WorldWideScience

Sample records for at grade intersections

  1. Optimizing Performance of at-grade Intersection with Bus Rapid Transit Corridor and Heterogeneous Traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Kumar Sharma

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Bus Rapid Transit (BRT has emerged as a preferred mode of public transport in various countries all over the world for its cost effectiveness in construction as well as in operation and maintenance. The rapid transit feature of BRT is seen as a solution to many traffic problems in these countries. However, in developing countries like India, the right -of-way for most of the roads is restricted and traffic is heterogeneous in nature. Provision of BRT in existing right -of-way reduces the capacity available for other motorized traffic. As the buses travel with a certain frequency on dedicated bus- ways, the dedicated corridor remains unused for most of the period when other traffic on motorized vehicle (MV lanes suffers from congestion. The problem gets severe at intersections. However, if buses are operated in mixed traffic it is no more rapid transit. Hence, a solution is required to address this problem and optimize the performance of traffic as a whole. This paper presents the effect if dedicated bus-ways end at a reasonable distance before the stop line at a busy signalized at-grade intersection, and bus lanes (beyond that are made available to all the motorized vehicular traffic (heterogeneous traffic at intersection. The performance evaluation is done in terms of average queue length, maximum queue length, average delay time per vehicle, vehicle throughput, average speed in network and emission of Carbon monoxide CO, mono-nitrogen oxides NOx and Volatile organic compounds (VOC. It is observed that availability of bus lanes to other motorized traffic for a reasonable distance before intersection considerably reduces the average queue length, maximum queue length, average delay time per vehicle and emission per vehicle, while there is an increase in vehicle throughput and average speed of all the vehicles in the network. Thus it results in reduction of congestion and performance enhancement of at-grade intersections and network. Results of

  2. Traffic Control Models Based on Cellular Automata for At-Grade Intersections in Autonomous Vehicle Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous vehicle is able to facilitate road safety and traffic efficiency and has become a promising trend of future development. With a focus on highways, existing literatures studied the feasibility of autonomous vehicle in continuous traffic flows and the controllability of cooperative driving. However, rare efforts have been made to investigate the traffic control strategies in autonomous vehicle environment on urban roads, especially in urban intersections. In autonomous vehicle environment, it is possible to achieve cooperative driving with V2V and V2I wireless communication. Without signal control, conflicted traffic flows could pass intersections through mutual cooperative, which is a remarkable improvement to existing traffic control methods. This paper established a cellular automata model with greedy algorithm for the traffic control of intersections in autonomous vehicle environment, with autonomous vehicle platoon as the optimization object. NetLogo multiagent simulation platform model was employed to simulate the proposed model. The simulation results are compared with the traffic control programs in conventional Synchro optimization. The findings suggest that, on the premises of ensuring traffic safety, the control strategy of the proposed model significantly reduces average delays and number of stops as well as increasing traffic capacity.

  3. The Ideal Intersection Property for Groupoid Graded Rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öinert, Per Johan; Lundström, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    We show that, if a groupoid graded ring has a grading satisfying a certain nondegeneracy property, then the commutant of the center of the principal component of the ring has the ideal intersection property, that is it intersects nontrivially every nonzero ideal of the ring. Furthermore, we show...

  4. Comparing the effects of infrastructure on bicycling injury at intersections and non-intersections using a case-crossover design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M Anne; Reynolds, Conor C O; Winters, Meghan; Cripton, Peter A; Shen, Hui; Chipman, Mary L; Cusimano, Michael D; Babul, Shelina; Brubacher, Jeffrey R; Friedman, Steven M; Hunte, Garth; Monro, Melody; Vernich, Lee; Teschke, Kay

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the impact of transportation infrastructure at intersection and non-intersection locations on bicycling injury risk. In Vancouver and Toronto, we studied adult cyclists who were injured and treated at a hospital emergency department. A case-crossover design compared the infrastructure of injury and control sites within each injured bicyclist's route. Intersection injury sites (N=210) were compared to randomly selected intersection control sites (N=272). Non-intersection injury sites (N=478) were compared to randomly selected non-intersection control sites (N=801). At intersections, the types of routes meeting and the intersection design influenced safety. Intersections of two local streets (no demarcated traffic lanes) had approximately one-fifth the risk (adjusted OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.66) of intersections of two major streets (more than two traffic lanes). Motor vehicle speeds less than 30 km/h also reduced risk (adjusted OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.92). Traffic circles (small roundabouts) on local streets increased the risk of these otherwise safe intersections (adjusted OR 7.98, 95% CI 1.79 to 35.6). At non-intersection locations, very low risks were found for cycle tracks (bike lanes physically separated from motor vehicle traffic; adjusted OR 0.05, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.59) and local streets with diverters that reduce motor vehicle traffic (adjusted OR 0.04, 95% CI 0.003 to 0.60). Downhill grades increased risks at both intersections and non-intersections. These results provide guidance for transportation planners and engineers: at local street intersections, traditional stops are safer than traffic circles, and at non-intersections, cycle tracks alongside major streets and traffic diversion from local streets are safer than no bicycle infrastructure.

  5. Comparing the effects of infrastructure on bicycling injury at intersections and non-intersections using a case–crossover design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M Anne; Reynolds, Conor C O; Winters, Meghan; Cripton, Peter A; Shen, Hui; Chipman, Mary L; Cusimano, Michael D; Babul, Shelina; Brubacher, Jeffrey R; Friedman, Steven M; Hunte, Garth; Monro, Melody; Vernich, Lee; Teschke, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Background This study examined the impact of transportation infrastructure at intersection and non-intersection locations on bicycling injury risk. Methods In Vancouver and Toronto, we studied adult cyclists who were injured and treated at a hospital emergency department. A case–crossover design compared the infrastructure of injury and control sites within each injured bicyclist's route. Intersection injury sites (N=210) were compared to randomly selected intersection control sites (N=272). Non-intersection injury sites (N=478) were compared to randomly selected non-intersection control sites (N=801). Results At intersections, the types of routes meeting and the intersection design influenced safety. Intersections of two local streets (no demarcated traffic lanes) had approximately one-fifth the risk (adjusted OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.66) of intersections of two major streets (more than two traffic lanes). Motor vehicle speeds less than 30 km/h also reduced risk (adjusted OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.92). Traffic circles (small roundabouts) on local streets increased the risk of these otherwise safe intersections (adjusted OR 7.98, 95% CI 1.79 to 35.6). At non-intersection locations, very low risks were found for cycle tracks (bike lanes physically separated from motor vehicle traffic; adjusted OR 0.05, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.59) and local streets with diverters that reduce motor vehicle traffic (adjusted OR 0.04, 95% CI 0.003 to 0.60). Downhill grades increased risks at both intersections and non-intersections. Conclusions These results provide guidance for transportation planners and engineers: at local street intersections, traditional stops are safer than traffic circles, and at non-intersections, cycle tracks alongside major streets and traffic diversion from local streets are safer than no bicycle infrastructure. PMID:23411678

  6. At the Intersection of Identities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidasi Judit

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is assumed that part of today’s societal difficulties, uncertainties and crisis worldwide can be attributed to the competing of multiple identities, to their intersections and their overlapping nature – on the level of nations, on the level of communities and also on the level of the individual. We aim at presenting a typology of identities that come into play in the public and in the private domain of the individual. It is hypothesized that there is a strong interdependence of cultural heritage, human values and social traditions in the competition of identities. These questions, which are interrelated and interconnected with each other through a common denominator, namely “cultural-mental programming” and “reprogramming efforts,” are going to be pondered about in the presentation. In the context of globalization the relevance of this topic is reinforced by the need to adapt to changes within the ever-intensifying shift from intercultural to multicultural environment in communities, in business and in work places. Attempts will be made to articulate some projections with respect to future trends that are to be expected: the way to go from competing identities to establishing a competitive identity (Simon Anholt. The contribution does not offer ready solutions but rather serves as fuel for further discussions.

  7. Opposed turns at signalized intersections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akcelik, R.

    1989-06-01

    The 1985 Highway Capacity Manual (HCM) brought the U.S. and Australian methodologies for signalized intersections closer together. An important element in this methodology is the techniques used for the estimation of opposed (permissive) turn saturation flows. Although the basic modeling philosophies of the HCM and Australian methods are similar, there are significant differences in the procedures used and therefore in the results from the two methods. In particular, the latest methodology employed in the SIDRA software has eliminated the use of opposed turn adjustment factors for lane groups and adopted an explicit and direct method of modeling individual lanes. The purpose of this paper is to bring these new methods to the attention of the U.S. researchers since it is understood that efforts are being made to improve the 1985 HCM method.

  8. Vacuum chamber at intersection I-6

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    The vacuum chamber at intersection region I-6, one of these where experiments in colliding-beam physics will be taking place. The "wheels" prevent the thin wall (1.5 mm) of the chamber from collapsing. The chamber is equipped with heating tapes and its wrapped in thermal insulation. Residual gas pressure at this and other similar regions is around 10_11.

  9. Pavement Distress at Road Intersections: A Case Study | Owuama ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Road intersection represents a major geometric feature of road networks. The rate at which road intersections fail, relative to the entry legs, is exceptionally high hence the need to examine the probable causes. A case was investigated by studying traffic behaviors and pavement conditions at selected intersections.

  10. Statistical modeling of total crash frequency at highway intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash M. Roshandeh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intersection-related crashes are associated with high proportion of accidents involving drivers, occupants, pedestrians, and cyclists. In general, the purpose of intersection safety analysis is to determine the impact of safety-related variables on pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles, so as to facilitate the design of effective and efficient countermeasure strategies to improve safety at intersections. This study investigates the effects of traffic, environmental, intersection geometric and pavement-related characteristics on total crash frequencies at intersections. A random-parameter Poisson model was used with crash data from 357 signalized intersections in Chicago from 2004 to 2010. The results indicate that out of the identified factors, evening peak period traffic volume, pavement condition, and unlighted intersections have the greatest effects on crash frequencies. Overall, the results seek to suggest that, in order to improve effective highway-related safety countermeasures at intersections, significant attention must be focused on ensuring that pavements are adequately maintained and intersections should be well lighted. It needs to be mentioned that, projects could be implemented at and around the study intersections during the study period (7 years, which could affect the crash frequency over the time. This is an important variable which could be a part of the future studies to investigate the impacts of safety-related works at intersections and their marginal effects on crash frequency at signalized intersections.

  11. The effectiveness of grouted macadam at intersections. : A life-cycle cost analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobsen, Sofie

    2012-01-01

    Intersections often experience severe rutting in the asphalt concrete layers due to slow moving, high loads, acceleration, deceleration and turning. This thesis aims to investigate the effectiveness of grouted macadam, open graded asphalt with its voids filled with cement grout, as a pavement material at intersections. This was done by investigating the properties of grouted macadam through a literature review and performing a life-cycle cost analysis comparing grouted macadam and asphalt con...

  12. Self-Localization at Street Intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Giovanni; Shen, Huiying; Coughlan, James M

    2014-05-01

    There is growing interest among smartphone users in the ability to determine their precise location in their environment for a variety of applications related to wayfinding, travel and shopping. While GPS provides valuable self-localization estimates, its accuracy is limited to approximately 10 meters in most urban locations. This paper focuses on the self-localization needs of blind or visually impaired travelers, who are faced with the challenge of negotiating street intersections. These travelers need more precise self-localization to help them align themselves properly to crosswalks, signal lights and other features such as walk light pushbuttons. We demonstrate a novel computer vision-based localization approach that is tailored to the street intersection domain. Unlike most work on computer vision-based localization techniques, which typically assume the presence of detailed, high-quality 3D models of urban environments, our technique harnesses the availability of simple, ubiquitous satellite imagery (e.g., Google Maps) to create simple maps of each intersection. Not only does this technique scale naturally to the great majority of street intersections in urban areas, but it has the added advantage of incorporating the specific metric information that blind or visually impaired travelers need, namely, the locations of intersection features such as crosswalks. Key to our approach is the integration of IMU (inertial measurement unit) information with geometric information obtained from image panorama stitchings. Finally, we evaluate the localization performance of our algorithm on a dataset of intersection panoramas, demonstrating the feasibility of our approach.

  13. Landscaping of highway medians and roadway safety at unsignalized intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongyun; Fabregas, Aldo; Lin, Pei-Sung

    2016-05-01

    Well-planted and maintained landscaping can help reduce driving stress, provide better visual quality, and decrease over speeding, thus improving roadway safety. Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) Standard Index (SI-546) is one of the more demanding standards in the U.S. for landscaping design criteria at highway medians near intersections. The purposes of this study were to (1) empirically evaluate the safety results of SI-546 at unsignalized intersections and (2) quantify the impacts of geometrics, traffic, and landscaping design features on total crashes and injury plus fatal crashes. The studied unsignalized intersections were divided into (1) those without median trees near intersections, (2) those with median trees near intersections that were compliant with SI-546, and (3) those with median trees near intersections that were non-compliant with SI-546. A total of 72 intersections were selected, for which five-year crash data from 2006-2010 were collected. The sites that were compliant with SI-546 showed the best safety performance in terms of the lowest crash counts and crash rates. Four crash predictive models-two for total crashes and two for injury crashes-were developed. The results indicated that improperly planted and maintained median trees near highway intersections can increase the total number of crashes and injury plus fatal crashes at a 90% confidence level; no significant difference could be found in crash rates between sites that were compliant with SI-546 and sites without trees. All other conditions remaining the same, an intersection with trees that was not compliant with SI-546 had 63% more crashes and almost doubled injury plus fatal crashes than those at intersections without trees. The study indicates that appropriate landscaping in highway medians near intersections can be an engineering technology that not only improves roadway environmental quality but also maintains intersection safety. Copyright © 2016. Published by

  14. Pavement Distress at Road Intersections: A Case Study | Owuama ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rate at which road intersections fail, relative to the entry legs, is exceptionally high hence the need to examine the probable causes. A case was investigated by studying traffic behaviors and pavement conditions at selected intersections. It was observed that the distress was mainly a result of poor construction ...

  15. Tracer Flux Balance at an Urban Canyon Intersection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentieri, Matteo; Robins, Alan G.

    2010-05-01

    Despite their importance for pollutant dispersion in urban areas, the special features of dispersion at street intersections are rarely taken into account by operational air quality models. Several previous studies have demonstrated the complex flow patterns that occur at street intersections, even with simple geometry. This study presents results from wind-tunnel experiments on a reduced scale model of a complex but realistic urban intersection, located in central London. Tracer concentration measurements were used to derive three-dimensional maps of the concentration field within the intersection. In combination with a previous study (Carpentieri et al., Boundary-Layer Meteorol 133:277-296, 2009) where the velocity field was measured in the same model, a methodology for the calculation of the mean tracer flux balance at the intersection was developed and applied. The calculation highlighted several limitations of current state-of-the-art canyon dispersion models, arising mainly from the complex geometry of the intersection. Despite its limitations, the proposed methodology could be further developed in order to derive, assess and implement street intersection dispersion models for complex urban areas.

  16. Empirical observations of red light running at arterial signalized intersection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Red Light Running (RLR) has become an increasely national safety issue at signalized intersections. : Significant efforts have been made to understand the RLR related driver behaviors and develop : countermeasures to reduce RLR and its related crashe...

  17. Estimation of air quality improvement at road and street intersections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeglund, P.G. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Traffic and Transport Planning

    1995-12-31

    There has always been a very great problem to quantify the detrimental exhaust air pollution related to the traffic flow, especially at road and street intersections. Until now model calculations have been developed mainly for the links between the intersections. In an attempt to remedy this situation the author has developed a method of estimating emissions on the micro level from motor vehicles at intersections as a help for infrastructural design related to improved environmental conditions. Very parsimonious knowledge exists regarding the deceleration and acceleration patterns at road- and street intersections. Not many surveys are done neither in Sweden nor within other countries. Evidently, the need for knowledge regarding deceleration and acceleration behaviour on the micro level has until now not been given priority. In traffic safety related research studies have been done describing the drivers` deceleration and acceleration behaviour and the vehicles` braking performance. Those results give deceleration data for extreme situations and are not useful for describing normal decelerations and accelerations at road- and street intersections. Environment related problems within the traffic flow analysis are now accentuating the need for the studying of special deceleration and acceleration behaviours in combination with an alternative design of the road and street infrastructure. There is a big difference in different vehicles` amount of emitted exhaust pollutions during the passing of intersections depending on the vehicles` speed levels related to their deceleration and acceleration levels. (author)

  18. Examining traffic crash injury severity at unsignalized intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem, Kirolos; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed

    2010-08-01

    This study presents multiple approaches to the analysis of crash injury severity at three- and four-legged unsignalized intersections in the state of Florida from 2003 until 2006. An extensive data collection process was conducted for this study. The dataset used in the analysis included 2,043 unsignalized intersections in six counties in the state of Florida. For the scope of this study, there were three approaches explored. The first approach dealt with the five injury levels, and an ordered probit model was fitted. The second approach was an aggregated one, and dealt with only the severe versus non-severe crash levels, and a binary probit model was used. The third approach dealt with fitting a nested logit model. Results from the three fitted approaches were shown and discussed, and a comparison between the three approaches was shown. Several important factors affecting crash severity at unsignalized intersections were identified. These include the traffic volume on the major approach, and the number of through lanes on the minor approach (surrogate measure for traffic volume), and among the geometric factors, the upstream and downstream distance to the nearest signalized intersection, left and right shoulder width, number of left turn movements on the minor approach, and number of right and left turn lanes on the major approach. As for driver factors, young and very young at-fault drivers were associated with the least fatal probability compared to other age groups. The analysis identified some countermeasures to reduce injury severity at unsignalized intersections. The spatial covariates showed the importance of including safety awareness campaigns for speeding enforcement. Also, having a 90-degree intersection design is the most appropriate safety design for reducing severity. Moreover, the assurance of marking stop lines at unsignalized intersections is very essential. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mitigating gas emissions at signalised intersections using wireless vehicle detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses Kwasi Torkudzor

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Traffic congestion on roads wastes travel times and increases fuel consumption as well as gas emissions which are dangerous to human health. This has led to growing concern about environmental protection and energy conservation and a number of studies to increase fuel economy and reduce gas emissions. To increase travel times so as to reduce fuel consumption and gas emissions, traffic signals at intersections must be well implemented. It is therefore necessary to employ the current technology of wireless sensor networks to enhance the optimisation of the signalised intersections so as to address such a concern. In this study, a vehicular traffic control model was developed to optimise a signalised intersection, using wireless vehicle detectors. Real-time traffic volume gathered were analysed to obtain the peak hour traffic volume causing congestion. The intersection was modelled and simulated in Synchro7 as an actuated signalised model using results from the analysed data. The model for morning peak and evening peak periods gave optimal cycle lengths which result in the reduction of gas emissions, fuel consumption and delay at the intersection.

  20. Calculation of Additional Lost Green Time at Closely Spaced Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available At closely spaced signalized intersections or interchanges, additional lost green time can occur at upstream intersections when there is a queue spillback. For an accurate estimation of capacities and delays at closely spaced intersections, it is necessary to account such additional lost time. The Highway Capacity Manual (HCM 2010 provides a model for the estimation of the additional lost time due to the presence of a downstream queue. However, case studies indicate that the HCM model does not provide a very accurate estimation when the distance to the downstream queue is short. In this paper, a new model is developed for the estimation of additional lost time considering queue discharge patterns and traffic flow patterns. Simulation results show that the proposed model provides a more accurate estimation of additional lost time compared with the HCM model when the distance to the downstream queue is limited.

  1. Research on Driver Behavior in Yellow Interval at Signalized Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaosheng Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vehicles are often caught in dilemma zone when they approach signalized intersections in yellow interval. The existence of dilemma zone which is significantly influenced by driver behavior seriously affects the efficiency and safety of intersections. This paper proposes the driver behavior models in yellow interval by logistic regression and fuzzy decision tree modeling, respectively, based on camera image data. Vehicle’s speed and distance to stop line are considered in logistic regression model, which also brings in a dummy variable to describe installation of countdown timer display. Fuzzy decision tree model is generated by FID3 algorithm whose heuristic information is fuzzy information entropy based on membership functions. This paper concludes that fuzzy decision tree is more accurate to describe driver behavior at signalized intersection than logistic regression model.

  2. Traffic noise and vehicle movement at a controlled intersection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    Traffic noise at an intersection controlled by traffic lights shows noise level variations due to the alternating green and red lights for the different trafficstreams. Noise peaks caused by automobiles pulling up or passing by at highspeed may be quite annoying for people living near the

  3. At the intersection of Behavioural Economics and Philosophy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At the intersection of Behavioural Economics and Philosophy: Mutually informed disciplines. J Martin. Abstract. The field of behavioural economics has produced a number of valuable insights into the psychology of irrational behaviour, consumerism and morality. One particularly interesting line of research is that of ...

  4. Investigating factors influencing pedestrian injury severity at intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhuanglin; Lu, Xi; Chien, Steven I-Jy; Hu, Dawei

    2017-07-24

    Vehicle crashes that involve pedestrians at intersections have been reported occasionally. Pedestrian injury severity in these crashes is significantly related to driver and pedestrian attributes, vehicle characteristics, and the geometry of intersections. Identifying factors associated with pedestrian injury severity (PIS) is critical for reducing crashes and improving safety. For developing the proposed probit models, drivers involved in crashes are classified into 3 groups: young drivers (16 ≤ age ≤ 24), middle-aged drivers (25 ≤ age ≤ 64), and older drivers (age ≥ 65). This study determines that PIS is significantly but differently affected by these grouped drivers with different sets of explanatory variables. A total of 2,614 crash records (2011-2012) at intersections in Cook County, Illinois, were collected. An ordered probit modeling approach was employed to develop the proposed model and examine factors influencing PIS. The likelihood ratio test was used to assess model performance. Elasticity analysis was conducted to interpret the marginal effect of contributing factors on PIS associated with different driver groups by age. The results show that 4 independent variables, including pedestrian age, vehicle type, point of first contact, and weather condition, significantly affect PIS at intersections for all drivers. Two additional independent variables (i.e., number of vehicles and traffic type) affect PIS for young and middle-aged drivers, and 2 other variables (i.e., divided type and hit-and-run related) are significant to PIS for both young and older drivers. The independent variables significant to PIS at intersections for young, middle-aged, and older driver groups were identified and the marginal effect of each variable to the likelihood of PIS were assessed.

  5. At the ISR intersection I-7

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1975-01-01

    The vacuum chamber being mounted is the titanium bicone for the experiment R702 (see photo 7507132X). On the centre, facing the camera, G. Mathis handles a clearing electrode, at his left M. Achard (?). On the outside of the fence R. Laude.

  6. Exploring Driver Injury Severity at Intersection: An Ordered Probit Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaping Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that intersections are the most hazardous locations; however, only little is known about driver injury severity in intersection crashes. Hence, the main goal of this study was to further examine the different factors contributing to driver injury severity involved in fatal crashes at intersections. Data used for the present analysis was from the US DOT-Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS crash database from the year 2011. An ordered probit model was employed to fit the fatal crash data and analyze the factors impacting each injury severity level. The analysis results displayed that driver injury severity is significantly affected by many factors. They include driver age and gender, driver ethnicity, vehicle type and age (years of use, crash type, driving drunk, speeding, violating stop sign, cognitively distracted driving, and seat belt usage. These findings from the current study are beneficial to form a solid basis for adopting corresponding measures to effectively drop injury severity suffering from intersection crash. More insights into the effects of risk factors on driver injury severity could be acquired using more advanced statistical models.

  7. Pedestrian Behavior at Five Dangerous and Busy Manhattan Intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Corey H; Ethan, Danna; Zybert, Patricia; Basch, Charles E

    2015-08-01

    Technology-related distracted behavior is an emergent national concern. Listening to, looking at or talking into an electronic device while walking divides attention, increasing the risk of injury. The purpose of this study was to quantify technology-related distracted pedestrian behavior at five dangerous and busy Manhattan intersections. Data were collected over ten cycles of signal changes at each of the four corners of five intersections at four times of day. Data for 'Walk' and 'Don't Walk' signals were tallied separately. A total of 21,760 pedestrians were observed. Nearly one-third crossing on a 'Walk' signal (n = 5414, 27.8%), and nearly half crossing on a 'Don't Walk' signal (n = 974; 42.0%) were wearing headphones, talking on a mobile phone, and/or looking down at an electronic device. Headphone use was the most common distraction.

  8. Self-Organizing Traffic at a Malfunctioning Intersection

    OpenAIRE

    Sujai Kumar; Sugata Mitra

    2006-01-01

    Traffic signals and traffic flow models have been studied extensively in the past and have provided valuable insights on the design of signalling systems, congestion control, and punitive policies. This paper takes a slightly different tack and describes what happens at an intersection where the traffic signals are malfunctioning and stuck in some configuration. By modelling individual vehicles as agents, we were able to replicate the surprisingly organized traffic flow that we observed at a ...

  9. Study on pedestrian crossing behavior at signalized intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisamynathan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A clear understanding of pedestrian crossing behavior under mixed traffic conditions is needed for providing necessary infrastructure and also for enhancing pedestrian safety at signalized intersections. This paper attempts to analyze the crossing behavior of pedestrians like crossing speed, compliance with signal, and pedestrian-vehicular interaction under mixed traffic conditions and to identify the influencing factors based on statistical tests. 775 pedestrian samples were observed from three signalized intersections in Mumbai, India for analyzing crossing behaviors and the significant factors affecting traffic signal compliance by pedestrians were identified by conducting Pearson’s correlation coefficient test, ANOVA test, and Student t test. Factors influencing pedestrian crossing speed had been studied and a design crossing speed had been determined for old and adult pedestrians at 0.95 m/s and 1.12 m/s respectively. Logistic regression models had been developed in which the odds of pedestrian violation and interactions were modeled and verified. This study can help researchers and practitioners to understand pedestrian crossing behavior at signalized intersections and develop pedestrian delay models under mixed traffic conditions.

  10. Influences of hydraulic gradient, surface roughness, intersecting angle, and scale effect on nonlinear flow behavior at single fracture intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Liu, Richeng; Jiang, Yujing

    2016-07-01

    Fluid flow tests were conducted on two crossed fracture models for which the geometries of fracture segments and intersections were measured by utilizing a visualization technique using a CCD (charged coupled device) camera. Numerical simulations by solving the Navier-Stokes equations were performed to characterize the fluid flow at fracture intersections. The roles of hydraulic gradient, surface roughness, intersecting angle, and scale effect in the nonlinear fluid flow behavior through single fracture intersections were investigated. The simulation results of flow rate agreed well with the experimental results for both models. The experimental and simulation results showed that with the increment of the hydraulic gradient, the ratio of the flow rate to the hydraulic gradient, Q/J, decreases and the relative difference of Q/J between the calculation results employing the Navier-Stokes equations and the cubic law, δ, increases. When taking into account the fracture surface roughness quantified by Z2 ranging 0-0.42 for J = 1, the value of δ would increase by 0-10.3%. The influences of the intersecting angle on the normalized flow rate that represents the ratio of the flow rate in a segment to the total flow rate, Ra, and the ratio of the hydraulic aperture to the mechanical aperture, e/E, are negligible when J 10-2. Based on the regression analysis on simulation results, a mathematical expression was proposed to quantify e/E, involving variables of J and Rr, where Rr is the radius of truncating circles centered at an intersection. For E/Rr > 10-2, e/E varies significantly and the scale of model has large impacts on the nonlinear flow behavior through intersections, while for E/Rr fracture intersections is suggested as J < 10-3, E/Rr < 10-3, and Z2 = 0.

  11. The Research of Vehicle Acceleration at Signalized Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuk Bogdanović

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Vehicle acceleration is an important parameter used in planning various road elements, traffic signalization, geometric elements of an intersection, signal plans of traffic lights, etc. The knowledge of vehicle acceleration values is also necessary in using simulation softwares for more accurate analysis of the total situation at an intersection, on a road section or in a traffic network. In a lot of earlier studies, acceleration values were analysed and defined, mostly in optimal conditions for traffic functioning. However, values of almost all traffic flow parameters have been changed over time, due to changes in driving-dynamic vehicle characteristics, pneumatic tyres, material used for building road surface, etc. Besides, local environment influence and changes in drivers’ behaviour also significantly affect values of this parameter. According to HCM, it is advisable to perform local research for all values of the parameters recommended within the framework of this handbook, and to adapt their values to local conditions as well. The results of measuring the values of vehicles acceleration at signalized intersections in Novi Sad, Serbia, have been shown in this paper, using the procedure based on video recording processing.

  12. Multinomial Logit Model of Pedestrian Crossing Behaviors at Signalized Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu-Ping Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pedestrian crashes, making up a large proportion of road casualties, are more likely to occur at signalized intersections in China. This paper aims to study the different pedestrian behaviors of regular users, late starters, sneakers, and partial sneakers. Behavior information was observed manually in the field study. After that, the survey team distributed a questionnaire to the same participant who has been observed, to acquire detailed demographic and socioeconomic characteristics as well as attitude and preference indicators. Totally, 1878 pedestrians were surveyed at 16 signalized intersections in Nanjing. First, correlation analysis is performed to analyze each factor’s effect. Then, five latent variables including safety, conformity, comfort, flexibility, and fastness are obtained by structure equation modeling (SEM. Moreover, based on the results of SEM, a multinomial logit model with latent variables is developed to describe how the factors influence pedestrians’ behavior. Finally, some conclusions are drawn from the model: (1 for the choice of being late starters, arrival time, the presence of oncoming cars, and crosswalk length are the most important factors; (2 gender has the most significant effect on the pedestrians to be sneakers; and (3 age is the most important factor when pedestrians choose to be partial sneakers.

  13. At the Intersection of Chemistry, Biology, and Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Christopher T

    2017-06-20

    After an undergraduate degree in biology at Harvard, I started graduate school at The Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research in New York City in July 1965. I was attracted to the chemical side of biochemistry and joined Fritz Lipmann's large, hierarchical laboratory to study enzyme mechanisms. That work led to postdoctoral research with Robert Abeles at Brandeis, then a center of what, 30 years later, would be called chemical biology. I spent 15 years on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology faculty, in both the Chemistry and Biology Departments, and then 26 years on the Harvard Medical School Faculty. My research interests have been at the intersection of chemistry, biology, and medicine. One unanticipated major focus has been investigating the chemical logic and enzymatic machinery of natural product biosynthesis, including antibiotics and antitumor agents. In this postgenomic era it is now recognized that there may be from 10 5 to 10 6 biosynthetic gene clusters as yet uncharacterized for potential new therapeutic agents.

  14. Lessons learned at the intersection of immunology and neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Lawrence

    2012-04-01

    Neurobiologists and immunologists study concepts often signified with identical terminology. Scientists in both fields study a structure known as the synapse, and each group analyzes a subject called memory. Is this a quirk of human language, or are there real similarities between these two physiological systems? Not only are the linguistic concepts expressed in the words "synapse" and "memory" shared between the fields, but the actual molecules of physiologic importance in one system play parallel roles in the other: complement, the major histocompatibility molecules, and even "neuro"-transmitters all have major impacts on health and on disease in both the brain and the immune system. Not only are the same molecules found in diverse roles in each system, but we have learned that there is real "hard-wired" crosstalk between nerves and lymphoid organs. This issue of the JCI highlights some of the lessons learned from experts who are working at this scintillating intersection between immunology and neuroscience.

  15. Gender inequalities at the intersection of discriminatory mecha-nisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Hurubean

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The text aims to present less visible facet of discrimination by identifying social and cultural mechanisms that generate and maintain multiple forms of discrimination, the intersection of which gender has a central position, because he combine with all other criteria of discrimination (race, ethnicity, nationality, religion, social class, age, disability, multiplying the effect of discriminatory behavior. This paper highlights the gender inequalities, the disparities between women and men, boys and girls who are socially constructed which are produced in the process of education and differential gender socialization, asymmetric and hierarchical, correlated with educational and professional orientation and also with labor market access and situation. The fact that gender inequalities exist at a structural level and they are deeply rooted in social practices and collective mental lead to situations where discriminatory behavior manifested without being noticed and as less as sanctioned.

  16. Predicting crash-relevant violations at stop sign-controlled intersections for the development of an intersection driver assistance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, John M; Sherony, Rini; Gabler, Hampton C

    2016-09-01

    Intersection crashes resulted in over 5,000 fatalities in the United States in 2014. Intersection Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (I-ADAS) are active safety systems that seek to help drivers safely traverse intersections. I-ADAS uses onboard sensors to detect oncoming vehicles and, in the event of an imminent crash, can either alert the driver or take autonomous evasive action. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a predictive model for detecting whether a stop sign violation was imminent. Passenger vehicle intersection approaches were extracted from a data set of typical driver behavior (100-Car Naturalistic Driving Study) and violations (event data recorders downloaded from real-world crashes) and were assigned weighting factors based on real-world frequency. A k-fold cross-validation procedure was then used to develop and evaluate 3 hypothetical stop sign warning algorithms (i.e., early, intermediate, and delayed) for detecting an impending violation during the intersection approach. Violation detection models were developed using logistic regression models that evaluate likelihood of a violation at various locations along the intersection approach. Two potential indicators of driver intent to stop-that is, required deceleration parameter (RDP) and brake application-were used to develop the predictive models. The earliest violation detection opportunity was then evaluated for each detection algorithm in order to (1) evaluate the violation detection accuracy and (2) compare braking demand versus maximum braking capabilities. A total of 38 violating and 658 nonviolating approaches were used in the analysis. All 3 algorithms were able to detect a violation at some point during the intersection approach. The early detection algorithm, as designed, was able to detect violations earlier than all other algorithms during the intersection approach but gave false alarms for 22.3% of approaches. In contrast, the delayed detection algorithm sacrificed

  17. Evolving norms at the intersection of health and trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drope, Jeffrey; Lencucha, Raphael

    2014-06-01

    There has been growing tension at the intersection of health and economic policy making as global governance has increased across sectors. This tension has been particularly evident between tobacco control and trade policy, as the international norms that frame them -- particularly the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control and the World Trade Organization (WTO) -- have continued to institutionalize. Using five case studies of major tobacco-related trade disputes from the principal multilateral system of trade governance -- the WTO/General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade -- we trace the evolution of these interacting norms over nearly twenty-five years. Our analytic framework focuses on the actors that advance, defend, and challenge these norms. We find that an increasingly broad network, which includes governments, intergovernmental organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and members of the epistemic community, is playing a more active role in seeking to resolve these tensions. Moreover, key economic actors are beginning to incorporate health more actively into their messaging and activities. We also demonstrate that the most recent resonant messages reflect a more nuanced integration of the two norms. The tobacco control example has direct relevance to related policy areas, including environment, safety, access to medicines, diet, and alcohol. Copyright © 2014 by Duke University Press.

  18. Mixed Vehicle Flow At Signalized Intersection: Markov Chain Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gertsbakh Ilya B.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We assume that a Poisson flow of vehicles arrives at isolated signalized intersection, and each vehicle, independently of others, represents a random number X of passenger car units (PCU’s. We analyze numerically the stationary distribution of the queue process {Zn}, where Zn is the number of PCU’s in a queue at the beginning of the n-th red phase, n → ∞. We approximate the number Yn of PCU’s arriving during one red-green cycle by a two-parameter Negative Binomial Distribution (NBD. The well-known fact is that {Zn} follow an infinite-state Markov chain. We approximate its stationary distribution using a finite-state Markov chain. We show numerically that there is a strong dependence of the mean queue length E[Zn] in equilibrium on the input distribution of Yn and, in particular, on the ”over dispersion” parameter γ= Var[Yn]/E[Yn]. For Poisson input, γ = 1. γ > 1 indicates presence of heavy-tailed input. In reality it means that a relatively large ”portion” of PCU’s, considerably exceeding the average, may arrive with high probability during one red-green cycle. Empirical formulas are presented for an accurate estimation of mean queue length as a function of load and g of the input flow. Using the Markov chain technique, we analyze the mean ”virtual” delay time for a car which always arrives at the beginning of the red phase.

  19. Delays at signalized intersections with exhaustive traffic control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, M.A.A.; Adan, I.J.B.F.; Winands, E.M.M.; Down, D.G.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study a traffic intersection with vehicle-actuated traffic signal control. Traffic lights stay green until all lanes within a group are emptied. Assuming general renewal arrival processes, we derive exact limiting distributions of the delays under heavy traffic (HT) conditions.

  20. Improved paleoenvironmental interpretations at the intersection between paleontology and biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, T. W.

    2012-04-01

    paleoenvironments using the combined approach, subtle variations in chemical tracers can be calibrated with refined paleoredox resolution using fossils and extrapolated back to Precambrian intervals predating the evolutionary appearance of animals. Oxygen deficiencies of varying degree likely dominated most of the Precambrian marine record. Additional topics to be discussed are new and refined geochemical proxies that work best under intermediate redox states. Another interesting intersection of Fe and trace metal proxies and biology lies with the clear fingerprints of depositional settings with abundant free hydrogen sulfide in the pore fluids, often right at the sediment-water interface, but with oxygen in the bottom waters. Independent recognition of such conditions would have important impact on our interpretations of infaunal and epifaunal animal communities, including those that thrive at redox interfaces in symbiotic partnership with thiotrophic and methanotropic bacteria.

  1. Experimental Detection of Branching at a Conical Intersection in a Highly Fluorescent Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazard, Johanna; Bizimana, Laurie A; Gellen, Tobias; Carbery, William P; Turner, Daniel B

    2016-01-07

    Conical intersections are molecular configurations at which adiabatic potential-energy surfaces touch. They are predicted to be ubiquitous, yet condensed-phase experiments have focused on the few systems with clear spectroscopic signatures of negligible fluorescence, high photoactivity, or femtosecond electronic kinetics. Although rare, these signatures have become diagnostic for conical intersections. Here we detect a coherent surface-crossing event nearly two picoseconds after optical excitation in a highly fluorescent molecule that has no photoactivity and nanosecond electronic kinetics. Time-frequency analysis of high-sensitivity measurements acquired using sub-8 fs pulses reveals phase shifts of the signal due to branching of the wavepacket through a conical intersection. The time-frequency analysis methodology demonstrated here on a model compound will enable studies of conical intersections in molecules that do not exhibit their diagnostic signatures. Improving the ability to detect conical intersections will enrich the understanding of their mechanistic role in molecular photochemistry.

  2. Droplet coalescence at microchannel intersection chambers with different shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaomiao; Wang, Xiang; Cao, Rentuo; Pang, Yan

    2016-06-29

    The influence of microchannel intersection chamber shape on the droplet coalescence process is investigated in this study. Three kinds of chamber shapes (half-round, triangle and camber) are designed to realize head-on droplet coalescence. The coalescence processes are visualized using a high-speed camera system and the internal flow patterns are resolved using a micro-PIV system. Experimental analyses on the coalescence position and coalescence time of droplets and the critical conditions are discussed. Both direct coalescence and late coalescence can be observed in the camber junction while only the late coalescence is present for the half-round and the triangle junction. The critical capillary number Ca* varies for different working systems or intersection shapes. Ca* in the camber junction is larger than that in the other two junctions for each working system and it decreases with the increase of the viscosity ratio for each intersection shape. Moreover, the characteristics of the velocity fields for different coalescence cases are analyzed for an in-depth understanding of the process.

  3. Droplets coalescence at microchannel intersection chambers with different shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaomiao; Wang, Xiang; Cao, Rentuo; Pang, Yan

    2016-11-01

    The influence of microchannel intersection chamber shape on droplets coalescence process is investigated in this study. Three kinds of chamber shapes (half-round, triangle and camber) are designed to realize head-on droplets coalescence. The coalescence processes are visualized with high-speed camera system and the internal flow patterns are resolved with micro-PIV system. Experimental analyses on droplets coalescence position, coalescence time and the critical conditions are discussed. Both direct coalescence and late coalescence can be observed in the camber junction while only the late coalescence is present for the half-round and the triangle junction. The critical capillary number Ca* varies for different working systems or intersection shapes. Ca* in the camber junction is larger than that in the other two junctions for each working system and it decreases with the increase of the viscosity ratios for each intersection shape. Moreover, the characteristics of the velocity fields for different coalescence cases are analyzed for in-depth understanding of the process. The authors do appreciate the financial support of No.11572013 of National Nature Scicence Funding of China.

  4. The incidence of pedestrian distraction at urban intersections after implementation of a Streets Smarts campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violano, Pina; Roney, Linda; Bechtel, Kirsten

    2015-12-01

    Pedestrians distracted by digital devices or other activities are at a higher risk of injury as they cross streets. We sought to describe the incidence of pedestrians distracted by digital devices or other activities at two highly traveled urban intersections after the implementation of a pedestrian safety intervention at one of the intersections. This was an observational field study of two urban intersections. Two investigators were stationed at each of the four corners of the intersection. Each pair of observers included one "person counter" and one "behavior counter". The "person counter" tallied every individual who approached that corner from any of the three opposing corners. The "behavior counter" tallied every individual approaching from the three opposing corners who were exhibiting any of the following behaviors: 1) eating, 2) drinking, 3) wearing ear buds/headphones, 4) texting, 5) looking at mobile phone or reading something on mobile phone, or 6) talking on mobile phone. Every 15 min, each pair of observers rotated to the next corner of the same intersection, allowing each pair of observers to complete one 15-min observation at each of the four corners of the intersection. Intersection A had stencils at the curb cuts of each corner alerting pedestrians to put down a digital device while crossing the intersection while intersection B did not. 1362 pedestrians were observed; of those, 19 % were distracted by another activity at both intersections. Of the total, 9 % were using ear buds/headphones; 8 % were using a digital device (talking, texting, or looking down at it); and 2 % were eating or drinking. Inter-observer validity among observers (kappa) was 98 %. Of those that were distracted, 5 % were either using an assistive device (cane, walker, motorized scooter) or walking with a child (either on foot or in stroller). There were no differences in the proportion of pedestrians who were distracted at either intersection, except that more

  5. Agent-based game theory modeling for driverless vehicles at intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    This report presents three research efforts that were published in various journals. The first research effort presents a reactive-driving agent based algorithm for modeling driver left turn gap acceptance behavior at signalized intersections. This m...

  6. Eliminating sun glare disturbance at signalized intersections by a vehicle to infrastructure wireless communication : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Due to sun glare disturbances, drivers may encounter fatal threats on roadways, particularly at signalized intersections. Many studies have attempted to develop applicable solutions, such as avoiding sun positions, road geometric redirections, and we...

  7. Eliminating Right-Turn-on-Red (RTOR) at Key Intersections in a City Core

    OpenAIRE

    Aspnäs, Frida

    2012-01-01

    The City of Fredericton is the capital of New Brunswick, located in eastern Canada. Rightturn-on-red (RTOR) is a general practice at any traffic intersection in this maritime province. Many collisions between pedestrians and vehicles have been recorded at signalized intersections in the downtown area of the city. Due to the number of collisions, the City of Fredericton was interested in investigating how a restriction against RTOR could affect vehicular traffic. The purpose and goal of this p...

  8. Using Cellular Automata to Investigate Pedestrian Conflicts with Vehicles in Crosswalk at Signalized Intersection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomeng Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The operational efficiency and safety of pedestrian flows at intersections is an important aspect of urban traffic. Particularly, conflicts between pedestrians and vehicles in crosswalk are one of the most influential factors for intersection safety. This paper presents a cellular automata model that simulates pedestrian and vehicle crossing behaviors at signalized intersections. Through the simulation, we investigate the effects of different pedestrian signal timing and crosswalk widths on the crosswalk capacity, the number of traffic conflicts between pedestrians and vehicles, and pedestrian delay due to the conflicts. The simulation results indicate that the cellular automata is an effective simulation platform for investigating complex pedestrian-related traffic phenomenon at signalized intersections.

  9. Empirical Analysis and Modeling of Stop-Line Crossing Time and Speed at Signalized Intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Keshuang; Wang, Fen; Yao, Jiarong; Sun, Jian

    2016-12-23

    In China, a flashing green (FG) indication of 3 s followed by a yellow (Y) indication of 3 s is commonly applied to end the green phase at signalized intersections. Stop-line crossing behavior of drivers during such a phase transition period significantly influences safety performance of signalized intersections. The objective of this study is thus to empirically analyze and model drivers' stop-line crossing time and speed in response to the specific phase transition period of FG and Y. High-resolution trajectories for 1465 vehicles were collected at three rural high-speed intersections with a speed limit of 80 km/h and two urban intersections with a speed limit of 50 km/h in Shanghai. With the vehicle trajectory data, statistical analyses were performed to look into the general characteristics of stop-line crossing time and speed at the two types of intersections. A multinomial logit model and a multiple linear regression model were then developed to predict the stop-line crossing patterns and speeds respectively. It was found that the percentage of stop-line crossings during the Y interval is remarkably higher and the stop-line crossing time is approximately 0.7 s longer at the urban intersections, as compared with the rural intersections. In addition, approaching speed and distance to the stop-line at the onset of FG as well as area type significantly affect the percentages of stop-line crossings during the FG and Y intervals. Vehicle type and stop-line crossing pattern were found to significantly influence the stop-line crossing speed, in addition to the above factors. The red-light-running seems to occur more frequently at the large intersections with a long cycle length.

  10. Empirical Analysis and Modeling of Stop-Line Crossing Time and Speed at Signalized Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshuang Tang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In China, a flashing green (FG indication of 3 s followed by a yellow (Y indication of 3 s is commonly applied to end the green phase at signalized intersections. Stop-line crossing behavior of drivers during such a phase transition period significantly influences safety performance of signalized intersections. The objective of this study is thus to empirically analyze and model drivers’ stop-line crossing time and speed in response to the specific phase transition period of FG and Y. High-resolution trajectories for 1465 vehicles were collected at three rural high-speed intersections with a speed limit of 80 km/h and two urban intersections with a speed limit of 50 km/h in Shanghai. With the vehicle trajectory data, statistical analyses were performed to look into the general characteristics of stop-line crossing time and speed at the two types of intersections. A multinomial logit model and a multiple linear regression model were then developed to predict the stop-line crossing patterns and speeds respectively. It was found that the percentage of stop-line crossings during the Y interval is remarkably higher and the stop-line crossing time is approximately 0.7 s longer at the urban intersections, as compared with the rural intersections. In addition, approaching speed and distance to the stop-line at the onset of FG as well as area type significantly affect the percentages of stop-line crossings during the FG and Y intervals. Vehicle type and stop-line crossing pattern were found to significantly influence the stop-line crossing speed, in addition to the above factors. The red-light-running seems to occur more frequently at the large intersections with a long cycle length.

  11. Red light violations at rural and suburban signalized intersections in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Omari, Bashar H; Al-Masaeid, Hashem R

    2003-06-01

    This case study investigated red light violations at rural and suburban signalized intersections in Jordan. Field observations were conducted at 15 signalized intersections located in different Jordanian regions: Amman, Irbid, and Zarqa. The results showed that, out of a total of 1,190 drivers who had a chance for violation, 153 (12.9%) drivers ran red lights. It was found that older drivers have less tendency for running red lights. Based on vehicle type, the analysis showed that truck drivers had the highest violation rate followed by small vehicles and then buses. The Y-shaped intersection had a higher percentage of violations as compared to the T- and cruciform-shaped intersections. The percentage of red light violations was found to be directly proportional to the subjects approach speed and inversely proportional to the conflicting traffic volumes.

  12. THE DIFFERENCES OF DRIVING BEHAVIOR AMONG DIFFERENT DRIVER AGE GROUPS AT SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian John LU, Ph.D., P.E.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few years the population of older drivers has substantially increased across the United States. Older drivers are a group of special interest because of their potential age-related deficiencies. It is essential to understand their driving behavior and adjust the conditions of roadway systems according to their requirements. Likewise, driving behavior of older drivers needs to be considered in order to adequately estimate capacities at intersections. In the past few years, research projects were performed by the University of South Florida to analyze the differences of driving behavior among different driver age groups. Typically, the driving behavior of older drivers was evaluated by analyzing their start-up lost time and saturation headway at signalized intersections as compared to young and mid-age driver groups. Research results were based on data collected from signalized intersections with different land-use types. These intersections are located in west and central Florida where the elderly population has been increasing rapidly in recent years. From the results it was found that the presence of older drivers significantly reduced intersection capacity at all study sites because of their higher lost times and lower saturation flow rates. Therefore, driving behavior of older drivers should be considered in designing intersections located in places with a significant older driver population. In the research, models were developed to predict start-up lost time and saturation headway values generated by older drivers. Then, the variation in capacities with an increasing percentage of older drivers in the traffic stream was modeled. Finally, adjustment factors for different percentages of older drivers were developed to adjust intersection capacity. These factors are believed to account for the presence of older drivers in the traffic stream. The adjustment factors may be used in capacity analysis and design procedures for

  13. Estimation of Saturation Flow Rates at Signalized Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-qiao Shao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The saturation flow rate is a fundamental parameter to measure the intersection capacity and time the traffic signals. However, it is revealed that traditional methods which are mainly developed using the average value of observed queue discharge headways to estimate the saturation headway might lead to underestimate saturation flow rate. The goal of this paper is to study the stochastic nature of queue discharge headways and to develop a more accurate estimate method for saturation headway and saturation flow rate. Based on the surveyed data, the characteristics of queue discharge headways and the estimation method of saturated flow rate are studied. It is found that the average value of queue discharge headways is greater than the median value and that the skewness of the headways is positive. Normal distribution tests were conducted before and after a log transformation of the headways. The goodness-of-fit test showed that for some surveyed sites, the queue discharge headways can be fitted by the normal distribution and for other surveyed sites, the headways can be fitted by lognormal distribution. According to the queue discharge headway characteristics, the median value of queue discharge headways is suggested to estimate the saturation headway and a new method of estimation saturation flow rates is developed.

  14. Behavior of two-wheelers at limited priority uncontrolled T-intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal R. Patil

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Being convenient and affordable, motorized two-wheeler is the most widely used personal mode for short and medium distance trips in India, thereby resulting in a very high concentration of two-wheelers on Indian roads. Its compact size and aggressive nature of two-wheeler riders have significant impact on the overall traffic characteristics and safety. A large number of unsignalized intersections in India do not have stop or yield sign, and even if it exists, drivers in general do not follow the intended priorities. The combinations of these factors create complex conditions at unsignalized intersections. At some intersections, where the drivers clearly perceive major and minor roads, priority rules are followed to a certain extent. Such partially controlled intersections where limited priorities are observed are studied here. The focus of this paper is on analyzing and modeling gap acceptance behavior of two-wheelers at limited priority unsignalized T-intersections in India. The data collected at four intersections revealed that accepted gaps/lags follow lognormal distribution. Logit models are developed for major and minor road right turnings which show that the probability of accepting a gap is higher if the driver is young, the conflicting vehicle is a two-wheeler, or both. Critical gap values are estimated using Raff's method, lag method, Ashworth's method, logit method, and maximum likelihood method. These values vary from 2.38 to 3.06 s for major road right turning and 2.77 to 3.71 s for minor road right turning. The maximum likelihood method is found to give the most consistent values. The findings of this study are useful in developing performance and safety evaluation of uncontrolled intersections in India.

  15. Grounded Intersectionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marfelt, Mikkel Mouritz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to build on contemporary intersectional literature to develop a grounded methodological framework for the study of social differences. Design/methodology/approach – A systematic literature review serves as the foundation for a discussion of the challenges...... associated with intersectional research. The findings assist in positioning the proposed methodological framework within recent intersectional debates. Findings – The review shows a rise in intersectional publications since the birth of the “intersectionality” term in 1989. Moreover, the paper points to four...... tensions within the field: a tension between looking at or beyond oppression; a tension between structural-oriented and process-oriented perspectives; an apparent incommensurability among the macro, meso, and micro levels of analysis; and a lack of coherent methodology. Research limitations...

  16. The Contribution to the Procedure of Capacity Determination at Unsignalized Priority-controlled Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaž Tolazzi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of minor vehicles crossing or merging into themajor stream at unsignalized priority-controlled intersections iswell-known. Numerous solutions involve various assumptionsconcerning the major headway distributions, number of majorlanes, critical gap distributions, etc. Such cases can be dividedinto two main groups: intersections with two streams (one majorand one minor stream and intersections with more thantwo streams (more than one major stream and one minorstream. At roundabouts, also at single-lane roundabouts,there are similar problems like the ones at other unsignalizedpriority-controlled intersections. A vehicle at the roundaboutapproach can only cross the pedestrian crossing when a sufficienttime-gap between two pedestrians (or cyclists is provided.A vehicle at the roundabout entries can only merge into the majorstream when a sufficient gap between the two vehicles in themajor stream is provided. Because of that, single-lane roundaboutscan also be treated as unsignalized intersections withtwo major lanes: the first one in its circulatory roadway and thesecond one on the pedestrian crossing.

  17. Estimation of fuel loss due to idling of vehicles at a signalized intersection in Chennai, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasantha Kumar, S.; Gulati, Himanshu; Arora, Shivam

    2017-11-01

    The vehicles while waiting at signalized intersections are generally found to be in idling condition, i.e., not switching off their vehicles during red times. This phenomenon of idling of vehicles during red times at signalized intersections may lead to huge economic loss as lot of fuel is consumed by vehicles when they are in idling condition. The situation may even be worse in countries like India as different vehicle types consume varying amount of fuel. Only limited studies have been reported on estimation of fuel loss due to idling of vehicles in India. In the present study, one of the busy intersections in Chennai, namely, Tidel Park Junction in Rajiv Gandhi salai was considered. Data collection was carried out in one approach road of the intersection during morning and evening peak hours on a typical working day by manually noting down the red timings of each cycle and the corresponding number of two-wheelers, three-wheelers, passenger cars, light commercial vehicles (LCV) and heavy motorized vehicles (HMV) that were in idling mode. Using the fuel consumption values of various vehicles types suggested by Central Road Research Institute (CRRI), the total fuel loss during the study period was found to be Rs. 4,93,849/-. The installation of red timers, synchronization of signals, use of non-motorized transport for short trips and public awareness are some of the measures which government need to focus to save the fuel wasted at signalized intersections in major cities of India.

  18. Road factors and bicycle-motor vehicle crashes at unsignalized priority intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, J P; Kroeze, P A; Sweers, W; Wüst, J C

    2011-05-01

    In this study, the safety of cyclists at unsignalized priority intersections within built-up areas is investigated. The study focuses on the link between the characteristics of priority intersection design and bicycle-motor vehicle (BMV) crashes. Across 540 intersections that are involved in the study, the police recorded 339 failure-to-yield crashes with cyclists in four years. These BMV crashes are classified into two types based on the movements of the involved motorists and cyclists: • type I: through bicycle related collisions where the cyclist has right of way (i.e. bicycle on the priority road); • type II: through motor vehicle related collisions where the motorist has right of way (i.e. motorist on the priority road). The probability of each crash type was related to its relative flows and to independent variables using negative binomial regression. The results show that more type I crashes occur at intersections with two-way bicycle tracks, well marked, and reddish coloured bicycle crossings. Type I crashes are negatively related to the presence of raised bicycle crossings (e.g. on a speed hump) and other speed reducing measures. The accident probability is also decreased at intersections where the cycle track approaches are deflected between 2 and 5m away from the main carriageway. No significant relationships are found between type II crashes and road factors such as the presence of a raised median. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Exploring Factors Impacting Paths of Left-Turning Vehicles from Minor Road Approach at Unsignalized Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At unsignalized intersections, left-turning vehicles from minor road approach are more likely to be involved in traffic conflicts and traffic crashes and are one of the most leading factors impacting traffic efficiency and capacity. The authors of the paper observed that some drivers behaved illegally and dangerously while performing left turns from minor road approach, resulting in abnormal trajectories at unsignalized intersections. By applying binary logistic analysis, a probability prediction model was developed to explore various factors affecting probability of normal path taken by drivers while turning left from minor road approach. Based upon the model, measures such as lowering running speeds of vehicles on major road or minor road and adding more lanes on minor road can be used to encourage more drivers to take normal vehicle paths, which is helpful for the improvement of traffic safety, efficiency, and capacity. Results of the paper can be used for the guidance of design and management of unsignalized intersections.

