WorldWideScience

Sample records for at-home welfare device

  1. Report on achievements in fiscal 1998. Surveys on development of an at-home welfare device system to rationalize energy use; 1998 nendo energy shiyo gorika zaitaku fukushi kiki system kaihatsu chosa itaku kenkyu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This paper analyzes and puts into order the data surveyed and discussed on thirteen Welfare Techno-Houses (WTH) from a comprehensive viewpoint. It summarizes findings contributing to development and structuring of new at-home welfare device systems of effective energy utilization type. The paper first puts into order and discusses the survey and study items available for comparison and discussion, and the survey items with originality found in the surveys of the WTH, with which relatively large number of items were surveyed and studied among the thirteen locations nationwide. Next, the paper attempts comprehensive evaluation on the achievements thereof by the following items: (1) measurement and evaluation on energy consumption of different at-home welfare devices, (2) surveys and studies on energy demand evaluation inside and outside the residential houses arranged with considerations for elderly people according to the district characteristics, (3) evaluation on daily, weekly and annual changes in energy consumption in these houses, and (4) design and development of welfare systems of effective energy utilization type for these houses. Furthermore, the paper summarizes the general attributes of the WTHs in different districts, power consumption in these at-home welfare device systems in the WTH and energy consumption of the houses, in the forms available for comparison and discussion. Then, the paper summarizes the achievements of the present surveys and studies on the thirteen WTHs all over the country. (NEDO)

  2. Report on achievements in fiscal 1998. Surveys on development of an at-home welfare device system to rationalize energy use. (Chofu City); 1998 nendo energy shiyo gorika zaitaku fukushi kiki system kaihatsu chosa (Chofu) saiitaku kenkyu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This paper describes investigative studies on a new at-home welfare devices. Section 2 of the document, 'Studies on electric power conservation considering living patterns of elderly and physically handicapped persons' describes verification experiments in ferro-concrete buildings and ordinary homes by using a prototype system structured in last fiscal year. Qualitative analysis was performed based on the result thereof. In the 'Surveys on working environments for elderly people', directionality was presented in improving labor environments for the elderly people. Section 3, 'Studies on emergency evacuation devices for physically handicapped and elderly people' discovered that many of the presently available evacuation devices are intended of use mainly by handicap-free people, and there are many aspects that are difficult to say that elderly and physically handicapped people are included in the field of vision. In the 'Studies on an at-home training supporting system to maintain movement functions of the legs of elderly people', design and fabrication were performed on a prototype of an external control device operated by the legs. The 'Surveys on energy demand for at-home welfare devices for elderly people', showed how much the growth of the number of utilized devices will link to the cause to push up the energy demand in the household department in Japan. (NEDO)

  3. Making Medical Devices Safer at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... condition and recommend any changes related to your equipment. Report serious events to the device supplier and to FDA's MedWatch . For more advice to consumers, see Home Healthcare Medical Devices: A Checklist and Additional Resources on Home ...

  4. The DEKA hand: A multifunction prosthetic terminal device-patterns of grip usage at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Acluche, Frantzy; Borgia, Matthew

    2017-09-01

    Research is needed to understand how upper limb prosthesis users take advantage of multiple grip options. To quantify usage of DEKA hand grip patterns during home use and compare patterns of usage at home to test sessions. Observational study design. Data were collected from 21 subjects. Engineering data on grip were downloaded at various intervals. Proportion of time in each grip was calculated for the first 4 weeks of home use, later months, and test sessions (testing use) and compared statistically across intervals. Exploratory analyses compared grip proportion by DEKA Arm level and prior prosthesis use. Three most commonly used grips during home use were power, pinch open, and lateral pinch. There were no significant differences between grip use during the first month and later months. Power grip was used 55% of the time at home and 23% of the time in testing use. Pinch closed, lateral, and chuck grip were used less at home than in tests. Comparisons were by configuration level and prosthetic use and no significant differences were found. Patterns of DEKA hand grip usage differed between home and test environments, suggesting that users relied on fewer grip patterns at home. Clinical relevance These findings have implications for prosthetic training with multi-articulating terminal devices.

  5. What is customary about customary care? How Dutch welfare policy defines what citizens have to consider 'normal' at home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootegoed, E.; van Barneveld, E.; Duyvendak, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    In most welfare states, home care for elderly and disabled persons relies on a combination of private and public responsibilities, with gatekeepers adjudicating access to publicly funded care. Unlike other governments, the Dutch government has codified an explicit ‘customary care principle’ that

  6. A P300-based brain-computer interface aimed at operating electronic devices at home for severely disabled people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corralejo, Rebeca; Nicolás-Alonso, Luis F; Alvarez, Daniel; Hornero, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    The present study aims at developing and assessing an assistive tool for operating electronic devices at home by means of a P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI). Fifteen severely impaired subjects participated in the study. The developed tool allows users to interact with their usual environment fulfilling their main needs. It allows for navigation through ten menus and to manage up to 113 control commands from eight electronic devices. Ten out of the fifteen subjects were able to operate the proposed tool with accuracy above 77 %. Eight out of them reached accuracies higher than 95 %. Moreover, bitrates up to 20.1 bit/min were achieved. The novelty of this study lies in the use of an environment control application in a real scenario: real devices managed by potential BCI end-users. Although impaired users might not be able to set up this system without aid of others, this study takes a significant step to evaluate the degree to which such populations could eventually operate a stand-alone system. Our results suggest that neither the type nor the degree of disability is a relevant issue to suitably operate a P300-based BCI. Hence, it could be useful to assist disabled people at home improving their personal autonomy.

  7. Safer healthcare at home: Detecting, correcting and learning from incidents involving infusion devices

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, I.; Blandford, A. E.

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Complex medical devices such as infusion pumps are increasingly being used in patients’ homes with little known about the impact on patient safety. Our aim was to better understand the risks to patient safety in this situation and how these risks might be minimised, by reference to incident reports. DESIGN: We identified 606 records of incidents associated with infusion devices that had occurred in a private home and were reported to the UK National Reporting and Learni...

  8. Children at home on mechanical assistive devices and their families: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P D; Williams, A R; Griggs, C

    1990-01-01

    Few assessments have been done of the influence of caregiver and family interactions on the developmental status of children discharged on mechanical assistive devices. The ages of the 25 children in this study ranged from 2-30 months. Seven were on apnea monitors at the time of the home interviews, and 18 had been off the monitors for 18 months or more. Mothers were administered six questionnaires: Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales (FACES III), Duke-UNC Functional Social Support Questionnaire, Families Coping Strategies (FCOPES), Self-Esteem Scale, Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment, and the Receptive-Expressive Emergent Language Scale (REEL). Results on the FACES III revealed that families were not rigid in adaptability; 61% were chaotic, and 33% were balanced. On the cohesion scale, 25% were disengaged, 30% were enmeshed, and 45% were balanced. On the FCOPES, and it's subscales, 36-40% of the respondents scored below the established norms. Social support was strongly correlated with Cohesion and Adaptability (r = .47, .67), HOME scores correlated with Self-Esteem (r = .47) and FCOPES Reframe scale (r = .45), and REEL scores correlated with Social Support (r = .47, .52). Path-analysis revealed two paths: help-seeking behaviors of the mother and the child-mother interactions.

  9. Our experience of 200 patients: usage and maintenance of long-term oxygen therapy and non-invasive ventilation devices at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulger, A Füsun; Poyraz, Barış; Gulec Balbay, Ege; Binay, Songül

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the patients' attitudes about the devices, of which they use for long-term respiratory support at home. 200 consecutive patients were questioned about the treatment and devices of respiratory support at home by face to face questionnaire. Their records were taken from the archives of Social Security Agency. 123 (61.5%) of the patients were men and 77 (38.5%) were women. The mean age was 65.8 ± 11.9 (15-92) years. The most frequently prescribed device was oxygen concentrator and BIPAP was the one that follows. The most common indications were hypoxic and hypercapnic respiratory failure due to COPD. The devices were prescribed by the state university hospitals, most commonly. The average daily oxygen usage duration was 16.3 ± 3.1 hours, the average duration was 7.4 ± 3.1 hours, for BIPAP. Twenty one (11.4%) of the patients, who were treated with LTOT, stated that they were taking oxygen less than 15 hours a day. Higher education levels of the patients was correlated with the higher rates of visiting the companies - that they bought the devices- both for information about and control of the devices (p=0.002). The rate of visiting companies/firms was significantly higher in patients, who use BIPAP and respiratory support combined with it (p=0.010). Twenty three (47.9%) of the 48 patients, who notified that their devices were impaired, waited for repairment by the firm, 20 (41.6%) investigated special repair facilities and the rest (10.5%) rented a new device. Effective and continuous technical maintenance support must be provided to the patients, who are treated with long-term respiratory support at home.

  10. Higher Household Income and the Availability of Electronic Devices and Transport at Home Are Associated with Higher Waist Circumference in Colombian Children: The ACFIES Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Gómez-Arbeláez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The current “epidemic” of childhood obesity is described as being driven by modern lifestyles with associated socioeconomic and environmental changes that modify dietary habits, discourage physical activity and encourage sedentary behaviors. Objective: To evaluate the association between household income and the availability of electronic devices and transport at home, and the values of waist circumference (WC, as an indicator of abdominal obesity, in children and adolescents from Bucaramanga, Colombia. Methods: Cross-sectional study of public elementary and high school population, of low-middle socioeconomic status. Results: A total of 668 schoolchildren were recruited. After adjusting for potential confounders, significant positive associations between waist circumference and higher household income (p = 0.011, and waist circumference and the availability of electronic devices and transport at home (p = 0.026 were found. Conclusions: In low-middle socioeconomic status schoolchildren in a developing country, those from relatively more affluent families had greater waist circumference, an association that is opposite to that observed in developed countries. This finding could be related to higher income family’s ability to purchase electronic devices and motorized transport which discourage physical activity and for their children to buy desirable and more costly western fast food.

  11. Eye Injuries at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Steps to Safer Champagne Celebrations Eye Injuries at Home Leer en Español: Lesiones de los Ojos en ... chore is being done. Preventing Eye Injuries at Home Wearing protective eyewear will prevent 90 percent of ...

  12. Exercise at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Insights Exercise & Weight Exercise at Home Exercise at Home Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... with the movement and contact your provider. Posture Exercises Better posture means better breathing and movement. Axial ...

  13. First Experiences With a Wearable Multisensor Device in a Noninvasive Continuous Glucose Monitoring Study at Home, Part II: The Investigators' View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanon, Mattia; Mueller, Martin; Zakharov, Pavel; Talary, Mark S; Donath, Marc; Stahel, Werner A; Caduff, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    Extensive past work showed that noninvasive continuous glucose monitoring with a wearable multisensor device worn on the upper arm provides useful information about glucose trends to improve diabetes therapy in controlled and semicontrolled conditions. To test previous findings also in uncontrolled conditions, a long term at home study has been organized to collect multisensor and reference glucose data in a population of 20 type 1 diabetes subjects. A total of 1072 study days were collected and a fully on-line compatible algorithmic routine linking multisensor data to glucose applied to estimate glucose levels noninvasively. The algorithm used here calculates glucose values from sensor data and adds a constant obtained by a daily calibration. It provides point inaccuracy measured by a MARD of 35.4 mg/dL on test data. This is higher than current state-of-the-art minimally invasive devices, but still 86.9% of glucose rate points fall within the zone AR+BR. The multisensor device and the algorithmic routine used earlier in controlled conditions tracks glucose changes also in uncontrolled conditions, although with lower accuracy. The examination of learning curves suggests that obtaining more data would not improve the results. Therefore, further efforts would focus on the development of more complex algorithmic routines able to compensate for environmental and physiological confounders better.

  14. Managing migraines at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000420.htm Managing migraines at home To use the sharing features ... you drink every day. Learn and practice stress management . Some people find relaxation exercises and meditation helpful. ...

  15. Dying at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyanda, Brigitte Gagnon; Dechêne, Geneviève; Marchand, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To demonstrate that it is possible for a team of palliative care nurses in an urban centre to care for more than 50% of their terminally ill patients at home until they die, and that medical care delivered in the home is a determining factor in death at home versus death in a hospital. Design Analysis of place of death of terminally ill patients who died in 2012 and 2013 (N = 212) and who had been cared for by palliative care nurses, by type of medical care. Setting The centre local de services communautaires (CLSC) in Verdun, Que, an urban neighbourhood in southwest Montreal. Participants A total of 212 terminally ill patients. Main outcome measures Rate of deaths at home. Results Of the 212 patients cared for at home by palliative care nurses, 56.6% died at home; 62.6% received medical home care from CLSC physicians, compared with 5.0% who did not receive medical home care from any physician. Conclusion Combined with a straightforward restructuring of the nursing care delivered by CLSCs, development of medical services delivered in the home would enable the more than 50% of terminally ill patients in Quebec who are cared for by CLSCs to die at home—something that most of them wish for. PMID:25873716

  16. Health Begins at Home

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-03-30

    Clean and well-maintained homes can prevent many illnesses and injuries. This podcast discusses how good health begins at home.  Created: 3/30/2009 by Coordinating Center for Environmental Health and Injury Prevention (CCEHIP).   Date Released: 3/30/2009.

  17. Parents spend an average of nine hours a day providing palliative care for children at home and need to maintain an average of five life-saving devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzarin, P; Schiavon, B; Brugnaro, L; Benini, F

    2018-02-01

    This Italian study investigated home-based palliative care for young children and how long it took parents to meet their needs. The study population consisted of 33 families with a child under the responsibility of the Veneto Regional Center for Pediatric Palliative Care, northern Italy, who needed medical support in at least two of the following areas: respiratory, feeding, pain and seizures. The children had a mean age of 6.8 ± 4.7 years. We found that 72% of the patients needed medical devices for feeding, 36% had a tracheostomy and 55% were on mechanical ventilatory support. The children needed an average of five different life-supporting medical appliances, and the time taken to provide for their care increased significantly with each additional appliance (p = 0.016). Their most time-consuming daily needs were feeding (174 minutes) and support when they woke up at night (67 minutes). The average daily time that parents spent taking care of their child amounted to eight hours and 54 minutes per day. Parents providing palliative care for children with life-limiting diseases spent an average of nine hours a day caring for them each day and had to maintain an average of five medical appliances. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Managing tension headaches at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000421.htm Managing tension headaches at home To use the sharing ... have glasses, use them. Learn and practice stress management. Some people find relaxation exercises or meditation helpful. ...

  19. Dental plaque identification at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003426.htm Dental plaque identification at home To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Plaque is a sticky substance that collects around and ...

  20. Eldercare at Home: Hearing Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Join our e-newsletter! Resources Eldercare at Home: Hearing Problems Caregiving How Tos Understanding the Problem Fifty percent ... at all). Unfortunately, not many older people with hearing problems visit a hearing specialist or wear a hearing ...

  1. Comparisons of automated blood pressures in a primary health care setting with self-measurements at the office and at home using the Omron i-C10 device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Karkhi, Isam; Al-Rubaiy, Raad; Rosenqvist, Ulf; Falk, Magnus; Nystrom, Fredrik H

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to compare blood pressure (BP) levels recorded using the semiautomatic oscillometric Omron i-C10 BP device in patients with or without hypertension in three different settings: (a) when used by a doctor or a nurse at the office (OBP); (b) when used for self-measurement by the patient at the office (SMOBP); and (c) when used for 7 consecutive days at home (HBP). A total of 247 individuals were invited to participate, but 78 of these individuals declined and a further seven were excluded, leaving a final cohort of 162 participants. The mean OBP was higher than HBP (difference 8.1±14/3.1±8.8 mmHg, Poffice does not preclude an increase in BP when levels in the individual patients are compared with HBP using the same equipment. Thus, SMOBP with a semiautomatic device does not lead to a reduction in the white-coat effect in the same manner as fully automatic devices.

  2. 17th Symposium of NEDO projects. Medical and welfare device subcommittee; Iryo fukushi kiki bunkakai. Dai 17 kai jigyo hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    Described herein are the reports presented to the medical and welfare device subcommittee, 17th symposium of NEDO projects. Those devices selected to develop include a system for detecting information of trace quantities of cells, high-sensitivity optical DNA analyzer, superhigh-speed/high-precision brain function measuring MRI system, opto-tomographic imaging system and non-invasive cerebral metabolism measuring {sup 13}C-MRS device in the health and diagnosis area; system for supporting cerebral tumor surgery in the treatment area; body-embedded type artificial heart system, oral device engineering systems of the next generation and esophagus phonation aiding system in the body function supporting/acting area; automatic food-carrying robot system for the aged and handicapped, and discharging self-supporting system in the daily activity supporting area; and comprehensive wheelchair supporting system in the social activity supporting area. A total of 13 welfare technohouses have been built by the FY 1995. The welfare tool commercialization/development promotion project granted subsidies to a total of 28 themes by the FY 1995, and a total of 23 themes, including those continued, by the FY 1996. A total of 12 themes have been already commercialized. (NEDO)

  3. At Home in the Countryside

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Steenbekkers; C. Simon; V. Veldheer

    2006-01-01

    The Dutch countryside is in a state of flux. The decline of agriculture and the altered use of space are being studied extensively in research and in the media.  But what about the people living in the countryside? How are they doing? In the report Thuis op het platteland (At Home in the

  4. Challenges In the At Home Anywhere (@HA) Service Discovery Protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sundramoorthy, V.; Scholten, Johan; Finney, J.; Haahr, M.; Montresor, A.

    2002-01-01

    Since the idea of ubiquitous computing kicked off, service discovery has been found essential in implementing automatic discovery of networked devices, and remote control of one device from another. In the At Home Anywhere (@HA) project, service discovery ensures seamless communication between home

  5. Eldercare at Home: Communication Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... create frustration for those who have spent much of their recreation time reading magazines and corresponding by mail. On the other ... but also hearing aids. Many assistive devices and techniques are ... Optimal use of these devices generally involves instruction from a health ...

  6. Ombuds’ corner: Work at home

    CERN Multimedia

    Vincent Vuillemin

    2013-01-01

    Just the word “telecommuter” is enough to make many managers start to sweat. When faced with the prospect of managing an employee they cannot even see, basic managerial knowledge often becomes hazy, resulting in a confusing arrangement for both manager and employee. As more and more of our world revolves around technology and an increasing number of jobs can be executed from an office at home , managers must learn how to adapt their leadership style to cater to both remote employees, and those working in the office.(1)   As the policy concerning working from home is described in the Operational Circular No 7(2), I will not describe it in detail but rather focus on the pros and cons of such a work arrangement, and most importantly on the discussion following a request and on the necessary mutual confidence between the manager and the employee. Of course, working from home is appropriate for some professions, but may not be possible for all of them. Some 500 studies(3) abou...

  7. Designing for Active Place Presence at Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ylirisku, Salu; Jylhä, Antti; Lehtiö, Anu

    2016-01-01

    Technological support for augmenting the relationship that people establish with remote places has been studied fairly little as the primary focus in telepresence studies is the connection between people. This paper addresses the design challenge for supporting ‘active place presence’ at home...... to be considered when designing for active place presence at home....

  8. Factors affecting death at home in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvaget, C; Tsuji, I; Li, J H; Hosokawa, T; Fukao, A; Hisamichi, S

    1996-10-01

    Despite the wish of the Japanese people to spend their final moments at home, the percentage of deaths at home among elderly is decreasing. Moreover, large variations in this rate were observed over the country. The present ecological study analyzed the relationship between the percentage of deaths at home for decedents aged 70 and over, and demographic, medical and socioeconomic characteristics. The data published in 1990 by the Japanese National Government were analyzed by correlation, principal-component, and multiple linear regression analyses. The results showed that the percentage of deaths at home for decedents aged 70 and over was positively associated with the number of persons per household, and the area of floor space per house. The divorce rate, the national tax per capita, and the mean length of hospitalization for stroke showed a negative association with the percentage of deaths at home. In the prefectures where the crude death rates of stroke and senility were high, elderly were more likely to die at home. These results suggested the importance of the number of family caregivers, and the housing conditions for terminal care at home. This research may lead to improve home medical assistance which is still underdeveloped in Japan.

  9. Common cold - how to treat at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000466.htm Common cold - how to treat at home To use the ... Antibiotics are almost never needed to treat a common cold. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) help lower ...

  10. Taking medicine at home - create a routine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000613.htm Taking medicine at home - create a routine To use the ... teeth. Find Ways to Help You Remember Your Medicines You can: Set the alarm on your clock, ...

  11. Staph infections -- self-care at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000686.htm Staph infections - self-care at home To use the ... used to treat other staph germs. How Does Staph Spread? Many healthy people normally have staph on ...

  12. Do Kids Have Rights at Home?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, Teri; Sussman, Susan

    1981-01-01

    Examines the role of children with regard to the law, with emphasis on their rights within the home. Examines various rights that kids and parents have at home and whether granting or denying certain rights is fair. Topics discussed include whether minors can get medical treatment on their own and their sexual and reproductive freedom. (DB)

  13. Caring at home until death: enabled determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Carole A; Bottorff, Joan L; McFee, Erin; Bissell, Laura J; Fyles, Gillian

    2017-04-01

    The importance of family caregivers in providing palliative care at home and in supporting a home death is well supported. Gaining a better understanding of what enables palliative family caregivers to continue caring at home for their family members until death is critical to providing direction for more effective support. The purpose of the study was to describe the experiences of bereaved family caregivers whose terminally ill family members with advanced cancer were successful in achieving a desired home death. A qualitative interpretive descriptive approach was used. Data were collected using semi-structured, audio-recorded interviews conducted in-person or via telephone in addition to field notes and reflective journaling. The study took place in British Columbia, Canada, and included 29 bereaved adult family caregivers who had provided care for a family member with advanced cancer and experienced a home death. Four themes captured the experience of caring at home until death: context of providing care, supportive antecedents to providing care, determination to provide care at home, and enabled determination. Factors that enabled determination to achieve a home death included initiation of formal palliative care, asking for and receiving help, augmented care, relief or respite, and making the healthcare system work for the ill person. Clarifying caregiving goals and supporting the factors that enable caregiver determination appear to be critical in enhancing the likelihood of a desired home death.

  14. Parenting at Home and Bullying at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Stelios N.; Stavrinides, Panayiotis

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed at examining the relationship that may exist between specific parental practices at home and the child's bullying and victimization experiences at school. This study attempted to go beyond parental styles, a variable that most of the earlier studies have used and introduce three, relatively new parameters of bullying and…

  15. At Home in a Digital World

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jos de Haan; Frank Huysmans; Jan Steyaert

    2002-01-01

    Original title: Van huis uit digitaal. Young people grow up surrounded by digital media. Particularly at home, but increasingly at school as well, they have access to computers, the Internet and digital technology as well as information carriers such as video games and CD-ROMs. Some young

  16. Management of feverish children at home.

    OpenAIRE

    Kinmonth, A L; Fulton, Y.; Campbell, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To compare the acceptability and effects on temperature of advice to unwrap children and give paracetamol or warm sponging treatments in the management of feverish illness at home. DESIGN--A randomised, open, parallel group study using factorial design comparison of unwrapping, warm sponging plus unwrapping, paracetamol plus unwrapping, and paracetamol and warm sponging plus unwrapping. SETTING--Homes of willing families with a feverish child recruited after consulting one of 21 p...

  17. [Enteral alimentation at home: why PEG now?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Y; Hanyu, N; Kashiwagi, H; Kubo, T; Aoki, T

    1996-12-01

    The history of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is relatively short. In 1980, a report entitled "Gastrostomy without laparotomy: A percutaneous endoscopic technique" by Ponsky and Gaudere was first published in the Journal of Pediatric Surgery. Thereafter, PEG soon saw widespread use in Western countries because of its clinical efficacy and economy. It has been performed in about 170,000 cases annually in the US. In contrast, its spread in Japan has been extremely slow: only about 10,000 cases have undergone this procedure annually, and this number accounted for less than 5% of patients receiving enteral alimentation. The reason why PEG has not spread may be the medical insurance system in Japan and the local distaste for operation scarring. However, in consideration of the unprecedented ageing of society that is surely coming in the near future, the role of PEG in Japan must be reexamined. In this report, we presented the methodology of enteral alimentation at home by means of PEG, giving special consideration to: (1) "What points are improved by using enteral alimentation at home by means of PEG in various diseases; (2) dysphagia due to cerebral angiopathy; (3) terminal cancer; (4) otolaryngological diseases; and (5) Crohn disease. We also discussed "Why PEG is important now?" in performing enteral alimentation at home.

  18. Telemonitoring of patients at home: a software agent approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rialle, Vincent; Lamy, Jean Baptiste; Noury, Norbert; Bajolle, Lionel

    2003-11-01

    To address the issue of the increasing social, economical and medical needs of maintaining at home people in loss of autonomy while preserving privacy and quality of life, the authors present a software agent based telemonitoring and alarm raising system. The article describes the overall architecture, the various components of the model, and the methodology that has been used. It specifically addresses the issue of reflecting in the object oriented model of the system various dimensions including: the physical world of in-home bio-signal sensors, the numerical world of software agents and Internet-related technologies, and the medical and social worlds of patients, physicians and caregivers. In the model, the main stream of information goes from the biophysical world of patients at home to the socio-medical world of carers through a chain of devices including in-home sensors, local area network, home computer, remote server, and carers' computers. Each device hosts software agents with different levels of knowledge and complexity. Internet and Java technologies provide the building blocks of the designed telemonitoring software. Laboratory experiments have been realized using a fully equipped 'smart' demonstration home for telecare. The study takes place into a more general research project on 'smart' homes for telecare conducted at the Hospital Centre of Grenoble, France.

  19. Soldiers' personal technologies on deployment and at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Nigel E; Fullerton, Nicole; Crumpton, Rosa; Metzger-Abamukong, Melinda; Fantelli, Emily

    2012-05-01

    Personal technologies such as smartphones, computers, and gaming devices, are ubiquitous in the civilian world. Consequently they represent ideal vehicles for disseminating psychological and other health resources and interventions. However, almost nothing is known about personal technology use in the U.S. military. We conducted the most comprehensive survey to date of the use, availability, and need for personal technologies by U.S. military service members. Our survey asked detailed questions about computers and the Internet, phones and smartphones, other mobile or portable technologies, gaming devices, and TV and video media used during deployment and at permanent duty station or home. We collected data by paper-and-pencil survey in 2010 and 2011 from 331 active Army service members at a processing and registration center in a large military installation in the western United States. Two cohorts were surveyed: Soldiers who had previously been deployed to a warzone and soldiers who had never been deployed. We measured high rates of personal technology use by service members at home across all popular electronic media. Soldiers at home essentially resembled civilian consumers in their use of popular technologies. Some technologies, including the Internet, gaming, and TV, were widespread on deployment. Others, most notably cellphones, were more restricted by availability, connectivity, opportunity, and military regulation in the warzone. Results will enable researchers and technology developers target their efforts on the most promising and popular technologies for psychological health in the military.

  20. Robotics to Enable Older Adults to Remain Living at Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan J. Pearce

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the rapidly ageing population, interest is growing in robots to enable older people to remain living at home. We conducted a systematic review and critical evaluation of the scientific literature, from 1990 to the present, on the use of robots in aged care. The key research questions were as follows: (1 what is the range of robotic devices available to enable older people to remain mobile, independent, and safe? and, (2 what is the evidence demonstrating that robotic devices are effective in enabling independent living in community dwelling older people? Following database searches for relevant literature an initial yield of 161 articles was obtained. Titles and abstracts of articles were then reviewed by 2 independent people to determine suitability for inclusion. Forty-two articles met the criteria for question 1. Of these, 4 articles met the criteria for question 2. Results showed that robotics is currently available to assist older healthy people and people with disabilities to remain independent and to monitor their safety and social connectedness. Most studies were conducted in laboratories and hospital clinics. Currently limited evidence demonstrates that robots can be used to enable people to remain living at home, although this is an emerging smart technology that is rapidly evolving.

  1. [Organ donation following physician-hastened death at home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, J G H; Sonneveld, J P C

    2017-01-01

    Patients considering physician-hastened death (PHD) increasingly express a wish to donate organs after death. This fairly unique proposition stems from patients' desire to do something good with (parts of) the same diseased body that has prompted them to request physician-hastened death. In this article we describe a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) who expressed this wish. In March 2017 a national guideline on 'Organ donation following physician-hastened death' (ODP) was presented to the Minister of Health, Welfare and Sport of the Netherlands. From the development of this guideline it emerged that, for PHD patients, being forced to experience their final conscious moments in hospital - in order to facilitate organ donation - was a key reason for not choosing ODP. Together with an anaesthesiologist-intensivist, the GP of the ALS patient developed a domestic ODP, thereby overcoming the hurdle of experiencing death in hospital and maintaining the possible option of organ donation. The applied solution is an 'anaesthesia bridge' which separates the experience of farewells, and losing consciousness under pre-medication at home, from biological death and organ donation in hospital.

  2. Welfare migration

    OpenAIRE

    Giulietti, Corrado; Wahba, Jackline

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reviews and discusses major theories and empirical studies about the welfare magnet hypothesis, i.e. whether immigrants are more likely to move to countries with generous welfare systems. Although economic theory predicts that welfare generosity affects the number, composition and location of immigrants, the empirical evidence is rather mixed. We offer possible explanations for the existence of such mixed evidence and highlight that the literature so far has overlooked the presen...

  3. Predicting recovery at home after Ambulatory Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayala Guillermo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The correct implementation of Ambulatory Surgery must be accompanied by an accurate monitoring of the patient post-discharge state. We fit different statistical models to predict the first hours postoperative status of a discharged patient. We will also be able to predict, for any discharged patient, the probability of needing a closer follow-up, or of having a normal progress at home. Background The status of a discharged patient is predicted during the first 48 hours after discharge by using variables routinely used in Ambulatory Surgery. The models fitted will provide the physician with an insight into the post-discharge progress. These models will provide valuable information to assist in educating the patient and their carers about what to expect after discharge as well as to improve their overall level of satisfaction. Methods A total of 922 patients from the Ambulatory Surgery Unit of the Dr. Peset University Hospital (Valencia, Spain were selected for this study. Their post-discharge status was evaluated through a phone questionnaire. We pretend to predict four variables which were self-reported via phone interviews with the discharged patient: sleep, pain, oral tolerance of fluid/food and bleeding status. A fifth variable called phone score will be built as the sum of these four ordinal variables. The number of phone interviews varies between patients, depending on the evolution. The proportional odds model was used. The predictors were age, sex, ASA status, surgical time, discharge time, type of anaesthesia, surgical specialty and ambulatory surgical incapacity (ASI. This last variable reflects, before the operation, the state of incapacity and severity of symptoms in the discharged patient. Results Age, ambulatory surgical incapacity and the surgical specialty are significant to explain the level of pain at the first call. For the first two phone calls, ambulatory surgical incapacity is significant as a predictor for all

  4. Predicting recovery at home after Ambulatory Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The correct implementation of Ambulatory Surgery must be accompanied by an accurate monitoring of the patient post-discharge state. We fit different statistical models to predict the first hours postoperative status of a discharged patient. We will also be able to predict, for any discharged patient, the probability of needing a closer follow-up, or of having a normal progress at home. Background The status of a discharged patient is predicted during the first 48 hours after discharge by using variables routinely used in Ambulatory Surgery. The models fitted will provide the physician with an insight into the post-discharge progress. These models will provide valuable information to assist in educating the patient and their carers about what to expect after discharge as well as to improve their overall level of satisfaction. Methods A total of 922 patients from the Ambulatory Surgery Unit of the Dr. Peset University Hospital (Valencia, Spain) were selected for this study. Their post-discharge status was evaluated through a phone questionnaire. We pretend to predict four variables which were self-reported via phone interviews with the discharged patient: sleep, pain, oral tolerance of fluid/food and bleeding status. A fifth variable called phone score will be built as the sum of these four ordinal variables. The number of phone interviews varies between patients, depending on the evolution. The proportional odds model was used. The predictors were age, sex, ASA status, surgical time, discharge time, type of anaesthesia, surgical specialty and ambulatory surgical incapacity (ASI). This last variable reflects, before the operation, the state of incapacity and severity of symptoms in the discharged patient. Results Age, ambulatory surgical incapacity and the surgical specialty are significant to explain the level of pain at the first call. For the first two phone calls, ambulatory surgical incapacity is significant as a predictor for all responses except for sleep at

  5. Task Oriented Training and Evaluation at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Veronica T; Neville, Marsha

    2018-01-01

    Principles of experience-dependent plasticity, motor learning theory, and the theory of Occupational Adaptation coalesce into a translational model for practice in neurorehabilitation. The objective of this study was to explore the effectiveness of a Task Oriented Training and Evaluation at Home (TOTE Home) program completed by people with subacute stroke, and whether effects persisted 1 month after this training. A single-subject design included a maximum of 30, 1hour sessions of training conducted in participants' homes. Repeated target measures of accelerometry and level of confidence were used to assess movement and confidence in weaker arm use through baseline, intervention, and follow-up phases of TOTE Home. Four participants completed TOTE Home and each demonstrated improvement in movement and confidence in function. The degree of improvement varied between participants, but a detectable change was evident in outcome measures. TOTE Home, using client-centered, salient tasks not only improved motor function but also facilitated an adaptive response demonstrated in continued improvement beyond the intervention.

  6. Promoting respect at home and abroad

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    This week, I’d like to focus on respect, whether at home, at work or on the international scene. Last week, I had the opportunity to visit the SESAME laboratory in Jordan along with the new European Commissioner for Research, Carlos Moedas. Since taking up his post, Mr Moedas has attached great importance to the role science can play in diplomacy, and the visit was on his initiative.   Through the EU-funded CESSAMag project, CERN is coordinating the provision of magnets and power supplies for the SESAME main ring. The first are currently being tested at CERN by a team involving accelerator scientists from the SESAME members, and all are due to be delivered to SESAME in time for commissioning in the second half of 2016. SESAME, and CERN’s contribution to the project, are well documented in the pages of the Bulletin, but what really impresses when you visit the lab is the diversity of people working there and the degree of mutual respect they show to each other. SESAME will...

  7. On-line hemodiafiltration at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Almudena; Abad, Soraya; Macías, Nicolás; Aragoncillo, Inés

    2017-10-03

    Survival with online hemodiafiltration (OL-HDF) is higher than with hemodialysis; frequent hemodialysis has also improved survival and quality of life. Home hemodialysis facilitates frequent therapy. We report our experience with 2 patients with stage 5 CKD who started home hemodialysis with OL-HDF in November 2016. After a training period at the hospital, they started home hemodialysis with OL-HDF after learning how to manage dialysis monitors and how to administer water treatment. We used the "5008-home" (FMC© ) monitor, and the Acqua C© (Fresenius Medical Care) for water treatment. Water conductivity was always checked before and during dialysis sessions and was always 2.5 to 3 mS/cm. Water cultures always fulfilled the criteria for ultrapurity. As far as we know, this is the first report on patients receiving OL-HDF at home. The technique proved to be safe and valid for renal replacement therapy and transfers the benefits of hospital convective therapy to the home setting. Future data will enable us to determine whether survival has also improved. © 2017 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  8. FY1998 report on a survey related to joint utilization of welfare device development data using an international network; 1998 nendo kokusai network ni yoru fukushi kiki kaihatsu data no kyodo riyo ni kansuru chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    A survey was made in relation with joint utilization of welfare device development data using an international network. Developing welfare devices requires data from ergonomic and medical systems, while the cope of the objects is wide, and the kinds are various. For proliferation of welfare devices, system compatibility evaluation including that on using environment is important, including living environments that are different by countries. The present survey has identified how data for aged, handicapped and help-needing persons are accumulated and utilized in research organizations in America and Europe for both of the ergonomic and medical areas. The survey also investigated major academic societies in overseas countries, and collected database and academic network information that support the advanced research and development. At the same time, investigations were also made on organizations and corporations who are moving forward the efficient data utilization. Welfare device and service information providing systems in Japan were investigated to compare them with the trends in other countries. Conceptions and methods were compiled to utilize data internationally and jointly. Database models for device development were considered, and a proposal was made on structuring a research and development supporting database, and the operation method thereof. (NEDO)

  9. SCRIPT passive orthosis : design of interactive hand and wrist exoskeleton for rehabilitation at home after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ates, Sedar; Haarman, Claudia J W; Stienen, Arno H A

    2017-01-01

    Recovery of functional hand movements after stroke is directly linked to rehabilitation duration and intensity. Continued therapy at home has the potential to increase both. For many patients this requires a device that helps them overcome the hyperflexion of wrist and fingers that is limiting their

  10. Do Maltreated Children who Remain at Home Function Better than Those who Are Placed?

    OpenAIRE

    Mennen, Ferol E.; Brensilver, Matthew; Trickett, Penelope K.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of children in the child welfare system remain with their maltreating parents, yet little is known about their level of functioning and whether they are in need of mental health intervention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mental health functioning of an ethnically diverse sample of 302 maltreated children and 151 non maltreated children ages 9–12 to see if there were differences between those who remained at home, those placed in kin care, non-relative foster care...

  11. Vision Trainer Teaches Focusing Techniques at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Based on work Stanford Research Institute did for Ames Research Center, Joseph Trachtman developed a vision trainer to treat visual focusing problems in the 1980s. In 2014, Trachtman, operating out of Seattle, released a home version of the device called the Zone-Trac. The inventor has found the biofeedback process used by the technology induces an alpha-wave brain state, causing increased hand-eye coordination and reaction times, among other effects

  12. Talking to Write: A Mother and Son at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Elizabeth Baumann

    2000-01-01

    Describes how the author participated in her son Carl's writing process at home when she realized his growing resistance to writing in school in the second grade. Examines the in-class composing process and Carl's frustrations. Describes how she became Carl's scribe at home as he gradually discovered that writing could be a symbolic representation…

  13. Dying at home in Belgium: a descriptive GP interview study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemans, K.; van den Block, L.; Bilsen, J.; Cohen, J.; Boffin, N.; Deliens, L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: While increasing attention is being paid to enabling terminal patients to remain at home until death, limited information is available on the circumstances in which people at home actually die. Therefore this study aims to describe patient characteristics, functional and cognitive status

  14. Paediatric palliative care at home: a single centre's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Lee Ai; Khalid, Farah

    2016-02-01

    There is increased awareness of paediatric palliative care in Malaysia, but no local published data on home care services. We aimed to describe the paediatric experience at Hospis Malaysia, a community-based palliative care provider in Malaysia. We conducted a retrospective case note review of patients aged up to 21 years who were referred to Hospis Malaysia from 2009 to 2013. A total of 137 patients (92 male, 45 female) with a median age of 140 (3-250) months were included in this study. The majority (71.5%) had malignancies. At referral, 62 patients were still in hospital and 17 died prior to discharge. A total of 108 patients received home visits. At the first home visit, 89.8% of patients had at least one physical symptom. Pain was the most common (52.5%) symptom. Patients had various supportive devices: 39 were on feeding tubes, ten had tracheostomies, five were on bilevel positive airway pressure and ten had urinary catheters. 66 families discussed the preferred location of care at end-of-life. Among those who died, 78.9% died at home, as they preferred (p home death and age, diagnosis and number of home visits. Bereavement follow-up occurred for 93.3% of families. Community care referrals tend to occur late, with 25.5% of patients dying within two weeks of referral. At referral, patients often had untreated physical symptoms. The majority of families preferred and had a home death. Copyright © Singapore Medical Association.

  15. Where can we find our places at home?

    OpenAIRE

    甲村, 和三; 飯田, 沙依亜

    2013-01-01

    When we go into a new environment, it impose both change and challenge. While most people can turn it into opportunity, some people are crushed with anxiety or loneliness. In this study, we asked college students to describe the factors contributing to their comfort at home. The comfort at home should effects on the comfort at college. Based on results, we discuss how we can support the efforts made by college students to adjust to college life.

  16. Strength at Home Couples Program to Prevent Military Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0374 TITLE: Strength at Home Couples Program to Prevent Military Partner Violence PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Casey T...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Strength at Home Couples Program to Prevent Military Partner Violence 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0374 5c. PROGRAM...Health 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT U b

  17. Dying at home in Belgium: a descriptive GP interview study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background While increasing attention is being paid to enabling terminal patients to remain at home until death, limited information is available on the circumstances in which people at home actually die. Therefore this study aims to describe patient characteristics, functional and cognitive status and physical and psychological symptom burden in the last three months of life among Belgian patients dying at home, according to their GPs. Methods In 2005, a nationwide and retrospective interview study with GPs took place on people dying at home in Belgium as reported by Sentinel Network of GPs in Belgium. GPs registered all deaths (patients aged 1 year or more) weekly and were interviewed about all patients dying non-suddenly at home, using face-to-face structured interviews. Results Interviews were obtained on 205 patients (90% response rate). Between the second and third month before death, 55% were fully invalid or limited in self-care. In the last week of life, almost all were fully invalid. Fifty four percent were unconscious at some point during the last week; 46% were fully conscious. Most frequently reported symptoms were lack of energy, lack of appetite and feeling drowsy. Conditions most difficult for GPs to manage were shortness of breath, lack of energy and pain. Conclusions Many people dying at home under the care of their GPs in Belgium function relatively well until the last week of life and cognitive status seems to be preserved until the end in many cases. However, symptoms which GPs find difficult to control still manifest in many patients in the final week of life. PMID:22260260

  18. Dying at home in Belgium: a descriptive GP interview study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leemans Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While increasing attention is being paid to enabling terminal patients to remain at home until death, limited information is available on the circumstances in which people at home actually die. Therefore this study aims to describe patient characteristics, functional and cognitive status and physical and psychological symptom burden in the last three months of life among Belgian patients dying at home, according to their GPs. Methods In 2005, a nationwide and retrospective interview study with GPs took place on people dying at home in Belgium as reported by Sentinel Network of GPs in Belgium. GPs registered all deaths (patients aged 1 year or more weekly and were interviewed about all patients dying non-suddenly at home, using face-to-face structured interviews. Results Interviews were obtained on 205 patients (90% response rate. Between the second and third month before death, 55% were fully invalid or limited in self-care. In the last week of life, almost all were fully invalid. Fifty four percent were unconscious at some point during the last week; 46% were fully conscious. Most frequently reported symptoms were lack of energy, lack of appetite and feeling drowsy. Conditions most difficult for GPs to manage were shortness of breath, lack of energy and pain. Conclusions Many people dying at home under the care of their GPs in Belgium function relatively well until the last week of life and cognitive status seems to be preserved until the end in many cases. However, symptoms which GPs find difficult to control still manifest in many patients in the final week of life.

  19. Aspects of family-managed care at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grönvall, Erik

    More and more care, for example of older adults, is performed at home. Municipality home-care workers and novel technologies support this translocation of care. At home, an important care provider is also the immediate family. A recent trend is to formalize this volunteer-, and family-based care....... However, this formalization requires new support systems for collaboration and communication. Also, when informal care turns formal there is a risk that a caring family-member might have to give up professional goals such as a career, or suffer economically as one may not be able to work fulltime while...

  20. Pet Problems at Home: Pet Problems in the Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Discusses problems of pets in the community, examining the community's role related to disruptive pets and pet overpopulation. Also discusses pet problems at home, offering advice on selecting a pet, meeting a pet's needs, and disciplining pets. Includes a list of books, films/filmstrips, teaching materials, and various instructional strategies.…

  1. At Home in Maine: Gifted Children and Homeschooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Katheryn

    1984-01-01

    Parents of two gifted children are interviewed about their decision to teach their children at home. The parents describe their reasons for taking the children out of school and the benefits of home schooling and offer suggestions for other parents contemplating the idea. (CL)

  2. Troubles with the Internet: The Dynamics of Help at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesler, Sara; Zdaniuk, Bozena; Lundmark, Vicki; Kraut, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of the need for technical support during home computer Internet use focuses on a study that examined the conditions and consequences of acquiring technical support at home. Topics include the role of teenagers, family dynamics, and implications for support services and for research on technological change. (LRW)

  3. The Stay-at-Home Sabbatical Increases in Popularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robin

    1999-01-01

    Two factors are fueling college faculty interest in at-home sabbaticals: the rise of the two-career family, and technological advances that allow faculty to communicate with colleagues from home. Critics feel that to take full advantage of sabbatical leave, faculty should leave the home area. One institution has created a seven-week sabbatical for…

  4. Optimization of complex palliative care at home via teleconsultation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasselaar, J.; van Gurp, J.; van Selm, M.; Schers, H.J.; van Leeuwen, E.; Vissers, K.; van den Hoven, J.; Doorn, N.; Swierstra, T.; Koops, B.J.; Romijn, H.

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care involves the care for patients with a life threatening disease, often advanced cancer, aiming at an optimal quality of life for the patient and his/her family. Although many patients with advanced cancer live at home in the last phase of disease, hospital transfers are often

  5. Internationalisation at Home: Intercultural Learning for Social Psychology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Patricia M.; Mak, Anita S.; Neill, James T.

    2016-01-01

    An internationalised curriculum could better prepare graduates for globalising and increasingly culturally diverse workplaces. There is a need to provide students with intercultural learning opportunities at home because many students do not have access to study abroad opportunities. This paper describes curriculum changes designed to enhance…

  6. Patients' experiences of telerehabilitation at home after shoulder joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Lisbeth; Lindström, Britta; Ekenberg, Lilly

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the experience of ten patients who received video-based physiotherapy at home for two months after a shoulder joint replacement. Videoconferencing took place via the patient's home broadband connection at a bandwidth of 256-768 kbit/s. Qualitative interviews were carried out, transcribed and analysed. Through qualitative content analysis six categories were identified: (1) a different reinforced communication; (2) pain-free exercising as an effective routine; (3) from a dependent patient to a strengthened person at home; (4) closeness at a distance; (5) facilitated daily living; and (6) continuous physiotherapy chain. The access to bodily knowledge, continuity, collaboration and being at home were all aspects that contributed to the patients' recovery. The patients described experiences of safety, and strengthening during their daily exercise routine at home. The frequent interplay with the patient during telerehabilitation made it possible for the physiotherapist to make an individual judgement about each patient; this could be one reason for the positive findings. Home video-based physiotherapy may be useful in other kinds of physiotherapy.

  7. Teaching Strategy: Human Rights Around the World and at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    Presents a lesson on human rights for middle and secondary school students in which they identify human rights, cite examples of human-rights abuses and affirmations, and relate actions to the articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). Explains that students identify human-rights issues globally and at home. (CMK)

  8. Children and Learning Climate at Home and at School: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results showed that most of the children had serious financial and sociological problems at home which had effects on their academic progress. There was a positive correlation between alcoholic fathers on the one hand and family quarrels and poor academic performance of children in school on the other. It was also ...

  9. Measuring gender equality at home and in the marketplace | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-04-20

    Apr 20, 2011 ... Razavi's talk, Gender Equality: at Home and in the Market, highlighted the interplay between gender struggles and economic understanding. Public and private spheres. Razavi identified the private sphere – the home and the personal relationships housed within it as the historical battleground for equality.

  10. Flipping the Classroom: Homework in Class, Lessons at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    One way to create more class time and not lose education time is to have students take notes at home and do the work in class. This article describes "flipping the classroom," a new instructional model that allows an educator to record a lesson plan on video in the same fashion it would be presented to students. The structure of the…

  11. Making Breakfast Kid-Pleasing at Home or School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neifert, Marianne

    1993-01-01

    Research consistently shows links between eating breakfast and learning. Many resources, including the National School Breakfast Program, are available to help parents who cannot provide breakfast at home. The article offers suggestions to help parents make creative, child-pleasing breakfasts and become active in planning school breakfasts. (SM)

  12. [Technological advances and hospital-at-home care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibaldi, Vittoria; Aimonino Ricauda, Nicoletta; Rocco, Maurizio; Bertone, Paola; Fanton, Giordano; Isaia, Giancarlo

    2013-05-01

    Advances in the miniaturization and portability of diagnostic technologies, information technologies, remote monitoring, and long-distance care have increased the viability of home-based care, even for patients with serious conditions. Telemedicine and teleradiology projects are active at the Hospital at Home Service of Torino.

  13. Support for Children Who Are Educated at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Mary; Martin, Kerry; Downing, Dick; Harland, Jennie; Kendall, Sally; White, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Many thousands of children in the UK are educated at home, and the subject of support for the home-education community is debated. The National Foundation for Educational Research conducted research to examine the views of home educators about the support they receive from local authorities, other home-educating families, schools and other…

  14. Behaviors of Youth Involved in the Child Welfare System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew; Ruffolo, Mary C.; Ortega, Robert M.; Clarke, Jenell

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Using data from a nationally representative panel study, the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW), we address the following questions: (a) What are the youth, family, community, and child welfare system risk factors that place youth (ages 11-14 years) living at home, who are referred for maltreatment, at increased…

  15. State Welfarism and Social Welfare in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Indra P TIWARI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper has analyzed and discussed the social welfare policies of the Asian countries—the responsibilities of international activist institutions and the State towards individuals in terms of state welfarism and social and economic protection, and the conventional family system, which was and still is the core responsible institution for the well-being of its members. The paper has presented economic and poverty indicators (19, demographic, social and economic indicators associated social welfarism (16, satisfaction related indicators (7, and funding related indicators that have association with social welfarism (9. This has also analyzed and discussed the gap between the international propaganda on social welfare, social policies of the Government and its actual delivery and the situation of vacuum being created due to the moribund family system of slothful state welfarism, in the new living context created by the notion of right-prone individualism. The study has identified along with their history of starting social security provisions the present state major workfare and welfare and welfare protection in the Asian countries, thereby explored countries falling into five levels of social welfare system by taking a combined state of poverty, vulnerable employment, and government expenditure on education, health and social protection, namely (i early stage of welfare system; (ii transition to take-off stage of welfare system; (iii take-off stage of welfare system; (iv transition to drive to maturity stage of welfare system; and (v the drive to maturity stage of welfare system. Finally, the paper has presented the critical areas for dialogue where the synergy of the propagandist international activism, state slothfulness, moribund family dynamics, and right-prone individualism interface for a reliable and sustainable social welfare with affection, protection, nurturance, and protection thereby live in peace and harmony with dignity.

  16. Math at home adds up to achievement in school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Talia; Schaeffer, Marjorie W; Maloney, Erin A; Peterson, Lori; Gregor, Courtney; Levine, Susan C; Beilock, Sian L

    2015-10-09

    With a randomized field experiment of 587 first-graders, we tested an educational intervention designed to promote interactions between children and parents relating to math. We predicted that increasing math activities at home would increase children's math achievement at school. We tested this prediction by having children engage in math story time with their parents. The intervention, short numerical story problems delivered through an iPad app, significantly increased children's math achievement across the school year compared to a reading (control) group, especially for children whose parents are habitually anxious about math. Brief, high-quality parent-child interactions about math at home help break the intergenerational cycle of low math achievement. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Nutritional condition and food intake in seniors living at home

    OpenAIRE

    CHARVÁTOVÁ, Pavla

    2017-01-01

    Bachelor thesis entitled "Nutrition status and intake of food in seniors living at home" deals with nutrition of seniors, food intake and their nutritional status. The theoretical part deals first with the basic concepts of aging, important components of food - the need of energy, proteins, fats, carbohydrates, fiber, calcium and vitamin D as well as drinking and eating. Further, the theoretical work describes all changes of gastrointestinal tract from oral to thin and colon and any complicat...

