Ren2 rats AT1R activation leads to induction of an immune response, causing a shift from Th1-cells to Tregs, contributing to the development of irreversible renal damage and hypertension.

  2. Intrarenal Mas and AT1 receptors play a role in mediating the excretory actions of renal interstitial angiotensin-(1-7) infusion in anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Julie; Healy, Vincent; Johns, Edward J

    2017-09-21

    What is the central question of this study? Dietary sodium manipulation alters the magnitude of angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]-induced natriuresis. The present study sought to determine whether this was related to relative changes in the activity of intrarenal Mas and/or AT1 receptors. What is the main finding and its importance? Angiotensin-(1-7)-induced diuresis and natriuresis is mediated by intrarenal Mas receptors. However, intrarenal AT1 receptor blockade also had an inhibitory effect on Ang-(1-7)-induced natriuresis and diuresis. Thus, Ang-(1-7)-induced increases in sodium and water excretion are dependent upon functional Mas and AT1 receptors. We investigated whether angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]-induced renal haemodynamic and excretory actions were solely dependent upon intrarenal Mas receptor activation or required functional angiotensin II type 1 (AT1 ) receptors. The renin-angiotensin system was enhanced in anaesthetized rats by prior manipulation of dietary sodium intake. Angiotensin-(1-7) and AT1 and Mas receptor antagonists were infused into the kidney at the corticomedullary border. Mas receptor expression was measured in the kidney. Mean arterial pressure, urine flow and fractional sodium excretion were 93 ± 4 mmHg, 46.1 ± 15.7 μl min(-1)  kg(-1) and 1.4 ± 0.3%, respectively, in the normal-sodium group and 91 ± 2 mmHg, 19.1 ± 3.3 μl min(-1)  kg(-1) and 0.7 ± 0.2%, respectively, in the low-sodium group. Angiotensin-(1-7) infusion had no effect on mean arterial pressure in rats receiving a normal-sodium diet but decreased it by 4 ± 5% in rats receiving a low-sodium diet (P Mas receptor inhibition after either losartan or A-779, respectively. Thus, AT1 receptor activation, as well as Mas receptor activation, plays an essential role in mediating Ang-(1-7)-induced natriuresis and diuresis. Whether this is because Ang-(1-7) partly antagonizes AT1 receptors or whether Ang-(1-7)-induced natriuresis is mediated through AT1

  3. Functional interaction of AT1 and AT2 receptors in fructose-induced insulin resistance and hypertension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Po-Shiuan; Tai, Yueh-Hua; Loh, Ching-Hui; Shih, Kuang-Chung; Cheng, Wei-Tung; Chu, Chi-Hong

    2005-02-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the potential role and functional interaction of angiotensin II AT1 and AT2 receptors (AT1R and AT2R) in the regulation of blood pressure and glucose homeostasis in fructose-induced insulin-resistant, hypertensive rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats on fructose-enriched or regular diets for 4 weeks were subjected to 2-step euglycemic euinsulinemic (EEI) and euglycemic hyperinsulinemic (EHI) clamp studies with [3-3H]glucose infusion. After a 40-minute basal period, selective AT1R and AT2R antagonists, losartan (LOS, 10 mg/kg IV bolus) and PD123319 (PD, 50 microg/kg/min), alone or in combination were separately given to control and fructose-fed groups in the 2 clamp periods. The results showed that during the EEI period, LOS significantly reduced the elevated blood pressure in fructose-fed rats, whereas PD further increased fructose-induced high blood pressure. Coadministration of LOS and PD did not alter the elevated blood pressure in fructose-fed rats. Administration of LOS and/or PD failed to change the blood pressure in control rats. During the EHI period, blockade of both AT1R and AT2R eliminated the insulin-induced blood pressure elevation in control and fructose-fed rats. Hepatic glucose production (HGP) did not alter among groups in the basal and EEI periods. Insulin infusion (EHI period) markedly suppressed HGP in control rats, but this suppressive effect was significantly attenuated in fructose-fed rats. LOS administration further reduced the insulin-induced suppression of HGP in fructose-fed rats. The whole-body glucose uptakes (rates of glucose disappearance, Rd) during the basal and EEI periods were similar among groups. During the EHI period, Rd was markedly increased in all groups and the magnitude of increase was significantly greater in control rats than in fructose-fed rats except those with LOS treatment. LOS treatment also redirected Rd in favor of glycolysis in fructose rats, but not in control rats, during

  4. Glucocorticoid effects on the programming of AT1b angiotensin receptor gene methylation and expression in the rat.

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    Irina Bogdarina

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Adverse events in pregnancy may 'programme' offspring for the later development of cardiovascular disease and hypertension. Previously, using a rodent model of programmed hypertension we have demonstrated the role of the renin-angiotensin system in this process. More recently we showed that a maternal low protein diet resulted in undermethylation of the At1b angiotensin receptor promoter and the early overexpression of this gene in the adrenal of offspring. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that maternal glucocorticoid modulates this effect on fetal DNA methylation and gene expression. We investigated whether treatment of rat dams with the 11beta-hydroxylase inhibitor metyrapone, could prevent the epigenetic and gene expression changes we observed. Offspring of mothers subjected to a low protein diet in pregnancy showed reduced adrenal Agtr1b methylation and increased adrenal gene expression as we observed previously. Treatment of mothers with metyrapone for the first 14 days of pregnancy reversed these changes and prevented the appearance of hypertension in the offspring at 4 weeks of age. As a control for non-specific effects of programmed hypertension we studied offspring of mothers treated with dexamethasone from day 15 of pregnancy and showed that, whilst they had raised blood pressure, they failed to show any evidence of Agtr1b methylation or increase in gene expression. We conclude that maternal glucocorticoid in early pregnancy may induce changes in methylation and expression of the Agtr1b gene as these are clearly reversed by an 11 beta-hydroxylase inhibitor. However in later pregnancy a converse effect with dexamethasone could not be demonstrated and this may reflect either an alternative mechanism of this glucocorticoid or a stage-specific influence.

  5. The effect of AT1 receptor blockade on bax and bcl-2 expression in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis

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    L Safaeian

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background and the purpose of the study: Recent studies have indicated the role of apoptosis and angiotensin in the pathogenesis of bleomycin induced-pulmonary fibrosis. Losartan, an angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R antagonist, has ameliorated apoptosis and fibrosis from bleomycin. In this study, alterations in the expression of apoptosis-regulatory genes (bcl-2 and bax were investigated in different cells of lung tissue of mice treated with bleomycin in the presence of losartan. Methods: Losartan (10 mg/kg, i.p. was given to mice two days before administration of bleomycin (3 U/kg and throughout the test period. After two weeks, lung tissues of mice were evaluated for fibrosis by biochemical measurement of collagen deposition and semiquantitative analysis of pathological changes of the lung. The expression of bcl-2 and bax was assessed by immunohistochemical assay using biotin-streptavidin staining method on paraffin-embedded lung tissues. Results and major conclusion: Pre-treatment with losartan significantly (P < 0.05 reduced the increase in lung collagen content and also inhibited the histological changes induced by bleomycin. Immunohistochemical studies showed that losartan significantly (P < 0.05 reduced the bax/bcl-2 expression ratio in the alveolar epithelial cells, lymphocytes, macrophages and interstitial myofibroblasts. Losartan also inhibited the bcl-2 upregulation which was educed by bleomycin in neutrophils. By reduction of bax/bcl-2 ratio as a determinant of susceptibility of a cell to apoptosis, losartan exerted protective effects on the alveolar epithelial cells that may be important in the amelioration of pulmonary fibrosis. These results may help to better understanding of the role of angiotensin II and apoptosis in pulmonary fibrosis.

  6. Cerebrovascular ETB, 5-HT1B, and AT1 receptor upregulation correlates with reduction in regional CBF after subarachnoid hemorrhage

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    Ansar, Saema; Vikman, Petter; Nielsen, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    We hypothesize that cerebral ischemia leads to enhanced expression of endothelin (ET), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), and angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors in the vascular smooth muscle cells. Our aim is to correlate the upregulation of cerebrovascular receptors and the underlying molecular mechanisms...... levels. These changes occur in parallel with a successive decrease in CBF. Thus there is a temporal correlation between the changes in receptor expression and CBF reduction, suggesting a linkage....

  7. Effects of the AT1 receptor antagonist on adhesion molecule expression in leukocytes and brain microvessels of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

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    Takemori, K; Ito, H; Suzuki, T

    2000-11-01

    To elucidate the possible involvement of angiotensin II (AII) in the pathogenesis of microvascular changes in severe hypertension, we investigated the effects of angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) on the expression of adhesion molecules of leukocytes and brain microvessels. Male stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) at 19 weeks of age were divided into three groups and age-matched Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) were used as the control group. AT1 receptor antagonist (TCV-116, 0.5 mg/kg/day) and ACEI (captopril, 20 mg/kg/day) were administered to SHRSP for 4 weeks. Mac-1 expression in leukocytes was investigated by flow cytometric analysis. For endothelial cells, we examined the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), the AT1 receptor, and glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1, a marker of the blood-brain barrier) using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The blood pressure of AT1 receptor antagonist and ACEI-treated groups was slightly lower than that of the control, but was still greater than 220 mm Hg. Mac-1 expression, as well as ICAM-1 expression, was higher in control SHRSP than in WKY. Such enhanced expression of adhesion molecules in SHRSP was ameliorated by the administration of AT1 receptor antagonist or ACEI, the former being more effective. AT1 receptor expression was higher in control SHRSP than in WKY, and was lower in the AT1 receptor antagonist group, whereas no difference was found in the ACEI group. No significant differences were found in GLUT-1 expression among all groups. In the case of hypertensive cerebral injuries in SHRSP, leukocytes may have an important role for initiation via adhesion to endothelial cells. AT1 receptor antagonist showed a beneficial effect for the amelioration of enhanced expression of adhesion molecule in both leukocytes and endothelial cells. Thus, AII seems to be an important mediator for the hypertensive

  8. Increased expression of endothelin ET(B) and angiotensin AT(1) receptors in peripheral resistance arteries of patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrijevic, Ivan; Ekelund, Ulf; Edvinsson, Marie-Louise

    2009-01-01

    of arterial vasoconstrictor endothelin (ET) and angiotensin (AT) receptors. Our aim was to investigate if the arterial expressions of these receptors are changed in patients with suspected but ruled out acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Small subcutaneous arteries (diameter of 100 microm) were surgically removed......Patients who experience chest pain, in which ischemic heart disease has been ruled out, still have an increased risk of future ischemic cardiac events and premature death, possibly due to subclinical endothelial dysfunction. A feature of endothelial dysfunction is an increased expression...... group. There were no significant differences in AT(2) and ET(A) receptor expression between the groups. The results indicate that the expression of arterial smooth muscle ET(B) and AT(1) receptors are increased in patients with suspected but ruled out ACS. These receptor changes could be important...

  9. AT1 receptor antagonist induces thermogenic beige adipocytes in the inguinal white adipose tissue of obese mice.

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    Graus-Nunes, Francielle; Rachid, Tamiris Lima; de Oliveira Santos, Felipe; Barbosa-da-Silva, Sandra; Souza-Mello, Vanessa

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate whether losartan is able to induce beige adipocytes formation, focusing on the thermogenic gene expression and adipocyte remodeling in the subcutaneous white adipose tissue of diet-induced obese mice. Male C57BL/6 mice received a control diet (10% energy as lipids) or a high-fat diet (50% energy as lipids) for 10 weeks, followed by a 5-week treatment with losartan: control group, control-losartan group (10 mg/Kg/day), high-fat group and high-fat-losartan group (10 mg/Kg/day). Biochemical, morphometrical, stereological and molecular approaches were used to evaluate the outcomes. The high-fat diet elicited overweight, insulin resistance and adipocyte hypertrophy in the high-fat group, all of which losartan rescued in the high-fat-losartan group. These effects comply with the induction of beige adipocytes within the inguinal fat pads in high-fat-losartan group as they exhibited the greatest energy expenditure among the groups along with the presence uncoupling protein 1 positive multilocular adipocytes with enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha and PR domain containing 16 mRNA levels, indicating a significant potential for mitochondrial biogenesis and adaptive thermogenesis. Our results show compelling evidence that losartan countered diet-induced obesity in mice by enhancing energy expenditure through beige adipocytes induction. Reduced body mass, increased insulin sensitivity, decreased adipocyte size and marked expression of uncoupling protein 1 by ectopic multilocular adipocytes support these findings. The use of losartan as a coadjutant medicine to tackle obesity and its related disorders merits further investigation.

  10. Exposure to AT1 Receptor Autoantibodies during Pregnancy Increases Susceptibility of the Maternal Heart to Postpartum Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Rats

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    Hui-Ping Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that women with a history of preeclampsia have a two-fold increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases in later life. It is not known whether or not this risk is associated with angiotensin II receptor type 1 autoantibody (AT1-AA, an agonist acting via activation of AT1 receptor (AT1R, which is believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. The objective of the present study was to confirm the hypothesis that AT1-AA exposure during pregnancy may change the maternal cardiac structure and increase the susceptibility of the postpartum heart to ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI. In the present study, we first established a preeclampsia rat model by intravenous injection of AT1-AA extracted from the plasma of rats immunized with AT1R, observed the susceptibility of the postpartum maternal heart to IRI at 16 weeks postpartum using the Langendorff preparation, and examined the cardiac structure using light and transmission electron microscopy. The modeled animals presented with symptoms very similar to the clinical symptoms of human preeclampsia during pregnancy, including hypertension and proteinuria. The left ventricular weight (LVW and left ventricular mass index (LVMI in AT1-AA treatment group were significantly increased as compared with those of the control group (p < 0.01, although there was no significant difference in final weight between the two groups. AT1-AA acting on AT1R not only induced myocardial cell hypertrophy, mitochondrial swelling, cristae disorganization and collagen accumulation in the interstitium but affected the left ventricular (LV function and delayed recovery from IRI. In contrast, co-treatment with AT1-AA + losartan completely blocked AT1-AA-induced changes in cardiac structure and function. These data indicate that the presence of AT1-AA during pregnancy was strongly associated with the markers of LV geometry changes and remodeling, and increased the cardiac

  11. Increased perfusion pressure enhances the expression of endothelin (ETB) and angiotensin II (AT1, AT2) receptors in rat mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstedt, Isak; Xu, Cang-Bao; Zhang, Yaping

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we hypothesized that changes in perfusion pressure result in altered expression of mRNA and protein encoding for the ETA-, ETB-, AT1- and AT2-receptors in rat mesenteric vessels. Segments of the rat mesenteric artery were cannulated with glass micropipettes, pressurized and ...

  12. AT1 and AT2 Receptors in the Prelimbic Cortex Modulate the Cardiovascular Response Evoked by Acute Exposure to Restraint Stress in Rats.

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    Brasil, Taíz F S; Fassini, Aline; Corrêa, Fernando M

    2017-07-10

    The prelimbic cortex (PL) is an important structure in the neural pathway integrating stress responses. Brain angiotensin is involved in cardiovascular control and modulation of stress responses. Blockade of angiotensin receptors has been reported to reduce stress responses. Acute restraint stress (ARS) is a stress model, which evokes sustained blood pressure increase, tachycardia, and reduction in tail temperature. We therefore hypothesized that PL locally generated angiotensin and angiotensin receptors modulate stress autonomic responses. To test this hypothesis, we microinjected an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or angiotensin antagonists into the PL, prior to ARS. Male Wistar rats were used; guide cannulas were bilaterally implanted in the PL for microinjection of vehicle or drugs. A polyethylene catheter was introduced into the femoral artery to record cardiovascular parameters. Tail temperature was measured using a thermal camera. ARS was started 10 min after PL treatment with drugs. Pretreatment with ACE inhibitor lisinopril (0.5 nmol/100 nL) reduced the pressor response, but did not affect ARS-evoked tachycardia. At a dose of 1 nmol/100 nL, it reduced both ARS pressor and tachycardic responses. Pretreatment with candesartan, AT1 receptor antagonist reduced ARS-evoked pressor response, but not tachycardia. Pretreatment with PD123177, AT2 receptor antagonist, reduced tachycardia, but did not affect ARS pressor response. No treatment affected ARS fall in tail temperature. Results suggest involvement of PL angiotensin in the mediation of ARS cardiovascular responses, with participation of both AT1 and AT2 receptors. In conclusion, results indicate that PL AT1-receptors modulate the ARS-evoked pressor response, while AT2-receptors modulate the tachycardic component of the autonomic response.

  13. Increased expression of endothelin ET(B) and angiotensin AT(1) receptors in peripheral resistance arteries of patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrijevic, Ivan; Ekelund, Ulf; Edvinsson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    in an abdominal biopsy from 12 patients suspicious of ACS (susp ACS), admitted to the medical telemetry unit for chest pain. The vessels were analyzed for their receptor protein expression by quantitative immunohistochemistry using specific antibodies directed against ET(A), ET(B), AT(1), and AT(2) receptors......Patients who experience chest pain, in which ischemic heart disease has been ruled out, still have an increased risk of future ischemic cardiac events and premature death, possibly due to subclinical endothelial dysfunction. A feature of endothelial dysfunction is an increased expression...... of arterial vasoconstrictor endothelin (ET) and angiotensin (AT) receptors. Our aim was to investigate if the arterial expressions of these receptors are changed in patients with suspected but ruled out acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Small subcutaneous arteries (diameter of 100 microm) were surgically removed...

  14. Antibodies against AT1 receptors are associated with vascular endothelial and smooth muscle function impairment: protective effects of hydroxysafflor yellow A.

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    Zhu Jin

    Full Text Available Ample evidence has shown that autoantibodies against AT1 receptors (AT1-AA are closely associated with human cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate mechanisms underlying AT1-AA-induced vascular structural and functional impairments in the formation of hypertension, and explore ways for preventive treatment. We used synthetic peptide corresponding to the sequence of the second extracellular loop of the AT1 receptor (165-191 to immunize rats and establish an active immunization model. Part of the model received preventive therapy by losartan (20 mg/kg/day and hyroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA (10 mg/kg/day. The result show that systolic blood pressure (SBP and heart rate (HR of immunized rats was significantly higher, and closely correlated with the plasma AT1-Ab titer. The systolic response of thoracic aortic was increased, but diastolic effects were attenuated markedly. Histological observation showed that the thoracic aortic endothelium of the immunized rats became thinner or ruptured, inflammatory cell infiltration, medial smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration, the vascular wall became thicker. There was no significant difference in serum antibody titer between losartan and HSYA groups and the immunized group. The vascular structure and function were reversed, and plasma biochemical parameters were also improved significantly in the two treatment groups. These results suggest that AT1-Ab could induce injury to vascular endothelial cells, and proliferation of smooth muscle cells. These changes were involved in the formation of hypertension. Treatment with AT1 receptor antagonists and anti oxidative therapy could block the pathogenic effect of AT1-Ab on vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells.

  15. Staphylococcal nuclease domain containing-1 (SND1 promotes migration and invasion via angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R and TGFβ signaling

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    Prasanna K. Santhekadur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal nuclease domain containing-1 (SND1 is overexpressed in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC patients and promotes tumorigenesis by human HCC cells. We now document that SND1 increases angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R levels by increasing AT1R mRNA stability. This results in activation of ERK, Smad2 and subsequently the TGFβ signaling pathway, promoting epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT and migration and invasion by human HCC cells. A positive correlation was observed between SND1 and AT1R expression levels in human HCC patients. Small molecule inhibitors of SND1, alone or in combination with AT1R blockers, might be an effective therapeutic strategy for late-stage aggressive HCC.

  16. Participation of 5-HT and AT1 Receptors within the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla in the Maintenance of Hypertension in the Goldblatt 1 Kidney-1 Clip Model

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    Cássia T. Bergamaschi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that changes in neurotransmission within the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM are important to maintain the high blood pressure (BP was tested in Goldblatt one kidney-one clip hypertension model (1K-1C. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized (urethane 1.2 g/kg, i.v., and the effects of bilateral microinjections into the RVLM of the following drugs were measured in 1K-1C or control groups: glutamate (0.1 mol/L, 100 nL and its antagonist kynurenic acid (0.02 mol/L, 100 nL, the angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonist candesartan (0.01 mol/L, 100 nL, and the nonselective 5-HT receptor antagonist methiothepin (0.06 mol/L, 100 nL. Experiments in 1K-1C rats were performed 6 weeks after surgery. In anesthetized rats glutamate response was larger in hypertensive than in normotensive rats (H: Δ67±6.5; N: Δ43±3.54 mmHg. In contrast, kynurenic acid microinjection into the RVLM did not cause any change in BP in either group. The blockade of either AT1 or 5-HT receptors within the RVLM decreased BP only in 1K-1C rats. A largest depressor response was caused by 5-HT receptor blockade. The data suggest that 5-HT and AT1 receptors act tonically to drive RVLM in 1K-1C rats, and these actions within RVLM contribute to the pathogenesis of this model of hypertension.

  17. High intraluminal pressure via H2O2 upregulates arteriolar constrictions to angiotensin II by increasing the functional availability of AT1 receptors

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    Bagi, Zsolt; Erdei, Nora; Koller, Akos

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we found that high intraluminal pressure leads to production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and also upregulates several components of the renin-angiotensin system in the wall of small arteries. We hypothesized that acute exposure of arterioles to high intraluminal pressure in vitro via increasing ROS production enhances the functional availability of type 1 angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors (AT1 receptors), resulting in sustained constrictions. In arterioles (∼180 μm) isolated from rat skeletal muscle, Ang II elicited dose-dependent constrictions, which decreased significantly by the second application [maximum (max.): from 59% ± 4% to 26% ± 5% at 10−8 M; P < 0.05] in the presence of 80 mmHg of intraluminal pressure. In contrast, if the arterioles were exposed to high intraluminal pressure (160 mmHg for 30 min), Ang II-induced constrictions remained substantial on the second application (max.: 51% ± 3% at 10−8 M). In the presence of Tiron and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-catalase, known to reduce the level of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), second applications of Ang II evoked similarly reduced constrictions, even after high-pressure exposure (29% ± 4% at 10−8 M). Furthermore, when arterioles were exposed to H2O2 (for 30 min, 10−7 M, at normal 80 mmHg pressure), Ang II-induced constrictions remained substantial on second applications (59% ± 5% at 10−8 M). These findings suggest that high pressure, likely via inducing H2O2 production, increases the functional availability of AT1 receptors and thus enhances Ang II-induced arteriolar constrictions. We propose that in hypertension–regardless of etiology–high intraluminal pressure, via oxidative stress, enhances the functional availability of AT1 receptors augmenting Ang II-induced constrictions. PMID:18567710

  18. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT-1R) expression correlates with VEGF-A and VEGF-D expression in invasive ductal breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethon, Aleksandra; Pula, Bartosz; Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Wojnar, Andrzej; Rys, Janusz; Dziegiel, Piotr; Podhorska-Okolow, Marzena

    2012-10-01

    Recent studies point to the involvement of angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor type 1 (AT-1R) on processes of metastasing, stimulation of invasiveness and angiogenesis in tumours. In this study, the correlation between intensity of AT-1R expression and expression of lymph- and angiogenesis markers in invasive ductal breast cancers (IDC) was examined. Immunohistochemical studies (IHC) were performed on archival material of 102 IDC cases. Only 28 (27.5%) cases manifested low AT-1R expression while 74 (72.5%) cases demonstrated a moderate or pronounced AT-1R expression. Expression intensity of AT-1R was found to correlate with expressions of VEGF-A (r = 0.26; p = 0.008) and VEGF-D (r = 0.24; p = 0.015). Out of the examined markers of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis only the pronounced expression of VEGF-C was found to correlate with patient poor clinical outcome (p = 0.009). The positive correlation between AT-1R and VEGF-A and VEGF-D could point to stimulatory action of Ang II on their expression what might result in augmented lymph- and angiogenesis in IDC.

  19. Effects of the AT1 receptor blocker candesartan on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion in isolated rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songur, C Murat; Songur, Merve Ozenen; Kocabeyoglu, Sinan Sabit; Basgut, Bilgen

    2014-10-01

    We sought to investigate the effects of the angiotension II receptor blocker candesartan on ischemia-reperfusion injury using a cardioplegia arrested isolated rat heart model. Ischemia-reperfusion injury was induced in isolated rat hearts with 40 minutes of global ischemia followed by a 30-minute reperfusion protocol. Throughout the experiment, constant pressure perfusion was achieved using a Langendorff apparatus. Cardioplegic solution alone, and in combination with candesartan, was administered before ischemia and 20 minutes after ischemia. Post-ischemic recovery of contractile function, left ventricular developed pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and contraction and relaxation rates were evaluated. In the control group, left ventricular developed pressure, rate pressure product, contraction and relaxation rates and coronary flow significantly decreased but coronary resistance increased following reperfusion. With the administration of candesartan alone, parameters did not differ compared to controls. Contractile parameters improved in the group that received candesartan in combination with the cardioplegia compared to the group that received cardioplegia alone; however, the difference between these two groups was insignificant. In this study, the addition of candesartan to a cardioplegic arrest protocol routinely performed during cardiac surgery did not provide a significant advantage in protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury compared with the administration of cardioplegic solution alone.

  20. AT1 receptor blockade attenuates insulin resistance and myocardial remodeling in rats with diet-induced obesity.

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    Silvio A Oliveira-Junior

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although obesity has been associated with metabolic and cardiac disturbances, the carrier mechanisms for these responses are poorly understood. This study analyzed whether angiotensin II blockade attenuates metabolic and cardiovascular disorders in rats with diet-induced obesity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Wistar-Kyoto (n = 40 rats were subjected to control (C; 3.2 kcal/g and hypercaloric diets (OB; 4.6 kcal/g for 30 weeks. Subsequently, rats were distributed to four groups: C, CL, OB, and OBL. L groups received Losartan (30 mg/kg/day for five weeks. After this period we performed in vivo glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance tests, and measured triacylglycerol, insulin, angiotensin-converting enzyme activity (ACE, and leptin levels. Cardiovascular analyzes included systolic blood pressure (SBP, echocardiography, myocardial morphometric study, myosin heavy chain composition, and measurements of myocardial protein levels of angiotensin, extracellular signal-regulated (ERK1/2, c-Jun amino-terminal kinases (JNK, insulin receptor subunit β (βIR, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K by Western Blot. RESULTS: Glucose metabolism, insulin, lipid, and ACE activity disorders observed with obesity were minimized by Losartan. Moreover, obesity was associated with increased SBP, myocardial hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis and improved systolic performance; these effects were also minimized with Losartan. On a molecular level, OB exhibited higher ERK, Tyr-phosphorylated βIR, and PI3K expression, and reduced myocardial angiotensin and JNK expression. ERK and JNK expression were regulated in the presence of Losartan, while angiotensin, Tyr-βRI, total and Tyr-phosphorylated PI3K expression were elevated in the OBL group. CONCLUSION: Angiotensin II blockade with Losartan attenuates obesity-induced metabolic and cardiovascular changes.

  1. Effects of AT1 Receptor Blockade on Plasma Thromboxane A2 (TXA2 Level and Skin Microcirculation in Young Healthy Women on Low Salt Diet

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    Ana Cavka

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the effect of AT1 receptor antagonism on skin microcirculation and plasma level of thromboxane A2 (TXA2. Methods: Healthy women (n=20 maintained 7 days low salt (LS diet (intake 2 metabolite thromboxane B2 (TXB2 and plasma renin activity (PRA aldosterone concentration, electrolytes (Na+, K+, as well as blood pressure and heart rate were determined before and after study protocols. Results: PRA and aldosterone increased significantly after 7 days of both LS diet and LS diet+losartan. LS diet or LS diet+losartan administrations had no significant effect on post-occlusion hyperemia While there was no change in TXB2 after LS diet TXB2 significantly increased after one week of LS+losartan compared to control levels (cTXB2 pg/mL control 101±80 vs. LS diet+losartan 190±116, pConclusion: These data suggest that inhibition of AT1 receptors could lead to activation of AT2 receptors, which maintain hyperemia, despite the increased level of vasoconstrictor TXA2. These findings also suggest an important role of crosstalk between renin-angiotensin system (RAS and arachidonic acid metabolites in the regulation of microcirculation under physiological conditions.

  2. Synthesis, anti-hypertensive effect of a novel angiotensin II AT1 receptor antagonist and its anti-tumor activity in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da, Y-J; Yuan, W-D; Zhu, L-F; Chen, Z-L

    2012-12-01

    Since the first non-peptide Ang II receptor antagonist was originally reported, it has become the most common target in the development of new treatments for hypertension. In recent years, all components of the classical RAS have been reported in the prostate, these results suggest the possibility that ARB is a novel therapeutic class of agents for prostate cancer. In this study, a new compound 2-(4-((2-propyl-5-nitro-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-1-yl) methyl)-1H-indol-1-yl) benzoic acid was synthesized and evaluated as a novel angiotensin II AT1 receptor antagonist by radioligand binding assays, anti-hypertensive assays in vivo and oral acute toxicity test. MTT assays and tests in nude mice were used to demonstrate its anti-tumor activity. This new compound showed high affinity to AT1 receptor and anti-hypertensive activity in spontaneously hypertensive rats and renal hypertensive rats. Moreover, in human prostate cancer cells and in athymic nude mice bearing human prostate cancer cells, we observed this new compound had an efficient antiproliferative activity in vitro and anti-tumor activity in vivo. The preliminary pharmacological characteristics with oral acute toxicity test suggested that this new compound can be considered as a candidate for both anti-hypertensive and anti-tumor drug. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockade decreases vasopressin-induced water reabsorption and AQP2 levels in NaCl-restricted rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwon, Tae-Hwan; Nielsen, Jakob; Knepper, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Vasopressin and ANG II, which are known to play a major role in renal water and sodium reabsorption, are mainly coupled to the cAMP/PKA and phosphoinositide pathways, respectively. There is evidence for cross talk between these intracellular signaling pathways. We therefore hypothesized...... that vasopressin-induced water reabsorption could be attenuated by ANG II AT1 receptor blockade in rats. To address this, three protocols were used: 1) DDAVP treatment (20 ng/h sc for 7 days, n = 8); 2) DDAVP (20 ng/h sc for 7 days) and candesartan (1 mg·kg−1·day−1 sc for 7 days) cotreatment (n = 8); and 3...... receptor blockade in DDAVP-treated rats was associated with decreased urine concentration and decreased AQP2 and AQP1 expression. Moreover, FENa was increased in parallel with decreased expression of NHE3, NCC, and Na-K-ATPase. These results suggest that ANG II AT1 receptor activation plays a significant...

  4. Impaired vascular contractility and aortic wall degeneration in fibulin-4 deficient mice: effect of angiotensin II type 1 (AT1 receptor blockade.

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    Els Moltzer

    Full Text Available Medial degeneration is a key feature of aneurysm disease and aortic dissection. In a murine aneurysm model we investigated the structural and functional characteristics of aortic wall degeneration in adult fibulin-4 deficient mice and the potential therapeutic role of the angiotensin (Ang II type 1 (AT(1 receptor antagonist losartan in preventing aortic media degeneration. Adult mice with 2-fold (heterozygous Fibulin-4(+/R and 4-fold (homozygous Fibulin-4(R/R reduced expression of fibulin-4 displayed the histological features of cystic media degeneration as found in patients with aneurysm or dissection, including elastin fiber fragmentation, loss of smooth muscle cells, and deposition of ground substance in the extracellular matrix of the aortic media. The aortic contractile capacity, determined by isometric force measurements, was diminished, and was associated with dysregulation of contractile genes as shown by aortic transcriptome analysis. These structural and functional alterations were accompanied by upregulation of TGF-β signaling in aortas from fibulin-4 deficient mice, as identified by genome-scaled network analysis as well as by immunohistochemical staining for phosphorylated Smad2, an intracellular mediator of TGF-β. Tissue levels of Ang II, a regulator of TGF-β signaling, were increased. Prenatal treatment with the AT(1 receptor antagonist losartan, which blunts TGF-β signaling, prevented elastic fiber fragmentation in the aortic media of newborn Fibulin-4(R/R mice. Postnatal losartan treatment reduced haemodynamic stress and improved lifespan of homozygous knockdown fibulin-4 animals, but did not affect aortic vessel wall structure. In conclusion, the AT(1 receptor blocker losartan can prevent aortic media degeneration in a non-Marfan syndrome aneurysm mouse model. In established aortic aneurysms, losartan does not affect aortic architecture, but does improve survival. These findings may extend the potential therapeutic

  5. Candesartan, an Angiotensin II AT1-Receptor Blocker and PPAR-γ Agonist, Reduces Lesion Volume and Improves Motor and Memory Function After Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villapol, Sonia; Yaszemski, Alexandra K; Logan, Trevor T; Sánchez-Lemus, Enrique; Saavedra, Juan M; Symes, Aviva J

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in complex pathological reactions, the initial lesion worsened by secondary inflammation and edema. Angiotensin II (Ang II) is produced in the brain and Ang II receptor type 1 (AT1R) overstimulation produces vasoconstriction and inflammation. Ang II receptor blockers (ARBs) are neuroprotective in models of stroke but little is known of their effect when administered in TBI models. We therefore performed controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury on mice to investigate whether the ARB candesartan would mitigate any effects of TBI. We administered candesartan or vehicle to mice 5 h before CCI injury. Candesartan treatment reduced the lesion volume after CCI injury by approximately 50%, decreased the number of dying neurons, lessened the number of activated microglial cells, protected cerebral blood flow (CBF), and reduced the expression of the cytokine TGFβ1 while increasing expression of TGFβ3. Candesartan-treated mice also showed better motor skills on the rotarod 3 days after injury, and improved performance in the Morris water maze 4 weeks after injury. These results indicate that candesartan is neuroprotective, reducing neuronal injury, decreasing lesion volume and microglial activation, protecting CBF and improving functional behavior in a mouse model of TBI. Co-treatment with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) antagonist significantly reduced some of the beneficial effects of candesartan after CCI, suggesting that PPARγ activation may contribute to part or to all of the neuroprotective effect of candesartan. Overall, our data suggest that ARBs with dual AT1R-blocking and PPARγ activation properties may have therapeutic value in treating TBI. PMID:22892395

  6. Angiotensin II modulates mouse skeletal muscle resting conductance to chloride and potassium ions and calcium homeostasis via the AT1 receptor and NADPH oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzoli, Anna; Liantonio, Antonella; Conte, Elena; Cannone, Maria; Massari, Ada Maria; Giustino, Arcangela; Scaramuzzi, Antonia; Pierno, Sabata; Mantuano, Paola; Capogrosso, Roberta Francesca; Camerino, Giulia Maria; De Luca, Annamaria

    2014-10-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) plays a role in muscle wasting and remodeling; however, little evidence shows its direct effects on specific muscle functions. We presently investigated the acute in vitro effects of ANG II on resting ionic conductance and calcium homeostasis of mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle fibers, based on previous findings that in vivo inhibition of ANG II counteracts the impairment of macroscopic ClC-1 chloride channel conductance (gCl) in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy. By means of intracellular microelectrode recordings we found that ANG II reduced gCl in the nanomolar range and in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50 = 0.06 μM) meanwhile increasing potassium conductance (gK). Both effects were inhibited by the ANG II receptors type 1 (AT1)-receptor antagonist losartan and the protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine; no antagonism was observed with the AT2 antagonist PD123,319. The scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) N-acetyl cysteine and the NADPH-oxidase (NOX) inhibitor apocynin also antagonized ANG II effects on resting ionic conductances; the ANG II-dependent gK increase was blocked by iberiotoxin, an inhibitor of calcium-activated potassium channels. ANG II also lowered the threshold for myofiber and muscle contraction. Both ANG II and the AT1 agonist L162,313 increased the intracellular calcium transients, measured by fura-2, with a two-step pattern. These latter effects were not observed in the presence of losartan and of the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 and the in absence of extracellular calcium, disclosing a Gq-mediated calcium entry mechanism. The data show for the first time that the AT1-mediated ANG II pathway, also involving NOX and ROS, directly modulates ion channels and calcium homeostasis in adult myofibers. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Angiotensin II Reduces Cardiac AdipoR1 Expression through AT1 Receptor/ROS/ERK1/2/c-Myc Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hong; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Li-Peng; Wang, Jin-Yu; Fu, Feng-Ying; Zhu, Wei-Guo; Wu, Li-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin, an abundant adipose tissue-derived protein, exerts protective effect against cardiovascular disease. Adiponectin receptors (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2) mediate the beneficial effects of adiponectin on the cardiovascular system. However, the alteration of AdipoRs in cardiac remodeling is not fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of angiotensin II (AngII) on cardiac AdipoRs expression and explored the possible molecular mechanism. AngII infusion into rats induced cardiac hypertrophy, reduced AdipoR1 but not AdipoR2 expression, and attenuated the phosphorylations of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase, and those effects were all reversed by losartan, an AngII type 1 (AT1) receptor blocker. AngII reduced expression of AdipoR1 mRNA and protein in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, which was abolished by losartan, but not by PD123319, an AT2 receptor antagonist. The antioxidants including reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger NAC, NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin, Nox2 inhibitor peptide gp91 ds-tat, and mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I inhibitor rotenone attenuated AngII-induced production of ROS and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. AngII-reduced AdipoR1 expression was reversed by pretreatment with NAC, apocynin, gp91 ds-tat, rotenone, and an ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that AngII provoked the recruitment of c-Myc onto the promoter region of AdipoR1, which was attenuated by PD98059. Moreover, AngII-induced DNA binding activity of c-Myc was inhibited by losartan, NAC, apocynin, gp91 ds-tat, rotenone, and PD98059. c-Myc small interfering RNA abolished the inhibitory effect of AngII on AdipoR1 expression. Our results suggest that AngII inhibits cardiac AdipoR1 expression in vivo and in vitro and AT1 receptor/ROS/ERK1/2/c-Myc pathway is required for the downregulation of AdipoR1 induced by AngII. PMID

  8. Angiotensin II reduces cardiac AdipoR1 expression through AT1 receptor/ROS/ERK1/2/c-Myc pathway.

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    Li Li

    Full Text Available Adiponectin, an abundant adipose tissue-derived protein, exerts protective effect against cardiovascular disease. Adiponectin receptors (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 mediate the beneficial effects of adiponectin on the cardiovascular system. However, the alteration of AdipoRs in cardiac remodeling is not fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of angiotensin II (AngII on cardiac AdipoRs expression and explored the possible molecular mechanism. AngII infusion into rats induced cardiac hypertrophy, reduced AdipoR1 but not AdipoR2 expression, and attenuated the phosphorylations of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase, and those effects were all reversed by losartan, an AngII type 1 (AT1 receptor blocker. AngII reduced expression of AdipoR1 mRNA and protein in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, which was abolished by losartan, but not by PD123319, an AT2 receptor antagonist. The antioxidants including reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenger NAC, NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin, Nox2 inhibitor peptide gp91 ds-tat, and mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I inhibitor rotenone attenuated AngII-induced production of ROS and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2. AngII-reduced AdipoR1 expression was reversed by pretreatment with NAC, apocynin, gp91 ds-tat, rotenone, and an ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that AngII provoked the recruitment of c-Myc onto the promoter region of AdipoR1, which was attenuated by PD98059. Moreover, AngII-induced DNA binding activity of c-Myc was inhibited by losartan, NAC, apocynin, gp91 ds-tat, rotenone, and PD98059. c-Myc small interfering RNA abolished the inhibitory effect of AngII on AdipoR1 expression. Our results suggest that AngII inhibits cardiac AdipoR1 expression in vivo and in vitro and AT1 receptor/ROS/ERK1/2/c-Myc pathway is required for the downregulation of AdipoR1 induced by AngII.

  9. An efficient synthesis of a rationally designed 1,5 disubstituted imidazole AT1 Angiotensin II receptor antagonist: reorientation of imidazole pharmacophore groups in losartan reserves high receptor affinity and confirms docking studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agelis, George; Roumelioti, Panagiota; Resvani, Amalia; Durdagi, Serdar; Androutsou, Maria-Eleni; Kelaidonis, Konstantinos; Vlahakos, Demetrios; Mavromoustakos, Thomas; Matsoukas, John

    2010-09-01

    A new 1,5 disubstituted imidazole AT1 Angiotensin II (AII) receptor antagonist related to losartan with reversion of butyl and hydroxymethyl groups at the 2-, 5-positions of the imidazole ring was synthesized and evaluated for its antagonist activity ( V8). In vitro results indicated that the reorientation of butyl and hydroxymethyl groups on the imidazole template of losartan retained high binding affinity to the AT1 receptor concluding that the spacing of the substituents at the 2,5- positions is of primary importance. The docking studies are confirmed by binding assay results which clearly show a comparable binding score of the designed compound V8 with that of the prototype losartan. An efficient, regioselective and cost effective synthesis renders the new compound as an attractive candidate for advanced toxicological evaluation and a drug against hypertension.

  10. The intrathecal administration of losartan, an AT1 receptor antagonist, produces an antinociceptive effect through the inhibiton of p38 MAPK phosphorylation in the mouse formalin test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Wataru; Ogata, Yoshiki; Nakagawasai, Osamu; Yaoita, Fukie; Tanado, Takeshi; Tan-No, Koichi

    2015-01-12

    We have recently reported that an intrathecal (i.t.) administration of angiotensin II (Ang II) into mice induces a nociceptive behavior accompanied by the activation of p38 MAPK signaling via AT1 receptors (Nemoto et al., 2013, Mol. Pain 9, 38). These results suggested that Ang II participates in the facilitation of nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord. In the present study, we used formalin test to examine the effect of i.t.-administered losartan, an AT1 receptor antagonist, and determine whether Ang II acts as a neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator in the spinal transmission of nociceptive information. When administered i.t. 5 min before the injection of a 2% formalin solution into the plantar surface of the hindpaw, losartan (30-100 nmol) produced a dose-dependent and significant antinociceptive effect during both the first and second phases of the test. In the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord (laminae I and II), the fluorescence intensities for Ang II and phospho-p38 MAPK were both significantly increased on the ipsilateral side 3 min after the injection of formalin compared to saline-treated controls. Moreover, the increase of phospho-p38 MAPK fluorescence intensity was significantly inhibited by the i.t. administration of losartan (54.8 nmol) 5 min prior to formalin. These results indicate that losartan produces an antinociceptive effect through the inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation in the mouse formalin test and that Ang II may act as a neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator in the spinal transmission of nociceptive information. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. TRC120038, a Novel Dual AT1/ETA Receptor Blocker for Control of Hypertension, Diabetic Nephropathy, and Cardiomyopathy in ob-ZSF1 Rats

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    Anookh Mohanan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In hypertensive subjects, angiotensin II and endothelin participate in a manner involving closely interwoven pathways in increasing blood pressure (BP and inducing end organ damage. The primary objective of this study was to determine the effect of TRC120038, a novel dual AT1/ETA receptor blocker on BP, in obese Zucker spontaneously hypertensive fatty rats (ob-ZSF1, an animal model of moderate hypertension, diabetes with progressive renal and cardiac dysfunction. Ob-ZSF1 rats loaded with 0.5% salt were treated with TRC120038 (11.8 mg/kg bid. or candesartan cilexetil (0.3 mg/kg od. or vehicle control. Blood pressure (by radio-telemetry and renal functional markers were monitored throughout the study. Cardiac function was assessed terminally by pressure volume catheter. Markers for renal dysfunction were measured and changes were evaluated histopathologically. TRC120038 showed greater fall in both systolic and diastolic BP in comparison to candesartan at its maximum antihypertensive dose. TRC120038 also reduced the severity of renal dysfunction and preserved cardiac function in ob-ZSF1 rat.

  12. AT1 receptor blockade alters nutritional and biometric development in obesity-resistant and obesity-prone rats submitted to a high fat diet

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    Pauline M Smith

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a chronic metabolic condition with important public health implications associated with numerous co-morbidities including cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance, and hypertension. The renin angiotensin system (RAS, best known for its involvement in cardiovascular control and body fluid homeostasis has, more recently, been implicated in regulation of energy balance. Interference with the RAS (genetically or pharmacologically has been shown to influence body weight gain. In this study we investigated the effects of systemic AT1 receptor blockade using losartan on ingestive behaviors and weight gain in diet induced obese (DIO rats. Prior to losartan administration (30mg/kg/day body weight gain remained constant within the DIO animals (3.6 ± 0.3g/day, n=8, diet resistant (DR animals (2.1 ± 0.6g/day, n=8 and in the age matched chow fed control (CHOW animals (2.8 ± 0.3g/day, n=8, Losartan administration abolished body weight gain in animals fed a high fat diet (DIO: -0.4 ± 0.7g/day, n=8; and DR: -0.8 ± 0.3g/day, n=8 while chow fed animals continued to gain weight (2.2 ± 0.3g/day, n=8 as they had previously to oral administration of losartan. This decrease in daily body weight gain was accompanied by a decrease in food intake in the high fat diet fed animals. Following the removal of losartan, both the DIO and DR animals again showed daily increases in body weight gain and food intake which were similar to control values. Our data demonstrate that oral losartan administration attenuates body weight gain in animals fed a HFD whether the animal is obese (DIO or not (DR while having no effect on body weight gain in age matched chow fed animals suggesting a protective effect of losartan against body weight gain while on a HFD.

  13. Structure of the Human Angiotensin II Type 1 (AT1) Receptor Bound to Angiotensin II from Multiple Chemoselective Photoprobe Contacts Reveals a Unique Peptide Binding Mode*

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    Fillion, Dany; Cabana, Jérôme; Guillemette, Gaétan; Leduc, Richard; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel

    2013-01-01

    Breakthroughs in G protein-coupled receptor structure determination based on crystallography have been mainly obtained from receptors occupied in their transmembrane domain core by low molecular weight ligands, and we have only recently begun to elucidate how the extracellular surface of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) allows for the binding of larger peptide molecules. In the present study, we used a unique chemoselective photoaffinity labeling strategy, the methionine proximity assay, to directly identify at physiological conditions a total of 38 discrete ligand/receptor contact residues that form the extracellular peptide-binding site of an activated GPCR, the angiotensin II type 1 receptor. This experimental data set was used in homology modeling to guide the positioning of the angiotensin II (AngII) peptide within several GPCR crystal structure templates. We found that the CXC chemokine receptor type 4 accommodated the results better than the other templates evaluated; ligand/receptor contact residues were spatially grouped into defined interaction clusters with AngII. In the resulting receptor structure, a β-hairpin fold in extracellular loop 2 in conjunction with two extracellular disulfide bridges appeared to open and shape the entrance of the ligand-binding site. The bound AngII adopted a somewhat vertical binding mode, allowing concomitant contacts across the extracellular surface and deep within the transmembrane domain core of the receptor. We propose that such a dualistic nature of GPCR interaction could be well suited for diffusible linear peptide ligands and a common feature of other peptidergic class A GPCRs. PMID:23386604

  14. A case with concurrent duplication, triplication, and uniparental isodisomy at 1q42.12-qter supporting microhomology-mediated break-induced replication model for replicative rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Nana; Naruto, Takuya; Murata, Chie; Ouchi, Yuya; Fujita, Naoko; Inagaki, Hidehito; Satomura, Shigeko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Saito, Masako; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Imoto, Issei

    2017-01-01

    Complex genomic rearrangements (CGRs) consisting of interstitial triplications in conjunction with uniparental isodisomy (isoUPD) have rarely been reported in patients with multiple congenital anomalies (MCA)/intellectual disability (ID). One-ended DNA break repair coupled with microhomology-mediated break-induced replication (MMBIR) has been recently proposed as a possible mechanism giving rise to interstitial copy number gains and distal isoUPD, although only a few cases providing supportive evidence in human congenital diseases with MCA have been documented. Here, we report on the chromosomal microarray (CMA)-based identification of the first known case with concurrent interstitial duplication at 1q42.12-q42.2 and triplication at 1q42.2-q43 followed by isoUPD for the remainder of chromosome 1q (at 1q43-qter). In distal 1q duplication/triplication overlapping with 1q42.12-q43, variable clinical features have been reported, and our 25-year-old patient with MCA/ID presented with some of these frequently described features. Further analyses including the precise mapping of breakpoint junctions within the CGR in a sequence level suggested that the CGR found in association with isoUPD in our case is a triplication with flanking duplications, characterized as a triplication with a particularly long duplication-inverted triplication-duplication (DUP-TRP/INV-DUP) structure. Because microhomology was observed in both junctions between the triplicated region and the flanking duplicated regions, our case provides supportive evidence for recently proposed replication-based mechanisms, such as MMBIR, underlying the formation of CGRs + isoUPD implicated in chromosomal disorders. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of CGRs + isoUPD observed in 1q and having DUP-TRP/INV-DUP structure with a long proximal duplication, which supports MMBIR-based model for genomic rearrangements. Molecular cytogenetic analyses using CMA containing single

  15. Angiotensin II Type 1 receptor (AT1) signaling in astrocytes regulates synaptic degeneration-induced leukocyte entry to the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Füchtbauer, L; Groth-Rasmussen, Maria; Holm, Thomas Hellesøe

    2011-01-01

    in the dentate gyrus following axonal transection was totally abrogated in GFAP-IκBα-dn mice. Whereas angiotensin II was upregulated in microglia and astrocytes in the dentate gyrus post-lesion, AT1 was exclusively expressed on astrocytes. Blocking AT1 with Candesartan led to significant increase in numbers...

  16. Permanent Distal Occlusion of Middle Cerebral Artery in Rat Causes Local Increased ETB, 5-HT1B and AT1 Receptor-Mediated Contractility Downstream of Occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marianne N P; Hornbak, Malene; Larsen, Stine S

    2013-01-01

    a model of permanent distal occlusion of rat middle cerebral arteries, we investigated whether there was a regional difference in receptor-mediated contractility of segments located upstream and downstream of the occlusion site. The contractile response to endothelin, angiotensin and 5-hydroxytryptamine...... receptor stimulation was studied by sensitive wire myograph. Results: Only downstream segments exhibited an augmented contractile response to stimulation with each of the three ligands, with the response towards sarafotoxin 6c being especially augmented compared to sham, upstream and contralateral controls...... occlusion without significant visible infarct resulted in locally increased ETB, angiotensin type 1 and 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B receptor-mediated contractile responses only in segments located downstream of the occlusion site. This suggests lack of wall stress as an initiating trigger leading to regulation...

  17. Angiotensin AT1-receptor blockers and cerebrovascular protection: do they actually have a cutting edge over angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oprisiu-Fournier, Roxana; Faure, Sébastien; Mazouz, Hakim

    2009-01-01

    First, an update of the vascular systemic and tissue renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is provided to explain how it is regulated at the systemic and tissue levels, and how many angiotensin peptides and receptors can be modulated by the various antihypertensive drugs. Second, experimental data...... AT2 receptors are overexpressed) or by directly increasing neuronal resistance to anoxia. Third, we review most of the large primary and secondary stroke prevention trials as well as the ACCESS acute stroke trial in which antihypertensive drugs were evaluated. With the exception of the secondary...

  18. Functional enhancement of AT1R potency in the presence of the TPαR is revealed by a comprehensive 7TM receptor co-expression screen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jonas Tind; Lyngsø, Christina; Speerschneider, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Functional cross-talk between seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors can dramatically alter their pharmacological properties, both in vitro and in vivo. This represents an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutics that potentially target more specific biological effects while causing few...

  19. Increased perfusion pressure enhances the expression of endothelin (ETB) and angiotensin II (AT1, AT2) receptors in rat mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstedt, Isak; Xu, Cang-Bao; Zhang, Yaping

    2009-01-01

    and luminally perfused in a perfusion chamber. After either exposure to no ("organ culture" (0 mmHg)), normal (85/75 mmHg) or high pressure (160/150 mmHg) at constant flow for 1-17 h, the vessel segments were snap frozen and real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to quantify the ET- and AT-receptor m...

  20. Discovery of novel, potent and low-toxicity angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) blockers: Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of 6-substituted aminocarbonyl benzimidazoles with a chiral center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao-Feng; He, Xing; Wang, Miao; Xu, Di; Hao, Li-Ping; Liang, Ai-Hua; Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Zhi-Ming

    2015-10-20

    Novel angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) blockers bearing 6-substituted carbamoyl benzimidazoles with a chiral center were designed and synthesized as the first step to develop new antihypertensive agents and understand their pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties. The newly synthesized compounds were tested for their potential ability to displace [(125)I] Sar(1) Ile(8)-Ang II, which was specifically bound to human AT1 receptor. Radioligand binding assays revealed nanomolar affinity in several compounds under study. The IC50 values of nine ligands were higher than those of Losartan. The screening of decreased blood pressure in spontaneous hypertensive rats displayed that compound 8S (IC₅₀ = 5.0 nM) was equipotent with Losartan, whereas compounds 13R (IC₅₀ = 7.3 nM), 14R (IC₅₀ = 6.3 nM), and 14S (IC₅₀ = 3.5 nM) were slightly ahead of Losartan, and the most significant activity was demonstrated by compound 8R (IC₅₀ = 1.1 nM). Candidate 8R was identified for its excellent efficacy in antihypertension and fairly low toxicity based on plasma analyses, toxicology studies, and chronic oral tests. Finally, compound 8R exhibited strong and multiple interactions with target active sites of the theoretical AT1 receptor model in docking study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Metabolic effects of an AT1-receptor blockade combined with HCTZ in cardiac risk patients: a non interventional study in primary care

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    Schönrock Eleonore

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reduction of blood pressure alone does not eliminate the increased risk of arterial hypertension. Whilst concomitant metabolic risk factors have been shown to be responsible, the available pharmacotherapy has differential effects on these metabolic risk factors. For example, diuretics and betablockers worsen glucose metabolism, hence the starting point of the current subanalysis of the CHILI (Candesartan in patients with HIgher cardiovascuLar rIsk study was the assumption that an angiotensin receptor blocker may counterbalance the metabolic effects of a low dose diuretic in patients with several metabolic risk factors. Methods The present study was performed as a non-interventional observational study in Germany. Patients with previously uncontrolled hypertension with at least one further risk factor in which physicians deemed a treatment with 16 mg Candesartan/12.5 mg HCTZ to be necessary were included. The risk factors were calculated in patient subgroups with diabetes, the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn and neither condition (control. The risk of cardiovascular mortality within the next 10 years was calculated using the SCORE algorithm of the ESC. Results Between August 2006 and February 2007 a total of 3,787 patients were included into the non-interventional trial. Patients were 62.2 ± 11.3 years old, 48.1% were female, 97.5% had at least one additional risk factor. Blood pressure was reduced by -27.2/-13.4 mmHg with only minor non significant variations between patient groups. Waist circumference was reduced (P Conclusion The present study demonstrates that a 16 mg candesartan/12.5 mg HCTZ based treatment results in a pronounced blood pressure reduction and was associated with a favourable change in metabolic risk factors such as HDL cholesterol, triglycerides and blood glucose. These data indicate that metabolic effects observed in clinical trials like ALPINE, SCOPE or CHARM can also be observed in an unselected

  2. Complete Reversible Refolding of a G-Protein Coupled Receptor on a Solid Support.

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    Natalie Di Bartolo

    Full Text Available The factors defining the correct folding and stability of integral membrane proteins are poorly understood. Folding of only a few select membrane proteins has been scrutinised, leaving considerable deficiencies in knowledge for large protein families, such as G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs. Complete reversible folding, which is problematic for any membrane protein, has eluded this dominant receptor family. Moreover, attempts to recover receptors from denatured states are inefficient, yielding at best 40-70% functional protein. We present a method for the reversible unfolding of an archetypal family member, the β1-adrenergic receptor, and attain 100% recovery of the folded, functional state, in terms of ligand binding, compared to receptor which has not been subject to any unfolding and retains its original, folded structure. We exploit refolding on a solid support, which could avoid unwanted interactions and aggregation that occur in bulk solution. We determine the changes in structure and function upon unfolding and refolding. Additionally, we employ a method that is relatively new to membrane protein folding; pulse proteolysis. Complete refolding of β1-adrenergic receptor occurs in n-decyl-β-D-maltoside (DM micelles from a urea-denatured state, as shown by regain of its original helical structure, ligand binding and protein fluorescence. The successful refolding strategy on a solid support offers a defined method for the controlled refolding and recovery of functional GPCRs and other membrane proteins that suffer from instability and irreversible denaturation once isolated from their native membranes.

