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Sample records for asynchronous particle tracking

  1. 3D asynchronous particle tracking in single and dual continuum matrix-fractures. Application to nuclear waste storage; Modelisation 3D du transport particulaire asynchrone en simple et double continuum matrice-fractures: application au stockage de dechets nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, M.Ph

    2008-06-15

    This PhD research was conducted as a collaboration between Laboratoire National d'Hydraulique et Environnement (LNHE) from EDF R and D and the Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse (IMFT) in the frame of a CIFRE contract. This PhD thesis aims at providing LNHE a reliable numerical model to study the feasibility of a nuclear waste storage in deep geological structures. The main focus of the thesis is put on developing and implementing a Random Walk Particle Method (RWPM) to model contaminant transport in 3D heterogeneous and fractured porous media. In its first part, the report presents the Lagrangian particle tracking method used to model transport in heterogeneous media with a direct high resolution approach. The solute plume is discretized into concentration packets: particles. The model tracks each particle based on a time-explicit displacement algorithm according to an advective component and a diffusive random component. The method is implemented on a hydraulic model discretized on a 3D unstructured tetrahedral finite element mesh. We focus on techniques to overcome problems due to the discontinuous transport parameters and the unstructured mesh. First, we introduce an asynchronous time-stepping approach to deal with the numerical and overshoot errors that occur with conventional RWPM. Then, a filtering method is applied to smooth discontinuous transport parameters (pre-processing). Finally, once the particle displacements are computed, we propose several filtering and sampling methods to obtain concentrations from particle positions (post-processing). Applications of these methods are presented with cases of tracer advection-dispersion in homogeneous and heterogeneous media. For dense fracture networks, direct high resolution methods are very time consuming and need a lot of computational resources. So, as an alternative to the discrete approach, a dual-continuum representation is used, in the second part of the report, to describe the porous

  2. Selective particle capture by asynchronously beating cilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-12-01

    Selective particle filtration is fundamental in many engineering and biological systems. For example, many aquatic microorganisms use filter feeding to capture food particles from the surrounding fluid, using motile cilia. One of the capture strategies is to use the same cilia to generate feeding currents and to intercept particles when the particles are on the downstream side of the cilia. Here, we develop a 3D computational model of ciliary bands interacting with flow suspended particles and calculate particle trajectories for a range of particle sizes. Consistent with experimental observations, we find optimal particle sizes that maximize capture rate. The optimal size depends nonlinearly on cilia spacing and cilia coordination, synchronous vs. asynchronous. These parameters affect the cilia-generated flow field, which in turn affects particle trajectories. The low capture rate of smaller particles is due to the particles' inability to cross the flow streamlines of neighboring cilia. Meanwhile, large particles have difficulty entering the sub-ciliary region once advected downstream, also resulting in low capture rates. The optimal range of particle sizes is enhanced when cilia beat asynchronously. These findings have potentially important implications on the design and use of biomimetic cilia in processes such as particle sorting in microfluidic devices.

  3. Particle tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Safarík, K; Newby, J; Sørensen, P

    2002-01-01

    In this lecture we will present a short historical overview of different tracking detectors. Then we will describe currently used gaseous and silicon detectors and their performance. In the second part we will discuss how to estimate tracking precision, how to design a tracker and how the track finding works. After a short description of the LHC the main attention is drawn to the ALICE experiment since it is dedicated to study new states in hadronic matter at the LHC. The ALICE tracking procedure is discussed in detail. A comparison to the tracking in ATLAS, CMS and LHCb is given. (5 refs).