  18. Computational Intelligence and Game Design for Effective At-Home Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghese, Nunzio Alberto; Pirovano, Michele; Lanzi, Pier Luca; Wüest, Seline; de Bruin, Eling D

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this article is to describe a game engine that has all the characteristics needed to support rehabilitation at home. The low-cost tracking devices recently introduced in the entertainment market allow measuring reliably at home, in real time, players' motion with a hands-free approach. Such systems have also become a source of inspiration for researchers working in rehabilitation. Computer games appear suited to guide rehabilitation because of their ability to engage the users. However, commercial videogames and game engines lack the peculiar functionalities required in rehabilitation: Games should be adapted to each patient's functional status, and monitoring the patient's motion is mandatory to avoid maladaptation. Feedback on performance and progression of the exercises should be provided. Lastly, several tracking devices should be considered, according to the patient's pathology and rehabilitation aims. We have analyzed the needs of the clinicians and of the patients associated in performing rehabilitation at home, identifying the characteristics that the game engine should have. The result of this analysis has led us to develop the Intelligent Game Engine for Rehabilitation (IGER) system, which combines the principles upon which commercial games are designed with the needs of rehabilitation. IGER is heavily based on computational intelligence: Adaptation of the difficulty level of the exercise is carried out through a Bayesian framework from the observation of the patient's success rate. Monitoring is implemented in fuzzy systems and based on rules defined for the exercises by clinicians. Several devices can be attached to IGER through an input abstraction layer, like the Nintendo(®) (Kyoto, Japan) Wii™ Balance Board™, the Microsoft(®) (Redmond, WA) Kinect, the Falcon from Novint Technologies (Albuquerque, NM), or the Tyromotion (Graz, Austria) Timo(®) plate balance board. IGER is complemented with videogames embedded in a specific taxonomy

  19. Computational Intelligence and Game Design for Effective At-Home Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirovano, Michele; Lanzi, Pier Luca; Wüest, Seline; de Bruin, Eling D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective The aim of this article is to describe a game engine that has all the characteristics needed to support rehabilitation at home. The low-cost tracking devices recently introduced in the entertainment market allow measuring reliably at home, in real time, players' motion with a hands-free approach. Such systems have also become a source of inspiration for researchers working in rehabilitation. Computer games appear suited to guide rehabilitation because of their ability to engage the users. However, commercial videogames and game engines lack the peculiar functionalities required in rehabilitation: Games should be adapted to each patient's functional status, and monitoring the patient's motion is mandatory to avoid maladaptation. Feedback on performance and progression of the exercises should be provided. Lastly, several tracking devices should be considered, according to the patient's pathology and rehabilitation aims. Subjects and Methods We have analyzed the needs of the clinicians and of the patients associated in performing rehabilitation at home, identifying the characteristics that the game engine should have. Results The result of this analysis has led us to develop the Intelligent Game Engine for Rehabilitation (IGER) system, which combines the principles upon which commercial games are designed with the needs of rehabilitation. IGER is heavily based on computational intelligence: Adaptation of the difficulty level of the exercise is carried out through a Bayesian framework from the observation of the patient's success rate. Monitoring is implemented in fuzzy systems and based on rules defined for the exercises by clinicians. Several devices can be attached to IGER through an input abstraction layer, like the Nintendo® (Kyoto, Japan) Wii™ Balance Board™, the Microsoft® (Redmond, WA) Kinect, the Falcon from Novint Technologies (Albuquerque, NM), or the Tyromotion (Graz, Austria) Timo® plate balance board. IGER is complemented with

  20. Poor Reliability of Wrist Blood Pressure Self-Measurement at Home: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casiglia, Edoardo; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Albertini, Federica; Palatini, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    The reliability of blood pressure measurement with wrist devices, which has not previously been assessed under real-life circumstances in general population, is dependent on correct positioning of the wrist device at heart level. We determined whether an error was present when blood pressure was self-measured at the wrist in 721 unselected subjects from the general population. After training, blood pressure was measured in the office and self-measured at home with an upper-arm device (the UA-767 Plus) and a wrist device (the UB-542, not provided with a position sensor). The upper-arm-wrist blood pressure difference detected in the office was used as the reference measurement. The discrepancy between office and home differences was the home measurement error. In the office, systolic blood pressure was 2.5% lower at wrist than at arm (P=0.002), whereas at home, systolic and diastolic blood pressures were higher at wrist than at arm (+5.6% and +5.4%, respectively; Phome measurement error of at least ±5 mm Hg and 455 of at least ±10 mm Hg (bad measurers). In multivariable linear regression, a lower cognitive pattern independently determined both the systolic and the diastolic home measurement error and a longer forearm the systolic error only. This was confirmed by logistic regression having bad measurers as dependent variable. The use of wrist devices for home self-measurement, therefore, leads to frequent detection of falsely elevated blood pressure values likely because of a poor memory and rendition of the instructions, leading to the wrong position of the wrist. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Detecting Falls at Home: User-Centered Design of a Pervasive Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc-Eric Bobillier Chaumon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Falling is the main cause of domestic accidents and fatal injuries to seniors at home. In this paper, we describe the design process for a new pervasive technology (CIRDO. The aim of this technology is to detect falls (via audio and video sensors and to alert the elderly's family or caregivers. Two complementary studies were performed. Firstly, the actual risk situations of older adults were analyzed. Secondly, social acceptance was investigated for the different homecare field stakeholders. Our results highlight the tensions among social actors towards the tool and their impacts on technology acceptance by the elderly. Also, we show a significant change in the fall process due to the device. In actuality, the social functions associated with CIRDO implementation and the necessity of iterative design processes suggest that the CIRDO system should be more flexible and versatile to better fit the risk behaviors of seniors that evolve using this device.

  2. Palliative sedation at home for terminally ill children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewska-Eksterowicz, Aleksandra; Przysło, Łukasz; Fendler, Wojciech; Stolarska, Małgorzata; Młynarski, Wojciech

    2014-11-01

    The presence of symptoms that are difficult to control always requires adjustment of treatment, and palliative sedation (PS) should be considered. We analyzed our experience in conducting PS at home for terminally ill children with cancer during a seven-year period. We performed a retrospective analysis of medical records of children with cancer treated at home between the years 2005 and 2011. We analyzed the data of 42 cancer patients (18% of all patients); in 21 cases, PS was initiated (solid tumors n = 11, brain tumors [5], bone tumors [4], leukemia [1]). Sedation was introduced because of pain (n = 13), dyspnea (9), anxiety (5), or two of those symptoms (6). The main drug used for sedation was midazolam; all patients received morphine. There were no significant differences in the dose of morphine or midazolam depending on the patient's sex; age was correlated with an increase of midazolam dose (R = 0.68; P = 0.005). Duration of sedation (R = 0.61; P = 0.003) and its later initiation (R = 0.43; P = 0.05) were correlated with an increase of the morphine dose. All patients received adjuvant treatment; in patients who required a morphine dose increase, metoclopramide was used more often (P = 0.0002). Patients did not experience any adverse reactions. Later introduction of sedation was associated with a marginally higher number of intervention visits and a significantly higher number of planned visits (R = 0.53; P = 0.013). Sedation may be safely used at home. It requires close monitoring and full cooperation between the family and hospice team. Because of the limited data on home PS in pediatric populations, further studies are needed. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Withdrawal of Ventilatory Support at Home on Hospice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Kenneth M

    2016-08-01

    When ventilatory support is withdrawn in an intensive care unit (ICU), the place of death for most patients is the hospital. However, the majority of terminally ill patients prefer to die at home. Few articles have addressed taking adult mechanically ventilated patients home from the ICU for withdrawal of ventilatory support (WVS). To determine the outcomes of a protocol-driven program of WVS in the home under hospice care. A retrospective chart review of 14 consecutive patients who had WVS at home. All subjects were mechanically ventilated ICU patients referred to hospice with a request for WVS to be performed in the patient's home. A protocol/checklist guided care. Medical records were reviewed to obtain demographic and medical information, particularly for duration of mechanical ventilation, the use of premedication, level of consciousness at the time of WVS, symptoms following WVS, pharmacologic measures used for symptom control after WVS, and survival time after WVS. At the time of WVS, five patients were awake or arousable and nine were stuporous or comatose. Ten patients required no medication before WVS; only four required medications for symptom control after WVS. Median survival after WVS was 18.15 hours. In all cases, symptomatic control was judged to be excellent. Successful WVS and a natural death at home is possible with logistic support from the hospice organization and the expertise of the hospice team, guided by a comprehensive protocol/checklist. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Specifics of Analgesia in Palliative Care Patients at Home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pautex, Sophie

    2015-02-25

    Pain management at home for a patient, suffering from one or more advanced progressive diseases, goes beyond the prescription of an opioid. Apart from the importance of finding the most suitable analgesic drug (controlled pain with least possible adverse effects), three important dimensions will be addressed: interprofessionnal care (shared care goals, evaluation, monitoring of pain and other symptoms; physiotherapy, etc.) information, education and support for patients and relatives in particular on the use of opioids, and finally the importance of anticipation. This includes for example the requirement of breakthrough pain treatment in case of pain exacerbation or the definition of the place of hospitalization in case of worsening general condition or of death.

  5. Mathematics at home practical activities for parents and children

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, John

    2001-01-01

    How can teachers help parents to get involved with their children's learning? Maths at home is full of activities designed to fit in with the Key Stage 2 Numeracy topics. Teachers can photocopy the appropriate sheet and send it home for parents and children to work on together. Each activity has a set of explanatory notes for teachers and a photocopiable worksheet. Instructions to parents are clearly presented, with resources listed. The activities are practical and enjoyable, covering everyday mathematical tasks, such as calculating shopping bills, estimating quantities and looking at timetab

  6. Hospital at home – a review of our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U Edmond C.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hospital at home (HAH is a service that provides home-based nursing and rehabilitation services whose aim is to prevent admission or to facilitate early discharge from care in an acute hospital. Methods: We evaluated the effectiveness of early discharge hospital at home (HAH schemes for hip fracture patients over a 27-year period in a district general hospital in the United Kingdom. A long-term database for audit and research purposes is maintained for all hip fracture patients admitted to Peterborough City Hospital. The data were analysed retrospectively and patients were followed up routinely for six weeks after discharge. Results: As many as 8876 patients were admitted with a hip fracture between 1st January 1987 and 31st December 2014, of which 5512 patients were eligible for one of the two available HAH schemes. The proportion of eligible patients discharged to the HAH schemes, and their hospital stay and readmission rates were measured; 1786 patients were discharged to a HAH scheme. The proportion of patients discharged to the scheme progressively reduced from a maximum of 94% to a minimum of 13% over the study period. The length of hospital stay until discharge to the scheme progressively increased from a mean of eight days to 18 days. Discussion: We conclude that HAH schemes can potentially reduce the length of hospital stay of hip fracture patients but continued resources and service organisation have to be provided to match the increasing demand to prevent the service from becoming ineffective.

  7. Personal characteristics, cooking at home and shopping frequency influence consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustat, Jeanette; Lee, Yu-Sheng; O'Malley, Keelia; Luckett, Brian; Myers, Leann; Terrell, Leonetta; Amoss, Lisa; Fitzgerald, Erin; Stevenson, Peter T; Johnson, Carolyn C

    2017-06-01

    This study examines how the consumption of fruits and vegetables is affected by home cooking habits and shopping patterns, including distance to patronized stores and frequency of shopping, in two low-income predominantly African American urban neighborhoods in New Orleans, Louisiana. In-person interviews were conducted in 2013 with 901 adult residents who identified themselves as the primary household shopper. Respondents were asked where and how often they shopped and answered a food frequency questionnaire. Addresses were geocoded and distances to the stores where respondents shopped were calculated. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between food consumption and personal factors, neighborhood factors and shopping habits. Consumption of daily servings of fresh produce increased by 3% for each additional trip to a grocery store, by 76% for shopping at a farmer's market, and by 38% for preparing food at home. Each additional trip to a convenience store increased the frequency of consumption of chips, candy and pastries by 3%. The distance from residence to the type of store patronized was not associated with consumption of produce or chips, candy or pastries. Shopping at full-service grocery stores, farmer's markets and cooking at home were positively associated with the consumption of fresh produce while shopping at convenience stores was associated with increased consumption of chips, candy and pastries. These findings are useful for designing programmatic interventions to increase fresh fruit and vegetable consumption among residents in low-income urban communities.

  8. Innovative Urgent Care for the Palliative Patient at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Carmel L; Pooler, Charlotte; Arsenault, Julia E; Berean, Colleen; Sharman, Robert; Cameron, Cheryl L; de Kock, Ingrid

    2017-04-01

    Palliative and end-of-life patients in their homes are at risk of developing symptom crises requiring urgent care. The usual care for these patients involves transport to an Emergency Department (ED) despite the preference of most palliative patients to stay home. The objective of this initiative was to develop an innovative strategy to provide collaborative care in the home to alleviate symptoms and avoid transport. A partnership was created among Emergency Medical Services and Community Care staff, physicians, and leaders to enable patients to stay at home with existing resources during symptom crisis. As a result of the initiative, patients were able to stay at home more frequently. When patients required transport to the ED, it occurred after attempted symptom management in the home. A total of 110 calls were tracked in the first 18 months of the initiative. Of those, 61% ended with the patient staying home, in alignment with their preferred place of care at the end of life. A collaborative approach by care providers in the community enabled patients to stay home despite symptom crisis near the end of life.

  9. The drama of end of life care at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, Jenny

    Many terminally ill patients want to die at home. Family carers are fundamental to achieving this, but often feel anxious and unprepared for the role. Supporting them is vital in palliative care. To explore the experiences of carers of patients dying at home, in particular their expectations and preparedness for the dying process. The study followed a qualitative approach. In-depth, semi-structured interviews with 15 carers were carried out. Carers experienced uncertainty and felt unrehearsed for their role. They were reluctant to seek information to give them a script for their performance because it was too painful to contemplate the patient's death. The carers needed the direction of health and social care professionals, and the help of paid carers, but experiences of these services varied. The study highlighted the drama of the situation for carers, and the anxiety of being the leading player on stage with minimal preparation. Nurses play a crucial role in supporting carers and can use a "dramaturgical" perspective to guide them in giving carers the direction they need.

  10. Proportion and characteristics of patients who measure their blood pressure at home: Nationwide survey in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petek-Šter Marija

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Home blood pressure monitoring has several advantages over blood pressure monitoring at a physician's office, and has become a useful instrument in the management of hypertension. Objective. To explore the rate and characteristics of patients who measure their blood pressure at home. Methods. A sample of 2,752 patients with diagnosis of essential arterial hypertension was selected from 12596 consecutive office visitors. Data of 2,639 patients was appropriate for analysis. The data concerning home blood pressure measurement and patients' characteristics were obtained from the patients' case histories. Results 1,835 (69.5% out of 2,639 patients measured their blood pressure at home. 1,284 (70.0% of home blood pressure patients had their own blood pressure measurement device. There were some important differences between these two groups: home blood pressure patients were more frequently male, of younger age, better educated, from urban area, mostly non-smokers, more likely to have diabetes mellitus and ischemic heart disease and had higher number of co-morbidities and were on other drugs beside antihypertensive medication. Using the logistic regression analysis we found that the most powerful predictors of home blood pressure monitoring had higher education level than primary school OR=1.80 (95% CI 1.37-2.37, non-smoking OR=2.16 (95% CI 1.40-3.33 and having a physician in urban area OR=1.32 (95% CI 1.02-1.71. Conclusion. Home blood pressure monitoring is popular in Slovenia. Patients who measured blood pressure at home were different from patients who did not. Younger age, higher education, non-smoking, having a physician in urban area and longer duration of hypertension were predictors of home blood pressure monitoring.

  11. Human dignity at home and in public – introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frits De Lange

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available

    A genuine concern for human dignity fosters a public culture of human rights. A concern for  dignity contributes to equality, justice and respect in civil life. But how about dignity at home? The life people live privately in their intimate relationships, within their families, is mostly withheld from public debate. Though the relationships between men and women, parents and children are evidently unequal in power and vulnerability, and thereby susceptible for abuse, they are hardly subject of public evaluation. What about dignity at home? Families are thought to be places where human dignity feels ‘at home’. The image of home as a ‘safe haven’ however, is heavily disputed by the facts. Domestic violence is widespread. Home is a paradoxical environment: it is the place where new generations are nurtured and educated in human values, and where respect and love is practised. At the same time it is the place where the dignity of especially women and children is often contested and violated. There is no other place where people are living together so intimately, and so vulnerable. This hidden side of dignity was the theme of the conference “Dignity at home and in public” that the Protestant Theological University organised together with the Faculty of Theology of the Stellenbosch University, October 25- 26, 2010 at Kampen University, the Netherlands. A selection of the contributions are gathered in this volume. By engaging in intense, personal North-South and South-North dialogues around themes as the family in the Reformed tradition, vulnerability and autonomy, domestic violence, cultural shifts in the relationships between generations, and end of life decisions, the conference continued a five-year long partnership between the two theological faculties around the theme of human dignity. This volume explores from a

  12. Vaccines and animal welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, D B

    2007-04-01

    Vaccination promotes animal welfare by protecting animal health, but it also has other welfare benefits, e.g. recent investigations have looked at the potential of vaccines in immunoneutering such as immunocastration--a humane alternative to the painful traditional methods. Similarly, vaccination can be used during disease outbreaks as a viable alternative to stamping-out, thus avoiding the welfare problems that on-farm mass slaughter can cause. Protecting animal health through vaccination leads to improved animal welfare, and maintaining good welfare ensures that animals can respond successfully to vaccination (as poor welfare can lead to immunosuppression, which can affect the response to vaccination). It is clear that vaccination has tremendous advantages for animal welfare and although the possible side effects of vaccination can have a negative effect on the welfare of some individual animals, the harm caused by these unwanted effects must be weighed against the undoubted benefits for groups of animals.

  13. A system for ubiquitous fall monitoring at home via a wireless sensor network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Luque, Francisco J; Zapata, Juan; Ruiz, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    Accidental falls of our elderly, and physical injuries resulting, represent a major health and economic. Falls are the most common causes of serious injuries and a major health threats in the stratum of older population. Early detection of a fall is a key factor when trying to provide adequate care to the elderly person who has suffered an accident at home. In this paper, we present a support system for detecting falls of an elder person by a static wireless nonintrusive sensorial infrastructure based on heterogenous sensor nodes. This previous infrastructure, named AID (Alarm Intelligent Device), is an AAL (Ambient Assisted Living) system that allows to infer a potential fall. We have developed, different to other contributions, a specific low-power multi-hop network consists of nodes (Motes) that wirelessly communicate to each other and are capable of hopping radio messages to a base station where they are passed to a PC (or other possible client). The goal of this project is 1) to provide alerts to caregivers in the event of an accident, acute illness or strange (possibly dangerous) activities, and 2) to enable that authorized and authenticated caregivers by means of a itinerant wearable mote can be inserted into mesh and interact with it. In this paper, we describe an ubiquitous assistential monitoring system at home.

  14. Designing Intuitive Web Solutions for Monitoring Patients’ Rehabilitation at Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raihana Ferdous

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design of web-based remote monitoring interfaces aimed at supporting therapists and caregivers in supervising motor-cognitive rehabilitation plans of care to be performed by patients at home. This work was part of a three years’ research project where game-based environments for upper body motor rehabilitation of post-stroke patients were developed in collaboration with two main rehabilitation centers in Italy and Austria, for a subsequent deployment at patients’ homes. The paper will specifically focus on describing the iterative design of the home rehabilitation features for clinicians over the first two years of the project to enable the delivery and monitoring of more personalized, engaging plans of care for home therapy by rehabilitation centers and services.

  15. Hospital at home: home-based end of life care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepperd, Sasha; Wee, Bee; Straus, Sharon E

    2014-01-01

    Background The policy in a number of countries is to provide people with a terminal illness the choice of dying at home. This policy is supported by surveys indicating that the general public and patients with a terminal illness would prefer to receive end of life care at home. Objectives To determine if providing home-based end of life care reduces the likelihood of dying in hospital and what effect this has on patients’ symptoms, quality of life, health service costs and care givers compared with inpatient hospital or hospice care. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library) to October 2009, Ovid MED-LINE(R) 1950 to March 2011, EMBASE 1980 to October 2009, CINAHL 1982 to October 2009 and EconLit to October 2009. We checked the reference lists of articles identified for potentially relevant articles. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials, interrupted time series or controlled before and after studies evaluating the effectiveness of home-based end of life care with inpatient hospital or hospice care for people aged 18 years and older. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted data and assessed study quality. We combined the published data for dichotomous outcomes using fixed-effect Mantel-Haenszel meta-analysis. When combining outcome data was not possible we presented the data in narrative summary tables. Main results We included four trials in this review. Those receiving home-based end of life care were statistically significantly more likely to die at home compared with those receiving usual care (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.55, P = 0.0002; Chi 2 = 1.72, df = 2, P = 0.42, I2 = 0% (three trials; N=652)). We detected no statistically significant differences for functional status (measured by the Barthel Index), psychological well-being or cognitive status, between patients receiving home-based end of life care compared with those receiving standard care (which

  16. Do Maltreated Children who Remain at Home Function Better than Those who Are Placed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennen, Ferol E; Brensilver, Matthew; Trickett, Penelope K

    2010-12-01

    The majority of children in the child welfare system remain with their maltreating parents, yet little is known about their level of functioning and whether they are in need of mental health intervention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mental health functioning of an ethnically diverse sample of 302 maltreated children and 151 non maltreated children ages 9-12 to see if there were differences between those who remained at home, those placed in kin care, non-relative foster care or a comparison group of children who were not maltreated. Children were evaluated on multiple measures of mental health functioning, both self report and caregiver report. Results showed that the maltreated children did not differ by placement type but did score significantly higher than the comparison children on many measures. There were substantial numbers of maltreated children scoring in the clinical range of measures in all placement types with over 60% of those remaining with birth parents being seen as functioning at a level that indicated a need for mental health intervention. While fewer comparison children had scores indicating a need for mental health care, the numbers were higher than noted in national studies. Implications of the findings are presented.

  17. Scandinavian Model of Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Within the so-called welfare modeling business Scandinavia stands out as a space with a particular welfare regime. It is a peculiar combination of market, state, and civil societal interventions into people's social life, that define this welfare regime. The particular welfare mix emphasizes...... universal public interventions and a high degree of employment in the formal labor market for all. The thesis promoted in this paper is, that the Scandinavian welfare regime ought to be highly desirable elsewhere, but unfortunately rather difficult to replicate, because it is premised upon a set...

  18. At Home with Students – Observing Online and Offline Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Lyngsø

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article reflects the methodological challenges presented in the research process, where the principle of 'following the field’ means that the researcher must also follow students engaged in online activities in their own homes. The ethnographic studies are a part of a PhD project on “NETeducation,” a full-scale development project in nursing education (Lyngsø, 2014. With a focus on online professional education as the starting point, the process of research will follow the shifting learning process, through phases in the virtual classroom and in the students’ own homes.Research in online contexts demands a rethinking of the traditional ethnographic approach (Hammersley, 2006; Hine, 2005, sharpening the focus on the online and offline contexts, and the shifting between them (Webster, da Silva, 2013. The methodological reflections in the first part of this article can relate to this division due to the “netstudents” activities in studying online at home. On the other hand, the dichotomy between online and offline contexts is found to be inadequate, during the observations conducted. In light of some preliminary findings, the challenges of observing online and offline activities almost simultaneously are considered, despite a dearth of literature existing on this subject.

  19. At Home in Space The Late Seventies into the Eighties

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Ben

    2012-01-01

    April 12, 2011, is the 50th anniversary of Yuri Gagarin's pioneering journey into space. To commemorate this momentous achievement, Springer-Praxis is producing a mini series of books that reveals how humanity's knowledge of flying, working, and living in space has grown in the last half century. At Home in Space, the third book in the series, continues the story throughout the later Seventies and into the Eighties. It was a period of time characterised by great promise. Regular Soviet missions demonstrated that humanity could not only survive, but thrive, in a weightless environment, and the arrival of the Space Shuttle seemed to offer a more economical and routine means of accessing the heavens. Living in space became truly international as astronauts from many nations lived and worked together on Soviet space stations and aboard the Shuttle. At the same time, however, relations between two key players in this drive to conquer the high ground of space - the United States and the Soviet Union - steadily decl...

  20. Postoperative recovery at home after ambulatory gynecologic laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Kathy J

    2003-10-01

    The purposes of this descriptive, correlational study were to measure pain, fatigue, and functional limitations affecting the "at home" recovery process for ambulatory gynecologic laparoscopic surgery and to explore the relationships between these variables and the return to normal activities. Subjects (N = 91) recorded daily ratings of pain, fatigue, and function on a Home Recovery Log for 6 days postoperatively. The findings indicate that 95% of subjects resumed basic self-care activities such as dressing, bathing, and eating by postoperative day (POD) 3; however, less than 40% of subjects were able to perform other role functions such as shopping, laundry, and work outside of the home. A logistic regression model indicated that pain ratings and functional status on POD 2 were the best predictors of subjects who would need more than 5 days to resume their usual activities and routines. The findings have implications for preoperative teaching and telephone follow-up for ambulatory surgery patients. Preoperative teaching should prepare women for the additional days needed for recovery of instrumental activities of daily living to enable them to make alternate plans as necessary. Furthermore, because pain on POD 2 was the single most significant predictor of delayed recovery, moving the follow-up phone call from the morning to the late afternoon of POD 1 may help the nurse to identify patients who will need extra assistance with pain management.

  1. Welfare State Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obinger, Herbert; Starke, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes welfare state transformation in OECD countries since the 1970s against the background of the post-war settlement. Relying on quantitative macro-data and qualitative information from the literature, we show that welfare states have con-verged, especially regarding various...... spending measures, and also to a certain extent in some qualitative policy-making patterns. What has emerged can best be described as the ‘supply-side welfare state’ model, and this overall orientation is reflected in many wel-fare state areas. We differ from earlier prognoses of a race to the bottom...... by generous welfare states and disagree with the view that a supply-side orientation equals ‘lean government’ in terms of social expenditure. But convergence implies that the space to maneuver has shrunk for policy-makers. The consequences of the 2008 financial crisis for welfare states are difficult...

  2. Welfare improving product bans

    OpenAIRE

    Doğanoğlu, Uğur Toker; Doganoglu, Ugur Toker; İnceoğlu, Fırat; Inceoglu, Firat

    2010-01-01

    We formulate a model of vertical differentiation to evaluate the welfare effects of removing a low quality product from the market. The mechanism through which a welfare improvement might arise is simple: Once the low quality low cost alternative is banned, entry into the high quality segment becomes more likely. This in turn may lead to a significant reduction in the price of the high quality product. We find that such a ban might improve aggregate welfare when consumers value the higher qua...

  3. Teleconsultation for integrated palliative care at home: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gurp, Jelle; van Selm, Martine; van Leeuwen, Evert; Vissers, Kris; Hasselaar, Jeroen

    2016-03-01

    Interprofessional consultation contributes to symptom control for home-based palliative care patients and improves advance care planning. Distance and travel time, however, complicate the integration of primary care and specialist palliative care. Expert online audiovisual teleconsultations could be a method for integrating palliative care services. This study aims to describe (1) whether and how teleconsultation supports the integration of primary care, specialist palliative care, and patient perspectives and services and (2) how patients and (in)formal caregivers experience collaboration in a teleconsultation approach. This work consists of a qualitative study that utilizes long-term direct observations and in-depth interviews. A total of 18 home-based palliative care patients (16 with cancer, 2 with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; age range 24-85 years old), 12 hospital-based specialist palliative care team clinicians, and 17 primary care physicians. Analysis showed that the introduction of specialist palliative care team-patient teleconsultation led to collaboration between primary care physicians and specialist palliative care team clinicians in all 18 cases. In 17/18 cases, interprofessional contact was restricted to backstage work after teleconsultation. In one deviant case, both the patient and the professionals were simultaneously connected through teleconsultation. Two themes characterized integrated palliative care at home as a consequence of teleconsultation: (1) professionals defining responsibility and (2) building interprofessional rapport. Specialist palliative care team teleconsultation with home-based patients leads to collaboration between primary care physicians and hospital-based palliative care specialists. Due to cultural reasons, most collaboration was of a multidisciplinary character, strongly relying on organized backstage work. Interdisciplinary teleconsultations with real-time contact between patient and both professionals were

  4. [Care and implications for caregivers of surgical patients at home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirveches-Pérez, Emilia; Roca-Closa, Josep; Puigoriol-Juvanteny, Emma; Ubeda-Bonet, Inmaculada; Subirana-Casacuberta, Mireia; Moreno-Casbas, María Teresa

    2014-01-01

    To identify the care given by informal caregivers to patients who underwent abdominal surgery in the Consorci Hospitalari of Vic (Barcelona). To compare the responsibility burden for those caregivers in all the different stages of the surgical process. To determine the consequences of the care itself on the caregiver's health and to identify the factors that contribute to the need of providing care and the appearance of consequences for the caregivers in the home. A longitudinal observational study with follow-up at admission, at discharge and 10 days, of 317 non-paid caregivers of patients who suffer underwent surgery. The characteristics of caregivers and surgical patients were studied. The validated questionnaire, ICUB97-R based on the model by Virginia Henderson, was used to measure the care provided by informal caregivers and its impact on patient quality of life. Most of the caregivers were women, with an average age of 52.9±13.7 years without any previous experience as caregivers. The greater intensity of care and impact was observed in the time when they arrived home after hospital discharge (p<0.05). The predictive variables of repercussions were being a dependent patient before the surgical intervention (β=2.93, p=0.007), having a cancer diagnosis (β=2.87, p<.001) and time dedicated to the care process (β=0.07, p=0.018). Caregivers involved in the surgical process provide a great amount of care at home depending on the characteristics of patients they care for, and it affects their quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Welfare in horse breeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, M.L.H.; Sandøe, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Welfare problems related to the way horses are bred, whether by coitus or by the application of artificial reproduction techniques (ARTs), have been given no discrete consideration within the academic literature. This paper reviews the existing knowledge base about welfare issues in horse breeding...... positive welfare effects associated with breeding might be maximised. Further studies are needed to establish an evidence base about how stressful or painful various breeding procedures are for the animals involved, and what the lifetime welfare implications of ARTs are for future animal generations....

  6. A pediatric robotic thumb exoskeleton for at-home rehabilitation: the Isolated Orthosis for Thumb Actuation (IOTA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin, Patrick M; Sallum, Hani; Walsh, Conor; Stirling, Leia; Correia, Annette

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present the design of a thumb exoskeleton for pediatric at-home rehabilitation. Pediatric disorders, such as cerebral palsy (CP) and stroke, can result in thumb in palm deformity greatly limiting hand function. This not only limits children's ability to perform activities of daily living but also limits important motor skill development. Specifically, the device, dubbed IOTA (Isolated Orthosis for Thumb Actuation) is a 2-DOF thumb exoskeleton that can actuate the carpometacarpal (CMC) and metacarpalphalangeal (MCP) joints through ranges of motion required for activities of daily living. The device consists of a lightweight hand-mounted mechanism that can be custom secured and aligned to the wearer. The mechanism is actuated via flexible cables that connect to a portable control box. Embedded encoders and bend sensors monitor the two degrees of freedom of the thumb and flexion/extension of the wrist. Using this platform, a number of control modes can be implemented that will enable the device to be intuitively controlled by a patient to assist with opposition grasp, fine motor control, and ultimately facilitate motor recovery. We envision this at-home device augmenting the current in-clinic therapy and enabling tele-rehabilitation where a clinician can remotely monitor a patient's usage and performance.

  7. Ethical challenges with welfare technology: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Bjørn

    2013-06-01

    Demographical changes in high income counties will increase the need of health care services but reduce the number of people to provide them. Welfare technology is launched as an important measure to meet this challenge. As with all types of technologies we must explore its ethical challenges. A literature review reveals that welfare technology is a generic term for a heterogeneous group of technologies and there are few studies documenting their efficacy, effectiveness and efficiency. Many kinds of welfare technology break with the traditional organization of health care. It introduces technology in new areas, such as in private homes, and it provides new functions, e.g. offering social stimuli and entertainment. At the same time welfare technology is developed for groups that traditionally have not been extensive technology users. This raises a series of ethical questions with regard to the development and use of welfare technologies, which are presented in this review. The main challenges identified are: (1) Alienation when advanced technology is used at home, (2) conflicting goals, as welfare technologies have many stakeholders with several ends, (3) respecting confidentiality and privacy when third-party actors are involved, (4) guaranteeing equal access and just distribution, and (5) handling conflicts between instrumental rationality and care in terms of respecting dignity and vulnerability. Addressing these issues is important for developing and implementing welfare technologies in a morally acceptable manner.

  8. Interoperation, Composition and Simulation of Services at Home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaldeli, Eirini; Warriach, Ehsan Ullah; Bresser, Jaap; Lazovik, Alexander; Aiello, Marco; Maglio, PP; Weske, M; Yang, J; Fantinato, M

    2010-01-01

    Pervasive computing environments such as our future homes are the prototypical example of a dynamic, complex system where Service-Oriented Computing techniques will play an important role. A home equipped with heterogeneous devices, whose services and location constantly change, needs to behave as a

  9. Meeting contribution: Beyond Stonehenge: ancient astronomy at home and abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, C.

    2002-02-01

    To many astronomers, mention of archaeoastronomy continues to conjure up theories of Stonehenge as a computing device and eclipse predictor, while to many archaeologists it continues to be viewed as something niggling away at the fringes of their discipline, something to be wary of and avoided if possible. Yet in the past twenty years or so archaeoastronomy has come of age and attained respectability.

  10. [Intestinal transplant in patients with parenteral nutrition at home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cos, A I; Gómez Candela, C; Vázquez, C; López Santamaría, M; Vicente, E

    2003-01-01

    Failure of the intestine, whether due to functional or anatomical reasons, constrains Parenteral Nutrition Therapy in children or adults who, as a result of intestinal resections, alterations in motility, diseases of the microvilli or other reasons, present insufficient intestine to cover their needs in terms of nutrients and fluids. Nonetheless, the maintenance of support with parenteral nutrition at home in subjects with irreversible intestinal failure is not without life-threatening complications: liver disease, recurrent sepsis and loss of central routes recommend the assessment of the indication of intestinal transplant in this group of patients. The incidence of morbidity and mortality after intestinal transplant is greater than in other transplants (kidney, liver), but the long-term survival is around 50-60%. In Spain, 7 transplants (6 children and 1 adult) have been performed so far: 3 of intestine alone, 3 of liver plus intestine and 1 mutivisceral transplant. In 4 cases, the indication for transplant was due to terminal liver disease, with the remainder being due to the loss of venous access, intractable diarrhoea and intra-abdominal desmoid tumour, respectively. Except for one girl who presented severe rejection of the graft, the rest achieved digestive autonomy. One boy has presented lymphocyte neoplasia (PTLD) after 2 years and another died after the transplant as a result of a routine liver biopsy (with functioning grafts). Of the 38 patients assessed for transplant, 18 were considered as candidates and of these, three youthful candidates for hepato-intestinal transplant (with short intestine syndrome) have died while on the waiting list and a fourth in the operating theatre prior to an attempted multivisceral transplant. Intestinal transplants must not be considered as the last desperate therapeutic option in patients with permanent intestinal failure. The type of graft, clinical expertise and the use of new inducers (Sirulimos) all contribute to the

  11. Respite: carers’ experiences and perceptions of respite at home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenwood Nan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Informal carers play an important role in supporting people with long-term conditions living at home. However, the caring role is known to have adverse effects on carers such as poorer emotional health and social isolation. A variety of types of respite may be offered to carers but little is known about the benefits of respite, carers’ experiences with it, or their perceptions of care workers. This study therefore investigated these experiences and perceptions. Method Recorded, semi-structured interviews were undertaken with twelve carers receiving weekly four-hourly respite. Carers were either caring for a person over sixty or were over sixty themselves. Interviews were analysed thematically. Results and Discussion Respite sometimes alleviated carers’ constant sense of responsibility for their cared for. Trust, whether in the service provider or individual care workers, was essential. Carers lacking this trust tended to perceive respite as less beneficial. Low expectations were common with carers often unwilling to find fault. Care workers were frequently seen as very kind with some carers valuing their company. Care workers who were flexible, communicated well and responded to the cared for’s needs were valued. Stimulation of the cared for during respite was very important to most carers but the perceived benefits for carers were often very individual. Many carers used respite to catch up with routine, domestic tasks, rarely using it to socialise. Conclusions For many carers, respite was a way of maintaining normality in often difficult, restricted lives. Respite allowed continuation of what most people take for granted. Carers frequently viewed respite as intended to improve their cared for’s quality of life, rather than their own. This centrality of the cared for means that carers can only really benefit from respite if the cared for is happy and also seen to benefit. Future research should investigate the

  12. Maltreatment and sexual abuse at home concerning schooling adolscents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuranis Ibeth Henríquez Santoya

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEl presente estudio consistió en determinar la presencia del maltrato infantil y abuso sexual en el hogar en adolescentes escolarizados con edades comprendidas entre 14 y 16 años, matriculados a 2010 en colegios públicos de la de la ciudad de Santa Marta. Los participantes fueron 229 jóvenes. Las variables medidas fueron la edad, el tipo de maltrato y el género. Los resultados indican que la tendencia al maltrato psicológico fue de 29.3%, de maltrato físico 13.3% y de abuso sexual de 32.3%. Con relación al género se halló que las mujeres han sido objeto en mayor porcentaje de maltrato físico y abuso sexual que los hombres y éstos han sido objeto de mayor maltrato psicológico que las mujeres; respecto a la edad los jóvenes de 14 años presentaron mayor porcentaje de maltrato y abuso que en los otros rangos etarios. Se concluye que tres (3 de cada 10 estudiantes ha sido objeto de abuso sexual, tres ha sido objeto de maltrato psicológico y uno de maltrato físico. (DUAZARY 2011 No. 2, 262 - 269AbstractThe present study was to determine the presence of child maltreatment and sexual abuse at home, concerning schooling adolescents, aged between 14 and 16 years enrolled in public schools belonging to the city of Santa Marta. Participants were 229 young persons. The variables were age, abuse and gender. The results point out: 29.3% for psychological abuse, 32.3% for sexual abuse, and 13.3% for physical abuse. Concerning the gender it was detected that women have been at a higher rate aim of physical mistreatment and sexual abuse than men, but on the other hand men are aim of psychological abuse. With regard to age, young people of 14 years, revealed a higher percentage of maltreatment than the elder ones. We conclude that three of each schooling boy has been object of sexual abuse; three of them have been injured of psychological mistreatment and one of physical abuse.Keywords: abuse; sexual abuse; maltreatment; gender; adolescents

  13. Welfare and self care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulløv, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Using the case of early childcare institutions in contemporary Denmark, the aim of the article is to show that welfare entails visions of living that are made manifest through the requirements of everyday institutional practices. The main argument is that welfare institutions are designed not onl...

  14. The Nordic Welfare Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Helle; Thrane, Claus

     The aim of this paper is to elucidate the impact of welfare policies on women's entrepreneurship because the benefits of these policies do not reflect in the numbers of female entrepreneurs. These are consistently similar to those in other countries that do not have a similar welfare model. Henc...

  15. Wellbeing or welfare benefits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handlos, Line Neerup; Kristiansen, Maria; Nørredam, Marie Louise

    2016-01-01

    This debate article debunks the myth that migrants are driven primarily by the size of the welfare benefits in the host country, when they decide where to migrate to. We show that instead of welfare benefits, migrants are driven by a desire for safety, wellbeing, social networks and opportunities...

  16. Market Access and Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raimondos-Møller, Pascalis; Woodland, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Well known tariff reform rules that are guaranteed to increase welfare will not necessarily increase market access, while rules that are guaranteed to increase market access will not necessarily increase welfare. The present paper proposes a new set of tariff reforms that can achieve both objecti...

  17. Teenagers and Welfare Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Paul

    This report examines the extent to which welfare reform is changing adolescent behaviors that lead to welfare dependency. It begins by discussing the provisions in the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 that require teenagers to stay in school and live with a parent, concluding that relatively little can be…

  18. The Danish welfare state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jørgen Elm; Bengtsson, Tea Torbenfeldt; Frederiksen, Morten

    The Danish Welfare State analyzes a broad range of areas, such as globalization, labor marked, family life, health and social exclusion, the book demonstrates that life in a modern welfare state is changing rapidly, creating both challenges and possibilities for future management....

  19. The Child Welfare Cartel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoesz, David

    2016-01-01

    The probity of the Children's Bureau's National Child Welfare Workforce Institute (NCWWI) is examined with respect to the status of child welfare as well as the performance of social work education. By requiring that funding go only to accredited schools of social work, which is not authorized by relevant provisions of the Social Security Act,…

  20. Silk'n--a novel device using Home Pulsed Light for hair removal at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, R Stephen

    2009-06-01

    A small, light-weight, low-energy, and low-cost IPL system designed for home use (Silk'n; HomeSkinovations, Kfar, Saba, Israel) was tested for efficacy and safety on 34 test individuals and 92 sites. Each of the patients underwent informed consent and performed self-treatment at the clinic supervised by an experienced laser hair removal nurse. The pre- and post-treatment hair counts were performed and the reduction counts were analyzed by a blinded observer.

  1. Associations Between Home Death and the Use and Type of Care at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Rebecca; Asada, Yukiko; Burge, Frederick; Lawson, Beverley

    2018-01-01

    Despite wishes for and benefits of home deaths, a discrepancy between preferred and actual location of death persists. Provision of home care may be an effective policy response to support home deaths. Using the population-based mortality follow-back study conducted in Nova Scotia, we investigated the associations between home death and formal care at home and between home death and the type of formal care at home. We found (1) the use of formal care at home at the end of life was associated with home death and (2) the use of formal home support services at home was associated with home death among those whose symptoms were well managed.

  2. Technology and Poultry Welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Sassi, Neila; Averós, Xavier; Estevez, Inma

    2016-01-01

    Consideration of animal welfare is essential to address the consumers’ demands and for the long term sustainability of commercial poultry. However, assessing welfare in large poultry flocks, to be able to detect potential welfare risks and to control or minimize its impact is difficult. Current developments in technology and mathematical modelling open new possibilities for real-time automatic monitoring of animal welfare and health. New technological innovations potentially adaptable to commercial poultry are appearing, although their practical implementation is still being defined. In this paper, we review the latest technological developments with potential to be applied to poultry welfare, especially for broiler chickens and laying hens. Some of the examples that are presented and discussed include the following: sensors for farm environmental monitoring, movement, or physiological parameters; imaging technologies such as optical flow to detect gait problems and feather pecking; infrared technologies to evaluate birds’ thermoregulatory features and metabolism changes, that may be indicative of welfare, health and management problems. All these technologies have the potential to be implemented at the commercial level to improve birds’ welfare and to optimize flock management, therefore, improving the efficiency of the system in terms of use of resources and, thus, long term sustainability. PMID:27727169

  3. Technology and Poultry Welfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neila Ben Sassi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Consideration of animal welfare is essential to address the consumers’ demands and for the long term sustainability of commercial poultry. However, assessing welfare in large poultry flocks, to be able to detect potential welfare risks and to control or minimize its impact is difficult. Current developments in technology and mathematical modelling open new possibilities for real-time automatic monitoring of animal welfare and health. New technological innovations potentially adaptable to commercial poultry are appearing, although their practical implementation is still being defined. In this paper, we review the latest technological developments with potential to be applied to poultry welfare, especially for broiler chickens and laying hens. Some of the examples that are presented and discussed include the following: sensors for farm environmental monitoring, movement, or physiological parameters; imaging technologies such as optical flow to detect gait problems and feather pecking; infrared technologies to evaluate birds’ thermoregulatory features and metabolism changes, that may be indicative of welfare, health and management problems. All these technologies have the potential to be implemented at the commercial level to improve birds’ welfare and to optimize flock management, therefore, improving the efficiency of the system in terms of use of resources and, thus, long term sustainability.

  4. Care of newborn in the community and at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, S B; Sharma, J; Chauhan, M; Khanna, R; Chokshi, M; Srivastava, R; Prabhakar, P K; Khera, A; Kumar, R; Zodpey, S; Paul, V K

    2016-01-01

    India has contributed immensely toward generating evidence on two key domains of newborn care: Home Based Newborn Care (HBNC) and community mobilization. In a model developed in Gadchiroli (Maharashtra) in the 1990s, a package of Interventions delivered by community health workers during home visits led to a marked decline in neonatal deaths. On the basis of this experience, the national HBNC program centered around Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs) was introduced in 2011, and is now the main community-level program in newborn health. Earlier in 2004, the Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illnesses (IMNCI) program was rolled out with inclusion of home visits by Anganwadi Worker as an integral component. IMNCI has been implemented in 505 districts in 27 states and 4 union territories. A mix of Anganwadi Workers, ASHAs, auxiliary nursing midwives (ANMs) was trained. The rapid roll out of IMNCI program resulted in improving quality of newborn care at the ground field. However, since 2012 the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare decided to limit the IMNCI program to ANMs only and leaving the Anganwadi component to the stewardship of the Integrated Child Development Services. ASHAs, the frontline workers for HBNC, receive four rounds of training using two modules. There are a total of over 900 000 ASHAs per link workers in the country, out of which, only 14% have completed the fourth round of training. The pace of uptake of the HBNC program has been slow. Of the annual rural birth cohort of over 17 million, about 4 million newborns have been visited by ASHA during the financial year 2013–2014 and out of this 120 000 neonates have been identified as sick and referred to health facilities for higher level of neonatal care. Supportive supervision remains a challenge, the role of ANMs in supervision needs more clarity and there are issues surrounding quality of training and the supply of HBNC kits. The program has low visibility in many states

  5. Does Formal Integration between Child Welfare and Behavioral Health Agencies Result in Improved Placement Stability for Adolescents Engaged with Both Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Rebecca; Chuang, Emmeline

    2012-01-01

    National survey data were used to assess whether child welfare agency ties to behavioral health care providers improved placement stability for adolescents served by both systems. Adolescents initially at home who were later removed tended to have fewer moves when child welfare and behavioral health were in the same larger agency. Joint training…

  6. Market Access and Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raimondos-Møller, Pascalis; Woodland, Alan D.

    objectives of trade policy is problematic and calls for finding alternative tariff reform rules that can achieve both objectives at the same time. The present paper contributes to this aim by using a new set of tariff reforms that are based on local optimality. Using such reforms it is shown that market......According to the literature, well known tariff reform rules that are guaranteed to increase welfare will not necessarily increase market access, while rules that are guaranteed to increase market access will not necessarily increase welfare. Such conflict between welfare and market access...

  7. Animal welfare and eggs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Laura Mørch

    This paper identifies revealed willingness to pay for animal welfare using a panel mixed logit model allowing for correlation between willingness to pay for different types of production. We utilize a unique household level panel, combining real purchases with survey data on perceived public...... and private good attributes of different types of eggs. We find that the estimated correlations are consistent with the levels of animal welfare, and that consumers perceiving a stronger connection between animal welfare and the organic label have higher willingness to pay for organic eggs, even when we...

  8. Post-operative symptoms at home in children following day case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    Children also depend on relatives for support and post operative care at home. Postoperative symptoms that develop, however, add to the burden of the family of the sick child at home. This ... spontaneous breathing of the induction mixture either through .... reflecting the mother's anxiety about the child's surgery. Pain.

  9. Young Children's Internet Use at Home and School: Patterns and Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Genevieve Marie

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-eight children in first and second grade completed a 10-item rating scale on Internet use at home and school. Results suggested that, in general, more children used the Internet at school than at home but home-based use was more often perceived as enjoyable. Three patterns of Internet use emerged suggesting three types of young users:…

  10. [Quality of care and risk management in hospital at home services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzin-Garrec, Martine; Hoden, Romy

    2016-04-01

    Hospital at home structures are healthcare institutions in their own right, with the same obligations in terms of governance with regard to quality of care and risk management. However, hospital at home services are characterised by the remote management of the activity and the nursing staff, with specific constraints. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. Post-operative symptoms at home in children following day case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    the burden of the family of the sick child at home. ... The instructions given in hospital for care at home were evaluated by the parents using a different questionnaire. ... The parents reported on the occurrence of these symptoms on the way home, and during the first and second post-operative clinic visits. Data on the child, ...

  12. At Home in the Office. A Guide for the Home Worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Neil; And Others

    This guide provides information to persons interested in establishing a work-at-home program, specifically those in clerical or support staff positions who use modern automated office equipment. The text is divided into two sections. The Home Worker section provides a summary of the At Home in the Office Project, personality characteristics…

  13. 29 CFR 785.23 - Employees residing on employer's premises or working at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... on employer's premises or working at home. An employee who resides on his employer's premises on a... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employees residing on employer's premises or working at home. 785.23 Section 785.23 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION...

  14. Reconciling Ourselves to Reality: Arendt, Education and the Challenge of Being at Home in the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesta, Gert

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I explore the educational significance of the work of Hannah Arendt through reflections on four papers that constitute this special issue. I focus on the challenge of reconciling ourselves to reality, that is, of being at home in the world. Although Arendt's idea of being at home in the world is connected to her explorations of…

  15. Power and Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mik-Meyer, Nanna; Villadsen, Kaspar

    approaches, their weaknesses and indicates some possibilities of theoretical integration. Including case studies of patients, nursing home residents, unemployed people, homeless people, and young offenders, from the USA, Denmark, France, Sweden, Canada, and Australia, Power and Welfare is designed...

  16. Power and welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mik-Meyer, Nanna; Villadsen, Kasper

    approaches, their weaknesses and indicates some possibilities of theoretical integration. Including case studies of patients, nursing home residents, unemployed people, homeless people, and young offenders, from the USA, Denmark, France, Sweden, Canada, and Australia, Power and Welfare is designed...

  17. Zoo Animal Welfare Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koene, P.

    2012-01-01

    Species with specific environmental adaptations may show specific behavioral adaptations, difficulty in adapting to a new environment, and hence suboptimal functioning and fitness. Discrepancy between natural behavioral adaptations and behavioral possibilities in captivity may cause welfare

  18. Welfare Professions in Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Kamp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Welfare professions constitute one of the backbones in the development of the Nordic welfare states. Working in the public sector was for decades associated with high status; public sector employees were trusted employees. Through their work, they had important responsibilities for the welfare state and its citizens. To provide job security—through employment as officials—was a part of ensuring the stability of the state (Åkerstrøm, 2001, and we saw the establishment of what could be called a public ethos, a special morality aimed at serving the needs of the citizens and the state (Hoggett, 2005. The term welfare professions is widely used, referring to public sector employees in the field of, for example, health, education, care, and social work. So this term covers professionals who work directly in contact with patients, citizens, clients, students, etc. (Brante, 1990; Järvinen & Mik-Meyer, 2012. Along with the development and modernization of the welfare state, a number of new welfare professions, such as pedagogues, social works, physiotherapists, social care assistants, and auxiliary nurses have joined the existing ones like nurses, teachers, psychologists, and physicians. At the same time, however, the public sector has undergone dramatic changes as part of a neoliberal transformation of the welfare state. With the New Public Management (NPM wave from 1980s and onwards efforts to restructure public institutions and introduce market-like relationships between them, to outsource and privatize public services and to transform citizens to customers in a market have prevailed (Busch, 2005; Christensen & Lægreid, 2007; Greve, 2008. Within this reform strategy, welfare professionals are perceived as part of the problem that NPM is created to solve, namely an uncontrollable and wildly growing bureaucracy (Clarke & Newman, 1997 (...

  19. Trade, Environment & Animal Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Peter; Nielsen, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of animal welfare and the environment under the WTO GATT and GATS Agreements - including introduction of the innovative idea of limiting consumption abroad (mode 2) for e.g. bull fights.......Regulation of animal welfare and the environment under the WTO GATT and GATS Agreements - including introduction of the innovative idea of limiting consumption abroad (mode 2) for e.g. bull fights....

  20. Paediatric palliative care at home: a single centre’s experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Lee Ai; Khalid, Farah

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION There is increased awareness of paediatric palliative care in Malaysia, but no local published data on home care services. We aimed to describe the paediatric experience at Hospis Malaysia, a community-based palliative care provider in Malaysia. METHODS We conducted a retrospective case note review of patients aged up to 21 years who were referred to Hospis Malaysia from 2009 to 2013. RESULTS A total of 137 patients (92 male, 45 female) with a median age of 140 (3–250) months were included in this study. The majority (71.5%) had malignancies. At referral, 62 patients were still in hospital and 17 died prior to discharge. A total of 108 patients received home visits. At the first home visit, 89.8% of patients had at least one physical symptom. Pain was the most common (52.5%) symptom. Patients had various supportive devices: 39 were on feeding tubes, ten had tracheostomies, five were on bilevel positive airway pressure and ten had urinary catheters. 66 families discussed the preferred location of care at end-of-life. Among those who died, 78.9% died at home, as they preferred (p care referrals tend to occur late, with 25.5% of patients dying within two weeks of referral. At referral, patients often had untreated physical symptoms. The majority of families preferred and had a home death. PMID:26893078

  1. Automated Software Analysis of Fetal Movement Recorded during a Pregnant Woman's Sleep at Home.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoko Nishihara

    Full Text Available Fetal movement is an important biological index of fetal well-being. Since 2008, we have been developing an original capacitive acceleration sensor and device that a pregnant woman can easily use to record fetal movement by herself at home during sleep. In this study, we report a newly developed automated software system for analyzing recorded fetal movement. This study will introduce the system and compare its results to those of a manual analysis of the same fetal movement signals (Experiment I. We will also demonstrate an appropriate way to use the system (Experiment II. In Experiment I, fetal movement data reported previously for six pregnant women at 28-38 gestational weeks were used. We evaluated the agreement of the manual and automated analyses for the same 10-sec epochs using prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK including quantitative indicators for prevalence and bias. The mean PABAK value was 0.83, which can be considered almost perfect. In Experiment II, twelve pregnant women at 24-36 gestational weeks recorded fetal movement at night once every four weeks. Overall, mean fetal movement counts per hour during maternal sleep significantly decreased along with gestational weeks, though individual differences in fetal development were noted. This newly developed automated analysis system can provide important data throughout late pregnancy.

  2. A systematic review of patient medication error on self-administering medication at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, José Joaquín; Lorenzo, Susana; Guilabert, Mercedes; Navarro, Isabel; Pérez-Jover, Virtudes

    2015-06-01

    Medication errors have been analyzed as a health professionals' responsibility (due to mistakes in prescription, preparation or dispensing). However, sometimes, patients themselves (or their caregivers) make mistakes in the administration of the medication. The epidemiology of patient medication errors (PEs) has been scarcely reviewed in spite of its impact on people, on therapeutic effectiveness and on incremental cost for the health systems. This study reviews and describes the methodological approaches and results of published studies on the frequency, causes and consequences of medication errors committed by patients at home. A review of research articles published between 1990 and 2014 was carried out using MEDLINE, Web-of-Knowledge, Scopus, Tripdatabase and Index Medicus. The frequency of PE was situated between 19 and 59%. The elderly and the preschooler population constituted a higher number of mistakes than others. The most common were: incorrect dosage, forgetting, mixing up medications, failing to recall indications and taking out-of-date or inappropriately stored drugs. The majority of these mistakes have no negative consequences. Health literacy, information and communication and complexity of use of dispensing devices were identified as causes of PEs. Apps and other new technologies offer several opportunities for improving drug safety.

  3. Randomised controlled trial of effectiveness of Leicester hospital at home scheme compared with hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A; Parker, H; Wynn, A; Jagger, C; Spiers, N; Jones, J; Parker, G

    1999-12-11

    To compare effectiveness of patient care in hospital at home scheme with hospital care. Pragmatic randomised controlled trial. Leicester hospital at home scheme and the city's three acute hospitals. 199 consecutive patients referred to hospital at home by their general practitioner and assessed as being suitable for admission. Six of 102 patients randomised to hospital at home refused admission, as did 23 of 97 allocated to hospital. Hospital at home or hospital inpatient care. Mortality and change in health status (Barthel index, sickness impact profile 68, EuroQol, Philadelphia geriatric morale scale) assessed at 2 weeks and 3 months after randomisation. The main process measures were service inputs, discharge destination, readmission rates, length of initial stay, and total days of care. Hospital at home group and hospital group showed no significant differences in health status (median scores on sickness impact profile 68 were 29 and 30 respectively at 2 weeks, and 24 and 26 at 3 months) or in dependency (Barthel scores 15 and 14 at 2 weeks and 16 for both groups at 3 months). At 3 months' follow up, 26 (25%) of hospital at home group had died compared with 30 (31%) of hospital group (relative risk 0. 82 (95% confidence interval 0.52 to 1.28)). Hospital at home group required fewer days of treatment than hospital group, both in terms of initial stay (median 8 days v 14.5 days, P=0.026) and total days of care at 3 months (median 9 days v 16 days, P=0.031). Hospital at home scheme delivered care as effectively as hospital, with no clinically important differences in health status. Hospital at home resulted in significantly shorter lengths of stay, which did not lead to a higher rate of subsequent admission.