  20. Intersection Group Dynamic Subdivision and Coordination at Intraregional Boundaries in Sudden Disaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciyun Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at the traffic flow agglomeration effect characteristics and rapid evacuation requirement in sudden disaster; operation time of intraregional boundaries traffic signal coordination was presented firstly. Then intraregional boundaries intersection group dynamic subdivision and consolidation method based on relative similarity degree and similarity coefficient of adjacent intersections was put forward. As to make the traffic control strategy adapt to traffic condition of different intraregional boundaries intersection groups, this paper proposes an intraregional boundaries traffic signal coordination and optimization technology based on organic computing theory. Finally, this paper uses Delphi 7.0, MapX, and Oracle developing a software package, combined with Paramics V6 Simulator to validate the methods of this paper. The result shows that it can obviously improve disaster affected regional traffic signal control efficiency which reduces average traffic delay by 30–35%, decreases vehicle queue by more than 20% and reduces evacuation time more than 13.06%.

  1. Influence of the cognitive workload on bicycle safety at four-legged intersections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kveladze, Irma; Agerholm, Niels

    2018-01-01

    environment and make decisions in a complicated situation that is critical in traffic safety. The studies conducted previously on cognitive workload focused on drivers of autonomous vehicles. However, less is known about bicyclists. Therefore, a more in-depth study is offered to gain a comprehensive insight...... is the influence of workload capacity on bicyclists spatial behaviour in a natural environment of four-legged intersections. Method: Due to the traffic safety of test participants, the study is divided in two phases. In the first phase, the actual physical environment of the four-legged intersection and bicyclists....... Conclusions: The research intends to contribute to the bicycle safety by providing new insights for local officials on threats at four-legged intersections. The cognitive workload is considered as one of the main sources for traffic accidents, therefore, outcomes should help to answer why particular four...

  2. Resisting Exile in the "Land of the Free:" Indigenous Groundwork at Colonial Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. Anthony Tyeeme; Powell, Malea

    2008-01-01

    The guest editorialists argue in this introduction that the phrase "indigenous groundwork at colonial intersections" identifies versatile cultural, historical, and social processes that fundamentally--at times devastatingly--shape relations among differently situated life forms on this planet. In short, Indigenous groundwork marks Indigenous…

  3. Pedestrian Choice Behavior at Shopping Mall Intersections in China and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitgood, Stephen; Davey, Gareth; Huang, Xiaoyi; Fung, Holly

    2013-01-01

    Pedestrian navigation through public spaces reflects the nature of interaction between behavior and environment. This study compared pedestrian choice behavior at shopping mall intersections in China and the United States. The study found that in both countries (a) pedestrians chose movement patterns that involved the fewest steps and (b) there…

  4. Guidelines for Assessing the Need for Adaptive Devices for Visually Impaired Pedestrians at Signalized Intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Brian R.; de Oca, Patricia Montes

    1998-01-01

    Presents guidelines for orientation and mobility instructors and traffic engineers to assess the need for adaptive devices to make crosswalks at signalized intersections accessible to pedestrians with visual impairments. The discussions of audible and tactile pedestrian devices, along with case examples, distinguish when each device should be…

  5. Comparative analysis of risky behaviors of electric bicycles at signalized intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lu; Liu, Pan; Guo, Yanyong; Yu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to compare the risky behaviors of e-bike, e-scooter, and bicycle riders as they were crossing signalized intersections. Pearson's chi-square test was used to identify whether there were significant differences in the risky behaviors among e-bike, e-scooter, and bicycle riders. Binary logit models were developed to evaluate how various variables affected the behaviors of 2-wheeled vehicle riders at signalized intersections. Field data collection was conducted at 13 signalized intersections in 2 cities (Nanjing and Kunming) in China. Three different types of risky behaviors were identified, including stop beyond the stop line, riding in motorized lanes, and riding against traffic. Two-wheeled vehicle riders' gender and age and traffic conditions were significantly associated with the behaviors of 2-wheeled vehicle riders at the selected signalized intersections. Compared to e-bike and bicycle riders, e-scooter riders are more likely to take risky behaviors. More specifically, they are more likely to ride in motorized lanes and ride against traffic.

  6. Nonadiabatic Eigenfunctions Can Have Amplitude, Signed Conical Nodes, or Signed Higher Order Nodes at a Conical Intersection with Circular Symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Peter W; Jonas, David M

    2017-10-05

    Numerically exact nonadiabatic eigenfunctions are computed for a two-dimensional conical intersection with circular symmetry, for which a pseudorotation quantum number is conserved and all eigenstates are doubly degenerate. In the calculations reported here, the conical intersection is submerged, with energy below the zero point level. The complete real-valued vibrational-electronic eigenfunctions are visualized using Hunter's exact factorization for the total vibrational amplitude factor and color for the electronic factor. The zero-point levels have nonzero amplitude at the conical intersection. Nodes in the degenerate nonadiabatic eigenfunctions are classified as accidental if they can be moved or removed by a change in degenerate basis and as essential if they cannot. An integer electronic index defines the order of the nodes for nonadiabatic eigenfunctions by simple closed counterclockwise line integrals. Higher eigenstates can have accidental conical nodes around the conical intersection and essential nodes of varying circular orders at the conical intersection. The signs of the essential nodes are all opposite the sign of the conical intersection and the signed node orders obey sum rules. Even for submerged conical intersections, the appearance of the exact eigenstates motivates use of signed, half-odd-integral, pseudorotation quantum numbers j. Essential nodes of absolute order (|j| - 1/2) are located on the conical intersection for |j| greater than or equal to 3/2. The eigenfunctions around essential first order nodes are right circular cones with their vertex at the conical intersection.

  7. Analyte distribution at channel intersections of electro-fluid-dynamic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Luo, Yong; Fang, Ning; Chen, David D Y

    2011-02-15

    Mass conservation is the guiding principle for analyte distribution at channel intersections of microfluidic devices, where analyte migration is mainly driven by an applied electric field, and in electro-fluid-dynamic (EFD) devices, where multiple fields and pressures can be applied simultaneously on the same channel network. This paper introduces another type of conservation, the conservation of effective volumetric flow rate, at channel intersections when the conductivity of the solution in the intersecting channels is maintained constant. This conservation principle provides an additional criterion needed to describe analyte migration in channels connecting to a common intersection and to predict how analyte is distributed into individual channels in the channel network of EFD devices, when multiple voltages and pressures are applied. The theoretical bases of effective volumetric flow rate balance are discussed, and the potential use of this principle in conjunction with the principle of mass conservation to predict the migration behavior of analytes is demonstrated. Junctions of different geometry in EFD devices are used to demonstrate the validity of these equations, and the measured velocities and numbers of microbeads in each channel agree with the predicted values.

  8. Split Field magnet at the I4 ISR intersection

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The Split-Field Magnet (SFM) at I4 had an unconventional topology, consisting of two dipole magnets of opposite polarity. It formed the heart of the first general facility at the ISR. It had a useful magnetic field volume of 28 m3 and a field in the median plane of 1.14 T. With a gap height of 1.1 m and length of 10.5 m, the magnet weighed about 1000 t. The SFM spectrometer featured the first large-scale application of MWPCs (about 70,000 wires), which filled the main magnet, visible here in 1974, and the two large compensator magnets.

  9. Comparison of proposed countermeasures for dilemma zone at signalized intersections based on cellular automata simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yina; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Ding, Yaoxian; Jia, Bin; Shi, Qi; Yan, Xuedong

    2017-09-11

    The Type II dilemma zone describes the road segment to a signalized intersection where drivers have difficulties to decide either stop or go at the onset of yellow signal. Such phenomenon can result in an increased crash risk at signalized intersections. Different types of warning systems have been proposed to help drivers make decisions. Although the warning systems help to improve drivers' behavior, they also have several disadvantages such as increasing rear-end crashes or red-light running (RLR) violations. In this study, a new warning system called pavement marking with auxiliary countermeasure (PMAIC) is proposed to reduce the dilemma zone and enhance the traffic safety at signalized intersections. The proposed warning system integrates the pavement marking and flashing yellow system which can provide drivers with better suggestions about stop/go decisions based on their arriving time and speed. In order to evaluate the performance of the proposed warning system, this paper presents a cellular automata (CA) simulation study. The CA simulations are conducted for four different scenarios in total, including the typical intersection without warning system, the intersection with flashing green countermeasure, the intersection with pavement marking, and the intersection with the PMAIC warning system. Before the specific CA simulation analysis, a logistic regression model is calibrated based on field video data to predict drivers' general stop/go decisions. Also, the rules of vehicle movements in the CA models under the influence by different warning systems are proposed. The proxy indicators of rear-end crash and potential RLR violations were estimated and used to evaluate safety levels for the different scenarios. The simulation results showed that the PMAIC countermeasure consistently offered best performance to reduce rear-end crash and RLR violation. Meanwhile, the results indicate that the flashing-green countermeasure could not effectively reduce either rear

  10. Noise emission corrections at intersections based on microscopic traffic simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coensel, B.de; Vanhove, F.; Logghe, S.; Wilmink, I.; Botteldooren, D.

    2006-01-01

    One of the goals of the European IMAGINE project, is to formulate strategies to improve traffic modelling for application in noise mapping. It is well known that the specific deceleration and acceleration dynamics of traffic at junctions can influence local noise emission. However, macroscopic

  11. Ways of knowing at the intersection of culture and rhetoric

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance

    , and combining it with Wenger's (definition for communities of practice which relies on participation and reification occurring in conjunction with written documents, we can understand Internet texts as reifications in an ongoing social action of producing knowledge. This study looks at the use of web presences......As the internet becomes increasingly embedded in society (Woolgar 2002), the impact of information available on the Web implies an increasing capacity to reflect and affect common knowledge in a given society. Looking at the question of the role writing plays as communities engage in technological...... and social change in local and increasingly global contexts, writing is approached from a knowledge communication perspective--situating writing as a reification of knowledge processes in discourse communities. Working from Bazerman(1988) and Miller's (1986) definition of writing as social action...

  12. Biophysics at the intersection of health science and nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquardt, D., E-mail: thad.harroun@brocku.ca [Brock Univ., Dept. of Physics, St. Catherines, Ontario (Canada); Alsop, R.J.; Rheinstadter, M.C. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Harroun, T.A. [Brock University, Dept. of Physics, St. Catherines, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    We're all on a quest for improved heart health, but what do we really know about it? A daily regimen of aspirin can help some people with heart disease. We need to lower our cholesterol, and increase our intake of omega fatty acids. There is simply no health bene t to taking extra vitamin E, and it's not known why. Apart from cardiac tests with radiopharmaceuticals, what role does nuclear technology play in this story? It turns out that cold and thermal neutrons are important tools for the biophysicists studying these topics. We will review some recently published studies that are advancing our understanding of how cholesterol, vitamin E, and aspirin all work at the molecular level, inside the membrane of our cells. These insights could not have been learned without access to research reactor neutron beams such as those at the Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, and how this new knowledge has really engaged the broader health science community into new ways of thinking about these molecules. (author)

  13. Biophysics at the intersection of health science and nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquardt, D. [Brock Univ., Dept. of Physics, St. Catharines, Ontario (Canada); Alsop, R.J.; Rheinstadter, M.C. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Harroun, T.A. [Brock Univ., Dept. of Physics, St. Catharines, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    We're all on a quest for improved heart health, but what do we really know about it? A daily regimen of aspirin can help some people with heart disease. We need to lower our cholesterol, and increase our intake of omega fatty acids. There is simply no health benefit to taking extra vitamin E, and it's not known why. Apart from cardiac tests with radiopharmaceuticals, what role does nuclear technology play in this story? It turns out that cold and thermal neutrons are important tools for the biophysicists studying these topics. We will review some recently published studies that are advancing our understanding of how cholesterol, vitamin E, and aspirin all work at the molecular level, inside the membrane of our cells. These insights could not have been learned without access to research reactor neutron beams such as those at the Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, and how this new knowledge has really engaged the broader health science community into new ways of thinking about these molecules. (author)

  14. Shocked materials at the intersection of experiment and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzana, H. E.; Belak, J. F.; Bradley, K. S.; Bringa, E. M.; Budil, K. S.; Cazamias, J. U.; El-Dasher, B.; Hawreliak, J. A.; Hessler, J.; Kadau, K.; Kalantar, D. H.; McNaney, J. M.; Milathianaki, D.; Rosolankova, K.; Swift, D. C.; Taravillo, M.; Van Buuren, T. W.; Wark, J. S.; de la Rubia, T. Diaz

    2008-04-01

    Understanding the dynamic lattice response of solids under the extreme conditions of pressure, temperature and strain rate is a scientific quest that spans nearly a century. Critical to developing this understanding is the ability to probe and model the spatial and temporal evolution of the material microstructure and properties at the scale of the relevant physical phenomena-nanometers to micrometers and picoseconds to nanoseconds. While experimental investigations over this range of spatial and temporal scales were unimaginable just a decade ago, new technologies and facilities currently under development and on the horizon have brought these goals within reach for the first time. The equivalent advancements in simulation capabilities now mean that we can conduct simulations and experiments at overlapping temporal and spatial scales. In this article, we describe some of our studies which exploit existing and new generation ultrabright, ultrafast x-ray sources and large scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the real-time physical phenomena that control the dynamic response of shocked materials.

  15. Shocked materials at the intersection of experiment and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadau, Kai [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the dynamic lattice response of solids under the extreme conditions of pressure, temperature and strain rate is a scientific quest that spans nearly a century. Critical to developing this understanding is the ability to probe and model the spatial and temporal evolution of the material microstructure and properties at the scale of the relevant physical phenomena -- nanometers to micrometers and picoseconds to nanoseconds. While experimental investigations over this range of spatial and temporal scales were unimaginable just a decade ago, new technologies and facilities currently under development and on the horizon have brought these goals within reach for the first time. The equivalent advancements in simulation capabilities now mean that we can conduct simulations and experiments at overlapping temporal and spatial scales. In this article, we describe some of our studies which exploit existing and new generation ultrabright, ultrafast x-ray sources and large scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the real-time physical phenomena that control the dynamic response of shocked materials.

  16. Drivers' smart advisory system improves driving performance at STOP sign intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available STOP signs are often physically blocked by obstacles at the corner, forming a safety threat. To enhance the safety at an un-signalized intersection like a STOP sign intersection, a radio frequency identification (RFID based drivers smart advisory system (DSAS was developed, which provides drivers with an earlier warning message when they are approaching an un-signalized intersection. In this research, a pilot field test was conducted with the DSAS alarm on an approach towards a STOP sign intersection in a residential area in Houston, Texas. The designed test route covers all turning movements, including left turn, through movement, and right turn. GPS units recorded test drivers' driving behaviors. A self-developed MATLAB program and statistically significant difference t-test were applied to analyze the impacts of the DSAS messages on drivers' driving performance, in terms of approaching speed profile, acceleration/deceleration rates, braking distance, and possible extra vehicle emissions induced by the introduction of the DSAS message. Drivers' preference on the DSAS was investigated by a designed survey questionnaire among test drivers. Results showed that the DSAS alarm was able to induce drivers to drive significantly slower to approach a STOP sign intersection, perform smaller fluctuation in acceleration/deceleration rates, and be more aware of a coming STOP sign indicated by decelerating earlier. All test drivers preferred to follow the DSAS alarm on roads for a safety concern. Further, the DSAS alarm caused the reduction in emission rates through movement. For a general observation, more road tests with more participants and different test routes were recommended.

  17. TURKEY AT THE INTERSECTION OF ECONOMIC AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru GRIBINCEA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Turkey has made in the last 4 decades a remarkable growth in economy. The energy industry is represented mainly by the coal industry (especially lignite and coal, located in northwest Anatolia. The electricity is produced in the hydro and thermal power plants. Turkey has the world's 17th largest nominal GDP, and 15th largest GDP by PPP. The country is a founding member of the OECD (1961 and the G-20 major economies (1999. Since December 31, 1995, Turkey is also a part of the EU Customs Union. While many economies have been unable to recover from the recent global financial recession, the Turkish economy expanded by 9.2% in 2010, and 8.5 percent in 2011, thus standing out as the fastest growing economy in Europe, and one of the fastest growing economies in the world. Hence, Turkey has been meeting the “60 percent EU Maastricht criteria” for public debt stock since 2004. Similarly, from 2002 to 2011, the budget deficit decreased from more than 10 percent to less than 3 percent, which is one of the EU Maastricht criteria for the budget balance. As of 2012, the main trading partners of Turkey are Germany, Russia and Iran. Turkey has taken advantage of a customs union with the European Union, signed in 1995, to increase industrial production for exports, while benefiting from EU – origin foreign investment into the country. Turkey is also a source of foreign direct invest-ment in central and eastern Europe and the CIS, with more than $1.5 billion invested. 32% has been invested in Russia, primarily in the natural resources and construction sector, and 46% in Turkey’s Black Sea neighbours, Bulgaria and Romania. Turkish companies also have sizable FDI stocks in Poland, at about $100 million. The construction and contracting companies have been significant players, such as Enka, Tekfen, Gama, and Üçgen İnşaat, as well as the three industrial groups, Anadolu Efes Group, ŞişeCam Group and Vestel Group. The exports reached $115.3 billion in

  18. Temporal Variation of Carbon Monoxide Concentration at Congested Urban Roadways Intersection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanshyam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The carbon monoxide (CO is dominant among major traffic emitted pollutants such as respirable suspended particulate matter (RSPM, oxides of nitrogen (NOx, volatile organic carbons(VOCs and ozone (O3 etc. It is generated by automobiles due to incomplete combustion of the fuel. The vehicles that queue up at an intersection spend more time in idle driving mode generating more pollutant leading to higher pollutant concentrations. Therefore, the trends of average hourly CO concentrations at various locations of congested roadways intersection have been investigated. The four approach roads making intersection have been selected for the present study. CO monitoring has been carried out at 2 selected locations of each approach road. The CO concentration has been monitored from 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM at each location using portable online CO monitor. The average hourly CO concentrations data have been analyzed using MS excel spread sheet for each approach road. The average hourly concentration of monitored CO concentration at all receptors locations shows two peak CO concentration values (i.e., the morning peak and evening peak throughout the monitoring programme (March to May, 2011. The comparison of monitored values of average 1 hourly CO concentration levels as well as 8 hourly average concentration levels of CO showed non compliance with the prescribed standards (4000 µg/m3 average hourly and 2000 µg/m3 average 8 hourly CO concentration. The temporal CO concentration at various approach roads making roadway intersection shows non-uniform. The highest CO concentration has been observed to be towards high rise building and vice-versa. The least CO concentration has been observed towards either low rise building or open area.

  19. Experimental and numerical studies on the mixing at the intersection of millimetric channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etcheverry, F; Cachile, M [LIA-Grupo de Medios Porosos, Facultad de Ingenieria, UBA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gomba, J M [Instituto de Fisica Arroyo Seco, UNCPBA, Tandil (Argentina); Wolluschek, C, E-mail: mcachil@fi.uba.ar [Mecanica de Fluidos e Ingenieria Termica, Centro tecnologico Cemitec, Noain, Navarra (Spain)

    2011-05-01

    In this work, experimental and numerical results on the effect of diffusion and geometrical dispersion on the mixing of confluent flows are presented. Two channels with an internal diameter D{sub h} = 4 mm intersect with an angle {alpha} = 30,60,90,120,150,180{sup 0}. The experimental setup allows to accurately control the flow rate and assures a constant flow at both inlets. The mixing properties are studied by injecting pure water in one inlet and colored water at the other. The effects of the inlet flow and the intersection angle on the diffusion of ink is analyzed. We observed that the mixing by convection is only important for {alpha} = 180{sup 0}. For other angles, diffusion is the main mechanism for mixing.

  20. Investigating crash injury severity at unsignalized intersections in Heilongjiang Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulong Pei

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Many studies suggest that more crashes occur due to mixed traffic flow at unsignalized intersections. However, very little is known about the injury severity of these crashes. The objective of this study is therefore to investigate how contributory factors affect crash injury severity at unsignalized intersections. The dataset used for this analysis derived from police crash reports from Dec. 2006 to Apr. 2009 in Heilongjiang Province, China. An ordered probit model was developed to predict the probability that the injury severity of a crash will be one of four levels : no injury, slight injury, severe injury, and fatal injury. The injury severity of a crash was evaluated in terms of the most severe injury sustained by any person involved in the crash. Results from the present study showed that different factors had varying effects on crash injury severity. Factors found to resuit in the increased probability of serious injuries include adverse weather, sideswiping with pedestrians on poor surface, the interaction of rear-ends and the third-class highway, winter night without illumination, and the interaction between traffic signs or markings and the third-class highway. Although there are some limitations in the current study, this study provides more insights into crash injury severity at unsignalized intersections.

  1. Motorcyclists violating hook-turn area at intersections in Taiwan: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Chih-Wei; Hsu, Jiun-Jia; Chang, Jia-Lin; Kuo, Ming-Shin

    2013-10-01

    Research has suggested that the most typical and catastrophic automobile-motorcycle crash takes place when an automobile manoeuvres into the path of an oncoming motorcycle at intersection, which involves a motorist infringing upon the motorcycle's right of way (ROW). In Taiwan, motorcycles, on the other hand, are the one that has been observed to violate the ROW of approaching automobiles at intersections. Such a ROW-violation by left-turn motorcyclists in front of approaching traffic is a safety problem in terms of its frequency and accident consequence. Using high-definition video cameras to capture motorcycles' behaviours, the present study empirically analyses the determinants of motorcyclists violating the hook-turn area (HTA) that has been implemented in Taiwan to deter motorcyclists from violating the ROW of approaching vehicles. Mixed (random parameters) logit models are found to be superior in fitting the data to traditional binary logit models. Main findings include that there was an increased likelihood of HTA-violation at T/Y intersections, in rural areas, during non rush hours, when the riders were females, younger, when riders were travelling on mopeds or heavier motorcycles, when traffic volume was less, and when riders were with half-style helmets. Implications of the research findings, the concluding remarks, and recommendations for future research are finally provided. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Safety impacts of red light cameras at signalized intersections based on cellular automata models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, C; Wong, Y D; Lum, K M

    2015-01-01

    This study applies a simulation technique to evaluate the hypothesis that red light cameras (RLCs) exert important effects on accident risks. Conflict occurrences are generated by simulation and compared at intersections with and without RLCs to assess the impact of RLCs on several conflict types under various traffic conditions. Conflict occurrences are generated through simulating vehicular interactions based on an improved cellular automata (CA) model. The CA model is calibrated and validated against field observations at approaches with and without RLCs. Simulation experiments are conducted for RLC and non-RLC intersections with different geometric layouts and traffic demands to generate conflict occurrences that are analyzed to evaluate the hypothesis that RLCs exert important effects on road safety. The comparison of simulated conflict occurrences show favorable safety impacts of RLCs on crossing conflicts and unfavorable impacts for rear-end conflicts during red/amber phases. Corroborative results are found from broad analysis of accident occurrence. RLCs are found to have a mixed effect on accident risk at signalized intersections: crossing collisions are reduced, whereas rear-end collisions may increase. The specially developed CA model is found to be a feasible safety assessment tool.

  3. Cellular automata model for traffic flow at intersections in internet of vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Han-Tao; Liu, Xin-Ru; Chen, Xiao-Xu; Lu, Jian-Cheng

    2018-03-01

    Considering the effect of the front vehicle's speed, the influence of the brake light and the conflict of the traffic flow, we established a cellular automata model called CE-NS for traffic flow at the intersection in the non-vehicle networking environment. According to the information interaction of Internet of Vehicles (IoV), introducing parameters describing the congestion and the accurate speed of the front vehicle into the CE-NS model, we improved the rules of acceleration, deceleration and conflict, and finally established a cellular automata model for traffic flow at intersections of IoV. The relationship between traffic parameters such as vehicle speed, flow and average travel time is obtained by numerical simulation of two models. Based on this, we compared the traffic situation of the non-vehicle networking environment with conditions of IoV environment, and analyzed the influence of the different degree of IoV on the traffic flow. The results show that the traffic speed is increased, the travel time is reduced, the flux of intersections is increased and the traffic flow is more smoothly under IoV environment. After the vehicle which achieves IoV reaches a certain proportion, the operation effect of the traffic flow begins to improve obviously.

  4. Acceptability of Countdown Signals at an Urban Signalized Intersection and their Influence on Drivers Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Rijavec

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available There are different factors that affect driver’s behaviour at an urban signalized intersection. Complementary countdown signal heads can be used to inform the driver about the traffic light phase status. In the research presented in this paper, we explored how a countdown signal affects the driver’s reaction. We focused on the analysis of red/amber, red and amber running violations. We also observed and measured traffic flow start-up lost time and headway per cycle. Measurements took place in Ljubljana at a four-way intersection where two countdown signal heads are installed that face different directions. We used the “on-off-on” approach, using video surveillance and detection technology. According to the results of the investigative questionnaire, more than 84% of the surveyed drivers expressed positive opinion about the device. Analyses of field-test results have shown that the red and/or amber running violation rate is higher when the device is turned off. The results of the paper suggest that the countdown device had very little effect on the capacity of an urban signalized intersection.

  5. Travel Time Model for Right-Turning Vehicles of Secondary Street at Unsignalized Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Yu-Qin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The travel time of right-turning vehicles on secondary street at unsignalized intersection is discussed in this paper. Under the assumption that the major-street through vehicles’ headway follows Erlang distribution and secondary-street right-turning vehicles’ headway follows Poisson distribution. The right-turning vehicles travel time model is established on the basis of gap theory and M/G/1 queue theory. Comparison is done with the common model based on the assumption that the major-street vehicles’ headway follows Poisson distribution. An intersection is selected to verify each model. The results show that the model established in this paper has stronger applicability, and its most relative error is less than 15%. In addition, the sensitivity analysis has been done. The results show that right-turning flow rate and major-street flow rate have a significant impact on the travel time. Hence, the methodology for travel time of right-turning vehicles at unsignalized intersection proposed in this paper is effective and applicable.

  6. Management challenges at the intersection of public policy environments and strategic decision making in public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longest, Beaufort B

    2012-01-01

    Hospitals in the United States are heavily impacted by public policies that affect them. For example, Medicare and Medicaid programs account for more than half the revenue in most of the nation's almost 5,000 community hospitals, including the almost 1,100 public hospitals controlled by state and local governments (American Hospital Association, 2012). The public hospitals are especially closely aligned with and controlled by governmental entities compared with hospitals with other kinds of sponsorship. This article addresses the management challenges at the intersection of the strategic management of public hospitals and their public policy environments. Public hospitals are complicated entities designed not only to provide health services but also in many cases to play key roles in health-related research and education and to play important general economic development roles in their communities. The multi-faceted strategic decision making in these organizations is as heavily affected by their public policy environments as by their business, demographic, technological or other external environments. Effectively managing the intersection of their public policy environments and their strategic management is indeed vital for contemporary public hospitals. This article is intended to clarify certain aspects of this intersection through a description and model of the strategic activity in public hospitals and the connection between this activity and their external environments. Specific attention is focused on the concept of public policy environments and their features. Attention is also given to how managers can assess public policy environments and incorporate the results into strategic activities.

  7. Understanding the Influence of Race/Ethnicity, Gender, and Class on Inequalities in Academic and Non-Academic Outcomes among Eighth-Grade Students: Findings from an Intersectionality Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bécares, Laia; Priest, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    Socioeconomic, racial/ethnic, and gender inequalities in academic achievement have been widely reported in the US, but how these three axes of inequality intersect to determine academic and non-academic outcomes among school-aged children is not well understood. Using data from the US Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten (ECLS-K; N = 10,115), we apply an intersectionality approach to examine inequalities across eighth-grade outcomes at the intersection of six racial/ethnic and gender groups (Latino girls and boys, Black girls and boys, and White girls and boys) and four classes of socioeconomic advantage/disadvantage. Results of mixture models show large inequalities in socioemotional outcomes (internalizing behavior, locus of control, and self-concept) across classes of advantage/disadvantage. Within classes of advantage/disadvantage, racial/ethnic and gender inequalities are predominantly found in the most advantaged class, where Black boys and girls, and Latina girls, underperform White boys in academic assessments, but not in socioemotional outcomes. In these latter outcomes, Black boys and girls perform better than White boys. Latino boys show small differences as compared to White boys, mainly in science assessments. The contrasting outcomes between racial/ethnic and gender minorities in self-assessment and socioemotional outcomes, as compared to standardized assessments, highlight the detrimental effect that intersecting racial/ethnic and gender discrimination have in patterning academic outcomes that predict success in adult life. Interventions to eliminate achievement gaps cannot fully succeed as long as social stratification caused by gender and racial discrimination is not addressed.

  8. Analysis and methods of improvement of safety at high-speed rural intersections : appendix C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Since 2006, INDOT has been preparing an annual fivepercent report that identifies intersections and segments on Indiana state roads that require attention due to the excessive number and severity of crashes. Many of the identified intersections ar...

  9. Intersecting Attractors

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, S; Morales, J F; Samtleben, H

    2009-01-01

    We apply the entropy formalism to the study of the near-horizon geometry of extremal black p-brane intersections in D>5 dimensional supergravities. The scalar flow towards the horizon is described in terms an effective potential given by the superposition of the kinetic energies of all the forms under which the brane is charged. At the horizon active scalars get fixed to the minima of the effective potential and the entropy function is given in terms of U-duality invariants built entirely out of the black p-brane charges. The resulting entropy function reproduces the central charges of the dual boundary CFT and gives rise to a Bekenstein-Hawking like area law. The results are illustrated in the case of black holes and black string intersections in D=6, 7, 8 supergravities where the effective potentials, attractor equations, moduli spaces and entropy/central charges are worked out in full detail.

  10. Thickness of extensor tendons at the proximal intersection: sonographic measurements in asymptomatic volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiaanse, Ernst; Jager, Tjeerd; Lenchik, Leon; Buls, Nico; Van Hedent, Eddy; De Maeseneer, Michel

    2014-12-01

    An important sign of proximal intersection syndrome is thickening of the tendons at the area where the first extensor compartment tendons cross over the second compartment. Normal values for the thickness of the tendons have not been reported. Our purpose was to measure the thickness of the tendons with sonography at the level of the intersection in healthy volunteers and assess differences between men and women, dominant and nondominant sides, and different tendons. Forty-one asymptomatic volunteers (25 women and 16 men) were examined by 2 radiologists experienced in musculoskeletal sonography. The thickness of the tendons in the first and second compartments was measured at their intersection at standardized proximal and distal levels. Descriptive statistics were obtained. Differences between men and women, dominant and nondominant sides, and different tendons were evaluated by a Student t test. The 95% confidence intervals for measurements of superimposed tendon groups varied between 0.30 and 0.40 cm in women and between 0.36 and 0.48 cm in men. There were no statistically significant differences in comparisons of the different tendon groups (P > .05). There were statistically significant differences (P measurement) and extensor carpi radialis brevis + extensor pollicis brevis (distal measurement). On comparison of dominant and nondominant sides, there were no statistically significant differences. Normal tendon thickness should be between 0.30 and 0.40 cm in women and 0.36 and 0.48 cm in men. A comparison between asymptomatic and symptomatic sides and proximal and distal measurements is recommended. © 2013 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  11. Growing up at the intersection of the genomic era and the information age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessnack, Martha

    2009-06-01

    Children actively seek to make sense of their worlds based on the information they receive and their experience. For children growing up at the intersection of genomic era and information age, the array of information and experience continues to expand. This article highlights the importance of exploring these early contexts for learning, including the children's exposure to books and mass media, and the impact of early learning on later health literacy and behaviors. This article presents a case study discussing the inheritance of cystic fibrosis using the Harry Potter book series.

  12. The M8 Intersection at Charing Cross as a Metaphor for my Heartbeart

    OpenAIRE

    Boyd, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The artefact and neckpiece ‘The M8 Intersection at Charing Cross as a Metaphor for my Heartbeat’ is the outcome of a year of extensive research and exploration of the way language is used in a urban setting. The work consist of over 15 sections which build on photography research, research which explore ways of printing and image transfer on metal surface, painting directly onto metal surface, narrative, the meaning behind signs and symbols and the impact of fonts.\\ud \\ud The artefact itself ...

  13. Capacity of Bicycle Platoon Flow at Two-Phase Signalized Intersection: a Case Analysis of Xi’an City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Gang Wang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Although much is known about the operation of signalized intersections, little or no empirical research has been conducted regarding bicycle capacity at these locations and the correspondent contributory factors. The purpose of this study is to accurately quantify the capacity of bikeway at signalized intersection through a fluid dispersion approach, and ultimately the lane group capacity. Using this total dispersion of bicycle flow, a relationship is also described between bicycle volume per hour and per unit width, signal parameters (length of signal cycle and green time, bicycle flow (arrival rate, density, moving velocity and geometric intersection distance. Through the videotaping of four intersections that have significant bicycle traffic around Xiaozhai in Xi’an, China, it is ascertained that bicycle capacity varies linearly (but limited by an asymptote domain associated with the adjustment of these parameters. The analytical results indicate that the impact saturation flow of lane groups containing right-turning vehicles and pedestrian flow at signalized intersections on bicycles is being underestimated. If this is the case, then capacity is being overestimated through the HCM 2000 capacity model and JJ37-90 approach and intersections are not being adequately designed, due to the neglect of conflict nature of mixed traffic arrivals in competing for space.

  14. Safety effectiveness of pavement design treatment at intersections: Left turning vehicles and pedestrians on crosswalks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasina Iasmin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pedestrians are the most vulnerable road users as they are more exposed than other road users. Pedestrian safety at road intersections still remains the most vital and yet unsolved issue. One of the critical points in pedestrian safety is the occurrence of accidents between left-turning vehicle and pedestrians on crosswalks at signalized intersections. A crosswalk is a place designated for pedestrians and cyclists to cross vehicular roads safely. Drivers are expected to give priority to pedestrians or cyclists during interactions between them on the crosswalk. If a driver exhibits non-yielding behavior, the interaction will turn into a collision. This study examined the safety effect of three crosswalks designed with different materials such as red-colored material or brick pavement based on a safety performance study. The safety performance study considered left-turning driver's gap acceptance behavior and the severity of traffic conflict events between left-turning vehicles and pedestrians. The results of the study indicates that using brick pavement on a crosswalk increases the safety level of the crosswalk. Drivers at such crosswalks are more acquiescent to the priority rule.

  15. A PREDICTIVE STUDY: CARBON MONOXIDE EMISSION MODELING AT A SIGNALIZED INTERSECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FREDDY WEE LIANG KHO

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available CAL3QHC dispersion model was used to predict the present and future carbonmonoxide (CO levels at a busy signalized intersection. This study attempted to identify CO “hot-spots” at nearby areas of the intersection during typical A.M. and P.M. peak hours. The CO concentration “hot-spots” had been identified at 101 Commercial Park and the simulated maximum 1-hour Time-Weighted Average (1-h TWA ground level CO concentrations of 18.3 ppm and 18.6 ppm had been observed during A.M. and P.M. peaks, respectively in year 2006. This study shows that there would be no significant increment in CO level for year 2014 although a substantial increase in the number of vehicles is assumed to affect CO levels. It was also found that CO levels would be well below the Malaysian Ambient Air Quality Guideline of 30 ppm (1-h TWA. Comparisons between the measured and simulated CO levels using quantitative data analysis technique and statistical methods indicated that CAL3QHC dispersion model correlated well with measured data.

  16. Two innovative healthcare technologies at the intersection of serious games, alternative realities, and play therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahnam, Sheryl; Brooks, Anthony L

    2014-01-01

    Using game technologies and digital media for improving physical and mental health and for the therapeutic benefit and well-being of a wide range of people is an area of study that is rapidly expanding. Much research in this emerging field is centered at the intersection of serious games, alternative realities, and play therapy. In this paper the authors describe their transdisciplinary work at this intersection: i) an integrative system of psychotherapy technologies called MyPsySpace currently being prototyped in Second Life with the aim of offering new and virtual translations of traditional expressive therapies (virtual sandplay, virtual drama therapy, digital expressive therapy, and virtual safe spaces) and ii) a mature body of research entitled SoundScapes that is exploring the use of interactive video games and abstract creative expression (making music, digital painting, and robotic device control) as a supplement to traditional physical rehabilitation intervention. Aside from introducing our work to a broader audience, our goal is to encourage peers to investigate ideas that reach across disciplines-to both risk and reap the benefits of combining technologies, theories, and methods stemming from multiple disciplines.

  17. Simulation study of car accidents at the intersection of two roads in the mixed traffic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzoug, R.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Benyoussef, A.

    2015-05-01

    Using cellular automata (CA) Nagel-Schreckenberg (NaSch) model, we numerically study the probability Pac of the occurrence of car accidents at nonsignalized intersection when drivers do not respect the priority rules. We also investigated the impact of mixture lengths and velocities of vehicles on this probability. It is found that in the first case, where vehicles distinguished only by their lengths, the car accidents start to occur above a critical density ρc. Furthermore, the increase of the fraction of long vehicles (FL) delays the occurrence of car accidents (increasing ρc) and increases the risk of collisions when ρ > ρc. In other side, the mixture of maximum velocities (with same length for all vehicles) leads to the appearance of accidents at the intersection even in the free flow regime. Moreover, the increase of the fraction of fast vehicles (Ff) reduces the accident probability (Pac). The influence of roads length is also studied. We found that the decrease of the roads length enhance the risk of collision.

  18. Travel Time Model of Left-Turning Vehicles at Signalized Intersection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leng Jun-qiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The travel time of left-turning vehicles at signalized intersection was discussed. Under the assumption that the opposing through vehicles headway follows M3 distribution, the travel time model was established on the basis of gap theory and queue theory. Comparison was done with the common model based on the assumption that the opposing through vehicles headway follows negative exponential distribution. The results show that the model in this paper has stronger applicability and its most relative error is less than 15%. In addition, the sensitivity analysis was done. The results show that the opposing through flow rate has significant impact on travel time. The impact of left-turning flow rate and following headway is light when the opposing through flow rate is small, the threshold is about 0.18 veh/s. The model established in this paper can well calculate travel time of left-turning vehicles at intersection, and the methodology may provide reference to other occasions.

  19. Surrogate Safety Analysis of Pedestrian-Vehicle Conflict at Intersections Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Videos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Conflict analysis using surrogate safety measures (SSMs has become an efficient approach to investigate safety issues. The state-of-the-art studies largely resort to video images taken from high buildings. However, it suffers from heavy labor work, high cost of maintenance, and even security restrictions. Data collection and processing remains a common challenge to traffic conflict analysis. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs, known for easy maneuvering, outstanding flexibility, and low costs, are considered to be a novel aerial sensor. By taking full advantage of the bird’s eye view offered by UAV, this study, as a pioneer work, applied UAV videos for surrogate safety analysis of pedestrian-vehicle conflicts at one urban intersection in Beijing, China. Aerial video sequences for a period of one hour were analyzed. The detection and tracking systems for vehicle and pedestrian trajectory data extraction were developed, respectively. Two SSMs, that is, Postencroachment Time (PET and Relative Time to Collision (RTTC, were employed to represent how spatially and temporally close the pedestrian-vehicle conflict is to a collision. The results of analysis showed a high exposure of pedestrians to traffic conflict both inside and outside the crosswalk and relatively risking behavior of right-turn vehicles around the corner. The findings demonstrate that UAV can support intersection safety analysis in an accurate and cost-effective way.

  20. An accelerated failure time model for investigating pedestrian crossing behavior and waiting times at signalized intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaobao; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Huan, Mei; Peng, Yichuan; Gao, Ziyou

    2015-09-01

    The waiting process is crucial to pedestrians in the street-crossing behavior. Once pedestrians terminate their waiting behavior during the red light period, they would cross against the red light and put themselves in danger. A joint hazard-based duration model is developed to investigate the effect of various covariates on pedestrian crossing behavior and to estimate pedestrian waiting times at signalized intersections. A total of 1181 pedestrians approaching the intersections during red light periods were observed in Beijing, China. Pedestrian crossing behaviors are classified into immediate crossing behavior and waiting behavior. The probability and effect of various covariates for pedestrians' immediate crossing behavior are identified by a logit model. Four accelerated failure time duration models based on the exponential, Weibull, lognormal and log-logistic distributions are proposed to examine the significant risk factors affecting duration times for pedestrians' waiting behavior. A joint duration model is developed to estimate pedestrian waiting times. Moreover, unobserved heterogeneity is considered in the proposed model. The results indicate that the Weibull AFT model with shared frailty is appropriate for modelling pedestrian waiting durations. Failure to account for heterogeneity would significantly underestimate the effects of covariates on waiting duration times. The proposed model provides a better understanding of pedestrian crossing behavior and more accurate estimation of pedestrian waiting times. It may be applicable in traffic system analysis in developing countries with high flow of mixed traffic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Safety surrogate histograms (SSH): A novel real-time safety assessment of dilemma zone related conflicts at signalized intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanipoor Machiani, Sahar; Abbas, Montasir

    2016-11-01

    Drivers' indecisiveness in dilemma zones (DZ) could result in crash-prone situations at signalized intersections. DZ is to the area ahead of an intersection in which drivers encounter a dilemma regarding whether to stop or proceed through the intersection when the signal turns yellow. An improper decision to stop by the leading driver, combined with the following driver deciding to go, can result in a rear-end collision, unless the following driver recognizes a collision is imminent and adjusts his or her behavior at or shortly after the onset of yellow. Considering the significance of DZ-related crashes, a comprehensive safety measure is needed to characterize the level of safety at signalized intersections. In this study, a novel safety surrogate measure was developed utilizing real-time radar field data. This new measure, called safety surrogate histogram (SSH), captures the degree and frequency of DZ-related conflicts at each intersection approach. SSH includes detailed information regarding the possibility of crashes, because it is calculated based on the vehicles conflicts. An example illustrating the application of the new methodology at two study sites in Virginia is presented and discussed, and a comparison is provided between SSH and other DZ-related safety surrogate measures mentioned in the literature. The results of the study reveal the efficacy of the SSH as complementary to existing surrogate measures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Knowledge Communication at the Intersection of the Community and the Individual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance

    2008-01-01

    How can we approach the relationship between the individual and the community in terms of knowledge communication processes?  This presentation explores definitions of knowledge combining individual and group perspectives, seeking to build a flexible understanding of knowledge communication...... of organizational knowing.  From definitions foregrounding the individual's role in knowledge communication, Nonaka & Takeuchi's notions of implicit and explicit knowledge in the SECI model, Kenneth Burke's conception of Terministic Screens as a language process at the individual level, Tsoukas & Vladimirou...... at the intersection of the community and the individual.  Theories which foreground community include Wengers' concept of Communities of practice, Kenneth Burke's concept of Entitlement as a group language creation process,  Karl Weick's notion of organizational sensemaking and Chun Wei Choo's examination...

  3. Extraterrestrial intelligence and human imagination SETI at the intersection of science, religion, and culture

    CERN Document Server

    Traphagan, John

    2015-01-01

    The search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) represents one of the most significant crossroads at which the assumptions and methods of scientific inquiry come into direct contact with—and in many cases conflict with—those of religion. Indeed, at the core of SETI is the same question that motivates many interested in religion: What is the place of humanity in the universe? Both scientists involved with SETI (and in other areas) and those interested in and dedicated to some religious traditions are engaged in contemplating these types of questions, even if their respective approaches and answers differ significantly. This book explores this intersection with a focus on three core points: 1) the relationship between science and religion as it is expressed within the framework of SETI research, 2) the underlying assumptions, many of which are tacitly based upon cultural values common in American society, that have shaped the ways in which SETI researchers have conceptualized the nature of their endeavo...

  4. Variability of Green Time to Discharge a Specified Number of Queued Vehicles at a Signalized Intersection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to study the headway distribution of queued vehicles (less than 16 vehicles at signalized intersections. Existing studies usually take the average statistics of headway at any queuing place. When different percentile points of statistical data are assigned to headway, the passing rate (the rate of all queued vehicles passing the stop line under the ideal signal timing scheme varies. When selecting the mean value, the passing rate of a queue of fewer than 16 vehicles is no more than 65%. When selecting 75% as the percentile, the passing rate is up to 94%. The queue length also decides the assigned percentile of headway to ensure the passing rate reaches a certain level. The value assignation of headway directly affects lane capacity and start-up loss time. This paper provides a new perspective on parameter calibration and will make the signal timing algorithm method more effective.

  5. Using cognitive work analysis and the strategies analysis diagram to understand variability in road user behaviour at intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Miranda; Salmon, Paul M; McClure, Roderick; Stanton, Neville A

    2013-01-01

    In this article, an application of cognitive work analysis (CWA), using the strategies analysis diagram (SAD) method, to model performance variability in road transport, is presented. Specifically, the method was used to describe performance variability across four road user groups (drivers, cyclists, motorcyclists and pedestrians) when turning right at an urban signalised intersection. The analysis demonstrated that the method was able to identify a comprehensive range of strategies that road users can potentially use while turning right at an intersection, thereby describing a range of performance variability within intersection systems. Furthermore, the method identified constraints, disturbances, changes in circumstances and other influences on road user performance variability. It is concluded that the CWA/SAD approach was able to describe both the different ways in which activities can be executed and disturbances, situations and constraints that create performance variability. The implications of these findings for road design and intersection safety are discussed along with the benefits and drawbacks of the methodology used. Recently, the strategies analysis diagram was proposed as a method to support the cognitive work analysis framework in modelling performance variability. This article evaluated this method within a complex sociotechnical system, namely road transport. The application provided insight into performance variability across road user groups when turning right at intersections.

  6. At the intersection of micro and macro: opportunities and challenges for physician-patient communication research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Rebecca J Welch

    2003-05-01

    The health care relationship model is undergoing dramatic change. Micro-level communication patterns yield health care relationship models (e.g. paternalism, mutual participation, consumerism). At the same time, macro-level systems appear increasingly likely to influence the nature of micro-level interaction. The intersections of health care communication micro-level and macro-level phenomena provide important venues for research and interventions. This essay identifies theoretical premises regarding the relationships between communication and health-related behavior; explores three prominent and growing macro-level phenomena that observers argue likely influence the physical-patient relationship and communication therein: complementary and alternative medicine, the Internet, and direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs; and offers a research agenda for exploring macro-level influences on micro-level physician-patient communication.

  7. Building Theory at the Intersection of Ecological Sustainability and Strategic Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borland, Helen; Ambrosini, Véronique; Lindgreen, Adam

    2016-01-01

    This article builds theory at the intersection of ecological sustainability and strategic management literature—specifically, in relation to dynamic capabilities literature. By combining industrial organization economics–based, resource-based, and dynamic capability–based views, it is possible...... to develop a better understanding of the strategies that businesses may follow, depending on their managers’ assumptions about ecological sustainability. To develop innovative strategies for ecological sustainability, the dynamic capabilities framework needs to be extended. In particular, the sensing......–seizing–maintaining competitiveness framework should operate not only within the boundaries of a business ecosystem but in relation to global biophysical ecosystems; in addition, two more dynamic capabilities should be added, namely, remapping and reaping. This framework can explicate core managerial beliefs about ecological...

  8. Electron-muon coincidences in proton-proton collisions at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, A G; Darriulat, Pierre; Eggert, K; Hungerbühler, V; Jenni, Peter; Lapuyade, C; Modis, T; Pérez, P; Renshall, H; Richter, Burton; Smadja, G; Strauss, J; Strolin, P; Tarnopolsky, G J; Teiger, J; Tur, C; Vialle, J P; Zaccone, Henri; Zallo, A; Zylberstejn, A

    1978-01-01

    In an experiment carried out at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings with a highly selective electron spectrometer system and a magnetized iron filter to detect muons, the authors have observed 32+or-16 dilepton events of the type p+p to mu /sup +or-/+e/sup -or+/+... The integrated luminosity of the experiment was (2.0+or-0.1)*10/sup 37/ cm /sup -2/, and the over-all detection efficiency 0.14+or-0.07. Interpreting this signal as due to charmed meson-pair production, the authors estimate a model-dependent acceptance of 6.5*10/sup -5/ per event, and a cross-section sigma (p+p to D+D+...)=(18+or-9) mu b, with a scale uncertainty of 50% due to the detection efficiency. (9 refs).

  9. Evaluation of j-turn intersection design performance in Missouri, final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Research shows that a high percentage of crashes that take place on high-speed rural expressways occur at intersections : with minor roads. One low-cost alternative design for improving the safety of at-grade intersections on such expressways is : th...

  10. Analysis and methods of improvement of safety at high-speed rural intersections [technical summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Since 2006, INDOT has been preparing an annual fivepercent : report that identifies intersections and segments : on Indiana state roads that require attention due to the : excessive number and severity of crashes. Many of the : identifi...

  11. Advancing Social Justice Work at the Intersections of Multiple Privileged Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Frances E.; Wijeyesinghe, Charmaine L.

    2017-01-01

    The authors discuss how the concept of social location and tenets of intersectionality inform the understanding of power and privilege, our work with people with multiple privileged identities, and the preparation of social justice educators.

  12. AERIS : Eco-Vehicle Speed Control at Signalized Intersections Using I2V Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    This report concentrates on a velocity advisory tool, or decision support system, for vehicles : approaching an intersection using communication capabilities between the infrastructure and : vehicles. The system uses available signal change informati...

  13. Analysis on influencing factors and decision-making of pedestrian crossing at intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Likun; Wang, Ziyang

    2017-10-01

    The city signal intersection always has complex traffic flow and many traffic accidents. As vulnerable participants, the proportion of traffic accidents involving pedestrians remain high. And a lot of insecure crossing behavior seriously reduce the safety of the intersection. Therefore, it is necessary to carry out in-depth study on the traversing characteristics of pedestrians, reveal the inherent laws of pedestrian crossing, and then put forward targeted measures to improve pedestrian traffic environment, protect pedestrian crossing safety and improve traffic efficiency.

  14. Women Physicists of Color Achieving at the Intersection of Race and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, K. Renee

    2006-03-01

    As minority women physicists, we stand at the intersection of race and gender. We are physicists to be sure, but we are also women of Native, African and Hispanic descent. We are colleagues, mothers, sisters, and wives, as are our white counterparts, but our experiences cannot be distilled to only gender or race. As Prudence Carter and Scott Page remind us, women of color emerge from the interaction between race and gender. This distinction is important since most researchers who study American women's participation in science focus exclusively on the participation of white American women. Of those who acknowledge the existence of non-white women, most do so by disclaiming the exclusion of women of color because the numbers are so small or the experiences are different from white American women. There are some important differences however. While American women are 15 percent of all scientists and engineers, black American women are 60 percent of all black scientists and engineers. Yet less than 3 black women and 3 Hispanic women earn PhDs each year, out of about 1100. As Rachel Ivie and Kim Nies Ray point out, ``Minority women especially represent a great, untapped resource that could be drawn on to increase the size of the scientific workforce in the U.S." Donna Nelson's study of diversity in science and engineering faculties further finds that there are no female black or Native American full professors. In physics, there are no black women professors and no Native American women professors at all. Despite such a bleak picture, there is hope. Of the 18 departments that award at least 40 percent of bachelor's degrees to women, 7 are Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Black women are earning degrees from HBCUs at rates above equity, and many singles and firsts at predominantly white institutions continue to persevere despite the obstacles. Prudence Carter. 2005. Intersectional Matters and Meanings: Ethnicity, Gender, and Resistance to ``Acting White

  15. Highway-rail intersection GPS-based in-vehicle warning systems - literature review and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    In 2008, there were 2,395 incidents at highway-rail intersections (level crossings) in the United States, resulting in 939 injuries and 287 fatalities. Crossing elimination, grade separation, and the implementation of traditional warning devices are ...

  16. A Fully-Distributed Heuristic Algorithm for Control of Autonomous Vehicle Movements at Isolated Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah A. Hassan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Optimizing autonomous vehicle movements through roadway intersections is a challenging problem. It has been demonstrated in the literature that traditional traffic control, such as traffic signal and stop sign control are not optimal especially for heavy traffic demand levels. Alternatively, centralized autonomous vehicle control strategies are costly and not scalable given that the ability of a central controller to track and schedule the movement of hundreds of vehicles in real-time is questionable. Consequently, in this paper a fully distributed algorithm is proposed where vehicles in the vicinity of an intersection continuously cooperate with each other to develop a schedule that allows them to safely proceed through the intersection while incurring minimum delay. Unlike other distributed approaches described in the literature, the wireless communication constraints are considered in the design of the control algorithm. Specifically, the proposed algorithm requires vehicles heading to an intersection to communicate only with neighboring vehicles, while the lead vehicles on each approach lane share information to develop a complete intersection utilization schedule. The scheduling rotates between vehicles to identify higher traffic volumes and favor vehicles coming from heavier lanes to minimize the overall intersection delay. The simulated experiments show significant reductions in the average delay using the proposed approach compared to other methods reported in the literature and reduction in the maximum delay experienced by a vehicle especially in cases of heavy traffic demand levels.

  17. Elucidating the origin of solute spreading in fracture networks: permeability heterogeneity vs fluid mixing at fracture intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, P. K.; Dentz, M.; Le Borgne, T.; Juanes, R.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding fluid flow and transport in fractured rock is essential in many natural and engineered processes in the geosciences. Despite its broad relevance, our understanding of flow and transport through fractured media still faces significant challenges. One such challenge is the hydrodynamics at fracture-fracture intersections, and their role on macroscopic transport. Here, we study the impact of (local) fluid mixing at fracture intersections on the (global) behavior of transport, as measured by longitudinal and transverse spreading of a tracer plume. We show that both mixing at fracture intersections and permeability heterogeneity in the fracture network can lead to similar global solute spreading, which poses the question of the origin of spreading in fracture networks. To isolate the signature of mixing-induced and heterogeneity-induced plume spreading, we develop a lattice network model with quenched disorder, which leads to spatial correlation in the velocity field through the network. We simulate particle transport under this correlated velocity field with two models of flow at fracture intersections: (1) complete mixing, which assumes that outflow particle density is proportional to outflow flux; and (2) streamtube routing, which assumes that particles follow the trace of streamlines at the intersection, without mixing. While the complete mixing model leads to large spreading, its relative importance decreases as the level of permeability heterogeneity increases (see figure). To unravel the individual contributions of mixing at intersections and network heterogeneity on spreading, we hypothesize that the two mechanisms are fundamentally different from the point of view of their reversibility. Indeed, we show that injection followed by flow-back leads to different universal signatures of transport that can be used to elucidate the origin of spreading. Finally, we develop a stochastic transport model that accounts for velocity correlation and partial

  18. Intersections between Music Education and Music Therapy: Education Reform, Arts Education, Exceptionality, and Policy at the Local Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Karen; Pasiali, Varvara

    2017-01-01

    In this article, a music teacher educator and a music therapy clinician and educator discuss special education policy and arts instruction at the district level. To illustrate the gulf between federal and local policies with regard to exceptional learners and arts instruction, we examine the intersections of music therapy and music education with…

  19. Concurrent audio-visual feedback for supporting drivers at intersections : a study using two linked driving simulators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtenbos, M. Winter, J.C.F. de Hale, A.R. Wieringa, P.A. & Hagenzieker, M.P.