  4. Fuzzy Logic Particle Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    A new all-electronic Particle Image Velocimetry technique that can efficiently map high speed gas flows has been developed in-house at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Particle Image Velocimetry is an optical technique for measuring the instantaneous two component velocity field across a planar region of a seeded flow field. A pulsed laser light sheet is used to illuminate the seed particles entrained in the flow field at two instances in time. One or more charged coupled device (CCD) cameras can be used to record the instantaneous positions of particles. Using the time between light sheet pulses and determining either the individual particle displacements or the average displacement of particles over a small subregion of the recorded image enables the calculation of the fluid velocity. Fuzzy logic minimizes the required operator intervention in identifying particles and computing velocity. Using two cameras that have the same view of the illumination plane yields two single exposure image frames. Two competing techniques that yield unambiguous velocity vector direction information have been widely used for reducing the single-exposure, multiple image frame data: (1) cross-correlation and (2) particle tracking. Correlation techniques yield averaged velocity estimates over subregions of the flow, whereas particle tracking techniques give individual particle velocity estimates. For the correlation technique, the correlation peak corresponding to the average displacement of particles across the subregion must be identified. Noise on the images and particle dropout result in misidentification of the true correlation peak. The subsequent velocity vector maps contain spurious vectors where the displacement peaks have been improperly identified. Typically these spurious vectors are replaced by a weighted average of the neighboring vectors, thereby decreasing the independence of the measurements. In this work, fuzzy logic techniques are used to determine the true

  5. Tracking Transition: Issues in Asynchronous E-Mail Interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muir Houston

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose and focus of this paper is twofold. The first concerns the methodological issues involved with tracking a mobile population, namely students graduating from university; whose patterns of residence may for some time be transitory in nature. The second is to provide some details from a small sample of graduates on the issues raised in the transition from undergraduate study. The paper will tackle the two issues in order. First, an examination of recent methods of qualitative data collection which the development of information technology, in the form of Computer Mediated Communication (CMC, has allowed is undertaken. Second, the results of using one of these techniques (asynchronous e-mail to gather information on the transition from undergraduate study are reported. In addition, advantages and disadvantages that can arise in the use of these new techniques are reported. This paper engages with the overall theme of transition in a number of ways. First, the students are in a process of transition in status; from undergraduate to graduate. Second, in many cases, they may well be in transition in terms of location; from the university location either back home, or away to a new location. Third, they are in transition in terms of activity; either seeking or into employment or engaging in further study at a higher level. Finally, they may be in transition in relation to developing new social networks. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0802116

  6. A Parallel Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm Accelerated by Asynchronous Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Gerhard; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    2005-01-01

    A parallel Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm is presented. Particle swarm optimization is a fairly recent addition to the family of non-gradient based, probabilistic search algorithms that is based on a simplified social model and is closely tied to swarming theory. Although PSO algorithms present several attractive properties to the designer, they are plagued by high computational cost as measured by elapsed time. One approach to reduce the elapsed time is to make use of coarse-grained parallelization to evaluate the design points. Previous parallel PSO algorithms were mostly implemented in a synchronous manner, where all design points within a design iteration are evaluated before the next iteration is started. This approach leads to poor parallel speedup in cases where a heterogeneous parallel environment is used and/or where the analysis time depends on the design point being analyzed. This paper introduces an asynchronous parallel PSO algorithm that greatly improves the parallel e ciency. The asynchronous algorithm is benchmarked on a cluster assembled of Apple Macintosh G5 desktop computers, using the multi-disciplinary optimization of a typical transport aircraft wing as an example.

  7. Particle Tracks in Aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    In an experiment using a special air gun, particles are shot into aerogel at high velocities. Closeup of particles that have been captured in aerogel are shown here. The particles leave a carrot-shaped trail in the aerogel. Aerogel was used on the Stardust spacecraft to capture comet particles from Comet Wild 2.

  8. Fuzzy logic particle tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1993-01-01

    Fuzzy logic has proven to be a simple and robust method for process control. Instead of requiring a complex model of the system, a user defined rule base is used to control the process. In this paper the principles of fuzzy logic control are applied to Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV). Two frames of digitally recorded, single exposure particle imagery are used as input. The fuzzy processor uses the local particle displacement information to determine the correct particle tracks. Fuzzy PTV is an improvement over traditional PTV techniques which typically require a sequence (greater than 2) of image frames for accurately tracking particles. The fuzzy processor executes in software on a PC without the use of specialized array or fuzzy logic processors. A pair of sample input images with roughly 300 particle images each, results in more than 200 velocity vectors in under 8 seconds of processing time.