  3. Renin activates PI3K-Akt-eNOS signalling through the angiotensin AT1 and Mas receptors to modulate central blood pressure control in the nucleus tractus solitarii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wen-Han; Lu, Pei-Jung; Hsiao, Michael; Hsiao, Chun-Hui; Ho, Wen-Yu; Cheng, Pei-Wen; Lin, Chia-Te; Hong, Ling-Zong; Tseng, Ching-Jiunn

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is critical for the control of blood pressure by the CNS. Recently, direct renin inhibitors were approved as antihypertensive agents. However, the signalling mechanism of renin, which regulates blood pressure in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) remains unclear. Here we have investigated the signalling pathways involved in renin-mediated blood pressure regulation, at the NTS. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Depressor responses to renin microinjected into the NTS of Wistar-Kyoto rats were elicited in the absence and presence of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-specific inhibitor, N(5)-(-iminoethyl)-L-ornithine, Akt inhibitor IV and LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor and GP antagonist-2A [Gq inhibitor]. Lisinopril (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor), losartan, valsartan (angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonists), D-Ala7-Ang-(1-7) (angiotensin-(1-7) receptor antagonist) were used to study the involvement of RAS on renin-induced depressor effects. KEY RESULTS Microinjection of renin into the NTS produced a prominent depressor effect and increased NO production. Pretreatment with Gq-PI3K-Akt-eNOS pathway-specific inhibitors significantly attenuated the depressor response evoked by renin. Immunoblotting and immunohistochemical studies further showed that inhibition of PI3K significantly blocked renin-induced eNOS-Ser117 and Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation in situ. In addition, pre-treatment of the NTS with RAS inhibitors attenuated the vasodepressor effects evoked by renin. Microinjection of renin also increased Ras activation in the NTS. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Taken together, these results suggest renin modulated blood pressure at the NTS by AT1 and Mas receptor-mediated activation of Gq and Ras to evoke PI3K-Akt-eNOS signalling. PMID:22224457

  4. Influence of Angiotensin II Subtype 2 Receptor (AT2R Antagonist, PD123319, on Cardiovascular Remodelling of Aged Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats during Chronic Angiotensin II Subtype 1 Receptor (AT1R Blockade

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    Emma S. Jones

    2012-01-01

    Adult (20 weeks and senescent (20 months spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs were treated with either the AT1R antagonist, candesartan cilexetil (2 mg/kg/day, the AT2R antagonist, PD123319 (10 mg/kg/day, or a combination of the 2 compounds. Mean arterial pressure (MAP and left ventricular volume were markedly decreased by candesartan cilexetil, however, simultaneous treatment with PD123319 had no additional effect on either parameter. Perivascular fibrosis was significantly reduced by candesartan cilexetil in aged animals only, and this effect was reversed by concomitant PD123319 administration. Vascular hypertrophy was reduced by candesartan cilexetil, and these effects were reversed by simultaneous PD123319. These results suggest that AT2R stimulation does not significantly influence the antihypertensive effect of chronic AT1R blockade, but plays a role in the regulation of vascular structure. The severe degree of cardiac perivascular fibrosis in senescent animals was regressed by AT1R blockade and this effect was reversed by simultaneous AT2R inhibition, demonstrating an antifibrotic role of AT2R stimulation in the aging hypertensive heart.

  5. New zircon data supporting models of short-lived igneous activity at 1.89 Ga in the western Skellefte District, central Fennoscandian Shield

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    P. Skyttä

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available New U-Th-Pb zircon data (SIMS from three intrusive phases of the Palaeoproterozoic Viterliden intrusion in the western Skellefte District, central Fennoscandian Shield, dates igneous emplacement in a narrow time interval at about 1.89 Ga. A locally occurring quartz-plagioclase porphyritic tonalite, here dated at 1889 ± 3 Ma, is considered the youngest of the intrusive units, based on the new age data and field evidence. This supports an existing interpretation of its fault-controlled emplacement after intrusion of the dominating hornblende-tonalite units, in this study dated at 1892 ± 3 Ma. The Viterliden magmatism was synchronous with the oldest units of the Jörn type early-orogenic intrusions in the eastern part of the district (1.89–1.88 Ga; cf. Gonzàles Roldán, 2010. A U-Pb zircon age for a felsic metavolcanic rock from the hanging-wall to the Kristineberg VMS deposit, immediately south of the Viterliden intrusion, is constrained at 1883 ± 6 Ma in this study. It provides a minimum age for the Kristineberg ore deposit and suggests contemporaneous igneous/volcanic activity throughout the Skellefte District. Furthermore, it supports the view that the Skellefte Group defines a laterally continuous belt throughout this "ore district". Tentative correlation of the 1889 ± 3 Ma quartz-plagioclase porphyritic tonalite with the Kristineberg "mine porphyry" suggests that these units are coeval at about 1.89 Ga. Based on the new age determinations, the Viterliden intrusion may equally well have intruded into or locally acted as a basement for the ore-hosting Skellefte Group volcanic rocks.

  6. Endothelial Microparticles From Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients Induce Premature Coronary Artery Endothelial Cell Aging and Thrombogenicity: Role of the Ang II/AT1 Receptor/NADPH Oxidase-Mediated Activation of MAPKs and PI3-Kinase Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Malak; Jesel, Laurence; Auger, Cyril; Amoura, Lamia; Messas, Nathan; Manin, Guillaume; Rumig, Cordula; León-González, Antonio J; Ribeiro, Thais P; Silva, Grazielle C; Abou-Merhi, Raghida; Hamade, Eva; Hecker, Markus; Georg, Yannick; Chakfe, Nabil; Ohlmann, Patrick; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B; Toti, Florence; Morel, Olivier

    2017-01-17

    Microparticles (MPs) have emerged as a surrogate marker of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular risk. This study examined the potential of MPs from senescent endothelial cells (ECs) or from patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) to promote premature EC aging and thrombogenicity. Primary porcine coronary ECs were isolated from the left circumflex coronary artery. MPs were prepared from ECs and venous blood from patients with ACS (n=30) and from healthy volunteers (n=4) by sequential centrifugation. The level of endothelial senescence was assessed as senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity using flow cytometry, oxidative stress using the redox-sensitive probe dihydroethidium, tissue factor activity using an enzymatic Tenase assay, the level of target protein expression by Western blot analysis, platelet aggregation using an aggregometer, and shear stress using a cone-and-plate viscometer. Senescence, as assessed by senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, was induced by the passaging of porcine coronary artery ECs from passage P1 to P4, and was associated with a progressive shedding of procoagulant MPs. Exposure of P1 ECs to MPs shed from senescent P3 cells or circulating MPs from ACS patients induced increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, oxidative stress, early phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and Akt, and upregulation of p53, p21, and p16. Ex vivo, the prosenescent effect of circulating MPs from ACS patients was evidenced only under conditions of low shear stress. Depletion of endothelial-derived MPs from ACS patients reduced the induction of senescence. Prosenescent MPs promoted EC thrombogenicity through tissue factor upregulation, shedding of procoagulant MPs, endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation, and reduced nitric oxide-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation. These MPs exhibited angiotensin-converting enzyme activity and upregulated AT1 receptors and angiotensin

  7. Tyrosine Kinase Ligand-Receptor Pair Prediction by Using Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Yarimizu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Receptor tyrosine kinases are essential proteins involved in cellular differentiation and proliferation in vivo and are heavily involved in allergic diseases, diabetes, and onset/proliferation of cancerous cells. Identifying the interacting partner of this protein, a growth factor ligand, will provide a deeper understanding of cellular proliferation/differentiation and other cell processes. In this study, we developed a method for predicting tyrosine kinase ligand-receptor pairs from their amino acid sequences. We collected tyrosine kinase ligand-receptor pairs from the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP and UniProtKB, filtered them by removing sequence redundancy, and used them as a dataset for machine learning and assessment of predictive performance. Our prediction method is based on support vector machines (SVMs, and we evaluated several input features suitable for tyrosine kinase for machine learning and compared and analyzed the results. Using sequence pattern information and domain information extracted from sequences as input features, we obtained 0.996 of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. This accuracy is higher than that obtained from general protein-protein interaction pair predictions.

  8. Differential effects of selective estrogen receptor modulators on the vagina and its supportive tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Rui; Knight, Katrina; Nolfi, Alexis; Abramowitch, Steven; Moalli, Pamela A

    2016-02-01

    Some selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been associated with increased incidence of urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse. This study explored the effects of five SERMs on the function and matrix components of the vagina and its supportive tissues. Fifty-six rats were administered SERMs by oral gavage for 8 weeks (n = 8 for each SERM): raloxifene, tamoxifen, idoxifene, bazedoxifene at three different doses, and bazedoxifene with conjugated estrogens. Thirty-two rats were used as controls (n = 8 per group): sham operation (no ovariectomy), ovariectomy only, ovariectomy with vehicle gavage, and 17β-estradiol (subcutaneous). Vaginal supportive tissue complex was tested by uniaxial tensile testing. Total collagen content (hydroxyproline) and glycosaminoglycan content (Blyscan) were measured. Ovariectomy significantly decreased the mechanical integrity of the vagina and its supportive tissue complex, with a decrease in ultimate load and stiffness (all P vagina and its supportive tissues, with the effects of idoxifene and bazedoxifene being the least. The paradoxically increased collagen content in these two groups may be related to increased formation of nonfunctional collagen.

  9. The Dopamine D2 Receptor Gene, Perceived Parental Support, and Adolescent Loneliness: Longitudinal Evidence for Gene-Environment Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roekel, Eeske; Goossens, Luc; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Verhagen, Maaike

    2011-01-01

    Background: Loneliness is a common problem in adolescence. Earlier research focused on genes within the serotonin and oxytocin systems, but no studies have examined the role of dopamine-related genes in loneliness. In the present study, we focused on the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2). Methods: Associations among the DRD2, sex, parental support,…

  10. Decision trees versus support vector machine for classification of androgen receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaye, A; Doucet, J P; Devillers, J; Marchand-Geneste, N; Porcher, J M

    2008-01-01

    With the current concern of limiting experimental assays, increased interest now focuses on in silico models able to predict toxicity of chemicals. Endocrine disruptors cover a large number of environmental and industrial chemicals which may affect the functions of natural hormones in humans and wildlife. Structure-activity models are now increasingly used for predicting the endocrine disruption potential of chemicals. In this study, a large set of about 200 chemicals covering a broad range of structural classes was considered in order to categorize their relative binding affinity (RBA) to the androgen receptor. Classification of chemicals into four activity groups, with respect to their log RBA value, was carried out in a cascade of recursive partitioning trees, with descriptors calculated from CODESSA software and encoding topological, geometrical and quantum chemical properties. The hydrophobicity parameter (log P), Balaban index, and descriptors relying on charge distribution (maximum partial charge, nucleophilic index on oxygen atoms, charged surface area, etc.) appear to play a major role in the chemical partitioning. Separation of strongly active compounds was rather straightforward. Similarly, about 90% of the inactive compounds were identified. More intricate was the separation of active compounds into subsets of moderate and weak binders, the task requiring a more complex tree. A comparison was made with support vector machine yielding similar results.

  11. Efficient Prediction of Progesterone Receptor Interactome Using a Support Vector Machine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Long Liu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interaction (PPI is essential for almost all cellular processes and identification of PPI is a crucial task for biomedical researchers. So far, most computational studies of PPI are intended for pair-wise prediction. Theoretically, predicting protein partners for a single protein is likely a simpler problem. Given enough data for a particular protein, the results can be more accurate than general PPI predictors. In the present study, we assessed the potential of using the support vector machine (SVM model with selected features centered on a particular protein for PPI prediction. As a proof-of-concept study, we applied this method to identify the interactome of progesterone receptor (PR, a protein which is essential for coordinating female reproduction in mammals by mediating the actions of ovarian progesterone. We achieved an accuracy of 91.9%, sensitivity of 92.8% and specificity of 91.2%. Our method is generally applicable to any other proteins and therefore may be of help in guiding biomedical experiments.

  12. A characteristic back support structure in the bisphenol A-binding pocket in the human nuclear receptor ERRγ.

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    Xiaohui Liu

    Full Text Available The endocrine disruptor bisphenol A (BPA affects various genes and hormones even at merely physiological levels. We recently demonstrated that BPA binds strongly to human nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor (ERR γ and that the phenol-A group of BPA is in a receptacle pocket with essential amino acid residues to provide structural support at the backside. This led BPA to bind to ERRγ in an induced-fit-type binding mode, for example, with a rotated motion of Val313 to support the Tyr326-binding site. A similar binding mechanism appears to occur at the binding site of the BPA phenol-B ring. X-ray crystal analysis of the ERRγ-ligand-binding domain/BPA complex suggested that the ERRγ receptor residues Leu342, Leu345, Asn346, and Ile349 function as intrinsic binding sites of the BPA phenol-B, whereas Leu265, Leu268, Ile310, Val313, Leu324, Tyr330, Lys430, Ala431, and His434 work as structural elements to assist these binding sites. In the present study, by evaluating the mutant receptors replaced by a series of amino acids, we demonstrated that a finely assembled structural network indeed exists around the two adjacent Leu342-Asn346 and Leu345-Ile349 ridges on the same α-helix 7 (H7, constructing a part of the binding pocket structure with back support residues for the BPA phenol-B ring. The results reveal that the double-layer binding sites, namely, the ordinary ligand binding sites and their back support residues, substantiate the strong binding of BPA to ERRγ. When ERRγ-Asn346 was replaced by the corresponding Gly and Tyr in ERRα and ERRβ, respectively, the binding affinity of BPA and even 4-hydroxytamxifen (4-OHT is much reduced. Asn346 was found to be one of the residues that make ERRγ to be exclusive to BPA.

  13. Differential extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 activation by the angiotensin type 1 receptor supports distinct phenotypes of cardiac myocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aplin, Mark; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Schneider, Mikael

    2007-01-01

    The angiotensin II (AngII) type 1 receptor (AT(1)R) is a seven-transmembrane receptor well established to activate extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) by discrete G protein-dependent and beta-arrestin2-dependent pathways. The biological importance of this, however, remains obs...... obscure. Application of the modified analogue [Sar(1), Ile(4), Ile(8)]-AngII ([SII] AngII) allowed us to dissect the two pathways of ERK1/2 activation in native cardiac myocytes. Although cytosol-retained, the beta-arrestin2-bound pool of ERK1/2 represents an active signalling component...... that phosphorylates p90 Ribosomal S6 Kinase, a ubiquitous and versatile mediator of ERK1/2 signal transduction. Moreover, the beta-arrestin2-dependent ERK1/2 signal supports intact proliferation of cardiac myocytes. In contrast to G(q)-activated ERK1/2, and in keeping with its failure to translocate to the nucleus......, the beta-arrestin2-scaffolded pool of ERK1/2 does not phosphorylate the transcription factor Elk-1, induces no increased transcription of the immediate-early gene c-Fos, and does not entail myocyte hypertrophy. These results clearly demonstrate the biological significance of differential signalling...

  14. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  15. Reconstitution of Homomeric GluA2flop Receptors in Supported Lipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranovic, Jelena; Ramanujan, Chandra S.; Kasai, Nahoko; Midgett, Charles R.; Madden, Dean R.; Torimitsu, Keiichi; Ryan, John F.

    2013-01-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are glutamate-gated ion channels ubiquitous in the vertebrate central nervous system, where they mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission and act as molecular determinants of memory formation and learning. Together with detailed analyses of individual AMPAR domains, structural studies of full-length AMPARs by electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography have provided important insights into channel assembly and function. However, the correlation between the structure and functional states of the channel remains ambiguous particularly because these functional states can be assessed only with the receptor bound within an intact lipid bilayer. To provide a basis for investigating AMPAR structure in a membrane environment, we developed an optimized reconstitution protocol using a receptor whose structure has previously been characterized by electron microscopy. Single-channel recordings of reconstituted homomeric GluA2flop receptors recapitulate key electrophysiological parameters of the channels expressed in native cellular membranes. Atomic force microscopy studies of the reconstituted samples provide high-resolution images of membrane-embedded full-length AMPARs at densities comparable to those in postsynaptic membranes. The data demonstrate the effect of protein density on conformational flexibility and dimensions of the receptors and provide the first structural characterization of functional membrane-embedded AMPARs, thus laying the foundation for correlated structure-function analyses of the predominant mediators of excitatory synaptic signals in the brain. PMID:23382380

  16. A robust morphological classification of high-redshift galaxies using support vector machines on seeing limited images. II. Quantifying morphological k-correction in the COSMOS field at 1 < z < 2: Ks band vs. I band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Company, M.; Tasca, L.; Rouan, D.; Pelat, D.; Kneib, J. P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Capak, P.; Kartaltepe, J.; Koekemoer, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Willott, C.

    2009-04-01

    Context: Morphology is the most accessible tracer of galaxies physical structure, but its interpretation in the framework of galaxy evolution still remains problematic. Its quantification at high redshift requires deep high-angular resolution imaging, which is why space data (HST) are usually employed. At z > 1, the HST visible cameras however probe the UV flux, which is dominated by the emission of young stars, which could bias the estimated morphologies towards late-type systems. Aims: In this paper we quantify the effects of this morphological k-correction at 1 Methods: In Paper I we presented a new non-parametric method of quantifying morphologies of galaxies on seeing-limited images based on support vector machines. Here we use this method to classify ~50 000 Ks selected galaxies in the COSMOS area observed with WIRCam at CFHT. We use a 10-dimensional volume, including 5 morphological parameters, and other characteristics of galaxies such as luminosity and redshift. The obtained classification is used to investigate the redshift distributions and number counts per morphological type up to z ~ 2 and to compare them to the results obtained with HST/ACS in the I-band on the same objects. We associate to every galaxy with Ks find less early-type galaxies than the Ks-band one by a factor ~1.5, which might be a consequence of morphological k-correction effects. Conclusions: We argue therefore that studies based on I-band HST/ACS classifications at z > 1 could be underestimating the elliptical population. Using our method in a Ks ≤ 21.5 magnitude-limited sample, we observe that the fraction of the early-type population is (21.9% ± 8%) at z ~ 1.5-2 and (32.0% ± 5%) at the present time. We will discuss the evolution of the fraction of galaxies in types from volume-limited samples in a forthcoming paper. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des

  17. In Vitro Evidence Supports Membrane Alanyl Aminopeptidase N as a Receptor for a Plant Virus in the Pea Aphid Vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linz, Lucas B; Liu, Sijun; Chougule, Nanasaheb P; Bonning, Bryony C

    2015-11-01

    Insect-borne plant viruses cause significant agricultural losses and jeopardize sustainable global food production. Although blocking plant virus transmission would allow for crop protection, virus receptors in insect vectors are unknown. Here we identify membrane alanyl aminopeptidase N (APN) as a receptor for pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) coat protein (CP) in the gut of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, using a far-Western blot method. Pulldown and immunofluorescence binding assays and surface plasmon resonance were used to confirm and characterize CP-APN interaction. PEMV virions and a peptide comprised of PEMV CP fused to a proline-rich hinge (-P-) and green fluorescent protein (CP-P-GFP) specifically bound to APN. Recombinant APN expressed in Sf9 cells resulted in internalization of CP-P-GFP, which was visualized by confocal microscopy; such internalization is an expected hallmark of a functional gut receptor. Finally, in assays with aphid gut-derived brush border membrane vesicles, binding of CP-P-GFP competed with binding of GBP3.1, a peptide previously demonstrated to bind to APN in the aphid gut and to impede PEMV uptake into the hemocoel; this finding supports the hypothesis that GBP3.1 and PEMV bind to and compete for the same APN receptor. These in vitro data combined with previously published in vivo experiments (S. Liu, S. Sivakumar, W. O. Sparks, W. A. Miller, and B. C. Bonning, Virology 401:107-116, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virol.2010.02.009) support the identification of APN as the first receptor in a plant virus vector. Knowledge of this receptor will provide for technologies based on PEMV-APN interaction designed to block plant virus transmission and to suppress aphid populations. A significant proportion of global food production is lost to insect pests. Aphids, in addition to weakening plants by feeding on their sap, are responsible for transmitting about half of the plant viruses vectored by insects. Growers rely heavily on the

  18. The relationship between glucocorticoid receptor polymorphisms, stressful life events, social support, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Yulong; Xiao, Jing; Wang, Qian; Ning, Li; Guan, Suzhen; Ge, Hua; Li, Fuye; Liu, Jiwen

    2014-08-12

    It is debatable whether or not glucocorticoid receptor (GR) polymorphisms moderate susceptibility to PTSD. Our objective was to examine the effects of stressful life events, social support, GR genotypes, and gene-environment interactions on the etiology of PTSD. Three tag single nucleotide polymorphisms, trauma events, stressful life events, and social support were assessed in 460 patients with PTSD and 1158 control subjects from a Chinese Han population. Gene-environment interactions were analyzed by generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR). Variation in GR at rs41423247 and rs258747, stressful life events, social support, and the number of traumatic events were each separately associated with the risk for PTSD. A gene-environment interaction among the polymorphisms, rs41423247 and rs258747, the number of traumatic events, stressful life events, and social support resulted in an increased risk for PTSD. High-risk individuals (a large number of traumatic events, G allele of rs258747 and rs41423247, high level stressful life events, and low social support) had a 3.26-fold increased risk of developing PTSD compared to low-risk individuals. The association was statistically significant in the sub-groups with and without childhood trauma. Our data support the notion that stressful life events, the number of trauma events, and social support may play a contributing role in the risk for PTSD by interacting with GR gene polymorphisms.

  19. Caffeine May Reduce Perceived Sweet Taste in Humans, Supporting Evidence That Adenosine Receptors Modulate Taste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Ezen; Picket, Benjamin; Dando, Robin

    2017-09-01

    Multiple recent reports have detailed the presence of adenosine receptors in sweet sensitive taste cells of mice. These receptors are activated by endogenous adenosine in the plasma to enhance sweet signals within the taste bud, before reporting to the primary afferent. As we commonly consume caffeine, a powerful antagonist for such receptors, in our daily lives, an intriguing question we sought to answer was whether the caffeine we habitually consume in coffee can inhibit the perception of sweet taste in humans. 107 panelists were randomly assigned to 2 groups, sampling decaffeinated coffee supplemented with either 200 mg of caffeine, about the level found in a strong cup of coffee, or an equally bitter concentration of quinine. Participants subsequently performed sensory testing, with the session repeated in the alternative condition in a second session on a separate day. Panelists rated both the sweetened coffee itself and subsequent sucrose solutions as less sweet in the caffeine condition, despite the treatment having no effect on bitter, sour, salty, or umami perception. Panelists were also unable to discern whether they had consumed the caffeinated or noncaffeinated coffee, with ratings of alertness increased equally, but no significant improvement in reaction times, highlighting coffee's powerful placebo effect. This work validates earlier observations in rodents in a human population. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  20. NMDA receptors on non-dopaminergic neurons in the VTA support cocaine sensitization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Luo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The initiation of behavioral sensitization to cocaine and other psychomotor stimulants is thought to reflect N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR-mediated synaptic plasticity in the mesolimbic dopamine (DA circuitry. The importance of drug induced NMDAR mediated adaptations in ventral tegmental area (VTA DA neurons, and its association with drug seeking behaviors, has recently been evaluated in Cre-loxp mice lacking functional NMDARs in DA neurons expressing Cre recombinase under the control of the endogenous dopamine transporter gene (NR1(DATCre mice.Using an additional NR1(DATCre mouse transgenic model, we demonstrate that while the selective inactivation of NMDARs in DA neurons eliminates the induction of molecular changes leading to synaptic strengthening, behavioral measures such as cocaine induced locomotor sensitization and conditioned place preference remain intact in NR1(DATCre mice. Since VTA DA neurons projecting to the prefrontal cortex and amygdala express little or no detectable levels of the dopamine transporter, it has been speculated that NMDA receptors in DA neurons projecting to these brain areas may have been spared in NR1(DATCre mice. Here we demonstrate that the NMDA receptor gene is ablated in the majority of VTA DA neurons, including those exhibiting undetectable DAT expression levels in our NR1(DATCre transgenic model, and that application of an NMDAR antagonist within the VTA of NR1(DATCre animals still blocks sensitization to cocaine.These results eliminate the possibility of NMDAR mediated neuroplasticity in the different DA neuronal subpopulations in our NR1(DATCre mouse model and therefore suggest that NMDARs on non-DA neurons within the VTA must play a major role in cocaine-related addictive behavior.

  1. Glycine receptors support excitatory neurotransmitter release in developing mouse visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Portia A; Burette, Alain C; Weinberg, Richard J; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2012-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are found in most areas of the brain, and their dysfunction can cause severe neurological disorders. While traditionally thought of as inhibitory receptors, presynaptic-acting GlyRs (preGlyRs) can also facilitate glutamate release under certain circumstances, although the underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. In the current study, we sought to better understand the role of GlyRs in the facilitation of excitatory neurotransmitter release in mouse visual cortex. Using whole-cell recordings, we found that preGlyRs facilitate glutamate release in developing, but not adult, visual cortex. The glycinergic enhancement of neurotransmitter release in early development depends on the high intracellular to extracellular Cl− gradient maintained by the Na+–K+–2Cl− cotransporter and requires Ca2+ entry through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. The glycine transporter 1, localized to glial cells, regulates extracellular glycine concentration and the activation of these preGlyRs. Our findings demonstrate a developmentally regulated mechanism for controlling excitatory neurotransmitter release in the neocortex. PMID:22988142

  2. Signals emanating from the membrane proximal region of the thrombopoietin receptor (mpl) support hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wei; Ibarra, Yessenia M; Lodish, Harvey F

    2007-09-01

    Studies using thrombopoietin -/- (TPO(-/-)) or TPO receptor, mpl(-/-) mice have established a critical role for TPO/mpl signaling in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) development. In this study, we further dissected mpl signaling in both megakaryopoiesis and HSC function, using mice bearing a truncated mpl receptor lacking the distal 60 amino acids (Delta60). This deletion removes three major signaling tyrosines on the mpl cytoplasmic domain, but retains the membrane proximal Box1 and Box2 domains required for JAK2 activation. Competitive bone marrow transplantations (BMT) and serial BMTs were performed to study HSC function. Western blot analysis was used to study TPO-stimulated signaling pathways. BM cell cultures in the presence of TPO were used to study megakaryocyte development. In agreement with prior findings, we show that Delta60 BM cells cultured in TPO generated normal numbers of megakaryocytes, but with greatly reduced ploidy. As expected from the deletion of three signaling tyrosine residues, freshly isolated Delta60 megakaryocytes showed marked reduction in all known TPO-stimulated signaling pathways tested, including signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat) 5, Stat3, Akt, and p42/44 mitogen-activated kinase. We found that Delta60 mice displayed normal short-term (ST-HSC) activities and marginally compromised long-term (LT-HSC) stem cell activities in primary transplantation. In addition, Delta60 mice supported HSC self-renewal for at least two serial BMTs. Our data reveal a pivotal role for an unknown signal emanating from the membrane proximal region of the mpl receptor or from JAK2 itself in maintaining stem cell activity and self-renewal, in addition to its role in megakaryocytopoiesis and thrombopoiesis.

  3. Bat origins of MERS-CoV supported by bat coronavirus HKU4 usage of human receptor CD26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qihui; Qi, Jianxun; Yuan, Yuan; Xuan, Yifang; Han, Pengcheng; Wan, Yuhua; Ji, Wei; Li, Yan; Wu, Ying; Wang, Jianwei; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Woo, Patrick C Y; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Yan, Jinghua; Lu, Guangwen; Gao, George F

    2014-09-10

    The recently reported Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is phylogenetically closely related to the bat coronaviruses (BatCoVs) HKU4 and HKU5. However, the evolutionary pathway of MERS-CoV is still unclear. A receptor binding domain (RBD) in the MERS-CoV envelope-embedded spike protein specifically engages human CD26 (hCD26) to initiate viral entry. The high sequence identity in the viral spike protein prompted us to investigate if HKU4 and HKU5 can recognize hCD26 for cell entry. We found that HKU4-RBD, but not HKU5-RBD, binds to hCD26, and pseudotyped viruses embedding HKU4 spike can infect cells via hCD26 recognition. The structure of the HKU4-RBD/hCD26 complex revealed a hCD26-binding mode similar overall to that observed for MERS-RBD. HKU4-RBD, however, is less adapted to hCD26 than MERS-RBD, explaining its lower affinity for receptor binding. Our findings support a bat origin for MERS-CoV and indicate the need for surveillance of HKU4-related viruses in bats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evidence Supporting a Role for Constitutive Ghrelin Receptor Signaling in Fasting-Induced Hyperphagia in Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Gimena; Cabral, Agustina; Andreoli, María F; Labarthe, Alexandra; M'Kadmi, Céline; Ramos, Jorge G; Marie, Jacky; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Epelbaum, Jacques; Tolle, Virginie; Perello, Mario

    2018-02-01

    Ghrelin is a potent orexigenic peptide hormone that acts through the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), a G protein-coupled receptor highly expressed in the hypothalamus. In vitro studies have shown that GHSR displays a high constitutive activity, whose physiological relevance is uncertain. As GHSR gene expression in the hypothalamus is known to increase in fasting conditions, we tested the hypothesis that constitutive GHSR activity at the hypothalamic level drives the fasting-induced hyperphagia. We found that refed wild-type (WT) mice displayed a robust hyperphagia that continued for 5 days after refeeding and changed their food intake daily pattern. Fasted WT mice showed an increase in plasma ghrelin levels, as well as in GHSR expression levels and ghrelin binding sites in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. When fasting-refeeding responses were evaluated in ghrelin- or GHSR-deficient mice, only the latter displayed an ∼15% smaller hyperphagia, compared with WT mice. Finally, fasting-induced hyperphagia of WT mice was significantly smaller in mice centrally treated with the GHSR inverse agonist K-(D-1-Nal)-FwLL-NH2, compared with mice treated with vehicle, whereas it was unaffected in mice centrally treated with the GHSR antagonists D-Lys3-growth hormone-releasing peptide 6 or JMV2959. Taken together, genetic models and pharmacological results support the notion that constitutive GHSR activity modulates the magnitude of the compensatory hyperphagia triggered by fasting. Thus, the hypothalamic GHSR signaling system could affect the set point of daily food intake, independently of plasma ghrelin levels, in situations of negative energy balance. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society.

  5. Recruitment of resting vesicles into recycling pools supports NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic potentiation in cultured hippocampal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayaka, Arjuna; Marra, Vincenzo; Bush, Daniel; Burden, Jemima J; Branco, Tiago; Staras, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Most presynaptic terminals in the central nervous system are characterized by two functionally distinct vesicle populations: a recycling pool, which supports action potential-driven neurotransmitter release via vesicle exocytosis, and a resting pool. The relative proportions of these two pools are highly variable between individual synapses, prompting speculation on their specific relationship, and on the possible functions of the resting pool. Using fluorescence imaging of FM-styryl dyes and synaptophysinI-pHluorin (sypHy) as well as correlative electron microscopy approaches, we show here that Hebbian plasticity-dependent changes in synaptic strength in rat hippocampal neurons can increase the recycling pool fraction at the expense of the resting pool in individual synaptic terminals. This recruitment process depends on NMDA-receptor activation, nitric oxide signalling and calcineurin and is accompanied by an increase in the probability of neurotransmitter release at individual terminals. Blockade of actin-mediated intersynaptic vesicle exchange does not prevent recycling pool expansion demonstrating that vesicle recruitment is intrasynaptic. We propose that the conversion of resting pool vesicles to the functionally recycling pool provides a rapid mechanism to implement long-lasting changes in presynaptic efficacy. PMID:22271866

  6. Individual receptor profiling as a novel tool to support diagnosis of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Jochen; Schulte-Baukloh, Heinrich; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Speroni di Fenizio, Pietro; Horn, Lars-Christian; Rüffert, Henrik; Hartenstein, Siegurd; Burger, Maximilian; Schulze, Matthias; Schwalenberg, Thilo

    2012-10-01

    Dysregulation of neurotransmitter receptors may contribute to bladder overactivity (OAB) symptoms. To address the question whether specific receptor expression patterns are associated with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC), we examined the expression of muscarinic, purinergic and histamine receptors in the detrusor. Detrusor receptor expression was investigated in bladder biopsies of female BPS/IC patients (n = 44; age 60.64 ± 13.78, mean ± SD) and carcinoma patients (n = 11; age 58.91 ± 12.72) undergoing cystectomy. Protein expression of muscarinic (M2, M3), purinergic (P2X1-3) and histamine receptors (H1, H2) was analysed by confocal immunofluorescence, and gene expression was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). M2, P2X1, P2X2 and H1 receptor immunoreactivity (-IR) was significantly enhanced in BPS/IC compared to the control group, while there was no difference for M3-, P2X3- and H2-IR. We calculated a score, which separated BPS/IC from control patients with an AUC of 89.46%, showing 84.09% sensitivity and 90.91% specificity. Patients had a 9.25 times enhanced calculated risk for BPS/IC. In addition, two patient subgroups (M2 > M3 and M3 > M2) were observed, which differed in associated purinergic and histamine receptor expression. M2, P2X1, P2X2 and H1 were significantly upregulated in BPS/IC patients, and H2 was occasionally highly overexpressed. There was no significant correlation between receptor protein and gene expression, implying posttranslational mechanisms being responsible for the altered receptor expressions. On the basis of individual receptor profiles, upregulated receptors could be targeted by monotherapy or combination therapy with already approved receptor inhibitors, thereby promoting tailored therapy for patients suffering from BPS/IC-like symptoms.

  7. In Vitro Evidence Supports Membrane Alanyl Aminopeptidase N as a Receptor for a Plant Virus in the Pea Aphid Vector

    OpenAIRE

    Linz, Lucas B.; LIU, Sijun; Chougule, Nanasaheb P.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2015-01-01

    Insect-borne plant viruses cause significant agricultural losses and jeopardize sustainable global food production. Although blocking plant virus transmission would allow for crop protection, virus receptors in insect vectors are unknown. Here we identify membrane alanyl aminopeptidase N (APN) as a receptor for pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) coat protein (CP) in the gut of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, using a far-Western blot method. Pulldown and immunofluorescence binding assays and ...

  8. Neurochemical evidence supporting dopamine D1-D2 receptor heteromers in the striatum of the long-tailed macaque: changes following dopaminergic manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Alberto J; Dopeso-Reyes, Iria G; Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Sucunza, Diego; Pignataro, Diego; Roda, Elvira; Marín-Ramos, David; Labandeira-García, José L; George, Susan R; Franco, Rafael; Lanciego, José L

    2017-05-01

    Although it has long been widely accepted that dopamine receptor types D1 and D2 form GPCR heteromers in the striatum, the presence of D1-D2 receptor heteromers has been recently challenged. In an attempt to properly characterize D1-D2 receptor heteromers, here we have used the in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA) in striatal sections comprising the caudate nucleus, the putamen and the core and shell territories of the nucleus accumbens. Experiments were carried out in control macaques as well as in MPTP-treated animals (with and without dyskinesia). Obtained data support the presence of D1-D2 receptor heteromers within all the striatal subdivisions, with the highest abundance in the accumbens shell. Dopamine depletion by MPTP resulted in an increase of D1-D2 density in caudate and putamen which was normalized by levodopa treatment. Two different sizes of heteromers were consistently found, thus suggesting that besides individual heteromers, D1-D2 receptor heteromers are sometimes organized in macromolecular complexes made of a number of D1-D2 heteromers. Furthermore, the PLA technique was combined with different neuronal markers to properly characterize the identities of striatal neurons expressing D1-D2 heteromers. We have found that striatal projection neurons giving rise to either the direct or the indirect basal ganglia pathways expressed D1-D2 heteromers. Interestingly, macromolecular complexes of D1-D2 heteromers were only found within cholinergic interneurons. In summary, here we provide overwhelming proof that D1 and D2 receptors form heteromeric complexes in the macaque striatum, thus representing a very appealing target for a number of brain diseases involving dopamine dysfunction.

  9. Reconstitution of homomeric GluA2(flop) receptors in supported lipid membranes: functional and structural properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranovic, Jelena; Ramanujan, Chandra S; Kasai, Nahoko; Midgett, Charles R; Madden, Dean R; Torimitsu, Keiichi; Ryan, John F

    2013-03-22

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are glutamate-gated ion channels ubiquitous in the vertebrate central nervous system, where they mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission and act as molecular determinants of memory formation and learning. Together with detailed analyses of individual AMPAR domains, structural studies of full-length AMPARs by electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography have provided important insights into channel assembly and function. However, the correlation between the structure and functional states of the channel remains ambiguous particularly because these functional states can be assessed only with the receptor bound within an intact lipid bilayer. To provide a basis for investigating AMPAR structure in a membrane environment, we developed an optimized reconstitution protocol using a receptor whose structure has previously been characterized by electron microscopy. Single-channel recordings of reconstituted homomeric GluA2(flop) receptors recapitulate key electrophysiological parameters of the channels expressed in native cellular membranes. Atomic force microscopy studies of the reconstituted samples provide high-resolution images of membrane-embedded full-length AMPARs at densities comparable to those in postsynaptic membranes. The data demonstrate the effect of protein density on conformational flexibility and dimensions of the receptors and provide the first structural characterization of functional membrane-embedded AMPARs, thus laying the foundation for correlated structure-function analyses of the predominant mediators of excitatory synaptic signals in the brain.

  10. The dopamine D2 receptor gene, perceived parental support, and adolescent loneliness : longitudinal evidence for gene-environment interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roekel, Eeske; Goossens, Luc; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Verhagen, Maaike

    2011-01-01

    Background: Loneliness is a common problem in adolescence. Earlier research focused on genes within the serotonin and oxytocin systems, but no studies have examined the role of dopamine-related genes in loneliness. In the present study, we focused on the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2). Methods:

  11. Low-density lipoprotein-receptor gene haplotypes in Afrikaans-speaking patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia. Further evidence in support of a founder gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, H E; Landon, S V; Berger, G M

    1987-02-21

    Pvu II and Stu I restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the low-density lipoprotein-receptor gene were used for receptor allele haplotype analysis in 6 unrelated white Afrikaans-speaking subjects with homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH). Five patients were homozygous for P-S+, one of four possible haplotypes, and 1 patient showed compound heterozygosity for P-S+ and P+S-. The haplotype distribution in these patients differed from the calculated distribution in the general Afrikaner population at the 5-10% level of significance. These data support the founder gene hypothesis advanced to account for the high frequency of FH in the Afrikaans population. Four non-Afrikaner homozygous FH patients, also investigated in this study, manifested a variety of haplotypes in conformity with the heterogeneity underlying FH reported by others.

  12. An Extended Structure-Activity Relationship of Nondioxin-Like PCBs Evaluates and Supports Modeling Predictions and Identifies Picomolar Potency of PCB 202 Towards Ryanodine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Erika B; Feng, Wei; Zheng, Jing; Dong, Yao; Li, Xueshu; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Pessah, Isaac N

    2017-01-01

    Nondioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (NDL PCBs) activate ryanodine-sensitive Ca(2+ )channels (RyRs) and this activation has been associated with neurotoxicity in exposed animals. RyR-active congeners follow a distinct structure-activity relationship and a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) predicts that a large number of PCBs likely activate the receptor, which requires validation. Additionally, previous structural based conclusions have been established using receptor ligand binding assays but the impact of varying PCB structures on ion channel gating behavior is not understood. We used [(3)H]Ryanodine ([(3)H]Ry) binding to assess the RyR-activity of 14 previously untested PCB congeners evaluating the predictability of the QSAR. Congeners determined to display widely varying potency were then assayed with single channel voltage clamp analysis to assess direct influences on channel gating kinetics. The RyR-activity of individual PCBs assessed in in vitro assays followed the general pattern predicted by the QSAR but binding and lipid bilayer experiments demonstrated higher potency than predicted. Of the 49 congeners tested to date, tetra-ortho PCB 202 was found to be the most potent RyR-active congener increasing channel open probability at 200 pM. Shifting meta-substitutions to the para-position resulted in a > 100-fold reduction in potency as seen with PCB 197. Non-ortho PCB 11 was found to lack activity at the receptor supporting a minimum mono-ortho substitution for PCB RyR activity. These findings expand and support previous SAR assessments; where out of the 49 congeners tested to date 42 activate the receptor demonstrating that the RyR is a sensitive and common target of PCBs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. A bioluminescence resonance energy transfer 2 (BRET2) assay for monitoring seven transmembrane receptor and insulin receptor crosstalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanni, Samra Joke; Kulahin, Nikolaj; Jorgensen, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    The angiotensin AT1 receptor is a seven transmembrane (7TM) receptor, which mediates the regulation of blood pressure. Activation of angiotensin AT1 receptor may lead to impaired insulin signaling indicating crosstalk between angiotensin AT1 receptor and insulin receptor signaling pathways. To el...

  14. Protease-Activated Receptor-1 Supports Locomotor Recovery by Biased Agonist Activated Protein C after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D Whetstone

    Full Text Available Thrombin-induced secondary injury is mediated through its receptor, protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1, by "biased agonism." Activated protein C (APC acts through the same PAR-1 receptor but functions as an anti-coagulant and anti-inflammatory protein, which counteracts many of the effects of thrombin. Although the working mechanism of PAR-1 is becoming clear, the functional role of PAR-1 and its correlation with APC in the injured spinal cord remains to be elucidated. Here we investigated if PAR-1 and APC are determinants of long-term functional recovery after a spinal cord contusive injury using PAR-1 null and wild-type mice. We found that neutrophil infiltration and disruption of the blood-spinal cord barrier were significantly reduced in spinal cord injured PAR-1 null mice relative to the wild-type group. Both locomotor recovery and ability to descend an inclined grid were significantly improved in the PAR-1 null group 42 days after injury and this improvement was associated with greater long-term sparing of white matter and a reduction in glial scarring. Wild-type mice treated with APC acutely after injury showed a similar level of improved locomotor recovery to that of PAR-1 null mice. However, improvement of APC-treated PAR-1 null mice was indistinguishable from that of vehicle-treated PAR-1 null mice, suggesting that APC acts through PAR-1. Collectively, our findings define a detrimental role of thrombin-activated PAR-1 in wound healing and further validate APC, also acting through the PAR-1 by biased agonism, as a promising therapeutic target for spinal cord injury.

  15. Lack of evidence for AT1R/B2R heterodimerization in COS-7, HEK293, and NIH3T3 cells: how common is the AT1R/B2R heterodimer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob L; Hansen, Jonas T; Speerschneider, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    It has been suggested previously ( AbdAlla, S., Lother, H., and Quitterer, U. (2000) Nature 407, 94-98 ) that the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and the bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R) form constitutive heterodimers. Furthermore they demonstrate that AT1R signaling significantly increases in ...

  16. Skin CCR10+ CD8+ T cells support resident Treg cells through the B7.2/receptor axis to regulate local immune homeostasis and response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yaoyao; Yang, Jie; Xiong, Na

    2016-01-01

    Resident T cells in barrier tissues are important in protecting against foreign agents but could also contribute to inflammatory diseases if dysregulated. How T cell homeostasis is maintained in barrier tissues is still poorly understood. Herein we report that resident CD8+ T cells directly support maintenance of regulatory T (Treg) cells in the skin to promote immune homeostasis. Impaired establishment of resident CD8+ T cells due to knockout of the skin-homing chemokine receptor CCR10 resulted in altered balance of resident Treg and CD4+ effector T (Teff) cells in the skin and over-reactive inflammatory responses to cutaneous stimulations. Furthermore, B7.2 expressed on skin CD8+ T cells is involved in supporting survival of Treg cells, likely through interaction with its receptor CTLA-4, which is highly expressed on skin Treg cells. Our findings provide novel insight into T cell homeostatic regulation in the skin and may help understand pathobiology of tissue inflammatory diseases. PMID:27183612

  17. Effect of 5-HT2A Receptor Polymorphisms, Work Stressors, and Social Support on Job Strain among Petroleum Workers in Xinjiang, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jiang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that work stressors and social support influence job strain. However, few studies have examined the impact of individual differences on job strain. In Xinjiang, there are a large number of petroleum workers in arid deserts. The present study investigated the effects of work stressors, social support, and 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor (5-HTR2A genotype on the etiology of job strain among petroleum workers in Xinjiang. A cross-sectional study was carried out between January and August 2013. A total of 700 workers were selected by a three-stage stratified sampling method. 5-HTR2A genotypes were determined with the SNaPshot single nucleotide polymorphism assay. Work stressors and job strain were evaluated with the Occupational Stress Inventory-Revised questionnaire. Social support was assessed with the Chinese Social Support Rating Scale. Work overload and responsibility were significantly associated with job strain. Low social support was associated with severe vocational and interpersonal strain. High social support was a protective factor against job strain (odds ratio (OR = 0.32, 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.14–0.76. The CC genotype of rs6313 and the AA genotype of rs2070040 were linked to severe vocational strain. Ordinal logistic regression analysis revealed that the CC genotype of rs6313 was linked to higher risk of job strain than the TT genotype (OR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.10–3.23. These data provide evidence that work stressors, low social support, and 5-HTR2A gene polymorphism contributes to the risk of job strain.

  18. Effect of 5-HT2A Receptor Polymorphisms, Work Stressors, and Social Support on Job Strain among Petroleum Workers in Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu; Tang, Jinhua; Li, Rong; Zhao, Junling; Song, Zhixin; Ge, Hua; Lian, Yulong; Liu, Jiwen

    2016-12-19

    Previous studies have shown that work stressors and social support influence job strain. However, few studies have examined the impact of individual differences on job strain. In Xinjiang, there are a large number of petroleum workers in arid deserts. The present study investigated the effects of work stressors, social support, and 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor (5-HTR2A) genotype on the etiology of job strain among petroleum workers in Xinjiang. A cross-sectional study was carried out between January and August 2013. A total of 700 workers were selected by a three-stage stratified sampling method. 5-HTR2A genotypes were determined with the SNaPshot single nucleotide polymorphism assay. Work stressors and job strain were evaluated with the Occupational Stress Inventory-Revised questionnaire. Social support was assessed with the Chinese Social Support Rating Scale. Work overload and responsibility were significantly associated with job strain. Low social support was associated with severe vocational and interpersonal strain. High social support was a protective factor against job strain (odds ratio (OR) = 0.32, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.14-0.76). The CC genotype of rs6313 and the AA genotype of rs2070040 were linked to severe vocational strain. Ordinal logistic regression analysis revealed that the CC genotype of rs6313 was linked to higher risk of job strain than the TT genotype (OR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.10-3.23). These data provide evidence that work stressors, low social support, and 5-HTR2A gene polymorphism contributes to the risk of job strain.

  19. p68/DdX5 supports β-catenin & RNAP II during androgen receptor mediated transcription in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma L Clark

    Full Text Available The DEAD box RNA helicase p68 (Ddx5 is an important androgen receptor (AR transcriptional co-activator in prostate cancer (PCa and is over-expressed in late stage disease. β-Catenin is a multifunctional protein with important structural and signalling functions which is up-regulated in PCa and similar to p68, interacts with the AR to co-activate expression of AR target genes. Importantly, p68 forms complexes with nuclear β-Catenin and promotes gene transcription in colon cancer indicating a functional interplay between these two proteins in cancer progression. In this study, we explore the relationship of p68 and β-Catenin in PCa to assess their potential co-operation in AR-dependent gene expression, which may be of importance in the development of castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPCa. We use immunoprecipitation to demonstrate a novel interaction between p68 and β-Catenin in the nucleus of PCa cells, which is androgen dependent in LNCaP cells but androgen independent in a hormone refractory derivative of the same cell line (representative of the CRPCa disease type. Enhanced AR activity is seen in androgen-dependent luciferase reporter assays upon transient co-transfection of p68 and β-Catenin as an additive effect, and p68-depleted Chromatin-Immunoprecipitation (ChIP showed a decrease in the recruitment of the AR and β-Catenin to androgen responsive promoter regions. In addition, we found p68 immunoprecipitated with the processive and non-processive form of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II and show p68 recruited to elongating regions of the AR mediated PSA gene, suggesting a role for p68 in facilitating RNAP II transcription of AR mediated genes. These results suggest p68 is important in facilitating β-Catenin and AR transcriptional activity in PCa cells.

  20. Depression Case Control (DeCC) Study fails to support involvement of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (CHRM2) gene in recurrent major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Gaysina, Daria; Craddock, Nick; Farmer, Anne; Gray, Joanna; Gunasinghe, Cerisse; Hoda, Farzana; Jones, Lisa; Knight, Jo; Korszun, Ania; Owen, Michael J; Sterne, Abram; Craig, Ian W; McGuffin, Peter

    2009-04-15

    It has been suggested that alteration in the muscarinic-cholinergic system is involved in modulation of mood. Three studies have reported linkage on chromosome 7 with major depressive disorder (MDD) in or close to a region containing the muscarinic receptor CHRM2 gene. A haplotype of SNPs located in CHRM2 (rs1824024-rs2061174-rs324650) has been significantly associated with MDD in a previous study. We report the first study investigating this gene in a large, adequately powered, clinical depression case-control sample (n = 1420 cases, 1624 controls). Our data fail to support association with the CHRM2 polymorphisms previously implicated in the genetic aetiology of depression. It is possible our failure to replicate may be a consequence of differences in definition of the MDD phenotype and/or ethnic differences.

  1. Maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS Proteins Interact with Ethylene Receptor Signaling Complex, Supporting a Regulatory Role for ARGOS in Ethylene Signal Transduction[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinrui; Wang, Hongyu; Habben, Jeffrey E.

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone ethylene regulates plant growth and development as well as plant response to environmental cues. ARGOS genes reduce plant sensitivity to ethylene when overexpressed in transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). A previous genetic study suggested that the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi-localized maize ARGOS1 targets the ethylene signal transduction components at or upstream of CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1, but the mechanism of ARGOS modulating ethylene signaling is unknown. Here, we demonstrate in Arabidopsis that ZmARGOS1, as well as the Arabidopsis ARGOS homolog ORGAN SIZE RELATED1, physically interacts with Arabidopsis REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 (RTE1), an ethylene receptor interacting protein that regulates the activity of ETHYLENE RESPONSE1. The protein-protein interaction was also detected with the yeast split-ubiquitin two-hybrid system. Using the same yeast assay, we found that maize RTE1 homolog REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 LIKE4 (ZmRTL4) and ZmRTL2 also interact with maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS proteins. Like AtRTE1 in Arabidopsis, ZmRTL4 and ZmRTL2 reduce ethylene responses when overexpressed in maize, indicating a similar mechanism for ARGOS regulating ethylene signaling in maize. A polypeptide fragment derived from ZmARGOS8, consisting of a Pro-rich motif flanked by two transmembrane helices that are conserved among members of the ARGOS family, can interact with AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins in Arabidopsis. The conserved domain is necessary and sufficient to reduce ethylene sensitivity in Arabidopsis and maize. Overall, these results suggest a physical association between ARGOS and the ethylene receptor signaling complex via AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins, supporting a role for ARGOS in regulating ethylene perception and the early steps of signal transduction in Arabidopsis and maize. PMID:27268962

  2. Investigation of Microplasma Instabilities at 1 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen; Hopwood, Jeffrey

    2013-09-01

    Microwave microplasmas have been operated stably in excess of 2000 hours using less than one watt of power. Plasmas at atmospheric pressure and high power density, however, are subject to ionization overheating instability followed by a destructive glow-to-arc transition. We describe steady-state atmospheric pressure microplasmas in non-flowing argon and air driven by up to 40 watts of microwave power. These discharges are supported by either a quarter-wave microstrip resonator or a microstrip transmission line. Models show that the resonator configuration rejects excess power and remains unconditionally stable. The transmission line, however, couples power efficiently to a plasma of ~100 Ω and produces a more intense discharge. Electrodes of copper, aluminum and lead-based solder are investigated on both polymer and alumina substrates. Copper and lead electrodes may be evaporated by a high power microdischarge as seen by optical emission. These conditions uniquely result in severe electrode damage. Microdischarges supported on polymer substrates show C2, CN and CH emission but alumina substrates are unaffected by the microplasma. These results show that steady-state microwave discharges can be stable at very high power density provided that copper microelectrodes and ceramic substrates are employed. This work supported by the US DOE Grant No. DE-SC0001923.

  3. Extreme interplanetary rotational discontinuities at 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C.-C.

    2005-11-01

    This study is concerned with the identification and description of a special subset of four Wind interplanetary rotational discontinuities (from an earlier study of 134 directional discontinuities by Lepping et al. (2003)) with some "extreme" characteristics, in the sense that every case has (1) an almost planar current sheet surface, (2) a very large discontinuity angle (ω), (3) at least moderately strong normal field components (>0.8 nT), and (4) the overall set has a very broad range of transition layer thicknesses, with one being as thick as 50 RE and another at the other extreme being 1.6 RE, most being much thicker than are usually studied. Each example has a well-determined surface normal (n) according to minimum variance analysis and corroborated via time delay checking of the discontinuity with observations at IMP 8 by employing the local surface planarity. From the variance analyses, most of these cases had unusually large ratios of intermediate-to-minimum eigenvalues (λI/λmin), being on average 32 for three cases (with a fourth being much larger), indicating compact current sheet transition zones, another (the fifth) extreme property. For many years there has been a controversy as to the relative distribution of rotational (RDs) to tangential discontinuities (TDs) in the solar wind at 1 AU (and elsewhere, such as between the Sun and Earth), even to the point where some authors have suggested that RDs with large ∣Bn∣s are probably not generated or, if generated, are unstable and therefore very rare. Some of this disagreement apparently has been due to the different selection criteria used, e.g., some allowed eigenvalue ratios (λI/λmin) to be almost an order of magnitude lower than 32 in estimating n, usually introducing unacceptable error in n and therefore also in ∣Bn∣. However, we suggest that RDs may not be so rare at 1 AU, but good quality cases (where ∣Bn∣ confidently exceeds the error in ∣Bn∣) appear to be uncommon, and further

  4. Dehydration kinetics of talc at 1 bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, J.; Bose, K.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental results on the dehydration kinetics of talc, which is likely to be a major potential resource for water and hydrogen in carbonaceous chondrites, is presented. The rate of dehydration of an essentially pure Mg-end member natural talc, (Mg(.99)Fe(.01))3Si4O10(OH)2, was studied by measuring in situ weight change under isothermal condition at 1 bar as a function of time in the temperature range 775 to 985 C. The grain size of the starting material was 0.7 to 1 micron. It was found that the data up to 50 to 60 percent dehydration can be fitted by an equation of the form alpha = exp(-Kt(exp n)), where alpha is the weight fraction of talc remaining, K is a rate constant and n is a numerical constant for a given temperature. For any set of isothermal data, there is a major change in the value of n for larger dehydration. For up to approximately 50 percent dehydration, all rate constants can be described by an Arrheniun relation with an activation energy of 432 (+/- 30) kJ/mol; n has a nearly constant value of 0.54 between 775 and 875 C, but increases almost linearly according to n = -10.77 + 0.012T C at T greater than or equal to 875 C.

  5. AT1R blockade in adverse milieus: role of SMRT and corepressor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tejinder; Ayasolla, Kamesh; Rai, Partab; Chandel, Nirupama; Haque, Shabirul; Lederman, Rivka; Husain, Mohammad; Vethantham, Vasupradha; Chawla, Amrita; Vashistha, Himanshu; Saleem, Moin A; Ding, Guohua; Chander, Praveen N; Malhotra, Ashwani; Meggs, Leonard G; Singhal, Pravin C

    2015-08-01

    ANG II type 1 receptor blockade (AT1R-BLK) is used extensively to slow down the progression of proteinuric kidney diseases. We hypothesized that AT1R-BLK provides podocyte protection through regulation of silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptor (SMRT) and vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression under adverse milieus such as high glucose and human immunodeficiency virus infection. Both AT1R-BLK and VDR agonists (VDAs) stimulated VDR complex formation that differed not only in their composition but also in their functionality. AT1R-BLK-induced VDR complexes contained predominantly unliganded VDR, SMRT, and phosphorylated histone deacetylase 3, whereas VDA-VDR complexes were constituted by liganded VDR and CREB-binding protein/p300. AT1R-BLK-induced complexes attenuated podocyte acetyl-histone 3 levels as well as cytochrome P-450 family 24A1 expression, thus indicating their deacetylating and repressive properties. On the other hand, VDA-VDR complexes not only increased podocyte acetyl-histone 3 levels but also enhanced cytochrome P-450 family 24A1 expression, thus suggesting their acetylating and gene activation properties. AT1R-BLK- induced podocyte SMRT inhibited expression of the proapoptotic gene BAX through downregulation of Wip1 and phosphorylation of checkpoint kinase 2 in high-glucose milieu. Since SMRT-depleted podocytes lacked AT1R-BLK-mediated protection against DNA damage, it appears that SMRT is necessary for DNA repairs during AT1R-BLK. We conclude that AT1R-BLK provides podocyte protection in adverse milieus predominantly through SMRT expression and partly through unliganded VDR expression in 1,25(OH)2D-deficient states; on the other hand, AT1R-BLK contributes to liganded VDR expression in 1,25(OH)2D-sufficient states. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. An evolutionary conserved region (ECR in the human dopamine receptor D4 gene supports reporter gene expression in primary cultures derived from the rat cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haddley Kate

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detecting functional variants contributing to diversity of behaviour is crucial for dissecting genetics of complex behaviours. At a molecular level, characterisation of variation in exons has been studied as they are easily identified in the current genome annotation although the functional consequences are less well understood; however, it has been difficult to prioritise regions of non-coding DNA in which genetic variation could also have significant functional consequences. Comparison of multiple vertebrate genomes has allowed the identification of non-coding evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs, in which the degree of conservation can be comparable with exonic regions suggesting functional significance. Results We identified ECRs at the dopamine receptor D4 gene locus, an important gene for human behaviours. The most conserved non-coding ECR (D4ECR1 supported high reporter gene expression in primary cultures derived from neonate rat frontal cortex. Computer aided analysis of the sequence of the D4ECR1 indicated the potential transcription factors that could modulate its function. D4ECR1 contained multiple consensus sequences for binding the transcription factor Sp1, a factor previously implicated in DRD4 expression. Co-transfection experiments demonstrated that overexpression of Sp1 significantly decreased the activity of the D4ECR1 in vitro. Conclusion Bioinformatic analysis complemented by functional analysis of the DRD4 gene locus has identified a a strong enhancer that functions in neurons and b a transcription factor that may modulate the function of that enhancer.