  4. Does Formal Integration Between Child Welfare And Behavioral Health Agencies Result in Improved Placement Stability For Adolescents Engaged With Both Systems?

    OpenAIRE

    Wells, Rebecca; Chuang, Emmeline

    2012-01-01

    National survey data were used to assess whether child welfare agency ties to behavioral health care providers improved placement stability for adolescents served by both systems. Adolescents initially at home who were later removed tended to have fewer moves when child welfare and behavioral health were in the same larger agency. Joint training of child welfare and behavioral health staff was negatively associated with numbers of moves as well as numbers of days out of home.

  5. Improving the accessibility at home: implementation of a domotic application using a p300-based brain computer interface system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Corralejo Palacios

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a Brain Computer Interface (BCI application to control domotic devices usually present at home. Previous studies have shown that people with severe disabilities, both physical and cognitive ones, do not achieve high accuracy results using motor imagery-based BCIs. To overcome this limitation, we propose the implementation of a BCI application using P300 evoked potentials, because neither extensive training nor extremely high concentration level are required for this kind of BCIs. The implemented BCI application allows to control several devices as TV, DVD player, mini Hi-Fi system, multimedia hard drive, telephone, heater, fan and lights. Our aim is that potential users, i.e. people with severe disabilities, are able to achieve high accuracy. Therefore, this domotic BCI application is useful to increase

  6. Welfare indicators in laying hens

    OpenAIRE

    Alm, Malin

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing concern regarding the welfare of laying hens worldwide and there are both ethical and economic reasons for improving their welfare. Although several different welfare indicators are used today, their ability to accurately reflect welfare status is sometimes questioned. This thesis sought to increase knowledge regarding a number of these welfare indicators by investigating whether and to what extent they were affected when layers were exposed to different stressors. Three di...

  7. What matters for long-term absenteeism: Iso-Strain at work or at home?

    OpenAIRE

    Kittel, France; Casini, Annalisa; Clays, Els; Godin, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES :To determine the prospective impact of Iso-Strain at Work (Iso-W) and Iso-Strain at Home (Iso-H) in workers, on long term absenteeism. METHODS :In the Belstress III study (N= 2675 workers from 7 enterprises) Job-Demand-Control-Social Support (KARASEK ) as well as Stress problems at Home (KLITZMAN) and Social Support outside work (SYME & BERKMAN) –calculated accordingly in Iso-Strain at Home - were measured besides classical socio-demographic data (age, sex, educational level, prof...

  8. What matters for long-term absenteeism: Iso-Strain at work or at home?

    OpenAIRE

    Kittel, France; Casini, Annalisa; Clays, Els; Godin, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES : To determine the prospective impact of Iso-Strain at Work (Iso-W) and Iso-Strain at Home (Iso-H) in workers, on long term absenteeism. METHODS : In the Belstress III study (N= 2675 workers from 7 enterprises) Job-Demand-Control-Social Support (KARASEK ) as well as Stress problems at Home (KLITZMAN) and Social Support outside work (SYME & BERKMAN) –calculated accordingly in Iso-Strain at Home - were measured besides classical socio-demographic data (age, sex, educational level, pr...

  9. Welfare of broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Sirri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Broiler chickens have been selected for their rapid growth rate as well as for high carcass yields, with particular regard to the breast, and reared in intensive systems at high stocking density ranging from 30 to 40 kg live weight/m2. These conditions lead to a worsening of the welfare status of birds. In Europe a specific directive for the protection of broiler chickens has been recently approved whereas in Italy there is not yet any regulation. The EU directive lays down minimum rules for the protection of chickens kept for meat production and gives indications on management practices with particular focus on stocking density, light regimen and air quality, training and guidance for people dealing with chickens, as well as monitoring plans for holding and slaughterhouse. In this review the rearing factors influencing the welfare conditions of birds are described and detailed information on the effects of stocking density, light regimen, litter characteristic and air quality (ammonia, carbon dioxide, humidity, dust are provided. Moreover, the main health implications of poor welfare conditions of the birds, such as contact dermatitis, metabolic, skeletal and muscular disorders are considered. The behavioural repertoire, including scratching, dust bathing, ground pecking, wing flapping, locomotor activity, along with factors that might impair these aspects, are discussed. Lastly, farm animal welfare assessment through physiological and behavioural indicators is described with particular emphasis on the “Unitary Welfare Index,” a tool that considers a wide range of indicators, including productive traits, in order to audit and compare the welfare status of chickens kept in different farms.

  10. Welfare Landscape and Communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braae, Ellen Marie

    2017-01-01

    Danish housing developments of the post-war era were a cornerstone in the implementation of the welfare vision and the overall urban and landscape planning in the post-war period. The new city was a horizontal city and – as it will be my primary ambition to show – a green and landscape-like city....... The landscape came, in Denmark, to play a prominent role and became synonymous with ‘The Good Life’, but it also presented a number of moral imperatives. The article concerns how communities and community feelings found their expression in the Danish ‘welfare landscapes’....

  11. From Vikings to Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gert Tinggaard, Svendsen; Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase

    The Scandinavian welfare states hold the highest social trust scores in the world. Why? Based on the stationary bandit model by Olson (1993), we first demonstrate that early state building during Viking Age facilitated public good provision and extensive trade. Social trust were probably not dest......The Scandinavian welfare states hold the highest social trust scores in the world. Why? Based on the stationary bandit model by Olson (1993), we first demonstrate that early state building during Viking Age facilitated public good provision and extensive trade. Social trust were probably...

  12. The Scandinavian Welfare States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte

    1987-01-01

    and emphasises the need to explore the relationship between the family and the state ( and the family and the economy) in difefrent wefare states. The paper emphasises that the qualitative difference in the organization of care work are important for understanding the institutional differences for between...... the welfare states, and especially the Scandinavian welfare states, where motherhood and care work has to day bef´come part of social citizenship The auther argues that even though women have in important ways been empowered in the Scandinavian woefare states as mothers, workers and citizens, they have...

  13. Fish welfare and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunet, P; Øverli, Ø; Douxfils, J; Bernardini, G; Kestemont, P; Baron, D

    2012-02-01

    There is a considerable public and scientific debate concerning welfare of fish in aquaculture. In this review, we will consider fish welfare as an integration of physiological, behavioral, and cognitive/emotional responses, all of which are essentially adaptative responses to stressful situations. An overview of fish welfare in this context suggests that understanding will rely on knowledge of all components of allostatic responses to stress and environmental perturbations. The development of genomic technologies provides new approaches to this task, exemplified by how genome-wide analysis of genetic structures and corresponding expression patterns can lead to the discovery of new aspects of adaptative responses. We will illustrate how the genomic approach may give rise to new biomarkers for fish welfare and also increase our understanding of the interaction between physiological, behavioral, and emotional responses. In a first part, we present data on expression of candidate genes selected a priori. This is a common avenue to develop molecular biomarkers capable of diagnosing a stress condition at its earliest onset, in order to allow quick corrective intervention in an aquaculture setting. However, most of these studies address isolated physiological functions and stress responses that may not be truly indicative of animal welfare, and there is only rudimentary understanding of genes related to possible cognitive and emotional responses in fish. We also present an overview on transcriptomic analysis related to the effect of aquaculture stressors, environmental changes (temperature, salinity, hypoxia), or concerning specific behavioral patterns. These studies illustrate the potential of genomic approaches to characterize the complexity of the molecular mechanisms which underlies not only physiological but also behavioral responses in relation to fish welfare. Thirdly, we address proteomic studies on biological responses to stressors such as salinity change and

  14. Report on achievements in fiscal 1999 on research and development of the Welfare Techno-system (Nishi Ward, Kobe); 1999 nendo Welfare Techno system kenkyu kaihatsu (Kobe-shi Nishi-ku) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Research and development has been performed on devices to enhance autonomy, safety and comfort for elderly and handicapped people in houses and homes. This paper summarizes the achievements in fiscal 1999. In developing wheelchairs to allow autonomy in meal taking and working at homes, a small upper arm holding device that can be installed on a wheelchair was fabricated on the trial basis according to the experience obtained in making the first prototype in the previous fiscal year, and clinical evaluation was given. In the research and development on a safe walk assisting appliance for elderly and handicapped people, development, improvement and trial fabrication were carried out on a caster in which the brake will not work during walking, but it works automatically in a sudden movement such as falling down. In developing an environment information transmitting system for elderly and handicapped people, a first prototype fabrication was performed on a system to detect sound of an alarm or vibration caused by knocking a door, and convey information to elderly and handicapped people by utilizing the communication services including the commercially available cellular phones. In the research on a welfare device support system for use in disaster and emergency, design and structuring were carried out on a nighttime electric power utilizing system having solar cells combined with storage batteries. Related data were measured. (NEDO)

  15. Patients? practices and experiences of using nebuliser therapy in the management of COPD at home

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim How patients use their nebulisers at home is vital to ensure effective treatment and optimal health outcomes for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of the study was to identify the practicalities and problems associated with nebuliser use by patients with COPD at home, which may impact on the safety and effectiveness of therapy. Design and setting A cross-sectional descriptive study in which participants were recruited from two levels of car...

  16. Literature Review of the Evidence Base for a Hospice at Home Service

    OpenAIRE

    Stosz, Laura

    2008-01-01

    This literature review aimed to identify the evidence base for a hospice at home service at the end of life for facilitating death at home to narrow the gap between preference and reality. This study defines ‘hospice at home’ as hospice style care provided in the home environment; this means specialist palliative care, equipment and medication is available 24/7. However, services operating under this term are not uniform across the literature. Terms encountered in the literature that are used...

  17. Attitudes of palliative home care physicians towards palliative sedation at home in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Masedu, Francesco; Mercadante, Alessandro; Marinangeli, Franco; Aielli, Federica

    2017-05-01

    Information about the attitudes towards palliative sedation (PS) at home is limited. The aim of this survey was to assess the attitudes of palliative care physicians in Italy regarding PS at home. A questionnaire was submitted to a sample of palliative care physicians, asking information about their activity and attitudes towards PS at home. This is a survey of home care physicians in Italy who were involved in end-of-life care decisions at home. One hundred and fifty participants responded. A large heterogeneity of home care organizations that generate some problems was found. Indications, intention and monitoring of PS seem to be appropriate, although some cultural and logistic conditions were limiting the use of PS. Specialized home care physicians are almost involved to start PS at home. Midazolam was seldom available at home and opioids were more frequently used. These data should prompt health care agencies to make a minimal set of drugs easily available for home care. Further research is necessary to compare attitudes in countries with different sociocultural profiles.

  18. The Nordic Welfare Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Helle; Thrane, Claus

    2011-01-01

    The welfare states of Scandinavia have been regarded as pioneers of gender equality, but structural barriers to women’s participation in the labour market may inadvertently discriminate against women and create opportunity costs delimiting women’s career choices. Family policies are defined...

  19. The Danish Welfare Commission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerding, Allan Næs

    2006-01-01

    ) competitiveness in the global economy, (4) behavioural regulation of the use of public bene-fits and services, and (5) management within tight budgets of an increasing demand on health and care. Finally, the concluding section sums up the discussion and elaborates on the debate on the Welfare Commission’s work...

  20. Farm animal welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandøe, Peter; Christiansen, Stine Billeschou; Appleby, M. C.

    2003-01-01

    An experimental survey was undertaken to explore the links between the characteristics of a moral issue, the degree of moral intensity/moral imperative associated with the issue (Jones, 1991), and people’s stated willingness to pay (wtp) for policy to address the issue. Two farm animal welfare...

  1. Unequal Welfare States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Soede; J.C. Vrooman; P.M. Ferraresi; G. Segre

    2004-01-01

    The financial sustainability of the ageing welfare states in Europe has become a key policy issue recently. This study highlights a different aspect of the ageing process, namely its potential impact on income distributions. Since older people usually live on a lower income, their growing share

  2. Activating Welfare States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Jon

    This paper investigates how welfare states may actively contribute to promote employment opportunities, i.e. participation in the labour market through various operations and policies. The principal operations concern in particular the de-familiarisation of caring tasks through social services...

  3. Animal learning and training: implications for animal welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brando, Sabrina I C A

    2012-09-01

    Exotic animals are housed in a variety of settings, from pets at home, as display animals housed in wildlife centers and zoos, to those kept for interactive and outreach programs. The behavioral management program and medical care are major parts of an excellent animal care program. Because animals learn all the time, albeit through different mechanisms, animals are almost always "in training." Understanding animal learning when caring for and treating animals can greatly improve their welfare during experiences that are often related to involuntary procedures and where animals have little control over living conditions or procedures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Who cares about fish welfare?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellingsen, Kristian; Grimsrud, Kristine; Nielsen, Hanne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to assess how concerned Norwegians are about fish welfare; second, to investigate Norwegians’ willingness to pay for salmon filet made from welfare-assured farmed fish with high levels of welfare; and third, to examine Norwegian opinions...... about the appropriate way to pay for better welfare standards in fish production. Design/methodology/approach – On the basis of two focus group sessions, a survey questionnaire was developed and distributed to a representative sample of 2,147 Norwegian households via e-mail. Findings – Results showed...... that the Norwegian public is concerned about fish welfare and is willing to pay a price premium for products made from welfare-assured fish. Norwegian consumers do not, however, want to be the only ones paying for fish welfare, as the main responsibility for fish welfare lies with producers and the Government...

  5. Performance of hospital-at-home after a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew; Parker, Hilda; Wynn, Alison; Spiers, Nicky

    2003-07-01

    To compare the performance of an admission-avoidance hospital-at-home scheme one year after the end of a randomised trial with its performance during the trial. Observational study of patients admitted to the scheme during a period of 12-19 months after the trial ended. In addition to routine data from service records, patients were interviewed at three days, two weeks and three months after admission, using the same instruments as used in the trial. All 78 patients admitted to hospital-at-home during the follow-up period were included, and compared with the 95 patients admitted during the trial. The referral rate to hospital-at-home was the same (11 per month) as during the trial. During the trial, patients were randomised to hospital-at-home or hospital, meaning that hospital-at-home worked at about double the trial volume in the post-trial period. Baseline characteristics showed no statistically significant differences except that post-trial patients were less cognitively impaired. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in survival at two weeks and three months, or in Barthel index, Sickness Impact Profile 68 and Philadelphia Geriatric Morale Scale. Length of stay in hospital-at-home was significantly shorter in the post-trial period (median of five days versus seven, P patients received a visit from their general practitioner during the period of admission (54% versus 38%, P = 0.04); otherwise there were no significant differences in process measures. Apart from working at higher volume and achieving a shorter length of stay, performance of the hospital-at-home scheme a year after the trial ended was little different from that reported during the trial. This is an example of an observational study providing evidence to support the generalisability of trial findings.

  6. Technologcal Literacy in welfare professions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch-Jensen, Peter; Kondrup, Sissel

    to be ‘welfare technological literate’ – both generally as well as within specific welfare professions. Secondly to support the development of a helpful educational framework that enables students to develop welfare technological literacy. This paper discusses some difficulties and preliminary findings...

  7. Welfare assessment in pet rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, F.; Koene, P.; Beerda, B.

    2009-01-01

    One million pet rabbits are kept in The Netherlands, but there are no data available on their behaviour and welfare. This study seeks to assess the welfare of pet rabbits in Dutch households and is a first step in the development of a welfare assessment system. In an internet survey, housing

  8. The European Welfare Model. Is Romania a Welfare State?!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pop-Radu, I.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the various interpretations of the social model and welfare regime concepts. In order to observe Romania’s position within the European welfare regimes, the paper presents a short analysis of the main characteristics of the welfare regimes identified in Europe – i.e. the corporatist welfare regime, the liberal welfare regime and the social democratic/Scandinavian welfare system. We analyze the dynamics of several indicators relevant for establishing the performance of the Romanian welfare regime. Using the results of this study, the current research might offer a new approach on proving that Romania’s case is a particular one among the CEE countries and its sustainability could become a model for other countries.

  9. Experimental Animal Welfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Ergun

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available It is an obvious obligation for investigators to consume millions of experimental animals every year to obtain scientific data. Because most of these experiments involve painful and distressing procedures, to obey the so-called 3Rs, reduction, refinement and replacement, is a prerequisite for those who would apply to ethics committees for a given research proposal. Of the 3Rs, refinement could be defined as “decrease in the incidence of severity of inhumane procedures applied to those animals, which have to be used”. In this context, animal welfare and well-being have been referred to the concept of refinement. In the present review, general principles relating to experimental animal welfare will be discussed. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2011; 20(1.000: -

  10. Multilingual children with hearing loss: Factors contributing to language use at home and in early education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Kathryn; McKinnon, David H; McLeod, Sharynne; Ching, Teresa Yc

    2013-02-01

    Understanding the relationship between children's cultural and linguistic diversity and child, caregiver, and environmental characteristics is important to ensure appropriate educational expectations and provisions. As part of the Longitudinal Outcomes of Children with Hearing Impairment (LOCHI) study, children's caregivers and educators completed questionnaires on demographic characteristics, including the communication mode (oral, manual, or mixed) and languages used in home and early educational environments. This article reports an exploratory analysis to examine factors associated with language use and communication mode of children at 3 years of age. A Chi Square Automatic Interaction Detector (CHAID) analysis was performed on data from 406 children to examine factors influencing communication mode and oral language use. The factor that most influenced children's communication mode at home was the communication mode used by their female caregiver. Children's communication mode in their early education environment was most related to the communication mode they used at home, and then related to the presence of additional needs in the children, female caregivers' level of education and the male caregivers' use of languages other than English (LOTEs). A second exploratory CHAID analysis of data for children from multilingual families (n = 106) indicated that female caregivers' use of English at home significantly influenced whether children used a LOTE at home. Finally, the use of a LOTE at home was associated with the use of a LOTE in the early education environment. These findings serve as an initial description of the factors that were associated with the communication mode and language use of children with hearing loss.

  11. Palliative sedation in patients with advanced cancer followed at home: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Porzio, Giampiero; Valle, Alessandro; Aielli, Federica; Casuccio, Alessandra

    2014-05-01

    Home care programs in Italy. The aim of this study was to assess a protocol for palliative sedation (PS) performed at home. A total of 219 patients were prospectively assessed to evaluate a PS protocol in patients with advanced cancer followed at home by two home care programs with different territorial facilities. The protocol was based on stepwise administration of midazolam. A total of 176 of the patients died at home, and PS was performed in 24 of these patients (13.6%). Younger patients received the procedure more frequently than older patients (P=0.012). The principal reasons to start PS were agitated delirium (n=20) and dyspnea (n=4). Mean duration of PS was 42.2±30.4 hours, and the mean doses of midazolam were 23-58 mg/day. Both the home care team and the patients' relatives expressed optimal or good levels of satisfaction with the procedure in all but one case, respectively. This protocol for PS was feasible and effective in minimizing distress for a subgroup of patients who died at home. The characteristics of patients who may be effectively sedated at home should be better explored in future studies. Copyright © 2014 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Can parents prevent heavy episodic drinking by allowing teens to drink at home?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Jennifer A; Testa, Maria; Hoffman, Joseph H; Windle, Michael

    2010-12-01

    The current study examined whether permitting young women to drink alcohol at home during senior year of high school reduces the risk of heavy drinking in college. Participants were 449 college-bound female high school seniors, recruited at the end of their senior year. Participants were classified into one of three permissibility categories according to their baseline reports of whether their parents allowed them to drink at home: (a) not permitted to drink at all; (b) allowed to drink with family meals; (c) allowed to drink at home with friends. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to compare the drinking behaviors of the three groups at the time of high school graduation and again after the first semester of college. Students who were allowed to drink at home during high school whether at meals or with friends, reported more frequent heavy episodic drinking (HED) in the first semester of college than those who reported not being allowed to drink at all. Those who were permitted to drink at home with friends reported the heaviest drinking at both time points. Path analysis revealed that the relationship between alcohol permissiveness and college HED was mediated via perceptions of parental alcohol approval. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Family Smoking, Exposure to Secondhand Smoke at Home and Family Unhappiness in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Jiu Chen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco use adversely affects many aspects of well-being and is disliked by non-smokers. However, its association with family happiness is unknown. We investigated the associations of family unhappiness with smoking in family members and secondhand smoke (SHS exposure at home in Hong Kong children. In a school-based survey in 2012–2013, 1238 primary school students (mean age 8.5 years, standard deviation 0.9; 42.6% boys reported family smoking, SHS exposure at home and whether their families had any unpleasant experience caused by smoking or SHS in the past 30 days (tobacco-related unpleasant experience, and rated the overall level of happiness in their families (family unhappiness. Multivariable logistic regression was used to study the associations of tobacco-related unpleasant experience and family unhappiness with family smoking and SHS exposure at home. Tobacco-related unpleasant experience and family unhappiness were reported by 27.5% and 16.5% of students. Unpleasant experience was more strongly associated with family smoking than SHS exposure at home. Family unhappiness was associated with both family smoking (odds ratio 2.37; 95% confidence interval 1.51–3.71 and SHS exposure at home (1.82; 1.39–2.40. These results suggest a previously neglected possible impact of tobacco use on family happiness.

  14. Family Smoking, Exposure to Secondhand Smoke at Home and Family Unhappiness in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian Jiu; Ho, Sai Yin; Au, Wing Man; Wang, Man Ping; Lam, Tai Hing

    2015-11-13

    Tobacco use adversely affects many aspects of well-being and is disliked by non-smokers. However, its association with family happiness is unknown. We investigated the associations of family unhappiness with smoking in family members and secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure at home in Hong Kong children. In a school-based survey in 2012-2013, 1238 primary school students (mean age 8.5 years, standard deviation 0.9; 42.6% boys) reported family smoking, SHS exposure at home and whether their families had any unpleasant experience caused by smoking or SHS in the past 30 days (tobacco-related unpleasant experience), and rated the overall level of happiness in their families (family unhappiness). Multivariable logistic regression was used to study the associations of tobacco-related unpleasant experience and family unhappiness with family smoking and SHS exposure at home. Tobacco-related unpleasant experience and family unhappiness were reported by 27.5% and 16.5% of students. Unpleasant experience was more strongly associated with family smoking than SHS exposure at home. Family unhappiness was associated with both family smoking (odds ratio 2.37; 95% confidence interval 1.51-3.71) and SHS exposure at home (1.82; 1.39-2.40). These results suggest a previously neglected possible impact of tobacco use on family happiness.

  15. 'Holding on to life': An ethnographic study of living well at home in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsdottir, Kristin

    2017-12-13

    In recent years, much attention has been paid to how older people living at home can remain independent and manage their illness themselves, while less attention has been given to those who have become frail and need assistance with challenges of everyday life. In this article, I drew on Latimer's formulation of care for frail older people as relational and world-making and on Foucault's work related to the care of the self in developing an understanding of how frail older persons manage to live well at home in the final years of their lives. I use data from an ethnographic study of home care nursing in the homes of 15 frail older people to develop an understanding of how their care at home can be developed. The participants were holding on to life, which reflected their vitality and vulnerability as well as agency in continuing to explore ways to preserve and build their world at home. With declining ability and stamina relations with material things, relatives and official care workers become of central importance in holding on to life. Home care services can be thought of as part of life, as world-forming, where workers contribute to daily activities that support living well at home. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The effects of stress at work and at home on inflammation and endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non, Amy L; Rimm, Eric B; Kawachi, Ichiro; Rewak, Marissa A; Kubzansky, Laura D

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether stress at work and at home may be related to dysregulation of inflammation and endothelial function, two important contributors to the development of cardiovascular disease. In order to explore potential biological mechanisms linking stress with cardiovascular health, we investigated cross-sectional associations between stress at work and at home with an inflammation score (n's range from 406-433) and with two endothelial biomarkers (intercellular and vascular adhesion molecules, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1; n's range from 205-235) in a cohort of healthy US male health professionals. No associations were found between stress at work or at home and inflammation. Men with high or medium levels of stress at work had significantly higher levels of sVCAM-1 (13% increase) and marginally higher levels of sICAM-1 (9% increase), relative to those reporting low stress at work, independent of health behaviors. Men with high levels of stress at home had marginally higher levels of both sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 than those with low stress at home. While lack of findings related to inflammation are somewhat surprising, if replicated in future studies, these findings may suggest that endothelial dysfunction is an important biological mechanism linking stress at work with cardiovascular health outcomes in men.

  17. Quality of human milk expressed in a human milk bank and at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Mayla S; Oliveira, Angela M de M; Hattori, Wallisen T; Abdallah, Vânia O S

    2017-08-30

    To evaluate the quality of the human milk expressed at home and at a human milk bank. This a retrospective, analytical, and observational study, performed by assessing titratable acidity records and the microbiological culture of 100 human milk samples expressed at home and at a human milk bank, in 2014. For the statistical analysis, generalized estimating equations (GEE) and the chi-squared test were used. When comparing the two sample groups, no significant difference was found, with 98% and 94% of the samples being approved among those collected at the milk bank and at home, respectively. No main interaction effect between local and titratable acidity records (p=0.285) was observed, and there was no statistically significant difference between the expected and observed values for the association between the collection place and the microbiological culture results (p=0.307). The quality of human milk expressed at home and at the milk bank are in agreement with the recommended standards, confirming that the expression of human milk at home is as safe as expression at the human milk bank, provided that the established hygiene, conservation, storage, and transport standards are followed. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Opportunities-to-Learn at Home: Profiles of Students With and Without Reaching Science Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiufeng; Whitford, Melinda

    2011-08-01

    This study examines the relationship between opportunity-to-learn (OTL) at home and students' attainment of science proficiency. The data set used was the 2006 PISA science US national sample. Data mining was used to create patterns of association between home OTL variables and student attainment of science proficiency. It was found that students who failed to reach science proficiency are characterized by having fewer than 100 books at home; these students are also found to take out-of-school individual or group lessons with their teachers or with other teachers. On the other hands, students who reached science proficiency are characterized by having more than 100 books at home, not taking any out-of-school lessons, and having a highest parent level of graduate education. In addition to the above common characteristics, other home characteristics (e.g. computer and internet at home and language spoke at home) are also identified in profiles of students who have reached science proficiency. We explain the above findings in terms of current social-cultural theories. We finally discuss implications of the above findings for future studies and for improving science education policy and practice.

  19. Inequality and Social Welfare

    OpenAIRE

    Wodon, Quentin; Yitzhaki, Shlomo

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides a review of part of the literature on inequality and social welfare, with a special focus on the Gini index. The paper first presents the extended Gini index used for measuring inequality, as well as the source decomposition of the Gini used to analyze how changes in income and consumption sources affect overall inequality. The paper then provides a wide range of policy applications of the source decomposition of the extended Gini index, including techniques for analyzing ...

  20. East Asian welfare regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamson, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The paper asks if East Asian welfare regimes are still productivist and Confucian? And, have they developed public care policies? The literature is split on the first question but (mostly) confirmative on the second. Care has to a large, but insufficient extent, been rolled out in the region. Pol...... focusing on outcomes or causal links tend to suggest that legacies prevail, but there is (nearly) consensus that Confucianism exercises great influence in the whole region....

  1. Universal Design and Welfare Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brynn, Rudolph

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the background for the increased interest for and use of welfare technology. It discusses current definitions of welfare technology and suggests a typology of this technology based on the different definitions. It compares the definitions with that of assistive technology and endeavors to draw a clearer limit between them, in particular related to possibilities to utilize the principle of universal design on welfare technology. The issue of operationalization requirements of universal design to welfare technology through standardization is also discussed. Finally, the paper suggests what elements should be part of a new definition of welfare technology.

  2. European welfare states beyond neoliberalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    . Social policies are no longer regarded as a burden on economies, but rather as investment in human capital. Hence, we are now beyond neo-liberalism. Secondly, the widespread welfare reforms in Europe must be distinguished according to welfare regime. Thus, the paper discusses welfare reform within five...... identifying retrenchment even if parts of the literature do argue for such a perspective. This seeming contradiction within the scholarly community calls for a more precise definition of all three import concepts: What should be understood by neo-liberal reform or a neo-liberal approach? Which welfare...... of benefits and an increase in risks and coverage. Therefore, the remainder of the paper discusses in more detail particular welfare reforms within each of the five welfare regimes. It is concluded that problems of welfare state development differ within the different regimes, but a strong commitment...

  3. Comparison of semen parameters in samples collected by masturbation at a clinic and at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzanaty, Saad; Malm, Johan

    2008-06-01

    To investigate differences in semen quality between samples collected by masturbation at a clinic and at home. Cross-sectional study. Fertility center. Three hundred seventy-nine men assessed for infertility. None. Semen was analyzed according to World Health Organization guidelines. Seminal markers of epididymal (neutral alpha-glucosidase), prostatic (prostate-specific antigen and zinc), and seminal vesicle (fructose) function were measured. Two patient groups were defined according to sample collection location: at a clinic (n = 273) or at home (n = 106). Compared with clinic-collected semen, home-collected samples had statistically significantly higher values for sperm concentration, total sperm count, rapid progressive motility, and total count of progressive motility. Semen volume, proportion of normal sperm morphology, neutral alpha-glucosidase, prostate-specific antigen, zinc, and fructose did not differ significantly between groups. An abnormal sperm concentration (masturbation at home compared with at a clinic. This should be taken into consideration in infertility investigations.

  4. Factors associated with preference for dying at home among terminally ill patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou-Andersen, Marianne; Ullersted, Maria P; Jensen, Anders Bonde

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: An important element in end-of-life care advocacy is to meet patients' end-of-life preferences. Most Scandinavian patients die in hospitals even though the majority prefers to die at home. Earlier studies have shown socio-economic differences in relation to dying at home, but more...... knowledge is needed in relation to preferences for place of death. Hence, on valid Danish register-based socio-economic data, we aimed to investigate whether demographic and socio-economic factors were associated with preference for dying at home. METHOD: Population-based, historic cohort study among 282...... relatives of deceased patients who died of cancer in Denmark in 2006. Bereaved relatives were asked to state patient's preference concerning place of death at the beginning and end of the palliative period. These data were recently combined with updated, extensive demographic and socio-economic data from...

  5. Family Dynamics of the Stay-at-Home Father and Working Mother Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushing, Cassie; Powell, Lisa

    2015-09-01

    A phenomenological qualitative study was utilized to explore family dynamics in stay-at-home father and working mother households. A total of 20 working mothers were asked to describe family interactions and daily routines with regard to their stay-at-home father and working mother dynamic. All participants were married, heterosexual women with biological children ages 1 to 4 and who worked outside the home and the father stayed home as primary caretaker and did not contribute financially. The study indicated that the family dynamic of a working mother and stay-at-home father provided a positive parent-child relationship, enhanced parenting cohesion, and enhanced quality time. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Development of a Health Care Information System for the Elderly at Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Dong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing population aging is a serious social problem in the world today. Accidental death at home is increasing because abnormal conditions can not be discovered in time, especially to the elderly who live alone. Besides, according to statistics, over 80 percent of the elderly need the service of home care in China. A health care information system for the elderly at home is developed to monitor the real–time state of the elderly remotely in this thesis. The system can show the current positions of the elderly in the house and judge whether they are in dangerous locations or have dangerous activities. In the case of emergency, the elderly can press the emergency button. The system also provides some help for the elderly’s daily life. The system offers the advantage for living at home more safely and more comfortably, and has better application prospect

  7. The Medical Battery in The United States (1870-1920): Electrotherapy at Home and in the Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Anna

    2017-04-01

    This paper focuses on the history of a portable shock-producing electrotherapeutic device known as the medical battery (1870-1920), which provided both direct and alternating current and was thought to cure a wide variety of ailments. The product occupied a unique space at the nexus of medicine, consumerism and quackery: it was simultaneously considered a legitimate device by medical professionals who practiced electrotherapeutics, yet identical versions were sold directly to consumers, often via newspaper advertisements and with cure-all marketing language. Indeed, as I show in this paper, the line between what was considered a medical device and a consumer product was often blurred. Even though medical textbooks and journals never mentioned (much less promoted) the home use of electricity, every reputable electrotherapy instrument manufacturer sold a "family battery" for patients to use on themselves at home. While a handful of physicians spoke out against the use of electricity by the laity-as they felt it undermined the image of electrotherapy as a skilled medical procedure-existing evidence suggests that many physicians were likely recommending the home use of medical electricity to their patients. Taken together, this paper shows how the professional ideals of electrotherapeutics were not always aligned with physicians' actual practices. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Fecal Calprotectin Measured By Patients at Home Using Smartphones—A New Clinical Tool in Monitoring Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinding, Kristoffer Kofod; Elsberg, Henriette; Thorkilgaard, Tine

    2016-01-01

    in clinical practice. Our aim was to evaluate CalproSmart, a new rapid test for fecal calprotectin performed by patients themselves at home, and compare it to gold standard ELISA. METHODS: A total of 221 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (115 ulcerative colitis and 106 Crohn's disease) were included...... CalproSmart at home, patients also sent in 2 fecal samples to be analyzed by ELISA. RESULTS: Totally, 894 fecal calprotectin results were obtained by ELISA, and 632 of them from CalproSmart. The correlation coefficient was 0.685, higher for academics than nonacademics (0.768 versus 0.637; P = 0....... The CalproSmart test involves extraction of feces, application to the lateral flow device, and taking a picture with a smartphone after 10 minutes of incubation. Results appear on the screen within seconds. Patients were instructed at inclusion and had a video guide of the procedure as support. When using...

  9. Healthcare costs attributable to secondhand smoke exposure at home for U.S. adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Tingting; Sung, Hai-Yen; Wang, Yingning; Lightwood, James; Max, Wendy

    2017-12-27

    To estimate healthcare costs attributable to secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure at home among nonsmoking adults (18+) in the U.S. We analyzed data on nonsmoking adults (N=67,735) from the 2000, 2005, and 2010 (the latest available data on SHS exposure at home) U.S. National Health Interview Surveys. This study was conducted from 2015 to 2017. We examined hospital nights, home care visits, doctor visits, and emergency room (ER) visits. For each, we analyzed the association of SHS exposure at home with healthcare utilization with a Zero-Inflated Poisson regression model controlling for socio-demographic and other risk characteristics. Excess healthcare utilization attributable to SHS exposure at home was determined and multiplied by unit costs derived from the 2014 Medical Expenditures Panel Survey to determine annual SHS-attributable healthcare costs. SHS exposure at home was positively associated with hospital nights and ER visits, but was not statistically associated with home care visits and doctor visits. Exposed adults had 1.28 times more hospital nights and 1.16 times more ER visits than non-exposed adults. Annual SHS-attributable healthcare costs totaled $4.6 billion (including $3.8 billion for hospital nights and $0.8 billion for ER visits, 2014 dollars) in 2000, $2.1 billion (including $1.8 billion for hospital nights and $0.3 billion for ER visits) in 2005, and $1.9 billion (including $1.6 billion for hospital nights and $0.4 billion for ER visits) in 2010. SHS-attributable costs remain high, but have fallen over time. Tobacco control efforts are needed to further reduce SHS exposure at home and associated healthcare costs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. [Neonatal palliative care at home: Contribution of the regional pediatric palliative care team].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojean, N; Strub, C; Kuhn, P; Calvel, L

    2017-02-01

    The "patients' rights and end-of-life care" act, known as the Leonetti law, has allowed implementation of palliative care in neonatology as an alternative to unreasonable therapeutic interventions. A palliative care project can be offered to newborns suffering from intractable diseases. It must be focused on the newborn's quality of life and comfort and on family support. Palliative care for newborns can be provided in the delivery room, in the neonatal unit, and also at home. Going home is possible but requires medical support. Here we describe the potential benefits of the intervention of a regional team of pediatric palliative care for newborns, both in the hospital and at home. Two clinical situations of palliative care at home started in the neonatal period and the neonatal unit are presented. They are completed by a retrospective national survey focusing on the type of support to newborns in palliative care in 2014, which was conducted in 22 French regional pediatric palliative care teams. It shows that 26 newborns benefited from this support at home in 2014. Sixteen infants were born after a pregnancy with a palliative care birth plan and ten entered palliative care after a decision to limit life-sustaining treatments. Twelve of them returned home before the 20th day of life. Sixteen infants died, six of them at home. The regional pediatric palliative care team first receives in-hospital interventions: providing support for ethical reflection in the development of the infant's life project, meeting with the child and its family, helping organize the care pathway to return home. When the child is at home, the regional pediatric palliative care team can support the caregiver involved, provide home visits to continue the clinical monitoring of the infant, and accompany the family. The follow-up of the bereavement and the analysis of the practices with caregivers are also part of its tasks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Giving birth on our own terms-Women's experience of childbirth at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouhki, Maija-Riitta; Suominen, Tarja; Åstedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2017-10-01

    home births are quite rare and are not supported as part of mainstream health care services in most European countries. Women who choose home as the place of birth often do so because maternity services in hospitals do not offer the options that they want. The aim of the present study is to describe women's experiences of giving birth at home and to produce a comprehensive structure of meaning regarding giving birth at home. a phenomenological study based on analysis of open-interview transcripts using Colaizzi's approach. women who gave birth at home FINDINGS: women who have given birth at home experience having control over their own body, the care they are given, and the practical arrangements surrounding the birth. However, they also experience negative attitudes from other people about their decision to give birth at home, and challenges because of worries about how they and their baby will cope. During the birth women feel a sense of connection to their own body, which they trust to tell them what to do. They experience great happiness on successfully giving birth and feel connected to nature and the circle of life. Being able to celebrate with family members and be pampered by them after the birth made the women feel 'like queens'. women's experience of childbirth at home is one of having control over the birthing process and its environment. The main challenge is exposure to negative attitudes from others, including health care professionals. Overall, the experience was full of happiness and good feelings. We conclude that more attention should be paid to the quality of birth experiences and women's individual needs and wishes within maternity care provision. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A reassuring presence: An evaluation of Bradford District Hospice at Home service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daley Andrew

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the United Kingdom, a developing role for primary care services in cancer and palliative care has resulted in an increase in palliative home care teams. The provision of professional care in the home setting seeks to provide necessary services and enhanced choice for patients whose preference is to die at home. A mismatch between patient preference for home death and the actual number of people who died at home was identified within Bradford, the locality of this study. In response to this mismatch, and reflecting the policy environment of wishing to enhance community service provision, the four Primary Care Trusts (PCTs in the city sought to offer support to patients who wished to remain in their own homes through the final stages of a terminal illness. To offer this support they set up a dedicated hospice at home team. This would provide services and support for patients in achieving a dignified, symptom free and peaceful death, allowing families to maximise time spent together. The aim of the study was to evaluate the Bradford hospice at home service from the perspective of carers, nurses and General Practitioners. Methods Postal questionnaires were sent to carers (n = 289, district nurses (n = 508 and GP's (n = 444 using Bradford's hospice at home service. Resulting quantitative data was analysed using the Statical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS and qualitative data was analysed using grounded theory techniques. Results The data from carers, district nurses and GPs provide general support for the Bradford hospice at home service. Carers valued highly the opportunity to 'fulfil a promise' to the individual who wished to be cared for at home. District nurses and GPs cited the positive impact of access to specialist expertise. This was a 'reassuring presence' for primary healthcare teams and offered 'relief of carer anxiety' by providing prompt, accessible and sensitive care. Conclusion Carers and health

  13. Screen-Time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH): a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddison, Ralph; Marsh, Samantha; Foley, Louise; Epstein, Leonard H; Olds, Timothy; Dewes, Ofa; Heke, Ihirangi; Carter, Karen; Jiang, Yannan; Mhurchu, Cliona Ni

    2014-09-10

    Screen-based activities, such as watching television (TV), playing video games, and using computers, are common sedentary behaviors among young people and have been linked with increased energy intake and overweight. Previous home-based sedentary behaviour interventions have been limited by focusing primarily on the child, small sample sizes, and short follow-up periods. The SWITCH (Screen-Time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home) study aimed to determine the effect of a home-based, family-delivered intervention to reduce screen-based sedentary behaviour on body composition, sedentary behaviour, physical activity, and diet over 24 weeks in overweight and obese children. A two-arm, parallel, randomized controlled trial was conducted. Children and their primary caregiver living in Auckland, New Zealand were recruited via schools, community centres, and word of mouth. The intervention, delivered over 20 weeks, consisted of a face-to-face meeting with the parent/caregiver and the child to deliver intervention content, which focused on training and educating them to use a wide range of strategies designed to reduce their child's screen time. Families were given Time Machine TV monitoring devices to assist with allocating screen time, activity packages to promote alternative activities, online support via a website, and monthly newsletters. Control participants were given the intervention material on completion of follow-up. The primary outcome was change in children's BMI z-score from baseline to 24 weeks. Children (n = 251) aged 9-12 years and their primary caregiver were randomized to receive the SWITCH intervention (n = 127) or no intervention (controls; n = 124). There was no significant difference in change of zBMI between the intervention and control groups, although a favorable trend was observed (-0.016; 95% CI: -0.084, 0.051; p = 0.64). There were also no significant differences on secondary outcomes, except for a trend towards

  14. Political Parties’ Welfare Image, Electoral Punishment and Welfare State Retrenchment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumacher, Gijs; Vis, Barbara; van Kersbergen, Kees

    2013-01-01

    Will voters punish the government for cutting back welfare state entitlements? The comparative literature on the welfare state suggests that the answer is yes. Unless governments are effectively employing strategies of blame avoidance, retrenchment leads to vote loss. Because a large majority...... of voters supports the welfare state, the usual assumption is that retrenchment backfires equally on all political parties. This study contributes to an emerging body of research that demonstrates that this assumption is incorrect. On the basis of a regression analysis of the electoral fate of the governing...... parties of 14 OECD countries between 1970 and 2002, we show that most parties with a positive welfare image lose after they implemented cutbacks, whereas most parties with a negative welfare image do not. In addition, we show that positive welfare image parties in opposition gain votes, at the expense...

  15. Family stories of end-of-life cancer care when unable to fulfill a loved one's wish to die at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Karen; Murray, Craig D; Seddon, Lesley

    2015-06-01

    Control over place of death is deemed important, not only in providing a "good death," but also in offering person-centered palliative care. Despite the wish to die at home being endorsed by many, few achieve it. The present study aimed to explore the reasons why this wish is not fulfilled by examining the stories of ten individuals who lost a loved one to cancer. We adopted a narrative approach, with stories synthesized to create one metastory depicting plot similarities and differences. Stories were divided into four chapters: (1) the cancer diagnosis, (2) the terminal stage and advancement of death, (3) death itself, and (4) reflections on the whole experience. Additionally, several reasons for cessation of home care were uncovered, including the need to consider children's welfare, exhaustion, and admission of the loved one by professionals due to a medical emergency. Some participants described adverse effects as a result of being unable to continue to support their loved one's wish to remain at home. Reflections upon the accounts are provided with a discussion around potential clinical implications.

  16. Urban adolescent mothers exposed to community, family, and partner violence: prevalence, outcomes, and welfare policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Angie C

    2006-01-01

    The federal welfare reforms of 1996 mandated that all minor adolescent mothers receiving cash assistance must attend school and live at home to receive their cash grant. Though this law has been in place for over 8 years, little research has been done that explores the barriers facing adolescent mothers who try to attend school and live at home. Anecdotal and qualitative evidence from welfare reform evaluation studies suggests that violence may be just such a barrier. This article reviews the recent empirical literature on urban adolescent mothers' exposure to multiple forms of violence. The author delineates and critiques the existing research on the prevalence of and outcomes linked with exposure to community violence, witnessed parental violence, physical abuse within the family, and partner violence among this population. The article concludes with recommendations for researchers, practitioners, and policy makers in light of the reviewed findings. 2006 APA, all rights reserved

  17. Social Welfare in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rutten, Koen

    of China’s economic growth, the long and midterm sustainability of its economic development model and the implications thereof for social stability and political legitimacy. An immediate priority has been to formulate and implement a response to mitigate the disruptive effects of the transition to a market...... to meet China’s social challenges. In this paper, I provide a summary of the academic literature on post-reform development of the welfare system. I will give an overview of its most salient problems, initiatives and their preliminary outcomes. Finally, I will present some concluding remarks and provide...

  18. Farmers on Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Ann-Christina

    the member states of the European Community from 1958 onward. That story holds that the political priority given to the CAP, as well as its long-term stability, resides in a basic devil's bargain between French agriculture and German industry. In Farmers on Welfare, a landmark new account of the making...... on extensive archival research from a variety of political actors across the Community, she illustrates how and why this supranational farm regime was created in the 1960s, and also provides us with a detailed narrative history of how national and European administrations gradually learned about this kind...

  19. Peace, welfare, culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Ulrik Pram

    2011-01-01

    and multiculturalism – pitted in opposition. By analytically focusing on “security narratives”, the article details how initial narratives of Muslims as threats to culture, welfare and societal peace merged and morphed to award surprising new roles to the state and multiculturalism. The re-evaluation of cultural......This article analyzes how Muslims are implied to constitute threats in the official Danish discourse of the centre-right government since 2001. It does so to provide a more nuanced picture of Danish debates on integration than the usual presentation of two discourses – culturalism...

  20. Associations between intensity of child welfare involvement and child development among young children in child welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahmer, Aubyn C; Hurlburt, Michael; Horwitz, Sarah McCue; Landsverk, John; Zhang, Jinjin; Leslie, Laurel K

    2009-09-01

    To examine developmental and behavioral status of children in child welfare (CW) over time, by intensity of CW involvement using a national probability sample. As part of the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being (NSCAW), data were collected on 1,049 children 12-47 months old investigated by CW agencies for possible abuse or neglect. Analyses used descriptive statistics to characterize developmental and behavioral status across four domains (developmental/cognitive, language, adaptive functioning, and behavior) by intensity of CW involvement (in-home with CW services, in-home with no CW services or out-of-home care) over time. Multivariate analyses were used to examine the relationship between independent variables (age, gender, home environment, race/ethnicity, maltreatment history, intensity of CW involvement) and follow-up domain scores. On average, children improved in developmental/cognitive, communication/language status over time, but these improvements did not differ by intensity of CW involvement. Analyses revealed a positive relationship between the home environment and change in language and adaptive behavior standard scores over time, and few predictors of change in behavioral status. An interaction between intensity of CW involvement and initial developmental/cognitive status was present. Across domains, intensity of CW involvement does not appear to have a significant effect on change in developmental and behavioral status, although out-of-home care does have differential relationships with children's developmental/cognitive status for those with very low initial cognitive/developmental status. Facilitating development in children in CW may require supportive, enriched care environments both for children remaining at home and those in foster care. Toddler and preschool age children known to child welfare are likely to have difficulties with development whether they are removed from their homes or not. It would be helpful if child welfare

  1. Associations Between Intensity of Child Welfare Involvement and Child Development Among Young Children in Child Welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahmer, Aubyn C; Hurlburt, Michael; Horwitz, Sarah McCue; Landsverk, John; Zhang, Jinjin; Leslie, Laurel K

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine developmental and behavioral status of children in child welfare (CW) over time, by intensity of CW involvement using a national probability sample. Methods As part of the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW), data were collected on 1,049 children 12–47 months old investigated by CW agencies for possible abuse or neglect. Analyses used descriptive statistics to characterize developmental and behavioral status across four domains (developmental/cognitive, language, adaptive functioning, and behavior) by intensity of CW involvement (in-home with CW services, in-home with no CW services or out-of-home care) over time. Multivariate analyses were used to examine the relationship between independent variables (age, gender, home environment, race/ethnicity, maltreatment history, intensity of CW involvement) and follow-up domain scores. Results On average, children improved in developmental/cognitive, communication/language status over time, but these improvements did not differ by intensity of CW involvement. Analyses revealed a positive relationship between the home environment and change in language and adaptive behavior standard scores over time, and few predictors of change in behavioral status. An interaction between intensity of CW involvement and initial developmental/cognitive status was present. Conclusions Across domains, intensity of CW involvement does not appear to have a significant effect on change in developmental and behavioral status, although out-of-home care does have differential relationships with children’s developmental/cognitive status for those with very low initial cognitive/developmental status. Facilitating development in children in CW may require supportive, enriched care environments both for children remaining at home and those in foster care. Practice Implications Toddler and preschool age children known to child welfare are likely to have difficulties with development whether they are

  2. Qualities to Be Developed in Estonian Children at Home and at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulviste, Tiia; Kikas, Eve

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the views of 580 mothers, 333 fathers and 43 primary school teachers about qualities to be developed at home and at school in Estonia--a country in transition with reforms towards child-centered democratic education. The study found that mothers, fathers and teachers shared the dominant family socialization values. Mothers,…

  3. "It does affect me” Disruptive behaviors in preadolescents directly and indirectly abused at home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldry, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    Aggressive and delinquent behaviors in preadolescents may be indicators of problems suffered at home from direct child abuse by one or both parents or indirect abuse, such as exposure to domestic violence. A total of 532 Italian preadolescents recruited in their schools took part in this study. They

  4. Sleep Disruption at Home As an Independent Risk Factor for Postoperative Delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Oliver M; Gelrich, Lisa; MacLullich, Alasdair M; Driessen, Martin; Thomas, Christine; Kreisel, Stefan H

    2017-05-01

    To determine whether sleep disruption at home or in hospital is an independent risk factor for postoperative delirium in older adults undergoing elective surgery. Prospective cohort study. German teaching hospital. Individuals aged 65 and older undergoing elective arthroplasty (N = 101). Preoperative questionnaires were used to assess sleep disruption at home (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index). Actigraphy was used to objectively measure sleep disruption in the hospital before and after surgery. Delirium was assessed daily after surgery using the Confusion Assessment Method and, if there was uncertainty, validated according to International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10), criteria. Twenty-seven participants developed postoperative delirium. Those with sleep disruption at home were 3.26 times as likely to develop postoperative delirium as those without (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.34-7.92, P = .009). Participants with sleep disruption in hospital were 1.21 times as likely to develop postoperative delirium as those without (95% CI = 1.03-1.41, P = .02). When adjusting for other variables, risk remained significant for sleep disruption at home (risk ratio (RR) = 3.90, 95% CI = 2.14-7.11, P delirium than those without. Sleep disruption in the hospital may further heighten this risk. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. Practice, Problems and Power in "Internationalisation at Home": Critical Reflections on Recent Research Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Neil

    2015-01-01

    In a period when international flows of higher education students are rapidly increasing and diversifying, this paper reviews recent research evidence about the experiences of "home" students--those who are not mobile and study in their home nation. This is situated within the concept of "internationalisation at home", which…

  6. Trajectories of At-Homeness and Health in Usual Care and Small House Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molony, Sheila L.; Evans, Lois K.; Jeon, Sangchoon; Rabig, Judith; Straka, Leslie A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Long-term care providers across the United States are building innovative environments called "Green House" or small-house nursing homes that weave humanistic person-centered philosophies into clinical care, organizational policies, and built environments. Purpose: To compare and contrast trajectories of at-homeness and health over…

  7. Internationalisation at Home: Exploiting the Potential of the Non-nationals' and Expatriates' Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Jaklič

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The paper explores the first-time internationalisation strategy and discusses whether firms could actually begin internationalisation at home without crossing the border by approaching the international expatriates’ community in the home city/market. Research Design & Methods: The concept of internationalisation at home is studied through the case study method. An example of a public company from the creative industry in the capital city from the Central and Eastern European region is studied. Findings: The expatriates’ community, so far often neglected market segment, has a rising potential in several European cites. The results highlight a positive impact on performance after approaching the expatriates’ community. Organisational learning effects result in improved and stabilised sales and strengthened firm-specific advantages. Implications & Recommendations: Internationalisation at home is disruptive innovation, especially appropriate for enterprises under high resource constraints. It is fast, cost efficient and has positive externalities. The international expatriates’ community in the home city/market offers fast organisational learning and a testing area for enterprises. Contribution & Value Added: Internationalisation at home adds to the existing understanding of internationalisation. The findings that firms could begin the organisational learning process of internationalisation before or even without the first foreign entry and proposals for the integrating expatriates’ community into the marketing strategy may influence future internationalisation paths.

  8. The Semiotics of Learning Korean at Home: An Ecological Autoethnographic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    This autoethnographic study examines how I re-learn Korean in, and through, interactions with family members at home. The analysis, which is informed by language ecology and sociocultural concepts of development, shows how semiotic and human resources, including material objects and more proficient speakers, play a mediating role in how I deal…

  9. Changes in symptoms and pain intensity of cancer patients after enrollment in palliative care at home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dumitrescu, Luminita; van den Heuvel-Olaroiu, Marinela; van den Heuvel, Wim J. A.

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the activities and interventions carried out by an at-home palliative care team treating cancer patients who died within two years of being enrolled in a palliative care program. It analyzes which changes in symptoms and pain occurred and which sociodemographic and medical

  10. Interdisciplinary cooperation of GPs in palliative care at home: a nationwide survey in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgsteede, Sander D.; Deliens, Luc; van der Wal, Gerrit; Francke, Anneke L.; Stalman, Wim A. B.; van Eijk, Jacques T. M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the occurrence and predictors of interdisciplinary cooperation of GPs with other caregivers in palliative care at home. DESIGN: In a prospective study among 96 general practices, the GPs involved identified all dying patients during the study period of 12 months. The GPs

  11. Aims and tasks in parental caregiving for children receiving palliative care at home: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, Lisa M.; Kars, Marijke C.; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Y. N.; Bosman, Diederik K.; Colenbrander, Derk A.; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; van Delden, Johannes J. M.