  9. Three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry using dynamic vision sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borer, D.; Delbruck, T.; Rösgen, T.

    2017-12-01

    A fast-flow visualization method is presented based on tracking neutrally buoyant soap bubbles with a set of neuromorphic cameras. The "dynamic vision sensors" register only the changes in brightness with very low latency, capturing fast processes at a low data rate. The data consist of a stream of asynchronous events, each encoding the corresponding pixel position, the time instant of the event and the sign of the change in logarithmic intensity. The work uses three such synchronized cameras to perform 3D particle tracking in a medium sized wind tunnel. The data analysis relies on Kalman filters to associate the asynchronous events with individual tracers and to reconstruct the three-dimensional path and velocity based on calibrated sensor information.

  10. Two-Particle Asynchronous Quantum Correlation: Wavefunction Collapse Acting as a Beamsplitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, F. V.; Browne, R. S.

    2016-03-01

    A two-body quantum correlation is calculated for a particle reflecting from a moving mirror. Correlated interference results when the incident and reflected particle substates and their associated mirror substates overlap. Using the Copenhagen interpretation of measurement, an asynchronous joint probability density (PDF), which is a function both of the different positions and different times at which the particle and mirror are measured, is derived assuming that no interaction occurs between each measurement. Measurement of the particle first, in the correlated interference region, results in a splitting of the mirror substate into ones which have and have not reflected the particle. An analog of the interference from the Doppler effect for only measurements of the particle (a marginal PDF), in this two-body system, is shown to be a consequence of the asynchronous measurement. The simplification obtained for a microscopic particle reflecting from a mesoscopic or macroscopic mirror is used to illustrate asynchronous correlation interferometry. In this case, the small displacement between these mirror states can yield negligible environmental decoherence times. In addition, interference of these mirror states does not vanish in the limit of large mirror mass due to the small momentum exchange in reflecting a microscopic particle.

  11. PDT - PARTICLE DISPLACEMENT TRACKING SOFTWARE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, M. P.

    1994-01-01

    Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) is a quantitative velocity measurement technique for measuring instantaneous planar cross sections of a flow field. The technique offers very high precision (1%) directionally resolved velocity vector estimates, but its use has been limited by high equipment costs and complexity of operation. Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) is an all-electronic PIV data acquisition and reduction procedure which is simple, fast, and easily implemented. The procedure uses a low power, continuous wave laser and a Charged Coupled Device (CCD) camera to electronically record the particle images. A frame grabber board in a PC is used for data acquisition and reduction processing. PDT eliminates the need for photographic processing, system costs are moderately low, and reduced data are available within seconds of acquisition. The technique results in velocity estimate accuracies on the order of 5%. The software is fully menu-driven from the acquisition to the reduction and analysis of the data. Options are available to acquire a single image or 5- or 25-field series of images separated in time by multiples of 1/60 second. The user may process each image, specifying its boundaries to remove unwanted glare from the periphery and adjusting its background level to clearly resolve the particle images. Data reduction routines determine the particle image centroids and create time history files. PDT then identifies the velocity vectors which describe the particle movement in the flow field. Graphical data analysis routines are included which allow the user to graph the time history files and display the velocity vector maps, interpolated velocity vector grids, iso-velocity vector contours, and flow streamlines. The PDT data processing software is written in FORTRAN 77 and the data acquisition routine is written in C-Language for 80386-based IBM PC compatibles running MS-DOS v3.0 or higher. Machine requirements include 4 MB RAM (3 MB Extended), a single or

  12. Discovery Mondays - 'Particle tracks: Seeing the invisible'

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Simulation of particle tracks in the CMS detector. How can you 'see' something as infinitesimal and fleeting as an elementary particle that defeats even the most powerful microscope? Well, physicists have detectors to snoop on them. Unlike biologists looking at bacteria, physicists don't see the particles themselves. They study their impact on sensitive materials as they pass through them at ultra high speed, a bit like seeing plane vapour trails in a clear sky. At the next Discovery Monday you will be able to find out about the different methods used at CERN to detect particles. There will be demonstrations of the cloud chamber, where particles leave tell-tale evidence of their passage in tracks of droplets. You will also learn about past and current particle track detection techniques and how the tracks are reconstructed into magnificent composite images. Don't miss this opportunity to learn about the various ways of 'seeing' particles. The event will be conducted in French. Come along to the Microcosm ...