  7. The Second Transmembrane Domain of the Human Type 1 Angiotensin II Receptor Participates in the Formation of the Ligand Binding Pocket and Undergoes Integral Pivoting Movement during the Process of Receptor Activation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domazet, Ivana; Holleran, Brian J.; Martin, Stéphane S.; Lavigne, Pierre; Leduc, Richard; Escher, Emanuel; Guillemette, Gaétan

    2009-01-01

    The octapeptide hormone angiotensin II (AngII) exerts a wide variety of cardiovascular effects through the activation of the angiotensin II type-1 (AT1) receptor, which belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. Like other G protein-coupled receptors, the AT1 receptor possesses seven transmembrane domains that provide structural support for the formation of the ligand-binding pocket. In order to identify those residues in the second transmembrane domain (TMD2) that contribute to the formation of the binding pocket of the AT1 receptor, we used the substituted cysteine accessibility method. All of the residues within the Leu-70 to Trp-94 region were mutated one at a time to a cysteine, and, after expression in COS-7 cells, the mutant receptors were treated with the sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agent methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA). MTSEA reacts selectively with water-accessible, free sulfhydryl groups of endogenous or introduced point mutation cysteines. If a cysteine is found in the binding pocket, the covalent modification will affect the binding kinetics of the ligand. MTSEA substantially decreased the binding affinity of D74C-AT1, L81C-AT1, A85C-AT1, T88C-AT1, and A89C-AT1 mutant receptors, which suggests that these residues orient themselves within the water-accessible binding pocket of the AT1 receptor. Interestingly, this pattern of acquired MTSEA sensitivity was altered for TMD2 reporter cysteines engineered in a constitutively active N111G-AT1 receptor background. Indeed, mutant D74C-N111G-AT1 became insensitive to MTSEA, whereas mutant L81C-N111G-AT1 lost some sensitivity and mutant V86C-N111G-AT1 became sensitive to MTSEA. Our results suggest that constitutive activation of the AT1 receptor causes TMD2 to pivot, bringing the top of TMD2 closer to the binding pocket and pushing the bottom of TMD2 away from the binding pocket. PMID:19276075

  8. Beta-adrenergic receptors support attention to extinction learning that occurs in the absence, but not the presence, of a context change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Emma André

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The noradrenergic (NA-system is an important regulator of cognitive function. It contributes to extinction learning(EL, and in disorders where EL is impaired NA-dysfunction has been postulated. We explored whether NA acting on beta-adrenergic-receptors (β-AR, regulates EL that depends on context, but is not fear-associated. We assessed behaviour in an ‘AAA’ or ‘ABA’ paradigm: rats were trained for 3 days in a T-maze(context-A to learn that a reward is consistently found in the goal arm, despite low reward probability. This was followed on day 4 by EL(unrewarded, whereby in the ABA-paradigm, EL was reinforced by a context change (B, and in the AAA-paradigm, no context change occurred. On day 5, re-exposure to the A-context (unrewarded occurred. Typically, in control ‘AAA’ animals EL occurred on day 4 that progressed further on day 5. In control ‘ABA’ animals, EL also occurred on day 4, followed by renewal of the previously learned (A behavior on day 5, that was followed (in day 5 by extinction of this behavior, as the animals realised that no food reward would be given.Treatment with the β-AR-antagonist, propranolol, prior to EL on day 4, impaired EL in the AAA-paradigm. In the ‘ABA’ paradigm, antagonist treatment on day 4, had no effect on extinction that was reinforced by a context change (B. Furthermore, β-AR-antagonism prior to renewal testing (on day 5 in the ABA-paradigm, resulted in normal renewal behavior, although subsequent extinction of responses during day 5 was prevented by the antagonist. Thus, under both treatment conditions, β-AR-antagonism prevented extinction of the behavior learned in the ‘A’ context.β-AR-blockade during an overt context change did not prevent EL, whereas β-AR were required for EL in an unchanging context. These data suggest that β-AR may support EL by reinforcing attention towards relevant changes in the previously learned experience, and that this process supports extinction

  9. Renal proximal tubule angiotensin AT1A receptors regulate blood pressure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Huiping; Weatherford, Eric T; Davis, Deborah R; Keen, Henry L; Grobe, Justin L; Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A; Allen, Andrew M; Sigmund, Curt D

    2011-01-01

    .... Given the close relationship between renal sodium handling and blood pressure regulation, we hypothesized that modulating the action of ANG II specifically in the renal proximal tubules would alter...

  10. Renal proximal tubule angiotensin AT1A receptors regulate blood pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Huiping; Weatherford, Eric T.; Davis, Deborah R.; Keen, Henry L.; Grobe, Justin L.; Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A.; Allen, Andrew M.; Sigmund, Curt D.

    2011-01-01

    All components of the renin angiotensin system necessary for ANG II generation and action have been reported to be present in renal proximal convoluted tubules. Given the close relationship between renal sodium handling and blood pressure regulation, we hypothesized that modulating the action of ANG II specifically in the renal proximal tubules would alter the chronic level of blood pressure. To test this, we used a proximal tubule-specific, androgen-dependent, promoter construct (KAP2) to ge...

  11. Role and mechanism of AT1-AA in the pathogenesis of HELLP syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Shurui; Wang, Yuxian; Sun, Shuqing; Zheng, Yanqian; Jin, Zhu; Zhi, Jianming

    2018-01-10

    HELLP syndrome remains a leading cause of maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity worldwide, which symptoms include hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count. The objective of this study was to determine whether HELLP is associated with AT1-AA. The positive rate and titer of AT1-AA in plasma from pregnant women were determined, and the correlation of AT1-AA titer with the grade of HELLP was analyzed. A HELLP rat model established by intravenous injection of AT1-AA. Our experimental results show the AT1-AA titer and positive rate were significantly higher in HELLP group, and AT1-AA titer were positively correlated with the level of TNF-α and ET-1 in plasma and the grade of HELLP syndrome. The results of animal experiments showed that the typical features of HELLP in the pregnant rats after AT1-AA injection. The levels of TNF-α and ET-1 in plasma and liver tissue were significantly increased in AT1-AA-treated rats compared with control rats. The HELLP syndrome induced by AT1-AA was attenuated markedly after administration of losartan. These data support the hypothesis that one the potential pathway that AT1-AA induce damage to capillary endothelial cells and liver during pregnancy is through activation of TNF-α and ET-1.

  12. Candesartan attenuates angiogenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma via downregulating AT1R/VEGF pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fangtian; Tian, Chao; Tao, Li; Wu, Hongyan; Liu, Zhaoguo; Shen, Cunsi; Jiang, Guorong; Lu, Yin

    2016-10-01

    Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) was reported to express in many types of tumors, promoting tumor growth and angiogenesis. We herein examined AT1R expression in liver cancer and the potential antitumor effects of AT1R antagonist Candesartan in liver cancer. We found that AT1R expression was positively correlated with VEGF-A expression and microvascular density (MVD) in 40 HCC patients. Angiotensin II and Candesartan neither had effects on the proliferation of liver cancer cells in vitro. However, Angiotensin II upregulated AT1R protein expression and promoted production of VEGF-A in liver cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Candesartan was able to reverse this process in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, Candesartan downregulated the expression of VEGF-A in SMMC-7721 bearing xenografts in mice and inhibited tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo. Our data suggested that AT1R antagonist Candesartan might be useful to suppress liver cancer by inhibiting angiogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Muscarinic receptor oligomerization

    OpenAIRE

    Marsango, Sara; Ward, Richard J.; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Milligan, Graeme

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been classically described as monomeric entities that function by binding in a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio to both ligand and downstream signalling proteins. However, in recent years, a growing number of studies has supported the hypothesis that these receptors can interact to form dimers and higher order oligomers although the molecular basis for these interactions, the overall quaternary arrangements and the functional importance of GPCR oligomerization...

  14. Presence of TSH receptors in discrete areas of the hypothalamus and caudal brainstem with relevance for feeding controls-Support for functional significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Jonathan R; Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Wärnåker, Sara; Smedh, Ulrika

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that brain-derived thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and its receptor (TSHr) are present in hypothalamic extracts. No studies investigating both the anatomical location and functional significance of putative TSHr proteins in specific central nervous system (CNS) nuclei involved in feeding controls have yet been conducted. The aim was thus to determine whether TSHr are present in nuclei associated with feeding behavior, and if such receptors may be functional. Brain tissue from adult rats was analyzed for gene expression and receptor protein expression was investigated with immunohistochemistry and western blotting. To investigate whether putative TSHr may be functional, we evaluated food intake of rats given intraparenchymal nanoinjections of TSH into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). RT-qPCR confirmed previous reports that TSHr mRNA is expressed in CNS tissues of the adult rat. Immunohistochemistry showed TSHr-immunoreactivity in the arcuate, the ventromedial, the dorsomedial, and the paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei. We also found TSHr-ir in the dorsal hindbrain to be localized to the area postrema, NTS, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, and the hypoglossal motor nucleus. Further protein analysis with western blotting showed 120kDa TSHr-ir proteins present in the hypothalamus and brainstem. Injections of TSH into the NTS reduced food intake similar to the positive control, urocortin. These data suggest that functional TSHr are present in the caudal brainstem and hypothalamic nuclei of relevance for feeding control as a possibly uncleaved holoreceptor, and highlights a hindbrain component to central TSH inhibition of food intake. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Dissociations in the effects of β2-adrenergic receptor agonists on cAMP formation and superoxide production in human neutrophils: support for the concept of functional selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Brunskole Hummel

    Full Text Available In neutrophils, activation of the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR, a Gs-coupled receptor, inhibits inflammatory responses, which could be therapeutically exploited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of various β2AR ligands on adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP accumulation and N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (fMLP-induced superoxide anion (O2(•- production in human neutrophils and to probe the concept of ligand-specific receptor conformations (also referred to as functional selectivity or biased signaling in a native cell system. This is an important question because so far, evidence for functional selectivity has been predominantly obtained with recombinant systems, due to the inherent difficulties to genetically manipulate human native cells. cAMP concentration was determined by HPLC/tandem mass spectrometry, and O2(•- formation was assessed by superoxide dismutase-inhibitable reduction of ferricytochrome c. β2AR agonists were generally more potent in inhibiting fMLP-induced O2(•- production than in stimulating cAMP accumulation. (--Ephedrine and dichloroisoproterenol were devoid of any agonistic activity in the cAMP assay, but partially inhibited fMLP-induced O2(•- production. Moreover, (--adrenaline was equi-efficacious in both assays whereas the efficacy of salbutamol was more than two-fold higher in the O2(•- assay. Functional selectivity was visualized by deviations of ligand potencies and efficacies from linear correlations for various parameters. We obtained no evidence for involvement of protein kinase A in the inhibition of fMLP-induced O2(•- production after β2AR-stimulation although cAMP-increasing substances inhibited O2(•- production. Taken together, our data corroborate the concept of ligand-specific receptor conformations with unique signaling capabilities in native human cells and suggest that the β2AR inhibits O2(•- production in a cAMP-independent manner.

  16. Evolutionary reconstructions of the transferrin receptor of Caniforms supports canine parvovirus being a re-emerged and not a novel pathogen in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaelber, Jason T; Demogines, Ann; Harbison, Carole E; Allison, Andrew B; Goodman, Laura B; Ortega, Alicia N; Sawyer, Sara L; Parrish, Colin R

    2012-01-01

    Parvoviruses exploit transferrin receptor type-1 (TfR) for cellular entry in carnivores, and specific interactions are key to control of host range. We show that several key mutations acquired by TfR during the evolution of Caniforms (dogs and related species) modified the interactions with parvovirus capsids by reducing the level of binding. These data, along with signatures of positive selection in the TFRC gene, are consistent with an evolutionary arms race between the TfR of the Caniform clade and parvoviruses. As well as the modifications of amino acid sequence which modify binding, we found that a glycosylation site mutation in the TfR of dogs which provided resistance to the carnivore parvoviruses which were in circulation prior to about 1975 predates the speciation of coyotes and dogs. Because the closely-related black-backed jackal has a TfR similar to their common ancestor and lacks the glycosylation site, reconstructing this mutation into the jackal TfR shows the potency of that site in blocking binding and infection and explains the resistance of dogs until recent times. This alters our understanding of this well-known example of viral emergence by indicating that canine parvovirus emergence likely resulted from the re-adaptation of a parvovirus to the resistant receptor of a former host.

  17. Evolutionary reconstructions of the transferrin receptor of Caniforms supports canine parvovirus being a re-emerged and not a novel pathogen in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason T Kaelber

    Full Text Available Parvoviruses exploit transferrin receptor type-1 (TfR for cellular entry in carnivores, and specific interactions are key to control of host range. We show that several key mutations acquired by TfR during the evolution of Caniforms (dogs and related species modified the interactions with parvovirus capsids by reducing the level of binding. These data, along with signatures of positive selection in the TFRC gene, are consistent with an evolutionary arms race between the TfR of the Caniform clade and parvoviruses. As well as the modifications of amino acid sequence which modify binding, we found that a glycosylation site mutation in the TfR of dogs which provided resistance to the carnivore parvoviruses which were in circulation prior to about 1975 predates the speciation of coyotes and dogs. Because the closely-related black-backed jackal has a TfR similar to their common ancestor and lacks the glycosylation site, reconstructing this mutation into the jackal TfR shows the potency of that site in blocking binding and infection and explains the resistance of dogs until recent times. This alters our understanding of this well-known example of viral emergence by indicating that canine parvovirus emergence likely resulted from the re-adaptation of a parvovirus to the resistant receptor of a former host.

  18. Cutting Edge: Skin CCR10+ CD8+ T Cells Support Resident Regulatory T Cells through the B7.2/Receptor Axis To Regulate Local Immune Homeostasis and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yaoyao; Yang, Jie; Xiong, Na

    2016-06-15

    Resident T cells in barrier tissues are important in protecting against foreign agents but can also contribute to inflammatory diseases if dysregulated. How T cell homeostasis is maintained in barrier tissues is still poorly understood. We report that resident CD8(+) T cells directly support maintenance of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the skin to promote immune homeostasis. Impaired establishment of resident CD8(+) T cells caused by knockout of the skin-homing chemokine receptor CCR10 resulted in an altered balance of resident Tregs and CD4(+) effector T cells in the skin and overreactive inflammatory responses to cutaneous stimulations. Furthermore, B7.2 expressed on skin CD8(+) T cells supports the survival of Tregs, likely through interaction with its receptor CTLA-4, which is highly expressed on skin Tregs. Our findings provide novel insights into T cell homeostatic regulation in the skin and may improve our understanding of the pathobiology of tissue inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Computational Study of Estrogen Receptor-Alpha Antagonist with Three-Dimensional Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship, Support Vector Regression, and Linear Regression Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hsin Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human estrogen receptor (ER isoforms, ERα and ERβ, have long been an important focus in the field of biology. To better understand the structural features associated with the binding of ERα ligands to ERα and modulate their function, several QSAR models, including CoMFA, CoMSIA, SVR, and LR methods, have been employed to predict the inhibitory activity of 68 raloxifene derivatives. In the SVR and LR modeling, 11 descriptors were selected through feature ranking and sequential feature addition/deletion to generate equations to predict the inhibitory activity toward ERα. Among four descriptors that constantly appear in various generated equations, two agree with CoMFA and CoMSIA steric fields and another two can be correlated to a calculated electrostatic potential of ERα.

  20. HUMAN GRK4γ142V VARIANT PROMOTES AT1R-MEDIATED HYPERTENSION VIA RENAL HDAC1 INHIBITION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Zeng, Chunyu; Villar, Van Anthony M.; Chen, Shi-You; Konkalmatt, Prasad; Wang, Xiaoyan; Asico, Laureano D.; Jones, John E.; Yang, Yu; Sanada, Hironobu; Felder, Robin A.; Eisner, Gilbert M.; Weir, Matthew R.; Armando, Ines; Jose, Pedro A.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of a single gene on the etiology of essential hypertension may be difficult to ascertain, unless the gene interacts with other genes that are germane to blood pressure regulation. G protein-coupled receptor kinase type 4 (GRK4) is one such gene. We have reported that the expression of its variant hGRK4γ142V in mice results in hypertension due to impaired dopamine D1 receptor (D1R). Signaling through D1R and angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) reciprocally modulates renal sodium excretion and blood pressure. Here, we demonstrate the ability of the hGRK4γ142V to increase the expression and activity of the AT1R. We show that hGRK4γ142V phosphorylates histone deacetylase type 1 and promotes its nuclear export to the cytoplasm, resulting in increased AT1R expression and greater pressor response to angiotensin II. AT1R blockade and the deletion of the Agtr1a gene normalize the hypertension in hGRK4γ142V mice. These findings illustrate the unique role of GRK4 by targeting receptors with opposite physiological activity for the same goal of maintaining blood pressure homeostasis, and thus making the GRK4 a relevant therapeutic target to control blood pressure. PMID:26667412

  1. Muscarinic receptor oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsango, Sara; Ward, Richard J; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Milligan, Graeme

    2017-11-14

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been classically described as monomeric entities that function by binding in a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio to both ligand and downstream signalling proteins. However, in recent years, a growing number of studies has supported the hypothesis that these receptors can interact to form dimers and higher order oligomers although the molecular basis for these interactions, the overall quaternary arrangements and the functional importance of GPCR oligomerization remain topics of intense speculation. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors belong to class A of the GPCR family. Each muscarinic receptor subtype has its own particular distribution throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the central nervous system, muscarinic receptors regulate several sensory, cognitive, and motor functions while, in the peripheral nervous system, they are involved in the regulation of heart rate, stimulation of glandular secretion and smooth muscle contraction. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors have long been used as a model for the study of GPCR structure and function and to address aspects of GPCR dimerization using a broad range of approaches. In this review, the prevailing knowledge regarding the quaternary arrangement for the various muscarinic acetylcholine receptors has been summarized by discussing work ranging from initial results obtained using more traditional biochemical approaches to those generated with more modern biophysical techniques. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. 30 YEARS OF THE MINERALOCORTICOID RECEPTOR: Nongenomic effects via the mineralocorticoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhs, Stefanie; Nolze, Alexander; Hübschmann, Ralf; Grossmann, Claudia

    2017-07-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) belongs to the steroid hormone receptor family and classically functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor. It is involved in water-electrolyte homeostasis and blood pressure regulation but independent from these effects also furthers inflammation, fibrosis, hypertrophy and remodeling in cardiovascular tissues. Next to genomic effects, aldosterone elicits very rapid actions within minutes that do not require transcription or translation and that occur not only in classical MR epithelial target organs like kidney and colon but also in nonepithelial tissues like heart, vasculature and adipose tissue. Most of these effects can be mediated by classical MR and its crosstalk with different signaling cascades. Near the plasma membrane, the MR seems to be associated with caveolin and striatin as well as with receptor tyrosine kinases like EGFR, PDGFR and IGF1R and G protein-coupled receptors like AT1 and GPER1, which then mediate nongenomic aldosterone effects. GPER1 has also been named a putative novel MR. There is a close interaction and functional synergism between the genomic and the nongenomic signaling so that nongenomic signaling can lead to long-term effects and support genomic actions. Therefore, understanding nongenomic aldosterone/MR effects is of potential relevance for modulating genomic aldosterone effects and may provide additional targets for intervention. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  3. Surviving rat distal tubule bicarbonate reabsorption: effects of chronic AT(1) blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, D Z; Iacovitti, M; Luck, B; Hincke, M T; Burns, K D; Fryer, J N

    2000-03-01

    To determine the in vivo effects of chronic ANG II type 1 (AT(1))-receptor blockade by losartan (Los) on enhanced unidirectional bicarbonate reabsorption (J(HCO(3))) of surviving distal tubules, nephrectomized rats drank either water or a solution of Los, 7 days before microperfusion. J(HCO(3)) was suppressed by 50% after Los without further reduction by 5 nM concanamycin A (Conc), suggesting that Los suppresses all Conc-sensitive H(+)-ATPase pumping. Indeed, ultrastructural analysis of A-type intercalated cells revealed a 50% reduction of H(+)-ATPase immunogold labeling of the apical plasma membrane, whereas Western blotting showed that H(+)-ATPase protein levels were also reduced by one-half by Los treatment. To identify other transporters sustaining J(HCO(3)), we perfused three inhibitors simultaneously [5-(N, N-dimethyl) amiloride hydrochloride, Conc, Schering 28080] with or without prior Los treatment: J(HCO(3)) was unchanged despite marked reduction of water reabsorption. We conclude enhanced distal tubule J(HCO(3)) of surviving nephrons is largely mediated by AT(1) receptor-dependent synthesis and insertion of apical H(+)-ATPase pumps in A-type intercalated cells.

  4. Adenosine receptor neurobiology: overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Lee, Chien-fei; Chern, Yijuang

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring nucleoside that is distributed ubiquitously throughout the body as a metabolic intermediary. In the brain, adenosine functions as an important upstream neuromodulator of a broad spectrum of neurotransmitters, receptors, and signaling pathways. By acting through four G-protein-coupled receptors, adenosine contributes critically to homeostasis and neuromodulatory control of a variety of normal and abnormal brain functions, ranging from synaptic plasticity, to cognition, to sleep, to motor activity to neuroinflammation, and cell death. This review begun with an overview of the gene and genome structure and the expression pattern of adenosine receptors (ARs). We feature several new developments over the past decade in our understanding of AR functions in the brain, with special focus on the identification and characterization of canonical and noncanonical signaling pathways of ARs. We provide an update on functional insights from complementary genetic-knockout and pharmacological studies on the AR control of various brain functions. We also highlight several novel and recent developments of AR neurobiology, including (i) recent breakthrough in high resolution of three-dimension structure of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) in several functional status, (ii) receptor-receptor heterodimerization, (iii) AR function in glial cells, and (iv) the druggability of AR. We concluded the review with the contention that these new developments extend and strengthen the support for A1 and A2ARs in brain as therapeutic targets for neurologic and psychiatric diseases. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prolonged AT1R activation induces CaV1.2 channel internalization in rat cardiomyocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Hermosilla, Tamara; Encina, Mat?as; Morales, Danna; Moreno, Cristian; Conejeros, Carolina; Alfaro-Vald?s, Hilda M.; Lagos-Meza, Felipe; Simon, Felipe; Altier, Christophe; Varela, Diego

    2017-01-01

    The cardiac L-type calcium channel is a multi-subunit complex that requires co-assembling of the pore-forming subunit CaV1.2 with auxiliary subunits CaV?2? and CaV?. Its traffic has been shown to be controlled by these subunits and by the activation of various G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR). Here, we explore the consequences of the prolonged activation of angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1R) over CaV1.2 channel trafficking. Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) assay between ?-ar...

  6. High molecular weight FGF2 isoforms demonstrate canonical receptor-mediated activity and support human embryonic stem cell self-renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Kole

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2 is a highly pleiotropic member of a large family of growth factors with a broad range of activities, including mitogenesis and angiogenesis (Ornitz et al., 1996; Zhang et al., 2006, and it is known to be essential for maintenance of balance between survival, proliferation, and self-renewal in human pluripotent stem cells (Eiselleova et al., 2009; Zoumaro-Djayoon et al., 2011. A single FGF2 transcript can be translated into five FGF2 protein isoforms, an 18 kDa low molecular weight (LMW isoform and four larger high molecular weight (HMW isoforms (Arese et al., 1999; Arnaud et al., 1999. As they are not generally secreted, high molecular weight (HMW FGF2 isoforms have predominantly been investigated intracellularly; only a very limited number of studies have investigated their activity as extracellular factors. Here we report over-expression, isolation, and biological activity of all recombinant human FGF2 isoforms. We show that HMW FGF2 isoforms can support self-renewal of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs in vitro. Exogenous supplementation with HMW FGF2 isoforms also activates the canonical FGFR/MAPK pathway and induces mitogenic activity in a manner similar to that of the 18 kDa FGF2 isoform. Though all HMW isoforms, when supplemented exogenously, are able to recapitulate LMW FGF2 activity to some degree, it appears that certain isoforms tend to do so more poorly, demonstrating a lesser functional response by several measures. A better understanding of isoform-specific FGF2 effects will lead to a better understanding of developmental and pathological FGF2 signaling.

  7. Thujone exhibits low affinity for cannabinoid receptors but fails to evoke cannabimimetic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschler, J P; Howlett, A C

    1999-03-01

    Absinthe, an abused drug in the early 1900s, has been speculated to activate the receptors responsible for marijuana intoxication (the CB1 cannabinoid receptor) (Nature 253:365-356; 1975). To test this hypothesis, we investigated oil of wormwood (Artemisia absinthium) the active plant product found in absinthe, and thujone, the active compound found in oil of wormwood. Radioligand receptor binding assays employing membrane preparations from rat brains containing CB1 cannabinoid receptors, and human tonsils containing CB2 receptors, demonstrated that thujone displaced [3H]CP55940, a cannabinoid agonist, only at concentrations above 10 microM. HPLC analysis of oil of wormwood revealed that only the fractions having mobility close to thujone displaced [3H]CP55940 from the CB1 cannabinoid receptor. [35S]GTPgammaS binding assays revealed that thujone failed to stimulate G-proteins even at 0.1 mM. Thujone failed to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in N18TG2 membranes at 1 mM. Rats administered thujone exhibited different behavioral characteristics compared with rats administered a potent cannabinoid agonist, levonantradol. Therefore, the hypothesis that activation of cannabinoid receptors is responsible for the intoxicating effects of thujone is not supported by the present data.

  8. Cannabinoid receptors in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, J M; Agraval, J; Gleeson, D; Heasman, K; Glass, M

    2006-03-01

    Two cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, are expressed in mammals, birds, reptiles, and fish. The presence of cannabinoid receptors in invertebrates has been controversial, due to conflicting evidence. We conducted a systematic review of the literature, using expanded search parameters. Evidence presented in the literature varied in validity, ranging from crude in vivo behavioural assays to robust in silico ortholog discovery. No research existed for several clades of invertebrates; we therefore tested for cannabinoid receptors in seven representative species, using tritiated ligand binding assays with [3H]CP55,940 displaced by the CB1-selective antagonist SR141716A. Specific binding of [3H]CP55,940 was found in neural membranes of Ciona intestinalis (Deuterstoma, a positive control), Lumbricusterrestris (Lophotrochozoa), and three ecdysozoans: Peripatoides novae-zealandiae (Onychophora), Jasus edwardi (Crustacea) and Panagrellus redivivus (Nematoda); the potency of displacement by SR141716A was comparable to measurements on rat cerebellum. No specific binding was observed in Actinothoe albocincta (Cnidaria) or Tethya aurantium (Porifera). The phylogenetic distribution of cannabinoid receptors may address taxonomic questions; previous studies suggested that the loss of CB1 was a synapomorphy shared by ecdysozoans. Our discovery of cannabinoid receptors in some nematodes, onychophorans, and crustaceans does not contradict the Ecdysozoa hypothesis, but gives it no support. We hypothesize that cannabinoid receptors evolved in the last common ancestor of bilaterians, with secondary loss occurring in insects and other clades. Conflicting data regarding Cnidarians precludes hypotheses regarding the last common ancestor of eumetazoans. No cannabinoid receptors are expressed in sponges, which probably diverged before the origin of the eumetazoan ancestor.

  9. A bioluminescence resonance energy transfer 2 (BRET2) assay for monitoring seven transmembrane receptor and insulin receptor crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanni, Samra Joke; Kulahin, Nikolaj; Jorgensen, Rasmus; Lyngsø, Christina; Gammeltoft, Steen; Hansen, Jakob Lerche

    2017-12-01

    The angiotensin AT1 receptor is a seven transmembrane (7TM) receptor, which mediates the regulation of blood pressure. Activation of angiotensin AT1 receptor may lead to impaired insulin signaling indicating crosstalk between angiotensin AT1 receptor and insulin receptor signaling pathways. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms behind this crosstalk, we applied the BRET2 technique to monitor the effect of angiotensin II on the interaction between Rluc8 tagged insulin receptor and GFP2 tagged insulin receptor substrates 1, 4, 5 (IRS1, IRS4, IRS5) and Src homology 2 domain-containing protein (Shc). We demonstrate that angiotensin II reduces the interaction between insulin receptor and IRS1 and IRS4, respectively, while the interaction with Shc is unaffected, and this effect is dependent on Gαq activation. Activation of other Gαq-coupled 7TM receptors led to a similar reduction in insulin receptor and IRS4 interactions whereas Gαs- and Gαi-coupled 7TM receptors had no effect. Furthermore, we used a panel of kinase inhibitors to show that angiotensin II engages different pathways when regulating insulin receptor interactions with IRS1 and IRS4. Angiotensin II inhibited the interaction between insulin receptor and IRS1 through activation of ERK1/2, while the interaction between insulin receptor and IRS4 was partially inhibited through protein kinase C dependent mechanisms. We conclude that the crosstalk between angiotensin AT1 receptor and insulin receptor signaling shows a high degree of specificity, and involves Gαq protein, and activation of distinct kinases. Thus, the BRET2 technique can be used as a platform for studying molecular mechanisms of crosstalk between insulin receptor and 7TM receptors.

  10. AT2 Receptors Targeting Cardiac Protection Post-Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaschina, Elena; Lauer, Dilyara; Schmerler, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    is preserved over periods of up to four months. Depending on the experimental protocol, the AT2R also attenuates post-MI left ventricular remodeling or protects the heart from early left ventricular thinning and rupture. In combination with AT1-receptor blockade or deficiency, post-MI cardiac hypertrophy...... deficiency or overexpression, treatment with an AT1-receptor blocker leading to indirect stimulation of the unopposed AT2-receptor, or studies using AT2-receptor agonists. It is a common finding in these studies that the AT2-receptor improves cardiac function in the early phase post-MI, and that this effect...

  11. Large Cryogenics Systems at 1.8 K

    CERN Document Server

    Tavian, L

    2000-01-01

    Cryogenics is now widely present in large accelerator projects using applied superconductivity. Economical considerations permanently require an increase of the performance of superconducting devices. One way to do this consists to lower their operating temperature and to cool them with superfluid helium. For this purpose, large cryogenic systems at 1.8 K producing refrigeration capacity in the kW range have to be developed and implemented. These cryogenic systems require large pumping capacity at very low pressure based on integral cold compression or mixed cold-warm compression. This paper describes and compares the different cooling methods with saturated or pressurised superfluid helium, gives the present status of the available process machinery with their practical performance, and reviews the different thermodynamical cycles for producing refrigeration below 2 K, with emphasis on their operational compliance.

  12. Quantitative receptor radioautography in the study of receptor-receptor interactions in the nucleus tractus solitarii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fior-Chadi D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS in the dorsomedial medulla comprises a wide range of neuropeptides and biogenic amines. Several of them are related to mechanisms of central blood pressure control. Angiotensin II (Ang II, neuropeptide Y (NPY and noradrenaline (NA are found in the NTS cells, as well as their receptors. Based on this observation we have evaluated the modulatory effect of these peptide receptors on a2-adrenoceptors in the NTS. Using quantitative receptor radioautography, we observed that NPY and Ang II receptors decreased the affinity of a2-adrenoceptors for their agonists in the NTS of the rat. Cardiovascular experiments agreed with the in vitro data. Coinjection of a threshold dose of Ang II or of the NPY agonists together with an ED50 dose of adrenergic agonists such as NA, adrenaline and clonidine counteracted the depressor effect produced by the a2-agonist in the NTS. The results provide evidence for the existence of an antagonistic interaction between Ang II at1 receptors and NPY receptor subtypes with the a2-adrenoceptors in the NTS. This receptor interaction may reduce the transduction over the a2-adrenoceptors which can be important in central cardiovascular regulation and in the development of hypertension

  13. Hematuria duration does not predict kidney function at 1 year in ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Teresa K.; Murakami, Christine; Manno, Rebecca L.; Geetha, Duvuru

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Hematuria is considered a marker of active renal disease in ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis (ANCA-GN) with induction immunosuppression often continued until hematuria has resolved. We aim to determine whether longer hematuria duration is associated with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at 1 year. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 55 patients with biopsy-proven ANCA-GN. Linear regression models were constructed to determine predictors of eGFR at 1 year. The primary exposure was hematuria (>5 rbc/hpf) duration, defined as hematuria, 95% had proteinuria, and mean serum creatinine was 3.1 [standard deviation (SD) = 2.3] mg/dL. Overall, 93% were treated with steroids in combination with either cyclophosphamide or rituximab. Mean hematuria duration was 92 (SD = 77) days with 34 (62%) patients having hematuria resolution within 90 days. Older age and lower baseline eGFR were associated with lower eGFR at 1 year (p = 0.03 and p Hematuria resolution (hematuria duration does not predict eGFR at 1 year. Our findings provide support that among individuals who are otherwise considered to be in clinical remission, the persistence of hematuria should not delay transition from induction to maintenance immunosuppression. PMID:24775913

  14. Solubility of Helium in Olivine at 1 Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parman, S. W.; Kurz, M. D.; Hart, S. R.; Grove, T. L.

    2004-12-01

    We have measured the solubility of He in olivine at 1 atm. Previous measurements of noble gas solubility in mantle minerals have found mineral/melt partition coefficients (D) that are higher [1;2] or close to [3] the D values of U and Th in the mantle. In contrast, geochemical systematics suggest that DHe is lower than DU and DTh. Our experiments were specifically designed to avoid gas trapped in melt pockets or between sintered grains, which may have affected previous studies [1;2]. The starting materials are gem quality San Carlos olivine and synthetic pure forsterite. These materials were examined before and after the experiments for inclusions and bubbles using optical, scanning electron and scanning transmission electron microscopic techniques. No bubbles were found. The primary experiments were performed on cm size grains to avoid trapping of gas in sintered powders. The experiments were run for 17-21 days at 1350° C, in crucibles made from large San Carlos olivine crystals, in an atmosphere of 50% He and 50% a mix of CO2 and H2 (to control fO2 at NNO and QFM). At no time was the olivine in contact with a melt phase. To examine the effects of powder sintering, experiments that span a range of smaller grain sizes (100-1000 microns) were also performed. He concentrations in the olivines were measured by noble gas mass spectrometry using sequential in vacuo crushing followed by melting of the powders. The experimental results are consistent: 8.3(+/-2.6) e-7 cc STP He/g are released by crushing and 6.2(+/-1.3) e-7 cc He STP/g are released by melting. Over 50% of the total gas is released by crushing. Powdered samples release unusually high amounts of gas on the first crush step (interpreted to be trapped between grains), but subsequently follow the same release pattern as the unpowdered samples and yield the same solubility values (excluding the first step). The consistency of the results over a range of compositions, grain sizes and fO2 conditions, and our

  15. Valsartan reduces AT1-AA-induced apoptosis through suppression oxidative stress mediated ER stress in endothelial progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z-C; Qi, J; Liu, L-M; Li, J; Xu, H-Y; Liang, B; Li, B

    2017-03-01

    Valsartan has been reported to have the function of treating hypertension and improving the prognosis of patients. Many studies indicated that valsartan can also increase angiotensin II, andosterone and plasma renin activity (PRA). Autoantibodies against the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-AA) have been showed to increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium (Ca2+) and result in apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells. In this study, we attempted to explore the effect of valsartan on AT1-AA-induced apoptosis in endothelial progenitor cells. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were cultured. The cytotoxicity was determined by MTT assay. EPCs apoptosis was determined by DAPI staining and flow cytometry. Reactive oxygen species, intracellular calcium concentration and calpain activity were measured using Fluostar Omega Spectrofluorimeter. The expression of p-ERK, p-eIF-2a, CHOP, Bcl-2 and caspase-3 were detected by Western blot. MTT assays showed valsartan significantly inhibited AT1-AA- induced decline of the viability of EPCs. DAPI staining and flow cytometry results indicated valsartan inhibited AT1-AA-induced decline of the viability of EPCs via inhibiting AT1-AA-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, the increasing of reactive oxygen species, intracellular calcium and calpain activity induced by AT1-AA in EPCs were also recovered after pre-treated with valsartan. Meanwhile, the upregulation of p-ERK, p-eIF-2a and CHOP, downregulation of Bcl-2, and activation of Caspase-3 caused by AT1-AA were reversed after pre-incubated with valsartan. Valsartan could inhibit AT1-AA-induced apoptosis through inhibiting oxidative stress mediated ER stress in EPCs.

  16. Differences between angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition and angiotensin II-AT(1) antagonism on angiotensin-mediated responses in human internal mammary arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, AA; Oosterga, M; Buikema, H; Mariani, M; Grandjean, JG; van Glist, WH

    The cur-rent study aimed to demonstrate differences between angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition and Ang II-AT(1) receptor antagonism on full concentration-contraction responses to Ang I. Contraction responses to increasing concentrations of Ang I (1 nM-1 muM) were evaluated in organ

  17. Stargazin Modulation of AMPA Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana A. Shaikh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fast excitatory synaptic signaling in the mammalian brain is mediated by AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors. In neurons, AMPA receptors co-assemble with auxiliary proteins, such as stargazin, which can markedly alter receptor trafficking and gating. Here, we used luminescence resonance energy transfer measurements to map distances between the full-length, functional AMPA receptor and stargazin expressed in HEK293 cells and to determine the ensemble structural changes in the receptor due to stargazin. In addition, we used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer to study the structural and conformational distribution of the receptor and how this distribution is affected by stargazin. Our nanopositioning data place stargazin below the AMPA receptor ligand-binding domain, where it is well poised to act as a scaffold to facilitate the long-range conformational selection observations seen in single-molecule experiments. These data support a model of stargazin acting to stabilize or select conformational states that favor activation.

  18. Estimates of magnetic cloud expansion at 1 AU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Lepping

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study we analyze 53 magnetic clouds (MCs of standard profiles observed in WIND magnetic field and plasma data, in order to estimate the speed of MC expansion (VE at 1 AU, where the expansion is investigated only for the component perpendicular to the MCs' axes. A high percentage, 83%, of the good and acceptable quality cases of MCs (N(good=64 were actually expanding, where "good quality" as used here refers to those MCs that had relatively well determined axial attitudes. Two different estimation methods are employed. The "scalar" method (where the estimation is denoted VE,S depends on the average speed of the MC from Sun-to-Earth (, the local MC's radius (RO, the duration of spacecraft passage through the MC (at average local speed , and the assumption that =. The second method, the "vector determination" (denoted VE,V, depends on the decreasing value of the absolute value of the Z-component (in MC coordinates of plasma velocity (|VZ| across the MC, the closest approach distance (YO, and estimated RO; the Z-component is related to spacecraft motion through the MC. Another estimate considered here, VE,V', is similar to VE,V in its formulation but depends on the decreasing |VZ| across part of the MC, that part between the maximum and minimum points of |VZ| which are usually close to (but not the same as the boundaries points. The scalar means of estimating VE is almost independent of any MC parameter fitting model results, but the vector means slightly depends on quantities that are model dependent (e.g. |CA|≡|YO|/RO. The most probable values of VE from all three means, based on the full set of N=53 cases, are shown to be around 30 km/s, but VE has larger average values of =49 km/s, =36 km/s, and =44 km/s, with standard deviations of 27 km/s, 38 km/s, and 38 km/s, respectively. The linear correlation coefficient for VE,S vs. VE,V' is 0.85 but is lower (0.76 for VE,S vs. VE,V, as expected. The

  19. Molecular determinants of angiotensin II type 1 receptor functional selectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aplin, Mark; Bonde, Marie Mi; Hansen, Jakob Lerche

    2008-01-01

    The angiotensin AT(1) receptor is an important pharmacological target in the treatment of cardiovascular disorders, such as hypertension, diabetic nephropathy, cardiac hypertrophy, arrhythmia and failure. Simultaneously, the AT(1) receptor has emerged to be a prominent model for the emerging......-dependent and -independent behaviour. While G protein activation is known to be detrimental, G protein-independent signalling by the AT(1) receptor has been associated with phenotypes such as cell survival and renewal, regulation of cardiac contraction and cell migration. It is therefore currently hypothesized...

  20. Estimates of magnetic cloud expansion at 1 AU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Lepping

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study we analyze 53 magnetic clouds (MCs of standard profiles observed in WIND magnetic field and plasma data, in order to estimate the speed of MC expansion (VE at 1 AU, where the expansion is investigated only for the component perpendicular to the MCs' axes. A high percentage, 83%, of the good and acceptable quality cases of MCs (N(good=64 were actually expanding, where "good quality" as used here refers to those MCs that had relatively well determined axial attitudes. Two different estimation methods are employed. The "scalar" method (where the estimation is denoted VE,S depends on the average speed of the MC from Sun-to-Earth (<VS-to-E>, the local MC's radius (RO, the duration of spacecraft passage through the MC (at average local speed <VC>, and the assumption that <VS-to-E>=<VC>. The second method, the "vector determination" (denoted VE,V, depends on the decreasing value of the absolute value of the Z-component (in MC coordinates of plasma velocity (|VZ| across the MC, the closest approach distance (YO, and estimated RO; the Z-component is related to spacecraft motion through the MC. Another estimate considered here, VE,V', is similar to VE,V in its formulation but depends on the decreasing |VZ| across part of the MC, that part between the maximum and minimum points of |VZ| which are usually close to (but not the same as the boundaries points. The scalar means of estimating VE is almost independent of any MC parameter fitting model results, but the vector means slightly depends on quantities that are model dependent (e.g. |CA|≡|YO|/RO. The most probable values of VE from all

  1. A pre-in vitro maturation medium containing cumulus oocyte complex ligand-receptor signaling molecules maintains meiotic arrest, supports the cumulus oocyte complex and improves oocyte developmental competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiquet, Nicolas W; Greene, Alison F; Becker, John; Barfield, Jennifer P; Schoolcraft, William B; Krisher, Rebecca L

    2017-09-01

    Can a pre-in vitro maturation (pre-IVM) medium containing signaling molecules rather than chemical/pharmaceutical agents, sustain meiotic arrest and improve developmental competence of in vitro matured oocytes in CF1 outbred mice? A short 2 h period of pre-IVM prevents spontaneous meiotic resumption, improves mitochondria activity in subsequently matured oocytes, and increases developmental competence, pregnancy rate and implantation of resulting embryos. Spontaneous resumption of meiosis in vitro is detrimental for oocyte developmental competence. Pre-IVM systems that prevent spontaneous meiotic resumption with chemical/pharmaceutical agents are a promising approach to improving IVM oocyte competence; however, the success of these methods has proven to be inconsistent. This study consisted of a series of experiments using cumulus oocyte complexes (COC) derived from outbred mice following ovarian stimulation. The study was designed to examine if a novel, ligand/receptor-based pre-IVM treatment could sustain meiotic arrest in vitro and improve oocyte developmental competence, compared to control IVM. Two pre-IVM durations (2 h and 24 h) were evaluated, and the effect of the mitochondrial stimulator PQQ during 24 h pre-IVM was studied. Murine (outbred CF1) immature COC were cultured in vitro in the presence of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) (30 nM), estradiol (100 nM), FSH (1 × 10-4 IU/ml) and bone morphogenic protein 15 (BMP15) (100 ng/ml) for 2 h or 24 h prior to IVM. Meiotic status during pre-IVM and IVM was analyzed using orcein staining, and functionality of gap junction communication was confirmed using the functional gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone (CBX). Oocytes exposed to pre-IVM treatment were compared to control oocytes collected on the same day from the same females and undergoing standard IVM. Developmental competence and embryo viability was assessed by oocyte mitochondrial activity and ATP concentration, in vitro embryo development following

  2. C4d-negative antibody-mediated rejection with high anti-angiotensin II type I receptor antibodies in absence of donor-specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, Alexander; Hope, Christopher M; Deayton, Susan; Bennett, Greg Donald; Holdsworth, Rhonda; Carroll, Robert P; Coates, P Toby H

    2015-07-01

    Acute antibody-mediated rejection can occur in absence of circulating donor-specific antibodies. Agonistic antibodies targeting the anti-angiotensin II type 1 receptor (anti-AT1 R) are emerging as important non-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Elevated levels of anti-angiotensin II receptor antibodies were first observed in kidney transplant recipients with malignant hypertension and allograft rejection. They have now been studied in three separate kidney transplant populations and associate to frequency of rejection, severity of rejection and graft failure. We report 11 cases of biopsy-proven, Complement 4 fragment d (C4d)-negative, acute rejection occurring without circulating donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies. In eight cases, anti-angiotensin receptor antibodies were retrospectively examined. The remaining three subjects were identified from our centre's newly instituted routine anti-angiotensin receptor antibody screening. All subjects fulfilled Banff 2013 criteria for antibody-mediated rejection and all responded to anti-rejection therapy, which included plasma exchange and angiotensin receptor blocker therapy. These cases support the routine assessment of anti-AT1 R antibodies in kidney transplant recipients to identify subjects at risk. Further studies will need to determine optimal assessment protocol and the effectiveness of pre-emptive treatment with angiotensin receptor blockers. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  3. Support of the supporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiefel, F

    2008-02-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that health care professionals working with severely ill patients are in need of support. Beside "external" factors, such as heavy clinical patient volume or administrative duties, "intra-psychic stressors," related to the inner significance of contextual factors, are an important source of clinician's distress. Identification of and working through intrapsychic stressors can considerably reduce psychological distress and thus provide effective and long-lasting support of the oncology clinician. This article discusses key elements of intra-psychic stressors, namely (1) emotions towards the patient, (2) awareness of own limits, (3) confusion about empathy, identification, counter-transference and collusion, (4) the influence of early development and life trajectory on career choices and professional identity and (5) the conflicting roles a health care professional being in need of support has to face.

  4. Depletion of endothelial or smooth muscle cell-specific angiotensin II type 1a receptors does not influence aortic aneurysms or atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra L Rateri

    Full Text Available Whole body genetic deletion of AT1a receptors in mice uniformly reduces hypercholesterolemia and angiotensin II-(AngII induced atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs. However, the role of AT1a receptor stimulation of principal cell types resident in the arterial wall remains undefined. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether deletion of AT1a receptors in either endothelial cells or smooth muscle cells influences the development of atherosclerosis and AAAs.AT1a receptor floxed mice were developed in an LDL receptor -/- background. To generate endothelial or smooth muscle cell specific deficiency, AT1a receptor floxed mice were bred with mice expressing Cre under the control of either Tie2 or SM22, respectively. Groups of males and females were fed a saturated fat-enriched diet for 3 months to determine effects on atherosclerosis. Deletion of AT1a receptors in either endothelial or smooth muscle cells had no discernible effect on the size of atherosclerotic lesions. We also determined the effect of cell-specific AT1a receptor deficiency on atherosclerosis and AAAs using male mice fed a saturated fat-enriched diet and infused with AngII (1,000 ng/kg/min. Again, deletion of AT1a receptors in either endothelial or smooth muscle cells had no discernible effects on either AngII-induced atherosclerotic lesions or AAAs.Although previous studies have demonstrated whole body AT1a receptor deficiency diminishes atherosclerosis and AAAs, depletion of AT1a receptors in either endothelial or smooth muscle cells did not affect either of these vascular pathologies.

  5. Angiotensin type 2 receptors: blood pressure regulation and end organ damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumners, Colin; de Kloet, Annette D; Krause, Eric G; Unger, Thomas; Steckelings, Ulrike Muscha

    2015-04-01

    In most situations, the angiotensin AT2-receptor (AT2R) mediates physiological actions opposing those mediated by the AT1-receptor (AT1R), including a vasorelaxant effect. Nevertheless, experimental evidence vastly supports that systemic application of AT2R-agonists is blood pressure neutral. However, stimulation of AT2R locally within the brain or the kidney apparently elicits a systemic blood pressure lowering effect. A systemic effect of AT2R stimulation on blood pressure can also be achieved, when the prevailing effect of continuous background AT1R-stimulation is attenuated by low-dose AT1R blockade. Despite a lack of effect on blood pressure, AT2R stimulation still protects from hypertensive end-organ damage. Current data and evidence therefore suggest that AT2R agonists will not be suitable as future anti-hypertensive drugs, but that they may well be useful for end-organ protection in combination with established anti-hypertensives. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. ABA Receptors: Past, Present and Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jianjun [Harvard University; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is the key plant stress hormone. Consistent with the earlier studies in support of the presence of both membrane- and cytoplasm-localized ABA receptors, recent studies have identified multiple ABA receptors located in various subcellular locations. These include a chloroplast envelope-localized receptor (the H subunit of Chloroplast Mg2+-chelatase/ABA Receptor), two plasma membrane-localized receptors (G-protein Coupled Receptor 2 and GPCR-type G proteins), and one cytosol/nucleus-localized Pyrabactin Resistant (PYR)/PYR-Like (PYL)/Regulatory Component of ABA Receptor 1 (RCAR). Although the downstream molecular events for most of the identified ABA receptors are currently unknown, one of them, PYR/PYL/RACR was found to directly bind and regulate the activity of a long-known central regulator of ABA signaling, the A-group protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C). Together with the Sucrose Non-fermentation Kinase Subfamily 2 (SnRK2s) protein kinases, a central signaling complex (ABA-PYR-PP2Cs-SnRK2s) that is responsible for ABA signal perception and transduction is supported by abundant genetic, physiological, biochemical and structural evidence. The identification of multiple ABA receptors has advanced our understanding of ABA signal perception and transduction while adding an extra layer of complexity.

  7. Family C 7TM receptor dimerization and activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Sheikh, Søren P; Hansen, Jakob Lerche

    2006-01-01

    to be fully defined. This review presents the biochemical support for family C 7TM receptor dimerization and discusses its importance for receptor biosynthesis, surface expression, ligand binding and activation, since lessons learnt here may well be applicable to the whole superfamily of 7TM receptors....

  8. Concomitant manipulation of murine NMDA- and AMPA-receptors to produce pro-cognitive drug effects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignisse, Julie; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Grigoriev, Vladimir; Bolkunov, Alexei; Proshin, Alexey; Bettendorff, Lucien; Bachurin, Sergey; Strekalova, Tatyana

    2014-02-01

    Bifunctional drug therapy targeting distinct receptor signalling systems can generate increased efficacy at lower concentrations compared to monofunctional therapy. Non-competitive blockade of the NMDA receptors or the potentiation of AMPA receptors is well documented to result in memory enhancement. Here, we compared the efficacy of the low-affinity NMDA receptor blocker memantine or the positive modulator of AMPA receptor QXX (in C57BL/6J at 1 or 5mg/kg, ip) with new derivatives of isothiourea (0.5-1 mg/kg, ip) that have bifunctional efficacy. Low-affinity NMDA blockade by these derivatives was achieved by introducing greater flexibility into the molecule, and AMPA receptor stimulation was produced by a sulfamide-containing derivative of isothiourea. Contextual learning was examined in a step-down avoidance task and extinction of contextual memory was studied in a fear-conditioning paradigm. Memantine enhanced contextual learning while QXX facilitated memory extinction; both drugs were effective at 5 mg/kg. The new derivative IPAC-5 elevated memory scores in both tasks at the dose 0.5 mg/kg and exhibited the lowest IC₅₀ values of NMDA receptor blockade and highest potency of AMPA receptor stimulation. Thus, among the new drugs tested, IPAC-5 replicated the properties of memantine and QXX in one administration with increased potency. Our data suggest that a concomitant manipulation of NMDA- and AMPA-receptors results in pro-cognitive effects and supports the concept bifunctional drug therapy as a promising strategy to replace monofunctional therapies with greater efficacy and improved compliance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  9. Vascular Contraction and Preeclampsia Downregulation of the Angiotensin Receptor 1 by Hemopexin In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, Winston W.; Henning, Rob H.; Willem J van Son; Pampus, Maria; Aarnoudse, Jan G; Niezen-Koning, Klary E; Borghuis, Theo; Jongman, Rianne M.; van Goor, Harry; Poelstra, Klaas; Navis, Gerjan; Faas, Marijke M.

    2009-01-01

    During normal pregnancy, in contrast to preeclampsia, plasma hemopexin activity is increased together with a decreased vascular angiotensin II receptor (AT1) expression. We now tested the hypothesis that hemopexin can downregulate the AT1 receptor in vitro. Analysis of human monocytes or endothelial cells by flow cytometry showed decreased membrane density of AT1 exclusively after incubation with active hemopexin, whereas in supernatants of these cell cultures, AT1 molecules could be detected...

  10. Receptor Quaternary Organization Explains G Protein-Coupled Receptor Family Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H. Felce

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The organization of Rhodopsin-family G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs at the cell surface is controversial. Support both for and against the existence of dimers has been obtained in studies of mostly individual receptors. Here, we use a large-scale comparative study to examine the stoichiometric signatures of 60 receptors expressed by a single human cell line. Using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer- and single-molecule microscopy-based assays, we found that a relatively small fraction of Rhodopsin-family GPCRs behaved as dimers and that these receptors otherwise appear to be monomeric. Overall, the analysis predicted that fewer than 20% of ∼700 Rhodopsin-family receptors form dimers. The clustered distribution of the dimers in our sample and a striking correlation between receptor organization and GPCR family size that we also uncover each suggest that receptor stoichiometry might have profoundly influenced GPCR expansion and diversification.

  11. Divergent effects of ERα and ERβ on fluid intake by female rats are not dependent on concomitant changes in AT1R expression or body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santollo, Jessica; Marshall, Anikó; Curtis, Kathleen S; Speth, Robert C; Clark, Stewart D; Daniels, Derek

    2016-07-01

    Estradiol (E2) decreases both water and saline intakes by female rats. The ERα and ERβ subtypes are expressed in areas of the brain that control fluid intake; however, the role that these receptors play in E2's antidipsogenic and antinatriorexigenic effects have not been examined. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that activation of ERα and ERβ decreases water and saline intakes by female rats. We found a divergence in E2's inhibitory effect on intake: activation of ERα decreased water intake, whereas activation of ERβ decreased saline intake. E2 decreases expression of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), a receptor with known relevance to water and salt intakes, in multiple areas of the brain where ERα and ERβ are differentially expressed. Therefore, we tested for agonist-induced changes in AT1R mRNA expression by RT-PCR and protein expression by analyzing receptor binding to test the hypothesis that the divergent effects of these ER subtypes are mediated by region-specific changes in AT1R expression. Although we found no changes in AT1R mRNA or binding in areas of the brain known to control fluid intake associated with agonist treatment, the experimental results replicate and extend previous findings that body weight changes mediate alterations in AT1R expression in distinct brain regions. Together, the results reveal selective effects of ER subtypes on ingestive behaviors, advancing our understanding of E2's inhibitory role in the controls of fluid intake by female rats. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. The androgen receptor and estrogen receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, H.M.; Bernards, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) and the estrogen receptors (ER) are members of the nuclear receptor (NR) family. These NRs are distinguished from the other transcription factors by their ability to control gene expression upon ligand binding (steroids, retinoids, thyroid hormone, vitamin D, fatty

  13. Estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current clinical practice employs the use of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), as biomarkers to appropriately select patients that would benefit from targeted therapy against these major molecular pathways of the disease. This study aims at ...

  14. beta-Arrestin 1 and 2 stabilize the angiotensin II type I receptor in distinct high-affinity conformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanni, S J; Hansen, J T; Bonde, M M

    2010-01-01

    The angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor belongs to family A of 7 transmembrane (7TM) receptors. The receptor has important roles in the cardiovascular system and is commonly used as a drug target in cardiovascular diseases. Interaction of 7TM receptors with G proteins or beta-arrestins often i...

  15. Luminal leptin inhibits L-glutamine transport in rat small intestine: involvement of ASCT2 and B0AT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducroc, Robert; Sakar, Yassine; Fanjul, Carmen; Barber, Ana; Bado, André; Lostao, Maria Pilar

    2010-07-01

    L-glutamine is the primary metabolic fuel for enterocytes. Glutamine from the diet is transported into the absorptive cells by two sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporters present at the apical membrane: ASCT2/SLC1A5 and B(0)AT1/SLC6A19. We have demonstrated that leptin is secreted into the stomach lumen after a meal and modulates the transport of sugars after binding to its receptors located at the brush border of the enterocytes. The present study was designed to address the effect of luminal leptin on Na(+)-dependent glutamine (Gln) transport in rat intestine and identify the transporters involved. We found that 0.2 nM leptin inhibited uptake of Gln and phenylalanine (Phe) (substrate of B(0)AT1) using everted intestinal rings. In Ussing chambers, 10 mM Gln absorption followed as Na(+)-induced short-circuit current was inhibited by leptin in a dose-dependent manner (maximum inhibition at 10 nM; I(C50) = approximately 0.1 nM). Phe absorption was also decreased by leptin. Western blot analysis after 3-min incubation of the intestinal loops with 10 mM Gln, showed marked increase of ASCT2 and B(0)AT1 protein in the brush-border membrane that was reduced by rapid preincubation of the intestinal lumen with 1 nM leptin. Similarly, the increase in ASCT2 and B(0)AT1 gene expression induced by 60-min incubation of the intestine with 10 mM Gln was strongly reduced after a short preincubation period with leptin. Altogether these data demonstrate that, in rat, leptin controls the active Gln entry through reduction of both B(0)AT1 and ASCT2 proteins traffic to the apical plasma membrane and modulation of their gene expression.

