WorldWideScience

Sample records for at-risk older people

  1. Considering the benefits of egg consumption for older people at risk of sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alison; Gray, Juliet

    2016-06-01

    Sarcopenia is an important health issue for older people. It is closely linked with frailty and malnutrition and can significantly reduce both health and quality of life for those affected. Sarcopenic decline in muscle mass can start as early as the fourth and fifth decade of life, so the maintenance of muscle mass throughout adulthood, through regular physical activity and a balanced diet, should be an important consideration in reducing the risk of sarcopenia in older age. Maintaining regular exercise throughout older age remains key to the treatment of sarcopenia, as does an adequate intake of nutrients, including high-quality protein and vitamin D. A significant proportion of older people fail to meet the recommended requirements for protein; it has also been suggested that the requirements in existing recommendations could be higher. Evidence is emerging that an adequate intake of protein at each meal may be required to optimise muscle synthesis in older people. Eggs are an inexpensive, widely available and easily digestible source of high-quality protein and contain a significant proportion of leucine, an amino acid that is important for muscle synthesis, as well as many other nutrients of significance for older people, including vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids. For many older people, eggs are a familiar and acceptable protein food at breakfast and other meals. Encouraging both those approaching older age and older people to include eggs more frequently, as part of a healthy, balanced diet and in addition to physical activity, could help them maintain their muscle strength and function, thereby preserving their functional capacity and reducing morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs associated with sarcopenia. PMID:27270199

  2. Napping in older people 'at risk' of dementia: relationships with depression, cognition, medical burden and sleep quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Nathan; Terpening, Zoe; Rogers, Naomi L; Duffy, Shantel L; Hickie, Ian B; Lewis, Simon J G; Naismith, Sharon L

    2015-10-01

    Sleep disturbance is prevalent in older adults, particularly so in those at a greater risk of dementia. However, so far the clinical, medical and neuropsychological correlates of daytime sleep have not been examined. The aims of this study were to investigate the characteristics and effects of napping using actigraphy in older people, particularly in those 'at risk' of dementia. The study used actigraphy and sleep diaries to measure napping habits in 133 older adults 'at risk' of dementia (mean age = 65.5 years, SD = 8.4 years), who also underwent comprehensive medical, psychiatric and neuropsychological assessment. When defined by actigraphy, napping was present in 83.5% (111/133) of participants; however, duration and timing varied significantly among subjects. Nappers had significantly greater medical burden and body mass index, and higher rates of mild cognitive impairment. Longer and more frequent naps were associated with poorer cognitive functioning, as well as higher levels of depressive symptoms, while the timing of naps was associated with poorer nocturnal sleep quality (i.e. sleep latency and wake after sleep onset). This study highlights that in older adults 'at risk' of dementia, napping is associated with underlying neurobiological changes such as depression and cognition. Napping characteristics should be more routinely monitored in older individuals to elucidate their relationship with psychological and cognitive outcomes. PMID:26096839

  3. Measuring appetite with the simplified nutritional appetite questionnaire identifies hospitalised older people at risk of worse health outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Pilgrim, A.L.; Baylis, D; Jameson, K.A; Cooper, C; Sayer, A.A.; Robinson, S. M.; Roberts, H. C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Poor appetite is commonly reported by older people but is rarely measured. The Simplified Nutritional Appetite Questionnaire (SNAQ) was validated to predict weight loss in community dwelling older adults but has been little used in hospitals. We evaluated it in older women on admission to hospital and examined associations with healthcare outcomes. Design: Longitudinal observational with follow- up at six months. Setting: Female acute Medicine for Older People wards at a U...

  4. Feasibility and effects of preventive home visits for at-risk older people: Design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catellier Diane

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The search for preventive methods to mitigate functional decline and unwanted relocation by older adults living in the community is important. Preventive home visit (PHV models use infrequent but regular visits to older adults by trained practitioners with the goal of maintaining function and quality of life. Evidence about PHV efficacy is mixed but generally supportive. Yet interventions have rarely combined a comprehensive (biopsychosocial occupational therapy intervention protocol with a home visit to older adults. There is a particular need in the USA to create and examine such a protocol. Methods/Design The study is a single-blind randomized controlled pilot trial designed to assess the feasibility, and to obtain preliminary efficacy estimates, of an intervention consisting of preventive home visits to community-dwelling older adults. An occupational therapy-based preventive home visit (PHV intervention was developed and is being implemented and evaluated using a repeated measures design. We recruited a sample of 110 from a population of older adults (75+ who were screened and found to be at-risk for functional decline. Participants are currently living in the community (not in assisted living or a skilled nursing facility in one of three central North Carolina counties. After consent, participants were randomly assigned into experimental and comparison groups. The experimental group receives the intervention 4 times over a 12 month follow-up period while the comparison group receives a minimal intervention of mailed printed materials. Pre- and post-intervention measures are being gathered by questionnaires administered face-to-face by a treatment-blinded research associate. Key outcome measures include functional ability, participation, life satisfaction, self-rated health, and depression. Additional information is collected from participants in the experimental group during the intervention to assess the feasibility of

  5. Older people without children

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, Jill

    2009-01-01

    In a recent discussion about government proposals on care for older people (July 2009), the Radio 4 news presenter referred to a possible need to return to the attitude that it's the family's responsibility to look after its older members. Yet there is often already an expectation that the family – by which is usually meant children or grandchildren – can be relied upon to take an active part in the social life and any care arrangements for their older members. Indeed, social policy in much o...

  6. Rehabilitation and older people.

    OpenAIRE

    Young, J.

    1996-01-01

    Rehabilitation is concerned with lessening the impact of disabling conditions. These are particularly common in older people and considerable health gain can be achieved by successful rehabilitation. Hospital doctors and general practitioners should be aware of the core principles of rehabilitation, be able to recognise rehabilitation need in their patients, and have sufficient knowledge of their local rehabilitation services to trigger the referral process.

  7. Older people's perceptions about symptoms.

    OpenAIRE

    R. Morgan; Pendleton, N; Clague, J E; Horan, M A

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known of the nature and origins of the attitudes that older people have towards ageing, disease, and medical treatments. Several studies on older people in the community have suggested under-reporting of symptoms. There may be several reasons for this, including the possibility that some older people regard disease processes as a natural feature of ageing and, consequently, feel that medical intervention may have little to offer. AIM: To investigate the perceptions of ol...

  8. Appropriate prescribing for older people

    OpenAIRE

    Drenth - van Maanen, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate prescribing is the result of pharmacotherapeutic decision-making to maximise the net health benefit of treatment, given the resources available. Several risk factors for inappropriate prescribing in older people have been identified, such as polypharmacy, impaired renal function, and frequent transfers between healthcare settings. The objectives of the studies described in this thesis were to describe the frequency and nature of risk factors for inappropriate prescribing in older ...

  9. Appropriate prescribing for older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenth - van Maanen, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate prescribing is the result of pharmacotherapeutic decision-making to maximise the net health benefit of treatment, given the resources available. Several risk factors for inappropriate prescribing in older people have been identified, such as polypharmacy, impaired renal function, and fre

  10. PTSD in older bereaved people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Maja

    2010-08-01

    Late life bereavement has been associated with psychological problems, mainly depression. A few studies indicated that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was an important issue in late life bereavement reactions. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of PTSD in recently bereaved older people compared with married controls and to investigate whether the loss of a spouse in old age, in contrast with earlier assumptions, could lead to PTSD. Two hundred and ninety-six Danish older bereaved people (mean age 73 years, 113 males) were chosen from national registers and assessed two months postbereavement. They were compared with a control group of 276 married older people. The prevalence of PTSD and depression were measured through a self-report questionnaire. Results showed that 16% of the bereaved and 4% of the control group had a PTSD diagnosis (ES = 0.35; Cohen's d = 0.74). Additionally, 37% of the bereaved and 22% of the control group had mild to severe depression (ES = 0.19; Cohen's d = 0.37). The results suggested that late life spousal bereavement result in PTSD with equal frequency to general samples of bereaved persons. Furthermore, the prevalence of PTSD in the first months after bereavement was more elevated than the level of depression. This makes PTSD an important factor when studying late life bereavement reactions. PMID:20686978

  11. Interface Design and Engagement with Older People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorn, D.

    2007-01-01

    The current paper examines the design process that led to an unusually successful interactive tutorial for older people. The paper describes the issues that make designing for older people different. These include differences between the designer and the target population and the difficulty that older people have in interacting with low-fidelity…

  12. Identification of older hospitalized patients at risk for functional decline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerduijn, J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Between 30% and 60% of older patients experience functional decline after hospitalization, resulting in a decline in health-related quality of life and autonomy. This is associated with increased risk of readmission, nursing home placement and mortality, increased length of hospital stay and increas

  13. Reduced glomerular filtration rate and its association with clinical outcome in older patients at risk of vascular events: secondary analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ford, Ian

    2009-01-20

    Reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk in young and middle aged individuals. Associations with cardiovascular disease and mortality in older people are less clearly established. We aimed to determine the predictive value of the GFR for mortality and morbidity using data from the 5,804 participants randomized in the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER).

  14. How Many People Are Affected or At Risk for Lactose Intolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... many people are affected or at risk for lactose intolerance? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... lactose do not get symptoms. 1 Who gets lactose intolerance and who is at risk for it? Lactose ...

  15. Lived experiences of self-care among older, home-dwelling individuals identified to be at risk of undernutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomstad ST

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Solveig T Tomstad,1,2 Ulrika Söderhamn,2 Geir Arild Espnes,3 Olle Söderhamn21Department of Social Work and Health Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; 2Centre for Caring Research – Southern Norway, University of Agder, Grimstad, Norway; 3Research Centre for Health Promotion and Resources HiST-NTNU, Department of Social Work and Health Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, NorwayIntroduction: In a society where most older people live in their own homes, it may be expected of older individuals to exercise their potential to take care of themselves in daily life. Nutrition is a central aspect of self-care, and groups of older, home-dwelling people are at risk of undernutrition.Aim: The aim of this study was to describe the lived experiences of self-care and features that influence health and self-care among older, home-dwelling individuals identified to be at risk of undernutrition.Methods: Qualitative interviews were performed with eleven home-dwelling individuals who had been identified as being at risk of undernutrition. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed with a descriptive phenomenological method.Findings: Self-care as a lived experience among older, home-dwelling individuals identified to be at risk of undernutrition is about being aware of food choices and making decisions about taking healthy steps or not. In the presence of health problems, the appetite often decreases. Being able to take care of oneself in daily life is important, as is receiving help when needing it. Working at being physically and socially active and engaged may stimulate the appetite. Having company at meals is important and missed when living alone. Being present and taking each day by day, as well as considering oneself in the light of past time and previous experiences and looking ahead, is central, even when having fears for the future and the end of life

  16. Suicide in older people: Revisioning new approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuter, Kate; Procter, Nicholas; Evans, David; Jaworski, Katrina

    2016-03-01

    This discussion paper identifies and examines several tensions inherent in traditional approaches to understanding older people's suicide. Predicted future increases in the absolute number of elderly suicides are subject to careful interpretation due to the underreporting of suicides in older age groups. Furthermore, a significant number of studies of older people's death by suicide examine risk factors or a combination of risk factors in retrospect only, while current approaches to suicide prevention in the elderly place disproportionate emphasis on the identification and treatment of depression. Taken together, such tensions give rise to a monologic view of research and practice, ultimately limiting our potential for understanding older people's experience of suicide and suicidal behaviour. New approaches are necessary if we are to move beyond the current narrow focus that prevails. Fresh thinking, which draws on older people's experience of attempting to die by suicide, might offer critical insight into socially-constructed meanings attributed to suicide and suicidal behaviour by older people. Specifically, identification through research into the protective mechanisms that are relevant and available to older people who have been suicidal is urgently needed to effectively guide mental health nurses and health-care professionals in therapeutic engagement and intervention. PMID:26762697

  17. Food patterns of Polish older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadolowska, L.; Danowska-Oziewicz, M.; Niedzwiedzka, E.;

    2006-01-01

    Food patterns of Polish older people were separated and described. The research included 422 people aged 65+ years, living in 5 geographical locations. Participants of the study were selected in quota sampling. Criteria for recruitment included sex, age (65-^74 or 75+ years) and family status...

  18. Insular Dysfunction in People at Risk for Psychotic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianna Sepede

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In response to the review article written by Pavuluri and May [1] and to the original article by Tomasino et al [2] we will comment the recent neuroimaging findings of insular dysfunctions in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorders, focusing on people at genetic risk for developing psychotic symptoms. A disrupted insular functioning was reported in several studies, even though the results were not univocal with respect to the direction of the effect (some studies reported a reduced activation, other an augmented activation and the lateralization of the observed alterations (left, right or bilateral. We will conclude that an altered function of the insula during both cognitive and emotional task may be a candidate vulnerability marker for psychotic disorders.

  19. Insomnia (primary) in older people

    OpenAIRE

    Alessi, Cathy; Vitiello, Michael V.

    2011-01-01

    Up to 40% of older adults have insomnia, with difficulty getting to sleep, early waking, or feeling unrefreshed on waking. The prevalence of insomnia increases with age. Other risk factors include medical and psychiatric illnesses, psychological factors, stress, daytime napping, and hyperarousal.Primary insomnia is a chronic and relapsing condition that may increase the risks of accidents.Primary insomnia is chronic insomnia without specific underlying medical, psychiatric, or other sleep ...

  20. Socioeconomic differentials in mortality among older people

    OpenAIRE

    Bowling, Ann

    2004-01-01

    Research in social epidemiology and medical sociology has consistently shown that people in lower socioeconomic status groups experience poorer health and live shorter lives than those in higher status groups. However, investigations of such differentials among people aged 65 and over is still comparatively rare. In this issue of the journal Huisman et al report on the results of their analyses of socioeconomic status (housing tenure, education) and mortality among older people. These were ba...

  1. Brief Report: Young People at Risk for Eating Disorders in Southeast Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, Tatiana; Fleitlich-Bilyk, Bacy; Goodman, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A representative sample of 7-14-year-old young people in southeast Brazil (N=1251) was assessed using standardized parent and youth interviews, thereby identifying an "at-risk" group of young people who met one or more DSM-IV criteria for anorexia and/or bulimia nervosa. These young people were compared with an age and gender matched comparison…

  2. How Many People Are Affected by or at Risk for Endometriosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people are affected by or at risk for endometriosis? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... menstruates. Factors that May Increase the Risk of Endometriosis Studies show that women are at higher risk ...

  3. How Many People Are Affected by or at Risk for Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people are affected by or at risk for Down syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... ethnicity. 4 , 5 Maternal Age and Risk for Down Syndrome Because the likelihood that an egg will contain ...

  4. The Right to Health of Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Britta; Bhushan, Anjana; Taleb, Hala Abou; Vasquez, Javier; Thomas, Rebekah

    2016-04-01

    A focus on the right to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health (hereinafter, "the right to health") draws attention to the health needs of older people, including the most marginalized among them. Many factors that influence vulnerability or impede the enjoyment of health and access to quality services result from an inability to freely exercise these human rights. A human rights approach can help to address the legal, social, and structural barriers to good health for older persons, clarifying the legal obligations of State and non-State actors to uphold and respect these rights. However, despite growing impetus for action, this area has historically received limited attention. Drawing on practice examples from different regions, this article unpacks the meaning of the right to health and other related human rights of older people in practice, covering both health care and underlying determinants of their health. Questions of availability, accessibility, acceptability, and quality are highlighted from the perspective of older people's health and well-being. The article brings together knowledge, principles, norms, and standards from the human rights law, health, and ageing arenas. By making links between these arenas, it is hoped that the article fills a gap in thinking on how to achieve the progressive realization of the right to health of older people and the effective promotion and protection of their other related human rights, which are crucial for the enjoyment of health. PMID:26994261

  5. Pressure ulcer prevention in frail older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Maree; Nugent, Linda

    2015-12-16

    Pressure ulcers are painful and cause discomfort, have a negative effect on quality of life, and are costly to treat. The incidence and severity of preventable pressure ulcers is an important indicator of quality of care; it is essential that healthcare providers monitor prevalence and incidence rates to ensure that care strategies implemented are effective. Frail older people are at increased risk of developing pressure ulcers. This article discusses the complexities of preventing pressure ulcers in frail older people and emphasises the importance of structured educational programmes that incorporate effective clinical leadership and multidisciplinary teamwork. PMID:26669407

  6. Poverty and wellbeing among older people in Nairobi slum settlements

    OpenAIRE

    Baird, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Levels of poverty and wellbeing among older people in poor, urban settings in Africa have been under-researched, yet absolute numbers of older people are set to increase in this continent in the coming decades. The urban experience of wellbeing for older people is relatively unknown as research tends to focus on older people residing in rural places. This study addresses this research gap and investigates patterns of poverty and wellbeing among older people in two slum settlements in Nairobi....

  7. Older people, food and satisfaction with life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dean, Moira; Raats, Monique M.; Grunert, Klaus G.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter discusses food-related satisfaction with life of older people, identifying some of the determinants and barriers to satisfaction with food-related quality of life, and discusses possible ways of enhancing older people's quality of life in the domain of food. Despite being strongly...... associated with life, and heavily contributing to the quality of life, food has so far been neglected and not much research has been conducted into people's satisfaction with their food-related life and its relationship to overall life satisfaction. As people age, their goals and available resources in terms...... of health, social networks, income and skills change. Changes in resources can be expected to have an impact on satisfaction with life....

  8. Correlates of alcohol abstinence and at-risk alcohol consumption in older adults with depression : the NESDO study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Julia F.; Kok, Rob M.; van Marwijk, Harm W. J.; van der Mast, Roos C.; Naarding, Paul; Oude Voshaar, Richard C.; Stek, Max L.; Verhaak, Peter F. M.; de Waal, Margot W. M.; Comijs, Hannie C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare alcohol use between depressed and nondepressed older adults, and to investigate correlates of alcohol abstinence and at-risk alcohol consumption in depressed older adults. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Netherlands Study of Depression in Older Persons (NESDO). PARTICI

  9. Older People as Consumers of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Alan

    Socio-psychological variables that influence the extent to which older people (age: 50+) will be consumers of education are examined to arrive at criteria for programs appropriate to the developmental needs of this group. Research indicates that two primary influences are changes in learning abilities and interests. Secondary influences include…

  10. Improving the oral health of older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2005-01-01

    The proportion of older people continues to grow worldwide, especially in developing countries. Non-communicable diseases are fast becoming the leading causes of disability and mortality, and in coming decades health and social policy-makers will face tremendous challenges posed by the rapidly ch...

  11. Polypharmacy and older people - the GP perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vass, M; Hendriksen, C

    2005-01-01

    is recommended at every encounter, and time consuming comprehensive follow-up will be demanded, 'polypharmacy consultations' surely will be built into GP contracts in the future. The authors state that a number of pharmacological regimens for older people are outperformed by non...

  12. Housing Accessibility Methodology Targeting Older People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, Tina

    accessibility problems before the planning of housing intervention strategies. It is also critical that housing standards addressing accessibility intended to accommodate people with functional limitations are valid in the sense that their definitions truly support accessibility. However, there is a paucity of...... reasonably question the validity of the housing standards addressing accessibility. This thesis addresses housing accessibility methodology in general and the reliability of assessment and the validity of standards targeting older people with functional limitations and a dependence on mobility devices in...... particular. The overarching aim of the thesis was to develop and explore methods applicable for improving housing accessibility assessments and to explore feasible approaches to create housing standards that truly support accessibility and accommodate older people. A main methodological contribution of the...

  13. Estimating Glomerular Filtration Rate in Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Garasto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed at reviewing age-related changes in kidney structure and function, methods for estimating kidney function, and impact of reduced kidney function on geriatric outcomes, as well as the reliability and applicability of equations for estimating glomerular filtration rate (eGFR in older patients. CKD is associated with different comorbidities and adverse outcomes such as disability and premature death in older populations. Creatinine clearance and other methods for estimating kidney function are not easy to apply in older subjects. Thus, an accurate and reliable method for calculating eGFR would be highly desirable for early detection and management of CKD in this vulnerable population. Equations based on serum creatinine, age, race, and gender have been widely used. However, these equations have their own limitations, and no equation seems better than the other ones in older people. New equations specifically developed for use in older populations, especially those based on serum cystatin C, hold promises. However, further studies are needed to definitely accept them as the reference method to estimate kidney function in older patients in the clinical setting.

  14. Older People's Mobility: Segments, Factors, Trends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haustein, Sonja; Siren, Anu

    2015-01-01

    demographic, health-related, or transport-related factors. This paper reviews these studies and compares the segments of older people that different studies have identified. First, as a result of a systematic comparison, we identified four generic segments: (1) an active car-oriented segment; (2) a car......The expanding older population is increasingly diverse with regard to, for example, age, income, location, and health. Within transport research, this diversity has recently been addressed in studies that segment the older population into homogeneous groups based on combinations of various...... people’s travel behaviour. Based on this, we proposed a theoretical model on how the different determinants work together to form the four mobility patterns related to the identified segments. Finally, based on current trends and expectations, we assessed which segments are likely to increase or decrease...

  15. Pharmacological treatment of depression in older people

    OpenAIRE

    Curran, Stephen; Byrne, Andrew; Wattis, John

    2006-01-01

    In the light of recent National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) and Committee for the Safety of Medicines (CSM) guidance we discuss the importance of the diagnosis of depression in old age and review pharmacological interventions. An introductory section is followed by sections on each of the main antidepressant groups. This briefly describes their pharmacology and reviews research done specifically relevant to older people. Finally practical clinical applications are discussed.

  16. Pathways between stigma and suicidal ideation among people at risk of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ziyan; Müller, Mario; Heekeren, Karsten; Theodoridou, Anastasia; Metzler, Sibylle; Dvorsky, Diane; Oexle, Nathalie; Walitza, Susanne; Rössler, Wulf; Rüsch, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Mental illness stigma may contribute to suicidality and is associated with social isolation and low self-esteem among young people at risk of psychosis. However, it is unclear whether mental illness stigma contributes to suicidality in this population. We therefore examined the associations of self-labeling and stigma stress with suicidality among young people at risk. Self-labeling as "mentally ill", stigma stress, social isolation, self-esteem, symptoms and suicidal ideation were assessed in 172 individuals at risk of psychosis. Self-labeling and stigma stress were examined as predictors of suicidality by path analysis. Increased self-labeling as "mentally ill" was associated with suicidality, directly as well as indirectly mediated by social isolation. More stigma stress was related to social isolation which in turn was associated with low self-esteem, depression and suicidal ideation. Social isolation fully mediated the link between stigma stress and suicidal ideation. Interventions to reduce the public stigma associated with risk of psychosis as well as programs to facilitate non-stigmatizing awareness of at-risk mental state and to reduce stigma stress among young people at risk of psychosis might strengthen suicide prevention in this population. PMID:26843510

  17. The Activity of Older People at the Third Generation University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Kruszewski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the needs of older people as well as manifestations of their activity. Third Generation Universities, which are being created around the world, make it possible to actualize the needs of older people. Through the example of the Society in Plotsk, the author examines the activity of older people attending a Third Generation University.

  18. Access to Vocational Guidance for People at Risk of Social Exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Pamela M., Ed.; Fojcik, Vavrinec; Greco, Silvana; Hulkko, Johanna; Kelly, Eimer; Kostka, Miroslav; McGill, Paul; Machackova, D.; Maiello, Marco; Makela, Eija; Sinorova, Lenka; Troska, Robert; Ward, Mary

    This document contains 7 papers that evolved from 44 case studies of access to vocational guidance for people at risk of social exclusion in 5 European countries. The following papers are included: "Introduction" (Pamela Clayton); "Access to Vocational Guidance in Italy" (Silvana Greco, Marco Maiello); "Access to Vocational Guidance in Ireland"…

  19. Stigma and suicidal ideation among young people at risk of psychosis after one year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ziyan; Mayer, Benjamin; Müller, Mario; Heekeren, Karsten; Theodoridou, Anastasia; Dvorsky, Diane; Metzler, Sibylle; Oexle, Nathalie; Walitza, Susanne; Rössler, Wulf; Rüsch, Nicolas

    2016-09-30

    Suicidality is common among individuals at risk of psychosis. Emerging findings suggest that mental illness stigma contributes to suicidality. However, it is unclear whether stigma variables are associated with suicidality among young people at risk of psychosis. This longitudinal study assessed perceived public stigma and the cognitive appraisal of stigma as a stressor (stigma stress) as predictors of suicidal ideation among individuals at risk of psychosis over the period of one year. One hundred and seventy-two participants between 13 and 35 years of age were included who were at high or ultra-high risk of psychosis or at risk of bipolar disorder. At one-year follow-up, data were available from 73 completers. In multiple logistic regressions an increase of stigma stress (but not of perceived stigma) over one year was significantly associated with suicidal ideation at one-year follow-up, controlling for age, gender, symptoms, comorbid depression and suicidal ideation at baseline. Interventions to reduce public stigma and stigma stress could therefore improve suicide prevention among young people at risk of psychosis. PMID:27419651

  20. Screening for Malnutrition in Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyonnet, Sophie; Rolland, Yves

    2015-08-01

    Malnutrition risk increases with age and level of care. Despite significant medical advances, malnutrition remains a significant and highly prevalent public health problem of developed countries. Earlier identification and appropriate nutrition support may help to reverse or halt the malnutrition trajectory and the negative outcomes associated with poor nutritional status. A nutrition screening process is recommended to help detect people with protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) or at malnutrition risk. Evidence supports that oral nutritional supplements and dietary counseling can increase dietary intake and improve quality of life in elderly with PEM or at malnutrition risk. This article examines nutritional screening and assessment tools designated for older adults. PMID:26195101

  1. Private Transport Access Among Older People: Identifying The Disadvantaged

    OpenAIRE

    Nerina Vecchio

    2003-01-01

    Private transport is important in enabling older people living in the community to maintain their independence and social networks. Access to this resource remains a major concern for older people. This study examines the demographic risk factors that restrict older people's access to private transport. The findings lead to policy recommendations directed towards self-reliance. Analysis, based on the study's household survey consisting of a sample of noninstitutionalised older Gold Coast peop...

  2. Contemporary concepts in the pharmacotherapy of depression in older people

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas-Fernandez, Carlos; Mikhail, Mina

    2012-01-01

    Late-life depression is common in older people. Its incidence increases significantly after age 70 to 85, as well as among those living in long-term care facilities. Depression contributes to excess morbidity and complicates management of comorbid conditions in older people. Diagnosis and management of depression often present clinicians with a challenge. Indeed, symptoms of depression in older people may not always be the same as those associated with depression in younger people. Additional...

  3. Perceptions of disaster preparedness among older people in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Myoungran; Lee, Mijung; Tullmann, Dorothy

    2016-03-01

    Older people are a major vulnerable population. During disasters, given their physical frailty, lower social status, loss of medications and medical care, the vulnerability of older people increases. The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of older people in Korea on various aspects of disaster preparedness to better understand their special needs and to facilitate appropriate disaster planning. The study was qualitative and used focus group interviews with 12 older people in one major city and one rural area of South Korea. Four themes were identified by the analysis of the interviews: defenceless state, reality of accepting limitations, strong will to live, importance of disaster preparedness governmental efforts for the older people. Findings indicated that preparation of shelters and transportation was critical to help older people survive in times of disasters and suggested that there should be active involvement of the government in terms of disaster planning, managing and preparing older people for disasters. In addition, healthy older people can be assets to disaster relief efforts by providing practical and emotional support for the most fragile older people. Older people can also provide knowledge of their special needs to the government to improve their disaster response policy. PMID:26179452

  4. Ways to improve the lives of older people

    OpenAIRE

    G.G. URMURZINA; A.D. SOKOLOV; T.A. ZHUMAKOVA; N.B. BABAZADE

    2015-01-01

    For the improvement of quality of life of older people development of gerontology service in the republic of Kazakhstan, grant to the older people of possibility to engage in labour, maintenance of their entrepreneurial activity is needed, involving in a civilized manner elucidative work. In all spheres of life older people are the powerful, but not used resource of society. Forming of new attitude is needed toward the place of old age in the vital loop.

  5. Media portrayal of older people as illustrated in Finnish newspapers

    OpenAIRE

    Koskinen, Sanna; Salminen, Leena; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Media portrayals of older people, such as those in newspapers, both inform and reflect public attitudes. By becoming aware of culturally influenced attitudes about older people, and how these attitudes are reflected in the ways older people are viewed, treated, and cared for in society, the healthcare profession can better understand how to provide high-quality care. By applying an ethnographic approach in textual reality, this paper explores how newspaper articles focusing on health portray ...

  6. Urban Space and Mobility System of the Older People

    OpenAIRE

    TABATABAEI, Seyyede Farzane; TOUZANDEHJAN, Omid

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The problem of accommodating traffic is important when its inappropriateness is one of the main problems of older people and now most of the public places, passages, streets, parks and, entertainment places are inappropriate for them and they cannot easily enter the community and use facilities. If we do not consider urban poor conditions as well as physical and psychological problems that many older people suffer from at the age disability, in the next few decades the older people ...

  7. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Older People with Intellectual Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, Channa

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Chapter 1 General introduction There is an increasing group of older people with intellectual disability in The Netherlands, reaching almost the same life expectancy as the general population. Age-related diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, cancer and dementia are now the most encountered diseases and causes of death in older people with intellectual disabilities. Although cardiovascular disease is a major risk for older people with intellectual disabilities...

  8. Controlling joint pain in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paisley, Peter; Serpell, Mick

    2016-01-01

    Jont pain in oldder people The prevalence of chronic pain in older people in the community ranges from 25 to 76% and for those in residential care, it is even higher at 83 to 93%. The most common sites affected are the back, hip, or knee, and other joints. There is increased reporting of pain in women (79%) compared with men (53%). Common conditions include osteoarthritis and, to a lesser extent, the inflammatory arthropathies such as rheumatoid arthritis. The differential diagnosis includes non-articular pain such as vascular limb pain and nocturnal cramp, some neuropathic pain conditions (such as compressive neuropathies and postherpetic neuralgia), soft tissue disorders such as fibromyalgia and myofascial pain syndromes. In addition to an assessment of pain intensity, a biopsychosocial model should be adopted to ascertain the effect of the pain on the patient's degree of background pain at rest. The disease is often localised to the large load-bearing joints, predominantly the hips and knees. In contrast to osteoarthritis, the inflammatory arthritides typically present with symmetrical swollen, stiff, and painful small joints of the hands and feet, usually worse in the morning. PMID:27180497

  9. Taking older people's rights seriously: the role of international law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kwong-leung

    2008-01-01

    Older people face many difficult challenges that amount to a deplorable violation of their basic human rights (poverty, discrimination, denial of social services, etc.). However, the world has been slow to react. Factors that limit global responses to the challenges of aging include: limited political will, the prevalence of neo-liberalism, and NGOs' longstanding advocacy for other seemingly "more" disadvantaged groups. Such oppression of and discrimination against older people require a concerted world-wide response. We contend that the introduction of an international convention on the human rights of older people is most relevant. Reinforced by a potent international monitoring system, the convention should contain comprehensive and legally binding provisions that require participating states to promote older people's rights. It is argued that international law would be a powerful force in defending and protecting older persons, operating as a baseline for establishing underlying values for national aging policies and linking older persons' concerns with other segments of society. PMID:18198162

  10. Media portrayal of older people as illustrated in Finnish newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna Koskinen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Media portrayals of older people, such as those in newspapers, both inform and reflect public attitudes. By becoming aware of culturally influenced attitudes about older people, and how these attitudes are reflected in the ways older people are viewed, treated, and cared for in society, the healthcare profession can better understand how to provide high-quality care. By applying an ethnographic approach in textual reality, this paper explores how newspaper articles focusing on health portray older people in society, using Finland as an example. The data consist of articles selected from three of the main Finnish daily newspapers during a 3-month period in the spring of 2012. The findings show that, overall, the society regards older people and their care as important. However, there were suggestions of paternalistic attitudes towards older people. Furthermore, the perceptions regarding different groups of older people could lead to the possibility of inequality. The media portrayals of older people worldwide seem to share similarities, although the findings of this study are particularly in accordance with the cultural attributes of the Nordic countries and societies.

  11. Media portrayal of older people as illustrated in Finnish newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Sanna; Salminen, Leena; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Media portrayals of older people, such as those in newspapers, both inform and reflect public attitudes. By becoming aware of culturally influenced attitudes about older people, and how these attitudes are reflected in the ways older people are viewed, treated, and cared for in society, the healthcare profession can better understand how to provide high-quality care. By applying an ethnographic approach in textual reality, this paper explores how newspaper articles focusing on health portray older people in society, using Finland as an example. The data consist of articles selected from three of the main Finnish daily newspapers during a 3-month period in the spring of 2012. The findings show that, overall, the society regards older people and their care as important. However, there were suggestions of paternalistic attitudes towards older people. Furthermore, the perceptions regarding different groups of older people could lead to the possibility of inequality. The media portrayals of older people worldwide seem to share similarities, although the findings of this study are particularly in accordance with the cultural attributes of the Nordic countries and societies. PMID:25261872

  12. EXECUTIVE DYSFUNCTION IN HOMEBOUND OLDER PEOPLE WITH DIABETES MELLITUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to describe patterns of cognitive deficits and activities of daily living (ADLs) in older people with diabetes mellitus. We conducted a cross-sectional, population-based study on two hundred ninety-one homebound people aged 60 and older, 40% with diabetes mellitus, in...

  13. Sustainability Literacy of Older People in Retirement Villages

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    With many developed countries experiencing the aging of the population, older people play a large role in contributing to environmental problems but also to environmental solutions. The purpose of this research is to understand the awareness and behavior of current older people living in retirement villages towards sustainability development. To achieve this, a sustainability literacy survey was conducted with 65 older residents of a private retirement village located 10 Km outside the Brisba...

  14. Involving older people in improving general hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Nicky; Dearnley, Barbara

    2007-05-01

    User involvement is high on the NHS agenda. At King's College Hospital, London, older people helped to develop the Improving Hospital Care for Older People project by producing teaching and learning materials for staff using e-learning. The project was set up by holding focus groups with older people. Staff surveys were also conducted to explore views and identify issues to be addressed. Older people's representatives were selected and directly involved in developing learning materials. This article describes the process of working together and includes the personal reflections of some of the key players. It discusses barriers to effective user involvement work between staff and older people, and identifies some benefits and opportunities presented by this approach. PMID:17518196

  15. Why Social Exclusion Persists among Older People in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyana Miranti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The existing literature on social exclusion among older people, though relatively limited, suggests that disadvantage among older people is cumulative in nature. Some aspects of disadvantage starting at early life stages have long-term consequences. As such, older people with disadvantages may be subject to higher risks of persistent social exclusion. This article aims to improve understanding of social exclusion and its persistence among senior Australians in three ways. Firstly, the incidence of social exclusion among older people is analysed using selected indicators. Secondly, the study examines whether an older person experiencing social exclusion at one time is more likely to experience it again (persistence. Thirdly, it investigates what factors may be protecting older people from social exclusion. The analysis is conducted using the first eight waves of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA Survey. The sample of older people is disaggregated into a younger group (55–64 years at wave 1 and an older group (65+ years. The article suggests that higher education and income, as well as better health conditions and previous employment experiences, are important protective factors from social exclusion for older Australians.

  16. Mental health issues and discrimination among older LGBTI people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinney, Jean; Dow, Briony; Maude, Phillip; Purchase, Rachel; Whyte, Carolyn; Barrett, Catherine

    2015-09-01

    LGBT is an acronym used to describe people from diverse sexual orientation or gender identity, people that are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender. LGBT people do not constitute a single group nor does each individual "group" constitute a homogeneous unity. However, as higher rates of depression and/or anxiety have been observed in older LGBT people, compared to their heterosexual counterparts (Guasp, 2011) there is a need to raise the profile of mental health issues amongst these groups. The additional letter I is also often included in the acronym LGBTI as intersex people are often included as another gender diverse group. However, there is very little research that includes intersex people and none on older intersex people's mental health so this editorial is restricted to consideration of older LGBT people. PMID:26223452

  17. Cardiovascular prevention in older people: The preDIVA trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Ligthart

    2015-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the number of people aged 70 and above has increased in the previous decades, and will continue to do so in the coming years. Nowadays, older people are often healthy and active, and strive for a high quality of life. However, in an aging population new problems arise: many peopl

  18. Individualised dietary counselling for nutritionally at-risk older patients following discharge from acute hospital to home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, T; Tolstrup, U; Beck, A M;

    2016-01-01

    ) (MD = 1.01 kg, 95% CI = 0.08-1.95, P = 0.03). Meta-analyses revealed no significant effect on physical function assessed using hand grip strength, and similarly on mortality. Narrative summation of effects on physical function using other instruments revealed inconsistent effects. Meta-analyses were......BACKGROUND: Many older patients are undernourished after hospitalisation. Undernutrition impacts negatively on physical function and the ability of older patients to perform activities of daily living at home after discharge from acute hospital. The present study aimed to evaluate the evidence for...... an effect of individualised dietary counselling following discharge from acute hospital to home on physical function, and, second, on readmissions, mortality, nutritional status, nutritional intake and quality of life (QoL), in nutritionally at-risk older patients. METHODS: A systematic review of...

  19. Protein Requirements and Recommendations for Older People: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Caryl Nowson; Stella O'Connell

    2015-01-01

    Declines in skeletal muscle mass and strength are major contributors to increased mortality, morbidity and reduced quality of life in older people. Recommended Dietary Allowances/Intakes have failed to adequately consider the protein requirements of the elderly with respect to function. The aim of this paper was to review definitions of optimal protein status and the evidence base for optimal dietary protein. Current recommended protein intakes for older people do not account for the compensa...

  20. Transport needs of older people in rural Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Ahern, Aoife; Hine, Julian

    2010-01-01

    Investment in public transport in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland has been predominantly in urban areas, with the development of a coherent rural transport policy being very much neglected. This has lead to high levels of car dependency in rural areas in both countries. This paper describes a project that focuses on one particularly vulnerable group: older people in rural areas. The project examined the problems that are faced by older people in rural areas in accessing services...

  1. Factors associated with excessive polypharmacy in older people

    OpenAIRE

    Walckiers, Denise; Van der Heyden, Johan; Tafforeau, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Background Older people are a growing population. They live longer, but often have multiple chronic diseases. As a consequence, they are taking many different kind of medicines, while their vulnerability to pharmaceutical products is increased. The objective of this study is to describe the medicine utilization pattern in people aged 65 years and older in Belgium, and to estimate the prevalence and the determinants of excessive polypharmacy. Methods Data were used from the Belgian Health Inte...

  2. Pedestrian fatalities and injuries involving Irish older people.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, A J

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been established internationally that road traffic accidents (RTAs) involving older drivers follow clearly different patterns of timing, location and outcomes from those of younger age groups. Older pedestrians are also a vulnerable group and fewer analyses have been undertaken of the phenomenology of their injuries and fatalities. We studied the pattern of pedestrian RTAs in Ireland over a five-year period with the aim of identifying differences between older pedestrians (aged 65 or older) and younger adults. METHODS: We examined the datasets of the Irish National Road Authority (now the Road Safety Authority) from 1998-2002. We analysed patterns of crashes involving older pedestrians (aged 65) and compared them with younger adults (aged 18-64). RESULTS: Older people represented 36% (n = 134) of pedestrian fatalities and 23% of serious injuries while they only account for 19% of total RTAs. Mortality in RTA is more than doubled for older pedestrians compared to younger adults (RR 2.30). Most accidents involving older pedestrians happen in daylight with good visibility (56%) and in good weather conditions (77%). CONCLUSIONS: Older pedestrians are particularly vulnerable in RTAs. These occur more frequently during daylight hours and in good weather conditions. This may point to a need for prevention strategies that are targeted at the traffic environment and other road users rather than at older people.

  3. Fatigue and Depressive Symptoms in Older People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna; Rantanen, Taina; Era, Pertti; Avlund, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue is considered an important indicator of aging-related declines in health and functional abilities. Previous studies have indicated strong associations between fatigue and depressive symptoms among younger populations and in patient groups with specific diseases. However, it is not known how...... different measures of fatigue are associated with depressive symptoms among general older populations. The purpose of this study is to describe the prevalence of depressive symptoms among community-dwelling older adults reporting mobility-related or general feelings fatigue. The study population consisted...... of 75-year-old community-living individuals (n = 561). Both, mobility-related and general fatigue, were associated in a stepwise relationship with depressive symptoms: a higher level of fatigue was related to higher level of depressive symptoms. Especially major general fatigue was strongly...

  4. Belief in AIDS-Related Conspiracy Theories and Mistrust in the Government: Relationship With HIV Testing Among At-Risk Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, Chandra L.; WALLACE, STEVEN P.; Newman, Peter A.; Lee, Sung-Jae; Cunningham, William

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: One in 4 persons living with HIV/AIDS is an older adult (age 50 or older); unfortunately, older adults are disproportionately diagnosed in late stages of HIV disease. Psychological barriers, including belief in AIDS-related conspiracy theories (e.g., HIV was created to eliminate certain groups) and mistrust in the government, may influence whether adults undergo HIV testing. We examined relationships between these factors and recent HIV testing among at-risk, older adults. Design and...

  5. Quality of spirometric performance in older people

    OpenAIRE

    Pezzoli, L.; G. Giardini; Consonni, S.; Dallera, I; C. Bilotta; Ferrario, G; Sandrini, MC; Annoni, G; C. Vergani

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma are major causes of hospitalisation and mortality among older patients but respiratory diseases are often under- or misdiagnosed because spirometry is not extensively used at this age. Design: we examined 715 elderly subjects with respiratory symptoms; all underwent a spirometric test and were administered the Mini Mental State Examination, Activities of Daily Living, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living and Geriatric Depression ...

  6. Conceptualising quality of life for older people with aphasia

    OpenAIRE

    Cruice, M.; Hill, R.; Worrall, L.; Hickson, L

    2010-01-01

    Background: There is an increasing need in speech and language therapy for clinicians to provide intervention in the context of the broader life quality issues for people with aphasia. However, there is no descriptive research that is explicitly focused on quality of life (QoL) from the perspectives of older people with aphasia. Aims: The current study explores how older people with chronic aphasia who are living in the community describe their QoL in terms of what contributes to and det...

  7. Communicating Science to Officials and People at Risk During a Slow-Motion Lava Flow Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, C. A.; Babb, J.; Brantley, S.; Kauahikaua, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    From June 2014 through March 2015, Kīlauea Volcano's Púu ´Ō´ō vent on the East Rift Zone produced a tube-fed pāhoehoe lava flow -the "June 27th flow" - that extended 20 km downslope. Within 2 months of onset, flow trajectory towards populated areas in the Puna District caused much concern. The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) issued a news release of increased hazard on August 22 and began participating in public meetings organized by Hawai`i County Mayor and Civil Defense two days later. On September 4, HVO upgraded the volcano alert level to WARNING based on an increased potential for lava to reach homes and infrastructure. Ultimately, direct impacts were modest: lava destroyed one unoccupied home and one utility pole, crossed a rural roadway, and partially inundated a waste transfer station, a cemetery, and agricultural land. Anticipation that lava could reach Pāhoa Village and cross the only major access highway, however, caused significant disruption. HVO scientists employed numerous methods to communicate science and hazard information to officials and the at-risk public: daily (or more frequent) written updates of the lava activity, flow front locations and advance rates; frequent updates of web-hosted maps and images; use of the 'lines of steepest descent' method to indicate likely lava flow paths; consistent participation in well-attended community meetings; bi-weekly briefings to County, State, and Federal officials; correspondence with the public via email and recorded phone messages; participation in press conferences and congressional briefings; and weekly newspaper articles (Volcano Watch). Communication lessons both learned and reinforced include: (1) direct, frequent interaction between scientists and officials and at-risk public builds critical trust and understanding; (2) images, maps, and presentations must be tailored to audience needs; (3) many people are unfamiliar with maps (oblique aerial photographs were more effective); (4

  8. The disaster flood experience: Older people's poetic voices of resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Evonne; Brockie, Lauren

    2015-08-01

    This paper explores the experiences of older community-dwelling Australians evacuated from their homes during the 2011 and 2013 Queensland floods, applying the novel creative methodology of poetic inquiry as an analysis and interpretative tool. As well as exploring how older adults managed during a natural disaster, the paper documents the process and potential of poetic inquiry in gerontological research. The first and second poems highlight the different social resources older people have to draw on in their lives, especially during a crisis. Poem 1 ("Nobody came to help me") illustrates how one older resident felt all alone during the flood, whereas Poem 2 ("They came from everywhere"), Poem 3 ("The Girls") and Poem 5 ("Man in Blue Shirt") shows how supported--from both family and the wider community--other older residents felt. Poem 4 ("I can't swim") highlights one participant's fear as the water rises. To date, few studies have explicitly explored older adult's disaster experience, with this paper the first to utilise a poetic lens. We argue that poetic presentation enhances understanding of older residents' unique experiences during a disaster, and may better engage a wider audience of policy-makers, practitioners, the general community and older people themselves in discussion about, and reflection on, the impact and experience of disasters. PMID:26162730

  9. Protein Requirements and Recommendations for Older People: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caryl Nowson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Declines in skeletal muscle mass and strength are major contributors to increased mortality, morbidity and reduced quality of life in older people. Recommended Dietary Allowances/Intakes have failed to adequately consider the protein requirements of the elderly with respect to function. The aim of this paper was to review definitions of optimal protein status and the evidence base for optimal dietary protein. Current recommended protein intakes for older people do not account for the compensatory loss of muscle mass that occurs on lower protein intakes. Older people have lower rates of protein synthesis and whole-body proteolysis in response to an anabolic stimulus (food or resistance exercise. Recommendations for the level of adequate dietary intake of protein for older people should be informed by evidence derived from functional outcomes. Randomized controlled trials report a clear benefit of increased dietary protein on lean mass gain and leg strength, particularly when combined with resistance exercise. There is good consistent evidence (level III-2 to IV that consumption of 1.0 to 1.3 g/kg/day dietary protein combined with twice-weekly progressive resistance exercise reduces age-related muscle mass loss. Older people appear to require 1.0 to 1.3 g/kg/day dietary protein to optimize physical function, particularly whilst undertaking resistance exercise recommendations.

  10. Protein Requirements and Recommendations for Older People: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowson, Caryl; O'Connell, Stella

    2015-08-01

    Declines in skeletal muscle mass and strength are major contributors to increased mortality, morbidity and reduced quality of life in older people. Recommended Dietary Allowances/Intakes have failed to adequately consider the protein requirements of the elderly with respect to function. The aim of this paper was to review definitions of optimal protein status and the evidence base for optimal dietary protein. Current recommended protein intakes for older people do not account for the compensatory loss of muscle mass that occurs on lower protein intakes. Older people have lower rates of protein synthesis and whole-body proteolysis in response to an anabolic stimulus (food or resistance exercise). Recommendations for the level of adequate dietary intake of protein for older people should be informed by evidence derived from functional outcomes. Randomized controlled trials report a clear benefit of increased dietary protein on lean mass gain and leg strength, particularly when combined with resistance exercise. There is good consistent evidence (level III-2 to IV) that consumption of 1.0 to 1.3 g/kg/day dietary protein combined with twice-weekly progressive resistance exercise reduces age-related muscle mass loss. Older people appear to require 1.0 to 1.3 g/kg/day dietary protein to optimize physical function, particularly whilst undertaking resistance exercise recommendations. PMID:26287239

  11. Emergency care of older people who fall: a missed opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snooks, Helen A; Halter, Mary; Close, Jacqueline C T; Cheung, Wai‐Yee; Moore, Fionna; Roberts, Stephen E

    2006-01-01

    Introduction A high number of emergency (999) calls are made for older people who fall, with many patients not subsequently conveyed to hospital. Ambulance crews do not generally have protocols or training to leave people at home, and systems for referral are rare. The quality and safety of current practice is explored in this study, in which for the first time, the short‐term outcomes of older people left at home by emergency ambulance crews after a fall are described. Results will inform the development of care for this population. Methods Emergency ambulance data in London were analysed for patterns of attendance and call outcomes in 2003–4. All older people who were attended by emergency ambulance staff after a fall in September and October 2003, within three London areas, were identified. Those who were not conveyed to hospital were followed up; healthcare contacts and deaths within the following 2 weeks were identified. Results During 2003–4, 8% of all 999 calls in London were for older people who had fallen (n = 60 064), with 40% not then conveyed to hospital. Of 2151 emergency calls attended in the study areas during September and October 2003, 534 were for people aged ⩾65 who had fallen. Of these, 194 (36.3%) were left at home. 86 (49%) people made healthcare contacts within the 2‐week follow‐up period, with 83 (47%) people calling 999 again at least once. There was an increased risk of death (standard mortality ratio 5.4) and of hospital admission (4.7) compared with the general population of the same age in London. Comment The rate of subsequent emergency healthcare contacts and increased risk of death and hospitalisation for older people who fall and who are left at home after a 999 call are alarming. Further research is needed to explore appropriate models for delivery of care for this vulnerable group. PMID:17142584

  12. Prevention of dehydration in independently living elderly people at risk: A study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Francis JCM Konings; Jolanda JP Mathijssen; Jasper M Schellingerhout; Ike HT Kroesbergen; Joyce Goede de; Ien AM Goor de

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dehydration of elderly people living independently is a very important public health issue. This study compares two interventions to prevent dehydration in elderly people at risk: an educational intervention and an educational intervention in combination with a drink reminder device. Methods: This is an experimental two-armed parallel study. A Public Health Service develops the interventions and will be partnering with a general practice and a university to evaluate the effect...