  13. Nanoscale three-dimensional single particle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Aurélie; Lamb, Don C

    2011-11-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) in biological systems is a quickly growing field. Many new technologies are being developed providing new tracking capabilities, which also lead to higher demands and expectations for SPT. Following a single biomolecule as it performs its function provides quantitative mechanistic information that cannot be obtained in classical ensemble methods. From the 3D trajectory, information is available over the diffusional behavior of the particle and precise position information can also be used to elucidate interactions of the tracked particle with its surroundings. Thus, three-dimensional (3D) SPT is a very valuable tool for investigating cellular processes. This review presents recent progress in 3D SPT, from image-based techniques toward more sophisticated feedback approaches. We focus mainly on the feedback technique known as orbital tracking. We present here a modified version of the original orbital tracking in which the intensities from two z-planes are simultaneously measured allowing a concomitant wide-field imaging. The system can track single particles with a precision down to 5 nm in the x-y plane and 7 nm in the axial direction. The capabilities of the system are demonstrated using single virus tracing to follow the infection pathway of Prototype Foamy Virus in living cells.

  14. Fast particle tracking with wake fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohlus, M.; Floettmann, K.; Henning, C.

    2012-01-15

    Tracking calculations of charged particles in electromagnetic fields require in principle the simultaneous solution of the equation of motion and of Maxwell's equations. In many tracking codes a simpler and more efficient approach is used: external fields like that of the accelerating structures are provided as field maps, generated in separate computations and for the calculation of self fields the model of a particle bunch in uniform motion is used. We describe how an externally computed wake function can be approximated by a table of Taylor coefficients and how the wake field kick can be calculated for the particle distribution in a tracking calculation. The integrated kick, representing the effect of a distributed structure, is applied at a discrete time. As an example, we use our approach to calculate the emittance growth of a bunch in an undulator beam pipe due to resistive wall wake field effects. (orig.)

  15. Tracking particles by passing messages between images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kroc, Lukas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zdeborova, Lenka [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Krakala, Florent [ESPCI; Vergassola, M [CNRS

    2009-01-01

    Methods to extract information from the tracking of mobile objects/particles have broad interest in biological and physical sciences. Techniques based on the simple criterion of proximity in time-consecutive snapshots are useful to identify the trajectories of the particles. However, they become problematic as the motility and/or the density of the particles increases because of the uncertainties on the trajectories that particles have followed during the acquisition time of the images. Here, we report efficient methods for learning parameters of the dynamics of the particles from their positions in time-consecutive images. Our algorithm belongs to the class of message-passing algorithms, also known in computer science, information theory and statistical physics under the name of Belief Propagation (BP). The algorithm is distributed, thus allowing parallel implementation suitable for computations on multiple machines without significant inter-machine overhead. We test our method on the model example of particle tracking in turbulent flows, which is particularly challenging due to the strong transport that those flows produce. Our numerical experiments show that the BP algorithm compares in quality with exact Markov Chain Monte-Carlo algorithms, yet BP is far superior in speed. We also suggest and analyze a random-distance model that provides theoretical justification for BP accuracy. Methods developed here systematically formulate the problem of particle tracking and provide fast and reliable tools for its extensive range of applications.