    2016-01-01

    A large portion of road traffic crashes occur at intersections for the reason that drivers lack necessary visual information. This research examined the effects of an audio-visual display that provides real-time sonification and visualization of the speed and direction of another car approaching the

  20. Assessing convergence processes at the intersection of the food and pharmaceutical industries in functional food innovation using different perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bornkessel, S.

    2016-01-01

    Assessing convergence processes at the intersection of the food and pharmaceutical industries in functional food innovation using different perspectives  Sabine Bornkessel The worldwide growing functional food market (e.g. Menrad,

  1. Interdisciplinary Research at the Intersection of CALL, NLP, and SLA: Methodological Implications from an Input Enhancement Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Nicole; Meurers, Detmar; Rebuschat, Patrick; Ruiz, Simón; Moreno-Vega, José L.; Chinkina, Maria; Li, Wenjing; Grey, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Despite the promise of research conducted at the intersection of computer-assisted language learning (CALL), natural language processing, and second language acquisition, few studies have explored the potential benefits of using intelligent CALL systems to deepen our understanding of the process and products of second language (L2) learning. The…

  2. Tunable current partition at zero-line intersection of quantum anomalous Hall topologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yafei; Zeng, Junjie; Wang, Ke; Xu, Fuming; Qiao, Zhenhua

    2017-10-01

    At the interface between two-dimensional materials with different topologies, topologically protected one-dimensional states (also named zero-line modes) arise. Here, we focus on the quantum anomalous Hall-effect-based zero-line modes formed at the interface between regimes with different Chern numbers. We find that these zero-line modes are chiral and unilaterally conductive due to the breaking of time-reversal invariance. For a beam splitter consisting of two intersecting zero lines, the chirality ensures that a current can only be injected from two of the four terminals. Our numerical results further show that, in the absence of contact resistance, the (anti-)clockwise partitions of the currents from these two terminals are the same owing to the current conservation, which effectively simplifies the partition laws. We find that the partition is robust against the relative shift of Fermi energy but can be adjusted effectively by tuning the relative magnetization strengths at different regimes or relative angles between zero lines.

  3. Substituent effects on dynamics at conical intersections: Allene and methyl allenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neville, Simon P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Wang, Yanmei [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Boguslavskiy, Andrey E.; Stolow, Albert, E-mail: albert.stolow@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Schuurman, Michael S., E-mail: michael.schuurman@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2016-01-07

    We report a joint experimental and theoretical study on the ultrafast excited state dynamics of allene and a series of its methylated analogues (1,2-butadiene, 1,1-dimethylallene, and tetramethylallene) in order to elucidate the conical intersection mediated dynamics that give rise to ultrafast relaxation to the ground electronic state. We use femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) to probe the coupled electronic-vibrational dynamics following UV excitation at 200 nm (6.2 eV). Ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) simulations are employed to determine the mechanistic details of two competing dynamical pathways to the ground electronic state. In all molecules, these pathways are found to involve as follows: (i) twisting about the central allenic C–C–C axis followed by pyramidalization at one of the terminal carbon atoms and (ii) bending of allene moiety. Importantly, the AIMS trajectory data were used for ab initio simulations of the TRPES, permitting direct comparison with experiment. For each molecule, the decay of the TRPES signal is characterized by short (30 fs, 52 fs, 23 fs) and long (1.8 ps, 3.5 ps, [306 fs, 18 ps]) time constants for 1,2-butadiene, 1,1-dimethylallene, and tetramethylallene, respectively. However, AIMS simulations show that these time constants are only loosely related to the evolution of electronic character and actually more closely correlate to large amplitude motions on the electronic excited state, modulating the instantaneous vertical ionization potentials. Furthermore, the fully substituted tetramethylallene is observed to undergo qualitatively different dynamics, as displacements involving the relatively massive methyl groups impede direct access to the conical intersections which give rise to the ultrafast relaxation dynamics observed in the other species. These results show that the branching between the “twisting” and “bending” pathways can be modified via the selective methylation of the terminal

  4. A simulator-based analysis of engineering treatments for right-hook bicycle crashes at signalized intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Jennifer; Hurwitz, David S; Monsere, Christopher M; Fleskes, Kayla

    2017-07-01

    A right-hook crash is a crash between a right-turning motor vehicle and an adjacent through-moving bicycle. At signalized intersections, these crashes can occur during any portion of the green interval when conflicting bicycles and vehicles are moving concurrently. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of four types of engineering countermeasures - regulatory signage, intersection pavement marking, smaller curb radius, and protected intersection design - at modifying driver behaviors that are known contributing factors in these crashes. This research focused on right-hook crashes that occur during the latter stage of the circular green indication at signalized intersections with a shared right-turn and through lane. Changes in driver performance in response to treatments were measured in a high-fidelity driving simulator. Twenty-eight participants each completed 22 right-turn maneuvers. A partially counterbalanced experimental design exposed drivers to critical scenarios, which had been determined in a previous experiment. For each turn, driver performance measures, including visual attention, crash avoidance, and potential crash severity, were collected. A total of 75 incidents (47 near-collisions and 28 collisions) were observed during the 616 right turns. All treatments had some positive effect on measured driver performance with respect to the right-turn vehicle conflicts. Further work is required to map the magnitude of these changes in driver performance to crash-based outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Triple jeopardy? Mental health at the intersection of gender, race, and class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfield, Sarah

    2012-06-01

    Structural theories of stratification predict that groups with low positions in social hierarchies experience high rates of mental health problems. Extensions of this approach such as a triple jeopardy hypotheses claim that groups that are subordinate in multiple stratification systems such as gender, race and class are at especially high risk. Multiple minority statuses affect mental health in paradoxical ways, however, that refute triple jeopardy approaches. This paper presents a theoretical perspective based in cultural as well as structural theories that offers an alternative to triple jeopardy. I predict that certain relational schemas are jointly shaped by gender, race, and class and help explain their anomalous effects on mental health. These schemas of self-salience refer to beliefs about the relative importance of the self and others in social relations; they affect mental health by forming subjective alternative hierarchies to larger societal stratification systems. I use secondary analyses of two U.S. data sets to investigate this perspective. Results of regression analysis show that self-salience helps explain the paradoxical patterns of mental health by gender, race, and social class. The findings underscore the importance of using an intersectional approach and integrating cultural and structural factors to understand how stratification shapes mental health. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Implications of advanced warning messages on eliminating sun glare disturbances at signalized intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to sun glare disturbances, drivers encounter fatal threats on roadways, particularly at signalized intersections. Many studies have attempted to develop applicable solutions, such as avoiding sun positions, applying road geometric re-directions, and wearing anti-glare glasses. None of these strategies have fully solved the problem. As one of the “Connected Vehicle” practices proposed by the U.S. Department of Transportation, advanced warning messages (AWMs are capable of providing wireless information about traffic controls. AWM acts as a supplement to conventional signs and signals, which can be blocked by obstacles or natural disturbances, such as sun glare. The drivers' smart advisory system (DSAS can provide drivers with AWM. Using a driving simulator this research explores the effects of DSAS messages on driving behaviors under sun glare disturbance. Statistical analyses were applied to assess (1 the negative impacts of sun glare, (2 the compensation of the DSAS AWM to sun glare effects, and (3 the improvement in driving performance due to DSAS AWM. Four performance indexes were measured, including (1 half kinetic energy speed, (2 mean approach speed, (3 brake response time, and (4 braking distance. The effects of the socio-demographic factors, such as gender, age, educational background, and driving experience were also studied. The analytical results illustrate that the DSAS can compensate for reduced visibility due to sun glare and improve driving performance to a normal visual situation, particularly for left turn and through movement.

  7. Theory and method at the intersection of anthropology and cultural neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Rebecca; Brown, Ryan A

    2010-06-01

    Anthropologists have become increasingly interested in embodiment-that is, the ways that socio-cultural factors influence the form, behavior and subjective experience of human bodies. At the same time, social cognitive neuroscience has begun to reveal the mechanisms of embodiment by investigating the neural underpinnings and consequences of social experience. Despite this overlap, the two fields have barely engaged one another. We suggest three interconnected domains of inquiry in which the intersection of neuroscience and anthropology can productively inform our understanding of the relationship between human brains and their socio-cultural contexts. These are: the social construction of emotion, cultural psychiatry, and the embodiment of ritual. We build on both current research findings in cultural neuroscience and ethnographic data on cultural differences in thought and behavior, to generate novel, ecologically informed hypotheses for future study. In addition, we lay out a specific suggestion for operationalizing insights from anthropology in the context of cultural neuroscience research. Specifically, we advocate the development of field studies that use portable measurement technologies to connect individual patterns of biological response with socio-cultural processes. We illustrate the potential of such an approach with data from a study of psychophysiology and religious devotion in Northeastern Brazil.

  8. Dementia Care at the Intersection of Regulation and Reflexivity: A Critical Realist Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Karen-Lee; Mitchell, Gail J.; Cott, Cheryl A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To understand point-of-care decisions, and in particular rule-breaking, by personal support workers (PSWs) regarding institutionalized elders with dementia within a context of legislative and organizational care mandates. Methods Qualitative baseline data including focus groups and semi-structured interviews with PSWs (n=26) and supervisors (n=9) were collected during a 2-year, multi-method trial of a 12-week interprofessional arts-informed educational intervention in two Alzheimer support units, and were analyzed using a critical realist approach. Results PSW care decisions were the outcome of a discordant interrelationship between PSWs’ reflective deliberations, and legislative and organizational care mandates. PSWs responded to discordance through rule-breaking in order to provide individualized care. Unbeknownst to PSWs, rule-breaking was contingent upon supervisors’ case-by-case complicity as they strove to balance fears of regulatory citations with private assessment of the soundness of PSW logic. Discussion Quality care emerges at the intersection of policies governing long-term care, PSW rule-breaking, and the supportive but undisclosed role supervisors play in these violations. Understanding this complexity has important implications for initiatives to improve care practices, and to challenge legislation and policies that impede dementia care. PMID:20375084

  9. Theory and method at the intersection of anthropology and cultural neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan A.

    2010-01-01

    Anthropologists have become increasingly interested in embodiment—that is, the ways that socio-cultural factors influence the form, behavior and subjective experience of human bodies. At the same time, social cognitive neuroscience has begun to reveal the mechanisms of embodiment by investigating the neural underpinnings and consequences of social experience. Despite this overlap, the two fields have barely engaged one another. We suggest three interconnected domains of inquiry in which the intersection of neuroscience and anthropology can productively inform our understanding of the relationship between human brains and their socio-cultural contexts. These are: the social construction of emotion, cultural psychiatry, and the embodiment of ritual. We build on both current research findings in cultural neuroscience and ethnographic data on cultural differences in thought and behavior, to generate novel, ecologically informed hypotheses for future study. In addition, we lay out a specific suggestion for operationalizing insights from anthropology in the context of cultural neuroscience research. Specifically, we advocate the development of field studies that use portable measurement technologies to connect individual patterns of biological response with socio-cultural processes. We illustrate the potential of such an approach with data from a study of psychophysiology and religious devotion in Northeastern Brazil. PMID:19965815

  10. A Bayesian Combined Model for Time-Dependent Turning Movement Proportions Estimation at Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengpeng Jiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-dependent turning movement flows are very important input data for intelligent transportation systems but are impossible to be detected directly through current traffic surveillance systems. Existing estimation models have proved to be not accurate and reliable enough during all intervals. An improved way to address this problem is to develop a combined model framework that can integrate multiple submodels running simultaneously. This paper first presents a back propagation neural network model to estimate dynamic turning movements, as well as the self-adaptive learning rate approach and the gradient descent with momentum method for solving. Second, this paper develops an efficient Kalman filtering model and designs a revised sequential Kalman filtering algorithm. Based on the Bayesian method using both historical data and currently estimated results for error calibration, this paper further integrates above two submodels into a Bayesian combined model framework and proposes a corresponding algorithm. A field survey is implemented at an intersection in Beijing city to collect both time series of link counts and actual time-dependent turning movement flows, including historical and present data. The reported estimation results show that the Bayesian combined model is much more accurate and stable than other models.

  11. Smart Girls, Black Girls, Mean Girls, and Bullies: At the Intersection of Identities and the Mediating Role of Young Girls' Social Network in Mathematical Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholson, Maisie; Martin, Danny B.

    2014-01-01

    By taking an intersectional and emic view to studying a group of African American girls in a third-grade class, we attempted to capture the complexity of mathematics learning for these girls. Traditionally, children's social networks in school are framed as external to mathematics content learning. Our preliminary analyses of student interviews…

  12. Development of a large streamer chamber for the Intersecting Storage Rings at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Eckardt, V; Meinke, R; Sander, O R

    1973-01-01

    A streamer chamber system has been constructed surrounding as completely as possible one of the intersection regions of the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings. The system consists of two identical streamer chambers with ground electrodes shaped to fit the vacuum tubes of the storage rings. To detect photons, lead oxide plates have been inserted into the sensitive volume of the chambers. To have a very short and constant memory time, a system which measures and regulates the memory time within a few per cent is used. (4 refs).

  13. EMPIRICAL STUDY ON USABILITY OF CROSSING SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR VISUALLY DISABLED AT SIGNALIZED INTERSECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Koji; Fujita, Motohiro; Matsuura, Kazuma; Fukuzono, Kazuyuki

    This paper evaluates the adjustment process for crossing support system for visually disabled at signalized intersections with the use of pedestrian traffic signals in concert with visible light communication (VLC) technology through outdoor experiments. As for the experiments, we put a blindfold on sighted people by eye mask in order to analyze the behavior of acquired visually disabled. And we used a full-scale crosswalk which is taking into consideration the crossing slope, the bumps at the edge of a crosswalk between the roadway and the sidewalkand crosswalk line. From the results of the survey, it is found that repetitive use of the VLC system decreased the number of lost their bearings completely and ended up standing immobile and reduced the crossing time for each person. On the other hand, it is shown that the performance of our VLC system is nearly equal to the existing support system from the view point of crossing time and the number of standing immobile and we clarified the effect factor for guidance accuracy by the regression analyses. Then we broke test subjects down into patterns by cluster analysis, and explained the walking characteristics for each group as they used the VLC system. In addition, we conducted the additional surveys for the quasi-blind subjects who had difficulty walking by using VLC system and visually impaired users. As a result, it is revealed that guidance accuracy was improved by providing the information about their receiving movement at several points on crosswalk and the habit of their walks for each user.

  14. Using the event analysis of systemic teamwork (EAST) to explore conflicts between different road user groups when making right hand turns at urban intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Paul M; Lenne, Michael G; Walker, Guy H; Stanton, Neville A; Filtness, Ashleigh

    2014-01-01

    Collisions between different types of road users at intersections form a substantial component of the road toll. This paper presents an analysis of driver, cyclist, motorcyclist and pedestrian behaviour at intersections that involved the application of an integrated suite of ergonomics methods, the Event Analysis of Systemic Teamwork (EAST) framework, to on-road study data. EAST was used to analyse behaviour at three intersections using data derived from an on-road study of driver, cyclist, motorcyclist and pedestrian behaviour. The analysis shows the differences in behaviour and cognition across the different road user groups and pinpoints instances where this may be creating conflicts between different road users. The role of intersection design in creating these differences in behaviour and resulting conflicts is discussed. It is concluded that currently intersections are not designed in a way that supports behaviour across the four forms of road user studied. Interventions designed to improve intersection safety are discussed. Practitioner Summary: Intersection safety currently represents a key road safety issue worldwide. This paper presents a novel application of a framework of ergonomics methods for studying differences in road user behaviour at intersections. The findings support development of interventions that consider all road users as opposed to one group in isolation.

  15. At the Intersection Between Art and Research. Practice-Based Research in the Performing Arts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    As an emerging field within the Nordic countries, the 'intersection' between art and research is still in the process of being named and renamed. Practice-Based Research within the Performing Arts was the concept that framed the investigation of the field in a NSU study circle during a period...

  16. Detecting Road Users at Intersections Through Changing Weather Using RGB-Thermal Videos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahnsen, Chris; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares the performance of a watch-dog sys- tem that detects road user actions in urban intersections to a KLT- based tracking system used in traffic surveillance. The two approaches are evaluated on 16 hours of video data captured by RGB and ther- mal cameras under challenging light...

  17. Dynamic all-red extension at signalized intersection : probabilistic modeling and algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Red light running has been a major cause of intersection injuries and fatalities in the United : States. In 2004 alone, there were 8,619 fatal crashes and 848,000 crashes with people injured, all : caused by RLR. Under the U.S. Department of Transpor...

  18. Analytical investigation on the minimum traffic delay at a two-phase intersection considering the dynamical evolution process of queues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Ze; Jiang, Rui; Hu, Mao-Bin; Jia, Bin

    2016-04-01

    This paper has studied the minimum traffic delay at a two-phase intersection, taking into account the dynamical evolution process of queues. The feature of delay function has been studied, which indicates that the minimum traffic delay must be achieved when at least one of the two constraint inequalities take the equal sign. We have derived the minimum delay as well as the corresponding traffic signal period, which shows that two situations are classified. Under certain circumstance, extra green time is needed for one phase while otherwise extra green time should be assigned to neither phase. Our work indicates that although the clearing policies were shown in many experiments to be optimal at isolated intersections, it is sometimes not the case.

  19. Analytical investigation on the minimum traffic delay at a three-phase signalized T-type intersection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Ze; Jiang, Rui; Hu, Mao-Bin; Jia, Bin

    2017-02-01

    The traffic delay at intersections is crucial for the performance of urban traffic system. This paper analytically investigated the minimum traffic delay at a three-phase T-type intersection. We firstly demonstrate that the minimum traffic delay must be achieved on the surface of the 3D space constituted by the three constraints. Next, we prove that the minimum traffic delay must be achieved on the three borderlines of the surface. Finally, we show that the minimum delay is achieved either on one specific borderline or at the vertex of the surface. In the former case, extra green time is needed for the stream with largest demand, while no extra green time should be assigned to any stream in the latter case.

  20. Analytical investigation on the minimum traffic delay at a two-phase intersection considering the dynamical evolution process of queues

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hong-Ze; Hu, Mao-Bin; Jia, Bin

    2016-01-01

    This paper has studied the minimum traffic delay at a two-phase intersection, taking into account the dynamical evolution process of queues. The feature of delay function has been studied, which indicates that the minimum traffic delay must be achieved when equality holds in at least one of the two constraints. We have derived the minimum delay as well as the corresponding traffic signal period, which shows that two situations are classified. Under certain circumstance, extra green time is needed for one phase while otherwise no extra green time should be assigned in both phases. Our work indicates that although the clearing policies were shown in many experiments to be optimal at isolated intersections, it is sometimes not the case.

  1. U.S. Geological Survey Science at the Intersection of Health and Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, S. M.; Plumlee, G. S.

    2016-12-01

    People worldwide worry about how their environment affects their health, and expect scientists to help address these concerns. The OneHealth concept recognizes the crucial linkages between environment, human health, and health of other organisms. Many US Geological Survey science activities directly examine or help inform how the Earth and the environment influence toxicological and infectious diseases. Key is our ability to bring to bear a collective expertise in environmental processes, geology, hydrology, hazards, microbiology, analytical chemistry, ecosystems, energy/mineral resources, geospatial technologies, and other disciplines. Our science examines sources, environmental transport and fate, biological effects, and human exposure pathways of many microbial (e.g. bacteria, protozoans, viruses, fungi), inorganic (e.g. asbestos, arsenic, lead, mercury) and organic (e.g. algal toxins, pesticides, pharmaceuticals) contaminants from geologic, anthropogenic, and disaster sources. We develop new laboratory, experimental, and field methods to analyze, model, and map contaminants, to determine their baseline and natural background levels, and to measure their biological effects. We examine the origins, environmental persistence, wildlife effects, and potential for transmission to humans of pathogens that cause zoonotic or vector-borne diseases (e.g., avian influenza or West Nile virus). Collaborations with human health scientists from many organizations are essential. For example, our work with epidemiologists and toxicologists helps understand the exposure pathways and roles of geologically sourced toxicants such as arsenic (via drinking water) and asbestos (via dusts) in cancer. Work with pulmonologists and pathologists helps clarify the sources and fate of inhaled mineral particles in lungs. Wildlife health scientists help human health scientists assess animals as sentinels of human disease. Such transdisciplinary science is essential at the intersection of health

  2. Competing conceptualizations of decent work at the intersection of health, social and economic discourses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ruggiero, Erica; Cohen, Joanna E; Cole, Donald C; Forman, Lisa

    2015-05-01

    According to the International Labour Organization (ILO), decent work is critical to economic and social progress and well-being. The ILO's Decent Work Agenda outlines four directions (creating jobs, guaranteeing rights at work, extending social protection, promoting social dialogue) (ILO, 2015). While the Agenda's existence may imply consensus about its meaning, we contend that several conceptualizations of decent work exist in the global policy arena. Different institutional perspectives must be negotiated, and political, economic, social and health considerations balanced in its pursuit. This paper reports findings from a critical discourse analysis of 10 policy texts that aimed to reveal different health, economic, and social claims about decent work and how these are shaped by the work policy agendas of the ILO, World Health Organization, and World Bank. Themes emerging from the discourse analysis include the: challenges and realities of promoting "one" agenda; complex intersection between decent work, health and health equity concepts; emphasis on economic and pro-market interests versus the social dimensions of work; and, relative emphasis on individual versus collective responsibility for decent work. To our knowledge, this is a first attempt to contrast different conceptualizations of decent work involving these institutions. Our findings suggest that decent work is a contested notion, and that more than one "agenda" is operating in the face of vested institutional interests. Broader discourses are contributing to a reframing of decent work in economic, social and/or health terms and these are impacting which dimensions of work are taken up in policy texts over others. Results show how the language of economics acts as a disciplinary and regulatory power and its role as a normalizing discourse. We call for research that deepens understanding of how a social, economic and health phenomenon like work is discursively re-interpreted through different global

  3. The Grading Nemesis: An Historical Overview and a Current Look at Pass/Fail Grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, L. David

    1983-01-01

    A brief history of grading practices at American colleges and universities is given, along with results of a survey of the current uses of pass/fail grading. The pass/fail system is widely used for a limited number of elective courses. Its adoption peaked during the mid-1970s. (PP)

  4. Minority American Women Physicists Achieving at the Intersection of Race and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, K. Renee

    2005-10-01

    As minority women physicists, we stand at the intersection of race and gender. We are physicists to be sure, but we are also women of Native, African, Hispanic, and Asian descent. We are colleagues, mothers, sisters, friends and wives, as are our white counterparts, but our experiences cannot be distilled to only gender or race. As Prudence Carter (2005 Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association) and Scott Page (``The Logic of Diversity,'' private communication, 2004) remind us, women of color emerge from the interaction between race and gender. This distinction is important because most researchers who study American women's participation in science focus exclusively on the participation of white American women. Of those who acknowledge the existence of non-white women, most do so by disclaiming the exclusion of women of color because the numbers are so small or the experiences are different from white American women. There are some important differences, however. While American women are 15% of all scientists and engineers, black American women are 60% of all black scientists and engineers. Yet an average of less than 3 black women and less than 3 Hispanic women earn PhDs in the U.S. each year, out of about 1100. As Rachel Ivie and Kim Nies Ray point out in AIP Publication R-430.02, ``Minority women especially represent a great, untapped resource that could be drawn on to increase the size of the scientific workforce in the U.S.'' Donna Nelson's (University of Oklahoma) study of diversity in science and engineering faculties further finds that (with the exception of one black woman in astronomy) there are no female black or Native American full professors. In physics, there are no black women professors and no Native American women professors. Despite such a bleak picture, there is hope. Of the 18 departments that award at least 40% of bachelors degrees to women, 7 are in Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Black women are

  5. Bi-Bayesian Combined Model for Two-Step Prediction of Dynamic Turning Movement Proportions at Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengpeng Jiao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Short-term prediction of dynamic turning movement proportions at intersections is very important for intelligent transportation systems, but it is impossible to detect turning flows directly through current traffic surveillance devices. Existing prediction models have proved to be rather accurate in general, but not precise enough during every time interval, and can only obtain the one-step prediction. This paper first presents a Bayesian combined model to forecast the entering and exiting flows at intersections, by integrating a nonlinear regression, a moving average, and an autoregressive model. Based on the forecasted traffic flows, this paper further develops an accurate backpropagation neural network model and an efficient Kalman filtering model to predict the dynamic turning movement proportions. Using Bayesian method with both historical information and currently prediction results for error adjustment, this paper finally integrates both the above two prediction models and proposes a Bi-Bayesian combined framework to achieve both one-step and two-step predictions. A case study is implemented based on practical survey data, which are collected at an intersection in Beijing city, including both historical and current data. The reported prediction results indicate that the Bi-Bayesian combined model is rather accurate and stable for on-line applications.

  6. Influence of dimension box differences and time differences during operations of red box for motorcycles at signalized intersection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyadi, Agah Muhammad

    2017-11-01

    Performance of signalized intersection has declined due to a large number of motorcycles. The number of motorcycles reached 98.2 million units and the composition of motorcycles has reached around 81.7% of the total composition of vehicles in Indonesia (AISI, 2017). To solve that problem, the red box for motorcycles are provided at the signalized intersection. Red box for the motorcycle at signalized intersections was developed from the concept of Advance Stop Line (ASL) for bicycles. The Red Box was developed to split the queue between motorcycles and other vehicles when waiting at red light. This paper aims to evaluate the influence of the red box dimension and red time operation differences. The survey was conducted as many as 30 cycles of traffic signals per day. The data were analyzed using software IBM SPSS Statistics 20 by using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) to obtain p-value (significant). The analysis shows that there are insignificant influences between the occupancy rates to the dimension of Red Box. Furthermore, that there is a significant difference that shows the dependency of only motorcycles in the Red Box Area towards red time operation.

  7. Urban Middle School Students' Stereotypes at the Intersection of Sexual Orientation, Ethnicity, and Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavami, Negin; Peplau, Letitia Anne

    2017-03-06

    Heterosexual urban middle school students' (N = 1,757) stereotypes about gender typicality, intelligence, and aggression were assessed. Students (Mage  = 12.36 years) rated Facebook-like profiles of peers who varied by gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation. Several hypotheses about how the gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation of target peers intersect to shape stereotypes were tested. As predicted, a peer's sexual orientation determined stereotypes of gender typicality, with gay and lesbian students viewed as most atypical. As expected, ethnicity shaped stereotypes of intelligence, with Asian American students seen as most intelligent. Gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation independently and jointly affected stereotypes of aggression. These results demonstrate the value of an intersectional approach to the study of stereotypes. Implications for future research and practice are offered. © 2017 The Authors. Child Development © 2017 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  8. Americans' Gender Attitudes at the Intersection of Sexual Orientation and Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grollman, Eric Anthony

    2017-10-26

    Extensive research on differences in women's and men's gender attitudes and more recent work on sexual orientation differences in these and other social attitudes have overlooked the potential intersection between gender and sexual orientation in predicting Americans' gender attitudes. I use data from the 2012 American National Election Survey 2012 to investigate differences in views on gender roles, gender discrimination and inequality, and abortion among lesbian and bisexual women, gay and bisexual men, heterosexual women, and heterosexual men. The results suggest that heterosexual men hold the most conservative views on gender, while lesbian and bisexual women are most conscious of gender discrimination and inequality. These differences are partially explained by LGB Americans' liberal political ideology and heightened awareness of homophobic discrimination-two mechanisms that are also gendered. I conclude by arguing that the intersection between sexual orientation and gender produces unique lived experiences that, in turn, produce gendered sexual orientation gaps in worldviews.

  9. Analysis of Emission Effects Related to Drivers’ Compliance Rates for Cooperative Vehicle-Infrastructure System at Signalized Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruohua Liao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Unknown remaining time of signal phase at a signalized intersection generally results in extra accelerations and decelerations that increase variations of operating conditions and thus emissions. A cooperative vehicle-infrastructure system can reduce unnecessary speed changes by establishing communications between vehicles and the signal infrastructure. However, the environmental benefits largely depend on drivers’ compliance behaviors. To quantify the effects of drivers’ compliance rates on emissions, this study applied VISSIM 5.20 (Planung Transport Verkehr AG, Karlsruhe, Germany to develop a simulation model for a signalized intersection, in which light duty vehicles were equipped with a cooperative vehicle-infrastructure system. A vehicle-specific power (VSP-based model was used to estimate emissions. Based on simulation data, the effects of different compliance rates on VSP distributions, emission factors, and total emissions were analyzed. The results show the higher compliance rate decreases the proportion of VSP bin = 0, which means that the frequencies of braking and idling were lower and light duty vehicles ran more smoothly at the intersection if more light duty vehicles complied with the cooperative vehicle-infrastructure system, and emission factors for light duty vehicles decreased significantly as the compliance rate increased. The case study shows higher total emission reductions were observed with higher compliance rate for all of CO2, NOx, HC, and CO emissions. CO2 was reduced most significantly, decreased by 16% and 22% with compliance rates of 0.3 and 0.7, respectively.

  10. A hazard-based duration model for analyzing crossing behavior of cyclists and electric bike riders at signalized intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaobao; Huan, Mei; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Peng, Yichuan; Gao, Ziyou

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a hazard-based duration approach to investigate riders' waiting times, violation hazards, associated risk factors, and their differences between cyclists and electric bike riders at signalized intersections. A total of 2322 two-wheeled riders approaching the intersections during red light periods were observed in Beijing, China. The data were classified into censored and uncensored data to distinguish between safe crossing and red-light running behavior. The results indicated that the red-light crossing behavior of most riders was dependent on waiting time. They were inclined to terminate waiting behavior and run against the traffic light with the increase of waiting duration. Over half of the observed riders cannot endure 49s or longer. 25% of the riders can endure 97s or longer. Rider type, gender, waiting position, conformity tendency and crossing traffic volume were identified to have significant effects on riders' waiting times and violation hazards. Electric bike riders were found to be more sensitive to the external risk factors such as other riders' crossing behavior and crossing traffic volume than cyclists. Moreover, unobserved heterogeneity was examined in the proposed models. The finding of this paper can explain when and why cyclists and electric bike riders run against the red light at intersections. The results of this paper are useful for traffic design and management agencies to implement strategies to enhance the safety of riders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Concurrent audio-visual feedback for supporting drivers at intersections: A study using two linked driving simulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtenbos, M; de Winter, J C F; Hale, A R; Wieringa, P A; Hagenzieker, M P

    2017-04-01

    A large portion of road traffic crashes occur at intersections for the reason that drivers lack necessary visual information. This research examined the effects of an audio-visual display that provides real-time sonification and visualization of the speed and direction of another car approaching the crossroads on an intersecting road. The location of red blinking lights (left vs. right on the speedometer) and the lateral input direction of beeps (left vs. right ear in headphones) corresponded to the direction from where the other car approached, and the blink and beep rates were a function of the approaching car's speed. Two driving simulators were linked so that the participant and the experimenter drove in the same virtual world. Participants (N = 25) completed four sessions (two with the audio-visual display on, two with the audio-visual display off), each session consisting of 22 intersections at which the experimenter approached from the left or right and either maintained speed or slowed down. Compared to driving with the display off, the audio-visual display resulted in enhanced traffic efficiency (i.e., greater mean speed, less coasting) while not compromising safety (i.e., the time gap between the two vehicles was equivalent). A post-experiment questionnaire showed that the beeps were regarded as more useful than the lights. It is argued that the audio-visual display is a promising means of supporting drivers until fully automated driving is technically feasible. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Micro-simulation of vehicle conflicts involving right-turn vehicles at signalized intersections based on cellular automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, C; Wong, Y D

    2014-02-01

    At intersection, vehicles coming from different directions conflict with each other. Improper geometric design and signal settings at signalized intersection will increase occurrence of conflicts between road users and results in a reduction of the safety level. This study established a cellular automata (CA) model to simulate vehicular interactions involving right-turn vehicles (as similar to left-turn vehicles in US). Through various simulation scenarios for four case cross-intersections, the relationships between conflict occurrences involving right-turn vehicles with traffic volume and right-turn movement control strategies are analyzed. Impacts of traffic volume, permissive right-turn compared to red-amber-green (RAG) arrow, shared straight-through and right-turn lane as well as signal setting are estimated from simulation results. The simulation model is found to be able to provide reasonable assessment of conflicts through comparison of existed simulation approach and observed accidents. Through the proposed approach, prediction models for occurrences and severity of vehicle conflicts can be developed for various geometric layouts and traffic control strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Multivariate random-parameters zero-inflated negative binomial regression model: an application to estimate crash frequencies at intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chunjiao; Clarke, David B; Yan, Xuedong; Khattak, Asad; Huang, Baoshan

    2014-09-01

    Crash data are collected through police reports and integrated with road inventory data for further analysis. Integrated police reports and inventory data yield correlated multivariate data for roadway entities (e.g., segments or intersections). Analysis of such data reveals important relationships that can help focus on high-risk situations and coming up with safety countermeasures. To understand relationships between crash frequencies and associated variables, while taking full advantage of the available data, multivariate random-parameters models are appropriate since they can simultaneously consider the correlation among the specific crash types and account for unobserved heterogeneity. However, a key issue that arises with correlated multivariate data is the number of crash-free samples increases, as crash counts have many categories. In this paper, we describe a multivariate random-parameters zero-inflated negative binomial (MRZINB) regression model for jointly modeling crash counts. The full Bayesian method is employed to estimate the model parameters. Crash frequencies at urban signalized intersections in Tennessee are analyzed. The paper investigates the performance of MZINB and MRZINB regression models in establishing the relationship between crash frequencies, pavement conditions, traffic factors, and geometric design features of roadway intersections. Compared to the MZINB model, the MRZINB model identifies additional statistically significant factors and provides better goodness of fit in developing the relationships. The empirical results show that MRZINB model possesses most of the desirable statistical properties in terms of its ability to accommodate unobserved heterogeneity and excess zero counts in correlated data. Notably, in the random-parameters MZINB model, the estimated parameters vary significantly across intersections for different crash types. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The macrophage at the intersection of immunity and metabolism in obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaan M Constantine

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity is a worldwide pandemic representing one of the major challenges that societies face around the globe. Identifying the mechanisms involved in its development and propagation will help the development of preventative and therapeutic strategies that may help control its rising rates. Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation, and this is believed to be one of the major contributors to the development of insulin resistance, which is an early event in obesity and leads to type 2 diabetes when the pancreas fails to keep up with increased demand for insulin. In this review, we discuss the role of macrophages in mediation of inflammation in obesity in metabolic organs including adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and liver. The presence of immune cells at the interface with metabolic organs modulates both metabolic function and inflammatory responses in these organs, and may provide a potential therapeutic target to modulate metabolic function in obesity.

  15. Black-White health inequalities in Canada at the intersection of gender and immigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Andrew C; Veenstra, Gerry

    2016-10-20

    Intersectionality theory proposes that each combination of social categories derived from gender, race and nationality, such as immigrant White man or native-born Black woman, is associated with unique social experiences. We tested the potential of intersectionality theory for explicating racial inequalities in Canada by investigating whether Black-White health inequalities are conditioned by gender and immigrant status in a synergistic way. Our dataset comprised 10 cycles (2001-2013) of the Canadian Community Health Survey. We used binary logistic regression to model Black- White inequalities in hypertension, diabetes, self-rated health, self-rated mental health and asthma separately for native-born women, native-born men, immigrant women and immigrant men. After controlling for potentially confounding factors we found that immigrant Black women had significantly higher odds of hypertension, diabetes and fair/poor self-rated health than immigrant White women. Native-born Black women and immigrant Black men had higher odds of hypertension and diabetes than native-born White women and immigrant White men respectively, and native-born White women were more likely than native-born Black women to report asthma. There were no statistically significant health differences between native-born Black and White men. Socio-economic status, smoking, physical activity and body mass index were implicated in some but not all of these racial health inequalities. None of the three-way interactions between racial identity, gender and immigration status was statistically significant. We found relatively high risks of ill health for Black Canadians in three of the four samples. Overall, however, we found little support for the intersectional hypothesis that Black-White health inequalities in Canada are conditioned by gender and immigrant status in a synergistic way.

  16. Evaluating the Safety In Numbers effect for pedestrians at urban intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brendan; Levinson, David M; Owen, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Assessment of collision risk between pedestrians and automobiles offers a powerful and informative tool in urban planning applications, and can be leveraged to inform proper placement of improvements and treatment projects to improve pedestrian safety. Such assessment can be performed using existing datasets of crashes, pedestrian counts, and automobile traffic flows to identify intersections or corridors characterized by elevated collision risks to pedestrians. The Safety In Numbers phenomenon, which refers to the observable effect that pedestrian safety is positively correlated with increased pedestrian traffic in a given area (i.e. that the individual per-pedestrian risk of a collision decreases with additional pedestrians), is a readily observed phenomenon that has been studied previously, though its directional causality is not yet known. A sample of 488 intersections in Minneapolis were analyzed, and statistically-significant log-linear relationships between pedestrian traffic flows and the per-pedestrian crash risk were found, indicating the Safety In Numbers effect. Potential planning applications of this analysis framework towards improving pedestrian safety in urban environments are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. ISR Intersection 1

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    The experimental apparatus used at intersection 1 by the CERN-Bologna Collaboration (experiment R105). It consists of two almost identical magnetic spectrometers centered at 90 degrees on opposite sides of the intersection region. In each spectrometer one can see magnetostrictive wire spark chambers, a magnet, more chambers and various hodoscopes of scintillation counters. Gas Cerenkov counters (almost invisible in the picture) are located in the gap of each magnet. On the left hand side, a matrix of 119 lead glass Cerenkov counters is located behind some concrete and iron shielding.

  18. Understanding driver behavior at grade crossings through signal detection theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    This report uses signal detection theory (SDT) to model motorists decisionmaking strategies at grade crossings in order to understand the factors that influence such decisions and to establish a framework for evaluating the impact of proposed coun...

  19. Understanding driver behavior at grade crossings through signal detection theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This report uses signal detection theory (SDT) to model motorists decisionmaking strategies at grade crossings in order to understand the factors that influence such decisions and to establish a framework for evaluating the impact of proposed coun...

  20. The White Habitus and Hegemonic Masculinity at the Elite Southern University: Asian Americans and the Need for Intersectional Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalind S. Chou

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Our article demonstrates the power of white habitus, prevalence of colorblind racism, and effect of hegemonic masculine ideology on Asian American students at an elite Southern university. This study takes an intersectional approach towards white habitus, acknowledging the gendered sexualized nature of colorblind racial ideology. Using semi-structured interviews with 14 Asian American undergraduates, we emphasize that Asian Americans are not immune to the racist and racialized experiences of even the most elite American universities and its social spaces. Findings suggest that white habitus and exclusionary white university Greek spaces support a racialized, sexualized, and gendered socialization that intimatley affects our respondents. Our Asian American undergraduates describe instances of sexualized racism and racialized romantic experiences that are particular by gender. We also discuss how our participants have adopted and internalized ideology produced from white habitus and colorblind racism at the university. White habitus socializes and shapes Asian American students at an elite Southern university through intersecting domains of power and through exclusion in largely white spaces.

  1. A Finite Characterization and Recognition of Intersection Graphs of Hypergraphs with Rank at Most 3 and Multiplicity at Most 2 in the Class of Threshold Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metelsky Yury

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We characterize the class L32$L_3^2 $ of intersection graphs of hypergraphs with rank at most 3 and multiplicity at most 2 by means of a finite list of forbidden induced subgraphs in the class of threshold graphs. We also give an O(n-time algorithm for the recognition of graphs from L32$L_3^2 $ in the class of threshold graphs, where n is the number of vertices of a tested graph.

  2. The limits of intensive feeding: maternal foodwork at the intersections of race, class, and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenton, Joslyn

    2017-07-01

    Despite experiencing numerous barriers, mothers today confront increasing social pressure to embody perfection through their foodwork. A growing body of social science research identifies how gender and class inequality shape women's perceptions of food and their feeding strategies, but this research is thus far limited in its understanding of the roles that race and ethnic identity play in a mother's food landscape. Drawing on 60 in-depth interviews with a racially and economically diverse group of mothers, this paper examines how feeding young children is intertwined with contemporary ideas about child health as well as women's efforts to negotiate race, class, and gender hierarchies. Extending Hays' concept of intensive mothering, rich descriptions of feeding children reveal how mothers in this study are discursively engaged with what I call an 'intensive feeding ideology' - the widespread belief that good mothering is synonymous with intensive food labour. Drawing on intersectional theory, this article discusses the limits of an intensive feeding ideology, particularly for poor and middle-class mothers of colour. The findings contribute to an understanding of how power relations are embedded within food ideologies and how mothers of young children attempt to negotiate them. © 2017 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  3. Racism at the intersections: Gender and socioeconomic differences in the experience of racism among African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwate, Naa Oyo A; Goodman, Melody S

    2015-09-01

    Several studies investigating the health effects of racism have reported gender and socioeconomic differences in exposures to racism, with women typically reporting lower frequencies, and individuals with greater resources reporting higher frequencies. This study used diverse measures of socioeconomic position and multiple measures and methods to assess experienced racism. Socioeconomic position included education and financial and employment status. Quantitative racism measures assessed individual experiences with day-to-day and with major lifetime incidents and perceptions of the extent to which African Americans as a group experience racism. A brief qualitative question asked respondents to describe a racist incident that stood out in recent memory. Participants comprised a probability sample of N = 144 African American adults aged 19 to 87 residing in New York City. Results suggested that women reported fewer lifetime incidents but did not differ from men on everyday racism. These differences appear to be partly because of scale content. Socioeconomic position as measured by years of education was positively associated with reported racism in the total sample but differently patterned across gender; subjective social status showed a negative association. Qualitative responses describing memorable incidents fell into 5 key categories: resources/opportunity structures, criminal profiling, racial aggression/assault, interpersonal incivilities, and stereotyping. In these narratives, men were more likely to offer accounts involving criminal profiling, and women encountered incivilities more often. The findings highlight the need for closer attention to the intersection of gender and socioeconomic factors in investigations of the health effects of racism. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Evaluation of Deployment Challenges of Wireless Sensor Networks at Signalized Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyre Azpilicueta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available With the growing demand of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS for safer and more efficient transportation, research on and development of such vehicular communication systems have increased considerably in the last years. The use of wireless networks in vehicular environments has grown exponentially. However, it is highly important to analyze radio propagation prior to the deployment of a wireless sensor network in such complex scenarios. In this work, the radio wave characterization for ISM 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs deployed taking advantage of the existence of traffic light infrastructure has been assessed. By means of an in-house developed 3D ray launching algorithm, the impact of topology as well as urban morphology of the environment has been analyzed, emulating the realistic operation in the framework of the scenario. The complexity of the scenario, which is an intersection city area with traffic lights, vehicles, people, buildings, vegetation and urban environment, makes necessary the channel characterization with accurate models before the deployment of wireless networks. A measurement campaign has been conducted emulating the interaction of the system, in the vicinity of pedestrians as well as nearby vehicles. A real time interactive application has been developed and tested in order to visualize and monitor traffic as well as pedestrian user location and behavior. Results show that the use of deterministic tools in WSN deployment can aid in providing optimal layouts in terms of coverage, capacity and energy efficiency of the network.

  5. Evaluation of Deployment Challenges of Wireless Sensor Networks at Signalized Intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azpilicueta, Leyre; López-Iturri, Peio; Aguirre, Erik; Martínez, Carlos; Astrain, José Javier; Villadangos, Jesús; Falcone, Francisco

    2016-07-22

    With the growing demand of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) for safer and more efficient transportation, research on and development of such vehicular communication systems have increased considerably in the last years. The use of wireless networks in vehicular environments has grown exponentially. However, it is highly important to analyze radio propagation prior to the deployment of a wireless sensor network in such complex scenarios. In this work, the radio wave characterization for ISM 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) deployed taking advantage of the existence of traffic light infrastructure has been assessed. By means of an in-house developed 3D ray launching algorithm, the impact of topology as well as urban morphology of the environment has been analyzed, emulating the realistic operation in the framework of the scenario. The complexity of the scenario, which is an intersection city area with traffic lights, vehicles, people, buildings, vegetation and urban environment, makes necessary the channel characterization with accurate models before the deployment of wireless networks. A measurement campaign has been conducted emulating the interaction of the system, in the vicinity of pedestrians as well as nearby vehicles. A real time interactive application has been developed and tested in order to visualize and monitor traffic as well as pedestrian user location and behavior. Results show that the use of deterministic tools in WSN deployment can aid in providing optimal layouts in terms of coverage, capacity and energy efficiency of the network.

  6. PASSENGER CAR EQUIVALENT (PCE OF THROUGH VEHICLES AT SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS IN DHAKA METROPOLITAN CITY, BANGLADESH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha SAHA

    2009-01-01

    PCE currently used in Bangladesh is based on the values given in Geometric Design of Highways (MoC, 2001, which is the modification of the values given by Webster (1958 on the study performed in the United Kingdom in the 50's and 60's. But now-a-days, the situation is far different both for traffic and road user as the characteristics have changed from that time. Hence, in this paper an empirical study was carried out to determine the PCE of different types of vehicle that reflect the actual traffic conditions of Dhaka Metropolitan City. Data were collected from ten signalized intersections and the headway ratio method was used to estimate the PCE of different types of vehicle. The main vehicle compositions observed during the study period consist of passenger cars, auto-rickshaws, mini-buses and buses. The PCE obtained in this study were compared to the values established earlier. It was found that the estimated PCE are smaller than those being used in Bangladesh.

  7. Evaluation of Deployment Challenges of Wireless Sensor Networks at Signalized Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azpilicueta, Leyre; López-Iturri, Peio; Aguirre, Erik; Martínez, Carlos; Astrain, José Javier; Villadangos, Jesús; Falcone, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    With the growing demand of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) for safer and more efficient transportation, research on and development of such vehicular communication systems have increased considerably in the last years. The use of wireless networks in vehicular environments has grown exponentially. However, it is highly important to analyze radio propagation prior to the deployment of a wireless sensor network in such complex scenarios. In this work, the radio wave characterization for ISM 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) deployed taking advantage of the existence of traffic light infrastructure has been assessed. By means of an in-house developed 3D ray launching algorithm, the impact of topology as well as urban morphology of the environment has been analyzed, emulating the realistic operation in the framework of the scenario. The complexity of the scenario, which is an intersection city area with traffic lights, vehicles, people, buildings, vegetation and urban environment, makes necessary the channel characterization with accurate models before the deployment of wireless networks. A measurement campaign has been conducted emulating the interaction of the system, in the vicinity of pedestrians as well as nearby vehicles. A real time interactive application has been developed and tested in order to visualize and monitor traffic as well as pedestrian user location and behavior. Results show that the use of deterministic tools in WSN deployment can aid in providing optimal layouts in terms of coverage, capacity and energy efficiency of the network. PMID:27455270

  8. Open badges for education: what are the implications at the intersection of open systems and badging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June Ahn

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Badges have garnered great interest among scholars of digital media and learning. In addition, widespread initiatives such as Mozilla’s Open Badge Framework expand the potential of badging into the realm of open education. In this paper, we explicate the concept of open badges. We highlight some of the ways that researchers have examined badges as part of educational practice and also highlight the different definitions of open-ness that are employed in popular and scholarly thought. By considering badges from three different perspectives (motivation, pedagogy, and credential and the concept of openness from three different perspectives (production, access and appropriation we develop a framework to consider the tensions where these competing conceptions meet. This explication illuminates how the ideas of open and badges intersect, and clarifies situations where these concepts come into direct conflict or mutually enhance each other. Our analysis pinpoints and elucidates particular areas where research is needed to better understand the complex phenomenon of open badges, and also offers design considerations for developers, educators, and organizations that are actively involved in open badges.

  9. Ortographic difficulties in writing at a basic grade level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Rodrigues Azevedo Joly

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the performance in children’s writing at a basic grade level. A written test was applied to 546 grade 2 or 3 boys and girls (aged 7 to 13 in public and private schools from the State of São Paulo. The results showed that the grade 3 participants presented a better performance than the grade 2 participants even though both groups have achieved the same maximum and minimum scores. It was confirmed that participants had more difficulty with words containing compound syllables, while words with aggregated consonants and digraphs were associated with the highest rate of correct answers. Furthermore, students from private school revealed more competence in orthographic writing than those coming from public schools. As to gender differences, there were no significant differences in performance for compound and complex syllables items though for other words, girls had better scores.   Keywords: writing; academic achievement; evaluation.

  10. Intersection I-1

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1971-01-01

    Intersection I-1 of the ISR in August 1971 showing the 90 degree large acceptance spectrometer of the Saclay-Strasbourg Collaboration which is studying the momentum spectra of electrons at large angles. On the left of the crossing region can be seen the track used by the CERN-Bucharest-Cracow-Tata Collaboration to bring nuclear emulsions into the ISR.

  11. Examination of drivers' cell phone use behavior at intersections by using naturalistic driving data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Huimin; Bao, Shan; Sayer, James; Kato, Kazuma

    2015-09-01

    Many driving simulator studies have shown that cell phone use while driving greatly degraded driving performance. In terms of safety analysis, many factors including drivers, vehicles, and driving situations need to be considered. Controlled or simulated studies cannot always account for the full effects of these factors, especially situational factors such as road condition, traffic density, and weather and lighting conditions. Naturalistic driving by its nature provides a natural and realistic way to examine drivers' behaviors and associated factors for cell phone use while driving. In this study, driving speed while using a cell phone (conversation or visual/manual tasks) was compared to two baselines (baseline 1: normal driving condition, which only excludes driving while using a cell phone, baseline 2: driving-only condition, which excludes all types of secondary tasks) when traversing an intersection. The outcomes showed that drivers drove slower when using a cell for both conversation and visual/manual (VM) tasks compared to baseline conditions. With regard to cell phone conversations, drivers were more likely to drive faster during the day time compared to night time driving and drive slower under moderate traffic compared to under sparse traffic situations. With regard to VM tasks, there was a significant interaction between traffic and cell phone use conditions. The maximum speed with VM tasks was significantly lower than that with baseline conditions under sparse traffic conditions. In contrast, the maximum speed with VM tasks was slightly higher than that with baseline driving under dense traffic situations. This suggests that drivers might self-regulate their behavior based on the driving situations and demand for secondary tasks, which could provide insights on driver distraction guidelines. With the rapid development of in-vehicle technology, the findings in this research could lead the improvement of human-machine interface (HMI) design as well

  12. Unpacking 'Give Back Box': A Social Enterprise at the Intersection of Leadership, Innovation, and Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Barrientos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Once the domain of government agencies and non-profit organizations, a social enterprise integrates social benefits such as employment and sustainability into a for-profit firm’s mission.  The social enterprise (SE bottom line includes both economic and social value, reflecting an intersection of the Jesuit leadership tradition with commercial business enterprise.  This case study describes the start-up of Give Back Box (GBB, a Chicago-based social enterprise that supports recycling and repurposing.  GBB’s business model involves providing a convenient, no-cost opportunity to follow up an online purchase by recycling the shipping box to forward unneeded items to charities.  GBB was founded in 2012 by two entrepreneurs with expertise in global business as well as online retailing. Thus, this case also addresses the entrepreneurial dimension of SE by illustrating the close link between social enterprise and social entrepreneurship.  Following its initial pilot phase, GBB has grown steadily, receiving impressive media coverage that has included articles in Forbes, Fast Company, and a feature on NBC’s ‘Today’ show.  In 2013 another partner joined GBB: a Colombian engineer with an MBA from a U.S. Jesuit business school who has sought to apply business principles and Jesuit values in his work as a GBB partner.  This case study describes the start-up’s inception, its mission and business plan, and its achievements to date, together with recommendations for other SE start-ups.

  13. 3D Numerical Modeling of the Propagation of Hydraulic Fracture at Its Intersection with Natural (Pre-existing) Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, Ali Naghi; Goshtasbi, Kamran; Ahangari, Kaveh; Jin, Yan; Bahmani, Aram

    2017-02-01

    A variety of 3D numerical models were developed based on hydraulic fracture experiments to simulate the propagation of hydraulic fracture at its intersection with natural (pre-existing) fracture. Since the interaction between hydraulic and pre-existing fractures is a key condition that causes complex fracture patterns, the extended finite element method was employed in ABAQUS software to simulate the problem. The propagation of hydraulic fracture in a fractured medium was modeled in two horizontal differential stresses (Δ σ) of 5e6 and 10e6 Pa considering different strike and dip angles of pre-existing fracture. The rate of energy release was calculated in the directions of hydraulic and pre-existing fractures (G_{{frac}} /G_{{rock}}) at their intersection point to determine the fracture behavior. Opening and crossing were two dominant fracture behaviors during the hydraulic and pre-existing fracture interaction at low and high differential stress conditions, respectively. The results of numerical studies were compared with those of experimental models, showing a good agreement between the two to validate the accuracy of the models. Besides the horizontal differential stress, strike and dip angles of the natural (pre-existing) fracture, the key finding of this research was the significant effect of the energy release rate on the propagation behavior of the hydraulic fracture. This effect was more prominent under the influence of strike and dip angles, as well as differential stress. The obtained results can be used to predict and interpret the generation of complex hydraulic fracture patterns in field conditions.

  14. Optimal medical outcomes with limited liability: risk management principles for medical practices at the intersection of medicine, law, and business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterick, Timothy J; Paterick, Timothy E; Waterhouse, Blake E

    2007-01-01

    Physicians practice at the intersection of medicine, law, and business. Each discipline creates its own challenges for the practicing physician: to practice efficient, effective medicine; to limit potential liability; and to create a positive financial outcome. Those challenges increase with escalating costs and reduced reimbursements. In this paper, the common clinical presentation of chest pain has been used to create a paradigm to educate physicians to understand efficient and effective approaches to diagnosis and treatment, and how effective communication with patients and meticulous documentation of all medical encounters can limit the potential for liability. Ultimately, given today's reimbursement formulas, physicians must also understand the cost of testing, in relation to its benefits, in an attempt to yield a positive financial outcome.

  15. Emerging issues at the intersection of immigration and child welfare: results from a transnational research and policy forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettlaff, Alan J; Vidal de Haymes, Maria; Velazquez, Sonia; Mindell, Robert; Bruce, Lara

    2009-01-01

    In July 2006, the American Humane Association and the Loyola University Chicago School of Social Work facilitated a roundtable to address the emerging issue of immigration and its intersection with child welfare systems. More than 70 participants from 10 states and Mexico joined the roundtable, representing the fields of higher education, child welfare, international immigration, legal practice, and others. This roundtable created a transnational opportunity to discuss the emerging impact of migration on child welfare services in the United States and formed the basis of a continued multidisciplinary collaboration designed to inform and impact policy and practice at the local, state, and national levels. This paper presents the results of the roundtable discussion and summarizes the emerging issues that participants identified as requiring attention by child welfare systems to facilitat positive outcomes of child safety, permanency, and well-being. Suggestions for further research and implications for policy and practice are also presented.