  13. Predicting Ecstasy Use among Young People at Risk: A Prospective Study of Initially Ecstasy-Naive Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervaeke, Hylke K.E.; Benschop, Annemieke; Van Den Brink, Wim; Korf, Dirk J.

    2008-01-01

    Our aim is to identify predictors of first-time ecstasy use in a prospective study among young people at risk. As part of the multidisciplinary Netherlands XTC Toxicity Study (NeXT), we monitored 188 subjects aged up to 18 years who were ecstasy-naive at baseline but seemed likely to start taking ecstasy in the near future. After an 11- to…

  14. Guide to providing mouth care for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissett, Susan; Preshaw, Philip

    2011-12-01

    The authors provide an overview of oral health, why it is important for older people and how poor oral health can affect nutritional status and quality of life. Practical advice is given on assessment of oral health; cleaning of natural teeth and dentures; and care of oral problems that commonly affect older people. An oral healthcare education session is recommended to provide hands-on advice to caregivers. The article is not intended as an exhaustive reference and the reader should always ask for professional dental advice and assistance if in doubt about any aspect of oral care. PMID:22256725

  15. 10 Hz flicker improves recognition memory in older people

    OpenAIRE

    Ramaswamy Deepa; Williams Jonathan; Oulhaj Abderrahim

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background 10 Hz electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha rhythms correlate with memory performance. Alpha and memory decline in older people. We wished to test if alpha-like EEG activity contributes to memory formation. Flicker can elicit alpha-like EEG activity. We tested if alpha-frequency flicker enhances memory in older people. Pariticpants aged 67–92 identified short words that followed 1 s of flicker at 9.0 Hz, 9.5 Hz, 10.0 Hz, 10.2 Hz, 10.5 Hz, 11.0 Hz, 11.5 Hz or 500 Hz. A few mi...

  16. Resilience and vision impairment in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thetford, Clare; Bennett, Kate M; Hodge, Suzanne; Knox, Paul C; Robinson, Jude

    2015-12-01

    Some people fare better than others when faced with adversity; they appear to be more 'resilient'. This article explores the concept of resilience in the context of vision impairment using two linked sets of narrative interview data from 2007 to 2010. Three case studies were analysed in detail using a framework approach based upon a social-ecological model of resilience and vision impairment. Within the model a range of assets and resources are identified which influence an individual's capacity for resilience. A set of criteria were used to establish the extent to which each individual appeared to be resilient at each point in time. Analysis revealed that it is not merely the presence or absence of individual, social, and community resources - but how these resources interact with each other - that influences resilience and can create a risk to wellbeing. To possess only some of these resources is not sufficient; there is a co-dependency between these resources which requires the presence of other resources for resilience to be achieved. Resilience is not a fixed state; individuals can become more or less resilient as their circumstances and resources change over time. We suggest that the concept of resilience has much to offer the field of vision impairment as it allows the identification of enablers as well as areas of barriers to improving people's health and wellbeing and suggests further opportunities for service providers to engage with clients, even those who appear to be supported, as people's social, economic and emotional landscapes continue to change over time, rather than identifying deficit. PMID:26568213

  17. Dementia in older people: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoGiudice, D; Watson, R

    2014-11-01

    Dementia is a common condition of the elderly characterised by multiple cognitive deficits resulting in a decline from previous level of function. In the older person, multiple pathologies contribute, including changes commonly seen in Alzheimer disease, dementia with Lewy bodies in addition to vascular changes. Comorbid factors, such as depression, delirium and polypharmacy can contribute to cognitive decline. Novel biomarkers and neuroimaging techniques may assist in the near future to improve accuracy of diagnosis. To date, pharmacological therapies have been largely unsuccessful and provide symptomatic relief only. The timely diagnosis of dementia can facilitate important discussions regarding personal and financial planning and introduce education and supports to the person with dementia and their carers. The person with dementia commonly experiences behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia that may cause much distress, including to families and carers. Clinical guidelines indicate non-pharmacological approaches as first line measures, including attention to pain, nutrition and the environment. Dementia is recognised as a National Health Priority in Australia, and efforts to target risk factors as preventative measures to delay onset of dementia require further urgent consideration. PMID:25367725

  18. Reckless lending: how Canada's Export Development Corporation puts people and environment at risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    This report documents the negative impacts of several projects financed by Canada's Export Development Corporation (EDC), how these investments put people and the environment at risk, and highlights the need for ensuring that EDC, an agency of the Canadian Government, is compelled to uphold public policies and international standards protecting human rights, the environment and the social needs of communities. By way of proving its case, authors of this report describe several international projects --the Three Gorges Dam in China; the Urra Hydro Project in Colombia; the Marcopper Mine in the Philippines; the BioBio Dam in Chile; the Ok Tedi Copper Mine in Papua New Guinea; the Yacyreta Dam in Argentina and Paraguay; and CANDU reactors in Argentina, China, Romania, South Korea and Turkey -- as proof of human rights violations and environmental disasters in which EDC has been an accessory. It is emphasized that unlike the World Bank and the U.S. export credit agencies, EDC is not required to undertake environmental assessment, or to take into account the impact on human rights or communities of project which they help to finance. The authors recommend amendments to the Export Development Act that would require the EDC to disclose information about proposed project at least 60 days before approval by the Board, including description of the project, the terms of financing, along with any environmental, social and human rights information collected. EDC should be required to establish an autonomous accountability mechanism, using the mechanisms of the World Bank Group as a model to track and guide EDC's policy implementation, and to receive and address complaints from external parties affected by EDC-supported activities. EDC should require social, environmental and human rights assessments, using World Bank standards and methodology as the base, and ensure implementation of recommendations by separately specifying them in the contract. EDC should not be

  19. Cortisol Awakening Response and Walking Speed in Older People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulopulos, Matias M.; Puig-Perez, Sara; Hidalgo, Vanesa; Villada, Carolina; Salvador, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    In older people, less diurnal variability in cortisol levels has been consistently related to worse physical performance, especially to slower walking speed (WS). The cortisol awakening response (CAR) is a discrete component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that has been related to several health problems, such as cardiovascular disease and/or worse performance on executive function and memory. The relationship between the CAR and physical performance in older people is poorly understood. In this study, in 86 older people (mean age = 64.42, SD = 3.93), we investigated the relationship between the CAR and WS, a commonly used measure of physical performance in the older population that has also been related to health problems, such as cardiovascular disease and executive function performance in older people. Additionally, we studied whether the relationship between the CAR and WS was independent from cortisol levels on awakening and several possible confounders. Results showed that a CAR of reduced magnitude (measured with 3 samples each day, for two consecutive days, and calculated as the area under the curve with respect to the increase), but not cortisol levels on awakening, was related to slower WS. In addition, this relationship was independent from cortisol levels on awakening. It is possible that a CAR of reduced magnitude would contribute to less diurnal cortisol variability, affecting physical performance. Additionally, it is possible that a CAR of reduced magnitude affects WS through a possible negative effect on executive function, or that the association between the CAR and WS is due to the fact that both are related to similar health problems and to changes in cognitive performance in older people. PMID:27191847

  20. Frail bodies, courageous voices: older people influencing community care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Marian; Bennett, Gaynor

    1998-03-01

    Involving frail older users of health and social care services in decision making presents particular challenges for those committed to hearing the voices of service users. Age Concern Scotland initiated a project in Fife, the User Panels project, intended to enable older people who were unable to leave their homes without assistance to meet together to develop a collective voice expressing the needs and experiences of older service users. This paper reports on an evaluation of that project. It considers methodological questions posed by the evaluation of projects which aim to empower users, as well as discussing key findings from the evaluation. Older people were recruited through contacts in service agencies and other local organizations. The largest group was aged between 86 and 90 years and all were experiencing difficulties relating to poor health, physical frailty or disability. The project was based on a belief in the value of meeting together as a means through which people could develop the confidence to express their views. Those who became members of the panels valued this experience and reported intrinsic benefits related to the social contact, opportunities for learning and development of self-esteem. Evidence concerning enhanced capacity to exercise control over key aspects of their lives was less convincing. The work of the panels was generally well received by local social work and health agencies and had influenced local action in some areas. Responses to some issues raised by the panels generated a less positive response and the article considers reasons for this. The model is considered to demonstrate benefits both for the older people who become involved and for officials seeking to improve the sensitivity of services to the needs of older people. PMID:11560582

  1. Cortisol Awakening Response and Walking Speed in Older People.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matias M Pulopulos

    Full Text Available In older people, less diurnal variability in cortisol levels has been consistently related to worse physical performance, especially to slower walking speed (WS. The cortisol awakening response (CAR is a discrete component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that has been related to several health problems, such as cardiovascular disease and/or worse performance on executive function and memory. The relationship between the CAR and physical performance in older people is poorly understood. In this study, in 86 older people (mean age = 64.42, SD = 3.93, we investigated the relationship between the CAR and WS, a commonly used measure of physical performance in the older population that has also been related to health problems, such as cardiovascular disease and executive function performance in older people. Additionally, we studied whether the relationship between the CAR and WS was independent from cortisol levels on awakening and several possible confounders. Results showed that a CAR of reduced magnitude (measured with 3 samples each day, for two consecutive days, and calculated as the area under the curve with respect to the increase, but not cortisol levels on awakening, was related to slower WS. In addition, this relationship was independent from cortisol levels on awakening. It is possible that a CAR of reduced magnitude would contribute to less diurnal cortisol variability, affecting physical performance. Additionally, it is possible that a CAR of reduced magnitude affects WS through a possible negative effect on executive function, or that the association between the CAR and WS is due to the fact that both are related to similar health problems and to changes in cognitive performance in older people.

  2. Cortisol Awakening Response and Walking Speed in Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulopulos, Matias M; Puig-Perez, Sara; Hidalgo, Vanesa; Villada, Carolina; Salvador, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    In older people, less diurnal variability in cortisol levels has been consistently related to worse physical performance, especially to slower walking speed (WS). The cortisol awakening response (CAR) is a discrete component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that has been related to several health problems, such as cardiovascular disease and/or worse performance on executive function and memory. The relationship between the CAR and physical performance in older people is poorly understood. In this study, in 86 older people (mean age = 64.42, SD = 3.93), we investigated the relationship between the CAR and WS, a commonly used measure of physical performance in the older population that has also been related to health problems, such as cardiovascular disease and executive function performance in older people. Additionally, we studied whether the relationship between the CAR and WS was independent from cortisol levels on awakening and several possible confounders. Results showed that a CAR of reduced magnitude (measured with 3 samples each day, for two consecutive days, and calculated as the area under the curve with respect to the increase), but not cortisol levels on awakening, was related to slower WS. In addition, this relationship was independent from cortisol levels on awakening. It is possible that a CAR of reduced magnitude would contribute to less diurnal cortisol variability, affecting physical performance. Additionally, it is possible that a CAR of reduced magnitude affects WS through a possible negative effect on executive function, or that the association between the CAR and WS is due to the fact that both are related to similar health problems and to changes in cognitive performance in older people. PMID:27191847

  3. Policy and service responses to rough sleeping among older people

    OpenAIRE

    Crane, M.; Warnes, A. M.

    2000-01-01

    Rough sleeping in Britain has a long history, and interventions have alternated between legal sanctions and humanitarian concern. This paper critically examines recent changes in homeless policies and services, with particular reference to the needs of older people who sleep rough. The characteristics and problems of the group are first described. Single homeless people were formerly accommodated in direct-access hostels but, from the 1970s, individualised rehabilitation and resettlement have...

  4. What do older people understand by mobility-related difficulties?

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos Pichardo, Juan Diego; Cabrero García, Julio; González Llopis, Lorena; Cabañero Martínez, María José; Muñoz Mendoza, Carmen Luz; Sanjuán Quiles, Ángela; Richart Martínez, Miguel; Reig Ferrer, Abilio

    2014-01-01

    Despite the centrality of the difficulty concept in the study of disability, there has been little research on its significance from the point of view of people with functional limitations. The main objective of this study was to describe what older people understand when asked about difficulty in undertaking mobility activities. As a secondary objective, we considered whether there are any differences depending on the type of activities, according to the International Classification of Funct...

  5. Assessment and management of nutrition in older people and its importance to health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvir Ahmed

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Tanvir Ahmed, Nadim HaboubiAdult and Elderly Medicine, Nevill Hall Hospital, Abergavenny, Wales, UKAbstract: Nutrition is an important element of health in the older population and affects the aging process. The prevalence of malnutrition is increasing in this population and is associated with a decline in: functional status, impaired muscle function, decreased bone mass, immune dysfunction, anemia, reduced cognitive function, poor wound healing, delayed recovery from surgery, higher hospital readmission rates, and mortality. Older people often have reduced appetite and energy expenditure, which, coupled with a decline in biological and physiological functions such as reduced lean body mass, changes in cytokine and hormonal level, and changes in fluid electrolyte regulation, delay gastric emptying and diminish senses of smell and taste. In addition pathologic changes of aging such as chronic diseases and psychological illness all play a role in the complex etiology of malnutrition in older people. Nutritional assessment is important to identify and treat patients at risk, the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool being commonly used in clinical practice. Management requires a holistic approach, and underlying causes such as chronic illness, depression, medication and social isolation must be treated. Patients with physical or cognitive impairment require special care and attention. Oral supplements or enteral feeding should be considered in patients at high risk or in patients unable to meet daily requirements.Keywords: malnutrition, older people, anorexia of aging, sarcopinia, nutritional assessment

  6. Living alone, receiving help, helplessness, and inactivity are strongly related to risk of undernutrition among older home-dwelling people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomstad ST

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Solveig T Tomstad1, Ulrika Söderhamn2, Geir Arild Espnes3, Olle Söderhamn21Department of Social Work and Health Science, Faculty of Sciences and Technology Management, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway and Centre for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, Norway; 2Centre for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, Norway; 3Research Centre for Health Promotion and Resources HiST-NTNU, Department of Social Work and Health Science, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, NTNU, Trondheim, NorwayBackground: Being at risk of undernutrition is a global problem among older people. Undernutrition can be considered inadequate nutritional status, characterized by insufficient food intake and weight loss. There is a lack of Norwegian studies focusing on being at risk of undernutrition and self-care ability, sense of coherence, and health-related issues among older home-dwelling people.Aim: To describe the prevalence of being at risk of undernutrition among a group of older home-dwelling individuals in Norway, and to relate the results to reported self-care ability, sense of coherence, perceived health and other health-related issues.Methods: A cross-sectional design was applied. A questionnaire with instruments for nutritional screening, self-care ability, and sense of coherence, and health-related questions was sent to a randomized sample of 450 persons (aged 65+ years in southern Norway. The study group included 158 (35.1% participants. Data were analysed using statistical methods.Results: The results showed that 19% of the participants were at medium risk of undernutrition and 1.3% at high risk. Due to the low response rate it can be expected that the nonparticipants can be at risk of undernutrition. The nutritional at-risk group had lower self-care ability and weaker sense of coherence. Living alone, receiving help

  7. Effects of Nonpharmacological Interventions for Dizziness in Older People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kendall, Julie C; Hartvigsen, Jan; Azari, Michael F;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-pharmacological interventions have been shown to have some effectiveness in adults with dizziness; however, the effectiveness of these interventions in older people is unknown. PURPOSE: To determine the effects of conservative non-pharmacological interventions for dizziness in older......-reported dizziness. CONCLUSION: There is insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of non-pharmacological treatments for dizziness in older people. Current evidence suffers from high risk of bias and future well-designed trials are needed with adequate blinding, randomization and compliance....... over 60 years of age. Dizziness from a specific diagnosis such as Meniere's disease and benign positional paroxysmal vertigo were excluded. Outcome measures from included studies included self-reported dizziness and postural balance. DATA EXTRACTION: Two investigators independently extracted data...

  8. Better housing and living conditions for older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    There is an increasing emphasis on strategies designed to combat the exclusion of older people from society. The development of social policies oriented towards community care and community living has important consequences for housing policies and urban planning policies. How can the general hou...... necessary between social service and housing agencies? This report contains examples of good practice from six European cities: Birmingham, Vicenza, Copenhagen, Berlin, Amsterdam, and Niorth. The research study was supported by the European Commission.......There is an increasing emphasis on strategies designed to combat the exclusion of older people from society. The development of social policies oriented towards community care and community living has important consequences for housing policies and urban planning policies. How can the general...... housing stock and local neighbourhood facilites be made more responsive to the demands of older people? How can housing and planning measures contribute to the integration of older people in local communities? How can urban renewal be implemented in elderly-friendly forms? What forms of coordination are...

  9. Mobility assessment in older people : new possibilities and challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Wiebren; Aminian, Kamiar

    2007-01-01

    A major challenge for researchers and clinicians who address health issues in the ageing population is to monitor functioning, and to timely initiate interventions that aim to prevent loss of functional abilities and to improve the quality of life of older people. With the progress of technologies i

  10. Children's Views of Older People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Sally; Howatson-Jones, Lioba

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide demographic change means that the responsibility for an aging population will fall to younger generations. This narrative literature review comprises an international examination of what has been published about children's views of older people between 1980 and 2011. Sixty-nine academic articles were inductively analyzed, and the…

  11. Newer Drugs Helping Older People with Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 158961.html Newer Drugs Helping Older People With Eye Disease Treatments keeping those with macular degeneration reading and ... of long-term follow-up in studies evaluating disease treatments." Study ... U.S. National Eye Institute. The findings were published recently in the ...

  12. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Older People with Intellectual Disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.F. de Winter (Channa)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Chapter 1 General introduction There is an increasing group of older people with intellectual disability in The Netherlands, reaching almost the same life expectancy as the general population. Age-related diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, cancer and dementia are

  13. Beyond WhatsApp: Older people and smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Rosales

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes how older people, living in Spain, use smartphones and smartphone applications. Using a mixed methods approach, we compare quantitative results obtained by tracking mobile app usage amongst different generational samples with qualitative, focus-group discussions with active smartphone users. A sample of Spanish smartphone users were tracked during one month in the winter of 2014 (238 individuals, aged 20 to 76 years-old. This was followed by three focus group sessions conducted in the spring of 2015, with 24 individuals aged 55 to 81. As we learned, WhatsApp is currently the most popular application used by people of all ages, including older adults. Smartphones increasingly are playing a central role in the life of older participants, although the frequency of app access is negatively correlated with age. On the other hand, as our data indicates, older adults also use a number of different types of apps that are distinct from that of younger users. Older participants access personal information manager apps (calendar, address book and notes more often than other age groups. And comparatively, older participants use the smartphone less often in stable locations (home, office, relatives’ home with Wifi than somewhere else and with mobile data. As we argue, differences in age seem to reflect the evolution in personal interests and communication patterns that change as we grow older. Our study captures new trends in smartphone usage amongst this cohort. It also indicates how a combination of methods may help to assess the validity of the log and qualitative data. We highlight the relevance of conducting careful generational studies in smartphone use and some of the potentials and limitations of making predictive studies of ICT use as we change throughout the life course. Finally, we assert the value of the inclusion of older representatives within research, which ultimately may influence public decisions and the design of new

  14. SUK- A companion to promoting well-being among overweight hypertensive older people : Health seeking behavior among overweight hypertensive older people

    OpenAIRE

    Seesawang, Junjira

    2011-01-01

    Health seeking behaviour is important in older people with hypertension and overweight, in terms of managing health factors that are related to their health and illness. However, health seeking behaviour of Thai older people is not well documented. This qualitative study aimed to describe health seeking behaviour of overweight hypertensive older people. Seven older women and three men participated in this study through purposive sampling. Qualitative data were gathered via in-depth interviews...

  15. Antineoplastic drugs in veterinary oncology: excretion in dogs, contamination of the environment and exposure assessment of people at risk

    OpenAIRE

    Janssens, T.

    2012-01-01

    Anticancer drugs themselves can cause adverse health effects when administered to human patients. In addition, it has become apparent that personnel in human medicine, occupationally exposed to these anticancer drugs, may also be at risk. The past decades, the use of chemotherapy in veterinary medicine has been gaining popularity. Consequently, an increasing number of people in veterinary medicine may be exposed to anticancer drugs. This raises the question whether veterinary personnel and ow...

  16. The relationship between oral health and nutrition in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, A W G; Steele, J G

    2004-12-01

    The oral health of older people is changing with reducing numbers of people relying on complete dentures for function, and retaining some natural teeth. Despite this there are substantial numbers of older people whose ability to chew foods is compromised by their oral health status, either because they have few or no natural teeth. This alteration results in individuals selecting a diet that they can chew in comfort. Such diets are low in fruits and vegetables intake with associated reduction in both non-starch polysaccharide and micronutrient intakes. There is also a trend for reduced dietary intake overall. Salivary flow and function may have an impact in relation to the ability to chew and swallow. Whilst there are few differences in salivary function in fit healthy unmedicated subjects, disease resulting in reduced salivary flow and particularly polypharmacy, with xerostomia as a side effect, are likely to have a role in older people. This paper explores the relationships between oral health status and food's choice and discusses the potential consequences for the individual of such dietary change. PMID:15563930

  17. Nutritional advice in older patients at risk of malnutrition during treatment for chemotherapy: a two-year randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Bourdel-Marchasson

    Full Text Available We tested the effect of dietary advice dedicated to increase intake in older patients at risk for malnutrition during chemotherapy, versus usual care, on one-year mortality.We conducted a multicentre, open-label interventional, stratified (centre, parallel randomised controlled trial, with a 1∶1 ratio, with two-year follow-up. Patients were aged 70 years or older treated with chemotherapy for solid tumour and at risk of malnutrition (MNA, Mini Nutritional Assessment 17-23.5. Intervention consisted of diet counselling with the aim of achieving an energy intake of 30 kCal/kg body weight/d and 1.2 g protein/kg/d, by face-to-face discussion targeting the main nutritional symptoms, compared to usual care. Interviews were performed 6 times during the chemotherapy sessions for 3 to 6 months. The primary endpoint was 1-year mortality and secondary endpoints were 2-year mortality, toxicities and chemotherapy outcomes.Between April 2007 and March 2010 we randomised 341 patients and 336 were analysed: mean (standard deviation age of 78.0 y (4·9, 51.2% male, mean MNA 20.2 (2.1. Distribution of cancer types was similar in the two groups; the most frequent were colon (22.4%, lymphoma (14.9%, lung (10.4%, and pancreas (17.0%. Both groups increased their dietary intake, but to a larger extent with intervention (p<0.01. At the second visit, the energy target was achieved in 57 (40.4% patients and the protein target in 66 (46.8% with the intervention compared respectively to 13 (13.5% and 20 (20.8% in the controls. Death occurred during the first year in 143 patients (42.56%, without difference according to the intervention (p = 0.79. No difference in nutritional status changes was found. Response to chemotherapy was also similar between the groups.Early dietary counselling was efficient in increasing intake but had no beneficial effect on mortality or secondary outcomes. Cancer cachexia antianabolism may explain this lack of effect.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  18. Interventions targeting social isolation in older people: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greaves Colin J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeting social isolation in older people is a growing public health concern. The proportion of older people in society has increased in recent decades, and it is estimated that approximately 25% of the population will be aged 60 or above within the next 20 to 40 years. Social isolation is prevalent amongst older people and evidence indicates the detrimental effect that it can have on health and wellbeing. The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness of interventions designed to alleviate social isolation and loneliness in older people. Methods Relevant electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, ASSIA, IBSS, PsycINFO, PubMed, DARE, Social Care Online, the Cochrane Library and CINAHL were systematically searched using an extensive search strategy, for randomised controlled trials and quasi-experimental studies published in English before May 2009. Additional articles were identified through citation tracking. Studies were included if they related to older people, if the intervention aimed to alleviate social isolation and loneliness, if intervention participants were compared against inactive controls and, if treatment effects were reported. Two independent reviewers extracted data using a standardised form. Narrative synthesis and vote-counting methods were used to summarise and interpret study data. Results Thirty two studies were included in the review. There was evidence of substantial heterogeneity in the interventions delivered and the overall quality of included studies indicated a medium to high risk of bias. Across the three domains of social, mental and physical health, 79% of group-based interventions and 55% of one-to-one interventions reported at least one improved participant outcome. Over 80% of participatory interventions produced beneficial effects across the same domains, compared with 44% of those categorised as non-participatory. Of interventions categorised as having a theoretical basis, 87

  19. Educational intervention and functional decline among older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tine; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Lund, Rikke;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To analyse if social capital modifies the effect of educational intervention of home visitors on mobility disability. Earlier studies have found that educational intervention of home visitors has a positive effect of older peoples' functional decline, but how social capital might modify this...... educational intervention of home visitors on functional decline. The three measures of social capital (bonding, bridging, and linking) were measured at contextual level. Data was analysed with multivariate linear regression model using generalised estimating equations to account for repeated measurements...... Danish Intervention Study on Preventive Home Visits and with theory-based measures of social capital that distinguish between three aspects of social capital with focus on older people, this study contributes to the literature about the role of social capital for interventions on mobility disability....

  20. Guidance on the management of pain in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Aza; Adams, Nicola; Bone, Margaret; Elliott, Alison M; Gaffin, Jean; Jones, Derek; Knaggs, Roger; Martin, Denis; Sampson, Liz; Schofield, Pat

    2013-03-01

    This guidance document reviews the epidemiology and management of pain in older people via a literature review of published research. The aim of this document is to inform health professionals in any care setting who work with older adults on best practice for the management of pain and to identify where there are gaps in the evidence that require further research. The assessment of pain in older people has not been covered within this guidance and can be found in a separate document (http://www.britishpainsociety.org/pub_professional.htm#assessmentpop). Substantial differences in the population, methods and definitions used in published research makes it difficult to compare across studies and impossible to determine the definitive prevalence of pain in older people. There are inconsistencies within the literature as to whether or not pain increases or decreases in this age group, and whether this is influenced by gender. There is, however, some evidence that the prevalence of pain is higher within residential care settings. The three most common sites of pain in older people are the back; leg/knee or hip and 'other' joints. In common with the working-age population, the attitudes and beliefs of older people influence all aspects of their pain experience. Stoicism is particularly evident within this cohort of people. Evidence from the literature search suggests that paracetamol should be considered as first-line treatment for the management of both acute and persistent pain, particularly that which is of musculoskeletal origin, due to its demonstrated efficacy and good safety profile. There are few absolute contraindications and relative cautions to prescribing paracetamol. It is, however, important that the maximum daily dose (4 g/24 h) is not exceeded. Non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) should be used with caution in older people after other safer treatments have not provided sufficient pain relief. The lowest dose should be provided

  1. Food access and dietary variety among older people

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, L.; Alexander, A; Lumbers, M.

    2004-01-01

    Decentralisation of many food retailers to edge-of-town and out-of-town locations has resulted in some older people experiencing difficulty in accessing food shops and those experiencing the greatest difficulties in food shopping are considered to be at the greatest nutritional risk. The present study examines how and to what extent usage of, and physical access to food shops might influence dietary variety. Shopping behaviour and dietary variety are investigated using focus groups, a consume...

  2. The Problems of Vitamin D Insufficiency in Older People

    OpenAIRE

    Boucher, Barbara J

    2012-01-01

    This report reviews evidence on disorders related to inadequate vitamin D repletion in older people. Vitamin D is as essential for bone health in adults as in children, preventing osteomalacia and muscle weakness and protecting against falls and low-impact fractures. Vitamin D is provided by skin synthesis by UVB-irradiation from summer sunshine and to a small extent by absorption from food. However, these processes become less efficient with age. Loss of mobility or residential care restrict...

  3. A home from hospital service for older people.

    OpenAIRE

    Donnelly, Michael; Dempster, Martin

    1999-01-01

    Current policy and practice emphasises much more than ever before a need for purchasers and providers to reduce appropriately the length of hospital stay. Consequently, a number of early discharge "schemes" have been developed. This paper presents the findings from an evaluation of a "home from hospital" (HFH) scheme. The HFH service provides a maximum of six weeks' intensive domiciliary care for older people on their discharge from hospital. The aim of the service is to facilitate early disc...

  4. Managerialism and the care of older people: The Swedish example

    OpenAIRE

    Blomberg, Staffan; Jan, Peterson

    2008-01-01

    In his dissertation Blomberg (2004) investigates into how the care manager reform is incorporated into organizational practice in the care of older people in Sweden. He shows that it is made through different lines of argumentations following one another. Through applying neo-institutional theory this can be understood as “solutions seeking problems to solve” rather than the other way around. In this paper we develop the idea that these findings can be associated with a broader development...

  5. Older LGBT people's beliefs and experiences regarding GP services

    OpenAIRE

    Toze, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Public policy on responding to the ageing “crisis” typically involves a focus on preventative interventions in primary care, tackling inequalities and increasing use of informal and voluntary care networks. Yet at present, the experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans (LGB&T) older people remains under-researched, despite evidence of increased risk of mortality and morbidity in LGBT populations (Williams et al., 2013; Addis et. al, 2009). Voluntary sector surveys (River, 2011; Guasp, un...

  6. Potentially inappropriate prescribing among older people in the United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Bradley, Marie C; Motterlini, Nicola; Padmanabhan, Shivani; Cahir, Caitriona; Williams, Tim; Fahey, Tom; Hughes, Carmel M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) in older people is associated with increases in morbidity, hospitalisation and mortality. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of and factors associated with PIP, among those aged ≥70 years, in the United Kingdom, using a comprehensive set of prescribing indicators and comparing these to estimates obtained from a truncated set of the same indicators.Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was carried out in t...

  7. The (in)visibility of older people in the international development discourse

    OpenAIRE

    Lipman, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    Older people are the world’s fastest growing population group. By 2050 eighty per cent of older persons will live in what are now developing countries. There is established and growing evidence of the difficulties families in developing countries are experiencing in providing adequate support for their older members. This thesis explores how international development is responding to the interests of older people. The research examines how older people are represented in international develop...

  8. How Many People Are Affected by or at Risk of Adrenal Gland Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people affected depends on the specific disorder. Cushing’s Syndrome Cushing’s syndrome is uncommon, affecting about 10 to 15 out ... Related A-Z Topics Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) Cushing Syndrome Newborn Screening All related topics NICHD News and ...

  9. Co-endemicity of Cysticercosis and Schistosomiasis in Africa - how many people are at risk?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saarnak, Christopher; Braae, Uffe Christian; Magnussen, Pascal;

    countries were identified. The co-endemicity dataset was then combined with modelled data on population density for 2015 derived from the WorldPop database (http://www.worldpop.org). We used the open source GIS software QGIS and GRASS to overlay the two datasets and identified the number of people living in...

  10. Methodology for developing quality indicators for the care of older people in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Martin-Khan, Melinda; Burkett, Ellen; Schnitker, Linda; Jones, Richard N.; Gray, Leonard C

    2013-01-01

    Background: Compared with younger people, older people have a higher risk of adverse health outcomes when presenting to emergency departments. As the population ages, older people will make up an increasing proportion of the emergency department population. Therefore it is timely that consideration be given to the quality of care received by older persons in emergency departments, and to consideration of those older people with special needs. Particular attention will be focused on important ...

  11. Methodology for developing quality indicators for the care of older people in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Martin-Khan, Melinda; Burkett, Ellen; Schnitker, Linda; Jones, Richard N.; Gray, Leonard C

    2013-01-01

    Background Compared with younger people, older people have a higher risk of adverse health outcomes when presenting to emergency departments. As the population ages, older people will make up an increasing proportion of the emergency department population. Therefore it is timely that consideration be given to the quality of care received by older persons in emergency departments, and to consideration of those older people with special needs. Particular attention will be focused on important g...

  12. Inappropriate prescribing and adverse drug events in older people.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hamilton, Hilary J

    2009-01-01

    Inappropriate prescribing (IP) in older patients is highly prevalent and is associated with an increased risk of adverse drug events (ADEs), morbidity, mortality and healthcare utilisation. Consequently, IP is a major safety concern and with changing population demographics, it is likely to become even more prevalent in the future. IP can be detected using explicit or implicit prescribing indicators. Theoretically, the routine clinical application of these IP criteria could represent an inexpensive and time efficient method to optimise prescribing practice. However, IP criteria must be sensitive, specific, have good inter-rater reliability and incorporate those medications most commonly associated with ADEs in older people. To be clinically relevant, use of prescribing appropriateness tools must translate into positive patient outcomes, such as reduced rates of ADEs. To accurately measure these outcomes, a reliable method of assessing the relationship between the administration of a drug and an adverse clinical event is required. The Naranjo criteria are the most widely used tool for assessing ADE causality, however, they are often difficult to interpret in the context of older patients. ADE causality criteria that allow for the multiple co-morbidities and prescribed medications in older people are required. Ultimately, the current high prevalence of IP and ADEs is unacceptable. IP screening criteria need to be tested as an intervention to assess their impact on the incidence of ADEs in vulnerable older patients. There is a role for IP screening tools in everyday clinical practice. These should enhance, not replace good clinical judgement, which in turn should be based on sound pharmacogeriatric training.

  13. Tackling anxiety and depression in older people in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that anxiety and depression are less common in older than younger adults. One in ten people aged > or = 65 fulfils the diagnostic criteria for at least one common mental disorder. Older depressed patients have an increased risk of both cardiac and all-cause mortality. Both anxiety and depression in older patients are often unrecognised and untreated, and have a poor prognosis. There is a progressive decline in the prevalence of common mental disorders above the age of 55. Anxiety and depression often occur together, and share many risk factors. However, anxiety tends to follow threats or traumatic events, whereas depression follows loss events. Chronic diseases, cognitive impairment, pain and functional disability are risk factors for the onset of depression, but not anxiety. Depression is between two and three times more common among those with a chronic physical health problem. Even patients with major depression often remain unrecognised and untreated. Generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) is by far the most common anxiety disorder in older people but most GAD patients are not recognised in primary care and only a third of them receive any form of treatment. Older patients often deny feeling anxious or depressed and are more likely to present with insomnia, irritability, agitation and multiple somatic complaints. GPs may erroneously believe that depression is a normal reaction to the losses of old age, and may be reluctant to initiate treatment. A good case can be made for replacing the PHQ-9 with the 15-item version of the Geriatric Depression Scale which almost entirely avoids somatic questions. This is a screening not a diagnostic tool and does not evaluate symptom severity. PMID:22720455

  14. Inappropriate prescribing and adverse drug events in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallagher Paul F

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Inappropriate prescribing (IP in older patients is highly prevalent and is associated with an increased risk of adverse drug events (ADEs, morbidity, mortality and healthcare utilisation. Consequently, IP is a major safety concern and with changing population demographics, it is likely to become even more prevalent in the future. IP can be detected using explicit or implicit prescribing indicators. Theoretically, the routine clinical application of these IP criteria could represent an inexpensive and time efficient method to optimise prescribing practice. However, IP criteria must be sensitive, specific, have good inter-rater reliability and incorporate those medications most commonly associated with ADEs in older people. To be clinically relevant, use of prescribing appropriateness tools must translate into positive patient outcomes, such as reduced rates of ADEs. To accurately measure these outcomes, a reliable method of assessing the relationship between the administration of a drug and an adverse clinical event is required. The Naranjo criteria are the most widely used tool for assessing ADE causality, however, they are often difficult to interpret in the context of older patients. ADE causality criteria that allow for the multiple co-morbidities and prescribed medications in older people are required. Ultimately, the current high prevalence of IP and ADEs is unacceptable. IP screening criteria need to be tested as an intervention to assess their impact on the incidence of ADEs in vulnerable older patients. There is a role for IP screening tools in everyday clinical practice. These should enhance, not replace good clinical judgement, which in turn should be based on sound pharmacogeriatric training.

  15. Applying citizenship social work with older people and people at the end of life

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines how the rights associated with citizenship for older people and people at the end of life may be restricted, particularly in conservative communitarian views of citizenship, which demands economic participation as a condition of citizenship and devalues dependence on others. It identifies the characteristics of a citizenship social work, which implements radical communitarian values that favour participation and engagement as a source of solidarity in society. ...

  16. Does protein and energy supplementation benefit older people at risk of malnutrition?

    OpenAIRE

    Kirshbaum, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    Best practice recommendations: Despite the weak quality of the majority of studies included in this review, as evaluated according to the criteria set for randomised controlled trials, the small increase in weight gain and the decrease in mortality - for undernurished groups only - provides justification for continuing the prescription of protein and energy supplements. However, other interventions intended to improve nutritional status should be integrated. These could include providi...

  17. Sustainability Literacy of Older People in Retirement Villages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Xia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With many developed countries experiencing the aging of the population, older people play a large role in contributing to environmental problems but also to environmental solutions. The purpose of this research is to understand the awareness and behavior of current older people living in retirement villages towards sustainability development. To achieve this, a sustainability literacy survey was conducted with 65 older residents of a private retirement village located 10 Km outside the Brisbane, Australia’s central business district (CBD. Most of residents recognized the importance of environment protection and would like to lead a more environmentally friendly lifestyle. In addition, the majority were willing to pay higher prices for a living environment with sustainable features. The importance of positive social communications was emphasized with most residents having established good relationships with others in the village. The findings provide an important insight into consumer perspectives regarding the sustainable features that should and can be incorporated into the village planning and development.

  18. Assessment and management of nutrition in older people and its importance to health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Tanvir; Haboubi, Nadim

    2010-01-01

    Nutrition is an important element of health in the older population and affects the aging process. The prevalence of malnutrition is increasing in this population and is associated with a decline in: functional status, impaired muscle function, decreased bone mass, immune dysfunction, anemia, reduced cognitive function, poor wound healing, delayed recovery from surgery, higher hospital readmission rates, and mortality. Older people often have reduced appetite and energy expenditure, which, coupled with a decline in biological and physiological functions such as reduced lean body mass, changes in cytokine and hormonal level, and changes in fluid electrolyte regulation, delay gastric emptying and diminish senses of smell and taste. In addition pathologic changes of aging such as chronic diseases and psychological illness all play a role in the complex etiology of malnutrition in older people. Nutritional assessment is important to identify and treat patients at risk, the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool being commonly used in clinical practice. Management requires a holistic approach, and underlying causes such as chronic illness, depression, medication and social isolation must be treated. Patients with physical or cognitive impairment require special care and attention. Oral supplements or enteral feeding should be considered in patients at high risk or in patients unable to meet daily requirements. PMID:20711440

  19. Time in Care for Older People Living in Nursing Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Sivberg, B. V.; L. Fagerström; B. M. Nordström; Thorsell, K. B. E.

    2010-01-01

    In order to measure actual care needs in relation to resources required to fulfill these needs, an instrument (Time in Care) with which to evaluate care needs and determine the time needed for various care activities has been developed with the aim of assessing nursing intensity in municipal care for older people. Interreliability (ICC = 0.854) of time measurements (n = 10'546) of 32 nursing activities in relation to evaluated care levels in two nursing homes (staff n = 81) has been determine...

  20. Fuel poverty, older people and cold weather: An all-island analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, Pat; Helen McAvoy, Helen; Cotter, Noëlle; Monahan,, Eugene; Barrett, Eimear; Browne, Stephen; Zeka, Ariana

    2011-01-01

    Executive Summary This report covers a number of different aspects of fuel poverty and older people. 1. An exploration of existing government survey data from Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland with a particular focus on older people and conducting additional targeted analyses where required. 2. An original survey in the Republic of Ireland exploring the lived experience of older people in cold weather. 3. A feasibility study of data logging thermometers placed in the homes of older...

  1. Physical exercise for older people : focusing on people living in residential care facilities and people with dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Littbrand, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    The main purposes of this thesis were to evaluate a high-intensity functional weight-bearing exercise pro­gramme, regarding its applicability (attendance, achieved intensity, adverse events) as well as its effect on physical functions and activities of daily living (ADL) among older people living in residential care facilities, with a special focus on people with dementia. Furthermore, a main purpose was to systematically review the applicability and effects of physical exercise on physical f...

  2. Current Policy and Legislation in England Regarding Older People--What This Means for Older People with Learning Disabilities: A Discussion Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Sue; Cooper Ueki, Madeline

    2015-01-01

    Background: This paper seeks to explore the opportunities and challenges generated by current policy, guidance and legislation in England relating to older people, in terms of the practical implications for older people with learning disabilities. Methods: Using the broad themes housing, employment, social inclusion and isolation, care and…

  3. Theorizing accommodation in supportive home care for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceci, Christine; Purkis, Mary Ellen; Björnsdóttir, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the issue of what thinking is necessary in order to advance a notion of accommodation in the organization and provision of supportive home care for older people. Accommodation in this context is understood as responsiveness to the singularity of older adults, and we consider how this idea might be used to support opportunities for (independent) living for elders as they age and become frailer. To elaborate the question we draw on examples from our empirical work - ethnographic studies of home care practice undertaken in Canada and Iceland - and consider these examples in light of critical philosophical and social theory, particularly Agamben's (1993) work, The Coming Community. This is a relevant frame through which to consider the potential for the accommodation of the unique needs of older adults in home care because it helps us to problematize the systems through which care is accomplished and the current, dominant terms of relations between individuals and collectives. We argue that giving substance to a notion of accommodation contributes an important dimension to aligned ideas, such as patient-centeredness in care, by working to shift the intentionality of these practices. That is, accommodation, as an orientation to care practices, contests the organizational impulse to carry on in the usual way. PMID:23273554

  4. Older people as equal partners in the creative design of digital devices

    OpenAIRE

    Sustar, Helena

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes research which explores the importance and feasibility of involving older people as equal partners in the creative design of digital devices for an ageing population. In exploring this topic, I have carried out two preliminary studies, a pilot study and a major empirical study. Firstly, I invited three groups of people, including very old people, active older people and postgraduate students, to evaluate a mock-­‐up model of an interactive device intended for older p...

  5. Health risk appraisal in older people 2: the implications for clinicians and commissioners of social isolation risk in older people

    OpenAIRE

    Iliffe, S; Kharicha, K.; Harari, D.; Swift, C.; Gillmann, G.; Stuck, A.E.

    2007-01-01

    Background Social isolation is associated with poorer health, and is seen by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as one of the major issues facing the industrialised world.Aim To explore the significance of social isolation in the older population for GPs and for service commissioners.Design of study Secondary analysis of baseline data from a randomised controlled trial of health risk appraisal.Setting A total of 2641 community-dwelling, non-disabled people aged 65 years and over in suburban ...

  6. The Housing and Support Needs of People with an Intellectual Disability into Older Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, K.; Cartwright, C.; Craig, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disabilities (IDs) are growing older as a population cohort. Many live at home with family members who are their carers but who are also becoming older and less able to provide care. The housing and support preferences of people with IDs and their carers into older age are poorly characterised in the…

  7. Distribution and correlates of plantar hyperkeratotic lesions in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menz Hylton B

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar hyperkeratotic lesions are common in older people and are associated with pain, mobility impairment and functional limitations. However, little has been documented in relation to the frequency or distribution of these lesions. The aim of this study was to document the occurrence of plantar hyperkeratotic lesions and the patterns in which they occur in a random sample of older people. Methods A medical history questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 301 people living independently in the community (117 men, 184 women aged between 70 and 95 years (mean 77.2, SD 4.9, who also underwent a clinical assessment of foot problems, including the documentation of plantar lesion locations, toe deformities and the presence and severity of hallux valgus. Results Of the 301 participants, 180 (60% had at least one plantar hyperkeratotic lesion. Those with plantar lesions were more likely to be female (χ2 = 18.75, p 2 = 6.15, p vs 36.3 ± 8.4°; t = 2.68, df = 286, p vs 4.8 ± 1.3 hours, t = -2.46, df = 299, p = 0.01. No associations were found between the presence of plantar lesions and body mass index, obesity, foot posture, dominant foot or forefoot pain. A total of 53 different lesions patterns were observed, with the most common lesion pattern being "roll-off" hyperkeratosis on the medial aspect of the 1st metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ, accounting for 12% of all lesion patterns. "Roll-off" lesions under the 1st MPJ and interphalangeal joint were significantly associated with moderate to severe hallux valgus (p p Conclusion Plantar hyperkeratotic lesions affect 60% of older people and are associated with female gender, hallux valgus, toe deformity, increased ankle flexibility and time spent on feet, but are not associated with obesity, limb dominance, forefoot pain or foot posture. Although there are a wide range of lesion distribution patterns, most can be classified into medial, central or lateral groups. Further

  8. Young people's perceptions of older people before and after an ethnodrama presentation / Dunay Nortje

    OpenAIRE

    Nortje, Dunay

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that we presently live in an era where birth rates are low and life expectancy is high, drawing the conclusion that older people will be part of young people’s lives for longer. Intergenerational relationships refer to the relationship between two or more generations and are crucial for growth within both generations, young and old. There are many stereotypes attached to old age, and it has been found that young people take on these stereotypes through the media and society...

  9. Predictors of diabetes in older people in urban China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoling Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: China has the largest number of people with diabetes in the world. Over the last 30 years China has experienced rapid economic growth and a growing income gap between rich and poor. The population is ageing, however diabetes in older people has not been well studied to date. In this study we determined incidence and predictors of diabetes in older Chinese people. METHODS: During 2001, using a standard interview method, we examined 1,317 adults aged ≥65 years who did not have diabetes in the city of Hefei, and characterized baseline risk factors. Over 7.5 years of follow up, we documented incident diabetes using self-reported doctor diagnosis and the cause of death in the whole cohort, and HbA(1C ≥48 mmol/mol in a nested case-control sample. A multivariate Cox regression model was employed to investigate risk of diabetes in relation to baseline risk factors. RESULTS: During follow up, 119 persons had newly diagnosed diabetes. World age-standardised incidence of diabetes was 24.5 (95% CI 19.5-29.5 per 1,000 person-years. Risk of diabetes was significantly and positively associated with income, waist circumference and body mass index, smoking and uncontrolled hypertension, but negatively associated with having a hobby of walking and frequency of visiting children/other relatives and contacting neighbours/friends. Higher income was significantly associated with increased diabetes risk regardless of cardiovascular and psychosocial risk factors. Compared to those with middle income and no psychosocial risk factors, the hazard ratio for incident diabetes among participants with high income and psychosocial risk was 2.13 (95% CI 1.02-4.45. CONCLUSIONS: Increasing incidence of diabetes in relation to high income has become an important public health issue in China. Maintaining social networks and gentle physical activities and reducing psychosocial factors may be integrated into current multi-faceted preventive strategies for curbing the

  10. ICT, Education and Older People in Australia: A Socio-Technical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatnall, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    People over 65 (or older people) are a growing proportion of the population in many developed countries including Australia. In the last 10 to 12 years interest from this group in the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and the Internet has also grown considerably. ICT has much to offer older people as a means of keeping in…

  11. Older People's Views of Advice about Falls Prevention: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardley, L.; Donovan-Hall, M.; Francis, K.; Todd, C.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain an understanding of older people's perceptions of falls prevention advice, and how best to design communications that will encourage older people to take action to prevent falls. Focus groups and interviews were carried out with 66 people aged 61-94 years recruited from a variety of settings, using falls…

  12. Older People's Perspectives on Health, Physical Activity and Nutritional Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Alizadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Approaches for investigating health-promoting lifestyle generally focus on physical activ­ity and regular diet. To explore the perspectives of Iranian elders regarding health, healthy eating and physical activity (PA this study was conducted in 2012. Methods: Participants in this qualitative study were selected through purposeful sampling. Ten focus groups were conducted with 60 older adults in 3 elderly centers in Tehran. A moderator’s guideline that consisted of general and specific questions was used. Focus groups were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysis was performed using conventional content analysis. Results: Participants explained their perspectives regarding health, healthy eating and PA in the follow­ing 5 categories: meaning of health was represented based on issues such as absence of pain and disor­der, complete body wellbeing, staying away from hazards, complete individual satisfaction, experiencing positive events, effective communication, faithfulness and trust in God. The healthy eating category was featured by adequate eating, age balanced diet, refraining from under or over nutrition and sensible consumption of fruits and vegetables. The PA was described - according to the level of performing outdoor activities or household tasks. Expressions about the perceived benefits and barriers of healthy eating and PA were aligned the two remaining categories. Conclusions: Participants have referred to the association between both PA and dietary practices and health. Understanding how older people define physical activity and nutritional behavior and recognition of the most important perceived benefits and barriers that might contribute to have a healthy eating or adequate PA profile could procure insight into the type of interventions that are required to promote healthy lifestyle among Iranian older adults.

  13. Collaborative relationship in preventive home visits to older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, Yukari; Vass, Mikkel; Hvas, Lotte;

    2011-01-01

    important elements associated with a collaborative relationship were (i) visitor communication skills i.e. mastering 'enhancing motivation' and 'having patience and coping with frustrations' in difficult and problematic situations, (ii) professionalism, which includes 'professional instruction and guidance...... trust between visitor and the visited person seem to work as a vehicle, but little is known about which part of the encounters contributes to a collaborative relationship. Methods. We performed a retrospective qualitative analysis of visiting records written by preventive home visitors immediately after...... home visitor communication skills and professionalism, and practical actions after the visits characterized cases, where favourable changes in behaviour were obtained in non-disabled home-dwelling older people in Japan. Relevance to clinical practice. Education should be emphasized, because preventive...