  16. Particle tracks fitted on the Riemann sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Strandlie, A; Frühwirth, R; Lillekjendlie, B

    2000-01-01

    We present a novel method of fitting trajectories of charged particles in high-energy physics particle detectors. The method fits a circular arc to two-dimensional measurements by mapping the measurements onto the Riemann sphere and fitting a plane to the transformed coordinates of the measurements. In this way, the non- linear task of circle fitting, which in general requires the application of some iterative procedure, is turned into a linear problem which can be solved in a fast, direct and non-iterative manner. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach by stating results from two simulation experiments of tracks from the ATLAS Inner Detector Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT). The first experiment shows that with a significantly lower execution time, the accuracy of the estimated track parameters is virtually as good as the accuracy obtained by applying an optimal, non-linear least- squares procedure. The second experiment focuses on track parameter estimation in the presence of ambiguous measurements....

  17. Nuclear track radiography of 'hot' aerosol particles

    CERN Document Server

    Boulyga, S F; Kievets, M K; Lomonosova, E M; Zhuk, I V; Yaroshevich, O I; Perelygin, V P; Petrova, R I; Brandt, R; Vater, P

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear track radiography was applied to identify aerosol 'hot' particles which contain elements of nuclear fuel and fallout after Chernobyl NPP accident. For the determination of the content of transuranium elements in radioactive aerosols the measurement of the alpha-activity of 'hot' particles by SSNTD was used in this work, as well as radiography of fission fragments formed as a result of the reactions (n,f) and (gamma,f) in the irradiation of aerosol filters by thermal neutrons and high energy gamma quanta. The technique allowed the sizes and alpha-activity of 'hot' particles to be determined without extracting them from the filter, as well as the determination of the uranium content and its enrichment by sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U, sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu and sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Pu isotopes. Sensitivity of determination of alpha activity by fission method is 5x10 sup - sup 6 Bq per particle. The software for the system of image analysis was created. It ensured the identification of track clusters on an optical imag...

  18. A Performance Study on Synchronous and Asynchronous Update Rules for A Plug-In Direct Particle Swarm Repetitive Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufnalski Bartlomiej

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper two different update schemes for the recently developed plug-in direct particle swarm repetitive controller (PDPSRC are investigated and compared. The proposed approach employs the particle swarm optimizer (PSO to solve in on-line mode a dynamic optimization problem (DOP related to the control task in the constant-amplitude constant-frequency voltage-source inverter (CACF VSI with an LC output filter. The effectiveness of synchronous and asynchronous update rules, both commonly used in static optimization problems (SOPs, is assessed and compared in the case of PDPSRC. The performance of the controller, when synthesized using each of the update schemes, is studied numerically.

  19. Extending particle tracking capability with Delaunay triangulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kejia; Anthony, Stephen M; Granick, Steve

    2014-04-29

    Particle tracking, the analysis of individual moving elements in time series of microscopic images, enables burgeoning new applications, but there is need to better resolve conformation and dynamics. Here we describe the advantages of Delaunay triangulation to extend the capabilities of particle tracking in three areas: (1) discriminating irregularly shaped objects, which allows one to track items other than point features; (2) combining time and space to better connect missing frames in trajectories; and (3) identifying shape backbone. To demonstrate the method, specific examples are given, involving analyzing the time-dependent molecular conformations of actin filaments and λ-DNA. The main limitation of this method, shared by all other clustering techniques, is the difficulty to separate objects when they are very close. This can be mitigated by inspecting locally to remove edges that are longer than their neighbors and also edges that link two objects, using methods described here, so that the combination of Delaunay triangulation with edge removal can be robustly applied to processing large data sets. As common software packages, both commercial and open source, can construct Delaunay triangulation on command, the methods described in this paper are both computationally efficient and easy to implement.

  20. Particle Filtering Applied to Musical Tempo Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm D. Macleod

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the use of particle filters for beat tracking in musical audio examples. The aim is to estimate the time-varying tempo process and to find the time locations of beats, as defined by human perception. Two alternative algorithms are presented, one which performs Rao-Blackwellisation to produce an almost deterministic formulation while the second is a formulation which models tempo as a Brownian motion process. The algorithms have been tested on a large and varied database of examples and results are comparable with the current state of the art. The deterministic algorithm gives the better performance of the two algorithms.