  16. The red-light running behavior of electric bike riders and cyclists at urban intersections in China: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changxu; Yao, Lin; Zhang, Kan

    2012-11-01

    Electric bikes and regular bicycles play an important role in the urban transportation system of China. Red-light running is a type of highly dangerous behavior of two-wheeled riders. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the rate, associated factors, and behavior characteristics of two-wheelers' red-light running in China. A field observational study was conducted using two synchronized video cameras at three signalized intersections in Beijing. A total of 451 two-wheelers facing a red light (222 e-bike riders and 229 cyclists) were observed and analyzed. The results showed that 56% of the two-wheelers crossed the intersection against a red light. Age was found to be a significant variable for predicting red-light runners, with the young and middle-aged riders being more likely than the old ones to run against a red light. The logistic regression analysis also indicated that the probability of a rider running a red light was higher when she or he was alone, when there were fewer riders waiting, and when there were riders already crossing on red. Further analysis of crossing behavior revealed that the majority of red-light running occurred in the early and late stages of a red-light cycle. Two-wheelers' crossing behavior was categorized into three distinct types: law-obeying (44%), risk-taking (31%) and opportunistic (25%). Males were more likely to act in a risk-taking manner than females, and so were the young and middle-aged riders than the old ones. These findings provide valuable insights in understanding two-wheelers' red-light running behaviors, and their implications in improving road safety were discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Peer harassment at primary school: gender and school grade differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gema Martín Seoane

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to study the relationship among gender, school grade and peer harassment at Primary School. The participants were 2.050 children aged 8 to 13. The overall sample was designed to represent all students in grades 3th through 6th in both public and private schools. A self-report questionnaire on peer harassment situations was administered to the participants. Factor analysis revealed two different dimensions: ‘physical violence and property attacks’ and ‘verbal violence and social exclusion’. Boys reported higher levels of peer harassment among classmates than girls. No effect of the school grade on the gender differences CONTEXTOS EDUCATIVOS, 13 (2010, 11-26 11 Contextos Educ., 13 (2010, 11-26 was found. This paper provides a better understanding of peer harassment as well as some prevention indications.

  18. "Bring it on": Explaining persistence in science at the intersection of identity and epistemology

    CERN Document Server

    Conlin, Luke D; Gupta, Ayush; Elby, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Research has documented a sharp decline in students' interest and persistence in science, starting in middle school, particularly among students from underrepresented populations. In working to address this problem, we can learn a great deal from positive examples of students getting excited about science, especially students who were previously disengaged. In this paper, we present a case study of Estevan, an 8th grade student who came into Ms. K's science class with a reputation as a potential "problem student," but left as a leader of the class, even making plans to pursue a career in science. Through analysis of interviews and classroom interactions, we show how Estevan's love of science can be partially explained by an alignment between his identity as a lover of challenges and his epistemology of science as involving the challenge of figuring things out for yourself. This alignment was possible in part because it was supported by his caring teacher, who attended to his ideas and constantly challenged hi...

  19. Intersectional perspective in elderly care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Cuesta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Earlier research has shown that power relationships at workplaces are constructed by power structures. Processes related to power always influence the working conditions for (in this study in elderly care the working groups involved. Power structures are central for intersectional analysis, in the sense that the intersectional perspective highlights aspects such as gender and ethnicity (subjective dimensions and interrelates them to processes of power (objective dimension. This qualitative study aims to explore in what way an intersectional perspective could contribute to increased knowledge of power structures in a nursing home where the employees were mostly immigrants from different countries. By using reflexive dialogues related to an intersectional perspective, new knowledge which contributes to the employees’ well-being could develop. Narrative analysis was the method used to conduct this study. Through a multi-stage focus group on six occasions over 6 months, the staff were engaged in intersectional and critical reflections about power relationship with the researchers, by identifying patterns in their professional activities that could be connected to their subjectivities (gender, ethnicity, etc.. The result of this study presents three themes that express the staff's experiences and connect these experiences to structural discrimination. 1 Intersectionality, knowledge, and experiences of professionalism; 2 Intersectionality, knowledge, and experiences of collaboration; and 3 Intersectionality, knowledge, and experiences of discrimination. The result demonstrates that an intersectional perspective reinforces the involved abilities, during the conversations, into being clear about, for example, their experiences of discrimination, and consequently developing a better understanding of their professionalism and collaboration. Such deeper reflections became possible through a process of consciousness raising, strengthening the employee

  20. Exposure to coarse and fine particulate matter at and around major intra-urban traffic intersections of Ilorin metropolis, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniran, J. A.; Yusuf, R. O.; Olajire, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    This study aims to determine the seasonal variations and composition of suspended particulate matter in different sizes PM1.0, PM2.5, PM10 and the total suspended particles (TSP) emitted at major intra-urban traffic intersections (TIs) of Ilorin metropolis. The concentration levels of PM (PM1.0, PM2.5, PM10) obtained at the TIs during the rush hours (45.1, 77.9, and 513 μg/m3) are higher than the levels obtained for the non-rush hour periods (42.3, 62.7, and 390 μg/m3). The average on-road respiratory deposition dose (RDD) rates of PM1.0, PM2.5 and PM10 during the dry period at TIs types was found to be about 24%, 9% and 25% higher than those obtained during the wet period. Based on EF values calculated, Pb and Zn were anthropogenically-derived while Fe, Mn, Cr, Cu and Mg were of crustal source. Principal component analysis (PCA) has been applied to a set of PM data in order to determine the contribution of different sources. It was found that the main principal factors extracted from particulate emission data were related to exhaust and non-exhaust emissions such as tyre wears, oil and fuel combustion sources.

  1. Naturally Occurring Asbestos in Washington State: Swift Creek at the Intersection of Science, Law, and Risk Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melious, J. O.

    2012-12-01

    In the northwestern corner of Washington state, a large landslide on Sumas Mountain deposits more than 100,000 cubic yards of soil containing asbestos fibers and heavy metals into Swift Creek every year. Engineers predict that asbestos-laden soils will slide into Swift Creek for at least the next 400 years. Swift Creek joins the Sumas River, which crosses the border into Canada, serving as an international delivery system for asbestos-laden soils. When the rivers flood, as happens regularly, they deliver asbestos into field, yards, and basements. The tools available to address the Swift Creek situation are at odds with the scope and nature of the problem. Asbestos regulation primarily addresses occupational settings, where exposures can be estimated. Hazardous waste regulation primarily addresses liability for abandoned waste products from human activities. Health and environmental issues relating to naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) are fundamentally different from either regulatory scheme. Liability is not a logical lever for a naturally occurring substance, the existence of which is nobody's fault, and exposures to NOA in the environment do not necessarily resemble occupational exposures. The gaps and flaws in the legal regime exacerbate the uncertainties created by uncertainties in the science. Once it is assumed that no level of exposure is safe, legal requirements adopted in very different contexts foreclose the options for addressing the Swift Creek problem. This presentation will outline the applicable laws and how they intersect with issues of risk perception, uncertainty and politics in efforts to address the Swift Creek NOA site.

  2. Comanagement at the Fringes: Examining Stakeholder Perspectives at Macassar Dunes, Cape Town, South Africa - at the Intersection of High Biodiversity, Urban Poverty, and Inequality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Graham

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Theoretically, co-management provides a fruitful way to engage local residents in efforts to conserve and manage particular spaces of ecological value. However, natural resource management, and biodiversity conservation in particular, are faced with novel sets of complexities in the rapidly urbanizing areas of Cape Town, South Africa, and in the nexus between an apartheid past, informal settlements, remnant biodiversity patches, and urban poverty. Departing from such a dynamic social and ecological context, this article first provides an historical account of the decade-long comanagement process at Macassar Dunes, and then considers, through stakeholder perceptions, what are the successes and failures of the contested process. We find that comanagement at Macassar Dunes faces serious legitimacy, trust, and commitment issues, but also that stakeholders find common ground on education and awareness-raising activities. In conclusion we argue that the knowledge generated from case studies like this is useful in challenging and rethinking natural resource management theory generally, but specifically it is useful for the growing cities of the Global South. More case studies and a deeper engagement are needed with geographical theories on the "urban fringe" as "possibility space", to help build a firm empirical base for theorizing comanagement "at the fringes", i.e., at the intersection of poverty, socioeconomic inequality, and high biodiversity and ecological values.

  3. Exploring interepistemological encounters in international HE at the intersection of ideologies of neoliberalism and ethical globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadsholt, Tanja Kanne

    Within recent years, plurality and difference have been embraced in higher education both by internationalization strategies originating in a neoliberal marked-driven process as well as by counter-ideologies of ethical globalization. The neoliberal transformation has resulted in new ontologies....... 2010. "Student experience in the globalized Higher Education market: Challenges and Research Imperatives." In Globalization and internationalization in Higher Education: Theoretical, strategic and management perspectives, edited by F. Maringe and N. Foskett, 155-173. London: Continuum Publishing...... higher education as a field structured by neoliberalism at one pole and counter-ideologies of ethical globalization on the other, the paper maps the interaction of these ideologies in the epistemologies at play at three international master programs at Aarhus University and in their visions of IC...

  4. Do Grades Shape Students' School Engagement? The Psychological Consequences of Report Card Grades at the Beginning of Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorthuis, Astrid M. G.; Juvonen, Jaana; Thomaes, Sander; Denissen, Jaap J. A.; de Castro, Bram Orobio; van Aken, Marcel A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Receiving report card grades is psychologically salient to most students and can elicit a range of affective reactions. A 3-wave longitudinal study examined how grades shape students' (N = 375; M age at Wave 1 = 12.6 years) school engagement through the affective reactions they elicit. Emotional and behavioral engagement were measured at the start…

  5. The effects of mobile phone use on pedestrian crossing behaviour at signalized and unsignalized intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Julie; Murphy, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    Research amongst drivers suggests that pedestrians using mobile telephones may behave riskily while crossing the road, and casual observation suggests concerning levels of pedestrian mobile-use. An observational field survey of 270 females and 276 males was conducted to compare the safety of crossing behaviours for pedestrians using, versus not using, a mobile phone. Amongst females, pedestrians who crossed while talking on a mobile phone crossed more slowly, and were less likely to look at traffic before starting to cross, to wait for traffic to stop, or to look at traffic while crossing, compared to matched controls. For males, pedestrians who crossed while talking on a mobile phone crossed more slowly at unsignalized crossings. These effects suggest that talking on a mobile phone is associated with cognitive distraction that may undermine pedestrian safety. Messages explicitly suggesting techniques for avoiding mobile-use while road crossing may benefit pedestrian safety.

  6. Latin@s in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) at the Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón, Blanca E.; Lane, Tonisha B.

    2017-01-01

    As the United States population approaches a minority majority, the need to address educational inequities is intensified, especially for Latin@ students who are among the fastest growing ethnic minority group across the United States and at four-year colleges and universities. Concerns for educational equity also demand broadening participation…

  7. Student Data Privacy, Digital Learning, and Special Education: Challenges at the Intersection of Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, William M.; Karger, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    The rapid adoption of digital content and delivery systems, each with its own capacity to track, store, and analyze student usage, interactions, and academic outcomes at both a highly detailed and granular level, has emerged as an area of widespread opportunity, but also of concern. The comingling of various student data sets (demographics, usage,…

  8. Winning Is Everything: The Intersection of Academics and Athletics at Prestige University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Ashley B.; Grantham, Ashley; McGurrin, Daniel P.; Paparella, Paul; Pellegrino, Lauren N.

    2015-01-01

    For years, football and basketball players at Prestige University were earning college credit for classes that never existed. The students were enrolled in fake courses, known as "ghost classes," with no formal instruction or required meeting times and requiring only a single term paper. Faculty, staff, and administrators were complicit…

  9. "Beyond "BIO2010": Celebration and Opportunities" at the Intersection of Mathematics and Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungck, John R.; Gaff, Holly D.; Fagen, Adam P.; Labov, Jay B.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors report on an important symposium, Beyond BIO2010: Celebration and Opportunities, which was held at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, D.C. on May 21-22, 2010. This symposium was organized to assess what progress has been made in addressing the challenges and recommendations in the National Research…

  10. Facts for Babies: Visual Experiments at the Intersection of Art, Science and Consumerism in Education

    OpenAIRE

    Priem, Karin

    2015-01-01

    The paper takes as its point of departure a particular photography book, The First Picture Book: Everyday Things for Babies, first published in 1930 and aimed at young children. The book’s origins can be traced back to a collaboration between Edward Steichen, his daughter Mary Steichen Calderone, and the Bureau of Educational Experiments. Founded in New York in 1916, the latter focused its work on developmental child psychology and progressive educational practices. The paper analyses h...

  11. Corporate Entrepreneurship: Innovation at the Intersection between Creative Destruction and Controlled Adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Astrid Heidemann; Løwe Nielsen, Suna

    2009-01-01

    In spite of a growing body of knowledge on the importance of innovation and changeability, firms still experience great difficulties in being continuously corporate entrepreneurial. This article addresses reasons for such difficulties. Building on a conceptual discussion, the article first...... identifies seemingly opposing forces found at the core of corporate entrepreneurship. These forces are in the article described in terms of ‘creative destruction' and ‘controlled adaptation'. Both forces are identified as being essential to successful corporate entrepreneurship, but set very different...

  12. Studying sustainable development at the intersection of conduct and counter-conduct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Laura Bang

    ) that is sensitive to the subtle effects of counter-conduct. The paper reports on an empirical study that tracks the connections between the UN’s Agenda 21 and a ‘local’ Agenda 21 initiative in a rural Danish municipality aiming at ‘greening’ citizens’ everyday transportation practices, and, secondly, the paper...... analyses how these documents are participating in the continuous negotiations of the governmental rationalities of global citizenship that are an inevitable part of the dispersed governing of sustainable development. In more detail, the paper analyses how the Danish transportation initiative is co...

  13. Nanoinformatics: an emerging area of information technology at the intersection of bioinformatics, computational chemistry and nanobiotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Nilo, Fernando; Pérez-Acle, Tomás; Guínez-Molinos, Sergio; Geraldo, Daniela A; Sandoval, Claudia; Yévenes, Alejandro; Santos, Leonardo S; Laurie, V Felipe; Mendoza, Hegaly; Cachau, Raúl E

    2011-01-01

    After the progress made during the genomics era, bioinformatics was tasked with supporting the flow of information generated by nanobiotechnology efforts. This challenge requires adapting classical bioinformatic and computational chemistry tools to store, standardize, analyze, and visualize nanobiotechnological information. Thus, old and new bioinformatic and computational chemistry tools have been merged into a new sub-discipline: nanoinformatics. This review takes a second look at the development of this new and exciting area as seen from the perspective of the evolution of nanobiotechnology applied to the life sciences. The knowledge obtained at the nano-scale level implies answers to new questions and the development of new concepts in different fields. The rapid convergence of technologies around nanobiotechnologies has spun off collaborative networks and web platforms created for sharing and discussing the knowledge generated in nanobiotechnology. The implementation of new database schemes suitable for storage, processing and integrating physical, chemical, and biological properties of nanoparticles will be a key element in achieving the promises in this convergent field. In this work, we will review some applications of nanobiotechnology to life sciences in generating new requirements for diverse scientific fields, such as bioinformatics and computational chemistry.

  14. Teaching languages to deaf students in Brazil at the intersection of discourses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Bassi Piconi

    Full Text Available This work aims to discuss multilingual issues involving teaching languages to the deaf in Brazilian schools. For this purpose, it proposes an analysis of a set of materials produced by the Brazilian Ministry of Education aimed at situating means through which to act, represent and identify the deaf, as well as practices of teaching Brazilian Sign Language and Portuguese to this social group, based on the Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA framework. Investigating discursive practices on this issue is important, as it allows one to identify the changes in the maintenance/transformation of recognition issues regarding the deaf in the Brazilian context. This analysis illustrates a multiplicity of voices that work to establish controversy upon evoking different meanings and a power struggle regarding the preservation of rules that currently guide the processes of language teaching for the deaf in an inclusive perspective.

  15. Beyond Identity: the Dynamic Self at the Intersection of Performance Philosophy and the Philosophy of Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibila Petlevski

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article we advocate the methodological feedback loop in the study of the dynamical self at the crossroads of performance philosophy, (artistic performance, and the philosophy of science. We point to the importance of the dynamics of methodology transfer between arts and sciences and the “interactive continuum” proposed by Newman & Benz in 1998. In the first part of this paper we give a comparative review of the research context relevant for our field of study, and we explain our research hubs in approaching the concept of “performance”. We suggest the possibility to define our filed of research in three equally legitimate ways: as philosophy-of-performance, philosophy-as-performance and performance-as-philosophy. In our recent work we are primarily interested in artistic performances that incorporate elements of artistic practice in the methodology of research output (Frayling 1993, as well as in the potentials of performative aspects of scientific praxis and methodology. However, the conceptual background relevant for this paper is in the field of process philosophy and its relation to science (Birkhard’s “interactivist model” 2009; Campbell’s “process-based model for an interactive ontology” 2009. We attribute particular importance to the notion of “autopoietic feedback” (Maturana and Varela 1974; Luhmann 1990. The second part addresses the issue of transcending identity in the representations of the self and the other; the relationship between Theory-Theory (TT and Simulation Theory (ST, as well as some recent attempts at combining different theories of mind (e.g. Barlassina 2013. We also deal with the notion of “embodied praxis” (Gallagher and Meltzoff 1996; we mention some neuroscientific insights into the similar phenomena, and – commenting on the importance of the dialogue between neuroscientists and philosophers (Changeux and Ricour – we give an example of an enactive approach to understanding

  16. Neutron Scattering at the Intersection of Heart Health Science and Biophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew Marquardt

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent quest for improved heart health. Here, we review how neutron radiation can provide insight into the molecular basis of heart health. Lower cholesterol, a daily intake of aspirin and supplemental vitamin E are argued to all improve heart health. However, the mechanisms behind these common regimens, and others, are not entirely understood. It is not clear why a daily intake of aspirin can help some people with heart disease, and the benefits of vitamin E in the treatment of reperfusion injury have been heavily debated. The molecular impact of cholesterol in the body is still a hot topic. Neutron scattering experiments present a unique opportunity for biophysicists attempting to address these problems. We review some recently published studies that are advancing our understanding of how cholesterol, vitamin E and aspirin work at the molecular level, by studying the impact of these molecules on the cell membrane. These insights engage the broader health science community with new ways of thinking about these molecules.

  17. Spatial database for intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Deciding which intersections in the state of Kentucky warrant safety improvements requires a comprehensive inventory : with information on every intersection in the public roadway network. The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) : had previously c...

  18. Protagonist’s Self-Writing: Modus of Biography at the Intersection of Methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Pavlenko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The article views the place of the fictional subject’s self-writing at workshops concerning autobiographical questions. The study reveals the repression of a particle “grafos” in the formula “auto-bio-graphy” and leads to the idea of the compensatory function of the self-writing practice analysis in that very situation. The change of the perspective on the research of self-writing appeals to the problematic of the method. The fictional subject’s self-writing represents a field of multiple crossings of different methodologies that examine ego-documents; therefore in this field the role of figures and metaphors is actualized. It is quite logical to describe the self-writing practice within the coordinates of the critical synthesis as the place of illustration and transmission of the values, as the dimension of self-reflectiveness, multi-generic reflectiveness, introspection, representation of author/reader relations, display of intertextuality (both declared by the author and unforeseen, play in autobiography, tension between fiction and reference. The fictional subject’s self-writing is not identical to the autobiographical writing of a real subject, though a lot of semantic fields and registers come across. The character writing the story of his life becomes that another who makes it possible to multiply the experience of the inner harmony research, to see the power of the writing work from one side approaching thus to its ontology. The key for understanding the figure of this another is deeply hidden in the interpretation of the fictional space metaphoric.

  19. First Contact: the intersection of demographics, knowledge, and appraisal of treatment at the initial infertility visit

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHILDRESS, Krista J.; LAWSON, Angela K.; GHANT, Marissa S.; MENDOZA, Gricelda; CARDOZO, Eden R.; CONFINO, Edmond; MARSH, Erica E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of the initial infertility visit on treatment-related knowledge, patient anxiety, and appraisals of treatment. Study Design Prospective survey. Setting Academic medical center. Patients 234 English-speaking women, ages 18-50, attending their first infertility visit Intervention(s) Participants completed a survey assessing health literacy, knowledge, anxiety, and appraisals of the treatment process before and after their infertility visit. Main Outcome Measure(s) 1) Knowledge of infertility and treatment and, 2) Anxiety and appraisal scores. Results Most participants were white and earned >$100,000/year and had at least a college education. Baseline knowledge of reproductive anatomy, ART, and fertility factors was modest, but improved after the initial visit. Factors associated with higher knowledge included higher education and income, White or Asian ethnicity, and English as their primary language. Patient appraisals of treatment represented by the positive (Challenge) and negative (Threat and Loss) subscale scores on the Appraisal of Life Events (ALE) scale, changed from the pre-visit survey to the post-visit survey. Negative appraisals of treatment and anxiety scores decreased and positive appraisals of treatment increased after the initial visit. Lower knowledge was associated with higher positive appraisal scores lower health literacy was associated with higher anxiety and appraisal scores (positive and negative) post-visit. Black women had higher Challenge scores compared to White and Asian women. Hispanic women had higher anxiety scores than non-Hispanic women. Conclusions Infertility patients have modest baseline knowledge of fertility and infertility treatment. The initial infertility visit can improve this knowledge and decrease both negative appraisals of treatment and anxiety levels. Differences in knowledge and appraisal were seen across ethnic groups and other demographic variables. Physicians should individualize

  20. Socioeconomic Factors at the Intersection of Race and Ethnicity Influencing Health Risks for People with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney-Long, Elizabeth A; Romano, Sebastian D; Carroll, Dianna D; Fox, Michael H

    2017-04-01

    People with disabilities are known to experience disparities in behavioral health risk factors including smoking and obesity. What is unknown is how disability, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status combine to affect prevalence of these health behaviors. We assessed the association between race/ethnicity, socioeconomic factors (income and education), and disability on two behavioral health risk factors. Data from the 2007-2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were used to determine prevalence of cigarette smoking and obesity by disability status, further stratified by race and ethnicity as well as income and education. Logistic regression was used to determine associations of income and education with the two behavioral health risk factors, stratified by race and ethnicity. Prevalence of disability by race and ethnicity ranged from 10.1 % of Asian adults to 31.0 % of American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) adults. Smoking prevalence increased with decreasing levels of income and education for most racial and ethnic groups, with over half of white (52.4 %) and AIAN adults (59.3 %) with less than a high school education reporting current smoking. Education was inversely associated with obesity among white, black, and Hispanic adults with a disability. Smoking and obesity varied by race and ethnicity and socioeconomic factors (income and education) among people with disabilities. Our findings suggest that disparities experienced by adults with disabilities may be compounded by disparities associated with race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic factors. This knowledge may help programs in formulating health promotion strategies targeting people at increased risk for smoking and obesity, inclusive of those with disabilities.

  1. First contact: the intersection of demographics, knowledge, and appraisal of treatment at the initial infertility visit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Krista J; Lawson, Angela K; Ghant, Marissa S; Mendoza, Gricelda; Cardozo, Eden R; Confino, Edmond; Marsh, Erica E

    2015-07-01

    To determine the impact of the initial infertility visit on treatment-related knowledge, patient anxiety, and appraisals of treatment. Prospective survey. Academic medical center. Two hundred thirty-four English-speaking women aged 18-50 years attending their first infertility visit. Participants completed a survey assessing health literacy, knowledge, anxiety, and appraisals of the treatment process before and after their infertility visit. Knowledge of infertility and treatment and anxiety and appraisal scores. Most participants were white and earned >$100,000/year and had at least a college education. Baseline knowledge of reproductive anatomy, assisted reproductive technology (ART), and fertility factors was modest but improved after the initial visit. Factors associated with higher knowledge included higher education and income, white or Asian ethnicity, and English as a primary language. Patient appraisals of treatment represented by the positive (Challenge) and negative (Threat and Loss) subscale scores on the Appraisal of Life Events (ALE) scale changed over time Negative appraisals of treatment and anxiety scores decreased and positive appraisals of treatment increased after the initial visit. Lower knowledge was associated with higher positive appraisal scores; lower health literacy was associated with higher anxiety and appraisal scores (positive and negative) after the visit. Black women had higher Challenge scores compared with white and Asian women. Hispanic women had higher anxiety scores than non-Hispanic women. Infertility patients have modest baseline knowledge of fertility and infertility treatment. The initial infertility visit can improve this knowledge and decrease both negative appraisals of treatment and anxiety levels. Differences in knowledge and appraisal were seen across ethnic groups and other demographic variables. Physicians should individualize patient counseling to improve patients' knowledge and provide realistic treatment

  2. Do grades shape students' school engagement? : The psychological consequences of report card grades at the beginning of secondary school

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorthuis, Astrid M. G.; Juvonen, Jaana; Thomaes, Sander; Denissen, Jaap J. A.; de Castro, Bram Orobio; van Aken, Marcel A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Receiving report card grades is psychologically salient to most students and can elicit a range of affective reactions. A 3-wave longitudinal study examined how grades shape students’ (N = 375; M age at Wave 1 = 12.6 years) school engagement through the affective reactions they elicit. Emotional and

  3. Do grades shape students’ school engagement? The psychological consequences of report card grades at the beginning of secondary school

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorthuis, A.M.G.; Juvonen, J.; Thomaes, S.; Denissen, J.J.A.; Orobio de Castro, B.; van Aken, M.A.G.

    2015-01-01

    Receiving report card grades is psychologically salient to most students and can elicit a range of affective reactions. A 3-wave longitudinal study examined how grades shape students’ (N = 375; M age at Wave 1 = 12.6 years) school engagement through the affective reactions they elicit. Emotional and

  4. Green lumber grade yields from black cherry and red maple factory grade logs sawed at band and circular mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel A. Yaussy

    1989-01-01

    Multivariate regression models were developed to predict green board-foot yields (1 board ft. = 2.360 dm 3) for the standard factory lumber grades processed from black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) and red maple (Acer rubrum L.) factory grade logs sawed at band and circular sawmills. The models use log...

  5. Matching critical intersection hypergraphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henning, Michael A.; Yeo, Anders

    2014-01-01

    A matching in a hypergraph H is a set of pairwise vertex disjoint edges in H and the matching number of H is the maximum cardinality of a matching in H. A hypergraph H is an intersecting hypergraph if every two distinct edges of H have a non-empty intersection. Equivalently, H is an intersecting...

  6. INTERSECTIONAL DISCRIMINATION AGAINST CHILDREN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnbøl, Camilla Ida

    This paper adds a perspective to existing research on child protection by engaging in a debate on intersectional discrimination and its relationship to child protection. The paper has a twofold objective, (1) to further establish intersectionality as a concept to address discrimination against...... children, and (2) to illustrate the importance of addressing intersectionality within rights-based programmes of child protection....

  7. The effects of cyclists present at rural intersections on speed behavior and workload of car drivers : A driving simulator study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duivenvoorden, K.; Hogema, J.; Hagenzieker, M.; Wegman, F.

    2015-01-01

    Methods: An experiment was conducted in a moving-base driving simulator. Thirty participants completed 3 runs each in 3 conditions: a baseline, a plateau, and a chicane condition. Participants drove an 80 km/h rural distributor road with 8 intersections. Eight cyclist scenarios were developed

  8. The effects of cyclists present at rural intersections on speed behaviour and workload of car drivers : a driving simulator study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duivenvoorden, C.W.A.E. Hogema, J.H. Hagenzieker, M.P. & Wegman, F.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to gain insight in how the number of cyclists, the cyclist's approach direction and the cyclist's action affect speed and mental workload of drivers approaching rural intersections. Also, the effects of a speed-reducing measure on the interaction between cyclists and motorised

  9. I Would Take any Job, but…: Biographies of Low-Educated Women at the Intersection of Class and Gender

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křížková, Alena; Formánková, Lenka

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 6 (2012), s. 651-677 ISSN 0049-1225 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP404/10/0021 Institutional support: RVO:68378025 Keywords : gender * intersectionality * care Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography Impact factor: 0.240, year: 2012

  10. Negotiating multisectoral evidence: a qualitative study of knowledge exchange at the intersection of transport and public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Guell

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For the prevention and control of chronic diseases, two strategies are frequently highlighted: that public health should be evidence based, and that it should develop a multisectoral approach. At the end of a natural experimental study of the health impacts of new transport infrastructure, we took the opportunity of a knowledge exchange forum to explore how stakeholders assessed, negotiated and intended to apply multisectoral evidence in policy and practice at the intersection of transport and health. We aimed to better understand the challenges they faced in knowledge exchange, as well as their everyday experiences with working in multisectoral remits. Methods In 2015, we conducted participant observation during an interactive event with 41 stakeholders from national and local government, the third sector and academia in Cambridge, UK. Formal and informal interactions between stakeholders were recorded in observational field notes. We also conducted 18 semistructured interviews reflecting on the event and on knowledge exchange in general. Results We found that stakeholders negotiated a variety of challenges. First, stakeholders had to negotiate relatively new formal and informal multisectoral remits; and how to reconcile the differing expectations of transport specialists, who tended to emphasise the importance of precedence in guiding action, and health specialists’ concern for the rigour and synthesis of research evidence. Second, research in this field involved complex study designs, and often produced evidence with uncertain transferability to other settings. Third, health outcomes of transport schemes had political traction and were used strategically but not easily translated into cost-benefit ratios. Finally, knowledge exchange meant multiple directions of influence. Stakeholders were concerned that researchers did not always have skills to translate their findings into understandable evidence, and some stakeholders

  11. Negotiating multisectoral evidence: a qualitative study of knowledge exchange at the intersection of transport and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guell, Cornelia; Mackett, Roger; Ogilvie, David

    2017-01-05

    For the prevention and control of chronic diseases, two strategies are frequently highlighted: that public health should be evidence based, and that it should develop a multisectoral approach. At the end of a natural experimental study of the health impacts of new transport infrastructure, we took the opportunity of a knowledge exchange forum to explore how stakeholders assessed, negotiated and intended to apply multisectoral evidence in policy and practice at the intersection of transport and health. We aimed to better understand the challenges they faced in knowledge exchange, as well as their everyday experiences with working in multisectoral remits. In 2015, we conducted participant observation during an interactive event with 41 stakeholders from national and local government, the third sector and academia in Cambridge, UK. Formal and informal interactions between stakeholders were recorded in observational field notes. We also conducted 18 semistructured interviews reflecting on the event and on knowledge exchange in general. We found that stakeholders negotiated a variety of challenges. First, stakeholders had to negotiate relatively new formal and informal multisectoral remits; and how to reconcile the differing expectations of transport specialists, who tended to emphasise the importance of precedence in guiding action, and health specialists' concern for the rigour and synthesis of research evidence. Second, research in this field involved complex study designs, and often produced evidence with uncertain transferability to other settings. Third, health outcomes of transport schemes had political traction and were used strategically but not easily translated into cost-benefit ratios. Finally, knowledge exchange meant multiple directions of influence. Stakeholders were concerned that researchers did not always have skills to translate their findings into understandable evidence, and some stakeholders would welcome opportunities to influence research agendas

  12. Magnetic resonance perfusion for differentiating low-grade from high-grade gliomas at first presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrigo, Jill M; Fountain, Daniel M; Provenzale, James M; Law, Eric K; Kwong, Joey Sw; Hart, Michael G; Tam, Wilson Wai San

    2018-01-22

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumour. They are graded using the WHO classification system, with Grade II-IV astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas. Low-grade gliomas (LGGs) are WHO Grade II infiltrative brain tumours that typically appear solid and non-enhancing on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. People with LGG often have little or no neurologic deficit, so may opt for a watch-and-wait-approach over surgical resection, radiotherapy or both, as surgery can result in early neurologic disability. Occasionally, high-grade gliomas (HGGs, WHO Grade III and IV) may have the same MRI appearance as LGGs. Taking a watch-and-wait approach could be detrimental for the patient if the tumour progresses quickly. Advanced imaging techniques are increasingly used in clinical practice to predict the grade of the tumour and to aid clinical decision of when to intervene surgically. One such advanced imaging technique is magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion, which detects abnormal haemodynamic changes related to increased angiogenesis and vascular permeability, or "leakiness" that occur with aggressive tumour histology. These are reflected by changes in cerebral blood volume (CBV) expressed as rCBV (ratio of tumoural CBV to normal appearing white matter CBV) and permeability, measured by K trans . To determine the diagnostic test accuracy of MR perfusion for identifying patients with primary solid and non-enhancing LGGs (WHO Grade II) at first presentation in children and adults. In performing the quantitative analysis for this review, patients with LGGs were considered disease positive while patients with HGGs were considered disease negative.To determine what clinical features and methodological features affect the accuracy of MR perfusion. Our search strategy used two concepts: (1) glioma and the various histologies of interest, and (2) MR perfusion. We used structured search strategies appropriate for each database searched, which included: MEDLINE

  13. Investigating the migrant mortality advantage at the intersections of social stratification in Switzerland: The role of vulnerability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Zufferey

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Migrant mortality advantage has been widely studied in Western countries, but little attention has been paid to how social factors interact to increase or diminish risks of death. Socioeconomic factors are indeed widely used in regression models but mostly to define, ceteris paribus, whether migrants have a higher propensity to die than natives. Objective: Using an inductive approach, the aim of this paper is to reassess the role of social factors. Focusing on migrant communities, the paper establishes at which intersection of the components of social stratification the migrant mortality advantage is mainly located. Methods: This study is based on census data linked with population registers (2001-2008 and focuses on individuals aged 25-64 years living in Switzerland. It uses model-based regression trees to first map the structure of mortality risks within the social stratification. In a second step, a confirmatory analysis supports the main outcomes. Results: Inductive methods give substantial results, firstly in revealing interactions within the social structure. Secondly, the findings suggest that the mortality advantage is not located only among immigrants but encompasses a wide population with a foreign background. Thirdly, it demonstrates that the migrant mortality advantage is stronger in the most vulnerable profiles. The non-inclusion in previous research of the flatter mortality gradient among individuals with a foreign background tends to underestimate the strength of the differentials. Conclusions: Selection and acculturation explanations are not sufficient to understand the migrant mortality advantage. Psychosocial factors related to the migration background may provide an alternative explanation. Contribution: Selection and acculturation explanations are not sufficient to understand the migrant mortality advantage. Psychosocial factors related to the migration background may provide an alternative explanation.

  14. Analysis of Universal Values Integration in Grade 5 and Grade 6 English Textbooks Used At the Fountain International School

    OpenAIRE

    Kazkondu, D.

    2015-01-01

    This descriptive study sought to determine the values integrated in Grades 5 and 6 English textbooks used at Fountain International School. The respondents of this study were the five English teachers teaching English in the Grades 5 and 6 levels and six other English teachers who were teaching other year levels. This comprised 100 percent of the total English teachers employed by the school. A researcher-made questionnaire consisting of 64 Inventory of values was content validated whi...

  15. Design space for space design: Dialogs through boundary objects at the intersections of art, design, science, and engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Tibor S.; Pangaro, Paul

    2017-05-01

    For over half a century space exploration has been dominated by engineering and technology driven practices. This paradigm leaves limited room for art and design. Yet in other parts of our lives, art and design play important roles: they stimulate new ideas and connect people to their experiences and to each other at a deeper level, while affecting our worldview as we evolve our cognitive models. We develop these models through circular conversations with our environment, through perception and making sense through our sensory systems and responding back through language and interactions. Artists and designers create artifacts through conversation cycles of sense-giving and sense-making, thus increasing variety in the world in the form of evolving messages. Each message becomes information when the observer decodes it, through multiple sense-making and re-sampling cycles. The messages form triggers to the cognitive state of the observer. Having a shared key between the artist/designer and the observer-for example, in the form of language, gestures, and artistic/design styles-is fundamental to encode and decode the information, in conversations. Art, design, science, and engineering, are all creative practices. Yet, they often speak different languages, where some parts may correspond, while others address a different variety in a cybernetic sense. These specialized languages within disciplines streamline communications, but limit variety. Thus, different languages between disciplines may introduce communication blocks. Nevertheless, these differences are desired as they add variety to the interactions, and could lead to novel discourses and possibilities. We may dissolve communication blocks through the introduction of boundary objects in the intersection of multiple disciplines. Boundary objects can ground ideas and bridge language diversity across disciplines. These artifacts are created to facilitate circular cybernetic conversations, supporting convergence

  16. Cross-comparison of three surrogate safety methods to diagnose cyclist safety problems at intersections in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laureshyn, Aliaksei; Goede, Maartje de; Saunier, Nicolas; Fyhri, Aslak

    2017-08-01

    Relying on accident records as the main data source for studying cyclists' safety has many drawbacks, such as high degree of under-reporting, the lack of accident details and particularly of information about the interaction processes that led to the accident. It is also an ethical problem as one has to wait for accidents to happen in order to make a statement about cyclists' (un-)safety. In this perspective, the use of surrogate safety measures based on actual observations in traffic is very promising. In this study we used video data from three intersections in Norway that were all independently analysed using three methods: the Swedish traffic conflict technique (Swedish TCT), the Dutch conflict technique (DOCTOR) and the probabilistic surrogate measures of safety (PSMS) technique developed in Canada. The first two methods are based on manual detection and counting of critical events in traffic (traffic conflicts), while the third considers probabilities of multiple trajectories for each interaction and delivers a density map of potential collision points per site. Due to extensive use of microscopic data, PSMS technique relies heavily on automated tracking of the road users in video. Across the three sites, the methods show similarities or are at least "compatible" with the accident records. The two conflict techniques agree quite well for the number, type and location of conflicts, but some differences with no obvious explanation are also found. PSMS reports many more safety-relevant interactions including less severe events. The location of the potential collision points is compatible with what the conflict techniques suggest, but the possibly significant share of false alarms due to inaccurate trajectories extracted from video complicates the comparison. The tested techniques still require enhancement, with respect to better adjustment to analysis of the situations involving cyclists (and vulnerable road users in general) and further validation. However, we

  17. 49 CFR 213.347 - Automotive or railroad crossings at grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Automotive or railroad crossings at grade. 213.347 Section 213.347 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Higher § 213.347 Automotive or railroad crossings at grade. (a) There shall be no at-grade (level...

  18. Analysing adjustment factors for using lanes at traffic-light-controlled intersections in Bogotá, Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo José Peña Lindarte

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This article was focused on analyzing the lane use adjustment factor (fLU forming one of the eleven adjustment factors proposed in the current calculation methodology contained in the 2000 version of the Transportation Research Board’s (TRB Highway Capacity Manual (HCM for analyzing traffic-light-controlled intersection capacity in terms of saturation intensity. A methodology was established when analyzing the fLU factor that considered operational conditions regarding traffic-light-controlled intersections in Bogota. Road traffic flows were analyzed, including characterizing road traffic based on statistical sampling, field data collection and analysis. The project proposed equations allowing reference values to be gathered for determining adjustment factors regarding lane use on roads in Bogota in relation to existing access typologies and road traffic volume for analyzing traffic-light- controlled intersections. For example, in the specific case of roads having direct double-lane access (2CCD, the basic equation was determined to be y=-3,03E-08X2+3,44E-05X+0,888988, having a 1.0 coefficient of correlation. The dependent variable y referred to the fLU factor and the independent variable X was the volume of road traffic in mixed vehicles/hour. This equation was considered to be statistically relevant. A comparative analysis of the lane use adjustment factors estimated in the project is also presented and compared to the values recommended by the US Highway Capacity Manual. The project’s conclusions and re- commendations were thus sustained, validating the recommended factors summarized by the HCM and recommending that the results obtained from the project should be used in traffic-light-controlled design and planning projects.

  19. Traffic monitoring and modeling for Intersection Safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pyykönen, P.; Molinier, M.; Klunder, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    The INTERSAFE-2 project aims to develop and demonstrate a Cooperative Intersection Safety System that is able to significantly reduce injury and fatal accidents at intersections. The cooperative sensor data fusion is based on state-of-the-art and advanced on-board sensors for object recognition and

  20. Eliminating Right-Turn-on-Red (RTOR) at Key Intersections in a City Core : A Traffic Simulation Study Analyzing How Traffic Conditions Could Change When Restricting RTOR in Downtown Fredericton, New Brunswick

    OpenAIRE

    Aspnäs, Frida

    2012-01-01

    The City of Fredericton is the capital of New Brunswick, located in eastern Canada. Right-turn-on-red (RTOR) is a general practice at any traffic intersection in this maritime province. Many collisions between pedestrians and vehicles have been recorded at signalized intersections in the downtown area of the city. Due to the number of collisions, the City of Fredericton was interested in investigating how a restriction against RTOR could affect vehicular traffic. The purpose and goal of this ...

  1. Converging flow joint insert system at an intersection between adjacent transitions extending between a combustor and a turbine assembly in a gas turbine engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, David J.; Carlson, Andrew; Stoker, Kyle C.

    2017-10-31

    A transition duct system for routing a gas flow in a combustion turbine engine is provided. The transition duct system includes one or more converging flow joint inserts forming a trailing edge at an intersection between adjacent transition ducts. The converging flow joint insert may be contained within a converging flow joint insert receiver and may be disconnected from the transition duct bodies by which the converging flow joint insert is positioned. Being disconnected eliminates stress formation within the converging flow joint insert, thereby enhancing the life of the insert. The converging flow joint insert may be removable such that the insert can be replaced once worn beyond design limits.

  2. Modelling how drivers respond to a bicyclist crossing their path at an intersection: How do test track and driving simulator compare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda, Christian-Nils; Dozza, Marco; Bohman, Katarina; Thalya, Prateek; Larsson, Annika; Lubbe, Nils

    2018-02-01

    Bicyclist fatalities are a great concern in the European Union. Most of them are due to crashes between motorized vehicles and bicyclists at unsignalised intersections. Different countermeasures are currently being developed and implemented in order to save lives. One type of countermeasure, active safety systems, requires a deep understanding of driver behaviour to be effective without being annoying. The current study provides new knowledge about driver behaviour which can inform assessment programmes for active safety systems such as Euro NCAP. This study investigated how drivers responded to bicyclists crossing their path at an intersection. The influences of car speed and cyclist speed on the driver response process were assessed for three different crossing configurations. The same experimental protocol was tested in a fixed-base driving simulator and on a test track. A virtual model of the test track was used in the driving simulator to keep the protocol as consistent as possible across testing environments. Results show that neither car speed nor bicycle speed directly influenced the response process. The crossing configuration did not directly influence the braking response process either, but it did influence the strategy chosen by the drivers to approach the intersection. The point in time when the bicycle became visible (which depended on the car speed, the bicycle speed, and the crossing configuration) and the crossing configuration alone had the largest effects on the driver response process. Dissimilarities between test-track and driving-simulator studies were found; however, there were also interesting similarities, especially in relation to the driver braking behaviour. Drivers followed the same strategy to initiate braking, independent of the test environment. On the other hand, the test environment affected participants' strategies for releasing the gas pedal and regulating deceleration. Finally, a mathematical model, based on both experiments

  3. Investigating risk factors of traffic casualties at private highway-railroad grade crossings in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem, Kirolos

    2016-10-01

    Private highway-railroad grade crossings (HRGCs) are intersections of highways and railroads on roadways that are not maintained by a public authority. Since no public authority maintains private HRGCs, fatal and injury crashes at these locations are of concern. However, no study has been conducted at private HRGCs to identify the safety issues that might exist and how to alleviate them. This study identifies the significant predictors of traffic casualties (including both injuries and fatalities) at private HRGCs in the U.S. using six years of nationwide crashes from 2009 to 2014. Two levels of injury severity were considered, injury (including fatalities and injuries) and no injury. The study investigates multiple predictors, e.g., temporal crash characteristics, geometry, railroad, traffic, vehicle, and environment. The study applies both the mixed logit and binary logit models. The mixed logit model was found to outperform the binary logit model. The mixed logit model revealed that drivers who did not stop, railroad equipment that struck highway users, higher train speeds, non-presence of advance warning signs, concrete road surface type, and cloudy weather were associated with an increase in injuries and fatalities. For example, a one-mile-per-hour higher train speed increases the probability of fatality by 22%. On the contrary, male drivers, PM peak periods, and presence of warning devices at both approaches were associated with a fatality reduction. Potential strategies are recommended to alleviate injuries and fatalities at private HRGCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Grade inflation at a north american college of veterinary medicine: 1985-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Bonnie R; Elmore, Ronnie G; Sanderson, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    Grade inflation, an upward shift in student grade-point averages without a similar rise in achievement, is considered pervasive by most experts in post-secondary education in the United States. Grade-point averages (GPAs) at US universities have increased by roughly 0.15 points per decade since the 1960s, with a 0.6-point increase since 1967. In medical education, grade inflation has been documented and is particularly evident in the clinical setting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate grade inflation over a 22-year period in a college of veterinary medicine. Academic records from 2,060 students who graduated from the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University between 1985 and 2006 were evaluated, including cumulative GPAs earned during pre-clinical professional coursework, during clinical rotations, and at graduation. Grade inflation was documented at a rate of approximately 0.2 points per decade at this college of veterinary medicine. The difference in mean final GPA between the minimum (1986) and maximum (2003) years of graduation was 0.47 points. Grade inflation was similar for didactic coursework (years 1-3) and clinical rotations (final year). Demographic shifts, student qualifications, and tuition do not appear to have contributed to grade inflation over time. A change in academic standards and student evaluation of teaching may have contributed to relaxed grading standards, and technology in the classroom may have led to higher (earned) grades as a result of improved student learning.

  5. Determining of the Parking Manoeuvre and the Taxi Blockage Adjustment Factor for the Saturation Flow Rate at the Outlet Legs of Signalized Intersections: Case Study from Rasht City (Iran)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbahani, Hamid; Jahangir Samet, Mehdi; Najafi Moghaddam Gilani, Vahid; Amini, Amir

    2017-10-01

    The presence of taxi stops within the area of signalized intersections at the outlet legs due to unnatural behaviour of the taxis, sudden change of lanes, parking manoeuvres activities and stopping the vehicle to discharge or pick up the passengers have led to reduction of saturation flow rate at the outlet leg of signalized intersections and increased delay as well as affecting the performance of a crossing lane. So far, in term of evaluating effective adjustment factors on saturation flow rate at the inlet legs of the signalized intersections, various studies have been carried out, however; there has not been any studies on effective adjustment factors on saturation flow rate at the inlet legs. Hence, the evaluating of the traffic effects of unique behaviours on the saturation flow rate of the outlet leg is very important. In this research the parking manoeuvre time and taxi blockage time were evaluated and analyzed based on the available lane width as well as determining the effective adjustment factors on the saturation flow rate using recording related data at four signalized intersections in Rasht city. The results show that the average parking manoeuvre time is a function of the lane width and is increased as the lane width is reduced. Also, it is suggested to use the values of 7.37 and 11.31 seconds, respectively for the average parking manoeuvre time and the average blockage time of taxies at the outlet legs of signalized intersections for the traffic designing in Rasht city.

  6. ACCIDENT PREDICTION METHODOLOGY USING CONFLICT ZONE METHOD FOR “TRANSIT TRANSPORT-PEDESTRIAN” CONFLICT SITUATION AND MODELS OF TRAFFIC FLOWS AT CONTROLLED INTERSECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Kapsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accidents are considered as the most significant cost of road traffic. Therefore any measures for road traffic management should be evaluated according to a minimization  criterion of accident losses. In order to develop a method for evaluation of the accident losses it is necessary to prepare a methodology for cost estimate of road accidents of various severity with due account of their consequences and prediction (economic assessment and severity level of their consequences (quantitative risk assessment. The research has been carried with the purpose to devise appropriate models for accident prediction at a decision-making stage while organizing road traffic in respect of  the “transport-pedestrian” conflict. An interaction of pedestrian and transit road traffic flows  is characterized by rather high risk level. In order to reduce number of road accidents  and  severity of their consequences in the observed conflict, it is necessary to evaluate  proposed solutions, in other words to predict accidents at the stage of object designing and  development of measures.The paper presents its observations on specificity of road traffic and pedestrian flow interactions and analysis of spatial conflict point formation and conflict zone creation in the studied conflict between transport facilities and pedestrians at controlled pedestrian crossings which are located in the area of intersections. Methodology has been developed for accident prediction in accordance with the conflict zone method for various traffic modes at intersections. Dependences of the represented road traffic accidents (according to consequence severity on potential danger of conflicts have been determined for various traffic modes and various conditions of conflict interaction.

  7. Intersecting flavor branes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomoni, Elli; Rastelli, Leonardo

    2012-10-01

    We consider an instance of the AdS/CFT duality where the bulk theory contains an open string tachyon, and study the instability from the viewpoint of the boundary field theory. We focus on the specific example of the AdS5 × S 5 background with two probe D7 branes intersecting at general angles. For generic angles supersymmetry is completely broken and there is an open string tachyon between the branes. The field theory action for this system is obtained by coupling to {N}=4 super Yang-Mills two {N}=2 hyper multiplets in the fundamental representation of the SU( N) gauge group, but with different choices of embedding of the two {N}=2 subalgebras into {N}=4 . On the field theory side we find a one-loop Coleman-Weinberg instability in the effective potential for the fundamental scalars. We identify a mesonic operator as the dual of the open string tachyon. By AdS/CFT, we predict the tachyon mass for small 't Hooft coupling (large bulk curvature) and confirm that it violates the AdS stability bound.

  8. Intersectionality - an intercategorical approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emerek, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    their intersection may give misleading results. Secondly, the pitfalls of a narrow focus on a single section of categories are discussed by means of an example of educational attainment for categories of gender and ancestry. Finally, using the example of a study of the gender pay gap, it is shown how a breakdown......The aim of this article is to demonstrate how to empirically uncover intersectional complexity by simple methods. The article is based on three examples of intercategorical complexity. Firstly, by discussing gender mainstreaming, it is shown that a narrow focus on categories without...

  9. Optimising Signalised Intersection Using Wireless Vehicle Detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjin, Daniel Michael Okwabi; Torkudzor, Moses; Asare, Jack

    Traffic congestion on roads wastes travel times. In this paper, we developed a vehicular traffic model to optimise a signalised intersection in Accra, using wireless vehicle detectors. Traffic volume gathered was extrapolated to cover 2011 and 2016 and were analysed to obtain the peak hour traffic...... volume causing congestion. The intersection was modelled and simulated in Synchro7 as an actuated signalised model using results from the analysed data. The model for morning peak periods gave optimal cycle lengths of 100s and 150s with corresponding intersection delay of 48.9s and 90.6s in 2011 and 2016...... respectively while that for the evening was 55s giving delay of 14.2s and 16.3s respectively. It is shown that the model will improve traffic flow at the intersection....

  10. An Evaluation of Close Reading with At-Risk Fourth-Grade Students in Science Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreaux-Johnson, Marcy; Mooney, Paul; Lastrapes, Renée E.

    2017-01-01

    The study's primary purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of a widely promoted close reading instructional routine for elementary grades students at risk for reading failure. Close reading is designed to help students read complex text independently and proficiently. Participants were six fourth-grade students receiving supplemental…

  11. History at the intersection of disability and public health: the case of John Galsworthy and disabled soldiers of the First World War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznick, Jeffrey S

    2011-01-01

    The author presented an earlier version of this historical article to the Disability Section of the American Public Health Association (November 2009). It is part of his ongoing research in the social and cultural history of medicine as the field intersects with the history of disability, veterans, and public health, as well as current issues that touch all of these areas. This article introduces readers to perspectives on disability held by the British novelist John Galsworthy (1867-1933), which he developed primarily through his philanthropic support for and his compositions about rehabilitation programs for British and American soldiers disabled in the First World War (1914-1918). Readers will learn that Galsworthy's perspectives are as much about his identity as an individual with disabilities as they are about men disabled in the "war to end all wars." The rediscovery of Galsworthy's experiences and words more than 90 years after the end of World War I reveals how history is present today at the intersection of disability and public health. Indeed, the story of Galsworthy ultimately seeking to forget his own experiences during the "Great War," as well as the very physical and psychological disability caused by that conflict, can inspire public health professionals and disability rights advocates today to remember-indeed, to advocate for-men and women who served in battle and have returned home to realize renewed health and social participation despite permanent physical and psychological wounds. Readers will note that language used throughout this article to describe disability is period-specific and therefore not keeping with current conventions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Multiuse trail intersection safety analysis: A crowdsourced data perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jestico, Ben; Nelson, Trisalyn A; Potter, Jason; Winters, Meghan

    2017-06-01

    Real and perceived concerns about cycling safety are a barrier to increased ridership in many cities. Many people prefer to bike on facilities separated from motor vehicles, such as multiuse trails. However, due to underreporting, cities lack data on bike collisions, especially along greenways and multiuse paths. We used a crowdsourced cycling incident dataset (2005-2016) from BikeMaps.org for the Capital Regional District (CRD), BC, Canada. Our goal was to identify design characteristics associated with unsafe intersections between multiuse trails and roads. 92.8% of mapped incidents occurred between 2014 and 2016. We extracted both collision and near miss incidents at intersections from BikeMaps.org. We conducted site observations at 32 intersections where a major multiuse trail intersected with roads. We compared attributes of reported incidents at multiuse trail-road intersections to those at road-road intersections. We then used negative binomial regression to model the relationship between the number of incidents and the infrastructure characteristics at multiuse trail-road intersections. We found a higher proportion of collisions (38%, or 17/45 total reports) at multiuse trail-road intersections compared to road-road intersections (23%, or 62/268 total reports). A higher proportion of incidents resulted in an injury at multiuse trail-road intersections compared to road-road intersections (33% versus 15%). Cycling volumes, vehicle volumes, and trail sight distance were all associated with incident frequency at multiuse trail-road intersections. Supplementing traditional crash records with crowdsourced cycling incident data provides valuable evidence on cycling safety at intersections between multiuse trails and roads, and more generally, when conflicts occur between diverse transportation modes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Intersectional embodiment and power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elg, Camilla; Jensen, Sune Qvotrup

    Through almost two decades the term ‘intersectionality' has gained influence in post colonial studies, gender studies, feminist theory and other research fields occupied with how social differences are distributed and how individuals are socially constructed  in stratified societies. The ‘interse...... differences and discuss the implications this has for our understanding of power relations....

  14. Considering Intersectionality in Multiculturalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Madeline

    2015-01-01

    The intersection of feminist theory and multiculturalism is discussed. Although Frisby makes several strong points, there are several aspects of his definition of multiculturalism that are simplistic. Expansion of ideas borrowed from feminism has potential to increase the nuance and accuracy of the conceptualization of multiculturalism.

  15. Intersection I-2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1971-01-01

    Intersection I-2 of the ISR during the installation of experiments. On the left to the crossing region can be seen the massive iron plate structure of the muon detector being used by a British collaboration in a search for the intermediate vector boson. The magnet and hodoscopes on the right are part of the spectrometer arm of the Bristish-Scandinavian Collaration.

  16. Genetic algorithm-based stochastic optimization for preempted signals at highway railroad grade crossing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Decreasing the number of accidents at highway-railway grade crossings (HRGCs) is an important goal in the transportation field. The preemption of traffic signal operations at HRGCs is widely used to prevent accidents by clearing vehicles off the trac...