  14. Alcohol and older people from a public health perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Anderson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES AND METHODS: As part of the European project VINTAGE, a systematic review of scientific literature was undertaken to document the evidence base on the impact of alcohol on the health and well-being of older people, and on effective policies and preventive approaches to face the problem in this steadily increasing segment of the population. RESULTS: 369 references were identified, from which 78 papers were selected. CONCLUSIONS: The review confirms the paucity of data on this topic and the need for more specific research. Although there is scarce evidence, the elderly seems to respond equally well to alcohol policy, screening instruments and brief interventions as do younger adults. According to a lifecycle approach, a future focus on the middle aged is also recommended.

  15. Psychological profile of young people at risk of social exclusion in the city of León in Nicaragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Mercedes Diaz Rodriguez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The city of León has pioneered the development of community health programs, developing comprehensive health programs such as the project ‘A New Initiative for the Americas’, a university hospital, a hospital ‘Mother´s Friend’, teaching assistance municipality, including many others. In the last five years, a group of professionals from different fields of medicine, psychology, and social work has focused on the task of working together with the community, National Police, My Family, MINED, as well as national and international NGOs to study the youth phenomenon and its impact on society. There have been five meetings with teenagers and young people promoted by the Departmental Board of Save the Children and Youth Leonesa, where the UNAN León is actively participating. Based on these meetings, a possibility of a descriptive cross-sectional study on the characterization of young people at risk of social exclusion of the peripheral area of the city of Leon arose, and the results are revealing.

  16. Deprescribing in Frail Older People: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Potter

    Full Text Available Deprescribing has been proposed as a way to reduce polypharmacy in frail older people. We aimed to reduce the number of medicines consumed by people living in residential aged care facilities (RACF. Secondary objectives were to explore the effect of deprescribing on survival, falls, fractures, hospital admissions, cognitive, physical, and bowel function, quality of life, and sleep.Ninety-five people aged over 65 years living in four RACF in rural mid-west Western Australia were randomised in an open study. The intervention group (n = 47 received a deprescribing intervention, the planned cessation of non-beneficial medicines. The control group (n = 48 received usual care. Participants were monitored for twelve months from randomisation. Primary outcome was change in the mean number of unique regular medicines. All outcomes were assessed at baseline, six, and twelve months.Study participants had a mean age of 84.3 ± 6.9 years and 52% were female. Intervention group participants consumed 9.6 ± 5.0 and control group participants consumed 9.5 ± 3.6 unique regular medicines at baseline. Of the 348 medicines targeted for deprescribing (7.4 ± 3.8 per person, 78% of regular medicines, 207 medicines (4.4 ± 3.4 per person, 59% of targeted medicines were successfully discontinued. The mean change in number of regular medicines at 12 months was -1.9 ± 4.1 in intervention group participants and +0.1 ± 3.5 in control group participants (estimated difference 2.0 ± 0.9, 95%CI 0.08, 3.8, p = 0.04. Twelve intervention participants and 19 control participants died within 12 months of randomisation (26% versus 40% mortality, p = 0.16, HR 0.60, 95%CI 0.30 to 1.22 There were no significant differences between groups in other secondary outcomes. The main limitations of this study were the open design and small participant numbers.Deprescribing reduced the number of regular medicines consumed by frail older people living in residential care with no significant

  17. Performance Measurement in Social Care Services for Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela GHENŢA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account the current social and economic environment, managers of social organizations are under a constant pressure to get results and to optimize costs with an efficient allocation of resources. Performance management allows measuring the results of public and private organizations which provide social care for the elderly. The potential of social services to respond to current challenges is linked not only to financial resources, but also to the ability of social managers to develop methods, techniques and innovative practices. Since innovation requires change, the providers should promote management practices and structures that favour the expression of new ideas. The article presents the results of a mixed-type research methodology based on qualitative and quantitative methods, such as the in-depth semi-structured interview, focus-group, and questionnaire with public policymakers, as well as with private and public providers of social services for older people. Research was conducted during October – November 2014 and the instruments were developed by the team members. The aim of the research has been to find out the importance of performance and performance measurement among public and private managers of social services for older people, and also from the perspective of policymakers. Conclusions reveal that the managers of social services for elderly should be aware that measurement alone is not sufficient, as long as the information obtained is not used in other decision-making processes like: strategic planning, quality management, budgeting activities, increased productivity. The findings have implications for practitioners, researchers and policymakers.

  18. Magnitude of HIV infection among older people in Mufindi and Babati districts of the Tanzania mainland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyigo V

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Vitus Nyigo,1 Andrew Kilale,2 Stella Kilima,1 Elizabeth H Shayo,1 Kesheni P Senkoro,1 Jonathan Mshana,1 Adiel K Mushi,1 Lucas Matemba,1 Julius Massaga11National Institute for Medical Research, 2Muhimbili Medical Research Centre, National Institute for Medical Research, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania Introduction: According to the 2011–2012 HIV and Malaria Indicator Survey, the prevalence of HIV infection in Tanzania is 5.1%, with limited information on its magnitude among older people, as the community believes that the elderly are not at risk. Consequently, little attention is given to the fight against HIV and AIDS in this group. The present study investigated the magnitude of HIV and AIDS infection among older people in rural and urban areas of the Tanzania mainland. Subjects and methods: The study was conducted in Mufindi and Babati districts of Iringa and Manyara regions, respectively, through multistage sampling procedures. Dried blood spot cards were used to collect blood samples for HIV testing among consenting participants. HIV testing was done and retested using different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Results: A total of 720 individuals, 340 (47.2% males and 380 (52.8% females, were randomly selected, of whom 714 (99.2% consented to HIV testing while six (0.8% refused to donate blood. The age ranged from 50 to 98 years, with a mean age of 64.2 years. Overall, a total of 56 (7.8% participants were HIV-positive. Females had a higher prevalence (8.3% than males (7.4%, with Mufindi district recording the higher rate (11.3% compared to the 3.7% of Babati district. The prevalence was higher in the rural population (9.4% compared to 6.4% of their urban counterparts. Conclusion: Although HIV/AIDS is considered a disease of individuals aged 15–49 years, the overall prevalence among the older people aged 50 years and above for Mufindi and Babati districts was higher than the national prevalence in the general population. These findings

  19. Barriers to participation in a hospital-based falls assessment clinic programme: an interview study with older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evron, Lotte; Schultz-Larsen, Kirsten; Fristrup, Tine

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To gain new knowledge about barriers to participation in hospital-based falls assessment. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 20 older people referred to falls assessment at a hospital-based clinic were conducted. A convenience sample of 10 refusers and 10 accepters was collected. Those...... the healthcare system taking over their life. Conclusions: This study indicates that older at-risk patients acknowledge their falls problem, but refuse to participate in hospital-based assessment programmes because they expect to lose their authority and to be caught up in the healthcare system. In...... order to transform the findings of this study to a public health message, we have to consider moving the focus of falls prevention strategies from disease control to the domain of health promotion in order to engage older adults in preventive healthcare....

  20. Supporting choice:Support planning, older people and managed personal budgets

    OpenAIRE

    Rabiee, Parvaneh; Baxter, Kate; Glendinning, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Summary: English policy emphasises personalised and flexible social care support using ‘Personal Budgets’ (PB) – preferably as cash direct payments. However, most older people opt for their council to manage personal budgets on their behalf. It is not clear what benefits of personalisation are available to this group of older people. This article reports research into the choices available to older people using managed personal budgets to fund home care services in three councils. It focuses ...

  1. Nutritional status, body composition and physical activity among older people living in residential care facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Carlsson, Maine

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this thesis was to study, whether drinkable yoghurt enriched with probiotic bacteria could have any effect on constipation and body weight (BW) among older people with dementia. Further, it concerns poor nutritional status among older people with physical and cognitive impairments and its relationship with factors commonly occur in older people living in residential care facilities. It also discusses how body composition changes with ageing and the associations between cha...

  2. Telephone consultation for improving health of people living with or at risk of HIV: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle H M M T van Velthoven

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low cost, effective interventions are needed to deal with the major global burden of HIV/AIDS. Telephone consultation offers the potential to improve health of people living with HIV/AIDS cost-effectively and to reduce the burden on affected people and health systems. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of telephone consultation for HIV/AIDS care. METHODS: We undertook a comprehensive search of peer-reviewed and grey literature. Two authors independently screened citations, extracted data and assessed the quality of randomized controlled trials which compared telephone interventions with control groups for HIV/AIDS care. Telephone interventions were voice calls with landlines or mobile phones. We present a narrative overview of the results as the obtained trials were highly heterogeneous in design and therefore the data could not be pooled for statistical analysis. RESULTS: The search yielded 3321 citations. Of these, nine studies involving 1162 participants met the inclusion criteria. The telephone was used for giving HIV test results (one trial and for delivering behavioural interventions aimed at improving mental health (four trials, reducing sexual transmission risk (one trial, improving medication adherence (two trials and smoking cessation (one trial. Limited effectiveness of the intervention was found in the trial giving HIV test results, in one trial supporting medication adherence and in one trial for smoking cessation by telephone. CONCLUSIONS: We found some evidence of the benefits of interventions delivered by telephone for the health of people living with HIV or at risk of HIV. However, only limited conclusions can be drawn as we only found nine studies for five different interventions and they mainly took place in the United States. Nevertheless, given the high penetration of low-cost mobile phones in countries with high HIV endemicity, more evidence is needed on how telephone consultation

  3. The relationship between pain intensity and severity and depression in older people: exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swift Cameron

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain and depression are known to be associated in later life, and both have a negative effect on physical performance both separately and in combination. The nature of the relationships between pain intensity and depression in elderly persons experiencing pain is less clear. The objectives of this study were to explore which factors are associated with depressed mood in older people experiencing pain, and to test the hypothesis that older people experiencing pain are at risk of depressed mood according to the severity or frequency of their pain. In addition we explored whether other potentially modifiable factors might increase the risk of depressed mood in these persons. Methods The study is a secondary analysis of baseline data for four hundred and six community-dwelling non-disabled people aged 65 and over registered with three group practices in suburban London who had experienced pain in the past 4 weeks. Intensity and frequency of pain was measured using 24 item Geriatric Pain Measure (GPM and the presence of depressive symptoms using the 5 item Mental Health Inventory. Risk for social isolation was measured using the 6 item Lubben Social Network scale and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL were also measured. Results Overall 76 (19% had depressed mood. Pain frequency and severity were not statistically significantly associated with depressed mood in this population. In multivariate analyses, significant predictors of the presence of depressive symptoms were difficulties with basic ADLs (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.1.7.8, risk for social isolation (OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.8–9.3, and basic education only (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1–4.4. Conclusion Older people experiencing pain are also likely to experience depression. Among those experiencing pain, social network and functional status seem to be more important predictors of depressive symptoms than the severity of pain. Further studies should evaluate whether improvement of social

  4. Coaching in Healthy Dietary Practices in At-Risk Older Adults: A Case of Indicated Depression Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Stahl, Sarah T.; Albert, Steven M.; Dew, Mary Amanda; Lockovich, Michael H.; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2014-01-01

    Prevention of major depressive disorder is important because current treatments are only partially adequate in reducing symptom burden and promoting health-related quality of life. Lifestyle interventions may be a desirable prevention strategy for reasons of patient preference, particularly among older patients from minority groups. Using evidence from a randomized depression prevention trial for older adults, the authors found that coaching in healthy dietary practices was potentially effect...

  5. Road Pricing and Older People: Identifying Age-Specific Differences Between Older and Younger People's Attitudes, Social Norms and Pro-Social Value Orientations to Road Pricing.

    OpenAIRE

    Nikitas, Alexandros

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of road pricing schemes is likely to be an inescapable measure in the future of managing road transport demand in highly congested environments. Since public acceptability is the ‘Holy Grail’ of charging policy-making, revealing the special attitudinal issues of older people may help the identification of some of the potential social dilemmas of road pricing. In an ageing society, where older people have a growing influence in politics in general, and potentially in the acc...

  6. Exploring empathy in intergenerational relationships form the perspective of a group of older people / Anri Wheeler

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeler, Anri

    2014-01-01

    Intergenerational relationships refer to relationships between people in alternate generational groups. The increasing numbers of older people all over the world highlight the need for studies on psychological processes that enhance well-being through intergenerational relationships. People from different generations are co-dependent for care and support. Older people constitute a diverse group: some may experience a depletion of energy, physical, financial and emotional resources, while othe...

  7. An Exploration of Loneliness: Communication and the Social Networks of Older People with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballin, Liora; Balandin, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Background: There is a large body of research focusing on the experiences of loneliness of older adults, yet little is known about the loneliness experiences of older adults with lifelong disability. In this paper, the authors present some findings from a larger qualitative study on the loneliness experiences of older people with cerebral palsy.…

  8. Images of Older People in UK Magazine Advertising: Toward a Typology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Angie; Wadleigh, Paul Mark; Ylanne, Virpi

    2010-01-01

    The use of images of older people in the British advertising media has been under-researched to date. Further, previous research in any country has tended to examine such images from an "a priori" framework of general impressions and stereotypes of older people. This study addresses these issues with British consumers' (n = 106) impressions, trait…

  9. Global oral health of older people--call for public health action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, P E; Kandelman, D; Arpin, S;

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this report is (1) to provide a global overview of oral health conditions in older people, use of oral health services, and self care practices; (2) to explore what types of oral health services are available to older people, and (3) to identify some major barriers to and opportunities...

  10. Older people's perception of and coping with falling, and their motivation for fall-prevention programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Dorte; Hendriksen, Carsten; Borup, Ina

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to investigate older people's perceptions of and coping with falls, and what motivates them to join such programmes.......This study aims to investigate older people's perceptions of and coping with falls, and what motivates them to join such programmes....

  11. Communication between Older People and Their Health Care Agents: Results of an Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutheil, Irene A.; Heyman, Janna C.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined an intervention to help high-functioning community-dwelling older people communicate their wishes for care at the end of life with someone they would trust to make health care decisions for them if necessary. Groups consisted of dyads of older people and their potential or designated health care agents randomly assigned to the…

  12. Older People and Poverty in Rural Britain: Material Hardships, Cultural Denials and Social Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbourne, Paul; Doheny, Shane

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the relations between older people, poverty and place in rural Britain. It develops previous work on rural poverty that has pointed both to the significance of older people within the rural poor population and to their denials of poverty. The paper also connects with recent discussions on the complexity of relations between…

  13. Not Quite Color Blind: Ethnic and Gender Differences in Attitudes toward Older People among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laditka, Sarah B.; Laditka, James N.; Houck, Margaret M.; Olatosi, Bankole A.

    2011-01-01

    Attitudes toward older people can influence how they are treated and their cognitive and physical health. The populations of the United States and many other countries have become more ethnically diverse, and are aging. Yet little research examines how ethnic diversity affects attitudes toward older people. Our study addresses this research gap.…

  14. Inquiry-Based Learning for Older People at a University in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorell, Ingrid; Medrano, Marc; Sole, Cristian; Vila, Neus; Cabeza, Luisa F.

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing number of older people in the world and their interest in education, universities play an important role in providing effective learning methodologies. This paper presents a new instructional methodology implementing inquiry-based learning (IBL) in two courses focused on alternative energies in the Program for Older People at…

  15. Randomized Trial of Social Rehabilitation and Integrated Health Care for Older People with Severe Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueser, Kim T.; Pratt, Sarah I.; Bartels, Stephen J.; Swain, Karin; Forester, Brent; Cather, Corinne; Feldman, James

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The Helping Older People Experience Success (HOPES) program was developed to improve psychosocial functioning and reduce long-term medical burden in older people with severe mental illness (SMI) living in the community. HOPES includes 1 year of intensive skills training and health management, followed by a 1-year maintenance phase.…

  16. Theorising the Relationship between Older People and Their Immediate Social Living Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffel, Tine; Verte, Dominique; De Donder, Liesbeth; De Witte, Nico; Dury, Sarah; Vanwing, Tom; Bolsenbroek, Anouk

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a theoretical framework for exploring the dynamics between older people and their immediate social living environment. After introducing a gerontological perspective that goes beyond "microfication," a literature review presents findings from studies that have explored the role of place and locality for older people. Next,…

  17. GPs' perspectives on preventive care for older people: a focus group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.M. Drewes; J.M. Koenen; W. de Ruijter; D.J.A. van Dijk - van Dijk; G.M. van der Weele; B.J.C. Middelkoop; R. Reis; W.J.J. Assendelft; J. Gussekloo

    2012-01-01

    Background: Preventive care traditionally aims to prevent diseases or injuries. For older people, different aims of prevention, such as maintenance of independence and wellbeing, are increasingly important. Aim: To explore GPs' perspectives on preventive care for older people. Design and setting: Qu

  18. Psychosocial Issues in Engaging Older People with Physical Activity Interventions for the Prevention of Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Samuel R.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the psychosocial factors that influence older people's participation in physical activity interventions to prevent falls. The importance of psychosocial factors is stressed inasmuch as interventions will be rendered useless if they do not successfully gain the active participation of older people. The theory of…

  19. Measures to enhance mobility among older people in Scandinavia. A literature review of best practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Lena; Ulleberg, Pål; Siren, Anu Kristiina;

    Measures enhancing the mobility of older people, helping them live independently and for longer, are advantageous for society as a whole. They are good business for society and they are good for the well-being and welfare of older people who often want to stay in their own home for as long as pos...

  20. Mild cognitive impairment and its management in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshkoor, Sima Ataollahi; Hamid, Tengku Aizan; Mun, Chan Yoke; Ng, Chee Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a common condition in the elderly. It is characterized by deterioration of memory, attention, and cognitive function that is beyond what is expected based on age and educational level. MCI does not interfere significantly with individuals' daily activities. It can act as a transitional level of evolving dementia with a range of conversion of 10%-15% per year. Thus, it is crucial to protect older people against MCI and developing dementia. The preventive interventions and appropriate treatments should improve cognitive performance, and retard or prevent progressive deficits. The avoidance of toxins, reduction of stress, prevention of somatic diseases, implementation of mental and physical exercises, as well as the use of dietary compounds like antioxidants and supplements can be protective against MCI. The modification of risk factors such as stopping smoking, as well as the treatment of deficiency in vitamins and hormones by correcting behaviors and lifestyle, can prevent cognitive decline in the elderly. The progressive increase in the growth rate of the elderly population can enhance the rate of MCI all over the world. There is no exact cure for MCI and dementia; therefore, further studies are needed in the future to determine causes of MCI and risk factors of progression from MCI to dementia. This will help to find better ways for prevention and treatment of cognitive impairment worldwide. PMID:25914527

  1. Recruiting older people at nutritional risk for clinical trials: what have we learned?

    OpenAIRE

    Piantadosi, Cynthia; Chapman, Ian M; Naganathan, Vasi; Hunter, Peter; Cameron, Ian D.; Visvanathan, Renuka

    2015-01-01

    Background The difficulty of recruiting older people to clinical trials is well described, but there is limited information about effective ways to screen and recruit older people into trials, and the reasons for their reluctance to enrol. This paper examines recruitment efforts for a community-based health intervention study that targeted older adults. Methods One year randomized control trial. Undernourished men and women, aged ≥ 65 years and living independently in the community were recru...

  2. The Home-Based Older People's Exercise (HOPE) trial: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Forster Anne; Young John; Barber Sally; Clegg Andrew; Iliffe Steve

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Frailty is common in older age, and is associated with important adverse health outcomes including increased risk of disability and admission to hospital or long-term care. Exercise interventions for frail older people have the potential to reduce the risk of these adverse outcomes by increasing muscle strength and improving mobility. Methods/Design The Home-Based Older People's Exercise (HOPE) trial is a two arm, assessor blind pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) to a...

  3. Identification of depressive disorder among older people in care homes – a feasibility study

    OpenAIRE

    Morrell, C Jane; Curran, Stephen; Topping, Annie; Shaik, Kauserjan; Muthukrishnan, Venkatesh; Stephenson, John

    2011-01-01

    Background: Depression is common among older people but more common among those living in care homes. Depression is not easily detected among older adults because of the presentation, and the tendency for older people not to complain of depression, particularly those living in care homes. In general, care home staff have limited training in recognising depression. Depression is undertreated and residents may not receive a therapeutic dose of antidepressant. The true prevalence of depression a...

  4. Prevalence and risk factors for depression among community resident older people in Kerala

    OpenAIRE

    Nakulan, Anisha; Sumesh, T. P.; Kumar, Sebind; Rejani, P. P.; K. S. Shaji

    2015-01-01

    Background: Depression is the most common mental health problem in late-life. We need more information about the incidence and prevalence of major and minor syndromes of depression in older people. This will help in service development. Aims: To estimate the prevalence of depressive disorders among community resident older people in Kerala, India and to identify factors associated with late-life depression. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and twenty community resident older subjects were a...

  5. Functional Ability, Participation in Activities and Life Satisfaction of the Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestor Pabiona Blace

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study determined whether the functional ability and participations in activities affect the life satisfaction of the older people. Data were gathered from the 780 older people through survey interview, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale and Life Satisfaction Index for the Third Age Scale. The functional ability, participation in physical activities and activities with formal support networks are statistically significant predictors of life satisfaction among the older people. These variables, when combined explain a statistically significant portion (23.7% of the variance in their life satisfaction. The older people who have better health status enjoy their lives more than those who have poor health conditions. After reaching the age of sixty, the older people are still capable of working and be active participants in the labor sector. The results have theoretical implications on the activity theory of aging since high levels of participation in the activities mean high levels of life satisfaction.

  6. Unique factors that place older Hispanic women at risk for HIV: intimate partner violence, machismo, and marianismo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianelli, Rosina; Villegas, Natalia; Lawson, Sarah; Ferrer, Lilian; Kaelber, Lorena; Peragallo, Nilda; Yaya, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Hispanic women who are 50 years of age and older have been shown to be at increased risk of acquiring HIV infection due to age and culturally related issues. The purpose of our study was to investigate factors that increase HIV risk among older Hispanic women (OHW) as a basis for development or adaptation of an age and culturally tailored intervention designed to prevent HIV-related risk behaviors. We used a qualitative descriptive approach. Five focus groups were conducted in Miami, Florida, with 50 participants. Focus group discussions centered around eight major themes: intimate partner violence (IPV), perimenopausal-postmenopausal-related biological changes, cultural factors that interfere with HIV prevention, emotional and psychological changes, HIV knowledge, HIV risk perception, HIV risk behaviors, and HIV testing. Findings from our study stressed the importance of nurses' roles in educating OHW regarding IPV and HIV prevention. PMID:23790277

  7. Developing Methods of Repurposing Electronic Health Record Data for Identification of Older Adults at Risk of Unintentional Falls

    OpenAIRE

    Baus, Adam; Zullig, Keith; Long, Dustin; Mullett, Charles; Pollard, Cecil; Taylor, Henry; Coben, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Nationally, nearly 40 percent of community-dwelling adults age 65 and older fall at least once a year, making unintentional falls the leading cause of both fatal and nonfatal injuries among this age group. Addressing this public health problem in primary care offers promise. However, challenges in incorporating fall risk screening into primary care result in a problem of missed opportunities for screening, counseling, intervention, and ultimately prevention. Given these barriers, this study e...

  8. Reducing emergency bed-days for older people? Network governance lessons from the 'Improving the Future for Older People' programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheaff, Rod; Windle, Karen; Wistow, Gerald; Ashby, Sue; Beech, Roger; Dickinson, Angela; Henderson, Catherine; Knapp, Martin

    2014-04-01

    In 2007, the UK government set performance targets and public service agreements to control the escalation of emergency bed-days. Some years earlier, nine English local authorities had each created local networks with their health and third sector partners to tackle this increase. These networks formed the 'Improving the Future for Older People' initiative (IFOP), one strand of the national 'Innovation Forum' programme, set up in 2003. The nine sites set themselves one headline target to be achieved jointly over three years; a 20 per cent reduction in the number of emergency bed-days used by people aged 75 and over. Three ancillary targets were also monitored: emergency admissions, delayed discharges and project sustainability. Collectively the sites exceeded their headline target. Using a realistic evaluation approach, we explored which aspects of network governance appeared to have contributed to these emergency bed-day reductions. We found no simple link between network governance type and outcomes. The governance features associated with an effective IFOP network appeared to suggest that the selection and implementation of a small number of evidence-based services was central to networks' effectiveness. Each service needed to be coordinated by a network-based strategic group and hierarchically implemented at operational level by the responsible network member. Having a network-based implementation group with a 'joined-at-the-top' governance structure also appeared to promote network effectiveness. External factors, including NHS incentives, health reorganisations and financial targets similarly contributed to differences in performance. Targets and financial incentives could focus action but undermine horizontal networking. Local networks should specify which interventions network structures are intended to deliver. Effective projects are those likely to be evidence based, unique to the network and difficult to implement through vertical structures alone. PMID

  9. Scaffolding, organizational structure and interpersonal interaction in musical activities with older people

    OpenAIRE

    Creech, A.; Varvarigou, M.; Hallam, S.; McQueen, H.; Gaunt, H.

    2014-01-01

    The research reported here focuses on the organizational structure and facilitator strategies observed in musical activities with older people. The observations formed one part of the Music for Life Project, funded by the ESRC New Dynamics of Ageing Programme (http://www.newdynamics.group.shef.ac.uk/), which investigated the social, emotional and cognitive benefits of participation in community music making, amongst older people. Three hundred and ninety eight people aged 50+ were recruited f...

  10. Preventing falls among older people with mental health problems: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Bunn, F; Dickinson, A.; Simpson, C.; Narayanan, V.; Humphrey, D; Griffiths, C; W. Martin; Victor, C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Falls are a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in older people and the risk of falling is exacerbated by mental health conditions. Existing reviews have focused on people with dementia and cognitive impairment, but not those with other mental health conditions or in mental health settings. The objective of this review is to evaluate the effectiveness of fall prevention interventions for older people with mental health problems being cared for across all settings.Methods: A s...

  11. A Pilot Physical Activity Initiative to Improve Mental Health Status amongst Iranian Institutionalized Older People

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Matlabi; Abdolreza Shaghaghi; Shahriar Amiri

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sufficient level of physical activity may promote overall and mental health of old people. This study was carried out to investigate the practicability of a physical activity promotion initiative amongst institutionalized older people in Tabriz, Iran. Methods: Purposive sampling method was used in this semi-experimental study to recruit 31 older people living in a selected residential care in Tabriz. Moderate-intensity aerobic and muscle-strengthening activity was planned for t...

  12. Ageing, Leisure, and Social Connectedness : How could Leisure Help Reduce Social Isolation of Older People?

    OpenAIRE

    Toepoel, Vera

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the relation between leisure activities and the social status of the elderly based on a heterogeneous sample of the Dutch population. Close relationships are also analyzed to identify which people could serve as successful stimulators of leisure participation. The social profile confirms that older people have fewer social contacts and often feel lonely. This study shows that leisure activities explain a significant part of older people's social connectedness. Voluntar...

  13. Association of day length and weather conditions with physical activity levels in older community dwelling people

    OpenAIRE

    Witham, Miles D; Donnan, Peter T.; Thenmalar Vadiveloo; Sniehotta, Falko F.; Crombie, Iain K; Zhiqiang Feng; McMurdo, Marion E. T.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Weather is a potentially important determinant of physical activity. Little work has been done examining the relationship between weather and physical activity, and potential modifiers of any relationship in older people. We therefore examined the relationship between weather and physical activity in a cohort of older community-dwelling people. METHODS: We analysed prospectively collected cross-sectional activity data from community-dwelling people aged 65 and over in the Physical...

  14. Establishing the cause of memory loss in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouliaras, Leonidas; Topiwala, Anya; Cristescu, Tamara; Ebmeier, Klaus P

    2015-01-01

    Common causes of memory loss in older people are mild cognitive impairment, the various types of dementia, and psychiatric illness, mainly depression. Around 10% of patients with mild cognitive impairment progress to dementia each year. Alzheimer's disease accounts for 60-80% of cases. Other common types of dementia are vascular, fronto-temporal, Lewy body, Parkinson's, and mixed type dementia. There is evidence to suggest that dementia pathology is established before the onset of symptoms, and thus mild cognitive impairment can be considered as a predementia stage. NICE guidance suggests examination of: attention, concentration, short- and long-term memory, praxis, language and executive function. Particular attention should be paid to any signs of neglect, state of dress, agitation or poor attention. Dysphasia and difficulty in naming objects is often present. Mood symptoms (including suicidal ideation) may be primary or comorbid. Abnormal thoughts and perceptions should be probed for, as psychotic symptoms are common. Primary care options for cognitive testing include the General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition or the Abbreviated Mental Test Score. Physical examination should include observation of gait, inspection for tremor; examination for rigidity, bradykinesia, frontal release signs, upper motor neurone lesions, pulse and BP. Structural brain imaging can improve diagnostic accuracy, exclude other pathologies and act as a prognostic marker of dementia progression but the overlap in structural changes between the dementias makes imaging alone insufficient for diagnostic purposes. NICE guidelines recommend referral to a memory clinic for patients with mild cognitive impairment, those at high risk of dementia, such as patients with learning disabilities, Parkinson's disease, or patients who have had several strokes. PMID:25726616

  15. Barriers to participation in a hospital-based falls assessment clinic programme: an interview study with older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evron, Lotte

    2009-01-01

    the healthcare system taking over their life. Conclusions: This study indicates that older at-risk patients acknowledge their falls problem, but refuse to participate in hospital-based assessment programmes because they expect to lose their authority and to be caught up in the healthcare system. In......Aims: To gain new knowledge about barriers to participation in hospital-based falls assessment. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 20 older people referred to falls assessment at a hospital-based clinic were conducted. A convenience sample of 10 refusers and 10 accepters was collected. Those...... who refused referral were recruited in relation to a systematic falls screening programme performed by preventive home visitors. Accepters were selected among 72 participants successively completing the falls assessment clinic programme. The time between the interviews was 12 months; different levels...

  16. Iterative Evaluation in a Mobile Counseling and Testing Program to Reach People of Color at Risk for HIV--New Strategies Improve Program Acceptability, Effectiveness, and Evaluation Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberg, Freya; Kurth, Ann; Reidy, William; McKnight, Teka; Dikobe, Wame; Wilson, Charles

    2011-01-01

    This article highlights findings from an evaluation that explored the impact of mobile versus clinic-based testing, rapid versus central-lab based testing, incentives for testing, and the use of a computer counseling program to guide counseling and automate evaluation in a mobile program reaching people of color at risk for HIV. The program's…

  17. Higher Education and Older People: Some Theoretical Considerations, Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, Herbert C.

    1983-01-01

    Describes disengagement, activity, lifespan, subcultural, and continuity theories of social gerontology in light of participation in higher education by older students. Argues that continuity theory holds the most promise in accounting for older students. Emphasizes the need to stress the positive roles of old age. (JAC)

  18. Use of short-acting insulin aspart in managing older people with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eltayeb Marouf

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Eltayeb Marouf, Alan J SinclairInstitute of Diabetes for Older People – IDOP, Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Postgraduate Medical School, University of Bedfordshire, UKAbstract: Type 2 diabetes mellitus affects 5.9% of the world adult population, with older people and some ethnic groups disproportionately affected. Treatment of older people with diabetes differs in many ways from that in younger adults since the majority have type 2 disease and are at particular risk of macrovascular rather than disabling microvascular disease. Insulin therapy, the most effective of diabetes medications, can reduce any level of elevated HBA1c if used in adequate doses. However, some clinicians are often reluctant to initiate insulin therapy in older people with diabetes mainly out of their concerns about adverse reactions to insulin, particularly hypoglycemia. There is evidence suggesting that insulin aspart appears to act similarly to regular human insulin in older people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Insulin aspart can be used in the treatment of older people with diabetes, but this should be individualized. There is evidence that it improves postprandial glucose control, improves long-term metabolic control, reduces risk of major nocturnal hypoglycemia and increases patient satisfaction compared with soluble insulin.Keywords: older people, diabetes, insulin aspart, hypoglycemia

  19. Health and functional status among older people with HIV/AIDS in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholten Francien

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In sub-Saharan Africa, little is known about the health and functional status of older people who either themselves are HIV infected or are affected by HIV and AIDS in the family. This aim of this study was to describe health among older people in association with the HIV epidemic. Methods The cross-sectional survey consisted of 510 participants aged 50 years and older, equally divided into five study groups including; 1 HIV infected and on antiretroviral therapy (ART for at least 1 year; 2 HIV infected and not yet eligible for ART; 3 older people who had lost a child due to HIV/AIDS; 4 older people who have an adult child with HIV/AIDS; 5 older people not known to be infected or affected by HIV in the family. The participants were randomly selected from ongoing studies in a rural and peri-urban area in Uganda. Data were collected using a WHO standard questionnaire and performance tests. Eight indicators of health and functioning were examined in an age-adjusted bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results In total, 198 men and 312 women participated. The overall mean age was 65.8 and 64.5 years for men and women respectively. Men had better self-reported health and functional status than women, as well as lower self-reported prevalence of chronic diseases. In general, health problems were common: 35% of respondents were diagnosed with at least one of the five chronic conditions, including 15% with depression, based on algorithms; 31% of men and 35% of women had measured hypertension; 25% of men and 21% of women had poor vision test results. HIV-positive older people, irrespective of being on ART, and HIV-negative older people in the other study groups had very similar results for most health status and functioning indicators. The main difference was a significantly lower BMI among HIV-infected older people. Conclusion The systematic exploration of health and well being among older people, using eight self-reported and

  20. Nutritional self-care among a group of older home-living people in rural Southern Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale B

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bjørg Dale, Ulrika SöderhamnCentre for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, NorwayBackground: Older home-living people are an at-risk group for undernutrition, particularly those who are living alone. Lack of knowledge about healthy dietary habits, altered taste sensation, and declined health status are shown to be some of the factors related to undernutrition. The aims of this study were to explore how a small group of older people in Southern Norway perceived their nutritional self-care.Methods: An exploratory qualitative approach, combined with a simple self-report questionnaire, was used. Five persons living in rural areas in Southern Norway, who in a former study were screened and found to be at risk for undernutrition, participated. Qualitative data assessed by means of individual self-care talks in the persons' own homes were analyzed using directed content analysis. A simple self-report questionnaire containing demographic variables, two health-related questions, and the Nutritional Form For the Elderly (NUFFE-NO instrument was filled out at baseline and 6 months after the self-care talks.Results: The qualitative data showed that the participants had adequate knowledge about healthy and nutritious diets. They were aware of and motivated to adapt their diet to their current state of health and to perform the necessary actions to maintain an optimal nutritional status and nutritional self-care.Conclusion: Older people living at home are a diverse group. However, this study showed that they may have sufficient knowledge, willingness, and ability to perform nutritional self-care, even if they live alone and have several chronic illnesses and impaired health.Keywords: adapting, decision-making, knowledge, self-care talks

  1. Evaluation of the accuracy of shoe fitting in older people using three-dimensional foot scanning

    OpenAIRE

    Menz, Hylton B; Auhl, Maria; Ristevski, Sonja; Frescos, Nicoletta; Munteanu, Shannon E

    2014-01-01

    Background Ill-fitting footwear is a common problem in older people. The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of shoe fitting in older people by comparing the dimensions of allocated shoes to foot dimensions obtained with a three-dimensional (3D) scanner. Methods The shoe sizes of 56 older people were determined with the Brannock device®, and weightbearing foot scans were obtained with the FotoScan 3D scanner (Precision 3D Ltd, Weston-super-mare, UK). Participants were provid...

  2. Smart Homes for Older People: Positive Aging in a Digital World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Barnett

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Smart homes are homes with technologically advanced systems to enable domestic task automation, easier communication, and higher security. As an enabler of health and well-being enhancement, smart homes have been geared to accommodate people with special needs, especially older people. This paper examines the concept of “smart home” in a technologically driven society and its multi-functional contribution to the enhancement of older people’s lives. Discussion then focuses on the challenges in the use of smart homes among older people such as accessibility and ethical issues. Finally, some implications and recommendations are provided.

  3. The health of older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoGiudice, Dina

    2016-06-01

    The health of Aboriginal Australians is poorer than that of all other Indigenous cultures in developed nations, and recent studies suggest high rates of dementia and other conditions that are common in old age. This has implications for health promotion, provision of services and planning for older age in these communities. This article provides an overview on the health of Older Aboriginal Australians. PMID:27155822

  4. Leg ulcers in older people: a national study addressing variation in diagnosis, pain and sleep disturbance

    OpenAIRE

    Hellström, Amanda; Nilsson, Camilla; Nilsson, Annina; Fagerström, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Background Leg ulcers commonly emerge as a symptom of other comorbidities, often in older people. As a consequence of the ulcer, pain and sleep disturbances might occur. Due to the complex illness, the responsibility of treatment is unclear between health caregivers. The interaction between ulcer type, sleep and pain has not previously been investigated. This study aimed to explore pain in older men and women (65 years and older) with different diagnoses of leg ulcers and to investigate the a...

  5. Protocol of the Home-based Older People's Exercise (HOPE) trial

    OpenAIRE

    Iliffe, S. R.; Clegg, A.; Barber, S.; Young, J.; Forster, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Frailty is common in older age, and is associated with important adverse health outcomes including increased risk of disability and admission to hospital or long-term care. Exercise interventions for frail older people have the potential to reduce the risk of these adverse outcomes by increasing muscle strength and improving mobility. Methods/Design: The Home-Based Older People’s Exercise (HOPE) trial is a two arm, assessor blind pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) to assess t...

  6. Migration and the informal support networks of older people in Scotland

    OpenAIRE

    Atherton, Iain Maitland

    2007-01-01

    This thesis investigates the effects of national patterns of migration on informal support for older adults in contemporary Scotland. It argues that geography matters, and develops a multi-scale conceptual framework to analyse the relationships among population mobility, contrasting local contexts in which older people live, and care and support from the intergenerational family and the community. 130 older persons from three locales with different migration patterns are recruited to the stud...

  7. How is Change in Physical Health Status Reflected by Reports of Nurses and Older People Themselves?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puvill, Thomas; Lindenberg, Jolanda; Slaets, Joris P J;

    2016-01-01

    retrospectively appreciated their annual change in health. Functional status was assessed with the Groningen Activity Rating Scale and all were followed for vital status. RESULTS: Functional decline was reflected by all reports of change in health (all p < .001). When incongruent, change in nurse...... appreciation of health by older people is superior to change in self-ratings and nurse-ratings in reflecting change in physical health, possibly because similar norms and values are applied in the assessment. The nurse's norms, like the norms of older people, may shift with the ageing of the researched cohort......BACKGROUND: Self-rated health is assumed to closely reflect actual health status, but older people's shifting norms and values may influence this association. We investigated how older people's change in self-ratings, in comparison to their retrospective appreciation and change in nurse ratings...

  8. [Subjective memory complaints in older people. Is it a symptom of dementia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, A.

    2008-01-01

    Subjective memory complaints are common in older people. They are inconsistently related to current cognitive impairment, but are more consistently correlated to future development of dementia. Subjective memory complaints are also related to depression and personality traits. Many patients with...

  9. Entitlement to concessionary public transport and wellbeing: a qualitative study of young people and older citizens in London, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alasdair; Goodman, Anna; Roberts, Helen; Steinbach, Rebecca; Green, Judith

    2013-08-01

    Access to transport is an important determinant of health, and concessionary fares for public transport are one way to reduce the 'transport exclusion' that can limit access. This paper draws on qualitative data from two groups typically at risk of transport exclusion: young people (12-18 years of age, n = 118) and older citizens (60+ years of age, n = 46). The data were collected in London, UK, where young people and older citizens are currently entitled to concessionary bus travel. We focus on how this entitlement is understood and enacted, and how different sources of entitlement mediate the relationship between transport and wellbeing. Both groups felt that their formal entitlement to travel for free reflected their social worth and was, particularly for older citizens, relatively unproblematic. The provision of a concessionary transport entitlement also helped to combat feelings of social exclusion by enhancing recipients' sense of belonging to the city and to a 'community'. However, informal entitlements to particular spaces on the bus reflected less valued social attributes such as need or frailty. Thus in the course of travelling by bus the enactment of entitlements to space and seats entailed the negotiation of social differences and personal vulnerabilities, and this carried with it potential threats to wellbeing. We conclude that the process, as well as the substance, of entitlement can mediate wellbeing; and that where the basis for providing a given entitlement is widely understood and accepted, the risks to wellbeing associated with enacting that entitlement will be reduced. PMID:23317663

  10. Predictors of long term mortality in older people with hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariza-Vega, Patrocinio; Kristensen, Morten Tange; Martín-Martín, Lydia;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine one year mortality and predisposing factors in older people who had surgery after a hip fracture. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Public acute hospital, trauma service. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 281 patients, 65 years or older, admitted with a hip fracture within...

  11. Asymptomatic spontaneous cerebral emboli and mood in a cohort of older people: a prospective study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Purandare, N.; Hardicre, J.; McCollum, C.N.; Burns, A.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether asymptomatic spontaneous cerebral emboli (SCE) predicts subsequent depression in older people. METHODS: Prospective cohort study with 2.5 years of follow-up including 96 nondepressed older subjects in primary care. Presence of SCE was measured at baseline by transcrania

  12. The Effects of an Education Program on Home Renovation for Fall Prevention of Korean Older People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Miseon; Lee, Yeunsook

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to verify the effects of an education program on home renovation for fall prevention among older people, more specifically fall efficacy and home renovation intentions. A quasiexperimental study with nonequivalent control and comparative groups was conducted to demonstrate the effects of the education. A total of 51 older people…

  13. Personalized Primary Care for Older People: An evaluation of a multicomponent nurse-led care program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenberg, N.

    2013-01-01

    Providing optimal care for the increasing number of frail older people with complex care needs is a major challenge in primary care. The current approach is reactive and does not meet the needs of older patients, resulting in unnecessary loss of daily functioning, suboptimal quality of life and high

  14. Antineoplastic drugs in veterinary oncology: excretion in dogs, contamination of the environment and exposure assessment of people at risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, T.

    2012-01-01

    Anticancer drugs themselves can cause adverse health effects when administered to human patients. In addition, it has become apparent that personnel in human medicine, occupationally exposed to these anticancer drugs, may also be at risk. The past decades, the use of chemotherapy in veterinary medic

  15. Screening for older emergency department inpatients at risk of prolonged hospital stay: the brief geriatric assessment tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrille P Launay

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were 1 to confirm that combinations of brief geriatric assessment (BGA items were significant risk factors for prolonged LHS among geriatric patients hospitalized in acute care medical units after their admission to the emergency department (ED; and 2 to determine whether these combinations of BGA items could be used as a prognostic tool of prolonged LHS.Based on a prospective observational cohort design, 1254 inpatients (mean age ± standard deviation, 84.9±5.9 years; 59.3% female recruited upon their admission to ED and discharged in acute care medical units of Angers University Hospital, France, were selected in this study. At baseline assessment, a BGA was performed and included the following 6 items: age ≥85years, male gender, polypharmacy (i.e., ≥5 drugs per day, use of home-help services, history of falls in previous 6 months and temporal disorientation (i.e., inability to give the month and/or year. The LHS in acute care medical units was prospectively calculated in number of days using the hospital registry.Area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves of prolonged LHS of different combinations of BGA items ranged from 0.50 to 0.57. Cox regression models revealed that combinations defining a high risk of prolonged LHS, identified from ROC curves, were significant risk factors for prolonged LHS (hazard ratio >1.16 with P>0.010. Kaplan-Meier distributions of discharge showed that inpatients classified in high-risk group of prolonged LHS were discharged later than those in low-risk group (P<0.003. Prognostic value for prolonged LHS of all combinations was poor with sensitivity under 77%, a high variation of specificity (from 26.6 to 97.4 and a low likelihood ratio of positive test under 5.6.Combinations of 6-item BGA tool were significant risk factors for prolonged LHS but their prognostic value was poor in the studied sample of older inpatients.

  16. Clinical effectiveness of interventions for treatment-resistant anxiety in older people; a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Barton, S; Karner, C.; Salih, F.; Baldwin, D S; Edwards, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Anxiety and related disorders include generalised anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder and phobic disorders (intense fear of an object or situation). These disorders share the psychological and physical symptoms of anxiety, but each disorder has its own set of characteristic symptoms. Anxiety disorders can be difficult to recognise, particularly in older people (those aged over 65 years). Older people tend to be more rel...

  17. Psychosocial needs of a group of older people in a residential facility / Anna Petronella Zaaiman

    OpenAIRE

    Zaaiman, Anna Petronella

    2015-01-01

    This study, which is part of a research project conducted to explore the experiences of quality of life of older people living in a residential facility, focuses specifically on the psychosocial needs of these residents. Psychosocial needs refer to the innate psychological nutriments that prompt older people to take purposeful, self-directed action in an attempt to satisfy these needs and ultimately foster well-being. These may include needs for mastery, acknowledgement, social interaction an...

  18. Practical Problems with Medication Use that Older People Experience: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Notenboom, Kim; Beers, Erna; Van Riet-Nales, Diana A.; Egberts, Toine C. G.; Leufkens, Hubert G. M.; Jansen, Paul A F; Bouvy, Marcel L

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To identify the practical problems that older people experience with the daily use of their medicines and their management strategies to address these problems and to determine the potential clinical relevance thereof. Design Qualitative study with semistructured face-to-face interviews. Setting A community pharmacy and a geriatric outpatient ward. Participants Community-dwelling people aged 70 and older (N = 59). Measurements Participants were interviewed at home. Two researchers ...

  19. Is the Nintendo Wii Fit really acceptable to older people?: a discrete choice experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Burgess Leonie; George Stacey; Ratcliffe Julie; Laver Kate; Crotty Maria

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Interactive video games such as the Nintendo Wii Fit are increasingly used as a therapeutic tool in health and aged care settings however, their acceptability to older people is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the acceptability of the Nintendo Wii Fit as a therapy tool for hospitalised older people using a discrete choice experiment (DCE) before and after exposure to the intervention. Methods A DCE was administered to 21 participants in an interview style f...

  20. Impact of Social Capital on 8-year Mortality Among Older People in 34 Danish Municipalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tine; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Christensen, Ulla;

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the impact of social capital measures (bonding, bridging, and linking) on all-cause mortality at 8-year follow-up among older people aged 75 and 80 at baseline.......To analyze the impact of social capital measures (bonding, bridging, and linking) on all-cause mortality at 8-year follow-up among older people aged 75 and 80 at baseline....

  1. Occupational Engagement among Older People : Evaluation, Repertoire and Relation to Life satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Ingeborg

    2006-01-01

    Occupational engagement among older people is important to investigate as older people are the fastest growing segment in our society, and because occupational engagement is viewed within occupational therapy as one of the basic premises for health. Three perspectives of engagement are highlighted in this thesis: evaluation of occupational engagement, the repertoire of occupational engagement, and finally, the relation between occupational engagement and life satisfaction. The overall aim of ...

  2. The influence of cognition on self-management of type 2 diabetes in older people

    OpenAIRE

    Tomlin A; Sinclair A

    2016-01-01

    Ali Tomlin, Alan Sinclair Institute of Diabetes for Older People, University of Bedfordshire, Luton, Bedfordshire, UK Abstract: Diabetes is a growing public health issue, increasing in prevalence, eroding quality of life, and burdening health care systems. The complications of diabetes can be avoided or delayed by maintaining good glycemic control, which is achievable through self-management and, where necessary, medication. Older people with diabetes are at increased risk for cognitive impa...

  3. Auditory rehabilitation of older people from the general population--the Leiden 85-plus study.

    OpenAIRE

    Gussekloo, Jacobijn; de Bont, L E; von Faber, M; Eekhof, J A; de Laat, J A; Hulshof, J H; Van Dongen, E; Westendorp, R. G.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Very few older people with severe hearing loss use hearing aids to reduce the negative consequences of reduced hearing in daily functioning. AIM: Assessment of a screening test and a standardised auditory rehabilitation programme for older people from the general population with untreated severe hearing loss. DESIGN OF STUDY: Intervention study and qualitative exploration. SETTING: Leiden 85-Plus Study, a prospective population-based study of 85-year-old inhabitants of Leiden, the...

  4. Depressive symptoms predict cognitive decline and dementia in older people independently of cerebral white matter changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdelho, Ana; Madureira, Sofia; Moleiro, Carla; Ferro, José M; O'Brien, John T; Poggesi, Anna; Pantoni, Leonardo; Fazekas, Franz; Scheltens, Philip; Waldemar, Gunhild; Wallin, Anders; Erkinjuntti, Timo; Inzitari, Domenico; Study, LADIS

    2013-01-01

    Depressive symptoms (DS) have been associated with increased risk of cognitive decline. Our aim was to evaluate the longitudinal influence of DS on cognition in independent older people, accounting for the severity of white matter changes (WMC).......Depressive symptoms (DS) have been associated with increased risk of cognitive decline. Our aim was to evaluate the longitudinal influence of DS on cognition in independent older people, accounting for the severity of white matter changes (WMC)....

  5. Health Literacy and Socioeconomic Characteristics among Older People in Transitional Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    Toçi, Ervin; Burazeri, Genc; Sorensen, Kristine; Jerliu, Naim; Ramadani, Naser; Roshi, Enver; Brand, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Health literacy among older people has received little attention in transitional countries of Southeast Europe. Our aim was to assess the level and socioeconomic correlates of health literacy among older people in Kosovo, a post-war country in the Western Balkans. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Kosovo, between January-March 2011. Methods: This nationwide survey, conducted in Kosovo in 2011, included 1753 individuals aged ≥65 years (886 men, 867 wome...