  1. Particle tracking in the eastern Irish Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Judith; Amoudry, Karen; Phillips, Hazel; Brown, Jenny

    2017-04-01

    in saltmarshes. A particle tracking experiment has been carried out in order to examine advection and dispersion of particles released at different levels in the water column. The particle tracking has been carried out using the FVCOM offline particle tracking software, using multiple particle releases at select locations. The results are used to identify possible fates of suspended sediment and associated pollutants.

  2. Discovery Mondays - The detectors: tracking particles

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    View of a module from the LHCb vertex detector, which will be presented at the next Discovery Monday. How do you observe the invisible? In order to deepen still further our knowledge of the infinitely small, physicists accelerate beams of particles and generate collisions between them at extraordinary energies. The collisions give birth to showers of new particles. What are they? In order to find out, physicists slip into the role of detectives thanks to the detectors. At the next Discovery Monday you will find out about the different methods used at CERN to detect particles. A cloud chamber will allow you to see the tracks of cosmic particles live. You will also be given the chance to see real modules for the ATLAS and for the LHCb experiments. Strange materials will be on hand, such as crystals that are heavier than iron and yet as transparent as glass... Come to the Microcosm and become a top detective yourself! This event will take place in French. Join us at the Microcosm (Reception Building 33, M...

  3. Charged Particle Tracking with the Timepix ASIC

    CERN Document Server

    Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Collins, P; Crossley, M; Dumps, R; Gersabeck, M; Gligorov, Vladimir V; Llopart, X; Nicol, M; Poikela, T; Cabruja, Enric; Fleta, C; Lozano, M; Pellegrini, G; Bates, R; Eklund, L; Hynds, D; Ferre Llin, L; Maneuski, D; Parkes, C; Plackett, R; Rodrigues, E; Stewart, G; Akiba, K; van Beuzekom, M; Heijne, V; Heijne, E H M; Gordon, H; John, M; Gandelman, M; Esperante, D; Gallas, A; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Bayer, F; Michel, T; Needham, M; Artuso, M; Badman, R; Borgia, A; Garofoli, J; Wang, J; Xing, Z; Buytaert, Jan; Leflat, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    A prototype particle tracking telescope has been constructed using Timepix and Medipix ASIC hybrid pixel assemblies as the six sensing planes. Each telescope plane consisted of one 1.4 cm2 assembly, providing a 256x256 array of 55 micron square pixels. The telescope achieved a pointing resolution of 2.3 micron at the position of the device under test. During a beam test in 2009 the telescope was used to evaluate in detail the performance of two Timepix hybrid pixel assemblies; a standard planar 300 micron thick sensor, and 285 micron thick double sided 3D sensor. This paper describes a detailed charge calibration study of the pixel devices, which allows the true charge to be extracted, and reports on measurements of the charge collection characteristics and Landau distributions. The planar sensor achieved a best resolution of 4.0 micron for angled tracks, and resolutions of between 4.4 and 11 micron for perpendicular tracks, depending on the applied bias voltage. The double sided 3D sensor, which has signific...

  4. User's manual for the particle tracking model ZOOPT

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, C.R.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the development of a steady-state particle tracking code for use in conjunction with the object-oriented groundwater flow model, ZOOMQ3D (Jackson and Spink, 2004). Like the flow model, the particle tracking software, ZOOPT, is written using an object-oriented approach to promote its extensibility and flexibility. ZOOPT enables the definition of steady-state and time-variant path lines in three dimensions. Particles can be tracked in both the forward and re...

  5. Single-Particle Tracking of Human Lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Messieres, Michel; Ng, Abby; Duarte, Cornelio J; Remaley, Alan T; Lee, Jennifer C

    2016-01-05

    Lipoproteins, such as high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and very-low density lipoprotein (VLDL), play a critical role in heart disease. Lipoproteins vary in size and shape as well as in their apolipoprotein content. Here, we developed a new experimental framework to study freely diffusing lipoproteins from human blood, allowing analysis of even the smallest HDL with a radius of 5 nm. In an easily constructed confinement chamber, individual HDL, LDL, and VLDL particles labeled with three distinct fluorophores were simultaneously tracked by wide-field fluorescence microscopy and their sizes were determined by their motion. This technique enables studies of individual lipoproteins in solution and allows characterization of the heterogeneous properties of lipoproteins which affect their biological function but are difficult to discern in bulk studies.