  16. AT2 Receptor and Tissue Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Namsolleck, Pawel; Recarti, Chiara; Foulquier, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in the initiation and progression of tissue injuries in the cardiovascular and nervous systems. The detrimental actions of the AT1 receptor (AT1R) in hypertension and vascular injury, myocardial infarction and brain ischemia are well...... and often opposing those of the AT1R. These include anti-inflammation, anti-fibrosis, anti-apoptosis and neuroregeneration that can counterbalance pathological processes and enable recovery from disease. The recent development of novel, small-molecule AT2R agonists offers a therapeutic potential in humans...

  17. Gβ promotes pheromone receptor polarization and yeast chemotropism by inhibiting receptor phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismael, Amber; Tian, Wei; Waszczak, Nicholas; Wang, Xin; Cao, Youfang; Suchkov, Dmitry; Bar, Eli; Metodiev, Metodi V; Liang, Jie; Arkowitz, Robert A; Stone, David E

    2016-04-12

    Gradient-directed cell migration (chemotaxis) and growth (chemotropism) are processes that are essential to the development and life cycles of all species. Cells use surface receptors to sense the shallow chemical gradients that elicit chemotaxis and chemotropism. Slight asymmetries in receptor activation are amplified by downstream signaling systems, which ultimately induce dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton. During the mating response of budding yeast, a model chemotropic system, the pheromone receptors on the plasma membrane polarize to the side of the cell closest to the stimulus. Although receptor polarization occurs before and independently of actin cable-dependent delivery of vesicles to the plasma membrane (directed secretion), it requires receptor internalization. Phosphorylation of pheromone receptors by yeast casein kinase 1 or 2 (Yck1/2) stimulates their internalization. We showed that the pheromone-responsive Gβγ dimer promotes the polarization of the pheromone receptor by interacting with Yck1/2 and locally inhibiting receptor phosphorylation. We also found that receptor phosphorylation is essential for chemotropism, independently of its role in inducing receptor internalization. A mathematical model supports the idea that the interaction between Gβγ and Yck1/2 results in differential phosphorylation and internalization of the pheromone receptor and accounts for its polarization before the initiation of directed secretion. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Cloning and sequence analysis of the human brain beta-adrenergic receptor. Evolutionary relationship to rodent and avian beta-receptors and porcine muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, F Z; Lentes, K U; Gocayne, J; Fitzgerald, M; Robinson, D; Kerlavage, A R; Fraser, C M; Venter, J C

    1987-01-26

    Two cDNA clones, lambda-CLFV-108 and lambda-CLFV-119, encoding for the beta-adrenergic receptor, have been isolated from a human brain stem cDNA library. One human genomic clone, LCV-517 (20 kb), was characterized by restriction mapping and partial sequencing. The human brain beta-receptor consists of 413 amino acids with a calculated Mr of 46480. The gene contains three potential glucocorticoid receptor-binding sites. The beta-receptor expressed in human brain was homology with rodent (88%) and avian (52%) beta-receptors and with porcine muscarinic cholinergic receptors (31%), supporting our proposal [(1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81, 272 276] that adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors are structurally related. This represents the first cloning of a neurotransmitter receptor gene from human brain.

  19. Vascular Contraction and Preeclampsia Downregulation of the Angiotensin Receptor 1 by Hemopexin In Vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Winston W.; Henning, Rob H.; van Son, Willem J.; van Pampus, Maria; Aarnoudse, Jan G.; Niezen-Koning, Klary E.; Borghuis, Theo; Jongman, Rianne M.; van Goor, Harry; Poelstra, Klaas; Navis, Gerjan; Faas, Marijke M.

    During normal pregnancy, in contrast to preeclampsia, plasma hemopexin activity is increased together with a decreased vascular angiotensin II receptor (AT1) expression. We now tested the hypothesis that hemopexin can downregulate the AT1 receptor in vitro. Analysis of human monocytes or endothelial

  20. Current topics in angiotensin II type 1 receptor research: Focus on inverse agonism, receptor dimerization and biased agonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezako, Takanobu; Unal, Hamiyet; Karnik, Sadashiva S; Node, Koichi

    2017-09-01

    Although the octapeptide hormone angiotensin II (Ang II) regulates cardiovascular and renal homeostasis through the Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R), overstimulation of AT1R causes various human diseases, such as hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. Therefore, AT1R blockers (ARBs) have been widely used as therapeutic drugs for these diseases. Recent basic research and clinical studies have resulted in the discovery of interesting phenomena associated with AT1R function. For example, ligand-independent activation of AT1R by mechanical stress and agonistic autoantibodies, as well as via receptor mutations, has been shown to decrease the inverse agonistic efficacy of ARBs, though the molecular mechanisms of such phenomena had remained elusive until recently. Furthermore, although AT1R is believed to exist as a monomer, recent studies have demonstrated that AT1R can homodimerize and heterodimerize with other G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), altering the receptor signaling properties. Therefore, formation of both AT1R homodimers and AT1R-GPCR heterodimer may be involved in the pathogenesis of human disease states, such as atherosclerosis and preeclampsia. Finally, biased AT1R ligands that can preferentially activate the β-arrestin-mediated signaling pathway have been discovered. Such β-arrestin-biased AT1R ligands may be better therapeutic drugs for cardiovascular diseases. New findings on AT1R described herein could provide a conceptual framework for application of ARBs in the treatment of diseases, as well as for novel drug development. Since AT1R is an extensively studied member of the GPCR superfamily encoded in the human genome, this review is relevant for understanding the functions of other members of this superfamily. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The sutureless aortic valve at 1 year: A large multicenter cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischlein, Theodor; Meuris, Bart; Hakim-Meibodi, Kavous; Misfeld, Martin; Carrel, Thierry; Zembala, Marian; Gaggianesi, Sara; Madonna, Francesco; Laborde, François; Asch, Federico; Haverich, Axel

    2016-06-01

    Sutureless aortic valve replacement (AVR) offers an alternative to standard AVR in aortic stenosis. This prospective, single-arm study aimed to demonstrate safety and effectiveness of a bovine pericardial sutureless aortic valve at 1 year. From February 2010 to September 2013, 658 patients (mean age 78.3 ± 5.6 years; 40.0% octogenarian; 64.4% female; mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons score 7.2 ± 7.4) underwent sutureless AVR in 25 European centers. Concomitant cardiac procedures were performed in 29.5% and minimally invasive cardiac surgery in 33.3%. One-year site-reported event rates were 8.1% for all-cause mortality, 4.5% for cardiac mortality, 3.0% for stroke, 1.9% for valve-related reoperation, 1.4% for endocarditis, and 0.6% for major paravalvular leak. No valve thrombosis, migration, or structural valve deterioration occurred. New York Heart Association class improved at least 1 level in 77.5% and remained stable (70.4% New York Heart Association class I or II at 1 year). Mean effective orifice area was 1.5 ± 0.4 cm(2); pressure gradient was 9.2 ± 5.0 mm Hg. Left ventricular mass decreased from 138.5 g/m(2) before surgery to 115.3 g/m(2) at 1 year (P < .001). Echocardiographic core laboratory findings confirmed that paravalvular leak was rare and remained stable during follow-up. The Perceval sutureless valve resulted in low 1-year event rates in intermediate-risk patients undergoing AVR. New York Heart Association class improved in more than three-quarters of patients and remained stable. These data support the safety and efficacy to 1 year of the Perceval sutureless valve in this intermediate-risk population. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Reassessment of the unique mode of binding between angiotensin II type 1 receptor and their blockers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Ichiro Miura

    Full Text Available While the molecular structures of angiotensin II (Ang II type 1 (AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs are very similar, they are also slightly different. Although each ARB has been shown to exhibit a unique mode of binding to AT1 receptor, different positions of the AT1 receptor have been analyzed and computational modeling has been performed using different crystal structures for the receptor as a template and different kinds of software. Therefore, we systematically analyzed the critical positions of the AT1 receptor, Tyr(113, Tyr(184, Lys(199, His(256 and Gln(257 using a mutagenesis study, and subsequently performed computational modeling of the binding of ARBs to AT1 receptor using CXCR4 receptor as a new template and a single version of software. The interactions between Tyr(113 in the AT1 receptor and the hydroxyl group of olmesartan, between Lys(199 and carboxyl or tetrazole groups, and between His(256 or Gln(257 and the tetrazole group were studied. The common structure, a tetrazole group, of most ARBs similarly bind to Lys(199, His(256 and Gln(257 of AT1 receptor. Lys(199 in the AT1 receptor binds to the carboxyl group of EXP3174, candesartan and azilsartan, whereas oxygen in the amidecarbonyl group of valsartan may bind to Lys(199. The benzimidazole portion of telmisartan may bind to a lipophilic pocket that includes Tyr(113. On the other hand, the n-butyl group of irbesartan may bind to Tyr(113. In conclusion, we confirmed that the slightly different structures of ARBs may be critical for binding to AT1 receptor and for the formation of unique modes of binding.

  3. Effects of CO2 at 1-MCP treated tomato on the vine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wild, de H.P.J.

    2003-01-01

    Elevated CO2 can inhibit ethylene effects. The mechanism of this inhibition is not exactly known. It was investigated whether competition with ethylene at the receptor binding-site is involved. The receptor binding-site was blocked by 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP). In this case CO2 can not have an

  4. β-Arrestin regulation of myosin light chain phosphorylation promotes AT1aR-mediated cell contraction and migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie Simard

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, it has been established that G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs signal not only through canonical G-protein-mediated mechanisms, but also through the ubiquitous cellular scaffolds β-arrestin-1 and β-arrestin-2. Previous studies have implicated β-arrestins as regulators of actin reorganization in response to GPCR stimulation while also being required for membrane protrusion events that accompany cellular motility. One of the most critical events in the active movement of cells is the cyclic phosphorylation and activation of myosin light chain (MLC, which is required for cellular contraction and movement. We have identified the myosin light chain phosphatase Targeting Subunit (MYPT-1 as a binding partner of the β-arrestins and found that β-arrestins play a role in regulating the turnover of phosphorylated myosin light chain. In response to stimulation of the angiotensin Type 1a Receptor (AT1aR, MLC phosphorylation is induced quickly and potently. We have found that β-arrestin-2 facilitates dephosphorylation of MLC, while, in a reciprocal fashion, β-arrestin 1 limits dephosphorylation of MLC. Intriguingly, loss of either β-arrestin-1 or 2 blocks phospho-MLC turnover and causes a decrease in the contraction of cells as monitored by atomic force microscopy (AFM. Furthermore, by employing the β-arrestin biased ligand [Sar(1,Ile(4,Ile(8]-Ang, we demonstrate that AT1aR-mediated cellular motility involves a β-arrestin dependent component. This suggests that the reciprocal regulation of MLC phosphorylation status by β-arrestins-1 and 2 causes turnover in the phosphorylation status of MLC that is required for cell contractility and subsequent chemotaxic motility.

  5. N-glycosylation of the β2 adrenergic receptor regulates receptor function by modulating dimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaona; Zhou, Mang; Huang, Wei; Yang, Huaiyu

    2017-07-01

    N-glycosylation is a common post-translational modification of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). However, it remains unknown how N-glycosylation affects GPCR signaling. β2 adrenergic receptor (β2 AR) has three N-glycosylation sites: Asn6, Asn15 at the N-terminus, and Asn187 at the second extracellular loop (ECL2). Here, we show that deletion of the N-glycan did not affect receptor expression and ligand binding. Deletion of the N-glycan at the N-terminus rather than Asn187 showed decreased effects on isoproterenol-promoted G-protein-dependent signaling, β-arrestin2 recruitment, and receptor internalization. Both N6Q and N15Q showed decreased receptor dimerization, while N187Q did not influence receptor dimerization. As decreased β2 AR homodimer accompanied with reduced efficiency for receptor function, we proposed that the N-glycosylation of β2 AR regulated receptor function by influencing receptor dimerization. To verify this hypothesis, we further paid attention to the residues at the dimerization interface. Studies of Lys60 and Glu338, two residues at the receptor dimerization interface, exhibited that the K60A/E338A showed decreased β2 AR dimerization and its effects on receptor signaling were similar to N6Q and N15Q, which further supported the importance of receptor dimerization for receptor function. This work provides new insights into the relationship among glycosylation, dimerization, and function of GPCRs. Peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase F, EC 3.2.2.11); endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase A (Endo-A, EC 3.2.1.96). © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Lipophorin Receptor: The Insect Lipoprotein Receptor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 8. Lipophorin Receptor: The Insect Lipoprotein Receptor. G Ravikumar N B Vijayaprakash. General Article Volume 18 Issue 8 August 2013 pp 748-755. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  7. Evaluation of magnetic resonance safety of veterinary radiofrequency identification devices at 1 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Martin A; MacDonald, Iain

    2011-01-01

    Implants containing metallic components have the potential to become heated or move within the patient while in the magnetic resonance (MR) environment. Despite containing a ferromagnetic core and having been in use for over 20 years, no information is available on the safety of veterinary radiofrequency identification devices during MR examinations. These devices are the most commonly encountered metallic implants in dogs and cats undergoing MR imaging. Three commercial veterinary microchips were evaluated for safety in the MR environment at 1 T. Parameters tested were translational force, torque, heating, artifact production, and function. Translation and torque were larger than that expected from normal activity under normal gravity. No significant heating was observed. Signal void artifacts may affect diagnosis if they are too close to the area of clinical importance. Microchip function was unaffected by routine clinical MR imaging. Capsule formation around devices is a major factor in counteracting translation and torque. Our findings support that is acceptable for patients to undergo MR imaging with this 1 T system following an interval of 3 months postimplantation to allow capsule growth. Because of the complex interactions involved, these observations may not be translatable to MR scanners of different field strength and/or manufacturer. Further safety testing of these and other radiofrequency identification devices is therefore recommended at different field strengths and equipment specifications. © 2010 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  8. Tech Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beem, Kate

    2002-01-01

    Discusses technology-support issues, including staff training, cost, and outsourcing. Describes how various school districts manage technology-support services. Features the Technology Support Index, developed by the International Society for Technology in Education, to gauge the operation of school district technology-support programs. (PKP)

  9. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood ...

  10. Receptor Autoradiography Protocol for the Localized Visualization of Angiotensin II Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Andrea; Couling, Leena E; Carrera, Eduardo J; Speth, Robert C

    2016-06-07

    This protocol describes receptor binding patterns for Angiotensin II (Ang II) in the rat brain using a radioligand specific for Ang II receptors to perform receptor autoradiographic mapping. Tissue specimens are harvested and stored at -80 °C. A cryostat is used to coronally section the tissue (brain) and thaw-mount the sections onto charged slides. The slide-mounted tissue sections are incubated in (125)I-SI-Ang II to radiolabel Ang II receptors. Adjacent slides are separated into two sets: 'non-specific binding' (NSP) in the presence of a receptor saturating concentration of non-radiolabeled Ang II, or an AT1 Ang II receptor subtype (AT1R) selective Ang II receptor antagonist, and 'total binding' with no AT1R antagonist. A saturating concentration of AT2 Ang II receptor subtype (AT2R) antagonist (PD123319, 10 µM) is also present in the incubation buffer to limit (125)I-SI-Ang II binding to the AT1R subtype. During a 30 min pre-incubation at ~22 °C, NSP slides are exposed to 10 µM PD123319 and losartan, while 'total binding' slides are exposed to 10 µM PD123319. Slides are then incubated with (125)I-SI-Ang II in the presence of PD123319 for 'total binding', and PD123319 and losartan for NSP in assay buffer, followed by several 'washes' in buffer, and water to remove salt and non-specifically bound radioligand. The slides are dried using blow-dryers, then exposed to autoradiography film using a specialized film and cassette. The film is developed and the images are scanned into a computer for visual and quantitative densitometry using a proprietary imaging system and a spreadsheet. An additional set of slides are thionin-stained for histological comparisons. The advantage of using receptor autoradiography is the ability to visualize Ang II receptors in situ, within a section of a tissue specimen, and anatomically identify the region of the tissue by comparing it to an adjacent histological reference section.

  11. Androgen receptor abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); H.C.J. van Rooij (Henri); G. Romalo (G.); G. Trifiro (Gianluca); E. Mulder (Eppo); L. Pinsky (L.); H.U. Schweikert (H.); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The human androgen receptor is a member of the superfamily of steroid hormone receptors. Proper functioning of this protein is a prerequisite for normal male sexual differentiation and development. The cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA and the elucidation of

  12. [Effects of estrogen on ACE-Ang II-AT1 axis in ovariectomy and hypoxic pulmonary hypertension rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Mengqi; Duan, Zheng; Sun, Yanli; Yuan, Yadong

    2014-06-10

    To explore the effects of estrogen (E2) on angiotensin converting enzyme-angiotensin II-angiotensin type 1 receptor (ACE-Ang II-AT1) axis in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension rats. A total of 60 healthy female Sprague-Dawdley (SD) rats were divided randomly into 6 groups (n = 10 each) of sham operation, pure ovariectomy (OVX), pure hypoxia,OVX+hypoxia,OVX+E2 and OVX+hypoxia+E2. Abdominal cavity was opened for sham operation group and bilateral ovaries were left intact without any other procedure. The pure OVX group underwent oophorectomy. The pure hypoxia group were placed into a low-oxygen environment (24 hour, 8 weeks). The OVX+hypoxia group were placed into a low-oxygen environment after bilateral oophorectomy. The OVX+E2 group received a subcutaneous injection of E2 (20 µg×kg(-1)×d(-1)) after bilateral oophorectomy. The OVX+hypoxia+E2 group had an injection of E2 and was placed into a low-oxygen environment after bilateral oophorectomy. The rats were feed continuously for 8 weeks to establish hypoxic pulmonary hypertension model. The mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) was measured after bloodletting. Then right ventricle hypertrophy index (RVHI) and hematoxylin-eosin pulmonary artery remodeling (HPSR) were observed. And electron microscope was employed to observe pulmonary arteriolar ultrastructure. The methods of radio-immunity assay, ultraviolet spectroscopy, Western blot and reverse transcription PCR were used to measure the levels of CE,Ang II and AT1 in sera, lung and pulmonary artery. The vascular walls of pure hypoxia and OVX+hypoxia groups became thickened and lumen narrowed.mPAP and RVHI were (32.4 ± 2.2) mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa),0.331 ± 0.032 and (37.9 ± 1.6) mmHg,0.433 ± 0.033. Both were significantly higher than those of Sham operation group ((12.6 ± 1.8) mmHg,0.233 ± 0.029) (both P 0.05). Compared with Sham operation group, the expression levels of ACE,Ang II and AT1 in pure OVX, pure hypoxia and OVX+ hypoxia groups rose markedly (all P 0

  13. T1 at 1.5T and 3T compared with conventional T2*at 1.5T for cardiac siderosis

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, MH; Auger, D; Smith, GC; He, T.; Vassiliou, V; Baksi, AJ; Wage, R; Drivas, P.; Feng, Y; Firmin, DN; Pennell, DJ

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myocardial black blood (BB) T2* relaxometry at 1.5T provides robust, reproducible and calibrated non-invasive assessment of cardiac iron burden. In vitro data has shown that like T2*, novel native Modified Look-Locker Inversion recovery (MOLLI) T1 shortens with increasing tissue iron. The relative merits of T1 and T2* are largely unexplored. We compared the established 1.5T BB T2* technique against native T1 values at 1.5T and 3T in iron overload patients and in normal volunteers....

  14. T1 at 1.5T and 3T compared with conventional T2* at 1.5T for cardiac siderosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammed H; Auger, Dominique; Smith, Gillian C; He, Taigang; Vassiliou, Vassilis; Baksi, A John; Wage, Rick; Drivas, Peter; Feng, Yanqiu; Firmin, David N; Pennell, Dudley J

    2015-11-24

    Myocardial black blood (BB) T2* relaxometry at 1.5T provides robust, reproducible and calibrated non-invasive assessment of cardiac iron burden. In vitro data has shown that like T2*, novel native Modified Look-Locker Inversion recovery (MOLLI) T1 shortens with increasing tissue iron. The relative merits of T1 and T2* are largely unexplored. We compared the established 1.5T BB T2* technique against native T1 values at 1.5T and 3T in iron overload patients and in normal volunteers. A total of 73 subjects (42 male) were recruited, comprising 20 healthy volunteers (controls) and 53 patients (thalassemia major 22, sickle cell disease 9, hereditary hemochromatosis 9, other iron overload conditions 13). Single mid-ventricular short axis slices were acquired for BB T2* at 1.5T and MOLLI T1 quantification at 1.5T and 3T. In healthy volunteers, median T1 was 1014 ms (full range 939-1059 ms) at 1.5T and modestly increased to 1165ms (full range 1056-1224 ms) at 3T. All patients with significant cardiac iron overload (1.5T T2* values T1 values 3T. Associations between T2* and T1 were found to be moderate with y =377 · x(0.282) at 1.5T (R(2) = 0.717), and y =406 · x(0.294) at 3T (R(2) = 0.715). Measures of reproducibility of T1 appeared superior to T2*. T1 mapping at 1.5T and at 3T can identify individuals with significant iron loading as defined by the current gold standard T2* at 1.5T. However, there is significant scatter between results which may reflect measurement error, but it is also possible that T1 interacts with T2*, or is differentially sensitive to aspects of iron chemistry or other biology. Hurdles to clinical implementation of T1 include the lack of calibration against human myocardial iron concentration, no demonstrated relation to cardiac outcomes, and variation in absolute T1 values between scanners, which makes inter-centre comparisons difficult. The relative merits of T1 at 3T versus T2* at 3T require further consideration.

  15. AT1R blocker losartan attenuates intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis in a mouse model of Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian-Jing; Shi, Yong-Yan; Wang, En-Bo; Zhu, Tong; Zhao, Qun

    2016-02-01

    Angiotensin II, which is the main effector of the renin‑angiotensin system, has an important role in intestinal inflammation via the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of the AT1R blocker losartan on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. Losartan was administered to male adult C57BL/6 J mice 2 weeks prior to the induction of colitis, and images of the whole colon were captured to record changes, scored according to a microscopic scoring system, and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction were performed in order to investigate colonic inflammation. In addition, intestinal epithelial barrier permeability was evaluated, and intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) apoptosis was measured using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, and apoptosis-related protein expression levels were detected by western blotting. Losartan was able to attenuate TNBS-induced body weight loss and colonic damage. Furthermore, T helper 1-mediated proinflammatory cytokines were suppressed by losartan, and gut permeability was largely preserved. TUNEL staining revealed reduced IEC apoptosis in the losartan-treated mice. Losartan also increased the B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2)/Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) ratio and suppressed caspase-3 induction. These results suggested that the AT1R blocker losartan may attenuate TNBS-induced colitis by inhibiting the apoptosis of IECs. The effects of losartan were partially mediated through increasing the Bcl-2/Bax ratio and subsequently suppressing the induction of the proapoptotic mediator caspase-3.

  16. The landslide susceptibility map of Italy at 1:1 Million scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigila, A.; Catani, F.; Casagli, N.; Crosta, G.; Esposito, C.; Frattini, P.; Iadanza, C.; Lagomarsino, D.; Lari, S.; Scarascia Mugnozza, G.; Segoni, S.; Spizzichino, D.; Tofani, V.

    2012-04-01

    a significant number of statistical units. These tests also demonstrated that large grid-cells (100x100 m, 500x500 m) are suitable terrain units for the scale of the analysis. Considering the results of the tests, the Bayesian Tree Random Forest model was selected to produce the 1:1,000,000 susceptibility map of Italy. Landslide susceptibility map of Italy at 1:1,000,000 scale can be an important support for the implementation of pan-European landslide susceptibility map and a useful tools for the EU policies and measures finalized to the landslide risk reduction and mitigation.

  17. A low-temperature-responsive element involved in the regulation of the Arabidopsis thaliana At1g71850/At1g71860 divergent gene pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shijuan; Chen, Huiqing; Li, Xiulan; Zhang, Wei

    2016-08-01

    The bidirectional promoter of the Arabidopsis thaliana gene pair At1g71850/At1g71860 harbors low-temperature-responsive elements, which participate in anti-correlated transcription regulation of the driving genes in response to environmental low temperature. A divergent gene pair is defined as two adjacent genes organized head to head in opposite orientation, sharing a common promoter region. Divergent gene pairs are mainly coexpressed, but some display opposite regulation. The mechanistic basis of such anti-correlated regulation is not well understood. Here, the regulation of the Arabidopsis thaliana gene pair At1g71850/At1g71860 was investigated. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Genevestigator analyses showed that while one of the pair was upregulated by exposure to low temperature, the same treatment downregulated the other. Promoter::GUS fusion transgenes were used to show that this behavior was driven by a bidirectional promoter, which harbored an as-1 motif, associated with the low-temperature response; mutation of this sequence produced a significant decrease in cold-responsive expression. With regard to the as-1 motif in the native orientation repressing the promoter's low-temperature responsiveness, the same as-1 motif introduced in the reverse direction showed a slight enhancement in the promoter's responsiveness to low-temperature exposure, indicating that the orientation of the motif was important for the promoter's activity. These findings provide new insights into the complex transcriptional regulation of bidirectional gene pairs as well as plant stress response.

  18. Stoichiometry of δ subunit containing GABAA receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, B; Mortensen, M; Smart, T G

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although the stoichiometry of the major synaptic αβγ subunit-containing GABAA receptors has consensus support for 2α:2β:1γ, a clear view of the stoichiometry of extrasynaptic receptors containing δ subunits has remained elusive. Here we examine the subunit stoichiometry of recombinant α4β3δ receptors using a reporter mutation and a functional electrophysiological approach. Experimental Approach Using site-directed mutagenesis, we inserted a highly characterized 9′ serine to leucine mutation into the second transmembrane (M2) region of α4, β3 and δ subunits that increases receptor sensitivity to GABA. Whole-cell, GABA-activated currents were recorded from HEK-293 cells co-expressing different combinations of wild-type (WT) and/or mutant α4(L297S), β3(L284S) and δ(L288S) subunits. Key Results Recombinant receptors containing one or more mutant subunits showed increased GABA sensitivity relative to WT receptors by approximately fourfold, independent of the subunit class (α, β or δ) carrying the mutation. GABA dose–response curves of cells co-expressing WT subunits with their respective L9′S mutants exhibited multiple components, with the number of discernible components enabling a subunit stoichiometry of 2α, 2β and 1δ to be deduced for α4β3δ receptors. Varying the cDNA transfection ratio by 10-fold had no significant effect on the number of incorporated δ subunits. Conclusions and Implications Subunit stoichiometry is an important determinant of GABAA receptor function and pharmacology, and δ subunit-containing receptors are important mediators of tonic inhibition in several brain regions. Here we demonstrate a preferred subunit stoichiometry for α4β3δ receptors of 2α, 2β and 1δ. PMID:24206220

  19. Nutritional Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutritional support is therapy for people who cannot get enough nourishment by eating or drinking. You may need it ... nutrients through your digestive system You receive nutritional support through a needle or catheter placed in your ...

  20. Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) receptor in locally advanced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, L.A. [Laboratório de Metabolismo de Lípides, Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Ginecologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hegg, R. [Departamento de Ginecologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Freitas, F.R.; Tavares, E.R.; Almeida, C.P. [Laboratório de Metabolismo de Lípides, Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Baracat, E.C. [Departamento de Ginecologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Maranhão, R.C. [Laboratório de Metabolismo de Lípides, Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-05-04

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors are overexpressed in most neoplastic cell lines and provide a mechanism for the internalization and concentration of drug-laden nanoemulsions that bind to these receptors. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the administration of standard chemotherapeutic schemes can alter the expression of LDL and LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) receptors in breast carcinoma. Fragments of tumoral and normal breast tissue from 16 consecutive volunteer women with breast cancer in stage II or III were obtained from biopsies before the beginning of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and after chemotherapy, from fragments excised during mastectomy. Tissues were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for both receptors. Because complete response to treatment was achieved in 4 patients, only the tumors from 12 were analyzed. Before chemotherapy, there was overexpression of LDL receptor in the tumoral tissue compared to normal breast tissue in 8 of these patients. LRP-1 receptor overexpression was observed in tumors of 4 patients. After chemotherapy, expression of both receptors decreased in the tumors of 6 patients, increased in 4 and was unchanged in 2. Nonetheless, even when chemotherapy reduced receptors expression, the expression was still above normal. The fact that chemotherapy does not impair LDL receptors expression supports the use of drug carrier systems that target neoplastic cells by the LDL receptor endocytic pathway in patients on conventional chemotherapy.

  1. Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on low-density lipoprotein (LDL receptor and LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1 receptor in locally advanced breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Pires

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Low-density lipoprotein (LDL receptors are overexpressed in most neoplastic cell lines and provide a mechanism for the internalization and concentration of drug-laden nanoemulsions that bind to these receptors. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the administration of standard chemotherapeutic schemes can alter the expression of LDL and LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1 receptors in breast carcinoma. Fragments of tumoral and normal breast tissue from 16 consecutive volunteer women with breast cancer in stage II or III were obtained from biopsies before the beginning of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and after chemotherapy, from fragments excised during mastectomy. Tissues were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for both receptors. Because complete response to treatment was achieved in 4 patients, only the tumors from 12 were analyzed. Before chemotherapy, there was overexpression of LDL receptor in the tumoral tissue compared to normal breast tissue in 8 of these patients. LRP-1 receptor overexpression was observed in tumors of 4 patients. After chemotherapy, expression of both receptors decreased in the tumors of 6 patients, increased in 4 and was unchanged in 2. Nonetheless, even when chemotherapy reduced receptors expression, the expression was still above normal. The fact that chemotherapy does not impair LDL receptors expression supports the use of drug carrier systems that target neoplastic cells by the LDL receptor endocytic pathway in patients on conventional chemotherapy.

  2. Microglia and macrophages express tumor necrosis factor receptor p75 following middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertsen, K.L.; Clausen, B.H.; Fenger, C.

    2006-01-01

    The proinflammatory and potential neurotoxic cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is produced by activated CNS resident microglia and infiltrating blood-borne macrophages in infarct and peri-infarct areas following induction of focal cerebral ischemia. Here, we investigated the expression...... of the TNF receptors, TNF-p55R and TNF-p75R, from 1 to 10 days following permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in mice. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), we observed that the relative level of TNF-p55R mRNA was significantly increased at 1-2 days and TNF-p75R m...... was expressed in resident microglia and blood-borne macrophages located in the peri-infarct and infarct 1 and 5 days after arterial occlusion, which was supported by Western blotting. The data show that increased expression of the TNF-p75 receptor following induction of focal cerebral ischemia in mice can...

  3. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von, E-mail: evonrose@medicine.umaryland.edu; Raufman, Jean-Pierre [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 22 S. Greene Street, N3W62, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Maryland Health Care System, 10 North Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-03-02

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  4. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  5. Overexpression of the human angiotensin II type 1 receptor in the rat heart augments load induced cardiac hypertrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, S; van Geel, PP; Willenbrock, R; Pagel, [No Value; Pinto, YM; Buikema, H; van Gilst, WH; Lindschau, C; Paul, M; Inagami, T; Ganten, D; Urata, H

    2001-01-01

    Angiotensin II is known to stimulate cardiac hypertrophy and contractility. Most angiotensin II effects are mediated via membrane bound AT(1) receptors. However, the role of myocardial AT(1) receptors in cardiac hypertrophy and contractility is still rarely defined. To address the hypothesis that

  6. Predicting Kinase Activity in Angiotensin Receptor Phosphoproteomes Based on Sequence-Motifs and Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgebo, Rikke; Horn, Heiko; Olsen, Jesper V

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in the understanding of seven-transmembrane receptor (7TMR) signalling has promoted the development of a new generation of pathway selective ligands. The angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1aR) is one of the most studied 7TMRs with respect to selective activation of the β-arrestin ......Recent progress in the understanding of seven-transmembrane receptor (7TMR) signalling has promoted the development of a new generation of pathway selective ligands. The angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1aR) is one of the most studied 7TMRs with respect to selective activation of the β...

  7. Comprehensive Analysis of Mouse Bitter Taste Receptors Reveals Different Molecular Receptive Ranges for Orthologous Receptors in Mice and Humans*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lossow, Kristina; Hübner, Sandra; Roudnitzky, Natacha; Slack, Jay P.; Pollastro, Federica; Behrens, Maik; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    One key to animal survival is the detection and avoidance of potentially harmful compounds by their bitter taste. Variable numbers of taste 2 receptor genes expressed in the gustatory end organs enable bony vertebrates (Euteleostomi) to recognize numerous bitter chemicals. It is believed that the receptive ranges of bitter taste receptor repertoires match the profiles of bitter chemicals that the species encounter in their diets. Human and mouse genomes contain pairs of orthologous bitter receptor genes that have been conserved throughout evolution. Moreover, expansions in both lineages generated species-specific sets of bitter taste receptor genes. It is assumed that the orthologous bitter taste receptor genes mediate the recognition of bitter toxins relevant for both species, whereas the lineage-specific receptors enable the detection of substances differently encountered by mice and humans. By challenging 34 mouse bitter taste receptors with 128 prototypical bitter substances in a heterologous expression system, we identified cognate compounds for 21 receptors, 19 of which were previously orphan receptors. We have demonstrated that mouse taste 2 receptors, like their human counterparts, vary greatly in their breadth of tuning, ranging from very broadly to extremely narrowly tuned receptors. However, when compared with humans, mice possess fewer broadly tuned receptors and an elevated number of narrowly tuned receptors, supporting the idea that a large receptor repertoire is the basis for the evolution of specialized receptors. Moreover, we have demonstrated that sequence-orthologous bitter taste receptors have distinct agonist profiles. Species-specific gene expansions have enabled further diversification of bitter substance recognition spectra. PMID:27226572

  8. Efficacy benefit of an NK1 receptor antagonist (NK1RA) in patients receiving carboplatin: supportive evidence with NEPA (a fixed combination of the NK1 RA, netupitant, and palonosetron) and aprepitant regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Karin; Gralla, Richard; Rizzi, Giada; Kashef, Kimia

    2016-11-01

    Antiemetic guideline recommendations are inconsistent as to whether a neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist (NK1 RA) should be administered with a 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5HT3) RA + dexamethasone (DEX) in patients receiving carboplatin. Patients receiving cisplatin routinely receive an NK1 RA-containing regimen with a resulting 14-22 % benefit in no emesis rates over a 5-HT3 RA/DEX control. Recent studies suggest a similar benefit in patients receiving carboplatin. NEPA is the first fixed antiemetic combination agent and comprises the highly selective NK1 RA, netupitant, and pharmacologically distinct 5-HT3 RA, palonosetron (PALO). This paper presents the efficacy of NEPA in the subset of patients receiving carboplatin in a phase 3 trial (NCT01376297), in the context of aprepitant (APR) data in the carboplatin setting. One hundred ninety-six patients (47 % of all study patients: n = 145 NEPA + DEX; n = 51 APR + PALO + DEX) received carboplatin in a multinational, double-blind, randomized phase 3 study. Complete response (CR: no emesis/rescue) and no significant nausea (NSN: score ≤25 on 100 mm visual analog scale) rates were calculated. Cycle 1-4 overall (0-120 h) CR rates were similar for NEPA (80, 91, 92, and 93 %) and APR (82, 88, 88, and 90 %). Overall NSN rates were also similar (NEPA 84-96 %; APR 82-90 %). Response rates for NEPA and APR regimens were similar and consistent with prior studies evaluating the contribution of adding NK1 RAs in patients receiving carboplatin. Considering such evidence, guideline groups/practitioners should consider giving a NK1 RA antiemetic triplet in patients receiving carboplatin.

  9. Class I Cytokine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinocher, Helena

    The members of the class I cytokine receptor family are involved in a wide range of cellular processes and of high pharmaceutical importance, however, even though the transmembrane receptors have been studied for decades, it has not been fully elucidated yet, how these receptors induce their intr......The members of the class I cytokine receptor family are involved in a wide range of cellular processes and of high pharmaceutical importance, however, even though the transmembrane receptors have been studied for decades, it has not been fully elucidated yet, how these receptors induce...... their intracellular response. The overall goal of this thesis was to improve the understanding of class I cytokine receptor activation and regulation at an atomic level. Two members of the class I cytokine receptor family, the human growth hormone receptor (hGHR), and the human erythropoietin receptor (hEPOR) have...... the traptamers on the hEPOR TMD dimeric complex in detergent micelles. To gain a better understanding of hGHR regulation a point mutation in the hGHR intracellular domain (ICD), which has recently been linked to lung cancer, was characterized. The mutation was found to decrease binding of suppressor of cytokine...

  10. GABA receptor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Doo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABA{sub A}-receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABA{sub B}-receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABA{sub A}-receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABA{sub A}-receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with {sup 11}C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, {sup 18}F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome {sup 11}C's short half-life. {sup 18}F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '1{sup 1}C-FMZ PET instead of {sup 18}F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABA{sub A} receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas.

  11. Supporting Families to Support Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John; Rossen, Eric; Cowan, Katherine C.

    2018-01-01

    Collaboration between students' families and the school is an essential component to promoting student mental and behavioral health. Many schools structure their mental health services using a Multi-Tiered System of Supports that offers three different tiers of support from universal supports to personalized help for students with serious…

  12. "Assessment of human AT1 Binding Affinity of Some Novel 2-alkylthio-1-[4-(N-α-ethoxycarbonyl-nzylaminobenzyl-5-hydroxymethylimidazoles "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Badakhshannoory

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Antagonists of various components of the renin-angiotensin system have been the subject of many studies for the control of blood pressure. Compounds with a phenoxyphenylacetic acid moiety that mimic the structure of losartan which is a powerful competitive antagonist of angiotensin receptor, have shown to be effective. In this study, the affinity of some 2-alkylthio-1-[4-(N-α-ethoxycarbonylbenzylaminobenzyl]-5-hydroxymethyl imidazoles for the human AT1 receptor was assessed in a radioligand binding assay. It was found that an alkyl chain of appropriate length would be most suitable if situated on the imidazole ring. Furthermore, variations of the lower phenyl rings demonstrated that introduction of a methyl group in this position will account for the most desired effect.

  13. Associations of common variants at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) with breast cancer risk and heterogeneity by tumor subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueroa, Jonine D; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Humphreys, Manjeet

    2011-01-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) as breast cancer susceptibility loci. The initial GWAS suggested stronger effects for both loci for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors. Using data from the Breast Cancer As...

  14. Further observations on an intratubercular sensory receptor of Schistosoma mattheei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, F J; Hamilton-Attwell, V L; Tiedt, L; Du Preez, L

    1986-12-01

    A structure, presumably a sensory receptor in the nippled tubercles of Schistosoma mattheei, previously observed by scanning electron microscopy, was studied further by light and transmission electron microscopy. The results obtained by differential staining indicate that this structure does, in fact, consist of nervous tissue, and this provides additional evidence to support the sensory receptor hypothesis.

  15. BALLOON SUPPORT,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two instrument bearing arrays were supported by balloons on the Double Tracks event. One large balloon supported a 750-foot high by 1,500-foot wide...array at 2,500 feet downwind from ground zero, and 8 small evenly spaced balloons supported instruments up to 1,000 feet high over a 7,500foot wide...area at 13,000 feet downwind from ground zero. Air samplers, cascade impactors, and sticky cylinders were supported by the arrays. The balloons used for

  16. [Nuclear receptors PPARalpha].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soska, V

    2006-06-01

    Mechanism of the fibrates action is mediated by nuclear PPARalpha receptors (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor). These receptors regulate a number of genes that are involved both in lipids and lipoproteins metabolism and other mediators (e.g. inflammatory mediatores). Due to PPARalpha activation by fibrates, triglycerides and small dense LDL concentration is decreased, HDL cholesterol is increased and both inflammation and prothrombotic status are reduced. These effects are very important in patients with metabolic syndrom.

  17. ventilatory support

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kinfu Betemariam, Gebreyesus Hagos. Abstract. Background: Mechanical Ventilation is a supportive measure for patients who are in respiratory failure. Objective: Designed to identify the commonest pathology responsible for admission to the unit for mechanical respiratory support. Method: A prospective case study ...

  18. Single-Frequency Semiconductor Lasers Operating at 1.5 and 2.0 microns Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — While conventional injection seeding sources (such as DFB diode lasers and rare-earth doped solid-state microchip lasers) are available at 1.5 microns, these sources...

  19. Narrow Wavelength, Frequency Modulated Source at 1.5 Wavelength Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ultrastable, narrow linewidth, tunable, high reliability sources at 1.5 or 2mm are needed for high performance LIDARs for several NASA applications, including wind...

  20. A novel human gene encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR15) is located on chromosome 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiber, M.; Marchese, A.; O`Dowd, B.F. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1996-03-05

    We used sequence similarities among G-protein-coupled receptor genes to discover a novel receptor gene. Using primers based on conserved regions of the opioid-related receptors, we isolated a PCR product that was used to locate the full-length coding region of a novel human receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor encoded by GPR15 with other receptors revealed that it shared sequence identity with the angiotensin II AT1 and AT2 receptors, the interleukin 8b receptor, and the orphan receptors GPR1 and AGTL1. GPR15 was mapped to human chromosome 3q11.2-q13.1. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Dielectron spectroscopy at 1-2 AGeV with HADES⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spataro, S.; Agakishiev, G.; Agodi, C.; Balanda, A.; Bellia, G.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A.; Blanco, A.; Böhmer, M.; Boyard, J. L.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Cabanelas, P.; Castro, E.; Chernenko, S.; Christ, T.; Destefanis, M.; Díaz, J.; Dohrmann, F.; Dybczak, A.; Eberl, T.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fonte, P.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Gil, A.; Gilardi, C.; Golubeva, M.; González-Díaz, D.; Grosse, E.; Guber, F.; Heilmann, M.; Hennino, T.; Holzmann, R.; Ierusalimov, A.; Iori, I.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Kanaki, K.; Karavicheva, T.; Kirschner, D.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Kotte, R.; Kozuch, A.; Krása, A.; Krizek, F.; Krücken, R.; Kühn, W.; Kugler, A.; Kurepin, A.; Lamas-Valverde, J.; Lang, S.; Lange, J. S.; Lapidus, K.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Marín, J.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Micel, J.; Michalska, B.; Mishra, D.; Morinière, E.; Mousa, J.; Müntz, C.; Naumann, L.; Novotny, R.; Otwinowski, J.; Pachmayer, Y. C.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Pérez Cavalcanti, T.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramstein, B.; Reshetin, A.; Roy-Stephan, M.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Sailer, B.; Salabura, P.; Schmah, A.; Simon, R.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spruck, B.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Sturm, C.; Sudol, M.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Trebacz, R.; Tsertos, H.; Veretenkin, I.; Wagner, V.; Wen, H.; Wisniowski, M.; Wojcik, T.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Yurevich, S.; Zanevsky, Y.; Zhou, P.; Zumbruch, P.

    2008-11-01

    The HADES spectrometer at GSI (Darmstadt) is investigating the e + e - pair production in p+p, p+ A and A+ A collisions. In this contribution we would like to highlight the physics motivations and the experiments performed so far, focusing mainly on the first results coming from 12C + 12C collisions at 1 and 2AGeV, and on preliminary results from p+ p/ d+ p collisions at 1.25AGeV.

  2. Crosslinking photosensitized by a ruthenium chelate as a tool for labeling and topographical studies of G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duroux-Richard, Isabelle; Vassault, Philippe; Subra, Guy; Guichou, Jean-François; Richard, Eric; Mouillac, Bernard; Barberis, Claude; Marie, Jacky; Bonnafous, Jean-Claude

    2005-01-01

    The purpose was to apply oxidative crosslinking reactions to the study of recognition and signaling mechanisms associated to G-protein-coupled receptors. Using a ruthenium chelate, Ru(bipy)(3)(2+), as photosensitizer and visible light irradiation, in the presence of ammonium persulfate, we performed fast and efficient covalent labeling of the B(2) bradykinin receptor by agonist or antagonist ligands possessing a radio-iodinated phenol moiety. The chemical and topographical specificities of these crosslinking experiments were investigated. The strategy could also be applied to the covalent labeling of the B(1) bradykinin receptor, the AT(1) angiotensin II receptor, the V(1a) vasopressin receptor and the oxytocin receptor. Interestingly, we demonstrated the possibility to covalently label the AT(1) and B(2) receptors with functionalized ligands. The potential applications of metal-chelate chemistry to receptor structural and signaling studies through intramolecular or intermolecular crosslinking are presented.

  3. Histamine H2 receptor - Involvement in gastric ulceration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, P. A.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Brown, T. H.

    1976-01-01

    The involvement of the H1 and H2 receptors for histamine in the pathogenesis of gastric ulcers was investigated in rats. Metiamide, an H2 receptor antagonist, reliably reduced ulceration produced by stress alone or by a combination of stress and aspirin. In contrast, pyrilamine, which blocks only the H1 receptor, was without effect under these same conditions. The results support the hypothesis that histamine mediates both stress and stress plus aspirin induced ulceration by a mechanism involving the H2 receptor.

  4. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad eKhanfar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®, the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures.

  5. Efficacy Trial of a Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Depression Prevention Program for High-Risk Adolescents: Effects at 1- and 2-Year Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Gau, Jeff M.; Wade, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of a brief group cognitive-behavioral (CB) depression prevention program for high-risk adolescents with elevated depressive symptoms at 1- and 2-year follow-up. Method: In this indicated prevention trial, 341 at-risk youths were randomized to a group CB intervention, group supportive expressive intervention, CB…

  6. Identification of Distinct Conformations of the Angiotensin-II Type 1 Receptor Associated with the Gq/11 Protein Pathway and the β-Arrestin Pathway Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabana, Jérôme; Holleran, Brian; Leduc, Richard; Escher, Emanuel; Guillemette, Gaétan; Lavigne, Pierre

    2015-06-19

    Biased signaling represents the ability of G protein-coupled receptors to engage distinct pathways with various efficacies depending on the ligand used or on mutations in the receptor. The angiotensin-II type 1 (AT1) receptor, a prototypical class A G protein-coupled receptor, can activate various effectors upon stimulation with the endogenous ligand angiotensin-II (AngII), including the Gq/11 protein and β-arrestins. It is believed that the activation of those two pathways can be associated with distinct conformations of the AT1 receptor. To verify this hypothesis, microseconds of molecular dynamics simulations were computed to explore the conformational landscape sampled by the WT-AT1 receptor, the N111G-AT1 receptor (constitutively active and biased for the Gq/11 pathway), and the D74N-AT1 receptor (biased for the β-arrestin1 and -2 pathways) in their apo-forms and in complex with AngII. The molecular dynamics simulations of the AngII-WT-AT1, N111G-AT1, and AngII-N111G-AT1 receptors revealed specific structural rearrangements compared with the initial and ground state of the receptor. Simulations of the D74N-AT1 receptor revealed that the mutation stabilizes the receptor in the initial ground state. The presence of AngII further stabilized the ground state of the D74N-AT1 receptor. The biased agonist [Sar(1),Ile(8)]AngII also showed a preference for the ground state of the WT-AT1 receptor compared with AngII. These results suggest that activation of the Gq/11 pathway is associated with a specific conformational transition stabilized by the agonist, whereas the activation of the β-arrestin pathway is linked to the stabilization of the ground state of the receptor. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Structure of acid-sensing ion channel 1 at 1.9 A resolution and low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasti, Jayasankar; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Gonzales, Eric B; Gouaux, Eric

    2007-09-20

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are voltage-independent, proton-activated receptors that belong to the epithelial sodium channel/degenerin family of ion channels and are implicated in perception of pain, ischaemic stroke, mechanosensation, learning and memory. Here we report the low-pH crystal structure of a chicken ASIC1 deletion mutant at 1.9 A resolution. Each subunit of the chalice-shaped homotrimer is composed of short amino and carboxy termini, two transmembrane helices, a bound chloride ion and a disulphide-rich, multidomain extracellular region enriched in acidic residues and carboxyl-carboxylate pairs within 3 A, suggesting that at least one carboxyl group bears a proton. Electrophysiological studies on aspartate-to-asparagine mutants confirm that these carboxyl-carboxylate pairs participate in proton sensing. Between the acidic residues and the transmembrane pore lies a disulphide-rich 'thumb' domain poised to couple the binding of protons to the opening of the ion channel, thus demonstrating that proton activation involves long-range conformational changes.

  8. Genetic variants of dopamine D2 receptor impact heterodimerization with dopamine D1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błasiak, Ewa; Łukasiewicz, Sylwia; Szafran-Pilch, Kinga; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, Marta

    2017-04-01

    The human dopamine D2 receptor gene has three polymorphic variants that alter its amino acid sequence: alanine substitution by valine in position 96 (V96A), proline substitution by serine in position 310 (P310S) and serine substitution by cysteine in position 311 (S311C). Their functional role has never been the object of extensive studies, even though there is some evidence that their occurrence correlates with schizophrenia. The HEK293 cell line was transfected with dopamine D1 and D2 receptors (or genetic variants of the D2 receptor), coupled to fluorescent proteins which allowed us to measure the extent of dimerization of these receptors, using a highly advanced biophysical approach (FLIM-FRET). Additionally, Fluoro-4 AM was used to examine changes in the level of calcium release after ligand stimulation of cells expressing different combinations of dopamine receptors. Using FLIM-FRET experiments we have shown that in HEK 293 expressing dopamine receptors, polymorphic mutations in the D2 receptor play a role in dimmer formation with the dopamine D1 receptor. The association level of dopamine receptors is affected by ligand administration, with variable effects depending on polymorphic variant of the D2 dopamine receptor. We have found that the level of heteromer formation is reflected by calcium ion release after ligand stimulation and have observed variations of this effect dependent on the polymorphic variant and the ligand. The data presented in this paper support the hypothesis on the role of calcium signaling regulated by the D1-D2 heteromer which may be of relevance for schizophrenia etiology. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydrocarbon molar water solubility predicts NMDA vs. GABAA receptor modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Robert J; Pham, Trung L

    2014-11-19

    Many anesthetics modulate 3-transmembrane (such as NMDA) and 4-transmembrane (such as GABAA) receptors. Clinical and experimental anesthetics exhibiting receptor family specificity often have low water solubility. We hypothesized that the molar water solubility of a hydrocarbon could be used to predict receptor modulation in vitro. GABAA (α1β2γ2s) or NMDA (NR1/NR2A) receptors were expressed in oocytes and studied using standard two-electrode voltage clamp techniques. Hydrocarbons from 14 different organic functional groups were studied at saturated concentrations, and compounds within each group differed only by the carbon number at the ω-position or within a saturated ring. An effect on GABAA or NMDA receptors was defined as a 10% or greater reversible current change from baseline that was statistically different from zero. Hydrocarbon moieties potentiated GABAA and inhibited NMDA receptor currents with at least some members from each functional group modulating both receptor types. A water solubility cut-off for NMDA receptors occurred at 1.1 mM with a 95% CI = 0.45 to 2.8 mM. NMDA receptor cut-off effects were not well correlated with hydrocarbon chain length or molecular volume. No cut-off was observed for GABAA receptors within the solubility range of hydrocarbons studied. Hydrocarbon modulation of NMDA receptor function exhibits a molar water solubility cut-off. Differences between unrelated receptor cut-off values suggest that the number, affinity, or efficacy of protein-hydrocarbon interactions at these sites likely differ.

  10. Glutamate receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine Byskov; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Bunch, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    The neurotransmitter (S)-glutamate [(S)-Glu] is responsible for most of the excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The effect of (S)-Glu is mediated by both ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. Glutamate receptor agonists are generally a-amino acids with one or more...... stereogenic centers due to strict requirements in the agonist binding pocket of the activated state of the receptor. By contrast, there are many examples of achiral competitive antagonists. The present review addresses how stereochemistry affects the activity of glutamate receptor ligands. The review focuses...... mainly on agonists and discusses stereochemical and conformational considerations as well as biostructural knowledge of the agonist binding pockets, which is useful in the design of glutamate receptor agonists. Examples are chosen to demonstrate how stereochemistry not only determines how the agonist...

  11. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (A1166C) gene polymorphism in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    angiotensin system (RAS) is likely to contribute for its heterogenous association in renal diseased patients. Among the candidate genes of RAS, angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene polymorphism (AT1R A1166C) seems to be particularly ...

  12. Supporting Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is the supporting information for the journal article. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Rankin, K., S. Mabury, T. Jenkins, and J....

  13. Supporting Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Supporting Information. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Washington , J., T. Jenkins, and E. Weber. Identification of Unsaturated and 2H...

  14. Supporting Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Supporting Info. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Washington , J., and T. Jenkins. Abiotic Hydrolysis of Fluorotelomer-Based Polymers as a...

  15. Lipophorin Receptor: The Insect Lipoprotein Receptor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    five structural and functional domains, which are discussed here. (Figure 1). Figure 1. Structure of lipophorin receptor. 3 Vitellogenesis: The process by which the yolk is formed and accumulated in the ovum as a source of nutrients for the egg development. Vitellogenin and lipophorin are the major yolk pro- tein precursors in ...

  16. C-type lectin receptors and RIG-I-like receptors: new points on the oncogenomics map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzhalin AE

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Anton G Kutikhin, Arseniy E YuzhalinDepartment of Epidemiology, Kemerovo State Medical Academy, Kemerovo, Russian FederationAbstract: The group of pattern recognition receptors includes families of Toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors, C-type lectin receptors, and RIG-I-like receptors. They are key sensors for a number of infectious agents, some of which are oncogenic, and they launch an immune response against them, normally promoting their eradication. Inherited variations in genes encoding these receptors and proteins and their signaling pathways may affect their function, possibly modulating cancer risk and features of cancer progression. There are numerous studies investigating the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms within or near genes encoding Toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors, cancer risk, and features of cancer progression. However, there is an almost total absence of articles analyzing the correlation between polymorphisms of genes encoding C-type lectin receptors and RIG-I-like receptors and cancer risk or progression. Nevertheless, there is some evidence supporting the hypothesis that inherited C-type lectin receptor and RIG-I-like receptor variants can be associated with increased cancer risk. Certain C-type lectin receptors and RIG-I-like receptors recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns of potentially oncogenic infectious agents, and certain polymorphisms of genes encoding C-type lectin receptors and RIG-I-like receptors may have functional consequences at the molecular level that can lead to association of such single nucleotide polymorphisms with risk or progression of some diseases that may modulate cancer risk, so these gene polymorphisms may affect cancer risk indirectly. Polymorphisms of genes encoding C-type lectin receptors and RIG-I-like receptors thereby may be correlated with a risk of lung, oral, esophageal, gastric, colorectal, and liver cancer, as well as nasopharyngeal carcinoma

  17. Does protein binding modulate the effect of angiotensin II receptor antagonists?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc P Maillard

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionAngiotensin II AT 1-receptor antagonists are highly bound to plasma proteins (≥ 99%. With some antagonists, such as DuP-532, the protein binding was such that no efficacy of the drug could be demonstrated clinically. Whether protein binding interferes with the efficacy of other antagonists is not known. We have therefore investigated in vitro how plasma proteins may affect the antagonistic effect of different AT1-receptor antagonists.MethodsA radio-receptor binding assay was used to analyse the interaction between proteins and the ability of various angiotensin II (Ang II antagonists to block AT1-receptors. In addition, the Biacore technology, a new technique which enables the real-time monitoring of binding events between two molecules, was used to evaluate the dissociation rate constants of five AT1-receptor antagonists from human serum albumin.ResultsThe in vitro AT 1-antagonistic effects of different Ang II receptor antagonists were differentially affected by the presence of human plasma, with rightward shifts of the IC50 ranging from one to several orders of magnitude. The importance of the shift correlates with the dissociation rate constants of these drugs from albumin. Our experiments also show that the way that AT1-receptor antagonists bind to proteins differs from one compound to another. These results suggest that the interaction with plasma proteins appears to modulate the efficacy of some Ang II antagonists.ConclusionAlthough the high binding level of Ang II receptor antagonist to plasma proteins appears to be a feature common to this class of compounds, the kinetics and characteristics of this binding is of great importance. With some antagonists, protein binding interferes markedly with their efficacy to block AT1-receptors.

  18. Endothelial necrosis at 1h post-burn predicts progression of tissue injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirth, Douglas; McClain, Steve A.; Singer, Adam J.; Clark, Richard A.F.

    2013-01-01

    Burn injury progression has not been well characterized at the cellular level. To define burn injury progression in terms of cell death, histopathologic spatiotemporal relationships of cellular necrosis and apoptosis were investigated in a validated porcine model of vertical burn injury progression. Cell necrosis was identified by High Mobility Group Box 1 protein and apoptosis by Caspase 3a staining of tissue samples taken 1h, 24h and 7 days post-burn. Level of endothelial cell necrosis at 1h was predictive of level of apoptosis at 24h (Pearson's r=0.87) and of level of tissue necrosis at 7 days (Pearson's r=0.87). Furthermore, endothelial cell necrosis was deeper than interstitial cell necrosis at 1h (pnecrosis at 1h divided the zone of injury progression (Jackson's zone of stasis) into an upper subzone with necrotic endothelial cells and initially viable adnexal and interstitial cells at 1h that progressed to necrosis by 24h, and a lower zone with initially viable endothelial cells at 1h, but necrosis and apoptosis of all cell types by 24h. Importantly, this spatiotemporal series of events and rapid progression resembles myocardial infarction and stroke, and implicates mechanisms of these injuries, ischemia, ischemia reperfusion, and programmed cell death, in burn progression. PMID:23627744

  19. Radio variability in complete samples of extragalactic radio sources at 1.4 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rys, S.; Machalski, J.