  17. Design of a rotary for an uncontrolled multi-leg intersection in Chennai, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasantha Kumar, S.; Gulati, Himanshu; Arora, Shivam

    2017-11-01

    One way to control the traffic at busy intersections is to construct a roundabout or rotary intersection, which is a special type of at-grade intersection, where all converging vehicles are forced to move round a central island in clock-wise direction. The present study aims to design a rotary for an uncontrolled multi leg intersection located in Royapetah in Chennai, India. The intersection has five approach roads with two-way traffic in all the approach roads and there is no signal or traffic police to control the traffic at present and hence experiences traffic chaos during peak hours. In order to design the rotary, it is essential to have the information on traffic volumes coming from the approach roads. For this, a video data collection was carried out for a duration of eight hours from 7.30 am to 11.30 am and from 2.30 pm to 6.30 pm on a typical working day using a handycam from the terrace of an apartment building located near the intersection. During data extraction stage, each 5 min. traffic volume was extracted for all the five classes of vehicles considered and were converted to passenger car units (PCU). The analysis of traffic data showed that during peak hour from 4.45 pm to 5.45 pm, the proportion of weaving traffic, i.e., ratio of sum of crossing streams to the total traffic on the weaving section was found to be 0.81. According to Indian road congress (IRC) guidelines, this proportion can take any value between 0.4 and 1 and in the present study, the calculated value is found to be within the prescribed range. Using the calculated values of average entry width of the rotary and width & length of weaving section, the practical capacity of the rotary was found to be 3020 PCUs which is well above the observed traffic volume of 2665 PCUs.

  18. 67 FR 78563 - Guidance on Traffic Control Devices at Highway-Rail Grade Crossings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-24

    ...This notice announces that the FHWA has issued guidance to assist engineers in selection of traffic control devices or other measures at highway-rail crossings. The report, ``Guidance on Traffic Control Devices at Highway-Rail Grade Crossings'' is available at the following URL: http://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/media/twgreport.htm. This guidance is designed to assist in decisions to install traffic control devices or otherwise improve highway-rail grade crossings.

  19. Neuroendocrine neoplasms of the pancreas at dynamic enhanced CT: comparison between grade 3 neuroendocrine carcinoma and grade 1/2 neuroendocrine tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Kim, Kyung Won; Byun, Jae Ho [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ki Byung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hoon; Hong, Seung-Mo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    To identify the CT features in differentiating grade 3 neuroendocrine carcinomas from grade 1/2 neuroendocrine tumours. This study included 161 patients with surgically confirmed pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. Pathology slides were reviewed to determine the tumour grade. CT image analysis included size, pattern, calcification, margin, pancreatic duct dilatation, bile duct dilatation, vascular invasion, arterial enhancement ratio, and portal enhancement ratio. We used 2 cm, 3 cm, and 4 cm as cutoff values of tumour size and 0.9 and 1.1 of enhancement ratio to determine the sensitivity and specificity. Pathology analysis identified 167 lesions in 161 patients. 154 lesions (92 %) were grade 1/2 and 13 (8 %) were grade 3. Portal enhancement ratio (< 1.1) showed high sensitivity and specificity 92.3 % and 80.5 %, respectively in differentiating grade 3 from grade 1/2. It showed the highest odds ratio (49.60), followed by poorly defined margin, size (> 3 cm), bile duct dilatation, and vascular invasion. When at least two of these five criteria were used in combination, the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing grade 3 were 92.3 % (12/13) and 87.7 % (135/154), respectively. By using specific CT findings, grade 3 can be differentiated from grade 1/2 with a high diagnostic accuracy leading to an appropriate imaging staging. (orig.)

  20. Autonomous Intersection Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    specific hardware, such as the Denso Corporation’s Wireless Safety Unit (WSU), which is a small, embedded machine that uses Digi- tal Short-Range...Communications (DSRC)—part of the IEEE 801.11p standard—to enable vehicles and intersections to communicate over distances of 300 meters or more [ Denso ...2009]. Work using Denso Corporation’s Wireless Safety Unit (WSU) [ Denso 176 Corporation, 2006] has also started, in order to verify the feasibility of

  1. Comparative analysis of driver's brake perception-reaction time at signalized intersections with and without countdown timer using parametric duration models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chuanyun; Zhang, Yaping; Bie, Yiming; Hu, Liwei

    2016-10-01

    Countdown timers display the time left on the current signal, which makes drivers be more ready to react to the phase change. However, previous related studies have rarely explored the effects of countdown timer on driver's brake perception-reaction time (BPRT) to yellow light. The goal of this study was therefore to characterize and model driver's BPRT to yellow signal at signalized intersections with and without countdown timer. BPRT data for "first-to-stop" vehicles after yellow onset within the transitional zone were collected through on-site observation at six signalized intersections in Harbin, China. Statistical analysis showed that the observed 15th, 50th, and 85th percentile BPRTs without countdown timer were 0.52, 0.84, and 1.26s, respectively. The observed 15th, 50th, and 85th percentile BPRTs with countdown timer were 0.32, 1.20, and 2.52s, respectively. Log-logistic distribution appeared to best fit the BPRT without countdown timer, while Weibull distribution seemed to best fit the BPRT with countdown timer. After that, a Log-logistic accelerated failure time (AFT) duration model was developed to model driver's BPRT without countdown timer, whereas a Weibull AFT duration model was established to model driver's BPRT with countdown timer. Three significant factors affecting the BPRT identified in both AFT models included yellow-onset distance from the stop line, yellow-onset approach speed, and deceleration rate. No matter whether the presence of countdown timer or not, BPRT increased as yellow-onset distance to the stop line or deceleration rate increased, but decreased as yellow-onset speed increased. The impairment of driver's BPRT due to countdown timer appeared to increase with yellow-onset distance to the stop line or deceleration rate, but decrease with yellow-onset speed. An increase in driver's BPRT because of countdown timer may induce risky driving behaviors (i.e., stop abruptly, or even violate traffic signal), revealing a weakness of

  2. Measurement of small-angle antiproton-proton and proton-proton elastic scattering at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amos, N.; Block, M.M.; Bobbink, G.J.; Botje, M.A.J.; Favart, D.; Leroy, C.; Linde, F.; Lipnik, P.; Matheys, J-P.; Miller, D.

    1985-01-01

    Antiproton-proton and proton-proton small-angle elastic scattering was measured for centre-of-mass energies at the CERN Intersectung Storage Rings. In addition, proton-proton elastic scattering was measured at . Using the optical theorem, total cross sections are obtained with an accuracy of about

  3. Determinations of the angular and energy dependence of hard constituent scattering from $\\pi^{0}$ pair events at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Angelis, A L S; Blumenfeld, B; Camilleri, L L; Chapin, T J; Cool, R L; del Papa, C; Di Lella, L; Dimcovski, Zlatomir; Hollebeek, R J; Lederman, Leon Max; Levinthal, D A; Linnemann, J T; Newman, C B; Phinney, N; Pope, B G; Pordes, S H; Rothenberg, A F; Rusack, R W; Segar, A M; Singh-Sidhu, J; Smith, A M; Tannenbaum, M J; Vidal, R A; Wallace-Hadrill, J S; Yelton, J M; Young, K K

    1982-01-01

    The authors present data on proton-proton collisions, obtained at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings, in which two roughly back-to-back\\pi^{0}s of high transverse momentum (p/sub T/) were produced. The angular distribution of the dipion axis relative to the collision axis is found to be independent of both the effective mass m of the dipion system and the centre-of-mass energy \\sqrt{s} of the proton- proton collision. The cross-sections d sigma /dm at the two values of \\sqrt{s} satisfy a scaling law of the form d sigma /dm=G(x)/m/sup n/, where x=m(\\pi^{0},\\pi^{0})/ \\sqrt{s} and n =6.5+or-0.5. They show from the data that the leading\\pi^{0} carries most of the momentum of the scattered parton. Given this fact, the axis of the dipion system follows closely the direction of the scattered constituents, and they exploit this to determine the angular dependence of the hard-scattering subprocess. They also compare our data with the lowest order QCD predictions using structure functions as determined in deep-inelast...

  4. Prion-like nanofibrils of small molecules (PriSM): A new frontier at the intersection of supramolecular chemistry and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Du, Xuewen; Xu, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Formed by non-covalent interactions and not defined at genetic level, the assemblies of small molecules in biology are complicated and less explored. A common morphology of the supramolecular assemblies of small molecules is nanofibrils, which coincidentally resembles the nanofibrils formed by proteins such as prions. So these supramolecular assemblies are termed as prion-like nanofibrils of small molecules (PriSM). Emerging evidence from several unrelated fields over the past decade implies the significance of PriSM in biology and medicine. This perspective aims to highlight some recent advances of the research on PriSM. This paper starts with description of the intriguing similarities between PriSM and prions, discusses the paradoxical features of PriSM, introduces the methods for elucidating the biological functions of PriSM, illustrates several examples of beneficial aspects of PriSM, and finishes with the promises and current challenges in the research of PriSM. We anticipate that the research of PriSM will contribute to the fundamental understanding at the intersection of supramolecular chemistry and cell biology and ultimately lead to a new paradigm of molecular (or supramolecular) therapeutics for biomedicine.

  5. A safe haven for the injured? Urban trauma care at the intersection of healthcare, law enforcement, and race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Sara F; Richmond, Therese S; Holena, Daniel N; Kaufman, Elinore J

    2017-05-18

    Patients with traumatic injuries often interact with police before and during hospitalization, particularly when their injuries are due to violence. People of color are at highest risk for violent injuries and have the poorest outcomes after injury. The purpose of this study was to describe how injured, Black patients perceived their interactions with police and what these perceptions reveal about police involvement within trauma care systems. We combined data from two qualitative studies to achieve this aim. The first was ethnographic fieldwork that followed Black trauma patients in the hospital through the physical and emotional aftermath of their injuries. The second was a qualitative, descriptive study of how patients experienced trauma resuscitation in the emergency department (ED). Both studies were conducted between 2012 and 2015 at the Trauma Center at Penn, an academic medical center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. The present study includes data from 24 adult, Black participants undergoing treatment for injury. We reanalyzed all interview data related to law enforcement encounters from the scene of injury through inpatient hospitalization and coded data using a constant comparative technique from grounded theory. Participants described law enforcement encounters at the scene of injury and during transport to the hospital, in the ED, and over the course of inpatient care. Injured participants valued police officers' involvement when they perceived that officers provided safety at the scene, speed of transport to the hospital, or support and information after injury. Injured participants also found police questioning to be stressful and, at times, disrespectful or conflicting with clinical care. Communities, trauma centers, and professional societies have the opportunity to enact policies that standardize law enforcement access in trauma centers and balance patients' health, privacy, and legal rights with public safety needs. Copyright

  6. Ethnicity, Gender, Social Class and Achievement Gaps at Age 16: Intersectionality and "Getting It" for the White Working Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Perhaps the most prevailing inequalities in educational achievement in England are those associated with socio-economic status (SES), ethnicity and gender. However, little research has sought to compare the relative size of these gaps or to explore interactions between these factors. This paper analyses the educational achievement at age 11, 14…

  7. Low-energy direct photon production in p p and alpha alpha collisions at the cern intersecting storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Young-il

    1986-01-01

    High transverse momentum (p(,T)) direct photons have given us some of our best evidence for low order perturbative QCD proces- ses in hadron collisions. It is also important to examine hadronic collisions with a weakly interacting probe in the low p(,T) region, where hadron interactions involve very complicated phenomena. A previous experiment at SQRT.(s) = 12 GeV has observed an excess of low p(,T) direct photons. The present experiment has studied direct soft photons in pp interactions at SQRT.(s) = 63 GeV and alpha-alpha interactions at SQRT.(s(,NN)) = 31.5 GeV at the CERN ISR. Comparisons of photon production with respect to track production in pp minimum bias events with that in pp events with high transverse energy (E(,T)) and with alpha-alpha minimum bias events are investigated. For alpha-alpha minimum bias data, within experimental errors there was no excess of photons with respect to tracks, compared with pp minimum bias data. But for pp high E(,T) data, we observed an interesting effect: as p(,T) i...

  8. Safety evaluation of driver cognitive failures and driving errors on right-turn filtering movement at signalized road intersections based on Fuzzy Cellular Automata (FCA) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Chen; Wong, Yiik Diew; Wang, Xuesong

    2017-07-01

    This paper proposes a simulation-based approach to estimate safety impact of driver cognitive failures and driving errors. Fuzzy Logic, which involves linguistic terms and uncertainty, is incorporated with Cellular Automata model to simulate decision-making process of right-turn filtering movement at signalized intersections. Simulation experiments are conducted to estimate the relationships between cognitive failures and driving errors with safety performance. Simulation results show Different types of cognitive failures are found to have varied relationship with driving errors and safety performance. For right-turn filtering movement, cognitive failures are more likely to result in driving errors with denser conflicting traffic stream. Moreover, different driving errors are found to have different safety impacts. The study serves to provide a novel approach to linguistically assess cognitions and replicate decision-making procedures of the individual driver. Compare to crash analysis, the proposed FCA model allows quantitative estimation of particular cognitive failures, and the impact of cognitions on driving errors and safety performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Body weight, perceived weight stigma and mental health among women at the intersection of race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status: Insights from the modified labelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciciurkaite, Gabriele; Perry, Brea L

    2017-10-04

    With increasing rates of obesity in the United States, attention to life chances and psychological consequences associated with weight stigma and weight-based discrimination has also intensified. While research has demonstrated the negative effects of weight-based discrimination on mental health, little is known about whether different social groups are disproportionately vulnerable to these experiences. Drawing on the modified labelling theory, the focus of this paper is to investigate the psychological correlates of body weight and self-perceived weight-based discrimination among American women at the intersection of race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status (SES). Analyses use data from the National Health Measurement Study (NHMS), a national multi-stage probability sample of non-institutional, English-speaking adults, ages 35 to 89 in 2005-2006. Our findings demonstrate that the effect of weight-based discrimination on psychological well-being is highly contingent on social status. Specifically, the psychological consequences of discrimination on Hispanic women and women in the lowest household income group is significantly greater relative to White women and women with higher household income, controlling for obesity status and self-rated health. These results suggest that higher social status has a buffering effect of weight stigma on psychological well-being. © 2017 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  10. Converging flow joint insert system at an intersection between adjacent transitions extending between a combustor and a turbine assembly in a gas turbine engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Robert T.

    2017-09-26

    A transition duct system (100) for routing a gas flow from a combustor (102) to the first stage (104) of a turbine section (106) in a combustion turbine engine (108), wherein the transition duct system (100) includes one or more converging flow joint inserts (120) forming a trailing edge (122) at an intersection (124) between adjacent transition ducts (126, 128) is disclosed. The transition duct system (100) may include a transition duct (126, 128) having an internal passage (130) extending between an inlet (132, 184) to an outlet (134, 186) and may expel gases into the first stage turbine (104) with a tangential component. The converging flow joint insert (120) may be contained within a converging flow joint insert receiver (136) and disconnected from the transition duct bodies (126, 128) by which the converging flow joint insert (120) is positioned. Being disconnected eliminates stress formation within the converging flow joint insert (120), thereby enhancing the life of the insert. The converging flow joint insert (120) may be removable such that the insert (120) can be replaced once worn beyond design limits.

  11. Gender at the intersection with race and class in the schooling and wellbeing of immigrant-origin students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshaei, Mahsa; Henderson, Rita Isabel

    2016-07-28

    In French-language secondary schools in Quebec, among all immigrant-origin students, those originating from South Asia have the highest dropout rate. However, girls belonging to this group consistently outperform their male peers of similar ethnic background. This stirs questions about the reasons for this relative outperformance and its linkage with overall wellbeing among these girls. A mixed methods approach guided data collection. It involved in-depth interviews with female and male students of South Asian origin (n = 19) and with individuals holding educational roles in the lives of youth (n = 25). An additional anonymous questionnaire aggregated parent perspectives (n = 36), though this article focuses primarily on qualitative lessons. This article shows three main reasons for why South Asian female adolescents in Quebec French-language secondary schools outperform their male counterparts in schooling attainment: parental expectations after migration, socialization at home, and relationships at school. According to our findings, academic perseverance among these girls does not necessarily translate into their improved wellbeing or their involvement in an advantageous process of acculturation. This study highlights that although gender, ethnicity, and class can create an interlocking system of oppression in certain social spheres for a specific group of women, it can emerge as advantageous in other contexts for the same group. This provides educational policy makers, as well as school and community workers, with guidance and avenues for action that can promote the wellbeing of immigrant-origin girls through involvement in beneficial processes of acculturation aligned with their improved academic performance.

  12. Domestic violence at the intersections of race, class, and gender: challenges and contributions to understanding violence against marginalized women in diverse communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoloff, Natalie J; Dupont, Ida

    2005-01-01

    This article provides a comprehensive review of the emerging domestic violence literature using a race, class, gender, sexual orientation intersectional analysis and structural framework fostered by women of color and their allies to understand the experiences and contexts of domestic violence for marginalized women in U.S. society. The first half of the article lays out a series of challenges that an intersectional analysis grounded in a structural framework provides for understanding the role of culture in domestic violence. The second half of the article points to major contributions of such an approach to feminist methods and practices in working with battered women on the margins of society.

  13. Grade Inflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Hugh

    Grade inflation is discussed, and some solutions are offered for the grade inflation problem which exists in the Faculty of Education at the University of Victoria, British Columbia. Examples illustrate the existence of grade inflation at several colleges and universities, as well as at the high school level. Various reactions--involving college…

  14. Role of sensory and cognitive conspicuity in the prevention of collisions between motorcycles and trucks at T-intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Teik Hua; Ghanbari, Mahshid; Hamid, Hussain; Abdul-Halin, Alfian; Ng, Choy Peng

    2016-11-01

    increase the detection rate and the identification of a motorcycle by a truck driver at a farther distance, but effect deteriorates as the distance decreases. The results show that the detection rate and the identification of a motorcyclist wearing a black helmet with a reflective sticker increases as the distance between the motorcycle and the truck decreases. We also found that a motorcyclist wearing a white helmet and a white outfit is more identifiable and detectable at both shorter and longer distances. In conclusion, although this study provides evidence that the use of appropriate conspicuity treatments enhances motorcycle conspicuity to truck drivers, we suggest that more attention should be paid to the effect of background environment on motorcycle conspicuity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Buddhism at Crossroads: A Case Study of Six Tibetan Buddhist Monks Navigating the Intersection of Buddhist Theology and Western Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonam, Tenzin

    Recent effort to teach Western science in the Tibetan Buddhist monasteries has drawn interest both within and outside the quarters of these monasteries. This novel and historic move of bringing Western science in a traditional monastic community began around year 2000 at the behest of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, the spiritual head of Tibetan Buddhism. Despite the novelty of this effort, the literature in science education about learners from non-Western communities suggests various "cognitive conflicts" experienced by these non-Western learners due to fundamental difference in the worldview of the two knowledge traditions. Hence, in this research focuses on how six Tibetan Buddhist monks were situating/reconciling the scientific concepts like the theory of evolution into their traditional Buddhist worldview. The monks who participated in this study were engaged in a further study science at a university in the U.S. for two years. Using case study approach, the participants were interviewed individually and in groups over the two-year period. The findings revealed that although the monks scored highly on their acceptance of evolution on the Measurement of Acceptance of Theory of Evolution (MATE) survey, however in the follow-up individual and focus group interviews, certain conflicts as well as agreement between the theory of evolution and their Buddhist beliefs were revealed. The monks experienced conflicts over concepts within evolution such as common ancestry, human evolution, and origin of life, and in reconciling the Buddhist and scientific notion of life. The conflicts were analyzed using the theory of collateral learning and was found that the monks engaged in different kinds of collateral learning, which is the degree of interaction and resolution of conflicting schemas. The different collateral learning of the monks was correlated to the concepts within evolution and has no correlation to the monks' years in secular school, science learning or their

  16. Prader-Willi Syndrome and Schaaf-Yang Syndrome: Neurodevelopmental Diseases Intersecting at the MAGEL2 Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Michael D.; Schaaf, Christian P.

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by neonatal hypotonia, developmental delay/intellectual disability, and characteristic feeding behaviors with failure to thrive during infancy; followed by hyperphagia and excessive weight gain later in childhood. Individuals with PWS also manifest complex behavioral phenotypes. Approximately 25% meet criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). PWS is caused by the absence of paternally expressed, maternally silenced genes at chromosome 15q11-q13. MAGEL2 is one of five protein-coding genes in the PWS-critical domain. Truncating point mutations of the paternal allele of MAGEL2 cause Schaaf-Yang syndrome, which has significant phenotypic overlap with PWS, but is also clinically distinct; based on the presence of joint contractures, and a particularly high prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (up to 75% of affected individuals). The clinical and molecular overlap between PWS and Schaaf-Yang syndrome, but also their distinguishing features provide insight into the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying both disorders. PMID:28933382

  17. Eating disorder symptoms and obesity at the intersections of gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation in US high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, S Bryn; Nelson, Lauren A; Birkett, Michelle A; Calzo, Jerel P; Everett, Bethany

    2013-02-01

    We examined purging for weight control, diet pill use, and obesity across sexual orientation identity and ethnicity groups. Anonymous survey data were analyzed from 24 591 high school students of diverse ethnicities in the federal Youth Risk Behavioral Surveillance System Survey in 2005 and 2007. Self-reported data were gathered on gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation identity, height, weight, and purging and diet pill use in the past 30 days. We used multivariable logistic regression to estimate odds of purging, diet pill use, and obesity associated with sexual orientation identity in gender-stratified models and examined for the presence of interactions between ethnicity and sexual orientation. Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) identity was associated with substantially elevated odds of purging and diet pill use in both girls and boys (odds ratios [OR] range = 1.9-6.8). Bisexual girls and boys were also at elevated odds of obesity compared to same-gender heterosexuals (OR = 2.3 and 2.1, respectively). Interventions to reduce eating disorders and obesity that are appropriate for LGB youths of diverse ethnicities are urgently needed.

  18. Prader-Willi Syndrome and Schaaf-Yang Syndrome: Neurodevelopmental Diseases Intersecting at the MAGEL2 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Fountain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by neonatal hypotonia, developmental delay/intellectual disability, and characteristic feeding behaviors with failure to thrive during infancy; followed by hyperphagia and excessive weight gain later in childhood. Individuals with PWS also manifest complex behavioral phenotypes. Approximately 25% meet criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD. PWS is caused by the absence of paternally expressed, maternally silenced genes at chromosome 15q11-q13. MAGEL2 is one of five protein-coding genes in the PWS-critical domain. Truncating point mutations of the paternal allele of MAGEL2 cause Schaaf-Yang syndrome, which has significant phenotypic overlap with PWS, but is also clinically distinct; based on the presence of joint contractures, and a particularly high prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (up to 75% of affected individuals. The clinical and molecular overlap between PWS and Schaaf-Yang syndrome, but also their distinguishing features provide insight into the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying both disorders.

  19. A qualitative exploration of work-related head injury: vulnerability at the intersection of workers' decision making and organizational values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontos, P; Grigorovich, A; Nowrouzi, B; Sharma, B; Lewko, J; Mollayeva, T; Colantonio, A

    2017-10-18

    Work-related head injury is a critical public health issue due to its rising prevalence; the association with profound disruption of workers' lives; and significant economic burdens in terms of medical costs and lost wages. Efforts to understand and prevent these types of injuries have largely been dominated by epidemiological research and safety science, which has focused on identifying risk at the level of the individual worker, population group, or organizational sector. Limited research has focused on the perspectives of the workers, a key stakeholder group for informing understanding of vulnerability to work-related head injury. This study explored workers' perspectives to better understand their decision-making and how and why their injuries occurred. We conducted a qualitative study using in-depth semi-structured interviews with thirty-two adult workers who had sustained a work-related head injury. Workers were recruited from an urban clinic in central Ontario, Canada. Labour Process Theory informed the thematic analysis. Three hazardous work conditions were identified: insufficient training; inadequate staffing; and inattention to the physical environment. In addition, professional and organizational norms were implicated in vulnerability to head injury including putting the client before the worker and the pressure to work unsafely. The findings also highlight a complex interrelationship between workers' decision-making and professional and organizational norms that produces vulnerability to head injury, a vulnerability which oftentimes is reproduced by workers' decisions to work despite hazardous conditions. Our findings suggest that, beyond the need to redress the inattention to hazards in the physical environment, there is a need to address norms that influence worker decision-making to improve the safety of workers. Using Labour Process Theory highlights an important social dynamic within workplace sectors that could inform future development and

  20. A qualitative exploration of work-related head injury: vulnerability at the intersection of workers’ decision making and organizational values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kontos

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Work-related head injury is a critical public health issue due to its rising prevalence; the association with profound disruption of workers’ lives; and significant economic burdens in terms of medical costs and lost wages. Efforts to understand and prevent these types of injuries have largely been dominated by epidemiological research and safety science, which has focused on identifying risk at the level of the individual worker, population group, or organizational sector. Limited research has focused on the perspectives of the workers, a key stakeholder group for informing understanding of vulnerability to work-related head injury. This study explored workers’ perspectives to better understand their decision-making and how and why their injuries occurred. Methods We conducted a qualitative study using in-depth semi-structured interviews with thirty-two adult workers who had sustained a work-related head injury. Workers were recruited from an urban clinic in central Ontario, Canada. Labour Process Theory informed the thematic analysis. Results Three hazardous work conditions were identified: insufficient training; inadequate staffing; and inattention to the physical environment. In addition, professional and organizational norms were implicated in vulnerability to head injury including putting the client before the worker and the pressure to work unsafely. The findings also highlight a complex interrelationship between workers’ decision-making and professional and organizational norms that produces vulnerability to head injury, a vulnerability which oftentimes is reproduced by workers’ decisions to work despite hazardous conditions. Conclusions Our findings suggest that, beyond the need to redress the inattention to hazards in the physical environment, there is a need to address norms that influence worker decision-making to improve the safety of workers. Using Labour Process Theory highlights an important social

  1. Predictors of cultural capital on science academic achievement at the 8th grade level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misner, Johnathan Scott

    The purpose of the study was to determine if students' cultural capital is a significant predictor of 8th grade science achievement test scores in urban locales. Cultural capital refers to the knowledge used and gained by the dominant class, which allows social and economic mobility. Cultural capital variables include magazines at home and parental education level. Other variables analyzed include socioeconomic status (SES), gender, and English language learners (ELL). This non-experimental study analyzed the results of the 2011 Eighth Grade Science National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). The researcher analyzed the data using a multivariate stepwise regression analysis. The researcher concluded that the addition of cultural capital factors significantly increased the predictive power of the model where magazines in home, gender, student classified as ELL, parental education level, and SES were the independent variables and science achievement was the dependent variable. For alpha=0.05, the overall test for the model produced a R2 value of 0.232; therefore the model predicted 23.2% of variance in science achievement results. Other major findings include: higher measures of home resources predicted higher 2011 NAEP eighth grade science achievement; males were predicted to have higher 2011 NAEP 8 th grade science achievement; classified ELL students were predicted to score lower on the NAEP eight grade science achievement; higher parent education predicted higher NAEP eighth grade science achievement; lower measures of SES predicted lower 2011 NAEP eighth grade science achievement. This study contributed to the research in this field by identifying cultural capital factors that have been found to have statistical significance on predicting eighth grade science achievement results, which can lead to strategies to help improve science academic achievement among underserved populations.

  2. Grade Retention at Primary School: What the Teachers in Zimbabwe Say

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muchemwa Stella

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary education is the base of all advanced education levels, developments and innovations; it should therefore be meticulously done so as not to disadvantage the learners. In a bid to do it well, those involved in primary education have tried and are still trying strategies that can give the learners maximum advantage, for instance, grade retention and grade promotion. This research aimed at assessing the Zimbabwean primary school teachers’ stance on grade retention. The researcher took the advantage of Block-Release students at Solusi University in April 2016 (these are teachers from all over Zimbabwe and other countries in Africa who come for their degree studies at Solusi University during the holidays to collect data through interviews from a purposive sample of these teachers. Collected data was coded and analyzed descriptively. Findings showed that: 56% of the respondents indicated that retention is taking place at the primary schools where they are teaching but usually on a minimal scale since it is usually done upon parents’ request; 67% of the respondents said that retention is necessary and helpful; retention can be most suitably done at infant grades (1-3; however, the effect of retention on pupils’ performance is not clear due to other factors that affect performance. Findings also showed that the Zimbabwean Government is neither for retention nor grade promotion but for ERI (Early Reading Initiative and PLAP (Performance Lag Address Programme which have been recently introduced.

  3. Coordinated Ramp Metering and Intersection Signal Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyan Su

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The operations of freeway ramp metering and urban traffic network signal control are independent in most areas. Such situation may cause some conflict between traffic streams of the two subsystems, or, at least, their dynamic interactions have not been taken into account from an overall system viewpoint. Traffic performance can be improved if the controls of these two subnetworks are integrated. This paper proposes a novel signal control strategy for the feeding intersection and a coordination strategy for integrating it with the corresponding freeway onramp metering. UP ALINEA with queue-overwrite is used for the ramp metering. A signal optimization, which takes into account the available ramp space and traffic demand, is developed for intersection signal control. A calibrated micro-simulation is used to compare the proposed control/coordination strategies and current control plans in the field. Simulation result shows that, even though the overall system performance only gets a marginal improvement, intersection delay reduces significantly.

  4. 76 FR 11992 - Systems for Telephonic Notification of Unsafe Conditions at Highway-Rail and Pathway Grade Crossings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... loaded with steel at a highway- rail grade crossing. Almost the entire train derailed, causing 11 deaths... all public highway-rail grade crossings located within a port, or dock facility, railroad yard or... highway-rail grade crossings located within a port, or dock facility, railroad yard or private industrial...

  5. The Effects of Phonemic Awareness Instruction on the Writing Ability of First Grade At Risk Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carro, Dorothy J.

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of increased phonemic awareness instruction on the writing ability of At Risk first graders. Twenty-three students from a suburban first grade classroom in Central New Jersey were involved in the study. Twelve at risk students were divided into two groups, each of which received one half hour of…

  6. Enactment of Scientific Inquiry: Observation of Two Cases at Different Grade Levels in China Mainland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Ronghui; Clarke, David; Wang, Weizhen

    2014-04-01

    Enactment of scientific inquiry in classroom has attracted a great attention of science educators around the world. In this study, we examined two competent teachers' (one Grade 9 chemistry teacher and one Grade 4 science teacher) enactment of scientific inquiry in selected teaching units to reveal the characteristics of enacted inquiry at different grade levels by analyzing lesson sequence videos. The coding schemes for enacted inquiry consist of ontological properties and instructional practices. Pre-topic and post-topic teacher interviews and the two teachers' responses to a questionnaire were adopted to identify the factors influencing teacher's enactment. The results indicate that the two case teachers' enactment involved a range of inquiry activities. The enacted inquiry at fourth-grade level covered all the inquiry elements, tending to engage students in the whole procedure of inquiry. The ninth-grade chemistry class placed emphasis on the elements "making plans" to solve problems in authentic context. Important factors influencing the enactment include teacher's understanding about scientific inquiry, textbooks, assessment, students and resource. Implications for inquiry enactment and instruction improvement have been provided.

  7. Intersectional perspectives on intimate technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Marie Louise Juul; Hansen, Lone Koefoed

    In this text, we discuss if and how an intersectional perspective on design may be critically practiced from a privileged position. More precisely, we ask how intersectional perspectives on race, gender and class may be useful in reflecting on and critically intervening in a privileged, Northern...

  8. Intersectionality and Critical Race Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePouw, Christin

    2018-01-01

    This conceptual article employs critical race theory (CRT) as a theoretical framework to explore the importance of intersectionality in critical race parenting. In particular, I focus on intersectionality to understand better how Whiteness and racial power play out in intimate relationships within the family, particularly between White parents and…

  9. Medical school dropout - testing at admission versus selection by highest grades as predictors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Neill, Lotte Dyhrberg; Hartvigsen, Jan; Wallstedt, Birgitta

    2011-01-01

    Medical Education 2011: 45: 1111-1120 Context  Very few studies have reported on the effect of admission tests on medical school dropout. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive validity of non-grade-based admission testing versus grade-based admission relative to subsequent...... dropout. Methods  This prospective cohort study followed six cohorts of medical students admitted to the medical school at the University of Southern Denmark during 2002-2007 (n = 1544). Half of the students were admitted based on their prior achievement of highest grades (Strategy 1) and the other half...... years after admission. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to model dropout. Results  Strategy 2 (admission test) students had a lower relative risk for dropping out of medical school within 2 years of admission (odds ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.39-0.80). Only the admission...

  10. Medical school dropout - testing at admission versus selection by highest grades as predictors

    OpenAIRE

    O?Neill, Lotte Dyhrberg; Hartvigsen, Jan; Wallstedt, Birgitta; Korsholm, Lars; Eika, Berit

    2011-01-01

    Medical Education 2011: 45: 1111-1120 Context  Very few studies have reported on the effect of admission tests on medical school dropout. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive validity of non-grade-based admission testing versus grade-based admission relative to subsequent dropout. Methods  This prospective cohort study followed six cohorts of medical students admitted to the medical school at the University of Southern Denmark during 2002-2007 (n = 1544). Half of the stud...

  11. Cooperative intersection collision avoidance system limited to stop sign and traffic signal violations (CICAS-V).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-30

    The objective of the Cooperative Intersection Collision Avoidance System for Violations (CICAS-V) Project is to develop and field-test a comprehensive system to reduce the number of crashes at intersections due to violations of traffic control device...

  12. The Intersection of Education and Incarceration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannis, Lynette N.

    2017-01-01

    In this "Harvard Educational Review" symposium article, Lynette N. Tannis provides an in-depth look at the juncture of education and incarceration. Tannis states that the denial and/or lack of educational programs within carceral settings are concerning given the size of the US prison system. Discourse about the intersection of education…

  13. Intersection approach speed and accident probability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spek, A.C.E.; Wieringa, P.A.; Janssen, W.H.

    2006-01-01

    A statistical model is derived for gap acceptance at intersections, taking into account limitations of human perception. The model assumes the logarithm of the odds for acceptance of a gap as a linear function of the logarithms of gap time and the speed of the vehicle closing the gap. Fitting is

  14. Identifying patients at risk for high-grade intra-abdominal hypertension following trauma laparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Steven G; Van Imhoff, Diederik L; Van Lieshout, Esther M M; D'Amours, Scott K; Van Waes, Oscar J F

    2015-05-01

    Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (ACS) is an uncommon but deleterious complication after trauma laparotomy. Early recognition of patients at risk of developing ACS is crucial for their outcome. The aim of this study was to compare the characteristics of patients who developed high-grade intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) (i.e., grade III or IV; intra-abdominal pressure, IAP >20 mm Hg) following an injury-related laparotomy versus those who did not (i.e., IAP ≤20 mm Hg). A retrospective analysis of consecutive trauma patients admitted to a level 1 trauma centre in Australia between January 1, 1995 and January 31, 2010 was performed. A comparison was made between characteristics of patients who developed high-grade IAH following trauma laparotomy versus those who did not. A total of 567 patients (median age 31 years) were included in this study. Of these patients 10.2% (58/567) developed high-grade IAH of which 51.7% (30/58) developed ACS. Patients with high-grade IAH were older (pgrade IAH received larger volumes of crystalloids (pgrade IAH suffered higher mortality rates (25.9% (15/58) vs. 12.2% (62/509); p=0.012). Of all patients who underwent a trauma laparotomy, 10.2% developed high-grade IAH, which increases the risk of mortality. Patients with acidosis, coagulopathy, and hypothermia were especially at risk. In these patients, the abdomen should be left open until adequate resuscitation has been achieved, allowing for definitive surgery. This is a level III retrospective study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Early EEG Grade and Outcome at 5 Years After Mild Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Deirdre M; O'Connor, Catherine M; Ryan, C Anthony; Korotchikova, Irina; Boylan, Geraldine B

    2016-10-01

    More than half of all infants with neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) are graded as mild and do not meet current criteria for therapeutic hypothermia. These infants are often not enrolled in follow-up, and hence our knowledge of their long-term outcome is sparse. We wished to compare 5-year outcomes in a group of infants with mild, moderate, and severe HIE, graded with both early EEG and clinical assessment, none of whom were treated with therapeutic hypothermia. Term infants with HIE and a healthy comparison group were recruited at birth. Both groups had early continuous EEG recordings. Cognitive and motor outcome was assessed at 5 years. Outcome was available in 53 infants with HIE and 30 infants in the comparison group at 5 years. Infants with mild HIE at birth (n = 22) had significantly lower full-scale IQ, verbal IQ, and performance IQ than comparison infants (n = 30) at 5 years (P = .001, .001, and 0.004, respectively). No difference in cognitive measures was seen between infants with mild and moderate grades HIE. Intact survival at 5 years varied across EEG grade HIE at 6 hours after birth; 75% in mild, 46% in moderate, 43% in major abnormalities, and 0% with inactive EEGs, compared with 97% in the comparison group. Survivors of mild HIE, graded clinically or by early EEG, have higher rates of disability than their peers and have cognitive outcomes similar to that of children with moderate encephalopathy in an uncooled HIE cohort. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. The Impact of High-Speed Internet Connectivity at Home on Eighth-Grade Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Kent J.

    2013-01-01

    In the fall of 2008 Westside Community Schools - District 66, in Omaha, Nebraska implemented a one-to-one notebook computer take home model for all eighth-grade students. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a required yearlong one-to-one notebook computer program supported by high-speed Internet connectivity at school on (a)…

  17. School Readiness and Achievement of Crow Indian Children, First Through Fourth Grades, at Pryor, Montana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Joyce Martin

    The study was based on a year's work with Crow Indian children, grades 1-4, at Pryor, Montana. Five tests were given and evaluated: the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, the Metropolitan Achievement Tests, the Gesell Developmental Examination, the Lowenfeld Mosaic, and 3 selected tasks from Piaget. The 21 pupils used for this study were broken…

  18. Effective Instructional Strategies for Kindergarten and First-Grade Students at Risk in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Ben; Doabler, Christian T.; Nelson, Nancy J.; Shanley, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an overview of effective instructional strategies and interventions for kindergarten and first-grade students at risk in mathematics. The article reviews instructional strategies and interventions within a multitier instructional model in order to provide a framework for teachers and schools looking to increase the…

  19. Language at the Grade Three and Four Interface: The Theory-Policy-Practice Nexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibanda, Jabulani

    2017-01-01

    This paper interrogates the complexity of language use at the Grade Three-Four transition, using the South African context as a microcosm of similar educational systems. The paper describes the complex nature of the transition, particularly within a second language (L2) instructional context. It explores the dissonance between and among theory,…

  20. Driver behavior at highway-railroad grade crossings : a literature review from 1990-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Accidents at grade crossings continue to be the leading cause of fatalities in the railroad industry. A large proportion of these accidents are the result of driver error. The purpose of this report is to review research that addresses driver behavio...

  1. Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging of Gliomas Grades II and III - A Study of Perilesional Tumor Infiltration, Tumor Grades and Subtypes at Clinical Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Anna F; Fahlström, Markus; Nilsson, Markus; Berntsson, Shala G; Zetterling, Maria; Libard, Sylwia; Alafuzoff, Irina; van Westen, Danielle; Lätt, Jimmy; Smits, Anja; Larsson, Elna-Marie

    2017-06-01

    Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) allows for assessment of diffusion influenced by microcellular structures. We analyzed DKI in suspected low-grade gliomas prior to histopathological diagnosis. The aim was to investigate if diffusion parameters in the perilesional normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) differed from contralesional white matter, and to investigate differences between glioma malignancy grades II and III and glioma subtypes (astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas). Forty-eight patients with suspected low-grade glioma were prospectively recruited to this institutional review board-approved study and investigated with preoperative DKI at 3T after written informed consent. Patients with histologically proven glioma grades II or III were further analyzed (n=35). Regions of interest (ROIs) were delineated on T2FLAIR images and co-registered to diffusion MRI parameter maps. Mean DKI data were compared between perilesional and contralesional NAWM (student's t-test for dependent samples, Wilcoxon matched pairs test). Histogram DKI data were compared between glioma types and glioma grades (multiple comparisons of mean ranks for all groups). The discriminating potential for DKI in assessing glioma type and grade was assessed with receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves. There were significant differences in all mean DKI variables between perilesional and contralesional NAWM (p=grades II (n=23) and III (n=12) (p=0.003-0.048) and 10 variables differed significantly between ACs (n=18) and ODs (n=17) (p=0.011-0.050). ROC curves of the best discriminating variables had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.657-0.815. Mean DKI variables in perilesional NAWM differ significantly from contralesional NAWM, suggesting altered microstructure by tumor infiltration not depicted on morphological MRI. Histogram analysis of DKI data identifies differences between glioma grades and subtypes.

  2. Medical school dropout--testing at admission versus selection by highest grades as predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Lotte; Hartvigsen, Jan; Wallstedt, Birgitta; Korsholm, Lars; Eika, Berit

    2011-11-01

    Very few studies have reported on the effect of admission tests on medical school dropout. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive validity of non-grade-based admission testing versus grade-based admission relative to subsequent dropout. This prospective cohort study followed six cohorts of medical students admitted to the medical school at the University of Southern Denmark during 2002-2007 (n=1544). Half of the students were admitted based on their prior achievement of highest grades (Strategy 1) and the other half took a composite non-grade-based admission test (Strategy 2). Educational as well as social predictor variables (doctor-parent, origin, parenthood, parents living together, parent on benefit, university-educated parents) were also examined. The outcome of interest was students' dropout status at 2 years after admission. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to model dropout. Strategy 2 (admission test) students had a lower relative risk for dropping out of medical school within 2 years of admission (odds ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.39-0.80). Only the admission strategy, the type of qualifying examination and the priority given to the programme on the national application forms contributed significantly to the dropout model. Social variables did not predict dropout and neither did Strategy 2 admission test scores. Selection by admission testing appeared to have an independent, protective effect on dropout in this setting. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  3. Improving the Performance of Urban Road Intersection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Fareed M.A.Karim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Road intersection is responsible for an important proportion of air pollution especially in urban areas, due to long queues of vehicles waiting for discharge. Therefore, it is necessary to quantify their emissions as accurately as possible. In this study an attempt was made to research on reducing the traffic air pollution such as CO, CO2, HC and NOx, fuel consumption and vehicle operating cost along with improving the traffic flow and delay at a road intersection. One major uncontrolled (un signalized intersection in capital city Sana'a (Yemen was chosen for the study. The traffic air pollution, fuel consumption and vehicle operating cost as well as vehicle delay was calculated for the base year 2012 using aaSIDRA 2.0 software developed in Australia. For the horizon year 2022, three scenarios were considered for investigation viz. (1 do nothing, (2 signalizing the intersection and (3 construction of flyover. The analysis shows that for the above mentioned parameters scenario (3 will be the best scenario followed by scenario (2, while worst case scenario will be do nothing.

  4. Using Robots to Motivate At-Risk Learners in Science over the Ninth Grade Hurdle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerge, Dora

    The ninth grade is a pivotal year in an adolescent's academic career; however, educators have failed to find a remedy for the high failure and dropout rates at this grade level. Students who lack basic skills and support as they enter high school can experience repeated failures, which often lead to a decrease in motivation and dropping out of school. Up to 15% of all ninth graders repeat ninth grade and 36% of all U. S. dropouts are ninth graders. It is imperative that researchers and educators find new ways to motivate at-risk students and augment basic skills in order to mitigate the dropout problem at this grade level. Robot teachers could be a viable solution to increase student motivation and achievement. However, before such strategies could be recommended for implementation, information about their efficacy in a high school setting is needed. The purpose of this quantitative, two-group experimental, pretest-posttest study was to determine the effects of a robot teacher/instructor on science motivation and science achievement in ninth grade at-risk learners. Approximately 40 at-risk, repeating ninth graders, ranging in age from 13 to 17 years old from one high school in the United States Virgin Islands, participated in the study. Half of the students received a robot teacher/instructor manipulation whereby a robot taught a science lesson for physical science assessments (experimental group), and the other half received the same instruction from a human teacher (control group). An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to compare the science achievement posttest scores, as measured by test scores, and science motivation posttest scores, as measured by the SMTSL, between the experimental and the control groups, while controlling for the pretest scores (covariate). The results demonstrated that posttest motivation and achievement scores in the human teacher condition were not significantly different than posttest motivation scores in the robot teacher

  5. Monitoring subsurface microbial and nutrient transport to assess treatment capability of at- grade septic system designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cey, E.; Motz, E.; Chu, A.; Ryan, C.

    2009-05-01

    By design, septic systems release pathogenic microbes, nutrients and other chemical contaminants into the subsurface and have the potential to adversely impact groundwater quality. Newer at-grade septic system designs discharge wastewater effluent on the soil surface, however, relatively little research has been conducted on transport processes and treatment efficacy for these systems. The objective of this study was to investigate physical, biological, and chemical processes beneath two at-grade wastewater treatment systems. Secondary treated effluent from the Fish Creek wastewater treatment plant in Calgary is being applied to soil through the two at-grade systems in volumes equivalent to a three-bedroom household. A dye tracer was also introduced with the effluent to aid in the evaluation of subsurface flow patterns and the identification of soil sampling locations. An extensive vadose zone monitoring system, consisting of suction lysimeters, tensiometers, time domain reflectometry probes, thermistors, and soil vapour probes, was installed to track the effluent through the soil profile. Fecal coliform, total coliform, and E. Coli, as well as other physical and chemical parameters, are being monitored in-situ. Soil samples for microbial and chemical analysis have also been obtained by excavating portions of the infiltration area beneath the two systems. Chemical and dye tracers showed relatively rapid migration of effluent to depths of up to 1.5 m below surface. Preliminary pathogen results indicate an approximately four log reduction in E. Coli concentrations at 10 cm depth and six log reduction at 60 cm depth. Continued monitoring of these pilot systems will provide valuable data on subsurface pathogen migration and the suitability of at-grade systems for treating wastewater and reducing the risk of groundwater contamination.

  6. Intersectionality as a Framework for Inclusive Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    To create more inclusive environments for the advancement of scientific inquiry, it is critical to consider the role of intersectionality. Originating in activism and legal scholarship grounded in the realities of women of color, the concept of intersectionality emphasizes how societal power dynamics shape the differential construction of life opportunities of diverse demographic groups across a variety of social identities, contexts, and historical conditions. Importantly, intersectionality also recognizes that individuals can simultaneously hold privileged and marginalized identities. For example, while white women scientists are less represented in leadership and decision-making positions than their male counterparts, but they typically do not experience the marginalization of being mistaken for cleaning staff at their institutions, as many African American and Latina scientists report. Thus, white women are relatively privileged in this context. This case and national survey data demonstrate the critical importance of recognizing that the intersection of racial and gender identities creates complex and multi-faceted challenges for diverse women scientists in navigating the organizational culture of science. Educational research indicates that interventions seeking to create more inclusivity in science should take into account the relationships between various social identities, contexts, and broader historical conditions that affect the advancement of historically underrepresented minority groups. Therefore, this presentation will provide a conceptual framework of intersectionality to guide interventions to encourage all scientists to recognize the distinctive intellectual and social contributions of those from diverse gender, race, class, disability, sexual orientation, and other identity backgrounds. It will also address how this framework can be applied to develop programs, policies, and practices that transform organizational cultures to be more inclusive

  7. ENGLISH ESSAY WRITING SKILLS AT FIFTH GRADE STUDENTS OF KAMPUNG BARU ELEMENTARY SCHOOL IN BULELENG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanda Nadya Narulita Edy Poernomo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to (1 describe writing skills of description essay at student learned with contextual approach at fifth grade student in group of six buleleng districts, (2 describe writing skills of description essay at student learned with contextual at fifth grade student in group of six Buleleng district, and (3 determine significantly differences writing skills of description essay among student learned with contextual approach and student learned with convensional approach at fifth grade student in group of six Buleleng districts. This research was experiment research with Post Test Only with Non Equivalent Control Group Design. The population of this research is fifth grade student in elementary school group of VI Buleleng district. Sample of this research is Kampung Baru 1 elementary school as control class and Kampung Baru 2 Elemantary School as experiment class. Sample was chosen with random sampling technique. Writing skills of description essay data of student were collected using testing method. The data collected were analyzed by using descriptive statistics and inferential statistics. The results of research indicate that (1 writing skills of description essay of control group student have average score of 46,93 with less categories, (2 writing skills of description essay of experiment group student have average score of 81,79 with very high categories and (3 there are differences of writing skills of description essay in significantly among the group of student who learned the contextual approach and group of student who learned the convensional approach (t result = 7,28 > t table = 1,671.

  8. Improving Listening Skill of The Seventh Grade Students Using Games at MTsN Mojokerto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Andyani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the study conducted on research at MTsN Mojokerto, the researcher found that there are some problems with teaching English especially for listening of seventh grade students at MTsN Mojokerto, those are: 1 most of the students’ scores on listening test are still under the minimum of standard score (KKM of 79; 2 most students are not attracted to follow the listening activities; 3 students are difficult to understand the native speech in a tape recorder.The main purpose of the study is to improve listening skill of seventh grade students using games. Research design for this study was Classroom Action Research and the researcher used listening tests and observation checklists as instruments.The criteria of success was successfully achieved in Cycle 2 with the percentage of 74%.

  9. Morphological Evolution of Low-Grade Silica Fume at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junhong; Li, Tong; Li, Xiaoping; Chou, Kuo-Chih; Hou, Xinmei

    2017-07-01

    To solve the environmental pollution problem caused by low-grade silica fume (SiO2, < 86 mass%) and further expand its application field, the morphological development of low-grade silica fume from room temperature to 900 °C in air was investigated using TG-DTA, SEM and TEM techniques. The structural development of silica fume was further analyzed using FT-IR and Raman spectrum. The results show that silica fume contains many defects of broken bands such as Si-O or ≡Si at room temperature. When exposed to the moister or water, the broken bonds tend to react with water and result in the formation of Si-OH and adjacent hydroxyl groups of Si-OH•OH-Si. At elevated temperature up to 900 °C, the structure of silica fume becomes compact due to the reconstruction of the broken bonds caused by the dehydration reaction.

  10. Simulation of queue with cyclic service in signalized intersection system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Dermawan Mulyodiputro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The simulation was implemented by modeling the queue with cyclic service in the signalized intersection system. The service policies used in this study were exhaustive and gated, the model was the M/M/1 queue, the arrival rate used was Poisson distribution and the services rate used was Exponential distribution. In the gated service policy, the server served only vehicles that came before the green signal appears at an intersection. Considered that there were 2 types of exhaustive policy in the signalized intersection system, namely normal exhaustive (vehicles only served during the green signal was still active, and exhaustive (there was the green signal duration addition at the intersection, when the green signal duration at an intersection finished. The results of this queueing simulation program were to obtain characteristics and performance of the system, i.e. average number of vehicles and waiting time of vehicles in the intersection and in the system, as well as system utilities. Then from these values, it would be known which of the cyclic service policies (normal exhaustive, exhaustive and gated was the most suitable when applied to a signalized intersection system

  11. Improving Students' Speaking Skill Through Role Play Strategy at Grade Eighth in SMPN 6 Rambah

    OpenAIRE

    Dwiana, Ari Aprilia; Rahayu, Pipit; -, Eripuddin

    2015-01-01

    This research was conducted to improve students' speaking skill at eighth grade students of SMPN 6 Rambahthrough role play strategy used a Classroom Action Research (CAR) method which is conducted to solve thestudents' problem in English Speaking. The researcher did two cycles, which each cycle consists of planning, acting,observing, and reflecting. The qualitative data were gained by analyzing the field note and observation result andthe quantitative data were obtained from the students' spe...

  12. Art educators report grades at which they teach 11 drawing concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basseches, K B

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to solicit information about the applicability of 11 basic perceptual concepts for instruction in drawing to students in Kindergarten through Grade 12. The study is based on responses to a national survey of 750 art educators, 250 in elementary, 250 in middle, and 250 in high school teaching assignments. Among these, 87% were female, 8% were 20 to 29 years old, 15% were 30 to 39 years, 48% were 40 to 49 years, 27% were 50 to 59 years, and 2% were 60 years or older. As few as 35.5% to as many as 48.7% (per concept) of the art educators reported that they teach each of the 11 concepts in elementary grades. Also, from 33.3% to 38.4% (per concept) of these teachers indicated that they stop teaching the 11 target concepts to students in high school. Empirical evidence from psychologists suggested that children gain comprehension of the concepts at differing points in their development. Were art educators employing the information identified by psychological research, their reports might have presented clear distinctions between grades at which each of the 11 concepts are taught. The results are interpreted in light of five possible explanations.

  13. Political Intersectionality and Democratic Politics in the European Public Sphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte

    2015-01-01

    Public Sphere (EPS). It is inspired by results and reflections from the European Gender Project (EGP) , where intersectionality was used as an approach for analysing negotiations between gender and ethno-national diversity in selected European countries and in relation to the European Public Sphere...... intersections of gender and ethnic diversity in political life at the national and transnational levels across Europe. In this context, political intersectionality refers to the framing of gender and ethnic diversity by major political actors as well as by activities of women’s and anti-racist organisations...

  14. An Index for Intersecting Branes in Matrix Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Steinacker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We introduce an index indicating the occurrence of chiral fermions at the intersection of branes in matrix models. This allows to discuss the stability of chiral fermions under perturbations of the branes.

  15. The OAFM magnet for ISR intersection I-8

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    The Open Axial Field Magnet (OAFM), weighing in at 300 tons, was installed in ISR intersection I-8 and brought into operation early in 1979. Fitted with a highly transparent "flat-fish" vacuum chamber, it served experiment R807 (large transverse momentum). Flat-fish vacuum chambers were originally developed for use inside the Split-Field Magnet (SFM) at intersection I-4: see 8310325 and references there.

  16. Gender Equality, Intersectionality and Diversity in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agustin, Lise Rolandsen

    Analyzing the developments which have characterized EU gender equality policies and women's transnational activism since the introduction of multiple discrimination policies in the 1990s, this book identifies two interrelated challenges: diversity of women's interests, and degendering of policies....... Drawing on discursive policy analysis, it addresses the interaction between policies, institutions and civil society actors in relation to gender equality, diversity and intersectionality at the European level. Rolandsen Agustín successfully integrates the concepts of diversity and gender equality...

  17. Intersect a quartic to extract its roots

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavendra G. Kulkarni

    2017-01-01

    In this note we present a new method for determining the roots of a quartic polynomial, wherein the given quartic polynomial is intersected by a quadratic polynomial (which has two unknown coefficients) at its root point; so the root satisfies both the quartic and the quadratic equations. Elimination of the root term from the two equations leads to an expression in the two unknowns of quadratic polynomial. In addition, we introduce another expression in one unknown, which leads to determinati...

  18. Intersectional Dialogue - A Cosmopolitical Dialogue of Ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Adami

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The article is based on a critical cosmopolitan outlook on dialogue as not aimed at reaching consensus, but rather keeping dialogue of difference open, with the ability to reach common understanding of human rights on conflicting grounds. Intersectional dialogue is used as a concept that opens up possibilities to study, in a pragmatic sense, the ‘cosmopolitan space’ in which different axles of power met in the historical drafting of human rights. By enacting analysis of United Nations (UN documents from 1948 on the process of drafting the Universal Declaration on Human Rights (UDHR the conceptualization of intersectional dialogue is put to work. The utopian foundation for deliberative democracy as dialogue in the absence of power and interest does not acknowledge the reality in which the human rights were negotiated and debated. The paper questions the dominant narrative of a western philosophical ground for the universality of human rights.

  19. Planning of Autonomous Multi-agent Intersection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viksnin Ilya I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a traffic management system with agents acting on behalf autonomous vehicle at the crossroads. Alternatively to existing solutions based on usage of semiautonomous control systems with the control unit, proposed in this paper algorithm apply the principles of decentralized multi-agent control. Agents during their collaboration generate intersection plan and determinate the optimal order of road intersection for a given criterion based on the exchange of information about them and their environment. The paper contains optimization criteria for possible routes selection and experiments that perform in order to estimate the proposed model. Experiment results show that this model can significantly reduce traffic density compared to the traditional traffic management systems. Moreover, the proposed algorithm efficiency increases with road traffic density. Furthermore, the availability of control unit in the system significantly reduces the negative impact of possible failures and hacker attacks.