    2017-01-01

    In paediatric palliative care (PPC), parents are confronted with increasing caregiving demands. More children are cared for at home, and the need for PPC of children is lengthened due to technical and medical improvements. Therefore, a clear understanding of the content of parental caregiving in PPC

  12. Aims and tasks in parental caregiving for children receiving palliative care at home : a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, Lisa M; Kars, Marijke C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/28486711X; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Y N; Bosman, Diederik K; Colenbrander, Derk A; Grootenhuis, Martha A; van Delden, Johannes J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/086541331

    In paediatric palliative care (PPC), parents are confronted with increasing caregiving demands. More children are cared for at home, and the need for PPC of children is lengthened due to technical and medical improvements. Therefore, a clear understanding of the content of parental caregiving in PPC

  13. Patient Hand Hygiene at Home Predicts Their Hand Hygiene Practices in the Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, Anna; Sethi, Ajay; Shulkin, Emily; Caniza, Rachell; Zerbel, Sara; Safdar, Nasia

    2014-01-01

    We examine factors associated with hand hygiene practices of hospital patients. Hygiene decreased compared to at home, and home practices were strongly associated with hospital practices. Understanding and leveraging the intrinsic value some patients associate with hand hygiene may be important for improving overall hospital hygiene and decreasing healthcare-associated infections.

  14. A Hybrid Way of Learning: Taught at Home and Taught at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Charles

    2005-01-01

    There can be a natural conflict between home schoolers and the school district's attempt to restrict their freedom. Home schooling is an age-old educational method that was primarily utilized by parents seeking to teach their own children at home in order to restore traditional values and bring what they perceived to be an order to the family.…

  15. At-home oral care for adults with developmental disabilities: a survey of caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minihan, Paula M; Morgan, John P; Park, Angel; Yantsides, Konstantina E; Nobles, Carrie J; Finkelman, Matthew D; Stark, Paul C; Must, Aviva

    2014-10-01

    Little is known about effective at-home oral care methods for people with developmental disabilities (DDs) who are unable to perform personal preventive practices themselves and rely on caregivers for assistance. A convenience sample of 808 caregivers (84.5 percent paid, 15.5 percent family members) who accompanied adults with DDs (20 years or older) to appointments at a specialized statewide dental care system completed computer-assisted personal interview surveys. The authors used these data to investigate caregivers' at-home oral care experiences and to explore differences between caregivers who were paid and those who were family members. Caregivers reported that a high proportion (85 percent) of dentate adults with DDs received assistance with tooth cleaning. They also reported a high prevalence of dental problems, and low adherence to brushing (79 percent) and flossing (22 percent) recommendations. More caregivers reported that they felt confident assisting with brushing than with flossing (85 percent versus 54 percent). Family members and paid caregivers differed with respect to confidence and training. At-home oral care, particularly flossing, presents substantial challenges for adults with DDs. Solutions must be tailored to address the different experiences and distinct needs of the family members and paid caregivers who assist these adults. Caregivers play an important role in providing at-home oral care, and they must be included in efforts to improve oral health outcomes for people with DDs.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of ceftazidime in adult cystic fibrosis patients during continuous infusion and ambulatory treatment at home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinks, A A; Touw, D J; Heijerman, H G; Danhof, M; de Leede, G P; Bakker, W

    Acute exacerbations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections were treated with ceftazidime (CTZ) by continuous infusion (CI) in eight adult cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. CTZ pharmacokinetics were studied after a single dose and during CI (100 mg/kg/24 h) with a CADD-PLUS infusion pump at home for

  17. Costs and financial benefits of video communication compared to usual care at home: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, J.M.; Mistiaen, P.; Francke, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review of video communication in home care to provide insight into the ratio between the costs and financial benefits (i.e. cost savings). Four databases (PUBMED, EMBASE, COCHRANE LIBRARY, CINAHL) were searched for studies on video communication for patients living at home

  18. Internationalization-at-Home: Grounded Practices to Promote Intercultural, International, and Global Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Melanie; Kahn, Hilary E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores Internationalization-at-Home (IaH) as a comprehensive model for preparing every student with the needed global competencies for today's interconnected and diverse society. The authors show how the goal of IaH is to redefine classrooms and campuses into common spaces that intentionally promote intercultural, international, and…

  19. Internationalization at Home for Counseling Students: Utilizing Technology to Expand Global and Multicultural Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Christine Suniti; McMahon, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Advances in information and communications technology have created increased avenues to internationalize educational experiences for students on their home campuses. This article reports on a teaching strategy that used Blackboard to provide an "Internationalization at Home" online exchange experience for Australian and American graduate…

  20. Beyond "Just Being There": Teaching Internationalization at Home in Two Qualitative Methods Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassar, Loretta; McKenzie, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Study-abroad and international-student programs are commonly understood to transform their participants into "global citizens" possessing "cross-cultural competencies." Similar benefits are anticipated from "internationalization at home"--defined as any on-campus, internationally related activity--whereby…

  1. Ready-to-use introduction schedules for first exposure to allergenic foods in children at home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlieg - Boerstra, B. J.; Dubois, A. E. J.; van der Heide, S.; Bijleveld, C. M. A.; Wolt-Plompen, S. A. A.; Oude Elberink, J. N. G.; Kukler, J.; Jansen, D. F.; Venter, C.; Duiverman, E. J.

    Background: The vast majority of children will undergo their first exposure to common allergenic foods at home. However, the first exposure may lead to clinical reactions. It has been proposed to introduce allergenic foods gradually into the diets of children at risk for food allergy, but no

  2. Achieving a Global Mind-Set at Home: Student Engagement with Immigrant Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallinger, Carolyn

    2017-01-01

    Developing a global mind-set in college students is a goal of many colleges and universities. Most often this goal is met by encouraging students to study abroad. This article explains how a service learning student engagement program at home achieves this goal by pairing Introduction to Sociology students with young immigrant children in a weekly…

  3. Cooperation versus Coordination: Using Real-time Telemedicine for Treatment at Home of Diabetic Footulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemensen, Jane; Larsen, Simon Bo

    2007-01-01

    In conventional treatment the patient with a diabetic foot ulcer travels to hospital for consultations with the experts. We conducted an organizational analysis of the cooperation taking place when telemedicine was used for treatment at home instead. In a pilot study, five patients were offered...

  4. Internalizing symptoms of Italian youth directly and vicariously victimized at school and at home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldry, A.C.; Winkel, F.W.

    2004-01-01

    Internalizing symptoms, such as depression, anxiety/withdrawal, as well as somatic complaints are indicators of maladjustment. Mental and physical complaints may be related to victimization at home and at school. In the present study we investigated the independent impact of direct victimization at

  5. Postcolonial Exilic Narration in Femi Ojo-Ade's Exile At Home ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Femi Ojo-Ade is a Nigerian poet who has used the resources of actual events as framework in Exile at Home. Written within the context of the harsh socio-political and economic climate in Nigeria, the collection reconstructs historical truths about the nightmarish conditions of Nigerians in the last two decades of the twentieth ...

  6. Children's exposure to second hand smoke at home: a cross-sectional study in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitória, Paulo D; Machado, José Cunha; Araújo, Ana Carolina; Ravara, Sofia B; Samorinha, Catarina; Antunes, Henedina; Rosas, Manuel; Becoña, Elisardo; Precioso, José

    2015-01-01

    Second-hand tobacco smoke (SHS) is a major indoor pollutant that causes serious health problems for all exposed, especially children. Children are often exposed to SHS at home, due to parental or other households' or guests' smoking. This study describes Portuguese children's exposure to SHS at home (total and by Portuguese main regions). In 2010/2011, a questionnaire was applied to a sample of Portuguese children in the 4th grade (N=3187, mean age 9.05±0.7 years, 51.1% male). Descriptive analysis, chi-square tests and crude odds ratios were performed. Of the participants, 62.9% of those with smoking parents and 19.2% of those with non-smoking parents were exposed to SHS at their home. Parental smoking varied significantly among regions and was significantly associated with children's exposure to SHS at home. Children's exposure to SHS at home was high, especially if their parents smoke. Children living in Lisbon Region presented the highest SHS exposure rate. The association of SHS exposure with geographic regions suggests the influence of social and contextual factors on smoking behaviour and on tobacco control effectiveness. Our findings highlight the need to effectively prevent children's SHS exposure at their home and to develop tailored tobacco control measures by region. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Reassessment of suicide attempters at home, shortly after discharge from hospital.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwey, B.; Waarde, J.A. van; Bozdag, M.A.; Rooij, I.A.L.M. van; Beurs, E. de; Zitman, F.G.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessment of suicide attempters in a general hospital may be influenced by the condition of the patient and the unfavorable circumstances of the hospital environment. AIMS: To determine whether the results of a reassessment at home shortly after discharge from hospital differ from the

  8. Acquisition of Spanish Gender Agreement in Two Learning Contexts: Study Abroad and at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isabelli-Garcia, Christina

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study is to describe the acquisition rate for gender acquisition in Spanish and to show whether individual variability and language contact may affect this rate. The participants were intermediate second language Spanish (first language English) learners in the study abroad and at-home contexts over a 4-month period. The…

  9. The Lived Experiences of International Students Who's Family Remains at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Theresa; Robinson, Carolyn; Welch, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    The significant increase of international students, who leave their family at home, to study abroad, especially in the discipline of nursing, has implications for educational practice. This study's aim was to explore adult international students' experiences of leaving spouse and children--for further education overseas. A descriptive…

  10. Supplemental Work at Home among Finnish Wage Earners: Involuntary Overtime or Taking the Advantage of Flexibility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satu Ojala

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available It is suggested, that the new flexible work practices are enhanced to meet the work-family demandsand therefore benefit especially women. In the article the focus is on informal flexibilitytaking place at home, for which field studies of the role of gender are rare. Against the assumptions,paid work at home is mostly informal, supplementary overtime by nature. In this article, I explorewhy employees undertake work in their private sphere during their free time and whether gendermakes a difference there. I carry out both qualitative and quantitative analyses. The qualitativedata consists of 21 interviews with white-collar employees and the quantitative data from theFinnish Quality of Work Life survey 2008 for which there are almost 4400 respondents. The methodsinclude content analysis, descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis.According to both the qualitative and quantitative data, job characteristics play the most importantrole for all who work at home; employees with higher education, or supervisory tasks, inparallel with having an autonomous and inspiring job predict both tele- and supplemental work.Importantly, gender plays only a minor role in the puzzles of choosing when and where to work.The social relations at the workplace, including the atmosphere and the support of superiors andthe work community, are only weakly related to work at home. At the same time, supplementalwork is associated with great time pressure and involuntary overtime.

  11. Treatment of acute relapses in multiple sclerosis at home with oral dexamethasone : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Keyser, J; Zwanikken, C; Zorgdrager, A; Oenema, D

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of treating relapses of multiple sclerosis (MS) at home with oral dexamethasone. Twenty-five out of 28 consecutive patients with MS who presented with a relapse of less than 2 weeks' duration were treated on an open basis with oral

  12. Report: Review of Hotline Complaint on Employee Granted Full-Time Work-at-Home Privilege

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #10-P-0002, October 7, 2009. We found an unauthorized, full-time work-at-home arrangement that has existed for 9 years and allows a NETI employee to work from home in Ohio instead of an office in Washington, DC.

  13. 'Comrades' as a metaphor at home and on the road | Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is concerned specifically with couples that run the comrades marathon in South Africa together. The aim of this study was to explore how the metaphor of “comrades” informs these couples' relationships at home and on the road. A qualitative research method was used within a social constructionist epistemology.

  14. Home, but not Alone: Information and Communication Technology and Internationalisation at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joris, Michael; van den Berg, Christiaan; van Ryssen, Stefaan

    2003-01-01

    Discusses information and communication technology (ICT) within the context of "internationalization at home" efforts in higher education. Examines issues involved in introducing ICT as a tool in educational development, particularly in course and student management, and as an engine for international curriculum development. Addresses quality…

  15. “I’m Just Really Comfortable:” Learning at Home, Learning in Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Regalado

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In Brief: While commuter students may use their college or university libraries, student centers, or other campus locations for academic work, as commuters they will likely also create and negotiate learning spaces in their homes. Our research with urban commuter undergraduates revealed that finding space for their academic work at home was difficult for many […

  16. Social disparities in children's exposure to second hand smoke at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pisinger, Charlotta; Hammer-Helmich, Lene; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to second hand smoke (SHS) is an important preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in children. We hypothesised that there has been a growth in social inequality in children's exposure to SHS at home over time. The purpose of this study was to investigate temporal change in smoking...... in homes including children, focusing on the socioeconomic differences....

  17. Divorce and Children's Adjustment Problems at Home and School: The Role of Depressive/Withdrawn Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jeffrey J.; Repetti, Rena L.; Roesch, Scott C.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined linkages between divorce, depressive/withdrawn parenting, and child adjustment problems at home and school. Middle class divorced single mother families (n=35) and 2-parent families (n=174) with a child in the fourth grade participated. Mothers and teachers completed yearly questionnaires and children were interviewed when they…

  18. Palliative and terminal care at home as portrayed in Dutch newspapers in 2009 compared to 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Berg, Rianne; Eliel, Miriam R; Meijman, Frans J

    2011-03-01

    Terminal care at home is receiving increased attention from the Dutch media, which is relevant for primary care providers. To explore the portrayal of terminal care at home in newspapers in the Netherlands in 2000 and in 2009. We performed a systematic analysis of documents retrieved from the LexisNexis Academic NL database. We compared data regarding the 'point of reference' (or 'frame') and the 'moral judgments' in articles appearing in the first six months of 2009 to the same period in 2000. In the year 2000, the framing of articles in regional newspapers appeared to be predominantly consumer-oriented (66%) and in national newspapers predominantly contextual (63%). The moral judgment in the regional articles was predominantly positive (66%), in the national newspapers predominantly negative (58%). In 2009, articles in regional and national newspapers were categorized mainly as consumer-oriented (73% and 55%, respectively), and new themes appeared, i.e. self care and medical topics. For moral judgment, again regional articles were mainly positive (76%) and national articles were mainly negative (39%) and neutral (31%). Regarding the theme 'terminal care at home' as published in Dutch newspapers in 2009 as compared to 2000, the diversity of the framing was more prominent and over all moral judgments were more positive, particularly in regional newspapers. Health care providers should realize that the portrayal of palliative and terminal care at home may differ depending on the type of newspaper--regional or national.

  19. A comprehensive picture of palliative care at home from the people involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelin, Gunilla; Brobäck, Gunilla; Berterö, Carina

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the comprehensive picture of palliative care in the home, as experienced by the people involved. The study is a secondary analysis of three phenomenological studies including six cancer patients, six next of kin and six district nurses. Data were collected in qualitative interviews using an interview guide. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. In this secondary analysis, data were analysed by hermeneutic analysis guided by Gadamer. The guiding questions during the reading were: Is there an advantage receiving palliative care at home? Is there a disadvantage receiving palliative care at home? The findings indicate that the advantages of palliative care at home is; striving for normal life, including the care in the home composed of physical care and emotional/mental care. Striving for normal life also includes emotional feelings, safety and resources and policies which regulates this activity. Disadvantages of palliative care at home are commitment, composed of adaptation and extra work, and demands, composed of frustration and uncertainty. If the people involved are to be able to manage the situation and optimize living while dying, there must be support and resources facilitating the situation.

  20. Behaviour problems of young motor disabled children at home and in the therapeutic toddler class

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, A.H.C.; Moor, J.M.H. de; Oud, J.H.L.; Franken, W.M.; Savelberg, M.M.H.W.

    2001-01-01

    Behaviour problems of young motor disabled children at home and in the therapeutic toddler class were examined and possible determinants and parents' need for and received help were assessed. The study is based on a representative sample of 81 motor disabled children with central nervous system

  1. Initiation of home mechanical ventilation at home : A randomised controlled trial of efficacy, feasibility and costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, A; Kerstjens, H A M; Prins, S C L; Vermeulen, K M; Wijkstra, P J

    Introduction: Home mechanical ventilation (HMV) in the Netherlands is normally initiated in hospital, but this is expensive and often a burden for the patient. In this randomised controlled study we investigated whether initiation of HMV at home in patients with chronic respiratory failure is

  2. Marital Patterns and Use of Mother Tongue at Home among Native-Born Asian Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chigon; Min, Pyong Gap

    2010-01-01

    This article examines marital patterns and use of mother tongue at home among native-born Asian Americans using the 2005-2007 American Community Survey 3-Year Public Use Microdata Sample. There are variations in mother-tongue use across Asian ethnic groups, but variations among different types of marriage are even greater. Those who marry within…

  3. Young Children Engaging with Technologies at Home: The Influence of Family Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Christine; Stevenson, Olivia; Adey, Claire

    2013-01-01

    This article is about the ways in which young children engage with technological toys and resources at home and, in particular, the ways in which the family context makes a difference to young children’s engagement with these technologies. The data reviewed come from family interviews and parent-recorded video of four case study children as they…

  4. Welfare of Aged Horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine McGowan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Horses form a unique and special part of their owners’ lives and aged horses are no exception. This review considers the health and management of aged horses, including the role of the owner and their perceptions of aged horses, potential threats or risks to their welfare and finally, factors affecting quality of life and euthanasia of aged horses. Owners of aged horses are concerned about the health, welfare and quality of life of their aged animals. Yet surveys of management and preventive healthcare reflect that there may be some limitations to what owners are actually achieving in practice. They show declining management as horses age, particularly for the retired horse and insufficient appropriate preventive healthcare via veterinary surgeons. The veterinary surgeon plays an essential and influential role in preventive healthcare, management of diseases and disorders and ultimately in the decision making process for euthanasia of aged horses at the end of their lives. The value of aged horses should not be underestimated by veterinarians and others working with them and the continuing care of aged horses should be regarded with the same importance as the care of younger horses with more obvious monetary value.

  5. Appropriateness of leaving emergency medical service treated hypoglycemic patients at home: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S; Høgskilde, P D; Wetterslev, J; Bredgaard, M; Møller, J T; Dahl, J B

    2002-04-01

    Hypoglycemic patients treated by the emergency medical service (EMS) system are commonly left home. The criteria for leaving hypoglycemic patients at home and the appropriateness of the procedure remains, however, unvalidated. The present retrospective article addresses these questions. The Copenhagen physician-based mobile intensive care unit (MICU) responds to emergency calls in a two-tier rendezvous system. Its prehospital data from 1995 to 1998 were retrospectively incorporated into a clinical database and cross-referenced with clinical information from three Danish national registries, enabling identification of criteria for transportation of the patients to the hospital, and a detailed 72-h follow up on patients left at home. The MICU treated 1148 hypoglycemic patients within the period, of which 84% were released at home. Treatment or no treatment before arrival of the MICU and level of consciousness following MICU treatment, were found to be strong predictors of a need for transportation to hospital; although other factors were implicated. Within the 72-h following MICU treatment less than 8% of the patients left at home needed secondary MICU or hospital treatment because of glucose regulatory problems, and less than 5% experienced secondary hypoglycemia. Less than 1% was admitted to hospital beds with recurrent hypoglycemia within 24 h. Poor compliance with the diabetic treatment instructions often appeared to be involved in cases of recurrent hypoglycemia. A delay in admission was not to blame for a serious secondary patient course in any of the cases. The majority of patients with prehospital hypoglycemia may safely be treated and released at home in a physician-based EMS area.

  6. The modified self: family caregivers' experiences of caring for a dying family member at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlander, Ida; Sahlberg-Blom, Eva; Hellström, Ingrid; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore situations in daily life that challenge caregivers' self-image when caring for a dying family member at home. Background.  Caregiving affects the health and daily lives of family caregivers. Patterns of challenging situations may provide insight into the home caregiving experience, thus contributing to our understanding of the influence it has on the caregivers' self-image. Qualitative descriptive study. Ten family caregivers who cared for a dying family member at home with support from an advanced home care team were interviewed 6-12 months after the death of the family member. The interviews were analysed with interpretive description. Result.  Three patterns characterised the experiences of caregivers' daily lives in caring for a dying family member at home: challenged ideals, stretched limits and interdependency. These patterns formed the core theme, the modified self. Situations that challenged the caregivers' self-image were connected to experiences such as 'forbidden thoughts', intimacy and decreasing personal space. The caregivers met challenging situations in their daily lives that created a modified image of self. It is important to recognise the impact of caring for a dying family member at home. This study argues for supporting family caregivers to maximise their potential to handle the demanding everyday life with a dying family member at home. This study contributes to understanding situations in the home that may challenge caregivers' self-image and points out the importance of talking about caregiving experiences. From a clinical perspective, this study emphasises the significance of creating a climate, which allows family caregivers to express thoughts and feelings. Sharing experiences such as 'forbidden thoughts' can be one way of handling the profoundly changed every day life. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on Welfare Technosystem Takaoka research and development; 1998 nendo Walfare technosystem kenkyu kaihatsu (Takaoka) chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    In an effort at developing nursing equipment, a cursor-controlled system for on-the-screen operation is experimentally constructed, which facilitates the use of indoor electronic devices and help aged persons engaged in in-house work. Vocal communicators are investigated for feasibility. In relation to equipment for mobility training, a dynamic equilibrium function evaluating system is experimentally built, and a system for electric stimulation-aided mobility rehabilitation is studied. Sensors are imbedded into the stool, and an excellent result is obtained in the measurement of the user's weight and the discharged amount. Studies are conducted about algorithm for calculating changes in heartbeats while bathing and about recording electrocardiograms while in bed. For welfare equipment to be effectively utilized at home, it has to be easy to use on the one hand and, on the other hand, house configuration and facilities have to be appropriate for welfare equipment application. It is important to improve the mechanism of providing advice on house modification and to expand financial assistance. A measuring method is developed using the state of the art in sensor technologies for the construction of a system for checking old people's activities of daily living, and their activities are evaluated. The system supplies a sufficient amount of data to grasp their behavior, which shows that it is a serviceable system. (NEDO)

  8. Rents in a welfare state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paldam, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes rents in Denmark, a developed welfare state in which the private sector is sharply delimitated and kept efficient by secure property rights and markets including free trade. In the public sector, rents in the form of excess costs that provide benefits are difficult to measure......, but in a number of cases as described in this chapter, the rents are revealed. The implicit welfare coalition, defined as voters receiving their income from the public budget, is the majority, placing the median voter within the welfare coalition. Rents are created and protected by the welfare coalition. Non...

  9. The perspectives of bereaved family carers on dying at home: the study protocol of ‘unpacking the home: family carers’ reflections on dying at home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payne Sheila

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent end of life care policy prioritises patient choice over place of care and in particular promotes dying at home. This policy is predicated on the assumption that there are family carers able and willing to provide care for the dying person. Through the accounts of bereaved family members, the ‘Unpacking the home’ study aims to gain an in-depth understanding of ‘home’ and the issues faced by family members caring for a dying older person at home; it also aims to examine the way the home is transformed in the process of providing end of life care, and offer a critical analysis of policies that aim to increase home deaths. This paper presents the protocol for this study. Methods/design A cross-sectional qualitative study has been designed to achieve the study aims. In-depth interviews will be conducted in the north and south of England with 50 bereaved family carers to elicit their accounts of witnessing the dying in the home of an older person (50+ years. All interviews will be subjected to thematic analysis, and narrative analysis will be undertaken on a subset of 30 interview transcripts. A final phase of integration and policy analysis will be conducted towards the end of the study. User involvement is integral to this study, with service users actively engaged at every stage. Discussion This study will seek to take a qualitative approach by explicitly recognising that family carers are central to the experience of dying at home for older people, and they have needs that may be amenable to support and anticipatory planning. The strengths of this study, which include its interdisciplinary and participatory approach, and in-depth data collection and analysis methods, will be explored. The limitations and challenges of this research will also be considered. This study seeks to make recommendations that will ensure that family carers receive appropriate and adequate support in caring for their loved ones at the end

  10. Animal welfare impact assessments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandøe, Peter; Gamborg, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Control of wild animals may give rise to controversy, as is seen in the case of badger control to manage TB in cattle in the UK. However, it is striking that concerns about the potential suffering of the affected animals themselves are often given little attention or completely ignored in policies...... aimed at dealing with wild animals. McCulloch and Reiss argue that this could be remedied by means of a “mandatory application of formal and systematic Animal Welfare Impact Assessment (AWIA)”. Optimistically, they consider that an AWIA could help to resolve controversies involving wild animals. The aim...... of this paper is to evaluate the potential of AWIA. We begin by showing how ideas akin to AWIA already play a significant role in other animal ethics controversies, particularly those concerning laboratory animal use and livestock production; and we bring in lessons learnt from these controversies. Then we...

  11. Robotics for social welfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Fernández Cossío

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Supported by developments in the field of social robotics, virtual worlds and ICT tools it is possible to build new solutions in health and welfare. Two projects are described in this article. They are intended to improve efficiency and quality of current therapeutic procedures. The ESTIMULO project improves emotional and cognitive status of people with dementia using a reactive pet-robot. The ELDERTOY project modifies the classical concept from the toy industry to develop a new solution for the aged people. ELDERTOY involves a double purpose, fun and therapeutic. In a complementary way, these projects aim to be an example of the breaking of the technology gap both of seniors and of people with disabilities. Therefore, the ultimate goal is to promote and adapt scientific and technological knowledge to be applied to improve significantly the standard of quality of life in society.

  12. Drivers for Welfare Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    relevant objects of study. Innovation strategy and research traditionally regards innovation as a set of phases. The purpose of this paper is to enhance ‘phase’ models by adding to them a ‘driver’ model which may provide an appropriate strategy for studying and supporting the innovation potential...... of routines), and iii) purposes (i.e. values and visions). The model can assist the acknowledgment of initiatives that hold a potential for innovation, but risk being overlooked by phase models. The model points to the necessity to anchor innovation strategies in existing knowledge, routines, and values......Innovation has become a key goal towards which teaching and workplace learning needs to be directed. Now perceived as germane and even necessary in almost all kinds of welfare work, the innovation potential in everyday practices and ways of allowing for employer creativity have become a highly...

  13. A New App for At-Home Cognitive Training: Description and Pilot Testing on Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacchino, Andrea; Pedullà, Ludovico; Bonzano, Laura; Vassallo, Claudio; Battaglia, Mario Alberto; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Bove, Marco; Brichetto, Giampaolo

    2015-08-31

    Cognitive impairment is common in people with neurological diseases and severely affects their social and professional life. It has been shown that intensive and personalized cognitive rehabilitation (CR), based on working memory exercises, leads to improved cognitive status of healthy and cognitive-impaired subjects. New technologies would help to promote accessible, at-home, and self-managed CR interventions. The aim of this paper is to describe the design of Cognitive Training Kit (COGNI-TRAcK), an app for mobile devices, to self-administer an at-home, intensive, and personalized CR intervention based on working memory exercises, and test its disposability-to-use (usability, motivation to use, compliance to treatment) on cognitive-impaired patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). COGNI-TRAcK includes user-friendly interfaces for personal data input and management and for CR intervention configurations. Inner routines automatically implement adaptive working load algorithms and allow data processing and analysis. A dedicated team developed COGNI-TRAcK with C# programming language, by using the platform Xamarin Studio 4.0.10 for Android (API level 15 and following). Three exercises based on working memory are now available. To assess the disposability-to-use of the system, patients with MS were selected as likely users due to the young age of disease onset. Cognitive-impaired patients with MS (N=16) with a mean age of 49.06 years (SD 9.10) and a mean score of 3.75 (SD 1.92) on the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) were submitted to an 8-week at-home intervention administered by the app. The intervention consisted of 5 daily scheduled 30-minute sessions per week. Disposability-to-use of COGNI-TRAcK was investigated by means of a questionnaire administered to patients at the end of the training. The adherence to the treatment was 84% (33.4/40). Of the patients with MS, 94% (15/16) understood the instructions given, 100% (16/16) felt independent to use COGNI

  14. Welfare-Reducing Trade Liberalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Philipp J.H.; Jørgensen, Jan G.

    tariff that maximizes national and world welfare. Applying one of the simplest specifications possible, namely a symmetric two-country intra-industry trade model with fixed export costs that are heterogeneous across firms, we find that the reciprocal reduction of small tariffs reduces welfare....

  15. Dietary nitrogen and fish welfare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conceicao, L.E.C.; Aragao, C.; Dias, J.; Costas, B.; Terova, G.; Martins, C.I.; Tort, L.

    2012-01-01

    Little research has been done in optimizing the nitrogenous fraction of the fish diets in order to minimize welfare problems. The purpose of this review is to give an overview on how amino acid (AA) metabolism may be affected when fish are under stress and the possible effects on fish welfare when

  16. Governance Strategies and Welfare Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trifkovic, Neda

    Using an original dataset from the Vietnamese catfish sector, we study the impact of vertical coordination options on household welfare and the implications of different stages of vertical coordination for the success of the whole sector. The welfare gain from contract farming and employment...

  17. The Child Welfare Cartel, "Redux"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoesz, David

    2016-01-01

    In response to "The Child Welfare Cartel," defenders of the National Child Welfare Workforce Institute (NCWWI) make three errors: First, restricting federal funds to schools of social work is "not" authorized by the statute cited in the creation of NCWWI. Second, social work is "not" the only discipline engaged in…

  18. Mothers' experiences of their child's recovery in hospital and at home: a qualitative investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbyshire, Philip

    2003-12-01

    Decreasing hospital stays, increasing day surgery and the assumption that parents will manage their child at home necessitate research into children's recovery. Given the scarcity of studies seeking parents' perspectives, this exploratory and interpretive study is timely, presenting a detailed account of mothers' experiences of managing their child's recovery in hospital and at home. The study supports the view that recovery begins not with discharge, but with admission and before, as hospital experiences directly shape the recovery process. Mothers' experiences of hospital's recovery enablers and inhibitors suggest that good recovery practices and policies remain erratic. Following discharge, parents help the child 'back to normal' by 'reading the recovering child' and balancing the child's desire for activity with the need for caution and safety. Developing a deeper understanding of parents' recovery experiences and perceptions would help nurses to form an empathic 'grounding' upon which to base improvements in children's recovery care.

  19. Managing children's postural risk when using mobile technology at home: Challenges and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarelli, Marina; Chen, Janice D; Vaz, Sharmila; Cordier, Reinie; Falkmer, Torbjörn

    2015-11-01

    Maintaining the musculoskeletal health of children using mobile information and communication technologies (ICT) at home presents a challenge. The physical environment influences postures during ICT use and can contribute to musculoskeletal complaints. Few studies have assessed postures of children using ICT in home environments. The present study investigated the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) scores determined by 16 novice and 16 experienced raters. Each rater viewed 11 videotaped scenarios of a child using two types of mobile ICT at home. The Grand Scores and Action Levels determined by study participants were compared to those of an ergonomist experienced in postural assessment. All postures assessed were rated with an Action Level of 2 or above; representing a postural risk that required further investigation and/or intervention. The sensitivity of RULA to assess some of the unconventional postures adopted by children in the home is questioned. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Erosion and abrasion on dental structures undergoing at-home bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Meireles, Sônia Saeger; Sarmento, Hugo Ramalho; Dantas, Raquel Venâncio Fernandes; Botero, Tatiana; Tarquinio, Sandra Beatriz Chaves

    2011-01-01

    This review investigates erosion and abrasion in dental structures undergoing at- home bleaching. Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition that may be idiopathic or caused by a known acid source. Some bleaching agents have a pH lower than the critical level, which can cause changes in the enamel mineral content. Investigations have shown that at-home tooth bleaching with low concentrations of hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no significant damaging effects on enamel and dentin surface properties. Most studies where erosion was observed were in vitro. Even though the treatment may cause side effects like sensitivity and gingival irritation, these usually disappear at the end of treatment. Considering the literature reviewed, we conclude that tooth bleaching agents based on hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no clinically significant influence on enamel/dentin mineral loss caused by erosion or abrasion. Furthermore, the treatment is tolerable and safe, and any adverse effects can be easily reversed and controlled.

  1. Jump-Starting Early Childhood Education at Home: Early Learning, Parent Motivation, and Public Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Erin A; Converse, Benjamin A; Gibbs, Chloe R; Levine, Susan C; Beilock, Sian L

    2015-11-01

    By the time children begin formal schooling, their experiences at home have already contributed to large variations in their math and language development, and once school begins, academic achievement continues to depend strongly on influences outside of school. It is thus essential that educational reform strategies involve primary caregivers. Specifically, programs and policies should promote and support aspects of caregiver-child interaction that have been empirically demonstrated to boost early learning and should seek to impede "motivational sinkholes" that threaten to undermine caregivers' desires to engage their children effectively. This article draws on cognitive and behavioral science to detail simple, low-cost, and effective tools caregivers can employ to prepare their children for educational success and then describes conditions that can protect and facilitate caregivers' motivation to use those tools. Policy recommendations throughout focus on using existing infrastructure to more deeply engage caregivers in effective early childhood education at home. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Successful long-term intravenous hyperalimentation in the hospital and at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordos, D C; Cameron, J L

    1975-04-01

    Experience with long-term intravenous hyperalimentation in the hospital and at home in one patient over a 22-month period is reported. After multiple operative procedures the patient was left with only her stomach, duodenum, and 5 cm of the proximal part of the jejunum. During a 12-month period in the hospital, despite many life-threatening complications and with high-output intestinal fistulas, her weight increased from 40.7 kg (90 lb) to 70.1 kg (155 lb) on intravenous hyperalimentation therapy. During the past ten months, the patient has managed her intravenous feeding at home. A silicone elastomer catheter inserted into her superior vena cava through her facial vein has been used for the past ten months with no catheter sepsis. Although costly, home intravenous alimentation seems justifiable in selected patients because of the possible feasibility of bowel transplants in the near future.

  3. Depression Care for Patients at Home (Depression CAREPATH): Intervention Development and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Martha L.; Sheeran, Thomas; Raue, Patrick J.; Reilly, Catherine F.; Greenberg, Rebecca L.; Pomerantz, Judith C.; Meyers, Barnett S.; Weinberger, Mark I.; Johnston, Christine L.

    2011-01-01

    High levels of depressive symptoms are common and contribute to poorer clinical outcomes even in geriatric patients who are already taking antidepressant medication. The Depression CARE for PATients at Home (Depression CAREPATH) intervention was designed for managing depression as part of ongoing care for medical and surgical patients. The intervention provides Home Health Agencies the resources needed to implement depression care management as part of routine clinical practice. PMID:21716043

  4. Depression Care for Patients at Home (Depression CAREPATH): Home Care Depression Care Management Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Martha L.; Raue, Patrick J.; Sheeran, Thomas; Reilly, Catherine; Pomerantz, Judith C.; Meyers, Barnett S.; Weinberger, Mark I.; Zukowski, Diane

    2011-01-01

    High levels of depressive symptoms are common and contribute to poorer clinical outcomes even in geriatric patients who are already taking antidepressant medication. The Depression CARE for PATients at Home (Depression CAREPATH) intervention was designed to meet the needs of medical and surgical patients who suffer from depression. The intervention’s clinical protocols are designed to guide clinicians in managing depression as part of routine home care. PMID:21881429

  5. Ecosystem and population health: the role of Canadian physicians at home and abroad.

    OpenAIRE

    Woollard, R F

    1995-01-01

    Seemingly intractable problems of overpopulation, ecologic degradation, diminishing resources and regional warfare are having a profound effect on global population health. Canadian physicians can assist in ameliorating these problems by helping to modify the overconsumption of natural resources at home and by participating in international health projects focused at the community level, where the health of individuals and that of their environment intersect. The author describes the work of ...

  6. Patients' practices and experiences of using nebuliser therapy in the management of COPD at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhaddad, B; Smith, F J; Robertson, T; Watman, G; Taylor, K M G

    2015-01-01

    How patients use their nebulisers at home is vital to ensure effective treatment and optimal health outcomes for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of the study was to identify the practicalities and problems associated with nebuliser use by patients with COPD at home, which may impact on the safety and effectiveness of therapy. A cross-sectional descriptive study in which participants were recruited from two levels of care: primary care, involving 38 GP practices in North West London, and intermediate care with a major acute hospital. In-depth interviews were conducted with a representative sample of 50 patients with COPD using nebulisers in their home, recruited from general practice populations and at hospital discharge. A checklist was used to record activities and patients demonstrated use of their nebuliser. Qualitative procedures were employed to identify the range of problems experienced with nebuliser use. A wide range of practical issues was identified at all stages: problems prior to nebulisation: setting up equipment, lack of instructions, manual dexterity and time required. Problems during medication administration: inhalation technique, duration of nebulisation and understanding how to achieve optimal efficacy. Problems post-administration: inadequate cleaning of nebuliser components, access to accessories and use of damaged parts or self-repairs. Other problems included noise, weight and non-portability of equipment. Patients with COPD using nebulisers at home experienced problems with all aspects, many of which may be anticipated to compromise clinical outcomes. Healthcare providers should be aware of these problems to effectively support patients with COPD with the use of their nebulisers at home.

  7. Computer at home and at school with regard to the risks to the childs personal development

    OpenAIRE

    Knapová, Jana

    2010-01-01

    This thesis on "Computer at home and at school, having regard to the risks to the child's personality development", discusses how to use computers in school, especially in the education, home and leisure of the child. Work emphasizes the risks resulting from improper use of information and communication technology (especially computers and the Internet) and offers solutions to minimize these risks. The aim is to acquaint the reader with the emerging phenomena due to using computers, such as t...

  8. Fear of falling in older adults living at home: associated factors

    OpenAIRE

    Luciano Magalhães Vitorino; Carla Araujo Bastos Teixeira; Eliandra Laís Vilas Boas; Rúbia Lopes Pereira; Naiana Oliveira dos Santos; Célia Alves Rozendo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To identify the factors associated with the fear of falling in the older adultliving at home. METHOD Cross-sectional study with probabilistic sampling of older adultenrolled in two Family Health Strategies (FHS). The fear of falling was measured by the Brazilian version of the Falls Efficacy Scale-International and by a household questionnairethat contained the explanatory variables. Multiple Linear Regression using the stepwise selection technique and the Generalized Lin...

  9. Staff views on how to improve mealtimes for elderly people with dementia living at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Linda; Björklund, Anita; Sidenvall, Birgitta; Christensson, Lennart

    2017-10-01

    Dementia commonly leads to difficulties in performing daily activities, which can also often affect the ability to prepare and eat meals. As a result, formal support to maintain good nutritional intake might be needed, but there is a lack of knowledge concerning how to support older persons with dementia living at home. The aim of this study was to explore and describe staff views on how to improve mealtimes for persons with dementia who are still living at home. A qualitative descriptive study was performed and data were collected during 2011-2012 through four focus group interviews with staff working in the homes of persons with dementia. Data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. The participants described several ways to improve mealtimes for persons with dementia and advocated adjustments facilitating the preservation of the persons' independence. Finding suitable actions calls for knowledge about the person and his/her individual situation. Proposed actions were enabling meals at home, taking over, and moving meals outside of the home. In addition, it was found that, the types of meals served to these persons should be as familiar to the individual as possible. The results of this study indicate the importance of using a person-centered approach and meeting the individual needs when supporting people with dementia in regards to their meals when living at home. Individualized care in the home may be expensive, however, it is fair to say that people who become malnourished and admitted to hospitals is even more costly. Furthermore, sharing and reflecting experiences and knowledge can assist staff to identify ways to manage complex situations. Therefore, the use of refection should be a part of staff members' everyday work.

  10. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the setting of hospital at home. Study of 522 episodes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza Ruiz de Zuazu, H; Gómez Rodríguez de Mendarozqueta, M; Regalado de Los Cobos, J; Altuna Basurto, E; Marcaide Ruiz de Apodaca, M A; Aizpuru Barandiarán, F; Cía Ruiz, J M

    2007-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness, respiratory status, services of origin and outcome of patient with exacerbated COPD attended in Hospital at Home (HaH) regimen. Study of patients with an exacerbated COPD in HaH from Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain during the period March 1999-October 2004, in whom hospital admission had been recommended after medical assessment. We studied: age, gender, patient's stay, oxygen-saturation or arterial blood gas analysis, FEV1 (basal), dyspnea status (basal and current), coexisting diseases, exacerbation causes, Services of origin, use of home nebulizers and oxygen therapy, intravenous drugs, course (discharges/admissions/deaths). We analyzed the number of visits to the Emergency Department and hospital admissions 90 days before and after discharge from Hospital at home. A total of 302 patients who generated 522 cases with exacerbated COPD were accepted, 81% of whom are men. Means stay was 11 days (0-111). Three hundred ninety six (76%) of the cases were discharge from HaH, 111 (21%) had to be hospitalized for different reasons, on 13 (2.5%) died. Of these, 43% came from the Respiratory Department and 39% from the Emergency one. Mean FEV1 was 45.4. A total of 89% of the patients had dyspnea 4/4 and 34% 3/4 when seen and 9% of the patients had pneumonia. During the 90 days following discharge from Hospital at Home, the number of visits to the Emergency Department and the rate of hospital admissions decreased significantly (p < 0.001). Our data confirm that Hospital at Home is a good alternative to conventional hospital admission for the management of patients with exaxerbated COPD.

  11. Active smoking and second-hand-smoke exposure at home among Irish children, 1995-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Z; Manning, P J; Holohan, J; Goodman, P G; Clancy, L

    2010-01-01

    This study hypothesised a continual decline in current smoking prevalence over four calendar years (1995, 1998, 2002/03 and 2007) and no significant increase in second-hand-smoke (SHS) exposure levels at home after the workplace smoking ban of March 2004 (2007 versus 2002/03 survey) among Irish school children. A modified ISAAC (International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood) protocol was used. Children aged 13-14 years from randomly selected representative post-primary schools were studied: 2670 in 1995, 2273 in 1998, 2892 in 2002-2003, and 2805 in 2007. ISAAC is a cross-sectional self-administered questionnaire survey. Smoking history was self-reported. beta Coefficients (slopes) of smoking rates across the four surveys were computed. Odds ratios for smoking rates were also computed using the baseline year (1995) as the reference period. All analyses were performed using SAS software (v 9.1). There were significant reductions in active smoking rates between 1995 and 2007 (from 19.9% to 10.6%, respectively) resulting in 3.3% survey-to-survey reductions, with a significantly greater survey-to-survey decline among girls compared to boys (3.8% vs 2.7%, respectively). 45% of children were exposed to SHS at home in 2007. There was a statistically non-significant 2% overall decline in SHS exposure levels at home in 2007 relative to 2002/03, which was more pronounced in girls. The continual reduction in active smoking prevalence in children is welcome. That there was no significant increase in SHS exposure at home after the nationwide workplace smoking ban suggests that the ban did not increase smoking inside homes.

  12. Do Restrictions on Smoking at Home, at School and in Public Places Influence Teenage Smoking?

    OpenAIRE

    Wakefield, Melanie A. PhD; Chaloupka, Frank J. PhD; Kaufman, Nancy J. RN, MS; Orleans, C. Tracy PhD; Barker, Dianne C. MHS; Ruel, Erin E. MA

    2000-01-01

    Objectives - To determine the relationship between extent of restrictions on smoking at home, at school and in public places, and smoking uptake, smoking prevalence and monthly cigarette consumption by school students. Design - Cross-sectional survey with merged records of extent of restrictions on smoking in public places. Setting – United States. Participants – 17,287 high school students. Main outcome measures – Five-point scale of smoking uptake; 30-day...

  13. Institutional versus at-home long term care for functionally dependent older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottram, P; Pitkala, K; Lees, C

    2002-01-01

    An increasing number of functionally dependent older people require care and medical treatment. Increasingly governments are shifting resources into community care expecting both reduction in costs and improvement in the quality of care. However, it is difficult to establish the costs and benefits of institutional and the alternative at-home care. To assess the effects of institutional versus at-home care for functionally dependent older people on health outcomes, satisfaction (of functionally dependent older people, relatives and health care professionals), quality of care and costs. We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group (EPOC) specialised register (1999), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (Issue 4 1999), MEDLINE (1966 to 1999), EMBASE (1980 to 1999), Best Evidence (1990 to 1999), Ageline (1982 to 1999), Cinahl (1982 to 1999), EconLit (1969 to 1999), PsycInfo (1887 to 1999), NTIS (1980 to 1999), Scisearch (1980 to 1999), Sigle (1980 to 1999), and reference lists of related systematic reviews and articles. We contacted authors working in the field in an attempt to identify unpublished studies. Randomised trials, controlled clinical trials, controlled before and after studies and interrupted time series studies where functionally dependent older people were assigned to either institutional or at-home care. Three reviewers independently extracted data and assessed study quality. No meta analysis was conducted as only one trial was identified. One study was included involving 112 people. This evaluated a community care programme (CCP) organising foster care versus nursing home care. No studies were found where functionally dependent older people returned to their own homes. The included trial was small and of poor methodological quality. No significant difference was found between the two groups when comparing functioning (ADL and IADL), mental status, attitudes to perceived health, life satisfaction or mortality. There is

  14. WITHDRAWN: Institutional versus at-home long term care for functionally dependent older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottram, P; Pitkala, K; Lees, C

    2007-10-17

    An increasing number of functionally dependent older people require care and medical treatment. Increasingly governments are shifting resources into community care expecting both reduction in costs and improvement in the quality of care. However, it is difficult to establish the costs and benefits of institutional and the alternative at-home care. To assess the effects of institutional versus at-home care for functionally dependent older people on health outcomes, satisfaction (of functionally dependent older people, relatives and health care professionals), quality of care and costs. We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group (EPOC) specialised register (1999), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (Issue 4 1999), MEDLINE (1966 to 1999), EMBASE (1980 to 1999), Best Evidence (1990 to 1999), Ageline (1982 to 1999), Cinahl (1982 to 1999), EconLit (1969 to 1999), PsycInfo (1887 to 1999), NTIS (1980 to 1999), Scisearch (1980 to 1999), Sigle (1980 to 1999), and reference lists of related systematic reviews and articles. We contacted authors working in the field in an attempt to identify unpublished studies. Randomised trials, controlled clinical trials, controlled before and after studies and interrupted time series studies where functionally dependent older people were assigned to either institutional or at-home care. Three reviewers independently extracted data and assessed study quality. No meta analysis was conducted as only one trial was identified. One study was included involving 112 people. This evaluated a community care programme (CCP) organising foster care versus nursing home care. No studies were found where functionally dependent older people returned to their own homes. The included trial was small and of poor methodological quality. No significant difference was found between the two groups when comparing functioning (ADL and IADL), mental status, attitudes to perceived health, life satisfaction or mortality. There is

  15. Controlled-Release Oxycodone Versus Naproxen at Home After Ambulatory Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Stessel, MD

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Paracetamol/CR oxycodone and paracetamol/naproxen are equally effective in treatment of acute postoperative pain at home after ambulatory surgery with comparable patient satisfaction level. We suggest paracetamol/CR oxycodone to be a valuable alternative for the current paracetamol/naproxen gold standard, particularly in patients with a contraindication for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02152592.

  16. Comparing Sleep Quality and General Health Among the Elderly Living at Home and at Nursing Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Beyrami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Survey about the issues and problems related to elderly in order to improve their quality of life of this increasing population has become a universal concern.This study was performed by the purpose of comparing the sleep quality and general health among the Elderly Residing at Home and Old People's Homes. Methods & Materials: This study is descriptive-analytic type. Population of this investigation consisted of elderly men and women (upper than 60 years old living at personal home and at nursing home in Tabriz. Sample group composed of 100 elderly (50 men and 50 women 50 living at home and 50 living at nursing home who were selected through available sampling method. For collecting data, Goldberg General Health Questionnaire and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index were used. Data were analyzed by Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA. Results: Findings showed that In terms of general health and its components (Physical symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction and depression and Sleep quality and its components (Subjective quality of sleep, time for sleep, total sleep time, sleep efficiency, routine, sleep disorders, sleep medications and daily dysfunction there were significant differences between nursing home residents and elderly residents in nursing homes (P=0.001. Conclusion: Findings indicated that elderly residents in nursing home are experiencing more symptoms of anxiety, depression, physical symptoms and social dysfunction Compared with the elderly whom resident at home. Also the results showed that the elderly residents of nursing homes have poor sleep quality than ones whom residents at home. On the other hand Future development of elderly care institution is inevitable. Therefore, more attention to the living conditions of elderly residents of institutions seems necessary.

  17. Demand Interrelationships of At-Home Nonalcoholic Beverage Consumption in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Dharmasena, Senarath; Capps, Oral, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we modeled demand interrelationships of at-home nonalcoholic beverage consumption in the United States using a unique data set developed using Nielsen HomeScan panel data of household purchases of nonalcoholic beverages over the period January 1998 through December 2003. We used 72 monthly observations of expenditure shares, real prices and real per capita expenditures of 10 unique categories of nonalcoholic beverages in a full-blown AIDS model with an adjustment for seasonal (q...

  18. Dietary quality differs by consumption of meals prepared at home vs. outside in Korean adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Won; Song, Won O; Cho, Mi Sook

    2016-06-01

    Eating out has been reported to have negative effects on nutritional status. However, eating out can include meals prepared at home and eaten outside. Conversely, meals eaten at home can be brought from outside, as take-out and home deliveries have become common in Korea. Thus, we tested whether or not meal preparation location influences daily diet quality. From the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) 2007-2009, 4,915 Korean adults (20-64 years) were classified into two groups: home-made meal group (HMG), who ate ≥ 2 meals per day prepared at home (n = 4,146), and non-home-made meal group (NHMG), who ate ≥ 2 meals per day prepared outside home (n = 769). Daily diet quality was determined by energy intake, nutrient intake, Dietary Variety Score (DVS), and Diet Diversity Score (DDS). Compared to the HMG, the NHMG was more likely to consist of men, single, employed, educated and of a higher economic status (all, P home-made meals do not necessarily guarantee a healthy diet, and the effects of meal preparation location on nutritional status might vary depending on socio-demographic characteristics.

  19. Children's exposure to second-hand smoke at home in Bangladesh: a community survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar Ullah, Abu Naser; Huque, Rumana; Akter, Salma; Nasreen, Shammi; Akter, Humaira; Thomson, Heather; Cameron, Ian; Newell, James Nicholas; Siddiqi, Kamran

    2013-11-13

    In Bangladesh, second-hand smoke (SHS) is recognised as a principal source of indoor air pollution and a major public health problem. However, we know little about the extent to which people are aware of the risks of second-hand smoking, or restrict smoking indoors or in the presence of children. We report findings of a community survey exploring these questions. A total of 722 households were surveyed in urban and rural settings, using a multistage cluster random sampling approach and a semistructured questionnaire. In addition, we used qualitative methods to further explore the determinants of smoking-related behaviours inside homes. 55% of households in our sample had at least one regular smoker. Smoking indoors was common. In 30% of households, smoking occurred in the presence of children, exposing nearly 40% of children to SHS. Overall, we found a lack of awareness about the harms associated with second-hand smoking. Our study highlights that a sizeable proportion of children and non-smokers are exposed to SHS at homes in Bangladesh, posing a significant and grave public health problem. In the absence of any impetus to legislate against smoking in private places, an educational approach is recommended to change smoking practices at home. Such a shift toward voluntary smoking restrictions at home would require behaviour change among smokers and support from non-smoking family members.

  20. Parenting practices toward food and children's behavior: Eating away from home versus at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparian, Michelle; Mann, Georgianna; Serrano, Elena L; Farris, Alisha R

    2017-07-01

    Parenting style influences a child's overall diet quality and establishes food preferences. Parenting style and "food rules" for children differ by eating at home or away from home. Eating meals away from home is increasing despite associations with consumption of unhealthy foods and higher weight status. The objective of the current study was to compare parenting practices and decision-making at restaurants versus at home. A mixed methods approach was utilized: facilitated, individual interviews to explore decision-making and parenting practices; written questionnaires for socio-demographic information; and body mass index. Summaries and emergent themes were generated based on examination of tapes and transcripts. Descriptive statistics were computed for questionnaire data. Twenty-five mothers of children of five to eight years who ate at restaurants at least two times per week participated. Mothers reported more permissive food rules at restaurants yet maintained higher behavioral expectations. Mothers were also more likely to make decisions about whether they eat out, where to eat, and children's meal selections than their children. The findings suggest that parenting practices toward overall behavior and food choices may differ at restaurants than at home, highlighting the importance of healthy menu options, further research, and educational strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Relationship between self-esteem and living conditions among stroke survivors at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shida, Junko; Sugawara, Kyoko; Goto, Junko; Sekito, Yoshiko

    2014-10-01

    To clarify the relationship between self-esteem of stroke survivors at home and their living conditions. Study participants were stroke survivors who lived at home and commuted to one of two medical facilities in the Tohoku region of Japan. Stroke survivors were recruited for the present study when they came to the hospital for a routine visit. The researcher or research assistant explained the study objective and methods to the stroke survivor, and the questionnaire survey was conducted. Survey contents included the Japanese version of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE) and questions designed to assess living conditions. A total of 65 participants with complete RSE data were included in the analysis. The mean (standard deviation) age of participants was 70.9 years (± 11.1), with a mean RSE score of 32.12 (± 8.32). Only a minor decrease in participant self-esteem was observed, even after having experienced a stroke. Factors associated with self-esteem, including "independent bathing" (standardized partial regression coefficient, β = 0.405, P self-esteem in stroke survivors living at home. © 2013 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2013 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  2. The nature of parent-child talk during the sharing of science trade books at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groothuis, Becky Anne

    This study examined the interactions between parents and their typically developing fourth grade children as they shared science trade books together at home. The aim of this research was to understand how parents and children make meaning together in this context and how parent-child talk related to children's developing scientific views. Four parent-child dyads ranging in information book sharing experiences were videotaped once a week for three weeks in their home during the reading of three science trade books. Both parents and children were interviewed about their interactive experiences following each reading. Parent-child talk was captured and characterized using an analytic framework for discourse, along with a typology of intertextuality and interview data. The results of this research provide preliminary evidence of the capacity of parent-child talk in the context of science books at home to support both children's inquiry skills and their active participation in their sense making behaviors, both of which are integral to their scientific literacy development. The present investigation provides tentative evidence of how parent-child talk about science books can support children's developing social language of science, as well as encourage the practice of science process skills. The results of this study shed light on the importance of older readers' continued access and experiences with science books, and the potential of parent-child talk about science books at home to positively influence children's developing scientific literacy. Keywords: parent-child tally sharing science books, inquiry, scientific literacy.