  6. Potential role of vitamin D in prevention of skeletal and extraskeletal diseases in older people

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Montagnani; Roberto Nardi; Michela Cercignani; Valerio Verdiani

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D and calcium are essential for bone health. An adequate calcium-phosphorus product determines a high quality mineralization long lifetime. In older people, both calcium and vitamin D levels may be lower causing osteomalacia and/or osteoporosis with a higher risk of fracture. Epidemiological data have clearly associated serum vitamin D lower levels (deficiency) with bone fracture in older people, however, not univocal data exist in regard to a beneficial effect of vitamin D supplement...

  7. Real world problem solving and quality of life in older people

    OpenAIRE

    Gilhooly, M.; Gilhooly, K; Phillips, LH; Harvey, D.; Brady, A; Hanlon, P.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. This study examined relationships between quality of life (QoL) in older people and cognitive functioning in both abstract and real-world problem solving. Design. Contributions of levels of mental, physical and social activities, self-rated and objective health status, self-rated cognitive functioning, socio-economic status, gender, real-world and abstract problem solving were examined in a regression study of factors related to QoL in older people. Method. Participants (N...

  8. Consequences of Interaction of Functional, Somatic, Mental and Social Problems in Community-Dwelling Older People

    OpenAIRE

    van Houwelingen, Anne H.; den Elzen, Wendy P.J.; le Cessie, Saskia; Blom, Jeanet W.; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the combination of four common health problems in older people and whether problems on four domains result in an additional effect on indicators of poor health. For this purpose, a total of 2681 participants (32% male, mean age 82 years) of the Integrated Systematic Care for Older People (ISCOPE) study were screened on the presence of health problems on four domains (functional, somatic, mental, social) with the postal ISCOPE questionnaire. Extensive interview data on heal...

  9. The relationship between pain intensity and severity and depression in older people: exploratory study

    OpenAIRE

    Swift Cameron; Harari Danielle; Carmaciu Claudia; Kharicha Kalpa; Iliffe Steve; Gillman Gerhard; Stuck Andreas E

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Pain and depression are known to be associated in later life, and both have a negative effect on physical performance both separately and in combination. The nature of the relationships between pain intensity and depression in elderly persons experiencing pain is less clear. The objectives of this study were to explore which factors are associated with depressed mood in older people experiencing pain, and to test the hypothesis that older people experiencing pain are at ri...

  10. Relationships Between Deprivation and the Self-reported Health of Older People in Northern Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Doebler, Stefanie; Glasgow, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: There are few studies on relationships between deprivation and the self-reported health of people aged over 64 years, and no studies fully representative of Northern Ireland’s older population. This paper addresses this gap. Methods: Deprivation of older people as reported in the 2001 and 2011 Censuses and the relationship with self-reported health are analyzed over a ten-year span using multilevel modeling. The data are from the Northern Ireland Longitudinal Study (NILS) linked t...

  11. Physical exercise and mental health among older people : measurement methods and exercise effects focusing on people living in residential care facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Conradsson, Mia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to study the effects of exercise on mental health among older people living in residential care facilities. The aim was also to study the reliability of an assessment scale for balance function and the usefulness of an assessment scale for depressive symptoms among older people, including people with cognitive impairments.   The Berg Balance Scale (BBS) is frequently used to assess balance in older people, but knowledge is lacking about its absolute reliability. The...

  12. Social connection, relationships and older lesbian and gay people1

    OpenAIRE

    Barrett, Catherine; Whyte, Carolyn; Comfort, Jude; Lyons, Anthony; Crameri, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents data from a small study exploring the impacts of homophobia on the lives of older lesbian and gay Australians. Eleven in-depth interviews were conducted with older lesbians (6) and gay men (5) ranging in age from 65 to 79 years. The study found that participants’ sense of self was shaped by the dominant medical, legal and religious institutions of their youth that defined them as sick, immoral or criminal. Participants described enforced “cure” therapies, being imprisoned,...

  13. Functional MRI Assessment of Task-Induced Deactivation of the Default Mode Network in Alzheimer’s Disease and At-Risk Older Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maija Pihlajamäki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common form of dementia in old age, and is characterized by prominent impairment of episodic memory. Recent functional imaging studies in AD have demonstrated alterations in a distributed network of brain regions supporting memory function, including regions of the default mode network. Previous positron emission tomography studies of older individuals at risk for AD have revealed hypometabolism of association cortical regions similar to the metabolic abnormalities seen in AD patients. In recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies of AD, corresponding brain default mode regions have also been found to demonstrate an abnormal fMRI task-induced deactivation response pattern. That is, the relative decreases in fMRI signal normally observed in the default mode regions in healthy subjects performing a cognitive task are not seen in AD patients, or may even be reversed to a paradoxical activation response. Our recent studies have revealed alterations in the pattern of deactivation also in elderly individuals at risk for AD by virtue of their APOE e4 genotype, or evidence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI. In agreement with recent reports from other groups, these studies demonstrate that the pattern of fMRI task-induced deactivation is progressively disrupted along the continuum from normal aging to MCI and to clinical AD and more impaired in e4 carriers compared to non-carriers. These findings will be discussed in the context of current literature regarding functional imaging of the default network in AD and at-risk populations.

  14. Physical and cognitive functioning of people older than 90 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; Thinggaard, Mikael; Oksuzyan, Anna;

    2013-01-01

    A rapidly increasing proportion of people in high-income countries are surviving into their tenth decade. Concern is widespread that the basis for this development is the survival of frail and disabled elderly people into very old age. To investigate this issue, we compared the cognitive and phys......A rapidly increasing proportion of people in high-income countries are surviving into their tenth decade. Concern is widespread that the basis for this development is the survival of frail and disabled elderly people into very old age. To investigate this issue, we compared the cognitive...... and physical functioning of two cohorts of Danish nonagenarians, born 10 years apart....

  15. Model optimization activities psychologist employment of older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Lusova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the optimization of labor activity of the elderly, considered optimization factors of labor activity (macro meza- and microfactors, stages and principles of psychological work with the elderly, an attempt to create a model of a psychologist with an older man on the stage of retirement.

  16. Fish fatty acids and mental health in older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rest, van de O.

    2009-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that the intake of fish and marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids could protect against age-related cognitive decline and impaired mental well-being. However, results from observational studies are inconclusive and data from randomized controlled trials in older pe

  17. Family, Close Relatives, Friends: Life Satisfaction among Older People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Arzu; Oztop, Hulya; Dogan, Nuri; Guven, Seval

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the influence of socioeconomic (age, education, marital status, income, and health) and demographic variables and the quantity and quality of relationships with adult children, grandchildren, siblings and friends on life satisfaction of the elderly. Participants were 200 persons older than 60 years of age. Hierarchical…

  18. Autonomy among physically frail older people in nursing home settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Mette; Puggaard, Lis

    2008-01-01

    participants aged 65 years or older were included in the study. All the participants were restricted in performing at least one P-ADL activity unassisted and had a Mini Mental State Examination-score above 16. Perceived autonomy was measured at baseline, after 12 weeks and after 24 weeks by The Autonomy Sub...

  19. Dimensions of Housing Deprivation for Older People in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Brian; Winston, Nessa

    2011-01-01

    Housing is an important aspect of living standards and quality of life for older persons, but the housing-related problems they may face encompass rather different circumstances, relating to the condition of the dwelling, how well equipped it is, whether housing costs represent a serious burden, and whether the neighbourhood environment is…

  20. Caring for frail older people in the last phase of life – the general practitioners’ view

    OpenAIRE

    Geiger, Karin; Schneider, Nils; Bleidorn, Jutta; Klindtworth, Katharina; Jünger, Saskia; Müller-Mundt, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Background Frail older people are an increasingly important group in primary care due to demographic change. For these patients, a palliative care approach may be useful to sustain the quality of life in the last phase of their lives. While general practitioners (GPs) play a key role in the primary care for older patients, general palliative care is still in its infancy and little is known in Germany about caring for frail older people towards the end of life. This study aims to explore the t...

  1. The cost and cost-effectiveness of an enhanced intervention for people with substance abuse problems at risk for HIV.

    OpenAIRE

    Zarkin, G A; Lindrooth, R C; Demiralp, B; Wechsberg, W

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the costs, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of prevention interventions for out-of-treatment substance abusers at risk for HIV. This is the first cost-effectiveness study of an AIDS intervention that focuses on drug use as an outcome. STUDY DESIGN: We examined data from the North Carolina Cooperative Agreement site (NC CoOp). All individuals in the study were given the revised NIDA standard intervention and randomly assigned to either a longer, more personalized en...

  2. Advertising Representations of Older People in the United Kingdom and Taiwan: A Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chin-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Cross-cultural studies of advertising representations of older people are relatively scarce. This article aims to fill in this gap via a comparison between Taiwan and the United Kingdom, employing a combination of quantitative content analysis and the qualitative grounded theory method. The content-analysis phase reveals underrepresentation of older people in both countries' advertising contexts, as well as representational differences between Taiwan and the United Kingdom in terms of older characters' role salience, the products, physical settings, and social networks they are associated with. The grounded-theory phase yields nine prototypes of older people along with subcategories to conceptualize the qualities of older people as they appear in TV ads in these countries. The findings are discussed in relation to the stereotyping of older people and transformed into hypothetical statements to be modified in future research. In conclusion, the Confucian tradition of filial piety is still found to be important in explaining the observed cross-cultural differences, but the emergence of new norms about aging in Taiwanese advertising also suggests that this tradition may be in decline. PMID:26243326

  3. Age, gender and disability predict future disability in older people: The Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    U. Taş (Ümit); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); A. Hofman (Albert); B.W. Koes (Bart); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: To develop a prediction model that predicts disability in community-dwelling older people. Insight in the predictors of disability is needed to target preventive strategies for people at increased risk. Methods. Data were obtained from the Rotterdam Study, including subjects

  4. The fight-to-die: older people and death activism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Richards

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the activities and convictions of older right-to-die activists who belong to a small but very active interest group based in Scotland, UK, called Friends at the End (FATE. The analysis presented here is based on knowledge gained through seventeen months of ethnographic research with the organisation. While FATE activists currently campaign for a legal right to a medically assisted death, many are also open to taking matters into their own hands, either by travelling to the Swiss organisation Dignitas or by opting for what is known as ‘‘self-deliverance’’. FATE members’ openness to different means of securing a hastened death contrasts sharply with the more limited demands of the UK’s main right-to-die organisation, Dignity in Dying, and highlights their specific orientation to freedom, which, it is argued here, results from the organisation’s older demographic.

  5. Patient safety and hydration in the care of older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Julie

    2016-04-29

    Ensuring patients are adequately hydrated is a fundamental part of nursing care, however, it is clear from the literature that dehydration remains a significant problem in the NHS with implications for patient safety. The development of dehydration is often multifactorial and older age is an independent risk factor for the condition. However, the media often blame nursing staff for simply not giving patients enough to drink. This article discusses the scale of the problem in acute care settings and aims to raise awareness of the importance of hydration management and accurate documentation in nursing practice. It suggests that intentional hourly rounding may provide an opportunity for nurses to ensure older patients are prompted or assisted to take a drink. PMID:27125939

  6. Depressive illness in institutionalised older people in Malta

    OpenAIRE

    Zammit, Paul; Fiorini, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Depression in older persons is associated with being placed in a nursing home. Depression is linked to increased medical morbidity in nursing home residents. 150 patients living in two nursing homes in Malta were included in the study. The geriatric depression scale was used to identify depression. Data for risk factors for depression and management of residents for this pathology was also collected. 67.3% (p value

  7. Using landmarks to support older people in navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, J.; Gray, P.D.G.; Khammampad, K.; Brewster, S.

    2004-01-01

    Although landmarks are an integral aspect of navigation, they have rarely been used within electronic navigation aids. This paper describes the design of a pedestrian navigation aid for a handheld computer, which guides the user along a route using photographs of landmarks, together with audio and text instructions that reference these landmarks. This aid was designed with older users in mind who often find their mobility hampered by declines in sensory, cognitive and motor abilities. It was ...

  8. Transition from self-supported to living: Older people's experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrun Hvalvik

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available To become dependent on professional support to accomplish the daily activities of life can be considered a turning point, involving a range of challenging changes in life. The purpose of the study was to describe the experiences of older home-dwelling individuals in transition from self-supported to supported living from a lifeworld perspective. Five women and five men were interviewed, and a descriptive phenomenological design was used. The findings showed that an attitude of acceptance was an essential characteristic for this group. An attitude of acceptance comprised: flexibility and tolerance, recognition and hopes, and valuation of self and situation. Finding themselves in a situation they had to submit to, they took an attitude of acceptance. An attitude of acceptance implied acknowledgement of the situation as well as positivity and desires to manage. This attitude may represent a significant potential for improvement. Awareness of this is crucial to support older individuals in a healthy way through the transition process. An attitude of acceptance, however, also implied an acceptance of discontinuity in their lives, renunciations, and denigration of own needs. But this aspect of the acceptance was trivialized by the participants and not equally obvious. Insight into this complexity is vital to avoid ignorance of older individuals’ vulnerability in the transition process.

  9. Nuances in the Management of Older People With Multiple Myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlyn, Charlotte; Gay, Francesca; Larocca, Alessandra; Roy, Vivek; Ailawadhi, Sikander

    2016-06-01

    Multiple myeloma is a disease of the elderly, with about a third of patients at diagnosis older than 75 years of age. Yet, the population of elderly patients is heterogeneous: older patients are more likely to have comorbidities and frailties complicating both their initial diagnosis and subsequent management, but these are not consistent across the group. Furthermore, patients with comorbidities and frailty are generally underrepresented in clinical trials. Despite the survival of myeloma patients increasing following the introduction of novel agents, older patients continue to have worse outcomes with increased treatment-related toxicity. Treatment tolerability is not defined by age alone, rather a combination of age, physical function, cognitive function, and comorbidities. These factors all influence patients' tolerability of treatment and therefore treatment efficacy and should also be considered when reviewing the results of clinical trials. It is the nuances of determining how these factors interact that should influence initial treatment and ongoing management decisions and these will be discussed here. PMID:27038805

  10. Concern about HIV and AIDS among older people in the slums of Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepngeno-Langat, Gloria; Falkingham, Jane C; Madise, Nyovani J; Evandrou, Maria

    2012-09-01

    The article explores the way that social networks and personal experiences affect perceived HIV-related concerns among people aged 50 years or older living in a low resource neighborhood with high HIV prevalence in Nairobi, Kenya. Multiple logistic regression is used to model the association between the reporting of an HIV-related concern and individual-level characteristics, personal experiences, and social interaction. The main concerns regarding HIV reported by older people in the study included caring for orphaned children (65%), caring for people with AIDS (48%), and losing material and social support from adult children (36%). Interestingly, 38% of respondents voiced concerns about HIV infection among older people. Respondents who had been individually affected by HIV and AIDS, who were part of a wide social network, or who participated in community activities were frequently more likely to report a concern. The findings highlight the significance of the role of social interaction and social networks in the diffusion of information and knowledge. These findings have implications for HIV and AIDS policy and programs, highlighting the potential for social networks and community-level interventions to educate and increase awareness about HIV and AIDS among older people. Community leaders can make good peer educators and communication agents for HIV/AIDS campaigns. Additionally, the recognized high level of personal vulnerability to HIV infection among older people suggests the need for targeted sexual behavior change programs among this often neglected group. PMID:22324649

  11. Social marketing strategies for reaching older people with disabilities: findings from a survey of centers for independent living participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moone, Rajean Paul; Lightfoot, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Centers for independent living (CILs) provide critical supports, services, and advocacy for assisting people with disabilities in living independently. As there is a rapidly increasing population of older people with disabilities, many CILs are now considering how to actively engage older adults in their organizations. This study utilized a survey of older people with disabilities to help identify social marketing techniques that community organizations like CILs can use to effectively reach older people with disabilities. Utilizing the components of the social marketing mix in designing outreach efforts, including a critical examination of product, place, price, participants, and partnering, CILs and other community agencies can better reach older adults with disabilities. PMID:19459127

  12. Differences in false recollection according to the cognitive reserve of healthy older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitarque, Alfonso; Meléndez, Juan; Sales, Alicia; Mayordomo, Teresa; Escudero, Joaquín; Algarabel, Salvador

    2016-09-01

    We present an associative recognition experiment comparing three samples of healthy people (young people, older people with high cognitive reserve [HCR], and older people with low cognitive reserve [LCR], with each sample consisting of 40 people), manipulating stimuli repetition during the study phase. The results show significant differences among the three samples in their overall performance. However, these differences are not due to a different use of familiarity, but rather due to a different way of using recollection: although there are no differences in the hit rates between the HRC and LRC samples, the LCR group makes significantly more recollective false alarms than the HCR group. Moreover, repetition provokes an increase in the recollective false alarms in the LCR group, but this does not occur in the group of young people or in the HCR group. These findings are explained in terms of recollection-based monitoring errors and seem to provide support for the cognitive reserve hypothesis. PMID:26982550

  13. Older people's perspectives on an elderly-friendly hospital environment: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karki S

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sushmita Karki,1 Dharma Nand Bhatta,1,2 Umesh Raj Aryal3 1Department of Public Health, Nobel College, Pokhara University, Kathmandu, Nepal; 2Faculty of Medicine, Epidemiology Unit, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, Thailand; 3Department of Community Medicine, Kathmandu Medical College, Kathmandu, Nepal Background: Many older people are vulnerable with multiple health problems and need of extensive care and support for quality of life. The main objective of this study was to explore the older people's perspectives on an "elderly-friendly" hospital. Methods: Hospital was stratified by four domains including government, semi-government, community, and private. We interviewed 33 hospitalized older patients and four hospital managers between June and December 2014 in Kathmandu, Nepal, using purposive sampling technique. We executed a qualitative content analysis step with extensive review of the interviews. Final name of the theme was given after the agreement between the research team and experts to improve trustworthiness. Elderly-friendly services, expectation from government and hospital, and health policy related to senior citizen were developed as main themes. Results: Most of the participants were satisfied with the behavior of health personnel. However, none of the health personnel were trained with geriatric health care. Elderly-friendly hospital guidelines and policy were not developed by any hospitals. Older people health card, advocacy for older people's health and benefit, and hospital environment were the common expectations of older patients. Government policy and budget constraint were the main obstacles to promote elderly-friendly health care services. Conclusion: Elderly-related health policies, physical environments of hospital, elderly-friendly health manpower, advocacy, and other facilities and benefits should be improved and developed. There are urgent needs to develop elderly-friendly hospital policies and guidelines that

  14. At risk in two worlds: injury mortality among indigenous people in the US and Australia, 1990-92.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, M R; Wallace, L J; Harrison, J; Moller, J; Smith, R J

    1998-10-01

    This paper outlines the commonalties and unique differences in injury experience among the indigenous people in the United States and Australia. Injury mortality rates among Indigenous people in the United States and Australia are approximately 2-3 times greater than rates for the non-Indigenous population in each country. Motor vehicle-related injuries accounted for one-third of the injury deaths for Native Americans and Australian Aboriginals. Suicide accounted for more deaths in Native Americans (15.5 per 100,000) than it did for Australian Aboriginals (11.1 per 100,000), whereas the injury death rate in Australian Aboriginals due to poisoning was almost twice that of Native Americans. Culturally appropriate interventions tailored to specific local settings and problems will be necessary to reduce injury mortality among Indigenous people. PMID:9848955

  15. An overview of foot ulceration in older people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moakes, Helen

    2012-09-01

    A patient's whole body is affected by diabetes but in particular this chronic disease can cause foot complications. Damage to the nerve and blood supply to the feet as a result of diabetes causes lack of sensation and ischaemia. These problems can lead to diabetic foot ulceration, which, if left untreated, can result in amputation or even death. An essential part of nurses' role in caring for older patients with diabetes in community, acute and residential settings is learning to recognise the signs of a high-risk diabetic foot, and when and where to get help for its treatment. PMID:23008915

  16. Is the Nintendo Wii Fit really acceptable to older people?: a discrete choice experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgess Leonie

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactive video games such as the Nintendo Wii Fit are increasingly used as a therapeutic tool in health and aged care settings however, their acceptability to older people is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the acceptability of the Nintendo Wii Fit as a therapy tool for hospitalised older people using a discrete choice experiment (DCE before and after exposure to the intervention. Methods A DCE was administered to 21 participants in an interview style format prior to, and following several sessions of using the Wii Fit in physiotherapy. The physiotherapist prescribed the Wii Fit activities, supervised and supported the patient during the therapy sessions. Attributes included in the DCE were: mode of therapy (traditional or using the Wii Fit, amount of therapy, cost of therapy program and percentage of recovery made. Data was analysed using conditional (fixed-effects logistic regression. Results Prior to commencing the therapy program participants were most concerned about therapy time (avoiding programs that were too intensive, and the amount of recovery they would make. Following the therapy program, participants were more concerned with the mode of therapy and preferred traditional therapy programs over programs using the Wii Fit. Conclusions The usefulness of the Wii Fit as a therapy tool with hospitalised older people is limited not only by the small proportion of older people who are able to use it, but by older people's preferences for traditional approaches to therapy. Mainstream media portrayals of the popularity of the Wii Fit with older people may not reflect the true acceptability in the older hospitalised population.

  17. Older people's use of ambulance services: a population based analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, M J; Fitzgerald, G

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the use of emergency and non-urgent ambulance transport services by people aged 65 years and over. SETTING: The study was undertaken in Queensland where the Queensland Ambulance Services (QAS) is the sole provider of emergency pre-hospital and non-urgent ambulance services for the entire state. METHODS: The age and sex of 351,000 emergency and non-urgent cases treated and transported by the QAS from July 1995 to June 1996 were analysed. RESULTS: People aged 65 years ...

  18. Analyzing the problem of falls among older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionyssiotis Y

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Yannis DionyssiotisPhysical and Social Rehabilitation Center, Amyntaio, Florina, GreeceAbstract: Falls are a serious problem facing the elderly. The prevention of falls that contribute to disability, mainly in elderly people, is an important issue. Ensuring the greatest possible functionality for elderly people is an important element in the prevention of disability. This paper analyzes the importance of falls, risk factors for falls, and interventions to prevent falls. Recent publications as well as research regarding the prevention and rehabilitation for falls are reviewed.Keywords: falls, elderly, rehabilitation, risk factors

  19. Physical (in)activity and depression in older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassink-Vossen, Sanne; Collard, Rose M; Oude Voshaar, Richard C; Comijs, Hannie C; de Vocht, Hilde M; Naarding, Paul

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge about characteristics explaining low level of physical activity in late-life depression is needed to develop specific interventions aimed at improving physical health in depressed people above the age of 60. METHODS: This cross-sectional study used data from the Netherlands Stu

  20. Coffee, Cake & Culture: Evaluation of an art for health programme for older people in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Brenda; McCormick, Sheila; Lucas, Terri; Gallagher, Wendy; Winn, Andrea; Elkin, Sophie

    2016-07-01

    Arts for health initiatives and networks are being developed in a number of countries and an international literature is emerging on the evidence of their benefits to people's health, wellbeing and quality of life. Engagement in cultural and creative arts by older people can increase their morale and self-confidence and provides opportunities for social connection. Museums and galleries are increasingly required to justify their expenditure, reach and impact and some are working in partnership with local councils, hospitals, schools and communities to improve access to their collections. There is a body of literature emerging that describes such initiatives but empirical evidence of their benefits is less developed. This article reports an evaluation of an art for health initiative - Coffee, Cake & Culture organised and delivered by Whitworth Art Gallery and Manchester Museum in 2012 for older people living in a care home and a supported living facility. The study has identified the benefits and impacts of the arts for health programme and its feasibility for older people, with or without diagnosed memory loss - dementia, living in a care home or supported living facility and their care staff. The findings demonstrate there were benefits to the older people and their care staff in terms of wellbeing, social engagement, learning, social inclusion and creativity. These benefits were immediate and continued in the short term on their return home. The majority of older people and care staff had not previously been to the art gallery or museum and the programme encouraged creative arts and cultural appreciation which promoted social inclusion, wellbeing and quality of life. The programme is feasible and important lessons were identified for future planning. Further research involving partnerships of researchers, arts for health curators, artists, care staff, older people and their families is warranted. PMID:24686287

  1. Population based study of hospitalised fall related injuries in older people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, N; Kassulke, D; McClure, R

    2002-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to identify the distribution of fall related injury in older people hospitalised for acute treatment of injury, in order to direct priorities for prevention. Setting: A follow up study was conducted in the Brisbane Metropolitan Region of Australia during 1998. Methods: Medical records of patients aged 65 years and over hospitalised with a fall related injury were reviewed. Demographic and injury data were analysed and injury rates calculated using census data as the denominator for the population at risk. Results: From age 65, hospitalised fall related injury rates increased exponentially for both males and females, with age adjusted incidence rates twice as high in women than men. Fractures accounted for 89% of admissions, with over half being to the hip. Males were significantly more likely than females to have fractured their skull, face, or ribs (p<0.01). While females were significantly more likely than males to have fractured their upper or lower limbs (p<0.01), the difference between proportions of males and females fracturing their hip was not significant. Males were more likely than females (p<0.01) to have fall related head injuries (13% of admissions). Compared with hip fractures, head injuries contributed significantly to the burden of injury in terms of severity, need for intensive care, and excess mortality. Conclusions: The frequency and impact of hip fractures warrants continued emphasis in falls program interventions for both males and females to prevent this injury. However, interventions that go beyond measures to slow and protect against bone loss are also needed to prevent fall related head injuries. PMID:12460962

  2. Competitions as innovators of space for frail older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Jonas E; Rönn, Magnus

    spatial innovation is juxtaposed with sociopolitical reform work of the welfare regime. The present study is an explorative study of programming competition documents and winning entries that were part of the Swedish governmental initiative of 2010,” Growing older, Living well,” to innovate space for......, eldercare and space. Consequently, architecture competitions that focus on the emerging ageing society could be seen as a restrained type of space for architects to digress. National welfare goals and existing means to achieve these goals act as inhibitors for an innovative spatial preparation for the......In the context of the universal ageing process that is currently taking place in western society, the organization of architecture competitions that deals with space for dependent ageing comes of relevance. Based on the welfare regime theory, it could be argued that this type of architecture is...

  3. Why older people refuse to participate in falls prevention trials: A qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Elskamp, Annemijn; Hartholt, Klaas; Patka, Peter; van Beeck, Ed; Cammen, Tischa

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground/Objectives: Falls are a major public health problem. Older persons are frequently underrepresented in trials, including falls prevention trials. Insight into possible reasons for non-participation could help to improve trial designs and participation rates among this age-group. The aim of this study was to explore reasons why older people refuse to participate in falls prevention trials. Setting: A qualitative study. Participants: Community-dwelling adults aged ≥ 65. ye...

  4. Correlates of and physical activity counseling effect on attitude toward physical activity among older people

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Li-Tang

    2011-01-01

    Among older adults, moderate regular physical activity, even if below the level to show fitness effect, leads to multiple health benefits. However, despite well-documented benefits of physical activity, the majority of adults in developed countries do not exercise. There is a need to investigate what influences attitude toward physical activity among older people to develop suitable health promotion scheme. The purpose of this study was to identify correlates of attitude toward physical activ...

  5. Older people's portrayal in the print media: implications for intergenerational relations

    OpenAIRE

    Roos, Vera; Sedick, Samiera

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of older people in a residential care facility regarding how they are portrayed in the print media and the implications of such portrayal for intergenerational relations. Twenty-one older residents in a residential care facility participated voluntarily in the study (men = 9, women = 12; age range 60 to 85 years). Data were collected using exploratory interviews and focus groups followed by the thematic analysis of the data. The findings suggest that the ol...

  6. How likely are older people to take up different falls prevention activities?

    OpenAIRE

    Yardley, Lucy; Kirby, Sarah; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Gilbert, Rebecca; Whitehead, Sarah; Todd, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine the extent to which older people are willing to engage in different falls prevention activities, and how this may vary in different sectors of the older population. Methods: A survey sent to patients aged over 54 in ten general practices in the Southampton, Bristol and Manchester areas of the UK in 2006 yielded 5,440 respondents. The survey assessed willingness to attend classes of strength and balance training (SBT), carry out SBT at home, or accept suppo...

  7. Personalized Primary Care for Older People: An evaluation of a multicomponent nurse-led care program

    OpenAIRE

    Bleijenberg, N.

    2013-01-01

    Providing optimal care for the increasing number of frail older people with complex care needs is a major challenge in primary care. The current approach is reactive and does not meet the needs of older patients, resulting in unnecessary loss of daily functioning, suboptimal quality of life and high health care expenditures. In the Utrecht Proactive Frailty Intervention Trial (U-PROFIT, in Dutch:’ Om U’), we designed and evaluated a strategy for proactive patient-centred primary care of frail...

  8. Life-space mobility assessment in older people in Finland; measurement properties in winter and spring.

    OpenAIRE

    Portegijs, Erja; Iwarsson, Susanne; Rantakokko, Merja; Viljanen, Anne; Rantanen, Taina

    2014-01-01

    Background: Life-space mobility refers to the spatial area an individual moves through, the frequency and need for assistance. Based on the assumption that measurement scale properties are context-specific, we tested the scale distribution, responsiveness, and reproducibility of the 15-item University of Alabama at Birmingham Study of Aging Life-Space Assessment in older people in Finland, specifically accounting for season. Methods: Community-dwelling older men and women in...

  9. Medication administration errors for older people in long-term residential care

    OpenAIRE

    Szczepura Ala; Wild Deidre; Nelson Sara

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Older people in long-term residential care are at increased risk of medication prescribing and administration errors. The main aim of this study was to measure the incidence of medication administration errors in nursing and residential homes using a barcode medication administration (BCMA) system. Methods A prospective study was conducted in 13 care homes (9 residential and 4 nursing). Data on all medication administrations for a cohort of 345 older residents were recorde...

  10. Multidimensional structure of the Groningen Frailty Indicator in community-dwelling older people

    OpenAIRE

    Bielderman, A.; Schans, C. van der; Lieshout, M.R. van; Greef, M.H. de; Boersma, F.; Krijnen, W.P.; Steverink, N.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Due to the rapidly increasing number of older people worldwide, the prevalence of frailty among older adults is expected to escalate in coming decades. It is crucial to recognize early onset symptoms to initiate specific preventive care. Therefore, early detection of frailty with appropriate screening instruments is needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the underlying dimensionality of the Groningen Frailty Indicator (GFI), a widely used self-report screening instrument fo...

  11. Eating and drinking interventions for people at risk of lacking decision-making capacity: who decides and how?

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, G; Galbraith, Sarah; Woodward, Jeremy; Holland, Anthony; Barclay, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Some people with progressive neurological diseases find they need additional support with eating and drinking at mealtimes, and may require artificial nutrition and hydration. Decisions concerning artificial nutrition and hydration at the end of life are ethically complex, particularly if the individual lacks decision-making capacity. Decisions may concern issues of life and death: weighing the potential for increasing morbidity and prolonging suffering, with potentially shortenin...

  12. Improving access to optometry services for people at risk of preventable sight loss: a qualitative study in five UK locations

    OpenAIRE

    Leamon, S.; Hayden, C.; Lee, H; Trudinger, D.; Appelbee, E.; Hurrell, D.-L.; Richardson, I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Reducing preventable sight loss is an increasing priority for public health and health care providers. We examined the factors affecting people's use of optometry services in population groups at increased risk of sight loss. Methods This is a qualitative study in five UK locations. In England, participants were from the Pakistani and Black Caribbean communities; in Scotland from the Pakistani community; and in Northern Ireland and Wales from white socio-economically deprived commu...

  13. Early signs of mobility decline and physical activity counseling as a preventive intervention in older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna Regina

    The purpose of this study was to examine the early signs of mobility decline and falls in older people. In addition, the effects of physical activity counseling on the development of mobility limitation in an older community-dwelling population were studied. Data from two larger studies were used......: Screening and Counseling for Physical activity and Mobility among Older People, SCAMOB, a 2-year single-blinded randomized controlled trial (n=632) with a 1.5-year post-intervention follow-up, focused on 75 to 81-year-old community-dwelling people and the FITSA study, a 3-year prospective observational......-up for 1 year with daily fall calendars. Self-reported preclinical mobility limitation and fall history increased the risk of manifest mobility limitation and future falls. A single individualized physical activity counseling session with a supportive phone contact every 4 months for 2 years had a...

  14. The social positioning of older people living with Alzheimer's disease who scream in long-term care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbonnais, Anne; Ducharme, Francine

    2015-11-01

    This article describes the social positioning of older people living with Alzheimer's disease who scream in a long-term care home. Few studies have focused on the social positions taken by older people, their family and formal caregivers during interaction and their effects on screams. A secondary data analysis was conducted using Harré and Van Langenhove's positioning theory. The results show that older people are capable of positioning and repositioning themselves in relational patterns. Family and formal caregivers position older people who scream according to their beliefs about their lived experience. They also react emotionally to older people and try to influence their behaviors. Understanding the social positioning of older people with Alzheimer's disease brought out their capacities and their caregivers' concerns for their well-being. Interventions should focus on these strengths and on promoting healthy relations in the triads to enhance quality of care in long-term care homes. PMID:24339123

  15. UNEMPLOYMENT AND SOCIAL EXCLUSION OF YOUNG PEOPLE IN CROATIA: PERSPECTIVE OF UNEMPLOYED YOUTH AT RISK OR WITH BEHAVIOUR DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivex Koller-Trbović

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Main goal of this paper is to provide insight into perspective of unemployed youth at risk or with potential risks in enviroment, aboutstatus and experiance of being unemployed. Krounauer model of social excluasion was taken as the base for interpretation of riskfactors related to unemployment. Mentioned model is defi ned with six dimesions: exclusion from labour market, economic exclusion,social isolation, institutional exclusion, spatial and cultural exclusion. Five focus groups with 19 unemployed youth (age from 18 to27 years from 4 cities in Croatia and from two types of institutions (croatian employment service and center for social welfare havebeen conducted. Results implicate that unemployment represents important factor for integration and independence of youth, andrelevant risk factor especially for economical exclusion. However, result shows that unemployment does not lead to social isolation asthird key dimesion in social exclusion model. These results are, to some extant, similar to results in other countries in EU, especiallyin south-east European countries (Italy, Spain, Greecee where research results show that unemployment do not neccessarily leads tosocial exclusion due to the strong family and friends support. Results can be used for the creation of public strategies in coping withrisk of (longterm youth unemployment and also with risk of their social exclusion.

  16. Understanding gender differences in older people's attitudes towards life-prolonging medical technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Arber, S; Vandrevala, T; Daly, T; Hampson, S.

    2008-01-01

    The power of medical technologies to extend the final stages of life has heightened the need to understand what factors influence older people's wish to use such medical technologies. We analyse gender differences in such views, based on audio-recorded interviews with 33 men and 36 women (aged 65-93) in south-east England. Older women were twice as likely as men to Oppose using medical technologies to extend life. More older women voiced 'other-oriented' reasons for their opposition, particul...

  17. Cost-effectiveness of Occupational Therapy in Older People: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Hirofumi; Tomori, Kounosuke; Ohno, Kanta; Takahashi, Kayoko; Yamauchi, Keita

    2016-06-01

    A systematic review of the cost-effectiveness of occupational therapy for older people was conducted. MEDLINE, CINAHL, Web of Science, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, OT seeker and unpublished trials registers were searched. Reference lists of all potentially eligible studies were searched with no language restrictions. We included trial-based full economic evaluations that considered both costs and outcomes in occupational therapy for older people compared with standard care (i.e. other therapy) or no intervention. We reviewed each trial for methodological quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool and assessed the quality of economic evaluations using a Drummond checklist. In the results of this review, we included five eligible studies (1-5) that were randomized controlled trials with high-quality economic evaluation. Two studies were full economic evaluations of interventions for fall prevention (1 and 2); two studies were full economic evaluations of preventive occupational therapy interventions (3 and 4; one was a comparison of an occupational therapy group with a social work group); one study was a full economic evaluation of occupational therapy for individuals with dementia (5). Two of the studies (one was preventive occupational therapy [3] and the other was occupational therapy for dementia [5]) found a significant effect and confirmed the cost-effectiveness of occupational therapy for older people compared with the control group. These studies found that occupational therapy for older people was clinically effective and cost-effective in comparison with standard care or other therapies. With reference to their clinical implication, these intervention studies (using a client-centred approach) suggested potentially cost-effective means to motivate clients to maintain their own health. However, this review has limitations because of the high heterogeneity of the reviewed studies on full economic evaluations of occupational therapy for older people. Future

  18. Older white people's experiences of giving care to or receiving care from their children / Sonia S. Howes

    OpenAIRE

    Howes, Sonia S

    2013-01-01

    Social and demographic changes have a tremendous effect on the care for older people to the effect that caring for older people might have become a rare commodity. Increased life expectancy during the past century has prolonged the period in which older people need care and has made family care giving an increasingly recurrent activity for adult children. After the demolition of the apartheid area in South Africa, most research focused on previously disadvantaged groups, namely Black and Brow...

  19. Beyond health and well-being: transformation, memory and the virtual in older people's music and dance

    OpenAIRE

    Kate Wakeling; Jonathan Clark

    2015-01-01

    Research exploring older people and the participatory arts has tended to focus on notions of biomedical impact, often coupled with appeals to evasive notions of "well-being." Rather than suggesting such approaches are invalid, this article proposes the need for their extension and proposes an alternative, critical approach to analysing older people's experience of arts participation. Based on ethnographic participant observation and intensive consultation with a cohort of older people engaged...

  20. Challenges to conducting research with older people living in nursing homes

    OpenAIRE

    Higginson Irene J; Longhurst Susan; Hall Sue

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Although older people are increasingly cared for in nursing homes towards the end of life, there is a dearth of research exploring the views of residents. There are however, a number of challenges and methodological issues involved in doing this. The aim of this paper is to discuss some of these, along with residents' views on taking part in a study of the perceptions of dignity of older people in care homes and make recommendations for future research in these settings. M...

  1. Diabetic retinopathy in people aged 70 years or older. The Oulu Eye Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hirvela, H.; Laatikainen, L

    1997-01-01

    AIMS—To evaluate the presence and severity of diabetic retinopathy and the value of retinopathy screening in people aged 70 years or older.
METHODS—In a population based study on 500 of 560 eligible (89%) people aged 70 years or older, signs of diabetic retinopathy were evaluated through dilated pupils by an ophthalmologist using photographic and/or ophthalmoscopic methods.
RESULTS—23% of the study population (113/500) had diabetes mellitus. Signs of diabetic retinopathy were found in 24 peop...

  2. Older People and Mobile Communication in Two European Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireia FERNÁNDEZ-ARDÈVOL

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the relationships seniors have with mobile communications in two different European contexts, Romania and Catalonia. By means of a qualitative approach, we describe the ways older individuals incorporate mobile phones in everyday life communication practices, and the motivations supporting these decisions. To understand motivations for using a given communication device –as the mobile phone– we took into account the channels individual has access to; individual’s personal interest on using available devices in everyday communications; the location of the members of the individual’s personal network; and the pricing system that determines the cost of mediated communication. The empirical analysis is based on two case studies conducted in Romania and in the metropolitan area of Barcelona (Catalonia in different moments, between 2010 and 2012. Participants were 60 years old or over. Information was gathered by means of semi-structured interviews that were recorded and transcribed, while a common methodological design allows an enriched insight. Besides gender, we take into account heterogeneity of ageing for a more nuanced analysis. This paper constitutes the first step in the exploration of common trends in the relationship seniors have with mobile communication in different European countries.

  3. Enhancing Connectedness Through Peer Training for Community-Dwelling Older People: A Person Centred Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmeister, Oliver K; Bernoth, Maree; Dietsch, Elaine; Cleary, Michelle

    2016-06-01

    Social interaction and connectedness is important to the mental health and wellbeing of older people. The aim of this research study was to facilitate and increase opportunities for social connectedness for older people living in regional areas through the use of technology training. Weekly technology training sessions were conducted at a Seniors Citizen's Club with a peer trainer (an experienced, retired computer teacher) and sessions were attended not only by the six study participants, but also by other club members, with up to 15 club members participating in sessions. Data analysis involved all documents generated by the project, including the individual interviews, researcher observations of training sessions, reports from the peer trainer and weekly diaries maintained by participants. Findings demonstrated that computer training at the Senior Citizens Club helped participants build group cohesion and to form tiered connections with partners, family, and friends with whom they no longer live. When the trainer is seen as a peer, and training is person-centred, older people are more receptive to learning, exploring, and experimenting with technology. Although only six people were involved in the in-depth evaluation part of the study, voluntary training with the trainer in the absence of any funding continues even to this present time. The outcome of this research reinforces the potential for technology facilitated tiered connectivity to enhance the quality of life for older people living in regional and rural Australia. PMID:27050818

  4. A Pilot Physical Activity Initiative to Improve Mental Health Status amongst Iranian Institutionalized Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Matlabi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sufficient level of physical activity may promote overall and mental health of old people. This study was carried out to investigate the practicability of a physical activity promotion initiative amongst institutionalized older people in Tabriz, Iran. Methods: Purposive sampling method was used in this semi-experimental study to recruit 31 older people living in a selected residential care in Tabriz. Moderate-intensity aerobic and muscle-strengthening activity was planned for those who had not severe baseline cognitive impairment or were not too frail to undertake the survey. The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 was used to measure mental health status before and after intervention through a face-to-face interview. Descriptive statistics, Wilkcoxon rank-sum, Mann–Whitney U and Chi-Square tests were employed to analyses the data. Results: The applied intervention was significantly improved status of physical health, anxiety and insomnia, social dysfunction and severe depression. Conclusion: Incorporation of physical activity promotion programs into routines of older people residential care homes in Iran is feasible but may need training of physical activity specialists to work with older people based on their physical endurance and limitations.

  5. Knowledge and attitudes of radiation therapists and undergraduate students towards older people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Rapidly changing demographics worldwide mean that there will be a significant increase in the number of older cancer patients requiring radiation therapy treatment in the coming decades. Education is regarded as a key factor in addressing attitudes towards older people among healthcare professionals and has been proven to influence the quality of care received. To our knowledge, there is only one previous study specifically in relation to radiation therapists (RTs), and this included a small sample of RTs. The aim of this study was to investigate the knowledge and attitudes of RTs and RT students towards older people. Methods: A cross-sectional survey design was used, consisting of: 1) demographics, 2) knowledge and 3) attitudes. Knowledge was assessed using the Facts of Aging Quiz (FAQ), while Kogan's Attitude towards Old People (KAOP) Scale was used to assess attitudes. The study population included radiation therapists (RTs) working in Ireland and undergraduate students. Results: Mean knowledge scores in this study were recorded as 11.82 (SD = 3.07)for RTs and 12.17 (SD = 2.55) for students out of a possible 24, i.e. 49% and 51%, respectively. Average attitude scores were documented as 126.12 (SD = 10.06) for RTs and 125.30 (SD = 10.28) for RT students, out of a possible 170 i.e. 74% for both qualified RTs and students. There were no significant differences between students and qualified RTs in relation to both knowledge and attitude scores. Only 44% of RTs stated that their undergraduate degree equipped them with the necessary skills to deal effectively with older patients. Conclusion: RTs have a prominent role in the provision of care to cancer patients, the majority of whom are aged 65 and older. Provision of optimal care to older people undergoing radiotherapy will require “age attuning” of the profession, both at undergraduate and postgraduate level. The findings of this research indicate that RTs and RT students have average

  6. Effects of intensive home visiting programs for older people with poor health status: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelemans Patricia

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Home visiting programs have been developed aimed at improving the health and independent functioning of older people. Also, they intend to reduce hospital and nursing home admission and associated cost. A substantial number of studies have examined the effects of preventive home visiting programs on older people living in the community; the findings have been inconsistent. The objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness of intensive home visiting programs targeting older people with poor health or otherwise with functional impairments. Methods A search for literature was based on included trials from four reviews on the effectiveness of home visits published after 2000 and on a database search of Cinahl, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase, Medline and PsycINFO from 2001 onwards. We also manually searched reference lists from potentially relevant papers. Randomized controlled trials were included assessing the effectiveness of intervention programs consisting of at least four home visits per year, an intervention duration of 12 months or more, and targeting older people (aged 65 years and over with poor health. Two reviewers independently abstracted data from full papers on program characteristics and outcome measures; they also evaluated the methodological quality. Results The search identified 844 abstracts; eight papers met the inclusion criteria. Seven trials were of sufficient methodological quality; none of the trials showed a significant favorable effect for the main analysis comparing the intervention group with the control group on mortality, health status, service use or cost. The inclusion of less-intensive intervention programs for frail older persons would not have exerted a great influence on the findings of our review. Conclusion We conclude that home visiting programs appear not to be beneficial for older people with poor health within the health care setting of Western

  7. The Home-Based Older People's Exercise (HOPE trial: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forster Anne

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frailty is common in older age, and is associated with important adverse health outcomes including increased risk of disability and admission to hospital or long-term care. Exercise interventions for frail older people have the potential to reduce the risk of these adverse outcomes by increasing muscle strength and improving mobility. Methods/Design The Home-Based Older People's Exercise (HOPE trial is a two arm, assessor blind pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT to assess the effectiveness of a 12 week exercise intervention (the HOPE programme designed to improve the mobility and functional abilities of frail older people living at home, compared with usual care. The primary outcome is the timed-up-and-go test (TUGT, measured at baseline and 14 weeks post-randomisation. Secondary outcomes include the Barthel Index of activities of daily living (ADL, EuroQol Group 5-Dimension Self-Report Questionnaire (EQ-5D quality of life measure and the geriatric depression scale (GDS, measured at baseline and 14 weeks post-randomisation. We will record baseline frailty using the Edmonton Frail Scale (EFS, record falls and document muscle/joint pain. We will test the feasibility of collection of data to identify therapy resources required for delivery of the intervention. Discussion The HOPE trial will explore and evaluate a home-based exercise intervention for frail older people. Although previous RCTs have used operationalised, non-validated methods of measuring frailty, the HOPE trial is, to our knowledge, the first RCT of an exercise intervention for frail older people that includes a validated method of frailty assessment at baseline. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN57066881

  8. Age, gender and disability predict future disability in older people: The Rotterdam Study

    OpenAIRE

    Koes Bart W; Hofman Albert; Bierma-Zeinstra Sita MA; Steyerberg Ewout W; Taş Ümit; Verhagen Arianne P

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background To develop a prediction model that predicts disability in community-dwelling older people. Insight in the predictors of disability is needed to target preventive strategies for people at increased risk. Methods Data were obtained from the Rotterdam Study, including subjects of 55 years and over. Subjects who had complete data for sociodemographic factors, life style variables, health conditions, disability status at baseline and complete data for disability at follow-up we...

  9. ‘Keeping going’: chronic joint pain in older people who describe their health as good

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Jane C.; GRIME, JANET C.; Ong, Bie Nio

    2013-01-01

    It is common for people with chronic conditions to report their health as good, although models of healthy ageing do not account for this. The concept of successful ageing focuses on overcoming problems, in contrast to the concept of resilience, which can acknowledge vulnerability. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the main cause of joint pain in older people, but research in this area has tended to focus on OA as an illness. Consequently, our research aimed to explore OA from the perspective of wellnes...

  10. Involving older people in research: practical considerations when using the authenticity criteria in constructivist inquiry

    OpenAIRE

    Brown Wilson, Christine; Clissett, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this paper is to identify practical suggestions that could enable other researchers to consider how quality may be evidenced using constructivist principles including the perspectives of older people and their caregivers. Background Constructivism suggests that reality is part of a social construction, which holds different meanings for each person, in which people are active agents, making autonomous decisions. This approach to research has been identified as sui...

  11. Involving older people in research: practical considerations when using the authenticity criteria in constructivist inquiry

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Christine Brown; Clissett, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this paper is to identify practical suggestions that could enable other researchers to consider how quality may be evidenced using constructivist principles including the perspectives of older people and their caregivers. Background Constructivism suggests that reality is part of a social construction, which holds different meanings for each person, in which people are active agents, making autonomous decisions. This approach to research has been identified as suitable for ...

  12. Medication Regimen Complexity and Polypharmacy as Factors Associated With All-Cause Mortality in Older People

    OpenAIRE

    Wimmer, Barbara C.; Bell, J Simon; Fastbom, Johan; Wiese, Michael D; Johnell, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate whether medication regimen complexity and/or polypharmacy are associated with all-cause mortality in older people. Methods: This was a population-based cohort study among community-dwelling and institutionalized people ≥60 years old (n = 3348). Medication regimen complexity was assessed using the 65-item Medication Regimen Complexity Index (MRCI) in 10-unit steps. Polypharmacy was assessed as a continuous variable (number of medications). Mortality data were obtaine...