  20. Belonging and Unbelonging from an Intersectional Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ann-Dorte

    2009-01-01

    lives and local communities. The three levels are explained and illustrated with empirical examples from a Nordic context, all based on the perspective of intersectionality between gender, class, race, and ethnicity. Finally, the article discusses some challenges for further research on belonging......The article is primarily theoretical and conceptual. It focuses on the notion of belonging from an intersectional perspective. The purpose is to discuss different dimensions of the concept of ‘belonging' and its rooting at different analytical levels. The first part of the article outlines......, for instance how to combine analysis of model citizenship/migration regimes with perspectives on everyday life. Another question relates to dilemmas within studies of everyday life. On the one hand, these studies are based on voices from below and a high degree of authenticity, but on the other hand, they tend...

  1. Intense CH{sub 4} plumes generated by serpentinization of ultramafic rocks at the intersection of the 15{degree}20[minutes]N fracture zone and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlou, J.L.; Fouquet, Y.; Bougault, H.; Donval, J.P.; Etoubleau, J. [IFREMER Centre de Brest, Plouzane (France). Dept. Geosciences Marines; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Dapoigny, A. [CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Appriou, P. [Univ. de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France); Rona, P.A. [Rutgers-the State Univ. of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    1998-07-01

    As part of the FARA French-US Program designed to study the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) between 15{degree}N and the Azores, twenty-three dives with the submersible Nautile were conducted during the French-US Faranaut 15N cruise on the eastern and western parts of the Fracture Zone/Ridge axis intersection. South of the eastern ridge-transform fault intersection, nine Nautile dives were made within the rift valley and along the western rift valley wall. CH{sub 4} concentrations in the bottom waters reach 53.2 nmol/kg along faulted zones on top and on the east flank of the ultramafic inner corner high where serpentinized rocks outcrop. No {sup 3}He anomaly is associated with methane, ruling out any primary mantle component. High CH{sub 4} anomalies (up to 22 nmol/kg) are also present in the bottom waters of the rift valley northern segment on both the western and eastern valley walls and on the inner high adjacent to the eastern wall where ultramafic rocks outcrop. Seven vertical hydrocasts carried out in the axial valley (4500 M deep) show an intense CH{sub 4} anomaly, with a maximum (35.8 nmol/kg) at 3200 m depth. CH{sub 4} concentrations of 9.9--14.9 nmol/kg are also present on the western wall along the 3200 m isobath. CH{sub 4} output from ultramafic outcrops on the western and eastern intersections of the Fracture Zone with the MAR is believed to reflect ongoing serpentinization.

  2. Evaluation of several FDG PET parameters for prediction of soft tissue tumour grade at primary diagnosis and recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendler, Wolfgang P. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Chalkidis, Rebecca P.; Ilhan, Harun [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Knoesel, Thomas [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Institute of Pathology, Munich (Germany); Herrmann, Ken [Julius-Maximilians-University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Issels, Rolf D.; Lindner, Lars H. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Internal Medicine III, Munich (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Munich (Germany); Bartenstein, Peter [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Munich (Germany); Cyran, Clemens C. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Hacker, Marcus [Vienna General Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of SUV-based parameters derived from [{sup 18} F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in order to optimize non-invasive prediction of soft tissue tumour (STT) grade. One hundred and twenty-nine lesions from 123 patients who underwent FDG-PET for primary staging (n = 79) or assessment of recurrence (n = 44) of STT were analyzed retrospectively. Histopathology was the reference standard for tumour grading. Absolute values and tumour-to-liver ratios of several standardized uptake value (SUV) parameters were correlated with tumour grading. At primary diagnosis SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub peak}, SUV{sub max}/SUV{sub liver} and SUV{sub peak}/SUV{sub liver} showed good correlation with tumour grade. SUV{sub peak} (area under the receiver-operating-characteristic, AUC-ROC: 0.82) and SUV{sub peak}/SUV{sub liver} (AUC-ROC: 0.82) separated best between low grade (WHO intermediate, grade 1 sarcoma, and low risk gastrointestinal stromal tumours, GISTs) and high grade (grade 2/3 sarcoma and intermediate/high risk GISTs) lesions: optimal threshold for SUV{sub peak}/SUV{sub liver} was 2.4, which resulted in a sensitivity of 79 % and a specificity of 81 %. At disease recurrence, the AUC-ROC was <0.75 for each parameter. A tumour SUV{sub peak} of at least 2.4 fold mean liver uptake predicts high grade histopathology with good diagnostic accuracy at primary staging. At disease recurrence, FDG-PET does not reliably separate high and low grade lesions. (orig.)

  3. Corridor-level signalized intersection safety analysis in Shanghai, China using Bayesian hierarchical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kun; Wang, Xuesong; Huang, Helai; Chen, Xiaohong

    2013-01-01

    Most traffic crashes in Chinese cities occur at signalized intersections. Research on the intersection safety problem in China is still in its early stage. The recent development of an advanced traffic information system in Shanghai enables in-depth intersection safety analyses using road design, traffic operation, and crash data. In Shanghai, the road network density is relatively high and the distance between signalized intersections is small, averaging about 200m. Adjacent signalized intersections located along the same corridor share similar traffic flows, and signals are usually coordinated. Therefore, when studying intersection safety in Shanghai, it is essential to account for intersection correlations within corridors. In this study, data for 195 signalized intersections along 22 corridors in the urban areas of Shanghai were collected. Mean speeds and speed variances of corridors were acquired from taxis equipped with Global Positioning Systems (GPS). Bayesian hierarchical models were applied to identify crash risk factors at both the intersection and the corridor levels. Results showed that intersections along corridors with lower mean speeds were associated with fewer crashes than those with higher speeds, and those intersections along two-way roads, under elevated roads, and in close proximity to each other, tended to have higher crash frequencies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of Cooperative Class of Students at Different Grade Levels in Creative Manufacturing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honmura, Shinji; Yamada, Makoto; Hama, Katsumi; Sukenobu, Satoru

    Creative Manufacturing Practice, a cooperative class of the 2nd and the 3rd year students, has been conducted since fiscal year 2004 in Department of Mechanical Engineering, HAKODATE National College of Technology. In this paper, the contents of the practice in the classes covered for three years from fiscal year 2005 are outlined, and the results of the questionnaire survey conducted among the students who attended the cooperative class are shown. The results of the questionnaire survey showed that higher educational effects such as development of communication skills and leadership were obtained by working in combined teams of students at different grade levels.

  5. Intersectionality in European Union policymaking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lombardo, Emanuela; Agustin, Lise Rolandsen

    2016-01-01

    is particularly apt to deal with equality and diversity in policymaking. By analysing a selection of European Union policy documents on gender-based violence in the period 2000–2014, we attend to the question of what intersectionality can bring to policymaking in terms of strengthening inclusiveness and address......Inclusiveness of different social groups and responsiveness to the needs of increasingly diverse societies are key criteria for policy analysts to assess the quality of public policies. We argue that an intersectional approach attentive to the interaction of gender with other inequalities...

  6. Analysis of diffusion tensor imaging metrics for gliomas grading at 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Server, Andrés; Graff, Bjørn A; Josefsen, Roger; Orheim, Tone E D; Schellhorn, Till; Nordhøy, Wibeke; Nakstad, Per H

    2014-03-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values derived from DTI for grading of glial tumors, and to estimate the correlation between DTI parameters and tumor grades. Seventy-eight patients with glial tumors underwent DTI. AD, RD, ADC and FA values of tumor, peritumoral edema and contralateral normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and AD, RD, ADC and FA ratios: lowest average AD, RD, ADC and FA values in tumor or peritumoral edema to AD, RD, ADC and FA of NAWM were calculated. DTI parameters and tumor grades were analyzed statistically and with Pearson correlation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was also performed. The differences in ADC, AD and RD tumor values, and ADC and RD tumor ratios were statistically significant between grades II and III, grades II and IV, and between grades II and III-IV. The AD tumor ratio differed significantly among all tumor grades. Tumor ADC, AD, RD and glial tumor grades were strongly correlated. In the ROC curve analysis, the area under the curve (AUC) of the parameter tumor ADC was the largest for distinguishing grade II from grades III to IV (98.5%), grade II from grade IV (98.9%) and grade II from grade III (97.0%). ADC, RD and AD are useful DTI parameters for differentiation between low- and high-grade gliomas with a diagnostic accuracy of more than 90%. Our study revealed a good inverse correlation between ADC, RD, AD and WHO grades II-IV astrocytic tumors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Technological Studies at Thomas Edison Middle School. Grades 6-7-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Patrick N.

    This technology studies curriculum for grades 6-8 is a plan for each middle school student to experience technology education for approximately 60 days (1 trimester of a 180-day school year) in each grade. Section A provides definitions; structure or content for grade-level programs with science and technology unifiers (unifying curricular…

  8. Effects of Extracurricular Participation during Middle School on Academic Motivation and Achievement at Grade 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Myung Hee; Hughes, Jan N.; Cao, Qian; Kwok, Oi-man

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of participating in two domains of extracurricular activities (sports and performance arts/clubs) in Grades 7 and 8 on Grade 9 academic motivation and letter grades, above baseline performance. Participants were 483 students (55% male; 33% Euro-American, 25% African American, and 39% Latino). Propensity score weighting…

  9. Factors Related to the Likelihood of Grade Inflation at Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heulett, Steven Talmadge

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies have documented a trend of higher grades awarded by postsecondary institutions in both the United States and Canada over the last two decades. Grade inflation in higher education is a potentially costly problem for a variety of reasons, but little empirical research about the causes of grade inflation has been conducted. This…

  10. Democratising intersectionality? participatory structures and equality policies in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Alonso Alvarez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Scholarly work on intersectionality has shown some concern on whether this policy strategy is implemented in a participatory manner. The case of Portugal has been of particular interest since the country features a long tradition of involving civil society in the making of equality policies. This article revisits the Portuguese case in order to analyse recent developments. First, the participatory and coordinated approach adopted so far to deal with inequalities is described. Second, the analysis focuses on gender-based violence policies to help capturing new advancements. These policies have been recently enlarged to tackle the situation of women at the intersections and civil society actors have been actively involved in the policy-making process. In particular, the case of policies to combat female genital mutilation illustrates how participatory structures contribute to bring an intersectional perspective. The analysis of the Portuguese case allows thus reflecting on the potential benefits of democratising intersectionality as well as its limits.

  11. Intersectionalities of Gender Violence: Legal Remedies: Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Goldscheid

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Critiques of legal remedies’ capacity adequately to address the intersectional nature of gender violence lie at the heart of both theoretical and practical discourse. Concern about remedies complements the important literature detailing the narrative experiences of those who experience violence grounded in multiple intersections of identity. This is an introduction to a set of papers that represent highlights from the conference entitled “International Congress on Gender Violence: Intersectionalities”. The papers address approaches to legal remedies that take into account the intersectional nature of gender violence. Las críticas a la capacidad de los remedies legales para abordar la naturaleza interseccional de la violencia de género están en el centro del discurso teórico y práctico. La preocupación sobre los remedios complementa la importante literatura que detalla las experiencias narrativas de las personas que experimentan violencia alojada en múltiples intersecciones de identidad. Esta es una introducción a artículos representativos del Congreso Internacional sobre Violencia de Género: Intersecciones. Los artículos abordan un acercamiento a los remedios legales que tienen en cuenta la naturaleza interseccional de la violencia de género. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2710535

  12. Complicating Counterspaces: Intersectionality and the Michigan Womyn's Music Festival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Elizabeth A; Todd, Nathan R; Odahl-Ruan, Charlynn; Shattell, Mona

    2016-06-01

    The counterspaces framework articulated by Case and Hunter (2012), follows from community psychology's long-standing interest in the potential for settings to promote well-being and liberatory responses to oppression. This framework proposes that certain settings (i.e., "counterspaces") facilitate a specific set of processes that promote the well-being of marginalized groups. We argue that an intersectional analysis is crucial to understand whether and how counterspaces achieve these goals. We draw from literature on safe spaces and present a case study of the Michigan Womyn's Music Festival (Michfest) to illustrate the value of an intersectional analysis and explore how these processes operate. Based on 20 in-person interviews, 23 responses to an online survey, and ethnographic field notes, we show how Michfest was characterized by a particular intersection of identities at the setting level, and intersectional diversity complicated experiences at the individual level. Moreover, intersectional identities provided opportunities for dialogue and change at the setting level, including the creation of counterspaces within counterspaces. Overall, we demonstrate the need to attend to intersectionality in counterspaces, and more broadly in how we conceptualize settings in community psychology. © Society for Community Research and Action 2016.

  13. Misconception on Addition and Subtraction of Fraction at Primary School Students in Fifth-Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivena, V.; Ningsih, A. R.; Jupri, A.

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to investigate the mastery concept of the student in mathematics learning especially in addition and subtraction of fraction at primary school level. By using qualitative research method, the data were collected from 23 grade five students (10-11-year-old). Instruments included a test, that is accompanied by Certainty Response Index (CRI) and interview with students and teacher. The result of the test has been obtained, then processed by analyzing the student’s answers for each item and then grouped by the CRI categories that combined with the results of the interview with students and teacher. The results showed that student’s mastery-concept on additional and subtraction dominated by category ‘misconception’. So, we can say that mastery-concept on addition and subtraction of fraction at fifth-grade students is still low. Finally, the impact can make most of primary student think that learning addition and subtraction of fraction in mathematics is difficult.

  14. Grading Practices and Considerations of Graduate Students at the Beginning of their Teaching Assignment

    CERN Document Server

    Yerushalmi, Edit; Maries, Alexandru; Henderson, Charles R; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    Research shows that expert-like approaches to problem-solving can be promoted by encouraging students to explicate their thought processes and follow a prescribed problem-solving strategy. Since grading communicates instructors' expectations, teaching assistants' grading decisions play a crucial role in forming students' approaches to problem-solving in physics. We investigated the grading practices and considerations of 43 graduate teaching assistants (TAs). The TAs were asked to grade a set of specially designed student solutions and explain their grading decisions. We found that in a quiz context, a majority of TAs noticed but did not grade on solution features which promote expert-like approaches to problem-solving. In addition, TAs graded differently in quiz and homework contexts, partly because of how they considered time limitations in a quiz. Our findings can inform professional development programs for TAs.

  15. Rhythm production at school entry as a predictor of poor reading and spelling at the end of first grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundetræ, Kjersti; Thomson, Jenny M

    2018-01-01

    Rhythm plays an organisational role in the prosody and phonology of language, and children with literacy difficulties have been found to demonstrate poor rhythmic perception. This study explored whether students' performance on a simple rhythm task at school entry could serve as a predictor of whether they would face difficulties in word reading and spelling at the end of grade 1. The participants were 479 Norwegian 6-year-old first graders randomized as controls in the longitudinal RCT on track (n = 1171). Rhythmic timing and pre-reading skills were tested individually at school entry on a digital tablet. On the rhythm task, the students were told to tap a drum appearing on the screen to two different rhythms (2 Hz paced and 1.5 Hz paced). Children's responses were recorded as they tapped on the screen with their index finger. Significant group differences were found in rhythm tapping ability measured at school entry, when groups were defined upon whether children went on to score above or below the 20th percentile reading and spelling thresholds in national assessment tests at the end of grade one. Inclusion of the school-entry rhythmic tapping measure into a model of classification accuracy for above or below threshold reading and spelling improved accuracy of classification by 6.2 and 9.2% respectively.

  16. Using Intersectionality in Student Affairs Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayhorn, Terrell L.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter presents intersectionality as a useful heuristic for conducting research in higher education and student affairs contexts. Much more than just another theory, intersectionality can powerfully shape student affairs research in both obvious and tacit ways.

  17. Investigating everyday measures through exploratory talk: whole class plenary intervention and landscape study at grade four

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gade, Sharada; Blomqvist, Charlotta

    2016-10-01

    We report an exploratory talk based, whole class plenary intervention, in relation to students' understanding of everyday measures and measurement, in a grade four classroom at a grade 4-6 school in Sweden. Extended, project related, teacher-researcher collaboration forms basis for such cultural historical activity theory or CHAT based efforts. As formative intervention, the conduct of the plenary is not pre-determined but embedded in ongoing curricular realities, with the agency of students and teacher promoted, pedagogical ideas reutilised and the role of researcher viewed as supporting design and growth of the intervention. Under Charlotta's guidance as teacher, the plenary is opportunity for her students to examine improbable scenarios such as, Can Eva and Anton measure the length of Sweden on foot, Can Lars and Iris measure their age in decimeters. A zone of proximal development is created, in which students make the transition from spontaneous to scientific concepts and learn how various units of measurement are objects-that-can-be-used-for-certain-purposes. With opportunity for critical and reflective inquiry, in a plenary designed to lead development, Charlotta's students look beyond the making of rote measurements and articulate a theory of measure in nascent terms. Such a landscape of teaching-learning is finally understood in terms of the nature of talk that was facilitated, the manner of pedagogy utilised, the style of teaching exercised and the kind of learning that was demanded of her students.

  18. Intersection assistance: a safe solution for older drivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotzauer, Mandy; Caljouw, Simone R; de Waard, Dick; Brouwer, Wiebo H

    2013-10-01

    Within the next few decades, the number of older drivers operating a vehicle will increase rapidly (Eurostat, 2011). As age increases so does physical vulnerability, age-related impairments, and the risk of being involved in a fatal crashes. Older drivers experience problems in driving situations that require divided attention and decision making under time pressure as reflected by their overrepresentation in at-fault crashes on intersections. Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) especially designed to support older drivers crossing intersections might counteract these difficulties. In a longer-term driving simulator study, the effects of an intersection assistant on driving were evaluated. 18 older drivers (M=71.44 years) returned repeatedly completing a ride either with or without a support system in a driving simulator. In order to test the intersection assistance, eight intersections were depicted for further analyses. Results show that ADAS affects driving. Equipped with ADAS, drivers allocated more attention to the road center rather than the left and right, crossed intersections in shorter time, engaged in higher speeds, and crossed more often with a critical time-to-collision (TTC) value. The implications of results are discussed in terms of behavioral adaptation and safety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Intersecting surface defects and two-dimensional CFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomis, Jaume; Le Floch, Bruno; Pan, Yiwen; Peelaers, Wolfger

    2017-08-01

    We initiate the study of intersecting surface operators/defects in 4D quantum field theories (QFTs). We characterize these defects by coupled 4D/2D/0D theories constructed by coupling the degrees of freedom localized at a point and on intersecting surfaces in spacetime to each other and to the 4D QFT. We construct supersymmetric intersecting surface defects preserving just two supercharges in N =2 gauge theories. These defects are amenable to exact analysis by localization of the partition function of the underlying 4D/2D/0D QFT. We identify the 4D/2D/0D QFTs that describe intersecting surface operators in N =2 gauge theories realized by intersecting M2 branes ending on N M5 branes wrapping a Riemann surface. We conjecture and provide evidence for an explicit equivalence between the squashed four-sphere partition function of these intersecting defects and correlation functions in Liouville/Toda CFT with the insertion of arbitrary degenerate vertex operators, which are labeled by two representations of S U (N ).

  20. Intersection Bodies and Generalized Cosine Transforms

    OpenAIRE

    Rubin, Boris

    2007-01-01

    Intersection bodies represent a remarkable class of geometric objects associated with sections of star bodies and invoking Radon transforms, generalized cosine transforms, and the relevant Fourier analysis. The main focus of this article is interrelation between generalized cosine transforms of different kinds in the context of their application to investigation of a certain family of intersection bodies, which we call $\\lam$-intersection bodies. The latter include $k$-intersection bodies (in...

  1. Sensitivity analyses of stopping distance for connected vehicles at active highway-rail grade crossings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chung-Jen; Jones, Elizabeth G

    2017-02-01

    This paper performs sensitivity analyses of stopping distance for connected vehicles (CVs) at active highway-rail grade crossings (HRGCs). Stopping distance is the major safety factor at active HRGCs. A sensitivity analysis is performed for each variable in the function of stopping distance. The formulation of stopping distance treats each variable as a probability density function for implementing Monte Carlo simulations. The result of the sensitivity analysis shows that the initial speed is the most sensitive factor to stopping distances of CVs and non-CVs. The safety of CVs can be further improved by the early provision of onboard train information and warnings to reduce the initial speeds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Allergic Sensitization at School Age is a Systemic Low-grade Inflammatory Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, B. L.; Stokholm, J.; Schoos, A.-M. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Systemic low-grade inflammation has been demonstrated in a range of the frequent noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) proposing a shared mechanism, but is largely unexplored in relation to allergic sensitization. We therefore aimed to investigate the possible association with childhood...... allergic sensitization. Methods High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8) were measured in plasma at age 6 months (N = 214) and 7 years (N = 277) in children from the Copenhagen Prospective...... Studies on Asthma in Childhood2000 (COPSAC2000) birth cohort. Allergic sensitization against common inhalant and food allergens was determined longitudinally at ages ½, 1½, 4 and 6 years by specific IgE assessments and skin prick tests. Associations between inflammatory biomarkers and sensitization...

  3. Developing Problem-Based Learning (PBL Worksheets for the Eight Grade Students at Junior High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isrokijah Isrokijah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at developing problem-based learning (PBL worksheets for the eighth grade students at junior high school. It belongs to Borg & Gall’s research and development R & D, involving 35 students from one class as the subjects. Interview guide for the teachers and questionnaire for the students were employed to collect data in needs analysis, and checklist in validation and try-out stages. The qualitative data collected through interview was analyzed descriptively, while, the quantitative data collected through questionnaire and checklist was analyzed using statistic descriptive by counting the frequency of appearance of the response. Finally the result of the data analysis was synthesized to get the real picture about the teachers’ and students’ response towards the use of PBL worksheets in learning English.   DOI: https://doi.org/10.24071/llt.2015.180203

  4. Bicone vacuum chamber for ISR intersection

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    This is one of the bicone chambers made of titanium for experiment R 702. The central corrugated part had a very thin titanium wall (0.28 mm). The first of these chambers collapsed in its central part when baked at 300 C (August 1975). After an intensive effort to develop better quality and reproducible welds for this special material, the ISR workshop was able to build two new chambers of this type. One of them was installed at I 7 for R 702 in 1976 and worked perfectly. It was at that time the most "transparent" intersection vacuum chamber. See also 7609219, 7609221.

  5. A driving simulator evaluation of potential speed reductions using two innovative designs for signalised urban intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Amanda N; Beanland, Vanessa; Candappa, Nimmi; Mitsopoulos-Rubens, Eve; Corben, Bruce; Lenné, Michael G

    2017-01-01

    Intersections are typically associated with a higher level of crash risk than other types of facilities on the road network. Standard cross-road intersections are particularly hazardous because by their very design, drivers may travel through at speeds that are incompatible with human biomechanical tolerance should a crash occur. Further, drivers are exposed to dangerous conflict angles, which are likely to result in serious injury. This paper examines the effectiveness of two new intersection designs aimed at restricting potentially dangerous conflict angles while reducing driver speeds through the intersection. These designs, named the "Cut-Through" and the "Squircle", incorporate key features of both signalised intersections and roundabouts. The intersections are controlled by signals similar to a signalised roundabout. Instead of a standard central island, right turning traffic (equivalent to left turns in jurisdictions that drive on the right) cut through the central island, thereby avoiding traffic interlocks and delays that can occur with the traditional signalised roundabout. Across two driving simulator studies, vehicle speed data were collected on approach to and through each of the proposed intersection designs. Performance was benchmarked against equivalent standard signalised cross-road intersections and standard non-signalised roundabouts. Notably, drivers reduced their speeds by approximately 30-40% when negotiating both the Cut-Through and the Squircle compared to the standard signalised intersections. The safety potentials of the two new intersection designs are discussed within the guidelines of the Safe Systems principles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of a Tier 2 Supplemental Reading Intervention for At-Risk Fourth Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchey, Kristen D.; Silverman, Rebecca D.; Montanaro, Elizabeth A.; Speece, Deborah L.; Schatschneider, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated a Tier 2 intervention in the context of a Response to Intervention (RTI) model for 123 fourth grade students who were identified as having a high probability of reading failure. A randomized control trial was used to evaluate the effects of a 24 session multi-component supplemental intervention targeting fluency and expository comprehension of science texts. Intervention students performed significantly higher on comprehension strategy knowledge and use and science knowledge, but not on word reading, fluency, or other measures of reading comprehension. Moderators of intervention effects were also examined; children at higher risk in the intervention condition appeared to benefit more in comparison to lower probability children in intervention and compared to higher probability children in the control condition. PMID:22685347

  7. Allergic Sensitization at School Age is a Systemic Low-grade Inflammatory Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, B. L.; Stokholm, J.; Schoos, A.-M. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Systemic low-grade inflammation has been demonstrated in a range of the frequent noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) proposing a shared mechanism, but is largely unexplored in relation to allergic sensitization. We therefore aimed to investigate the possible association with childhood alle...... = 0.001], aeroallergens (aOR, 1.43; 1.15–1.77; P = 0.001), food allergens (aOR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.02–1.67; P = 0.04), sensitization without any clinical allergy symptoms (aOR = 1.40; 1.06–1.85; P = 0.02), and with similar findings for skin prick tests. The other inflammatory markers were...... not univariately associated with sensitization, but multiparametric PCA suggested a specific inflammatory response among sensitized children. Inflammatory markers at age 6 months were not associated with subsequent development of sensitization phenotypes. Conclusions Elevated hs-CRP is associated with allergic...

  8. Aspects That Concern Assessing Lower Secondary School Students at the Physics National Contest Exemplification for the 7th Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    In the present article, we aim at analysing the results obtained by the 7th grade students who participated in the 50th edition of the Physics National Contest, which took place in Cluj-Napoca between the 6th and the 11th of April, 2014. Why have we chosen the 7th grade? One of the reasons is represented by the good results obtained by the…

  9. Effects of a Parent Support Reading Intervention on Seventh-Grade At-Risk Students' Reading Comprehension Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reglin, Gary; Cameron, Horace; Losike-Sedimo, Nonofo

    2012-01-01

    This study determined the effectiveness of a parent support intervention to improve parental involvement and students' scores in reading. During the past 4 years (2006-2010), the students' seventh-grade reading scores at the study site on the state end-of-grade (EOG) reading test declined from 71.1% to 28.1%, which represented a decrease of 43.0%…

  10. Is social support equally beneficial for working climate and health of women and men at different professional grades?

    OpenAIRE

    Casini, Annalisa; Godin, Isabelle; Clays, Els; Kittel, France

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To examine the association between social support at work (SSW), health factors and working climate as a function of gender and professional grade. Methods: Belstress III database comprising data on 2983 workers of seven (semi-)public companies were used. Socio-demographic, working climate, mental and physical health indicators were collected. Professional grade and gender stratified logistic regressions were performed for evaluating the association between SSW and current health, stress...

  11. Frontal brain asymmetry, childhood maltreatment, and low-grade inflammation at midlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostinar, Camelia E; Davidson, Richard J; Graham, Eileen K; Mroczek, Daniel K; Lachman, Margie E; Seeman, Teresa E; van Reekum, Carien M; Miller, Gregory E

    2017-01-01

    Frontal EEG asymmetry is thought to reflect variations in affective style, such that greater relative right frontal activity at rest predicts enhanced emotional responding to threatening or negative stimuli, and risk of depression and anxiety disorders. A diathesis-stress model has been proposed to explain how this neuro-affective style might predispose to psychopathology, with greater right frontal activity being a vulnerability factor especially under stressful conditions. Less is known about the extent to which greater relative right frontal activity at rest might be associated with or be a diathesis for deleterious physical health outcomes. The present study examined the association between resting frontal EEG asymmetry and systemic, low-grade inflammation and tested the diathesis-stress model by examining whether childhood maltreatment exposure interacts with resting frontal asymmetry in explaining inflammation. Resting EEG, serum inflammatory biomarkers (interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen) and self-reported psychological measures were available for 314 middle-aged adults (age M=55.3years, SD=11.2, 55.7% female). Analyses supported the diathesis-stress model and revealed that resting frontal EEG asymmetry was significantly associated with inflammation, but only in individuals who had experienced moderate to severe levels of childhood maltreatment. These findings suggest that, in the context of severe adversity, a trait-like tendency towards greater relative right prefrontal activity may predispose to low-grade inflammation, a risk factor for conditions with inflammatory underpinnings such as coronary heart disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Factors associated with self-reported inattentive driving at highway-rail grade crossings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shanshan; Khattak, Aemal J

    2017-12-01

    This research identified factors associated with inattentive driving at Highway-Rail Grade Crossings (HRGCs) by investigating drivers' self-reported inattentive driving experiences and factors pertaining to their socioeconomic, personality, attitudinal, and other characteristics. A random selection of 2500 households in Nebraska received a survey questionnaire designed for licensed motor vehicle drivers; respondents returned 980 questionnaires. Factor analysis identified latent variables evaluating drivers' patience and inclination to wait for trains, attitudes toward new technology, law enforcement or education regarding HRGC safety, and the propensity to commit serious traffic violations at HRGCs. The investigation utilized a structural equation model for analysis. This model indicated that drivers with a higher risk of inattentive driving at HRGCs were: female, younger in age, from households with higher incomes, with shorter tenure (in years) in their current city of residence, more frequently used HRGCs, received less information on safety at HRGCs, had less patience to wait for trains to pass and had less interest in safety improvement technology, law enforcement or safety education at HRGCs. These research findings provide useful information for future research and to policy makers for improving public safety. Additionally, the results are useful for safety educational program providers for targeted program delivery to drivers that are more vulnerable to distracted driving at HRGCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Drama Performance Standards at Grades 4, 8 and 12 for North Dakota Drama Standards and Benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Roger; Lindekugel-Willis, Paula; Nilsen, Cheryl; Opp, Dean; Rauschenberger, Paula

    This document outlines the performance standards for drama in North Dakota public schools, grades K-12. Four levels of performance are provided for each benchmark by North Dakota educators for K-4, 5-8, and 9-12 grade levels. Level 4 describes advanced proficiency; Level 3, proficiency; Level 2, partial proficiency; and Level 1, novice. The…

  14. Una Mirada Interseccional a la Violencia contra las Mujeres con Diversidad Funcional (An Intersectional Glance at Violence against Women with Functional Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Arenas Conejo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The eradication of violence is one of the main demands of disabled women's organizations around the world. As a result of their activism, both the Beijing Platform for Action (1995 and the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (2006 made specific mention of their greater risk of suffering violence and the need to implement appropriate measures. However, the countries that have included these recommendations in their laws against gender violence are still scarce. Moreover, according to some women with functional diversity, this invisibility is often reproduced both among the feminist and the disability rights movement. The aim of this paper is to explore how an intersectional approach could help to overcome this double obstacle: on the one hand, encouraging the creation of alliances between social movements working for similar objectives and on the other hand, developing legislation and public policies which do not reproduce the exclusion of traditionally marginalized social groups. La erradicación de la violencia es una de las principales reivindicaciones de las organizaciones de mujeres con diversidad funcional a nivel internacional. Fruto de este activismo, se logró que tanto en la Plataforma de Acción de Beijing (1995 como en la Convención de la ONU sobre los derechos de las personas con discapacidad (2006, se hiciera mención específica a su mayor riesgo de sufrir violencia así como a la necesidad de implementar medidas adecuadas. Sin embargo, son todavía escasos los países cuya legislación contra la violencia de género ha introducido estas recomendaciones. Una invisibilización que, según manifiestan las propias mujeres con diversidad funcional, también se reproduce a menudo tanto en el movimiento feminista como en el de las personas con diversidad funcional. El objetivo del texto es explorar hasta qué punto la perspectiva de la interseccionalidad podría contribuir a superar este doble obstáculo: por un

  15. Composite Intersection Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misciagna, David T. (Inventor); Fuhrer, Jessica J. (Inventor); Funk, Robert S. (Inventor); Tolotta, William S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An assembly and method for manufacturing a composite reinforcement for unitizing a structure are provided. According to one embodiment, the assembly includes a base having a plurality of pins extending outwardly therefrom to define a structure about which a composite fiber is wound to define a composite reinforcement preform. The assembly also includes a plurality of mandrels positioned adjacent to the base and at least a portion of the composite reinforcement preform, and a cap that is positioned over at least a portion of the plurality of mandrels. The cap is configured to engage each of the mandrels to support the mandrels and the composite reinforcement preform during a curing process to form the composite reinforcement.

  16. On Supersymmetry Breaking in Intersecting Brane Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, M

    2004-01-13

    We discuss a framework to analyze the transmission of supersymmetry breaking in models of intersecting D-branes. Generically, different intersections preserve different fractions of an extended bulk supersymmetry, thus breaking supersymmetry completely but in a nonlocal way. We analyze this mechanism in a 5D toy model where two brane intersections, which are separated in the fifth dimension, break different halves of an extended {Nu} = 2 supersymmetry. The sector of the theory on one brane intersection feels the breakdown of the residual {Nu} = 1 supersymmetry only through two-loop interactions involving a coupling to fields from the other intersection. We compute the diagrams that contribute to scalar masses on one intersection and find that the masses are proportional to the compactification scale up to logarithmic corrections. We also compute the three-loop diagrams relevant to the Casimir energy between the two intersections and find a repulsive Casimir force.

  17. God-image of Servant King as powerful but vulnerable and serving: Towards transforming African church leadership at an intersection of African kingship and biblical kingship to servant leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vhumani Magezi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Christianity is mediated through culture and people’s cultural practices. One such cultural practice is African kingship. African kingship conveys on the ruler sovereignty, power, authority and supremacy over people under one’s jurisdiction. Intricately linked to respect for elders and those in power, African church leaders are at an intersection of the African kingship leadership style and the biblical kingship leadership style. Consciously or unconsciously, church leaders tend to embrace the African kingship approach to leadership and to a lesser extent biblical servant leadership. In such a situation, what God-image of biblical leadership could be discerned for constructive church leadership? In response, the God-image of Servant King as all powerful God, although vulnerable and serving, provides the framework for a transformative approach to church leadership in Africa.

  18. Dehydration Behavior of Metapelites and Metabasites at Very low to low Grade Metamorphic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massonne, H.; Willner, A. P.

    2007-12-01

    Thermodynamic calculations have been undertaken in the system Na-Ca-K-Fe-Mg-Al-Si-Ti-H-O with the PERPLE_X software package (Connolly, 1990 and updates) for a better understanding of the dehydration behavior of metapelites and metabasites during prograde metamorphism. To obtain reasonable results for the temperature range 150-450° C at pressures up to 25 kbar, the subsequent solid solution models were introduced being compatible with the applied thermodynamic data set of Holland & Powell (1998 and updates): a three component model for Mg-Fe2+-Fe3+-pumpellyite, a two component model for Fe2+-Mg- stilpnomelane, a four component amphibole model (tremolite - Fe2+-tremolite - glaucophane - Mg- riebeckite), and a four component Na-pyroxene model (acmite - jadeite - diopside - hedenbergite). The water contents released by prograde metamorphism up to 450° C from MORB and psammopelitic compositions on top of oceanic crust, were obtained by calculating P-T pseudosections. Metabasite contains 6-7 wt% H2O bound to minerals at 150° C depending on the oxidation state. Along geotherms lower than 7° C/km typical for young subduction zones, no water is released up to 400° C. However, reduction of the rock causes release of small amounts of water. Metapsammopelitic rocks also store about 6 wt% H2O in minerals at 150° C. Considerable amounts of water are liberated by mineral reactions already in the temperature range 150-250° C also at the above mentioned low geotherms. This behavior determines the rheological characteristics of the upper oceanic crust during early subduction. If water is exclusively released in the sedimentary portion of the downgoing crust only this material gets weakened to be scraped off to form accretionary wedges. At geotherms of 15-20° C/km both lithologies show significant dehydration at very low metamorphic grade. For instance, in cold frontal paleoaccretionary prisms of the Chilean Coastal Cordillera metapelites by far dominate whereas in hotter

  19. Identification of black spots for traffic injury in road intersections dependence of injury definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Hansen, Dennis; Lauritsen, Jens M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Introduction In Denmark it is common practice that road administrations use black spot identification methods in planning. Assumed black spots are further reviewed based on traffic volume, modes of transportation and other considerations. For our region hospital based geo-located traffic...... injury information has been available for about 20 years and in the current project the aim was to investigate whether different definitions of black spots (hot spots) would point at different intersections for further scrutiny. During the years 2002 to 2007 all 29 719 patient contacts due to traffic...... defined as The upper decile of injury generating intersections. Intersections with at least one death or hospitalised patient. The intersections covering the upper decile of injuries. Results The three definitions in combination identified 295 injury burdened intersections. Only three intersections were...

  20. Intersect a quartic to extract its roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra G. Kulkarni

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this note we present a new method for determining the roots of a quartic polynomial, wherein the given quartic polynomial is intersected by a quadratic polynomial (which has two unknown coefficients at its root point; so the root satisfies both the quartic and the quadratic equations. Elimination of the root term from the two equations leads to an expression in the two unknowns of quadratic polynomial. In addition, we introduce another expression in one unknown, which leads to determination of the two unknowns and subsequently the roots of quartic polynomial.

  1. ISR intersection I-2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1972-01-01

    Towards the left one sees, on top of ISR beam 1, the front section of the 30-metre-long, small-angle spectrometer from the CERN-Holland-Lancaster-Manchester single-particle production experiment. It consists of two special septum magnets carrying up to 20 kA each. These magnets are necessary to force charged particles produced at small angles away from the ISR beam. They are followed by two threshold Cerenkov counters and (not visible) three more bending magnets and a 6-metre-long Cerenkov counter. Particle identification follows from the Cerenkov signals after determination of the particle trajectory through the spectrometer with magnetostrictive spark chambers. The positions of the first magnets and Cerenkov counters can be changed by remote control. In front one sees the electronics which determines the traversal of a charged particle from scintillator counter signals and gives the "fire" signal for the spark chambers.

  2. Investigation of Key Factors for Accident Severity at Railroad Grade Crossings by Using a Logit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shou-Ren; Li, Chin-Shang; Lee, Chi-Kang

    2010-02-01

    Although several studies have used logit or probit models and their variants to fit data of accident severity on roadway segments, few have investigated accident severity at a railroad grade crossing (RGC). Compared to accident risk analysis in terms of accident frequency and severity of a highway system, investigation of the factors contributing to traffic accidents at an RGC may be more complicated because of additional highway-railway interactions. Because the proportional odds assumption was violated while fitting cumulative logit modeled by the proportional odds models with stepwise variable selection to ordinal accident severity data collected at 592 RGCs in Taiwan, as suggested by Strokes et al. (2000, p. 249) a generalized logit model with stepwise variable selection was used instead to identify explanatory variables (factors or covariates) that were significantly associated with the severity of collisions. Hence, the fitted model was used to predict the level of accident severity, given a set of values in the explanatory variables. Number of daily trains, highway separation, number of daily trucks, obstacle detection device, and approaching crossing markings significantly affected levels of accident severity at an RGC (p-value = 0.0009, 0.0008, 0.0112, 0.0017, and 0.0003, respectively). Finally, marginal effect analysis on the number of daily trains and law enforcement camera was conducted to evaluate the effect of the number of daily trains and presence of a law enforcement camera on the potential accident severity.

  3. An application of signal detection theory for understanding driver behavior at highway-rail grade crossings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-19

    We used signal detection theory to examine if grade crossing warning devices were effective because they increased drivers' sensitivity to a train's approach or because they encouraged drivers to stop. We estimated d' and a for eight warning devices ...

  4. High-grade myxofibrosarcoma presenting at the spermatic cord after radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tearada, Hiroshi; Nagata, Masao; Mugiya, Soichi; Ozono, Seiichiro

    2012-11-28

    A 72-year-old man with a history of prostate cancer presented 7 years postradiotherapy with a painless, egg-sized, rapidly growing nodule on the left groin at the radiation site. He underwent left high orchiectomy under a diagnosis of groin lymph node metastasis of prostate cancer. The tumour had penetrated deep into the internal inguinal ring and was resected as proximally as possible to the internal ring with a positive surgical margin. Macroscopically, the left testis was intact in the resected specimen. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the tumour consisted of myxofibrosarcoma (MFS) with spindle cells; and was positive for vimentin, cytokeratin (AE1/AE3), MIB-1 and CD68, and negative for α-SMA, S-100, CD34 and myogenin. Thus, the tumour was diagnosed as high-grade MFS of the spermatic cord. Postoperative CT revealed a right renal tumour and adrenal tumour. Right radial nephrectomy was performed and the patient was doing well at 10-month follow-up.

  5. Experimental Realization of an Epsilon-Near-Zero Graded-Index Metalens at Terahertz Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Peña, Victor; Engheta, Nader; Kuznetsov, Sergei; Gentselev, Alexandr; Beruete, Miguel

    2017-09-01

    The terahertz band has been historically hindered by the lack of efficient generators and detectors, but a series of recent breakthroughs have helped to effectively close the "terahertz gap." A rapid development of terahertz technology has been possible thanks to the translation of revolutionary concepts from other regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Among them, metamaterials stand out for their unprecedented ability to control wave propagation and manipulate electromagnetic response of matter. They have become a workhorse in the development of terahertz devices such as lenses, polarizers, etc., with fascinating features. In particular, epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) metamaterials have attracted much attention in the past several years due to their unusual properties such as squeezing, tunneling, and supercoupling where a wave traveling inside an electrically small channel filled with an ENZ medium can be tunneled through it, reducing reflections and coupling most of its energy. Here, we design and experimentally demonstrate an ENZ graded-index (GRIN) metamaterial lens operating at terahertz with a power enhancement of 16.2 dB, using an array of narrow hollow rectangular waveguides working near their cutoff frequencies. This is a demonstration of an ENZ GRIN device at terahertz and can open the path towards other realizations of similar devices enabling full quasioptical processing of terahertz signals.

  6. IMPROVING WRITING DESCRIPTIVE TEXT BY USING NLP STRATEGY AT VIII GRADE OF SMPN 11 DURI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahler Dahler

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This research is based on the problem faced by the students such as: difficulty inunderstanding the generic structures of descriptive text and the difficulties in developingparagraph. The purpose of this research was to improve the students’ writing skill by usingNeuro Linguistics Programming (NLP strategy at VIII grade of SMPN 11 Mandau Duri. Theresearch design was Classroom Action Research (CAR consisted of two cycles. The datawere collected by using test, field note, observation sheet, and interview. Then, the datacollected were analyzed by using scoring rubric of writing descriptive text. The result showedthat students’ ability in writing descriptive text could be improved. It could be seen frombased score of students writing skill was 38 (failed improve to 51 (failed in cycle 1 to 70(Pass in cycle II. It was caused by some factors, those were the teacher gave motivation,created enjoyfull experience, comfortable class and used various media. In conclusion, theuse of NLP strategy has many beneficial.Keywords:Writing skill, Descriptive Text and NLP strategy.

  7. [Language and behavioral difficulties at age 3 and half and reading delay in grade 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watier, L; Dellatolas, G; Chevrie-Muller, C

    2006-09-01

    Early detection of specific language impairment and dyslexia in children is an important public health problem. Longitudinal studies are needed for the distinction of real impairments from simple transitory delays. Teachers filled a 29-item questionnaire on language and behavior for 695 children aged 3.5 years. Four years later (at second grade of primary school) the same children were evaluated for reading and writing. Statistical analysis focused on the relationships between teacher's early observations and reading delay 4 years later. Associated factors were age, sex, educational level and bilinguism of the parents, and area of the school. The delay in written language acquisition (8.5% of the children) was significantly associated with low educational level (but not bilinguism) of the parents and to the area of the school. In univariate analysis, most of the teacher's early negative assessments were significantly related to reading/writing delay, with the exception of some behavioral problems. However, when the effect of associated factors was taken into account only a few items, mainly concerning language expression, remained significantly associated with later reading/writing delay. These data show a major role of associated factors (educational level of the parents, area of the school) in reading delay, and help to select specific teacher's observations for an early prediction of this delay.

  8. Longitudinal Study on the Co-Occurrence of Peer Problems at Daycare Centre, in Preschool and First Grade of School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Kaarina; Neitola, Marita; Auremaa, Jatta; Laakkonen, Eero

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal research was designed to examine the prevalence and co-occurrence of peer problems such as rejection, withdrawal, loneliness, bullying, and victimization experienced by children (99 boys, 80 girls) in their everyday lives at daycare, in preschool and first grade of school--each successive spring--at the ages of 5, 6, and 7.…

  9. An Empirical Framework for Intersection Optimization Based on Uniform Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Operational performance optimization of signalized intersections is one of the most important tasks for traffic engineers and researchers. To compensate for the limitations of practical implementation, simulation software packages have been widely used to evaluate different optimization strategies and thus to improve the efficiency of the intersections as well as the entire network. However, for the existing optimization studies on signalized intersections, the relationships among various optimization measures and the combination of strategies have not been fully investigated. In this paper, uniform design experimentation was introduced to combine different optimization measures into strategies and achieve the minimum time cost in model construction. VISSIM software package was then calibrated and used to evaluate various optimization strategies and identify the one with the best measurement of performance, namely, control delay at the signalized intersection. By taking a representative congested intersection in Shanghai as a case study, the optimal strategy was identified to reduce the overall control delay by 27.3%, which further verified the modeling capability of the proposed method.

  10. Intersection Monitor for Traffic-Light-Preemption System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelder, Aaron; Foster, Conrad

    2006-01-01

    The figure shows an intersection monitor that is a key subsystem of an emergency traffic-light-preemption system that could be any of the systems described in the three immediately preceding articles and in Systems Would Preempt Traffic Lights for Emergency Vehicles (NPO-30573), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 10 (October 2004), page 36. This unit is so named because it is installed at an intersection, where it monitors the phases (in the sense of timing) of the traffic lights. The mode of operation of this monitor is independent of the type of traffic-light-controller hardware or software in use at the intersection. Moreover, the design of the monitor is such that (1) the monitor does not, by itself, affect the operation of the traffic- light controller and (2) in the event of a failure of the monitor, the trafficlight controller continues to function normally (albeit without preemption). The monitor is installed in series with the traffic-light controller at an intersection. The control signals of interest are monitored by use of high-impedance taps on affected control lines. These taps are fully isolated and further protected by high-voltage diodes that prevent any voltages or short circuits that arise within the monitor from affecting the controller. The signals from the taps are processed digitally and cleaned up by use of high-speed logic gates, and the resulting data are passed on to other parts of the traffic-light-preemption intersection subsystem. The data are compared continuously with data from vehicles and used to calculate timing for reliable preemption of the traffic lights. The pedestrian crossing at the intersection is also monitored, and pedestrians are warned not to cross during preemption.

  11. Complex Road Intersection Modelling Based on Low-Frequency GPS Track Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Deng, M.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, H.

    2017-09-01

    It is widely accepted that digital map becomes an indispensable guide for human daily traveling. Traditional road network maps are produced in the time-consuming and labour-intensive ways, such as digitizing printed maps and extraction from remote sensing images. At present, a large number of GPS trajectory data collected by floating vehicles makes it a reality to extract high-detailed and up-to-date road network information. Road intersections are often accident-prone areas and very critical to route planning and the connectivity of road networks is mainly determined by the topological geometry of road intersections. A few studies paid attention on detecting complex road intersections and mining the attached traffic information (e.g., connectivity, topology and turning restriction) from massive GPS traces. To the authors' knowledge, recent studies mainly used high frequency (1 s sampling rate) trajectory data to detect the crossroads regions or extract rough intersection models. It is still difficult to make use of low frequency (20-100 s) and easily available trajectory data to modelling complex road intersections geometrically and semantically. The paper thus attempts to construct precise models for complex road intersection by using low frequency GPS traces. We propose to firstly extract the complex road intersections by a LCSS-based (Longest Common Subsequence) trajectory clustering method, then delineate the geometry shapes of complex road intersections by a K-segment principle curve algorithm, and finally infer the traffic constraint rules inside the complex intersections.

  12. COMPLEX ROAD INTERSECTION MODELLING BASED ON LOW-FREQUENCY GPS TRACK DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Huang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that digital map becomes an indispensable guide for human daily traveling. Traditional road network maps are produced in the time-consuming and labour-intensive ways, such as digitizing printed maps and extraction from remote sensing images. At present, a large number of GPS trajectory data collected by floating vehicles makes it a reality to extract high-detailed and up-to-date road network information. Road intersections are often accident-prone areas and very critical to route planning and the connectivity of road networks is mainly determined by the topological geometry of road intersections. A few studies paid attention on detecting complex road intersections and mining the attached traffic information (e.g., connectivity, topology and turning restriction from massive GPS traces. To the authors’ knowledge, recent studies mainly used high frequency (1 s sampling rate trajectory data to detect the crossroads regions or extract rough intersection models. It is still difficult to make use of low frequency (20–100 s and easily available trajectory data to modelling complex road intersections geometrically and semantically. The paper thus attempts to construct precise models for complex road intersection by using low frequency GPS traces. We propose to firstly extract the complex road intersections by a LCSS-based (Longest Common Subsequence trajectory clustering method, then delineate the geometry shapes of complex road intersections by a K-segment principle curve algorithm, and finally infer the traffic constraint rules inside the complex intersections.

  13. Motorcycle and scooter speeds approaching urban intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, D; Buchanan, J

    2012-09-01

    Five urban, uncontrolled T-intersections known to be motorcycle crash 'black spots' were monitored using instrumentation and a roadside observer. Two sets of twelve-hour observations were collected for each site (N≈100,000). Instrumentation recorded the 'events' of vehicles passing to measure, speed, direction, lane position, vehicle type (broadly characterised) and headway. Observers further recorded times of bicycle events, type of motorcycle (scooters or motorcycles), the behaviour of motorcycles and the use of 'high conspicuity' gear such as clothing or helmets. Results establish that motorcycles travel around 10% faster than the other traffic (car mean speed=34.97 km/h), with motorcycles travelling on average 3.3 km/h faster than cars. Motorcycles were 3.4 times more likely to be exceeding the speed limit than cars. Similar results are described for scooters. Also examined are the influences on mean speeds such as the time of day, the presence of a car at the t-intersection, and the influence of free headway. The results are compared for robustness across locations and days. It is concluded that in urban areas motorcycles are travelling significantly faster than other traffic. These findings are discussed against a concern to reduce motorcycle crashes by improving conspicuity and previous research that implicates a 'looked-but-failed-to-see' effect for car drivers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. DESIGNING AN EFFECTIVE INTERSECTION USING CAD ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRISAN George-Horea

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring the safety and streamline in road traffic are very important aims, with regard to the nowadays people mobility level. Road infrastructure is an essential element that can meet these requirements. Thus, it is proposed to develop an effective model of intersection by using CAD software tools. This type of intersection can be successfully used on almost any category of roads, increasing road traffic safety, reducing passing times through the intersection and in the same time, reducing conflict points and increase the intersection capacity.

  15. Treatment of High-Grade Anal Dysplasia in High Risk Patients: Outcome at an Urban Community Health Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assoumou, Sabrina Annick; Panther, Lori Ann; Feng, Yang; Gelman, Rebecca Sue; Fugelso, Dana Kailani; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Human immunodeficiency (HIV)-infected patients and men who have sex with men (MSM) have a higher rate of high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), a likely precursor to anal cancer. This retrospective study describes the outcome of treating MSM with incident biopsy-proven HGAIN in an urban community health setting with access to outpatient ablation or operative treatment. The main outcome was freedom from HGAIN at follow-up. 153 met inclusion criteria; 86 (56%) were HIV-infected. Eighty (52%) received outpatient ablation, 49(61%) had a follow-up within 9 months. Among those, 26 (53%) were free of high-grade disease, 19 (39%) had high-grade disease; and 4 (8%) had unknown grading. In a logistic regression model, a lower extent of anal disease (1 quadrant vs. 2,3, or 4 quadrants) was significantly associated with a lower probability of high-grade disease (p-value 0.04.) HGAIN could be managed in a community health setting; however, systems are needed to ensure follow-up care. PMID:23535356

  16. MOTORCYCLE CRASH PREDICTION MODEL FOR NON-SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. HARNEN

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to develop a prediction model for motorcycle crashes at non-signalized intersections on urban roads in Malaysia. The Generalized Linear Modeling approach was used to develop the model. The final model revealed that an increase in motorcycle and non-motorcycle flows entering an intersection is associated with an increase in motorcycle crashes. Non-motorcycle flow on major road had the greatest effect on the probability of motorcycle crashes. Approach speed, lane width, number of lanes, shoulder width and land use were also found to be significant in explaining motorcycle crashes. The model should assist traffic engineers to decide the need for appropriate intersection treatment that specifically designed for non-exclusive motorcycle lane facilities.

  17. Entering Adulthood: Looking at Body Image and Eating Disorders. A Curriculum for Grades 9-12. Contemporary Health Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarratano, Susan

    This module includes six lessons which focus on issues related to body image and self-esteem, eating disorders, and sensible eating habits for adolescents in grades 9-12. In lesson 1, students examine influences on body image, assess their personal traits, and trade assessments with their peers. In lesson 2, students look at pressure and…

  18. Assessing the Promise of a Supplemental Reading Intervention for At-Risk First Grade Students in a Public School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Kouider; Neel, Joanna L.; Kaiser, Forrest; Le, Hong-Hai

    2015-01-01

    In this exploratory quasi-experimental case study, we assessed the promise of a yearlong supplemental reading intervention with a small pilot group of at-risk first grade readers in an elementary school setting. Using standardized measures of reading proficiency, we found that after 47 hours of one-on-one tutoring instruction, students read…

  19. One Size Fits All: Perceptions of the Revised Primary Curriculum at Grades One to Three in Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roofe, Carmel G.

    2014-01-01

    The attainment of Education for All (EFA) goals is crucial to the productivity of any country. However attaining these goals cannot be realised unless due consideration is given to the inputs and processes that must be enacted to achieve such goals. In this article, the Revised Primary Curriculum (RPC) used at grades one to three in Jamaican…

  20. Assessment of Design Tools and Criteria for Urban Rail Track Structures : Volume 2. At-Grade Slab Track.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-04-01

    This report presents the results of a critical review of the technical factors which govern the design and performance of at-grade slab track for urban rail systems. The assessment of current design practices is based on a review of the literature an...

  1. Cognitive Processes and Math Performance: A Study with Children at Third Grade of Basic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Isabel S.; Almeida, Leandro S.; Ferreira, Aristides I.; Martinez, Luis F.; Ramalho, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims to examine the relationship between cognitive factors and mathematical achievement in primary education. Participants were 103 Portuguese third grade students, aged 8 and 9. All participants completed a battery for working memory (WMTB-C), a test of general intelligence (Raven's Progressive Color Matrices), a selective…

  2. Allergic sensitization at school age is a systemic low-grade inflammatory disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, B. L. K.; Stokholm, J.; Malby-Schoos, A.-M.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic low-grade inflammation has been demonstrated in a range of the frequent noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) as a possible shared mechanism, but is largely unexplored in relation to allergic sensitization. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the possible association between systemic low...

  3. Implementing a speaking test at Grade 6 (primary school) in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article is concerned with benchmarking the oral English skills of a small sample of Grade 6 learners in a local KwaZulu-Natal primary school where English is not the first language for either teachers or learners, but is the language of learning and teaching (LoLT). A structured assessment was made of learners' oral ...