  3. Study of constipation in a geriatric hospital, day hospital, old people's home and at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, O

    1991-06-01

    A study of constipation and related factors was carried out in 439 geriatric hospital patients, 183 people living in two old people's homes, and 78 patients visiting a geriatric day hospital. In addition, a cross-sectional survey of constipation and related factors was undertaken in 138 people older than 74 years and 74 people aged 41 to 50 years living at home. Constipation and the use of laxatives were most frequent in the geriatric hospital (79% and 76% respectively), followed by the old people's homes (59% and 60%), the day hospital (29% and 31%), elderly living at home (38% and 20%) and middle-aged living at home (12% and 5%). The results suggest an increased risk of constipation for the persons walking less than 0.5 km daily [relative risk (RR) = 1.7], walking with help (RR = 3.4), chairbound (RR = 6.9) and bedbound (RR = 15.9). The relative risk of constipation increased for the persons living in the old people's homes (RR = 1.7) and the geriatric hospital (RR = 2.2), and also with advancing age (between 75 and 84 years, RR = 2.9; over 84 years, RR = 4.9). The prevalence of constipation was directly correlated to fecal and urinary incontinence.

  4. Animal welfare in a global perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bracke, M.B.M.

    2009-01-01

    Global survey of animal-welfare regulations, practices and perceptions, with case studies on poultry meat from Brazil and Thailand, eggs from India and the USA, welfare regulations of farmed fish and welfare aspects related to (perceived) overpopulation of wildlife

  5. Welfare standards in hospital mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katona, Katalin; Canoy, Marcel

    2013-08-01

    There is a broad literature on the consequences of applying different welfare standards in merger control. Total welfare is usually defined as the sum of consumer and provider surplus, i.e., potential external effects are not considered. The general result is then that consumer welfare is a more restrictive standard than total welfare, which is advantageous in certain situations. This relationship between the two standards is not necessarily true when the merger has significant external effects. We model mergers on hospital markets and allow for not-profit-maximizing behavior of providers and mandatory health insurance. Mandatory health insurance detaches the financial and consumption side of health care markets, and the concept consumer in merger control becomes non-evident. Patients not visiting the merging hospitals still are affected by price changes through their insurance premiums. External financial effects emerge on not directly affected consumers. We show that applying a restricted interpretation of consumer (neglecting externality) in health care merger control can reverse the relation between the two standards; consumer welfare standard can be weaker than total welfare. Consequently, applying the wrong standard can lead to both clearing socially undesirable and to blocking socially desirable mergers. The possible negative consequences of applying a simple consumer welfare standard in merger control can be even stronger when hospitals maximize quality and put less weight on financial considerations. We also investigate the implications of these results for the practice of merger control.

  6. The economics of animal welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, T J; Jackson, E L

    2017-04-01

    This paper examines four examples of animal welfare issues, demonstrating the interactions between welfare and economic principles. Welfare issues associated with purebred companion animals are examined in terms of predicted inherited diseases, highlighting the power of supply and demand in perpetuating traits in pets that compromise their well-being. The livestock industry is presented from the point of view of pig production and the impact that a major disease (pleurisy) has on production and the animals' welfare. The authors investigate the conflicting and complementary demands of animal welfare and economic gains during the transport and slaughter of livestock and poultry. Finally, wildlife species are considered in terms of their prevalence as pests, and the different types of economic analysis that have been conducted to understand the losses caused by these organisms. Also included in this example are decisions made about cost effectiveness and opportunity costs, and regulatory and financial barriers to the development of humane control agents. In conclusion, animal welfare is illustrated as a central factor in the benefits that humans enjoy from the role played by animals in society. There are, however, tradeoffs between optimal animal welfare and meeting the needs of modern human society.

  7. Commuting, Transitions and Belonging: The Experiences of Students Living at Home in Their First Year at University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, Helen; Holley, Debbie; Kane, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    In this study, our cross-case analysis of students' lives challenges the conventional home-university model of transition and highlights the importance of acknowledging the influence of this complex symbiotic relationship for students who attend university and live at home. We argue that as with stay-at-home holidays, or "staycations",…

  8. Hospital at home; a review of the literature on the effects of a form of transmural care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, AJ; Schuling, J; Meyboom-De Jong, B

    2002-01-01

    Hospital at home; a review of the literature on the effects of a form of transmural care Objective. To evaluate the effects of hospital at home on health outcomes and quality of life of patients and carers; to evaluate the costs of this form of care and the experiences of the (para)medics involved.

  9. Welfare reform and child care options for low-income families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Bruce; Kagan, Sharon L; Caspary, Gretchen L; Gauthier, Christiane A

    2002-01-01

    For the changes under welfare reform to positively affect children, the gains that mothers make from employment must lead to improvements in children's daily settings at home, in child care, at school, or in the community. This article focuses on the role child care can play in promoting the development of, and life opportunities for, low-income children. Key observations include: Total federal and state funding for child care for welfare and working poor families has increased dramatically since welfare reform, from $2.8 billion in 1995 to $8.0 billion in 2000. The majority of welfare mothers tend to rely on informal child care arrangements when first participating in welfare-to-work programs, but as they move off welfare and into more stable jobs, they are more likely to choose a center or a family child care home. Although children from poor households stand to benefit the most from high-quality care, they are less likely to be enrolled in high-quality programs than are children from affluent families, partly due to uneven access to high-quality options in their neighborhoods. Less than one-quarter of all eligible families use child care subsidies, and usage varies widely across states and local areas reflecting various barriers to access and scarcity of quality center-based care. The authors conclude that to achieve welfare reform's ultimate goal of breaking the cycle of intergenerational poverty and dependence on government benefits, welfare-to-work programs should promote learning and development among children in welfare and working poor families by increasing access to high-quality child care in low-income neighborhoods.

  10. Monotonicity of social welfare optima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of maximizing social welfare subject to participation constraints. It is shown that for an income allocation method that maximizes a social welfare function there is a monotonic relationship between the incomes allocated to individual agents in a given coalition...... (with at least three members) and its participation constraint if and only if the aggregate income to that coalition is always maximized. An impossibility result demonstrates that there is no welfare maximizing allocation method in which agents' individual incomes monotonically increase in society...

  11. Welfare reform in European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immervoll, Herwig; Kleven, Henrik Jacobsen; Kreiner, Claus Thustrup

    2007-01-01

    microsimulation model to estimate current marginal and participation tax rates. We quantify the equity-efficiency trade-off for a range of elasticity parameters. In most countries, because of large existing welfare programmes with high phase-out rates, increasing traditional welfare is undesirable unless......This article compares the effects of increasing traditional welfare to introducing in-work benefits in the 15 (pre-enlargement) countries of the European Union. We use a labour supply model encompassing responses to taxes and transfers along both the intensive and extensive margins, and the EUROMOD...

  12. Multiple Family Groups for Child Behavior Difficulties Retention Among Child Welfare-Involved Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Geetha; Fuss, Ashley; Wisdom, Jennifer P

    2015-09-01

    Among children who remain at home with their permanent caregivers following a child welfare investigation, few who manifest emotional and behavioral difficulties actually engage in mental health treatment. The Multiple Family Group service delivery model to reduce childhood disruptive behavior disorders (MFG) has shown promise in engaging child welfare-involved families. This qualitative study examines caregiver perceptions of factors that influence retention in MFGs among child welfare-involved families. Twenty-five predominantly Black and Hispanic adult (ages 26-57) female caregivers with child welfare services involvement participated in individual, in-depth interviews about their experience with MFGs. Transcribed interview data were thematically coded guided by grounded theory methodology. Emergent themes were subsequently organized into a conceptual framework. Within the overarching influence of child welfare services involvement, specific components of MFGs influencing retention included the quality of interaction among group members, group facilitators' attentive approach with caregivers, supports designed to overcome logistical barriers (i.e., child care, transportation expenses, meals), and perceptions of MFG content and activities as fun and helpful. Caregiver factors, including their mental health and personal characteristics, as well as children's behavior, (i.e., observed changes in behavioral difficulties) were also associated with retention. High acceptability suggest utility for implementing MFGs within settings serving child welfare involved families, with additional modifications to tailor to setting and client features.

  13. The acceptability of TV-based game platforms as an instrument to support the cognitive evaluation of senior adults at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas Costa, Carlos; Fernández Iglesias, Manuel José; Anido Rifón, Luis Eulogio; Gómez Carballa, Miguel; Valladares Rodríguez, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    The computing capabilities of state-of-the-art television sets and media centres may facilitate the introduction of computer-assisted evaluation at home. This approach would help to overcome the drawbacks of traditional pen-and-paper evaluations administered in clinical facilities, as they could be performed in a more comfortable environment, the subject's home, and they would be more flexible for designing complex environments for the evaluation of neuropsychological constructs that are difficult to assess through traditional testing. The objective of this work was to obtain some initial evidence about the technical acceptance by senior adults of serious games played at home on the TV set and therefore about the convenience of further investigating such an approach to cognitive assesment. We developed a collection of games to be deployed on a TV environment. These games were tried by a group of senior adults at their homes. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) was used to validate this approach. Surveys were performed to study the perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use of such technical setting as an instrument for their cognitive evaluation; that is, its technical acceptance. Subjective information collected from participants was correlated with actual interaction data captured. An additional survey was performed 36 months after pilot testing to have an indication about the long-term perceptions about usefulness and ease of use. More than 90% of participating subjects perceived cognitive games on TV as useful or very useful. The majority of participants selected the TV set as their preferred option to interact with serious games at home, when compared to other devices such as smartphones, tablets or PCs. This result correlates with the number of participants perceiving them as easily usable or very easy to use, and also with automatically captured interaction data. Three out of four seniors expressed their interest in keeping the system at home after the

  14. Child Welfare Outcomes Data Portal

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The most current Child Welfare Outcomes data is featured on this site. Through the site, you can view the data before the full report is published. The most recently...

  15. Transfers, Taxes, and Welfare Reform

    OpenAIRE

    Haveman, Robert; Scolex, John Karl

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the need inability of past administrations to pass any welfare reform and gives an overview of an antipoverty policy. Shows that the poverty problem goes beyond tax reform and includes education, crime and violence.

  16. Periodic limb movements of sleep: empirical and theoretical evidence supporting objective at-home monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moro M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Marilyn Moro,1 Balaji Goparaju,1 Jelina Castillo,1 Yvonne Alameddine,1 Matt T Bianchi1,2 1Neurology Department, Massachusetts General Hospital, 2Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Introduction: Periodic limb movements of sleep (PLMS may increase cardiovascular and cerebrovascular morbidity. However, most people with PLMS are either asymptomatic or have nonspecific symptoms. Therefore, predicting elevated PLMS in the absence of restless legs syndrome remains an important clinical challenge.Methods: We undertook a retrospective analysis of demographic data, subjective symptoms, and objective polysomnography (PSG findings in a clinical cohort with or without obstructive sleep apnea (OSA from our laboratory (n=443 with OSA, n=209 without OSA. Correlation analysis and regression modeling were performed to determine predictors of periodic limb movement index (PLMI. Markov decision analysis with TreeAge software compared strategies to detect PLMS: in-laboratory PSG, at-home testing, and a clinical prediction tool based on the regression analysis.Results: Elevated PLMI values (>15 per hour were observed in >25% of patients. PLMI values in No-OSA patients correlated with age, sex, self-reported nocturnal leg jerks, restless legs syndrome symptoms, and hypertension. In OSA patients, PLMI correlated only with age and self-reported psychiatric medications. Regression models indicated only a modest predictive value of demographics, symptoms, and clinical history. Decision modeling suggests that at-home testing is favored as the pretest probability of PLMS increases, given plausible assumptions regarding PLMS morbidity, costs, and assumed benefits of pharmacological therapy.Conclusion: Although elevated PLMI values were commonly observed, routinely acquired clinical information had only weak predictive utility. As the clinical importance of elevated PLMI continues to evolve, it is likely that objective measures such as PSG or

  17. An Integrative Review of Interventions to Support Parents When Managing Their Child's Pain at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Roses; McKeever, Stephen; Wiseman, Theresa; Twycross, Alison

    2017-11-21

    To identify interventions aimed at helping parents manage their child's pain at home and to establish which aspects of interventions were effective. Integrative narrative review. MEDLINE, CINAHL Plus, PsychINFO, PsychArticles, AMED, PubMed, Scopus and Web of Knowledge databases were searched in 2016. This narrative synthesis followed Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and Economic and Social Research Council guidance. Reasons attributed to intervention success were analyzed using content analysis. From 2,534 papers, 17 were included. A majority were randomized controlled trials (n = 13) and most addressed postoperative pain (n = 15). A range of interventions were found that directly targeted parents, including child-parent interactions and health care professional-parent interactions, as well as complex interventions. Three studies were successful in reducing child pain at home and seven in increasing appropriate analgesic drug administration. Analysis of reasons attributed to interventions success revealed characteristics of interventions, components of parental pain management, and key features of research that aid researchers in designing and evaluating interventions. Risk of bias was present because of inadequate randomization, lack of a control group, and underpowered studies. Nurses should be aware that targeting parents directly is the most effective way of reducing child pain at home. Nurses need to advocate for effective analgesics for their child patients because the ineffectiveness of many interventions was attributed to inadequate analgesic drugs. Once this is achieved, success in increasing analgesic drug administration is most likely reached via parent-targeted interventions and those targeting health care professional-parent interactions. Successful interventions will be tailored to the child and adequately powered. Including a measure of sedation will ensure sedation is not mistaken for analgesic effectiveness. Interventions should address

  18. Costs of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) administered by Hospital at Home units in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ramallo, V J; Mirón-Rubio, M; Mujal, A; Estrada, O; Forné, C; Aragón, B; Rivera, A J

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the direct healthcare costs of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) administered by Hospital at Home (HaH) units in Spain. An observational, multicentre, economic evaluation of retrospective cohorts was conducted. Patients were treated at home by the HaH units of three Spanish hospitals between January 2012 and December 2013. From the cost accounting of HaH OPAT (staff, pharmacy, transportation, diagnostic tests and structural), the cost of each outpatient course was obtained following a top-down strategy based on the use of resources. Costs associated with inpatient stay, if any, were estimated based on length of stay and ICD-9-CM diagnosis. There were 1324 HaH episodes in 1190 patients (median age 70 years). The median (interquartile range) stay at home was 10 days (7-15 days). Of the OPAT episodes, 91.5% resulted in cure or improvement on completion of intravenous therapy. The mean total cost of each infectious episode was €6707 [95% confidence interval (CI) €6189-7406]. The mean cost per OPAT episode was €1356 (95% CI €1247-1560), mainly distributed between healthcare staff costs (46%) and pharmacy costs (39%). The mean cost of inpatient hospitalisation of an infectious episode was €4357 (95% CI €3947-4977). The cost per day of inpatient hospitalisation was €519, whilst the cost per day of OPAT was €98, meaning a saving of 81%. This study shows that OPAT administered by HaH units resulted in lower costs compared with inpatient care in Spain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  19. The nutritional care of people living with dementia at home: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mole, Louise; Kent, Bridie; Abbott, Rebecca; Wood, Chloë; Hickson, Mary

    2018-01-24

    There are an increasing number of people with dementia living in their own home for longer, often supported by a family member. The symptoms of dementia can affect an individual's nutritional status, which can lead to a reduced quality of life for the person with dementia and their family members. A scoping review was conducted from July 2016 until September 2016, using a recognised framework, to explore what is currently known, and identify any gaps in the research regarding the nutritional care of people living with dementia at home. This included any interventions that may have been trialled or implemented, and the views of those living with dementia, carers and clinicians. Six electronic databases were searched from inception to July 2016. A review team was involved in screening and data extraction for selected articles. Published qualitative and quantitative studies were included that explored the nutritional care of people living with dementia at home. Methods included data extraction and conventional content analysis. Stakeholders were involved in the development of final categories. Following screening, 61 studies reported in 63 articles were included. Most studies were cross-sectional (n = 24), cohort (n = 15) or qualitative (n = 9). Only three were randomised controlled trials. Three overarching categories represented the results: Timely identification of nutritional risk and subsequent regular monitoring of nutritional status, multi-component tailored interventions and the influence of the care-giving dyad on nutritional status. Many studies identify people living at home with dementia as a vulnerable group prone to malnutrition; however, a lack of interventions exists to address the increased risk. There is a lack of research exploring the role of home care providers and healthcare professionals in the provision of nutritional care. Further research is required to explore how the emotional aspect of the care-giving dyad influences nutritional care

  20. At-home vs In-office Bleaching: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Geus, J L; Wambier, L M; Kossatz, S; Loguercio, A D; Reis, A

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to evaluate the risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity during in-office and at-home bleaching in adult patients. The efficacy of dental bleaching was also evaluated. A comprehensive search was performed in the MEDLINE via PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature database, Brazilian Library in Dentistry, Cochrane Library, and System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe without restrictions. The annual conference of the International Association for Dental Research abstracts (1990-2014) and unpublished and ongoing trials registry were also searched. Dissertations and theses were searched using the ProQuest Dissertations and Periódicos Capes Theses databases. Only randomized clinical trials that compared the prevalence or intensity of tooth sensitivity during in-office and at-home bleaching in adult patients were included and studies that evaluated the efficacy of these dental bleaching techniques, in terms of shade guide units (ΔSGU) and in terms of color difference measured with a spectrophotometer (ΔE*). After the removal of duplicates, 1139 articles were identified. After title and abstract screening, 29 studies remained. Fifteen studies were further excluded, whereas 12 studies remained for qualitative analyses and 8 for the meta-analysis of the primary and secondary outcomes. No significant difference in the risk/intensity of tooth sensitivity or in bleaching efficacy was observed in the present study. In an overall comparison of at-home and in-office bleaching, no differences were detected, either regarding risk/intensity of tooth sensitivity or the effectiveness of the bleaching treatment. This comparison, however, does not take into consideration variations in the protocols (daily usage time, number of bleaching sessions, and product concentration) of the bleaching techniques in the studies included.

  1. Initiation of home mechanical ventilation at home: a randomised controlled trial of efficacy, feasibility and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazenberg, A; Kerstjens, H A M; Prins, S C L; Vermeulen, K M; Wijkstra, P J

    2014-09-01

    Home mechanical ventilation (HMV) in the Netherlands is normally initiated in hospital, but this is expensive and often a burden for the patient. In this randomised controlled study we investigated whether initiation of HMV at home in patients with chronic respiratory failure is non-inferior to an in hospital based setting. Seventy-seven patients were included, of which 38 patients started HMV at home. All patients were diagnosed with chronic respiratory failure due to a neuromuscular or thoracic cage disease. Primary outcome was the arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2) while quality of life and costs were secondary outcomes. Telemonitoring was used in the home group to provide therapeutic information, for example; transcutaneous carbon dioxide, oxygen saturation and ventilator information, to the caregivers. Follow-up was six months. PaCO2, improved by 0.72 (SE ± 0.16) kPa in the hospital group and by 0.91 (±0.20) in the home group, both improvements being significant and the latter clearly not inferior. There were also significant improvements in quality of life in both groups, again not being inferior with home treatment. This study is the first to show that initiation of HMV at home in a selective group of patients with chronic respiratory failure is as effective for gas exchange and quality of life as hospital initiation. In addition we found that it is safe, technically feasible and that more than € 3000 per patient can be saved compared to our standard care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Participation in siblings׳ birth at home from children׳s viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouhki, Maija-Riitta; Suominen, Tarja; Peltonen, Kirsi; Åstedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2016-03-01

    partners often participate in childbirth, and the effects on both partners have been intensively investigated, but children׳s participation is rare in western countries and less studied. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore and construct a comprehensive structure of meaning of Finnish children׳s experiences of participating in birth of a sibling at home. a phenomenological study based on analysis of open-interview transcripts by Colaizzi׳s approach and drawings. seven children aged five to 17 years who participated in birth of a sibling at home. the children׳s experience of participating in a sibling׳s birth was multifaceted. Their feelings varied from joy to worry, they helped their mother and learned from the experience. They chose to participate. They experienced overwhelmingly strong and positive feelings, but were also worried about the well-being of other family members during the birth. Further, younger children were frustrated, especially if the birth took a long time and they were not allowed to do all they wanted, such as going to a birthing pool. It was important for the children to be able to help their mother and support younger siblings. They learned a lot about childbirth from their participation and information given by the adults. The children regarded home as safe, cosy and a better place to give birth than a hospital. The older children also regarded a home birth as a possible choice for them in the future. They celebrated the baby׳s arrival and remembered the birth day as being joyful and happy. Participation in the sibling׳s birth made relationships between the children closer and warmer. Children felt hurt when people outside the family were suspicious when told that the baby was born at home. the children׳s experience of participating in a sibling׳s birth at home included varying feelings, learning from their experience and helping mother. The findings could be utilised in parent education if they are going to have their

  3. Bridging the Self-care Deficit Gap: Remote Patient Monitoring and the Hospital-at-Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafazzo, Joseph A.; Leonard, Kevin; Easty, Anthony C.; Rossos, Peter G.; Chan, Christopher T.

    This study examines the use of a remote patient monitoring intervention to address the challenge of patient self-care in complex hospital-at-home therapies. It was shown that in a home hemodialysis patient group, remote patient monitoring facilitated self-care and was supported by patients and, in particular, family caregivers. This does not come without cost to the patient however, who now has greater personal responsibility and accountability for their health management. Promising results from this study indicate that most patients are willing to assume this cost in exchange for the possibility of improved health outcomes.

  4. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on research and development of medical welfare device technologies. Ultrasound treatment system (rationalized use of energy); 1998 nendo seika hokokusho. Choonpa chiryo system (energy shiyo gorika)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    Studies are being made to establish a technology capable of performing accurately and efficiently an ultrasound treatment technology that can achieve therapeutic effect bloodlessly. In making a concept design of a transducer for thermal coagulation treatment, an applicator was constructed on a trial basis as a preliminary prototype, which integrates a power transducer for prostate treatment using transrectal approach and an imaging probe. Evaluation was given on the device by using dogs. It was verified that the device can irradiate ultrasonic waves onto prostate while targeting and monitoring the ultrasonic treatment region. The split focus system led the prostate tissues to coagulation and mortification efficiently. An intra-corporal therapeutic applicator, applied with the second harmonics superposition method was constructed on a trial basis as the preliminary prototype of a sonochemical treatment transducer. In order to explore substances to generate therapeutic effect efficiently in combination with a sonochemical therapeutic device, an approach was discussed to make certain xanthene dyes fatty and amphiphatic, and a possibility of making them amphiphatic was discovered. (NEDO)

  5. Exile at Home: Alienation in Rehman Rashid’s A Malaysian Journey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoe Pik Lin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A Malaysian Journey served as a novel which detailed and recorded Malaysia’s journey as a country from its pre-independence era until the time of the novel’s publication in 1993. But more than that, it was a novel of Rashid’s personal journey as he rediscovered his country and his own identity. As such, it was a highly personal memoir which reflected Rashid’s state of mind, his condition, and the problems which he faced through the years. Alienation was one of the problems that Rashid encountered throughout his life. This sense of alienation may be manifested in many forms, which could be through his ethnicity, language, religion as well as location. This alienation could occur due to the isolation that others forcefully impose on him, or it could be from his rejection towards his contemporaries. Rashid’s sense of alienation only further fueled his condition as both an external and internal exile of his country, whereby he was unable to feel at home wherever he was. It was only after he discarded his foreign view of the country, casting off his state of mind as an exile at the end of the story that he was able to finally feel at home without being plagued by thoughts of alienation.

  6. A sense of security for cancer patients at home: the role of community nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Heather; Boughton, Maureen; Hayes, Lillian; Forsyth, Sue; Davies, Michelle; Underwood, Emma; McVey, Peta

    2007-07-01

    The present paper reports on a qualitative research project designed to expose the presently unrecognised minutiae of community nurses' work with cancer patients at home, and to identify the ways in which these, combined to form comprehensive care episodes, contribute to physical and psychosocial well-being. The project was conducted in two locations in New South Wales, Australia, one metropolitan and one rural. The research model focused on particular nurse-patient encounters, and involved pre- and post-encounter interviews with nurses, post-encounter interviews with patients and carers, and observation of the encounters themselves. Participants included generalist community nurses, cancer patients being cared for at home, and their primary carers where appropriate. This research demonstrates that regular contact with generalist community nurses is associated with a strong sense of security about the immediate situation for home-based cancer patients and their primary carers. This sense of security is a significant component of patient and carer physical and psychosocial well-being, and may have implications for health services utilisation. In the present paper, the authors outline the factors underpinning this sense of security, and argue that these findings contribute important new knowledge that is vital for contemporary debates about role responsibilities and continuity of care for cancer patients.

  7. Fall Risk Assessment and Early-Warning for Toddler Behaviors at Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mau-Tsuen Yang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Accidental falls are the major cause of serious injuries in toddlers, with most of these falls happening at home. Instead of providing immediate fall detection based on short-term observations, this paper proposes an early-warning childcare system to monitor fall-prone behaviors of toddlers at home. Using 3D human skeleton tracking and floor plane detection based on depth images captured by a Kinect system, eight fall-prone behavioral modules of toddlers are developed and organized according to four essential criteria: posture, motion, balance, and altitude. The final fall risk assessment is generated by a multi-modal fusion using either a weighted mean thresholding or a support vector machine (SVM classification. Optimizations are performed to determine local parameter in each module and global parameters of the multi-modal fusion. Experimental results show that the proposed system can assess fall risks and trigger alarms with an accuracy rate of 92% at a speed of 20 frames per second.

  8. [Relationship between burden of care at home and functional independence level after stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmels, P; Ebermeyer, E; Bethoux, F; Gonard, C; Fayolle-Minon, I

    2002-03-01

    To determine the relationship between functional disability assessed with the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and burden of care in hemiplegic stroke patients living at home. The population is constituted of stroke survivors, initially treated in an academic inpatient Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation unit. Assessments included an evaluation of impairments (aphasia, negligence, cognitive impairment, motor impairment : Fugl-Meyer (FM) scale), disability (Functional Independence Measure (FIM) ), and burden of care (physical assistance and supervision). Forty-five subjects and their caregiver completed the assessments. Time spent on physical assistance and supervision were significantly correlated with FM and FIM scores. Cognitive deficits correlated with supervision time but not with physical assistance time. These results confirm the predictive value of functional independence measure relative to burden of care in a population of stroke patients with hemiplegia living at home. These results show that cognitive impairments are more specifically correlated with supervision time. This must be confirmed by studies taking into account functional and cognitive conditions of the patient, functional and psychological conditions of life of caregiver and also economical and environmental conditions of life.

  9. Emotional and instrumental support influencing male caregivers for people with dementia living at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Midori; Kimura, Hiromi; Ogomori, Koji; Ogata, Kumiko

    2017-05-01

    Object: To clarify the emotional and instrumental support influencing male caregivers for people with dementia living at home. Patients/Materials and Methods: The subjects were 298 male caregivers. Nursing care burden was assessed using the Zarit Caregiver Burden Scale. Ability to cope with care problems was assessed using the Nursing Care Problems Coping Scale for Male Caregivers for People with Dementia Living at Home (NCSM). Emotional support was assessed using the Emotional Support Network Scale. Instrumental support was assessed using the question "Do you have someone to help when you have a problem with nursing care?". Results: There was a significant correlation (P instrumental support for male caregivers was more than three times more likely to be obtained from within the family than outside it. With families becoming smaller, it is becoming more important for communities and society in general to provide emotional and instrumental support for male caregivers. Male caregivers need support from someone with whom they feel comfortable. It is particularly necessary to consider how to support male caregivers who use the "Emotional avoidance" coping style.

  10. Continuous positive airway pressure machines and the work of coordinating technologies at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Tiago

    2008-06-01

    Research on the use of health technology at home has consistently reported that it is underpinned by users' evaluations of the technology in relation to their illness trajectory, their social network, and the place where it is used. Recent studies have also revealed that the efficacy of health technologies depends upon users' work that is largely invisible to professionals, managers and designers. This paper draws on the most widely used therapy for the management of sleep apnoea, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), to show how users maintain workable relationships between it and other technological elements of the domestic environment. Qualitative analysis was performed of an archive of messages sent to a web-based support group for sleep disorders between 1994 and 2007. Users describe two related techniques: first, drawing on their embodied knowledge of using domestic technologies to imagine potential, alternative environments for CPAP; and second, using their body as an instrument to assess the ;fit' of each of the attempted arrangements. The interaction between these two techniques entails frequent shifts in users' understandings of their illness and those involved in its management. Strategies of implementation of health technologies at home should acknowledge and incorporate the embodied knowledge processes of users.

  11. Estimating long-haul airline pilots' at-home baseline sleep duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lora J; Gander, Philippa H; van den Berg, Margo J; Signal, T Leigh

    2016-06-01

    Characterize the baseline sleep of long-haul airline pilots. Sleep of 332 pilots (median age = 51 years, range = 23-64 years) from 4 airlines was measured by actigraphy while at home and off-duty and by retrospective estimate of the total amount of nighttime sleep usually obtained at home. Mean actigraphic sleep per 24 hours during baseline periods was 6.8 hours (SD = 1.0 hour), 52 minutes shorter than mean self-reported usual nighttime sleep (7.6 hours, SD = 1.1 hours). Pilots' self-reported sleep duration was comparable to weekend sleep of men in general population samples, but their actigraphic baseline sleep was longer than objectively monitored sleep of other samples. Long-haul pilots routinely experience sleep restriction and circadian disruption across trips, both of which are implicated in increased health risks. We recommend that they be educated about the long-term importance for health of obtaining adequate sleep on off-duty days. Copyright © 2016 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of At-home Bleaching in Smokers: 30-month Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Geus, J L; Fernández, E; Kossatz, S; Loguercio, A D; Reis, A

    This clinical study evaluated the color longevity after 30 months of at-home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) in smokers and nonsmokers. Sixty patients, 30 smokers and 30 nonsmokers, were subjected to bleaching with 10% CP (Whiteness Perfect-FGM) for three hours daily for three weeks. The color was measured at baseline and at one month and 30 months after the completion of dental bleaching using the shade guide Vita classical organized by value (ΔSGU) and the shade guide Vita Bleachedguide 3D-MASTER. At the 30-month recall, the color was assessed before and after dental prophylaxis. Data from color evaluation were analyzed by two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance and Tukey test for the contrast of means (α=0.05). Twenty-one smokers and 22 nonsmokers attended the 30 month recall. For both shade guides, only the main factor of assessment time was statistically significant (p<0.001). Effective whitening was observed in both groups at the baseline, which was stable at one month. However, color rebound was observed after 30 months for both groups of participants when color was measured before and after dental prophylaxis. Thirty months after at-home bleaching with 10% CP gel, dental darkening was detected in both groups, which cannot be solely attributed to stains caused by extrinsic staining from daily food, drinks, and smoke (in smokers).

  13. [The meaning of caregiving experience lived by Lebanese family caregivers of stroke survivors at home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Samy; Kazan, Rima Sassine

    2015-03-01

    Introduction six million of deaths are due today to stroke, while stroke survivors will depend on their caregivers at home. As the literature noted in, these caregivers meet challenges and satisfactions, encouraging them to resort to adaptation strategies in order to cope with their care situation. The purpose of this article is to describe and understand the experience of Lebanese family caregivers who take care at home of a relative stroke survivor. Using the phenomenological approach of Giorgi (1997), twelve interviews were conducted with six family caregivers who have been recruited through a rehabilitation center in Beirut. Eight themes have emerged from the phenomenological analysis: the family caregiver burden, the missing social support, the learning through his experience of a family caregiver, the contribution to caregiving survivor, the selflessness in the caregiving, the gratitude in the caregiving, the familiarization with new routines and reconciliation with new lifestyle. The proposed essence from this phenomenological analysis is: the satisfaction in taking care of the stoke survivor by facing challenges and bringing order into the chaos caused by the stroke. The knowledge gained from this study would allow nurses to identify family caregivers at risk in order to help them to adapt to their new role as caregivers, and to develop health promotion strategies, taking into consideration their experience.

  14. Exploring research cultures through internationalization at home for doctoral students in Hong Kong and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Doris; Carlson, Elisabeth; Kwong, Enid E Y; Idvall, Ewa; Kumlien, Christine

    2017-12-01

    Cultural skills are fundamental to developing global academic scholars. Internationalization at home can facilitate the acquisition of these skills without students having to go abroad. However, research on the effect of internationalization of higher education is scarce, despite apparent benefits to incorporating cultural sensitivity in research. Further, little is known about the role information and communication technology plays. In this pilot study, we describe the experience of doctoral students with an internationalization-at-home program, and its impact on developing an understanding about different research cultures. Eight doctoral nursing students from Sweden and Hong Kong participated in five webinars as "critical friends". The study followed a descriptive, qualitative design. The results demonstrated that students observed cultural differences in others' research training programs. However, while cultural differences reinforced friendship among local peers, they challenged engagement with critical friends. Challenges led to the perception of one another not as critical friends but as "distant" friends. We discuss the possible reasons for these outcomes, and emphasize a need to nurture connectivity and common goals. This would prepare students to identify, translate, and recognize cultural differences to help develop knowledge of diverse research cultures. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Erosion and abrasion on dental structures undergoing at-home bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarquinio SBC

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Flávio Fernando Demarco1, Sônia Saeger Meireles2, Hugo Ramalho Sarmento1, Raquel Venâncio Fernandes Dantas1, Tatiana Botero3, Sandra Beatriz Chaves Tarquinio11Graduate Program in Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, Brazil; 2Department of Operative Dentistry, Federal University of Paraíba, Brazil; 3Cariology, Restorative Science, and Endodontics Department, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, MI, USAAbstract: This review investigates erosion and abrasion in dental structures undergoing at-home bleaching. Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition that may be idiopathic or caused by a known acid source. Some bleaching agents have a pH lower than the critical level, which can cause changes in the enamel mineral content. Investigations have shown that at-home tooth bleaching with low concentrations of hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no significant damaging effects on enamel and dentin surface properties. Most studies where erosion was observed were in vitro. Even though the treatment may cause side effects like sensitivity and gingival irritation, these usually disappear at the end of treatment. Considering the literature reviewed, we conclude that tooth bleaching agents based on hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no clinically significant influence on enamel/dentin mineral loss caused by erosion or abrasion. Furthermore, the treatment is tolerable and safe, and any adverse effects can be easily reversed and controlled.Keywords: peroxide, tooth bleaching, enamel, dentin, erosion, abrasion

  16. Relationship between Caregivers’ Smoking at Home and Urinary Levels of Cotinine in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the impact of different smoking behaviors of caregivers on environmental tobacco smoke (ETS exposure in children aged 5–6 years in Changsha, China. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional, random digit-dial telephone survey of caregivers (n = 543 between August and October 2013. Caregivers’ smoking behaviors were collected by a questionnaire. Exposure assessment was based upon determination of urinary cotinine levels in children employing gas chromatography–triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS. Results: In children not living with a smoker, children living with one smoker, and children living with more than one smoker at home, median urinary cotinine concentrations (ng/mL were 0.72, 2.97, and 4.46, respectively. For children living with one smoker, median urinary cotinine levels of children exposed to ETS were associated with caregiver smoking behaviors, i.e., if a caregiver consumed more cigarettes (>20 compared with ≤10; 7.73 versus 2.29 ng/mL, respectively. Conclusions: The magnitude of ETS exposure in children is correlated with the smoking behaviors of the caregiver. Counseling for smoking cessation and educational interventions are needed urgently for smoking caregivers to increase their awareness about ETS exposure and to encourage smoking cessation at home or to take precautions to protect children’s health.

  17. Anticipatory prescribing in terminal care at home: what challenges do community health professionals encounter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faull, Christina; Windridge, Kate; Ockleford, Elizabeth; Hudson, Michael

    2013-03-01

    The prompt availability of medications to manage symptoms is key to high quality end-of-life care and anticipatory prescribing of these drugs is thought good practice. This study explored the challenges encountered by primary and community health professionals in Leicestershire and Rutland related to anticipatory prescribing when caring for terminally ill patients who wish to remain at home to die. A qualitative study was conducted using eight focus groups (54 participants) and nine individual interviews with a purposively sampled range of health professionals providing care for people who wished to die at home. Themes were identified iteratively via constant comparison. Challenges fell into four categories: resourcing concerns, professional expertise/experience, professionals' relationships with patients, and professionals' relationships with other professionals. The latter included the most serious perceived challenges. Links between community and hospital care providers and between 'usual' hours and 'out-of-hours' care providers were seen as particularly unstable. These findings suggest that building and maintaining trusting, responsive, personal links between professionals, both within and between teams, is essential when implementing good practice guidelines about anticipatory end-of-life prescribing in the community. The need for good communication and relationships between patients and professionals and maintaining expertise and confidence in end-of-life care are also key factors in the effective use of anticipatory prescribing for symptom management for dying patients.

  18. Inflammatory response of human dental pulp to at-home and in-office tooth bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Maysa Magalhães; Lopes, Lawrence Gonzaga; Cardoso, Paula Carvalho; Souza, João Batista de; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Costa, Nádia Lago; Torres, Érica Miranda; Estrela, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the inflammatory responses of human dental pulp after the use of two bleaching techniques. Pulp samples were collected from human third molars extracted for orthodontic reasons and divided into three groups: control - no tooth bleaching (CG) (n=7); at-home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide (AH) (n = 10), and in-office bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide (IO) (n=12). Pulps were removed and stained with hematoxylin-eosin for microscopic analysis of inflammation intensity, collagen degradation, and pulp tissue organization. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect mast cells (tryptase+), blood vessels (CD31+), and macrophages (CD68+). Chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at p0.05). No mast cells were found in the pulp samples analyzed. In-office bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide resulted in more intense inflammation, higher macrophages migration, and greater pulp damage then at-home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide, however, these bleaching techniques did not induce migration of mast cells and increased the number of blood vessels.

  19. Inflammatory response of human dental pulp to at-home and in-office tooth bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maysa Magalhães Vaz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Tooth bleaching is a technique of choice to obtain a harmonious smile, but bleaching agents may damage the dental pulp. Objective: This study evaluated the inflammatory responses of human dental pulp after the use of two bleaching techniques. Material and Methods: Pulp samples were collected from human third molars extracted for orthodontic reasons and divided into three groups: control - no tooth bleaching (CG (n=7; at-home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide (AH (n = 10, and in-office bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide (IO (n=12. Pulps were removed and stained with hematoxylin-eosin for microscopic analysis of inflammation intensity, collagen degradation, and pulp tissue organization. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect mast cells (tryptase+, blood vessels (CD31+, and macrophages (CD68+. Chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at p0.05. No mast cells were found in the pulp samples analyzed. Conclusion: In-office bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide resulted in more intense inflammation, higher macrophages migration, and greater pulp damage then at-home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide, however, these bleaching techniques did not induce migration of mast cells and increased the number of blood vessels.

  20. Subject-controlled stimulation of dorsal genital nerve to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opisso, Eloy; Borau, Albert; Rijkhoff, Nico J M

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the effects of subject controlled dorsal genital nerve (DGN) electrical stimulation on neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) in subjects at home. Subjects underwent a 5-day study at home with DGN stimulation. Stimulation was provided with surface electrodes placed either on the dorsal penile shaft in males and on or close to the clitoris in females. The days 1 and 5 were with no stimulation whereas days 2-4 were with stimulation. Two urodynamic studies were performed at the beginning and at the end of the study. A bladder diary was obtained. Eleven subjects with NDO and with urge incontinence were included. One subject stopped the protocol before the end of the 5-day trial and two did not undergo the second urodynamic study. The subjects showed a statistically significant increase in bladder capacities compared to baseline (P = 0.047). Mean volume per day voided significantly increased over the study within the subjects. Differences between day 1 and day 5 were statistically significant (P = 0.028). The feasibility and the globally positive outcomes of the study indicate that the stimulation of the dorsal genital nerve can be an option for the treatment of the NDO. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Why do women deliver at home? Multilevel modeling of Ethiopian National Demographic and Health Survey data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henock Yebyo

    Full Text Available Despite of the existing intensive efforts to improve maternal health in Ethiopia, the proportion of birth delivered at home remains high and is still the top priority among the national health threats.The study aimed to examine effects of individual women and community-level factors of women's decision on place of delivery in Ethiopia.Data were obtained from the nationally representative 2011 Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey (EDHS which used a two-stage cluster sampling design with rural-urban and regions as strata. The EDHS collected data from a big sample size but our study focused on a sample of 7,908 women whose most recent birth was within five years preceding 2011 and 576 communities in which the women were living in. The data were analyzed using a two-level mixed-effects logistic regression to determine fixed-effects of individual- and community-level factors and random-intercept of between-cluster characteristics.In the current study, 6980 out of 7908 deliveries (88.3% took place at home. Lower educational levels (OR=2.74, 95%CI:1.84,4.70; p<0.0001, making no or only a limited number of ANC visits (OR=3.72,95%CI:2.85, 4.83; p<0.0001, non-exposure to media (OR=1.51, 95%CI 1.13, 2.01; p=0.004, higher parity (OR=2.68, 95%CI:1.96,3.68; p<0.0001, and perceived distance problem to reach health facilities (OR=1.29, 95%CI:1.03,1.62; p=0.022 were positively associated with home delivery. About 75% of the total variance in the odds of giving birth at home was accounted for the between-community differences of characteristics (ICC=0.75, p<0.0001. With regard to community-level characteristics, rural communities (OR=4.67, 95%CI:3.06,7.11; p<0.0001, pastoralist communities (OR=4.53, 95%CI:2.81,7.28; p<0.0001, communities with higher poverty levels (OR=1.49 95%CI:1.08,2.22; p=0.048, with lower levels of ANC utilization (OR=2.01, 95%CI:1.42,2.85; p<0.0001 and problem of distance to a health facility (OR=1.29, 95%CI:1.03,1.62; p=0.004 had a

  2. The data model for social welfare in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärki, Jarmo; Ailio, Erja

    2014-01-01

    A client data model for social welfare was gradually developed in the National Project of IT in Social Services in Finland. The client data model describes the nationally uniformed data structures and relationships between the data elements needed in production of social services. It contains the structures of social care client records, unique core components and distinct classifications. The modeling method guaranteed the coverage, integrity, flexibility and device independency of the model. The model is maintained and developed by the National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL) together with the social workers and other experts of social welfare. It forms the basis of the electronic information management of the social services. Implementation of the data model in information systems enables the availability of the client data where and when ever a client has to be helped.

  3. Welfare Reform & the Health of Single Mothers

    OpenAIRE

    Narain, Kimberly Danae Cauley

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This dissertation explores the relationship between welfare reform and the health of single mothers with less than a high school diploma or GED (LESMS) by addressing six research questions: (1) what impact did welfare reform have on the health insurance coverage of LESMS, (2) what impact did welfare reform have on the annual medical provider contact of LESMS, (3) what impact did welfare reform have on the health outcomes of LESMS, (4) what impact did welfare reform have on the fede...

  4. The Labor Supply Effects of Welfare Reform

    OpenAIRE

    Bartik, Timothy J.

    1998-01-01

    Will welfare reform increase unemployment and reduce wages? The answer depends in part on how much welfare reform increases labor supply. This paper considers the labor supply effects of the welfare reforms that have occurred since 1993, when President Clinton entered office with a promise to "end welfare as we know it." The paper reviews previous estimates, and provides new estimates, of how many additional labor force participants have entered the labor force due to welfare reform. I estima...

  5. Social Media Use in Child Welfare Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Todd Edward Sage; Melanie Sage

    2016-01-01

    The scholarly child welfare literature offers little information about the use of social media by child welfare workers. We conducted a study of 171 child welfare workers across several states using an online survey. The resulting data offer insights from workers about current practices related to social media use in a child welfare work setting. Most respondents see social media as an acceptable tool for conducting child welfare assessments. Respondents describe strains and benefits of socia...

  6. A perfect storm? Welfare, care, gender and generations in Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filgueira, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Magdalena; Papadópulos, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This article claims that welfare states modelled on a contributory basis and with a system of entitlements that assumes stable two-parent families, a traditional breadwinner model, full formal employment and a relatively young age structure are profoundly flawed in the context of present-day challenges. While this is true for affluent countries modelled on the Bismarckian type of welfare system, the costs of the status quo are even more devastating in middle-income economies with high levels of inequality. A gendered approach to welfare reform that introduces the political economy and the economy of care and unpaid work is becoming critical to confront what may very well become a perfect storm for the welfare of these nations and their peoples. Through an in-depth study of the Uruguayan case, the authors show how the decoupling of risk and protection has torn asunder the efficacy of welfare devices in the country. An ageing society that has seen a radical transformation of its family and labour market landscapes, Uruguay maintained during the 1980s and 1990s a welfare state that was essentially contributory, elderly and male-oriented, and centred on cash entitlements. This contributed to the infantilization of poverty, increased the vulnerability of women and exacerbated fiscal stress for the system as a whole. Furthermore, because of high levels of income and asset inequality, the redistribution of risk between upper- and lower-income groups presented a deeply regressive pattern. The political economy of care and welfare has begun to change in the last decade or so, bringing about mild reforms in the right direction; but these might prove to be too little and too late.

  7. Invertebrate welfare: an overlooked issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Horvath

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available While invertebrates make up the majority of animal species, their welfare is overlooked compared to the concern shown to vertebrates. This fact is highlighted by the near absence of regulations in animal research, with the exception of cephalopods in the European Union. This is often justified by assumptions that invertebrates do not experience pain and stress while lacking the capacity for higher order cognitive functions. Recent research suggests that invertebrates may be just as capable as vertebrates in experiencing pain and stress, and some species display comparable cognitive capacities. Another obstacle is the negative view of invertebrates by the public, which often regards them as pests with no individual personalities, gastronomic entities, or individuals for scientific experimentation without rules. Increasingly, studies have revealed that invertebrates possess individual profiles comparable to the personalities found in vertebrates. Given the large economic impact of invertebrates, developing certain attitude changes in invertebrate welfare may be beneficial for producers while providing higher welfare conditions for the animals. While the immense number and type of species makes it difficult to suggest that all invertebrates will benefit from increased welfare, in this review we provide evidence that the topic of invertebrate welfare should be revisited, more thoroughly investigated, and in cases where appropriate, formally instituted.

  8. Effect of restrictions on smoking at home, at school, and in public places on teenage smoking: cross sectional study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wakefield, Melanie A; Chaloupka, Frank J; Kaufman, Nancy J; Orleans, C Tracy; Barker, Dianne C; Ruel, Erin E

    2000-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To determine the relation between extent of restrictions on smoking at home, at school, and in public places and smoking uptake and smoking prevalence among school students. Design...

  9. A family's difficulties in caring for a cancer patient at the end of life at home in Japan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ishii, Yoko; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Sato, Kazuki; Ozawa, Taketoshi

    2012-01-01

    ...% of the total deaths of cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate circumstances, difficulties, and correlated factors for family caregivers who provided care at home for a family member with terminal cancer...

  10. WIFE'S LABOR FORCE PARTICIPATION AND FAMILY EXPENDITURES FOR PREPARED FOOD, FOOD PREPARED AT HOME, AND FOOD AWAY FROM HOME

    OpenAIRE

    Nayga, Rodolfo M., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    This study examines the effects of a wife's participation in the labor force and other socioeconomic factors on family expenditures for prepared food, food prepared at home, and food away from home using the Bureau of Labor Statistics 1992 consumer expenditure survey. On the one hand, results indicate that the number of children, home ownership with mortgage, seasonality, region, wife's age, and income are important determinants of expenditures on food prepared at home. A wife's education and...

  11. Care of the Chronically Ill at Home: An Unresolved Dilemma in Health Policy for the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Buhler-Wilkerson, Karen

    2007-01-01

    The problems of caring for patients with disabling illnesses who neither get well nor die are not new. Such patients have always required assistance at home from family, benevolent volunteers, or paid caregivers. Despite two centuries of experimentation, however, no agreement exists concerning the balance between the public and private resources to be allocated through state funding, private insurance, and family contributions for the daily and routine care at home for chronically ill persons...

  12. Original article Psychological and socio-demographic correlates of women’s decisions to give birth at home

    OpenAIRE

    Urszula Domańska; Roman Ossowski; Barbara Ciżkowicz

    2014-01-01

    Background Some women decide to give birth at home. They treat their home as a safe place to do so, are against medicalization of natural labour or value activity and autonomy during labour. They are also characterized by good knowledge of their own bodies and about labour in general (including labour at home). Psychological studies have revealed a correlation between labour (including the derived satisfaction) and the levels of dispositional optimism, perception of efficacy, and cop...

  13. Promoting Parents' Use of Non-Pharmacological Methods and Assessment of Children's Postoperative Pain at Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyyssönen S.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Parents have reported challenges in assessing their child's postoperative pain at home.Aims: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the parental use of the Parents' Postoperative Pain Measure -tool (PPPM on 1-3 -year-old children's non-pharmacological pain alleviation at home.Methodology: This was a non-randomized, prospective study with two parallel groups, where the parents in the intervention group were provided with PPPM in addition to a pain diary consisting of a verbal pain scale. The data were collected from 50 parents whose children had undergone day surgery in three Finnish university hospitals between January 2006 and June 2007. Parents completed questionnaires consisting of background information, verbal pain rating scale and a sub-scale measuring parents' use of non-pharmacological methods in children's postoperative pain alleviation.Results: Most children had mild postoperative pain after discharge, but in some children pain was moderate or severe. Non-pharmacological interventions were used commonly for pain alleviation in both groups, including holding the child in lap, comforting the child and spending time with the child more than usual during the recovery period after discharge. However, the use of non-pharmacological pain alleviation methods was 15% more common in the intervention group than in the control group. Parents of the intervention group had carried the child (p=0.04 and used distraction (p=0.05 more commonly than parents in control group. No group differences were found in parental assessments of the helpfulness of non-pharmacological pain alleviation methods.Conclusions: Children's pain remains under-treated and their pain alleviation can be promoted by providing the parents pain assessment tools, such as PPPM, to be used at home. The results can be utilized to further improve children's pain alleviation. More parental education is needed to promote their skills to alleviate the

  14. Effects of health insurance on non-working married women’s medical care use and bed days at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background This study examines whether bed days are alternative methods to medical care use for treating a particular illness. If bed days at home are considered as an alternative to medical treatment, then medical care use and bed days at home should be influenced by an individual’s health insurance status. Method This study uses data from the 2003 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) on medical care use and bed days at home for each contracted illness of non-working married women. Results The results suggest that the health insurance status of non-working married women has considerable influence on their choice between medical care use and bed days at home. In addition, those with health insurance are more likely to use medical care and less likely to use bed days at home, but they tend to avoid the simultaneous use of medical care and bed days at home. Conclusions In contrast to previous studies’ findings indicating that absences from work and medical care use among working males may be complements, this study’s results for non-working married women without health insurance suggest that they use rest and medical treatment as substitutes, not complements. PMID:23816313

  15. Belonging and quality of life as perceived by people with advanced cancer who live at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peoples, Hanne; Nissen, Nina; Brandt, Åse

    Purpose: In previous research (Peoples, Nissen, Brandt, & la Cour, 2017), we explored how people with advanced cancer who live at home perceive quality of life. Findings from our previous study indicate that dimensions of belonging in various ways may be connected to quality of life when living...... with an impending death. These findings prompted our curiosity to further explore, how perceived quality of life may be linked to belonging when living with advanced cancer. By drawing on our findings and the theoretical concept of belonging within occupational science, the purpose of this study was to gain....... The findings furthermore indicate that objects such as personal items and everyday technology may serve as means through which people with advanced cancer may experience dimensions of belongings. Implications in relation to OS: This study adds to knowledge within occupational science of how quality of life...

  16. Exploring new operational research opportunities within the Home Care context: the chemotherapy at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahed, Salma; Marcon, Eric; Sahin, Evren; Feillet, Dominique; Dallery, Yves

    2009-06-01

    Home Care (HC) services provide complex and coordinated medical and paramedical care to patients at their homes. As health care services move into the home setting, the need for developing innovative approaches that improve the efficiency of home care organizations increases. We first conduct a literature review of investigations dealing with operation planning within the area of home care management. We then address a particular issue dealing with the planning of operations related to chemotherapy at home as it is an emergent problem in the French context. Our interest is focused on issues specific to the anti-cancer drug supply chain. We identify various models that can be developed and analyze one of them.

  17. Marie Curie nurses: enabling patients with cancer to die at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, Irene J; Wilkinson, Susie

    2002-05-01

    Marie Curie Cancer Care established its nursing service in 1958; however, the service has had little formal evaluation. This study aimed to describe and evaluate the care provided by Marie Curie nurse, and in particular to determine whether patients in their care remained and died at home. Two existing data sets were used: data on all patients referred to the Marie Curie Nursing Services in 147 areas of England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland for 26 months, and data on cancer death registrations in England. A request for a Marie Curie nurse was made for 26,632 patients, 97% of whom had cancer and 11% of whom lived alone. The amount of care provided varied enormously (Marie Curie nurses facilitated home death for many patients. Services need to ensure that mechanisms are in place to achieve data collection. Rigorous prospective evaluation is needed in the future.