  13. What do older people value when they visit their general practitioner? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinowicz, Ludmila; Pawlikowska, Teresa; Oleszczyk, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Older patients see their general practitioners (GPs) relatively often and so recognition of their preferences can lead to improvement of quality of care in general practice. This study aimed to identify which aspects of GPs' behaviour are the most important for older people in their assessment of the quality of their visits and to explore the application of Jung's taxonomy differentiating task and affective behaviour in this context. A qualitative approach to generating data was chosen. We conducted semi-structured interviews with a sample of 30 patients aged 65 and older using GP services in two demographically diverse big cities in Poland. Participants were interviewed in 2010 according to a pre-determined topic guide. This research showed that older people assess both 'task performance' and 'affective performance' behaviours of general practitioners. There were nearly twice as many patient comments concerning affective performance behaviour relative to task performance behaviour. Older people expect that their physicians will be demonstrably friendly, kind, able to joke and have enough time for the consultation. PMID:25431547

  14. Revisiting the Role of Neighbourhood Change in Social Exclusion and Inclusion of Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria F. Burns

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To explore how older people who are “aging in place” are affected when the urban neighbourhoods in which they are aging are themselves undergoing socioeconomic and demographic change. Methods. A qualitative case study was conducted in two contrasting neighbourhoods in Montréal (Québec, Canada, the analysis drawing on concepts of social exclusion and attachment. Results. Participants express variable levels of attachment to neighbourhood. Gentrification triggered processes of social exclusion among older adults: loss of social spaces dedicated to older people led to social disconnectedness, invisibility, and loss of political influence on neighbourhood planning. Conversely, certain changes in a disadvantaged neighbourhood fostered their social inclusion. Conclusion. This study thus highlights the importance of examining the impacts of neighbourhood change when exploring the dynamics of aging in place and when considering interventions to maintain quality of life of those concerned.

  15. Revisiting the role of neighbourhood change in social exclusion and inclusion of older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Victoria F; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Rose, Damaris

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To explore how older people who are "aging in place" are affected when the urban neighbourhoods in which they are aging are themselves undergoing socioeconomic and demographic change. Methods. A qualitative case study was conducted in two contrasting neighbourhoods in Montréal (Québec, Canada), the analysis drawing on concepts of social exclusion and attachment. Results. Participants express variable levels of attachment to neighbourhood. Gentrification triggered processes of social exclusion among older adults: loss of social spaces dedicated to older people led to social disconnectedness, invisibility, and loss of political influence on neighbourhood planning. Conversely, certain changes in a disadvantaged neighbourhood fostered their social inclusion. Conclusion. This study thus highlights the importance of examining the impacts of neighbourhood change when exploring the dynamics of aging in place and when considering interventions to maintain quality of life of those concerned. PMID:22013528

  16. Risk factors for aspiration pneumonia in frail older people: a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maarel-Wierink, C.D. van der; Vanobbergen, J.N.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Schols, J.M.; Baat, C. de

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the risks for aspiration pneumonia in frail older people and the contribution of bad oral health among the risk factors. DESIGN: Systematic literature review. SETTING: PubMed (Medline), Web of Science, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and CINAHL were searched for eligibl

  17. Using Actor-Network Theory to Understanding Virtual Community Networks of Older People Using the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Lepa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Older people around the world are adopting the Internet at an increasing rate, and in the process are forming virtual community networks in a way that would not otherwise have been possible. Internet interactions by this group include e-mail, chat groups, community forums and discussion groups as well as the individual use of the Web for information purposes. Some of these virtual networks relate older people to other older people, while other networks span age groups as when, for instance, a grandmother communicates by e-mail with her grandchildren. But linking to the Internet is not always straightforward as family members, friends and the technology, along with other non-human actors, often intrude. This highlights the socio-technical nature of these networks and the need to investigate them in a way that allows this to be seen. To attempt an understanding of the formation and operation of virtual networks of older people, and the interactions involved, a socio-technical approach is required and this paper will attempt such an analysis based on research, in an Australian context, undertaken by the authors.

  18. Practical problems with medication use that older people experience : A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notenboom, Kim; Beers, Erna; Van Riet-Nales, Diana A.; Egberts, Toine C G; Leufkens, Hubert G M; Jansen, Paul A F; Bouvy, Marcel L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To identify the practical problems that older people experience with the daily use of their medicines and their management strategies to address these problems and to determine the potential clinical relevance thereof. Design Qualitative study with semistructured face-to-face interviews.

  19. Employment Status and Perceived Health Status in Younger and Older People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krokavcova, Martina; Nagyova, Iveta; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Gavelova, Miriam; Middel, Berrie; Gdovinova, Zuzana; Groothoff, Johan W.; van Dijk, Jitse P.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores how employment is associated with perceived physical and mental health status in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) adjusted for sociodemographic and clinical variables stratified by age. The sample consisted of 184 MS patients divided into a younger (less than 45 years) and an older (greater than or equal to 45 years) age…

  20. Medication use in residential care for older people with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Medication administration may appear to be a 'simple' nursing task, but this audit published in Learning Disability Practice found that, due to a combination of multiple medication use and medical complexity in older people with learning disabilities, it can be more complicated than staff realise. PMID:27573967

  1. Learning, Identity and Citizenship: Researching Older People's Use of ICT in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossan, Beth; Martin, Ian; Whittaker, Susan

    Information and communication technology (ICT) within the lifelong learning agenda has the potential to maintain or activate citizenship, in both social and political terms, among older people in a Scottish context. Within recent government documents at both the United Kingdom and the Scottish level, the aims of the two major traditions of…

  2. Should there be Specific Policies to Protect the Welfare of Older People in Britain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flourish Itulua-Abumere

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Older people have always been a major focus for social policy and because the UK is an ageing society, their importance to the subject is likely to increase further. Like other modern welfare systems, the British welfare state originated in pension provision for older people and totally this group are the main users of the health and social services and the main recipients of social security spending. Compared with unemployed people and lone parents, older people are often viewed as a group that “deserves” specific social policy and especially, social security. However, it is sometimes said that the true test of a civilized society is how it treats its older and vulnerable groups. Despite this group's position as one of the most deserving of welfare, there are still widespread awareness of the many negative images of old age. In common with other western societies, Britain is a country in which age discrimination, or ageism, is widespread (Alcock et al, 2006.

  3. Ageing, Leisure, and Social Connectedness: How could Leisure Help Reduce Social Isolation of Older People?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toepoel, Vera

    2013-08-01

    This study investigates the relation between leisure activities and the social status of the elderly based on a heterogeneous sample of the Dutch population. Close relationships are also analyzed to identify which people could serve as successful stimulators of leisure participation. The social profile confirms that older people have fewer social contacts and often feel lonely. This study shows that leisure activities explain a significant part of older people's social connectedness. Voluntary work, cultural activities, holiday, sports, reading books, hobbies and shopping are found to be successful predictors for social connectedness of older people. Watching TV, listening to the radio, and spending time behind the computer (passive activities) were not associated with social connectedness. Friends correlate positively to participation in leisure activities. Partners play a role in participation in cultural activities and sports; parents play a role in participation in voluntary work and holidays; siblings play a role in voluntary work and sports; and children play a role in cultural activities, reading books, and shopping. Local communities can use these close relationships and develop special programs to increase social connectedness and hence improve quality of life for older adults. PMID:23874058

  4. Beyond Thresholds: The Everyday Lived Experience of the House by Older People

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felix, E.; Haan, de H.; Vaandrager, L.; Koelen, M.

    2015-01-01

    To support decision making regarding modifications to the current housing stock, this article explores older people's everyday lived experience of the house in the Netherlands. Twelve in-depth interviews were carried out, using diaries and a topic list. The study found physical, personal and social

  5. Reliability of Six Physical Performance Tests in Older People With Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankevoort, Christiaan G.; van Heuvelen, Marieke J. G.; Scherder, Erik J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Physical performance tests are important for assessing the effect of physical activity interventions in older people with dementia, but their psychometric properties have not been systematically established within this specific population. Objective. The purpose of this study was to dete

  6. Municipal health expectancy in Japan: decreased healthy longevity of older people in socioeconomically disadvantaged areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takano Takehito

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about small-area variation in healthy longevity of older people and its socioeconomic correlates. This study aimed to estimate health expectancy at 65 years (HE65 at the municipal level in Japan, and to examine its relation to area socio-demographic conditions. Methods HE65 of municipalities (N = 3361 across Japan was estimated by a linear regression formula with life expectancy at 65 years and the prevalence of those certificated as needing nursing care. The relation between HE65 and area socio-demographic indicators was examined using correlation coefficients. Results The estimated HE65 (years ranged from 13.13 to 17.39 for men and from 14.84 to 20.53 for women. HE65 was significantly positively correlated with the proportion of elderly and per capita income, and negatively correlated with the percentage of households of a single elderly person, divorce rate, and unemployment rate. These relations were stronger in large municipalities (with a population of more than 100,000 than in small and medium-size municipalities. Conclusion A decrease in healthy longevity of older people was associated with a higher percentage of households of a single elderly person and divorce rate, and lower socioeconomic conditions. This study suggests that older people in urban areas are susceptible to socio-demographic factors, and a social support network for older people living in socioeconomically disadvantaged conditions should be encouraged.

  7. The involvement of Spanish older people in nondegree educational programs: reasons for and barriers to participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Feliciano; Celdrán, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the reasons older Spanish people participate in nondegree educational programs and the barriers they may face when they want to do so. Data were drawn from the 2007 Survey on Adults' Involvement in Learning Activities (Encuesta sobre la Participación de la Población Adulta en Actividades de Aprendizaje: EADA) and correspond to a nationally representative sample of Spanish people aged between 60 and 74 years old (n=4,559). Overall, only 8.7% of the sample participated in a nondegree educational program. Predictors of participation were being a woman, being younger, having a higher educational level, and being employed. The most frequent reason given for participation was of an intrinsic nature (e.g., interest in the topic), although instrumental motives (e.g., utility of the content for daily life) were more common than suggested by previous research. As for barriers to participation, the vast majority of older people (95.6% of those who did not participate) did not even express a desire to participate. The most frequent barriers were internal (e.g., age/health restrictions). This kind of barrier was ascribed a greater importance by older and less educated groups as well as by those who participate less in cultural activities. Policies to promote older people's participation in nonformal educational activities are discussed in light of the data. PMID:25010657

  8. Knowledge and attitudes of health care science students toward older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milutinović Dragana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Education of health science students in geriatrics is important in order to provide optimal care for the growing number of elderly people because it is the attitudes of health professionals toward the elderly that play the key role in the quality of care provided. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes of health care science students towards ageing and care for the elderly. Material and Methods. The present cross-sectional study was carried out on a sample of 130 students (medical, nursing and special education and rehabilitation of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Novi Sad. The students were divided into two groups. The first group (E included students having been taught geriatrics and nursing older adults and the other group (C included students who had not been trained in this subject. The authors used Palmore’s facts on Ageing Quiz for the knowledge evaluation and Kogan’s Attitude toward Older People Scale for the attitude evaluation. Results. The results of Facts on Aging Quiz showed the average level of students’ knowledge and statistically significant difference between E and C group. The analysis of Kogan’s Attitudes toward Old People Scale showed that both groups had neutral attitudes toward older people. Furthermore, a positive correlation between students’ knowledge and attitudes was found. Conclusion. There is increasing evidence on the correlation between education, knowledge and attitudes toward older people which suggests that by acquiring better insights into all aspects of ageing through their education the students develop more positive attitudes and interest in working with older adults.

  9. BMI and obesity incidence in relation to food patterns of Polish older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadolowska, L.; Danowska-Oziewicz, M.; Niedzwiedzka, E.;

    2006-01-01

    BMI differentiation and obesity incidence in relation to food patterns of Polish older people were analysed. The research included 422 people aged 65+ years. 21 food patterns were separated by the factor analysis. On the basis of the self-reported body mass and height, the BMI and percentages of...... overweight or obese people were calculated. The increase of the BMI and overweight and obesity incidence for both sexes was unequivocally connected with eating rye. The increase of the BMI and overweight and obesity incidence depended among women on consuming pork meat and alcoholic beverages. For men the...

  10. 'Keeping going': chronic joint pain in older people who describe their health as good.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jane C; Grime, Janet C; Ong, Bie Nio

    2014-09-01

    It is common for people with chronic conditions to report their health as good, although models of healthy ageing do not account for this. The concept of successful ageing focuses on overcoming problems, in contrast to the concept of resilience, which can acknowledge vulnerability. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the main cause of joint pain in older people, but research in this area has tended to focus on OA as an illness. Consequently, our research aimed to explore OA from the perspective of wellness. We undertook a longitudinal qualitative study to explore 'wellness and resilience' in a group of older people who reported chronic joint pain and considered themselves healthy. We interviewed 27 people and followed them up with monthly diary sheets, responding to reports of changes using their chosen contact method. This article focuses on how resilience relates to how people consider themselves to be well. Participants' experience of the adversity of their pain varied, and was influenced by context and meaning. Participants described 'keeping going' in body, mind and everyday life. Flexibility and pragmatism were key aspects of keeping going. The findings support a broader version of resilience that incorporates vulnerabilities. In the context of health care we suggest that treating the frail body should not come at the expense of undermining an older person's sense of a resilient self. PMID:25067864

  11. Physical Performance Is Associated with Working Memory in Older People with Mild to Severe Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Volkers

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Physical performances and cognition are positively related in cognitively healthy people. The aim of this study was to examine whether physical performances are related to specific cognitive functioning in older people with mild to severe cognitive impairment. Methods. This cross-sectional study included 134 people with a mild to severe cognitive impairment (mean age 82 years. Multiple linear regression was performed, after controlling for covariates and the level of global cognition, with the performances on mobility, strength, aerobic fitness, and balance as predictors and working memory and episodic memory as dependent variables. Results. The full models explain 49–57% of the variance in working memory and 40–43% of episodic memory. Strength, aerobic fitness, and balance are significantly associated with working memory, explaining 3–7% of its variance, irrespective of the severity of the cognitive impairment. Physical performance is not related to episodic memory in older people with mild to severe cognitive impairment. Conclusions. Physical performance is associated with working memory in older people with cognitive impairment. Future studies should investigate whether physical exercise for increased physical performance can improve cognitive functioning. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NTR1482.

  12. The psychometric properties of the older people's quality of life questionnaire, compared with the CASP-19 and the WHOQOL-OLD

    OpenAIRE

    Ann Bowling

    2009-01-01

    Purpose. To present the psychometric properties of a new measure of quality of life in older age, the Older People's Quality of Life (OPQOL) Questionnaire, compared with the CAPSE-19 and the WHOQOL-OLD. Design and Methods. The vehicle was three national population surveys of older people living at home in Britain, including a survey of ethnically diverse older people. Results. The OPQOL had acceptable levels of reliability and validity in British population samples of older people, but mo...

  13. Don't Stop Me Now! A Report on the Lifelong Learning Needs of Older People in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    AONTAS The National Adult Learning Organisation, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The overall aim of the research which informs this report is to examine the extent to which the learning needs of older people are understood and addressed within the adult and community education sector, and to explore how adult educators can be supported to develop innovative approaches and processes which engage older people in learning and…

  14. Independence, institutionalization, death and treatment costs 18 months after rehabilitation of older people in two different primary health care settings

    OpenAIRE

    Johansen Inger; Lindbak Morten; Stanghelle Johan K; Brekke Mette

    2012-01-01

    Background The optimal setting and content of primary health care rehabilitation of older people is not known. Our aim was to study independence, institutionalization, death and treatment costs 18 months after primary care rehabilitation of older people in two different settings. Methods Eighteen months follow-up of an open, prospective study comparing the outcome of multi-disciplinary rehabilitation ...

  15. A cross-sectional study on person-centred communication in the care of older people: the COMHOME study protocol.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hafskjold, L.; Sundler, A.J.; Holmström, I.K.; Sundling, V.; Dulmen, S. van; Eide, H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This paper presents an international cross-sectional study on person-centred communication with older people receiving healthcare (COMHOME). Person-centred care relies on effective communication, but few studies have explored this with a specific focus on older people. The main aim of

  16. A cross-sectional study on person-centred communication in the care of older people: the COMHOME study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hafskjold, L.; Sundler, A.J.; Holmstrom, I.K.; Sundling, V.; Dulmen, S. van; Eide, H.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This paper presents an international cross-sectional study on person-centred communication with older people receiving healthcare (COMHOME). Person-centred care relies on effective communication, but few studies have explored this with a specific focus on older people. The main aim of

  17. The Characteristics of Older People Who Engage in Community Music Making, Their Reasons for Participation and the Barriers They Face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallam, Susan; Creech, Andrea; Varvarigou, Maria; McQueen, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    There is now an accepted need for initiatives that support older people's health and well-being. There is increasing evidence that active engagement with music has the potential to contribute to this. This research aimed to explore the characteristics of older people who participated in active music making with a view to identifying the groups…

  18. Consequences of lower extremity and trunk muscle fatigue on balance and functional tasks in older people: A systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Helbostad Jorunn L; Sturnieks Daina L; Menant Jasmine; Delbaere Kim; Lord Stephen R; Pijnappels Mirjam

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Muscle fatigue reduces muscle strength and balance control in young people. It is not clear whether fatigue resistance seen in older persons leads to different effects. In order to understand whether muscle fatigue may increase fall risk in older persons, a systematic literature review aimed to summarize knowledge on the effects of lower extremity and trunk muscle fatigue on balance and functional tasks in older people was performed. Methods Studies were identified with se...

  19. Use of hypnotics in older people with mental illness: a systematic study of tolerability and use in different diagnostic groups

    OpenAIRE

    Curran, Stephen; Turner, Debbie; Musa, Shabir; Byrne, Andrew; Wattis, John

    2007-01-01

    Aims The objective of the study was to provide observational clinical data on psychotropic drugs and especially hypnotics used in older people with mental illness. Method This was an observational, single-centre, one-week prevalence study of psychiatric symptoms, disorders and psychotropic/hypnotic drug use in older people with mental illness cared for by the South West Yorkshire Mental Health NHS Trust (Wakefield Locality), UK. Results A total of 593/660 older patients with mental i...

  20. Joy, Exercise, Enjoyment, Getting out: A Qualitative Study of Older People's Experience of Cycling in Sydney, Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Alexis Zander; Erin Passmore; Chloe Mason; Chris Rissel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Cycling can be an enjoyable way to meet physical activity recommendations and is suitable for older people; however cycling participation by older Australians is low. This qualitative study explored motivators, enablers, and barriers to cycling among older people through an age-targeted cycling promotion program. Methods. Seventeen adults who aged 50–75 years participated in a 12-week cycling promotion program which included a cycling skills course, mentor, and resource pack...

  1. A validation of the ICECAP-O in a population of post-hospitalized older people in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Makai, Peter; Koopmanschap, Marc; Brouwer, Werner; Nieboer, Anna

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Various healthcare and social services may impact not only health, but wellbeing as well. Such effects may be more fully captured by capability-wellbeing instruments than with Health-related Quality of Life (HrQol) instruments. The aim of this study is to validate the ICEpop (Investigating Choice Experiments for the Preferences of Older People) CAPability measure for Older people (ICECAP-O) capability wellbeing instrument in a population of post-hospitalized older peop...

  2. A Web—Based Respondent Driven Sampling Pilot Targeting Young People at Risk for Chlamydia Trachomatis in Social and Sexual Networks with Testing: A Use Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Theunissen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the aim of targeting high-risk hidden heterosexual young people for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT testing, an innovative web-based screening strategy using Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS and home-based CT testing, was developed, piloted and evaluated. Methods: Two STI clinic nurses encouraged 37 CT positive heterosexual young people (aged 16–25 years, called index clients, to recruit peers from their social and sexual networks using the web-based screening strategy. Eligible peers (young, living in the study area could request a home-based CT test and recruit other peers. Results: Twelve (40% index clients recruited 35 peers. Two of these peers recruited other peers (n = 7. In total, 35 recruited peers were eligible for participation; ten of them (29% requested a test and eight tested. Seven tested for the first time and one (13% was positive. Most peers were female friends (80%. Nurses were positive about using the strategy. Conclusions: The screening strategy is feasible for targeting the hidden social network. However, uptake among men and recruitment of sex-partners is low and RDS stopped early. Future studies are needed to explore the sustainability, cost-effectiveness, and impact of strategies that target people at risk who are not effectively reached by regular health care.

  3. Meanings of at-homeness at end-of-life among older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarnio, Lotta; Boström, Anne-Marie; Gustavsson, Petter; Öhlén, Joakim

    2016-06-01

    Maintaining the well-being of older people who are approaching the end-of-life has been recognised as a significant aspect of well-being in general. However, there are few studies that have explicitly focused on at-homeness among older people. This study aims to illuminate meanings of at-homeness among older people with advancing illnesses. Twenty men and women, aged 85 or older, with advancing illnesses and who lived in their own homes, in nursing homes or in short-term nursing homes in three urban areas of Sweden were strategically sampled in the study. Data were generated in narrative interviews, and the analysis was based on a phenomenological hermeneutical method. After obtaining a naïve understanding and conducting structural analyses, two aspects of the phenomenon were revealed: at-homeness as being oneself and at-homeness as being connected. At-homeness as being oneself meant being able to manage ordinary everyday life as well as being beneficial to one's life. At-homeness as being connected meant being close to significant others, being in affirming friendships and being in safe dependency. Here, at-homeness is seen as a twofold phenomenon, where being oneself and being connected are interrelated aspects. Being oneself and being connected are further interpreted by means of the concepts of agency and communion, which have been theorised as two main forces of the human being. PMID:26058734

  4. Improvement in the physiological function and standing stability based on kinect multimedia for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Chen

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The increase in the Taiwanese older population is associated with age-related inconveniences. Finding adequate and simple physical activities to help the older people maintaining their physiological function and preventing them from falls has become an urgent social issue. [Subjects and Methods] This study aimed to design a virtual exercise training game suitable for Taiwanese older people. This system will allow for the maintenance of the physiological function and standing stability through physical exercise, while using a virtual reality game. The participants can easily exercise in a carefree, interactive environment. This study will use Kinect for Windows for physical movement detection and Unity software for virtual world development. [Results] Group A and B subjects were involved in the exercise training method of Kinect interactive multimedia for 12 weeks. The results showed that the functional reach test and the unipedal stance test improved significantly. [Conclusion] The physiological function and standing stability of the group A subjects were examined at six weeks post training. The results showed that these parameters remained constant. This proved that the proposed system provide substantial support toward the preservation of the Taiwanese older people' physiological function and standing stability. PMID:27190480

  5. Usability and acceptability of a website that provides tailored advice on falls prevention activities for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Samuel R; Yardley, Lucy

    2009-03-01

    This article presents the usability and acceptability of a website that provides older people with tailored advice to help motivate them to undertake physical activities that prevent falls. Views on the website from interviews with 16 older people and 26 sheltered housing wardens were analysed thematically. The website was well received with only one usability difficulty with the action plan calendar. The older people selected balance training activities out of interest or enjoyment, and appeared to carefully add them into their current routine. The wardens were motivated to promote the website to their residents, particularly those who owned a computer, had balance problems, or were physically active. However, the participants noted that currently a minority of older people use the Internet. Also, some older people underestimated how much activity was enough to improve balance, and others perceived themselves as too old for the activities. PMID:19218310

  6. Adverse drug reactions in older patients during hospitalisation: are they predictable?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Marie N

    2012-11-01

    adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major cause of morbidity and healthcare utilisation in older people. The GerontoNet ADR risk score aims to identify older people at risk of ADRs during hospitalisation. We aimed to assess the clinical applicability of this score and identify other variables that predict ADRs in hospitalised older people.

  7. Catastrophic Health Care Expenditure among Older People with Chronic Diseases in 15 European Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenijevic, Jelena; Pavlova, Milena; Rechel, Bernd; Groot, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It is well-known that the prevalence of chronic diseases is high among older people, especially those who are poor. Moreover, chronic diseases can result in catastrophic health expenditure. The relationship between chronic diseases and their financial burden on households is thus double-sided, as financial difficulties can give rise to, and result from, chronic diseases. Our aim was to examine the levels of catastrophic health expenditure imposed by private out-of-pocket payments among older people diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases and cancer in 15 European countries. Methods The SHARE dataset for individuals aged 50+ and their households, collected in 2010–2012 was used. The total number of participants included in this study was N = 51,661. The sample consisted of 43.8% male and 56.2% female participants. The average age was 67 years. We applied an instrumental variable approach for binary instrumented variables known as a treatment-effect model. Results We found that being diagnosed with diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases was associated with catastrophic health expenditure among older people even in comparatively wealthy countries with developed risk-pooling mechanisms. When compared to the Netherlands (the country with the lowest share of out-of-pocket payments as a percentage of total health expenditure in our study), older people diagnosed with diabetes mellitus in Portugal, Poland, Denmark, Italy, Switzerland, Belgium, the Czech Republic and Hungary were more likely to experience catastrophic health expenditure. Similar results were observed for diagnosed cardiovascular diseases. In contrast, cancer was not associated with catastrophic health expenditure. Discussion Our study shows that older people with diagnosed chronic diseases face catastrophic health expenditure even in some of the wealthiest countries in Europe. The effect differs across chronic diseases and countries. This may be due to different socio

  8. The health and well-being of older people in Nairobi's slums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Kyobutungi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Globally, it is estimated that people aged 60 and over constitute more than 11% of the population, with the corresponding proportion in developing countries being 8%. Rapid urbanisation in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA, fuelled in part by rural–urban migration and a devastating HIV/AIDS epidemic, has altered the status of older people in many SSA societies. Few studies have, however, looked at the health of older people in SSA. This study aims to describe the health and well-being of older people in two Nairobi slums. Methods: Data were collected from residents of the areas covered by the Nairobi Urban Health and Demographic Surveillance System (NUHDSS aged 50 years and over by 1 October 2006. Health status was assessed using the short SAGE (Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health form. Mean WHO Quality of Life (WHOQoL and a composite health score were computed and binary variables generated using the median as the cut-off. Logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with poor quality of life (QoL and poor health status. Results: Out of 2,696 older people resident in the NUHDSS surveillance area during the study period, data were collected on 2,072. The majority of respondents were male, aged 50–60 years. The mean WHOQoL score was 71.3 (SD 6.7 and mean composite health score was 70.6 (SD 13.9. Males had significantly better QoL and health status than females and older respondents had worse outcomes than younger ones. Sex, age, education level and marital status were significantly associated with QoL, while slum of residence was significantly associated with health status. Conclusion: The study adds to the literature on health and well-being of older people in SSA, especially those in urban informal settlements. Further studies are needed to validate the methods used for assessing health status and to provide comparisons from other settings. Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems have the potential to conduct such

  9. Patterns of comorbidity in community-dwelling older people hospitalised for fall-related injury: A cluster analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Community-dwelling older people aged 65+ years sustain falls frequently; these can result in physical injuries necessitating medical attention including emergency department care and hospitalisation. Certain health conditions and impairments have been shown to contribute independently to the risk of falling or experiencing a fall injury, suggesting that individuals with these conditions or impairments should be the focus of falls prevention. Since older people commonly have multiple conditions/impairments, knowledge about which conditions/impairments coexist in at-risk individuals would be valuable in the implementation of a targeted prevention approach. The objective of this study was therefore to examine the prevalence and patterns of comorbidity in this population group. Methods We analysed hospitalisation data from Victoria, Australia's second most populous state, to estimate the prevalence of comorbidity in patients hospitalised at least once between 2005-6 and 2007-8 for treatment of acute fall-related injuries. In patients with two or more comorbid conditions (multicomorbidity) we used an agglomerative hierarchical clustering method to cluster comorbidity variables and identify constellations of conditions. Results More than one in four patients had at least one comorbid condition and among patients with comorbidity one in three had multicomorbidity (range 2-7). The prevalence of comorbidity varied by gender, age group, ethnicity and injury type; it was also associated with a significant increase in the average cumulative length of stay per patient. The cluster analysis identified five distinct, biologically plausible clusters of comorbidity: cardiopulmonary/metabolic, neurological, sensory, stroke and cancer. The cardiopulmonary/metabolic cluster was the largest cluster among the clusters identified. Conclusions The consequences of comorbidity clustering in terms of falls and/or injury outcomes of hospitalised patients should be investigated by

  10. Patterns of comorbidity in community-dwelling older people hospitalised for fall-related injury: A cluster analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finch Caroline F

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-dwelling older people aged 65+ years sustain falls frequently; these can result in physical injuries necessitating medical attention including emergency department care and hospitalisation. Certain health conditions and impairments have been shown to contribute independently to the risk of falling or experiencing a fall injury, suggesting that individuals with these conditions or impairments should be the focus of falls prevention. Since older people commonly have multiple conditions/impairments, knowledge about which conditions/impairments coexist in at-risk individuals would be valuable in the implementation of a targeted prevention approach. The objective of this study was therefore to examine the prevalence and patterns of comorbidity in this population group. Methods We analysed hospitalisation data from Victoria, Australia's second most populous state, to estimate the prevalence of comorbidity in patients hospitalised at least once between 2005-6 and 2007-8 for treatment of acute fall-related injuries. In patients with two or more comorbid conditions (multicomorbidity we used an agglomerative hierarchical clustering method to cluster comorbidity variables and identify constellations of conditions. Results More than one in four patients had at least one comorbid condition and among patients with comorbidity one in three had multicomorbidity (range 2-7. The prevalence of comorbidity varied by gender, age group, ethnicity and injury type; it was also associated with a significant increase in the average cumulative length of stay per patient. The cluster analysis identified five distinct, biologically plausible clusters of comorbidity: cardiopulmonary/metabolic, neurological, sensory, stroke and cancer. The cardiopulmonary/metabolic cluster was the largest cluster among the clusters identified. Conclusions The consequences of comorbidity clustering in terms of falls and/or injury outcomes of hospitalised patients

  11. Evaluating a mental health assessment for older people with depressive symptoms in general practice: a randomised controlled trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Arthur, Antony J; Jagger, Carol; Lindesay, James; Matthews, Ruth J

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a lack of evidence on the most effective primary care management of older people with minor depression. AIM: To evaluate a follow-up assessment by the community mental health team (CMHT) for older people with depressive symptoms identified by practice nurses at a health check for people over the age of 75 years. DESIGN OF STUDY: A pragmatic randomised controlled trial. SETTING: A single large general practice in Leicestershire. METHOD: Patients receiving a health check ad...

  12. Nocturnal Enuresis in Older People: Where Is the Evidence and What Are the Gaps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Megan; Gibson, William; Hunter, Kathleen F; Chambers, Thane; Wagg, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    While there is extensive literature regarding nocturnal enuresis in children and young adults, relatively little research explores this problem in older people. This scoping review sought to identify knowledge gaps and provide research direction specifically for older, institutionalized adults with nocturnal enuresis. A comprehensive search of 8 electronic databases and the gray literature was undertaken. Studies focusing on the causes, symptoms, and treatment of nocturnal enuresis in older people were retrieved. A broad search strategy including all adults was employed in order to capture all relevant publications. Articles were then excluded by title and abstract such that only those relevant to the older adult and institutionalized populations remained. Relevant articles were identified by title and language. Further reading of the abstract allowed inclusion and a final full reading of the articles allowed all authors to map research activity and identify knowledge gaps. After duplicates and nonrelevant articles were eliminated, we identified 7 articles on nursing home residents and 2 involving older people living in psychiatric institutions. Published literature focused on causes and treatment with either desmopressin or aversive behavioral therapy. No study included a comprehensive continence assessment or controlled for comorbid conditions. Identified gray literature focused on general continence information for the public and nonspecialist clinicians. We conclude that there is a dearth of evidence relevant to this troublesome condition. Gaps in the evidence base include a lack of standardized terminology and limited research focusing on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of nocturnal enuresis, all of which suggest a rich research agenda for future investigation. PMID:27196686

  13. Interventions to promote physical activity in older people with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazlina eShariff-Ghazali

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM among people aged 60 years and above is a growing public health problem. Regular physical activity is one of the key elements in the management of T2DM. Recommendations suggest that older people with T2DM will benefit from regular physical activity for better disease control and delaying complications. Despite the known benefits, many remain sedentary. Hence, this review assessed interventions for promoting physical activity in persons aged 65 years and older with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: A literature search was conducted using OvidMEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, SPORTDiscus and CINAHL databases to retrieve articles published between January 2000 and December 2012. Randomised controlled trials and quasi-experimental designs comparing different strategies to increase physical activity level in persons aged 65 years and older with T2DM were included. The methodological quality of studies was assessed.Results: Twenty-one eligible studies were reviewed, only six studies were rated as good quality and only one study specifically targeted persons aged 65 years and older. Personalised coaching, goal setting, peer support groups, use of technology and physical activity monitors were proven to increase the level of physical activity. Incorporation of health behaviour theories and follow-up supports also were successful strategies. However, the methodological quality and type of interventions promoting physical activity of the included studies in this review varied widely across the eligible studies.Conclusion: Strategies that increased level of physical activity in persons with T2DM are evident but most studies focused on middle-aged persons and there was a lack of well-designed trials. Hence, more studies of satisfactory methodological quality with interventions promoting physical activity in older people are required.

  14. Later endogenous circadian temperature nadir relative to an earlier wake time in older people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, J. F.; Dijk, D. J.; Klerman, E. B.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    The contribution of the circadian timing system to the age-related advance of sleep-wake timing was investigated in two experiments. In a constant routine protocol, we found that the average wake time and endogenous circadian phase of 44 older subjects were earlier than that of 101 young men. However, the earlier circadian phase of the older subjects actually occurred later relative to their habitual wake time than it did in young men. These results indicate that an age-related advance of circadian phase cannot fully account for the high prevalence of early morning awakening in healthy older people. In a second study, 13 older subjects and 10 young men were scheduled to a 28-h day, such that they were scheduled to sleep at many circadian phases. Self-reported awakening from scheduled sleep episodes and cognitive throughput during the second half of the wake episode varied markedly as a function of circadian phase in both groups. The rising phase of both rhythms was advanced in the older subjects, suggesting an age-related change in the circadian regulation of sleep-wake propensity. We hypothesize that under entrained conditions, these age-related changes in the relationship between circadian phase and wake time are likely associated with self-selected light exposure at an earlier circadian phase. This earlier exposure to light could account for the earlier clock hour to which the endogenous circadian pacemaker is entrained in older people and thereby further increase their propensity to awaken at an even earlier time.

  15. Nutritional Intervention as part of Functional Rehabilitation in Older People with reduced functional ability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Dent, Elsa; Baldwin, Christine

    2016-01-01

    randomised controlled trials (RCTs) published between 2007 and 2014 with the aim of determining whether nutritional intervention combined with rehabilitation benefited older people with reduced functional ability. Six electronic databases were searched. RCTs including people aged 65 years and older with...... reduced physical, social and/or cognitive function were included. PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines were followed, and gradepro computer software (http://gradepro.org) was used for the quality assessment of critical and important outcomes. Included...... body weight, hand-grip strength or muscle strength. There was no difference between groups in the critical outcomes; balance, cognition, activities of daily living and mortality at long-term follow-up. Nutritional intervention given with functional rehabilitation was associated with an increased...

  16. Assessing the skills of home care workers in helping older people take their prescribed medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Elizabeth E J

    2015-08-01

    The Southern Health and Social Care Trust in Northern Ireland applied a modified version of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) to assess the skills of home care workers in assisting older people taking prescribed medications. In Northern Ireland, home care workers are care workers employed by health and social care trusts or private agencies. The application of the model has developed the skills of this staff group, improved the relationship between the commissioner and provider, significantly reduced the time spent by community nurses in individual training and assessment, and enhanced the patient experience for those taking medication. Overall, the application of this model has provided assurances to the Trust board, the executive director of nursing, and operational directors that home care workers are competent in assisting older people in this high-risk activity. PMID:26252238

  17. Barriers to healthy eating: Findings from the focus groups with older people and children/adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazbare, Laura; Bech-Larsen, Tino

      Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify barriers to healthy eating among older people and children/adolescents. Method: Four focus groups; two with older people and two with children/adolescents were conducted in Denmark. The focus groups were moderated to discuss the experienced or...... potential behavioural change in terms of healthier eating, discussing pre-selected healthy and unhealthy food categories. The revised Social Cognitive Theory was used as a theoretical framework. Results: The study suggests that the main obstacles to change can be grouped into motivational and implementation...... barriers. The motivational barriers are unwillingness to change eating habits, satisfaction with current diets and misconception about their healthiness; relatively low health consciousness and unwillingness to become excessively health-oriented. Implementation barriers include remembering the change...

  18. Liminal homes: Older people, loss of capacities, and the present future of living spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibing, Annette; Guberman, Nancy; Wiles, Janine

    2016-04-01

    There are many studies that have examined the meaning of home for older people. In this article, our aim is to add the concept of 'liminal homes' to the existing discussion: While the concept of liminal homes can be applied to a number of 'interim spaces', we focus in our study, on those older people who have to consider, or are concretely confronted with, the need to move into another living space, because of declining health. Based on interviews and photo-elicitation with 26 older lower-income seniors living in Montreal, Québec, this article demonstrates the complexity of liminality and analyzes the dynamics of this process, composed of a web of interrelated and often dichotomous elements. These include the idealized home in contrast to (sometimes imagined) institutions; declining health as opposed to the ideals of active aging and third age; and the widely promoted concept of aging in place versus the reality of being 'stuck in place' due to limited resources. The strategies employed by these older Quebeckers to remain in this state and resist a move to another living space, are the often arduous construction of a 'patchwork of care'. PMID:27131274

  19. Personal goals and changes in life-space mobility among older people

    OpenAIRE

    Saajanaho, Milla; Rantakokko, Merja; Portegijs, Erja; Törmäkangas, Timo; Eronen, Johanna; Tsai, Li-Tang; Jylhä, Marja; Rantanen, Taina

    2015-01-01

    Objective Life-space mobility – the spatial extent of mobility in daily life – is associated with quality of life and physical functioning but may also be influenced by future orientation expressed in personal goals. The aim of this study was to explore how different personal goals predict changes in older people's life-space mobility. Methods This prospective cohort study with a 2-year follow-up included 824 community-dwelling people aged 75 to 90 years from the municipalities of...

  20. Depression in older people : meeting the challenges of an ageing population

    OpenAIRE

    Raeburn, Alison Somers

    2014-01-01

    This thesis has been conducted in part fulfilment of the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology. It comprises two parts: a systematic review and an empirical research study. These are two distinct articles both aiming to provide insight into the challenges of late life depression. Firstly, the ageing population will mean that mental health services are likely to see an increase in older people with depression, many of whom will have neurological conditions common in late life, inc...

  1. Costs and economic consequences of a help-at-home scheme for older people in England

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Annette; Knapp, Martin; Wistow, Gerald; Perkins, Margaret; King, Derek; Iemmi, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Solutions to support older people to live independently and reduce the cost of an ageing population are high on the political agenda of most developed countries. Help-at-home schemes offer a mix of community support with the aim to address a range of wellbeing needs. However, not much is currently known about the costs, outcomes and economic consequences of such schemes. Understanding their impact on individuals’ wellbeing and the economic consequences for local and central government can con...

  2. Plantar pressure analysis of accommodative insole in older people with metatarsalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Bao-Chi; Liu, Ding-Hao; Chang, Jeffrey Liao; Lee, Si-Huei; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Foot pain frequently reduces physical activity and increases the risk of falls in older people. In current orthotic management of forefoot pain, metatarsal padding is the main strategy to reduce metatarsal pressure. However, pressure reductions are usually diverse and limited. The multi-step accommodative insole is fabricated by sequential foam padding on Plastazote under dynamic accommodation in daily walking. The aims of this study were to investigate the effectiveness and mechanisms of accommodative insole on plantar pressure redistribution in older people with metatarsalgia. The study was conducted on 21 old outpatients with moderate to severe metatarsalgia, using the ethylene vinyl acetate control, 9-mm flat Plastazote, and accommodative insoles with and without metatarsal and arch support. Outcome measures included pressure-related variables measured by a Pedar-X system, and pain scores assessed with a 0-10 Visual Analog Scale. The accommodative insole significantly decreased peak pressure under the metatarsal heads by 47.2% (p<0.001) and the pain scores from 8.2 to 1.1 (p<0.001). Plantar pressure analyses indicated that the effects of dynamic metatarsal contouring and cushioning on reducing peak pressure were greater than those of metatarsal padding. The temporo-spatial relationships between the toe and metatarsal head can assist in explaining an elevated metatarsal pressure and higher risk of falls in older people with toe deformities. The multi-step insole is simple in orthotic fabrication and ensures an even distribution of plantar pressure loading in walking. It can effectively relieve metatarsalgia and help to preserve regular walking activity for older people with metatarsalgia. PMID:24119776

  3. A comprehensive geriatric assessment screening questionnaire (CGA-GOLD) for older people undergoing treatment for cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Whittle, AK; Kalsi, Tania; Babic-Illman, G; Wang, Yanzhong; Fields, Paul; Ross, Paul; Maisey, Nick; Hughes, Simon; Kwan, WH; Harari, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Oncology services do not routinely assess broader needs of older people with cancer. This study evaluates a comprehensive geriatric assessment and comorbidity screening questionnaire (CGA-GOLD) covering evidence-based domains and quality of life (EORTC-QLQ-C30). Patients aged 65+ attending oncology services were recruited into (1) Observational cohort (completed CGA-GOLD, received standard oncology care), (2) Intervention cohort (responses categorised ‘low-risk’, ‘high-risk’, ‘possible need’ ...

  4. Interventions to improve the appropriate use of polypharmacy for older people

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, Susan M; Cadogan, Cathal A.; Kerse, Ngaire; Cardwell, Chris R.; Bradley, Marie C; Ryan, Cristin; Hughes, Carmel

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundInappropriate polypharmacy is a particular concern in older people and is associated with negative health outcomes. Choosing the best interventions to improve appropriate polypharmacy is a priority, hence interest in appropriate polypharmacy, where many medicines may be used to achieve better clinical outcomes for patients, is growing.ObjectivesThis review sought to determine which interventions, alone or in combination, are effective in improving the appropriate use of polypharmacy...

  5. Older people's perspectives on an elderly-friendly hospital environment: an exploratory study

    OpenAIRE

    Karki S; Bhatta DN; Aryal UR

    2015-01-01

    Sushmita Karki,1 Dharma Nand Bhatta,1,2 Umesh Raj Aryal3 1Department of Public Health, Nobel College, Pokhara University, Kathmandu, Nepal; 2Faculty of Medicine, Epidemiology Unit, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, Thailand; 3Department of Community Medicine, Kathmandu Medical College, Kathmandu, Nepal Background: Many older people are vulnerable with multiple health problems and need of extensive care and support for quality of life. The main objective of this study was to explore the...

  6. Older people's perspectives on an elderly-friendly hospital environment: an exploratory study

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatta, Dharma Nand

    2015-01-01

    Sushmita Karki,1 Dharma Nand Bhatta,1,2 Umesh Raj Aryal3 1Department of Public Health, Nobel College, Pokhara University, Kathmandu, Nepal; 2Faculty of Medicine, Epidemiology Unit, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, Thailand; 3Department of Community Medicine, Kathmandu Medical College, Kathmandu, Nepal Background: Many older people are vulnerable with multiple health problems and need of extensive care and support for quality of life. The main objective of this study was to explore the...

  7. A survey of local health promotion initiatives for older people in Wales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Nefyn H

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the demographic profile of the UK changes, policy makers and practitioners have to respond to health challenges presented by a progressively ageing population. The health promotion plan for older people, aged over 50 years, in Wales included eight key areas: physical activity, healthy eating, home safety and warmth, emotional health, health protection, smoking, alcohol and sexual health. The aim of this study was to describe the extent, content and regional variation of existing health promotion initiatives for older people in Wales, provided by statutory, voluntary and private sector agencies. Method A questionnaire was sent to senior health promotion specialists employed in the 22 local authority areas in Wales to ascertain details of all projects promoting health and wellbeing in the eight key areas where the priority population was aged over 50, or the majority of users were older people. Additional information was sought from project leads and websites. Results Eighteen questionnaires were returned; not all were fully completed. Four areas did not return a questionnaire. Additional information was obtained from internet searches but this mainly concerned national initiatives rather than local projects. In all, 120 projects were included, 11 were throughout Wales. Best provision was for physical activity, with 3 national and 42 local initiatives, but local provision was patchy. Healthy eating, and home safety and warmth had far fewer initiatives, as did health protection, which comprised two national immunisation campaigns. Smoking and alcohol misuse were poorly provided for, and there was no provision for older people's sexual health. Evaluation arrangements were poorly described. Half of those who responded identified unmet training needs. Conclusion The reasons for patchy provision of services were not clear. Increased efforts to improve the coverage of interventions known to be effective should be made. Rigorous

  8. Effective health care for older people living and dying in care homes: a realist review

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, Claire; Dening, Tom; Gordon, Adam L.; Davies, Susan L.; Meyer, Julienne; Martin, Finbarr C; Gladman, John R F; Bowman, Clive; Victor, Christina; Handley, Melanie; Gage, Heather; Iliffe, Steve; ZUBAIR, MARIA

    2016-01-01

    Background Care home residents in England have variable access to health care services. There is currently no coherent policy or consensus about the best arrangements to meet these needs. The purpose of this review was to explore the evidence for how different service delivery models for care home residents support and/or improve wellbeing and health-related outcomes in older people living and dying in care homes. Methods We conceptualised models of health care provision to care homes as comp...

  9. A Prospective Analysis of Elevated Fasting Glucose Levels and Cognitive Function in Older People

    OpenAIRE

    Euser, Sjoerd M; Sattar, Naveed; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Bollen, Eduard L. E. M.; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Hofman, Albert; Perry, Ivan J; Breteler, Monique M. B.; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.; . .

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the relationship between fasting glucose levels, insulin resistance, and cognitive impairment in old age. Diabetes is associated with cognitive impairment in older people. However, the link between elevated fasting glucose levels and insulin resistance in nondiabetic individuals, and the risk of cognitive impairment is unclear. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We analyzed data from, in total, 8,447 participants in two independent prospective studies: the PROspective Study ...

  10. Nutritional status among older people : Risk factors and consequences of malnutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Söderström, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Despite the high frequency and serious consequences of protein–energy malnutrition, prevention and treatment of malnutrition do not currently receive appropriate attention. Increased awareness of the importance of nutritional screening among older people is needed. The overall aim of this thesis was to extend our current knowledge about malnutrition and the consequences of a poor nutritional status in relation to preterm death, and to identify possible risk factors for developing malnutrition...

  11. Nutritional status predicts preterm death in older people : a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Söderström, Lisa; Rosenblad, Andreas; Adolfsson, Eva Thors; Saletti, Anja; Bergkvist, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Background & aims: There is an association between malnutrition and mortality. However, it is uncertain whether this association is independent of confounders. The aim of the present study was to examine whether nutritional status, defined according to the three categories in the full Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) instrument, is an independent predictor of preterm death in people 65 years and older. Methods: This prospective cohort study included individuals aged >= 65 years who we...

  12. The design of a purpose-built exergame for fall prediction and prevention for older people

    OpenAIRE

    Marston, Hannah R.; Woodbury, Ashley; Gschwind, Yves J; Kroll, Michael; Fink, Denis; Eichberg, Sabine; Kreiner, Karl; Ejupi, Andreas; Annegarn, Janneke; de Rosario, Helios; Wienholtz, Arno; Wieching, Rainer; Delbaere, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Background Falls in older people represent a major age-related health challenge facing our society. Novel methods for delivery of falls prevention programs are required to increase effectiveness and adherence to these programs while containing costs. The primary aim of the Information and Communications Technology-based System to Predict and Prevent Falls (iStoppFalls) project was to develop innovative home-based technologies for continuous monitoring and exercise-based prevention of falls in...

  13. Gaps in the Family Networks of Older People in Three Indonesian Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Kreager, P; Schröder-Butterfill, E.

    2007-01-01

    Family networks are widely assumed to be a key source of support for older people in Indonesia and Southeast Asia more generally, although empirical study of their composition and functioning is in its infancy. This paper draws on ethnographic and survey data collected in longitudinal research of ageing in three rural Indonesian communities, in order to identify demographic and social factors limiting the size of elders’ networks. Gaps in networks commonly emerge as a result of childlessness,...

  14. Self-perceived health in functionally independent older people: associated factors

    OpenAIRE

    Machón, Mónica; Vergara, Itziar; Dorronsoro, Miren; Vrotsou, Kalliopi; Larrañaga, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Background Self-perceived health (SPH) is a powerful indicator of the health status of elderly people. This issue has been widely studied in oldest populations considering altogether functionally independent and dependent individuals. The objective of this study was to describe SPH and to identify the main factors that have an impact on SPH in a sample of functionally independent community-dwelling older adults. Methods For this cross-sectional study, face-to-face interviews were carried out ...

  15. Prescribing of Psychoactive Drugs for Older People in Nursing Homes: An Analysis of Treatment Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, Catherine; McCormack, Brendan; Hughes, Carmel M

    2016-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest in how culture may affect the quality of healthcare services, and previous research has shown that ‘treatment culture’—of which there are three categories (resident centred, ambiguous and traditional)—in a nursing home may influence prescribing of psychoactive medications. Objective The objective of this study was to explore and understand treatment culture in prescribing of psychoactive medications for older people with dementia in nursing homes. Metho...

  16. Benzodiazepine discontinuation among community-dwelling older people: a population-based cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, J Simon; Lavikainen, Piia; Korhonen, Mikko; Hartikainen, Sirpa

    2010-01-01

    Benzodiazepine discontinuation among community-dwelling older people: a population-based cohort study fax: +358-171-62424 (Bell, J. Simon) (Bell, J. Simon) Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, University of Eastern Finland - P.O. Box 1627 - 70211 - Kuopio - FINLAND (Bell, J. Simon) Clinical Pharmacology and Geriatric Pharmacotherapy Unit, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Eastern Finland - Kuopio - FINLAND (Bell, J. Simon) ...