  4. Implementation of Case-Based Instruction on Electrochemistry at the 11th Grade Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkin, Aysegul; Uzuntiryaki-Kondakci, Esen

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to compare the effectiveness of case-based instruction over traditional instruction in improving 11th grade students' understanding of electrochemistry concepts, attitudes toward chemistry, chemistry self-efficacy beliefs, and motivation to learn chemistry. In total, 113 students (47 males and 66 females) from three high schools…

  5. Digital Writing Practices: A Close Look at One Grade Three Author

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kervin, Lisa; Mantei, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the digital writing practices of a Grade Three primary school student as he used an iPad to plan, produce and share digital texts. The case study acknowledges that writing is undergoing a period of great change in many classrooms and works to show how a student author has interpreted and produced digital texts with new…

  6. Modeling the dynamics of driver's dilemma zone perception using machine learning methods for safer intersection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The "dilemma zone" (DZ) is defined as the area where drivers approaching a signalized intersection must decide to either proceed or stop at the onset of the yellow indication. Drivers that might perceive themselves to be too close to an intersection ...

  7. The Effect of Gender and Race Intersectionality on Student Learning Outcomes in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Hyun Kyoung; Loya, Karla I.

    2015-01-01

    Women and underrepresented minorities in traditionally White and male-dominated disciplines tend to report lower learning outcomes than their White peers. Adopting a feminist intersectionality framework, this study looks at the intersections of gender and race to investigate differences in self-assessed learning outcomes in engineering…

  8. In Vivo Quantification of Cerebral R2FNx01-Response to Graded Hyperoxia at 3 Tesla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigorios Gotzamanis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aims to quantify the response of the transverse relaxation rate of the magnetic resonance (MR signal of the cerebral tissue in healthy volunteers to the administration of air with step-wise increasing percentage of oxygen. Materials and Methods: The transverse relaxation rate (R2FNx01 of the MR signal was quantified in seven volunteers under respiratory intake of normobaric gas mixtures containing 21, 50, 75, and 100% oxygen, respectively. End-tidal breath composition, arterial blood saturation (SaO 2 , and heart pulse rate were monitored during the challenge. R2FNx01 maps were computed from multi-echo, gradient-echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data, acquired at 3.0T. The average values in the segmented white matter (WM and gray matter (GM were tested by the analysis of variance (ANOVA, with Bonferroni post-hoc correction. The GM R2FNx01-reactivity to hyperoxia was modeled using the Hill′s equation. Results: Graded hyperoxia resulted in a progressive and significant (P < 0.05 decrease of the R2FNx01 in GM. Under normoxia the GM-R2FNx01 was 17.2 ± 1.1 s -1 . At 75% O 2 supply, the R2FNx01 had reached a saturation level, with 16.4 ± 0.7 s -1 (P = 0.02, without a significant further decrease for 100% O 2 . The R2FNx01-response of GM correlated positively with CO 2 partial pressure (R = 0.69 ± 0.19 and negatively with SaO 2 (R = -0.74 ± 0.17. The WM showed a similar progressive, but non-significant, decrease in the relaxation rates, with an increase in oxygen intake (P = 0.055. The Hill′s model predicted a maximum R2FNx01 response of the GM, of 3.5%, with half the maximum at 68% oxygen concentration. Conclusions: The GM-R2FNx01 responds to hyperoxia in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that monitoring and modeling of the R2FNx01-response may provide new oxygenation biomarkers for tumor therapy or assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity in patients.

  9. Improving Students' Speaking Skill Through Audio Visual Media at 4 Th Grade of Labschool Elementary School East Jakarta

    OpenAIRE

    Herlina

    2014-01-01

    This research aims at helping students to improve their speaking skill by using audio visual media. The subject of the research was fourth grade students of Labschool Elementary School. This research was conducted at Labschool Elementary School Rawamangun East Jakarta at 2nd semester of 2013 with 28 students as participants. The method conducted in this research was classroom action research by Kemmis and McTaggart. The research was carried out in two cycles. The research method is conducted...

  10. An Intersectional Social Capital Analysis of the Influence of Historically Black Sororities on African American Women's College Experiences at a Predominantly White Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greyerbiehl, Lindsay; Mitchell, Donald, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Research exploring the college experiences of African American women at predominantly White institutions (PWI) continues to be a necessity as African American women graduate at lower rates than their racial/ethnic peers. This qualitative study explored the influence historically Black sororities had on the college experiences of African American…

  11. Impact of intersection design on air quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, Peter

    2009-01-01

    During the period 2000-2009, the city of Groningen has been restructuring the beltway. The redesigning of the intersections and the impact on urban air quality was the motive for the research conducted. This thesis describes the effects of intersection design on the basis of the emissions of two

  12. Framing Gender Intersections in the European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lombardo, Emanuela; Agustin, Lise Rolandsen

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the extent to which the emergence of an antidiscrimination policy in the European Union (EU) implies a shift in EU gender equality policies towards an intersectional approach. The frame analysis of EU gender equality policy documents shows that intersectional dimensions...

  13. Integer representations of convex polygon intersection graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, T.; van Leeuwen, E.J.; van Leeuwen, J.

    2013-01-01

    We determine tight bounds on the smallest-size integer grid needed to represent the n-node intersection graphs of a convex polygon P with P given in rational coordinates. The intersection graphs use only polygons that are geometrically similar to P (translates or homothets) and must be represented

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic flow due to noncoaxial rotations of a porous disk and a fourth-grade fluid at infinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayat Tasawar

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The governing equations for the unsteady flow of a uniformly conducting incompressible fourth-grade fluid due to noncoaxial rotations of a porous disk and the fluid at infinity are constructed. The steady flow of the fourth-grade fluid subjected to a magnetic field with suction/blowing through the disk is studied. The nonlinear ordinary differential equations resulting from the balance of momentum and mass are discretised by a finite-difference method and numerically solved by means of an iteration method in which, by a coordinate transformation, the semi-infinite physical domain is converted to a finite calculation domain. In order to solve the fourth-order nonlinear differential equations, asymptotic boundary conditions at infinity are augmented. The manner in which various material parameters affect the structure of the boundary layer is delineated. It is found that the suction through the disk and the magnetic field tend to thin the boundary layer near the disk for both the Newtonian fluid and the fourth-grade fluid, while the blowing causes a thickening of the boundary layer with the exception of the fourth-grade fluid under strong blowing. With the increase of the higher-order viscosities, the boundary layer has the tendency of thickening.

  15. Aging road user studies of intersection safety : lab and simulator-based studies of crosswalk markings and flashing yellow arrow comprehension -- phase 2 : [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Nearly half of all traffic-related fatalities occur : at intersections, so engineering intersections : for greater safety remains a priority for the : Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT). : Engineering in this case must take into accoun...

  16. Dual intersection syndrome of the forearm: a case report | Zhari ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The intersection syndrome, described since the 19th century, is an uncommon disorder associated with rubbing at the crossing point between the first dorsal compartment muscles and the radial wrist extensor muscles. Imaging modalities used to diagnosis this syndrome includes ultrasonography and magnetic resonance ...

  17. The Challenges of Intersectionality: Researching Difference in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flintoff, A.; Fitzgerald, H.; Scraton, S.

    2008-01-01

    Researching the intersection of class, race, gender, sexuality and disability raises many issues for educational research. Indeed, Maynard (2002, 33) has recently argued that "difference is one of the most significant, yet unresolved, issues for feminist and social thinking at the beginning of the twentieth century". This paper reviews…

  18. Becoming Black Women: Intimate Stories and Intersectional Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I argue that intimate stories are an important resource for the achievement of intersectional identities. Drawing on in-depth interviews with black college students at two predominantly white universities, I examine the stories black college women tell about interracial relationships between black men and white women. I argue that…

  19. A Faculty Woman of Color and Micro-Invalidations at a White Research Institution: A Case of Intersectionality and Institutional Betrayal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Doris

    2017-01-01

    Faculty Women of Color should be able to thrive and grow at our best research and teaching institutions. Assuring their academic and professional success requires that an institution's academic culture shift from a White, male-dominated, meritocratic environment to a global enrichment campus, one that values the richness and diversity of talent…

  20. At the Intersection of HIV/AIDS and Cancer: A Qualitative Needs Assessment of Community-Based HIV/AIDS Service Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhalter, Jack E.; Cahill, Sean; Shuk, Elyse; Guidry, John; Corner, Geoffrey; Berk, Alexandra; Candelario, Norman; Kornegay, Mark; Lubetkin, Erica I.

    2013-01-01

    Due to advances in treatment, persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are living longer, but with aging, immune deficits, and lifestyle factors, they are at increased risk for cancer. This challenges community-based AIDS service organizations (ASOs) to address the growing cancer needs of…

  1. The Outlook for Low-Grade Fuels in Tomsk Region: Research Experience at Tomsk Polytechnic University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaustov, Sergei A.; Kazakov, Alexander V.; Cherkashina, Galina A.; Sobinova, Liubov A.

    2016-02-01

    The urgency of the discussed issue is caused by the need to substitute in the regional fuel-energy balances imported energy resources with local low-grade fuels. The main aim of the study is to estimate thermal properties of local fuels in Tomsk region and evaluate its energy use viability. The methods used in the study were based standard GOST 52911-2008, 11022-95 and 6382-2001, by means of a bomb calorimeter ABK-1 and Vario micro cube analyzer. The mineral ash of researched fuels was studied agreeing with GOST 10538-87. The results state the fact that discussed low-grade fuels of Tomsk region in the unprepared form are not able to replace imported coal in regional energy balance, because of the high moisture and ash content values. A promosing direction of a low-temperature fue processing is a catalytic converter, which allows receiving hydrogen-enriched syngas from the initial solid raw.

  2. Diffusion kurtosis imaging of gliomas grades II and III - a study of perilesional tumor infiltration, tumor grades and subtypes at clinical presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delgado Anna F.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI allows for assessment of diffusion influenced by microcellular structures. We analyzed DKI in suspected low-grade gliomas prior to histopathological diagnosis. The aim was to investigate if diffusion parameters in the perilesional normal-appearing white matter (NAWM differed from contralesional white matter, and to investigate differences between glioma malignancy grades II and III and glioma subtypes (astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas.

  3. Motor vehicle driver injury severity study under various traffic control at highway-rail grade crossings in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wei; Daniel, Janice

    2014-12-01

    Based on the Federal Railway Administration (FRA) database, approximately 62% of the collisions at highway-rail crossings occurred at locations with active controls (gate and flashing lights), followed by passive controls (cross bucks and stop signs) with approximately 28% of accidents. The study applied an ordered probit model to explore the determinants of driver injury severity under various control measures at highway-rail grade crossing in the United States. The analysis found that schedule factor (peak hour), visibility, motor vehicle speed, train speed, driver's age, area type, traffic volume and highway pavement impact driver injury severity at both active and passive highway-rail crossings. For both active and passive control highway-rail grade crossings, speed control for both trains and vehicles will significantly reduce driver injury severity. However, the level of influence by vehicle speed and train speed at passive control is higher compared with active control. Paving highways at highway-rail grade crossings will also help to reduce driver injury severity at highway-rail crossing accidents. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. A 21st Century Frontier for Discovery: The Physics of the Universe. A Strategic Plan for Federal Research at the Intersection of Physics and Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    Black Holes, precision laboratory measurements at distances below a millimeter, laboratory and space tests of the equivalence principle, lunar laser...the photomultiplier tubes within each optical module. (http://amanda.uci.edu/) IceCube is a one-cubic-kilometer international high energy neutrino...observatory being built and installed in the clear deep ice below the South Pole Station. IceCube will open unexplored bands for astronomy

  5. A STUDY ON THE USE OF ANIMATION FILM IN TEACHING WRITING AT THE ELEVENTH GRADE STUDENTS OF SMAN 1 TARAKAN

    OpenAIRE

    Dewi Fortuna Ramadhani

    2011-01-01

    Dewi Fortuna Ramadhani. 2011. A Study on the Use of Animation Film in Teaching Students Writing at the Eleventh Grade Students of SMAN 1 Tarakan. Thesis English Department the Faculty of Teacher Training and Education Borneo University Tarakan. Advisors: (I) Yansar, M.Pd. (II) Drs. Abdul Goni, SH. This study aimed at determining whether there is any significant difference in students’ writing ability after being taught by using animation film and without using animation film. The data coll...

  6. Loss of Consciousness at Onset of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage is Associated with Functional Outcomes in Good-Grade Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Justin; Alotaibi, Naif M; Akbar, Muhammad Ali; Ayling, Oliver G S; Ibrahim, George M; Macdonald, R Loch

    2017-02-01

    Transient loss of consciousness (LOC) is one of the most common presentations of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and may be an indicator of early brain injury. In this study, we examined the association of LOC and functional outcomes in patients with good-grade SAH. We searched the Subarachnoid Hemorrhage International Trialists Repository for patients who presented with LOC at ictus of SAH. A propensity score analysis was performed on good-grade patients (defined as World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grade 1-3) to balance selected covariates between those with and without LOC. The primary outcome was Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) at 3 months (with poor outcome defined as a GOS of 1-3). Secondary outcomes were delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), rebleed, length of hospital stay, and time to death. A propensity score-matching algorithm identified 336 patients (168 with and 168 without LOC at ictus). The proportion of patients with poor functional outcome at 3 months was significantly higher in the cohort with LOC at ictus compared with the matched cohort without LOC at ictus (30% vs. 19%; P = 0.02). There was a nonsignificant trend toward greater mortality in the patients with LOC at ictus (19% vs. 13%; P = 0.14). There were no significant differences in the secondary outcomes between the 2 cohorts. LOC at ictus of SAH is associated with a higher rate of unfavorable functional outcomes but not of mortality, DCI, or rebleed in patients with good-grade SAH. Future studies should further investigate the putative mechanisms through which LOC mediates early brain injury in SAH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. MR elastography of the liver at 3.0 T in diagnosing liver fibrosis grades; preliminary clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Mitsufuji, Toshimichi; Shinagawa, Yoshinobu; Fujimitsu, Ritsuko; Morita, Ayako; Urakawa, Hiroshi; Takano, Koichi [Fukuoka University, Department of Radiology, Fukuoka (Japan); Hayashi, Hiroyuki [Fukuoka University, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    To clarify the usefulness of 3.0-T MR elastography (MRE) in diagnosing the histological grades of liver fibrosis using preliminary clinical data. Between November 2012 and March 2014, MRE was applied to all patients who underwent liver MR study at a 3.0-T clinical unit. Among them, those who had pathological evaluation of liver tissue within 3 months from MR examinations were retrospectively recruited, and the liver stiffness measured by MRE was correlated with histological results. Institutional review board approved this study, waiving informed consent. There were 70 patients who met the inclusion criteria. Liver stiffness showed significant correlation with the pathological grades of liver fibrosis (rho = 0.89, p < 0.0001, Spearman's rank correlation). Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve were 0.93, 0.95, 0.99 and 0.95 for fibrosis score greater than or equal to F1, F2, F3 and F4, with cut-off values of 3.13, 3.85, 4.28 and 5.38 kPa, respectively. Multivariate analysis suggested that grades of necroinflammation also affected liver stiffness, but to a significantly lesser degree as compared to fibrosis. 3.0-T clinical MRE was suggested to be sufficiently useful in assessing the grades of liver fibrosis. (orig.)

  8. Intersections between Participatory Evaluation and Social Pedagogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Anne Chouinard

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It can be argued that participatory evaluation and social pedagogy share several interconnections given their respective developments and evolutions. In this paper we explore affinities between these two domains of inquiry in order to understand points of intersection and departure at deeper levels that has occurred to date. Following a recent review and integration of more than 100 empirical studies of participatory evaluation (Cousins & Chouinard, 2012 we re-examine a selection of emergent themes through a social-pedagogical lens. We highlight similarities and differences and then lay out a set of issues for considerations for participatory evaluation and in the interest of opening an dialogue among those engaged in research and practice within either sphere if interest.

  9. New limits to the remote monitoring of workers' activities at the intersection between the rules of the Statute and the privacy Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilario Alvino

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the provisions contained in the new article 4 of the Worker’s Statute that limit the employer’s monitoring powers.After more 40 years, this article is being changed by article 23 of d.lgs. 151/2015 with the purpose to revise the legislation in connection with development of modern technologies.In particular, emphasis is given to the difficult to implement and interpret the law in relation to the scope for employers to control how employees use the internet and emails at work.The new article is analysed in accordance with the rules of Italian Data Protection Code (d.lgs. 196/2003 and the norms laid down by the Italian Data Protection Authority.

  10. Interdisciplinary Issues at the Intersection of Assessing and Treating Substance Use Disorders and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: Clinical Social Work and Clinical Behavioral Analysis with Veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica M. Matthieu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Veterans and military personnel may be at higher risk for developing addictions due to increased prevalence rates of co-occurring mental health disorders including posttraumatic stress and substance abuse disorders. However, clinicians may feel unprepared to assess and to treat these co-occurring disorders, especially when it includes a behavioral addiction such as gambling. Clinical social work and clinical behavior analysis are two fields with complementary interdisciplinary approaches that can lead to improved client-centered outcomes. Yet, limited evidence exists to guide interdisciplinary treatment teams in effective treatment of gambling addictions and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD. The current article provides an interdisciplinary treatment model to assist clinicians in selecting appropriate evidence-based assessments and treatments. A case example focuses on the use of assessment tools and treatment approaches drawn from recommendations from best practice guidelines for veterans. Finally, resources related trauma and addictions are presented.

  11. Creating a Learning Continuum: A Critical Look at the Intersection of Prior Knowledge, Outdoor Education, and Next Generation Science Standards Disciplinary Core Ideas and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlobohm, Trisha Leigh

    Outdoor School is a cherished educational tradition in the Portland, OR region. This program's success is attributed to its presumed ability to positively impact affective and cognitive student outcomes. Residential programs such as Outdoor School are considered to be an important supplement to the classroom model of learning because they offer an authentic, contextually rich learning environment. References to relevant literature support the idea that student gains in affective and cognitive domains occur as a result of the multi-sensory, enjoyable, hands-on nature of outdoor learning. The sample population for this study was 115 sixth graders from a demographically diverse Portland, OR school district. This study used an instrument developed by the Common Measures System that was administered to students as part of Outdoor School's professional and program development project. The affective student outcome data measured by the Common Measures instrument was complemented by a formative assessment probe ascertaining prior knowledge of the definition of plants and field notes detailing Field Study instructor lesson content. This first part of this study examined the changes that take place in students' attitudes toward science as a result of attending Outdoor School. The second part took a look at how Outdoor School instruction in the Plants field study aligned with NGSS MS-LS Disciplinary Core Ideas and Practices. The third section of the study compared how Outdoor School instruction in the Plants Field Study and students' prior knowledge of what defines a plant aligned with NGSS MS-LS DCIs. The intent of the research was to arrive at a more nuanced understanding of how students' attitudes toward science are influenced by participating in an outdoor education program and contribute to the development of a continuum between classroom and outdoor school learning using Next Generation Science Standards Disciplinary Core Ideas and Practices as a framework. Results of

  12. Use of Online Learning Resources in the Development of Learning Environments at the Intersection of Formal and Informal Learning: The Student as Autonomous Designer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Lebeničnik

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Learning resources that are used in the education of university students are often available online. The nature of new technologies causes an interweaving of formal and informal learning, with the result that a more active role is expected from students with regard to the use of ICT for their learning. The variety of online learning resources (learning content and learning tools facilitates informed use and enables students to create the learning environment that is most appropriate for their personal learning needs and preferences. In contemporary society, the creation of an inclusive learning environment supported by ICT is pervasive. The model of Universal Design for Learning is becoming increasingly significant in responding to the need for inclusive learning environments. In this article, we categorize different online learning activities into the principles of Universal Design for Learning. This study examines ICT use among university students (N = 138, comparing student teachers with students in other study programs. The findings indicate that among all students, activities with lower demands for engagement are most common. Some differences were observed between student teachers and students from other programs. Student teachers were more likely than their peers to perform certain activities aimed at meeting diverse learner needs, but the percentage of students performing more advanced activities was higher for students in other study programs than for student teachers. The categorization of activities revealed that student teachers are less likely to undertake activities that involve interaction with others. Among the sample of student teachers, we found that personal innovativeness is correlated with diversity of activities in only one category. The results show that student teachers should be encouraged to perform more advanced activities, especially activities involving interaction with others, collaborative learning and use of ICT to

  13. Grade 2 spondylolisthesis at L4-5 treated by XLIF: safety and midterm results in the "worst case scenario".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, W B; Lehmen, Jeffrey A; Gerber, Edward J; Rodgers, Jody A

    2012-01-01

    Spondylolisthesis is one of the most common indications for spinal surgery. However, no one approach has been proven to be more effective in treating spondylolisthesis. Recent advances in minimally invasive spine technology have allowed for different approaches to be applied to this indication, notably extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF). The risk, however, of using XLIF in treating grade II spondylolisthesis is the ventral position of the lumbar plexus, particularly at L4-5. This study reports the safety and midterm clinical and radiographic outcomes of patients with grade II lumbar spondylolisthesis treated with XLIF. 63 patients with grade II spondylolisthesis and spinal stenosis were treated with XLIF and were available for 12-month followup. Of those, 61 (97%) were treated at L4-5. Clinical (VAS, complications, and reoperation rate) and radiographic (anterolisthesis, disk height, and fusion) parameters were assessed. Data were collected via a prospective registry and analyzed retrospectively. Sixty-three patients were available for evaluations at least one year postoperatively. Average pain (visual analog scale) decreased from a score of 8.7 at baseline to 2.2 at 12 months postoperatively. Average anterior slippage was reduced by 73% and was well maintained. Average disk height (4.6 mm pre-op and 9.0 mm post-op) nearly doubled after surgery. Slight settling (average 1.3 mm) occurred over the twelve-month follow-up period. There were no neural injuries and no nonunions noted. XLIF is a safe and effective minimally invasive treatment alternative for grade II spondylolisthesis. Real-time neurological monitoring and attention to technique are mandatory.

  14. IMPROVING STUDENTS’ READING COMPREHENSION BY USING MEDIA AT THE GRADE X3 OF SMA NEGERI I TAMBANG-KAMPAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurniawan Kurniawan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available At the grade X3 of SMAN I Tambang, the researcher found that the students havelow reading comprehension. One of the factors was the students’ lack of vocabulary. Theaimed of this research was to identify whether media can better improve students’ readingcomprehension and to find out what factors can influence the improvement of students’reading comprehension at the tenth grade students of SMAN 1 Tambang. This research wasClassroom Action Research (CAR. It had been carried out since May to June 2011. It hadtwo cycles and consisted of four meetings in each cycles. The participants of this researchwere the students at class X3 of SMAN I Tambang. They consisted of 39 students. Theresearcher found that media can better improve students’ reading comprehension at the gradeX3 of SMA Negeri I Tambang-Kampar. In conclusion, media can help the students toimprove their reading comprehension. The finding of this research implies that the use ofmedia can be used to enhance the students’ reading comprehension in English reading class.Key Words: Improve, Reading Comprehension, Media, Pictures, and Video

  15. Gold grade of epithermal gold ore at Lamuntet, Brang Rea, West Sumbawa District, West Nusa Tenggara Province, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernawati, Rika; Idrus, Arifudin; TBMP, Himawan

    2017-06-01

    Lamuntet is one of gold ore mining area carried out by the Artisanal Small scale Gold Mining (ASGM) located in West Sumbawa, Indonesia. Most of the miners at this area are not the local miners but also those from other regions. Mineralization of this area is strong identified as low sulfidation epithermal system. There are two blocks of this mining location, namely, Ngelampar block with an area of 0.164 km2 and Song block with an area of 0.067 km2. This study was focused on Ngelampar block. The characteristic of epithermal system is the existence of quartz vein with comb, vuggy, and sugary texture. The aim of this research was to analyze the gold grade and other metals, such as Cu, Ag, Pb, As, Zn, and Hg. The research methods included literature study from previous researches, field work, laboratory work, and interpretation. The literature study was performed on previous researches with similar study area. The field work comprised of direct observation and sampling. Fieldwork was done for a week to obtain gold ore/vein. Sixteen samples were analyzed to obtain the grade of ore/metal. The Hg laboratory analysis was then performed on the six samples with the highest gold grade. Laboratory works were conducted at Intertek Jakarta by using Fire Assay (FA) for gold grade and Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS) for Cu, Ag, Pb, As, Zn, and Hg. Results of the analysis showed the range of Au was grade (0.1 ppm - 27.8 ppm), Cu was 26 ppm -1740 ppm, Pb was 101 ppm- >4000 ppm, Zn of 73 ppm- >10,000 ppm, Ag of 3 ppm -185 ppm, As was 150 ppm-6530 ppm, and Hg of 0.08 ppm - 1.89 ppm. L1 and L15 had high grade for all values (Au, Ag, Zn, Cu, As, and Hg). Gold mineralization was formed as electrum because of Ag content is higher than 20%. Associated minerals of the samples in the study area were galena, sphalerite, arsenopyrite, and chalcopyrite which showed the characteristic of rich base metal of Pb, Zn, and Cu at LS epithermal.

  16. Improving Tudents' Writing Skill in Recount Text by Using Personal Letter at Eight Grade of SMP Tiga Hati Kepenuhan Hulu

    OpenAIRE

    Hidayati, Etri; Sukma, Dian; Antoni, Rivi

    2015-01-01

    This research was conducted in order to improve students' writing skill in recount text at eighth grade of SMP Tiga Hati Kepenuhan Hulu by using personal letter used a Classroom Action Research (CAR) which was conducted to solve the students' problem in English Writing. The reseacher did two cycles in which each cycle consisted of plan, action, observation, and reflection. The qualitative data was gained by analyzing the fieldnote, observation sheet and interview, then quantitative data were ...

  17. Examining school effectiveness at the fourth grade: A hierarchical analysis of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemler, Steven Edward

    This study explored school effectiveness in mathematics and science at the fourth grade using data from IEA's Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). Fourteen of the 26 countries participating in TIMSS at the fourth grade possessed sufficient between-school variability in mathematics achievement to justify the creation of explanatory models of school effectiveness while 13 countries possessed sufficient between-school variability in science achievement. Exploratory models were developed using variables drawn from student, teacher, and school questionnaires. The variables were chosen to represent the domains of student involvement, instructional methods, classroom organization, school climate, and school structure. Six explanatory models for each subject were analyzed using two-level hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) and were compared to models using only school mean SES as an explanatory variable. The amount of variability in student achievement in mathematics attributable to differences between schools ranged from 16% in Cyprus to 56% in Latvia, while the amount of between-school variance in science achievement ranged from 12% in Korea to 59% in Latvia. In general, about one-quarter of the variability in mathematics and science achievement was found to lie between schools. The research findings revealed that after adjusting for differences in student backgrounds across schools, the most effective schools in mathematics and science had students who reported seeing a positive relationship between hard work, belief in their own abilities, and achievement. In addition, more effective schools had students who reported less frequent use of computers and calculators in the classroom. These relationships were found to be stable across explanatory models, cultural contexts, and subject areas. This study has contributed a unique element to the literature by examining school effectiveness at the fourth grade across two subject areas and across 14

  18. MULTIAGENT PLANNING OF INTERSECTION PASSAGE BY AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Zikratov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose a traffic management system for autonomous vehicles that are agents at the intersection. In contrast to the known solutions based on the usage of semiautonomous control systems in assembly with the control unit, this algorithm is based on the principles of decentralized multiagent control. The best travel plan for intersection passage is produced by means of optimization methods jointly by all agents belonging to a dynamic collaboration of autonomous vehicles. The order of road intersection optimal for a given criterion is determined by the agents in the process of information exchange about themselves and environment. Our experiments show that this protocol can reduce significantly the traffic density as compared to the traditional systems of traffic management. Moreover, the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm increases with increasing density of road traffic. In addition, the absence of the critical object, that is the control unit, in the control system, reduces significantly the effectiveness of possible failures and hacker attacks on the intersection control system.

  19. The prognostic correlation of AFP level at diagnosis with pathological grade, progression, and survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Dou-Sheng; Zhang, Chi; Chen, Ping; Jin, Sheng-Jie; Jiang, Guo-Qing

    2017-10-09

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a comprehensive study of the clinical correlation between the alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level at diagnosis and pathological grades, progression, and survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A total of 78,743 patients in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER)-registered HCC was analyzed. The AFP test results for patients with HCC were mainly recorded as AFP-negative and AFP-positive. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the AFP level at diagnosis was an independent risk factor of pathological grade (odds ratio [OR], 2.559; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.075-3.157; P AFP level as an independent predictor of survival risk of patients with HCC who did not undergo surgery (hazard ratio [HR], 1.660; 95% CI, 1.534-1.797; P AFP level at diagnosis was an independent risk predictor associated with pathological grade, progression, and survival. Further, surgery may not significantly reverse the adverse effects of AFP-positive compared with AFP-negative.

  20. At the ISR intersection region I-7

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    One sees on the left the setup of the experiment R704 which aimed to study charmonium spectroscopy using a 4 GeV/c antiproton beam and a hydrogen-jet gas target (see Annual Report 1982 p. 109 and 1883 p. 127). Lars Leistam stands on top of the passerelle.

  1. Landscaping of highway medians at intersections : summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The most obvious benefit of landscaped medians is highway beautification, but they have also been found to enhance safety. Landscaping helps define turn lanes and crosswalks, adding to roadway safety. : Placement and specifications of highway landsca...

  2. Landscaping of highway medians at intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Recent interest in road beautification initiatives as a way to help economic growth has led to a number of changes in landscaping policies in Florida. These changes raised the need to evaluate whether the criteria in the landscaping requirements in t...

  3. At the Intersection of College & Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    By purchasing abandoned facilities and transforming them into vibrant hubs for culture and education, community colleges are fulfilling one of their key missions: revitalizing their communities. But these types of projects can be fraught with challenges as well. Here's how Austin Community College (Texas), Manchester Community College…

  4. The Effect of Arabism of Romanic Alphabets on the Development of 9th Grade English as a Foreign Language Students' Writing Skills at Secondary School Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhair, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at investigating the effect of Arabization of Romanic Alphabets on the development of 9th Grade English as a Foreign Language students' composition writing skills at secondary school level. This experimental study includes 25 secondary school students in their 9th Grade in which English is taught as a foreign language at…

  5. A Comparative Study of the Academic Performance of Secondary School Pupils at Grade Twelve Level in English, French and Zambian Languages (1998-2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chishiba, G. M.; Mukuka, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The study compared the performance of pupils at grade 12 level in Zambian languages, French and English during a period of ten years (1998-2008). Grade 12 is the final year of Secondary School Education in Zambia. This exercise was aimed at establishing the language with the best performance during the aforementioned period. The study, which was…

  6. “Bus Lane Within The Area Of Intersection” Method For Buses Priority On The Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikovych Ihor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this article is to formalize the “special bus lanes within the area of intersection” method that allows providing buses with space-time priority at signalized intersections (mostly of the isolated type, including those with no more than two traffic lanes in each direction at the approaches to the intersection. The article establishes the limits for efficient application of this method, and describes the results of a simulation experiment conducted in the VISSIM environment to investigate the functioning of the method on an actual intersection. The most critical phase of implementation of this method is to determine the optimum length of the special bus lane at the approach to the intersection. The optimum length of special bus lanes at the approaches to isolated or coordinated intersections is determined based on the maximum length of queued vehicles which is computed using the simulation models developed in the Objective-C language. The article covers the basic characteristics of those models, their structure and building principles, and also provides the model validation results. Simulation models can be used both for determination of the optimum length of special bus lanes at the approaches to signalized intersections and for analysis of intersection performance based on the maximum length of queued vehicles.

  7. UpSetR: an R package for the visualization of intersecting sets and their properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Jake R; Lex, Alexander; Gehlenborg, Nils

    2017-09-15

    Venn and Euler diagrams are a popular yet inadequate solution for quantitative visualization of set intersections. A scalable alternative to Venn and Euler diagrams for visualizing intersecting sets and their properties is needed. We developed UpSetR, an open source R package that employs a scalable matrix-based visualization to show intersections of sets, their size, and other properties. UpSetR is available at https://github.com/hms-dbmi/UpSetR/ and released under the MIT License. A Shiny app is available at https://gehlenborglab.shinyapps.io/upsetr/ . nils@hms.harvard.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  8. Concepts and practices of teachers of argumentation skills at the 5th grade of basic education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrezza da Costa França

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present article seeks to discuss the concepts of two teachers regarding the teaching of argumentation skills and how they refl ect on their teaching practices with 5th grade students. The analysis of fi ve classes of each teacher has revealed that one of them adopted a concept of argumentation detached from day-to-day situations, expressed in the teaching of concepts and in a standard compositional form. The other teacher has shown a clearer understanding of the diversity of textual genres and of the situations in which one has to use argumentation skills, therefore generating more reading and writing activities based on the context, focusing on the analyzed genres’ characteristics. It is possible to conclude that the concept of argumentation as a discursive practice requires a greater knowledge of the diversity of situations and genres found in the society. This knowledge is essential for a more refl exive pedagogical practice centered on the social uses of writing.

  9. Manufacturing process scale-up of optical grade transparent spinel ceramic at ArmorLine Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilman, Joseph; Voyles, John; Nick, Joseph; Shaffer, Lawrence

    2013-06-01

    While transparent Spinel ceramic's mechanical and optical characteristics are ideal for many Ultraviolet (UV), visible, Short-Wave Infrared (SWIR), Mid-Wave Infrared (MWIR), and multispectral sensor window applications, commercial adoption of the material has been hampered because the material has historically been available in relatively small sizes (one square foot per window or less), low volumes, unreliable supply, and with unreliable quality. Recent efforts, most notably by Technology Assessment and Transfer (TA and T), have scaled-up manufacturing processes and demonstrated the capability to produce larger windows on the order of two square feet, but with limited output not suitable for production type programs. ArmorLine Corporation licensed the hot-pressed Spinel manufacturing know-how of TA and T in 2009 with the goal of building the world's first dedicated full-scale Spinel production facility, enabling the supply of a reliable and sufficient volume of large Transparent Armor and Optical Grade Spinel plates. With over $20 million of private investment by J.F. Lehman and Company, ArmorLine has installed and commissioned the largest vacuum hot press in the world, the largest high-temperature/high-pressure hot isostatic press in the world, and supporting manufacturing processes within 75,000 square feet of manufacturing space. ArmorLine's equipment is capable of producing window blanks as large as 50" x 30" and the facility is capable of producing substantial volumes of material with its Lean configuration and 24/7 operation. Initial production capability was achieved in 2012. ArmorLine will discuss the challenges that were encountered during scale-up of the manufacturing processes, ArmorLine Optical Grade Spinel optical performance, and provide an overview of the facility and its capabilities.

  10. Multiphase flow in geometrically simple fracture intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basagaoglu, H.; Meakin, P.; Green, C.T.; Mathew, M.; ,

    2006-01-01

    A two-dimensional lattice Boltzmann (LB) model with fluid-fluid and solid-fluid interaction potentials was used to study gravity-driven flow in geometrically simple fracture intersections. Simulated scenarios included fluid dripping from a fracture aperture, two-phase flow through intersecting fractures and thin-film flow on smooth and undulating solid surfaces. Qualitative comparisons with recently published experimental findings indicate that for these scenarios the LB model captured the underlying physics reasonably well.

  11. Matching criticality in intersecting hypergraphs | Kang | Quaestiones ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Math. 37 (2014), 127–138]. In this paper we study the extremal behavior of matching critical intersecting hypergraphs. We show that n2(r) = n3(r) and n4(r) = n5(r) for all r ≥ 2, which partly answers an open problem on matching critical intersecting hypergraphs posed by Henning and Yeo. We also give a strengthening of the ...

  12. Multiphase Flow in Geometrically Simple Fracture Intersections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakan Basagaoglu; Paul Meakin; Sauro Succi; Timothy R. Ginn

    2006-03-01

    A two-dimensional lattice Boltzmann (LB) model with fluid-fluid and solid-fluid interaction potentials was used to Study gravity-driven flow in geometrically simple fracture intersections. simulated scenarios included fluid dripping from a fracture aperture, two-phase flow through intersecting fractures and thin-filin flow oil smooth and undulating solid surfaces. Qualitative comparisons with recently published experimental findings indicate that for these scenarios the LB model captured the underlying physics reasonably well.

  13. 7 CFR 51.304 - Combination grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Combination grades. 51.304 Section 51.304 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Apples Grades § 51.304 Combination grades. (a) Combinations of the above grades may... permitted in connection with the U.S. apple grades. When Combination grades are packed, at least 50 percent...

  14. [Association between occupational stress and presenteeism among medical staff at grade A tertiary hospitals in Shanghai, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Junming; Hua, Yujie; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Li; Fu, Hua

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the current status of occupational stress and presenteeism among medical staff at grade A tertiary hospitals in Shanghai, China, and to analyze the association between occupational stress and presenteeism. A total of 2356 healthcare workers from eight grade A tertiary hospitals in Shanghai were investigated by stratified random sampling. All the subjects were asked to complete self-administered questionnaires with informed consent. The occupational stress was assessed by the occupational stress core questionnaire. The presenteeism was evaluated by the Stanford Presenteeism Scale. In all subjects, the average score of presenteeism was 15.23 ± 3.89, and 72.5% felt occupational stress in self-evaluation. There were significant differences in the score of presenteeism between subjects with different ages, education levels, occupations, lengths of service, job titles, and shifts (all Ppresenteeism and the rate of high presenteeism between subjects with different indices of occupational stress, including job demand, control, social support, and demand-control ratio (Ppresenteeism (OR=2.56, 95% CI=2.01~3.27; OR=1.53, 95% CI=1.23~1.90). High social support was a protective factor for high presenteeism (OR=0.23, 95% CI=0.18~0.29). The intensity of occupational stress in medical staff from grade A tertiary hospitals is positively correlated with the level of presenteeism. It is important to promote social support to reduce the loss of work efficiency due to presenteeism.

  15. Association between intersection characteristics and perceived crash risk among school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gain; Park, Yuna; Kim, Jeongseob; Cho, Gi-Hyoug

    2016-12-01

    This research examined how environmental attributes near intersections influence the perceived crash risk among school-aged children, which provides information on the potential risks of pedestrian crashes that can guide the development of proactive countermeasures. In a sample of 799 children aged 10-12 years old in Korea, the environmental attributes of intersections perceived as having a high risk of producing crashes near elementary schools were investigated using standard negative binomial and zero-inflated negative binomial models.The results showed that a higher number of student crossings, a wider road width, the presence of crosswalks, student-friendly facilities at the intersection, and four-way intersections were significant and positively associated with perceived crash risk among school-aged children. The findings related to building characteristics indicated that a higher number of entrances at an intersection increased the perceived crash risk while higher visibility at the intersection reduced the perception of risk. Associations with traffic-calming measures were weak,suggesting that the measures used in the study areas were not effective in reducing the perceived crash risk. The results of a police-reported crash model showed that school-aged children have a relatively accurate perception of crash risk and that the perceived crash risk of school-aged children may provide valuable information on the intersection characteristics in need of attention near school sites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Outcomes of Hip Arthroscopic Surgery in Patients With Tönnis Grade 1 Osteoarthritis at a Minimum 5-Year Follow-up: A Matched-Pair Comparison With a Tönnis Grade 0 Control Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domb, Benjamin G; Chaharbakhshi, Edwin O; Rybalko, Danil; Close, Mary R; Litrenta, Jody; Perets, Itay

    2017-08-01

    Studies on midterm outcomes of the arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and labral tears with mild osteoarthritis (OA) are limited. To evaluate outcomes of the arthroscopic treatment of FAI and labral tears in patients with mild preoperative OA (Tönnis grade 1) at a minimum 5-year follow-up, and to perform a matched-pair comparison to a control group with Tönnis grade 0. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Data were prospectively collected on patients who underwent hip arthroscopic surgery between February 2008 and April 2011. Inclusion criteria were arthroscopic treatment for FAI and labral tears and having preoperative patient-reported outcome (PRO) scores, including the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), Non-Arthritic Hip Score (NAHS), and Hip Outcome Score-Sports-Specific Subscale (HOS-SSS), and visual analog scale (VAS) scores for pain. Exclusion criteria were workers' compensation claims, preoperative Tönnis grade ≥2, and previous hip conditions (ipsilateral surgery, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, avascular necrosis, and dysplasia). Patients with minimum 5-year outcomes were eligible for matching on a 1:1 ratio (Tönnis grade 0 vs 1) based on age ±5 years, body mass index ±5 kg/m2, sex, labral treatment, and capsular treatment. Of 356 eligible hips, 292 hips had minimum 5-year outcomes (82%). Eighty-five hips with Tönnis grade 1 were evaluated. At 5-year follow-up, patients with Tönnis grade 1 had significant improvements in all PRO and VAS scores ( P arthroscopic treatment of FAI and labral tears in patients with Tönnis grade 1 had good results at 5-year follow-up. After controlling for other variables using a matched-pair comparison, patients with Tönnis grade 1 had similar, durable improvements to those with Tönnis grade 0. While strict surgical indications and appropriate expectations are recommended for patients with mild OA, Tönnis grade 1 alone should not be considered a contraindication to hip arthroscopic

  17. Does Supplemental Instruction Support the Transition from Spanish to English Reading Instruction for First-Grade English Learners at Risk of Reading Difficulties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Doris Luft; Burns, Darci; Kame'enui, Edward J.; Smolkowski, Keith; Baker, Scott King

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the effect of 30 min of small group explicit instruction on reading outcomes for first-grade Spanish-speaking English learners (ELs) at risk of reading difficulties. Participants were 78 ELs from seven schools who were receiving Spanish only, or Spanish and English, whole group reading instruction in first grade. Students were…

  18. SPATIAL UNCERTAINTY IN LINE-SURFACE INTERSECTIONS WITH APPLICATIONS TO PHOTOGRAMMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marshall

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The fields of photogrammetry and computer vision routinely use line-surface intersections to determine the point where a line intersects with a surface. The object coordinates of the intersection point can be found using standard geometric and numeric algorithms, however expressing the spatial uncertainty at the intersection point may be challenging, especially when the surface morphology is complex. This paper describes an empirical method to characterize the unknown spatial uncertainty at the intersection point by propagating random errors in the stochastic model using repeated random sampling methods. These methods accommodate complex surface morphology and nonlinearities in the functional model, however the penalty is the resulting probability density function associated with the intersection point may be non-Gaussian in nature. A formal hypothesis test is presented to show that straightforward statistical inference tools are available whether the data is Gaussian or not. The hypothesis test determines whether the computed intersection point is consistent with an externally-derived known truth point. A numerical example demonstrates the approach in a photogrammetric setting with a single frame image and a gridded terrain elevation model. The results show that uncertainties produced by the proposed empirical method are intuitive and can be assessed with conventional methods found in textbook hypothesis testing.

  19. Beyond Typical Library Partnerships: Intersecting with the City

    OpenAIRE

    Cindy Derrenbacker

    2016-01-01

    This essay is adapted from a lightning-talk presentation given at the annual conference of The Workshop for Instruction in Library Use (WILU), held at the University of British Columbia, May 30-June 1, 2016. The conference theme was Intersections. The presentation and essay highlight the emerging library partnerships between Laurentian University's McEwen School of Architecture Library and various groups in downtown Sudbury, Ontario that are leading to expanded services and positive commun...

  20. The Intersection of Sociocultural Factors and Health-Related Behavior in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Youth: Experiences Among Young Black Gay Males as an Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Errol; Morgan, Anthony; Sanders, Renata Arrington

    2016-12-01

    Intersectionality suggests that multiple social identities intersect at the individual or micro level of experience and reflects larger social structural inequities experienced on the macro level. This article uses intersectionality to describe how multiple stigmatized social identities can create unique challenges for young black gay and bisexual men (YBGBM). YBGBM exist at the intersection of multiple stigmatized identities compared with their majority peers. This article examines key intersecting identities and cultural expectations that exist in YBGBM and how those factors may predispose young men to adverse health outcomes and health inequality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The results of STEM education methods in physics at the 11th grade level: Light and visual equipment lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tungsombatsanti, A.; Ponkham, K.; Somtoa, T.

    2018-01-01

    This research aimed to: 1) To evaluate the efficiency of the process and the efficiency of the results (E1 / E2) of the innovative instructional lesson plan in the form of the STEM Education method in the field of physics of secondary students at the 10th grade level in physics class to determine the efficiency of the STEM based on criteria of the 70/70 standard level. 2) To study students' critical thinking skills of secondary students at the 11th grade level, and assessing skill in criteria 80 percentage 3) To compare learning achievements between students' pre-post testing after taught in STEM Education 4) To evaluate Student' Satisfaction after using STEM Education teaching by using mean compare to 5 points Likert Scale. The participant used were 40 students from grade 11 at Borabu School, Borabu District, Mahasarakham Province, semester 2, Academic year 2016. Tools used in this study consist of: 1) STEM Education plan about the force and laws of motion for grade 11 students of 1 schemes with total of 15 hours, 2) The test of critical think skills with essay type in amount of 30 items, 3) achievement test on Light and visual equipment with multiple-choice of 4 options of 30 items, 4) satisfaction learning with 5 Rating Scale of 16 items. The statistics used in data analysis were percentage, mean, standard deviation, and t-test (Dependent). The results showed that 1) The results of these findings revealed that the efficiency of the STEM based on criteria indicate that are higher than the standard level of the 70/70 at 71.51/75 2) Student has critical thinking scores that are higher than criteria 80 percentage as amount is 26 people. 3) Statistically significant of students' learning achievements to their later outcomes were differentiated between pretest and posttest at the .05 level, evidently. 4) The student' level of satisfaction toward the learning by using STEM Education plan was at a good level (X ¯ = 4.33, S.D = 0.64).

  2. Incorporating intersectionality theory into population health research methodology: challenges and the potential to advance health equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Greta R

    2014-06-01

    Intersectionality theory, developed to address the non-additivity of effects of sex/gender and race/ethnicity but extendable to other domains, allows for the potential to study health and disease at different intersections of identity, social position, processes of oppression or privilege, and policies or institutional practices. Intersectionality has the potential to enrich population health research through improved validity and greater attention to both heterogeneity of effects and causal processes producing health inequalities. Moreover, intersectional population health research may serve to both test and generate new theories. Nevertheless, its implementation within health research to date has been primarily through qualitative research. In this paper, challenges to incorporation of intersectionality into population health research are identified or expanded upon. These include: 1) confusion of quantitative terms used metaphorically in theoretical work with similar-sounding statistical methods; 2) the question of whether all intersectional positions are of equal value, or even of sufficient value for study; 3) distinguishing between intersecting identities, social positions, processes, and policies or other structural factors; 4) reflecting embodiment in how processes of oppression and privilege are measured and analysed; 5) understanding and utilizing appropriate scale for interactions in regression models; 6) structuring interaction or risk modification to best convey effects, and; 7) avoiding assumptions of equidistance or single level in the design of analyses. Addressing these challenges throughout the processes of conceptualizing and planning research and in conducting analyses has the potential to improve researchers' ability to more specifically document inequalities at varying intersectional positions, and to study the potential individual- and group-level causes that may drive these observed inequalities. A greater and more thoughtful incorporation

  3. Justification of the Expediency of Creating Circular Intersections in Modern Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyeva, Elena; Sazonova, Tatiana

    2017-10-01

    The article resumes the principles of driving on Circular Intersections, which causes difficulties for some road users. Referring to certain foreign Traffic regulations, the author points out that such intersections are still stated imprecisely in Traffic regulations. Advantages and disadvantages of circular intersections as well as the expediency of their creation in the cities are considered in the article. The author offers to distinguish several types of circular intersections and claims that the most part of disadvantages listed in the article belong to circular intersections of the old type. On the contrary, the author presumes that creation of modern circular intersections will allow to regulate the planning of cities, make heavy traffic of transport possible while increasing the traffic safety at the same time, to improve the ecological situation of the city as well as its appearance, to carry out energy saving in the transport infrastructure of the city. All these aims could be feasible due to the creation of modern intersections of the Roundabout type.

  4. Media Representation of Women Politicians from a Gender to an Intersectionality Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiig, Christina

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates media representation from a perspective of intersectionality defined as one that deconstructs the category ‘woman’ by looking at different social divisions such as class, ethnicity, gender, race and sexuality. An intersectionality perspective is constructive in broadening...... the debate on the media as a powerful political site for different groups of men and women politicians. The analytical point of the article is that a perspective of intersectionality deepens the understanding of the ways that the media organize power through stereotypical representation and homogenization...

  5. Nine Potential Solutions to Abate Grade Inflation at Regionally Accredited Online U.S. Universities: An Intrinsic Case Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David Blum

    2017-01-01

    Grade inflation must be abated. The effect of grade inflation weakens academic standards to the point where accurately assessing levels of competency and student knowledge is difficult to determine...

  6. Characterization Test Procedures for Intersection Collision Avoidance Systems Based on Vehicle-to-Vehicle Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Characterization test procedures have been developed to quantify the performance of intersection collision avoidance (ICA) systems based on vehicle-to-vehicle communications. These systems warn the driver of an imminent crossing-path collision at a r...

  7. Development of intersection performance measures for timing plan maintenance using an actuated controller : Phase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    "This proof-of-concept study is to develop an automated data collection module for collection and management of : traffic data at signalized intersections controlled by the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT). The : objective of this proof-of...

  8. Low testosterone level is an independent risk factor for high-grade prostate cancer detection at biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Juhyun; Cho, Sung Yong; Jeong, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Seung Bae; Son, Hwancheol; Jeong, Hyeon

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between low testosterone levels and prostate cancer detection risk in a biopsy population. In all, 681 men who underwent initial 12-core transrectal prostate biopsy at our institution were included in this retrospective study. Patients were divided into groups with low (levels (≥300 ng/dL). Clinical and pathological data were analysed. Among 681 men, 86 men (12.6%) had low testosterone levels, 143 (32.7%) had a positive biopsy, and 99 (14.5%) had high-grade prostate cancer. The mean age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, PSA density, body mass index (BMI), number of abnormal digital rectal examination (DRE) findings, and diabetes mellitus (DM) history were significantly different between the low and normal level testosterone groups. A low testosterone level was significantly associated with a higher risk of detection of overall prostate cancer than a normal testosterone level in univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR] 2.545, P = 0.001), but not in multivariate analysis adjusting for parameters such as age, PSA, prostate volume, BMI, abnormal DRE findings and DM (OR 1.583, P = 0.277). Meanwhile, a low testosterone level was significantly related to a higher rate of high-grade prostate cancer compared with a normal testosterone level in univariate (OR 3.324, P level is an independent risk factor for high-grade prostate cancer detection at biopsy. Therefore, checking testosterone levels could help to determine whether prostate biopsy should be carried out. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Intersection signal control multi-objective optimization based on genetic algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Zhanhong; Cai, Ming

    2014-01-01

    A signal control intersection increases not only vehicle delay, but also vehicle emissions and fuel consumption in that area. Because more and more fuel and air pollution problems arise recently, an intersection signal control optimization method which aims at reducing vehicle emissions, fuel consumption and vehicle delay is required heavily. This paper proposed a signal control multi-object optimization method to reduce vehicle emissions, fuel consumption and vehicle delay simultaneously at ...

  10. Imploded test-chamber for an ISR intersection

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    At the ISR intersection points the vacuum chambers had to be as "transparent" as possible, for the p-p collision product particles to reach the detectors with minimum hindrance. This meant the choice of a light, yet very strong, metal; minimum thickness; and corrugation for mechanical strength. The test-chamber seen here was made of 0.6 mm thick corrugated titanium, obviously not strong enough to withstand the atmospheric pressure.

  11. Fuels Performance: Navigating the Intersection of Fuels and Combustion (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-12-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the only national laboratory dedicated 100% to renewable energy and energy efficiency, recognize that engine and infrastructure compatibility can make or break the impact of even the most promising fuel. NREL and its industry partners navigate the intersection of fuel chemistry, ignition kinetics, combustion, and emissions, with innovative approaches to engines and fuels that meet drivers' expectations, while minimizing petroleum use and GHGs.

  12. Tumor Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is used to grade prostate cancer ( 1 ). The Gleason score is based on biopsy samples taken from the ... two grades are then added to give a Gleason score. The American Joint Committee on Cancer recommends grouping ...

  13. Mechanical Forces Alter Conical Intersections Topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Daniel; Valentini, Alessio; Fernández-González, Miguel Ángel; Zapata, Felipe; García-Iriepa, Cristina; Sampedro, Diego; Palmeiro, Raúl; Frutos, Luis Manuel

    2015-08-11

    Photoreactivity can be influenced by mechanical forces acting over a reacting chromophore. Nevertheless, the specific effect of the external forces in the photoreaction mechanism remains essentially unknown. Conical intersections are key structures in photochemistry, as they constitute the funnels connecting excited and ground states. These crossing points are well known to provide valuable information on molecular photoreactivity, including crucial aspects as potential photoproducts which may be predicted by just inspection of the branching plane vectors. Here, we outline a general framework for understanding the effect of mechanical forces on conical intersections and their implications on photoreactivity. Benzene S1/S0 conical intersection topology can be dramatically altered by applying less than 1 nN force, making the peaked pattern of the intersection become a sloped one, also provoking the transition state in the excited state to disappear. Both effects can be related to an increase in the photostability as the conical intersection becomes more accessible, and its topology in this case favors the recovery of the initial reactant. The results indicate that the presence of external forces acting over a chromophore have to be considered as a potential method for photochemical reactivity control.

  14. Low back pain at school: unique risk deriving from unsatisfactory grade in maths and school-type recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erne, Cordula; Elfering, Achim

    2011-12-01

    Psychosocial stress and pain may relate to educational selection. At the end of primary school (International Standard Classification of Education: ISCED level 1) children are recommended for one of three performance-based lower secondary level types of school (ISCED level 2). The study examines the association of educational selection and other risk factors with pain in the upper back (UBP), lower back pain (LBP), peripheral (limb) pain (PP), and abdominal pain (AP). Teacher reports of unsatisfactory grades in mathematics, and official school-type recommendation are included as objective psychosocial risk factors. One hundred and ninety-two schoolchildren, aged between 10 and 13 from 11 classes of 7 schools in Switzerland participated in the cross-sectional study. In logistic regression analysis, predictor variables included age, sex, BMI, participation in sport, physical mobility, weight of satchel, hours of daily TV, video, and computer use, pupils' back pain reported by the mother and father, psychosocial strain, unsatisfactory grade in mathematics, and school-type recommendation. Analysis of pain drawings was highly reliable and revealed high prevalence rates of musculoskeletal pain in the last 4 weeks (UBP 15.3%, LBP 13:8%, PP 33.9%, AP 20.1%). Psychosocial risk factors were uniquely significant predictors of UBP (psychosocial strain), LBP (psychosocial strain, unsatisfactory grade in mathematics, school-type recommendation), and AP (school-type recommendation). In conclusion, selection in terms of educational school system was uniquely associated with LBP in schoolchildren. Stress caused by educational selection should be addressed in primary prevention of musculoskeletal pain in schoolchildren.