  18. Patient-centered care or cultural competence: negotiating palliative care at home for Chinese Canadian immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lisa Seto; Angus, Jan E; Howell, Doris; Husain, Amna; Gastaldo, Denise

    2015-06-01

    The literature about Chinese attitudes toward death and dying contains frequent references to strong taboos against open discussion about death; consequently, there is an assumption that dying at home is not the preferred option. This focused ethnographic study examined the palliative home care experiences of 4 Chinese immigrants with terminal cancer, their family caregivers, and home care nurses and key informant interviews with 11 health care providers. Three main themes emerged: (1) the many facets of taboo; (2) discursive tensions between patient-centered care and cultural competence; and (3) rethinking language barriers. Thus, training on cultural competence needs to move away from models that portray cultural beliefs as shared, fixed patterns, and take into account the complicated reality of everyday care provision at end of life in the home. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Paid carers' experiences of caring for mechanically ventilated children at home: implications for services and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Christina; Pontin, David

    2013-06-01

    UK survival rates for long-term mechanically ventilated children have increased and paid carers are trained to care for them at home, however there is limited literature on carers' training needs and experience of sharing care. Using a qualitative abductive design, we purposively sampled experienced carers to generate data via diaries, semi-structured interviews, and researcher reflexive notes. Research ethics approval was granted from NHS and University committees. Five analytical themes emerged - Parent as expert; Role definition tensions; Training and Continuing Learning Needs; Mixed Emotions; Support Mechanisms highlighting the challenges of working in family homes for carers and their associated learning needs. Further work on preparing carers to share feelings with parents, using burnout prevention techniques, and building confidence is suggested. Carers highlight the lack of clinical supervision during their night-working hours. One solution may be to provide access to registered nurse support when working out-of-office hours.

  20. Revisiting Goffman's Stigma: the social experience of families with children requiring mechanical ventilation at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Franco A

    2007-03-01

    This article argues for a sociologically grounded theoretical orientation for the study of selected health phenomena. Erving Goffman's theory of stigma provides a framework for better understanding the social dimension of the lives of disabled children and their families. First, the principal tenets of this theory are reviewed. Then, the findings from a study of the moral experience of families with children requiring mechanical ventilation at home are re-examined in light of Goffman's Stigma. This analysis highlights how a sociological framework can help advance our understanding of medical problems as social problems and shed light on socialization processes that can help resolve the discrediting, isolation and distress lived by disabled children and their families.

  1. Smart technologies to enhance social connectedness in older people who live at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Meg E; Adair, Brooke; Ozanne, Elizabeth; Kurowski, William; Miller, Kimberly J; Pearce, Alan J; Santamaria, Nick; Long, Maureen; Ventura, Cameron; Said, Catherine M

    2014-09-01

    To examine the effectiveness of smart technologies in improving or maintaining the social connectedness of older people living at home. We conducted a systematic review and critical evaluation of research articles published between 2000 and 2013. Article screening, data extraction and quality assessment (using the Downs and Black checklist) were conducted by two independent researchers. Eighteen publications were identified that evaluated the effect of smart technologies on dimensions of social connectedness. Fourteen studies reported positive outcomes in aspects such as social support, isolation and loneliness. There was emerging evidence that some technologies augmented the beneficial effects of more traditional aged-care services. Smart technologies, such as tailored internet programs, may help older people better manage and understand various health conditions, resulting in subsequent improvements in aspects of social connectedness. Further research is required regarding how technological innovations could be promoted, marketed and implemented to benefit older people. © 2014 ACOTA.

  2. Maternal smoking location at home and hospitalization for respiratory tract infections among children in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Michiyo; Yorifuji, Takashi; Kato, Tsuguhiko; Tsuda, Toshihide; Doi, Hiroyuki

    2017-11-02

    We examined the effects of maternal smoking location at home on hospitalization for respiratory tract infections among young children in Japan. We used the large nationwide population-based longitudinal survey and restricted study participants to children born after 37 gestational weeks and singleton births (n = 43,851). We evaluated the associations among children between the ages of 6 and 18 months and between the ages of 18 and 30 months, respectively. After adjusting for potential confounders, both maternal outdoor and indoor smoking were associated with the elevated risk. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of maternal outdoor and indoor smoking (vs nonsmoking mothers) were 1.21 (1.01-1.44) and 1.18 (1.04-1.33), respectively, in children between the ages of 6 and 18 months. We thus encourage a smoke-free home policy to protect children from second- and third-hand smoke exposure.

  3. Managing occupations in everyday life for people with advanced cancer living at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peoples, Hanne; Brandt, Åse; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen

    2017-01-01

    limited research that specifically explores how these occupational difficulties are managed. Objective: To describe and explore how people with advanced cancer manage occupations when living at home. Material and methods: A sub-sample of 73 participants from a larger occupational therapy project took part......Background: People with advanced cancer are able to live for extended periods of time. Advanced cancer can cause functional limitations influencing the ability to manage occupations. Although studies have shown that people with advanced cancer experience occupational difficulties, there is only...... in the study. The participants were consecutively recruited from a Danish university hospital. Qualitative interviews were performed at the homes of the participants. Content analysis was applied to the data. Results: Managing occupations were manifested in two main categories; 1) Conditions influencing...

  4. Managing occupations in everyday life for people with advanced cancer at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peoples, Hanne; Brandt, Åse; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen

    Background: People with advanced cancer are increasingly able to live for extended periods of time. Advanced cancer influences the ability to manage occupations in the everyday life. Although studies have showed that people with advanced cancer experience occupational difficulties......, there are limited research that more specifically explore how these are managed. The objective was to describe and explore how people with advanced cancer manage occupations at home. Material and methods: A qualitative descriptive design was applied. 73 participants were consecutively recruited from a Danish...... “Everyday life under change” and two sub-categories 1) Appling strategies to manage occupations in everyday life and 2) Preserving a meaningful everyday life. Significance: The findings suggest that people with advanced cancer, to a greater extent, should be supported in exploring familiar as well as new...

  5. From service quality in organisations to self-determination at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Tur, V; Moliner, C; Peñarroja, V; Gracia, E; Peiró, J M

    2015-10-01

    In our proposed model, family members' perceptions of service quality in organisations improve communication about self-determination. In turn, family perceptions of communication openness have a positive relationship with self-determination attitudes of family members. Finally, these attitudes predict self-determination behaviours of individuals with intellectual disability, as reported by family members. We tested this model with a sample of 625 family members (196 using 'day care services' and 429 using 'occupational services'). Multi-sample structural equation modelling (SEM) supported the model. Communication and attitudes fully mediated the link from service quality to self-determination behaviours. Improving family members' perceptions of service quality and opening channels of communication between professionals and family members are useful strategies to facilitate parents' positive attitudes and increase the frequency of self-determination behaviours at home. © 2015 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. How Do The EV Project Participants Feel about Charging Their EV at Home?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francfort, James E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Key Observations from the Survey of the EV Project Participants; In June 2013, 72% of EV Project participants were very satisfied with their home charging experience; 21% of participants relied totally on home charging for all of their charging needs; Volt owners relied more on home charging than Leaf owners, who reported more use of away-from-home charging; 74% of participants reported that they plug in their plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) every time they park at home. Others plugged in as they determined necessary to support their driving needs; 40% of participants reported that they would not have or are unsure that in June 2013 whether they would have purchased an alternating current (AC) Level 2 electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) for home charging if it had not been provided by The EV Project; and 61% of participants reported that The EV Project incentive was very important or important in their decision to obtain a PEV.

  7. Hospital at home: home-based end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepperd, Sasha; Gonçalves-Bradley, Daniela C; Straus, Sharon E; Wee, Bee

    2016-02-18

    The policy in a number of countries is to provide people with a terminal illness the choice of dying at home. This policy is supported by surveys indicating that the general public and people with a terminal illness would prefer to receive end-of-life care at home. This is the fourth update of the original review. To determine if providing home-based end-of-life care reduces the likelihood of dying in hospital and what effect this has on patients' symptoms, quality of life, health service costs, and caregivers, compared with inpatient hospital or hospice care. We searched the following databases until April 2015: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library), Ovid MEDLINE(R) (from 1950), EMBASE (from 1980), CINAHL (from 1982), and EconLit (from 1969). We checked the reference lists of potentially relevant articles identified and handsearched palliative care publications, clinical trials registries, and a database of systematic reviews for related trials (PDQ-Evidence 2015). Randomised controlled trials, interrupted time series, or controlled before and after studies evaluating the effectiveness of home-based end-of-life care with inpatient hospital or hospice care for people aged 18 years and older. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed study quality. We combined the published data for dichotomous outcomes using fixed-effect Mantel-Haenszel meta-analysis. When combining outcome data was not possible, we reported the results from individual studies. We included four trials in this review and did not identify new studies from the search in April 2015. Home-based end-of-life care increased the likelihood of dying at home compared with usual care (risk ratio (RR) 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14 to 1.55, P = 0.0002; Chi(2) = 1.72, df = 2, P = 0.42, I(2) = 0%; 3 trials; N = 652; high quality evidence). Admission to hospital while receiving home-based end-of-life care varied between trials, and this was

  8. [Current State of Medical Support by Nurses to Guide Cancer Patients to at Home Death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tange, Mitsuru; Hoshina, Kaori; Tsuda, Takashi

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the palliative care support in home-based settings for patients with end-stage cancer. Fifty patients who died at home were analyzed. MSC nurses listened to the patients and informal caregivers for their preferences for place of death. Home death was selected by 30%of participants prior to the environment adjustment support and by 68% after. The period leading up to home care that started with the adjustment assistance by MSC was 5 days(median). Nurse support by the MSC is intended to promote decision making regarding the place of end-of-life care. The dialogue between the hospital and local medical institutions is accelerating the period until the start of home care.

  9. Hospital-admitted COPD patients treated at home using telemedicine technology in The Virtual Hospital Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Anna Svarre; Laursen, Lars C; Østergaard, Birte

    2013-01-01

    Recent reviews suggest that telemedicine solutions for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may prevent hospital readmissions and emergency room visits and improve health-related quality of life. However, the studies are few and only involve COPD patients who are in a stable...... phase or in-patients who are ready for discharge. COPD patients hospitalized with an acute exacerbation may also benefit from telemedicine solutions. The overall aim is to investigate a telemedicine-based treatment solution for patients with acute exacerbation of COPD at home as compared to conventional...... hospital treatment measured according to first treatment failure, which is defined as readmission due to COPD within 30 days after discharge....

  10. Faces of the Welfare State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Mette-Louise

    2012-01-01

    the welfare State and other realms of life, such as their family and neighborhood, threatening to take away their children (to crime, to prison, to foster families or to the divorced partner, etc). The paper conceptualizes immobility and confinement as embedded in the contrary; a continuous spatial placement......The paper is a short presentation of a central theme in my PhD thesis, which revolves around the way the welfare State is approached as dangerous by parents struggling to keep their family from falling apart. The thesis is an excavation of the risks and dangers they navigate in relation to both...

  11. Crafting the English Welfare State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ydesen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    administrators in England during the constitutive years of English welfare state formation. Using Birmingham local education administration as an empirical and historical case, the influential Children Acts of 1948 and 1963 serve to demarcate the period treated. The theoretical framework is drawn from Bourdieu...... and Wacquant’s concept of state, with the key concept being ‘state-crafting’. The article contributes knowledge about the imaginaries, and the manufacturing and managing of ‘the public good’ – understood as a referent for modern governing – of the English welfare state. The article concludes...

  12. Ethnicization in Welfare State Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Frederik Georg

    that ethnicization is at once more limited (in that it is unlikely for the most widely discussed issue, welfare) and more pervasive (in that it can arise from local contexts as well as from media). Ethnicization of attitudes is one way in which immigration can influence political life, even when the political agenda...... is to a significant extent shaped by studies of American public opinion, where public opinion on some issues is widely considered 'racialized', i.e. in part based on attitudes toward racial outgroups. The dissertation examines whether by the same token, political attitudes in universal welfare states can become...

  13. Assessment of welfare in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Antonella Volpelli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the definition given by Appleby (1996, animal welfare represents the state of well-being brought about by meeting the physical, environmental, nutritional, behavioural and social needs of the animal or groups of animals under the care, supervision or influence of people. Suitable husbandry techniques and disease control (in which man is directly involved may satisfy an animal’s physical, environmental and nutritive needs. However, it cannot be stated that people’s supervision or influence always guarantee the satisfaction of behavioural and social needs. Thus, special attention must be paid to these factors in intensive husbandry. This paper calls attention to the main factors characterizing pig welfare on the basis of productive, physiological, pathological and behavioural indicators; to the behavioural needs, which are characterised by several peculiar traits (it is noteworthy that, since the beginning, all categories of reared pigs have been involved in welfare legislation; to all categories of pigs that often show the effects of negative stimuli on their behaviour (limitations, variations; to the main critical points on the farm likely to cause welfare impairment or stress including buildings, inner facilities, space allowance, microclimate, lighting systems, environmental stressors, feeding management, mutilations, weaning, social factors, and stockmanship; and to environmental stressors including dust, odours (especially ammonia and noises. This paper takes into account sources, effects and possible solutions for noises; the positive effect of fibrous feeding; environmental enrichment and other possible techniques for improving social status and for preventing/reducing stereotypic behaviour and abnormal reactions (e.g. tail biting. The scientific/objective evaluation of welfare for intensively reared pigs may be carried out by means of direct observation of the animals themselves (animal-based or encompassing performance

  14. Welfare State Changes and Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alves, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that welfare states ensure a certain level of social protection affecting levels of well-being and the extent of inequalities in society. Changes within crucial domains of social policy, such as education, health, or social protection, have, therefore, a major effect upon...... individuals’ opportunities. In this article I compare the effects of these changes in two countries from the mid-1980s to the financial crisis of 2008. Portugal that was a latecomer in welfare state development and Denmark was at the forefront of de-commodification and universalization of social rights...

  15. Welfare-Reducing Trade Liberalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Philipp J.H.; Jørgensen, Jan G.

    tariff that maximizes national and world welfare. Applying one of the simplest specifications possible, namely a symmetric two-country intra-industry trade model with fixed export costs that are heterogeneous across firms, we find that the reciprocal reduction of small tariffs reduces welfare. We explore......Recent literature on the workhorse model of intra-industry trade has explored heterogeneous cost structures at the firm level. These approaches have proven to add realism and predictive power. This note shows, however, that this added realism also implies that there may exist a positive bilateral...

  16. Gender inequality at home is associated with poorer health for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eek, Frida; Axmon, Anna

    2015-03-01

    As more women have joined the work force, the difference in employment rate between men and women has decreased, in Sweden as well as many other countries. Despite this, traditional gender patterns regarding, for example, responsibility for household duties still remain. Women are on sick leave more often than men, and previous studies have indicated that an unequal split of household responsibilities and perceived gender inequality could be associated with negative health outcomes. The aim of the present study was to explore whether an unequal distribution of responsibilities in the home was related to various health related outcomes among women. A sample consisting of 837 women living in a relationship, and working at least 50% of full time, responded to a questionnaire including information about division of responsibilities at home as well as various psychological and physiological health related outcomes. The results showed that women living in relationships with perceived more unequal distribution of responsibility for house hold duties showed significantly higher levels of perceived stress, fatigue, physical/psychosomatic symptoms, and work family conflict compared with women living in more equal relationships. They also had significantly increased odds for insufficient time for various forms of recovery, which may further contribute to an increased risk of poor health. Although an increasing employment rate among women is valuable for both society and individuals, it is important to work towards greater gender equality at home to maintain this development without it having a negative effect on women's health and well-being. © 2014 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  17. Patient and family perspectives on peritoneal dialysis at home: findings from an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Jessica; Lankshear, Annette

    2015-01-01

    To discuss findings from an ethnographic study, considering the experiences of patients and families, using peritoneal dialysis at home in the United Kingdom. Peritoneal dialysis is a daily, life-preserving treatment for end-stage renal disease, undertaken in the patient's home. With ever-growing numbers of patients requiring treatment for this condition, the increased use of peritoneal dialysis is being promoted. While it is known that quality of life is reduced when using dialysis, few studies have sought to explore experiences of peritoneal dialysis specifically. No previous studies were identified that adopted an ethnographic approach. A qualitative design was employed, utilising ethnographic methodology. Ethical and governance approvals were gained in November 2010 and data were generated in 2011. Patients (n = 16) and their relatives (n = 9) were interviewed and observed using peritoneal dialysis in their homes. Thematic analysis was undertaken using Wolcott's (1994) three stage process: Description, Analysis and Interpretation. This article describes four themes: initiating peritoneal dialysis; the constraints of peritoneal dialysis due to medicalisation of the home environment and the imposition of rigid timetables; the uncertainty of managing crises and inevitable deterioration; and seeking freedom through creativity and hope of a kidney transplant. This study highlights the culture of patients and their families living with peritoneal dialysis. Despite the challenges posed by the treatment, participants were grateful they were able to self-manage at home. Furthermore, ethnographic methods offer an appropriate and meaningful way of considering how patients live with home technologies. Participants reported confusion about kidney transplantation and also how to identify peritonitis, and ongoing education from nurses and other healthcare professionals is thus vital. Opportunities for sharing experiences of peritoneal dialysis were valued by participants and

  18. Screen Time at Home and School among Low-Income Children Attending Head Start.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Erica N; Whitaker, Robert C; Marino, Alexis J; Anderson, Sarah E

    2014-06-01

    To describe the patterns of screen viewing at home and school among low-income preschool-aged children attending Head Start and identify factors associated with high home screen time in this population. Few studies have examined both home and classroom screen time, or included computer use as a component of screen viewing. Participants were 2221 low-income preschool-aged children in the United States studied in the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) in spring 2007. For 5 categories of screen viewing (television, video/DVD, video games, computer games, other computer use), we assessed children's typical weekday home (parent-reported) and classroom (teacher-reported) screen viewing in relation to having a television in the child's bedroom and sociodemographic factors. Over half of children (55.7%) had a television in their bedroom, and 12.5% had high home screen time (>4 hours/weekday). Television was the most common category of home screen time, but 56.6% of children had access to a computer at home and 37.5% had used it on the last typical weekday. After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, children with a television in their bedroom were more likely to have high home screen time [odds ratio=2.57 (95% confidence interval: 1.80-3.68)]. Classroom screen time consisted almost entirely of computer use; 49.4% of children used a classroom computer for ≥1 hour/week, and 14.2% played computer games at school ≥5 hours/week. In 2007, one in eight low-income children attending Head Start had >4 hours/weekday of home screen time, which was associated with having a television in the bedroom. In the Head Start classroom, television and video viewing were uncommon but computer use was common.

  19. Evaluation of care quality for disabled older patients living at home and in institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Ching; Shiu, Ming-Neng; Chen, Huey-Tzy; Ng, Yee-Yung; Lin, Li-Chan; Wu, Shiao-Chi

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the level of care quality received by disabled older patients residing at home vs. those residing in institutions. Taiwan has an aging society and faces issues of caring for disabled older patients, including increasing needs, insufficient resources and a higher economic burden of care. Retrospective study extracting patient data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance database. We enrolled 76,672 disabled older patients aged 65 years and older who resided at home or institutions and had submitted claims for coverage of National Health Insurance for home care received for the first time between 2004-2006. Propensity score matching was applied to create a home-care group and an institutional-care group with 27,894 patients each. Indicators of care quality (emergency services use, hospitalisation, infection, pressure ulcers, death) within the first year were observed. The home care group had significantly higher emergency services use, fewer hospital admissions and fewer infections, but had significantly higher occurrence of pressure ulcers. The institutional-care group had significantly lower time intervals between emergencies, fewer deaths, lower risk of emergencies and lower pressure ulcer risk. Males had significantly higher emergency services use than females, and higher risk of hospital admission and death. Care quality indicators for elder care are significantly different between home care and institutional care. The quality of home care is associated with higher emergency services use and pressure ulcer development, and institutional care is associated with number of infections and hospitalisations. Care quality indicators were significantly different between home-care and institutional-care groups and were closely associated with the characteristics of individual patients' in the specific settings. Nursing capabilities must be directed towards reducing unnecessary care quality-related events among high-risk disabled older

  20. Hospice Care in Assisted Living Facilities Versus at Home: Results of a Multisite Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Meredith; Harris, Pamela S; Teno, Joan; Corcoran, Amy M; Douglas, Cindy; Nelson, Jackie; Way, Deborah; Harrold, Joan E; Casarett, David J

    2015-06-01

    To compare residents of assisted living facilities receiving hospice with people receiving hospice care at home. Electronic health record-based retrospective cohort study. Nonprofit hospices in the Coalition of Hospices Organized to Investigate Comparative Effectiveness network. Individuals admitted to hospice between January 1, 2008, and May 15, 2012 (N = 85,581; 7,451 (8.7%) assisted living facility, 78,130 (91.3%) home). Hospice length of stay, use of opioids for pain, and site of death. The assisted living population was more likely than the home hospice population to have a diagnosis of dementia (23.5% vs 4.7%; odds ratio (OR) = 13.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 12.3-14.4; P < .001) and enroll in hospice closer to death (median length of stay 24 vs 29 days). Assisted living residents were less likely to receive opioids for pain (18.1% vs 39.7%; OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.29-0.39, P < .001) and less likely to die in an inpatient hospice unit (9.3% vs 16.1%; OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.49-0.58, P < .001) or a hospital (1.3% vs 7.6%; OR = 0.16, 95% CI = 0.13-0.19, P < .001). Three are several differences between residents of assisted living receiving hospice care and individuals living at home receiving hospice care. A better understanding of these differences could allow hospices to develop guidelines for better coordination of end-of-life care for the assisted living population. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  1. Person identification from gait analysis with a depth camera at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Amandine; Bresciani, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our project is to develop a markerless system to detect falls and evaluate the frailty of elderly people at home. In previous work, we developed an algorithm detecting falls and daily life activities based on depth images provided by Microsoft's Kinect sensor. We also developed another algorithm based on the same features for gait analysis. However, an ambient system installed at home for frailty evaluation should be able to identify the individuals that one wishes to monitor. This paper proposes a method to identify individuals based on the depth images of gait sequences. The gait sequences are detected using previously presented results on activity recognition based on Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). The visibility of the person in the sequence is assessed from the likelihood of the sequence. We propose to perform the identification of the person from her height and gait in sequences in which she walks being fully visible. The gait pattern of the person is modeled using a HMM built from features of the trajectory of the centre of mass. A specific HMM is built for each person to be identified. This approach also allows us to identify unknown individuals who do not correspond to any of the built HMMs. We test the algorithm with 10 known and 2 unknown individuals. The results show that the presented method differentiates accurately enough the unknown and known individuals, and in the last case identifies correctly the individuals. In other words, our algorithm is able to identify the person of interest among other known (family, caregivers) or unknown persons (occasional individuals).

  2. Euthanasia in patients dying at home in Belgium: interview study on adherence to legal safeguards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smets, Tinne; Bilsen, Johan; Van den Block, Lieve; Cohen, Joachim; Van Casteren, Viviane; Deliens, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Background Euthanasia became legal in Belgium in 2002. Physicians must adhere to legal due care requirements when performing euthanasia; for example, consulting a second physician and reporting each euthanasia case to the Federal Review Committee. Aim To study the adherence and non-adherence of GPs to legal due care requirements for euthanasia among patients dying at home in Belgium and to explore possible reasons for non-adherence. Design of study Large scale, retrospective study. Setting General practice in Belgium. Method A retrospective mortality study was performed in 2005–2006 using the nationwide Belgian Sentinel Network of General Practitioners. Each week GPs reported medical end-of-life decisions taken in all non-sudden deaths of patients in their practice. GP interviews were conducted for each euthanasia case occurring at home. Results Interviews were conducted for nine of the 11 identified euthanasia cases. Requirements concerning the patient's medical condition were met in all cases. Procedural requirements such as consultation of a second physician were sometimes ignored. Euthanasia cases were least often reported (n = 4) when the physician did not regard the decision as euthanasia, when only opioids were used to perform euthanasia, or when no second physician was consulted. Factors that may contribute to explaining non-adherence to the euthanasia law included: being unaware of which practices are considered to be euthanasia; insufficient knowledge of the euthanasia law; and the fact that certain procedures are deemed burdensome. Conclusion Substantive legal due care requirements for euthanasia concerning the patient's request for euthanasia and medical situation were almost always met by GPs in euthanasia cases. Procedural consultation and reporting requirements were not always met. PMID:20353662

  3. EnergySavers: Tips on Saving Money & Energy at Home (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's consumer guide to saving money and energy at home and on the road. It consists of the following articles: (1) Save Money and Energy Today - Get started with things you can do now, and use the whole-house approach to ensure that your investments are wisely made to save you money and energy; (2) Your Home's Energy Use - Find out how your home uses energy, and where it's losing the most energy so you can develop a plan to save in the short and long term; (3) Air Leaks and Insulation - Seal air leaks and insulate your home properly so your energy dollars don't seep through the cracks; (4) Heating and Cooling - Use efficient systems to heat and cool your home, and save money and increase comfort by properly maintaining and upgrading equipment; (5) Water Heating - Use the right water heater for your home, insulate it and lower its temperature, and use less water to avoid paying too much; (6) Windows - Enjoy light and views while saving money by installing energy-efficient windows, and use strategies to keep your current windows from losing energy; (7) Lighting - Choose today's energy-efficient lighting for some of the easiest and cheapest ways to reduce your electric bill; (8) Appliances - Use efficient appliances through-out your home, and get greater performance with lower energy bills; (9) Home Office and Electronics - Find out how much energy your electronics use, reduce their out-put when you're not using them, and choose efficient electronics to save money; (10) Renewable Energy - Use renewable energy at home such as solar and wind to save energy dollars while reducing environmental impact; (11) Transportation - Choose efficient transportation options and drive more efficiently to save at the gas pump; and (12) References - Use our reference list to learn more about energy efficiency and renewable energy.

  4. Euthanasia in patients dying at home in Belgium: interview study on adherence to legal safeguards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smets, Tinne; Bilsen, Johan; Van den Block, Lieve; Cohen, Joachim; Van Casteren, Viviane; Deliens, Luc

    2010-04-01

    Euthanasia became legal in Belgium in 2002. Physicians must adhere to legal due care requirements when performing euthanasia; for example, consulting a second physician and reporting each euthanasia case to the Federal Review Committee. To study the adherence and non-adherence of GPs to legal due care requirements for euthanasia among patients dying at home in Belgium and to explore possible reasons for non-adherence. Large scale, retrospective study. General practice in Belgium. A retrospective mortality study was performed in 2005-2006 using the nationwide Belgian Sentinel Network of General Practitioners. Each week GPs reported medical end-of-life decisions taken in all non-sudden deaths of patients in their practice. GP interviews were conducted for each euthanasia case occurring at home. Interviews were conducted for nine of the 11 identified euthanasia cases. Requirements concerning the patient's medical condition were met in all cases. Procedural requirements such as consultation of a second physician were sometimes ignored. Euthanasia cases were least often reported (n = 4) when the physician did not regard the decision as euthanasia, when only opioids were used to perform euthanasia, or when no second physician was consulted. Factors that may contribute to explaining non-adherence to the euthanasia law included: being unaware of which practices are considered to be euthanasia; insufficient knowledge of the euthanasia law; and the fact that certain procedures are deemed burdensome. Substantive legal due care requirements for euthanasia concerning the patient's request for euthanasia and medical situation were almost always met by GPs in euthanasia cases. Procedural consultation and reporting requirements were not always met.

  5. Unmet needs, quality of life and support networks of people with dementia living at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Castillo, Claudia; Woods, Bob; Galboda, Kumari; Oomman, Sabu; Olojugba, Charles; Orrell, Martin

    2010-11-12

    There is lack of evidence about the unmet needs of people with dementia (PWD) living at home and the predictors of high levels of unmet needs. The main aim of this study was to identify the relationship between unmet needs, social networks and quality of life of PWD living at home. One hundred and fifty two community dwelling PWD and 128 carers were interviewed about PWD's needs, social networks, quality of life and other functional and psychological factors. All the interviews with PWD were carried out at their homes. Interviews with carers were undertaken either at PWD's home, their own home or at the health centre. Whenever possible, PWD and carers were interviewed separately. The data collection took place between November 2005 and July 2007. The majority of participants (129, 84.9%) were recruited from National Health Services (NHS) and the rest (23, 15.1%) were recruited from other organisations such as social services and voluntary organizations in the UK. The most frequent unmet needs for PWD were daytime activities (77, 50.7%), company (60, 39.5%), and help with psychological distress (47, 30.9%). Higher number of behavioural and psychological symptoms, low-community involvement social networks, having a younger carer and higher carer's anxiety were found to be predictors of higher unmet needs in PWD. Social networks and behavioural and psychological symptoms had an indirect effect on PWD's self-rated quality of life through unmet needs. Interventions aiming to reduce unmet needs, through the treatment of behavioural and psychological symptoms and the involvement of PWD in the community, would potentially improve PWD's quality of life.

  6. Perceived effects of home renovation on independence of physically disabled Koreans living at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeunsook; Park, Jiyoung; Jang, Miseon

    2017-06-06

    This study aims to identify the potential effects of home renovation on independence promotion of physically disabled Koreans living at home. The method of the study is a survey with a questionnaire; subjects are physically disabled people living at home in rural and urban areas in Korea. The Functional Independence Measure was used to measure changes in subjects' levels of independence. It was expected that if homes were renovated according to individual needs, disabled people's independence level would be increased by one or more level compared to their current daily independence level in their existing homes. In particular, independence levels concerning bathing and locomotion, which are low in existing conditions, were expected to increase significantly with renovation. Such effects on independence level were conspicuous for disabled people in rural area. The results prove the positive effects of home renovations of disabled people's independence, thus providing meaningful academic evidence on home renovations for disabled people. Implication for rehabilitation Korea had a culture where support measures to aid the life independence of disabled persons relied heavily on human services, leading to a lack of diversity in support measures. By closing the gap between the resident's disability and the inadequacy in their prevailing environment, house remodeling can be a crucial intervention for improving the independence of disabled persons in their daily lives. Depending on the nature of their disabilities and their residential arrangements, disabled persons have diverse needs regarding home remodeling. Implementing home remodeling in such a manner that suits the resident's needs is crucial to boosting their independence. Because of this, remodeling personnel must interact with residents prior to the renovation while also strengthening their expertise.

  7. Investigation of Frequency of Leftover Drugs at Home and Related Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muharrem Ucar

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: The purpose of this survey was to investigate the frequency of leftover drugs at homes and related factors regarding this problem. METHOD: This descriptive study was performed among 692 non-medical personnel servicing at two military bases in December 2006. Data were collected by using a questionnaire, which had been developed by the investigators. Frequencies and percents were used as descriptive statistics. Chi-square test was used to compare the frequencies of leftover drugs according to certain variables. RESULTS: Of the total participants 78,8% were males, 72,8% aged between 18 to 39, and 29,6% were unmarried. The findings revealed that 61,3% of the participants had leftover drugs at their homes. Participants living with together 2 to 4 family members had higher frequencies of leftover drugs at homes. When we looked at the frequencies of leftover drugs according to drug use behaviors; the frequency of leftover drug was determined higher among those who stated; the recipe was not explained sufficiently, he did not use drugs as directed, he kept drugs until due time when did not use all of the drugs, he kept drugs in a box or bag, he visited a health center in order to have a recipe (p<0,05. CONCLUSION: It was determined leftover drugs were kept at nearly two third of the participants’ homes. Regarding incompleteness of treatment, the intoxication risk for children, and drug waste, this frequency of drug leftover was high, and all responsible professions in the chain of rationale drug use particularly physicians should be awaked on this issue. The use of drugs in a recipe should be explained to patients clearly. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2009; 8(2.000: 113-118

  8. Fiscal 2000 report on results of R and D of welfare techno-system in West Ward, Kobe City; 2000 nendo walfare techno system kenkyu kaihatsu (Kobe-shi Nishi-ku) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    R and D was conducted on devices for promoting self-support, mitigating nursing care, and improving safety and comfort for the elderly and the disabled, with the fiscal 2000 results reported. In the development of a wheelchair system (small arm sling mountable on a wheelchair) capable of assisting self-support for eating and vocational activity at home, a mounting device of an arm sling was experimentally manufactured for five different types of wheelchairs. In the research on the welfare device support system at a disaster or emergency, the system was modified based on the result of the system operation in the preceding year. Consequently, it became possible to make use of a power from a solar battery, a storage battery and an utility line, and also to reduce instantaneous interruption caused by switching of the self-sustaining operation for example. Further, a load control adaptor linked with an inverter was developed, enabling the system to use electricity for a long period even at the time of power failure. In addition, a conventional simple charge/discharge control was found to cause a marked deterioration in storage cell properties; hence, an accurate charge controller was added. (NEDO)

  9. Data Mining in Child Welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoech, Dick; Quinn, Andrew; Rycraft, Joan R.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the historical and larger context of data mining and describes data mining processes, techniques, and tools. Illustrates these using a child welfare dataset concerning the employee turnover that is mined, using logistic regression and a Bayesian neural network. Discusses the data mining process, the resulting models, their predictive…

  10. Four Normative Languages of Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mathias Herup

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the normative languages used by ordinary citizens to measure ongoing welfare state transformations in Denmark. Empirically, the article turns to qualitative data from a deliberative democratic forum where 35 citizens gathered to reflect upon and discuss the future...

  11. Dietary nitrogen and fish welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Luis E C; Aragão, Cláudia; Dias, Jorge; Costas, Benjamín; Terova, Genciana; Martins, Catarina; Tort, Lluis

    2012-02-01

    Little research has been done in optimizing the nitrogenous fraction of the fish diets in order to minimize welfare problems. The purpose of this review is to give an overview on how amino acid (AA) metabolism may be affected when fish are under stress and the possible effects on fish welfare when sub-optimal dietary nitrogen formulations are used to feed fish. In addition, it intends to evaluate the current possibilities, and future prospects, of using improved dietary nitrogen formulations to help fish coping with predictable stressful periods. Both metabolomic and genomic evidence show that stressful husbandry conditions affect AA metabolism in fish and may bring an increase in the requirement of indispensable AA. Supplementation in arginine and leucine, but also eventually in lysine, methionine, threonine and glutamine, may have an important role in enhancing the innate immune system. Tryptophan, as precursor for serotonin, modulates aggressive behaviour and feed intake in fish. Bioactive peptides may bring important advances in immunocompetence, disease control and other aspects of welfare of cultured fish. Fishmeal replacement may reduce immune competence, and the full nutritional potential of plant-protein ingredients is attained only after the removal or inactivation of some antinutritional factors. This review shows that AA metabolism is affected when fish are under stress, and this together with sub-optimal dietary nitrogen formulations may affect fish welfare. Furthermore, improved dietary nitrogen formulations may help fish coping with predictable stressful events.

  12. Social Welfare Activism in Jordan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marie Juul

    , this interest tends to focus on secular organisations and institutions, overlooking religious ones, although these make up a large part of Jordanian civil society. Particularly interesting are the country's many Muslim social welfare organisations, engaged in activities such as education, health care...

  13. Measuring Welfare of Productive Consumers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Tinbergen (Jan)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractIn the last few decades an increasing number of economists have contributed to new methods of welfare (or utility) measurement. As set out in this journal (Tinbergen, 1985) three groups of economists have been active in this field since 1968, initially relatively independently; an

  14. Air quality and human welfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundseth K.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Human welfare is generally referring to allocation of resources to fit the well being of humans. If high standard of well-being is to be maintained, the concerns for a healthy environment must be balanced against requirements of economic growth. In a natural capital system, human welfare is best served by improving the quality and flow of desired services delivered rather than merely increasing the total money flow. An ecosystem based management of living and natural resource use will steer this progress to the best of human welfare while the efficiency of ecosystem based management depends strongly on the availability of integrated assessment tools that will combine environmental models and monitoring data with ecological economic valuation methods. In applied welfare economics, the methodological approach to assess resource allocations towards societal optimality and thereby establish criteria for government intervention is often linked to tools as Cost-ffectiveness Analysis (CEA, Cost-Benefit Assessment (CBA or Multi-criteria Analysis (MCA. By illustrating an assessment on costs and benefits of the implementation of Hg emission reduction measures in the coal sector, it becomes obvious that for a full analysis of societal costs and benefits, several aspects of Hg pollution, sources, impacts and co-benefits need to be considered.

  15. STRESS AND ANIMAL-WELFARE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIEPKEMA, PR; KOOLHAAS, JM

    When individual vertebrates loose grip on their life conditions stress symptoms appear and their welfare becomes problematic. Present day research supports the view that stress can originate when an organism experiences a substantial reduction of predictability and/or controllability (P/C) of

  16. Four Normative Languages of Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mathias Herup

    2018-01-01

    This article explores the normative languages used by ordinary citizens to measure ongoing welfare state transformations in Denmark. Empirically, the article turns to qualitative data from a deliberative democratic forum where 35 citizens gathered to reflect upon and discuss the future of the wel......This article explores the normative languages used by ordinary citizens to measure ongoing welfare state transformations in Denmark. Empirically, the article turns to qualitative data from a deliberative democratic forum where 35 citizens gathered to reflect upon and discuss the future...... to be of particular importance: (1) A civic order of worth, defining individualism and welfare consumerism as the big problems while emphasizing the need for every citizen to mentally step out of their selfish state of mind and care more for others and society as such. (2) A domestic order of worth stating...... of worth stating welfare dependency to be one of the big problems and stressing the need for individual responsibility and for giving structural incentives for such behaviour....

  17. Intercultural Health Care and Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Artiklen har fokus på undervisning, planlægning, udvikling og evaluering af et internationalt tværfagligt valgfag Intercultural Health Care and Welfare, der udbydes på Det Sundhedsfaglige og Teknologiske Fakultet på Professionshøjskolen Metropol. Ifølge den tysk-amerikanske professor Iris Varner og...

  18. Lifelong Learning and Welfare Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Colin

    1999-01-01

    An alternative perspective on lifelong learning locates it in culture, civil society, and leisure/consumption lifestyles. Distinctions between education and learning and markets and quasi-markets are used to explore policy models. The relationship to welfare reform policies is discussed. (Author/SK)

  19. Patients experiences of negative pressure wound therapy at home for the treatment of deep perivascular groin infection after vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsen, Christina; Acosta, Stefan; Kumlien, Christine

    2017-05-01

    To explore experiences of negative pressure wound therapy at home, in patients with deep perivascular groin infection after vascular surgery and management in daily life. Deep surgical site infection after vascular surgery with exposed vessels often requires long-term treatment with negative pressure wound therapy, and continued therapy at home has become routine. An explorative qualitative study. Nine men and six women with a deep surgical site infection in the groin after vascular surgery, treated in their home with negative pressure wound therapy, were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using manifest and latent content analysis. Undergoing negative pressure wound therapy at home meant a transition from being a dependent patient to a person who must have self-care competence and be involved in their own care. A need to feel prepared for this before discharge from hospital was expressed. Lack of information and feelings of uncertainty prolonged the time before feeling confident in managing the treatment. The informants gradually accepted the need to be tied up to a machine, became competent in its management and found solutions to perform everyday tasks. Overall, it was a relief to be treated at home. Several benefits of negative pressure wound therapy at home were expressed. However, unnecessary stress and anxiety were experienced due to a lack of information on the treatment and instruction concerning the equipment. Adequate information and education must therefore be provided to facilitate the transition from a patient to a person with self-care competence and ability to manage this treatment at home. The findings revealed a need for more support and knowledge in their transition from hospital care to home care with negative pressure wound therapy. Routines must be established that ensure patient safety and security in treatment at home. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. At-home and away-from-home dietary patterns and BMI z-scores in Brazilian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Diana Barbosa; Bezerra, Ilana Nogueira; Pereira, Rosangela Alves; Sichieri, Rosely

    2018-01-01

    Away-from-home food intake has been associated with high rates of overweight among children and adolescents. However, there are no studies comparing at-home and away-from-home eating patterns among adolescents. The objective of this paper was to identify at-home and away-from-home dietary patterns among adolescents in Brazil, and to evaluate the relationship between these patterns and body mass index (BMI) z-scores. Data from the Brazilian National Dietary Survey 2008-2009 were analyzed in this cross-sectional study. Dietary intake was assessed by completion of written food records on two non-consecutive days. Five thousand two hundred sixty-six adolescents 10-19 years of age living in urban areas of Brazil were included in the analysis. Thirty-two food groups were examined by factor analysis, stratified by at-home and away-from-home eating. The associations between the food patterns and BMI z-scores were ascertained using linear regression analysis. In general, mean at-home food intake was greater than away-from-home food intake, but the ratio of away-from-home/at-home was greater than 30% for baked and deep-fried snacks, soft drinks, sandwiches, pizza, and desserts, and was lower than 10% for rice and beans. Three main similar dietary patterns were identified both at-home and away-from-home: the "Traditional pattern", the "Bread and Butter pattern" and the "Western pattern"; however, away-from-home patterns encompassed more overall food items. Only the at-home "Western pattern" was positively associated with BMI z-scores (β = 0.0006; p home is associated to BMI z-score, while away-from-home food consumption is not associated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. At Home in the Universe - The Search for the Laws of Self-Organization and Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Stuart

    1995-09-01

    A major scientific revolution has begun, a new paradigm that rivals Darwin's theory in importance. At its heart is the discovery of the order that lies deep within the most complex of systems, from the origin of life, to the workings of giant corporations, to the rise and fall of great civilizations. And more than anyone else, this revolution is the work of one man, Stuart Kauffman, a MacArthur Fellow and visionary pioneer of the new science of complexity. Now, in At Home in the Universe , Kauffman brilliantly weaves together the excitement of intellectual discovery and a fertile mix of insights to give the general reader a fascinating look at this new science--and at the forces for order that lie at the edge of chaos.We all know of instances of spontaneous order in nature--an oil droplet in water forms a sphere, snowflakes have a six-fold symmetry. What we are only now discovering, Kauffman says, is that the range of spontaneous order is enormously greater than we had supposed. Indeed, self-organization is a great undiscovered principle of nature. But how does this spontaneous order arise? Kauffman contends that complexity itself triggers self-organization, or what he calls "order for free," that if enough different molecules pass a certain threshold of complexity, they begin to self-organize into a new entity--a living cell. Kauffman uses the analogy of a thousand buttons on a rug--join two buttons randomly with thread, then another two, and so on. At first, you have isolated pairs; later, small clusters; but suddenly at around the 500th repetition, a remarkable transformation occurs--much like the phase transition when water abruptly turns to ice--and the buttons link up in one giant network. Likewise, life may have originated when the mix of different molecules in the primordial soup passed a certain level of complexity and self-organized into living entities (if so, then life is not a highly improbable chance event, but almost inevitable). Kauffman uses the

  2. Final model of multicriterionevaluation of animal welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marianne; Botreau, R; Bracke, MBM

    One major objective of Welfare Quality® is to propose harmonized methods for the overall assessment of animal welfare on farm and at slaughter that are science based and meet societal concerns. Welfare is a multidimensional concept and its assessment requires measures of different aspects. Welfare...... Quality® proposes a formal evaluation model whereby the data on animals or their environment are transformed into value scores that reflect compliance with 12 subcriteria and 4 criteria of good welfare. Each animal unit is then allocated to one of four categories: excellent welfare, enhanced welfare......, acceptable welfare and not classified. This evaluation model is tuned according to the views of experts from animal and social sciences, and stakeholders....

  3. Double dose: the cumulative effect of TV viewing at home and in preschool on children's activity patterns and weight status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverno Ross, Sharon; Dowda, Marsha; Saunders, Ruth; Pate, Russell

    2013-05-01

    Little is known about how screen-based sedentary behavior at home and in preschool influences children's health and activity patterns. The current study examined the individual and cumulative influence of TV viewing at home and in preschool on children's physical activity (PA) and weight status. Children (n = 339) attending 16 preschools in South Carolina were grouped into high and low TV groups based on parent report of children's TV viewing at home and director report of TV use/rules in preschool. T-tests and mixed model ANOVAs examined differences in weight status and PA (min/hr) by high and low TV groups. Results revealed that children who were classified as High TV both at home and in pre- school had significantly lower levels of moderate-to-vigorous PA compared with their Low TV counterparts (8.3 (0.3) min/hr vs. 7.6 (0.2) min/hr, p TV groups at home or in preschool when examined individually. These findings demonstrate the importance of total environmental TV exposure on preschooler's PA. Longitudinal and observational research to assess preschoolers' cumulative screen-based sedentary behavior and its relationship with PA and weight status is needed.

  4. Finnish Mothers’ Assessments of the Harmfulness of Childcare at Home on Occupational Careers: A Comparison of Twelve European Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirpa Weckström

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It is generally believed that long periods of childcare at home deteriorate mothers’ occupational careers. This study examined mothers’ experiences regarding negative career consequences of full-time care of children at home, and of part-time work due to childcare. The focus was on Finland, a country that provides all mothers a financially compensated, longer-term childcare leave linked with unrestricted access to day care services. Experiences of Finnish mothers were compared with experiences of mothers in 11 other European countries. The data were based on European Social Survey (ESS round 2, conducted in 2004 and 2005. In all of the studied countries, the majority of mothers assessed that taking care of children at home had not harmed their occupational careers. There was, however, a clear cross-country variation. Perceived career consequences for both types of care at home were least common in Finland. In most of the investigated countries, longer times spent with children at home increased the probability to perceive negative career consequences. In Finland, the difference was relatively small. Thus, as long as the focus is on mothers’ perceptions, the longer-term childcare leave does not seem to markedly deteriorate Finnish mothers’ careers.

  5. Enabling at-homeness for residents living in a nursing home: Reflected experience of nursing home staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarnio, Lotta; Boström, Anne-Marie; Hedman, Ragnhild; Gustavsson, Petter; Öhlén, Joakim

    2017-12-01

    Older people are often living the last period of their lives in institutions such as nursing homes. Knowledge of this period, specifically related to at-homeness which can be described as wellbeing in spite of illness and has been regarded as one of the goals in palliative care, has been very little researched in the context of nursing homes and the experience of nursing home staff. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of nursing home staff of how to enable at-homeness for residents. Qualitative interpretive description methodology guided the design. The data generation was conducted in winter 2014-2015, when seven repetitive reflective group discussions with staff in a nursing home were held. The results show five patterns for how healthcare staff enabled at-homeness for the residents: Striving to know the resident, Showing respect for the resident's integrity, Creating and working in family-like relationships, Helping to find a new ordinariness and Preparing and making plans to ensure continuity. Nursing home staff seem to have collegial knowledge of how to enable at-homeness for the residents in a nursing home. Close relationships with respect for the resident's integrity stand out as enabling at-homeness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Comparison Between the Level of Happiness Among the Elderly Living at Home and That of Senior Home Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study was designed to compare the level of happiness among the elderly population living at home with that of senior home residents. Methods & Materials: This was a causative-comparative study. The statistical population consisted of all 60 plus men and women residing at home and senior homes in the city of Tabriz, from whom 100 samples were selected in two groups of 50 individuals (25 females and 25 males using an availability non-random sampling method. The oxford happiness questionnaire was used in order to collect data, which were then analyzed using an independent t-test. Results: Results showed that the level of happiness among the elderly living at home was significantly higher than that of senior home residents. Furthermore, among indicators of happiness, life satisfaction levels, psychological health, positive mood, and efficiency were significantly higher among the elderly living at home. However, there was no significant difference between the two in terms of self-esteem. Conclusion: Findings indicate that, due to better social and family support, the level of happiness among the elderly living at home is significantly higher than that of senior home residents. Conversely, residing at senior homes consequent to financial and family conditions, for those who would otherwise live with family, leads to depressed mood, dissatisfaction with life, and ultimately lack of happiness.

  7. The experience of living at home with frailty in old age: a psychosocial qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Caroline; Meyer, Julienne; Flatley, Mary; Holman, Cheryl

    2013-09-01

    With enhanced longevity, many people in late old age find themselves frail and living at home, often alone. Whilst conceptualisations vary, frailty is often used in clinical practice as a directional term, to refer to older people at particular risk of adverse health outcomes and to organise care. Investigation of the experience of being frail is a complementary and necessary addition to international research endeavours clearly to define, predict and measure frailty. Currently, there is little empirical work exploring how people over time manage being frail. The study aimed to understand the experience over time of home-dwelling older people deemed frail, in order to enhance the evidence base for person-centred approaches to frail elder care. The study design combined psychosocial narrative approaches and psycho-dynamically informed observation. Data on the experience of 15 frail older people were collected by visiting them up to four times over 17 months. These data were analyzed using psychosocial analytical methods that combined case based in-depth staged analysis of narratives with psycho-dynamically informed interpretations of observational data. The study was carried out in the homes of the participants; all lived in a socio-economically diverse area of inner London. 15 participants were purposively selected for living at home, being aged 85 or older and regarded as frail by a clinical multi-disciplinary intermediate care team. The findings challenge the negative terms in which frailty in older age is viewed in the predominant models. Rather, frailty is understood in terms of potential capacity - a state of imbalance in which people experience accumulated losses whilst working to sustain and perhaps create new connections. This study suggests that holding together loss and creativity is the ordinary, but nonetheless remarkable, experience of frail older people. For frail older people, the presence of others to engage with their stories, to recognise and

  8. Vancouver At Home: pragmatic randomized trials investigating Housing First for homeless and mentally ill adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    and HN groups had high rates of substance dependence, suicidality, and physical illness. Randomization resulted in no meaningful detectable differences between study arms. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN57595077 (Vancouver at Home study: Housing First plus Assertive Community Treatment versus congregate housing plus supports versus treatment as usual) and ISRCTN66721740 (Vancouver At Home study: Housing First plus Intensive Case Management versus treatment as usual). PMID:24176253

  9. Hispanic Mothers' Views of the Fathers' Role in Promoting Healthy Behaviors at Home: Focus Group Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora, Karina R; Cheney, Marshall; Branscum, Paul

    2017-06-01

    Overweight and obesity prevention interventions rarely take into account the unique role of fathers in promoting healthy home environments. To use qualitative methodology to examine the views of Hispanic mothers of children aged 2 to 5 years regarding fathers' roles in promoting healthy behaviors at home. Nine focus groups were conducted in Spanish with Hispanic mothers of preschool-aged children (N=55) from October to December 2015. Hispanic mothers were recruited from churches, community agencies, and preschools located in five Zip codes in the southwest part of Oklahoma City, OK. Questions examined the views of Hispanic mothers regarding fathers' roles in promoting healthy behaviors at home. Focus groups were audiorecorded, transcribed in Spanish, translated into English, and coded and analyzed for themes by two coders using NVivo version 10 software. Four themes were identified: fathers' disagreement with mothers about food preferences and preparation, fathers' support for child's healthy eating, fathers' support for child's physical activity, and fathers' lack of support for a healthy home food environment. Fathers' traditional expectations about the type of foods and portion sizes adults should eat conflicted with mothers' meal preparations. Mothers reported that, although they favored eating low-calorie meals, the meals fathers preferred eating were high-calorie meals (eg, quesadillas). In general, fathers supported healthy eating and physical activity behaviors for their children. Supportive behaviors for children included preparing healthy meals, using healthier cooking methods, grocery shopping with their children for healthy foods, and asking the child to participate in household chores and/or play sports. Fathers' unsupportive behaviors included bringing high-calorie foods, such as pizza, and sugary drinks into the home, using sweets and savory foods for emotion regulation, and displaying an indulgent parental feeding style. Mothers' views of fathers

  10. The implementation of the functional task exercise programme for elderly people living at home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleuren Margot A H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Functional Task Exercise programme is an evidence-based exercise programme for elderly people living at home. It enhances physical capacity with sustainable effects. FTE is provided by physiotherapists and remedial therapists. Although the intervention was found to be effective in a Randomised Controlled Trial, we may not assume that therapists will automatically supply the programme or that elderly people will automatically join the programme. This study protocol focuses on identifying determinants of implementation, developing implementation strategies and studying the effects of the implementation in daily practice. Methods/Design Phase 1: The systematic identification of determinants of the implementation of FTE among therapists and the elderly. A questionnaire study was conducted in a random sample of 100 therapists, and interviews took place with 23 therapists and 8 elderly people (aged 66 to 80 years. The determinants were broken down into four categories: the characteristics of the environment, the organisation, the therapists, and the training programme. Phase 2: Developing and applying strategies adapted to the determinants identified. Fifteen physiotherapists will be trained to provide FTE and to recruit elderly people living at home. The therapists will then deliver the 12-week programme to two groups of elderly, each consisting of six to twelve people aged 70 years or older. Phase 3: Study of implementation and the impact. To study the actual use of FTE: 1 therapists record information about the selection of participants and how they apply the key features of FTE, 2 the participating elderly will keep an exercise logbook, 3 telephone interviews will take place with the therapists and the elderly and there will be on-site visits. The effects on the elderly people will be studied using: 1 the Patient-Specific Questionnaire, the Timed Up and Go test and a two performance tests. All tests will be performed at

  11. Metamizole versus ibuprofen at home after day surgery: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stessel, Björn; Boon, Michiel; Joosten, Elbert A; Ory, Jean-Paul; Evers, Stefan; van Kuijk, Sander M J; Dubois, Jasperina; Hoofwijk, Daisy; Jamaer, Luc; Buhre, Wolfgang F F A

    2016-09-26

    Postoperative pain and, in a more extended perspective, quality of recovery (QOR) should be considered the principal endpoints after day surgery. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and paracetamol are a cornerstone of pain treatment after painful day surgery. Nevertheless, NSAIDs are not always sufficiently effective, have numerous contraindications, and consequently are not suitable in up to 25 % of all patients. Metamizole is a non-opioid compound with a favourable gastrointestinal, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular profile compared to NSAIDs. The aim of this study is to assess if a combination of metamizole and paracetamol is non-inferior to a combination of ibuprofen and paracetamol in the treatment of acute postoperative pain at home after painful day case surgery. In addition, we aim to assess and compare quality of recovery (QOR) profiles of both groups. This is an investigator-initiated, double-blind, randomised controlled, non-inferiority trial. A total of 200 patients undergoing elective haemorrhoid surgery, arthroscopic shoulder or knee surgery, or inguinal hernia repair in a day care setting will be randomised to receive either a combination of metamizole and paracetamol (MP) or a combination of ibuprofen and paracetamol (IP). Participants will take study medication orally for 4 days. Primary endpoints are average postoperative pain intensity measured by an 11-point Numeric Rating Scale at postoperative day 1 and QOR profile measured by the Functional Recovery Index (FRI), the 1-item Global Surgical Recovery (GSR) index and the EuroQol (EQ-5D) questionnaire at days 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 14 and 28 postoperatively. Secondary outcomes include compliance with study medication, adverse effects of study medication, use of rescue medication and satisfaction with study medication, surgery and hospital care and telephone follow-up. This study will provide clinical evidence on the analgesic efficacy and safety of a combination of metamizole and

  12. Heterogeneity and changes in preferences for dying at home: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Home-based models of hospice and palliative care are promoted with the argument that most people prefer to die at home. We examined the heterogeneity in preferences for home death and explored, for the first time, changes of preference with illness progression. Methods We searched for studies on adult preferences for place of care at the end of life or place of death in MEDLINE (1966–2011), EMBASE (1980–2011), psycINFO (1967–2011), CINAHL (1982–2011), six palliative care journals (2006–11) and reference lists. Standard criteria were used to grade study quality and evidence strength. Scatter plots showed the percentage preferring home death amongst patients, lay caregivers and general public, by study quality, year, weighted by sample size. Results 210 studies reported preferences of just over 100,000 people from 33 countries, including 34,021 patients, 19,514 caregivers and 29,926 general public members. 68% of studies with quantitative data were of low quality; only 76 provided the question used to elicit preferences. There was moderate evidence that most people prefer a home death–this was found in 75% of studies, 9/14 of those of high quality. Amongst the latter and excluding outliers, home preference estimates ranged 31% to 87% for patients (9 studies), 25% to 64% for caregivers (5 studies), 49% to 70% for the public (4 studies). 20% of 1395 patients in 10 studies (2 of high quality) changed their preference, but statistical significance was untested. Conclusions Controlling for methodological weaknesses, we found evidence that most people prefer to die at home. Around four fifths of patients did not change preference as their illness progressed. This supports focusing on home-based care for patients with advanced illness yet urges policy-makers to secure hospice and palliative care elsewhere for those who think differently or change their mind. Research must be clear on how preferences are elicited. There is an urgent need for studies

  13. At Home Photography-Based Method for Measuring Wrist Range of Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehan, Samir K; Rancy, Schneider K; Johnsen, Parker H; Hillstrom, Howard J; Lee, Steve K; Wolfe, Scott W

    2017-11-01

    Purpose  To determine the reliability of wrist range of motion (WROM) measurements based on digital photographs taken by patients at home compared with traditional measurements done in the office with a goniometer. Methods  Sixty-nine postoperative patients were enrolled in this study at least 3 months postoperatively. Active and passive wrist flexion/extension and radial/ulnar deviation were recorded by one of the two attending surgeons with a 1-degree resolution goniometer at the last postoperative office visit. Patients were provided an illustrated instruction sheet detailing how to take digital photographic images at home in six wrist positions (active and passive flexion/extension, and radial/ulnar deviation). Wrist position was measured from digital images by both the attending surgeons in a randomized, blinded fashion on two separate occasions greater than 2 weeks apart using the same goniometer. Reliability analysis was performed using the intraclass correlation coefficient to assess agreement between clinical and photography-based goniometry, as well as intra- and interobserver agreement. Results  Out of 69 enrolled patients, 30 (43%) patients sent digital images. Of the 180 digital photographs, only 9 (5%) were missing or deemed inadequate for WROM measurements. Agreement between clinical and photography-based measurements was "almost perfect" for passive wrist flexion/extension and "substantial" for active wrist flexion/extension and radial/ulnar deviation. Inter- and intraobserver agreement for the attending surgeons was "almost perfect" for all measurements. Discussion  This study validates a photography-based goniometry protocol allowing accurate and reliable WROM measurements without direct physician contact. Passive WROM was more accurately measured from photographs than active WROM. This study builds on previous photography-based goniometry literature by validating a protocol in which patients or their families take and submit their own

  14. The Globalization-welfare State Nexus Reconsidered

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie Meinhard; Niklas Potrafke

    2011-01-01

    Two hypotheses relate to the globalization-welfare state nexus: The efficiency hypothesis predicts that globalization reduces government sector size and governments’ capacity to finance the welfare state. The compensation hypothesis, in contrast, predicts that globalization induces a higher demand for social insurance which results in an extended welfare state. Empirical evidence on the globalization-welfare state nexus is mixed. We re-examine the evidence by investigating a yearly panel data...