    1990-09-01

    Complete samples of extragalactic radio sources obtained in 1970-1975 and the sky survey of Condon and Broderick (1983) were used to select sources variable at 1.4 GHz, and to investigate the characteristics of variability in the whole population of sources at this frequency. The radio structures, radio spectral types, and optical identifications of the selected variables are discussed. Only compact flat-spectrum sources vary at 1.4 GHz, and all but four are identified with QSOs, BL Lacs, or other (unconfirmed spectroscopically) stellar objects. No correlation of degree of variability at 1.4 GHz with Galactic latitude or variability at 408 MHz has been found, suggesting that most of the 1.4-GHz variability is intrinsic and not caused by refractive scintillations. Numerical models of the variability have been computed.

  20. Nonmelanoma skin cancer treated with electronic brachytherapy: results at 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Ajay

    2013-01-01

    We report clinical outcomes at 1 year or more after high-dose-rate (HDR) electronic brachytherapy (EBT) using surface applicators for the treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC). From July 2009 to April 2012, 122 patients with 171 NMSC lesions were treated with EBT to a dose of 40Gy in eight fractions, delivered twice weekly. At followup, patients were assessed for acute and late toxicities, cosmesis, and local control. Treatment of 171 lesions was completed in 122 patients with a mean age 73 years. There have been no recurrences to date with a mean followup of 10 months (range, 1-28 months). Followup data at 1 year or more were available for 46 lesions in 42 patients. Hypopigmentation (all Grade 1) was present in 5 (10.9%) of 46 lesions at 1 year. Other late effects at 1 year included dry desquamation, alopecia, and rash dermatitis, which occurred in 1 (2.2%), 1 (2.2%), and 3 (6.5%) of 46 lesions, respectively. No Grade 3 or higher adverse events were observed at any time point. Cosmesis was evaluated at 1 year for 42 of 46 lesions and was excellent for 39 (92.9%) and good for 3 (7.1%) of the 42 evaluable lesions. Treatment of NMSC with HDR EBT using surface applicators was effective with no recurrences, good to excellent cosmesis, and acceptable toxicities at 1 year or more after treatment. HDR EBT provides a convenient nonsurgical treatment option for NMSC patients. Copyright © 2013 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantitative phosphoproteomics dissection of 7TM receptor signaling using full and biased agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Gitte Lund; Kelstrup, Christian; Lyngsø, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) signal through the well described heterotrimeric G proteins, but can also activate G protein-independent signaling pathways of which the impact and complexity are less understood. The Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is a prototypical 7TMR and an importa...

  2. Dissociated incretin response to oral glucose at 1 year after restrictive vs. malabsorptive bariatric surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldstrand, M; Ahrén, B; Näslund, E

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Compare the response to oral glucose of the two incretin hormones, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) at 1 year after restrictive vs. malabsorptive bariatric surgery. METHODS: Vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG, n = 7) or jejunoileal bypass...... = 0.007). CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that at 1 year after bariatric surgery, the two incretins show dissociated responses in that the GIP secretion is higher after VBG whereas GLP-1 secretion is higher after JIB. This dissociated incretin response is independent from reduction in body weight, glucose...

  3. Determination of the exact molecular requirements for type 1 angiotensin receptor epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicola J; Chan, Hsiu-Wen; Qian, Hongwei; Bourne, Allison M; Hannan, Katherine M; Warner, Fiona J; Ritchie, Rebecca H; Pearson, Richard B; Hannan, Ross D; Thomas, Walter G

    2011-05-01

    Major interest surrounds how angiotensin II triggers cardiac hypertrophy via epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation. G protein-mediated transduction, angiotensin type 1 receptor phosphorylation at tyrosine 319, and β-arrestin-dependent scaffolding have been suggested, yet the mechanism remains controversial. We examined these pathways in the most reductionist model of cardiomyocyte growth, neonatal ventricular cardiomyocytes. Analysis with [(32)P]-labeled cardiomyocytes, wild-type and [Y319A] angiotensin type 1 receptor immunoprecipitation and phosphorimaging, phosphopeptide analysis, and antiphosphotyrosine blotting provided no evidence for tyrosine phosphorylation at Y319 or indeed of the receptor, and mutation of Y319 (to A/F) did not prevent either epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation in COS-7 cells or cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Instead, we demonstrate that transactivation and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy are completely abrogated by loss of G-protein coupling, whereas a constitutively active angiotensin type 1 receptor mutant was sufficient to trigger transactivation and growth in the absence of ligand. These results were supported by the failure of the β-arrestin-biased ligand SII angiotensin II to transactivate epidermal growth factor receptor or promote hypertrophy, whereas a β-arrestin-uncoupled receptor retained these properties. We also found angiotensin II-mediated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy to be attenuated by a disintegrin and metalloprotease inhibition. Thus, G-protein coupling, and not Y319 phosphorylation or β-arrestin scaffolding, is required for epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via the angiotensin type 1 receptor.

  4. SGIP1 alters internalization and modulates signaling of activated cannabinoid receptor 1 in a biased manner

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájková, Alena; Techlovská, Šárka; Dvořáková, Michaela; Chambers, Jayne Nicole; Kumpošt, Jiří; Hubálková, Pavla; Prezeau, L.; Blahoš, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 107, léto (2016), s. 201-214 ISSN 0028-3908 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP303/12/2408 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Seven transmembrane receptors * G-protein coupled receptors * Cannabinoid receptor 1 * Protein-protein interactions * Bias signaling * Receptor endocytosis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.012, year: 2016

  5. Serotonin Receptors in Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berumen, Laura Cristina; Rodríguez, Angelina; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is an ancient molecular signal and a recognized neurotransmitter brainwide distributed with particular presence in hippocampus. Almost all serotonin receptor subtypes are expressed in hippocampus, which implicates an intricate modulating system, considering that they can be localized as autosynaptic, presynaptic, and postsynaptic receptors, even colocalized within the same cell and being target of homo- and heterodimerization. Neurons and glia, including immune cells, integrate a functional network that uses several serotonin receptors to regulate their roles in this particular part of the limbic system. PMID:22629209

  6. Glutamate receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldbrandt, Mette; Johansen, Tommy N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Homologation and substitution on the carbon backbone of (S)-glutamic acid [(S)-Glu, 1], as well as absolute stereochemistry, are structural parameters of key importance for the pharmacological profile of (S)-Glu receptor ligands. We describe a series of methyl-substituted 2-aminoadipic acid (AA.......g., IC(50) = 300 microM for (2R,4S)-4-methyl-AA (5d)]. The two unsaturated analogs (S)- (7a) and (R)-(E)-Delta(4)-5-methyl-AA (7b) turned out to be a weak AMPA receptor agonist and a weak mixed NMDA/AMPA receptor antagonist, respectively....

  7. AMPA receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Mellor, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPAR), subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs), mediate fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS), and are involved in many neurological disorders, as well as being a key player...... polyamines are known to modulate the function of these receptors in vivo. In this study, recent developments in the medicinal chemistry of polyamine-based ligands are given, particularly focusing on the use of solid-phase synthesis (SPS) as a tool for the facile generation of libraries of polyamine toxin...

  8. Cold Test Results of the LARP HQ Nb3Sn Quadrupole Magnet at 1.9 K

    CERN Document Server

    Bajas, H; Anerella, M; Bajko, M; Bossert, R; Caspi, S; Chiuchiolo, A; Chlachidze, G; Dietderich, D; Dunkel, O; Felice, H; Ferracin, P; Feuvrier, J; Fiscarelli, L; Ghosh, A; Giloux, C; Godeke, A; Hafalia, A; Marchevsky, M; Russenschuck, S; Sabbi, G; Salmi, T; Schmalzle, J; Todesco, E; Wanderer, P; Wang, X; Yu, M

    2013-01-01

    The HQ magnet is a 120 mm aperture, 1-meter-long Nb3Sn quadrupole developed by the LARP collaboration in support of the High-Luminosity LHC project. Several tests were performed at LBNL in 2010-2011 achieving a maximum gradient of 170 T/m at 4.4 K. As a next step in the program, the latest model (HQ01e) was sent to CERN for testing at 1.9 K. As part of this test campaign, the magnet training has been done up to a maximum current of 16.2 kA corresponding to 85 % of the short sample limit. The ramp rate dependence of the quench current is also identified. The efficiency of the quench heaters is then studied at 4.2 K and at 1.9 K. The analyses of the magnet resistance evolution during fast current discharge showed evidence of quench whereas high energy quenches have been successfully achieved and sustained with no dump resistor.

  9. Cellular Imaging at 1.5 T: Detecting Cells in Neuroinflammation using Active Labeling with Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman J. Oweida

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability to visualize cell infiltration in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a well-known animal model for multiple sclerosis in humans, was investigated using a clinical 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scanner, a custom-built, high-strength gradient coil insert, a 3-D fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA imaging sequence and a superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO contrast agent. An “active labeling” approach was used with SPIO administered intravenously during inflammation in EAE. Our results show that small, discrete regions of signal void corresponding to iron accumulation in EAE brain can be detected using FIESTA at 1.5 T. This work provides early evidence that cellular abnormalities that are the basis of diseases can be probed using cellular MRI and supports our earlier work which indicates that tracking of iron-labeled cells will be possible using clinical MR scanners.

  10. Status Report on UH/ALOHA Participation in the ATS-1 Computer Communications Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, David W.

    Current developments in an experiment on Computer Communications via the ATS-1 geosynchronous satellite are described. Initiated by the Spacecraft Data Systems Branch of the Ames Research Center, NASA, this experiment is designed to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing satellite communication links to provide computer-computer and…

  11. A new putative plasmodesmata-associated protein, At1g19190, in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-30

    fluorescent wild-type was absent during AtRGP2 grafting. At1g19190 ... tobacco and its Arabidopsis thaliana PAPK homolog. (PAPK1) (Lee et al., 2005), ... binding proteins (PDCBs) (Simpson et al., 2009). Micrografting methods for ...

  12. Evidence for Heterodimerization and Functional Interaction of the Angiotensin Type 2 Receptor and the Receptor MAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Julia; Villela, Daniel C; Teichmann, Anke; Münter, Lisa-Marie; Mayer, Magnus C; Mardahl, Maibritt; Kirsch, Sebastian; Namsolleck, Pawel; Lucht, Kristin; Benz, Verena; Alenina, Natalia; Daniell, Nicholas; Horiuchi, Masatsugu; Iwai, Masaru; Multhaup, Gerhard; Schülein, Ralf; Bader, Michael; Santos, Robson A; Unger, Thomas; Steckelings, Ulrike Muscha

    2017-06-01

    The angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) and the receptor MAS are receptors of the protective arm of the renin-angiotensin system. They mediate strikingly similar actions. Moreover, in various studies, AT2R antagonists blocked the effects of MAS agonists and vice versa. Such cross-inhibition may indicate heterodimerization of these receptors. Therefore, this study investigated the molecular and functional interplay between MAS and the AT2R. Molecular interactions were assessed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and by cross correlation spectroscopy in human embryonic kidney-293 cells transfected with vectors encoding fluorophore-tagged MAS or AT2R. Functional interaction of AT2R and MAS was studied in astrocytes with CX3C chemokine receptor-1 messenger RNA expression as readout. Coexpression of fluorophore-tagged AT2R and MAS resulted in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency of 10.8 ± 0.8%, indicating that AT2R and MAS are capable to form heterodimers. Heterodimerization was verified by competition experiments using untagged AT2R and MAS. Specificity of dimerization of AT2R and MAS was supported by lack of dimerization with the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily C-member 6. Dimerization of the AT2R was abolished when it was mutated at cysteine residue 35. AT2R and MAS stimulation with the respective agonists, Compound 21 or angiotensin-(1-7), significantly induced CX3C chemokine receptor-1 messenger RNA expression. Effects of each agonist were blocked by an AT2R antagonist (PD123319) and also by a MAS antagonist (A-779). Knockout of a single of these receptors made astrocytes unresponsive for both agonists. Our results suggest that MAS and the AT2R form heterodimers and that-at least in astrocytes-both receptors functionally depend on each other. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Respiratory Support

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    can be caused by inappropriate mechanical ventilation. This soft-cover review of the current practice of appropriate respiratory support is not controversia(it describes in an easily readable and concise fashio-n the development, physiological implications, mechanical and technological basis, safety aspects and careful ...

  14. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    maximilien brice

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator.

  15. Cognitive domain deficits in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage at 1 year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, George Kwok Chu; Lam, Sandy Wai; Ngai, Karine; Wong, Adrian; Siu, Deyond; Poon, Wai Sang; Mok, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Background Cognitive domain deficits can occur after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) though few studies systemically evaluate its impact on 1-year outcomes. Objective We aimed to evaluate the pattern and functional outcome impact of cognitive domain deficits in aSAH patients at 1 year. Methods We carried out a prospective observational study in Hong Kong, during which, 168 aSAH patients (aged 21–75 years and had been admitted within 96 h of ictus) were recruited over a 26-month period. The cognitive function was assessed by a domain-specific neuropsychological assessment battery at 1 year after ictus. The current study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov of the US National Institutes of Health (NCT01038193). Results Prevalence of individual domain deficits varied between 7% to 15%, and 13% had two or more domain deficits. After adjusting for abbreviated National Institute of Health Stroke Scale and Geriatric Depressive Scale scores, unfavourable outcome (Modified Rankin Scale 3–5) and dependent instrumental activity of daily living (Lawton Instrumental Activity of Daily Living<15) were significantly associated with two or more domain deficits and number of cognitive domain deficits at 1 year. Two or more domain deficits was independently associated with age (OR, 1.1; 95% CI 1.1 to 1.2; p<0.001) and delayed cerebral infarction (OR, 6.1; 95% CI 1.1 to 33.5; p=0.036), after adjustment for years of school education. Interpretation In patients with aSAH, cognitive domain deficits worsened functional outcomes at 1 year. Delayed cerebral infarction was an independent risk factor for two or more domain deficits at 1 year. PMID:23606736

  16. Receptors for anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itsikson, N A; Chupakhin, O N [I. Ya. Postovsky Institute of Organic Synthesis, Urals Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Morzherin, Yu Yu; Matern, A I [B N Yeltsin Urals State Technical University - UPI (Russian Federation)

    2008-09-30

    The published data on receptors for anions with different geometry are generalised. Special attention is given to the analysis of binding abilities of organic ligands. Structural features of complex-forming agents and their properties are considered.

  17. Somatostatin receptor skintigrafi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karin; Nielsen, Jørn Theil; Rehling, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) is a very valuable imaging technique for visualisation of a diversity of neuroendocrine tumours. The sensitivity for localisation of carcinoid tumours is high, but somewhat lower for other neuroendocrine tumours. The methodology, multiple clinical aspects...

  18. Role of angiotensin II and vasopressin receptors within the supraoptic nucleus in water and sodium intake induced by the injection of angiotensin II into the medial septal area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antunes V.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the effects of the injection into the supraoptic nucleus (SON of non-peptide AT1- and AT2-angiotensin II (ANG II receptor antagonists, DuP753 and PD123319, as well as of the arginine-vasopressin (AVP receptor antagonist d(CH25-Tyr(Me-AVP, on water and 3% NaCl intake induced by the injection of ANG II into the medial septal area (MSA. The effects on water or 3% NaCl intake were assessed in 30-h water-deprived or in 20-h water-deprived furosemide-treated adult male rats, respectively. The drugs were injected in 0.5 ml over 30-60 s. Controls were injected with a similar volume of 0.15 M NaCl. Antagonists were injected at doses of 20, 80 and 180 nmol. Water and sodium intake was measured over a 2-h period. Previous administration of the AT1 receptor antagonist DuP753 into the SON decreased water (65%, N = 10, P<0.01 and sodium intake (81%, N = 8, P<0.01 induced by the injection of ANG II (10 nmol into the MSA. Neither of these responses was significantly changed by injection of the AT2-receptor antagonist PD123319 into the SON. On the other hand, while there was a decrease in water intake (45%, N = 9, P<0.01, ANG II-induced sodium intake was significantly increased (70%, N = 8, P<0.01 following injection of the V1-type vasopressin antagonist d(CH25-Tyr(Me-AVP into the SON. These results suggest that both AT1 and V1 receptors within the SON may be involved in water and sodium intake induced by the activation of ANG II receptors within the MSA. Furthermore, they do not support the involvement of MSA AT2 receptors in the mediation of these responses.

  19. Selective Glucocorticoid Receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bosscher, Karolien

    2010-05-31

    The ancient two-faced Roman god Janus is often used as a metaphor to describe the characteristics of the Glucocorticoid Receptor (NR3C1), which exhibits both a beneficial side, that serves to halt inflammation, and a detrimental side responsible for undesirable effects. However, recent developments suggest that the Glucocorticoid Receptor has many more faces with the potential to express a range of different functionalities, depending on factors that include the tissue type, ligand type, receptor variants, cofactor surroundings and target gene promoters. This behavior of the receptor has made the development of safer ligands, that trigger the expression program of only a desirable subset of genes, a real challenge. Thus more knowledge-based fundamental research is needed to ensure the design and development of selective Glucocorticoid Receptor modulators capable of reaching the clinic. Recent advances in the characterization of novel selective Glucocorticoid Receptor modulators, specifically in the context of anti-inflammatory strategies, will be described in this review. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetics of Taste Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Bosak, Natalia P.; Lin, Cailu; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Reed, Danielle R.; Nelson, Theodore M.

    2016-01-01

    Taste receptors function as one of the interfaces between internal and external milieus. Taste receptors for sweet and umami (T1R [taste receptor, type 1]), bitter (T2R [taste receptor, type 2]), and salty (ENaC [epithelial sodium channel]) have been discovered in the recent years, but transduction mechanisms of sour taste and ENaC-independent salt taste are still poorly understood. In addition to these five main taste qualities, the taste system detects such noncanonical “tastes” as water, fat, and complex carbohydrates, but their reception mechanisms require further research. Variations in taste receptor genes between and within vertebrate species contribute to individual and species differences in taste-related behaviors. These variations are shaped by evolutionary forces and reflect species adaptations to their chemical environments and feeding ecology. Principles of drug discovery can be applied to taste receptors as targets in order to develop novel taste compounds to satisfy demand in better artificial sweeteners, enhancers of sugar and sodium taste, and blockers of bitterness of food ingredients and oral medications. PMID:23886383

  1. Neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists--current prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvaro, Giuseppe; Di Fabio, Romano

    2007-09-01

    The isolation of substance P (SP) in 1931, and the later discovery of its preferred neurokinin (NK)1 receptor, led to an intense research effort aimed at elucidating the biological role of SP, particularly within the central nervous system. There is now a large body of evidence to support the hypothesis that SP is one of the most important neurotransmitters and neuromodulators present in the brain. Its pharmacology has been intimately linked to the pathophysiology of several relevant neurological and psychiatric disorders, namely nociception, migraine, asthma, nausea, inflammatory bowel syndrome, urinary incontinence, anxiety and depression. This wide therapeutic potential triggered an unprecedented research effort, both preclinically and clinically, to identify appropriate NK1 receptor antagonists and transform them into effective drugs. To date, despite huge investments made by some of the largest pharmaceutical groups worldwide, aprepitant (MK-869, an anti-emetic agent) remains the only NK1 receptor antagonist on the market. Nevertheless, the 'NK1 receptor antagonist race' is not over, as witnessed by the significant number of patents and scientific publications claiming the discovery of new NK1 receptor antagonists issued in recent years. This review describes the most relevant results obtained in this field in the period 2005 to 2006.

  2. Supporting members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Life Supporting Members L. Thomas Aldrich Thomas D. Barrow Hugh J . A. Chivers Allan V. Cox Samuel S. Goldich Pembroke J. Hart A. Ivan Johnson Helmut E. Landsberg Paolo Lanzano Murli H. Manghnani L. L. Nettleton Charles B. Officer Hyman Orlin Ned A. Ostenso Erick O. Schonstedt Waldo E. Smith Athelstan Spilhaus A. F. Spilhaus, Jr. John W. Townsend, Jr. James A. Van Allen Leonard W. Weis Charles A. Whitten J. Tuzo Wilson

  3. SM-like Higgs decay into two muons at 1.4 TeV CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Milutinovic-Dumbelovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    The branching fraction measurement of the SM-like Higgs boson decay into two muons at 1.4 TeV CLIC will be described in this paper contributed to the LCWS13. The study is performed in the fully simulated ILD detector concept for CLIC, taking into consideration all the relevant physics and the beam-induced backgrounds, as well as the instrumentation of the very forward region to tag the high-energy electrons. Higgs couplings are known to be sensitive to BSM physics and we prove that BR times the Higgs production cross section can be measured with approximately 35.5% statistical accuracy in four years of the CLIC operation at 1.4 TeV centre-of-mass energy with unpolarised beams. The result is preliminary as the equivalent photon approximation is not considered in the cross-section calculations. This study complements the Higgs physics program foreseen at CLIC.

  4. Glass fiber laser at 1. 36. mu. m from SiO sub 2 :Nd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakimi, F.; Po, H.; Tumminelli, R.; McCollum, B.C.; Zenteno, L.; Cho, N.M.; Snitzer, E. (Polaroid Corporation, 38 Henry Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (US))

    1989-10-01

    By adding 14 mol % P{sub 2}O{sub 5} to the core of a SiO{sub 2}:Nd fiber, laser emission was obtained at 1.36 {mu}m. From the fluorescent spectra and laser thresholds for the {sup 4}{ital F}{sub 3/2} to {sup 4}{ital I}{sub 11/2} and {sup 4}{ital F}{sub 3/2} to {sup 4}{ital I}{sub 3/2} transitions, the net gain at 1.36 {mu}m is 0.024 dB/mW, and the ratio of excited-state absorption (the {sup 4}{ital F}{sub 3/2} to {sup 4}{ital G}{sub 1/2} transition) to stimulated emission is estimated to be 0.78.

  5. Ultrasound backscatter from free-swimming fish at 1 MHz for fish identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, An Hoai; Lundgren, Bo; Stage, Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    In the frequency range well below 1 MHz, the swimbladder is often considered the most important part for acoustic fish detection. In this work a portable system was developed to not only detect but also try to identify free-swimming fish. It has been used to measure the ultrasound backscatter at 1...... indicate that at 1 MHz the surface areas (also fins and tail) of the fish can give echoes that are much stronger (up to 3 times) than the swimbladder can, therefore important for identification of fish...... MHz from fish. The system consists of a Reson TC3210 1 MHz single-element transducer, a dual-frequency, multi-beam Blueview P900-2250 sonar, and three Oregon ATC9K cameras. The Reson transducer is connected to an Olympus pulser-receiver monitored by a portable computer through a Picoscope 4226 PC...

  6. The 400W at 1.8K Test Facility at CEA-Grenoble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, P.; Girard, A.; Jager, B.; Rousset, B.; Bonnay, P.; Millet, F.; Gully, P.

    2006-04-01

    A new test facility with a cooling capacity respectively of 400W at 1.8K or 800W at 4.5K, is now under nominal operation in SBT (Low Temperature Department) at CEA Grenoble. It has been recently used for thermohydraulic studies of two phase superfluid helium in autumn 2004. In the near future, this test bench will allow: - to test industrial components at 1.8K (magnets, cavities of accelerators) - to continue the present studies on thermohydraulics of two phase superfluid helium - to develop and simulate new cooling loops for ITER Cryogenics, and other applications such as high Reynolds number flows This new facility consists of a cold box connected to a warm compressor station (one subatmospheric oil ring pump in series with two screw compressors). The cold box, designed by AIR LIQUIDE, comprises two centrifugal cold compressors, a cold turbine, a wet piston expander, counter flow heat exchangers and two phase separators at 4.5K and 1.8K. The new facility uses a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) connected to a bus for the measurements. The design is modular and will allow the use of saturated fluid flow (two phase flow at 1.8K or 4.5K) or single phase fluid forced flow. Experimental results and cooling capacity in different operation modes are detailed.

  7. Efficacy of Sanfujiu to Treat Allergies: Patient Outcomes at 1 Year after Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Jei Tai

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Sanfujiu is a treatment method of applying herbal paste onto the acupoints Fengmen and Feishu during the three hottest days of summer to treat patients with allergies. The objectives of this study were to determine the treatment efficacy at 1 year after the Sanfujiu treatment, and examine variations in the perceived efficacy of Sanfujiu among different subgroups, based on the patients' ages, diagnoses and number of reactive symptoms immediately after the treatment. We enrolled 105 patients who completed Sanfujiu treatment at a medical university hospital in Taipei as the subjects. One year after treatment, trained interviewers conducted telephone interviews with the patients. Approximately 60% of them perceived the treatment as being effective at 1 year later, which was higher than that at 1 week after treatment (45.7%. Younger subjects (<19 years of age and patients with asthma were more likely to report the treatment as being effective. Patients who had more reactive symptoms after the third Sanfujiu treatment were more likely to report the treatment as being effective. The results demonstrated that Sanfujiu was moderately effective, as perceived by patients in Taiwan, in treating their allergic symptoms.

  8. New Insights into Ligand-Receptor Pairing and Coevolution of Relaxin Family Peptides and Their Receptors in Teleosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Good

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Relaxin-like peptides (RLN/INSL play diverse roles in reproductive and neuroendocrine processes in placental mammals and are functionally associated with two distinct types of receptors (RXFP for each respective function. The diversification of RLN/INSL and RXFP gene families in vertebrates was predominantly driven by whole genome duplications (2R and 3R. Teleosts preferentially retained duplicates of genes putatively involved in neuroendocrine regulation, harboring a total of 10-11 receptors and 6 ligand genes, while most mammals have equal numbers of ligands and receptors. To date, the ligand-receptor relationships of teleost Rln/Insl peptides and their receptors have largely remained unexplored. Here, we use selection analyses based on sequence data from 5 teleosts and qPCR expression data from zebrafish to explore possible ligand-receptor pairings in teleosts. We find support for the hypothesis that, with the exception of RLN, which has undergone strong positive selection in mammalian lineages, the ligand and receptor genes shared between mammals and teleosts appear to have similar pairings. On the other hand, the teleost-specific receptors show evidence of subfunctionalization. Overall, this study underscores the complexity of RLN/INSL and RXFP ligand-receptor interactions in teleosts and establishes theoretical background for further experimental work in nonmammals.

  9. Divergent Transducer-specific Molecular Efficacies Generate Biased Agonism at a G Protein-coupled Receptor (GPCR)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Ryan T.; Sun, Jin-peng; Rominger, David H.; Violin, Jonathan D.; Ahn, Seungkirl; Rojas Bie Thomsen, Alex; Zhu, Xiao; Kleist, Andrew; Costa, Tommaso; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of “biased agonism” arises from the recognition that the ability of an agonist to induce a receptor-mediated response (i.e. “efficacy”) can differ across the multiple signal transduction pathways (e.g. G protein and β-arrestin (βarr)) emanating from a single GPCR. Despite the therapeutic promise of biased agonism, the molecular mechanism(s) whereby biased agonists selectively engage signaling pathways remain elusive. This is due in large part to the challenges associated with quantifying ligand efficacy in cells. To address this, we developed a cell-free approach to directly quantify the transducer-specific molecular efficacies of balanced and biased ligands for the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), a prototypic GPCR. Specifically, we defined efficacy in allosteric terms, equating shifts in ligand affinity (i.e. KLo/KHi) at AT1R-Gq and AT1R-βarr2 fusion proteins with their respective molecular efficacies for activating Gq and βarr2. Consistent with ternary complex model predictions, transducer-specific molecular efficacies were strongly correlated with cellular efficacies for activating Gq and βarr2. Subsequent comparisons across transducers revealed that biased AT1R agonists possess biased molecular efficacies that were in strong agreement with the signaling bias observed in cellular assays. These findings not only represent the first measurements of the thermodynamic driving forces underlying differences in ligand efficacy between transducers but also support a molecular mechanism whereby divergent transducer-specific molecular efficacies generate biased agonism at a GPCR. PMID:24668815

  10. Divergent transducer-specific molecular efficacies generate biased agonism at a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Ryan T; Sun, Jin-peng; Rominger, David H; Violin, Jonathan D; Ahn, Seungkirl; Rojas Bie Thomsen, Alex; Zhu, Xiao; Kleist, Andrew; Costa, Tommaso; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2014-05-16

    The concept of "biased agonism" arises from the recognition that the ability of an agonist to induce a receptor-mediated response (i.e. "efficacy") can differ across the multiple signal transduction pathways (e.g. G protein and β-arrestin (βarr)) emanating from a single GPCR. Despite the therapeutic promise of biased agonism, the molecular mechanism(s) whereby biased agonists selectively engage signaling pathways remain elusive. This is due in large part to the challenges associated with quantifying ligand efficacy in cells. To address this, we developed a cell-free approach to directly quantify the transducer-specific molecular efficacies of balanced and biased ligands for the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), a prototypic GPCR. Specifically, we defined efficacy in allosteric terms, equating shifts in ligand affinity (i.e. KLo/KHi) at AT1R-Gq and AT1R-βarr2 fusion proteins with their respective molecular efficacies for activating Gq and βarr2. Consistent with ternary complex model predictions, transducer-specific molecular efficacies were strongly correlated with cellular efficacies for activating Gq and βarr2. Subsequent comparisons across transducers revealed that biased AT1R agonists possess biased molecular efficacies that were in strong agreement with the signaling bias observed in cellular assays. These findings not only represent the first measurements of the thermodynamic driving forces underlying differences in ligand efficacy between transducers but also support a molecular mechanism whereby divergent transducer-specific molecular efficacies generate biased agonism at a GPCR. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Distribution of non-AT1, non-AT2 binding of 125I-sarcosine1, isoleucine8 angiotensin II in neurolysin knockout mouse brains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Speth

    Full Text Available The recent identification of a novel binding site for angiotensin (Ang II as the peptidase neurolysin (E.C. 3.4.24.16 has implications for the renin-angiotensin system (RAS. This report describes the distribution of specific binding of 125I-Sarcosine1, Isoleucine8 Ang II (125I-SI Ang II in neurolysin knockout mouse brains compared to wild-type mouse brains using quantitative receptor autoradiography. In the presence of p-chloromercuribenzoic acid (PCMB, which unmasks the novel binding site, widespread distribution of specific (3 µM Ang II displaceable 125I-SI Ang II binding in 32 mouse brain regions was observed. Highest levels of binding >700 fmol/g initial wet weight were seen in hypothalamic, thalamic and septal regions, while the lowest level of binding <300 fmol/g initial wet weight was in the mediolateral medulla. 125I-SI Ang II binding was substantially higher by an average of 85% in wild-type mouse brains compared to neurolysin knockout brains, suggesting the presence of an additional non-AT1, non-AT2, non-neurolysin Ang II binding site in the mouse brain. Binding of 125I-SI Ang II to neurolysin in the presence of PCMB was highest in hypothalamic and ventral cortical brain regions, but broadly distributed across all regions surveyed. Non-AT1, non-AT2, non-neurolysin binding was also highest in the hypothalamus but had a different distribution than neurolysin. There was a significant reduction in AT2 receptor binding in the neurolysin knockout brain and a trend towards decreased AT1 receptor binding. In the neurolysin knockout brains, the size of the lateral ventricles was increased by 56% and the size of the mid forebrain (-2.72 to +1.48 relative to Bregma was increased by 12%. These results confirm the identity of neurolysin as a novel Ang II binding site, suggesting that neurolysin may play a significant role in opposing the pathophysiological actions of the brain RAS and influencing brain morphology.

  12. Glomerular type 1 angiotensin receptors augment kidney injury and inflammation in murine autoimmune nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Steven D; Vasievich, Matthew P; Ruiz, Phillip; Gould, Samantha K; Parsons, Kelly K; Pazmino, A Kathy; Facemire, Carie; Chen, Benny J; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Tran, Trinh T; Pisetsky, David S; Barisoni, Laura; Prieto-Carrasquero, Minolfa C; Jeansson, Marie; Foster, Mary H; Coffman, Thomas M

    2009-04-01

    Studies in humans and animal models indicate a key contribution of angiotensin II to the pathogenesis of glomerular diseases. To examine the role of type 1 angiotensin (AT1) receptors in glomerular inflammation associated with autoimmune disease, we generated MRL-Faslpr/lpr (lpr) mice lacking the major murine type 1 angiotensin receptor (AT1A); lpr mice develop a generalized autoimmune disease with glomerulonephritis that resembles SLE. Surprisingly, AT1A deficiency was not protective against disease but instead substantially accelerated mortality, proteinuria, and kidney pathology. Increased disease severity was not a direct effect of immune cells, since transplantation of AT1A-deficient bone marrow did not affect survival. Moreover, autoimmune injury in extrarenal tissues, including skin, heart, and joints, was unaffected by AT1A deficiency. In murine systems, there is a second type 1 angiotensin receptor isoform, AT1B, and its expression is especially prominent in the renal glomerulus within podocytes. Further, expression of renin was enhanced in kidneys of AT1A-deficient lpr mice, and they showed evidence of exaggerated AT1B receptor activation, including substantially increased podocyte injury and expression of inflammatory mediators. Administration of losartan, which blocks all type 1 angiotensin receptors, reduced markers of kidney disease, including proteinuria, glomerular pathology, and cytokine mRNA expression. Since AT1A-deficient lpr mice had low blood pressure, these findings suggest that activation of type 1 angiotensin receptors in the glomerulus is sufficient to accelerate renal injury and inflammation in the absence of hypertension.

  13. A molecular movie at 1.8 A resolution displays the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein, a eubacterial blue-light receptor, from nanoseconds to seconds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Z.; Perman, B.; Srajer, V.; Teng, T.Y.; Pradervand, C.; Bourgeois, D.; Schotte, F.; Ursby, T.; Kort, R.

    2001-01-01

    The photocycle of the bacterial blue-light photoreceptor, photoactive yellow protein, was stimulated by illumination of single crystals by a 7 ns laser pulse. The molecular events were recorded at high resolution by time-resolved X-ray Laue diffraction as they evolved in real time, from 1 ns to

  14. A molecular movie at 1.8 A resolution displays the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein, a eubacterial blue-light receptor, from nanoseconds to seconds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Zhaochun; Perman, B; Srajer, V; Teng, T Y; Pradervand, C; Bourgeois, Dominique; Schotte, Friedrich; Ursby, T; Kort, R; Wulff, Michael; Moffat, K.

    2001-01-01

    The photocycle of the bacterial blue-light photoreceptor, photoactive yellow protein, was stimulated by illumination of single crystals by a 7 ns laser pulse. The molecular events were recorded at high resolution by time-resolved X-ray Laue diffraction as they evolved in real time, from 1 ns to

  15. Improvement of endothelial dysfunction in experimental heart failure by chronic RAAS-blockade : ACE-inhibition or AT(1)-receptor blockade?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buikema, H; Pinto, YM; van Gilst, WH

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is associated with endothelial dysfunction. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is believed to be important in the deterioration of endodiehal dysfunction in CHF through stimulation of oxidative stress. Whereas angiotensin-converting enzyme

  16. Promotion of breast cancer by β-Hexachlorocyclohexane in MCF10AT1 cells and MMTV-neu mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsumura Fumio

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to β-Hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH, a contaminant of the hexachlorohexane pesticide lindane, has been implicated as a risk factor in the development of breast cancers in epidemiological studies. Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated the ability of β-HCH to elicit its actions via a ligand-independent activation of the estrogen receptor through increased c-Neu (= erbB2 or HER-2 expression and kinase activation in both the BG-1 and MCF-7 cell lines. In addition, long term exposure (33 passages to β-HCH was shown to promote the selection of MCF-7 cells which exhibit a more metastatic phenotype. Methods In this current study, we decided to investigate the long-term effects of β-HCH in both the MCF10AT1 cell line which was derived from a normal epithelial cell line by stably transfecting a mutated c-Ha-ras and a MMTV-Neu mouse model for mammary cancer in vivo. MCF10AT1 cells were exposed for 20 passages with β-HCH, 4-OH-Tamoxifen (Tam, or 17-β-estradiol (E2 after which cells were analyzed for proliferation rates and mRNA expression by RT-PCR. In our in vivo studies, MMTV-Neu mice were injected with β-HCH and observed for tumor formation over a 70 week period. Results β-HCH and Tam selected MCF10AT1 cells demonstrated increased mRNA expression of MMP-13 (collagenase-3 a marker of increased invasiveness. β-HCH treatment was also seen to increase the expression in a number of proto-oncogenes (c-Neu, Cyclin D1, p27, cell status markers (Met-1, CK19, and the inflammatory marker NFκB. Previous studies, have demonstrated the role of these markers as evidence of malignant transformations, and further illustrate the ability of β-HCH to be carcinogenic. To demonstrate β-HCH's tumorigenic properties in an in vivo system, we used an MMTV-Neu mouse model. MMTV-Neu is a c-Neu overexpressing strain which has been shown to spontaneously develop mammary tumors at later stages of aging. In this experiment,

  17. NFAD Arrays for Single Photon Optical Communications at 1.5 um Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For this program, we propose to develop large pixel-count single photon counting detector arrays suitable for deployment in spacecraft terminal receivers supporting...

  18. Ionotropic crustacean olfactory receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Corey

    Full Text Available The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs, the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs, as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling.

  19. The Quantum Nature of Drug-Receptor Interactions: Deuteration Changes Binding Affinities for Histamine Receptor Ligands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Kržan

    Full Text Available In this article we report a combined experimental and computational study concerning the effects of deuteration on the binding of histamine and two other histaminergic agonists to 3H-tiotidine-labeled histamine H2 receptor in neonatal rat astrocytes. Binding affinities were measured by displacing radiolabeled tiotidine from H2 receptor binding sites present on cultured neonatal rat astrocytes. Quantum-chemical calculations were performed by employing the empirical quantization of nuclear motion within a cluster model of the receptor binding site extracted from the homology model of the entire H2 receptor. Structure of H2 receptor built by homology modelling is attached in the supporting information (S1 Table Experiments clearly demonstrate that deuteration affects the binding by increasing the affinity for histamine and reducing it for 2-methylhistamine, while basically leaving it unchanged for 4-methylhistamine. Ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on the cluster system extracted from the homology H2 model along with the implicit quantization of the acidic N-H and O-H bonds demonstrate that these changes in the binding can be rationalized by the altered strength of the hydrogen bonding upon deuteration known as the Ubbelohde effect. Our computational analysis also reveals a new mechanism of histamine binding, which underlines an important role of Tyr250 residue. The present work is, to our best knowledge, the first study of nuclear quantum effects on ligand receptor binding. The ligand H/D substitution is relevant for therapy in the context of perdeuterated and thus more stable drugs that are expected to enter therapeutic practice in the near future. Moreover, presented approach may contribute towards understanding receptor activation, while a distant goal remains in silico discrimination between agonists and antagonists based on the receptor structure.

  20. Self-Perceived Participation and Autonomy at 1-Year Post Stroke: A Part of the Stroke Arm Longitudinal Study at the University of Gothenburg (SALGOT Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Törnbom, Karin; Hadartz, Kristin; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S

    2017-12-25

    Identifying factors predicting the long-term outcome of participation and autonomy after stroke is essential for developing individualized rehabilitation interventions. The aim was to describe self-assessed participation and autonomy and to explore factors associated with the same at 1 year post stroke. Participants consisted of 79 persons (mean age = 67) with a first-time stroke at the 1-year follow-up. To investigate perceived participation and autonomy at 1 year, a self-assessment questionnaire, the Impact on Participation and Autonomy-English version (IPA-E) was used. Multivariate logistic regression models were performed using age, gender, stroke severity, and functional dependency at discharge as potential contributors to the perceived level of participation and autonomy. A high percentage (70%-88%) evaluated their functions as fair to very good within all domains of the IPA-E at 1 year post stroke. However, around a fifth experienced their Family role as poor to very poor. Participants' functional dependency at discharge significantly influenced the outcome for the domains of Family role (odds ratio [OR] = 5.66, P participation and autonomy at 1 year post stroke. The results also indicate that supporting indoor autonomy and social relations of persons with stroke during the acute rehabilitation is important to enhance participation and autonomy at 1 year post stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Taste Receptors in Innate Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Taste receptors were first identified on the tongue, where they initiate a signaling pathway that communicates information to the brain about the nutrient content or potential toxicity of ingested foods. However, recent research has shown that taste receptors are also expressed in a myriad of other tissues, from the airway and gastrointestinal epithelia to the pancreas and brain. The functions of many of these extraoral taste receptors remain unknown, but emerging evidence suggests that bitter and sweet taste receptors in the airway are important sentinels of innate immunity. This review discusses taste receptor signaling, focusing on the G-protein coupled–receptors that detect bitter, sweet, and savory tastes, followed by an overview of extraoral taste receptors and in-depth discussion of studies demonstrating the roles of taste receptors in airway innate immunity. Future research on extraoral taste receptors has significant potential for identification of novel immune mechanisms and insights into host-pathogen interactions. PMID:25323130

  2. Chronic Losartan Treatment Up-Regulates AT1R and Increases the Heart Vulnerability to Acute Onset of Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury in Male Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minwoo A.; Dasgupta, Chiranjib; Zhang, Lubo

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is an important therapy in the management of hypertension, particularly in the immediate post-myocardial infarction period. Yet, the role of AT1R in the acute onset of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury still remains controversial. Thus, the present study determined the effects of chronic losartan treatment on heart ischemia and reperfusion injury in rats. Losartan (10 mg/kg/day) was administered to six-month-old male rats via an osmotic pump for 14 days and hearts were then isolated and were subjected to ischemia and reperfusion injury in a Langendorff preparation. Losartan significantly decreased mean arterial blood pressure. However, heart weight, left ventricle to body weight ratio and baseline cardiac function were not significantly altered by the losartan treatment. Of interest, chronic in vivo losartan treatment significantly increased ischemia-induced myocardial injury and decreased post-ischemic recovery of left ventricular function. This was associated with significant increases in AT1R and PKCδ expression in the left ventricle. In contrast, AT2R and PKCε were not altered. Furthermore, losartan treatment significantly increased microRNA (miR)-1, -15b, -92a, -133a, -133b, -210, and -499 expression but decreased miR-21 in the left ventricle. Of importance, addition of losartan to isolated heart preparations blocked the effect of increased ischemic-injury induced by in vivo chronic losartan treatment. The results demonstrate that chronic losartan treatment up-regulates AT1R/PKCδ and alters miR expression patterns in the heart, leading to increased cardiac vulnerability to ischemia and reperfusion injury. PMID:26168042

  3. Human presynaptic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicker, Eberhard; Feuerstein, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Presynaptic receptors are sites at which transmitters, locally formed mediators or hormones inhibit or facilitate the release of a given transmitter from its axon terminals. The interest in the identification of presynaptic receptors has faded in recent years and it may therefore be justified to give an overview of their occurrence in the autonomic and central nervous system; this review will focus on presynaptic receptors in human tissues. Autoreceptors are presynaptic receptors at which a given transmitter restrains its further release, though in some instances may also increase its release. Inhibitory autoreceptors represent a typical example of a negative feedback; they are tonically activated by the respective endogenous transmitter and/or are constitutively active. Autoreceptors also play a role under pathophysiological conditions, e.g. by limiting the massive noradrenaline release occurring during congestive heart failure. They can be used for therapeutic purposes; e.g., the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist mirtazapine is used as an antidepressant and the inverse histamine H3 receptor agonist pitolisant has been marketed as a new drug for the treatment of narcolepsy in 2016. Heteroreceptors are presynaptic receptors at which transmitters from adjacent neurons, locally formed mediators (e.g. endocannabinoids) or hormones (e.g. adrenaline) can inhibit or facilitate transmitter release; they may be subject to an endogenous tone. The constipating effect of the sympathetic nervous system or of the antihypertensive drug clonidine is related to the activation of inhibitory α2-adrenoceptors on postganglionic parasympathetic neurons. Part of the stimulating effect of adrenaline on the sympathetic nervous system during stress is related to its facilitatory effect on noradrenaline release via β2-adrenoceptors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator. The installation of the feet is scheduled to finish during January 2004 with an installation precision at the 1 mm level despite their height of 5.3 metres. The manufacture was carried out in Russia (Company Izhorskiye Zavody in St. Petersburg), as part of a Russian and JINR Dubna in-kind contribution to ATLAS. Involved in the installation is a team from IHEP-Protvino (Russia), the ATLAS technical co-ordination team at CERN, and the CERN survey team. In all, about 15 people are involved. After the feet are in place, the barrel toroid magnet and the barrel calorimeters will be installed. This will keep the ATLAS team busy for the entire year 2004.

  5. Opioid receptors: from binding sites to visible molecules in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Kieffer, Brigitte L; Christopher J. Evans

    2008-01-01

    Opioid drugs such as heroin interact directly with opioid receptors whilst other addictive drugs, including marijuana, alcohol and nicotine indirectly activate endogenous opioid systems to contribute to their rewarding properties. The opioid system therefore plays a key role in addiction neurobiology and continues to be a primary focus for NIDA-supported research. Opioid receptors and their peptide ligands, the endorphins and enkephalins, form an extensive heterogeneous network throughout the...

  6. Design, synthesis, and pharmacological evaluation of 5-oxo-1,2,4-oxadiazole derivatives as AT1 antagonists with antihypertension activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weibo; Bao, Xiaolu; Ren, He; Liao, Pingyong; Zhu, Wei; Yan, Yijia; Wang, Li; Chen, Zhilong

    A series of new 5-oxo-1,2,4-oxadiazole derivatives with 1, 4-disubsituted or 1, 5-disubsituted indole group was designed, synthesized, and pharmacologically evaluated. These derivatives displayed high affinities to the AT1 receptor at the same order of magnitude to losartan. The methyl ester with 1, 4-disubsituted indole group, 1 (5.01 ± 1.67 nM) showed high antihypertension activity on spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Its maximal response lowered 30 mmHg of mean blood pressure (MBP) at 10 mg/kg after oral administration, which was better than irbesartan, and the antihypertensive effect lasted beyond 24 h. These results made 1 deserve further investigation.

  7. Convulsant bicuculline modifies CNS muscarinic receptor affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez de Lores Arnaiz Georgina

    2006-04-01

    itself. Findings support the notion that the muscarinic receptors play a major role in experimental epilepsy and provide a new example of differential neuronal plasticity.

  8. How does angiotensin AT2 receptor activation help neuronal differentiation and improve neuronal pathological situations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimond, Marie-Odile; Gallo-Payet, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    The angiotensin type 2 (AT2) receptor of angiotensin II has long been thought to be limited to few tissues, with the primary effect of counteracting the angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor. Functional studies in neuronal cells have demonstrated AT2 receptor capability to modulate neuronal excitability, neurite elongation, and neuronal migration, suggesting that it may be an important regulator of brain functions. The observation that the AT2 receptor was expressed in brain areas implicated in learning and memory led to the hypothesis that it may also be implicated in cognitive functions. However, linking signaling pathways to physiological effects has always proven challenging since information relative to its physiological functions has mainly emerged from indirect observations, either from the blockade of the AT1 receptor or through the use of transgenic animals. From a mechanistic standpoint, the main intracellular pathways linked to AT2 receptor stimulation include modulation of phosphorylation by activation of kinases and phosphatases or the production of nitric oxide and cGMP, some of which are associated with the Gi-coupling protein. The receptor can also interact with other receptors, either G protein-coupled such as bradykinin, or growth factor receptors such as nerve growth factor or platelet-derived growth factor receptors. More recently, new advances have also led to identification of various partner proteins, thus providing new insights into this receptor’s mechanism of action. This review summarizes the recent advances regarding the signaling pathways induced by the AT2 receptor in neuronal cells, and discussed the potential therapeutic relevance of central actions of this enigmatic receptor. In particular, we highlight the possibility that selective AT2 receptor activation by non-peptide and selective agonists could represent new pharmacological tools that may help to improve impaired cognitive performance in Alzheimer’s disease and other

  9. Test Results of the LARP HQ02b Magnet at 1.9 K

    CERN Document Server

    Bajas, H; Bottura, L; Chiuchiolo, A; Dunkel, O; Ferracin, P; Feuvrier, J; Giloux, Chr; Todesco, E; Ravaioli, E; Caspi, S; Dietderich, D; Felice, H; Hafalia, A R; Marchevsky, M; Sabbi, G L; Wang, X; Salmi, T; Ghosh, A; Schmalzle, J; Wanderer, P; Anerella, M; Ambrosio, G; Bossert, R; Chlachidze, G; Yu, M

    2015-01-01

    The HQ magnet is a 120 mm aperture, 1-meter-long Nb3Sn quadrupole developed by the LARP collaboration in the framework of the High-Luminosity LHC project. A first series of coils was assembled and tested in 5 assemblies of the HQ01 series. The HQ01e model achieved a maximum gradient of 170 T/m at 4.5 K at LBNL in 2010-2011 and reached 184 T/m at 1.9 K at CERN in 2012. A new series of coils incorporating major design changes was fabricated for the HQ02 series. The first model, HQ02a, was tested at Fermilab where it reached 98% of the short sample limit at 4.5 K with a gradient of 182 T/m in 2013. However, the full training of the coils at 1.9 K could not be performed due to a current limit of 15 kA. Following this test, the azimuthal coil pre-load was increased by about 30 MPa and an additional current lead was installed at the electrical center of the magnet for quench protection studies. The test name of this magnet changed to HQ02b. In 2014, HQ02b was then shipped to CERN as the first opportunity for full t...

  10. Climate extremes in Europe at 1.5 and 2 degrees of global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Andrew D.; Karoly, David J.

    2017-11-01

    There is an international effort to attempt to limit global warming to 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels, however, there is a lack of quantitative analysis on the benefits of holding global warming to such a level. In this study, coupled climate model simulations are used to form large ensembles of simulated years at 1.5 °C and 2 °C of global warming. These ensembles are used to assess projected changes in the frequency and magnitude of European climate extremes at these warming levels. For example, we find that events similar to the European record hot summer of 2003, which caused tens of thousands of excess deaths, would be very likely at least 24% less frequent in a world at 1.5 °C global warming compared to 2 °C global warming. Under 2 °C of global warming, we could expect such extreme summer temperatures in the historical record to become commonplace, occurring in at least one-in-every-two years. We find that there are very clear benefits to limiting global warming for the European continent, including fewer and less intense heat and rainfall extremes when compared with higher levels of global warming.

  11. Pre-operative predictors of weight loss at 1-year after Lap-Band surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, J B; Dixon, M E; O'Brien, P E

    2001-04-01

    The authors studied a range of preoperative factors for their predictive value of effectiveness of Lap-Band placement, using the percentage of excess weight loss at 1-year as the outcome measure (%EWL1). All factors were measured and recorded prior to surgery. Factors included: patient demographics, family, medical and weight history. Laboratory measures and the responses to the SF-36 Health Survey were also assessed. Factors were assessed for correlation with %EWL1. The group (N=440, F:M 383:57) had mean age 40.0+/-9.5 years, weight of 126+/-25 kg, and BMI 45.6+/-7.5 kg/m2 pre-operatively. At 1-year follow-up, the group had mean weight 97.6obesity. Important physical factors have been found to influence the rate of weight loss. Those with increased age, pain, physical disability and insulin resistance have a great deal to gain from weight loss. Although this study has identified factors that are associated with less weight loss, we have not found any factor that predicts an unacceptably low weight loss and thus provides a contraindication to Lap-Band placement. The findings of this study allow us to set more realistic goals for the rate of weight loss in specified sub-groups of our patients.

  12. Interpreting the Thermal Lightcurve of Iapetus at 1.3mm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Norland Raphael; Moullet, A.; Gurwell, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Saturn’s moon Iapetus is distinguished by a clearly defined hemispherical difference in albedo, ranging from 0.03-0.6. This makes it a unique object for re- solving a thermal light curve, because of how flux varies with respect to longitude. By using continuum data from the Submillimeter Array at 1.3 mm and 230 GHz, flux measurements of 0.0688 Jy (bright side) and 0.0899 Jy (dark side) were obtained. A 38-day observation window allowed for the highest contrast in albedo. By converting flux to brightness temperature via Planck’s Law and assuming a standard spectral emissivity value of 0.9, surface temperatures were derived. The darker hemisphere has a surface temperature of 91.899K with σ1 = 3.916 and σ3 = 11.746, while the bright hemisphere has a temperature of 63.939K with σ1 = 1.134 and σ3 = 3.429. This temperature difference at 1.3mm verifies the thermal dichotomy in the subsurface of Iapetus.

  13. Taste receptors for umami: the case for multiple receptors1234

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhari, Nirupa; Pereira, Elizabeth; Roper, Stephen D

    2009-01-01

    Umami taste is elicited by many small molecules, including amino acids (glutamate and aspartate) and nucleotides (monophosphates of inosinate or guanylate, inosine 5′-monophosphate and guanosine-5′-monophosphate). Mammalian taste buds respond to these diverse compounds via membrane receptors that bind the umami tastants. Over the past 15 y, several receptors have been proposed to underlie umami detection in taste buds. These receptors include 2 glutamate-selective G protein–coupled receptors,...

  14. Hydronephrosis alters cardiac ACE2 and Mas receptor expression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanling; Ma, Lulu; Wu, Junyan; Chen, Tingting

    2015-06-01

    Hydronephrosis is characterized by substantial loss of tubules and affects renin secretion in the kidney. However, whether alterations of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), ACE2 and Mas receptor in the heart are observed in hydronephrosis is unknown. Thus, we assessed these components in hydronephrotic mice treated with AT1 receptor blockade and ACE inhibitor. Hydronephrosis was induced by left ureteral ligation in Balb/C mice except sham-operated animals. The levels of cardiac ACE, ACE2 and Mas receptor were measured after treatment of losartan or enalapril. Hydronephrosis led to an increase of ACE level and a decrease of ACE2 and Mas receptor in the heart. Losartan decreased cardiac ACE level, but ACE2 and Mas receptor levels significantly increased in hydronephrotic mice (p Mas receptor in the heart. Plasma renin activity (PRA) and Ang II decreased in hydronephrotic mice, but significantly increased after treatment with losartan or enalapril. Hydronephrosis increased cardiac ACE and suppressed ACE2 and Mas receptor levels. AT1 blockade caused sustained activation of cardiac ACE2 and Mas receptor, but ACE inhibitor had the limitation of such activation of Mas receptor in hydronephrotic animals. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Optimal multivalent targeting of membranes with many distinct receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curk, Tine; Dobnikar, Jure; Frenkel, Daan

    2017-07-11

    Cells can often be recognized by the concentrations of receptors expressed on their surface. For better (targeted drug treatment) or worse (targeted infection by pathogens), it is clearly important to be able to target cells selectively. A good targeting strategy would result in strong binding to cells with the desired receptor profile and barely binding to other cells. Using a simple model, we formulate optimal design rules for multivalent particles that allow them to distinguish target cells based on their receptor profile. We find the following: (i) It is not a good idea to aim for very strong binding between the individual ligands on the guest (delivery vehicle) and the receptors on the host (cell). Rather, one should exploit multivalency: High sensitivity to the receptor density on the host can be achieved by coating the guest with many ligands that bind only weakly to the receptors on the cell surface. (ii) The concentration profile of the ligands on the guest should closely match the composition of the cognate membrane receptors on the target surface. And (iii) irrespective of all details, the effective strength of the ligand-receptor interaction should be of the order of the thermal energy [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is the absolute temperature and [Formula: see text] is Boltzmann's constant. We present simulations that support the theoretical predictions. We speculate that, using the above design rules, it should be possible to achieve targeted drug delivery with a greatly reduced incidence of side effects.

  16. Agonist Binding to Chemosensory Receptors: A Systematic Bioinformatics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Fierro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Human G-protein coupled receptors (hGPCRs constitute a large and highly pharmaceutically relevant membrane receptor superfamily. About half of the hGPCRs' family members are chemosensory receptors, involved in bitter taste and olfaction, along with a variety of other physiological processes. Hence these receptors constitute promising targets for pharmaceutical intervention. Molecular modeling has been so far the most important tool to get insights on agonist binding and receptor activation. Here we investigate both aspects by bioinformatics-based predictions across all bitter taste and odorant receptors for which site-directed mutagenesis data are available. First, we observe that state-of-the-art homology modeling combined with previously used docking procedures turned out to reproduce only a limited fraction of ligand/receptor interactions inferred by experiments. This is most probably caused by the low sequence identity with available structural templates, which limits the accuracy of the protein model and in particular of the side-chains' orientations. Methods which transcend the limited sampling of the conformational space of docking may improve the predictions. As an example corroborating this, we review here multi-scale simulations from our lab and show that, for the three complexes studied so far, they significantly enhance the predictive power of the computational approach. Second, our bioinformatics analysis provides support to previous claims that several residues, including those at positions 1.50, 2.50, and 7.52, are involved in receptor activation.