  17. Prevalence of depression among elderly on open care centers for older people

    OpenAIRE

    Vilma Karagianni; George Koulierakis; Christina Stylianopoulou; Fotoula Babatsikou; Charilaos Koutis

    2010-01-01

    Depression in the elderly is considered an important public health issue. Depression is the most common mental health problem among older people. It poses a critical impact on well-being and the quality of life of elderly and it is related with high expenses and great demand of health care services. Objective: To estimate the prevalence of depression among elderly in an urban area’s population and to investigate the aggravating and protective factors. Material and Method: The sample consisted...

  18. Symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Eckerblad, Jeanette; Theander, Kersti; Ekdahl, Anne; Unosson, Mitra; Wiréhn, Ann-Britt; Milberg, Anna; Krevers, Barbro; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2015-01-01

    Background: Globally, the population is ageing and lives with several chronic diseases for decades. A high symptom burden is associated with a high use of healthcare, admissions to nursing homes, and reduced quality of life. The aims of this study were to describe the multidimensional symptom profile and symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity, and to describe factors related to symptom burden. Methods: A cross-sectional study including 378 community-dwelling peo...

  19. Social support network to older people with depressive symptoms in a municipality of northeast in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Marta dos Reis; Vilela, Alba Benemérita Alves; Souza, Andréa dos Santos; Silva, Doane Martins da; Meira, Edméia Campos; Aguiar, Aline Cristiane de Souza Azevedo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Describe the sociodemographic profile of older people with depressive symptoms and their social support structure regarding the size, composition and degree of the elderly proximity with the network components. Method: Descriptive, transversal and quantitative study, conducted with 88 elderly, being used for data collection the Short Geriatric Depression Scale, Minimum Map of Social Relations and a form composed by sociodemographic questions. Results: Predominated ol...

  20. Spiritual belief, social support, physical functioning and depression among older people in Bulgaria and Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Coleman, Peter G.; Carare, Roxana O; Petrov, Ignat; Forbes, Elizabeth; Saigal, Anita; Spreadbury, John H.; Yap, Andrea; Kendrick, Tony

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: An exploratory investigation is reported into the role of spirituality and religious practice in protecting against depression among older people living in rural villages in Bulgaria and Romania, two neighbouring countries with similar cultural, political and religious histories, but with differing levels of current religiosity. Methods: In both countries, interviews were conducted with samples of 160 persons of 60 years and over in villages of similar socio-economic status. The H...

  1. An Example of Qualitative Research in Social Work with Older People: The History of Social Work in Old People’s Homes in Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Mali, Jana

    2011-01-01

    Social work with older people deals with improving their capacity and ability to face and resolve problems, and with raising awareness and encouraging their environment to maintain relational networks. Based on research regarding social work with older people this paper presents the historical aspect of older people’s position within the development of institutional care for older people in Slovenia. The paper attempts to show some characteristics of care in institutions for older...

  2. Comparison of older people and patients with frontal lesions: evidence from world list learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuss, D T; Craik, F I; Sayer, L; Franchi, D; Alexander, M P

    1996-09-01

    We examined the hypothesis that changes in memory performance of older normal participants are due to frontal lobe dysfunction by comparing three groups of normal individuals (young, middle-aged, and older) with three groups of patients who had documented lesions in specific frontal regions: unilateral right, unilateral left, and bilateral. All participants were given 4 successive learning trials on each of 3 lists of words: unrelated, related but presented in a pseudo-random order, and related and presented in a blocked format. We found significant correspondences in performance between the older normal participants and the (younger) frontal damaged groups. The qualitative nature of recall performance, particularly as measured by indices of organizational control processes, was similar between older normals and patients with frontal damage, particularly those with right frontal damage, but different from that normally exhibited by patients with focal limbic/memory dysfunction. These results add to the evidence that at least some of the decline in older people in tasks which measure executive or supervisory abilities is due to frontal system dysfunction. PMID:8893308

  3. Healthy Aging from the Perspectives of 683 Older People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Wallack

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this study was to determine what factors most greatly contributed to healthy aging with multiple sclerosis (MS from the perspective of a large sample of older people with MS. Design and Methods. Participants (n=683; >55 years of age with symptoms >20 years provided answers to an open-ended question regarding healthy aging and were categorized into three groups, 55–64 (young, 65–74 (middle, and 75 and over (oldest old. Sociodemographic actors were compared using ANOVA. Two independent raters used the framework method of analyzing qualitative data. Results. Participants averaged 64 years of age (±6.2 with MS symptoms for 32.9 years (±9.4. 531 participants were female (78%. The majority of participants lived in their own home (n=657 with a spouse or partner (n=483. Participants described seven themes: social connections, attitude and outlook on life, lifestyle choices and habits, health care system, spirituality and religion, independence, and finances. These themes had two shared characteristics, multidimensionality and interdependence. Implications. Learning from the experiences of older adults with MS can help young and middle aged people with MS plan to age in their own homes and communities. Our data suggests that older people with MS prioritize factors that are modifiable through targeted self-management strategies.

  4. Healthy Aging from the Perspectives of 683 Older People with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallack, Elizabeth M; Wiseman, Hailey D; Ploughman, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to determine what factors most greatly contributed to healthy aging with multiple sclerosis (MS) from the perspective of a large sample of older people with MS. Design and Methods. Participants (n = 683; >55 years of age with symptoms >20 years) provided answers to an open-ended question regarding healthy aging and were categorized into three groups, 55-64 (young), 65-74 (middle), and 75 and over (oldest old). Sociodemographic actors were compared using ANOVA. Two independent raters used the framework method of analyzing qualitative data. Results. Participants averaged 64 years of age (±6.2) with MS symptoms for 32.9 years (±9.4). 531 participants were female (78%). The majority of participants lived in their own home (n = 657) with a spouse or partner (n = 483). Participants described seven themes: social connections, attitude and outlook on life, lifestyle choices and habits, health care system, spirituality and religion, independence, and finances. These themes had two shared characteristics, multidimensionality and interdependence. Implications. Learning from the experiences of older adults with MS can help young and middle aged people with MS plan to age in their own homes and communities. Our data suggests that older people with MS prioritize factors that are modifiable through targeted self-management strategies. PMID:27504201

  5. ‘He wasn’t in that chair’: what loneliness means to widowed older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Mary Bennet

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We have little robust empirical evidence that articulates what being lonely means to older people and even less knowledge about what loneliness means to older widows and widowers; this article addresses that deficit. We undertook a re-analysis of 125 interviews with older people (aged 55-98 that explored their experiences of widowhood. In this article, we focus on those interviews in which participants described themselves as experiencing loneliness by the spontaneous use of terms such as ‘‘lonely’’, ‘‘loneliness’’ or ‘‘lonesome’’. Almost half of the participants (42% described themselves in that way without any prompting from the interviewer. In terms of understanding and describing the meaning of loneliness, 50% explained loneliness in terms of absence of either their spouse, a physical presence in the house or people. One-third (34% discussed loneliness in relation to time and place: night, weekends and home, and 4% described the emotional impact of loneliness. Fifteen per cent just said they were lonely without elaboration, assuming a common understanding of what loneliness means. Our findings suggest that widowed people’s understanding and experience of loneliness resonates with the concept of ‘‘emotional’’ loneliness, resulting from the loss of significant social and emotional attachment. This has important implications for the types of interventions that may be appropriate for remediating loneliness in this group.

  6. Self-reported diabetes in older people: comparison of prevalences and control measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Rizzato Stopa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to analyze the prevalence of diabetes in older people and the adopted control measures. METHODS Data regarding older diabetic individuals who participated in the Health Surveys conducted in the Municipality of Sao Paulo, SP, ISA-Capital, in 2003 and 2008, which were cross-sectional studies, were analyzed. Prevalences and confidence intervals were compared between 2003 and 2008, according to sociodemographic variables. The combination of the databases was performed when the confidence intervals overlapped. The Chi-square (level of significance of 5% and the Pearson’s Chi-square (Rao-Scott tests were performed. The variables without overlap between the confidence intervals were not tested. RESULTS The age of the older adults was 60-69 years. The majority were women, Caucasian, with an income of between > 0.5 and 2.5 times the minimum salary and low levels of schooling. The prevalence of diabetes was 17.6% (95%CI 14.9;20.6 in 2003 and 20.1% (95%CI 17.3;23.1 in 2008, which indicates a growth over this period (p at the limit of significance. The most prevalent measure adopted by the older adults to control diabetes was hypoglycemic agents, followed by diet. Physical activity was not frequent, despite the significant differences observed between 2003 and 2008 results. The use of public health services to control diabetes was significantly higher in older individuals with lower income and lower levels of education. CONCLUSIONS Diabetes is a complex and challenging disease for patients and the health systems. Measures that encourage health promotion practices are necessary because they presented a smaller proportion than the use of hypoglycemic agents. Public health policies should be implemented, and aimed mainly at older individuals with low income and schooling levels. These changes are essential to improve the health condition of older diabetic patients.

  7. An evaluative study of the benefits of participating in intergenerational playgroups in aged care for older people

    OpenAIRE

    Skropeta, C Margaret; Colvin, Alf; Sladen, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Background Intergenerational playgroups in aged care are limited and little is known about the perceptions of individuals who have participated in such programs. Most research is focused on intergenerational programs that involved two generations of people – young people and older people or young people and people with dementia reported the significant outcomes for each group of participants. In this study a number of generations participated in the intergenerational playgroup intervention th...

  8. Eliciting older people's preferences for exercise programs: a best-worst scaling choice experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia R Franco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Question: What relative value do older people with a previous fall or mobility-related disability attach to different attributes of exercise? Design: Prospective, best-worst scaling study. Participants: Two hundred and twenty community-dwelling people, aged 60 years or older, who presented with a previous fall or mobility-related disability. Methods: Online or face-to-face questionnaire. Outcome measures: Utility values for different exercise attributes and levels. The utility levels were calculated by asking participants to select the attribute that they considered to be the best (ie, they were most likely to want to participate in programs with this attribute and worst (ie, least likely to want to participate. The attributes included were: exercise type; time spent on exercise per day; frequency; transport type; travel time; out-of-pocket costs; reduction in the chance of falling; and improvement in the ability to undertake tasks inside and outside of home. Results: The attributes of exercise programs with the highest utility values were: home-based exercise and no need to use transport, followed by an improvement of 60% in the ability to do daily tasks at home, no costs, and decreasing the chances of falling to 0%. The attributes with the lowest utility were travel time of 30 minutes or more and out-of-pocket costs of AUD50 per session. Conclusion: The type of exercise, travel time and costs are more highly valued by older people than the health benefits. These findings suggest that physical activity engagement strategies need to go beyond education about health benefits and focus on improving accessibility to exercise programs. Exercise that can be undertaken at or close to home without any cost is most likely to be taken up by older people with past falls and/or mobility-related disability. [Franco MR, Howard K, Sherrington C, Ferreira PH, Rose J, Gomes JL, Ferreira ML (2015 Eliciting older people's preferences for exercise programs: a best

  9. Using Structured Observation and Content Analysis to Explore the Presence of Older People in Public Fora in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Nosowska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a lack of research on the everyday lives of older people in developing countries. This exploratory study used structured observation and content analysis to examine the presence of older people in public fora and considered the methods’ potential for understanding older people’s social integration and inclusion. Structured observation occurred of public social spaces in six cities each located in a different developing country and in one city in the United Kingdom, together with content analysis of the presence of people in newspaper pictures and on television in the selected countries. Results indicated that across all fieldwork sites and data sources, there was a low presence of older people, with women considerably less present than men in developing countries. There was variation across fieldwork sites in older people’s presence by place and time of day and in their accompanied status. The presence of older people in images drawn from newspapers was associated with the news/non-news nature of the source. The utility of the study’s methodological approach is considered, as is the degree to which the presence of older people in public fora might relate to social integration and inclusion in different cultural contexts.

  10. Perceptions of effective relationships in an institutional care setting for older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Roos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The relocation of older people to residential facilities has implications for their relationships.Research purpose: This article reports older residents’ perceptions of effective relationships.Motivation for the study: Effective relationships protect against loneliness and depression and contribute to well-being. The facility was identified by a social worker as a showcase for effective relationships, but it was not clear what these consist of.Research approach, design and method: The World Café, a qualitative, participatory action research method, was applied to an economically deprived, urban facility caring for older people in Gauteng, South Africa. Three positively framed questions elicited perceptions from participants (nine men, ten women, aged 65–89. Visual and textual data were obtained and thematically analysed until saturation had been achieved. Themes were then subjected to deductive direct content analysis in terms of Self-Interactional Group Theory (SIGT.Main findings: Older residents perceive care managers as friendly and trustworthy and co-residents as caring. Care managers were seen as flexible, empathetic and congruent leaders and they confirmed residents. Relationships between residents were parallel-defined with relational qualities such as empathy and unconditional acceptance. Residents’ needs for privacy were honoured and they felt confirmed. Group dynamics were underpinned by caring and a stimulating environment provided opportunities for engagement.Practical/managerial implications: Relationships between managers and consumers are facilitated by flexibility, empathy, congruence and unconditional acceptance. Supportive group dynamics develop when people confirm and accept one another. A stimulating environment that encourages continuous and close interpersonal contact contributes to effective relationships.Contribution/value-add: Effective relationships should be understood on different levels.

  11. Choice stepping reaction time test using exergame technology for fall risk assessment in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejupi, Andreas; Brodie, Matthew; Gschwind, Yves J; Schoene, Daniel; Lord, Stephen; Delbaere, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Accidental falls remain an important problem in older people. Stepping is a common task to avoid a fall and requires good interplay between sensory functions, central processing and motor execution. Increased choice stepping reaction time has been associated with recurrent falls in older people. The aim of this study was to examine if a sensor-based Exergame Choice Stepping Reaction Time test can successfully discriminate older fallers from non-fallers. The stepping test was conducted in a cohort of 104 community-dwelling older people (mean age: 80.7 ± 7.0 years). Participants were asked to step laterally as quickly as possible after a light stimulus appeared on a TV screen. Spatial and temporal measurements of the lower and upper body were derived from a low-cost and portable 3D-depth sensor (i.e. Microsoft Kinect) and 3D-accelerometer. Fallers had a slower stepping reaction time (970 ± 228 ms vs. 858 ± 123 ms, P = 0.001) and a slower reaction of their upper body (719 ± 289 ms vs. 631 ± 166 ms, P = 0.052) compared to non-fallers. It took fallers significantly longer than non-fallers to recover their balance after initiating the step (2147 ± 800 ms vs. 1841 ± 591 ms, P = 0.029). This study demonstrated that a sensor-based, low-cost and easy to administer stepping test, with the potential to be used in clinical practice or regular unsupervised home assessments, was able to identify significant differences between performances by fallers and non-fallers. PMID:25571596

  12. Promoting good dental health in older people: role of the community nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Blánaid; Smith, Kerry

    2015-09-01

    Good dental health enables a person to eat, speak, and socialise. It contributes to nutrition, general health, and quality of life. The dental health of people living in the UK has improved in the last 40 years, and older people are retaining their natural teeth throughout their life; nontheless, a significant proportion of people over 75 years still rely on partial and full dentures. Dental disease in all age groups is readily prevented by daily oral hygiene and adherence to a healthy diet, avoidance of smoking, and sensible alcohol intake. Some older people may simply need reminding and encouragement to carry out oral hygiene, while more dependent adults may need support and active help to do so. Nursing teams and health professionals play a key role in promoting oral health by supporting oral hygiene and adequate nutrition, preventing discomfort, and detecting dental diseases early. This article gives a brief overview of how nursing teams and health professionals can promote oral health and provides details of resources from which further detailed information may be obtained. PMID:26322990

  13. A randomised controlled trial investigating the effect of vitamin B12 supplementation on neurological function in healthy older people: the Older People and Enhanced Neurological function (OPEN) study protocol [ISRCTN54195799].

    OpenAIRE

    Whyte Ken; Richards Marcus; Letley Louise; Fletcher Astrid E; Fasey Nicky; Elbourne Diana; Clarke Robert; Allen Elizabeth; Dangour Alan D; Mills Kerry; Uauy Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Vitamin B12 deficiency is common in older people and the prevalence increases with age. Vitamin B12 deficiency may present as macrocytic anaemia, subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord, or as neuropathy, but is often asymptomatic in older people. The diagnosis and indications for treatment are clear for individuals with low plasma levels of vitamin B12 in the setting of megaloblastic anaemia and neuropathy, but the relevance of treatment of vitamin B12 deficienc...

  14. Prevalence of sarcopenia in community-dwelling older people in the UK using the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) definition: findings from the Hertfordshire Cohort Study (HCS)

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Harnish P; Syddall, Holly Emma; Jameson, Karen; Robinson, Sian; Denison, Hayley; Roberts, Helen C.; Edwards, Mark; Dennison, Elaine; Cooper, Cyrus; Aihie Sayer, Avan Aihie

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: sarcopenia is associated with adverse health outcomes. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of sarcopenia in community-dwelling older people in the UK using the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) consensus definition. Methods:we applied the EWGSOP definition to 103 community-dwelling men participating in the Hertfordshire Sarcopenia Study (HSS) using both the lowest third of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) lean mass (LM) and ...

  15. Objectively Measured Walking Duration and Sedentary Behaviour and Four-Year Mortality in Older People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denkinger, Michael Dieter; Rapp, Kilian; Koenig, Wolfgang; Rothenbacher, Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity is an important component of health. Recommendations based on sensor measurements are sparse in older people. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of objectively measured walking and sedentary duration on four-year mortality in community-dwelling older people. Methods Between March 2009 and April 2010, physical activity of 1271 participants (≥65 years, 56.4% men) from Southern Germany was measured over one week using a thigh-worn uni-axial accelerometer (activPAL; PAL Technologies, Glasgow, Scotland). Mortality was assessed during a four-year follow-up. Cox-proportional-hazards models were used to estimate the associations between walking (including low to high intensity) and sedentary duration with mortality. Models were adjusted for age and sex, additional epidemiological variables, and selected biomarkers. Results An inverse relationship between walking duration and mortality with a minimum risk for the 3rd quartile (102.2 to128.4 minutes walking daily) was found even after multivariate adjustment with HRs for quartiles 2 to 4 compared to quartile 1 of 0.45 (95%-CI: 0.26; 0.76), 0.18 (95%-CI: 0.08; 0.41), 0.39 (95%-CI: 0.19; 0.78), respectively. For sedentary duration an age- and sex-adjusted increased mortality risk was observed for the 4th quartile (daily sedentary duration ≥1137.2 min.) (HR 2.05, 95%-CI: 1.13; 3.73), which diminished, however, after full adjustment (HR 1.63, 95%-CI: 0.88; 3.02). Furthermore, our results suggest effect modification between walking and sedentary duration, such that in people with low walking duration a high sedentary duration was noted as an independent factor for increased mortality. Conclusions In summary, walking duration was clearly associated with four-year overall mortality in community-dwelling older people. PMID:27082963

  16. Association of day length and weather conditions with physical activity levels in older community dwelling people.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miles D Witham

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Weather is a potentially important determinant of physical activity. Little work has been done examining the relationship between weather and physical activity, and potential modifiers of any relationship in older people. We therefore examined the relationship between weather and physical activity in a cohort of older community-dwelling people. METHODS: We analysed prospectively collected cross-sectional activity data from community-dwelling people aged 65 and over in the Physical Activity Cohort Scotland. We correlated seven day triaxial accelerometry data with daily weather data (temperature, day length, sunshine, snow, rain, and a series of potential effect modifiers were tested in mixed models: environmental variables (urban vs rural dwelling, percentage of green space, psychological variables (anxiety, depression, perceived behavioural control, social variables (number of close contacts and health status measured using the SF-36 questionnaire. RESULTS: 547 participants, mean age 78.5 years, were included in this analysis. Higher minimum daily temperature and longer day length were associated with higher activity levels; these associations remained robust to adjustment for other significant associates of activity: age, perceived behavioural control, number of social contacts and physical function. Of the potential effect modifier variables, only urban vs rural dwelling and the SF-36 measure of social functioning enhanced the association between day length and activity; no variable modified the association between minimum temperature and activity. CONCLUSIONS: In older community dwelling people, minimum temperature and day length were associated with objectively measured activity. There was little evidence for moderation of these associations through potentially modifiable health, environmental, social or psychological variables.

  17. Development of a Frailty Index for Older People with Intellectual Disabilities: Results from the HA-ID Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoufour, Josje D.; Mitnitski, Arnold; Rockwood, Kenneth; Evenhuis, Heleen M.; Echteld, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although there is no strict definition of frailty, it is generally accepted as a state of high vulnerability for adverse health outcomes at older age. Associations between frailty and mortality, dependence, and hospitalization have been shown. We measured the frailty level of older people with intellectual disabilities (ID).…

  18. Choice and control for older people using home care services:how far have council-managed personal budgets helped?

    OpenAIRE

    Rabiee, Parvaneh; Glendinning, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This paper reports the experiences of older people who use council-managed personal budgets (PBs) to fund home care services and their satisfaction with the level of choice and control they are able to exercise. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from 18 older people from eight home care agencies across three councils in England. All interviews were semi-structured and face-to-face. Findings: Despite some optimism about improvements in choice and flexibility experienced...

  19. Expanding access to pain care for frail, older people in primary care: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Muntinga, M.E.; Jansen, A.P.D.; Schellevis, F.G.; Nijpels, G

    2016-01-01

    Background Although untreated pain has a negative impact on quality of life and health outcomes, research has shown that older people do not always have access to adequate pain care. Practice nurse-led, comprehensive geriatric assessments (CGAs) may increase access to tailored pain care for frail, older people who live at home. To explore this, we investigated whether new pain cases were identified by practice nurses during CGAs administered as part of an intervention with the Geriatric Care ...

  20. Set-Shifting Ability Is Associated with Gray Matter Volume in Older People with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Makizako, Hyuma; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Doi, Takehiko; Suzuki, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims An understanding of the association between gray matter volume and executive functioning could provide strategies to reduce dementia risk in older people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods In a cross-sectional analysis, we assessed executive functioning in 83 older people with MCI using three standard neuropsychological tests: set shifting (difference between Trail Making Test Parts B and A), working memory (difference between Digit Span forward and backward from th...

  1. The effect of testosterone and a nutritional supplement on hospital admissions in under-nourished, older people

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron Ian D; Hunter Peter; Naganathan Vasi; Visvanathan Renuka; Piantadosi Cynthia; Lange Kylie; Karnon Jonathan; Chapman Ian M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Weight loss and under-nutrition are relatively common in older people, and are associated with poor outcomes including increased rates of hospital admissions and death. In a pilot study of 49 undernourished older, community dwelling people we found that daily treatment for one year with a combination of testosterone tablets and a nutritional supplement produced a significant reduction in hospitalizations. We propose a larger, multicentre study to explore and hopefully conf...

  2. Road Pricing and Older People: An In-depth Study of Attitudes, Pro-Social Values and Social Norms.

    OpenAIRE

    Nikitas, Alexandros; Avineri, Erel; Parkhurst, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the socio-psychological mechanisms that determine the public acceptability of road pricing could be a key for its implementation in urban environments where this is a viable scenario. Studying the attitudes of older people is of particular importance due to the ageing of the populations in the industrialised democracies, the high political engagement of older people, and their vulnerability to transport-related social exclusion. Research by the present authors had previously ide...

  3. Effects of vitamin B-12 supplementation on neurologic and cognitive function in older people: a randomized controlled trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Dangour, AD; Allen, E; Clarke, R.; Elbourne, D; Fletcher, Ae; Letley, L.; Richards, M; Whyte, K.; Uauy, R.; Mills, K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Moderate vitamin B-12 deficiency is relatively common in older people. However, there is little robust evidence on the effect of vitamin B-12 supplementation on neurologic and cognitive outcomes in later life. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether vitamin B-12 supplementation benefits neurologic and cognitive function in moderately vitamin B-12-deficient older people. DESIGN: We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in 7 general practices in South East Englan...

  4. The use of eye-gaze data in the evaluation of assistive technology software for older people.

    OpenAIRE

    Judge, Simon; Blackburn, Steven

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on recent work undertaking usability study of a software-based assistive technology. The software was developed to support increased opportunities and interactions for people in residential nursing homes and extra-care housing. The objective of the project was to allow older people and those with early onset of dementia to have access to some of the functionality of modern computers. The software could also have applications in other markets, such as schools and for older ...

  5. Balancing Risk Prevention and Health Promotion: Towards a Harmonizing Approach in Care for Older People in the Community

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, Bienke M.; Van Regenmortel, Tine; Abma, Tineke A.

    2012-01-01

    Many older people in western countries express a desire to live independently and stay in control of their lives for as long as possible in spite of the afflictions that may accompany old age. Consequently, older people require care at home and additional support. In some care situations, tension and ambiguity may arise between professionals and clients whose views on risk prevention or health promotion may differ. Following Antonovsky’s salutogenic framework, different perspectives between p...

  6. Health risk appraisal in older people 3: prevalence, impact, and context of pain and their implications for GPs

    OpenAIRE

    Carmaciu, C.; Iliffe, S; Kharicha, K.; Harari, D.; Swift, C.; Gillmann, G.; Stuck, A.E.

    2007-01-01

    Background Pain is a common experience in later life. There is conflicting evidence of the prevalence, impact, and context of pain in older people. GPs are criticised for underestimating and under-treating pain.Aim To assess the extent to which older people experience pain, and to explore relationships between self-reported pain and functional ability and depression.Design of study Secondary analysis of baseline data from a randomised controlled trial of health risk appraisal.Setting A total ...

  7. Sociodemographic variables, clinical features, and the role of preassessment cross-sex hormones in older trans people

    OpenAIRE

    Bouman, Walter Pierre; Claes, Laurence; Marshall, Ellen; Pinner, Gill T.; Longworth, Julia; Maddox, Victoria; Witcomb, Gemma; Jimenez-Murcia, Susana; Fernandez-Aranda, Fernando; Arcelus, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: As referrals to gender identity clinics have increased dramatically over the last few years, no studies focusing on older trans people seeking treatment are available. Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of older trans people attending a national service and to investigate the influence of cross-sex hormones (CHT) on psychopathology. Methods: Individuals over the age of 50 years old referred to a national gender ...

  8. Sleep Quality and Recommended Levels of Physical Activity in Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartescu, Iuliana; Morgan, Kevin; Stevinson, Clare D

    2016-04-01

    A minimum level of activity likely to improve sleep outcomes among older people has not previously been explored. In a representative UK sample aged 65+ (n = 926), cross-sectional regressions controlling for appropriate confounders showed that walking at or above the internationally recommended threshold of ≥ 150 min per week was significantly associated with a lower likelihood of reporting insomnia symptoms (OR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.45-0.91, p walking levels at baseline significantly predicted a lower likelihood of reporting sleep onset (OR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.42-0.97, p sleep maintenance (OR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.41-0.95, p sleep quality in older adults. PMID:26291553

  9. Mobility-Related Fatigue, Walking Speed, and Muscle Strength in Older People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna; Mendes de Leon, Carlos F.; Rantanen, Taina;

    2012-01-01

    among men (b = −.04, p < .001) but not among women (b = −.005, p = .64). Among men, muscle strength accounted up to 15% for the association between baseline fatigue and change in maximum walking speed. Conclusions. Mobility-related fatigue is associated with slower walking speed in older adults. The......Background. Fatigue is an important early marker of functional decline among older people, but the mechanisms underlying this association are not fully understood. The purpose of the present study was to examine the association between mobility-related fatigue and walking speed and to test the...... degree to which muscle strength accounts for this association. Methods. The study is based on baseline (n = 523) and 5-year follow-up data (n = 292) from a cohort of 75-year-old persons. Standardized assessments include self-report measures of mobility-related fatigue (score range 0–6) and medical...

  10. Challenges to conducting research with older people living in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higginson Irene J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although older people are increasingly cared for in nursing homes towards the end of life, there is a dearth of research exploring the views of residents. There are however, a number of challenges and methodological issues involved in doing this. The aim of this paper is to discuss some of these, along with residents' views on taking part in a study of the perceptions of dignity of older people in care homes and make recommendations for future research in these settings. Methods Qualitative interviews were used to obtain the views on maintaining dignity of 18 people aged 75 years and over, living in two private nursing homes in South East London. Detailed field notes on experiences of recruiting and interviewing participants were kept. Results Challenges included taking informed consent (completing reply slips and having a 'reasonable' understanding of their participation; finding opportunities to conduct interviews; involvement of care home staff and residents' families and trying to maintain privacy during the interviews. Most residents were positive about their participation in the study, however, five had concerns either before or during their interviews. Although 15 residents seemed to feel free to air their views, three seemed reluctant to express their opinions on their care in the home. Conclusion Although we experienced many challenges to conducting this study, they were not insurmountable, and once overcome, allowed this often unheard vulnerable group to express their views, with potential long-term benefits for future delivery of care.

  11. The role of context and the interpersonal experience of loneliness among older people in a residential care facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Roos

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Older people are more prone to experience loneliness when living in residential care facilities. The purpose of this study was to explore older people's experiences of loneliness in the context of institutionalized care. A voluntary and convenience-based sample of 10 white South African older people (age range 62 to 82 years; three men and seven women was drawn. Data on the subjective experience of loneliness were then gathered through the Mmogo-method®, whereby drawings were employed to explore matters and issues of importance in the lives of older people that could be used to deal with loneliness. Data were analyzed thematically and visually as well as through the use of keywords in context. The results showed that older people experienced loneliness in terms of having unavailable interactions due to loss, and an absence of meaningful interpersonal interactions. Meaningful interpersonal interactions were described as when the older people had regular contact and a variety of interactions. Ineffective interpersonal styles (e.g. taking a controlling position in relationships and being rigid elicited rejection and isolation, and were associated with a lack of confirmatory interpersonal relationships. It is recommended that greater emphasis should be placed on creating awareness of unhealthy group dynamics as well as on psychosocial interventions to develop group support. Interpersonal styles, either effective or ineffective, take place in a social context, which, in this research, was observed to be unsafe, lacking in care, and a non-stimulating environment.

  12. How older people watch television. Telemetric data on the TV use in Germany in 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajczyk, A; Zöllner, O

    1998-01-01

    This study has been prompted by the relatively small body of knowledge on the media use of the elderly. The aim of this study was to show how people 50 years and older use the medium television in Germany. Therefore, the 1996 television usership data collected in a representative 'peoplemeter' panel of about 4,800 German television households have been surveyed, processed and analyzed using standard audience research software. In 1996, Germans 50 years and above watched on average 233 min television per day. The older a person, the longer he or she watches television. Individuals 65 years and older watch television for 253 min per day. This subgroup appears to comprise the most intensive users of the medium. Men 65 years and above may be depicted as the heaviest weekend TV watchers, older women as the medium's closest followers from Monday to Friday. Television program broadcast late in the afternoon and early in the evening have by far the best chances to be chosen by seniors. The affinity of the elderly for the medium can be explained by its potential for offering entertainment, information, and companionship, being a substitute for primary interpersonal communication, a tool for structuring time patterns and keeping up the rhythms of long-established everyday rituals. On the one hand, television can be a 'lifeline' and a 'window to the outside world' for people with little opportunity for direct, unmediated social contact, thus possibly raising their satisfaction of life. On the other hand, prolonged TV use may be seen as an indicator for the degree of loneliness and neglect of the elderly. PMID:9592692

  13. Talking about colds and flu: the lay diagnosis of two common illnesses among older British people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Lindsay; Evans, Meirion R; Prout, Hayley

    2011-09-01

    This paper reports on a study of the ways in which 54 older people in South Wales (UK) talk about the symptoms and causes of cold and influenza (flu). The study was designed to understand why older people might reject or accept the offer of seasonal flu vaccine, and in the course of the interviews respondents were also asked to express their views about the nature and causes of the two key illnesses. The latter are among the most common infections in human beings. In terms of the biomedical paradigm the common cold is caused by numerous respiratory viruses, whilst flu is caused by the influenza virus. Medical diagnosis is usually made on clinical grounds without laboratory confirmation. Symptoms of flu include sudden onset of fever and cough, and colds are characterized by sneezing, sore throat, and runny nose, but in practice the symptoms often overlap. In this study we examine the degree by which the views of lay people with respect to both diagnosis and epidemiology diverge with that which is evident in biomedical discourse. Our results indicate that whilst most of the identified symptoms are common to lay and professional people, the former integrate symptoms into a markedly different observational frame from the latter. And as far as causation is concerned it is clear that lay people emphasize the role of 'resistance' and 'immunity' at least as much as 'infection' in accounting for the onset of colds and flu. The data are analyzed using novel methods that focus on the co-occurrence of concepts and are displayed as semantic networks. As well as reporting on its findings the authors draw out some implications of the study for social scientific and policy discussions concerning lay diagnosis, lay expertise and the concept of an expert patient. PMID:21186076

  14. Health begins at home: the housing-health interface for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, L; Heywood, F

    2000-01-01

    Housing issues are of fundamental importance to the health and independence of older people in Britain, but this concept is not reflected in planning for health, housing, or community care. An analysis of community care plans and public health reports reflects how little attention the majority give either to the importance of housing or to the potential of primary care as a means of information exchange between older people and planning processes. Interviews with practitioners and policy makers in four cities, combined with a review of the considerable literature on planning and joint planning in the health and social services, helped to identify the problems in achieving more integrated systems. Structural blockages as fundamental as the definitions of 'health' and 'housing', the attitude of society to manual work, the hidden nature of the problems of older people, and the failure of planning to categorize according to the level of need are identified and summarized in a chart showing how these factors are linked and self-reinforcing. The article concludes with a vision of how things might work more effectively without requiring unrealistic changes. The authors offer a challenge to planners and joint commissioners to gather different kinds of information on need; to have long-term, as well as short-term, strategies; to think broadly across categories of issue; and to be prepared to invest money in new ways. Most significantly, by redefining the role of the Director of Public Health, we identify a focal point at which the responsibility and authority for coordinating, championing, and review could lie. PMID:10939090

  15. Serum cholesterol concentration associated with aspirin esterase activity in older people: preliminary data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Kotani, Russell Caccavello, Ricardo Hermo, Toshiyuki Yamada, Nobuyuki Taniguchi, Alejandro Gugliucci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Metabolism of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, commonly used in older people for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, is important to the effectiveness of this drug. Whereas part of aspirin hydrolysis occurs in blood, there is a paucity of information in regards to circulating aspirin esterase activity in various physiological and pathological conditions. High aspirin esterase activity, corresponding to faster aspirin hydrolysis (thus aspirin non-responsiveness, may occur in cardiovascular disease-prone states. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of cardio-metabolic variables such as cholesterol on serum aspirin esterase activity in older people who participated in an intervention study on physical activity. METHODS: A total of 18 non-medicated subjects (7 men/11 women, mean age 67.8 years, body mass index = 23.4 ± 3.3 kg/m2, who completed a 3-month interventional program for a mild-to-moderate increase in physical activity, were analyzed. The body mass index, plasma glucose, serum total cholesterol and aspirin esterase activity were measured in the pre- and post-interventional phases of the study. RESULTS: During the interventional period, the changes in aspirin esterase activity correlated significantly and positively with those of total cholesterol concentrations (r = 0.542, P = 0.020; β = 0.609, P = 0.035 in a multiple linear regression analysis after adjusting for all the measured variables. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that cholesterol metabolism alterations may be associated with aspirin metabolism in older people.

  16. Dignity in the care of older people – a review of the theoretical and empirical literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Ian

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dignity has become a central concern in UK health policy in relation to older and vulnerable people. The empirical and theoretical literature relating to dignity is extensive and as likely to confound and confuse as to clarify the meaning of dignity for nurses in practice. The aim of this paper is critically to examine the literature and to address the following questions: What does dignity mean? What promotes and diminishes dignity? And how might dignity be operationalised in the care of older people? This paper critically reviews the theoretical and empirical literature relating to dignity and clarifies the meaning and implications of dignity in relation to the care of older people. If nurses are to provide dignified care clarification is an essential first step. Methods This is a review article, critically examining papers reporting theoretical perspectives and empirical studies relating to dignity. The following databases were searched: Assia, BHI, CINAHL, Social Services Abstracts, IBSS, Web of Knowledge Social Sciences Citation Index and Arts & Humanities Citation Index and location of books a chapters in philosophy literature. An analytical approach was adopted to the publications reviewed, focusing on the objectives of the review. Results and discussion We review a range of theoretical and empirical accounts of dignity and identify key dignity promoting factors evident in the literature, including staff attitudes and behaviour; environment; culture of care; and the performance of specific care activities. Although there is scope to learn more about cultural aspects of dignity we know a good deal about dignity in care in general terms. Conclusion We argue that what is required is to provide sufficient support and education to help nurses understand dignity and adequate resources to operationalise dignity in their everyday practice. Using the themes identified from our review we offer proposals for the direction of

  17. Prevalence of depression among elderly on open care centers for older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Karagianni

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Depression in the elderly is considered an important public health issue. Depression is the most common mental health problem among older people. It poses a critical impact on well-being and the quality of life of elderly and it is related with high expenses and great demand of health care services. Objective: To estimate the prevalence of depression among elderly in an urban area’s population and to investigate the aggravating and protective factors. Material and Method: The sample consisted of 360 individuals, 218 women and 142 men, aged 60 years or older, members of the four Open Care Centres for Older People (KAPI of Agioi Anargyroi Municipality, in Attica. A questionnaire for demographics and phycho-social factors was used, whereas depression was probed through Geriatric Depression Scale, (Short Form - GDS-15, which has been standardized and adapted in a Greek elderly population. Results: 30,28% of the sample had depressive symptoms (22,22% moderate and 8,06% serious-clinical type depression. It was also shown that depression at women (70,6% appeared in a percentage over than the double against men (29,4%. The symptomatology of depression occurred widely among widower/widows, elderly being divorced or separated, people living alone, those with multiple pathologies and elderly informal family carers. Symptomatology of depression appeared in a lower rate among elderly who took care of their grandchildren or participated in social activities. Conclusions: The ascertainment high percentage of depressive symptoms in our sample of elderly population confirms the emergency of creating a strong psycho-social supporting network aimed to prevent depression among elderly and health promotion in the elderly in the context of Primary Health Care (PHC.

  18. Cross-cultural aspects of ICT use by older people: preliminary results of a four-country ethnographical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blat, Josep; Sayago, Sergio; Kälviäinen, Mirja;

    2011-01-01

    Culture is crucial in understanding how people use technologies and designing better ones. However, very little is known about cross-cultural aspects of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) use by older people (60+), despite the heterogeneity of this user group. This short paper...... addresses this issue by drawing on an ethnographical study of ICT use conducted with over 120 people, aged 67-71, in four European countries: Finland, Denmark, Italy and Spain, over a 6-month period. The preliminary results show that making a social, independent and worth use of ICT are common aspects...... across the four countries, despite the so-called heterogeneity of older people as ICT users. This short paper also touches on two key aspects which emerged from the study, engaging older people in research and the evolution of some barriers to technology use....

  19. Healthy Aging from the Perspectives of 683 Older People with Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Wallack, Elizabeth M.; Wiseman, Hailey D.; Ploughman, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to determine what factors most greatly contributed to healthy aging with multiple sclerosis (MS) from the perspective of a large sample of older people with MS. Design and Methods. Participants (n=683; >55 years of age with symptoms >20 years) provided answers to an open-ended question regarding healthy aging and were categorized into three groups, 55–64 (young), 65–74 (middle), and 75 and over (oldest old). Sociodemographic actors were compared using ANOVA....

  20. Models for Designing Long-Term Care Service Plans and Care Programs for Older People

    OpenAIRE

    Shogo Kato; Satoko Tsuru; Yoshinori Iizuka

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of a system for providing appropriate long-term care services for older people is a national issue in Japan, and it will likely become a worldwide issue in the years to come. Under Japanese Long-term Care Insurance System, long-term care is provided based on long-term care programs, which were designed by care providers on the basis of long-term care service plans, which were designed by care managers. However, defined methodology for designing long-term care service plans a...

  1. Poor Dental Status and Oral Hygiene Practices in Institutionalized Older People in Northeast Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Jorg Heukelbach; Peter Leggat; José Gomes Bezerra Filho; Luciene Ribeiro Gaião; Maria Eneide Leitão de Almeida

    2009-01-01

    In this study we describe the dental status and oral hygiene practices in institutionalized older people and identify factors associated with poor dental status. A cross-sectional study was performed in a nursing home in Fortaleza, the capital of Ceará State (northeast Brazil). The number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) was assessed in the residents of the nursing home (n=167; mean age = 76.6 years). The mean DMFT value was 29.7; the mean number of missing teeth was 28.4. Ni...

  2. Multidisciplinary model for housing and well-being for older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudstrup, Mary-Ann; Møller, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between housing and the well-being of older people is a topic of growing interest. The focus is often on a specific aspect of housing, for example accessibility, location or interior design, and the perspective taken is typically that of a specific discipline. The influence of...... the relationship between housing and the well-being of dependent elderly. This conceptual framework should encompass the many different factors that influence well-being as well as the interactions between these factors, and at the same time recognise the diversity of dependent elderly. The project is...

  3. ADL ability characteristics of partially dependent older people: Gender and age differences in ADL ability

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Susumu; Demura, Shinichi; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Kasuga, Kohsho; Kobayashi, Hidetsugu

    2001-01-01

    Age and gender differences in ADL ability were investigated using 568 Japanese partially dependent older people (PD, Mean age=82.2±7.76 years) living in welfare institutions. The subjects were asked about 17 ADL items representing 7 ADL domains by the professional staff working at subjects' institutions. Each item was assessed by a dichotomous scale of “possible” or “impossible”. Item proportions of “possible” response were calculated for gender and age groups (60s, 70s, 80s and 90s). Two-way...

  4. Integrated care for older people in Europe—latest trends and perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Kai Leichsenring

    2012-01-01

    As a researcher and consultant I have coordinated local pilots and European research projects to analyse and improve long-term care for older people by better integrating health and social care systems. One of my conclusions from the wide range of initiatives that have been taken over the past two decades in Europe has been the need to treat long-term care as a system in its own right.  Long-term care systems require a discernable identity; specific policies, structures, processes and pathway...

  5. Preventive home visits to older people in Denmark--why, how, by whom, and when?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vass, M; Avlund, K; Hendriksen, C;

    2007-01-01

    initiatives towards older people is politically formulated and underlined as part of the new structured municipality reform. Evidence of beneficial effects of health promotion and prevention of disease in old age is well documented. In-home visits with individualised assessments make it possible to reach......In Denmark, political decisions improved the implementation of 'preventative thinking' into every-day clinical work. The potential benefits of preventive efforts have been supported by legislative and administrative incentives, and an ongoing effort to remain focused on the benefits of these...

  6. The influence of cognition on self-management of type 2 diabetes in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomlin A

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ali Tomlin, Alan Sinclair Institute of Diabetes for Older People, University of Bedfordshire, Luton, Bedfordshire, UK Abstract: Diabetes is a growing public health issue, increasing in prevalence, eroding quality of life, and burdening health care systems. The complications of diabetes can be avoided or delayed by maintaining good glycemic control, which is achievable through self-management and, where necessary, medication. Older people with diabetes are at increased risk for cognitive impairment. This review aims to bring together current research that has investigated both cognition and diabetes self-management together. The Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (Cinahl, Excerpta Medica Database (Embase, Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (Medline, and Psychological Information (PsychInfo databases were searched. Studies were included if they featured older people with type 2 diabetes and had looked for associations between at least one distinct measure of cognition and at least one distinct measure of diabetes self-management. English language publications from the year 2000 were included. Cognitive measures of executive function, memory, and low scores on tests of global cognitive functioning showed significant correlations with multiple areas of diabetes self-management, including diabetes-specific numeracy ability, diabetes knowledge, insulin adjustment skills, ability to learn to perform insulin injections, worse adherence to medications, decreased frequency of self-care activities, missed appointments, decreased frequency of diabetes monitoring, and increased inaccuracies in reporting blood glucose monitoring. The nature of the subjects studied was quite variable in terms of their disease duration, previous medical histories, associated medical comorbidities, and educational level attained prior to being diagnosed with diabetes. The majority of studies were of an associational nature and not findings confirmed by

  7. Depression in older people after fall-related injuries: a prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Scaf-Klomp, W; Sanderman, R.; Ormel, J.; Kempen, GIJM

    2003-01-01

    Background: objectives of the study were i) to describe changes in depression in independently living people aged 57 or older with fall-related injuries, and ii) to examine the effect of incomplete recovery of physical functions on depression one year post-injury. Method: prospective cohort-study, including a pre-injury baseline and post-injury assessments at 8 weeks, 5 months and one year. The sample consisted of 159 patients who sustained various kinds of fall-related injuries to the limbs....

  8. Older People and Their Attitude to the Use of Information and Communication Technologies--A Review Study with Special Focus on the Czech Republic (Older People and Their Attitude to ICT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimova, Blanka; Simonova, Ivana; Poulova, Petra; Truhlarova, Zuzana; Kuca, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Rising standards of living and good quality health care have contributed to people living longer. According to the Eurostat agency (Benácová & Valenta, 2009), in the next 50 years there will be twice as many older people worldwide. The aging process, however, brings about new economic and social issues. Therefore, there is constant effort to…

  9. Dietary Patterns Are Associated with Cognition among Older People with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helman Alfonso

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available There has been increasing interest in the influence of diet on cognition in the elderly. This study examined the cross-sectional association between dietary patterns and cognition in a sample of 249 people aged 65–90 years with mild cognitive impairment (MCI. Two dietary patterns; whole and processed food; were identified using factor analysis from a 107-item; self-completed Food Frequency Questionnaire. Logistic regression analyses showed that participants in the highest tertile of the processed food pattern score were more likely to have poorer cognitive functioning; in the lowest tertile of executive function (OR 2.55; 95% CI: 1.08–6.03; as assessed by the Cambridge Cognitive Examination. In a group of older people with MCI; a diet high in processed foods was associated with some level of cognitive impairment.

  10. Beyond health and well-being: transformation, memory and the virtual in older people's music and dance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Wakeling

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Research exploring older people and the participatory arts has tended to focus on notions of biomedical impact, often coupled with appeals to evasive notions of "well-being." Rather than suggesting such approaches are invalid, this article proposes the need for their extension and proposes an alternative, critical approach to analysing older people's experience of arts participation. Based on ethnographic participant observation and intensive consultation with a cohort of older people engaged in a programme of creative music and dance, we explore the complex processes and possibilities of transformation that the participatory arts can initiate, examining how performance can create intriguing linkages between past, present and future experiences. Taking a phenomenological approach to the study of memory, recollection, reminiscence and future anticipation, we discuss how arts participation can "actualise" potential memories in older participants, examining how and why this kind of expressive activity animates the idea of "virtual" selves (after Bergson.

  11. Social Connections for Older People with Intellectual Disability in Ireland: Results from Wave One of IDS-TILDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCausland, Darren; McCallion, Philip; Cleary, Eimear; McCarron, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background: The literature on influences of community versus congregated settings raises questions about how social inclusion can be optimised for people with intellectual disability. This study examines social contacts for older people with intellectual disability in Ireland, examining differences in social connection for adults with intellectual…

  12. Potential role of vitamin D in prevention of skeletal and extraskeletal diseases in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Montagnani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D and calcium are essential for bone health. An adequate calcium-phosphorus product determines a high quality mineralization long lifetime. In older people, both calcium and vitamin D levels may be lower causing osteomalacia and/or osteoporosis with a higher risk of fracture. Epidemiological data have clearly associated serum vitamin D lower levels (deficiency with bone fracture in older people, however, not univocal data exist in regard to a beneficial effect of vitamin D supplementation in general population. Although not systematic, the present review aims to make a narrative synthesis of the most recent published data on vitamin D effect not only on bone, classical target associated with vitamin D studies, but namely on extraskeletal diseases. In fact, recently, there has been an increasing interest on this latter issue with surprising findings. Vitamin D, and in particular its deficiency, seems to have a role in pathophysiological pathways in several diseases involving cardiovascular, central nervous system and neoplastic process. On the other hand, vitamin D supplementation may modify the outcome of a wide range of illnesses. Up to date the data are conflicting mainly because of difficulty to establish a consensus on the threshold of vitamin D deficit. The US Institute of Medicine recommends to distinguish a level of insufficiency [defined as 30-50 nmol/L or 16-25 ng/mL of 25(OHD] and another of deficiency identified by 25(OHD levels lower than 30 nmol/L (or <16 ng/mL. This latter level is considered a minimum level necessary in older adults to minimize the risk of falls, fracture and probably to have some effects of vitamin D supplementation in extraskeletal diseases. Although there are no absolute certainties in such issue, the most recent data suggest that vitamin D deficiency, and its supplementation, may play an important role in a wide range of diseases other than in bone metabolic diseases in older but not in general

  13. The effect of walking on falls in older people: the 'Easy Steps to Health' randomized controlled trial study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voukelatos Alexander

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falls in older people continue to be a major public health issue in industrialized countries. Extensive research into falls prevention has identified exercise as a proven fall prevention strategy. However, despite over a decade of promoting physical activity, hospitalisation rates due to falls injuries in older people are still increasing. This could be because efforts to increase physical activity amongst older people have been unsuccessful, or the physical activity that older people engage in is insufficient and/or inappropriate. The majority of older people choose walking as their predominant form of exercise. While walking has been shown to lower the risk of many chronic diseases its role in falls prevention remains unclear. This paper outlines the methodology of a study whose aims are to determine: if a home-based walking intervention will reduce the falls rate among healthy but inactive community-dwelling older adults (65 + years compared to no intervention (usual activity and; whether such an intervention can improve risk factors for falls, such as balance, strength and reaction time. Methods/Design This study uses a randomised controlled trial design. A total of 484 older people exercising less than 120 minutes per week will be recruited through the community and health care referrals throughout Sydney and neighboring regions. All participants are randomised into either the self-managed walking program group or the health-education waiting list group using a block randomization scheme. Outcome measures include prospective falls and falls injuries, quality of life, and physical activity levels. A subset of participants (n = 194 will also receive physical performance assessments comprising of tests of dynamic balance, strength, reaction time and lower limb functional status. Discussion Certain types of physical activity can reduce the risk of falls. As walking is already the most popular physical activity amongst older

  14. The effect of advice by health care professionals on increasing physical activity of older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvensalo, M; Heikkinen, E; Lintunen, T; Rantanen, T

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether advice by health care professionals is associated with increased exercise activity in older people. As part of the Evergreen follow-up study, self-report data on exercise related advice were collected in 1996 and physical activity in 1988 and 1996 among 611 non-institutional people initially aged 65-84 years. Logistic regression analyses were used to study the association of recollection of having received exercise counseling with increased activity. Of all the subjects, 92% reported having been in contact with health care professionals during the follow-up period, and 58% of them recalled having been advised to exercise. Those men and women who recalled having received advice, started to participate in supervised exercise classes 5-6 times more often than those who did not recall being advised. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) in men was 6.27 (1.19-32.9), and in women 5.27 (1.97-14.1). For calisthenics at home, the corresponding figure was 12.5 (3.52-44.4) in men. We concluded that initiating new physical activities in old age is strongly connected to encouragement to exercise by health care professionals. Health care professionals should be supported to promote exercise among older patients. PMID:12859605

  15. Poor Dental Status and Oral Hygiene Practices in Institutionalized Older People in Northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorg Heukelbach

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we describe the dental status and oral hygiene practices in institutionalized older people and identify factors associated with poor dental status. A cross-sectional study was performed in a nursing home in Fortaleza, the capital of Ceará State (northeast Brazil. The number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT was assessed in the residents of the nursing home (n=167; mean age = 76.6 years. The mean DMFT value was 29.7; the mean number of missing teeth was 28.4. Ninety-three (58.1% were edentulous. Almost 90% practiced oral hygiene, but only about half used a toothbrush. Only 8% had visited a dentist in the preceding three months. Most of the variables regarding oral hygiene habits (such as the use of toothbrush, frequency of oral hygiene per day, regular tooth brushing after meals did not show any significant association with the DMFT. In multivariate regression analysis, age, general literacy level, and practice of oral hygiene were independently associated with the DMFT (R2=0.13. Institutionalized older people in northeast Brazil have poor dental status, and oral hygiene practices are insufficient. Dental health education is needed focusing on the special needs of this neglected and socioeconomically deprived population to improve their quality of life.