  15. A Universal Animal Welfare Framework for Zoos

    OpenAIRE

    Kagan, Ron; Carter, Scott; Allard, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The Detroit Zoological Society's (DZS) Center for Zoo Animal Welfare (CZAW) was created to advance the science and policy of the welfare of exotic nonhuman animals in captivity. This important part of the DZS mission is achieved through assessments of, and research on, the welfare of animals in zoos; by recognizing extraordinary achievement in the advancement of animal welfare; by widely sharing knowledge through a bibliographic resource center; by conducting professional training for animal ...

  16. Welfarism and extra-welfarism: a critical overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brayan Viegas Seixas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Rules and principles for guiding decision-making in the health care sector have been debated for decades. Here, we present a critical appraisal of the two most important paradigms in this respect: welfarism and extra-welfarism. While the former deals with the maximization of the overall sum of individual utilities as its primary outcome, the latter has been focusing on the maximization of the overall health status. We argue that welfarism has three main problems: (1 its central idea of overall sum of individual utilities does not capture societal values decisively relevant in the context of health; (2 the use of the Potential Pareto Improvement brings an unresolvable separation between efficiency and equity; and (3 individual utility may not be a good measure in the health sector, given that individuals might value things that diminish their overall health. In turn, the extra-welfarist approach is criticized regarding four main limitations: (1 the advocated expansion of the evaluative space, moving from utility to health, may have represented in reality a narrowing of it; (2 it operates using non-explicit considerations of equity; (3 it still holds the issue of “inability to desire” of unprivileged people being considered the best judges of weighing the criteria used to building the health measures; and (4 there is controversial empirical evidence about society members’ values that support its assumptions. Overall, both paradigms show significant weaknesses, but the debate has still been within the realm of welfare economics, and even the new approaches to resource allocation in health care systems appear to be unable to escape from these boundaries.

  17. Health and welfare of organic livestock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sukkel, W.; Hommes, M.

    2009-01-01

    Animal health and welfare are important principles of organic animal husbandry. In the Netherlands organic animal husbandry has proven to perform better than the conventional sector on many aspects of animal welfare. The Dutch organic animal husbandry sector has recognised animal health and welfare

  18. Come cambia il modello di welfare europeo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Bent

    2006-01-01

    European welfare states are changing. All countries are witnessing demographic changes, and are experiencing the impact of globalization. These changes, it is expected, will have repercussions for the various welfare states. Against this background, this paper looks at how the welfare states in E...

  19. Welfare Rights in the Liberal Tradition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Thomas A.

    1990-01-01

    Maintains that welfare rights are not incompatible with liberalism's commitment to private property and freedom. Argues that students need to be aware of liberalism's favorable historical position on welfare. Examines the positions of John Locke, Thomas Paine, and John Stuart Mills on poverty, welfare, and the role of the state. (RW)

  20. Is competition between regions welfare increasing?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerdink, G.C. (Gerhard); Stauvermann, P.J. (Peter)

    2010-01-01

    It is generally assumed that competition increases welfare. The main idea behind this assumption is that competition in a market is the best incentive mechanism to produce efficient market outcomes. This is good for social welfare and therefore stimulating competition is welfare increasing.

  1. The Paradigmatic Struggle for Legitimacy of the Danish Welfare State regarding the Provision of Welfare Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, John Storm; Nielsen, Anna Lyneborg; Rendtorff, Jacob Dahl

    2014-01-01

    The Danish welfare state constitutes a paradigmatic case of the welfare struggle of modern welfare states. Taking care of vulnerable children and youths is used as a case study here, to illustrate the efforts of the welfare state to acquire legitimacy as a body of public administration. That is, ...

  2. An Exploration of Intent to Use Telehealth at Home for Patients with Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Lin Uei

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Telecare is defined as care practiced at a distance. It is an effective strategy for improving the self-health care management of home-patients with chronic diseases. The purpose of this study was to explore the intent to use of telehealth patients. The correlation between the self-care behaviors, the intent to use of telehealth, and the effects on physiological indicators of patients with chronic disease at home were studied. A cross-sectional study design employing purposive sampling was selected. The structured questionnaire ‘Telecare Usage Intention Scale and Self-Care Behavior Scale’ were used, ‘HbA1c, glucose levels and monthly blood pressure measurements’ were analyzed in this thirteen month study. The self-care behaviors of the participants were positively correlated with their intent to use telehealth (p < 0.01. The results also indicated that HbA1c, glucose levels and frequency BP measurement of the participants improved significantly after using telecare (p < 0.005. The results indicated a strong intent to use telehealth and positive perception of telecare services by in-home patients with a chronic disease. Telehealth improves the self-care behavior of in-home chronic disease patients and enhances medical professionals’ ability to deliver quality and effective healthcare.

  3. [At-home music therapy intervention using video phone (Skype) for elderly people with dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Miyako; Iizuka, Mieko; Nakamura, Michikazu; Aiba, Ikuko; Saito, Yufuko; Kubota, Masakazu; Urabe, Mie; Kinoshita, Ayae

    2014-12-01

    There are various nonpharmacological therapies available for elderly people with dementia, and these can improve quality of life and the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) that appear throughout the progression of the disease. Since a substantial number of effects have been reported for music therapy, we focused on this nonpharmacological intervention. Generally, musical therapy is provided collectively in facilities. However, the music used in this context may not consider the preferences and music abilities of each person. Therefore, in this study we created made-to-order music CDs that accounted for each participant's musical preferences and abilities. Utilizing the CDs, we conducted an intervention study of music therapy using a video phone (Skype) that elderly people with dementia can use at home. An advantage of conducting music therapy for individuals with dementia using a video phone is that those who have difficulty going to the hospital or participating in dementia-related therapy groups can participate in therapy in a familiar place. The results of this intervention showed that participants demonstrated signs of improvement as measured by the smile degree(Smile scan)and Behavior Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease (BEHAVE-AD) scale.

  4. Country of birth and language spoken at home in relation to illicit substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Li-Yin; George, M Anne; Armstrong, Robert W

    2002-01-01

    This study examines the association between country of birth, language spoken at home, and lifetime illicit substance use in a Canadian national sample. Secondary analysis of data was conducted using a sample of 8,656 persons who were between 15 and 54 years of age in 1994 and who participated in Canada's Alcohol and Other Drugs Survey. Rates of substance use differed among the four groups (42.6% for Canadian-born who spoke official languages, 33.8% for Canadian-born who spoke non-official languages, 35.2% for foreign-born who spoke official languages, and 11.1% for foreign-born who spoke non-official languages). The rate differences persisted after adjustment for sociodemographic factors, religiousness, friends' use of substances, and participation in social activities. More in-depth studies that include culture-specific information are required to explain the rate differences. In addition, alternative preventive strategies may be required to reduce substance use among foreign-born persons.

  5. Hand use at home and in clinical settings by children with cerebral palsy: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Marina; Ocarino, Juliana Melo; Bueno, Kátia Maria Penido; Mancini, Marisa Cotta

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the physical, attitudinal, and assistive characteristics of the home and the therapeutic settings that enable and/or hinder hand use by children with spastic hemiparesis CP. A qualitative study with 7 children with CP, their caregivers, and therapists was conducted. Children were observed at home and in their therapeutic settings to understand the supports and barriers from these environments regarding their use of the affected hand. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with caregivers and therapists. The transcribed interviews and field diaries were used for content analysis. The following thematic categories were drawn from the data analyses: (1) use when needed: from consistent to nonuse of the affected extremity; (2) making decisions: choosing to use or not use the affected extremity; and (3) responsibilities with activities: from complete dependence to independent performance. Discrepancies between caregivers and therapists' attitudes and actions towards children's hands use highlight the specific features from each context that facilitated or hindered children with CP's engagement in functional activities. Recommendations for future studies include investigating the relationship between the identified facilitators and improvements in children's effective hand use in home and clinical settings. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Nursing people at home is a special skill that requires support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Rosemary

    2012-02-01

    Nursing people at home has always been a special skill. It is very different from nursing people in hospital beds, or in clinical type settings outside of hospital, such as GP surgeries and health centres. The real point at which care changes fundamentally is when it crosses the patient's doorstep. To provide high quality nursing care to people in their own homes requires particular skills, knowledge and approaches - and the development of these has been seriously neglected in recent years. These are the basic tenets of the new report from the Queen's Nursing Institute (QNI) (2011), which was launched at the House of Lords in November 2011. The evidence for the report was gathered throughout the first year of the QNI's Right Nurse, Right Skills campaign, which was supported by BJCN. As part of the campaign, both nurses and members of the public were invited to leave stories and comments on a special webpage, and hundreds of people did so. The nurses talked about the replacement of registered nurses with health-care assistants, and the influx of inexperienced nurses who were not given the support they needed to develop community skills. Patients and carers spoke of their experiences of care - most of the time, these were good or excellent. However, too often, care was delivered by nurses or assistants who lacked the right skills to prevent harm or deliver care properly. The results were sometimes discomfort, sometimes unnecessary suffering, and occasionally very serious.

  7. Foreign body aspiration and language spoken at home: 10-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choroomi, S; Curotta, J

    2011-07-01

    To review foreign body aspiration cases encountered over a 10-year period in a tertiary paediatric hospital, and to assess correlation between foreign body type and language spoken at home. Retrospective chart review of all children undergoing direct laryngobronchoscopy for foreign body aspiration over a 10-year period. Age, sex, foreign body type, complications, hospital stay and home language were analysed. At direct laryngobronchoscopy, 132 children had foreign body aspiration (male:female ratio 1.31:1; mean age 32 months (2.67 years)). Mean hospital stay was 2.0 days. Foreign bodies most commonly comprised food matter (53/132; 40.1 per cent), followed by non-food matter (44/132; 33.33 per cent), a negative endoscopy (11/132; 8.33 per cent) and unknown composition (24/132; 18.2 per cent). Most parents spoke English (92/132, 69.7 per cent; vs non-English-speaking 40/132, 30.3 per cent), but non-English-speaking patients had disproportionately more food foreign bodies, and significantly more nut aspirations (p = 0.0065). Results constitute level 2b evidence. Patients from non-English speaking backgrounds had a significantly higher incidence of food (particularly nut) aspiration. Awareness-raising and public education is needed in relevant communities to prevent certain foods, particularly nuts, being given to children too young to chew and swallow them adequately.

  8. Creation of a National, At-home Model for Ashkenazi Jewish Carrier Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinzaid, Karen Arnovitz; Page, Patricia Zartman; Denton, Jessica Johnson; Ginsberg, Jessica

    2015-06-01

    Ethnicity-based carrier screening for the Ashkenazi Jewish population has been available and encouraged by advocacy and community groups since the early 1970's. Both the American College of Medical Genetics and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommend carrier screening for this population (Obstetrics and Gynecology, 114(4), 950-953, 2009; Genetics in Medicine, 10(1), 55-56, 2008). While many physicians inquire about ethnic background and offer appropriate carrier screening, studies show that a gap remains in implementing recommendations (Genetic testing and molecular biomarkers, 2011). In addition, education and outreach efforts targeting Jewish communities have had limited success in reaching this at-risk population. Despite efforts by the medical and Jewish communities, many Jews of reproductive age are not aware of screening, and remain at risk for having children with preventable diseases. Reaching this population, preferably pre-conception, and facilitating access to screening is critically important. To address this need, genetic counselors at Emory University developed JScreen, a national Jewish genetic disease screening program. The program includes a national marketing and PR campaign, online education, at-home saliva-based screening, post-test genetic counseling via telephone or secure video conferencing, and referrals for face-to-face genetic counseling as needed. Our goals are to create a successful education and screening program for this population and to develop a model that could potentially be used for other at-risk populations.

  9. An IoT System for Remote Monitoring of Patients at Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KeeHyun Park

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Application areas that utilize the concept of IoT can be broadened to healthcare or remote monitoring areas. In this paper, a remote monitoring system for patients at home in IoT environments is proposed, constructed, and evaluated through several experiments. To make it operable in IoT environments, a protocol conversion scheme between ISO/IEEE 11073 protocol and oneM2M protocol, and a Multiclass Q-learning scheduling algorithm based on the urgency of biomedical data delivery to medical staff are proposed. In addition, for the sake of patients’ privacy, two security schemes are proposed—the separate storage scheme of data in parts and the Buddy-ACK authorization scheme. The experiment on the constructed system showed that the system worked well and the Multiclass Q-learning scheduling algorithm performs better than the Multiclass Based Dynamic Priority scheduling algorithm. We also found that the throughputs of the Multiclass Q-learning scheduling algorithm increase almost linearly as the measurement time increases, whereas the throughputs of the Multiclass Based Dynamic Priority algorithm increase with decreases in the increasing ratio.

  10. Acoustic confort at home: Noise emitted by house installations. Recommendations in order to avoid such noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Santiago

    2002-11-01

    The present survey consists of the analysis and the study of the solutions used at present in the installations of water supply and elevators. It has been carried out from the acoustic point of view. In order to achieve a thorough study a pilot plant was built in the Laboratory of Acoustics of the School of Industrial Engineering of Terrassa. This pilot plant reproduced different kinds of installations of the water supply in houses. And it has allowed us to systematize the measures and also to determine the optimum solutions from the acoustic perspective. In accordance with the objectives and the process of the survey, the solutions regularly employed in the facilities of water supply and elevators in houses have been analyzed, and levels of noise associated to these facilities have been also presented. A summary of the results obtained in the plant has been included, according to diverse variables. Both the conclusions of the analysis of the data obtained in the laboratory and those of the installations of the houses have been also compared, which has allowed us to describe a series of suggestions with the purpose of reducing the acoustic emission of this type of installations, and increase the acoustic comfort at home. (To be presented in Spanish.)

  11. Parents' help-seeking behaviours during acute childhood illness at home: A contribution to explanatory theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Sarah J; Jones, Caroline H D; Lakhanpaul, Monica; Roland, Damian T; Thompson, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Uncertainty and anxiety surround parents' decisions to seek medical help for an acutely ill child. Consultation rates for children are rising, yet little is known about factors that influence parents' help-seeking behaviours. We used focus groups and interviews to examine how 27 parents of children under five years, from a range of socioeconomic groups in the East Midlands of England, use information to make decisions during acute childhood illness at home. This article reports findings elucidating factors that influence help-seeking behaviours. Parents reported that decision-making during acute childhood illness was influenced by a range of personal, social and health service factors. Principal among these was parents' concern to do the right thing for their child. Their ability to assess the severity of the illness was influenced by knowledge and experience of childhood illness. When parents were unable to access their general practitioner (GP), feared criticism from or had lost trust in their GP, some parents reported using services elsewhere such as Accident and Emergency. These findings contribute to explanatory theory concerning parents' help-seeking behaviours. Professional and political solutions have not reduced demand; therefore, collaborative approaches involving the public and professionals are now needed to improve parents' access to information. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. An analysis of at-home demand for ice cream in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, C G; Blayney, D P; Yen, S T; Cooper, J

    2009-12-01

    Ice cream has been manufactured commercially in the United States since the middle of the 19th century. Ice cream and frozen dessert products comprise an important and relatively stable component of the United States dairy industry. As with many other dairy products, ice cream is differentiated in several dimensions. A censored translog demand system model was employed to analyze purchases of 3 ice cream product categories. The objective of this study was to determine the effect that changes in retail prices and consumer income have on at-home ice cream consumption. The analysis was based on Nielsen 2005 home scan retail data and used marital status, age, race, education, female employment status, and location in the estimations of aggregate demand elasticities. Results revealed that price and consumer income were the main determinants of demand for ice cream products. Calculated own-price elasticities indicated relatively elastic responses by consumers for all categories except for compensated bulk ice cream. All expenditure elasticities were inelastic except for bulk ice cream, and most of the ice cream categories were substitutes. Ongoing efforts to examine consumer demand for these products will assist milk producers, dairy processors and manufacturers, and dairy marketers as they face changing consumer responses to food and diet issues.

  13. Telemedicine support to patients with chronic diseases for better long-term control at home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Rudel

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Authors in many scientific publications suggest that the telemonitoring of health parameters is a useful tool for supporting patients with long-term conditions staying at home and their self-management of the disease. Those patients are likely to benefit from timely and adequate response to deteriorated conditions detected by the telemedicine system. Almost all of the studies state that telemedicine provided as telemonitoring can be an effective add-on tool in the hands of patients and medical experts for the self-management of patients with, for example, heart failure or diabetes. In this paper the principles of patient telemonitoring are presented as applied within a telemedicine service provided by the Centre for Telehealth (CEZAR at the General Hospital Slovenj Gradec (Slovenia. The centre supports patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 and/or with chronic congestive heart failure. The service was set-up in 2014 as part of a European project called UNITED4HEALTH. Since then over 550 patients from the Carinthia and Saleška regions (Slovenia have been receiving telemedicine support for more than two years. The clinical outcomes of the telemedicine service published elsewhere prove that the selected telemedicine service model is adequate and the implemented technological solution is acceptable for all service users: the patients and the clinicians.

  14. Costs and financial benefits of video communication compared to usual care at home: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, José M; Mistiaen, Patriek; Francke, Anneke L

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review of video communication in home care to provide insight into the ratio between the costs and financial benefits (i.e. cost savings). Four databases (PUBMED, EMBASE, COCHRANE LIBRARY, CINAHL) were searched for studies on video communication for patients living at home (up to December 2009). Studies were only included when data about the costs of video communication as well as the financial benefits were presented. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed. Nine studies, mainly conducted in the US, met the inclusion criteria. The methodological quality was poor, except for one study. Most studies (8 of the 9) did not demonstrate that the financial benefits were significantly greater than the costs of video communication. One study - the only one with a high methodological quality - found that costs for patients who received video communication were higher than for patients who received traditional care. The review found no evidence that the cost of implementing video communication in home care was lower than the resulting financial benefits. More methodologically well conducted research is needed.

  15. Factors Associated With Hyperphagic Behavior in Patients With Dementia Living at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Lu-Wen; Lin, Shu-Chin; Chang, Shu-Hua; Wu, Hua-Shan

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the prevalence and patterns of and factors associated with hyperphagic behavior in Taiwanese patients with dementia living at home. A cross-sectional and correlational design was used. A total of 104 patients with dementia and their primary caregivers were recruited from the geriatric, neurology, and memory clinics of a regional hospital, a medical center and two day-care centers in central Taiwan. The data related to hyperphagic behavior, functional abilities, medical conditions, body weight, and demographic characteristics of patients as well as the demographic characteristics of their primary caregivers were collected between January and May 2013. Based on a strict criterion (a median score of 3 for the hyperphagic subscale), the prevalence of hyperphagia in patients with dementia was 53.8%. Specific hyperphagic patterns exhibited included increased food intake (49% of patients with dementia), hoarding (8.7%), oral exploration (6.8%), and pica (3.9%). Years of education of the patient, the use of antipsychotics in patients, and the age of primary caregivers explained 16.3% of the variance in hyperphagic behavior subscale scores (F = 6.47, p behavior in patients with dementia in home care or in clinic services provided by health professionals, specific attention should be paid to the usual eating behaviors of patients with lower levels of education or who are taking antipsychotic medication or those who have a female primary caregiver. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Influence of parental attitudes towards Internet use on the employment of online safety measures at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floros, Georgios; Siomos, Konstantinos; Dafouli, Evaggelia; Fisoun, Virginia; Geroukalis, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of a cross-sectional study of the entire adolescent student population aged 12-18 of the island of Kos and their parents, on Internet safety-related practices and attitudes towards the Internet. Total sample was 2017 students and 1214 parent responders. Research material included extended demographics and an Internet security questionnaire, the Internet Attitudes Scale (IAS) for parents and the Adolescent Computer Addiction Test (ACAT) for children and both parents. Both parents thus provided their views on their children's computer use and an estimate for their degree of computer addiction which was tested against their child's self-report. Results indicated that fathers and mothers who had negative views of the Internet, tended to encourage less their children to engage in online activities and worried more for the possibility that their child is addicted to computer use; their worries weren't correlated with their children's results. Parental views on the Internet had no effect on the level of security precautions they employed at home. Those parents who reported a low level of security knowledge and were unsure as to what their children were doing online, tended to consider their children more likely to be addicted to computer use; those views were confirmed by their children' self-reported results.

  17. Exergames for unsupervised balance training at home: A pilot study in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diest, M; Stegenga, J; Wörtche, H J; Verkerke, G J; Postema, K; Lamoth, C J C

    2016-02-01

    Exercise videogames (exergames) are gaining popularity as tools for improving balance ability in older adults, yet few exergames are suitable for home-based use. The purpose of the current pilot study was to examine the effects of a 6-week unsupervised home-based exergaming training program on balance performance. Ten community dwelling healthy older adults (age: 75.9 ± 7.2 years) played a newly developed ice skating exergame for six weeks at home. In the game, the speed and direction of a virtual ice skater on a frozen canal were controlled using lateral weight shifts, which were captured using Kinect. Sway characteristics during quiet standing in eyes open (EO), eyes closed (EC) and dual task (DT) conditions were assessed in time and frequency domain before, and after two, four and six weeks of training. Balance was also evaluated using the narrow ridge balance test (NRBT). Multilevel modeling was applied to examine changes in balance ability. Participants played 631 (± 124)min over the intervention period and no subjects dropped out. Balance in terms of sway characteristics improved on average by 17.4% (EO) and 23.3% (EC) after six weeks of training (polder adults, but also that participants do not benefit equally from the program, thereby emphasizing the need for more personalized exergame training programs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Are Doctors familiar with enteral nutrition at home? Opinion poll in the province of Tarragona].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonada, A; Gómez-Gener, A; Boj, M; Salvador, P; Salas-Salvadó, J

    2003-01-01

    At our hospital, there is an At-Home Enteral Nutrition programme (NED in its Spanish acronym) with participation of the Clinical Nutrition Unit and the Pharmacy Service. The products and all necessary material are dispensed directly to the patient's home and nutritional follow-up is carried out. As a lack of information on various aspects of NED was detected among prescribing doctors, we decided to carry out a survey to assess the level of awareness and the opinion of doctors in the province of Tarragona with regard to NED. They were asked if they knew the indications and characteristics of the different enteral nutrition preparations, as well as their opinion on who should do the follow-up of the patients and on how dispensation should be organized. With the results obtained, we conclude that doctors rarely prescribe NED and are not familiar with the indications nor with enteral nutrition preparations (77.5% and 89%, respectively), although they are interested in the subject. They feel that dispensation should be done directly at the patient's home (43%) and that follow-up should be through a specialized team (57.6%).

  19. Passive solar design strategies: Remodeling guidelines for conserving energy at home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    The idea of passive solar is simple, but applying it effectively does require information and attention to the details of design and construction. Some passive solar techniques are modest and low-cost, and require only small changes in remodeler's typical practice. At the other end of the spectrum, some passive solar systems can almost eliminate a house's need for purchased heating (and in some cases, cooling) energy -- but probably at a relatively high first cost. In between are a broad range of energy-conserving passive solar techniques. Whether or not they are cost-effective, practical and attractive enough to offer a market advantage to any individual remodeler depends on very specific factors such as local costs, climate, and market characteristics. Passive solar design strategies: Remodeling Guidelines For Conserving Energy At Homes is written to help give remodelers the information they need to make these decisions. Passive Solar Design Strategies is a package in three basic parts: The Guidelines contain information about passive solar techniques and how they work, and provides specific examples of systems which will save various percentages of energy; The Worksheets offer a simple, fill-in-the-blank method to pre-evaluate the performance of a specific design; The Worked Example demonstrates how to complete the worksheets for a typical residence.

  20. Passive solar design strategies: Remodeling guidelines for conserving energy at home. [Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    The idea of passive solar is simple, but applying it effectively does require information and attention to the details of design and construction. Some passive solar techniques are modest and low-cost, and require only small changes in remodeler`s typical practice. At the other end of the spectrum, some passive solar systems can almost eliminate a house`s need for purchased heating (and in some cases, cooling) energy -- but probably at a relatively high first cost. In between are a broad range of energy-conserving passive solar techniques. Whether or not they are cost-effective, practical and attractive enough to offer a market advantage to any individual remodeler depends on very specific factors such as local costs, climate, and market characteristics. Passive solar design strategies: Remodeling Guidelines For Conserving Energy At Homes is written to help give remodelers the information they need to make these decisions. Passive Solar Design Strategies is a package in three basic parts: The Guidelines contain information about passive solar techniques and how they work, and provides specific examples of systems which will save various percentages of energy; The Worksheets offer a simple, fill-in-the-blank method to pre-evaluate the performance of a specific design; The Worked Example demonstrates how to complete the worksheets for a typical residence.

  1. Total energy expenditure in underweight patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease living at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slinde, F; Ellegård, L; Grönberg, A M; Larsson, S; Rossander-Hulthén, L

    2003-04-01

    The aim of the study was to assess total daily energy expenditure (TDE), as measured by doubly labelled water (DLW), and describe its components in home-living underweight patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Basal metabolic rate (BMR) was measured prior to the study. Ten patients received DLW, followed by urine analysis by isotope ratio mass spectrometry from 10 standardised occasions during 15 days. Dietary intake was registered by each patient the first 7 days of the study. The patients were also interviewed about their physical activity pattern. Measured BMR was higher than predicted in five of the 10 patients using equations from WHO. Using disease-specific equations, estimated BMR was higher for male, but not for female COPD patients. The best estimation of BMR resulted from prediction including fat-free mass. TDE varied considerably between 5200 and 11,100 kJ. Physical activity level (PAL) ranged from 1.15 to 1.80. Energy intake varied between 4500 and 9100 kJ. In underweight patients with severe COPD, TDE is highly variable, ranging from 110 to 200 kJ/kg body weight. This is the first study assessing and describing total energy expenditure in underweight patients with severe COPD living at home. Energy requirement in the patient group cannot solely be calculated from prediction equations. BMR should be measured and physical activity level assessed. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  2. Effect of thickener agents on dental enamel microhardness submitted to at-home bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, José Augusto; Oliveira, Glauco Paulo Felício; Amaral, Cristiane Mariote

    2007-01-01

    Dental bleaching occurs due to an oxidation reaction between the bleaching agents and the macromolecules of pigments in the teeth. This reaction is unspecific and the peroxides can also affect the dental matrix causing mineral loss. On the other hand, recent studies have suggested that the thickener agent carbopol can also cause mineral loss. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of at-home dental bleaching on dental enamel microhardness after the use of bleaching agents with and without carbopol as a thickener agent. Bovine dental slabs with 3 x 3 x 3 mm were obtained, sequentially polished, and randomly divided into 4 groups according to the experimental treatment: G1: 2% carbopol; G2: 10% carbamide peroxide with carbopol; G3: carbowax; G4: 10% carbamide peroxide with poloxamer. Bleaching was performed daily for 4 weeks, immersed in artificial saliva. Enamel microhardness values were obtained before the treatment (T0) and 7 (T1), 14 (T2), 21 (T3), 28 (T4), and 42 (T5) days after the beginning of the treatment. ANOVA and Tukey's test revealed statistically significant differences only for the factor Time (F = 5.48; p thickener agents caused no alterations on the enamel microhardness.

  3. Single Stance Stability and Proprioceptive Control in Older Adults Living at Home: Gender and Age Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Dario; Mamo, Carlo; Fanì, Mara; Saccavino, Patrizia; Rocca, Flavio; Momenté, Manuel; Fratta, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    In developed countries, falls in older people represent a rising problem. As effective prevention should start before the risk becomes evident, an early predictor is needed. Single stance instability would appear as a major risk factor. Aims of the study were to describe single stance stability, its sensory components, and their correlation with age and gender. A random sample of 597 older adults (319 men, 278 women) living at home, aged 65–84, was studied. Stability tests were performed with an electronic postural station. The single stance test showed the impairment of single stance stability in older individuals (75–84 yrs). The significant decline of stability in the older subjects may be explained by the impairment of proprioceptive control together with the decrease in compensatory visual stabilization and emergency responses. Younger subjects (65–74 yrs) exhibited better, but still inadequate, proprioceptive control with compensatory visual stabilization. Gender differences appeared in older subjects: women were significantly less stable than men. The measurement of the sensory components of single stance stability could aid in the early detection of a decay in antigravity movements many years before the risk of falling becomes evident. Adequate proprioceptive control could mitigate the effects of all other risks of falling. PMID:23984068

  4. Single Stance Stability and Proprioceptive Control in Older Adults Living at Home: Gender and Age Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Riva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In developed countries, falls in older people represent a rising problem. As effective prevention should start before the risk becomes evident, an early predictor is needed. Single stance instability would appear as a major risk factor. Aims of the study were to describe single stance stability, its sensory components, and their correlation with age and gender. A random sample of 597 older adults (319 men, 278 women living at home, aged 65–84, was studied. Stability tests were performed with an electronic postural station. The single stance test showed the impairment of single stance stability in older individuals (75–84 yrs. The significant decline of stability in the older subjects may be explained by the impairment of proprioceptive control together with the decrease in compensatory visual stabilization and emergency responses. Younger subjects (65–74 yrs exhibited better, but still inadequate, proprioceptive control with compensatory visual stabilization. Gender differences appeared in older subjects: women were significantly less stable than men. The measurement of the sensory components of single stance stability could aid in the early detection of a decay in antigravity movements many years before the risk of falling becomes evident. Adequate proprioceptive control could mitigate the effects of all other risks of falling.

  5. The influence of environment in palliative care: supporting or hindering experiences of 'at-homeness'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Birgit H; Edvardsson, David

    2007-12-01

    Florence Nightingale stated that the art of nursing is to provide an environment in which the patient is in the best position for nature to act upon, and Martha Rogers, in turn, emphasized that one part in nursing is to pattern the environment into a place where healing conditions are optimal. This paper presents a preliminary conceptual framework that describes the influence of environment in palliative care. Based on previously published studies, a conceptual framework describing the influence of environments in palliative care was developed consisting of an atmosphere of hospitality; an atmosphere of safety; and, an atmosphere of 'everydayness'. The framework describes that the atmosphere is created in the meeting between the person's needs/expectations and the environment, an atmosphere that can influence experiential outcomes of 'at-homeness' or homelessness in the palliative care setting. In conclusion, this preliminary conceptual framework may contribute to nursing practice by providing a conceptual basis for actively reflecting on and evaluating the atmosphere in palliative care settings.

  6. Prevalence of and risk factors for violent disciplinary practices at home in Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappa, Claudia; Dam, Hang

    2014-02-01

    Data on parenting practices and the use of violence in child rearing remain scarce worldwide, hindering prevention efforts. This study examines disciplinary methods used on children at home in Viet Nam. It is based on data collected from 2010 to 2011 through the fourth round of the Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS4)-a household survey program supported by the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) that focuses on women and children in low- and middle-income countries. Respondents in the survey were asked 11 questions relating to disciplinary measures used in the preceding month on one randomly selected child (2-14 years old) in each household. A final question about attitudes probed adults' views on the need for physical punishment in child rearing. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to estimate the prevalence of violent and nonviolent forms of discipline, and to identify risk factors associated with violent punishment. Results showed that three in four children in Viet Nam are disciplined through violent means. The exposure of Vietnamese children to violent forms of discipline was significantly associated with varied characteristics of both children and their caregivers. Moreover, the use of violent disciplinary practices on children was strongly associated with positive attitudes toward corporal punishment. Risk factors for violent child discipline identified in this study can inform future interventions to promote positive practices and to protect Vietnamese children against violence in the home.

  7. Care in prevention of pressure ulcers of bedridden patients at home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlene Laurenti M. Ayala

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in the catchment area of a Basic Health Unit in Joinville/SC patients bedridden at home. We aimed to characterize the risk of bedridden for developing pressure ulcers, describing the factors favorable to its emergence, and evaluate adherence to treatment prescribed to prevent this injury. This is a descriptive study. Data collection was carried out through an instrument containing identification data, clinical conditions of patients and the application of the Braden scale. It was evaluated 12 patients bedridden. The average age of the patients evaluated was 80.5 years. Most were white, with low education and dependent on public health services. All patients had some underlying disease, the most frequent the Stroke (CVA. The laid up time was 67 months (± 53. The mobility and sensory perception were completely or limited to 83% and 50% of the evaluated, respectively. 67% of users had very poor nutritional status or inadequate and 92% constantly moist or too moist skin. Low fluid intake was present for all participants. Adherence to prescribed care of the caregivers was partial. At the end of the study it was found that the findings are consistent with the literature data and the studied patients had an elevated risk for developing pressure ulcers, since the factors favorable to the appearance of the lesion showed with high frequencies.

  8. Tele-care robot for assisting independent senior citizens who live at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    In the last twenty years most developed countries face dramatic demographic changes, and predominantly the rapid aging of their population. As the share of elderly people is climbing while the number of care providers is declining, the aging problem is becoming an increasingly important social and economic challenge. The supply of care at home, utilizing affordable tele-care systems and smart home technologies, is one of the promising strategies to cope with challenges posed by these demographic changes. The goal of this paper is to present a tele-care robot (TCR) aimed to assist Senior citizens who live independently at their home, that need assistance in daily life activities. The idea of the proposed system is that a caregiver, operating from a central location, will be able to service between 10 to 20 patients living at their home, by using the tele-care robot. The robot will possess motion control capabilities to move inside the house of each patient and alert in case that emergency events occur. The robot will allow the care provider to communicate remotely with the patient using audio and video equipment installed on the robot. By using the robot, the caregiver will be able to examine several times during the day the well-being of the patient, his medication consumption, and his overall functionality.

  9. The Paradigmatic Struggle for Legitimacy of the Danish Welfare State regarding the Provision of Welfare Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rendtorff, Jacob Dahl; Nielsen, Anna Lyneborg; Pedersen, John Storm

    2014-01-01

    The Danish welfare state constitutes a paradigmatic case of the welfare struggle of modern welfare states. Taking care of vulnerable children and youths is used as a case study here, to illustrate the efforts of the welfare state to acquire legitimacy as a body of public administration. That is...... blindness, in order to test the legitimacy of the welfare state´s provision of welfare services at the beginning of this century. We propose a new paradigm to improve the welfare state´s legitimacy. Our case is considered critical....

  10. Why do women choose an unregulated birth worker to birth at home in Australia: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigg, Elizabeth Christine; Schmied, Virginia; Peters, Kath; Dahlen, Hannah Grace

    2017-03-28

    In Australia the choice to birth at home is not well supported and only 0.4% of women give birth at home with a registered midwife. Recent changes to regulatory requirements for midwives have become more restrictive and there is no insurance product that covers private midwives for intrapartum care at home. Freebirth (planned birth at home with no registered health professional) with an unregulated birth worker who is not a registered midwife or doctor (e.g. Doula, ex-midwife, lay midwife etc.) appears to have increased in Australia. The aim of this study is to explore the reasons why women choose to give birth at home with an unregulated birth worker (UBW) from the perspective of women and UBWs. Nine participants (five women who had UBWs at their birth and four UBWs who had themselves used UBWs in the past for their births) were interviewed in-depth and the data analysed using thematic analysis. Four themes were found: 'A traumatising system', 'An inflexible system'; 'Getting the best of both worlds' and 'Treated with love and respect versus the mechanical arm on the car assembly line'. Women interviewed for this study either experienced or were exposed to mainstream care, which they found traumatising. They were not able to access their preferred birth choices, which caused them to perceive the system as inflexible. They interpreted this as having no choice when choice was important to them. The motivation then became to seek alternative options of care that would more appropriately meet their needs, and help avoid repeated trauma through mainstream care. Women who engaged UBWs viewed them as providing the best of both worlds - this was birthing at home with a knowledgeable person who was unconstrained by rules or regulations and who respected and supported the woman's philosophical view of birth. Women perceived UBWs as not only the best opportunity to achieve a natural birth but also as providing 'a safety net' in case access to emergency care was required.

  11. Assessment of the quality of diet of Alzheimer's disease individuals living at homes and in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarek, Dariusz; Glabska, Dominika

    2013-01-01

    In case of many individuals, decrease of body mass is observed during aging, that is often in elderly living in nursing homes. It is especially important for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), when decrease of body mass, resulting in malnutrition. The aim of the study was the assessment of the quality of diet of AD individuals living at homes and in nursing homes, in comparison with a control group In the study participated 160 individuals with and without AD, living at home or in nursing homes. Assessment of diet of individuals living at homes was based on self-reported data from one-day dietary recall. Assessment of diet of individuals living in nursing homes was based on one-day menu from nursing homes accompanied by information about snacking between meals. The diets were assessed on the basis of qualitative meal classification method of Bieliiska and Kulesza. Individuals living in nursing homes consumed meals more often than living at homes, while AD did not have any impact on it. Individuals consuming fruits and vegetables not often enough were in all the groups, however, in case of individuals living at homes it was serious problem. Consuming animal products to almost all main meals was observed in case of many individuals in all analyzed groups. Composition of majority of main meals and small amount of lunches and afternoon snacks was rational. Improperly balanced diet following observed not only in a group of AD individuals but also of ones without dementia (both living at homes and in nursing homes), may result in dietary deficiencies.

  12. Animal Welfare in Air Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Popović

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Animal welfare is becoming an evermore-important factorfor air carriers from the economical viewpoint, due to its importantimpact on the carrier public image. High standard care hasto be taken of animals during transport in order to satisfy an importantsegment of airline customers, either the Business/Firstclass passengers travelling with pets, or influential shippers ofracing horses, dogs, Zoo species etc.Air transp011 of animals, disregarding other advantages,may pose a threat to their health and welfare being a significantmultifactorial stressor. Along with cardiovascular, endocrineand metabolic abe1mtions, it affects the immune response ofan animal and increases susceptibility to infection. Therefore,strict conditions for air transport of eve1y animal species havebeen imposed. Transport of only healthy animals is approved,as it is necessG/y to prevent the spread of disease during transportand to provide satisfactOJy environment for animals to betransported.

  13. The ethics of fish welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J C

    2009-12-01

    The topic of fish welfare in the context of commercial fisheries is a difficult one. From traditionally anthropocentric or human-centred perspectives, fishes are simply objects for humans to use as they see fit. When it is argued that anthropocentrism is arbitrary, it may appear that a strong animal rights position is the only recourse, with the result that humans ought not to use animals in the first place, if it is at all possible. It can be argued that both positions fail to view human beings as part of the natural world. If human beings are viewed as part of the world from which they live, then it has to be asked what it means to be respectful of the animals which humans use and from which they live. From this perspective, concern for the welfare of the fishes humans eat is simply what should be expected from humans as good citizens in the community of living creatures.

  14. Rescaling Welfare Policies in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haddad Thorgaard, Camilla; Vinter, Henrik

    The report is a contribution to the research project ”Rescaling of Social Welfare Policies: a comparative study on the path towards multilevel governance in Europe”, which is coordinated by the European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research. The report is a background paper for the project....... It provides background information for understanding the rescaling process in Denmark. The report has a three-fold purpose. First, it describes the contextual conditions within which the rescaling process occurs. Second, it describes the institutional settings in terms of territorial responsibilities...... and competences, identifying the relevant actors involved in policy design, management and delivery. Third, it describes the rescaling process that has occurred in Denmark since the 1980s; it focuses on four policy areas: social assistance and local politics against poverty, employment policy, elder care...

  15. Housing Welfare Policies in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lotte

    2013-01-01

    marketization, welfare criticism and internationalization. The aim is to provide outside readers a theoretically guided empirical insight into Scandinavian social housing policy. The paper first lines up the core of the inbuilt argument of historical institutionalism in housing policy. Secondly, it briefly...... the past quarter of a decade. The third section then concentrates on the differences between Denmark, Sweden and Norway in which social housing is, our was originally, embedded in a universal welfare policy targeting the general level of housing quality for the entire population. Differences stand out...... of the governance model of social housing policy in which the housing associations are conceived of as 'dialogue partners' in the local housing policy, expected to create solutions to, rather than produce problems in social housing areas. The reform testifies to the strategic ability of the Danish social housing...

  16. Post-Communist Welfare Pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerami, Alfio; Vanhuysse, Pieter

    countries and across social policy domains. By providing a broad overview based on a theoretical foundation and drawing on recent empirical evidence, Post-Communist Welfare Pathways offers a comprehensive, state-of-the-art account of the progress that has been made since 1989, and the main challenges...... does so by bringing together the leading experts on the subject worldwide. The editors' theoretically well-informed and analytically illuminating and innovative approach to the study of welfare state (self-) transformation, which casts new light on the evolution of domestic and supranational social...... with a stellar line-up of authors that is theoretically sophisticated and empirically rich as it provides insights into the dynamics of change in Central and Eastern European countries since the Fall of the Berlin Wall. The book shows that there are no simple explanations of the transformation of CEECs' social...

  17. Original article Psychological and socio-demographic correlates of women’s decisions to give birth at home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Domańska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Some women decide to give birth at home. They treat their home as a safe place to do so, are against medicalization of natural labour or value activity and autonomy during labour. They are also characterized by good knowledge of their own bodies and about labour in general (including labour at home. Psychological studies have revealed a correlation between labour (including the derived satisfaction and the levels of dispositional optimism, perception of efficacy, and coping with pain. Analysis of the available demographic data shows that the decision to give birth at home is correlated with a certain socio-demographic profile of women. Participants and procedures One hundred thirty five mothers took part in the study. Among them 72 had given birth at home and 63 in a hospital. The following were assumed as important psychological determinants: dispositional optimism, sense of self-efficacy, strategies for coping with pain and their effectiveness. The LOT-R Test, GSES Scale, CSQ Questionnaire as well as a demographic questionnaire were used in the study. Results Women who gave birth at home were characterised by significantly higher levels of optimism and sense of self-efficacy in comparison with the other women. Women giving birth at home reinterpreted the sensations of pain more frequently than the others, who were more likely to catastrophise and pray/hope. The level of conviction about having control over pain was much higher in the experimental group. The relationship between choice of place to give birth and the level of education, marital status, area of residence as well as age is weak. Correlations between the place of birth and income, number of children as well as membership of religious communities are moderate and statistically significant. Conclusions It is important to see and meet the different expectations of the two distinct groups of women. Today’s phenomenon of homebirth requires systematic interdisciplinary

  18. Daily living with distress and enrichment: the moral experience of families with ventilator-assisted children at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Franco A; Alexander, Eren; Davis, Michael; Rennick, Janet; Troini, Rita

    2006-01-01

    The growing shift toward home care services assumes that "being home is good" and that this is the most desirable option. Although ethical issues in medical decision-making have been examined in numerous contexts, home care decisions for technology-dependent children and the moral dilemmas that this population confronts remain virtually unknown. This study explored the moral dimension of family experience through detailed accounts of life with a child who requires assisted ventilation at home. This study involved an examination of moral phenomena inherent in (1) the individual experiences of the ventilator-assisted child, siblings, and parents and (2) everyday family life as a whole. A qualitative method based on Richard Zaner's interpretive framework was selected for this study. The population of interest for this study was the families of children who are supported by a ventilator or a positive-pressure device at home. Twelve families (38 family members) were recruited through the Quebec Program for Home Ventilatory Assistance. Children in the study population fell into 4 diagnostic groups: (1) abnormal ventilatory control (eg, central hypoventilation syndrome), (2) neuromuscular disorders, (3) spina bifida, and (4) craniofacial or airway abnormalities resulting in upper airway obstruction. All 4 of these diagnostic groups were included in this study. Among the 12 children recruited, 4 received ventilation via tracheostomies, and 8 received ventilation with face masks. All of the latter received ventilation only at night, except for 1 child, who received ventilation 24 hours a day. Family moral experiences were investigated using semistructured interviews and fieldwork observations conducted in the families' homes. Data analysis identified 6 principal themes. The themes raised by families whose children received ventilation invasively via a tracheostomy were not systematically different or more distressed than were families of children with face masks. The

  19. Human cloning and child welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, J; Harris, J

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we discuss an objection to human cloning which appeals to the welfare of the child. This objection varies according to the sort of harm it is expected the clone will suffer. The three formulations of it that we will consider are: 1. Clones will be harmed by the fearful or prejudicial attitudes people may have about or towards them (H1); 2. Clones will be harmed by the demands and expectations of parents or genotype donors (H2); 3. Clones will be harmed by their own awareness of their origins, for example the knowledge that the genetic donor is a stranger (H3). We will show why these three versions of the child welfare objection do not necessarily supply compelling reasons to ban human reproductive cloning. The claim that we will develop and defend in the course of our discussion is that even if it is the case that a cloned child will suffer harms of the type H1-H3, it is none the less permissible to conceive by cloning so long as these cloning-induced welfare deficits are not such as to blight the existence of the resultant child, whoever this may be. PMID:10226914

  20. Has the Nordic Welfare Model Been Transformed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Bent; Kvist, Jon

    2011-01-01

    schemes - collective and individual - supplementing public schemes is well documented, scant attention has focused on more recent developments in other areas of the welfare state. This article shows how the multi-tiered welfare state spread in the 2000s to policies for families, the unemployed...... and the sick. Although Denmark still offers universal coverage in core welfare state areas, the increased use of occupational and fiscal welfare as well as changes in public schemes has gradually transformed the nation into a multi-tiered welfare state that is more dualistic and individualistic...

  1. The acceptability of TV-based game platforms as an instrument to support the cognitive evaluation of senior adults at home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rivas Costa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The computing capabilities of state-of-the-art television sets and media centres may facilitate the introduction of computer-assisted evaluation at home. This approach would help to overcome the drawbacks of traditional pen-and-paper evaluations administered in clinical facilities, as they could be performed in a more comfortable environment, the subject’s home, and they would be more flexible for designing complex environments for the evaluation of neuropsychological constructs that are difficult to assess through traditional testing. The objective of this work was to obtain some initial evidence about the technical acceptance by senior adults of serious games played at home on the TV set and therefore about the convenience of further investigating such an approach to cognitive assesment. Materials and Methods We developed a collection of games to be deployed on a TV environment. These games were tried by a group of senior adults at their homes. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM was used to validate this approach. Surveys were performed to study the perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use of such technical setting as an instrument for their cognitive evaluation; that is, its technical acceptance. Subjective information collected from participants was correlated with actual interaction data captured. An additional survey was performed 36 months after pilot testing to have an indication about the long-term perceptions about usefulness and ease of use. Results More than 90% of participating subjects perceived cognitive games on TV as useful or very useful. The majority of participants selected the TV set as their preferred option to interact with serious games at home, when compared to other devices such as smartphones, tablets or PCs. This result correlates with the number of participants perceiving them as easily usable or very easy to use, and also with automatically captured interaction data. Three out of four seniors

  2. The acceptability of TV-based game platforms as an instrument to support the cognitive evaluation of senior adults at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas Costa, Carlos; Anido Rifón, Luis Eulogio; Gómez Carballa, Miguel; Valladares Rodríguez, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The computing capabilities of state-of-the-art television sets and media centres may facilitate the introduction of computer-assisted evaluation at home. This approach would help to overcome the drawbacks of traditional pen-and-paper evaluations administered in clinical facilities, as they could be performed in a more comfortable environment, the subject’s home, and they would be more flexible for designing complex environments for the evaluation of neuropsychological constructs that are difficult to assess through traditional testing. The objective of this work was to obtain some initial evidence about the technical acceptance by senior adults of serious games played at home on the TV set and therefore about the convenience of further investigating such an approach to cognitive assesment. Materials and Methods We developed a collection of games to be deployed on a TV environment. These games were tried by a group of senior adults at their homes. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) was used to validate this approach. Surveys were performed to study the perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use of such technical setting as an instrument for their cognitive evaluation; that is, its technical acceptance. Subjective information collected from participants was correlated with actual interaction data captured. An additional survey was performed 36 months after pilot testing to have an indication about the long-term perceptions about usefulness and ease of use. Results More than 90% of participating subjects perceived cognitive games on TV as useful or very useful. The majority of participants selected the TV set as their preferred option to interact with serious games at home, when compared to other devices such as smartphones, tablets or PCs. This result correlates with the number of participants perceiving them as easily usable or very easy to use, and also with automatically captured interaction data. Three out of four seniors expressed their

  3. Effects of sheltering on physiology, immune function, behavior, and the welfare of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protopopova, Alexandra

    2016-05-15

    Approximately 4 million dogs live in animal shelters each year. However, understanding and measuring the welfare of these kenneled dogs presents a challenge. One way to determine welfare is by assessing how stay at the shelter influences physiology, immune function, and behavior of the dogs. Prior research, from all of these domains, has not resulted in clear conclusions on how the animal shelter influences the well-being of dogs. One robust finding is that, when placed into a kennel environment, dogs experience a spike in cortisol levels followed by a decrease to original at-home levels. Current evidence cannot differentiate between several proposed hypotheses that may be responsible for this pattern. In addition, very few studies have assessed the effects of kenneling on immune function of dogs, and of these, no consistent findings have emerged. However, this line of inquiry can have a large impact as infectious diseases are rampant in animal shelters. The ability of behavioral measures to inform us about the welfare of dogs is discussed by reviewing published and new data on the effects of kenneling on dog behavior. Prior research has suffered from a lack of consistent operational definitions when defining abnormal behavior in dogs, resulting in difficult to interpret results. Research on the well-being of individual dogs, rather than on group averages, may be a fruitful next step in determining and improving the welfare of dogs housed in shelters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Fear of falling in older adults living at home: associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitorino, Luciano Magalhães; Teixeira, Carla Araujo Bastos; Boas, Eliandra Laís Vilas; Pereira, Rúbia Lopes; Santos, Naiana Oliveira Dos; Rozendo, Célia Alves

    2017-04-10

    To identify the factors associated with the fear of falling in the older adultliving at home. Cross-sectional study with probabilistic sampling of older adultenrolled in two Family Health Strategies (FHS). The fear of falling was measured by the Brazilian version of the Falls Efficacy Scale-International and by a household questionnairethat contained the explanatory variables. Multiple Linear Regression using the stepwise selection technique and the Generalized Linear Models were used in the statistical analyses. A total of170 older adultsparticipated in the research, 85 from each FHS. The majority (57.1%) aged between 60 and 69; 67.6% were female; 46.1% fell once in the last year. The majority of the older adults(66.5%) had highfear of falling. In the final multiple linear regression model, it was identified that a higher number of previous falls, female gender, older age, and worse health self-assessment explained 37% of the fear of falling among the older adult. The findings reinforce the need to assess the fear of falling among the older adultliving at home, in conjunction with the development and use ofstrategies based on modifiable factors by professionalsto reduce falls and improve health status, which may contribute to the reduction of the fear of falling among the older adult. Identificar os fatores associados ao medo de cair em idosos residentes no domicílio. Estudo transversal com amostragem probabilística de idosos cadastrados em duas Estratégias Saúde da Família (ESF). O medo de cair foi avaliado pela versão brasileira da escala Falls Efficacy Scale International e por um inquérito domiciliar que continha as variáveis explicativas.A Regressão Linear Múltipla por meio da técnica stepwise selectione osModelos Lineares Generalizados foram utilizados nas análises estatísticas. Participaram da pesquisa170 idosos, 85 de cada ESF. A maioria (57,1%) tinha entre 60 e 69 anos de idade; 67,6% eram do sexo feminino; 46,1% tiveram queda no último ano

  5. Consumer-reported handling of raw poultry products at home: results from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosa, Katherine M; Cates, Sheryl C; Bradley, Samantha; Chambers, Edgar; Godwin, Sandria

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella and Campylobacter cause an estimated combined total of 1.8 million foodborne infections each year in the United States. Most cases of salmonellosis and campylobacteriosis are associated with eating raw or undercooked poultry or with cross-contamination. Between 1998 and 2008, 20% of Salmonella and 16% of Campylobacter foodborne disease outbreaks were associated with food prepared inside the home. A nationally representative Web survey of U.S. adult grocery shoppers (n = 1,504) was conducted to estimate the percentage of consumers who follow recommended food safety practices when handling raw poultry at home. The survey results identified areas of low adherence to current recommended food safety practices: not washing raw poultry before cooking, proper refrigerator storage of raw poultry, use of a food thermometer to determine doneness, and proper thawing of raw poultry in cold water. Nearly 70% of consumers reported washing or rinsing raw poultry before cooking it, a potentially unsafe practice because "splashing" of contaminated water may lead to the transfer of pathogens to other foods and other kitchen surfaces. Only 17.5% of consumers reported correctly storing raw poultry in the refrigerator. Sixty-two percent of consumers own a food thermometer, and of these, 26% or fewer reported using one to check the internal temperature of smaller cuts of poultry and ground poultry. Only 11% of consumers who thaw raw poultry in cold water reported doing so correctly. The study results, coupled with other research findings, will inform the development of science-based consumer education materials that can help reduce foodborne illness from Salmonella and Campylobacter.