  17. Angiotensin II Type 1 and Type 2 Receptors Play Opposite Roles in Regulating the Barrier Function of Kidney Glomerular Capillary Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Koichi; HAN, Gi Dong; Miyauchi, Naoko; Hashimoto, Taeko; Nakatsue, Takeshi; FUJIOKA, Yumiko; Koike, Hiroko; Shimizu, Fujio; Kawachi, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Although angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 receptor antagonist ameliorates proteinuria, its pharmacological mechanism and the differential roles of Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and type 2 receptor (AT2R) are not well understood. We analyzed the effect of Ang II type 1 receptor antagonist on proteinuria caused by antibody against nephrin, a functional molecule of glomerular slit diaphragm and dysfunction of which is involved in the development of proteinuria in several glomerular diseases. We sh...

  18. Solubilized benzodiazepine receptors for use in receptor assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.J; Stegeman, M; Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, R.A

    In the development of non-radioactive receptor assays for benzodiazepines, employing fluorescent ligands, it was observed that the fluorescence measurements were hampered by the background fluorescence of the receptor preparation. This receptor preparation is a brain tissue homogenate in which the

  19. Metformin and insulin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigneri, R.; Gullo, D.; Pezzino, V.

    The authors evaluated the effect of metformin (N,N-dimethylbiguanide), a biguanide known to be less toxic than phenformin, on insulin binding to its receptors, both in vitro and in vivo. Specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding to cultured IM-9 human lymphocytes and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells was determined after preincubation with metformin. Specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding to circulating monocytes was also evaluated in six controls, eight obese subjects, and six obese type II diabetic patients before and after a short-term treatment with metformin. Plasma insulin levels and blood glucose were also measured on both occasions. Metformin significantly increased insulin binding in vitro to both IM-9 lymphocytes and MCF-7 cells; the maximum increment was 47.1% and 38.0%, respectively. Metformin treatment significantly increased insulin binding in vivo to monocytes of obese subjects and diabetic patients. Scatchard analysis indicated that the increased binding was mainly due to an increase in receptor capacity. Insulin binding to monocytes of normal controls was unchanged after metformin as were insulin levels in all groups; blood glucose was significantly reduced after metformin only in diabetic patients. These data indicate that metformin increases insulin binding to its receptors in vitro and in vivo. The effect in vivo is observed in obese subjects and in obese type II diabetic patients, paralleling the clinical effectiveness of this antidiabetic agent, and is not due to receptor regulation by circulating insulin, since no variation in insulin levels was recorded.

  20. Ginkgolides and glycine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaracz, Stanislav; Nakanishi, Koji; Jensen, Anders A.

    2004-01-01

    Ginkgolides from the Ginkgo biloba tree are diterpenes with a cage structure consisting of six five-membered rings and a unique tBu group. They exert a variety of biological properties. In addition to being antagonists of the platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR), it has recently been shown...

  1. Meeting report: nuclear receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuckermann, Jan; Bourguet, William; Mandrup, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    The biannual European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) conference on nuclear receptors was organized by Beatrice Desvergne and Laszlo Nagy and took place in Cavtat near Dubrovnik on the Adriatic coast of Croatia September 25-29, 2009. The meeting brought together researchers from all over...

  2. Standoff Detection of Explosives at 1 m using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Junjuri, R.; Myakalwar, A.K.; Gundawar, M.K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 6 (2017), s. 623-630 ISSN 0011-748X Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy * Multivariate analysis * Principal component analysis * Explosive detection Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.500, year: 2016

  3. VLBI clock synchronization tests performed via the ATS-1 and ATS-3 satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasastry, J.; Rosenbaum, B.; Michelini, R. D.; Kuegler, G.

    1971-01-01

    Clock synchronization experiments were carried out May 10 to June 10, 1971, by the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory via the ATS-1 and 3 geostationary satellites at the NASA tracking stations Rosman and Mojave, during a VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometer) experiment in order to determine the clock-offset between the two stations. Ten microsecond pulses at C-band with very sharp risetime were exchanged by the two stations through the dual transponders of the satellites. At each station, a time-interval counter was started by the transmitted pulse and stopped by the received pulse. The probable error of the difference in the mean values of the clock-offset is 10 nanoseconds.

  4. Channel characterization in high-speed railway station environments at 1.89 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao; Tao, Cheng; Salous, Sana; Liu, Liu; Tan, Zhenhui

    2015-11-01

    Channel characterization is the prerequisite condition for the research and development of the next-generation high-speed railway (HSR) communication system. Train station is one of typical HSR scenarios, where channel characteristics have not yet been investigated sufficiently. In this paper, wideband multiantenna channel measurements are performed at 1.89 GHz in an open-type train station environment based on long-term evolution networks along Beijing to Tianjin HSR in China. Large-scale characteristics of the HSR station channel, focusing on path loss, shadow fading (SF), and the autocorrelation property of SF, are studied. Moreover, small-scale characteristics, such as Ricean K-factor, delay spread, and spatial correlation, are analyzed and modeled. In addition, the stationary region is characterized using the RUN test method. The obtained results provide useful information for deployment and assessment of the future HSR communication system in the HSR station scenario.

  5. Dielectron production in Ar + KCl collisions at 1.76A GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agakishiev, G.; Balanda, A.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A.; Blanco, A.; Böhmer, M.; Boyard, J. L.; Cabanelas, P.; Castro, E.; Chernenko, S.; Christ, T.; Destefanis, M.; Dohrmann, F.; Dybczak, A.; Eberl, T.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fonte, P.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Gilardi, C.; Golubeva, M.; González-Díaz, D.; Guber, F.; Gumberidze, M.; Heinz, T.; Hennino, T.; Holzmann, R.; Huck, P.; Iori, I.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Kanaki, K.; Karavicheva, T.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Kotte, R.; Krása, A.; Krizek, F.; Krücken, R.; Kuc, H.; Kühn, W.; Kugler, A.; Kurepin, A.; Lang, S.; Lange, J. S.; Lapidus, K.; Liu, T.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michalska, B.; Michel, J.; Morinière, E.; Mousa, J.; Müntz, C.; Naumann, L.; Otwinowski, J.; Pachmayer, Y. C.; Palka, M.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramstein, B.; Reshetin, A.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Sailer, B.; Salabura, P.; Schmah, A.; Schwab, E.; Siebenson, J.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Sturm, C.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Trebacz, R.; Tsertos, H.; Wagner, V.; Weber, M.; Wendisch, C.; Wisniowski, M.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Yurevich, S.; Zanevsky, Y.

    2011-07-01

    We present results on dielectron production in 40Ar+KCl collisions at 1.76A GeV. For the first time ω mesons could be reconstructed in a heavy-ion reaction at a bombarding energy which is well below the production threshold in free nucleon-nucleon collisions. The ω multiplicity has been extracted and compared to the yields of other particles, in particular of the φ meson. At intermediate e+e- invariant masses, we find a strong enhancement of the pair yield over a reference spectrum from elementary nucleon-nucleon reactions, suggesting the onset of nontrivial effects of the nuclear medium. Transverse-mass spectra and angular distributions have been reconstructed in three invariant mass bins. In the former unexpectedly large slopes are found for high-mass pairs. The latter, in particular the helicity-angle distributions, are largely consistent with expectations for a pair cocktail dominated at intermediate masses by Δ Dalitz decays.

  6. Efficiency of multi-beam Fourier phase gratings at 1.4 THz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, B; Silva, J R G; Luo, Y C; Liu, X X; Wei, L; Hayton, D J; Gao, J R; Groppi, C

    2017-03-20

    We compare the results of simulated and measured power efficiency and far-field beam pattern, for two reflective Fourier phase gratings, designed to generate 2 × 2 and 2 × 4 beams respectively from a single-beam, coherent source at 1.4 THz. The designed surface structures were manufactured on aluminum plates by a computer numerical control (CNC) micro-milling machine. Despite small differences between the designed and fabricated gratings, we measured power efficiencies of both gratings to be around 70%, which is in a good agreement with the simulated values. We also find a good agreement between the simulated and measured diffracted beam size and spatial distribution. We demonstrate the application of both gratings as multiple beam local oscillators to simultaneously pump (or operate) a 4-pixel array of superconducting heterodyne mixers.

  7. Corrosion Process of Stainless Steel 441 with Heated Steam at 1,000 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Wang, Lijun; Yu, Ziyou; Li, Fushen; Sun, Zaihong; Zhao, Hailei; Chou, Kuo Chih

    2017-07-01

    Stainless steel 441 was oxidized in water vapor containing atmospheres at 1,000 °C to study the contrary effects of water vapor on the oxidization process. The steel in 3.5 vol. % H2O containing atmosphere exhibited an relatively strong protective behavior. The reason was that the densification of the chromium oxide scale was promoted due to the sintering of the oxide grains via Cr-containing species vapor. But the oxidation of the steel in 11.5 15.6 vol. % H2O containing atmosphere followed a non-protective breakaway oxidation due to the breakage of the dense scale by "bubbles" and the formation of iron-rich oxides layer. Experimental result shows that the growth stress increased about 2 GPa during the first 70 ks in wet oxidizing atmosphere. The relatively slow increase of the oxides scale growth stress could be release in water vapor containing atmosphere.

  8. Magellan FIRE Spectroscopy of Star-Forming Galaxies at 1.5 WISP) Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Daniel C.; McCarthy, P. J.; Hathi, N. P.; WISP survey Team

    2013-01-01

    We present high-resolution, near-infrared echelle spectra of strongly star-forming emission line galaxies at 1.5 WISP) survey, using the slitless grism capability of the WFC3 to identify galaxies with strong emission lines in an unbiased way. We are able to identify low-mass, high sSFR galaxies at these redshifts, which are likely analogues to galaxies in the early stages of formation at much higher redshifts. FIRE follow-up observations provide high-resolution rest-frame optical spectra, allowing us to identify possible AGN activity in the sample, estimate metallicity, and investigate the gas-phase dynamics of the galaxies. By obtaining high-resolution near-IR spectra of a statistically significant number of these galaxies we can begin to understand the population in detail and probe the low-mass end of the mass-metallicity relationship at 2.

  9. The Role of Adenosine Receptors in Psychostimulant Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Ballesteros-Yáñez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine receptors (AR are a family of G-protein coupled receptors, comprised of four members, named A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 receptors, found widely distributed in almost all human body tissues and organs. To date, they are known to participate in a large variety of physiopathological responses, which include vasodilation, pain, and inflammation. In particular, in the central nervous system (CNS, adenosine acts as a neuromodulator, exerting different functions depending on the type of AR and consequent cellular signaling involved. In terms of molecular pathways and second messengers involved, A1 and A3 receptors inhibit adenylyl cyclase (AC, through Gi/o proteins, while A2A and A2B receptors stimulate it through Gs proteins. In the CNS, A1 receptors are widely distributed in the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum, A2A receptors are localized mainly in the striatum and olfactory bulb, while A2B and A3 receptors are found at low levels of expression. In addition, AR are able to form heteromers, both among themselves (e.g., A1/A2A, as well as with other subtypes (e.g., A2A/D2, opening a whole range of possibilities in the field of the pharmacology of AR. Nowadays, we know that adenosine, by acting on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors, is known to antagonistically modulate dopaminergic neurotransmission and therefore reward systems, being A1 receptors colocalized in heteromeric complexes with D1 receptors, and A2A receptors with D2 receptors. This review documents the present state of knowledge of the contribution of AR, particularly A1 and A2A, to psychostimulants-mediated effects, including locomotor activity, discrimination, seeking and reward, and discuss their therapeutic relevance to psychostimulant addiction. Studies presented in this review reinforce the potential of A1 agonists as an effective strategy to counteract psychostimulant-induced effects. Furthermore, different experimental data support the hypothesis that A2A/D2 heterodimers are

  10. New Dielectric Measurement Data to Determine the Permittivity of Seawater at 1.4313 Hz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, R.; Zhou, Y.; Utku, C.; Levine, D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the new measurements - made in 2010-2011 - of the dielectric constant of seawater at 1.413 GHz using a resonant cavity technique. The purpose of these measurements is to develop an accurate relationship concerning the dependence of the dielectric constant of seawater on temperature and salinity for use by the Aquarius inversion algorithm. Aquarius is a NASA/CONAE satellite mission launched in June of 2011 with the primary mission of measuring global sea surface salinity with a 1.413 GHz radiometer to an accuracy of 0.2 psu. A brass microwave cavity resonant at 1.413 GHz has been used to measure the dielectric constant of seawater. The seawater is introduced into the cavity through a capillary glass tube having an inner diameter of 0.1 mm. The change of resonant frequency and the cavity Q value are used to determine the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant of seawater. Measurements are automated with Visual Basic software developed at the George Washington University. In this paper, new results from measurements made since September 2010 will be presented for salinities of 30, 35 and 38 psu with a temperature range of 0 C to 35 C in intervals of 5 C. These measurements are more accurate than earlier measurements made in 2008. The new results will be compared to the Klein-Swift (KS) and Meissner-Wentz (MW) model functions. The importance of an accurate model function will be illustrated by using these model functions to invert the Aquarius brightness temperature to retrieve the salinity values. The salinity values will be compared to co-located in situ data collected by Argo buoys.

  11. Operating Room Clinicians' Attitudes and Perceptions of a Pediatric Surgical Safety Checklist at 1 Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Elizabeth K; Singer, Sara J; Sparks, William; Ozonoff, Al; Baxter, Jessica; Rangel, Shawn

    2016-03-01

    Despite mounting evidence that use of surgical checklists improves patient morbidity and mortality, compliance among surgical teams in executing required elements of checklists has been low. Recognizing that clinicians' receptivity is a major determinant of checklist use, we conducted a survey to investigate how mandated use of a surgical checklist impacts its operating room clinicians' attitudes about and perceptions of operating room safety, efficiency, teamwork, and prevention of medical errors. Operating room clinicians at 1 pediatric hospital were surveyed on their attitudes and perception of the novel Pediatric Surgical Safety Checklist and the impact the checklist had on efficiency, teamwork, and prevention of medical errors 1 year after its implementation. The survey responses were compared and classified by multidisciplinary perioperative clinical staff. Most responses reflected positive attitudes toward checklist use. The respondents felt that the checklist reduced complications and errors and improved patient safety, communication among team members, teamwork in complex procedures, and efficiency in the operating room. Many operating room staff also reported that checklist use had prevented or averted an error or a complication. Perceptions varied according to perioperative clinical discipline, reflecting differences in perspectives. For example, the nurses perceived a higher rate of consent-related errors and site marking errors than did the physicians; the surgeons reported more antibiotic timing and equipment errors than did others. The surgical staff at 1 pediatric hospital who responded viewed the novel Pediatric Surgical Safety Checklist as potentially beneficial to operative patient safety by improving teamwork and communication, reducing errors, and improving efficiency. Responses varied by discipline, indicating that team members view the checklist from different perspectives.

  12. Angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) and receptor Mas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villela, Daniel; Leonhardt, Julia; Patel, Neal

    2015-01-01

    The angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) and the receptor Mas are components of the protective arms of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), i.e. they both mediate tissue protective and regenerative actions. The spectrum of actions of these two receptors and their signalling mechanisms display striking...... the phenomenon of blockade of angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] actions by AT2R antagonists and vice versa. Such mechanisms may comprise dimerization of the receptors or dimerization-independent mechanisms such as lack of specificity of the receptor ligands used in the experiments or involvement of the Ang-(1...

  13. Activation of intracellular angiotensin AT2 receptors induces rapid cell death in human uterine leiomyosarcoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Yi; Lützen, Ulf; Fritsch, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    of apoptosis and cell death in cultured human uterine leiomyosarcoma (SK-UT-1) cells and control human uterine smooth muscle cells (HutSMC). The intracellular levels of the AT2 receptor are low in proliferating SK-UT-1 cells but the receptor is substantially up-regulated in quiescent SK-UT-1 cells with high...... densities in mitochondria. Activation of the cell membrane AT2 receptors by a concomitant treatment with angiotensin II and the AT1 receptor antagonist, losartan, induces apoptosis but does not affect the rate of cell death. We demonstrate for the first time that the high-affinity, non-peptide AT2 receptor...... agonist, Compound 21 (C21) penetrates the cell membrane of quiescent SK-UT-1 cells, activates intracellular AT2 receptors and induces rapid cell death; approximately 70% of cells died within 24 h. The cells, which escaped from the cell death, displayed activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, i...

  14. Estimation of Reconnection Flux Using Post-Eruption Arcades and Its Relevance to Magnetic Clouds at 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.; Xie, H.

    2017-01-01

    We report on a new method to compute the flare reconnection (RC) flux from post-eruption arcades (PEAs) and the underlying photospheric magnetic fields. In previous works, the RC flux has been computed using the cumulative flare ribbon area. Here we obtain the RC flux as the flux in half of the area underlying the PEA in EUV imaged after the flare maximum. We apply this method to a set of 21 eruptions that originated near the solar disk center in Solar Cycle 23. We find that the RC flux from the arcade method ((Phi)rA) has excellent agreement with the flux from the flare-ribbon method ((Phi)rR) according to (Phi)rA = 1.24((Phi)rR)(sup 0.99). We also find (Phi)rA to be correlated with the poloidal flux ((Phi)P) of the associated magnetic cloud at 1 AU: (Phi)P = 1.20((Phi)rA)(sup 0.85). This relation is nearly identical to that obtained by Qiu et al. (Astrophys. J. 659, 758, 2007) using a set of only 9 eruptions. Our result supports the idea that flare reconnection results in the formation of the flux rope and PEA as a common process.

  15. Estimation of Reconnection Flux Using Post-eruption Arcades and Its Relevance to Magnetic Clouds at 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.; Xie, H.

    2017-04-01

    We report on a new method to compute the flare reconnection (RC) flux from post-eruption arcades (PEAs) and the underlying photospheric magnetic fields. In previous works, the RC flux has been computed using the cumulative flare ribbon area. Here we obtain the RC flux as the flux in half of the area underlying the PEA in EUV imaged after the flare maximum. We apply this method to a set of 21 eruptions that originated near the solar disk center in Solar Cycle 23. We find that the RC flux from the arcade method (Φ_{rA}) has excellent agreement with the flux from the flare-ribbon method (Φ_{rR}) according to Φ_{rA} = 1.24(Φ_{rR})^{0.99}. We also find Φ_{rA} to be correlated with the poloidal flux (ΦP) of the associated magnetic cloud at 1 AU: ΦP = 1.20(Φ_{rA})^{0.85}. This relation is nearly identical to that obtained by Qiu et al. ( Astrophys. J. 659, 758, 2007) using a set of only 9 eruptions. Our result supports the idea that flare reconnection results in the formation of the flux rope and PEA as a common process.

  16. Comparison of human brain metabolite levels using 1H MRS at 1.5T and 3.0T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Fernandes Paiva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS of the human brain has proven to be a useful technique in several neurological and psychiatric disorders and benefits from higher field scanners as signal intensity and spectral resolution are proportional to the magnetic field strength. Objective: To investigate the effects of the magnetic field on the measurement of brain metabolites in a typical routine clinical setting. Methods: Single voxel spectra were acquired from the posterior cingulate cortex in 26 healthy subjects. Each subject was scanned consecutively at 1.5T and 3.0T in a randomly distributed order. Results: SNR and peak width improvements were observed at higher fields. However, SNR improvement was lower than the theoretical two-fold improvement. Other than the values obtained for creatine (Cre and myo-Inositol (mI, which were both higher at 3.0T, all metabolite concentrations obtained were roughly the same at both field strengths. All the metabolite concentrations were estimated with a Cramer Rao lower bounds (CRLB lower than 15% of the calculated concentrations. Conclusions: Even though the present study supports the expected benefits of higher field strength for MRS, there are several factors that can lead to different quantitative results when comparing 1.5T to 3.0T MRS. Future comparative studies are necessary to refine the metabolite thresholds for early detection and quantification of distinct neurological and psychiatric disorders using 3.0T MRS.

  17. Candesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, inhibits pathological retinal neovascularization by downregulating VEGF receptor-2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shinsuke; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2012-06-15

    Several studies have examined the anti-angiogenic effects of angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor antagonists; however, the mechanisms underlying these effects are currently unclear. In the present study, we examined the efficacy and the mechanism of candesartan, an AT(1) receptor antagonist, in suppressing pathological retinal neovascularization. We used an in vivo murine oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model and also studied the in vitro proliferation and migration of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMECs) induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A. The regulation of angiogenesis-associated genes such as hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α), VEGF-A, VEGF receptor-1, and VEGF receptor-2 was evaluated with real-time RT-PCR in the OIR model. In the OIR model, candesartan suppressed the pathological neovascularization in a dose-dependent manner, but did not prevent the physiological angiogenesis. However, candesartan did not inhibit VEGF-A-induced proliferation or migration in HRMECs in the in vitro study. When administered interperitoneally in the OIR model, candesartan reduced the upregulation of VEGF receptor-2 in the retina, but had no effects in the other angiogenesis-related genes, such as HIF-1α, VEGF-A, and VEGF receptor-1. These findings indicate that candesartan inhibited the retinal pathological neovascularization, at least in part, by suppressing the expression of VEGF receptor-2, independent of VEGF signaling cascade. Therefore, candesartan may be a useful therapeutic target for the inhibition of retinal neovascularization that has a low risk of serious side effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of angiotensin II and angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade on neointimal formation after stent implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, Hendrik C.; van der Harst, Pim; Roks, Anton J. M.; Buikema, Hendrik; Zijlstra, Felix; van Gilst, Wiek H.; de Smet, Bart J. G. L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the effect of supraphysiological levels of angiotensin II and selective angiotensin II type 1 receptor ( AT1-receptor) blockade on neointimal formation and systemic endothelial function after stent implantation in the rat abdominal aorta. Methods: Male Wistar rats were

  19. Structure-Function Basis of Attenuated Inverse Agonism of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers for Active-State Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezako, Takanobu; Unal, Hamiyet; Karnik, Sadashiva S; Node, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    Ligand-independent signaling by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) can be activated in clinical settings by mechanical stretch and autoantibodies as well as receptor mutations. Transition of the AT1R to the activated state is known to lower inverse agonistic efficacy of clinically used AT1R blockers (ARBs). The structure-function basis for reduced efficacy of inverse agonists is a fundamental aspect that has been understudied not only in relation to the AT1R but also regarding other homologous receptors. Here, we demonstrate that the active-state transition in the AT1R indeed attenuates an inverse agonistic effect of four biphenyl-tetrazole ARBs through changes in specific ligand-receptor interactions. In the ground state, tight interactions of four ARBs with a set of residues (Ser109(TM3), Phe182(ECL2), Gln257(TM6), Tyr292(TM7), and Asn295(TM7)) results in potent inverse agonism. In the activated state, the ARB-AT1R interactions shift to a different set of residues (Val108(TM3), Ser109(TM3), Ala163(TM4), Phe182(ECL2), Lys199(TM5), Tyr292(TM7), and Asn295(TM7)), resulting in attenuated inverse agonism. Interestingly, V108I, A163T, N295A, and F182A mutations in the activated state of the AT1R shift the functional response to the ARB binding toward agonism, but in the ground state the same mutations cause inverse agonism. Our data show that the second extracellular loop is an important regulator of the functional states of the AT1R. Our findings suggest that the quest for discovering novel ARBs, and improving current ARBs, fundamentally depends on the knowledge of the unique sets of residues that mediate inverse agonistic potency in the two states of the AT1R. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  20. Peripherally restricted CB1 receptor blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorvat, Robert J

    2013-09-01

    Antagonists (inverse agonists) of the cannabinoid-1 (CB1) receptor showed promise as new therapies for controlling obesity and related metabolic function/liver disease. These agents, representing diverse chemical series, shared the property of brain penetration due to the initial belief that therapeutic benefit was mainly based on brain receptor interaction. However, undesirable CNS-based side effects of the only marketed agent in this class, rimonabant, led to its removal, and termination of the development of other clinical candidates soon followed. Re-evaluation of this approach has focused on neutral or peripherally restricted (PR) antagonists. Supporting these strategies, pharmacological evidence indicates most if not all of the properties of globally acting agents may be captured by molecules with little brain presence. Methodology that can be used to eliminate BBB penetration and the means (in vitro assays, tissue distribution and receptor occupancy determinations, behavioral paradigms) to identify potential agents with little brain presence is discussed. Focus will be on the pharmacology supporting the contention that reported agents are truly peripherally restricted. Notable examples of these types of compounds are: TM38837 (structure not disclosed); AM6545 (8); JD5037 (15b); RTI-12 (19). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dynamics of nanoparticules detected at 1 AU by S/WAVES onboard STEREO spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belheouane, Soraya; Issautier, Karine; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Le Chat, Gaétan; Czechowski, Andrzej; Zaslavsky, Arnaud; Zouganelis, Yannis; Mann, Ingrid

    In order to interpret in detail the S/WAVES data on the interplanetary nanodust discovered by STEREO at 1 AU [Meyer-Vernet et al., 2009], we study the dynamics of nanoparticles in the inner interplanetary medium as well as the distribution of their velocities and directions of arrival, with a model based on [Czechowski and Mann, 2012]. We deduce the charges released by their impacts on the STEREO spacecraft at 1 AU and their dependence on the position of the spacecraft on their orbits. The model studies nanoparticles of size equal or smaller than about 70 nm, assumed to be created via collisional fragmentation of dust grains of larger size moving on keplerian orbits, and sublimation of dust, meteoroids and comets. The nanoparticles are released near the Sun with initial velocities close to keplerian, and mainly subjected to the Lorentz force calculated with a simple solar wind model. A part of the nanoparticles is accelerated to high speeds of the order of 300 km/s, thereby providing impact charges between 10(-14) and 10(-11) Cb [Belheouane, 2014] which enable them to be detected by S/WAVES, whereas another part is trapped within about 0.2 AU from the Sun. We discuss how the fluxes and direction of arrival at 1 AU are expected to change in function of the solar cycle. These results enable us to interpret in detail the STEREO/WAVES observations [Zaslavsky et al., 2012]; [Pantellini et al., 2013]; [Le Chat et al., 2013]. Belheouane, S. (2014). Nanoparticules dans le vent solaire, observations spatiales et theorie. PhD thesis, Pierre and Marie Curie University UPMC. Czechowski, A. and Mann, I. (2012). Nanodust Dynamics in Interplanetary Space, chapter Nanodust Dynamics in Interplanetary Space. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. Le Chat, G., Zaslavsky, A., Meyer-Vernet, N., Issautier, K., Belheouane, S., Pantellini, F., Maksimovic, M., Zouganelis, I., Bale, S., and Kasper, J. (2013). Interplanetary Nanodust Detection by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory/WAVES Low

  2. [GABA receptors: structure and functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiurenkov, I N; Perfilova, V N

    2010-10-01

    Data on the structure, localization, physiology, and pharmacology of GABA receptors are reviewed. These receptors belong to cis-loop receptors and consist of 16 subunits in various combinations and occur in both central nervous system and peripheral organs. There are a great number of their allosteric modulators, agonists and antagonists. Activation of GABA receptors is accompanied by changes in the permeability of plasmatic membranes for chloride ions, which is followed by depolarization (presynaptic inhibition) or hyperpolarization (postsynaptic inhibition). GABA receptors contain some topographically different binding sites, intended for the interaction both with the main mediator (GABA) and with allosteric regulators such as benzodiazepines, barbiturates, convulsants, ethanol, and neurosteroids.

  3. Levamisole receptors: a second awakening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Richard J.; Robertson, Alan P.; Buxton, Samuel K.; Beech, Robin N.; Charvet, Claude L.; Neveu, Cedric

    2012-01-01

    Levamisole and pyrantel are old (1965) but useful anthelmintics that selectively activate nematode acetylcholine ion-channel receptors; they are used to treat roundworm infections in humans and animals. Interest in their actions has surged, giving rise to new knowledge and technical advances, including an ability to reconstitute receptors that reveal more details of modes of action/resistance. We now know that the receptors are plastic and may form diverse species-dependent subtypes of receptor with different sensitivities to individual cholinergic anthelmintics. Understanding the biology of the levamisole receptors is expected to inform other studies on anthelmintics (ivermectin and emodepside) that act on ion-channels. PMID:22607692

  4. Stoichiometry of δ subunit containing GABA(A) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, B; Mortensen, M; Smart, T G

    2014-02-01

    Although the stoichiometry of the major synaptic αβγ subunit-containing GABAA receptors has consensus support for 2α:2β:1γ, a clear view of the stoichiometry of extrasynaptic receptors containing δ subunits has remained elusive. Here we examine the subunit stoichiometry of recombinant α4β3δ receptors using a reporter mutation and a functional electrophysiological approach. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we inserted a highly characterized 9' serine to leucine mutation into the second transmembrane (M2) region of α4, β3 and δ subunits that increases receptor sensitivity to GABA. Whole-cell, GABA-activated currents were recorded from HEK-293 cells co-expressing different combinations of wild-type (WT) and/or mutant α4(L297S), β3(L284S) and δ(L288S) subunits. Recombinant receptors containing one or more mutant subunits showed increased GABA sensitivity relative to WT receptors by approximately fourfold, independent of the subunit class (α, β or δ) carrying the mutation. GABA dose-response curves of cells co-expressing WT subunits with their respective L9'S mutants exhibited multiple components, with the number of discernible components enabling a subunit stoichiometry of 2α, 2β and 1δ to be deduced for α4β3δ receptors. Varying the cDNA transfection ratio by 10-fold had no significant effect on the number of incorporated δ subunits. Subunit stoichiometry is an important determinant of GABAA receptor function and pharmacology, and δ subunit-containing receptors are important mediators of tonic inhibition in several brain regions. Here we demonstrate a preferred subunit stoichiometry for α4β3δ receptors of 2α, 2β and 1δ. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. MRI issues for ballistic objects: information obtained at 1.5-, 3- and 7-Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedini, Russell D; Karacozoff, Alexandra M; Shellock, Frank G; Xu, Duan; McClellan, R Trigg; Pekmezci, Murat

    2013-07-01

    Few studies exist for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) issues and ballistics, and there are no studies addressing movement, heating, and artifacts associated with ballistics at 3-tesla (T). Movement because of magnetic field interactions and radiofrequency (RF)-induced heating of retained bullets may injure nearby critical structures. Artifacts may also interfere with the diagnostic use of MRI. To investigate these potential hazards of MRI on a sample of bullets and shotgun pellets. Laboratory investigation, ex vivo. Thirty-two different bullets and seven different shotgun pellets, commonly encountered in criminal trauma, were assessed relative to 1.5-, 3-, and 7-T magnetic resonance systems. Magnetic field interactions, including translational attraction and torque, were measured. A representative sample of five bullets were then tested for magnetic field interactions, RF-induced heating, and the generation of artifacts at 3-T. At all static magnetic field strengths, non-steel-containing bullets and pellets exhibited no movement, whereas one steel core bullet and two steel pellets exhibited movement in excess of what might be considered safe for patients in MRI at 1.5-, 3- and 7-Tesla. At 3-T, the maximum temperature increase of five bullets tested was 1.7°C versus background heating of 1.5°C. Of five bullets tested for artifacts, those without a steel core exhibited small signal voids, whereas a single steel core bullet exhibited a very large signal void. Ballistics made of lead with copper or alloy jackets appear to be safe with respect to MRI-related movement at 1.5-, 3-, and 7-T static magnetic fields, whereas ballistics containing steel may pose a danger if near critical body structures because of strong magnetic field interactions. Temperature increases of selected ballistics during 3-T MRI was not clinically significant, even for the ferromagnetic projectiles. Finally, ballistics containing steel generated larger artifacts when compared with ballistics

  6. Structural biology of GABAB receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangaj, Aurel; Fan, Qing R

    2017-10-12

    Metabotropic GABAB receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates slow and prolonged inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain. It functions as a constitutive heterodimer composed of the GABAB1 and GABAB2 subunits. Each subunit contains three domains; the extracellular Venus flytrap module, seven-helix transmembrane region and cytoplasmic tail. In recent years, the three-dimensional structures of GABAB receptor extracellular and intracellular domains have been elucidated. These structures reveal the molecular basis of ligand recognition, receptor heterodimerization and receptor activation. Here we provide a brief review of the GABAB receptor structures, with an emphasis on describing the different ligand-bound states of the receptor. We will also compare these with the known structures of related GPCRs to shed light on the molecular mechanisms of activation and regulation in the GABAB system, as well as GPCR dimers in general. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterisation of net type thermal insulators at 1.8 K low boundary temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Peón-Hernández, G; Szeless, Balázs

    1997-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider's superconducting magnets are cooled by superfluid helium at 1.8 K and housed in cryostats that minimise the heat inleak to this temperature level by extracting heat at 70 and 5 K. In the first generation of prototype cryostats, the radiative heat to the 1.8 K temperature level accounted for 70 % of the total heat inleak. An alternative to enhance the cryostat thermal performance incorporates a thermalised radiation screen at 5 K. In order to avoid contact between the 5 K radiation screen and the cold mass, insulators are placed between both surfaces. Sets of commercial fibre glass nets are insulator candidates to minimise the heat inleak caused by a accidental contact between the two temperature levels. A model to estimate their performance is presented. A set-up to thermally characterise them has been designed and is also described in the paper. Finally, results as a function of the number of the spacer nets, the boundary temperatures and the compressive force in the spacer are pre...

  8. Unveiling the Galaxy Population at 1.3 < z < 4: the HUDF05 NICMOS Parallel Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Sara M.; deMello, Duilia F.; Wiklind, Tomy; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Mountain, Matt

    2010-01-01

    Using the Hubble Ultra Deep Field Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (HUDF-NICMOS) UDF05 parallel fields, we cross-matched 301 out of 630 galaxies with the ACS filters V606 and z850, NICMOS filters J110 and H160, and Spitzer IRAC filters at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 , and 8.0 (mu)m. We modeled the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to estimate: photometric redshifts, dust extinction, stellar mass, bolometric luminosity, starburst age and metallicity. To validate the photometric redshifts, comparisons with 16 spectroscopic redshifts give 75% within Delta or approx. 1.3. Based on the robustness of the photometric redshifts, we analyze a subsample of the 301 galaxies at 1.3 < or = z < or = 2 (35 objects) and 3 < or = z < or = 4 (31 objects) and determine that L(BoI) and the star formation rate increase significantly from z approx. 1.5 to 4. The Balmer decrement is indicative of more evolved galaxies, and at high redshifts, they serve as records of some of the first galaxies. Therefore, the galaxies in this sample are great candidates for future surveys with the James Webb Space Telescope and Atacama Large Millimeter Array.

  9. Climate impacts on human livelihoods at 1.5° and 2° of warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissner, Tabea

    2017-04-01

    The measurement of impacts of climate change on socio-economic systems remains challenging and especially multi-dimensional outcome measures remain scarce. Climate impacts can directly affect many dimensions of human livelihoods, which cannot be addressed by monetary assessments alone. Multi-dimensional measures are essential in order to understand the full range of consequences of climate change and to understand the costs that higher levels of warming may have, not only in economic terms, but also in terms of non-market impacts on human livelihood. The AHEAD framework aims at measuring "Adequate Human livelihood conditions for wEll-being And Development" in a multi-dimensional framework, allowing to focus on resources and conditions which are a requirement to attain well-being. In this contribution we build on previous implementations of AHEAD and focus on differences in climate impacts at 1.5° and 2° of warming in order to improve our understanding of the societal consequences of these different warming levels.

  10. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background temperature at 1. 47 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensadoun, M.J.

    1991-11-01

    A radiofrequency-gain total power radiometer measured the intensity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at a frequency of 1.47 GHz (20.4 cm wavelength) from White Mountain, California, in September 1988 and from the South Pole, Antarctica, in December 1989. The CMB thermodynamic temperature, TCMB, is 2.27 {plus minus} 0.25 K (68% C.L.) measured from White Mountain and 2.26 {plus minus} 0.21 K from the South Pole site. The combined result is 2.27 {plus minus} 0.19 K. The correction for galactic emission has been derived from scaled low-frequency maps and constitutes the main source, of error. The atmospheric signal is found by extrapolation from zenith scan measurements at higher frequencies. The result is consistent with previous low-frequency measurements, including a measurement at 1.41 GHz (Levin et al. 1988) made with an earlier version of this instrument. The result is {approximately}2.5 {sigma} ({approximately}l% probability) from the 2.74 {plus minus} 0.02,K global average CMB temperature.

  11. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background temperature at 1.47 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensadoun, Marc John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    A radiofrequency-gain total power radiometer measured the intensity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at a frequency of 1.47 GHz (20.4 cm wavelength) from White Mountain, California, in September 1988 and from the South Pole, Antarctica, in December 1989. The CMB thermodynamic temperature, TCMB, is 2.27 ± 0.25 K (68% C.L.) measured from White Mountain and 2.26 ± 0.21 K from the South Pole site. The combined result is 2.27 ± 0.19 K. The correction for galactic emission has been derived from scaled low-frequency maps and constitutes the main source, of error. The atmospheric signal is found by extrapolation from zenith scan measurements at higher frequencies. The result is consistent with previous low-frequency measurements, including a measurement at 1.41 GHz (Levin et al. 1988) made with an earlier version of this instrument. The result is ~2.5 σ (~l% probability) from the 2.74 ± 0.02,K global average CMB temperature.

  12. Continuous-flow DNP polarizer for MRI applications at 1.5 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denysenkov, V.; Terekhov, M.; Maeder, R.; Fischer, S.; Zangos, S.; Vogl, T.; Prisner, T. F.

    2017-03-01

    Here we describe a new hyperpolarization approach for magnetic resonance imaging applications at 1.5 T. Proton signal enhancements of more than 20 were achieved with a newly designed multimode microwave resonator situated inside the bore of the imager and used for Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization of the water proton signal. Different from other approaches in our setup the hyperpolarization is achieved continuously by liquid water flowing through the polarizer under continuous microwave excitation. With an available flow rate of up to 1.5 ml/min, which should be high enough for DNP MR angiography applications in small animals like mice and rats. The hyperpolarized liquid cooled to physiological temperature can be routed by a mechanical switch to a quartz capillary for injection into the blood vessels of the target object. This new approach allows hyperpolarization of protons without the need of an additional magnet and avoids the losses arising from the transfer of the hyperpolarized solution between magnets. The signal-to-noise improvement of this method is demonstrated on two- and three-dimensional phantoms of blood vessels.

  13. Biodegradation of dispersed oil in Arctic seawater at -1°C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly M McFarlin

    Full Text Available As offshore oil and gas exploration expands in the Arctic, it is important to expand the scientific understanding of arctic ecology and environmental impact to mitigate operational risks. Understanding the fate of oil in arctic seawater is a key factor for consideration. Here we report the chemical loss due to the biodegradation of Alaska North Slope (ANS crude oil that would occur in the water column following the successful dispersion of a surface oil slick. Primary biodegradation and mineralization were measured in mesocosms containing Arctic seawater collected from the Chukchi Sea, Alaska, incubated at -1°C. Indigenous microorganisms degraded both fresh and weathered oil, in both the presence and absence of Corexit 9500, with oil losses ranging from 46-61% and up to 11% mineralization over 60 days. When tested alone, 14% of 50 ppm Corexit 9500 was mineralized within 60 days. Our study reveals that microorganisms indigenous to Arctic seawater are capable of performing extensive biodegradation of chemically and physically dispersed oil at an environmentally relevant temperature (-1°C without any additional nutrients.

  14. In vivo near-IR imaging of approximal dental decay at 1,310 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staninec, Michal; Lee, Chulsung; Darling, Cynthia L; Fried, Daniel

    2010-04-01

    The high transparency of dental enamel in the near-IR (NIR) light at 1,310-nm can be exploited for imaging dental caries without the use of ionizing radiation (X-rays). We present the results of the first in vivo imaging study in which NIR images were acquired of approximal contact surfaces. NIR imaging hand-pieces were developed and attached to a compact InGaAs focal plane array and subsequently used to acquire in vivo NIR images of 33 caries lesions on 18 test subjects. The carious lesions were discernible on bitewing radiographs, but were not visible upon clinical examination. NIR images were acquired in vivo from three directions and the majority of lesions examined were too small to require restoration, based on accepted bitewing radiograph criteria. All but one of the 33 lesions examined were successfully imaged from at least one direction. This first in vivo study of imaging at the 1,310-nm wavelength region shows that NIR imaging has great potential as a screening tool for the detection of approximal lesions without the use of ionizing radiation. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. X-ray structure of imidazolonepropionase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens at 1.87 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, Rajiv; Kumaran, Desigan; Burley, Stephen K.; Swaminathan, Subramanyam (SGX); (BNL)

    2010-01-12

    Histidine degradation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens involves four enzymes, including histidase (EC 4.3.1.3), urocanase (EC 4.2.1.49), imidazolonepropionase (EC 3.5.2.7), and N-formylglutamate amidohydrolase (EC 3.5.3.8). The third enzyme of the pathway, imidazolone-propionase, a 45.6 kDa protein, catalyzes conversion of imidazolone-5-propanoate to N-forminio-L-glutamate. Initial studies of the role of imidazolonepropionase in histidine degradation were published in 1953. Subsequent publications have been limited to enzyme kinetics, crystallization, and a recently reported structure determination. The imidazolonepropionases are members of metallodepenent-hydrolases (or amidohydroase) superfamily, which includs ureases, adenosine deaminases, phosphotriesterases, dihydroorotases, allantoinases, hydantoinases, adenine and cytosine deaminases, imidazolonepropionases, aryldial-kylphosphatases, chlorohydrolases, and formylmethanofuran dehydroases. Proteins belonging to this large group share a common three-dimensional structural motif (an eightfold {alpha}/{beta} or TIM barrel) with similar active sites. Most superfamily members also share a conserved metal binding site, involving four histidine residues and one aspartic acid. Imidazolonepropionase is one of the targets selected for X-ray crystallpgrahpic structure determination by the New York Structural GenomiX Research Consortium (NYSGXRC) Target ID: 9252b to correlate the structure function relationship of poorly studied by important enzyme. Here they report the crystal structure of imidazolonepropionase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens determined at 1.87 {angstrom} resolution.

  16. Structure of oxalate decarboxylase from Bacillus subtilis at 1.75 A resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Ruchi; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Kinsland, Cynthia; Begley, Tadhg P; Ealick, Steven E

    2002-06-18

    Oxalate decarboxylase is a manganese-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of oxalate to formate and carbon dioxide. We have determined the structure of oxalate decarboxylase from Bacillus subtilis at 1.75 A resolution in the presence of formate. The structure reveals a hexamer with 32-point symmetry in which each monomer belongs to the cupin family of proteins. Oxalate decarboxylase is further classified as a bicupin because it contains two cupin folds, possibly resulting from gene duplication. Each oxalate decarboxylase cupin domain contains one manganese binding site. Each of the oxalate decarboxylase domains is structurally similar to oxalate oxidase, which catalyzes the manganese-dependent oxidative decarboxylation of oxalate to carbon dioxide and hydrogen peroxide. Amino acid side chains in the two metal binding sites of oxalate decarboxylase and the metal binding site of oxalate oxidase are very similar. Four manganese binding residues (three histidines and one glutamate) are conserved as well as a number of hydrophobic residues. The most notable difference is the presence of Glu333 in the metal binding site of the second cupin domain of oxalate decarboxylase. We postulate that this domain is responsible for the decarboxylase activity and that Glu333 serves as a proton donor in the production of formate. Mutation of Glu333 to alanine reduces the catalytic activity by a factor of 25. The function of the other domain in oxalate decarboxylase is not yet known.

  17. X-ray structure of a dihydropyrimidinase from Thermus sp. at 1.3 A resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abendroth, Jan; Niefind, Karsten; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2002-06-28

    Dihydropyrimidinases (hydantoinases) catalyse the reversible hydrolytic ring-opening of cyclic diamides such as dihydropyrimidines in the catabolism of pyrimidines. In biotechnology, these enzymes find application in the enantiospecific production of amino acids from racemic hydantoins. The crystal structure of a D-enantio-specific dihydropyrimidinase from Thermus sp. (D-hydantoinase) was solved de novo by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction phasing. In spite of a large unit cell the D-hydantoinase crystals exhibit excellent diffraction properties. The structure was subsequently refined at 1.30 A resolution against native data. The core of D-hydantoinase consists of a (alpha/beta)(8)-barrel, which is flanked by a beta-sheet domain and some additional helices. In the active site, a carboxylated lysine residue and the catalytically active hydroxide ion bridge a binuclear zinc centre. The tertiary structure and shape of the active site show strong homology to that of ureases, dihydroorotases, and phosphotriesterases. The homology of the active site was exploited for in silicio docking of substrates in the active site. This could shed light both on the substrate binding in hydantoinases and on the recently highly discussed origin of the proton in the course of hydantoinase catalysis. (c) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  18. Suicidal ideation at 1-year post-stroke: A nationwide survey in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Shi, Yu-Zhi; Zhang, Ning; Wang, Shuo; Ungvari, Gabor S; Ng, Chee H; Wang, Yi-Long; Zhao, Xing-Quan; Wang, Yong-Jun; Wang, Chun-Xue; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    Few studies on suicidal ideation have been conducted in post-stroke patients in China. This national study examined suicidal ideation at 1-year post-stroke and explored its demographic and clinical correlates. A total of 1418 patients with ischemic stroke were included in 56 hospitals nationwide. Demographic, clinical characteristics and neuro-imaging information were collected with standardized instruments, including assessment of stroke severity, depression, cognitive impairment, stroke recurrence, physical disability and insomnia. Suicidal ideation was measured using item 3 of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. The frequency of suicidal ideation in this study was 6.6%. Multivariate analyses revealed that disability (OR=2.07, 95% CI=1.09-3.05), stroke recurrence (OR=4.13, 95% CI=1.74-9.77) and insomnia early (OR=1.87, 95% CI=1.03-3.39), middle (OR=2.66, 95% CI=1.46-4.85) and late (OR=2.35, 95% CI=1.31-4.19) at the 1-year follow-up and post-stroke depression (OR=2.16, 95% CI=1.23-3.82) were significantly associated with post-stroke suicidal ideation. Post-stroke depression, disability, insomnia and stroke recurrence are possible risk factors of suicidal ideation that warrant attention in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Design of a silicon RCE Schottky photodetector working at 1.55 {mu}m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casalino, M. [Istituto per la Microelettronica e Microsistemi (IMM), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via P. Castellino, 80131 Naples (Italy); Universita degli studi ' Mediterranea' di Reggio Calabria, Localita Feo di Vito, 89060 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Sirleto, L. [Istituto per la Microelettronica e Microsistemi (IMM), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via P. Castellino, 80131 Naples (Italy)]. E-mail: luigi.sirleto@imm.cnr.it; Moretti, L. [Universita degli studi ' Mediterranea' di Reggio Calabria, Localita Feo di Vito, 89060 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Della Corte, F. [Universita degli studi ' Mediterranea' di Reggio Calabria, Localita Feo di Vito, 89060 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Rendina, I. [Istituto per la Microelettronica e Microsistemi (IMM), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via P. Castellino, 80131 Naples (Italy)

    2006-12-15

    In this paper, the design of a resonant cavity-enhanced (RCE) Schottky photodetector, based on internal photoemission effect and working at 1.55 {mu}m, is presented. In order to estimate the theoretical quantum efficiency we take the advantage of analytical formulation of the internal photoemission effect (Fowler theory), and its extension for thin films, while for the optical analysis of device a numerical method, based on the transfer matrix method, has been implemented. Finally, we complete our design calculating bandwidth and bandwidth-efficiency product. Our numerical results prove that a quantum efficiency of 0.1% is obtained at resonant wavelength (1.55 {mu}m) with a very thin absorbing metal layer (30 nm). Theoretical values of 100 GHz and 100 MHz were obtained, respectively, for the carrier-transit time limited 3-dB bandwidth and bandwidth-efficiency. The proposed photodetector can work at room temperature and its fabrication is completely compatible with standard silicon technology.

  20. Microcavity Silicon Photodetectors at 1.55 μm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Casalino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The design, the realization, and the characterization of silicon resonant cavity enhanced (RCE photodetectors, working at 1.55 μm, are reported. The photodetectors are constituted by a Fabry-Perot microcavity incorporating a Schottky diode. The working principle is based on the internal photoemission effect. We investigated two types of structures: top and back-illuminated. Concerning the top-illuminated photodetectors, a theoretical and numerical analysis has been provided and the device quantum efficiency has been calculated. Moreover, a comparison among three different photodetectors, having as Schottky metal: gold, silver, or copper, was proposed. Concerning the back-illuminated devices, two kinds of Cu/p-Si RCE photodetectors, having various bottom-mirror reflectivities, were realized and characterized. Device performances in terms of responsivity, free spectral range, and finesse were theoretically and experimentally calculated in order to prove an enhancement in efficiency due to the cavity effect. The back-illuminated device fabrication process is completely compatible with the standard silicon technology.

  1. Central angiotensin II stimulates cutaneous water intake behavior via an angiotensin II type-1 receptor pathway in the Japanese tree frog Hyla japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maejima, Sho; Konno, Norifumi; Matsuda, Kouhei; Uchiyama, Minoru

    2010-08-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulates oral water intake by causing thirst in all terrestrial vertebrates except anurans. Anuran amphibians do not drink orally but absorb water osmotically through ventral skin. In this study, we examined the role of Ang II on the regulation of water-absorption behavior in the Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica). In fully hydrated frogs, intracerebroventricular (ICV) and intralymphatic sac (ILS) injection of Ang II significantly extended the residence time of water in a dose-dependent manner. Ang II-dependent water uptake was inhibited by ICV pretreatment with an angiotensin II type-1 (AT(1)) receptor antagonist but not a type-2 (AT(2)) receptor antagonist. These results suggest that Ang II stimulates water-absorption behavior in the tree frog via an AT(1)-like but not AT(2)-like receptor. We then cloned and characterized cDNA of the tree frog AT(1) receptor from the brain. The tree frog AT(1) receptor cDNA encodes a 361 amino acid residue protein, which is 87% identical to the toad (Bufo marinus) AT(1) receptor and exhibits the functional characteristics of an Ang II receptor. AT(1) receptor mRNAs were found to be present in a number of tissues including brain (especially in the diencephalon), lung, large intestine, kidney and ventral pelvic skin. When tree frogs were exposed to dehydrating conditions, AT(1) receptor mRNA significantly increased in the diencephalon and the rhombencephalon. These data suggest that central Ang II may control water intake behavior via an AT(1) receptor on the diencephalon and rhombencephalon in anuran amphibians and may have implications for water consumption in vertebrates. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Experimental study of radium partitioning between anorthite and melt at 1 atm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, S; Burnett, D; Asimow, P; Phinney, D; Hutcheon, I

    2007-03-08

    We present the first experimental radium mineral/melt partitioning data, specifically between anorthite and a CMAS melt at atmospheric pressure. Ion microprobe measurement of coexisting anorthite and glass phases produces a molar D{sub Ra} = 0.040 {+-} 0.006 and D{sub Ra}/D{sub Ba} = 0.23 {+-} 0.05 at 1400 C. Our results indicate that lattice strain partitioning models fit the divalent (Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra) partition coefficient data of this study well, supporting previous work on crustal melting and magma chamber dynamics that has relied on such models to approximate radium partitioning behavior in the absence of experimentally determined values.

  3. Polyaza cryptand receptor selective for dihydrogen phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateus, Pedro; Delgado, Rita; Brandão, Paula; Félix, Vítor

    2009-11-20

    A hexaamine cage with pyridyl spacers was synthesized in good yield by a [2+3] Schiff-base condensation followed by sodium borohydride reduction. The protonation constants of the receptor as well as its association constants with Cl(-), NO(3)(-), AcO(-), ClO(4)(-), SO(4)(2-), H(2)PO(4)(-), and H(2)AsO(4)(-) were determined by potentiometry at 298.2 +/- 0.1 K in H(2)O/MeOH (50:50 v/v) and at ionic strength 0.10 +/- 0.01 M in KTsO. These studies revealed that although dihydrogen phosphate is less charged than sulfate, it is still appreciably bound by the receptor at low pH, suggesting that the pyridyl nitrogen is accepting hydrogen bonds from dihydrogen phosphate. It is also shown that dihydrogen phosphate is capable of effectively competing with sulfate for the receptor at higher pH, being selective for hydrogen phosphate at pH about 7.0. (31)P NMR experiments supported these findings. The fact that the receptor shows such a marked preference for hydrogen phosphate based mainly in its hydrogen bond accepting/donating ability in a highly competitive medium such as water/methanol mixed solvent is quite remarkable. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction determinations of anion associations between H(6)pyr(6+) receptor and nitrate, sulfate, and phosphate are consistent with the existence of [(H(6)pyr)(NO(3))(3)(H(2)O)(3)](3+), [(H(6)pyr)(SO(4))(2)(H(2)O)(4)](2+), and [(H(6)pyr)(HPO(4))(2)(H(2)PO(4))(H(2)O)(2)](+) cations. One nitrate anion is embedded into the H(6)pyr(6+) cage of the first supermolecule whereas in the second and third ones the anions are located in the periphery of the macrobicycle.

  4. Therapeutic Potential of 5-HT2C Receptor Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanna H. Jensen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin 2C receptors are G protein-coupled receptors expressed by GABAergic, glutamatergic, and dopaminergic neurons. Anatomically, they are present in various brain regions, including cortical areas, hippocampus, ventral midbrain, striatum, nucleus accumbens, hypothalamus, and amygdala. A large body of evidence supports a critical role of serotonin 2C receptors in mediating the interaction between serotonergic and dopaminergic systems, which is at the basis of their proposed involvement in the regulation of mood, affective behavior, and memory. In addition, their expression in specific neuronal populations in the hypothalamus would be critical for their role in the regulation of feeding behavior. Modulation of these receptors has therefore been proposed to be of interest in the search for novel pharmacological strategies for the treatment of various pathological conditions, including schizophrenia and mood disorders, as well as obesity. More precisely, blockade of serotonin 2C receptors has been suggested to provide antidepressant and anxiolytic benefit, while stimulation of these receptors may offer therapeutic benefit for the treatment of psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia and obesity. In addition, modulation of serotonin 2C receptors may offer cognitive-enhancing potential, albeit still a matter of debate. In the present review, the most compelling evidence from the literature is presented and tentative hypotheses with respect to existing controversies are outlined.

  5. Segregation of receptor-ligand complexes in cell adhesion zones: Phase diagrams and role of thermal membrane roughness

    OpenAIRE

    Rozycki, Bartosz; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    The adhesion zone of immune cells, the 'immunological synapse', exhibits characteristic domains of receptor-ligand complexes. The domain formation is likely caused by a length difference of the receptor-ligand complexes, and has been investigated in experiments in which T cells adhere to supported membranes with anchored ligands. For supported membranes with two types of anchored ligands, MHCp and ICAM1, that bind to the receptors TCR and LFA1 in the cell membrane, the coexistence of domains ...

  6. Aryl- and heteroaryl-substituted phenylalanines as AMPA receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szymańska, Ewa; Chałupnik, Paulina; Johansen, Tommy Nørskov

    2017-01-01

    in radioligand binding assays at native rat ionotropic glutamate receptors. The most interesting compound in this series, (RS)-2-amino-3-(3'-hydroxy-5-(1H-pyrazol-4-yl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-yl)propanoic acid 7e, showed the binding affinity of 4.6 µM for native AMPA receptors and almost 5-fold lower affinity...... for kainic acid receptors. Furthermore, 7e was evaluated at recombinant homomeric rat GluA2 and GluA3 receptors. Recently reported X-ray structures 5CBR and 5CBS, representing two distinct antagonist binding modes, were used as templates for molecular docking of the synthesized series. Binding data supported...

  7. Diffusion tensor imaging of the spinal cord at 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, C. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Tuebingen (Germany). Sektion fuer Experimentelle Radiologie; CNR-INFM CRS-Soft, La Sapienza-Univ. Roma (Italy); Enrico Fern Center, Roma (Italy); Boss, A.; Martirosian, P.; Steidle, G.; Schick, F. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Tuebingen (Germany). Sektion fuer Experimentelle Radiologie; Lindig, T.M. [Enrico Fern Center, Roma (Italy); Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Tuebingen (Germany). Sektion fuer Experimentelle Kernspinresonanz des ZNS; Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Zentrum fuer Neurologie und Hertie-Inst. fuer klinische Hirnforschung; Maetzler, W. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Zentrum fuer Neurologie und Hertie-Inst. fuer klinische Hirnforschung; Claussen, C.D. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Klose, U. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Tuebingen (Germany). Sektion fuer Experimentelle Kernspinresonanz des ZNS

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: The feasibility of highly resolved diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the human cervical spinal cord was tested on a clinical MR unit operating at 3.0 Tesla. DTI parametrical maps and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were compared to results recorded at 1.5 Tesla. Materials and Methods: Eight healthy volunteers and one patient participated in the study. A transverse oriented single-shot ECG-triggered echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence with double spin-echo diffusion preparation was applied for highly resolved DTI of the spinal cord. The signal yield, fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean diffusivity (MD) were compared for both field strengths. The clinical applicability of the protocol was also tested in one patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) at 3.0 T. Results: A mean increase in SNR of 95.7 {+-} 4.6% was found at 3.0 Tesla compared to 1.5 Tesla. Improved quality of the DTI parametrical maps was observed at higher field strength (p < 0.02). Comparable FA and MD (reported in units of 10 - 3 mm2/s) values were computed in the dorsal white matter at both field strengths (1.5 T: FA = 0.75 {+-} 0.08, MD = 0.84 {+-} 0.12, 3.0 T: FA = 0.74 {+-} 0.04, MD = 0.93 {+-} 0.14). The DTI images exhibited diagnostic image quality in the patient. At the site of the diseased corticospinal tract, a decrease of 46.0 {+-} 3.8% in FA (0.40 {+-} 0.03) and an increase of 50.3 {+-} 5.6% in MD (1.40 {+-} 0.05) were found in the ALS patient. (orig.)