  16. Forming a new clinical team for frail older people: can a group development model help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Elizabeth Susan; Pollard, Lorraine; Conroy, Simon; Clague-Baker, Nicola

    2014-03-01

    Integrated services which utilise the expertise of team members along care pathways are evolving. Changes in service structure and subsequent team working arrangements can be a challenge for practitioners expected to redefine how they work with one another. These services are particularly important for the care of frail older people. This exploratory study of one newly forming team presents the views of staff involved in establishing an interprofessional healthcare advisory team for older people within an acute hospital admissions unit. Staff experiences of forming a new service are aligned to a model of team development. The findings are presented as themes relating to the stages of team development and identify the challenges of setting up an integrated service alongside existing services. In particular, team process issues relating to the clarity of goals, role clarification, leadership, team culture and identity. Managers must allow time to ensure new services evolve before setting up evaluation studies for efficiency and effectiveness which might prove against the potential for interprofessional teamworking. PMID:24199595

  17. Long-term care and hospital utilisation by older people: an analysis of substitution rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forder, Julien

    2009-11-01

    Older people are intensive users of hospital and long-term care services. This paper explores the extent to which these services are substitutes. A small area analysis was used with both care home and (tariff cost-weighted) hospital utilisation for older people aggregated to electoral wards in England.Health and social-care structural equations were specified using a theoretical model. The estimation accounted for the skewed and censored nature of the data. For health utilisation, both a fixed effects instrumental variables GMM model and a generalised estimating equations (GEE) model were fitted, the later on a log dependent variable with predicted values of social care utilisation used to account for endogeneity (bootstrapping was used to derive standard errors). In addition to a GMM model, the social-care estimation used both two-part and tobit models (also with predicted health utilisation and bootstrapping).The results indicate that for each additional pound1 spent on care homes, hospital expenditure falls by pound0.35. Also, pound1 additional hospital spend corresponds to just over pound0.35 reduction on care home spend. With these cost substitution effects offsetting, a transfer of resources to care homes is efficient if the resultant outcome gain is greater than the outcome loss from reduced hospital use. PMID:19206085

  18. Self-reported health and functional limitations among older people in the Kassena-Nankana District, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelius Debpuur

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ghana is experiencing significant increases in its ageing population, yet research on the health and quality of life of older people is limited. Lack of data on the health and well-being of older people in the country makes it difficult to monitor trends in the health status of adults and the impact of social policies on their health and welfare. Research on ageing is urgently required to provide essential data for policy formulation and programme implementation. Objective: To describe the health status and identify factors associated with self-rated health (SRH among older adults in a rural community in northern Ghana. Methods: The data come from a survey on Adult Health and Ageing in the Kassena-Nankana District involving 4,584 people aged 50 and over. Survey participants answered questions pertaining to their health status, including self-rated overall health, perceptions of well-being and quality of life, and self-reported assessment of functioning on a range of different health domains. Socio-demographic information such as age, sex, marital status and education were obtained from a demographic surveillance database. Results: The majority of older people rated their health status as good, with the oldest old reporting poorer health. Multivariate regression analysis showed that functional ability and sex are significant factors in SRH status. Adults with higher levels of functional limitations were much more likely to rate their health as being poorer compared with those having lower disabilities. Household wealth was significantly associated with SRH, with wealthier adults more likely to rate their health as good. Conclusion: The depreciation in health and daily functioning with increasing age is likely to increase people's demand for health care and other services as they grow older. There is a need for regular monitoring of the health status of older people to provide public health agencies with the data they need to assess

  19. Gender differences and socioeconomic status in relation to overweight among older Korean people.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Won Noh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ever-increasing older population and its association with serious overweight problems have garnered much attention. The correlation between being overweight and socioeconomic status factors could be helpful for understanding the inequalities among the overweight population. We examined the correlation between being overweight and some key variables, such as demographics, socioeconomic status, general health status, and health behavior in a large sample of older individuals, by each gender. METHODS: We used data from the 2008 Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging and it included 8,157 participants who were 45 years or older. To understand the relationship between the overweight participants in accordance to demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, health status, and health behaviors, a weighted chi-square test and logistic regression analysis were conducted by separating variables related to overweight, according to the genders. RESULTS: The number of people in the normal group was 6,347 (77.8%, while the people who were considered overweight were 1,810 (22.2%. Women (n = 4,583 constituted 52.7% of the subject, 24.9% of whom were classified as overweight. Meanwhile, 20.6% of the 47.3% (n = 3,574 of the sample who were men were classified as overweight. Participants between the ages of 45 and 64 with chronic diseases were more likely to be overweight. Men in the 4th quartile of household income were more likely to be overweight than those who were in the 1st quartile, in contrast, while unemployed women with lower education levels and urban residents were at greater risk for being overweight. CONCLUSIONS: Among the men, health status and health behavior appeared to show a correlation with being overweight; however, among women, socioeconomic status factors were strongly related to being overweight. These findings appear to support the association of gender-specifics with the prevalence of being overweight.

  20. Balancing risk prevention and health promotion: towards a harmonizing approach in care for older people in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Bienke M; Van Regenmortel, Tine; Abma, Tineke A

    2014-03-01

    Many older people in western countries express a desire to live independently and stay in control of their lives for as long as possible in spite of the afflictions that may accompany old age. Consequently, older people require care at home and additional support. In some care situations, tension and ambiguity may arise between professionals and clients whose views on risk prevention or health promotion may differ. Following Antonovsky's salutogenic framework, different perspectives between professionals and clients on the pathways that lead to health promotion might lead to mechanisms that explain the origin of these tensions and how they may ultimately lead to reduced responsiveness of older clients to engage in care. This is illustrated with a case study of an older woman living in the community, Mrs Jansen, and her health and social care professionals. The study shows that despite good intentions, engagement, clear division of tasks and tailored care, the responsiveness to receive care can indeed not always be taken for granted. We conclude that to harmonize differences in perspectives between professionals and older people, attention should be given to the way older people endow meaning to the demanding circumstances they encounter (comprehensibility), their perceived feelings of control (manageability), as well as their motivation to comprehend and manage events (meaningfulness). Therefore, it is important that both clients and professionals have an open mind and attempt to understand each others' perspective, and have a dialogue with each other, taking the life narrative of clients into account. PMID:22228192

  1. The influence of theory and practice on perceptions about caring for ill older people - A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millns Sizer, Stephanie; Burton, Robert L; Harris, Ann

    2016-07-01

    The increasing longevity of the world's population implies the requirement for a nursing workforce who are appropriately equipped to care for older people when they are ill. Although attitudes toward this field of nursing appear to be positive amongst nursing students, fewer students choose the care of ill older people as a career upon qualification; the need to assure the future nursing workforce in this field has been acknowledged globally. In view of the ageing of the world population, there is a need to encourage the care of ill older people as a positive career choice (Koh, 2012). Factors both within the practical learning environment and the environment where students receive theoretical instruction, may potentially impact upon nursing students' attitudes towards caring for ill older people and their career intentions. It is against this background that this review was conducted, in order to identify reasons for this prevailing negativity. It is intended that the review will shed light on strategies to improve these perceptions, showing a career in caring for ill older people in a more positive light. PMID:27428691

  2. Exploring the impact of austerity-driven policy reforms on the quality of the long-term care provision for older people in Belgium and the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, David; Jongen, Wesley; Schröder-Bäck, Peter

    2016-08-01

    In this case study, European quality benchmarks were used to explore the contemporary quality of the long-term care provision for older people in the Belgian region of Flanders and the Netherlands following recent policy reforms. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with various experts on the long-term care provision. The results show that in the wake of the economic crisis and the reforms that followed, certain vulnerable groups of older people in Belgium and the Netherlands are at risk of being deprived of long-term care that is available, affordable and person-centred. Various suggestions were provided on how to improve the quality of the long-term care provision. The main conclusion drawn in this study is that while national and regional governments set the stage through regulatory frameworks and financing mechanisms, it is subsequently up to long-term care organisations, local social networks and informal caregivers to give substance to a high quality long-term care provision. An increased reliance on social networks and informal caregivers is seen as vital to ensure the sustainability of the long-term care systems in Belgium and in the Netherlands, although this simultaneously introduces new predicaments and difficulties. Structural governmental measures have to be introduced to support and protect informal caregivers and informal care networks. PMID:27531456

  3. The influence of cognition on self-management of type 2 diabetes in older people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlin, Ali; Sinclair, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a growing public health issue, increasing in prevalence, eroding quality of life, and burdening health care systems. The complications of diabetes can be avoided or delayed by maintaining good glycemic control, which is achievable through self-management and, where necessary, medication. Older people with diabetes are at increased risk for cognitive impairment. This review aims to bring together current research that has investigated both cognition and diabetes self-management together. The Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (Cinahl), Excerpta Medica Database (Embase), Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (Medline), and Psychological Information (PsychInfo) databases were searched. Studies were included if they featured older people with type 2 diabetes and had looked for associations between at least one distinct measure of cognition and at least one distinct measure of diabetes self-management. English language publications from the year 2000 were included. Cognitive measures of executive function, memory, and low scores on tests of global cognitive functioning showed significant correlations with multiple areas of diabetes self-management, including diabetes-specific numeracy ability, diabetes knowledge, insulin adjustment skills, ability to learn to perform insulin injections, worse adherence to medications, decreased frequency of self-care activities, missed appointments, decreased frequency of diabetes monitoring, and increased inaccuracies in reporting blood glucose monitoring. The nature of the subjects studied was quite variable in terms of their disease duration, previous medical histories, associated medical comorbidities, and educational level attained prior to being diagnosed with diabetes. The majority of studies were of an associational nature and not findings confirmed by repeat testing or by the effects of an intervention, neither were the majority of studies designed to give a view or conclusion on the clinical

  4. The influence of cognition on self-management of type 2 diabetes in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlin, Ali; Sinclair, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a growing public health issue, increasing in prevalence, eroding quality of life, and burdening health care systems. The complications of diabetes can be avoided or delayed by maintaining good glycemic control, which is achievable through self-management and, where necessary, medication. Older people with diabetes are at increased risk for cognitive impairment. This review aims to bring together current research that has investigated both cognition and diabetes self-management together. The Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (Cinahl), Excerpta Medica Database (Embase), Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (Medline), and Psychological Information (PsychInfo) databases were searched. Studies were included if they featured older people with type 2 diabetes and had looked for associations between at least one distinct measure of cognition and at least one distinct measure of diabetes self-management. English language publications from the year 2000 were included. Cognitive measures of executive function, memory, and low scores on tests of global cognitive functioning showed significant correlations with multiple areas of diabetes self-management, including diabetes-specific numeracy ability, diabetes knowledge, insulin adjustment skills, ability to learn to perform insulin injections, worse adherence to medications, decreased frequency of self-care activities, missed appointments, decreased frequency of diabetes monitoring, and increased inaccuracies in reporting blood glucose monitoring. The nature of the subjects studied was quite variable in terms of their disease duration, previous medical histories, associated medical comorbidities, and educational level attained prior to being diagnosed with diabetes. The majority of studies were of an associational nature and not findings confirmed by repeat testing or by the effects of an intervention, neither were the majority of studies designed to give a view or conclusion on the clinical

  5. A systematic review of the unit costs of allied health and community services used by older people in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Farag Inez; Sherrington Cathie; Ferreira Manuela; Howard Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background An economic evaluation of interventions for older people requires accurate assessment of costing and consideration of both acute and long-term services. Accurate information on the unit cost of allied health and community services is not readily available in Australia however. This systematic review therefore aims to synthesise information available in the literature on the unit costs of allied health and community services that may be utilised by an older person living in...

  6. A systematic review of the unit costs of allied health and community services used by older people in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Farag, Inez; Sherrington, Cathie; Ferreira, Manuela; Howard, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Background An economic evaluation of interventions for older people requires accurate assessment of costing and consideration of both acute and long-term services. Accurate information on the unit cost of allied health and community services is not readily available in Australia however. This systematic review therefore aims to synthesise information available in the literature on the unit costs of allied health and community services that may be utilised by an older person living in Australi...

  7. A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study of Home-Based Step Training in Older People Using Videogame Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Schoene, Daniel; Lord, Stephen R; Delbaere, Kim; Severino, Connie; Davies, Thomas A.; Smith, Stuart T

    2013-01-01

    Background Stepping impairments are associated with physical and cognitive decline in older adults and increased fall risk. Exercise interventions can reduce fall risk, but adherence is often low. A new exergame involving step training may provide an enjoyable exercise alternative for preventing falls in older people. Purpose To assess the feasibility and safety of unsupervised, home-based step pad training and determine the effectiveness of this intervention on stepping performance and assoc...

  8. Do white matter hyperintensities mediate the association between brain iron deposition and cognitive abilities in older people?

    OpenAIRE

    Valdes Hernandez, Maria; Allerhand, Michael; Glatz, Andreas; Clayson, L; Munoz-Maniega, Susana; Gow, Alan; Royle, Natalie; Bastin, Mark; Starr, John; Deary, Ian; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Several studies have reported associations between brain iron deposits (IDs), white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) and cognitive ability in older individuals. Whether the association between brain IDs and cognitive abilities in older people is mediated by or independent of total brain tissue damage represented by WMHs visible on structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was examined. Methods Data from 676 community-dwelling individuals from the Lothian Birth Cohort 19...

  9. Palliative care for older people – exploring the views of doctors and nurses from different fields in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider Nils; Schumacher Martin; Brueckner Torben

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Providing appropriate palliative care for older people is a major task for health care systems worldwide, and up to now it has also been one of the most neglected. Focusing on the German health care system, we sought to explore the attitudes of health professionals regarding their understanding of palliative care for older patients and its implementation. Methods In a qualitative study design, focus groups were established consisting of general practitioners, geriatricians...

  10. How do older people describe their sensory experiences of the natural world? A systematic review of the qualitative evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Orr, Noreen; Wagstaffe, Alexandra; Briscoe, Simon; Garside, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the increased scholarly interest in the senses and sensory experiences, the topic of older people’s sensory engagement with nature is currently under researched. This paper reviews and synthesises qualitative research evidence about how older people, including those living with dementia, describe their sensory engagement with the natural world. Methods Ten databases were searched from 1990 to September 2014: MEDLINE (Ovid), MEDLINE-in-Process (Ovid), PsycINFO (Ovid), CINAHL...

  11. Nutritional status in cognitively intact older people receiving home care services--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soini, H; Routasalo, P; Lagstrom, H

    2005-01-01

    Older adults are a potentially vulnerable group for malnutrition. This cross-sectional pilot study aims to assess the nutritional status of elderly patients living at home and receiving home health care services. The data were collected from patient care plans, the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), and a questionnaire on eating problems. In addition, serum nutritional status indicators were measured, and an oral examination including quantitative saliva measurement was carried out. Out of 71 eligible patients 51 (72%) patients aged 76-93 years participated. MNA results showed that 47% were at risk of malnutrition. Care plans for 26 patients made reference to questions of nutrition but provided no detailed forward planning. The mean serum albumin value was 39.1 +/- 3.8 g/l, seven patients had a value lower than 35 g/l. MNA scores were significantly lower for female patients with haemoglobin values lower than 120 g/l (p = 0.027). The dentist's estimation of dry mouth and subjective problems in energy intake were significantly associated with lower MNA scores (p = 0.049 and p = 0.015). Subjects with functioning natural dentition had higher body mass index (BMI) scores than others (p = 0.0485). The results point at the importance of using screening tools such as the MNA for purposes of nutritional assessment, the estimation of oral problems such as dry mouth, chewing and swallowing problems, and advance planning in nutritional issues within the field of home care. PMID:15980925

  12. Health service use, out-of-pocket payments and catastrophic health expenditure among older people in India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinda, Ethel Mary; Kowal, Paul; Attermann, Jørn;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Healthcare financing through out-of-pocket payments and inequities in healthcare utilisation are common in low and middle income countries (LMICs). Given the dearth of pertinent studies on these issues among older people in LMICs, we investigated the determinants of health service use......, out-of-pocket and catastrophic health expenditures among older people in one LMIC, India. METHODS: We accessed data from a nationally representative, multistage sample of 2414 people aged 65 years and older from the WHO's Study on global Ageing and adult health in India. Sociodemographic...... regression models were used to assess the determinants of out-of-pocket and catastrophic health expenditures. RESULTS: Out-of-pocket health expenditures were higher among participants with disability and lower income. Diabetes, hypertension, chronic pulmonary disease, heart disease and tuberculosis increased...

  13. An alternative discourse of productive aging: A self-restrained approach in older Chinese people in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Minxia; Chui, Ernest Wing-Tak

    2016-08-01

    While Western discourses regarding productive aging emphasize individuals' contributions to economic productivity, the Confucian cultural heritage of the Chinese community may provide an alternative perspective. This qualitative study explores interpretations of what constitutes productive aging, based on a series of in-depth interviews with older Chinese people in Hong Kong. It shows that some of these individuals adopted a passive and indirect interpretation of productive aging, distinct from that found in Western countries. The Confucianism-based, collectivist, normative order underpinning Hong Kong society disposed these older people to adopting a self-restrained attitude with the aim of avoiding becoming a burden to others, especially family members. Such a tendency toward self-restraint or avoidance also encompassed a compromise between ideals and reality, with the older people opting to compromise their expectations of the younger generation as a whole, their adult children in particular, in terms of respect and reciprocity. PMID:27531450

  14. Long-term effect of physical activity counseling on mobility limitation among older people: a randomized controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna Regina; Heinonen, Ari; Leinonen, Raija; Törmäkangas, Timo; Hirvensalo, Mirja; Kallinen, Mauri; Sakari, Ritva; von Bonsdorff, Mikaela B; Heikkinen, Eino; Rantanen, Taina

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physical activity counseling increases physical activity among older people, but its effectiveness on mobility, that is, maintaining the ability to move independently, is unknown. We studied the effect of physical activity counseling on mobility among older people and evaluated whether...... older people, a single individualized physical activity counseling session with a supportive phone contact every 4 months for 2 years had a positive effect on mobility, an important factor for maintaining independence in the community in old age....... counseling-induced benefits persist after cessation of the intervention. METHODS: In a 2-year, single-blinded, randomized controlled study, 632 sedentary participants aged 75-81 years were randomly assigned into the intervention (n = 318) or control (n = 314) group. The intervention group received a single...

  15. [Application of music therapy for managing agitated behavior in older people with dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Huei-Chuan; Chang, Anne M; Abbey, Jennifer

    2006-10-01

    Older people with dementia may display negative emotions, memory problems, sleep disturbance, and agitated behavior. Among these symptoms, agitated behavior has been identified by families and nursing staff as the care problem that presents the greatest challenge. Several studies have found that music therapy reduced agitated behaviors in those with dementia and recommended use of music as an effective strategy in managing this behavioral problem. Music therapy represents a lower cost, effective care approach that nursing staff can easily learn and apply to those with dementia. Furthermore, reductions in agitated behavior in dementia patients that result from music therapy can also alleviate caregiver stress and burden of care, leading to improvements in the health and quality of life of both dementia patients and their caregivers. This paper aims to introduce the principles and application of music therapy in the management of agitated behavior in those with dementia. PMID:17004208

  16. Effects of Tai Chi exercise on physical and psychological health of older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Holly; Hawley, Helen

    2012-02-01

    Tai Chi is a traditional Chinese form of conditioning exercise derived from martial arts and rooted in eastern philosophy and Chinese Medicine. Based on the inter-relatedness of mind, body and spirit this form of exercise focuses on producing an inner calmness which is thought to have both physical and psychological therapeutic value. This article provides a brief overview of selected current evidence examining the relationship between Tai Chi and physical, neurocognitive and psychosocial outcomes in older people. This is an emerging and growing area of research and improvements have often been reported in health functioning, physical and emotional health, reducing falls, fear of falling and risk of falls, and possibly enhancing cardiovascular functioning in older adults although the effects on bone density, cognitive and immunological functioning are less clear. Results overall are inconsistent and health improvements have not been evident in all studies. Tai Chi is becoming increasingly popular in practice, and more recent evidence is emerging which is based on experimental and longitudinal designs, although many of the proposed benefits of Tai Chi are yet to be validated in large, randomised controlled trials. PMID:21762093

  17. Auditory temporal processing and aging: implications for speech understanding of older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gordon-Salant

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Current estimates of the prevalence of age-related hearing loss among those over 65 years in the U.S. converge on an overall prevalence rate of approximately 50%, suggesting that there are currently 20 million senior citizens with significant hearing loss (Agrawal et al., 2008; Cruickshanks et al., 1998; Moscicki et al., 1985. Because the post-World War II baby generation (generally known as the Baby Boomers is approaching retirement age (and hence known as the Golden Boomers, it is anticipated that the population of those over 65 years with age-related hearing loss will increase to 36 million by the year 2030. Perhaps the #1 communication challenge reported by older adults is difficulty understanding speech in less-than-ideal conditions. These conditions include poor acoustic environments (noise or reverberation or speech that is produced by individuals with accents or fast speaking rates. The problems in speech understanding in demanding communication situations are reported by older people with hearing loss as well as those with normal hearing. One key challenge for researchers is to identify those aspects of the communication breakdown that are attributed to loss of hearing sensitivity vs. those that are associated with other factors that accompany aging...

  18. Health-related quality of life, and its determinants, among older people in rural Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoi Le V

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The proportion of people in Vietnam aged 60 and above has increased rapidly in recent decades. However, there is a lack of evidence, particularly in rural settings, on their health-related quality of life (HRQoL within the context of socioeconomic changes and health-sector reform in the country. This study assesses the level and determinants of HRQoL in a rural district in order to provide evidence for designing and implementing appropriate health policies. Methods In 2007, 2,873 people aged 60+ living in 2,240 households randomly selected from the FilaBavi demographic surveillance site (DSS were interviewed using a generic EQ-5D questionnaire to assess their HRQoL. Socioeconomic characteristics of the people and their households were extracted from the DSS's re-census that year, and the EQ-5D index was calculated based on the time trade-off tariff. Multilevel-multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to measure the affect of socioeconomic factors on HRQoL. Results The EQ-5D index at old age was found to be 0.876 (95%CI: 0.870-0.882. Age between 60-69 or 70-79 years, position as household head, working until old age, literacy, and belonging to better wealth quintiles are determinants of higher HRQoL. Ageing has a primary influence on the deterioration of HRQoL at older ages, mainly due to reduction in physical rather than mental functions. Educational disparity in HRQoL is low, and exists mostly between basic and higher levels of education. Being a household head and working at old age are advantageous for attaining better quality of life in physical rather than psychological terms. Economic conditions affect HRQoL through sensory rather than physical utilities. Long-term living conditions more likely affect HRQoL than short-term economic conditions. Conclusions HRQoL at old age is at a high level, and varies substantially according to socioeconomic factors. Its determinants should be addressed in social and

  19. Access to primary care for socioeconomically disadvantaged older people in rural areas: a realist review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, John A; Wong, Geoff; Jones, Andy P; Steel, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this review is to identify and understand the contexts that effect access to high-quality primary care for socioeconomically disadvantaged older people in rural areas. Design A realist review. Data sources MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases and grey literature (from inception to December 2014). Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Broad inclusion criteria were used to allow articles which were not specific, but might be relevant to the population of interest to be considered. Studies meeting the inclusion criteria were assessed for rigour and relevance and coded for concepts relating to context, mechanism or outcome. Analysis An overarching patient pathway was generated and used as the basis to explore contexts, causal mechanisms and outcomes. Results 162 articles were included. Most were from the USA or the UK, cross-sectional in design and presented subgroup data by age, rurality or deprivation. From these studies, a patient pathway was generated which included 7 steps (problem identified, decision to seek help, actively seek help, obtain appointment, get to appointment, primary care interaction and outcome). Important contexts were stoicism, education status, expectations of ageing, financial resources, understanding the healthcare system, access to suitable transport, capacity within practice, the booking system and experience of healthcare. Prominent causal mechanisms were health literacy, perceived convenience, patient empowerment and responsiveness of the practice. Conclusions Socioeconomically disadvantaged older people in rural areas face personal, community and healthcare barriers that limit their access to primary care. Initiatives should be targeted at local contextual factors to help individuals recognise problems, feel welcome, navigate the healthcare system, book appointments easily, access appropriate transport and have sufficient time with professional staff to improve their experience of healthcare; all of which

  20. Plantar calcaneal spurs in older people: longitudinal traction or vertical compression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landorf Karl B

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar calcaneal spurs are common, however their pathophysiology is poorly understood. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and correlates of plantar calcaneal spurs in a large sample of older people. Methods Weightbearing lateral foot radiographs of 216 people (140 women and 76 men aged 62 to 94 years (mean age 75.9, SD 6.6 were examined for plantar calcaneal and Achilles tendon spurs. Associations between the presence of spurs and sex, body mass index, radiographic measures of foot posture, self-reported co-morbidities and current or previous heel pain were then explored. Results Of the 216 participants, 119 (55% had at least one plantar calcaneal spur and 103 (48% had at least one Achilles tendon spur. Those with plantar calcaneal spurs were more likely to have Achilles tendon spurs (odds ratio [OR] = 2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2 to 3.5. Prevalence of spurs did not differ according to sex. Participants with plantar calcaneal spurs were more likely to be obese (OR = 7.9, 95% CI 3.6 to 17.0, report osteoarthritis (OR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.6 to 4.8 and have current or previous heel pain (OR = 4.6, 95% CI 2.3 to 9.4. No relationship was found between the presence of calcaneal spurs and radiographic measures of foot posture. Conclusion Calcaneal spurs are common in older men and women and are related to obesity, osteoarthritis and current or previous heel pain, but are unrelated to radiographic measurements of foot posture. These findings support the theory that plantar calcaneal spurs may be an adaptive response to vertical compression of the heel rather than longitudinal traction at the calcaneal enthesis.

  1. Health, wellbeing, and disability among older people infected or affected by HIV in Uganda and South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makandwe Nyirenda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe and compare the health status, emotional wellbeing, and functional status of older people in Uganda and South Africa who are HIV infected or affected by HIV in their families. Methods: Data came from the general population cohort and Entebbe cohort of the Medical Research Council/Uganda Virus Research Institute, and from the Africa Centre Demographic Information System through cross-sectional surveys in 2009/10 using instruments adapted from the World Health Organization (WHO Study on Global Ageing and adult health (SAGE. Analysis was based on 932 people aged 50 years or older (510 Uganda, 422 South Africa. Results: Participants in South Africa were slightly younger (median age − 60 years in South Africa, 63 in Uganda, and more were currently married, had no formal education, were not working, and were residing in a rural area. Adjusting for socio-demographic factors, older people in South Africa were significantly less likely to have good functional ability [adjusted odds ratio (aOR 0.72, 95% CI 0.53–0.98] than those in Uganda, but were more likely to be in good subjective wellbeing (aOR 2.15, 95% CI 1.60–2.90. South Africans were more likely to be obese (aOR 5.26, 95% CI 3.46–8.00 or to be diagnosed with hypertension (aOR 2.77, 95% CI 2.06–3.73. Discussion and conclusions: While older people's health problems are similar in the two countries, marked socio-demographic differences influence the extent to which older people are affected by poorer health. It is therefore imperative when designing policies to improve the health and wellbeing of older people in sub-Saharan Africa that the region is not treated as a homogenous entity.

  2. Embodied thermal environments: an examination of older-people's sensory experiences in a variety of residential types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal sensations of space, namely temperature, humidity and the movement of air, can be difficult to separate from other sensory information such as the sound of fans or ventilation equipment, or the smell of damp or cool fresh air. Despite this factor, efforts to reduce the consumption of energy through the installation of low-carbon technologies including sealed whole-building systems frequently isolate the thermal environment and fail to recognise and respond to the influence of other sensory information on personal preferences and behaviours. Older people represent an increasing proportion of the UK's population, can be faced with a range of physiological challenges associated with ageing, and sometimes have long-established personal preferences. Drawing from data collected across the Conditioning Demand Project, this paper explores the embodied nature of older people's experiences of low-carbon and more traditional thermal technologies in private residences, extra-care housing and residential care-homes, focussing specifically upon auditory and olfactory stimulus. Exploring the management of the sensory experience across these settings, we analyse each case to inform the development of new design and policy approaches to tackling housing for older people. In doing so, we further build connections between energy research and debates around sensory urbanism. -- Highlights: •Some thermal technologies present particular sensory issues and problems for older people. •Older people use a range of sensory stimuli in evaluating and controlling thermal environments. •Older people use non-thermal sensory information when selecting between thermal technologies. •Sensory information plays an important role in thermal technology maintenance

  3. Ability of older people with dementia or cognitive impairment to manage medicine regimens: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Rohan A; Goeman, Dianne; Beanland, Christine; Koch, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Impaired cognition has a significant impact on a person's ability to manage their medicines. The aim of this paper is to provide a narrative review of contemporary literature on medicines management by people with dementia or cognitive impairment living in the community, methods for assessing their capacity to safely manage medicines, and strategies for supporting independent medicines management. Studies and reviews addressing medicines management by people with dementia or cognitive impairment published between 2003 and 2013 were identified via searches of Medline and other databases. The literature indicates that as cognitive impairment progresses, the ability to plan, organise, and execute medicine management tasks is impaired, leading to increased risk of unintentional non-adherence, medication errors, preventable medication-related hospital admissions and dependence on family carers or community nursing services to assist with medicines management. Impaired functional capacity may not be detected by health professionals in routine clinical encounters. Assessment of patients' (or carers') ability to safely manage medicines is not undertaken routinely, and when it is there is variability in the methods used. Self-report and informant report may be helpful, but can be unreliable or prone to bias. Measures of cognitive function are useful, but may lack sensitivity and specificity. Direct observation, using a structured, standardised performance-based tool, may help to determine whether a person is able to manage their medicines and identify barriers to adherence such as inability to open medicine packaging. A range of strategies have been used to support independent medicines management in people with cognitive impairment, but there is little high-quality research underpinning these strategies. Further studies are needed to develop and evaluate approaches to facilitate safe medicines management by older people with cognitive impairment and their carers. PMID

  4. Community care: the impact of current welfare policies and ideologies on older people in Hertfordshire and Bedfordshire

    OpenAIRE

    Barrett, David

    1992-01-01

    This thesis investigates whether community care policy and service delivery is rhetoric or reality. The social policy and under-pinning ideologies that surround community care are reviewed. Important benchmarks are presented in the form of a chronology and aetiology of The National Health Service and Community Care Act, 1990. An interview schedule was designed from the perspective of older people and was used with a sample of 40 older people, 20 at Luton in an inner-city setting and 20 in Red...

  5. Integrated Care for older people in Europe – latest trends and perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Leichsenring

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As a researcher and consultant I have coordinated local pilots and European research projects to analyse and improve long-term care for older people by better integrating health and social care systems. One of my conclusions from the wide range of initiatives that have been taken over the past two decades in Europe has been the need to treat long-term care as a system in its own right.  Long-term care systems require a discernable identity; specific policies, structures, processes and pathways; and the leadership and resources that can underpin expectations, drive performance and achieve better outcomes for people that are living with (and working for those with long-term care needs. Progress in developing LTC systems can be identified today in all European countries. Integrated care solutions at the interface between health and social care, and between formal and informal care, have appeared. These have been achieved partly by means of (slow political reforms, partly as a response to market-oriented governance, and in many cases through pioneering community and civil society initiatives. It will depend on such initiatives, and their ability to convince both citizens and policy-makers, whether new societal approaches to long-term care are created that meet the demands of ageing societies.

  6. Structural violence in long-term, residential care for older people: comparing Canada and Scandinavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Albert; Daly, Tamara; Armstrong, Pat; Szebehely, Marta; Armstrong, Hugh; Lafrance, Stirling

    2012-02-01

    Canadian frontline careworkers are six times more likely to experience daily physical violence than their Scandinavian counterparts. This paper draws on a comparative survey of residential careworkers serving older people across three Canadian provinces (Manitoba, Nova Scotia, Ontario) and four countries that follow a Scandinavian model of social care (Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden) conducted between 2005 and 2006. Ninety percent of Canadian frontline careworkers experienced physical violence from residents or their relatives and 43 percent reported physical violence on a daily basis. Canadian focus groups conducted in 2007 reveal violence was often normalized as an inevitable part of elder-care. We use the concept of "structural violence" (Galtung, 1969) to raise questions about the role that systemic and organizational factors play in setting the context for violence. Structural violence refers to indirect forms of violence that are built into social structures and that prevent people from meeting their basic needs or fulfilling their potential. We applied the concept to long-term residential care and found that the poor quality of the working conditions and inadequate levels of support experienced by Canadian careworkers constitute a form of structural violence. Working conditions are detrimental to careworker's physical and mental health, and prevent careworkers from providing the quality of care they are capable of providing and understand to be part of their job. These conditions may also contribute to the physical violence workers experience, and further investigation is warranted. PMID:22204839

  7. A randomised controlled trial investigating the effect of vitamin B12 supplementation on neurological function in healthy older people: the Older People and Enhanced Neurological function (OPEN study protocol [ISRCTN54195799

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whyte Ken

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vitamin B12 deficiency is common in older people and the prevalence increases with age. Vitamin B12 deficiency may present as macrocytic anaemia, subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord, or as neuropathy, but is often asymptomatic in older people. The diagnosis and indications for treatment are clear for individuals with low plasma levels of vitamin B12 in the setting of megaloblastic anaemia and neuropathy, but the relevance of treatment of vitamin B12 deficiency in the absence of such clinical signs is uncertain. Methods The aim of the present study is to assess whether dietary supplementation with crystalline vitamin B12 will improve electrophysiological indices of neurological function in older people who have biochemical evidence of vitamin B12 insufficiency in the absence of anaemia. To test this hypothesis we designed a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial involving 200 older people aged 75 years or greater who were randomly allocated to receive either a daily oral tablet containing 1 mg vitamin B12 or a matching placebo tablet. The primary outcome assessed at 12 months is change in electrophysiological indices of peripheral and central neurosensory responses required for mobility and sensory function. We here report the detailed study protocol. Conclusions In view of the high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in later life, the present trial could have considerable significance for public health.

  8. Cross-sectional survey of older peoples' views related to influenza vaccine uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovats Sari

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The population's views concerning influenza vaccine are important in maintaining high uptake of a vaccine that is required yearly to be effective. Little is also known about the views of the more vulnerable older population over the age of 74 years. Methods A cross-sectional survey of community dwelling people aged 75 years and over wh, previous participant was conducted using a postal questionnaire. Responses were analysed by vaccine uptake records and by socio-demographic and medical factors. Results 85% of men and 75% of women were vaccinated against influenza in the previous year. Over 80% reported being influenced by a recommendation by a health care worker. The most common reason reported for non uptake was good health (44%, or illness considered to be due to the vaccine (25%. An exploration of the crude associations with socio-economic status suggested there may be some differences in the population with these two main reasons. 81% of people reporting good health lived in owner occupied housing with central heating vs. 63% who did not state this as a reason (p = 0.04, whereas people reporting ill health due to the vaccine was associated with poorer social circumstances. 11% lived in the least deprived neighbourhood compared to 36% who did not state this as a reason (p = 0.05 and were less likely to be currently married than those who did not state this as a reason (25% vs 48% p = 0.05. Conclusion Vaccine uptake was high, but non uptake was still noted in 1 in 4 women and 1 in 7 men aged over 74 years. Around 70% reported they would not have the vaccine in the following year. The divergent reasons for non-uptake, and the positive influence from a health care worker, suggests further uptake will require education and encouragement from a health care worker tailored towards the different views for not having influenza vaccination. Non-uptake of influenza vaccine because people viewed themselves as in good health may

  9. The effect of testosterone and a nutritional supplement on hospital admissions in under-nourished, older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Ian D

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Weight loss and under-nutrition are relatively common in older people, and are associated with poor outcomes including increased rates of hospital admissions and death. In a pilot study of 49 undernourished older, community dwelling people we found that daily treatment for one year with a combination of testosterone tablets and a nutritional supplement produced a significant reduction in hospitalizations. We propose a larger, multicentre study to explore and hopefully confirm this exciting, potentially important finding (NHMRC project grant number 627178. Methods/Design One year randomized control trial where subjects are allocated to either oral testosterone undecanoate and high calorie oral nutritional supplement or placebo medication and low calorie oral nutritional supplementation. 200 older community-dwelling, undernourished people [Mini Nutritional Assessment score 2: 7.5% over 3 months]. Hospital admissions, quality-adjusted life years, functional status, nutritional health, muscle strength, body composition and other variables will be assessed. Discussion The pilot study showed that combined treatment with an oral testosterone and a supplement drink was well tolerated and safe, and reduced the number of people hospitalised and duration of hospital admissions in undernourished, community dwelling older people. This is an exciting finding, as it identifies a treatment which may be of substantial benefit to many older people in our community. We now propose to conduct a multi-centre study to test these findings in a substantially larger subject group, and to determine the cost effectiveness of this treatment. Trial registration Australian Clinical Trial Registry: ACTRN 12610000356066

  10. Barriers to participation in a hospital-based falls assessment clinic programme: an interview study with older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evron, L.; Schultz-Larsen, K.; Fristrup, T.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To gain new knowledge about barriers to participation in hospital-based falls assessment. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 20 older people referred to falls assessment at a hospital-based clinic were conducted. A convenience sample of 10 refusers and 10 accepters was collected. Those...

  11. Adding Years to Life and Life to Years - A Health Promotion Strategy for Older People in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Department of Health

    1998-01-01

    This Health Strategy points to the need for promoting healthy ageing in conjunction with the then National Council for Elderly – a goal which was re-iterated in the 1995 Health Promotion Strategy, in which older people were identified as a priority  population group with particular health promotion needs  

  12. The Impact of Socioeconomic Conditions, Social Networks, and Health on Frail Older People's Life Satisfaction: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Helene; Hasson, Henna; Wilhelmson, Katarina; Dunér, Anna; Dahlin-Ivanoff, Synneve

    2016-06-23

    It has been shown that frailty is associated with low levels of well-being and life satisfaction. Further exploration is needed, however, to better understand which components constitute life satisfaction for frail older people and how satisfaction is related to other life circumstances. The aim of this study was to examine relationships between frail older people's life satisfaction and their socioeconomic conditions, social networks, and health-related conditions. A cross-sectional study was conducted (n=179). A logistic regression analysis was performed, including life satisfaction as the dependent variable and 12 items as independent variables. Four of the independent variables made statistically significant contributions: financial situation (OR 3.53), social contacts (OR 2.44), risk of depression (OR 2.26), and self-rated health (OR 2.79). This study demonstrates that financial situation, self-rated health conditions and social networks are important components for frail older people's life satisfaction. Health and social care professionals and policy makers should consider this knowledge in the care and service for frail older people; and actions that benefit life satisfaction - such as social support - should be promoted. PMID:27403463

  13. Can a Website-Delivered Computer-Tailored Physical Activity Intervention Be Acceptable, Usable, and Effective for Older People?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, Rahel; Vandelanotte, Corneel; de Vries, Hein; Mummery, W. Kerry

    2013-01-01

    Despite the numerous health benefits, population physical activity levels are low and declining with age. A continued increase of Internet access allows for website-delivered interventions to be implemented across age-groups, though older people have typically not been considered for this type of intervention. Therefore, the purpose of this study…

  14. Stress, Health Behavior, and Sleep as Mediators of the Association between Loneliness and Adverse Health Conditions among Older People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Julie

    Prior research has established an association between loneliness and a variety of negative health conditions among older people. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying the association. The Loneliness Model seeks to explain the mechanisms through which chronic loneliness might...

  15. Quality of University Programs for Older People in Spain: Innovations, Tendencies, and Ethics in European Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, C. Palmero; Eguizabal, A. Jimenez

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the innovative regulations, methodologies, and institutions involved in the development of the European Higher Education Area and their implications for teaching, research, and management of University Programs for Older People. It also identifies the main tendencies, creative dimensions, and ethical commitments implicit in…

  16. Treatment Fidelity of an Evidence-Based Nurse-Led Intervention in a Proactive Primary Care Program for Older People

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenberg, Nienke; ten Dam, Valerie H.; Drubbel, Irene; Numans, Mattijs E.; de Wit, Niek J.; Schuurmans, Marieke J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In a large randomized trial, Utrecht PROactive Frailty Intervention Trial (U-PROFIT), we evaluated the effectiveness of an integrated program on the preservation of daily functioning in older people in primary care that consisted of a frailty identification tool and a multicomponent nurs

  17. Keeping warm? Self-reported housing and home energy efficiency factors impacting on older people heating homes in North Wales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines a representative sample (N=421) of older people (aged 70+) living in rural North Wales with regard to relationships between fuel poverty, feeling cold in one's home and a range of self-reported housing and home energy efficiency items. In the Welsh context, the combination of poor housing stock and low-level income is likely to increase the chance of older people experiencing fuel poverty, therefore the analyses are relevant to both energy and social policy. The paper hypothesises that: (i) People in 'fuel poor' homes are: low-income households; living in older houses; lacking home energy efficiency measures; (ii) not all people facing difficulties heating their home (i.e. wearing extra clothing to keep warm during cold spells) are identified as 'fuel poor', but there will be an association between taking extra measures to keep warm and low income; older houses and lacking home energy efficiency factors. The results partially support the hypotheses. An estimation is made of the expenditure required to counter the factors associated with fuel poverty and cold homes in the region. The paper concludes with implications for the UK Fuel Poverty Strategy

  18. Associations of Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression with Diabetes and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Older People with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, C. F.; Hermans, H.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Depression, anxiety, diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors are frequent health problems among older people with intellectual disability (ID). These conditions may be bidirectionally related. Depression and anxiety may have biological effects causing glucose intolerance, fat accumulation and also lifestyle changes causing metabolic…

  19. MEDICATION MANAGEMENT CAPACITY IN RELATION TO COGNITION AND SELF-MANAGEMENT SKILLS IN OLDER PEOPLE ON POLYPHARMACY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sino, C. G. M.; Sietzema, M.; Egberts, T. C. G.; Schuurmans, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: to determine the medication management capacity of independently living older people (>= 75 years) on polypharmacy (>= 5 medications) in relation to their cognitive- and self-management skills. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: two homecare organizations in the Netherlands. Particip

  20. The effects of Tai Chi on fall prevention, fear of falling and balance in older people: a meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logghe, I.H.; Verhagen, A.P.; Rademaker, A.C.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S.M.; Rossum, E. van; Faber, M.J.; Koes, B.W.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Tai Chi (TC) is an exercise training that is becoming increasingly popular as an intervention for single fall prevention. This meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy of TC on fall rate, fear of falling and balance in older people. METHODS: Randomized controlled trials publis

  1. EFFECT OF STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE TRAINING ON COGNITION IN OLDER PEOPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gül Y. Özkaya

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of moderate strength and endurance training on cognition evaluated by event-related potentials (ERP in older people. Thirty-six adults, aged 60-85 years, were randomly divided into three groups: sedentary control (C, strength training (ST, and endurance training (ET. Participants performed functional fitness tests and ERP data were recorded before and after nine weeks of training. Training involved three sessions per week. Functional fitness test performance improved significantly in the ST and ET groups. The latencies of the N1, N2, and P2 components and the amplitudes of the N1P2, P2N2, and N2P3 components differed significantly between groups (p < 0.05. After training, the latencies of the P2 and N2 components at the Fz and Cz sites, decreased significantly, and the amplitudes of the N1P2, P2N2, and N2P3 components at the Fz site and the N1P2 and N2P3 components at the Cz site, increased significantly in the ST group compared with the ET group. After training, the latencies of N1, N2, and P2 components shortened significantly, and the amplitudes of the N1P2, P2N2, and N2P3 components increased significantly in the ST group compared with the C group. The latencies of the N2 and P2 components shortened significantly in the ET group compared with the C group, although the amplitudes of the ERP recordings did not differ significantly between groups. These data suggest that strength training might facilitate early sensory processing and cognitive functioning in older individuals

  2. Factors associated with self-rated health in older people living in institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastor-Barriuso Roberto

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although self-rated health has been extensively studied in community older people, its determinants have seldom been investigated in institutional settings. We carried out a cross-sectional study to describe the physical, mental, and social factors associated with self-rated health in nursing homes and other geriatric facilities. Methods A representative sample of 800 subjects 65 years of age and older living in 19 public and 30 private institutions of Madrid was randomly selected through stratified cluster sampling. Residents, caregivers, physicians, and nurses were interviewed by trained geriatricians using standardized instruments to assess self-rated health, chronic illnesses, functional capacity, cognitive status, depressive symptoms, vision and hearing problems, and social support. Results Of the 669 interviewed residents (response rate 84%, 55% rated their health as good or very good. There was no association with sex or age. Residents in private facilities and those who completed primary education had significantly better health perception. The adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval for worse health perception was 1.18 (1.07–1.28 for each additional chronic condition, 2.37 (1.38–4.06 when comparing residents with moderate dependency to those functionally independent, and 10.45 (5.84–18.68 when comparing residents with moderate/severe depressive symptoms to those without symptoms. Visual problems were also associated with worse health perception. Similar results were obtained in subgroup analyses, except for inconsistencies in cognitively impaired individuals. Conclusion Chronic conditions, functional status, depressive symptoms and socioeconomic factors were the main determinants of perceived health among Spanish institutionalized elderly persons. Doubts remain about the proper assessment of subjective health in residents with altered cognition.