  6. Profile of morbidity among elderly at home health care service in Southern Saudi Arabia

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    Mohamed A Al-Modeer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to determine the profile of morbidity among elderly registered at home health care service in the Armed Forces Hospital of Southern Region, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted (over a period of 6 months during year 2011 and data was collected by reviewing of medical records of all elderly patients of elderly. Results: The total number of elderly ≥ 60 years were 880. The most prevalent morbidity is hypertension (59.1% followed by diabetes mellitus (57.3%, stroke (34.9%, dementia (28.5%, osteoarthritis (24.2% and Alzheimer (21.4%. Females are at higher risks of having many types elderly diseases compared to males. The highest risk was for obesity (OR = 9.1; 95% CI = 3.51- 12.8, followed by osteoporosis (OR = 8.7; 95% CI = 15.10 - 9.13 and fracture neck femur (OR = 3.9; 95 CI = 2.11 - 6.91. In addition, females were also at higher risks of having Osteoarthritis and thyroid disorder. On the other hand, males are more susceptible to hypertension (OR = 1.4; 95 % CI = 1.07 - 1.85, stroke (OR = 1.3; 95 % CI = 1.08 - 1.89 and renal diseases (OR = 2.4; 95% CI = 1.25 - 4.54. Conclusion: It is concluded that there is a great need for preventive, curative and rehabilitative program in order to introduce high quality of health care services to elderly.

  7. Caregiver knowledge and skills to safely care for pediatric tracheostomy ventilation at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Reshma; Parshuram, Chris; Kelso, Jeannie; Lim, Audrey; Mateos, Dimas; Mitchell, Ian; Patel, Hema; Roy, Madan; Syed, Faiza; Troini, Rita; Wensley, David; Rose, Louise

    2017-12-01

    Caregivers of children using home mechanical ventilation (HMV) via tracheostomy require appropriate knowledge and skills. Existing training curricula are locally developed and content variable. We sought to develop a competency checklist to inform initial training and subsequent assessment of knowledge and skills of family caregivers. We used a 2-step process. Candidate items were generated by synthesis of a scoping review, existing checklists, with additional items suggested by an eight member inter-professional group representing pediatric HMV programs across Canada. Following removal of duplicate items, we conducted a three-round Delphi to gain consensus on items for the KidsVent Checklist. The scoping review and checklists from five HMV programs identified 18 domains and 172 items; one additional domain and 83 additional items were identified by our expert group who also classified domains as mandatory or optional. We recruited 95 clinicians representing 12 Canadian paediatric HMV programs to participate in Delphi round 1 (response rate 72%; 84%, and 100% for subsequent rounds). Importance rating of the 255 items reduced them to 246 items. In the final checklist, the 19 domains comprised 14 mandatory (189 mandatory items) and 5 optional domains (57 optional items). We have developed the KidsVent checklist using rigorous consensus building methods, informed by participants with diverse geographic and inter-professional representation. This checklist represents knowledge and skills required to safely care for children using tracheostomy ventilation at home. Further study is required to explore the impact of this checklist on outcomes of this growing group of technology-dependent children. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Aims and tasks in parental caregiving for children receiving palliative care at home: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verberne, Lisa M; Kars, Marijke C; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Y N; Bosman, Diederik K; Colenbrander, Derk A; Grootenhuis, Martha A; van Delden, Johannes J M

    2017-03-01

    In paediatric palliative care (PPC), parents are confronted with increasing caregiving demands. More children are cared for at home, and the need for PPC of children is lengthened due to technical and medical improvements. Therefore, a clear understanding of the content of parental caregiving in PPC becomes increasingly important. The objective is to gain insight into parental caregiving based on the lived experience of parents with a child with a life-limiting disease. An interpretative qualitative study using thematic analysis was performed. Single or repeated interviews were undertaken with 42 parents of 24 children with a malignant or non-malignant disease, receiving PPC. Based on their ambition to be a 'good parent', parents caring for a child with a life-limiting disease strived for three aims: controlled symptoms and controlled disease, a life worth living for their ill child and family balance. These aims resulted in four tasks that parents performed: providing basic and complex care, organising good quality care and treatment, making sound decisions while managing risks and organising a good family life. Parents need early explanation from professionals about balancing between their aims and the related tasks to get a grip on their situation and to prevent becoming overburdened. What is Known: • In paediatric palliative care, parents are confronted with increasing caregiving demands. • Parenting is often approached from the perspective of stress. What is New: • Parents strive for three aims: controlled symptoms and controlled disease, a life worth living for their child and family balance. • Parents perform four tasks: providing basic and complex care, organising good quality care, making decisions while managing risks and organising a good family life. • Professionals need insight into the parents' aims and tasks from the parental perspective to strengthen parents' resilience.

  9. How can the Serbian diaspora contribute much more to the development at home country?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grečić Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the existing contribution of the Serbian diaspora to the development at home country, and features of its major effects as a partner in the process of economic development. No doubt, the spiritus movens of the contemporary and future economic and social progress is and will be the economy of ideas and creativity. The key factors of this new economy are education, research and innovation. To achieve competitiveness in an increasingly global economic environment it is necessary: the adequate supply and quality of the workforce in the field of research and development. In the last two and a half decades, Serbia's brain drain was quite massive. Thus in the Serbian diaspora there are reputable scientists and successful managers in all fields. Diaspora, the people link between countries, can be the source of cooperation. Consequently, the most important is the question of whether and under what conditions Serbia’s brain drain can be reversed to brain gain. The author argue that the diasporas and migrants could play a crucial role in the development of home country, by presentation of their different experiences. Engaging the Diaspora in the development of home country largely depends on the home country. Talents remain an important component of countries’ and businesses’ long-term competitiveness. In support of this thesis, the author presents the most significant and most successful examples of good practice, arguing that this experience can be used in Serbia, of course, taking into account some of its specificities. The question: how they develop, retain and attract talent should therefore remain high on the agenda of policymakers and business leaders for the foreseeable future of Serbia.

  10. Study protocol: optimization of complex palliative care at home via telemedicine. A cluster randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasselaar Jeroen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the growing number of elderly with advanced chronic conditions, healthcare services will come under increasing pressure. Teleconsultation is an innovative approach to deliver quality of care for palliative patients at home. Quantitative studies assessing the effect of teleconsultation on clinical outcomes are scarce. The aim of this present study is to investigate the effectiveness of teleconsultation in complex palliative homecare. Methods/Design During a 2-year recruitment period, GPs are invited to participate in this cluster randomized controlled trial. When a GP refers an eligible patient for the study, the GP is randomized to the intervention group or the control group. Patients in the intervention group have a weekly teleconsultation with a nurse practitioner and/or a physician of the palliative consultation team. The nurse practitioner, in cooperation with the palliative care specialist of the palliative consultation team, advises the GP on treatment policy of the patient. The primary outcome of patient symptom burden is assessed at baseline and weekly using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS and at baseline and every four weeks using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Secondary outcomes are self-perceived burden from informal care (EDIZ, patient experienced continuity of medical care (NCQ, patient and caregiver satisfaction with the teleconsultation (PSQ, the experienced problems and needs in palliative care (PNPC-sv and the number of hospital admissions. Discussion This is one of the first randomized controlled trials in palliative telecare. Our data will verify whether telemedicine positively affects palliative homecare. Trial registration The Netherlands National Trial Register NTR2817

  11. The epidemiology of skin care provided by nurses at home: a multicentre prevalence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottner, Jan; Boronat, Xavier; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Lahmann, Nils; Suhr, Ralf

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the frequencies and patterns of skin care and applied skin care products in the home care nursing setting in Germany. Skin care belongs to the core activities of nursing practice. Especially in aged and long-term care settings, clients are vulnerable to various skin conditions. Dry skin is one of the most prevalent problems. Using mild skin cleansers and the regular application of moisturizing leave-on products is recommended. Until today, there are no quantitative empirical data about nursing skin care practice at home in the community. A multicentre cross-sectional study was conducted in July 2012. Home care clients from the German home care nursing setting were randomly selected. Instructed nurse raters performed the data collection using standardized forms. Variables included demographics, skin care needs and skin caring activities. Approximately 60% of home care clients received skin care interventions. The majority were washed and two-thirds received a leave-on product once daily. There was large heterogeneity in cleansing and skin care product use. Most often the product labels were unknown or product types were selected haphazardly. Skin care interventions play a significant role in home care and nurses have a considerable responsibility for skin health. Skin care provided does not meet recent recommendations. The importance of targeted skin cleansing and care might be underestimated. There are a confusing variety of skin care products available and often the labels provide little information regarding the ingredients or guidance about how they affect skin health. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Risk Analysis of Typhoid Fever Based on Personal Hygiene and Street Food Consumption Habit at Home

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    Hilda Nuruzzaman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Typhoid fever is disease caused by Salmonella typhi bacteria transmission trought contaminated food and drink. Data from RSUD dr. Abdoer Rahem showing that from 2011–2013 typhoid fever case always increase and often happened to children age 5–14 years old. The objective research to analysis risk factor of typhoid fever according to snacking habit at school and at house of children age 7–12 years old. This research was observasional case control study. Data for case in this research are taken from medical record of ‘Unit Teratai’ for the past 1 year in RSUD dr. Abdoer Rahem Situbondo, whereas for control are case group. There are eighty person taken for this research as sample. This result was the risk of typhoid fever children which has habit of hand washing had after defecation at home OR 3.67 (1.29 < OR < 10.64, children which has habit of hand washing before eating had OR 4.33 (1.54 < OR < 12.44, children with short dirty fingernails had OR 7.79 (1.46 < OR < 46.18 frequent street food consumption OR 3.89 (1.39 < OR < 11.06, buy snack at food street OR 3.95 (1.40 < OR < 11.30, buy some snack with packing had OR 3.5 (1.26 < OR < 9.38. The conclusion is that habit hand washing after defecation, habit hand washing before eating, short dirty fingernail, frequent food street consumption, buy food street and buy some food with sealed packing can secrease the risk of typhoid fever for children age 7–12 years Keywords: typhoid fever, risk factor of typhoid fever, personal hygiene, street food consumption habit

  13. Association between family satisfaction and caregiver burden in cancer patients receiving outreach palliative care at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoki, Yoko; Matsuda, Yoshinobu; Maeda, Isseki; Kamino, Hideka; Kozaki, Yoko; Tokoro, Akihiro; Maki, Norimasa; Takada, Minoru

    2017-05-02

    Little is known about the associations between family satisfaction with end-of-life care and caregiver burden. We conducted a researcher-assisted questionnaire survey to clarify the impact of caregiver burden on family satisfaction and to determine the types of burden that decrease family satisfaction. Bereaved family caregivers of patients with advanced cancer who received our outreach palliative care service were retrospectively identified. Family satisfaction with the end-of-life care provided by the palliative care service and caregiver burden were quantified using the Japanese versions of the FAMCARE Scale and the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI), respectively. Our study subjects included 23 family caregivers. The mean scores on the FAMCARE Scale and the ZBI for the total population were 72.8 ± 11.2 and 22.8 ± 17.3, respectively, indicating moderate-to-high satisfaction and low-to-moderate burden. Caregiver burden had a strong negative correlation to family satisfaction with end-of-life care (Spearman's rho [ρ] = -0.560, p = 0.005), which remained after adjustment for potential confounders (standardized beta [β] = -0.563, p = 0.01). Several burden items-including loss of control, personal time, social engagement with others, feeling angry with the patient, feeling that the patient wants more help than he/she needs, and a wish to leave the care to someone else-were associated with decreased satisfaction. The major cause of dissatisfaction for family members included the information provided regarding prognosis, family conferences with medical professionals, and the method of involvement of family members in care decisions. Caregiver burden can be a barrier to family satisfaction with end-of-life care at home. A home care model focused on caregiver burden could improve end-of-life experiences for patients and family caregivers.

  14. Paid sick days and stay-at-home behavior for influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin Piper

    Full Text Available Access to paid sick days (PSD differs by workplace size, race/ethnicity, gender, and income in the United States. It is not known to what extent decisions to stay home from work when sick with infectious illnesses such as influenza depend on PSD access, and whether access impacts certain demographic groups more than others. We examined demographic and workplace characteristics (including access to PSD associated with employees' decisions to stay home from work for their own or a child's illness. Linking the 2009 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS consolidated data file to the medical conditions file, we used multivariate Poisson regression models with robust variance estimates to identify factors associated with missed work for an employee's own or a child's illness/injury, influenza-like-illness (ILI, and influenza. Controlling for gender, race/ethnicity, education, and income, access to PSD was associated with a higher probability of staying home for an employee's own illness/injury, ILI, or influenza, and for a child's illness/injury. Hispanic ethnicity was associated with a lower prevalence of staying home for the employee's own or a child's illness compared to non-Hispanic Whites. Access to PSD was associated with a significantly greater increase in the probability of staying home among Hispanics than among non-Hispanic Whites. Women had a significantly higher probability of staying home for their child's illness compared to men, suggesting that women remain the primary caregivers for ill children. Our results indicate that PSD access is important to encourage employees to stay home from work when sick with ILI or influenza. Also, PSD access may be important to enable stay-at-home behavior among Hispanics. We conclude that access to PSD is likely to reduce the spread of disease in workplaces by increasing the rate at which sick employees stay home from work, and reduce the economic burden of staying home on minorities, women, and

  15. Neuropsychology reports for childhood brain tumor survivors: implementation of recommendations at home and school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Lorraine L T; Wakefield, Claire E; Ellis, Sarah J; Mandalis, Anna; Frow, Eleanor; Cohn, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    As pediatric brain tumor survivors may experience cognitive decline post-treatment, a neuropsychology assessment is often conducted. The assessment evaluates the child's cognitive functioning and highlights potential challenges. Whilst neuropsychology reports provide recommendations for the home and school, how this translates in practice is under researched. This study explored parent and teacher understanding of neuropsychology reports, implementation rates for recommendations and their perceived effectiveness. Barriers to implementation were also investigated. Twenty-five semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 parents and 8 teachers of childhood brain tumor survivors from 15 Australian families who had received a neuropsychology report within 2 years of the interview. Twenty-four neuropsychology reports encompassing 131 recommendations were reviewed. The qualitative methodological framework of Miles and Huberman [Miles M, Huberman A. Qualitative data analysis: An expanded sourcebook. London: Sage; 1994] was used to analyze interview transcripts with QSR NVivo 9.0. The majority of parents and teachers had a sound understanding of the report. Implementation of recommendations at home and school was 47% and 41%, respectively. Recommendations that did not require extra effort and organization appeared more likely to be implemented, however, those perceived to be more effective or helpful did not necessarily have higher implementation rates. Key reported barriers to implementation barrier were patient reluctance, and a lack of parents' willingness to adopt the recommendation. Patient understanding and willingness play a significant role in the implementation of neuropsychology recommendations. Collaboration and clear communication between the patient, teacher, parent, and neuropsychologist is vital for effective management. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Pediatric Critical Care Transport as a Conduit to Terminal Extubation at Home: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noje, Corina; Bernier, Meghan L; Costabile, Philomena M; Klein, Bruce L; Kudchadkar, Sapna R

    2017-01-01

    To present our single-center's experience with three palliative critical care transports home from the PICU for terminal extubation. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients transported between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2014. All cases were identified from our institutional pediatric transport database. Patients were terminally ill children unable to separate from mechanical ventilation in the PICU, who were transported home for terminal extubation and end-of-life care according to their families' wishes. Patients underwent palliative care transport home for terminal extubation. The rate of palliative care transports home for terminal extubation during the study period was 2.6 per 100 deaths. The patients were 7 months, 6 years, and 18 years old and had complex chronic conditions. The transfer process was protocolized. The families were approached by the PICU staff during multidisciplinary goals-of-care meetings. Parental expectations were clarified, and home hospice care was arranged pretransfer. All transports were performed by our pediatric critical care transport team, and all terminal extubations were performed by physicians. All patients had unstable medical conditions and urgent needs for transport to comply with the families' wishes for withdrawal of life support and death at home. As such, all three cases presented similar logistic challenges, including establishing do-not-resuscitate status pretransport, having limited time to organize the transport, and coordinating home palliative care services with available community resources. Although a relatively infrequent practice in pediatric critical care, transport home for terminal extubation represents a feasible alternative for families seeking out-of-hospital end-of-life care for their critically ill technology-dependent children. Our single-center experience supports the need for development of formal programs for end-of-life critical care transports to include patient screening tools

  17. Quality of life among the family caregivers of patients with terminal cancer at home in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Eriko; Tadaka, Etsuko

    2017-10-01

    To identify the associated factors of quality of life (QOL) among the family caregivers of patients with terminal cancer at home. The design was an epidemiological study with self-administered questionnaires by mail. Date collection was carried out in the Tokyo Metropolitan, Tochigi, Ibaraki, Saitama, Chiba, Kanagawa, Nara, Hyogo, Kagawa, Ehime, and Saga prefectures in Japan. The participants who met the criteria for the present study were 262 family caregivers. Their QOL was assessed by the Japanese version of the Caregiver Quality of Life Index-Cancer. The potential factors that are associated with family caregivers' QOL included three factors: patient factors, including demographic characteristics and disease-related factors, family caregiver factors, including demographic characteristics, health conditions, and self-efficacy of family caregiving, and environmental factors, including instrumental, emotional, informational support, and satisfaction with the home care service. A multiple regression analysis was conducted in order to identify the associated factors with family caregivers' QOL. A total of 74 family caregivers participated in this study (response rate: 33.2%). The mean age of the family caregivers was 63.6 years and 79.7% was female. The multiple regression analysis indicated that depression, self-efficacy of family caregiving, the subcaregiver, and satisfaction with the home care service were associated with family caregivers' QOL. It is recommended that health practitioners should develop interventions for family caregivers in order to enhance the competence of the individual and home care system in order to achieve the sustainability of high-quality home care for patients with terminal cancer and the family caregivers' QOL. © 2017 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  18. Behavioural indicators of welfare in farmed fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Catarina I M; Galhardo, Leonor; Noble, Chris; Damsgård, Børge; Spedicato, Maria T; Zupa, Walter; Beauchaud, Marilyn; Kulczykowska, Ewa; Massabuau, Jean-Charles; Carter, Toby; Planellas, Sònia Rey; Kristiansen, Tore

    2012-02-01

    Behaviour represents a reaction to the environment as fish perceive it and is therefore a key element of fish welfare. This review summarises the main findings on how behavioural changes have been used to assess welfare in farmed fish, using both functional and feeling-based approaches. Changes in foraging behaviour, ventilatory activity, aggression, individual and group swimming behaviour, stereotypic and abnormal behaviour have been linked with acute and chronic stressors in aquaculture and can therefore be regarded as likely indicators of poor welfare. On the contrary, measurements of exploratory behaviour, feed anticipatory activity and reward-related operant behaviour are beginning to be considered as indicators of positive emotions and welfare in fish. Despite the lack of scientific agreement about the existence of sentience in fish, the possibility that they are capable of both positive and negative emotions may contribute to the development of new strategies (e.g. environmental enrichment) to promote good welfare. Numerous studies that use behavioural indicators of welfare show that behavioural changes can be interpreted as either good or poor welfare depending on the fish species. It is therefore essential to understand the species-specific biology before drawing any conclusions in relation to welfare. In addition, different individuals within the same species may exhibit divergent coping strategies towards stressors, and what is tolerated by some individuals may be detrimental to others. Therefore, the assessment of welfare in a few individuals may not represent the average welfare of a group and vice versa. This underlines the need to develop on-farm, operational behavioural welfare indicators that can be easily used to assess not only the individual welfare but also the welfare of the whole group (e.g. spatial distribution). With the ongoing development of video technology and image processing, the on-farm surveillance of behaviour may in the near

  19. The labour market intentions and behaviour of stay-at-home mothers in Western and Eastern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gauthier, A.H.; Emery, T.; Bartova, A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent increases in female labour force participation across Europe, a non-negligible proportion of women continue to remain out of the labour force for short or longer periods of time. Among the six countries included in this paper, stay-at-home mothers represent on average 33% of all

  20. The labour market intentions and behaviour of stay-at-home mothers in Western and Eastern Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. Gauthier (Anne Hélène); T.E. Emery (Tom); A. Bártová (Alžběta)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractDespite recent increases in female labour force participation across Europe, a non-negligible proportion of women continue to remain out of the labour force for short or longer periods of time. Among the six countries included in this paper, stay-at-home mothers represent on average

  1. How technology in care at home affects patient self-care and self-management: a scoping review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, J.M.; Wiegers, T.A.; Friele, R.D.

    2013-01-01

    The use of technology in care at home has potential benefits such as improved quality of care. This includes greater focus on the patients’ role in managing their health and increased patient involvement in the care process. The objective of this scoping review is to analyse the existing evidence

  2. Experimenting with Photoelectrochemical Cells in Drinking Straws: Practical Aids for Learning about Solar Energy in School or at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleyard, S. J.

    2008-01-01

    Photoelectrochemical cells using dye-sensitized ZnO with a Cu[superscript 2+]/Fe[superscript 2+]/Fe[superscript 3+] electrolyte can be easily made at home or in a school classroom with household chemicals and other readily available materials. The cells, which are made with wire housed within plastic drinking straws, have open-circuit voltages of…

  3. Internationalization at Home Alternatives to Study Abroad: Implications for Students' Development of Global, International, and Intercultural Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Krista M.; Troisi, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    Colleges and universities are increasingly internationalizing their curricular and cocurricular efforts on campuses; subsequently, it is important to compare whether internationalization at home activities may be associated with students' self-reported development of global, international, and intercultural (GII) competencies. This study…

  4. Effectiveness and safety of intravenous therapy at home for children and adolescents with acute and chronic illnesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Eva Helena; Brødsgaard, Anne

    2016-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this systematic review are to assess the effectiveness and safety of intravenous therapy at home compared with in-patient intravenous therapy in acute and chronically ill children and adolescents. Outcomes will include improvement of the illness...

  5. Hunger at Home: A Higher Education Service Learning Course of Appraisal and Action in Community Food Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Nancy J.

    2011-01-01

    Service learning and civic engagement are playing an increasingly larger role in higher education. Unity College's Hunger at Home course could serve as a model for service learning in disciplines such as nutrition, sociology, and food and agriculture. The class worked with local partners to get a better understanding of hunger in the area, recent…

  6. Direct and vicarious victimization at school and at home as risk factors for suicidal cognotion among Italian youngsters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldry, A.C.; Winkel, F.W.

    2004-01-01

    Suicidal cognition is defined here as the combination of thinking about committing suicide and engaging in self-harm and is considered to indicate maladjustment following an extreme internalized reaction to negative life events. Victimization at home and at school might lead some youth to suicidal

  7. Direct and vicarious victimization at school and at home as risk factors for suicidal cognition among Italian youngsters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldry, A.C.; Winkel, F.W.

    2003-01-01

    Suicidal cognition is defined here as the combination of thinking about committing suicide and engaging in self-harm and is considered to indicate maladjustment following an extreme internalized reaction to negative life events. Victimization at home and at school might lead some youth to suicidal

  8. Locating Mothers: How Cultural Debates about Stay-at-Home versus Working Mothers Define Women and Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillaway, Heather; Pare, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Most women must decide whether to work for pay while mothering or make mothering their sole social role. Often this decision is portrayed in terms of whether they will be "stay-at-home" and presumably "full-time" mothers, or "working mothers" and therefore ones who prioritize paid work over caregiving. Inferred within this construction is women's…

  9. The myth of the stay-at-home family firm : How family-managed SMEs can overcome their internationalization limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennart, Jean-Francois; Majocchi, A.; Forlani, E.

    The prevalent view among family-firm internationalization scholars is that family management discourages internationalization. This is because selling abroad is said to require more specialized managers and more resources than selling at home, and yet family firms are unwilling to recruit non-family

  10. Personal, family and school influences on secondary pupils’ feelings of safety at school, in the school surroundings, and at home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ton

    2012-01-01

    Mooij, T. (2012). Personal, family and school influences on secondary pupils’ feelings of safety at school, in the school surroundings, and at home. Teachers and Teaching: theory and practice, 18(2), 129-157. doi:10.1080/13540602.2012.632270

  11. Substitution between Working at Home and Out-of-Home: The Role of ICT and Commuting Costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaff, T.; Rietveld, P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyzes the trade-off between working at home and out-of-home, ICT and commuting time. To this end, we develop a microeconomic demand system, which explicitly incorporates both time and income constraints. Commuting time is considered as the price to be paid for working out-of-home and a

  12. Personal, family, and school influences on secondary pupils’ feelings of safety at school, in the school surroundings, and at home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ton

    2010-01-01

    Mooij, T. (2010, 26-28 August). Personal, family, and school influences on secondary pupils’ feelings of safety at school, the school surroundings, and at home. Presentation at the ‘European Conference on Educational Research’ of the 'European Educational Research Association' (EERA), Helsinki.

  13. QUALITY-OF-LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY-DISEASE IMPROVES AFTER REHABILITATION AT HOME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIJKSTRA, PJ; VANALTENA, R; KRAAN, J; OTTEN, [No Value; POSTMA, DS; KOETER, GH

    We have developed a rehabilitation programme at home and have investigated its effects on quality of life (QOL), lung function, and exercise tolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We studied 43 patients with severe airflow obstruction: forced expiratory volume in

  14. Symptoms, unbearability and the nature of suffering in terminal cancer patients dying at home: a prospective primary care study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, C.D.M.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.; van der Wal, G.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Primary care physicians provide palliative home care. In cancer patients dying at home in the Netherlands (45% of all cancer patients) euthanasia in about one out of every seven patients indicates unbearable suffering. Symptom prevalence, relationship between intensity of symptoms and

  15. [Hospital-at-home in older patients: a scoping review on opportunities of developing comprehensive geriatric assessment based services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Miquel Àngel; Santaeugènia, Sebastià

    2015-01-01

    This scoping review focused on the opportunity of developing new hospital-at-home schemes in our health systems adapted to older patients with complex conditions due to acute illness. A review was conducted on articles including, randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews and meta-analysis in PubMed and Cochrane Library, from January 1990 to July 2013. Search terms were: hospital-at-home, Early Supported Discharge, hospital in the home and home hospitalization. An analysis was performed to include: the intervention model (admission avoidance or early discharge), age, diagnosis, main inclusion criteria and intervention characteristics (disciplines involved, duration of intervention, main outcomes and objectives). It is concluded that there are several models of hospital-at-home care, with favorable clinical outcomes. The majority of teams in our country focused on acute health care in the less elderly with chronic diseases. Other schemes based on comprehensive geriatric assessment and interdisciplinary teams specialized in complex interventions are also highlighted. The development of comprehensive geriatric assessment based hospital-at-home care by teams led by geriatricians is an opportunity to develop alternatives to conventional hospitalization interventions tailored to older patients. Copyright © 2014 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Sex and Age Differences in Exposure to Secondhand Smoke at Home among Korean Adolescents: A Nationally Representative Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hyun Hwang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The authors assessed sex and age differences in secondhand smoke (SHS exposure among vulnerable adolescent populations. Data from the 2013 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey of 64,499 non-smokers aged 13–18 years were analyzed using multiple logistic regression. Girls were exposed 1.26 times (95% confidence interval, 1.21–1.32 more to home SHS than boys, and the younger adolescents were more likely to be exposed to home SHS than were the older, regardless of sex (p < 0.001. Younger girls living with or without current smokers and the younger boys living with current smokers were more likely to be exposed to SHS at home, when the data were stratified according to current household member smoking, which was one of the main risk factors for SHS exposure at home. Girls living with current smokers were more likely to be exposed to SHS at home than boys regardless age. Girls and younger adolescents, populations vulnerable to smoke exposure, were more likely to be exposed to SHS at home, even though they should be more protected. It is necessary to improve home SHS awareness, especially among these vulnerable populations.

  17. Direct and Vicarious Victimization at School and at Home as Risk Factors for Suicidal Cognition among Italian Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldry, Anna C.; Winkel, Frans Willem

    2003-01-01

    Suicidal cognition is defined here as the combination of thinking about committing suicide and engaging in self-harm and is considered to indicate maladjustment following an extreme internalized reaction to negative life events. Victimization at home and at school might lead some youth to suicidal cognition. The present study aimed to examine…

  18. Parents' Responses to a Kindergarten-Classroom Lending-Library Component Designed to Support Shared Reading at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Lori E.; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.; Yu, SeonYeong; Favazza, Paddy C.; Mouzourou, Chryso; van Luling, Lisa; Park, Hyejin

    2016-01-01

    Teachers often recommend that families engage their children in shared book reading to support literacy learning at home. When teachers purposefully provide families with home literacy activities there are benefits for everyone involved. The purpose of this article is to report the findings of a study that examined parental participation and…

  19. ICT and Substitution between Out-of-home and At-home Work; the Importance of Timing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de Thomas; Rietveld, Piet

    2003-01-01

    This paper investigates the determinants of at home and out-of-home labor supply in the Netherlands in the 199s, focusing on the presence of ICT technologies in households -in particular modempossession.To investigate these determinants, a sequential hurdle model is estimated where people first

  20. ICT and substitution between out-of-home and at-home work: The importance of timing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaff, T.; Rietveld, P.

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates the determinants of at-home and out-of-home labor supply in the Netherlands in the 1990s, focusing on the presence of information and computer technology (ICT) in households-in particular modem possession. To investigate these determinants, a sequential hurdle model is

  1. mHealth tools for monitoring Obstructive Sleep Apnea patients at home: Proof-of-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Miguel A; Castillo, Yolanda; Blanco-Almazan, Dolores; Estrada, Luis; Jane, Raimon

    2017-07-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a sleep disorder that affects mainly the adult and elderly population. Due to the high percentage of patients who remain undiagnosed and untreated because of limitations of current diagnosis methods, the management of OSA is an important social, scientific and economic problem that will be difficult to be assumed by health systems. On the other hand, smartphone platforms (mHealth systems) are being considered as an innovative solution, thanks to the integration of the essential sensors to obtain clinically relevant parameters in the same device or in combination with wireless wearable devices.

  2. Socioeconomic Inequalities in Secondhand Smoke Exposure at Home and at Work in 15 Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazar, Gaurang P; Lee, John Tayu; Arora, Monika; Millett, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    In high-income countries, secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure is higher among disadvantaged groups. We examine socioeconomic inequalities in SHS exposure at home and at workplace in 15 low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Secondary analyses of cross-sectional data from 15 LMICs participating in Global Adult Tobacco Survey (participants ≥ 15 years; 2008-2011) were used. Country-specific analyses using regression-based methods were used to estimate the magnitude of socioeconomic inequalities in SHS exposure: (1) Relative Index of Inequality and (2) Slope Index of Inequality. SHS exposure at home ranged from 17.4% in Mexico to 73.1% in Vietnam; exposure at workplace ranged from 16.9% in Uruguay to 65.8% in Bangladesh. In India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Malaysia, Philippines, Vietnam, Uruguay, Poland, Turkey, Ukraine, and Egypt, SHS exposure at home reduced with increasing wealth (Relative Index of Inequality range: 1.13 [95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.22] in Turkey to 3.31 [95% CI 2.91-3.77] in Thailand; Slope Index of Inequality range: 0.06 [95% CI 0.02-0.11] in Turkey to 0.43 [95% CI 0.38-0.48] in Philippines). In these 11 countries, and in China, SHS exposure at home reduced with increasing education. In India, Bangladesh, Thailand, and Philippines, SHS exposure at workplace reduced with increasing wealth. In India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Philippines, Vietnam, Poland, Russian Federation, Turkey, Ukraine, and Egypt, SHS exposure at workplace reduced with increasing education. SHS exposure at homes is higher among the socioeconomically disadvantaged in the majority of LMICs studied; at workplaces, exposure is higher among the less educated. Pro-equity tobacco control interventions alongside targeted efforts in these groups are recommended to reduce inequalities in SHS exposure. SHS exposure is higher among the socioeconomically disadvantaged groups in high-income countries. Comprehensive smoke-free policies are pro-equity for certain health outcomes that are

  3. Supporting home care for the dying: an evaluation of healthcare professionals' perspectives of an individually tailored hospice at home service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Barbara A; Baldry, Catherine R; Groves, Karen E; Whelan, Alison; Sephton, Janice; Gaunt, Kathryn

    2013-10-01

    To explore health care professionals' perspective of hospice at home service that has different components, individually tailored to meet the needs of patients. Over 50% of adults diagnosed with a terminal illness and the majority of people who have cancer, prefer to be cared for and to die in their own home. Despite this, most deaths occur in hospital. Increasing the options available for patients, including their place of care and death is central to current UK policy initiatives. Hospice at home services aim to support patients to remain at home, yet there are wide variations in the design of services and delivery. A hospice at home service was developed to provide various components (accompanied transfer home, crisis intervention and hospice aides) that could be tailored to meet the individual needs of patients. An evaluation study. Data were collected from 75 health care professionals. District nurses participated in one focus group (13) and 31 completed an electronic survey. Palliative care specialist nurses participated in a focus group (9). One hospital discharge co-ordinator and two general practitioners participated in semi-structured interviews and a further 19 general practitioners completed the electronic survey. Health care professionals reported the impact and value of each of the components of the service, as helping to support patients to remain at home, by individually tailoring care. They also positively reported that support for family carers appeared to enable them to continue coping, rapid access to the service was suggested to contribute to faster hospital discharges and the crisis intervention service was identified as helping patients remain in their own home, where they wanted to be. Health care professionals perceived that the additional individualised support provided by this service contributed to enabling patients to continue be cared for and to die at home in their place of choice. This service offers various components of a hospice

  4. Policy Measures to Support Palliative Care at Home: A Cross-Country Case Comparison in Three European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maetens, Arno; Beernaert, Kim; Deliens, Luc; Aubry, Régis; Radbruch, Lukas; Cohen, Joachim

    2017-10-01

    The proportion of people in need of palliative care worldwide is rising, and the majority wish to receive this care at home. Many countries have created policy measures to support palliative care at home. To list and compare existing policy measures designed to support palliative care at home in addition to available primary care services in Belgium, France, and Germany. A cross-country case comparison based on expert consultation, governmental policy documents, and relevant scientific literature. All three countries have policy measures that allow informal caregivers to adapt their working patterns or take leave of absence to provide care without losing employee rights; however, only Belgium offers specific paid palliative care leave. All three countries offer various allowances to people who are dying at home and their caregivers. Cost-reductions for out-of-pocket expenses are available, based on the level of care dependency in Germany and on prognosis in Belgium, but are not provided in France. Mobile home support teams exist in all three countries and are free of charge for patients and caregivers; but only in Belgium and Germany, there are specialist multidisciplinary palliative home care teams. Belgium and Germany provide respite care for palliative patients. European countries with similar contextual characteristics offer comparable policy measures to support palliative care at home in addition to the available primary care services. However, important differences exist in the criteria for access and the extent of what is offered. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Short article: Remicade infusions at home: an alternative setting of infliximab therapy for patients with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuin, Sabine; Stolte, Suzan B; van den Brink, Gijs R; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y; Fockens, Paul; D'Haens, Geert R; Löwenberg, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Infliximab maintenance treatment for Crohn's disease (CD) consists of intravenous infusions that are usually given at 6-8-week intervals. We aimed to evaluate whether home-based infliximab infusions could offer a useful and safe alternative for the management of CD patients. Adult CD patients receiving infliximab maintenance treatment at the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam were invited to receive their infusions at home for the duration of 1 year. Patients had to be in clinical remission and should have had no adverse events during previous infusions. Patient satisfaction and experience were studied. Costs were analyzed and compared with hospital-based infliximab infusions. Twenty-nine patients were invited, of whom 13 (45%) wanted to participate. Of the participants, 54% were female, and the median age was 33 years. In total, 59 infliximab infusions were administered at home at a median dose of 360 mg. The median rating of patient satisfaction was 8 on a scale from 1 to 10 for both home and hospital treatment settings. An important observation was that patients' willingness to participate would have been 70% if the possibility of receiving infusions at home outside office hours had been offered. Costs of infliximab infusions at home were €229 per infusion compared with €284 at the infusion clinic (excluding drug costs). Home-based infliximab infusions were associated with a cost saving of €55 per infusion. Most participants were satisfied and would recommend home-based infusions to others. Infliximab treatment at home might be recommended as routine care for CD patients.

  6. Environmental Sustainability based on Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    The paper argues that the Scandinavian countries have some traditions of equity and social welfare, which are essential for reaching a truly environmentally sustainable society. But for the highly polluting Denmark, this would require a dramatic change in the political visions. Maintaining...... the present low birth rate is one condition necessary, environmentally better technology is another, and finally a saturation with material consumption, which is required. The latter is in line with people's quest for more leisure time rather than more consumption, but unfortunately counteracted by government...

  7. Reciprocity, World Prices and Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raimondos-Møller, Pascalis; Woodland, Alan D.

    We examine in detail the circumstances under which reciprocity, as defined in Bagwell and Staiger (1999), leads to fixed world prices. We show that a change of tariffs satisfying reciprocity does not necessarily imply constant world prices in a world of many goods and countries. While...... it is possible to find tariff reforms that are consistent with both reciprocity and constant world prices, these reforms do not follow from the reciprocity condition, but rather from the requirement of unchanged world prices. We propose an alternative reciprocity rule that is guaranteed to raise the welfare...... of all countries, independently of whether world prices change and independently of the relative numbers of goods and countries....

  8. 'Genericism' in Danish welfare professions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Verner

    and skills in the basic disciplines of the professions also termed as disciplinary and procedural knowledge '. Thus the main research question for this paper is: What consequences do recent reform actions in Danish welfare education concerning generic competence have on developing professional knowledge......Our paper is based on an ongoing research project about ‘genericism’ in Danish professional education. We critically discuss the concept of 'generic skills' and argue that the ability to act professionally and reflective, even in changing contexts, should foremost be based on extensive knowledge...

  9. No breakfast at home: association with cardiovascular disease risk factors in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoutsou, S; Briassoulis, G; Wolters, M; Peplies, J; Iacoviello, L; Eiben, G; Veidebaum, T; Molnar, D; Russo, P; Michels, N; Moreno, L A; Tornaritis, M

    2014-07-01

    Limited data exist regarding breakfast consumption and its association with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. This study investigates the relationship between breakfast routine and CVD risk factors in a multinational sample. Cross-sectional data from eight European countries participating in the IDEFICS (Identification and prevention of dietary- and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants) survey (2007-2008) were used. The sample included ;children 2 to daily breakfast at home (DBrH) consumption. Male school-aged NBrH consumers, ;compared with ;DBrH consumers, ;were more likely to be overweight/obese (odds ratio (OR): 1.37, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.05-1.79), to have higher risk for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels lower than 40 mg/dl (OR: 1.69, 95% CI=1.24-2.30), triglycerides (TG) above 75 mg/dl (OR: 1.65, 95% CI=1.24-2.19) and sum of skinfolds greater than the 90th percentile (OR: 1.32, 95% CI=1.0-1.76). Female school-aged NBrH consumers ;compared with ;DBrH consumers ;had a higher risk for waist circumference greater than the 90th percentile (OR: 1.70, 95% CI=1.14-2.51), HDL cholesterol levels lower than 40 mg/dl (OR: 1.65, 95% CI=1.23-2.21), TG above 75 mg/dl (OR: 1.65, 95% CI=1.26-2.17) and total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio >3.5 (OR: 1.39, 95% CI=1.09-1.77). RESULTS remained significant after adjusting for daily physical activity in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) periods (in min/day). Male DBrH consumers, 6 to daily periods of MVPA compared with ;NBrH consumers ;(32.0±21.4 vs 27.5±18.8, PDaily breakfast consumption contributes to controlling school-aged children's weight ;and lipid profile and promotes higher PA.

  10. Using Robots at Home to Support Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Elizabeth; Garrett, Jeff; Jepsen, Nicola; Li Ogilvie, Vickie; Ahn, Ho Seok; Robinson, Hayley; Peri, Kathryn; Kerse, Ngaire; Rouse, Paul; Pillai, Avinesh; MacDonald, Bruce

    2018-02-13

    Socially assistive robots are being developed for patients to help manage chronic health conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Adherence to medication and availability of rehabilitation are suboptimal in this patient group, which increases the risk of hospitalization. This pilot study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a robot delivering telehealth care to increase adherence to medication and home rehabilitation, improve quality of life, and reduce hospital readmission compared with a standard care control group. At discharge from hospital for a COPD admission, 60 patients were randomized to receive a robot at home for 4 months or to a control group. Number of hospitalization days for respiratory admissions over the 4-month study period was the primary outcome. Medication adherence, frequency of rehabilitation exercise, and quality of life were also assessed. Implementation interviews as well as benefit-cost analysis were conducted. Intention-to-treat and per protocol analyses showed no significant differences in the number of respiratory-related hospitalizations between groups. The intervention group was more adherent to their long-acting inhalers (mean number of prescribed puffs taken per day=48.5%) than the control group (mean 29.5%, P=.03, d=0.68) assessed via electronic recording. Self-reported adherence was also higher in the intervention group after controlling for covariates (P=.04). The intervention group increased their rehabilitation exercise frequency compared with the control group (mean difference -4.53, 95% CI -7.16 to -1.92). There were no significant differences in quality of life. Of the 25 patients who had the robot, 19 had favorable attitudes. This pilot study suggests that a homecare robot can improve adherence to medication and increase exercise. Further research is needed with a larger sample size to further investigate effects on hospitalizations after improvements are made to the robots. The robots could be

  11. Newborn care practices at home and in health facilities in 4 regions of Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Ethiopia is one of the ten countries with the highest number of neonatal deaths globally, and only 1 in 10 women deliver with a skilled attendant. Promotion of essential newborn care practices is one strategy for improving newborn health outcomes that can be delivered in communities as well as facilities. This article describes newborn care practices reported by recently-delivered women (RDWs) in four regions of Ethiopia. Methods We conducted a household survey with two-stage cluster sampling to assess newborn care practices among women who delivered a live baby in the period 1 to 7 months prior to data collection. Results The majority of women made one antenatal care (ANC) visit to a health facility, although less than half made four or more visits and women were most likely to deliver their babies at home. About one-fifth of RDWs in this survey had contact with Health Extension Workers (HEWS) during ANC, but nurse/midwives were the most common providers, and few women had postnatal contact with any health provider. Common beneficial newborn care practices included exclusive breastfeeding (87.6%), wrapping the baby before delivery of the placenta (82.3%), and dry cord care (65.2%). Practices contrary to WHO recommendations that were reported in this population of recent mothers include bathing during the first 24 hours of life (74.7%), application of butter and other substances to the cord (19.9%), and discarding of colostrum milk (44.5%). The results suggest that there are not large differences for most essential newborn care indicators between facility and home deliveries, with the exception of delayed bathing and skin-to-skin care. Conclusions Improving newborn care and newborn health outcomes in Ethiopia will likely require a multifaceted approach. Given low facility delivery rates, community-based promotion of preventive newborn care practices, which has been effective in other settings, is an important strategy. For this strategy to be

  12. A Universal Animal Welfare Framework for Zoos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Ron; Carter, Scott; Allard, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The Detroit Zoological Society's (DZS) Center for Zoo Animal Welfare (CZAW) was created to advance the science and policy of the welfare of exotic nonhuman animals in captivity. This important part of the DZS mission is achieved through assessments of, and research on, the welfare of animals in zoos; by recognizing extraordinary achievement in the advancement of animal welfare; by widely sharing knowledge through a bibliographic resource center; by conducting professional training for animal care staff; and by convening important discussions in the form of international symposia. This special issue of the Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science features selected papers from the most recent international CZAW symposium held at the Detroit Zoo in November 2014, as well as a universal framework for zoo animal welfare developed by the DZS. PMID:26440494

  13. Welfare Economics: A Story of Existence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Iqbal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to explore that, despite severe challenges, welfare economics still exists. This descriptive study is conducted through some specific time line developments in this field. Economists are divided over the veracity and survival of the welfare economics. Welfare economics emphasizes on the optimum resource and goods allocation with the objective of better living standard, materialistic gains, social welfare and ethical decisions. It origins back to the political economics and utilitarianism. Adam Smith, Irving Fisher and Pareto contributed significantly towards it. During 1930 to 1940, American and British approaches were developed. Many economists tried to explore the relationship between level of income and happiness. Amartya Sen gave the comparative approach and Tinbergen pioneered the theory of equity. Contemporarily the futuristic restoration of welfare economics is on trial and hopes are alive. This study may be useful to understand the transitional and survival process of welfare economics.

  14. A Universal Animal Welfare Framework for Zoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Ron; Carter, Scott; Allard, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The Detroit Zoological Society's (DZS) Center for Zoo Animal Welfare (CZAW) was created to advance the science and policy of the welfare of exotic nonhuman animals in captivity. This important part of the DZS mission is achieved through assessments of, and research on, the welfare of animals in zoos; by recognizing extraordinary achievement in the advancement of animal welfare; by widely sharing knowledge through a bibliographic resource center; by conducting professional training for animal care staff; and by convening important discussions in the form of international symposia. This special issue of the Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science features selected papers from the most recent international CZAW symposium held at the Detroit Zoo in November 2014, as well as a universal framework for zoo animal welfare developed by the DZS.

  15. Measuring zoo animal welfare: theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sonya P; Broom, Donald M

    2009-11-01

    The assessment of animal welfare relates to investigations of how animals try to cope with their environment, and how easy or how difficult it is for them to do so. The use of rigorous scientific methods to assess this has grown over the past few decades, and so our understanding of the needs of animals has improved during this time. Much of the work in the field of animal welfare has been conducted on farm animals, but it is important to consider how the methods and approaches used in assessing farm animal welfare have been, and can be, adapted and applied to the measurement of welfare in animals in other domains, such as in zoos. This is beneficial to our understanding of both the theoretical knowledge, and the practicability of methods. In this article, some of the commonly-used methods for measuring animal welfare will be discussed, as well as some practical considerations in assessing the welfare of zoo animals.

  16. Equality at home - A question of career? Housework, norms, and policies in a European comparative perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Fahlén

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dual-earner families are widespread in contemporary Europe, yet the division of housework is highly gendered, with women still bearing the lion's share. However, women in dual-career couples and in other types of non-traditional couples, across and within different European countries, appear to handle the division of housework differently. Objective: The objective of this study is to examine the division of housework among various couple-earner types, by determining i whether relative resources, time spent on paid work, gender attitudes, and family structure reduce variations in housework between different couple types, and ii whether the division of housework varies between countries with different work‒family policies and gender norms. Methods: The study uses data from ten countries, representing different welfare regime types, extracted from the European Social Survey (2010/11, and employs multivariate regressions and aggregated analysis of the association between the division of housework and the contextual indices. Results: The results show that dual-career couples divide housework more equally than dual-earner couples, relating more to the fact that the former group of women do less housework in general, rather than that men are doing more. The cross-national analysis shows tangible differences between dual-earner and dual-career couples; however, the difference is less marked with respect to the division of housework in countries with more institutional support for work‒family reconciliation and less traditional gender norms. Contribution: By combining conventional economic and gender-based approaches with an institutional framework, this study contributes to the research field by showing that the division of housework within different couple-earner types is contextually embedded.

  17. Welfare Effects of Food Miles Labels

    OpenAIRE

    Caputo, Vincenzina; Vassilopoulos, Achilleas; Nayga, Rodolfo M., Jr.; Canavari, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the consumer welfare effects of two generic food miles labels: carbon dioxide (CO2) emission label and number of miles label. Using data from a choice experiment, our results generally suggest that a mandatory labeling policy for either type of label would have a positive welfare effect on both informed and uninformed consumers. However, a label informing consumers about the number of miles the food product has travelled provides greater positive welfare effects than a label infor...

  18. Race, Debt and the Welfare State

    OpenAIRE

    Pitcher, B.

    2016-01-01

    In this article I explore how the figure of debt illuminates the racial politics of welfare in neoliberal Britain. I begin by giving a reading of the simultaneous unfolding of post-war race politics and the Beveridgean welfare state, and then turn to consider the interpellative appeal of neoliberal debt to minoritiSed subjects who have, in certain respects, been de facto excluded from prevailing models of welfare citizenship. In particular, this article considers the ways in which household d...

  19. Limited english proficiency, primary language at home, and disparities in children's health care: how language barriers are measured matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Glenn; Abreu, Milagros; Tomany-Korman, Sandra C

    2005-01-01

    Approximately 3.5 million U.S. schoolchildren are limited in English proficiency (LEP). Disparities in children's health and health care are associated with both LEP and speaking a language other than English at home, but prior research has not examined which of these two measures of language barriers is most useful in examining health care disparities. Our objectives were to compare primary language spoken at home vs. parental LEP and their associations with health status, access to care, and use of health services in children. We surveyed parents at urban community sites in Boston, asking 74 questions on children's health status, access to health care, and use of health services. Some 98% of the 1,100 participating children and families were of non-white race/ethnicity, 72% of parents were LEP, and 13 different primary languages were spoken at home. "Dose-response" relationships were observed between parental English proficiency and several child and parental sociodemographic features, including children's insurance coverage, parental educational attainment, citizenship and employment, and family income. Similar "dose-response" relationships were noted between the primary language spoken at home and many but not all of the same sociodemographic features. In multivariate analyses, LEP parents were associated with triple the odds of a child having fair/poor health status, double the odds of the child spending at least one day in bed for illness in the past year, and significantly greater odds of children not being brought in for needed medical care for six of nine access barriers to care. None of these findings were observed in analyses of the primary language spoken at home. Individual parental LEP categories were associated with different risks of adverse health status and outcomes. Parental LEP is superior to the primary language spoken at home as a measure of the impact of language barriers on children's health and health care. Individual parental LEP

  20. From the front lines of welfare reform: an analysis of social worker and welfare recipient attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Heather E

    2004-12-01

    Social workers and welfare recipients operate within the same institutional framework and share a working and/or lived knowledge of poverty, but they occupy different social and economic positions. To gain a better understanding of intergroup attitudes, the author compared how social workers and welfare recipients explain poverty and perceive the welfare system. The results highlight important similarities and differences between the two groups. Although the author did not find differences for individualistic attributions, welfare recipients regarded prejudice as playing a greater role in causing poverty than did social workers. Welfare recipients also expressed stronger support for increased welfare funding and progressive welfare policies than did social workers. The author discussed implications for strengthening interclass alliances, particularly the relationship between social service providers and welfare recipients.