  8. SPARC: Demonstrate burst-buffer-based checkpoint/restart on ATS-1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldfield, Ron A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ulmer, Craig D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Widener, Patrick [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ward, H. Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Recent high-performance computing (HPC) platforms such as the Trinity Advanced Technology System (ATS-1) feature burst buffer resources that can have a dramatic impact on an application’s I/O performance. While these non-volatile memory (NVM) resources provide a new tier in the storage hierarchy, developers must find the right way to incorporate the technology into their applications in order to reap the benefits. Similar to other laboratories, Sandia is actively investigating ways in which these resources can be incorporated into our existing libraries and workflows without burdening our application developers with excessive, platform-specific details. This FY18Q1 milestone summaries our progress in adapting the Sandia Parallel Aerodynamics and Reentry Code (SPARC) in Sandia’s ATDM program to leverage Trinity’s burst buffers for checkpoint/restart operations. We investigated four different approaches with varying tradeoffs in this work: (1) simply updating job script to use stage-in/stage out burst buffer directives, (2) modifying SPARC to use LANL’s hierarchical I/O (HIO) library to store/retrieve checkpoints, (3) updating Sandia’s IOSS library to incorporate the burst buffer in all meshing I/O operations, and (4) modifying SPARC to use our Kelpie distributed memory library to store/retrieve checkpoints. Team members were successful in generating initial implementation for all four approaches, but were unable to obtain performance numbers in time for this report (reasons: initial problem sizes were not large enough to stress I/O, and SPARC refactor will require changes to our code). When we presented our work to the SPARC team, they expressed the most interest in the second and third approaches. The HIO work was favored because it is lightweight, unobtrusive, and should be portable to ATS-2. The IOSS work is seen as a long-term solution, and is favored because all I/O work (including checkpoints) can be deferred to a single library.

  9. Investigation of the RF efficiency of inductively coupled hydrogen plasmas at 1 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauner, D.; Mattei, S.; Briefi, S.; Fantz, U.; Hatayama, A.; Lettry, J.; Nishida, K.; Tran, M. Q.

    2017-08-01

    The power requirements of RF heated sources for negative hydrogen ions in fusion are substantial, which poses strong demands on the generators and components of the RF circuit. Consequently, an increase of the RF coupling efficiency would be highly beneficial. Fundamental investigations of the RF efficiency in inductively coupled hydrogen and deuterium discharges in cylindrical symmetry are conducted at the lab experiment CHARLIE. The experiment is equipped with several diagnostics including optical emission spectroscopy and a movable floating double probe to monitor the plasma parameters. The presented investigations are performed in hydrogen at a varying pressure between 0.3 and 10 Pa, utilizing a conventional helical ICP coil driven at a frequency of 1 MHz and a fixed power of 520 W for plasma generation. The coupling efficiency is strongly affected by the variation in pressure, reaching up to 85 % between 1 and 3 Pa while dropping down to only 50 % at 0.3 Pa, which is the relevant operating pressure for negative hydrogen ion sources for fusion. Due to the lower power coupling, also the measured electron density at 0.3 Pa is only 5 . 1016 m-3, while it reaches up to 2.5 . 1017 m-3 with increasing coupling efficiency. In order to gain information on the spatially resolved aspects of RF coupling and plasma heating which are not diagnostically accessible, first simulations of the discharge by an electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo collision method have been conducted and are compared to the measurement data. At 1 Pa, the simulated data corresponds well to the results of both axially resolved probe measurements and radially resolved emission profiles obtained via OES. Thereby, information regarding the radial distribution of the electron density and mean energy is provided, revealing a radial distribution of the electron density which is well described by a Bessel profile.

  10. MR imaging of the chest: a practical approach at 1.5T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puderbach, M; Hintze, C; Ley, S; Eichinger, M; Kauczor, H-U; Biederer, J

    2007-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is capable of imaging infiltrative lung diseases as well as solid lung pathologies with high sensitivity. The broad use of lung MRI was limited by the long study time as well as its sensitivity to motion and susceptibility artifacts. These disadvantages were overcome by the utilisation of new techniques such as parallel imaging. This article aims to propose a standard MR imaging protocol at 1.5T and presents a spectrum of indications. The standard protocol comprises non-contrast-enhanced sequences. Following a GRE localizer (2D-FLASH), a coronal T2w single-shot half-Fourier TSE (HASTE) sequence with a high sensitivity for infiltrates and a transversal T1w 3D-GRE (VIBE) sequence with a high sensitivity for small lesions are acquired in a single breath hold. Afterwards, a coronal steady-state free precession sequence (TrueFISP) in free breathing is obtained. This sequence has a high sensitivity for central pulmonary embolism. Distinct cardiac dysfunctions as well as an impairment of the breathing mechanism are visible. The last step of the basic protocol is a transversal T2w-STIR (T2-TIRM) in a multi-breath holds technique to visualize enlarged lymph nodes as well as skeletal lesions. The in-room time is approximately 15min. The extended protocol comprises contrast-enhanced sequences (3D-GRE sequence (VIBE) after contrast media; about five additional minutes). Indications are tumorous lesions, unclear (malignant) pleural effusions and inflammatory diseases (vaskulitis). A perfusion analysis can be achieved using a 3D-GRE in shared echo-technique (TREAT) with a high temporal resolution. This protocol can be completed using a MR-angiography (3D-FLASH) with high spatial resolution. The in-room time for the complete protocol is approximately 30min.

  11. Copy number variation at 1q21.1 associated with neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diskin, Sharon J; Hou, Cuiping; Glessner, Joseph T; Attiyeh, Edward F; Laudenslager, Marci; Bosse, Kristopher; Cole, Kristina; Mossé, Yaël P; Wood, Andrew; Lynch, Jill E; Pecor, Katlyn; Diamond, Maura; Winter, Cynthia; Wang, Kai; Kim, Cecilia; Geiger, Elizabeth A; McGrady, Patrick W; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; London, Wendy B; Shaikh, Tamim H; Bradfield, Jonathan; Grant, Struan F A; Li, Hongzhe; Devoto, Marcella; Rappaport, Eric R; Hakonarson, Hakon; Maris, John M

    2009-06-18

    Common copy number variations (CNVs) represent a significant source of genetic diversity, yet their influence on phenotypic variability, including disease susceptibility, remains poorly understood. To address this problem in human cancer, we performed a genome-wide association study of CNVs in the childhood cancer neuroblastoma, a disease in which single nucleotide polymorphism variations are known to influence susceptibility. We first genotyped 846 Caucasian neuroblastoma patients and 803 healthy Caucasian controls at approximately 550,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms, and performed a CNV-based test for association. We then replicated significant observations in two independent sample sets comprised of a total of 595 cases and 3,357 controls. Here we describe the identification of a common CNV at chromosome 1q21.1 associated with neuroblastoma in the discovery set, which was confirmed in both replication sets. This CNV was validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, fluorescent in situ hybridization and analysis of matched tumour specimens, and was shown to be heritable in an independent set of 713 cancer-free parent-offspring trios. We identified a previously unknown transcript within the CNV that showed high sequence similarity to several neuroblastoma breakpoint family (NBPF) genes and represents a new member of this gene family (NBPF23). This transcript was preferentially expressed in fetal brain and fetal sympathetic nervous tissues, and the expression level was strictly correlated with CNV state in neuroblastoma cells. These data demonstrate that inherited copy number variation at 1q21.1 is associated with neuroblastoma and implicate a previously unknown neuroblastoma breakpoint family gene in early tumorigenesis of this childhood cancer.

  12. Mechanisms of acute neurovascular protection with AT1 blockade after stroke: Effect of prestroke hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Alhusban

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of adult disability worldwide. Improving stroke outcome requires an orchestrated interplay that involves up regulation of pro-survival pathways and a concomitant suppression of pro-apoptotic mediators. In this investigation, we assessed the involvement of eNOS in the AT1 blocker-mediated protective and pro-recovery effects in animals with hypertension. We also evaluated the effect of acute eNOS inhibition in hypertensive animals. To achieve these goals, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR were implanted with blood pressure transmitters, and randomized to receive either an eNOS inhibitor (L-NIO or saline one hour before cerebral ischemia induction. After 3 hours of ischemia, animals were further randomized to receive either candesartan or saline at the time of reperfusion and sacrificed either 24 hours or 7 days later. Candesartan induced an early protective effect that was independent of eNOS inhibition (50% improvement in motor function. However, the protective effect of candesartan was associated with about five fold up regulation of BDNF expression and about three fold reduction in ER stress markers, in an eNOS dependent manner. The early benefit of a single dose of candesartan, present at 24 hours after stroke, was diminished at 7 days, perhaps due to a failure to induce an angiogenic response in these hypertensive animals. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate an early prorecovery effect of candesartan at both functional and molecular levels. Candesartan induced prorecovery signaling was mediated through eNOS. This effect was not maintained at 7 days after experimental ischemia.

  13. Carotid artery stenting with emboli protection surveillance study: outcomes at 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Theodore L; Strickman, Neil; Davis, Thomas; Kumar, Vinay; Mishkel, Greg; Foster, Malcolm; Donohoe, Dennis; Britto, Suzanne; Ansel, Gary

    2010-06-29

    The CASES-PMS (Carotid Artery Stenting With Emboli Protection Surveillance-Post-Marketing Study) multicenter, prospective, single-arm, surveillance study was designed to assess the safety and efficacy of carotid artery stenting (CAS) when performed by physicians with varied experience in CAS utilizing a formal training program. Whether the excellent results achieved at 30 days would be sustained to 1 year was the subject of the current investigation. Previously, the pivotal SAPPHIRE (Stenting and Angioplasty with Protection of Patients with High Risk for Endarterectomy) trial demonstrated that CAS was not inferior to carotid endarterectomy (CEA) when performed by physicians experienced in carotid stenting. High surgical-risk patients with de novo atherosclerotic or post-endarterectomy restenotic lesions in native carotid arteries were enrolled at participating centers. Inclusion and exclusion criteria matched those of the SAPPHIRE trial. The primary end point was a composite of 30-day major adverse events (MAE) including death, any stroke, or myocardial infarction. A total of 1,492 patients were enrolled at 73 sites. The primary end point of 30-day MAE was 5.0%, meeting criteria for noninferiority to the prespecified objective performance criteria (OPC) established by the SAPPHIRE trial. The 1-year cumulative percentage of MAE was 12.5% by Kaplan-Meier analysis. All strokes to 30 days plus ipsilateral stroke between 31 and 360 days with CASES-PMS (5.4%) was similar to the rate seen with the SAPPHIRE trial stent cohort (4.9%). There were no significant differences in outcomes at 1 year by symptom status and high-risk status. With the formalized training program utilized in this study, physicians with varied experience in carotid stenting can achieve similar short- and longer-term results to the highly experienced SAPPHIRE Investigators. (Carotid Artery Stenting With Emboli Protection Surveillance-Post-Marketing Study [CASES-PMS]; NCT00231231). Copyright (c) 2010

  14. MAS receptors mediate vasoprotective and atheroprotective effects of candesartan upon the recovery of vascular angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-angiotensin-(1-7)-MAS axis functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernomian, Larissa; do Prado, Alejandro F; Gomes, Mayara S; Pernomian, Laena; da Silva, Carlos H T P; Gerlach, Raquel F; de Oliveira, Ana M

    2015-10-05

    AT1 antagonists effectively prevent atherosclerosis since AT1 upregulation and angiotensin II-induced proinflammatory actions are critical to atherogenesis. Despite the classic mechanisms underlying the vasoprotective and atheroprotective actions of AT1 antagonists, the cross-talk between angiotensin-converting enzyme-angiotensin II-AT1 and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-angiotensin-(1-7)-MAS axes suggests other mechanisms beyond AT1 blockage in such effects. For instance, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activity is inhibited by reactive oxygen species derived from AT1-mediated proinflammatory signaling. Since angiotensin-(1-7) promotes antiatherogenic effects, we hypothesized that the vasoprotective and atheroprotective effects of AT1 antagonists could result from their inhibitory effects on the AT1-mediated negative modulation of vascular angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-angiotensin-(1-7)-MAS axis functionality. Interestingly, our results showed that early atherosclerosis triggered in thoracic aorta from high cholesterol fed-Apolipoprotein E-deficient mice impairs angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-angiotensin-(1-7)-MAS axis functionality by a proinflammatory-redox AT1-mediated pathway. In such mechanism, AT1 activation leads to the aortic release of tumor necrosis factor-α, which stimulates NAD(P)H oxidase/Nox1-driven generation of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. While hydrogen peroxide inhibits angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activity, superoxide impairs MAS functionality. Candesartan treatment restored the functionality of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-angiotensin-(1-7)-MAS axis by inhibiting the proinflammatory-redox AT1-mediated mechanism. Candesartan also promoted vasoprotective and atheroprotective effects that were mediated by MAS since A779 (MAS antagonist) co-treatment inhibited them. The role of MAS receptors as the final mediators of the vasoprotective and atheroprotective effects of candesartan was supported by the vascular actions of angiotensin

  15. Evolutionary analysis of functional divergence among chemokine receptors, decoy receptors and viral receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi eDaiyasu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemokine receptors (CKRs function in the inflammatory response and in vertebrate homeostasis. Decoy and viral receptors are two types of CKR homologues with modified functions from those of the typical CKRs. The decoy receptors are able to bind ligands without signaling. On the other hand, the viral receptors show constitutive signaling without ligands. We examined the sites related to the functional difference. At first, the decoy and viral receptors were each classified into five groups, based on the molecular phylogenetic analysis. A multiple amino acid sequence alignment between each group and the CKRs was then constructed. The difference in the amino acid composition between the group and the CKRs was evaluated as the Kullback-Leibler (KL information value at each alignment site. The KL information value is considered to reflect the difference in the functional constraints at the site. The sites with the top 5% of KL information values were selected and mapped on the structure of a CKR. The comparisons with decoy receptor groups revealed that the detected sites were biased on the intracellular side. In contrast, the sites detected from the comparisons with viral receptor groups were found on both the extracellular and intracellular sides. More sites were found in the ligand-binding pocket in the analyses of the viral receptor groups, as compared to the decoy receptor groups. Some of the detected sites were located in the GPCR motifs. For example, the DRY motif of the decoy receptors was often degraded, although the motif of the viral receptors was basically conserved. The observations for the viral receptor groups suggested that the constraints in the pocket region are loose and that the sites on the intracellular side are different from those for the decoy receptors, which may be related to the constitutive signaling activity of the viral receptors.

  16. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Dong Yin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C, has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor.

  17. Pattern recognition receptors: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutagny, Nadege; Fitzgerald, Katherine A

    2006-07-01

    The vertebrate immune system consists of two inter-related components, the innate and adaptive responses, which are required for the resolution of infection. The innate immune response is critical for the immediate protection from infection and for marshalling the B- and T-cell responses of the adaptive response. A key component of the innate immune response is germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors that detect pathogens. Several families of these pattern recognition receptors have now been described. Microbial recognition by these receptors triggers appropriate immune responses, including the direct uptake and killing of pathogens and/or initiation of intracellular signaling pathways that culminate in the activation of immune responsive transcriptional programs. Pattern recognition receptors include soluble receptors in serum (collectins), transmembrane receptors on cell surfaces or vacuolar membranes (C-type lectins and Toll-like receptors) or cytoplasmic sensors (NACHT-LRR proteins and RNA helicases). Roles for these pattern recognition receptor families are emerging in the susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections and in acute and chronic conditions, such as sepsis, autoimmune disease and atherosclerosis. These findings suggest that the selective targeting of pattern recognition receptors and the pathways they trigger may be useful clinically. Progress towards therapeutics designed to target Toll-like receptor signaling is already well underway. This review will describe our current understanding of innate immune sensors and the mechanisms regulating their activity.

  18. Preparation and Biological Activity of the Monoclonal Antibody against the Second Extracellular Loop of the Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Wei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study was to prepare a mouse-derived antibody against the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-mAb based on monoclonal antibody technology, to provide a foundation for research on AT1-AA-positive diseases. Balb/C mice were actively immunized with the second extracellular loop of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R-ECII. Then, mouse spleen lymphocytes were fused with myeloma cells and monoclonal hybridomas that secreted AT1-mAb were generated and cultured, after which those in logarithmic-phase were injected into the abdominal cavity of mice to retrieve the ascites. Highly purified AT1-mAb was isolated from mouse ascites after injection with 1 × 107 hybridomas. A greater amount of AT1-mAb was purified from mouse ascites compared to the cell supernatant of hybridomas. AT1-mAb purified from mouse ascites constricted the thoracic aorta of mice and increased the beat frequency of neonatal rat myocardial cells via the AT1R, identical to the effects of AT1-AA extracted from patients’ sera. Murine blood pressure increased after intravenous injection of AT1-mAb via the tail vein. High purity and good biological activity of AT1-mAb can be obtained from mouse ascites after intraperitoneal injection of monoclonal hybridomas that secrete AT1-mAb. These data provide a simple tool for studying AT1-AA-positive diseases.

  19. The 5-HT7 receptor in learning and memory. Importance of the hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Amanda J.; Hedlund, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    The 5-HT7 receptor is a more recently discovered G-protein-coupled receptor for serotonin. The functions and possible clinical relevance of this receptor are not yet fully understood. The present paper reviews to what extent the use of animal models of learning and memory and other techniques have implicated the 5-HT7 receptor in such processes. The studies have used a combination of pharmacological and genetic tools targeting the receptor to evaluate effects on behavior and cellular mechanisms. In tests such as the Barnes maze, contextual fear conditioning and novel location recognition that involve spatial learning and memory there is a considerable amount of evidence supporting an involvement of the 5-HT7 receptor. Supporting evidence has also been obtained in studies of mRNA expression and cellular signaling as well as in electrophysiological experiments. Especially interesting are the subtle but distinct effects observed in hippocampus-dependent models of place learning where impairments have been described in mice lacking the 5-HT7 receptor or after administration of a selective antagonist. While more work is required, it appears that 5-HT7 receptors are particularly important in allocentric representation processes. In instrumental learning tasks both procognitive effects and impairments in memory have been observed using pharmacological tools targeting the 5-HT7 receptor. In conclusion, the use of pharmacological and genetic tools in animal studies of learning and memory suggest a potentially important role for the 5-HT7 receptor in cognitive processes. PMID:21484935

  20. Bariatric surgery in 1119 patients with preoperative body mass index<35 (kg/m(2)): results at 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiz, Cristóbal; Alvarado, Juan; Quezada, Nicolás; Salinas, José; Funke, Ricardo; Boza, Camilo

    2015-01-01

    The use of body mass index (BMI) as the only criterion to indicate bariatric surgery is currently under discussion. There is growing evidence that supports bariatric surgery in carefully selected patients with lower BMI. To report our experience in bariatric surgery in>1000 patients with BMI<35 kg/m(2) and their results at 1 year. University hospital (censored). A retrospective analysis was performed in patients who underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) or sleeve gastrectomy (SG) with preoperative BMI<35 kg/m(2) from January 2008 to December 2011. Demographic and anthropometric data, preoperative co-morbidities, and perioperative variables were retrieved. Weight loss and co-morbidities progression were analyzed 1 year after surgery and compared among procedures. A P value<.05 was considered significant. We identified 1119 patients: mean age 38.8±11.4, 951 (85%) women, preoperative weight 87.5±9.3 kg and BMI 33.1 (31.9-34.1) kg/m(2). Preoperatively, 11.7% had type 2 diabetes mellitus, 25.9% arterial hypertension, 55.6% insulin resistance, and 53.2% dyslipidemia. In total, 283 patients (25.2%) underwent LRYGB and 836 (74.8%) SG. One year after surgery (follow-up: 66.67%) patients reached 24.5 (22.8-26.4) BMI and the percentage of excess of weight loss (%EWL) was 107.9±36.6%. Diabetes, hypertension, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia remission/improvement rates were 54/39%, 58/29%, 72/17%, and 54/30%, respectively. Bariatric surgery in selected class I obesity patients can safely be performed. We have observed good results in terms of weight loss and co-morbidity improvement/remission. Long-term follow-up is required. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Reproducibility of brain metabolite concentration measurements in lesion free white matter at 1.5 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Martin H J; Vollmann, Wolfgang; Mateiescu, Serban; Stolze, Manuel; Deli, Martin; Garmer, Marietta; Grönemeyer, Dietrich H W

    2015-09-29

    Post processing for brain spectra has a great influence on the fit quality of individual spectra, as well as on the reproducibility of results from comparable spectra. This investigation used pairs of spectra, identical in system parameters, position and time assumed to differ only in noise. The metabolite amplitudes of fitted time domain spectroscopic data were tested on reproducibility for the main brain metabolites. Proton spectra of white matter brain tissue were acquired with a short spin echo time of 30 ms and a moderate repetition time of 1500 ms at 1.5 T. The pairs were investigated with one time domain post-processing algorithm using different parameters. The number of metabolites, the use of prior knowledge, base line parameters and common or individual damping were varied to evaluate the best reproducibility. The protocols with most reproducible amplitudes for N-acetylaspartate, creatine, choline, myo-inositol and the combined Glx line of glutamate and glutamine in lesion free white matter have the following common features: common damping of the main metabolites, a baseline using only the points of the first 10 ms, no additional lipid/macromolecule lines and Glx is taken as the sum of separately fitted glutamate and glutamine. This parameter set is different to the one delivering the best individual fit results. All spectra were acquired in "lesion free" (no lesion signs found in MR imaging) white matter. Spectra of brain lesions, for example tumors, can be drastically different. Thus the results are limited to lesion free brain tissue. Nevertheless the application to studies is broad, because small alterations in brain biochemistry of lesion free areas had been detected nearby tumors, in patients with multiple sclerosis, drug abuse or psychiatric disorders. Main metabolite amplitudes inside healthy brain can be quantified with a normalized root mean square deviation around 5 % using CH3 of creatine as reference. Only the reproducibility of myo

  2. On the twists of interplanetary magnetic flux ropes observed at 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuming; Zhuang, Bin; Hu, Qiang; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong; Chi, Yutian

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) are one kind of fundamental structures in the solar/space physics and involved in various eruption phenomena. Twist, characterizing how the magnetic field lines wind around a main axis, is an intrinsic property of MFRs, closely related to the magnetic free energy and stableness. Although the effect of the twist on the behavior of MFRs had been widely studied in observations, theory, modeling, and numerical simulations, it is still unclear how much amount of twist is carried by MFRs in the solar atmosphere and in heliosphere and what role the twist played in the eruptions of MFRs. Contrasting to the solar MFRs, there are lots of in situ measurements of magnetic clouds (MCs), the large-scale MFRs in interplanetary space, providing some important information of the twist of MFRs. Thus, starting from MCs, we investigate the twist of interplanetary MFRs with the aid of a velocity-modified uniform-twist force-free flux rope model. It is found that most of MCs can be roughly fitted by the model and nearly half of them can be fitted fairly well though the derived twist is probably overestimated by a factor of 2.5. By applying the model to 115 MCs observed at 1 AU, we find that (1) the twist angles of interplanetary MFRs generally follow a trend of about 0.6l/R radians, where l/R is the aspect ratio of a MFR, with a cutoff at about 12π radians AU-1, (2) most of them are significantly larger than 2.5π radians but well bounded by 2l/R radians, (3) strongly twisted magnetic field lines probably limit the expansion and size of MFRs, and (4) the magnetic field lines in the legs wind more tightly than those in the leading part of MFRs. These results not only advance our understanding of the properties and behavior of interplanetary MFRs but also shed light on the formation and eruption of MFRs in the solar atmosphere. A discussion about the twist and stableness of solar MFRs are therefore given.

  3. Nuclear receptors and microRNAs: who regulates the regulators in neural stem cells?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eendebak, R.J.A.H.; Lucassen, P.J.; Fitzsimons, C.P.

    2011-01-01

    In this mini-review, we focus on regulatory loops between nuclear receptors and microRNAs, an emerging class of small RNA regulators of gene expression. Evidence supporting interactions between microRNAs and nuclear receptors in the regulation of gene expression networks is discussed in relation to

  4. Dopamine 5 receptor mediates Ang II type 1 receptor degradation via a ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in mice and human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hewang; Armando, Ines; Yu, Peiying; Escano, Crisanto; Mueller, Susette C.; Asico, Laureano; Pascua, Annabelle; Lu, Quansheng; Wang, Xiaoyan; Villar, Van Anthony M.; Jones, John E.; Wang, Zheng; Periasamy, Ammasi; Lau, Yuen-Sum; Soares-da-Silva, Patricio; Creswell, Karen; Guillemette, Gaétan; Sibley, David R.; Eisner, Gilbert; Felder, Robin A.; Jose, Pedro A.

    2008-01-01

    Hypertension is a multigenic disorder in which abnormal counterregulation between dopamine and Ang II plays a role. Recent studies suggest that this counterregulation results, at least in part, from regulation of the expression of both the antihypertensive dopamine 5 receptor (D5R) and the prohypertensive Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R). In this report, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro interaction between these GPCRs. Disruption of the gene encoding D5R in mice increased both blood pressure and AT1R protein expression, and the increase in blood pressure was reversed by AT1R blockade. Activation of D5R increased the degradation of glycosylated AT1R in proteasomes in HEK cells and human renal proximal tubule cells heterologously and endogenously expressing human AT1R and D5R. Confocal microscopy, Förster/fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy revealed that activation of D5R initiated ubiquitination of the glycosylated AT1R at the plasma membrane. The regulated degradation of AT1R via a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway by activation of D5R provides what we believe to be a novel mechanism whereby blood pressure can be regulated by the interaction of 2 counterregulatory GPCRs. Our results therefore suggest that treatments for hypertension might be optimized by designing compounds that can target the AT1R and the D5R. PMID:18464932

  5. Flavivirus Entry Receptors: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Perera-Lecoin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses enter host cells by endocytosis initiated when the virus particles interact with cell surface receptors. The current model suggests that flaviviruses use at least two different sets of molecules for infectious entry: attachment factors that concentrate and/or recruit viruses on the cell surface and primary receptor(s that bind to virions and direct them to the endocytic pathway. Here, we present the currently available knowledge regarding the flavivirus receptors described so far with specific attention to C-type lectin receptors and the phosphatidylserine receptors, T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM and TYRO3, AXL and MER (TAM. Their role in flavivirus attachment and entry as well as their implication in the virus biology will be discussed in depth.

  6. [GABAC receptors: structure and functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfilova, V N; Tiurenkov, I N

    2011-01-01

    Data on the structure, localization, physiology and pharmacology of GABA(C) receptors are reviewed. Thece receptors belong to cys-loop receptors and consist of rho1-3 subunits representing pentamers with five subunits that form a chloride channel. They are found in both central nervous system and peripheral organs. The pentamer can be homomeric, consisting of five similar protomers (e.g., p1), or heteromeric (pseudo-homomeric), consisting of rho1 and rho2 subunits. Chloride channel function also depends on the GABA(C) receptor subunit composition. The activation of GABAc receptors is accompanied by a change in the permeability of plasmatic membranes for C1 ions, which is followed by depolarization (presynaptic inhibition) or hyperpolarization (postsynaptic inhibition). There are a great number of the allosteric modulators, agonists and antagonists of GABA(C) receptors.

  7. Evidence for Alpha Receptors in the Human Ureter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeb, Ralph; Knopf, Joy; Golijanin, Dragan; Bourne, Patricia; Erturk, Erdal

    2007-04-01

    immunohistochemistry and molecular techniques. These findings may lend support to the preliminary studies of the effectiveness of alpha-receptor blockade on ureteral colic and stone passage.

  8. Improvement in renal hemodynamics following combined angiotensin II infusion and AT1R blockade in aged female sheep following fetal unilateral nephrectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reetu R Singh

    Full Text Available Renin-angiotensin system (RAS is a powerful modulator of renal hemodynamic and fluid homeostasis. Up-regulation in components of intra-renal RAS occurs with ageing. Recently we reported that 2 year old uninephrectomised (uni-x female sheep have low renin hypertension and reduced renal function. By 5 years of age, these uni-x sheep had augmented decrease in renal blood flow (RBF compared to sham. We hypothesised that this decrease in RBF in 5 year old uni-x sheep was due to an up-regulation in components of the intra-renal RAS. In this study, renal responses to angiotensin II (AngII infusion and AngII type 1 receptor (AT1R blockade were examined in the same 5 year old sheep. We also administered AngII in the presence of losartan to increase AngII bioavailability to the AT2R in order to understand AT2R contribution to renal function in this model. Uni-x animals had significantly lower renal cortical content of renin, AngII (∼40% and Ang 1-7 (∼60% and reduced cortical expression of AT1R gene than sham animals. In response to both AngII infusion and AT1R blockade via losartan, renal hemodynamic responses and tubular sodium excretion were significantly attenuated in uni-x animals compared to sham. However, AngII infusion in the presence of losartan caused ∼33% increase in RBF in uni-x sheep compared to ∼14% in sham (P<0.05. This was associated with a significant decrease in renal vascular resistance in the uni-x animals (22% vs 15%, P<0.05 without any changes in systemic blood pressure. The present study shows that majority of the intra-renal RAS components are suppressed in this model of low renin hypertension. However, increasing the availability of AngII to AT2R by AT1R blockade improved renal blood flow in uni-x sheep. This suggests that manipulation of the AT2R maybe a potential therapeutic target for treatment of renal dysfunction associated with a congenital nephron deficit.

  9. Uncompetitive antagonism of AMPA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Trine F; Tikhonov, Denis B; Bølcho, Ulrik

    2006-01-01

    Philanthotoxins are uncompetitive antagonists of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors presumed to bind to the pore-forming region, but a detailed molecular mechanism for this interaction is missing. Here a small library of novel philanthotoxins was designed and synthesized using a solid-phase strategy. ...... polyamine toxins antagonize the AMPA receptor ion channel and provide the basis for rational development of uncompetitive antagonists of AMPA receptors....

  10. Functional Analyses of Bitter Taste Receptors in Domestic Cats (Felis catus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Weiwei; Ravoninjohary, Aurore; Li, Xia; Margolskee, Robert F; Reed, Danielle R; Beauchamp, Gary K; Jiang, Peihua

    2015-01-01

    Cats are obligate carnivores and under most circumstances eat only animal products. Owing to the pseudogenization of one of two subunits of the sweet receptor gene, they are indifferent to sweeteners, presumably having no need to detect plant-based sugars in their diet. Following this reasoning and a recent report of a positive correlation between the proportion of dietary plants and the number of Tas2r (bitter receptor) genes in vertebrate species, we tested the hypothesis that if bitter perception exists primarily to protect animals from poisonous plant compounds, the genome of the domestic cat (Felis catus) should have lost functional bitter receptors and they should also have reduced bitter receptor function. To test functionality of cat bitter receptors, we expressed cat Tas2R receptors in cell-based assays. We found that they have at least 7 functional receptors with distinct receptive ranges, showing many similarities, along with some differences, with human bitter receptors. To provide a comparative perspective, we compared the cat repertoire of intact receptors with those of a restricted number of members of the order Carnivora, with a range of dietary habits as reported in the literature. The numbers of functional bitter receptors in the terrestrial Carnivora we examined, including omnivorous and herbivorous species, were roughly comparable to that of cats thereby providing no strong support for the hypothesis that a strict meat diet influences bitter receptor number or function. Maintenance of bitter receptor function in terrestrial obligate carnivores may be due to the presence of bitter compounds in vertebrate and invertebrate prey, to the necessary role these receptors play in non-oral perception, or to other unknown factors. We also found that the two aquatic Carnivora species examined had fewer intact bitter receptors. Further comparative studies of factors driving numbers and functions of bitter taste receptors will aid in understanding the forces

  11. Functional Analyses of Bitter Taste Receptors in Domestic Cats (Felis catus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Lei

    Full Text Available Cats are obligate carnivores and under most circumstances eat only animal products. Owing to the pseudogenization of one of two subunits of the sweet receptor gene, they are indifferent to sweeteners, presumably having no need to detect plant-based sugars in their diet. Following this reasoning and a recent report of a positive correlation between the proportion of dietary plants and the number of Tas2r (bitter receptor genes in vertebrate species, we tested the hypothesis that if bitter perception exists primarily to protect animals from poisonous plant compounds, the genome of the domestic cat (Felis catus should have lost functional bitter receptors and they should also have reduced bitter receptor function. To test functionality of cat bitter receptors, we expressed cat Tas2R receptors in cell-based assays. We found that they have at least 7 functional receptors with distinct receptive ranges, showing many similarities, along with some differences, with human bitter receptors. To provide a comparative perspective, we compared the cat repertoire of intact receptors with those of a restricted number of members of the order Carnivora, with a range of dietary habits as reported in the literature. The numbers of functional bitter receptors in the terrestrial Carnivora we examined, including omnivorous and herbivorous species, were roughly comparable to that of cats thereby providing no strong support for the hypothesis that a strict meat diet influences bitter receptor number or function. Maintenance of bitter receptor function in terrestrial obligate carnivores may be due to the presence of bitter compounds in vertebrate and invertebrate prey, to the necessary role these receptors play in non-oral perception, or to other unknown factors. We also found that the two aquatic Carnivora species examined had fewer intact bitter receptors. Further comparative studies of factors driving numbers and functions of bitter taste receptors will aid in

  12. Studies of Cylindrical Liner Z-Pinches at 1 MA on COBRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atoyan, Levon; Byvank, Tom; Cahill, Adam; Potter, William; de Grouchy, Philip; Kusse, Bruce; Hammer, David

    2014-10-01

    Tests of the magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept will make use of the 27 MA Z-machine to implode a cylindrical metal liner onto a preheated plasma contained within it. While most pulsed power machines produce much lower currents than the Z-machine, there are questions that can be addressed on smaller scale facilities. Recent work on the 1 MA Cornell Beam Research Accelerator (COBRA) has made use of 10 mm long cylindrical metal liners having a 4 mm diameter and a varying wall thickness to study the initiation of plasma on the liner's outer surface as well as axial magnetic field compression. We will present experimental results with both imploding and non-imploding liners, investigating the impact the liner's external surface structure has on initiation, outer surface ablation, and implosion. The effect of a uniform axial external magnetic field on observed surface striations will also be discussed. This research is supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-NA0001836.

  13. Association between vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-19

    Mar 19, 2015 ... Background: Chronic periodontitis (CP) is a common oral disease characterized by inflammation in the supporting tissue of the ... Keywords: chronic periodontitis; vitamin D receptor; gene; polymorphisms; variations; SNP. Responsible Editor: ..... TLR4 and IL-18 gene variants in aggressive periodontitis.

  14. Membrane cholesterol access into a G-protein-coupled receptor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guixa-González, R.; Albasanz, J. L.; Rodriguez-Espigares, I.; Pastor, M.; Sanz, F.; Martí-Solano, M.; Manna, M.; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Hildebrand, P. W.; Martín, M.; Selent, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, Feb 21 (2017), č. článku 14505. ISSN 2041-1723 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : postmortem orbitofrontal cortex * A(2A) adenosine receptor * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 12.124, year: 2016 https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms14505

  15. Pharmacologic perspectives of functional selectivity by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aplin, Mark; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Hansen, Jakob Lerche

    2008-01-01

    such as aldosterone secretion, vasoconstriction, and detrimental cardiac hypertrophy are known to result from G protein-dependent or -independent signal transduction, whereas mechanisms have been connected with more adaptive cardiac cell survival, migration, and regeneration phenotypes. Selective blockade of G......The angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor plays a key role in cardiovascular pathophysiology, and it is a major pharmacologic target in the treatment of many cardiovascular disorders. However, AT(1) receptor activation is also involved in adaptive responses to altered hemodynamic demands...

  16. Combined Angiotensin Receptor Modulation in the Management of Cardio-Metabolic Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulis, Ludovit; Foulquier, Sébastien; Namsolleck, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, such as hypertension, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia or obesity are linked with chronic low-grade inflammation and dysregulation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Consequently, RAS inhibition by ACE inhibitors or angiotensin AT1 receptor (AT1R...... in properly treated patients, calls for additional means of pharmacological intervention. In the past decade, the stimulation of the angiotensin AT2 receptor (AT2R) has been shown to reduce inflammation, improve cardiac and vascular remodeling, enhance insulin sensitivity and increase adiponectin production...

  17. Dimerization of nuclear receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Pierre; Bourguet, William

    2013-01-01

    Multicellular organisms require specific intercellular communication to properly organize the complex body plan during embryogenesis and maintain its properties and functions during the entire life. While growth factors, neurotransmitters, and peptide hormones bind to membrane receptors, thereby inducing the activity of intracellular kinase cascades or the JAK-STAT signaling pathways, other small signaling compounds such as steroid hormones, certain vitamins, and metabolic intermediates enter, or are generated, within the target cells and bind to members of a large family of nuclear receptors (NRs). NRs are ligand-inducible transcription factors that control a plethora of biological phenomena, thus orchestrating complex events like development, organ homeostasis, immune function, and reproduction. NR-NR interactions are of major importance in these regulatory processes, as NRs regulate their target genes by binding to cognate DNA response elements essentially as homo- or heterodimers. A number of structural and functional studies have provided significant insights as to how combinatorial NRs rely on protein-protein contacts that discriminate geometric features of their DNA response elements, thereby allowing both binding site diversity and physiological specificity. Here, we will review our current understanding of NR-NR interactions and provide protocols for a number of experimental approaches that are useful for their study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Axonal GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, Federico F; Marty, Alain; Stell, Brandon M

    2008-09-01

    Type A GABA receptors (GABA(A)Rs) are well established as the main inhibitory receptors in the mature mammalian forebrain. In recent years, evidence has accumulated showing that GABA(A)Rs are prevalent not only in the somatodendritic compartment of CNS neurons, but also in their axonal compartment. Evidence for axonal GABA(A)Rs includes new immunohistochemical and immunogold data: direct recording from single axonal terminals; and effects of local applications of GABA(A)R modulators on action potential generation, on axonal calcium signalling, and on neurotransmitter release. Strikingly, whereas presynaptic GABA(A)Rs have long been considered inhibitory, the new studies in the mammalian brain mostly indicate an excitatory action. Depending on the neuron that is under study, axonal GABA(A)Rs can be activated by ambient GABA, by GABA spillover, or by an autocrine action, to increase either action potential firing and/or transmitter release. In certain neurons, the excitatory effects of axonal GABA(A)Rs persist into adulthood. Altogether, axonal GABA(A)Rs appear as potent neuronal modulators of the mammalian CNS.

  19. The detrimental role of angiotensin receptor agonistic autoantibodies in intrauterine growth restriction seen in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Roxanna A; Zhang, Yujin; Blackwell, Sean C; Zhou, Cissy Chenyi; Ramin, Susan M; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang

    2009-11-23

    Growth-restricted fetuses are at risk for a variety of lifelong medical conditions. Preeclampsia, a life-threatening hypertensive disorder of pregnancy, is associated with fetuses who suffer from intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Recently, emerging evidence indicates that preeclamptic women harbor AT(1) receptor agonistic autoantibodies (AT(1)-AAs) that contribute to the disease features. However, the exact role of AT(1)-AAs in IUGR and the underlying mechanisms have not been identified. We report that these autoantibodies are present in the cord blood of women with preeclampsia and retain the ability to activate AT(1) receptors. Using an autoantibody-induced animal model of preeclampsia, we show that AT(1)-AAs cross the mouse placenta, enter fetal circulation, and lead to small fetuses with organ growth retardation. AT(1)-AAs also induce apoptosis in the placentas of pregnant mice, human villous explants, and human trophoblast cells. Finally, autoantibody-induced IUGR and placental apoptosis are diminished by either losartan or an autoantibody-neutralizing peptide. Thus, these studies identify AT(1)-AA as a novel causative factor of preeclampsia-associated IUGR and offer two possible underlying mechanisms: a direct detrimental effect on fetal development by crossing the placenta and entering fetal circulation, and indirectly through AT(1)-AA-induced placental damage. Our findings highlight AT(1)-AAs as important therapeutic targets.

  20. Use of spiritual coping strategies by gender, race/ethnicity, and religion at 1 and 3 months after infant's/child's intensive care unit death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Dawn M; Youngblut, JoAnne M; Brooten, Dorothy

    2017-10-01

    In the United States, 57,000 children (newborn to 18 years) die annually. Bereaved parents may rely on religious or spiritual beliefs in their grief. The study's purpose was to examine differences in parents' use of spiritual and religious coping practices by gender, race/ethnicity, and religion at 1 and 3 months after infant/ICU death. The sample consisted of 165 bereaved parents, 78% minority. The Spiritual Coping Strategies Scale was used to measure religious and spiritual coping practices, separately. One-way ANOVAs indicated that Black non-Hispanic mothers used significantly more religious coping practices at 3 months than White non-Hispanic mothers. Protestant and Catholic parents used more religious coping practices than the "no" and "other" religion groups at 1 and 3 months. Within the 30 mother-father dyads (paired t-tests), mothers reported significantly greater use of religious coping practices at 1 and 3 months and spiritual coping practices at 3 months than fathers. Religious coping practices were most commonly used by Black mothers and Protestant and Catholic parents. Within dyads, mothers used more spiritual and religious coping practices than fathers. These findings are beneficial for healthcare personnel in providing support to bereaved parents of diverse races/ethnicities and religions. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  1. Homotypic and heterotypic adhesion induced by odorant receptors and the β2-adrenergic receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Richard

    Full Text Available In the mouse olfactory system regulated expression of a large family of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs, the Odorant Receptors (ORs, provides each sensory neuron with a single OR identity. In the wiring of the olfactory sensory neuron projections, a complex axon sorting process ensures the segregation of >1,000 subpopulations of axons of the same OR identity into homogeneously innervated glomeruli. ORs are critical determinants in axon sorting, and their presence on olfactory axons raises the intriguing possibility that they may participate in axonal wiring through direct or indirect trans-interactions mediating adhesion or repulsion between axons. In the present work, we used a biophysical assay to test the capacity of ORs to induce adhesion of cell doublets overexpressing these receptors. We also tested the β2 Adrenergic Receptor, a non-OR GPCR known to recapitulate the functions of ORs in olfactory axon sorting. We report here the first evidence for homo- and heterotypic adhesion between cells overexpressing the ORs MOR256-17 or M71, supporting the hypothesis that ORs may contribute to olfactory axon sorting by mediating differential adhesion between axons.

  2. Homotypic and Heterotypic Adhesion Induced by Odorant Receptors and the β2-Adrenergic Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouquet, Coralie; Dubacq, Caroline; Boggetto, Nicole; Pincet, Frédéric; Gourier, Christine; Trembleau, Alain

    2013-01-01

    In the mouse olfactory system regulated expression of a large family of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs), the Odorant Receptors (ORs), provides each sensory neuron with a single OR identity. In the wiring of the olfactory sensory neuron projections, a complex axon sorting process ensures the segregation of >1,000 subpopulations of axons of the same OR identity into homogeneously innervated glomeruli. ORs are critical determinants in axon sorting, and their presence on olfactory axons raises the intriguing possibility that they may participate in axonal wiring through direct or indirect trans-interactions mediating adhesion or repulsion between axons. In the present work, we used a biophysical assay to test the capacity of ORs to induce adhesion of cell doublets overexpressing these receptors. We also tested the β2 Adrenergic Receptor, a non-OR GPCR known to recapitulate the functions of ORs in olfactory axon sorting. We report here the first evidence for homo- and heterotypic adhesion between cells overexpressing the ORs MOR256-17 or M71, supporting the hypothesis that ORs may contribute to olfactory axon sorting by mediating differential adhesion between axons. PMID:24312457

  3. Qualitative Examination of Adolescent Health-Related Quality of Life at 1 Year Postconcussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iadevaia, Cheree; Roiger, Trevor; Zwart, Mary Beth

    2015-11-01

    behind while ensuring a healthy return to normal school routines. Furthermore, adolescent support systems must be considered throughout the recovery process.

  4. Requirements and ontology for a G protein-coupled receptor oligomerization knowledge base

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skrabanek, L.; Murcia, M.; Bouvier, M.; Devi, L.; George, S.R.; Lohse, M.J.; Milligan, G.; Neubig, R.; Palczewski, K.; Parmentier, M.; Pin, J.P.; Vriend, G.; Javitch, J.A.; Campagne, F.; Filizola, M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) are a large and diverse family of membrane proteins whose members participate in the regulation of most cellular and physiological processes and therefore represent key pharmacological targets. Although several bioinformatics resources support research

  5. CB1 AND CB2 CANNABINOID RECEPTOR EXPRESSION DURING DEVELOPMENT AND IN EPILEPTOGENIC DEVELOPMENTAL PATHOLOGIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zurolo, E.; Iyer, A. M.; Spliet, W. G. M.; van Rijen, P. C.; Troost, D.; Gorter, J. A.; Aronica, E.

    2010-01-01

    Recent data support the involvement of the endocannabinoid signaling in early brain development, as well as a key role of cannabinoid receptors (CBR) in pathological conditions associated with unbalanced neuronal excitability and inflammation. Using immunocytochemistry, we explored the expression

  6. CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor expression during development and in epileptogenic developmental pathologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zurolo, E.; Iyer, A.M.; Spliet, W.G.M.; van Rijen, P.C.; Troost, D.; Gorter, J.A.; Aronica, E.

    2010-01-01

    Recent data support the involvement of the endocannabinoid signaling in early brain development, as well as a key role of cannabinoid receptors (CBR) in pathological conditions associated with unbalanced neuronal excitability and inflammation. Using immunocytochemistry, we explored the expression

  7. Multiple genetic mechanisms lead to loss of functional TbAT1 expression in drug-resistant trypanosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mhairi L; Burchmore, Richard J S; Clucas, Caroline; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Brooks, Karen; Tait, A; Macleod, A; Turner, C Michael R; De Koning, Harry P; Wong, Pui Ee; Barrett, Michael P

    2010-02-01

    The P2 aminopurine transporter, encoded by TbAT1 in African trypanosomes in the Trypanosoma brucei group, carries melaminophenyl arsenical and diamidine drugs into these parasites. Loss of this transporter contributes to drug resistance. We identified the genomic location of TbAT1 to be in the subtelomeric region of chromosome 5 and determined the status of the TbAT1 gene in two trypanosome lines selected for resistance to the melaminophenyl arsenical, melarsamine hydrochloride (Cymelarsan), and in a Trypanosoma equiperdum clone selected for resistance to the diamidine, diminazene aceturate. In the Trypanosoma brucei gambiense STIB 386 melarsamine hydrochloride-resistant line, TbAT1 is deleted, while in the Trypanosoma brucei brucei STIB 247 melarsamine hydrochloride-resistant and T. equiperdum diminazene-resistant lines, TbAT1 is present, but expression at the RNA level is no longer detectable. Further characterization of TbAT1 in T. equiperdum revealed that a loss of heterozygosity at the TbAT1 locus accompanied loss of expression and that P2-mediated uptake of [(3)H]diminazene is lost in drug-resistant T. equiperdum. Adenine-inhibitable adenosine uptake is still detectable in a DeltaTbat1 T. b. brucei mutant, although at a greatly reduced capacity compared to that of the wild type, indicating that an additional adenine-inhibitable adenosine permease, distinct from P2, is present in these cells.

  8. Multiple Genetic Mechanisms Lead to Loss of Functional TbAT1 Expression in Drug-Resistant Trypanosomes ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mhairi L.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Clucas, Caroline; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Brooks, Karen; Tait, A.; MacLeod, A.; Turner, C. Michael R.; De Koning, Harry P.; Wong, Pui Ee; Barrett, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    The P2 aminopurine transporter, encoded by TbAT1 in African trypanosomes in the Trypanosoma brucei group, carries melaminophenyl arsenical and diamidine drugs into these parasites. Loss of this transporter contributes to drug resistance. We identified the genomic location of TbAT1 to be in the subtelomeric region of chromosome 5 and determined the status of the TbAT1 gene in two trypanosome lines selected for resistance to the melaminophenyl arsenical, melarsamine hydrochloride (Cymelarsan), and in a Trypanosoma equiperdum clone selected for resistance to the diamidine, diminazene aceturate. In the Trypanosoma brucei gambiense STIB 386 melarsamine hydrochloride-resistant line, TbAT1 is deleted, while in the Trypanosoma brucei brucei STIB 247 melarsamine hydrochloride-resistant and T. equiperdum diminazene-resistant lines, TbAT1 is present, but expression at the RNA level is no longer detectable. Further characterization of TbAT1 in T. equiperdum revealed that a loss of heterozygosity at the TbAT1 locus accompanied loss of expression and that P2-mediated uptake of [3H]diminazene is lost in drug-resistant T. equiperdum. Adenine-inhibitable adenosine uptake is still detectable in a ΔTbat1 T. b. brucei mutant, although at a greatly reduced capacity compared to that of the wild type, indicating that an additional adenine-inhibitable adenosine permease, distinct from P2, is present in these cells. PMID:19966032

  9. No effect of angiotensin II AT(2)-receptor antagonist PD 123319 on cerebral blood flow autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estrup, T M; Paulson, O B; Strandgaard, S

    2001-01-01

    Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) or angiotensin AT1-receptor antagonists shift the limits of autoregulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) towards lower blood pressure (BP). The role of AT2-receptors in the regulation of the cerebral...... circulation is uncertain. Hence, the present study investigated the effect on CBF autoregulation of blocking of angiotensin AT2-receptors with PD 123319 in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Anaesthetised and ventilated SHR were given PD 123319, 0.36 mg/kg/min, intravenously, and compared with a control...

  10. Short-term plasticity of kainate receptor-mediated EPSCs induced by NMDA receptors at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebola, Nelson; Sachidhanandam, Shankar; Perrais, David; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Mulle, Christophe

    2007-04-11

    Kainate receptors (KARs) are heteromeric ionotropic glutamate receptors that play a variety of functions in the regulation of the activity of synaptic networks. Little is known about the regulation of the function of synaptic KARs in the brain. In the present study, we found that a conditioning activation of synaptic NMDA receptors (NMDARs) induces short-term depression of KAR-EPSCs but not of AMPA receptor-EPSCs at synapses between mossy fibers and CA3 pyramidal cells. Short-term depression of KAR-EPSCs by synaptic NMDARs peaked at 1 s and reversed within 20 s, was likely induced and expressed postsynaptically, and was homosynaptic. It depended on a rise of Ca2+ in the postsynaptic cell and on the activation of the phosphatase calcineurin that likely binds to the GluR6b (glutamate receptor subunit 6b) subunit splice variant allowing the dephosphorylation of KARs and inhibition of activity. Finally, we show in the current-clamp mode that short-term depression of KAR-EPSPs is induced by the coincident discharge of action potentials in the postsynaptic cell together with synaptic stimulation. Hence, this study describes a form of short-term synaptic plasticity that is postsynaptic, depends on the temporal order of presynaptic and postsynaptic spiking, and likely affects the summation properties of mossy fiber EPSPs.

  11. Six Degree of Freedom Active Vibration Isolation at 1 HZ and above

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, David Bryan

    One possible addition to future ground-based gravitational wave observatories is a low frequency detector operating in the frequency range of about 1-100 Hz. Such a detector would extend the mass range of black holes from which bursts due to inspiral events or initial formation could be searched for. The increase in seismic noise in this frequency range, however, requires an isolation system of unconventional design. A group at JILA has proposed a local vibration isolation system which demonstrates the principles that could be used in a low frequency laser interferometric detector. Such a system would be used to isolate the support point of each final pendulum that carries one of the end mirrors from ground motion. It is a three-stage system with each stage consisting of a spring mounted platform that provides both active and passive isolation in all six degrees of freedom. Active isolation is achieved by six quasi-independent single input, single output control loops, based on displacement sensors. The second and third stages are expected to be capable of isolating by about a factor of 100 in all six degrees of freedom for frequencies from 1 to 100 Hz. The internal noise level for the last stage, including thermal noise and all other sources of noise, is expected to be [ 1times 10^{-13} (1 Hz/f)^{2.5}+3times 10^{-15 }] m/sqrt{Hz} or less for both horizontal and vertical displacements. The first stage has been completed and is the main topic of this thesis. The platform consists of an equilateral triangular table, 1.1 meter on a side, with a total weight of 462 kg, including the vacuum system and the expected mass of the other two stages. The current reduced vibrational noise of the first stage is about 10 ^{-10} m/sqrt{Hz} for vertical displacements and rm 3times 10^{-10} m/sqrt{Hz} for horizontal displacement from 1 to about 100 Hz.

  12. Possible Relevance of Receptor-Receptor Interactions between Viral- and Host-Coded Receptors for Viral-Induced Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi F. Agnati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that some viruses, such as the cytomegalovirus, code for G-protein coupled receptors not only to elude the immune system, but also to redirect cellular signaling in the receptor networks of the host cells. In view of the existence of receptor-receptor interactions, the hypothesis is introduced that these viral-coded receptors not only operate as constitutively active monomers, but also can affect other receptor function by interacting with receptors of the host cell. Furthermore, it is suggested that viruses could also insert not single receptors (monomers, but clusters of receptors (receptor mosaics, altering the cell metabolism in a profound way. The prevention of viral receptor-induced changes in host receptor networks may give rise to novel antiviral drugs that counteract viral-induced disease.

  13. Group Decision Process Support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, John; Hijikata, Masao

    1997-01-01

    Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists.......Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists....

  14. In Vivo Imaging of Nuclear Receptor Transcriptional Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dart, D Alwyn; Bevan, Charlotte L

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors drive key processes during development, reproduction, metabolism, and disease. In order to understand and analyze, as well as manipulate, their actions it is imperative that we are able to study them in whole animals and in a spatiotemporal manner. The increasing repertoire of transgenic animals, expressing reporter genes driven by a specific nuclear receptor, enables us to do this. Use of luciferase reporter genes is the method of choice of many researchers as it is well tolerated, relatively easy to use, and robust. Further, luciferase lends itself to the process as it can penetrate tissue and can be manipulated to degrade rapidly thus allowing a dynamic response. However, limited resolution, lack of quantitation, and the largely two-dimensional images acquired make it desirable to support results using ex vivo imaging and enzymatic and/or immunohistochemical analysis of dissected tissue. As well as enabling the visualization of nuclear receptor signaling in wild-type animals, crossing these mouse models with models of disease will provide invaluable information on how such signaling is dysregulated during disease progression, and how we may manipulate nuclear receptor signaling in therapy. The use of in vivo imaging therefore provides the power to determine where and when in development, aging, and disease nuclear receptors are active and how ligands or receptor modulators affect this.

  15. New horizons for lipoprotein receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Olav M.; Dagil, Robert; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt

    2013-01-01

    The lipoprotein receptor (LR) family constitutes a large group of structurally closely related receptors with broad ligand-binding specificity. Traditionally, ligand binding to LRs has been anticipated to involve merely the complement type repeat (CR)-domains omnipresent in the family. Recently...

  16. Coronavirus spike-receptor interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mou, H.

    2015-01-01

    Coronaviruses cause important diseases in humans and animals. Coronavirus infection starts with the virus binding with its spike proteins to molecules present on the surface of host cells that act as receptors. This spike-receptor interaction is highly specific and determines the virus’ cell, tissue

  17. NACP Forest Age Maps at 1-km Resolution for Canada (2004) and the U.S.A. (2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides forest age map products at 1-km resolution for Canada and the United States (U.S.A.). These continental forest age maps were...

  18. NACP Forest Age Maps at 1-km Resolution for Canada (2004) and the U.S.A. (2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides forest age map products at 1-km resolution for Canada and the United States (U.S.A.). These continental forest age maps were compiled from...

  19. Differential effects of exercise on brain opioid receptor binding and activation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arida, Ricardo Mario; Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Brand, Serge; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise stimulates the release of endogenous opioid peptides supposed to be responsible for changes in mood, anxiety, and performance. Exercise alters sensitivity to these effects that modify the efficacy at the opioid receptor. Although there is evidence that relates exercise to neuropeptide expression in the brain, the effects of exercise on opioid receptor binding and signal transduction mechanisms downstream of these receptors have not been explored. Here, we characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor or delta opioid receptor in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. As regards short- (acute) or long-term effects (chronic) of exercise, overall, higher opioid receptor binding was observed in acute-exercise animals and the opposite was found in the chronic-exercise animals. The binding of [(35) S]GTPγS under basal conditions (absence of agonists) was elevated in sensorimotor cortex and hippocampus, an effect more evident after chronic exercise. Divergence of findings was observed for mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor, and delta opioid receptor receptor activation in our study. Our results support existing evidence of opioid receptor binding and G protein activation occurring differentially in brain regions in response to diverse exercise stimuli. We characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. Higher opioid receptor binding was observed in the acute exercise animal group and opposite findings in the chronic exercise group. Higher G protein activation under basal conditions was noted in rats submitted to chronic exercise, as visible in the depicted pseudo-color autoradiograms. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  20. Dopamine Receptors and Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Hisahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive extrapyramidal motor disorder. Pathologically, this disease is characterized by the selective dopaminergic (DAergic neuronal degeneration in the substantia nigra. Correcting the DA deficiency in PD with levodopa (L-dopa significantly attenuates the motor symptoms; however, its effectiveness often declines, and L-dopa-related adverse effects emerge after long-term treatment. Nowadays, DA receptor agonists are useful medication even regarded as first choice to delay the starting of L-dopa therapy. In advanced stage of PD, they are also used as adjunct therapy together with L-dopa. DA receptor agonists act by stimulation of presynaptic and postsynaptic DA receptors. Despite the usefulness, they could be causative drugs for valvulopathy and nonmotor complication such as DA dysregulation syndrome (DDS. In this paper, physiological characteristics of DA receptor familyare discussed. We also discuss the validity, benefits, and specific adverse effects of pharmaceutical DA receptor agonist.