  3. Medication administration errors for older people in long-term residential care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczepura Ala

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Older people in long-term residential care are at increased risk of medication prescribing and administration errors. The main aim of this study was to measure the incidence of medication administration errors in nursing and residential homes using a barcode medication administration (BCMA system. Methods A prospective study was conducted in 13 care homes (9 residential and 4 nursing. Data on all medication administrations for a cohort of 345 older residents were recorded in real-time using a disguised observation technique. Every attempt by social care and nursing staff to administer medication over a 3-month observation period was analysed using BCMA records to determine the incidence and types of potential medication administration errors (MAEs and whether errors were averted. Error classifications included attempts to administer medication at the wrong time, to the wrong person or discontinued medication. Further analysis compared data for residential and nursing homes. In addition, staff were surveyed prior to BCMA system implementation to assess their awareness of administration errors. Results A total of 188,249 medication administration attempts were analysed using BCMA data. Typically each resident was receiving nine different drugs and was exposed to 206 medication administration episodes every month. During the observation period, 2,289 potential MAEs were recorded for the 345 residents; 90% of residents were exposed to at least one error. The most common (n = 1,021, 45% of errors was attempting to give medication at the wrong time. Over the 3-month observation period, half (52% of residents were exposed to a serious error such as attempting to give medication to the wrong resident. Error incidence rates were 1.43 as high (95% CI 1.32-1.56 p Conclusions The incidence of medication administration errors is high in long-term residential care. A barcode medication administration system can capture medication

  4. They are not always a burden: older people and child fostering in Uganda during the HIV epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasedde, Susan; Doyle, Aoife M; Seeley, Janet A; Ross, David A

    2014-07-01

    This qualitative study examines the role of older people (60 years and above) in fostering decisions for orphans and non-orphans within extended families in a rural Ugandan community heavily affected by HIV. Fieldwork conducted in 2006 provided information on the influence of HIV on fostering decisions through 48 individual in-depth interviews and two group interviews with foster-children and family members to develop detailed case studies related to 13 fostered adolescents. The adolescents included five non-orphans and eight orphans (five were double orphans because they had lost both parents). Older people play a very important role in fostering decisions as potential foster-parents, advisers, mediators and gatekeepers. They have a high level of authority over the foster-children, who are regarded as important resources within the extended family. With fewer potential caregivers available because of HIV-related deaths, the responsibility for fostering orphans has often fallen to surviving older people. Fostering is used by older people and the child's extended family as a strategy to ensure the welfare of the foster-child. When the foster-parent is an older person, it is also used to ensure physical and emotional support for the older person themselves. Support from the extended family towards foster households is widely reported to have been reduced by HIV by diminishing resources that would otherwise have been made available to support foster care. New initiatives and investment are required to complement community and family resources within well-managed social protection and welfare programmes. To be effective, such programmes will require adequate investment in administrative capacity and monitoring. They must aim to strengthen families and, recognizing that resources are limited, should prioritize the community's poorest households, rather than specifically targeting households with orphans or other foster-children. PMID:24880658

  5. Palliative care for older people – exploring the views of doctors and nurses from different fields in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Nils

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Providing appropriate palliative care for older people is a major task for health care systems worldwide, and up to now it has also been one of the most neglected. Focusing on the German health care system, we sought to explore the attitudes of health professionals regarding their understanding of palliative care for older patients and its implementation. Methods In a qualitative study design, focus groups were established consisting of general practitioners, geriatricians, palliative care physicians, palliative care nurses and general nurses (a total of 29 participants. The group discussions were recorded, transcribed, coded and analysed using the methodological approach of Qualitative Description. Results Deficiencies in teamwork and conflicting role definitions between doctors and nurses and between family practitioners and medical specialists were found to be central problems affecting the provision of appropriate palliative care for older people. It was emphasized that there are great advantages to family doctors playing a leading role, as they usually have the longest contacts to the patients. However, the professional qualifications of family doctors were to some extent criticized. The general practitioners for their part criticized the increasing specialization on the field of palliative care. All groups complained that the German compensation system gives insufficient consideration to the time-consuming care of older patients, and about excessive bureaucracy. Conclusion General practitioners are the central health professionals in the delivery of palliative care for older people. They should however be encouraged to involve specialized services such as palliative care teams where necessary. With the German health care reform of 2007, a legal framework has been created that allows for this. As far as its realization is concerned, it must be ensured that the spotlight remains on the needs of the patients and not on

  6. The contribution of home-based technology to older people's quality of life in extra care housing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Stuart G

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background British government policy for older people focuses on a vision of active ageing and independent living. In the face of diminishing personal capacities, the use of appropriate home-based technology (HBT devices could potentially meet a wide range of needs and consequently improve many aspects of older people's quality of life such as physical health, psychosocial well-being, social relationships, and their physical or living environment. This study aimed to examine the use of HBT devices and the correlation between use of such devices and quality of life among older people living in extra-care housing (ECH. Methods A structured questionnaire was administered for this study. Using purposive sampling 160 older people living in extra-care housing schemes were selected from 23 schemes in England. A face-to-face interview was conducted in each participant's living unit. In order to measure quality of life, the SEIQoL-Adapted and CASP-19 were used. Results Although most basic appliances and emergency call systems were used in the living units, communally provided facilities such as personal computers, washing machines, and assisted bathing equipment in the schemes were not well utilised. Multiple regression analysis adjusted for confounders including age, sex, marital status, living arrangement and mobility use indicated a coefficient of 1.17 with 95% CI (0.05, 2.29 and p = 0.04 [SEIQoL-Adapted] and 2.83 with 95% CI (1.17, 4.50 and p = 0.001 [CASP-19]. Conclusions The findings of the present study will be value to those who are developing new form of specialised housing for older people with functional limitations and, in particular, guiding investments in technological aids. The results of the present study also indicate that the home is an essential site for developing residential technologies.

  7. Effect of physical activity counseling on physical activity of older people in Finland (ISRCTN 07330512).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasinaho, Minna; Hirvensalo, Mirja; Törmäkangas, Timo; Leinonen, Raija; Lintunen, Taru; Rantanen, Taina

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the underlying theory and the implementation of a 2-year individualized physical activity counseling intervention and to evaluate whether benefits persisted 1.5 years after the intervention. The sample included 632 sedentary 75- to 81-year-old participants. Data were collected in 2003-2005. The participants were randomly assigned to an intervention group and a control group. The intervention consisted of an individualized face-to-face meeting followed by telephone contacts every 4 months for 2 years, with the aim to increase participation in specific physical activities as well as to increase habitual physical activity. At the 2-year follow-up, the prevalence of physical activities in the intervention group vs. control group was as follows: supervised calisthenics training 20 vs. 16%, walking for fitness 69 vs. 62%, weight training 13 vs. 8% and water aerobics 19 vs. 7%. For water aerobics and walking for fitness, the treatment effect was significant [water aerobics odds ratio (OR) 2.49, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-5.36, walking for fitness OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.05-2.40]. As to the other activities, the effect did not reach statistical significance. At the 1.5-year post-intervention, the follow-up results indicated that the intervention effect was still evident. The subgroup analyses suggested that physical activity counseling may be most efficacious among people with intact mobility, while those having manifest mobility limitations may not benefit from it. Older people who have manifest mobility limitations may need more face-to-face counseling. PMID:21911336

  8. Factors that influence intent to adopt a hearing aid among older people in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobelli, Nicola; Gill, Liz; Cassia, Fabio; Ugolini, Marta

    2014-11-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent health impairments associated with ageing in developed countries, and it can result in social, emotional and communication dysfunction. Hearing loss in Italy is increasing, yet, despite the availability of free hearing aids and access to qualified community-based health professionals specialising in audiology services, their uptake remains low (about 15%-20%). This paper presents an investigation of the possible reasons why older people in Italy resist adopting a hearing aid. We used the literature to identify factors influencing people with hearing loss's decision-making, and drew on the theory of reasoned action to create an explanatory model. To test our hypotheses, we applied a cross-sectional design. We developed a questionnaire including 13 items related to adopting a hearing aid. Health professionals identified 400 persons aged 60-90 who were candidates for a free hearing aid. Those willing to participate were sent a copy of the questionnaire and telephoned between August and September 2009; a total of 243 responded (response rate of 60.8%). Linear regression analysis highlighted that a person's intention to adopt a hearing aid was positively related to their attitude towards its adoption, but negatively linked to their perceived subjective norms. It was found that trust in the health professional does not moderate the relationship between a person's attitude and their intention to adopt a hearing aid, but trust mitigates the relationship between a person's perceived subjective norms and their intentions. These findings underline the importance of the potential role that the healthcare professional could play in reducing the uncertainty created by external social pressures. For this purpose, stronger collaboration between the various health professionals involved in hearing aid provision, from diagnosis to fitting, is recommended. PMID:25251979

  9. The risk for falls in older people in the context of objective functional studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignasiak Zofia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Falls may occur in each ontogenesis phase, but they become more frequent in the elderly and lead to serious health consequences. Dynamic changes in senior citizens’ environment and lifestyle makes studies of risk for falls necessary. To determine the relationship between the risk for falls and the objective functional and structural examination in the elderly living in Poland. The research consisted of 196 females and 61 males aged 60-88 recruited from health clinics, senior citizen centers and Universities of the Third Age between 2009-2012. Following parameters were collected: functional physical tests “30 second Chair Stand Test” and Timed Up and Go Test”, the flexor muscles and knee extensors force, the bone mineral density was measured in distal radius of the forearm with the EXA - 3000, the total risk for fall assessed by 5 tests by abbreviated version of Fallscreen test. Multiple linear regression and linear correlation were used for assessment of relationship with total estimated risk for fall and other parameters. The subjects displayed significant dimorphic differences within the range of the functional parameters and bone mineral density to the advantage of males. Only in women results revealed a significant link between the risk for falls and the dynamic balance, as well as the maximum quadricep muscle force equal. Strength of the lower limb muscles seems to be critical for decreasing the risk for fall. Special programs for strengthening this part of the body for older people should be elaborate.

  10. The financial implications of falls in older people for an acute hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cotter, P E

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Falls are a common occurrence in older people and frequently lead to hospital admission. There is a current lack of cohesive fall prevention strategies in the Republic of Ireland. AIM: To demonstrate the cost of fall-related admissions to an acute hospital. METHODS: A review of Hospital Inpatient Enquiry (HIPE) data and medical case notes was performed for all fall-related admissions over a one-year period. The cost of fall-related admissions was calculated. In addition a detailed cost analysis was performed to determine the true cost of a hip fracture admission. RESULTS: There were 810 fall-related admissions, resulting in 8,300 acute bed days, and 6,220 rehabilitation bed days, costing euros 10.3 million. Fall-related readmissions resulted in 650 bed-days, bringing the total cost to euros 10.8 million. A typical hip fracture incident admission episode costs euros 14,300. CONCLUSION: Fall-related admissions of olderpeople are a significant financial burden to the health service.

  11. Older people's concepts of spirituality, related to aging and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Lindanor Jacó; Gil, Claudia Aranha

    2015-12-01

    Increased life expectancy and the prospect of longevity lead to reflection on the importance of spirituality while aging. This article aims to investigate and analyze the concepts that older people have of spirituality and how this concept affects their quality of life. It is a descriptive, exploratory, quantitative-qualitative study, with a sample of 12 participants over the age of 60. The following tools were used: semi-structured interviews, social-demographic questionnaires and WHOQOL (Bref, SRPB and Domain VI). The statistical program SPSS 21.0, and Content Analysis, were used in the analysis. The average score on the Psychological Health and Social Relationship domains was high, and the WHOQOL-SRPB showed high averages in all facets, and positive association with the Bref domains. Content analysis showed a relationship between Quality of Life and Spirituality. The latter is conceptualized as: Support, Relationship with the Sacred, and Transcendence; and is distinguished from Religion, which is defined by Religious Affiliation, Cultural Affiliation, and Dogmas. The relationship between spirituality and old age takes place through the capacity to bear the limitations, difficulties and losses inherent to the process; thus, the nature of living a spiritual life was observed to be heterogeneous, while all had in common the recognition of its importance and its significance for living an old age with Quality of Life. PMID:26691790

  12. Methods, Diagnostic Criteria, Cutoff Points, and Prevalence of Sarcopenia among Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Pagotto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To identify methods, index, diagnostic criteria, and corresponding cutoff points used to estimate the prevalence of sarcopenia in older people in different countries. Methods. A systematic review was carried out in accordance with PRISMA Statement. The search encompassed the MEDLINE and LILACS databases and was executed during March 2012 using the keyword sarcopenia. Results. A total of 671 studies were identified by the search strategy, and 30 meet all inclusion criteria. Specifically for dual-X-ray absorptiometry, prevalence ranged from 2.2% to 95% in men and from 0.1% to 33.9% in women. For bioelectrical impedance analysis, the range was from 6.2% to 85.4% in men and 2.8% to 23.6% in women. Regarding anthropometric and computed tomography, prevalence rates were, respectively, 14.1% and 55.9%. Conclusions. Heterogeneity in prevalence of sarcopenia was identified, due to diagnostic method choice, cutoff points, and, characteristics of the population as well as reference population. These factors should be considered in research designs to enable comparison and validation of results. Despite the limitations of most studies that indicated high prevalence rates, the results indicate the need for early detection of this syndrome.

  13. Nurses' Perceptions of Their Relationships with Informal Carers in Institutional Respite Care for Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirpa Salin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe nurses' experiences of their collaboration and relationships with family members in institutional respite care for the elderly. The family has a particularly important role in respite care, which is an extension of care provided at home. However no published studies were found on this subject. The data were collected through qualitative interviews (N=22. Content analysis of the nurses’ descriptions of their collaboration with family members yielded four main categories as follows: (1 conscious ignoring, (2 attempting to understand the family’s situation, (3 hinting at private family matters, and (4 being a friend. The results lend support to earlier findings which emphasize the complexity of relationships between nurses and family carers. A novel finding here is that these relationships may also develop into friendships. Greater emphasis must be placed on primary nursing so that the nurse and informal carer can build up a genuine relationship of trust. If periods of respite care are to help older people and their families to manage independently, it is imperative that nurses have the opportunity to visit their patients at home.

  14. Exploring the feasibility of a community-based strength training program for older people with depressive symptoms and its impact on depressive symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson Sandra; Hill Keith; Sims Jane; Gunn Jane; Huang Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Depression is a disabling, prevalent condition. Physical activity programs may assist depression management in older people, ameliorate co-morbid conditions and reduce the need for antidepressants. The UPLIFT pilot study assessed the feasibility of older depressed people attending a community-based progressive resistance training (PRT) program. The study also aimed to determine whether PRT improves depressive status in older depressed patients. Methods A randomised control...

  15. Prevalence, types, risk factors and clinical correlates of anaemia in older people in a rural Ugandan population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph O Mugisha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies conducted in high income countries have shown that anaemia is a common medical condition among older people, but such data are scarce in Africa. The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence, types, risk factors and clinical correlates of anaemia in older people. METHODS: Participants were aged (≥ 50 years recruited from a general population cohort from January 2012 to January 2013. Blood samples were collected for assessing hemoglobin, serum ferritin, serum vitamin B12, serum folate, C-reactive protein, malaria infection and stool samples for assessment of hookworm infection. HIV status was assessed using an algorithm for HIV rapid testing. Questionnaires were used to collect data on sociodemographic characteristics and other risk factors for anaemia. RESULTS: In total, 1449 people participated (response rate 72.3%. The overall prevalence of anaemia was 20.3 % (95% CI 18.2-22.3%, and this was higher for males (24.1%, 95% CI=20.7-27.7% than females (17.5%, 95% CI=15.0-20.1%. In males, the prevalence of anaemia increased rapidly with age almost doubling between 50 and 65 years (p-trend<0.001. Unexplained anaemia was responsible for more than half of all cases (59.7%. Anaemia was independently associated with infections including malaria (OR 3.49, 95% CI 1.78-6.82, HIV (OR 2.17, 1.32-3.57 heavy hookworm infection (OR 3.45, 1.73-6.91, low fruit consumption (OR 1.55, 1.05-2.29 and being unmarried (OR 1.37 , 95% CI 1.01-1.89. However, the odds of anaemia were lower among older people with elevated blood pressure (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.29-0.77. CONCLUSION: Anaemia control programmes in Uganda should target older people and should include interventions to treat and control hookworms and educational programs on diets that enhance iron absorption. Clinicians should consider screening older people with HIV or malaria for anaemia. Further studies should be done on unexplained anaemia and serum ferritin levels that predict

  16. Qualitative study investigating the commissioning process for older people's services provided by third sector organisations: SOPRANO study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Gina; Chadborn, Neil; Craig, Chris; Gladman, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The commissioning of third sector services for older people may influence the quality, availability and coordination of services for older people. The SOPRANO study aims to understand the relationships between and processes of commissioning bodies and third sector organisations providing health and social care services for older people. Methods and analysis This qualitative study will be based in the East Midlands region of England. An initial scoping survey of commissioners will give an overview of services to maintain the health and well-being of older people in the community that are commissioned. Following this, semistructured interviews will be conducted with 4 sample groups: health and social care commissioners, service provider managers, service provider case workers and older service users. A sample size of 10–15 participants in each of the 4 groups is expected to be sufficient to reach data saturation, resulting in a final expected sample size of 40–60 participants. Informed consent will be gained from all participants, and those unable to provide informed consent will be excluded. The interview data will be analysed by 2 researchers using framework content analysis. Ethics and dissemination Approval for the study has been gained from the University of Nottingham School of Medicine ethical review board, and the relevant approvals have been gained from the National Health Service (NHS) research and development departments for interviewing NHS staff. Early engagement with a wide range of stakeholders will ensure that the research findings are extensively disseminated to relevant stakeholders (including commissioners and third sector providers) in an accessible format using the extensive communication networks available to the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care CLAHRCs (applied health research organisations covering all of England). The study will also be disseminated

  17. Association of polypharmacy with fall-related fractures in older Taiwanese people: age- and gender-specific analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hsueh-Hsing; Li, Chung-Yi; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Su, Tung-Ping; Wang, Kwua-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the associations between polypharmacy and age- and gender-specific risks of admission for fall-related fractures. Design Nested case–control study. Setting This analysis was randomly selected from all elderly beneficiaries in 2007–2008, and represents some 30% of the whole older insurers using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. Participants We identified 5933 cases newly admitted for fall-related fractures during 2007–2008, and 29 665 random controls free from fracture. Primary and secondary outcome measures Polypharmacy was defined as the use of fall-related drugs of four or more categories of medications and prescribed related to fall within a 1-year period. Logistic regression models were employed to estimate the ORs and related 95% CIs. The interaction of polypharmacy with age and sex was assessed separately. Results Compared with those who consumed no category of medication, older people who consumed 1, 2, 3 and ≥4 categories of medications were all at significantly increased odds of developing fall-related fractures, with a significant dose–gradient pattern (β=0.7953; p for trend <0.0001). There were significant interactions between polypharmacy and age, but no significant interactions between polypharmacy and gender. The dose–gradient relationship between number of medications category and risk of fall-related fractures was more obvious in women than in men (β=0.1962 vs β=0.1873). Additionally, it was most evident in older people aged 75–84 years (β=0.2338). Conclusions This population-based study in Taiwan confirms the link between polypharmacy and increased risk of fall-related fractures in older people; and highlights that elderly women and older people aged 75–84 years will be the targeted participants for further prevention from fall-related fractures caused by polypharmacy. PMID:24682575

  18. Perceived autonomy and activity choices among physically disabled older people in nursing home settings: a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Mette; Runge, Ulla; Hoff, Morten;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To evaluate the effect of individually tailored programs on perceived autonomy in institutionalized physically disabled older people and to describe participants' activity wishes and content of the programs. METHOD. This blinded randomized trial with follow up included a total of nine...... the correspondence between the individual wishes for activities and the concrete content of the programs was not obvious, results indicate potential for enabling the perception of autonomy among physically disabled older nursing home residents. The clinical consequences may suggest a focus on existing...

  19. The impact of having natural teeth on the QoL of frail dentulous older people. A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niesten Dominique

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to adapt oral care and treatment to the demands of the growing group of frail dentulous older people, it is important to understand how and to which extent having natural teeth contributes to the quality of life (QoL of frail older people and how frailty influences their perspective. Methods A qualitative approach was used. Interviews with 38 Dutch frail older dentulous people were tape-recorded, transcribed, coded for content and analyzed. Additional information was collected which included age, gender, living situation, use of dental prostheses, self-reported oral health status, chronic disorders, and an index for frailty. Results Seven themes were identified in the relationship between natural teeth and the QoL of the participants: pride and achievement; intactness; sense of control; oral function; appearance; comfort; along with coping and adapting to disabilities. Having natural teeth generally had a positive effect on QoL. Positive effects through pride and achievement, intactness, and sense of control were most apparent for the most severely frail. They compared themselves with peers who are more often edentate, and valued the good state of their teeth against the background of their declining health, especially those with disabilities causing severe chronic pain or impaired fine-motor skills. The effect of coping with and adaptation to tooth loss was also most apparent for the most severely frail. There was a gender effect in that the men generally cared less about having natural teeth than women, regardless of their level of frailty. Conclusions QoL of frail older people is positively influenced by natural teeth, and this effect seems to increase with increasing frailty. Preservation of teeth contributes to a positive body image and self-worth. Oral care for frail people should aim to preserve natural teeth if possible.

  20. Medicines Management, Medication Errors and Adverse Medication Events in Older People Referred to a Community Nursing Service: A Retrospective Observational Study

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, Rohan A; Lee, Cik Yin; Beanland, Christine; Vakil, Krishna; Goeman, Dianne

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing numbers of older people are receiving support with medicines management from community nursing services (CNSs) to enable them to live in their own homes. Little is known about these people and the support they receive. Objectives To explore the characteristics of older people referred for medicines management support, type of support provided, medication errors and adverse medication events (AMEs). Methods A retrospective observational study of a random sample of 100 old...

  1. The effect of sensor-based exercise at home on functional performance associated with fall risk in older people – a comparison of two exergame interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Gschwind, Yves J; Schoene, Daniel; Lord, Stephen R; Ejupi, Andreas; Valenzuela, Trinidad; Aal, Konstantin; Woodbury, Ashley; Delbaere, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Background There is good evidence that balance challenging exercises can reduce falls in older people. However, older people often find it difficult to incorporate such programs in their daily life. Videogame technology has been proposed to promote enjoyable, balance-challenging exercise. As part of a larger analysis, we compared feasibility and efficacy of two exergame interventions: step-mat-training (SMT) and Microsoft-Kinect® (KIN) exergames. Methods 148 community-dwelling people, aged 65...

  2. Gender differentials on the health consequences of care-giving to people with AIDS-related illness among older informal carers in two slums in Nairobi, Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Chepngeno-Langat, Gloria; Madise, Nyovani; Evandrou, Maria; Falkingham, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Informal caregivers, most often older people, provide valuable care and support for people ill due to AIDS, especially in poor-resource settings with inadequate health care systems and limited access to antiretroviral therapy. The negative health consequences associated with care-giving may vary depending on various factors that act to mediate the extent of the effects on the caregiver. This paper investigates the association between care-giving and poor health among older carers to people li...

  3. Health and use of health services of people who are homeless and at risk of homelessness who receive free primary health care in Dublin.

    OpenAIRE

    Keogh, Claire; O'Brien, Kirsty K; Hoban, Anthony; O'Carroll, Austin; Fahey, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Background Homeless populations experience poorer physical and mental health, and more barriers to accessing adequate healthcare. This study investigates the health of this population, following the provision of a free to access primary care service for homeless people in Dublin (Safetynet). The health of this group will be compared to previous studies on homelessness conducted in Dublin prior to the establishment of this service (in 1997 and 2005). Methods Participants were recruited through...

  4. Functional capacity and dependency in transfer and dressing are associated with depressive symptoms in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boström G

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Gustaf Boström,1 Mia Conradsson,1 Erik Rosendahl,1,2 Peter Nordström,1 Yngve Gustafson,1 Håkan Littbrand1,21Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; 2Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, SwedenBackground: This study examined associations between depressive symptoms and functional capacity, overall dependency in personal activities of daily living (ADLs, and dependency in individual ADL tasks, respectively, in people with a high mean age, large range of functional capacity, and wide spectrum of dependency in ADLs.Methods: Cross-sectional data from three studies were used. A total of 392 individuals living in community and residential care facilities were included. Mean age was 86.2 years, 72% were women, 75% were dependent in ADLs, 42% had depression, and 39% had dementia. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15, functional capacity with the Berg Balance Scale (BBS, and ADLs with the Barthel ADL Index. Multiple linear regression analyses with comprehensive adjustments were performed between GDS-15 and BBS, GDS-15 and Barthel ADL Index, and GDS-15 and each individual ADL task, separately.Results: GDS-15 score was associated with BBS score (unstandardized b =-0.03, P=0.008, but not with Barthel ADL Index score (unstandardized b =-0.07, P=0.068. No significant interaction effects of sex, dementia, or living conditions were found in these associations. Among individual ADL tasks, dependency in transfer (unstandardized b =-1.03, P=0.007 and dressing (unstandardized b =-0.70, P=0.035 were associated with depressive symptoms.Conclusion: Functional capacity seems to be independently associated with depressive symptoms in older people living in community and residential care facilities, whereas overall ADL performance may not be associated. Dependency in the individual ADL tasks of

  5. Perceived autonomy support, psychological needs satisfaction, depressive symptoms and apathy in French hospitalized older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souesme, Guillaume; Martinent, Guillaume; Ferrand, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Based on the self-determination theory, the aim of the present study was (1) to provide a better understanding of older people's psychological needs satisfaction in geriatric care units, then to link this information with depressive symptoms and apathy; (2) to examine whether the perceived autonomy support from health care professionals differs between needs satisfaction profiles; and (3) to investigate for all participants how each need satisfaction was related to depressive symptoms and apathy. Participants (N=100; Mage=83.33years, SD=7.78, 61% female) completed the measures of psychological needs satisfaction, perceived autonomy support, geriatric depression and apathy. Sociodemographic data were also collected. Cluster analyses showed three distinct profiles: one profile with low-moderate need satisfaction, one profile with high-moderate need satisfaction and one profile with high need satisfaction. These profiles are distinct, and did not differ in terms of participants' characteristics, except gender. Multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) revealed that participants with low-moderate need satisfaction profile have significantly higher level of depressive symptoms and apathy, and lower levels of perceived autonomy support than participants of the two other profiles. Moreover, for all participants, regression analyses revealed that both competence and relatedness needs satisfaction significantly and negatively explained 28% of the variance in depressive symptoms score and 44% of the variance in apathy score. Our results highlight the interest to examine more thoroughly the variables fostering autonomy-supportive environment in geriatric care units, and to deepen the relationship between competence and relatedness needs satisfaction and depressive symptoms and apathy. PMID:27002495

  6. Mild cognitive impairment and its management in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshkoor SA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sima Ataollahi Eshkoor, Tengku Aizan Hamid, Chan Yoke Mun, Chee Kyun Ng Institute of Gerontology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia Abstract: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI is a common condition in the elderly. It is characterized by deterioration of memory, attention, and cognitive function that is beyond what is expected based on age and educational level. MCI does not interfere significantly with individuals’ daily activities. It can act as a transitional level of evolving dementia with a range of conversion of 10%–15% per year. Thus, it is crucial to protect older people against MCI and developing dementia. The preventive interventions and appropriate treatments should improve cognitive performance, and retard or prevent progressive deficits. The avoidance of toxins, reduction of stress, prevention of somatic diseases, implementation of mental and physical exercises, as well as the use of dietary compounds like antioxidants and supplements can be protective against MCI. The modification of risk factors such as stopping smoking, as well as the treatment of deficiency in vitamins and hormones by correcting behaviors and lifestyle, can prevent cognitive decline in the elderly. The progressive increase in the growth rate of the elderly population can enhance the rate of MCI all over the world. There is no exact cure for MCI and dementia; therefore, further studies are needed in the future to determine causes of MCI and risk factors of progression from MCI to dementia. This will help to find better ways for prevention and treatment of cognitive impairment worldwide. Keywords: AD, Alzheimer’s disease, cognition, dementia, MCI

  7. Access to a Car and the Self-Reported Health and Mental Health of People Aged 65 and Older in Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doebler, Stefanie

    2016-05-01

    This article examines relationships between access to a car and the self-reported health and mental health of older people. The analysis is based on a sample of N = 65,601 individuals aged 65 years and older from the Northern Ireland Longitudinal Study linked to 2001 and 2011 census returns. The findings from hierarchical linear and binary logistic multilevel path models indicate that having no access to a car is related to a considerable health and mental health disadvantage particularly for older people who live alone. Rural-urban health and mental health differences are mediated by access to a car. The findings support approaches that emphasize the importance of autonomy and independence for the well-being of older people and indicate that not having access to a car can be a problem for older people not only in rural but also in intermediate and urban areas, if no sufficient alternative forms of mobility are provided. PMID:26055983

  8. Legislating for Filial Piety: An Indirect Approach to Promoting Family Support and Responsibility for Older People in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hong-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Although every culture follows its own indigenous elder care practices, Korea has retained a unique way of supporting elder parents, specifically, and older people in general. When the care of older people in Korea became significantly challenging, it was determined to launch a controversial law to promote the tradition of filial piety. The main content of the law consists of requiring the government to take action to encourage filial piety and to support those adult children who care for their parents. Although this legislation has the potential to promote the practice of filial piety, the nature of the law is largely rhetorical and symbolic rather than practical, and as a result, its workability and efficiency are limited. PMID:25941771

  9. Funny things happen at the Grange: introducing comedy activities in day services to older people with dementia--innovative practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafford-Letchfield, Trish

    2013-11-01

    This paper shares outcomes from the evaluation of a community project where comedy activities were introduced into a day centre for older people with dementia as a result of a partnership between the day centre, a local university and a specialist comedy provider. Four workshops were provided using improvisatory activities and comedy, as a medium to engage older people in reflecting on aspects of their care environment. The main output resulted in a 30 minute 'mockumentary' of the 'Her Majesty the Queen' visiting the day centre, in the form of a digital reusable learning object to be used by social work and mental health professionals. The evaluation demonstrated some additional outcomes for those involved and highlighted the benefits of laughter and fun in promoting a positive climate. PMID:24337643

  10. The Impact of Socioeconomic Conditions, Social Networks, and Health on Frail Older People's Life Satisfaction: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Helene; Hasson, Henna; Wilhelmson, Katarina; Dunér, Anna; Dahlin-Ivanoff, Synneve

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that frailty is associated with low levels of well-being and life satisfaction. Further exploration is needed, however, to better understand which components constitute life satisfaction for frail older people and how satisfaction is related to other life circumstances. The aim of this study was to examine relationships between frail older people’s life satisfaction and their socioeconomic conditions, social networks, and health-related conditions. A cross-sectional study was conducted (n=179). A logistic regression analysis was performed, including life satisfaction as the dependent variable and 12 items as independent variables. Four of the independent variables made statistically significant contributions: financial situation (OR 3.53), social contacts (OR 2.44), risk of depression (OR 2.26), and self-rated health (OR 2.79). This study demonstrates that financial situation, self-rated health conditions and social networks are important components for frail older people’s life satisfaction. Health and social care professionals and policy makers should consider this knowledge in the care and service for frail older people; and actions that benefit life satisfaction – such as social support – should be promoted. PMID:27403463

  11. Effectiveness of a Batteryless and Wireless Wearable Sensor System for Identifying Bed and Chair Exits in Healthy Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinmoto Torres, Roberto Luis; Visvanathan, Renuka; Hoskins, Stephen; van den Hengel, Anton; Ranasinghe, Damith C

    2016-01-01

    Aging populations are increasing worldwide and strategies to minimize the impact of falls on older people need to be examined. Falls in hospitals are common and current hospital technological implementations use localized sensors on beds and chairs to alert caregivers of unsupervised patient ambulations; however, such systems have high false alarm rates. We investigate the recognition of bed and chair exits in real-time using a wireless wearable sensor worn by healthy older volunteers. Fourteen healthy older participants joined in supervised trials. They wore a batteryless, lightweight and wireless sensor over their attire and performed a set of broadly scripted activities. We developed a movement monitoring approach for the recognition of bed and chair exits based on a machine learning activity predictor. We investigated the effectiveness of our approach in generating bed and chair exit alerts in two possible clinical deployments (Room 1 and Room 2). The system obtained recall results above 93% (Room 2) and 94% (Room 1) for bed and chair exits, respectively. Precision was >78% and 67%, respectively, while F-score was >84% and 77% for bed and chair exits, respectively. This system has potential for real-time monitoring but further research in the final target population of older people is necessary. PMID:27092506

  12. Assessing the needs of older gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people: a service-learning and agency partnership approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Laurie A; McCaslin, Rosemary; Chang, Janet; Martinez, Paulina; McGrew, Paula

    2010-01-01

    A county agency and a social work research class partnered to conduct a state-mandated needs assessment of older gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered people (GLBT). A survey design with purposive sampling of GLBT people over 60 yielded 38 participants. Findings included that the Internet was a viable means to reach this population and student awareness increased. Areas of greatest unmet need were GLBT-oriented/friendly legal advice, social events, grief and loss counseling, social workers, and assisted living. Some participants perceived existing senior services as unfriendly or hostile to GLBT persons. Recommendations include continued use of service-learning research and expanded needs assessment efforts. PMID:20603750

  13. Older people as users and consumers of health care: A third age rhetoric for a fourth age reality

    OpenAIRE

    Gilleard, C.; Higgs, P

    1998-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the emergence of consumerism as a dominant theme in the culture surrounding the organisation and provision of welfare in contemporary societies. In it we address the dilemmas produced by a consumerist discourse for older people's healthcare, dilemmas which may be seen as the conflicting representations of third age and fourth age reality. We begin by reviewing the appearance of consumerism in the recent history of the British healthcare system, relating it to the ...

  14. The PiTSTOP study:a feasibility cluster randomized trial of delirium prevention in care homes for older people

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqi, Najma; Cheater, Francine; Collinson, Michelle; Farrin, Amanda; Forster, Anne; George, Deepa; Godfrey, Mary; Graham, Elizabeth; Harrison, Jennifer; Heaven, Anne; Heudtlass, Peter; Hulme, Claire; Meads, David; North, Chris; Sturrock, Angus

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: delirium is a distressing but potentially preventable condition common in older people in long-term care. It is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, functional decline, hospitalization and significant healthcare costs. Multicomponent interventions, addressing delirium risk factors, have been shown to reduce delirium by one-third in hospitals. It is not known whether this approach is also effective in long-term care. In previous work, we designed a bespoke...

  15. They are not always a burden: Older people and child fostering in Uganda during the HIV epidemic

    OpenAIRE

    Kasedde, Susan; Doyle, Aoife M.; Seeley, Janet A.; David A Ross

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the role of older people (60 years and above) in fostering decisions for orphans and non-orphans within extended families in a rural Ugandan community heavily affected by HIV. Fieldwork conducted in 2006 provided information on the influence of HIV on fostering decisions through 48 individual in-depth interviews and two group interviews with foster-children and family members to develop detailed case studies related to 13 fostered adolescents. The adolescents i...

  16. Cognitive function in childhood and lifetime cognitive change in relation to mental wellbeing in four cohorts of older people

    OpenAIRE

    Gale, Catharine R.; Rachel Cooper; Leone Craig; Jane Elliott; Diana Kuh; Marcus Richards; Starr, John M; Lawrence J Whalley; Deary, Ian J

    2012-01-01

    Background: poorer cognitive ability in youth is a risk factor for later mental health problems but it is largely unknown whether cognitive ability, in youth or in later life, is predictive of mental wellbeing. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cognitive ability at age 11 years, cognitive ability in later life, or lifetime cognitive change are associated with mental wellbeing in older people. Methods: we used data on 8191 men and women aged 50 to 87 years from four coho...

  17. Dietary Pattern Is Associated with Obesity in Older People in China: Data from China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS)

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoyue Xu; John Hall; Julie Byles; Zumin Shi

    2015-01-01

    Background: No studies have been conducted to explore the associations between dietary patterns and obesity among older Chinese people, by considering gender and urbanization level differences. Methods: We analyzed data from the 2009 China Health and Nutrition Survey (2745 individuals, aged ≥ 60 years). Dietary data were obtained using 24 hour-recall over three consecutive days. Height, Body Weight, and Waist Circumference were measured. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify dieta...

  18. The harmonic ratio of trunk acceleration predicts falling among older people: results of a 1-year prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Doi Takehiko; Hirata Soichiro; Ono Rei; Tsutsumimoto Kota; Misu Shogo; Ando Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Gait variables derived from trunk accelerometry may predict the risk of falls; however, their associations with falls are not fully understood. The purpose of the study was to determine which gait variables derived from upper and lower trunk accelerometry are associated with the incidence of falls, and to compare the discriminative ability of gait variables and physical performance. Methods This study was a 1-year prospective study. Older people (n = 73) walked normally wh...

  19. Seasonal variation of serum vitamin D and the effect of vitamin D supplementation in Irish community-dwelling older people.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Romero-Ortuno, Roman

    2011-03-01

    Ireland is at 53°N, and its population risk of vitamin D deficiency is high. Previous Irish studies suggested a significant seasonality of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and a beneficial effect of supplementation in raising 25(OH)D levels. However, in Irish older people, little is known about the magnitude of the supplementation effect and whether supplementation affects 25(OH)D seasonality.

  20. Cognitive Function in Childhood and Lifetime Cognitive Change in Relation to Mental Wellbeing in Four Cohorts of Older People

    OpenAIRE

    Gale, C. R.; Cooper, R.; Craig, L.; Elliott, J.; Kuh, D.; Richards, M; Starr, J. M.; Whalley, L.J.; Deary, I. J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: poorer cognitive ability in youth is a risk factor for later mental health problems but it is largely unknown whether cognitive ability, in youth or in later life, is predictive of mental wellbeing. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cognitive ability at age 11 years, cognitive ability in later life, or lifetime cognitive change are associated with mental wellbeing in older people. Methods: we used data on 8191 men and women aged 50 to 87 years from four coho...

  1. A partial validation of the WHOQOL-OLD in a sample of older people in South Africa / Lizanle van Biljon

    OpenAIRE

    Van Biljon, Lizanle

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the psychometric properties of the WHOQOL-OLD (an add-on module to the World Health Organization's Quality of Life measure for older people) in a South African sample. International literature cites three short versions of the WHOQOL-OLD instrument. The psychometric properties associated with these three short versions of the WHOQOL-OLD are also described. The unique challenges posed by ageing populations are evident in both developed and developing countries. In Sou...

  2. Physical exercise and sarcopenia in older people: position paper of the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Medicine (OrtoMed)

    OpenAIRE

    Ioalascon, G; Di Pietro, G.; Gimigliano, F; Letizia Mauro, G; A. Moretti(Fermilab, Batavia, IL, USA); Giamattei, MT; Ortolani, S.; U. Tarantino; Brandi, ML

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia is the age-associated loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. It is a major clinical problem for older people and research in understanding of pathogenesis, clinical consequences, management, and socioeconomic burden of this condition is growing exponentially. The causes of sarcopenia are multifactorial, including inflammation, insulin resistance, changing endocrine function, chronic diseases, nutritional deficiencies and low levels of physical activity. Operational definition o...

  3. Improving Use of Medicines for Older People in Long-Term Care: Contrasting the Policy Approach of Four Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Carmel M; Roughead, Elizabeth; Kerse, Ngaire

    2008-01-01

    The quality of nursing home care for older people, including medication use and related outcomes, has been problematic in a number of developed countries. This paper compares the policy approaches to drug prescribing and administration in nursing homes adopted by four countries. The United States has led the way in terms of regulating and inspecting nursing homes, with strict requirements for prescribing psycho-tropic medications, commonly known as “chemical restraints.” These requirements ha...

  4. Transport-Related Social Exclusion amongst Older People in Rural Southwest England and Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shergold, Ian; Parkhurst, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Rural dwelling and older age are both associated with a higher risk of social exclusion, with accessibility identified as having an important facilitating role. The interactions between transport-related exclusion and older age, particularly in a rural context, are considered though analysis of quantitative and qualitative data collected from over…

  5. Set-Shifting Ability Is Associated with Gray Matter Volume in Older People with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kota Tsutsumimoto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: An understanding of the association between gray matter volume and executive functioning could provide strategies to reduce dementia risk in older people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI. Methods: In a cross-sectional analysis, we assessed executive functioning in 83 older people with MCI using three standard neuropsychological tests: set shifting (difference between Trail Making Test Parts B and A, working memory (difference between Digit Span forward and backward from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV, and selective attention/response inhibition (difference between the second and third conditions of the color- and picture-word Stroop test. Gray matter volume was computed from brain MRIs and SIENAX from FSL software. Results: Gray matter volume was significantly associated with set-shifting performance after accounting for age, gender, body mass index, education, and global cognition (standardized β = -0.376, p = 0.001, but not with working memory or selective attention/response inhibition. Conclusion: The executive function of set-shifting ability was correlated with gray matter volume in older people with MCI.

  6. The health, social care and housing needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender older people: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addis, Samia; Davies, Myfanwy; Greene, Giles; Macbride-Stewart, Sara; Shepherd, Michael

    2009-11-01

    This paper reports the findings of a literature review of the health, social care and housing needs of older lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) adults undertaken in 2006 for the Welsh Assembly Government. Peer-reviewed literature was identified through database searches of BNI, PubMed, CINAHL, DARE, ASSIA and PsychInfo. Follow-up searches were conducted using references to key papers and journals as well as specific authors who had published key papers. A total of 187 papers or chapters were retrieved, of which 66 were included in the study; major themes were identified and the findings synthesised using a meta-narrative approach. The main themes that emerged from the review were isolation, health behaviours, mental health and sexual health behaviours. The literature indicates that the health, social care and housing needs of LGBT older people is influenced by a number of forms of discrimination which may impact upon the provision of, access to and take up of health, social care and housing services. Understanding of the health, social care and housing needs of older LGBT people is limited and research in this area is scarce. The research which exists has been criticised for using small samples and for tending to exclude participants from less affluent backgrounds. The focus of research tends to be on gay men and lesbians; consequently, the needs of bisexual and transgender people remain largely unknown. Additionally, research which does exist tends to focus on a narrow range of health issues, often related to the health needs of younger LGBT people. Discrimination in various forms has a major impact on needs and experiences, leading to marginalisation of LGBT people both in the provision of health and social care services and neglect of these groups in public health research. PMID:19519872

  7. Promotion of self-management in vulnerable older people: a narrative literature review of outcomes of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP)

    OpenAIRE

    Jonker, A.A.G.C.; Comijs, H.; Knipscheer, C.P.M.; Deeg, D.J.H.

    2009-01-01

    With ageing, older people can become frail, and this has been shown to be associated with a decrease in well-being. Observational studies provide evidence of a positive effect of coping resources on well-being. The question is: can coping resources be improved in vulnerable older people? The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) is a target group-specific intervention which aims to promote the self-management of older people who are confronted with deteriorating health. The aim of t...

  8. Is self-rated health an independent index for mortality among older people in Indonesia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawi Ng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Empirical studies on the association between self-rated health (SRH and subsequent mortality are generally lacking in low- and middle-income countries. The evidence on whether socio-economic status and education modify this association is inconsistent. This study aims to fill these gaps using longitudinal data from a Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS site in Indonesia. METHODS: In 2010, we assessed the mortality status of 11,753 men and women aged 50+ who lived in Purworejo HDSS and participated in the INDEPTH WHO SAGE baseline in 2007. Information on self-rated health, socio-demographic indicators, disability and chronic disease were collected through face-to-face interview at baseline. We used Cox-proportional hazards regression for mortality and included all variables measured at baseline, including interaction terms between SRH and both education and socio-economic status (SES. RESULTS: During an average of 36 months follow-up, 11% of men and 9.5% of women died, resulting in death rates of 3.1 and 2.6 per 1,000 person-months, respectively. The age-adjusted Hazard Ratio (HR for mortality was 17% higher in men than women (HR = 1.17; 95% CI = 1.04-1.31. After adjustment for covariates, the hazard ratios for mortality in men and women reporting bad health were 3.0 (95% CI = 2.0-4.4 and 4.9 (95% CI = 3.2-7.4, respectively. Education and SES did not modify this association for either sex. CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the predictive power of bad self-rated health for subsequent mortality in rural Indonesian men and women 50 years old and over. In these analyses, education and household socio-economic status do not modify the relationship between SRH and mortality. This means that older people who rate their own health poorly should be an important target group for health service interventions.

  9. Medical complications and outcomes at an onsite rehabilitation unit for older people.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mulroy, M

    2013-09-01

    The rehabilitation of older patients in Ireland after an acute medical event occurs at dedicated onsite hospital units or at offsite centres. Information on medical complications and outcomes is inadequate.

  10. Cluster Analysis of Physical and Cognitive Ageing Patterns in Older People from Shanghai

    OpenAIRE

    Stephan Bandelow; Xin Xu; Shifu Xiao; Eef Hogervorst

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between education, cognitive and physical function in older age, and their respective impacts on activities of daily living (ADL). Data on 148 older participants from a community-based sample recruited in Shanghai, China, included the following measures: age, education, ADL, grip strength, balance, gait speed, global cognition and verbal memory. The majority of participants in the present cohort were cognitively and physically healthy and reported no p...

  11. Potentially inappropriate prescribing and cost outcomes for older people: a national population study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahir, Caitriona

    2010-05-01

    Optimization of drug prescribing in older populations is a priority due to the significant clinical and economic costs of drug-related illness. This study aimed to: (i) estimate the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) in a national Irish older population using European specific explicit prescribing criteria; (ii) investigate the association between PIP, number of drug classes, gender and age and; (iii) establish the total cost of PIP.

  12. Gender Differences and Socioeconomic Status in Relation to Overweight among Older Korean People

    OpenAIRE

    Noh, Jin-Won; Jo, Minkyung; Huh, Taewook; Cheon, Jooyoung; Kwon, Young Dae

    2014-01-01

    Background The ever-increasing older population and its association with serious overweight problems have garnered much attention. The correlation between being overweight and socioeconomic status factors could be helpful for understanding the inequalities among the overweight population. We examined the correlation between being overweight and some key variables, such as demographics, socioeconomic status, general health status, and health behavior in a large sample of older individuals, by ...

  13. Older Drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be more older drivers on the road. A Complex Task Click for more information Driving is a ... common for people to have declines in visual, thinking, or physical abilities as they get older. As ...

  14. Exercise in preventing falls and fall related injuries in older people: a review of randomised controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, M.; Robertson, M; Campbell, A

    2000-01-01

    Objective—To assess the effectiveness of exercise programmes in preventing falls (and/or lowering the risk of falls and fall related injuries) in older people. Design—A review of controlled clinical trials designed with the aim of lowering the risk of falling and/or fall injuries through an exercise only intervention or an intervention that included an exercise component Main outcome measures—Falls, fall related injuries, time between falls, costs, cost effectiveness. Subjects—A total of 4933 men and women aged 60 years and older. Results—Eleven trials meeting the criteria for inclusion were reviewed. Eight of these trials had separate exercise interventions, and three used interventions with an exercise programme component. Five trials showed a significant reduction in the rate of falls or the risk of falling in the intervention group. Conclusions—Exercise is effective in lowering falls risk in selected groups and should form part of falls prevention programmes. Lowering fall related injuries will reduce health care costs but there is little available information on the costs associated with programme replication or the cost effectiveness of exercise programmes aimed at preventing falls in older people. Key Words: exercise; elderly; falls; cost effectiveness PMID:10690444

  15. Intra- and interrater reliability and agreement of the Danish version of the Dynamic Gait Index in older people with balance impairments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønsson, Line R; Kristensen, Morten; Tibaek, Sigrid; Andersen, Christina W; Juhl, Carsten Bogh

    2011-01-01

    To examine the intrarater and interrater reliability and agreement of the Danish version of the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) in hospitalized and community-dwelling older people with balance impairments....

  16. Falls after Discharge from Hospital: Is There a Gap between Older Peoples' Knowledge about Falls Prevention Strategies and the Research Evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Anne-Marie; Hoffmann, Tammy; Beer, Christopher; McPhail, Steven; Hill, Keith D.; Oliver, David; Brauer, Sandra G.; Haines, Terry P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine whether older people are prepared to engage in appropriate falls prevention strategies after discharge from hospital. Design and Methods: We used a semi-structured interview to survey older patients about to be discharged from hospital and examined their knowledge regarding falls prevention strategies…

  17. Factores vinculados a la calidad de vida en la adultez mayor Quality of life of older people living in Antofagasta, Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Alfonso Urzúa; Miguel Bravo; Mario Ogalde; Carolina Vargas

    2011-01-01

    Background: As basic needs of older people are covered, the concern about the determinants of their quality of life becomes preeminent. Aim: To evaluate the relationship between self-reported quality of life and related variables. Material and Methods: The Quality of Life Survey for older people developed by the World Health Organization (WHOQOL-Old), the reduced scale of Ryff Psychological Well Being, the Functional Social Support Questionnaire, the SF-12 and GHQ12 general health surveys wer...

  18. Individual and environmental factors underlying life space of older people - study protocol and design of a cohort study on life-space mobility in old age (LISPE)

    OpenAIRE

    Rantanen Taina; Portegijs Erja; Viljanen Anne; Eronen Johanna; Saajanaho Milla; Tsai Li-Tang; Kauppinen Markku; Palonen Eeva-Maija; Sipilä Sarianna; Iwarsson Susanne; Rantakokko Merja

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background A crucial issue for the sustainability of societies is how to maintain health and functioning in older people. With increasing age, losses in vision, hearing, balance, mobility and cognitive capacity render older people particularly exposed to environmental barriers. A central building block of human functioning is walking. Walking difficulties may start to develop in midlife and become increasingly prevalent with age. Life-space mobility reflects actual mobility performan...

  19. Financial access to health care for older people in Cambodia: 10-year trends (2004-14) and determinants of catastrophic health expenses

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, Bart; de Groot, Richard; Fernandes Antunes, Adélio

    2016-01-01

    Background Older people make up an increasing proportion of the population in low- and middle-income countries. This brings a number of challenges, as their health needs are greater than, and different from, those of younger people. In general, these health systems are not geared to address their needs, and traditional support systems tend to erode, potentially causing financial hardship when accessing health care. This paper provides an overview of older Cambodians’ financial access to healt...

  20. Fall prediction and a high-intensity functional exercise programme to improve physical functions and to prevent falls among older people living in residential care facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Rosendahl, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Impairments in balance, mobility, and lower-limb strength are common in the growing population of older people and can lead to dramatic consequences for the individual, such as dependency in activities of daily living, admission to nursing home, falls, and fractures. The main purposes of this thesis were, among older people in residential care facilities, to validate a fall-risk assessment tool and to evaluate a high-intensity functional weight-bearing exercise pro-gramme regarding its applic...