  15. Procedural confidence in hospital based practitioners: implications for the training and practice of doctors at all grades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsagkaraki Petroula A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical doctors routinely undertake a number of practical procedures and these should be performed competently. The UK Postgraduate Medical Education and Training Board (PMETB curriculum lists the procedures trainees should be competent in. We aimed to describe medical practitioner's confidence in their procedural skills, and to define which practical procedures are important in current medical practice. Methods A cross sectional observational study was performed measuring procedural confidence in 181 hospital practitioners at all grades from 2 centres in East Anglia, England. Results Both trainees and consultants provide significant service provision. SpR level doctors perform the widest range and the highest median number of procedures per year. Most consultants perform few if any procedures, however some perform a narrow range at high volume. Cumulative confidence for the procedures tested peaks in the SpR grade. Five key procedures (central line insertion, lumbar puncture, pleural aspiration, ascitic aspiration, and intercostal drain insertion are the most commonly performed, are seen as important generic skills, and correspond to the total number of procedures for which confidence can be maintained. Key determinants of confidence are gender, number of procedures performed in the previous year and total number of procedures performed. Conclusion The highest volume of service requirement is for six procedures. The procedural confidence is dependent upon gender, number of procedures performed in the previous year and total number of procedures performed. This has implications for those designing the training curriculum and with regards the move to shorten the duration of training.

  16. Generalized dimension of the intersection between EEGs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, X; Xu, J; Gu, F

    2001-10-01

    The generalized dimension defined by [Mandelbrot (1995) J Fourier Anal Appl special J.P. Kahane issue: 409-432] was applied to studying the interrelationship between various parts of human cerebral cortex in different functional conditions. Taking EEG signals from different brain areas as different sets, the generalized dimensions of their intersections were calculated to describe the interrelationship between them. The results showed that the generalized dimensions of intersections in different brain states decreased according to the following order: rest with eyes open, closed, light sleep, and deep sleep. The generalized dimensions of intersections related to the left or right temporal lobe were higher than the others when the subjects was doing mental arithmetic, and there was a decrease when the subjects listened to soft classical music. In addition, it was found that there was a noticeable difference in singular spectra between epileptic patients and normal subjects, irrespective of whether the epileptic patient was experiencing a seizure or not.

  17. Educational inequalities in hypertension: complex patterns in intersections with gender and race in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Ronaldo Fernandes Santos; Faerstein, Eduardo

    2016-11-17

    Hypertension is a major public health issue worldwide, but knowledge is scarce about its patterns and its relationship to multiple axes of social disadvantages in Latin American countries. This study describes the educational inequality in the prevalence of hypertension in Brazil, including a joint stratification by gender and race. We analyzed interview-based data and blood pressure measurements from 59,402 participants aged 18 years or older at the 2013 Brazilian National Health Survey (PNS). Sociodemographic characteristics analyzed were gender (male, female), racial self-identification (white, brown, black), age (5-years intervals), and educational attainment (pre-primary, primary, secondary, tertiary). Hypertension was defined as systolic blood pressure ≥ 140 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mmHg, and/or self-reported use of antihypertensive medications in the last 2 weeks. We used logistic regression to evaluate the age-adjusted prevalences of hypertension (via marginal modeling), and pair-wise associations between education level and odds of hypertension. Further, the educational inequality in hypertension was summarized through the Relative Index of Inequality (RII) and the Slope Index of Inequality (SII). All analyses considered the appropriate sampling weights and intersections with gender, race, and education. Age-adjusted prevalence of hypertension was 34.0 % and 30.8 % among men and women, respectively. Black and brown women had a higher prevalence than whites (34.5 % vs. 31.8 % vs. 29.5 %), whereas no racial differences were observed among men. White and brown, but not black women, showed graded inverse associations between hypertension and educational attainment; among men, non-statistically significant associations were observed in all racial strata. The RII and SII estimated inverse gradients among white (RII = 2.5, SII = 18.1 %) and brown women (RII = 2.3, SII = 14.5 %), and homogeneous distributions

  18. Parenting influences on Latino children's social competence in the first grade: parental depression and parent involvement at home and school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Carmen R; Shewakramani, Vansa; Goldberg, Simon; Padilla, Brian

    2013-10-01

    Although it is widely accepted that parental depression is associated with problems with children's socioemotional adjustment, the pathways by which parental depression influences children's adjustment, particularly in low-income Latino children are not fully understood. In our investigation of 1,462 low-income Latino children in the first grade and their Spanish- and English-dominant parents, a factor analysis revealed three main pathways of possible influence of parent involvement in children's social development: emotional involvement and educational involvement at home and at school. The findings from multigroup structural equation modeling revealed that whereas the first two pathways mediated the effect of parental depression on child social competence for Spanish-dominant parents, only emotional involvement explained parental depression effects for English-dominant parents. Parent educational involvement at school did not mediate parental depression effects for either Spanish- or English-dominant Latino parents. Discussion and implications of findings with respect to research, practice, and policy with Latinos follow.

  19. An intersection graph of straight lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Carsten

    2002-01-01

    G. Ehrlich, S. Even, and R.E. Tarjan conjectured that the graph obtained from a complete 3 partite graph K4,4,4 by deleting the edges of four disjoint triangles is not the intersection graph of straight line segments in the plane. We show that it is.......G. Ehrlich, S. Even, and R.E. Tarjan conjectured that the graph obtained from a complete 3 partite graph K4,4,4 by deleting the edges of four disjoint triangles is not the intersection graph of straight line segments in the plane. We show that it is....

  20. The Effect of Using Content-Purpose-Audience (CPA) Strategy toward Students’ Writing of Analytical Exposition Text at the Eleventh Grade of SMA Nurul Falah Pekanbaru

    OpenAIRE

    Dahler Dahler; Fitri Jayanti Lumban Toruan

    2017-01-01

    The research was conducted at eleventh grade SMA Nurul Falah Pekanbaru in teaching writing analytical expoition text. The researcher used Content-Purpose-Audience (CPA) strategy because the strategy could facilitate the language skills particularly writing. The purpose of this research were to find out significant to effect of using Content-Purpose-Audience (CPA) strategy toward students’ writing ability in analytical exposition text at the eleventh grade students of SMA Nurul Falah Pekanbaru...

  1. On the extent and connectivity of conical intersection seams and the effects of three-state intersections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coe, Joshua D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Levine, B G [U IL AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN; Ong, M T [UIUC; Martinez, T J [UIUC

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the connectivity of intersection spaces and the role of minimal energy points within these intersection spaces (minimal energy conical intersections or MECIs) in promoting nonadiabatic transitions. We focus on malonaldeyde as a specific example, where there is a low-lying three-state conical intersection. This three-state intersection is the global minimum on the bright excited electronic state, but it plays a limited role in population transfer in our ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) simulations because the molecule must traverse a series of two-state conical intersections to reach the three-state intersection. Due to the differences in seam space dimensionality separating conventional (two-state) and three-state intersections, we suggest that dynamical effects arising directly from a three-state intersection may prove difficult to observe in general. We also use a newly developed method for intersection optimization with geometric constraints to demonstrate the connectivity of all the stationary points in the intersection spaces for malonaldehyde. This supports the conjecture that all intersection spaces are connected, and that three-state intersections play a key role in extending this connectivity to all pairs of states, e.g. the S{sub 1}/S{sub 0} and S{sub 2}/S{sub 1} intersection spaces.

  2. The Molecular Geometric Phase and Light-Induced Conical Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Emil J.

    2017-06-01

    Potential energy surfaces for electronic states of molecules in strong electromagnetic fields can be described in the dressed-state formalism, which introduces light-induced potentials. A light-induced conical intersection (LICI) [1] appears when two electronic states intersect due to the presence of an external electric field and when the dipole coupling between the field and the molecule vanishes. There are several aspects of quantum dynamics near LICIs, which still require a thorough investigation. How do non-adiabatic effects manifest themselves in polyatomic molecules in strong electromagnetic fields? Are the natural conical-intersections (NCI) and the light-induced conical intersections identical in nature? Do topological effects (Berry phase) [2] influence the nuclear dynamics around NCIs and LICIs? To answer these questions, a computer code for time-propagation of the ro-vibronic wavefunction on multiple coupled potential energy surfaces has been developed. The time-independent zero-order basis is taken from the DUO suite [3], which solves the full ro-vibronic Schrödinger equation for diatomic molecules. Non-adiabatic nuclear dynamics near LICIs will be presented on the examples of NaH and CaF molecules, with a perspective for extension to polyatomics. G. J. Halász, A Vibók, M. Sindelka, N. Moiseyev, L. S. Cederbaum, 2011 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 44 175102 C. Wittig, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 6409-6432 S. N. Yurchenko, L. Lodi, J. Tennyson, A. V. Stolyarov, Comput. Phys. Commun., 202, 262, 2016

  3. Enriching the semantics of the directed polyline-polygon topological relationships: the DLP-intersection matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formica, A.; Mazzei, M.; Pourabbas, E.; Rafanelli, M.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we define an intersection matrix for enriching the semantics of the topological relationships between a directed polyline and a polygon. In particular, we propose the DLP-intersection matrix which enables us to model the origin and destination points, as well as the right- and left-hand sides of the directed polyline. This matrix overcomes the limitation of the well-known DE-9 IM, because it allows the representation of the different dimensions of the intersection results at the same time. Accordingly, the geo-operators have been revised and extended in order to address the notions of right- and left-hand sides of a directed polyline, as well as additional notions related to the orientation of the polyline. The DLP-intersection matrix has been implemented by extending the Java Topology Suite methods in order to address the new geo-operators based on the notion of orientation.

  4. The role of intersection and street design on severity of bicycle-motor vehicle crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgarzadeh, Morteza; Verma, Santosh; Mekary, Rania A; Courtney, Theodore K; Christiani, David C

    2017-06-01

    Safety concerns are a major barrier to cycling. Intersection and street design variables such as intersection angles and street width might contribute to the severity of crashes and the safety concerns. In this study we examined whether these design variables were associated with bicycle-motor vehicle crashes (BMVC) severity. Using the geographical information system and latitudes/longitudes recorded by the police using a global positioning device, we extracted intersection angles, street width, bicycle facilities, posted speed limits and annual average daily traffic from 3266 BMVC data from New York City police records. Additional variables about BMVC, including age and sex of the bicyclist, time of the day, road surface conditions, road character, vehicle type and injury severity, were obtained from police reports. Injury severity was classified as severe (incapacitating or killed) or non-severe (non-incapacitating, possible injury). The associations between injury severity and environment design variables were examined using multivariate log-binomial regression model. Compared with crashes at orthogonal intersections, crashes at non-orthogonal intersections had 1.37 times (95% CI 1.05 to 1.80) and non-intersection street segments had 1.31 times (95% CI 1.01 to 1.70) higher risk of a severe injury. Crashes that involved a truck or a bus were twice as likely to result in a severe injury outcome; street width was not significantly associated with injury severity. Crashes at non-orthogonal intersections and non-intersection segments are more likely to result in higher injury severity. The findings can be used to improve road design and develop effective safety interventions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Mechanical properties of S-65C grade beryllium at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goods, S.H. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States); Dombrowski, D.E.

    1998-01-01

    Tensile property measurements and fractographic analysis of S-65C beryllium are reviewed. Tests were performed on specimens oriented in the longitudinal and transverse directions with respect to the direction of vacuum hot-pressing. Specimens were tested in air at RT, 100degC, 200degC, 300degC, 415degC and 500degC at an initial strain rate of 1.1 x 10{sup -4} sec{sup -1}. Ductility of the material was strongly affected by the test temperature, exhibiting a peak ductility at 300degC. The material displayed a yield point phenomenon which was most pronounced at this same temperature. Scanning electron microscopy was performed on the resulting fracture surfaces and observations are reported. (author)

  6. The impact of a freshman academy on science performance of first-time ninth-grade students at one Georgia high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Vivian Summerour

    The purpose of this within-group experimental study was to find out to what extent ninth-grade students improved their science performance beyond their middle school science performance at one Georgia high school utilizing a freshman academy model. Freshman academies have been recognized as a useful tool for increasing academic performance among ninth-grade students because they address a range of academic support initiatives tailored to improve academic performance among ninth-grade students. The talent development model developed by Legters, Balfanz, Jordan, and McPartland (2002) has served as a foundational standard for many ninth grade academy programs. A cornerstone feature of this model is the creation of small learning communities used to increase ninth-grade student performance. Another recommendation was to offer credit recovery opportunities for ninth graders along with creating parent and community involvement activities to increase academic success among ninth-grade students. While the site's program included some of the initiatives outlined by the talent development model, it did not utilize all of them. The study concluded that the academy did not show a definitive increase in academic performance among ninth-grade students since most students stayed within their original performance category.

  7. Using Rap Lyrics To Encourage At-Risk Elementary Grade Urban Learners To Read for Pleasure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow-Pretlow, Tharyll W.

    This practicum was developed to encourage the at-risk urban elementary school student to read for pleasure daily. Participants listened to their favorite rap songs, wrote lyrics for their own rap songs, and then read the lyrics as a text. The practicum was performed in a neighborhood community recreation center that serves urban students from…

  8. Identifying patients at risk for high-grade intra-abdominal hypertension following trauma laparotomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.D. Strang; D.L. van Imhoff (Diederik); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); S.K. D'Amours (Scott); O.J.F. van Waes (Oscar)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractBackground: Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (ACS) is an uncommon but deleterious complication after trauma laparotomy. Early recognition of patients at risk of developing ACS is crucial for their outcome. The aim of this study was to compare the characteristics of patients who

  9. A Math Intervention for Third Grade Latino English Language Learners at Risk for Math Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosco, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Word problems for English language learners (ELLs) at risk for math disabilities are challenging in terms of the constant need to develop precise math language and comprehension knowledge. As a result of this, ELLs may not only need math support but also reading and linguistic support. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a…

  10. Vacuum chamber for intersection I-4

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1972-01-01

    Vacuum chamber for intersection I-4 of the ISR being assembled inside a wooden mock-up of the gap of the split-field magnet. The central round-cylinder section is provisional and is to be replaced by an elliptic-cylinder section to give more space vertically for installation of detectors. Supports for the central section are of carbon fibre composite.

  11. Teaching Science from Cultural Points of Intersection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimberg, Bruna Irene; Gummer, Edith

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on a professional development program for science teachers near or on American Indian reservations in Montana. This program was framed by culturally relevant pedagogy premises and was characterized by instructional strategies and content foci resulting from the intersection between three cultures: tribal, science teaching, and…

  12. Compelling Diversities, Educational Intersections: Policy, Practice, Parity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Yvette

    2013-01-01

    The ninth international Gender and Education Association Conference "Compelling Diversities, Educational Intersections" hosted by the Weeks Centre for Social and Policy Research, London South Bank University engages with key debates surrounding the interplay between dynamics of education, work, employment and society in the context of…

  13. Can intersectional innovations reduce hospital infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint, S

    2017-02-01

    Preventing healthcare-associated infection remains an international priority given the clinical and economic consequences of this largely preventable patient safety harm. Whereas important strides have been made in preventing hospital infections over the past several decades, thorny issues remain, including how to consistently improve hand hygiene rates and further reduce device-related complications such as catheter-associated urinary tract infection. Rather than relying solely on directional innovations - incremental changes that continue to serve as the bedrock of scientific advancement - perhaps we should also search for 'intersectional innovations', which represent breakthrough discoveries that emanate from the intersection of often widely divergent disciplines. Several intersectional innovations that have the potential to greatly impact infection prevention efforts include human factors engineering, sociology, and engaging the senses. Indeed, Professor Edward Joseph Lister Lowbury, the namesake of this lecture, exemplified intersectional thinking in his own life, having been both an accomplished bacteriologist and poet. By incorporating approaches outside of traditional biomedical science we may hope to provide patients with the safe care they expect and deserve. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. A Finite Model Property for Intersection Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick Statman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We show that the relational theory of intersection types known as BCD has the finite model property; that is, BCD is complete for its finite models. Our proof uses rewriting techniques which have as an immediate by-product the polynomial time decidability of the preorder <= (although this also follows from the so called beta soundness of BCD.

  15. On approximating the TSP with intersecting neighborhoods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbassioni, Khaled; Fishkin, Aleksei V.; Sitters, René

    2006-01-01

    In the TSP with neighborhoods problem we are given a set of n regions (neighborhoods) in the plane, and seek to find a minimum length TSP tour that goes through all the regions. We give two approximation algorithms for the case when the regions are allowed to intersect: We give the first O(1)-factor

  16. Exploring Intersections between Teenage Pregnancy and Gender ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A qualitative study of teenage pregnancy was conducted over a period of three months in 1996 in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. Interviews with teenage mothers and fathers gave reason to explore the various intersections between teenage pregnancy and gender violence. Gender violence is defined as acts of force or coercion ...

  17. Symmetric intersections of Rauzy fractals | Sellami | Quaestiones ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article we study symmetric subsets of Rauzy fractals of unimodular irreducible Pisot substitutions. The symmetry considered is re ection through the origin. Given an unimodular irreducible Pisot substitution, we consider the intersection of its Rauzy fractal with the Rauzy fractal of the reverse substitution. This set is ...

  18. Intersection-theoretical computations on \\Mgbar

    OpenAIRE

    Faber, Carel

    1995-01-01

    We determine necessary conditions for ample divisors in arbitrary genus as well as for very ample divisors in genus 2 and 3. We also compute the intersection numbers $\\lambda^9$ and $\\lambda_{g-1}^3$ in genus 4. The latter number is relevant for counting curves of higher genus on manifolds, cf. the recent work of Bershadsky et al.

  19. Intersection Type Systems and Explicit Substitutions Calculi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Daniel Lima; Ayala-Rincón, Mauricio; Kamareddine, Fairouz

    The λ-calculus with de Bruijn indices, called λ dB , assembles each α-class of λ-terms into a unique term, using indices instead of variable names. Intersection types provide finitary type polymorphism satisfying important properties like principal typing, which allows the type system to include features such as data abstraction (modularity) and separate compilation. To be closer to computation and to simplify the formalisation of the atomic operations involved in β-contractions, several explicit substitution calculi were developed most of which are written with de Bruijn indices. Although untyped and simply types versions of explicit substitution calculi are well investigated, versions with more elaborate type systems (e.g., with intersection types) are not. In previous work, we presented a version for λ dB of an intersection type system originally introduced to characterise principal typings for β-normal forms and provided the characterisation for this version. In this work we introduce intersection type systems for two explicit substitution calculi: the λσ and the λs e . These type system are based on a type system for λ dB and satisfy the basic property of subject reduction, which guarantees the preservation of types during computations.

  20. Intersection layout, traffic volumes and accidents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppe, F.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on the accident research carried out as a part of a large project started in 1983. For this accident research an inventory was made of a large number of intersections.Recorded were layout features, accident data and estimates of traffic volumes. Attention will be given to the

  1. Intersection of neighbourhood structure, parenting and externalizing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Little is known about parenting practices and how it intersects with neighbourhood structure and externalizing behaviour, in South Africa. This chapter presents the findings of parental reflections on neighbourhood structure and problem behaviours, which is one component of a study, that is situated within a child safety, ...

  2. Extended MRI findings of intersection syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Roger P.; Hatem, Stephen F.; Recht, Michael P. [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2009-02-15

    The symptoms and physical findings of intersection syndrome have been well described in the clinical medical literature. However, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with intersection syndrome of the forearm have only recently been described in a small number of patients. We review our experience with imaging of intersection syndrome, describe previously unreported MRI findings, and emphasize modifications to MRI protocols for its evaluation. Institutional review board approval was obtained for this retrospective review of patients with MRI findings consistent with intersection syndrome of the forearm during the period from January 2004 to September 2006. Six patients were identified, three males and three females, with an average age of 39.3 years. The MRI examinations were reviewed to assess signal abnormalities within and adjacent to the first and second dorsal extensor tendon compartments (DETC): tendinosis, peritendinous edema or fluid, muscle edema, subcutaneous edema, and juxtacortical edema. The overall longitudinal extent of signal alterations was measured as well as the distance from Lister's tubercle to the crossover of the first and second DETC. Review of the MRIs showed increased intrasubstance tendon signal suggesting tendinosis in two of the six patients, peritendinous edema or fluid in all six patients, muscle edema in five of the six patients, and subcutaneous edema in three of the six patients. Juxtacortical edema was seen in one patient. Peritendinous edema or fluid extended distally beyond the radiocarpal joint in three of the six patients. The average distance from Lister's tubercle to the crossover of the first and second DETC was 3.95 cm, in keeping with recently published data. Intersection syndrome is an uncommon MRI diagnosis. In addition to the previously described MRI findings of edema adjacent to the first or second DETC, possibly with proximal extension and subcutaneous edema, we have identified

  3. Eating habits of pupils of eighth and ninth grade at elementary school

    OpenAIRE

    RYGLOVÁ, Petra

    2012-01-01

    This diploma thesis describes eating habits of pupils at elementary school. It mainly focuses on results of bad eating habits. The first chapter describes eating habits of pupils. The second chapter characterizes the age group 13 to 16 years. The following chapters are focused on eating disorders (in general and also specifically on anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa), individual and social factors influencing the disorder and disease prevention. The practical part informs about the results...

  4. Quality assurance grading guidelines for research and development at DOE facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, T.B.; Morris, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    The quality assurance (QA) requirements for the US Department of Energy (DOE) are established in DOE Order 5700.6C. This order is applicable for all DOE departmental elements, management, and maintenance and operating contractors and requires that documented Quality Assurance Programs (QAPs) are prepared at all levels; it has one attachment. The DOE Office of Energy Research (DOE-ER) has issued a standard to ensure implementation of the full intent of this order in the ER community.

  5. Cyclic softening based on dislocation annihilation at sub-cell boundary for SA333 Grade-6 C-Mn steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, S.; Dhar, S.; Acharyya, S. K.; Gupta, S. K.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, the response of SA333 Grade-6 C-Mn steel subjected to uniaxial and in-phase biaxial tension–torsion cyclic loading is experimented and an attempt is made to model the material behaviour. Experimentally observed cyclic softening is modelled based on ‘dislocation annihilation at low angle grain boundary’, while Ohno–Wang kinematic hardening rule is used to simulate the stress–strain hysteresis loops. The relevant material parameters are extracted from the appropriate experimental results and metallurgical investigations. The material model is plugged as user material subroutine into ABAQUS FE platform to simulate pre-saturation low cycle fatigue loops with cyclic softening and other cyclic plastic behaviour under prescribed loading. The stress–strain hysteresis loops and peak stress with cycles were compared with the experimental results and good agreements between experimental and simulated results validated the material model.

  6. Difficulties faced by eighth grade students in the learning of linear equation problems at a high school in Heredia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Chavarría Arroyo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The current article presents the results of a study that aimed to analyze the difficulties faced by eighth grade students when learning to solve algebraic problems based on linear equations with one unknown variable. The participants were learners with low average performance in mathematics at a high school in Heredia. The research followed a naturalistic paradigm and the case study method with a qualitative approach. Different techniques like class observations, questionnaires to students, non-structured interviews to teachers and interviews to the learners were applied. The research helped to identify the main causes of difficulty when learning to solve algebraic problems. Some of the causes that were identified are affective aspects, lack of previous knowledge, poor relational understanding, fatigue, diversion, reading deficiencies and misunderstanding of terminology.

  7. High-grade ureteroscopic biopsy is associated with advanced pathology of upper-tract urothelial carcinoma tumors at definitive surgical resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Thomas; Messer, Jamie C; Terrell, John D; Herman, Michael P; Ng, Casey K; Scherr, Douglas S; Scoll, Benjamin; Boorjian, Stephen A; Uzzo, Robert G; Wille, Mark; Eggener, Scott E; Lucas, Steven M; Lotan, Yair; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Raman, Jay D

    2012-04-01

    Accurate assessment of upper-tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) pathology may guide use of endoscopic vs extirpative therapy. We present a multi-institutional cohort of patients with UTUC who underwent surgical resection to characterize the association of ureteroscopic (URS) biopsy features with final pathology results. URS biopsy data were available in 238 patients who underwent surgical resection of UTUC. Biopsies were performed using a brush biopsy kit, mechanical biopsy device, or basket. Stage was classified as a positive brush, nonmuscle-invasive (biopsy, 88/238 (37%) patients had a positive brush, 140 (59%) had a diagnosis of non-MI, and 10 (4%) had MI disease. Biopsy results showed low-grade cancer in 140 (59%) and high-grade cancer in 98 (41%). Pathologic evaluation at surgical resection demonstrated non-MI tumors in 140 (59%) patients, MI in 98 (41%), and high-grade disease in 150 (63%). On univariate analysis, high URS biopsy grade was associated with high-grade (positive predictive value [PPV] 92%, Pbiopsy stage, however, was associated with surgical pathology grade (P=0.005), but not MI (P=0.16) disease. On multivariate analysis, high URS grade, but not biopsy stage, was associated with high final pathology grade (hazard ratio [HR] 16.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.0-39.5, Pbiopsy grade, but not stage, is associated with adverse tumor pathology. This information may play a valuable role for risk stratification and in the appropriate selection of endoscopic management vs surgical extirpation for UTUC.

  8. An Analysis of Elementary School Children's Ability to Learn Anthropological Content at Grades Four, Five, and Six.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potterfield, James Edward

    The problem of this study was to determine if there was any difference in fourth, fifth, and sixth grade children's ability to learn the materials in an anthropology unit, "Concept of Culture," designed for the fourth grade and developed by the Anthropology Curriculum Project. Major emphasis of the unit was given to an understanding of…

  9. A random parameters probit model of urban and rural intersection crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Intersections are hazardous locations and many studies have been conducted to identify the factors contributing to the frequency and severity of intersection crashes. However, little attention has been devoted to investigating the differences between crashes at urban and rural intersections, which have different road, traffic and environmental characteristics. By applying a random parameters probit model to the data from the Canadian Province of Alberta between 2008 and 2012, we find that urban intersection crashes are more likely to be associated with hit and run behaviours, roads with higher traffic volume, wet surfaces, four lanes and skewed intersections, and crashes on weekdays and off-peak hours, whereas rural crashes are likely to be associated with increases in fatalities and injuries, roads with higher speed limits, special road features, exit and entrance terminals, gravel, curvature and two lanes, crashes during weekends, peak hours and night-time, run-off-road crashes, and police visit to crash scene. Hence, road safety professionals in urban and rural areas should consider these differences when designing and implementing counter-measures to improve intersection safety, especially their safety audits and reviews, enforcement activities and education campaigns, to target the more vulnerable times and locations in the different areas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. App Inventor2 Learning Basketball at Grade X Senior High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dani Indrianto

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to involve the growing sophistication of technology on education and determine the feasibility and the improvement of learning outcomes using a smartphone. This study uses a development which is the basis for developing models produced. The results of the small scale trials, improving every aspect obtained is the cognitive aspects of 59%, 49% psychomotor, and affective 0%. Gain test results criterion level of cognitive, psychomotor and the average yield was high (value ≥ 0.7. On the affective aspect, low level criteria (value ≤ 0.3. From large-scale trial found an average increase in each school obtained on the cognitive aspects of between 49% -54%, psychomotor aspects 48% -55%, affective 0%. Data validation field tests of media experts 83.33%, experts PE 85%, experts basketball 97.5% and an average of four teachers at 93.1%, as well as the responses of students amounted to 91.68%. Gain test results criterion level of cognitive, psychomotor and the average yield was high (value ≥ 0.7. On the affective aspect, low level criteria (value ≤ 0.3. Based on the above results, it can be concluded that the instructional media PE (basketball Android-based high school students eligible for use in learning.

  11. The Final Oral/Practical State Examination at Freiburg Medical Faculty in 2012 – Analysis of grading to test quality assurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schickler, Angela

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to analyze the grades given for the oral/practical part of the German State Examination at the Medical Faculty of Freiburg. We examined whether or not the grades given for the written and the oral/practical examinations correlated and if differences in grading between the Freiburg University Medical Center (UMC and the other teaching hospitals could be found.In order to improve the quality of the state examination, the medical school has been offering standardized training for examiners for several years. We evaluated whether or not trained and untrained examiners differed in their grading of the exam and how these differences have changed over time.Methods: The results of the 2012 spring and fall exams were analyzed (N=315. The relevant data set was made available to us by the Baden-Württemberg Examination Office (. The data were analyzed by means of descriptive and inferential statistics.Results: We observed a correlation of ρ=0.460** between the grades for the written and the oral/practical exams. The UMC and the teaching hospitals did not differ significantly in their grade distributions. Compared to untrained examiners, trained ones assigned the grade of “very good” less often. Furthermore, they displayed a significantly higher variance in the grades given (p=0.007, phi=0.165. This effect is stronger when concentrating specifically on those examiners who took part in the training less than a year before.Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that the standardized training for examiners at the Medical Faculty of Freiburg is effective for quality assurance. As a consequence, more examiners should be motivated to take part in the training.

  12. Analyzing injury severity factors at highway railway grade crossing accidents involving vulnerable road users: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghomi, Haniyeh; Bagheri, Morteza; Fu, Liping; Miranda-Moreno, Luis F

    2016-11-16

    The main objective of this study is to identify the main factors associated with injury severity of vulnerable road users (VRUs) involved in accidents at highway railroad grade crossings (HRGCs) using data mining techniques. This article applies an ordered probit model, association rules, and classification and regression tree (CART) algorithms to the U.S. Federal Railroad Administration's (FRA) HRGC accident database for the period 2007-2013 to identify VRU injury severity factors at HRGCs. The results show that train speed is a key factor influencing injury severity. Further analysis illustrated that the presence of illumination does not reduce the severity of accidents for high-speed trains. In addition, there is a greater propensity toward fatal accidents for elderly road users compared to younger individuals. Interestingly, at night, injury accidents involving female road users are more severe compared to those involving males. The ordered probit model was the primary technique, and CART and association rules act as the supporter and identifier of interactions between variables. All 3 algorithms' results consistently show that the most influential accident factors are train speed, VRU age, and gender. The findings of this research could be applied for identifying high-risk hotspots and developing cost-effective countermeasures targeting VRUs at HRGCs.

  13. How does the grade obtained at school for English and Mathematics affect the probability of graduation at a university?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Murray

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Over half of all students enrolling at a particular university in KwaZulu-Natal fail to complete a degree. This article is wanting to determine to what extent the marks they obtain for English and Mathematics at school impact on their probability of graduation at this university. In addressing this problem, other student specific factors associated with their gender, race and the type of school they have attended need also to be properly accounted for. To provide answers for this study, the performance of 24 392 students enrolling at the university over the period 2004 to 2012 was followed until they graduated or dropped out from their studies. A structural equation model was fitted because it allows one to separate a direct effect from that of an indirect effect. Gender, race and school background were found to be very significant with males, Black Africans and students coming from a less privileged school background having a smaller probability associated with eventually graduating from this university. Males tend to perform better than females in Mathematics, with females performing better males in English. More importantly, however, a single percentage point increase in one’s mark for English increases the probability associated with graduating from this university far more than would be the case if their Mathematics mark were to increase by a single percentage point. In the light of these mediated results, perhaps this university should be directing their efforts more towards improving the English (rather than mathematical literacy of students entering the university.

  14. An Experimental Evaluation of Guided Reading and Explicit Interventions for Primary-Grade Students At-Risk for Reading Difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Carolyn A; Fletcher, Jack M; Taylor, W Pat; Barth, Amy E; Vaughn, Sharon

    2014-07-03

    Considerable research evidence supports the provision of explicit instruction for students at risk for reading difficulties; however, one of the most widely implemented approaches to early reading instruction is Guided Reading (GR; Fountas & Pinnel, 1996), which deemphasizes explicit instruction and practice of reading skills in favor of extended time reading text. This study evaluated the two approaches in the context of supplemental intervention for at-risk readers at the end of Grade 1. Students (n = 218) were randomly assigned to receive GR intervention, explicit intervention (EX), or typical school instruction (TSI). Both intervention groups performed significantly better than TSI on untimed word identification. Significant effects favored EX over TSI on phonemic decoding and one measure of comprehension. Outcomes for the intervention groups did not differ significantly from each other; however, an analysis of the added value of providing each intervention relative to expected growth with typical instruction indicated that EX is more likely to substantially accelerate student progress in phonemic decoding, text reading fluency, and reading comprehension than GR. Implications for selection of Tier 2 interventions within a response-to-intervention format are discussed.

  15. An Experimental Evaluation of Guided Reading and Explicit Interventions for Primary-Grade Students At-Risk for Reading Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Carolyn A.; Fletcher, Jack M.; Taylor, W. Pat; Barth, Amy E.; Vaughn, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Considerable research evidence supports the provision of explicit instruction for students at risk for reading difficulties; however, one of the most widely implemented approaches to early reading instruction is Guided Reading (GR; Fountas & Pinnel, 1996), which deemphasizes explicit instruction and practice of reading skills in favor of extended time reading text. This study evaluated the two approaches in the context of supplemental intervention for at-risk readers at the end of Grade 1. Students (n = 218) were randomly assigned to receive GR intervention, explicit intervention (EX), or typical school instruction (TSI). Both intervention groups performed significantly better than TSI on untimed word identification. Significant effects favored EX over TSI on phonemic decoding and one measure of comprehension. Outcomes for the intervention groups did not differ significantly from each other; however, an analysis of the added value of providing each intervention relative to expected growth with typical instruction indicated that EX is more likely to substantially accelerate student progress in phonemic decoding, text reading fluency, and reading comprehension than GR. Implications for selection of Tier 2 interventions within a response-to-intervention format are discussed. PMID:26779296

  16. Intersections and Unions of Session Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coşku Acay

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Prior work has extended the deep, logical connection between the linear sequent calculus and session-typed message-passing concurrent computation with equi-recursive types and a natural notion of subtyping. In this paper, we extend this further by intersection and union types in order to express multiple behavioral properties of processes in a single type. We prove session fidelity and absence of deadlock and illustrate the expressive power of our system with some simple examples. We observe that we can represent internal and external choice by intersection and union, respectively, which was previously suggested by Padovani for a different language of session types motivated by operational rather than logical concerns.

  17. Intersections between strategy and business models

    OpenAIRE

    磯村 和人

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between strategy and business models. I review major researches on strategy and business models to provide a viewpoint to consider the intersections between them. The theory of strategy shifts the focus from visible competitive advantage to its internal managerial resources. The concept of business models has been discussed because a business model is considered to be a combination of internal and external business processes; it clarifies how to effectivel...

  18. Spiked instantons from intersecting D-branes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Nekrasov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The moduli space of spiked instantons that arises in the context of the BPS/CFT correspondence [22] is realised as the moduli space of classical vacua, i.e. low-energy open string field configurations, of a certain stack of intersecting D1-branes and D5-branes in Type IIB string theory. The presence of a constant B-field induces an interesting dynamics involving the tachyon condensation.

  19. Spiked instantons from intersecting D-branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nekrasov, Nikita, E-mail: nikitastring@gmail.com [Simons Center for Geometry and Physics, C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3636 (United States); Prabhakar, Naveen S., E-mail: naveen.s.prabhakar@gmail.com [C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3840 (United States)

    2017-01-15

    The moduli space of spiked instantons that arises in the context of the BPS/CFT correspondence is realised as the moduli space of classical vacua, i.e. low-energy open string field configurations, of a certain stack of intersecting D1-branes and D5-branes in Type IIB string theory. The presence of a constant B-field induces an interesting dynamics involving the tachyon condensation.

  20. AN APPROACH TO CHARACTERIZING & EVALUATING ALTERNATIVES FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF SUB-GRADE STRUCTURES AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOPKINS, A.M.; KLOS, D.B.

    2007-01-25

    In 2002, the Richland Operations Office (RL) of the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) developed milestones for transitioning the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) facility to a clean slab-on-grade configuration. These milestones required developing an engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EF/CA) for the facility's sub-grade structures and installations as part of a series of evaluations intended to provide for the transition of the facility to a clean slab-on-grade configuration. In addition to supporting decisions for interim actions, the analyses of sub-grade structures and installations performed through this EE/CA will contribute to the remedial investigation feasibility study(ies) and subsequently to the final records of decision for the relevant operable units responsible for site closure in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site.

  1. Using Information Gap Activity to Increase Students' speaking Skill at the Twelve Grade of MAN 1 Pamekasan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansharul Fuqaha

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Based on the researchers’ observation on the preliminary study on the teachingof speaking, the problem was found that the students’ speaking skill in the teaching and learning was very low. It was because the class was heterogeneousand the teacher used monotonous teaching activity. To cope of this problem, theresearcher employed the Information gap activity. This study tries to prove how the Information-gap activity can increase students’ speaking skill at the thirdgrade of MAN 1 Pamekasan. The study was design to increase the students’speaking skill by using Information gap activity at MAN 1 Pamekasan. Thestudy was collaborative classroom action research in which the researcher andthe collaborator worked together, the researcher acted as the teacher while thecollaborator observed the students during the implementation of the strategy. This study was conducted in one cycle consisting of six meetings using thefollowing procedures; planning, implementing, observing and reflecting. The data of the study were collected through the observation checklists, field notes,and questionnaires. The subject of the study were 41 students of third grade on science 3 program MAN 1 Pamekasan. 

  2. Bayesian methodology incorporating expert judgment for ranking countermeasure effectiveness under uncertainty: example applied to at grade railroad crossings in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Simon; Oh, Jutaek

    2006-03-01

    Transportation professionals are sometimes required to make difficult transportation safety investment decisions in the face of uncertainty. In particular, an engineer may be expected to choose among an array of technologies and/or countermeasures to remediate perceived safety problems when: (1) little information is known about the countermeasure effects on safety; (2) information is known but from different regions, states, or countries where a direct generalization may not be appropriate; (3) where the technologies and/or countermeasures are relatively untested, or (4) where costs prohibit the full and careful testing of each of the candidate countermeasures via before-after studies. The importance of an informed and well-considered decision based on the best possible engineering knowledge and information is imperative due to the potential impact on the numbers of human injuries and deaths that may result from these investments. This paper describes the formalization and application of a methodology to evaluate the safety benefit of countermeasures in the face of uncertainty. To illustrate the methodology, 18 countermeasures for improving safety of at grade railroad crossings (AGRXs) in the Republic of Korea are considered. Akin to "stated preference" methods in travel survey research, the methodology applies random selection and laws of large numbers to derive accident modification factor (AMF) densities from expert opinions. In a full Bayesian analysis framework, the collective opinions in the form of AMF densities (data likelihood) are combined with prior knowledge (AMF density priors) for the 18 countermeasures to obtain 'best' estimates of AMFs (AMF posterior credible intervals). The countermeasures are then compared and recommended based on the largest safety returns with minimum risk (uncertainty). To the author's knowledge the complete methodology is new and has not previously been applied or reported in the literature. The results demonstrate that the

  3. Influence of cannabis use trajectories, grade repetition and family background on the school-dropout rate at the age of 17 years in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleye, Stéphane; Obradovic, Ivana; Janssen, Eric; Spilka, Stanislas; Le Nézet, Olivier; Beck, François

    2010-04-01

    Research has shown that cannabis use contributes to school dropout, but few studies have distinguished the age at onset of use from the age at progression to daily use neither their interaction with grade repetition. This study is based on a French representative cross-sectional survey (N = 29,393 teenagers aged 17 years) and uses retrospective data. The influence of drug-use patterns family socio-economic status, early grade repetition, single-parent families and daily tobacco smoking (ORa > or = 2.6). The link with the move to daily cannabis use was more evident when it occurred or =15 years (ORa = 1.45 for both sexes). The onset of cannabis use was not significant when occurring <14 years of age, but was linked to school attainment when occurring at age 15-16 years (ORa = 0.80 for boys and 0.64 for girls). Results are similar for alcohol use. Repeating a grade before beginning to use cannabis increased the dropout rates compared with the opposite sequence. Girls were more affected by early grade repetition and by early and daily cannabis use. Cannabis use is rarely a trigger for grade repetition but can have either damaging or positive effects on school attainment depending of the level of use. Positive social competence reflected by peer initiation should be investigated to understand this paradoxical effect.

  4. Performance in grade 12 mathematics and science predicts student nurses' performance in first year science modules at a university in the Western Cape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mthimunye, Katlego D T; Daniels, Felicity M

    2017-10-26

    The demand for highly qualified and skilled nurses is increasing in South Africa as well as around the world. Having a background in science can create a significant advantage for students wishing to enrol for an undergraduate nursing qualification because nursing as profession is grounded in scientific evidence. The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive validity of grade 12 mathematics and science on the academic performance of first year student nurses in science modules. A quantitative research method using a cross-sectional predictive design was employed in this study. The participants included first year Bachelor of Nursing students enrolled at a university in the Western Cape, South Africa. Descriptive and inferential statistics were performed to analyse the data by using the IBM Statistical Package for Social Sciences versions 24. Descriptive analysis of all variables was performed as well as the Spearman's rank correlation test to describe the relationship among the study variables. Standard multiple linear regressions analysis was performed to determine the predictive validity of grade 12 mathematics and science on the academic performance of first year student nurses in science modules. The results of this study showed that grade 12 physical science is not a significant predictor (p > 0.062) of performance in first year science modules. The multiple linear regression revealed that grade 12 mathematics and life science grades explained 37.1% to 38.1% (R2 = 0.381 and adj R2 = 0.371) of the variation in the first year science grade distributions. Based on the results of the study it is evident that performance in grade 12 mathematics (β = 2.997) and life science (β = 3.175) subjects is a significant predictor (p < 0.001) of the performance in first year science modules for student nurses at the university identified for this study.

  5. Rigorous Grading Does Not Raise Standards: It Only Lowers Grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Eleanor

    1995-01-01

    Discusses "grade inflation," and the pressure on instructors to "play grade roll politics to save their own professional hides." Argues that the grade deflation movement works at cross purposes with its goal of elevating academic standards, and that it is at odds with composition theory and its process pedagogy. Suggests…

  6. Three-family supersymmetric standardlike models from intersecting brane worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetic, M; Shiu, G; Uranga, A M

    2001-11-12

    We construct the first three family N = 1 supersymmetric string model with standard model gauge group SU(3)(C) x SU(2)(L) x U(1)(Y) from an orientifold of type IIA theory on T(6)/(Z(2) x Z(2)) and D6-branes intersecting at angles. In addition to the minimal supersymmetric standard model particles, the model contains right-handed neutrinos, a chiral (but anomaly-free) set of exotic multiplets, and extra vectorlike multiplets. We discuss some phenomenological features of this model.

  7. Some Problems of Unlikely Intersections in Arithmetic and Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zannier, Umberto

    2012-01-01

    This book considers the so-called Unlikely Intersections, a topic that embraces well-known issues, such as Lang's and Manin-Mumford's, concerning torsion points in subvarieties of tori or abelian varieties. More generally, the book considers algebraic subgroups that meet a given subvariety in a set of unlikely dimension. The book is an expansion of the Hermann Weyl Lectures delivered by Umberto Zannier at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton in May 2010. The book consists of four chapters and seven brief appendixes, the last six by David Masser. The first chapter considers multipli

  8. CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT PROTON - NEUTRON INTERACTIONS IN THE INTERSECTING STORAGE RINGS

    CERN Document Server

    Bartl, W; Steuer, M; Hubner, K

    1969-01-01

    The pos'sibility of proton-neutron scattering experiments at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings is studied. The use of proton-deuteron collisions to measure the reaction p+d •*• p*pv+n,witheitherp.orn,asspectator nucléon is discussed. An analysing magnet around the deuteron beamline allows to detect both nucléons of the deuteron up to the zero-momentum-transfer" région. Accélération and storage of deuteron beams is considered.

  9. Safety evaluation of signalized intersections with left-turn waiting area in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xinguo; Zhang, Guopeng; Bai, Wei; Fan, Wenbo

    2016-10-01

    In recent years the metropolitans in China have seen the surging installations of the left-turn waiting area (LWA) at the signalized intersections. The design allows the left-turning vehicles to enter the intersection at the onset of the through green phase (of the same approach) and wait for the exclusive left-turn signal at the LWA. The LWA layout can effectively reduce the probability of stranded and queue overflow of the left-turn vehicles, but no study is conducted yet to assess the safety performance of the signalized intersections with LWA. The paper adopts the traffic conflict technique (represented by post-encroachment time), compares the discrepancy of conflict types between intersections with LWA and without, and develops the severity models to identify the contributing factors for the left-turn conflicts. Results demonstrate that the left-turn volume, driving outside the LWA, running red light, the presence of secondary conflicts, and the rear-end conflicts significantly increase the severities of traffic conflicts at the LWA. The findings serve to provide recommendations to revise the current design standard of the LWA (GB5768-2009) and consequently improve the safety operations of signalized intersections with LWA in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Safety Performance Evaluation of a Three-Leg Unsignalized Intersection Using Traffic Conflict Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traffic conflicts were used to evaluate safety performance of a three-leg unsignalized intersection. With the aid of a video camera, data were collected at the intersection and 15-second time span was used in each observation to overcome the drawbacks of traditional methods of traffic conflict analysis. Time to collision (TTC, a widely accepted indicator, was used to identify whether an interaction between two vehicles was a traffic conflict. By using Poisson regression, a prediction model for traffic conflicts at the intersection was developed. Based upon the model, assuming that other factors remain constant, when time headway or speed of eastbound traffic on major road, which is crossed by left-turning traffic from minor road, increases, the number of traffic conflicts at the intersection decreases. When volume of left-turning traffic on minor road or speed of left-turning vehicles on minor road increases, the number of traffic conflicts at the intersection increases if other factors remain constant. Explanations for the influence of the factors, which were represented by independent variables of the prediction model, were then analyzed in detail.

  11. A counterfactual impact evaluation of a bilingual program on students' grade point average at a spanish university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arco-Tirado, J L; Fernández-Martín, F; Ramos-García, A M; Littvay, L; Villoria, J; Naranjo, J A

    2018-02-21

    This observational study intends to estimate the causal effects of an English as a Medium of Instruction (EMI) program (as predictor) on students Grade Point Average (GPA) (as outcome) at a particular University in Spain by using a Counterfactual Impact Evaluation (CIE). The need to address the crucial question of causal inferences in EMI programs to produce credible evidences of successful interventions contrasts, however, with the absence of experimental or quasi-experimental research and evaluation designs in the field. CIE approach is emerging as a methodologically viable solution to bridge that gap. The program evaluated here consisted in delivering an EMI program in a Primary Education Teacher Training Degree group. After achieving balance on the observed covariates and recreating a situation that would have been expected in a randomized experiment, three matching approaches such as genetic matching, nearest neighbor matching and Coarsened Exact Matching were used to analyze observational data from a total of 1288 undergraduate students, including both treatment and control group. Results show unfavorable effects of the bilingual group treatment condition. Potential interpretations and recommendations are provided in order to strengthen future causal evidences of bilingual education programs' effectiveness in Higher Education. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluating the outcomes of a hearing screening service for grade one learners in urban areas at Durban, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Govender

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Early intervention through hearing screening can reduce the negative impact of hearing loss for children. Optimal outcomes are achieved when an appropriate screening protocol is selected, a pathway for follow up care is established, and when a hearing conservation component is included. This study aimed to describe the outcomes of a hearing screening service provided to grade one learners in urban areas at Durban. A cross-sectional design was employed. Learners (n=241 were conveniently sampled from six randomly selected schools. They were screened using otoscopy, tympanometry and pure tone audiometry. Fifty eight participants (24% obtained a refer result, with 33% referred for diagnostic assessments, 29% for middle ear pathology and 38% for cerumen management. Findings further revealed that only 33% of referrals were followed up indicating poor compliance. Association between test results and income levels (P=0.38 as well as distance to the nearest health care facility (P=0.22 did not influence test outcomes. School aged children do present with common ear problems. Appropriate protocol selection, ensuring compliance to recommendations and education on hearing conservation are essential components of any health initiative.

  13. Schooling Effects on Degree Performance: A Comparison of the Predictive Validity of Aptitude Testing and Secondary School Grades at Oxford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogg, Tom; Zimdars, Anna; Heath, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the cause of school type effects upon gaining a first class degree at Oxford University, whereby for a given level of secondary school performance, private school students perform less well at degree level. We compare the predictive power of an aptitude test and secondary school grades (GCSEs) for final examination…

  14. Moving, sensing intersectionality: a case study of Miss China Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Yiu Fai

    2011-01-01

    Every year, Miss China Europe, a transnational beauty pageant organized for the Chinese diaspora, is held in the Netherlands. The hypervisuality of Chinese diasporic women at the event stands in painful contrast to their everyday invisibility, whether in the Netherlands, China, or elsewhere in the world. Informed by intersectional and transnational feminist scholarship, this empirical study zooms in on one group of women, ethnic Chinese born and/or growing up in the Netherlands, to identify and recuperate their neglected lived experience in a particular historical-cultural context. It takes their own voices as central, hopefully to contribute to their visibility. It aims to provide an understanding of diasporic Chinese women as living in the dynamics not only of their multiple subordinations but also of their subjective consciousness, experienced autonomy, and agency. Drawing insights from the subjective accounts of both contestants and audiences of Miss China Europe, I suggest that one way to foreground marginalized women's agency is to understand their intersectionality in terms of movements and sensory experiences. On the one hand, while the contestants articulated a readiness to perform their modern and yet Chinese selves, they were making movements along two intersecting axes of inequality and power relations - Chineseness and Dutchness - precisely to negotiate their sense of inequality and power relations. On the other hand, among the audiences, two major topics - the blood issue (or whether Chineseness should be defined by ancestry) and the language problem (or whether Chineseness should be defined by the ability to speak Chinese) - were raised regularly, underscoring a complex viewing experience of seeing and hearing, of the tension between visual and audio identifications.

  15. Two Successful Outreach Programs at Storm Peak Laboratory: GRASP for Undergraduates and Partnership for 5th Grade Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallar, A. G.; McCubbin, I. B.; Wright, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Desert Research Institute operates a high elevation facility, Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), located on the Steamboat Springs Ski Resort at an elevation 10,500 ft. SPL provides an ideal location for long-term atmospheric research. The SPL mission statement is to ensure that the laboratory will continue to integrate climate research and education by advancing discovery and understanding within the field of pollution, aerosol and cloud interactions. During the last year, SPL has created two successful outreach programs reaching very different audiences. First, to engage students from local elementary schools, SPL established a 5th grade climate education program. This program is based on a partnership between SPL and Yampatika's&penvironmental educators. Yampatika is a non-profit outdoor environmental education organization. The program spans three days for each school and includes five elementary schools. During the first day, educators from Yampatika visit each classroom to introduce the concepts of climate and weather as well as teach students how to use scientific equipment. During the field program on the second day, students measure and record information about temperature, pressure, relative humidity, wind speed, and particle concentration while they travel to SPL via the gondola (in winter) or Suburban (in fall). Once at the laboratory, students tour the facility, discuss SPL research activities, and explore application of these activities to their curriculum. Following the field trip, Yampatika educators and SPL scientists will visit the school for a follow-up to help children explore concepts, answer questions, and evaluate students" learning. The second program, Geoscience Research at Storm Peak (GRASP), was designed to engage students from underrepresented groups and created a partnership between three Minority Serving Institutions and the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). Undergraduate students from Tennessee State University, Howard University

  16. Behavioral and Psychosocial Effects of Two Middle School Sexual Health Education Programs at Tenth-Grade Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Christine M.; Peskin, Melissa F.; Shegog, Ross; Baumler, Elizabeth R.; Addy, Robert C.; Thiel, Melanie; Escobar-Chaves, Soledad Liliana; Robin, Leah; Tortolero, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose An earlier randomized controlled trial found that two middle school sexual education programsda risk avoidance (RA) program and a risk reduction (RR) programddelayed initiation of sexual intercourse (oral, vaginal, or anal sex) and reduced other sexual risk behaviors in ninth grade. We examined whether these effects extended into 10th grade. Methods Fifteen middle schools were randomly assigned to RA, RR, or control conditions. Follow-up surveys were conducted with participating students in 10th grade (n = 1,187; 29.2% attrition). Results Participants were 60% female, 50% Hispanic, and 39% black; seventh grade mean age was 12.6 years. In 10th grade, compared with the control condition, both programs significantly delayed anal sex initiation in the total sample (RA: adjusted odds ratio [AOR], .64, 95% confidence interval [CI], .42–.99; RR: AOR, .65, 95% CI, .50–.84) and among Hispanics (RA: AOR, .53, 95% CI, .31–.91; RR: AOR, .82, 95% CI, .74–.93). Risk avoidance students were less likely to report unprotected vaginal sex, either by using a condom or by abstaining from sex (AOR: .61, 95% CI, .45–.85); RR students were less likely to report recent unprotected anal sex (AOR: .34, 95% CI, .20–.56). Both programs sustained positive impact on some psychosocial outcomes. Conclusions Although both programs delayed anal sex initiation into 10th grade, effects on the delayed initiation of oral and vaginal sex were not sustained. Additional high school sexual education may help to further delay sexual initiation and reduce other sexual risk behaviors in later high school years. PMID:24445180

  17. Behavioral and psychosocial effects of two middle school sexual health education programs at tenth-grade follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Christine M; Peskin, Melissa F; Shegog, Ross; Baumler, Elizabeth R; Addy, Robert C; Thiel, Melanie; Escobar-Chaves, Soledad Liliana; Robin, Leah; Tortolero, Susan R

    2014-02-01

    An earlier randomized controlled trial found that two middle school sexual education programs-a risk avoidance (RA) program and a risk reduction (RR) program-delayed initiation of sexual intercourse (oral, vaginal, or anal sex) and reduced other sexual risk behaviors in ninth grade. We examined whether these effects extended into 10th grade. Fifteen middle schools were randomly assigned to RA, RR, or control conditions. Follow-up surveys were conducted with participating students in 10th grade (n = 1,187; 29.2% attrition). Participants were 60% female, 50% Hispanic, and 39% black; seventh grade mean age was 12.6 years. In 10th grade, compared with the control condition, both programs significantly delayed anal sex initiation in the total sample (RA: adjusted odds ratio [AOR], .64, 95% confidence interval [CI], .42-.99; RR: AOR, .65, 95% CI, .50-.84) and among Hispanics (RA: AOR, .53, 95% CI, .31-.91; RR: AOR, .82, 95% CI, .74-.93). Risk avoidance students were less likely to report unprotected vaginal sex, either by using a condom or by abstaining from sex (AOR: .61, 95% CI, .45-.85); RR students were less likely to report recent unprotected anal sex (AOR: .34, 95% CI, .20-.56). Both programs sustained positive impact on some psychosocial outcomes. Although both programs delayed anal sex initiation into 10th grade, effects on the delayed initiation of oral and vaginal sex were not sustained. Additional high school sexual education may help to further delay sexual initiation and reduce other sexual risk behaviors in later high school years. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

  18. Second Language Acquisition at the Early Childhood Level: A 5-Year Longitudinal Case Study of Pre-Kindergarten through First-Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billak, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    This 5-year longitudinal study investigated the English language acquisition and development of students in pre-Kindergarten through Grade 1 at a U.S.-accredited international school. Of the 1,509 students tested, the overwhelming majority were nonnative English speakers. The data provide valuable insight into the rate of second language…

  19. Research Examination of the Options to Increase the Education Effectiveness in the Technical Subjects at the 7th Grade of Elementary School Using Hypertext Educational Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žácok, L'ubomir

    2010-01-01

    The utilization of hypertext educational material is going to be solved in this paper as a source using which the effectiveness of education the technical subjects at the 7th grade of elementary school can be increased. As a comparison between reached results in the control and experimental groups of pupils we used final didactical examination,…

  20. Exploring the Variability in the Validity of SAT Scores and High School GPA for Predicting First-Year College Grades at Different Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobrin, Jennifer L.; Patterson, Brian F.

    2010-01-01

    There is substantial variability in the degree to which the SAT and high school grade point average (HSGPA) predict first-year college performance at different institutions. This paper demonstrates the usefulness of multilevel modeling as a tool to uncover institutional characteristics that are associated with this variability. In a model that…