  1. Probing Biased Signaling in Chemokine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarandi, Roxana Maria; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine system mediates leukocyte migration during homeostatic and inflammatory processes. Traditionally, it is described as redundant and promiscuous, with a single chemokine ligand binding to different receptors and a single receptor having several ligands. Signaling of chemokine receptors...

  2. Involvement of PPAR-γ in the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of angiotensin type 1 receptor inhibition: effects of the receptor antagonist telmisartan and receptor deletion in a mouse MPTP model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrido-Gil Pablo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several recent studies have shown that angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1 antagonists such as candesartan inhibit the microglial inflammatory response and dopaminergic cell loss in animal models of Parkinson's disease. However, the mechanisms involved in the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of AT1 blockers in the brain have not been clarified. A number of studies have reported that AT1 blockers activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR γ. PPAR-γ activation inhibits inflammation, and may be responsible for neuroprotective effects, independently of AT1 blocking actions. Methods We have investigated whether oral treatment with telmisartan (the most potent PPAR-γ activator among AT1 blockers provides neuroprotection against dopaminergic cell death and neuroinflammation, and the possible role of PPAR-γ activation in any such neuroprotection. We used a mouse model of parkinsonism induced by the dopaminergic neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP and co-administration of the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 to study the role of PPAR-γ activation. In addition, we used AT1a-null mice lesioned with MPTP to study whether deletion of AT1 in the absence of any pharmacological effect of AT1 blockers provides neuroprotection, and investigated whether PPAR-γ activation may also be involved in any such effect of AT1 deletion by co-administration of the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662. Results We observed that telmisartan protects mouse dopaminergic neurons and inhibits the microglial response induced by administration of MPTP. The protective effects of telmisartan on dopaminergic cell death and microglial activation were inhibited by co-administration of GW9662. Dopaminergic cell death and microglial activation were significantly lower in AT1a-null mice treated with MPTP than in mice not subjected to AT1a deletion. Interestingly, the protective effects of AT1 deletion were also inhibited by co

  3. Effect of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor on the intraocular growth factors and their receptors in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ik Soo Byon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the effect of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI on intraocular growth factors and their receptors in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. METHODS: Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups: control, diabetes mellitus (DM, candesartan-treated DM, and enalapril-treated DM (each group, n=10. After the induction of DM by streptozotocin, candesartan [ARB, 5 mg/(kg·d] and enalapril [ACEI, 10 mg/(kg·d] were administered to rats orally for 4wk. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and angiotensin II (Ang II concentrations in the vitreous were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and VEGF receptor 2 and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R levels were assessed at week 4 by Western blotting. RESULTS: Vitreous Ang II levels were significantly higher in the DM group and candesartan-treated DM group than in the control (P=0.04 and 0.005, respectively. Vitreous AT1R increased significantly in DM compared to the other three groups (P<0.007. Candesartan-treated DM rats showed higher vitreal AT1R concentration than the enalapril-treated DM group and control (P<0.001 and P=0.005, respectively. No difference in vitreous Ang II and AT1R concentration was found between the enalapril-treated DM group and control. VEGF and its receptor were below the minimum detection limit in all 4 groups. CONCLUSION: Increased Ang II and AT1R in the hyperglycemic state indicate activated the intraocular renin-angiotensin system, which is inhibited more effectively by systemic ACEI than systemic ARB.

  4. Umami taste in mice uses multiple receptors and transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasumatsu, Keiko; Ogiwara, Yoko; Takai, Shingo; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Iwatsuki, Ken; Torii, Kunio; Margolskee, Robert F; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2012-03-01

    The distinctive umami taste elicited by l-glutamate and some other amino acids is thought to be initiated by G-protein-coupled receptors. Proposed umami receptors include heteromers of taste receptor type 1, members 1 and 3 (T1R1+T1R3), and metabotropic glutamate receptors 1 and 4 (mGluR1 and mGluR4). Multiple lines of evidence support the involvement of T1R1+T1R3 in umami responses of mice. Although several studies suggest the involvement of receptors other than T1R1+T1R3 in umami, the identity of those receptors remains unclear. Here, we examined taste responsiveness of umami-sensitive chorda tympani nerve fibres from wild-type mice and mice genetically lacking T1R3 or its downstream transduction molecule, the ion channel TRPM5. Our results indicate that single umami-sensitive fibres in wild-type mice fall into two major groups: sucrose-best (S-type) and monopotassium glutamate (MPG)-best (M-type). Each fibre type has two subtypes; one shows synergism between MPG and inosine monophosphate (S1, M1) and the other shows no synergism (S2, M2). In both T1R3 and TRPM5 null mice, S1-type fibres were absent, whereas S2-, M1- and M2-types remained. Lingual application of mGluR antagonists selectively suppressed MPG responses of M1- and M2-type fibres. These data suggest the existence of multiple receptors and transduction pathways for umami responses in mice. Information initiated from T1R3-containing receptors may be mediated by a transduction pathway including TRPM5 and conveyed by sweet-best fibres, whereas umami information from mGluRs may be mediated by TRPM5-independent pathway(s) and conveyed by glutamate-best fibres.

  5. Hormones and receptors in fish: do duplicates matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roch, Graeme J; Wu, Sheng; Sherwood, Nancy M

    2009-03-01

    Modern fish are the result of major changes in evolution including three possible duplications of the whole genome. Retained duplicate genes are often involved with metabolism, transcription, neurogenic processes and development. Here we examine the consequences of the most recent (350 mya) teleost-specific duplication in five fishes (zebrafish, fugu, medaka, stickleback and rainbow trout) in regard to duplicate copies of hormones and receptors in the secretin superfamily. This subset of genes was selected as the superfamily is limited to ten hormones and their receptors and includes some important members: glucagon, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). We used reports from the literature and an extensive database search of the fish genomes to evaluate the status of the superfamily and its duplicate genes. We found that all five fish species have an almost complete set of orthologs with the human superfamily of hormones, although they lack secretin and its receptor. Receptor orthologs are present in zebrafish, fugu, medaka, stickleback and to a lesser extent in salmonids. Zebrafish retain duplicate copies for seven hormones and five receptors. Duplicated genes in fugu, medaka, stickleback and salmonids are also present, based mainly on genome annotation or mRNA transcription. Separate chromosome locations and synteny support zebrafish duplicates as the result of large-scale duplications. Novel changes in fish include the modification of a duplicate glucagon receptor to a GLP-1 receptor and, unlike humans, the presence of bioactive and specific PHI and GHRH-like peptide receptors. We conclude that fish duplicates in the secretin superfamily are a rich, mostly unexplored area for endocrine research.

  6. 5-HT1A receptor expression during memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Munguía, H; Manuel-Apolinar, L; Rocha, L; Meneses, A

    2005-09-01

    It has been reported that 5-HT(1A) receptors modulate learning and memory and diverse pharmacological and genetic evidence supports this notion. Nevertheless, there are few works about expression of these receptors during memory formation. We aimed to determine 5-HT(1A) receptor expression in brain areas of untrained, passive, and autoshaping trained groups of rats. Ex vivo receptor autoradiography using the ligand agonist [(3)H]8-hydroxy-2-[di-n-propylamino]tetralin] (8-OH-DPAT) was used. The trained group relative to untrained animals showed increases of 5-HT(1A) receptor expression in 14 brain areas, decrements in 7, and no changes in 12. Thus, in contrast to untrained rats, 5-HT(1A) receptor expression of autoshaping trained rats was augmented in the tubercule olfactory, septal nucleus, nucleus accumbens, caudate putamen, globus pallidus, striate, and parietal (1 and 2), temporal cortex (1 and 3), granular retrosplenial cortex (1), amygdala, and median and dorsal raphe nuclei. In contrast, in the latter group, receptors were decreased in the CA1 area, hypothalamus dorsal, frontal cortex (1 and 3), occipital cortex, cingulate cortex (1 and 2), and cuneiform nucleus. There were significant differences between passive vs trained groups, but not regarding untrained rats, in the lateral olfactory tract, dentate gyrus, CA3 area, ventromedial hypothalamic, lateral hypothalamus, preoptic medial, frontal cortex (2), granular retrosplenial cortex (2), entorhinal cortex (1 and 2), piriform cortex, and substantia nigra. These data suggest that upregulated, downregulated, and "silence" of 5-HT(1A) receptors in brain areas form part of neural circuits engaged in memory formation by demonstrating a high degree of specificity and memory mapping.

  7. Angiotensin II Induces C-Reactive Protein Expression via AT1-ROS-MAPK-NF-κB Signal Pathway in Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Zhao

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: C-reactive protein (CRP participates in development of inflammatory diseases. Hepatocytes are a major contributor of circulating CRP. Although angiotensin II (Ang II is known to evoke inflammatory response, it remains unknown whether Ang II induces CRP expression in hepatocytes. The present study observed effect of Ang II on CRP expression and the related signal pathway in hepatocytes. Methods: mRNA and protein expressions in human hepatocytes were determined with RT-PCR and Western blot respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROS was measured using a fluorescence probe. CRP in liver and serum of rats was determined by immunohistochemistry and ELISA respectively. Results: Ang II induced mRNA and protein expression of CRP in hepatocytes and increased CRP production in liver and CRP level in serum. Losartan reduced Ang II- induced CRP expression in hepatocytes. Losartan and thenoyltrifluoroacetone decreased Ang II-stimulated ROS production. N-acetylcysteine antagonized Ang II-induced CRP expression. Losartan and N-acetylcysteine inhibited Ang II-activated ERK1/2. Unlike ERK1/2, only losartan inhibited Ang II-activated JNK. Furthermore, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate abolished Ang II-induced CRP expression. Conclusion: Ang II has ability to induce CRP expression in hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo through AT1 receptor followed by ROS, MAPK and NF-κB signal pathway.

  8. Angiotensin II type 1 receptors and systemic hemodynamic and renal responses to stress and altered blood volume in conscious rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony B. Xu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We examined how systemic blockade of type 1 angiotensin (AT1- receptors affects reflex control of the circulation and the kidney. In conscious rabbits, the effects of candesartan on responses of systemic and renal hemodynamics and renal excretory function to acute hypoxia, mild hemorrhage and plasma volume expansion were tested. Candesartan reduced resting mean arterial pressure (MAP, -8 ± 2% without significantly altering cardiac output (CO, increased renal blood flow (RBF, +38 ± 9% and reduced renal vascular resistance (RVR, -32 ± 6%. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR was not significantly altered but sodium excretion (UNa+V increased four-fold. After vehicle treatment, hypoxia (10% inspired O2 for 30 min did not significantly alter MAP or CO, but reduced HR (-17 ± 6%, increased RVR (+33 ± 16% and reduced GFR (-46 ± 16% and UNa+V (-41 ± 17%. Candesartan did not significantly alter these responses. After vehicle treatment, plasma volume expansion increased CO (+35 ± 7%, reduced total peripheral resistance (TPR, -26 ± 5%, increased RBF (+62 ± 23% and reduced RVR (-32 ± 9%, but did not significantly alter MAP or HR. It also increased UNa+V (803 ± 184% yet reduced GFR (-47 ± 9%. Candesartan did not significantly alter these responses. After vehicle treatment, mild hemorrhage did not significantly alter MAP but increased HR (+16 ± 3%, reduced CO (-16 ± 4% and RBF (-18 ± 6%, increased TPR (+18 ± 4% and tended to increase RVR (+18 ± 9%, P = 0.1, but had little effect on GFR or UNa+V. But after candesartan treatment MAP fell during hemorrhage (-19 ± 1%, while neither TPR nor RVR increased, and GFR (-64 ± 18% and UNa+V (-83 ± 10% fell. AT1-receptor activation supports MAP and GFR during hypovolemia. But AT1-receptors appear to play little role in the renal vasoconstriction, hypofiltration and antinatriuresis accompanying hypoxia, or the systemic and renal vasodilatation and natriuresis accompanying plasma volume expansion.

  9. Heterotypic interactions between transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor 2

    OpenAIRE

    Vogt, TM; Blackwell, AD; Giannetti, AM; Bjorkman, PJ; Enns, CA

    2003-01-01

    Cellular iron uptake in most tissues occurs via endocytosis of diferric transferrin (Tf) bound to the transferrin receptor (TfR). Recently, a second transferrin receptor, transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2), has been identified and shown to play a critical role in iron metabolism. TfR2 is capable of Tf-mediated iron uptake and mutations in this gene result in a rare form of hereditary hemochromatosis unrelated to the hereditary hemochromatosis protein, HFE. Unlike TfR, TfR2 expression is not contro...

  10. Ethylene Regulates Levels of Ethylene Receptor/CTR1 Signaling Complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeel, Samina N.; Gao, Zhiyong; Amir, Madiha; Chen, Yi-Feng; Rai, Muneeza Iqbal; Haq, Noor Ul; Schaller, G. Eric

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone ethylene is perceived by a five-member family of receptors in Arabidopsis thaliana. The receptors function in conjunction with the Raf-like kinase CTR1 to negatively regulate ethylene signal transduction. CTR1 interacts with multiple members of the receptor family based on co-purification analysis, interacting more strongly with receptors containing a receiver domain. Levels of membrane-associated CTR1 vary in response to ethylene, doing so in a post-transcriptional manner that correlates with ethylene-mediated changes in levels of the ethylene receptors ERS1, ERS2, EIN4, and ETR2. Interactions between CTR1 and the receptor ETR1 protect ETR1 from ethylene-induced turnover. Kinetic and dose-response analyses support a model in which two opposing factors control levels of the ethylene receptor/CTR1 complexes. Ethylene stimulates the production of new complexes largely through transcriptional induction of the receptors. However, ethylene also induces turnover of receptors, such that levels of ethylene receptor/CTR1 complexes decrease at higher ethylene concentrations. Implications of this model for ethylene signaling are discussed. PMID:25814663

  11. Ethylene Regulates Levels of Ethylene Receptor/CTR1 Signaling Complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeel, Samina N; Gao, Zhiyong; Amir, Madiha; Chen, Yi-Feng; Rai, Muneeza Iqbal; Haq, Noor Ul; Schaller, G Eric

    2015-05-08

    The plant hormone ethylene is perceived by a five-member family of receptors in Arabidopsis thaliana. The receptors function in conjunction with the Raf-like kinase CTR1 to negatively regulate ethylene signal transduction. CTR1 interacts with multiple members of the receptor family based on co-purification analysis, interacting more strongly with receptors containing a receiver domain. Levels of membrane-associated CTR1 vary in response to ethylene, doing so in a post-transcriptional manner that correlates with ethylene-mediated changes in levels of the ethylene receptors ERS1, ERS2, EIN4, and ETR2. Interactions between CTR1 and the receptor ETR1 protect ETR1 from ethylene-induced turnover. Kinetic and dose-response analyses support a model in which two opposing factors control levels of the ethylene receptor/CTR1 complexes. Ethylene stimulates the production of new complexes largely through transcriptional induction of the receptors. However, ethylene also induces turnover of receptors, such that levels of ethylene receptor/CTR1 complexes decrease at higher ethylene concentrations. Implications of this model for ethylene signaling are discussed. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Interleukin 4/13 receptors: An overview of genes, expression and functional role in teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeida, A; Maisey, K; Imarai, M

    2017-12-01

    In superior vertebrates, Interleukin 4 (IL-4) and Interleukin 13 (IL-13) play key and diverse roles to support immune responses acting on cell surface receptors. When stimulated, receptors activate intracellular signalling cascades switching cell phenotypes according to stimuli. In teleost fish, Interleukin 4/13 (IL-4/13) is the ancestral family cytokine related to both IL-4 and IL-13. Every private and common receptor subunit for IL-4/13 have in fish at least two paralogues and, as in mammals, soluble forms are also part of the receptor system. Reports for findings of fish IL-4/13 receptors have covered comparative analysis, transcriptomic profiles and to a lesser extent, functional analysis regarding ligand-receptor interactions and their biological effects. This review addresses available information from fish IL-4/13 receptors and discusses overall implications on teleost immunity, summarized gene induction strategies and pathogen-induced gene modulation, which may be useful tools to enhance immune response. Additionally, we present novel coding sequences for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) common gamma chain receptor (γC), Interleukin 13 receptor alpha 1A chain (IL-13Rα1A) and Interleukin 13 receptor alpha 1B chain (IL-13Rα1B). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Arabidopsis ETR1 and ERS1 Differentially Repress the Ethylene Response in Combination with Other Ethylene Receptor Genes1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Wen, Chi-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    The ethylene response is negatively regulated by a family of five ethylene receptor genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The five members of the ethylene receptor family can physically interact and form complexes, which implies that cooperativity for signaling may exist among the receptors. The ethylene receptor gene mutations etr1-1(C65Y)(for ethylene response1-1), ers1-1(I62P) (for ethylene response sensor1-1), and ers1C65Y are dominant, and each confers ethylene insensitivity. In this study, the repression of the ethylene response by these dominant mutant receptor genes was examined in receptor-defective mutants to investigate the functional significance of receptor cooperativity in ethylene signaling. We showed that etr1-1(C65Y), but not ers1-1(I62P), substantially repressed various ethylene responses independent of other receptor genes. In contrast, wild-type receptor genes differentially supported the repression of ethylene responses by ers1-1(I62P); ETR1 and ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE4 (EIN4) supported ers1-1(I62P) functions to a greater extent than did ERS2, ETR2, and ERS1. The lack of both ETR1 and EIN4 almost abolished the repression of ethylene responses by ers1C65Y, which implied that ETR1 and EIN4 have synergistic effects on ers1C65Y functions. Our data indicated that a dominant ethylene-insensitive receptor differentially repressed ethylene responses when coupled with a wild-type ethylene receptor, which supported the hypothesis that the formation of a variety of receptor complexes may facilitate differential receptor signal output, by which ethylene responses can be repressed to different extents. We hypothesize that plants can respond to a broad ethylene concentration range and exhibit tissue-specific ethylene responsiveness with differential cooperation of the multiple ethylene receptors. PMID:22227969

  14. Estrogen-related receptor β (ERRβ) - renaissance receptor or receptor renaissance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divekar, Shailaja D; Tiek, Deanna M; Fernandez, Aileen; Riggins, Rebecca B

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) are founding members of the orphan nuclear receptor (ONR) subgroup of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Twenty-seven years of study have yet to identify cognate ligands for the ERRs, though they have firmly placed ERRα and ERRγ at the intersection of cellular metabolism and oncogenesis. The pace of discovery for novel functions of ERRβ, however, has until recently been somewhat slower than that of its family members. ERRβ has also been largely ignored in summaries and perspectives of the ONR literature. Here, we provide an overview of established and emerging knowledge of ERRβ in mouse, man, and other species, highlighting unique aspects of ERRβ biology that set it apart from the other two estrogen-related receptors, with a focus on the impact of alternative splicing on the structure and function of this receptor.

  15. Expression of a novel D4 dopamine receptor in the lamprey brain. Evolutionary considerations about dopamine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan ePérez-Fernández

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous data reported in lampreys, which belong to the phylogenetically oldest branch of vertebrates, show that the dopaminergic system was already well developed at the dawn of vertebrate evolution. The expression of dopamine in the lamprey brain is well conserved when compared to other vertebrates, and this is also true for the D2 receptor. Additionally, the key role of dopamine in the striatum, modulating the excitability in the direct and indirect pathways through the D1 and D2 receptors, has also been recently reported in these animals. The moment of divergence regarding the two whole genome duplications occurred in vertebrates suggests that additional receptors, apart from the D1 and D2 previously reported, could be present in lampreys. We used in situ hybridization to characterize the expression of a novel dopamine receptor, which we have identified as a D4 receptor according to the phylogenetic analysis. The D4 receptor shows in the sea lamprey a more restricted expression pattern than the D2 subtype, as reported in mammals. Its main expression areas are the striatum, lateral and ventral pallial sectors, several hypothalamic regions, habenula, and mesencephalic and rhombencephalic motoneurons. Some expression areas are well conserved through vertebrate evolution, as is the case of the striatum or the habenula, but the controversies regarding the D4 receptor expression in other vertebrates hampers for a complete comparison, especially in rhombencephalic regions. Our results further support that the dopaminergic system in vertebrates is well conserved and suggest that at least some functions of the D4 receptor were already present before the divergence of lampreys.

  16. Angiotensin-2-mediated Ca2+ signaling in the retinal pigment epithelium: role of angiotensin-receptor-associated-protein and TRPV2 channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Barro-Soria

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (AngII receptor (ATR is involved in pathologic local events such as neovascularisation and inflammation including in the brain and retina. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE expresses ATR in its AT1R form, angiotensin-receptor-associated protein (Atrap, and transient-receptor-potential channel-V2 (TRPV2. AT1R and Atrap co-localize to the basolateral membrane of the RPE, as shown by immunostaining. Stimulation of porcine RPE (pRPE cells by AngII results in biphasic increases in intracellular free Ca(2+inhibited by losartan. Xestospongin C (xest C and U-73122, blockers of IP3R and PLC respectively, reduced AngII-evoked Ca(2+response. RPE cells from Atrap(-/- mice showed smaller AngII-evoked Ca(2+peak (by 22% and loss of sustained Ca(2+elevation compared to wild-type. The TRPV channel activator cannabidiol (CBD at 15 µM stimulates intracellular Ca(2+-rise suggesting that porcine RPE cells express TRPV2 channels. Further evidence supporting the functional expression of TRPV2 channels comes from experiments in which 100 µM SKF96365 (a TRPV channel inhibitor reduced the cannabidiol-induced Ca(2+-rise. Application of SKF96365 or reduction of TRPV2 expression by siRNA reduced the sustained phase of AngII-mediated Ca(2+transients by 53%. Thus systemic AngII, an effector of the local renin-angiotensin system stimulates biphasic Ca(2+transients in the RPE by releasing Ca(2+from cytosolic IP3-dependent stores and activating ATR/Atrap and TRPV2 channels to generate a sustained Ca(2+elevation.

  17. Lysophospholipid receptors in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Chun, Jerold

    2015-05-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPs), including lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), sphingosine 1-phospate (S1P), lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), are bioactive lipids that transduce signals through their specific cell-surface G protein-coupled receptors, LPA1-6, S1P1-5, LPI1, and LysoPS1-3, respectively. These LPs and their receptors have been implicated in both physiological and pathophysiological processes such as autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, fibrosis, pain, cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, bone formation, fertility, organismal development, and other effects on most organ systems. Advances in the LP receptor field have enabled the development of novel small molecules targeting LP receptors for several diseases. Most notably, fingolimod (FTY720, Gilenya, Novartis), an S1P receptor modulator, became the first FDA-approved medicine as an orally bioavailable drug for treating relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. This success is currently being followed by multiple, mechanistically related compounds targeting S1P receptor subtypes, which are in various stages of clinical development. In addition, an LPA1 antagonist, BMS-986020 (Bristol-Myers Squibb), is in Phase 2 clinical development for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, as a distinct compound, SAR100842 (Sanofi) for the treatment of systemic sclerosis and related fibrotic diseases. This review summarizes the current state of drug discovery in the LP receptor field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Inhibition of (prorenin Receptor Contributes to Renoprotective Effects of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockade in Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Renal renin-angiotensin system (RAS plays a pivotal role in the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN. Angiotensin II (Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R blockade elevates (prorenin, which may bind to (prorenin receptor (PRR and exert receptor-mediated, angiotensin-independent profibrotic effects. We therefore investigated whether PRR activation leads to the limited anti-fibrotic effects of AT1R blockade on DN, and whether PRR inhibition might ameliorate progression of DN.Methods: To address the issue, the expression of RAS components was tested in different stages of streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats (6, 12, and 24 weeks and 6-week AT1R blockade (losartan treated diabetic rats. Using the blocker for PRR, the handle region peptide (HRP of prorenin, the effects of PRR on high glucose or Ang II-induced proliferative and profibrotic actions were evaluated by measurement of cell proliferation, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 activity, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 expression in rat mesangial cells (MCs.Results: PRR was downregulated in the kidneys of different stages of diabetic rats (6, 12, and 24 weeks. Moreover, 6-week losartan treatment further suppressed PRR expression via upregulating AT2R, and ameliorated diabetic renal injury. HRP inhibited high glucose and Ang II-induced proliferative and profibrotic effects in MCs through suppressing TGF-β1 expression and activating MMP-2. Meanwhile, HRP enhanced losartan's anti-fibrotic effects through further inhibiting phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and TGF-β1 expression. Moreover, the inhibitive effect of HRP on Ang II-induced TGF-β1 expression depended on the regulation of PRR expression by AT2R.Conclusions: Our findings suggest that inhibition of PRR contributes to renoprotection against diabetic nephropathy by AT1R blockade.

  19. Clinical Evidence for the Cardiovascular Benefits of Angiotensin Receptor Blockers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Nickenig

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Targeting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS, specifically the effector peptide angiotensin II (Ang II, represents a major opportunity for slowing the progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD and, in turn, reducing the risk of morbidity and mortality. Inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE and selective blockade of Ang II AT1 receptors are two approaches through which the pathophysiological effects of Ang II can be targeted. Numerous clinical studies have established the benefits of ACE inhibitors (ACE-Is in lessening the morbidity and mortality burden of CVD. There are, however, tolerability concerns associated with ACE-Is, such as angioedema and dry cough. By blocking Ang II at the AT1 receptor lever, Ang II receptor blockers (ARBs provide a more specific and complete blockade of the deleterious effects of Ang II and tend to have more favourable tolerability. A number of clinical trials have shown that ARBs are not only associated with positive outcomes across the CVD continuum but may also have a role in the prevention or delay of diabetes (a major cardiovascular risk factor. Ongoing trials are aiming to define the place of such agents in lessening morbidity and mortality from CVD.

  20. Clinical Evidence for the Cardiovascular Benefits of Angiotensin Receptor Blockers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Nickenig

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Targeting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS, specifically the effector peptide angiotensin II (Ang II, represents a major opportunity for slowing the progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD and, in turn, reducing the risk of morbidity and mortality. Inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE and selective blockade of Ang II AT1 receptors are two approaches through which the pathophysiological effects of Ang II can be targeted. Numerous clinical studies have established the benefits of ACE inhibitors P, (ACE-Is in lessening the morbidity and mortality burden of CVD. There are, however, tolerability concerns associated with ACE-Is, such as angioedema and dry cough. By blocking Ang II at the AT1 receptor level, Ang II receptor blockers (ARBs provide a more specific and complete blockade of the deleterious effects of Ang II and tend to have more favourable tolerability. A number of clinical trials have shown that ARBs are not only associated with positive outcomes across the CVD continuum but may also have a role in the prevention or delay of diabetes (a major cardiovascular risk factor. Ongoing trials are aiming to define the place of such agents in lessening morbidity and mortality from CVD.

  1. Cardiovascular effects of the angiotensin type 2 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria-Costa, Gabriel; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Henriques-Coelho, Tiago

    2014-01-01

    The angiotensin type 2 receptor, AT2R, has been described as having opposite effects to the angiotensin type 1 receptor, AT1R. Although the quantities of the AT2R found in the adult are low, its expression rises in pathological situations. The AT2R has three major signaling pathways: activation of serine/threonine phosphatases (promoting apoptosis and antioxidant effects), activation of the bradykinin/NO/cGMP pathway (promoting vasodilation), and activation of phospholipase A2 (associated with regulation of potassium currents). The AT2R appears to have effects in vascular remodeling, atherosclerosis prevention and blood pressure lowering (when associated with an AT1R inhibitor). After myocardial infarction, the AT2R appears to decrease infarct size, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, and to improve cardiac function. However, its role in the heart is controversial. In the kidney, the AT2R promotes natriuresis. Until now, treatment directed at the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system has been based on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin type 1 receptor blockers. The study of the AT2R has been revolutionized by the discovery of a direct agonist, C21, which promises to become part of the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Nuclear receptors outside the nucleus: extranuclear signalling by steroid receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Ellis R.; Hammes, Stephen R.

    2017-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors mediate numerous crucial biological processes and are classically thought to function as transcriptional regulators in the nucleus. However, it has been known for more than 50 years that steroids evoke rapid responses in many organs that cannot be explained by gene regulation. Mounting evidence indicates that most steroid receptors in fact exist in extranuclear cellular pools, including at the plasma membrane. This latter pool, when engaged by a steroid ligand, rapidly activates signals that affect various aspects of cellular biology. Research into the mechanisms of signalling instigated by extranuclear steroid receptor pools and how this extranuclear signalling is integrated with responses elicited by nuclear receptor pools provides novel understanding of steroid hormone signalling and its roles in health and disease. PMID:27729652

  3. Selective C1 Lesioning Slightly Decreases Angiotensin II Type I Receptor Expression in the Rat Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla (RVLM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, Erick A; Stedenfeld, Kristen A; Sved, Alan F; Speth, Robert C

    2015-10-01

    Cardiovascular homeostasis is regulated in large part by the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in mammals. Projections from the RVLM to the intermediolateral column of the thoracolumbar spinal cord innervate preganglionic neurons of the sympathetic nervous system causing elevation of blood pressure and heart rate. A large proportion, but not all, of the neurons in the RVLM contain the enzymes necessary for the production of epinephrine and are identified as the C1 cell group. Angiotensin II (Ang II) activates the RVLM acting upon AT1 receptors. To assess the proportion of AT1 receptors that are located on C1 neurons in the rat RVLM this study employed an antibody to dopamine-beta-hydroxylase conjugated to saporin, to selectively destroy C1 neurons in the RVLM. Expression of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons in the RVLM was reduced by 57 % in the toxin injected RVLM compared to the contralateral RVLM. In contrast, densitometric analysis of autoradiographic images of (125)I-sarcosine(1), isoleucine(8) Ang II binding to AT1 receptors of the injected side RVLM revealed a small (10 %) reduction in AT1-receptor expression compared to the contralateral RVLM. These results suggest that the majority of AT1 receptors in the rat RVLM are located on non-C1 neurons or glia.

  4. Taste receptors for umami: the case for multiple receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Nirupa; Pereira, Elizabeth; Roper, Stephen D

    2009-09-01

    Umami taste is elicited by many small molecules, including amino acids (glutamate and aspartate) and nucleotides (monophosphates of inosinate or guanylate, inosine 5'-monophosphate and guanosine-5'-monophosphate). Mammalian taste buds respond to these diverse compounds via membrane receptors that bind the umami tastants. Over the past 15 y, several receptors have been proposed to underlie umami detection in taste buds. These receptors include 2 glutamate-selective G protein-coupled receptors, mGluR4 and mGluR1, and the taste bud-expressed heterodimer T1R1+T1R3. Each of these receptors is expressed in small numbers of cells in anterior and posterior taste buds. The mGluRs are activated by glutamate and certain analogs but are not reported to be sensitive to nucleotides. In contrast, T1R1+T1R3 is activated by a broad range of amino acids and displays a strongly potentiated response in the presence of nucleotides. Mice in which the Grm4 gene is knocked out show a greatly enhanced preference for umami tastants. Loss of the Tas1r1 or Tas1R3 genes is reported to depress but not eliminate neural and behavioral responses to umami. When intact mammalian taste buds are apically stimulated with umami tastants, their functional responses to umami tastants do not fully resemble the responses of a single proposed umami receptor. Furthermore, the responses to umami tastants persist in the taste cells of T1R3-knockout mice. Thus, umami taste detection may involve multiple receptors expressed in different subsets of taste cells. This receptor diversity may underlie the complex perception of umami, with different mixtures of amino acids, peptides, and nucleotides yielding subtly distinct taste qualities.

  5. Taste receptors for umami: the case for multiple receptors1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Elizabeth; Roper, Stephen D

    2009-01-01

    Umami taste is elicited by many small molecules, including amino acids (glutamate and aspartate) and nucleotides (monophosphates of inosinate or guanylate, inosine 5′-monophosphate and guanosine-5′-monophosphate). Mammalian taste buds respond to these diverse compounds via membrane receptors that bind the umami tastants. Over the past 15 y, several receptors have been proposed to underlie umami detection in taste buds. These receptors include 2 glutamate-selective G protein–coupled receptors, mGluR4 and mGluR1, and the taste bud–expressed heterodimer T1R1+T1R3. Each of these receptors is expressed in small numbers of cells in anterior and posterior taste buds. The mGluRs are activated by glutamate and certain analogs but are not reported to be sensitive to nucleotides. In contrast, T1R1+T1R3 is activated by a broad range of amino acids and displays a strongly potentiated response in the presence of nucleotides. Mice in which the Grm4 gene is knocked out show a greatly enhanced preference for umami tastants. Loss of the Tas1r1 or Tas1R3 genes is reported to depress but not eliminate neural and behavioral responses to umami. When intact mammalian taste buds are apically stimulated with umami tastants, their functional responses to umami tastants do not fully resemble the responses of a single proposed umami receptor. Furthermore, the responses to umami tastants persist in the taste cells of T1R3-knockout mice. Thus, umami taste detection may involve multiple receptors expressed in different subsets of taste cells. This receptor diversity may underlie the complex perception of umami, with different mixtures of amino acids, peptides, and nucleotides yielding subtly distinct taste qualities. PMID:19571230

  6. How insulin engages its primary binding site on the insulin receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menting, John G.; Whittaker, Jonathan; Margetts, Mai B.; Whittaker, Linda J.; Kong, Geoffrey K.-W.; Smith, Brian J.; Watson, Christopher J.; Žáková, Lenka; Kletvíková, Emília; Jiráček, Jiří; Chan, Shu Jin; Steiner, Donald F.; Dodson, Guy G.; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.; Weiss, Michael A.; Ward, Colin W.; Lawrence, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin receptor signalling has a central role in mammalian biology, regulating cellular metabolism, growth, division, differentiation and survival1,2. Insulin resistance contributes to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and the onset of Alzheimer’s disease3; aberrant signalling occurs in diverse cancers, exacerbated by crosstalk with the homologous type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R)4. Despite more than three decades of investigation, the three-dimensional structure of the insulin–insulin receptor complex has proved elusive, confounded by the complexity of producing the receptor protein. Here we present the first view, to our knowledge, of the interaction of insulin with its primary binding site on the insulin receptor, on the basis of four crystal structures of insulin bound to truncated insulin receptor constructs. The direct interaction of insulin with the first leucine-rich-repeat domain (L1) of insulin receptor is seen to be sparse, the hormone instead engaging the insulin receptor carboxy-terminal α-chain (αCT) segment, which is itself remodelled on the face of L1 upon insulin binding. Contact between insulin and L1 is restricted to insulin B-chain residues. The αCT segment displaces the B-chain C-terminal β-strand away from the hormone core, revealing the mechanism of a long-proposed conformational switch in insulin upon receptor engagement. This mode of hormone–receptor recognition is novel within the broader family of receptor tyrosine kinases5. We support these findings by photo-crosslinking data that place the suggested interactions into the context of the holoreceptor and by isothermal titration calorimetry data that dissect the hormone–insulin receptor interface. Together, our findings provide an explanation for a wealth of biochemical data from the insulin receptor and IGF1R systems relevant to the design of therapeutic insulin analogues. PMID:23302862

  7. Rapid mineralocorticoid receptor trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekle, M; Bretschneider, M; Meinel, S; Ruhs, S; Grossmann, C

    2014-03-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that physiologically regulates water-electrolyte homeostasis and controls blood pressure. The MR can also elicit inflammatory and remodeling processes in the cardiovascular system and the kidneys, which require the presence of additional pathological factors like for example nitrosative stress. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) for pathophysiological MR effects remain(s) elusive. The inactive MR is located in the cytosol associated with chaperone molecules including HSP90. After ligand binding, the MR monomer rapidly translocates into the nucleus while still being associated to HSP90 and after dissociation from HSP90 binds to hormone-response-elements called glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) as a dimer. There are indications that rapid MR trafficking is modulated in the presence of high salt, oxidative or nitrosative stress, hypothetically by induction or posttranslational modifications. Additionally, glucocorticoids and the enzyme 11beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase may also influence MR activation. Because MR trafficking and its modulation by micro-milieu factors influence MR cellular localization, it is not only relevant for genomic but also for nongenomic MR effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Steroid receptors in osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, T; Sato, B; Matsumoto, K; Ono, K

    1980-05-01

    Using the whole-cell incubation system at 37 degrees C, the specific bindings for 3H-dexamethasone, 3H-estradiol-17 beta, 3H-dihydrotestosterone and 3H-R5020 were measured in the purified, putative osteoblasts isolated from fetal rat calvaria by collagenase digestion. More than 90% of the purified cells contained intense alkaline phosphatase activity. The specific binding for 3H-dexamethasone with high affinity and low capacity was demonstrated in the isolated osteoblasts. Most of the binding was found in the nuclear fraction, indicating nucler binding of the 3H-dexamethasone-receptor complex. The apparent dissociation constant (Kd) for 3H-dexamethasone was estimated to be 3.3 x 10(-9)M and the number of binding sites was calculated to be 65 fmol/ml (4 x 10(6) cells) or 9,750 binding sites per cell. High salt: sucrose gradient analysis of nuclear extracts revealed a radioactive 4.0 S peak. These results indicate that the purified osteoblasts are among the target cells for glucocorticoids. On the other hand, the specific bindings for 3H-estradiol-17 beta and 3H-dihydrotestosterone were not detectable in the isolated osteoblasts, which suggests that estrogens and androgens act on osteoblasts only indirectly.

  9. Optical amplification and electroluminescence at 1.54 μm in Er-doped zinc silicate germanate on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, C. C.; Heikenfeld, J.; Yu, Z.; Steckl, A. J.

    2004-03-01

    Optical amplification and electroluminescence at 1.5 μm is reported in Er-doped Zn2Si0.5Ge0.5O4 (ZSG:Er) on silicon. ZSG:Er films were deposited by rf sputtering from a composite target in Ar/O2 mixtures. Channel waveguides were fabricated by plasma etching with Cl/Ar. The refractive index of ZSG:Er was found to be 1.75 at 1.54 μm. Signal enhancement greater than 13 dB and an internal gain of ˜2 dB have been achieved by optically pumping a 4.7 cm ZSG:Er amplifier. Electroluminescence at 1.5 μm was achieved using an ac device structure with a ZSG:Er central layer and upper and lower dielectric layers.

  10. Segregation of receptor-ligand complexes in cell adhesion zones: phase diagrams and the role of thermal membrane roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Różycki, B.; Lipowsky, R.; Weikl, T. R.

    2010-09-01

    The adhesion zone of immune cells, the 'immunological synapse', exhibits characteristic domains of receptor-ligand complexes. The domain formation is probably caused by a length difference of the receptor-ligand complexes, and has been investigated in experiments in which T cells adhere to supported membranes with anchored ligands. For supported membranes with two types of anchored ligands, MHCp and ICAM1, which bind to the T-cell receptor (TCR) and the receptor LFA1 in the cell membrane, the coexistence of domains of the TCR-MHCp and LFA1-ICAM1 complexes in the cell adhesion zone has been observed for a wide range of ligand concentrations and affinities. For supported membranes with long and short ligands that bind to the same cell receptor CD2, in contrast, domain coexistence has been observed for a quite narrow ratio of ligand concentrations. In this paper, we determine detailed phase diagrams for cells adhering to supported membranes with a statistical-physical model of cell adhesion. We find a characteristic difference between the adhesion scenarios in which two types of ligands in a supported membrane bind (i) to the same cell receptor or (ii) to two different cell receptors, which helps us to explain the experimental observations. Our phase diagrams fully include thermal shape fluctuations of the cell membranes on nanometer scales, which lead to a critical point for the domain formation and to a cooperative binding of the receptors and ligands.

  11. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (A1166C) gene polymorphism in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    H. El-banawy

    2015-01-05

    Jan 5, 2015 ... sure and body fluids, via renin-angiotensin–aldosterone system. (RAAS).1 This enzymatic cascade acts as an endocrine and paracrine system that results in the production of angiotensin. II (AngII). 2,3 Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) mediates most of the action of AngII and therefore modulates the.

  12. The effect of serum angiotensin II and angiotensin II type 1 receptor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To measure serum Ang II and the frequency of AT1 receptor CC genotype among a group of Egyptian patients with pediatric onset lupus nephritis (pLN). Methods: This is a case-control cross sectional study which included 24 patients with pLN and 24 age and sex-matched healthy subjects as controls. Clinical ...

  13. POSSIBILITY OF ANGIOTENSIN RECEPTOR BLOCKERS IN OPTIMIZING OF ANTIHYPERTENSIVE PHARMACOTHERAPY IN PATIENTS AFTER STROK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z M. Sizova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Current possibilities of AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs, such as candesartan, for optimization of antihypertensive therapy in stroke patients are presented in the article. ARBs are original drugs that effect to the delicate balance of pressor and depressor neurohormonal systems. They also have cerebroprotective action and are the drugs of choice for primary and secondary prevention of stroke in hypertensive patients

  14. Cardiac nuclear receptors: architects of mitochondrial structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Rick B; Kelly, Daniel P

    2017-04-03

    The adult heart is uniquely designed and equipped to provide a continuous supply of energy in the form of ATP to support persistent contractile function. This high-capacity energy transduction system is the result of a remarkable surge in mitochondrial biogenesis and maturation during the fetal-to-adult transition in cardiac development. Substantial evidence indicates that nuclear receptor signaling is integral to dynamic changes in the cardiac mitochondrial phenotype in response to developmental cues, in response to diverse postnatal physiologic conditions, and in disease states such as heart failure. A subset of cardiac-enriched nuclear receptors serve to match mitochondrial fuel preferences and capacity for ATP production with changing energy demands of the heart. In this Review, we describe the role of specific nuclear receptors and their coregulators in the dynamic control of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism in the normal and diseased heart.

  15. Ionotropic ATP receptors in neuronal-glial communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalo, Ulyana; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Pankratov, Yuri

    2011-04-01

    In the central nervous system ATP is released from both neurones and astroglial cells acting as a homo- and heterocellular neurotransmitter. Glial cells express numerous purinoceptors of both ionotropic (P2X) and metabotropic (P2Y) varieties. Astroglial P2X receptors can be activated by ongoing synaptic transmission and can mediate fast local signalling through elevation in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) and Na(+) concentrations. These ionic signals can be translated into various physiological messages by numerous pathways, including release of gliotransmitters, metabolic support of neurones and regulation of activity of postsynaptic glutamate and GABA receptors. Ionotropic purinoceptors represent a novel pathway of glia-driven modulation of synaptic signalling that involves the release of ATP from neurones and astrocytes followed by activation of P2X receptors which can regulate synaptic activity by variety of mechanisms expressed in both neuronal and glial compartments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sex Steroid Hormone Receptor Expression Affects Ovarian Cancer Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Skovbjerg Arildsen, Nicolai; Malander, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    in epithelial ovarian cancer. METHODS: Immunohistochemical stainings for ERα, ERβ, PR, and AR were assessed in relation to survival in 118 serous and endometrioid ovarian cancers. Expression of the genes encoding the four receptors was studied in relation to prognosis in the molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer...... in ovarian cancer and support that tumors should be stratified based on molecular as well as histological subtypes in future studies investigating the role of endocrine treatment in ovarian cancer.......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Although most ovarian cancers express estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and androgen (AR) receptors, they are currently not applied in clinical decision making. We explored the prognostic impact of sex steroid hormone receptor protein and mRNA expression on survival...

  17. Dopamine D3 receptor agonists as pharmacological tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassel, S; Schwed, J S; Stark, H

    2015-09-01

    Dysregulation of the dopaminergic innervation in the central nervous system plays a key role in different neurological disorders like Parkinson´s disease, restless legs syndrome, schizophrenia etc. Although dopamine D3 receptors have been recognized as an important target in these diseases, their full pharmacological properties need further investigations. With focus on dopamine D3 receptor full agonists, this review has divided the ergoline and non-ergoline ligands in dissimilar chemical subclasses describing their pharmacodynamic properties on different related receptors, on species differences and their functional properties on different signaling mechanism. This is combined with a short description of structure-activity relationships for each class. Therefore, this overview should support the rational choice for the optimal compound selection based on affinity, selectivity and efficacy data in biochemical and pharmacological studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  18. Orexin receptor-1 mediates brown fat developmental differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellayah, Dyan; Sikder, Devanjan

    2012-01-01

    Orexin A (OX) is a small excitatory neuropeptide hormone that stimulates feeding, wakefulness and energy expenditure via a pair of G-coupled protein receptors, namely orexin receptor-1 (OXR1) and orexin receptor-2 (OXR2). OX-deficient mice are sensitive to obesity despite being hypophagic. The obesogenic effect of OX-deletion is due to brown adipose tissue (BAT) dysfunction, a defect that originates during fetal growth. Brown preadipocytes in OX-null mice display undifferentiated histological appearance and fail to support both diet- and cold-induced thermogenesis. We show that the OXR1-null mice phenocopies the differentiation defect observed in the ligand-null mice indicating that OXR1 relays OX’s differentiation and thermogenic function. Consistent with this, OX fails to induce differentiation in cultured OXR1-null preadipocytes. Thus, OX signaling via OXR1 constitutes an important thermoregulatory mechanism that defends against cold and obesity. PMID:23700511

  19. Allosteric modulation of chemoattractant receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Candida Cesta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemoattractants control selective leukocyte homing via interactions with a dedicated family of related GPCR. Emerging evidence indicates that the signalling activity of these receptors, as for other GPCR, is influenced by allosteric modulators, which interact with the receptor in a binding site distinct from the binding site of the endogenous agonist and modulate the receptor signalling activity in response to the orthosteric ligand. Allosteric modulators have a number of potential advantages over orthosteric agonists/antagonists as therapeutic agents and offer unprecedented opportunities to identify extremely selective drug leads. Here we resume evidence of allosterism in the context of chemoattractant receptors, discussing in particular its functional impact on functional selectivity and probe/concentration dependence of orthosteric ligands activities.

  20. Sialic Acid Receptors of Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrosovich, Mikhail; Herrler, Georg; Klenk, Hans Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Sialic acid linked to glycoproteins and gangliosides is used by many viruses as a receptor for cell entry. These viruses include important human and animal pathogens, such as influenza, parainfluenza, mumps, corona, noro, rota, and DNA tumor viruses. Attachment to sialic acid is mediated by receptor binding proteins that are constituents of viral envelopes or exposed at the surface of non-enveloped viruses. Some of these viruses are also equipped with a neuraminidase or a sialyl-O-acetyl-esterase. These receptor-destroying enzymes promote virus release from infected cells and neutralize sialic acid-containing soluble proteins interfering with cell surface binding of the virus. Variations in the receptor specificity are important determinants for host range, tissue tropism, pathogenicity, and transmissibility of these viruses.

  1. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) is designed to foster the development of a comprehensive understanding of the structure, function, and role in disease...

  2. Insulin receptor signaling in cones

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rajala, Ammaji; Dighe, Radhika; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Anderson, Robert E; Rajala, Raju V S

    2013-01-01

    .... To date there are no studies on the insulin receptor signaling in cones; however, mRNA levels of IR signaling proteins are significantly higher in cone-dominant neural retina leucine zipper (Nrl...

  3. Support Spinor Machine

    OpenAIRE

    Kanjamapornkul, Kabin; Pinčák, Richard; Chunithpaisan, Sanphet; Bartoš, Erik

    2017-01-01

    We generalize a support vector machine to a support spinor machine by using the mathematical structure of wedge product over vector machine in order to extend field from vector field to spinor field. The separated hyperplane is extended to Kolmogorov space in time series data which allow us to extend a structure of support vector machine to a support tensor machine and a support tensor machine moduli space. Our performance test on support spinor machine is done over one class classification o...

  4. Prolactin receptor, growth hormone receptor, and putative somatolactin receptor in Mozambique tilapia: tissue specific expression and differential regulation by salinity and fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, A L; Fox, B K; Davis, L K; Visitacion, N; Kitahashi, T; Hirano, T; Grau, E G

    2007-01-01

    In fish, pituitary growth hormone family peptide hormones (growth hormone, GH; prolactin, PRL; somatolactin, SL) regulate essential physiological functions including osmoregulation, growth, and metabolism. Teleost GH family hormones have both differential and overlapping effects, which are mediated by plasma membrane receptors. A PRL receptor (PRLR) and two putative GH receptors (GHR1 and GHR2) have been identified in several teleost species. Recent phylogenetic analyses and binding studies suggest that GHR1 is a receptor for SL. However, no studies have compared the tissue distribution and physiological regulation of all three receptors. We sequenced GHR2 from the liver of the Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus), developed quantitative real-time PCR assays for the three receptors, and assessed their tissue distribution and regulation by salinity and fasting. PRLR was highly expressed in the gill, kidney, and intestine, consistent with the osmoregulatory functions of PRL. PRLR expression was very low in the liver. GHR2 was most highly expressed in the muscle, followed by heart, testis, and liver, consistent with this being a GH receptor with functions in growth and metabolism. GHR1 was most highly expressed in fat, liver, and muscle, suggesting a metabolic function. GHR1 expression was also high in skin, consistent with a function of SL in chromatophore regulation. These findings support the hypothesis that GHR1 is a receptor for SL. In a comparison of freshwater (FW)- and seawater (SW)-adapted tilapia, plasma PRL was strongly elevated in FW, whereas plasma GH was slightly elevated in SW. PRLR expression was reduced in the gill in SW, consistent with PRL's function in freshwater adaptation. GHR2 was elevated in the kidney in FW, and correlated negatively with plasma GH, whereas GHR1 was elevated in the gill in SW. Plasma IGF-I, but not GH, was reduced by 4 weeks of fasting. Transcript levels of GHR1 and GHR2 were elevated by fasting in the muscle. However

  5. History of retinoic acid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbrook, Doris M; Chambon, Pierre; Rochette-Egly, Cécile; Asson-Batres, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of retinoic acid receptors arose from research into how vitamins are essential for life. Early studies indicated that Vitamin A was metabolized into an active factor, retinoic acid (RA), which regulates RNA and protein expression in cells. Each step forward in our understanding of retinoic acid in human health was accomplished by the development and application of new technologies. Development cDNA cloning techniques and discovery of nuclear receptors for steroid hormones provided the basis for identification of two classes of retinoic acid receptors, RARs and RXRs, each of which has three isoforms, α, β and ɣ. DNA manipulation and crystallographic studies revealed that the receptors contain discrete functional domains responsible for binding to DNA, ligands and cofactors. Ligand binding was shown to induce conformational changes in the receptors that cause release of corepressors and recruitment of coactivators to create functional complexes that are bound to consensus promoter DNA sequences called retinoic acid response elements (RAREs) and that cause opening of chromatin and transcription of adjacent genes. Homologous recombination technology allowed the development of mice lacking expression of retinoic acid receptors, individually or in various combinations, which demonstrated that the receptors exhibit vital, but redundant, functions in fetal development and in vision, reproduction, and other functions required for maintenance of adult life. More recent advancements in sequencing and proteomic technologies reveal the complexity of retinoic acid receptor involvement in cellular function through regulation of gene expression and kinase activity. Future directions will require systems biology approaches to decipher how these integrated networks affect human stem cells, health, and disease.

  6. Analysis of the protein related receptor GPR92 in G-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie Therese Rettenberger

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A continuous assessment of ingested food in the gastric lumen is essential for fine-tuning the digestive activities, including the secretion of the regulatory hormones such as gastrin. It has been proposed that G-cells may be able to sense the amount of ingested proteins and adjust the secretion of gastrin accordingly. Our previous studies have shown that G-cells express suitable receptor types, most notably the peptone-receptor GPR92 and the amino acid receptors GPRC6A and CaSR; however, their relative importance remained unclear. To determine the relative quantity of each receptor type, individual G-cells isolated from the transgenic mouse line mGas-EGFP were analyzed by means of a Liquid Chromatography Tandem-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS procedure. The results indicate that the relative amount of receptor protein for GPR92 was much higher than for the receptor types GPRC6A and CaSR. These findings support the notion that the peptone-receptor GPR92 may be particularly relevant for sensing partially digested protein products. This view was supported by the finding that a high-protein diet affected the expression level of the peptone-receptor GPR92 in the gastric antrum as well as in the circumvallate papillae.

  7. Molecular Insights into the Transmembrane Domain of the Thyrotropin Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Chantreau

    Full Text Available The thyrotropin receptor (TSHR is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR that is member of the leucine-rich repeat subfamily (LGR. In the absence of crystal structure, the success of rational design of ligands targeting the receptor internal cavity depends on the quality of the TSHR models built. In this subfamily, transmembrane helices (TM 2 and 5 are characterized by the absence of proline compared to most receptors, raising the question of the structural conformation of these helices. To gain insight into the structural properties of these helices, we carried out bioinformatics and experimental studies. Evolutionary analysis of the LGR family revealed a deletion in TM5 but provided no information on TM2. Wild type residues at positions 2.58, 2.59 or 2.60 in TM2 and/or at position 5.50 in TM5 were substituted to proline. Depending on the position of the proline substitution, different effects were observed on membrane expression, glycosylation, constitutive cAMP activity and responses to thyrotropin. Only proline substitution at position 2.59 maintained complex glycosylation and high membrane expression, supporting occurrence of a bulged TM2. The TSHR transmembrane domain was modeled by homology with the orexin 2 receptor, using a protocol that forced the deletion of one residue in the TM5 bulge of the template. The stability of the model was assessed by molecular dynamics simulations. TM5 straightened during the equilibration phase and was stable for the remainder of the simulations. Our data support a structural model of the TSHR transmembrane domain with a bulged TM2 and a straight TM5 that is specific of glycoprotein hormone receptors.

  8. Receptor antibodies as novel therapeutics for diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussar, Siegfried; Vienberg, Sara Gry; Kahn, C Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies to receptors can block or mimic hormone action. Taking advantage of receptor isoforms, co-receptors, and other receptor modulating proteins, antibodies and other designer ligands can enhance tissue specificity and provide new approaches to the therapy of diabetes and other diseases....

  9. Receptor-targeted metalloradiopharmaceuticals. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Mark A.

    2000-03-22

    Copper (II) and platinum (II) coordination complexes were prepared and characterized. These complexes were designed to afford structural homology with steroidal and non-steroidal estrogens for possible use as receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals. While weak affinity for the estrogen receptor was detectable, none would appear to have sufficient receptor-affinity for estrogen-receptor-targeted imaging or therapy.

  10. Interaction of Plant Extracts with Central Nervous System Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Lundstrom

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plant extracts have been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of various maladies including neurological diseases. Several central nervous system receptors have been demonstrated to interact with plant extracts and components affecting the pharmacology and thereby potentially playing a role in human disease and treatment. For instance, extracts from Hypericum perforatum (St. John’s wort targeted several CNS receptors. Similarly, extracts from Piper nigrum, Stephania cambodica, and Styphnolobium japonicum exerted inhibition of agonist-induced activity of the human neurokinin-1 receptor. Methods: Different methods have been established for receptor binding and functional assays based on radioactive and fluorescence-labeled ligands in cell lines and primary cell cultures. Behavioral studies of the effect of plant extracts have been conducted in rodents. Plant extracts have further been subjected to mood and cognition studies in humans. Results: Mechanisms of action at molecular and cellular levels have been elucidated for medicinal plants in support of standardization of herbal products and identification of active extract compounds. In several studies, plant extracts demonstrated affinity to a number of CNS receptors in parallel indicating the complexity of this interaction. In vivo studies showed modifications of CNS receptor affinity and behavioral responses in animal models after treatment with medicinal herbs. Certain plant extracts demonstrated neuroprotection and enhanced cognitive performance, respectively, when evaluated in humans. Noteworthy, the penetration of plant extracts and their protective effect on the blood-brain-barrier are discussed. Conclusion: The affinity of plant extracts and their isolated compounds for CNS receptors indicates an important role for medicinal plants in the treatment of neurological disorders. Moreover, studies in animal and human models have confirmed a scientific basis for the

  11. Rapid synthesis of acetylcholine receptors at neuromuscular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, D A; Drachman, D B; Pestronk, A

    1988-10-11

    The rate of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) degradation in mature, innervated mammalian neuromuscular junctions has recently been shown to be biphasic; up to 20% are rapidly turned over (RTOs; half life less than 1 day) whereas the remainder are lost more slowly ('stable' AChRs; half life 10-12 days). In order to maintain normal junctional receptor density, synthesis and insertion of AChRs should presumably be sufficiently rapid to replace both the RTOs and the stable receptors. We have tested this prediction by blocking pre-existing AChRs in the mouse sternomastoid muscle with alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BuTx), and monitoring the subsequent appeara