  6. Tracking Deforming Objects using Particle Filtering for Geometric Active Contours

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rathi, Yogesh; Vaswani, Namrata; Tannenbaum, Allen; Yezzi, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    .... Tracking algorithms using Kalman filters or particle filters have been proposed for finite dimensional representations of shape, but these are dependent on the chosen parametrization and cannot...

  7. Positron emission particle tracking in pulsatile flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nitant; Wiggins, Cody; Ruggles, Arthur

    2017-05-01

    Positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) is increasingly used to understand the flow characteristics in complex systems. This research utilizes PEPT to measure pulsatile flow of frequency 2.1 Hz in an elastic Masterkleer PVC tube of 19 mm inner diameter and 3.2 mm wall thickness. Anion exchange resin beads are labeled with 18F and delivered to a pump driven flow loop with motorized ball valve used to develop the pulsatile flow. Data are collected in the tube with circular cross section, and measurements are also collected with a section of the tube pinched. Nominal flow velocities are near 1 m/s and Reynolds numbers near 20,000. Many thousand PEPT particle traces are collected and synchronized with the flow pulsation. These Lagrangian data are presented as a series of 20 still frames depicting the 3-D velocity field present during each phase of the flow pulsation. Pressure data are also collected to resolve the pressure wave front moving through the open elastic tube at velocity 15.2 m/s.

  8. Positron emission particle tracking in pulsatile flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Nitant; Ruggles, Arthur [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wiggins, Cody [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) is increasingly used to understand the flow characteristics in complex systems. This research utilizes PEPT to measure pulsatile flow of frequency 2.1 Hz in an elastic Masterkleer PVC tube of 19 mm inner diameter and 3.2 mm wall thickness. Anion exchange resin beads are labeled with {sup 18}F and delivered to a pump driven flow loop with motorized ball valve used to develop the pulsatile flow. Data are collected in the tube with circular cross section, and measurements are also collected with a section of the tube pinched. Nominal flow velocities are near 1 m/s and Reynolds numbers near 20,000. Many thousand PEPT particle traces are collected and synchronized with the flow pulsation. These Lagrangian data are presented as a series of 20 still frames depicting the 3-D velocity field present during each phase of the flow pulsation. Pressure data are also collected to resolve the pressure wave front moving through the open elastic tube at velocity 15.2 m/s. (orig.)

  9. Particle tracking microrheology of lyotropic liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Mydul; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2011-05-17

    We present comprehensive results on the microrheological study of lyotropic liquid crystalline phases of various space groups constituted by water-monoglyceride (Dimodan) mixtures. In order to explore the viscoelastic properties of these systems, we use particle tracking of probe colloidal particles suitably dispersed in the liquid crystals and monitored by diffusing wave spectroscopy. The identification of the various liquid crystalline phases was separately carried out by small-angle X-ray scattering. The restricted motion of the particles was monitored and identified by the decay time of intensity autocorrelation function and the corresponding time-dependent mean square displacement (MSD), which revealed space group-dependent behavior. The characteristic time extracted by the intersection of the slopes of the MSD at short and long time scales, provided a characteristic time which could be directly compared with the relaxation time obtained by microrheology. Further direct comparison of microrheology and bulk rheology measurements was gained via the Laplace transform of the generalized time-dependent MSD, yielding the microrheology storage and loss moduli, G'(ω) and G''(ω), in the frequency domain ω. The general picture emerging from the microrheology data is that all liquid crystals exhibit viscoelastic properties in line with results from bulk rheology and the transition regime (elastic to viscous) differs according to the specific liquid crystal considered. In the case of the lamellar phase, a plastic fluid is measured by bulk rheology, while microrheology indicates viscoelastic behavior. Although we generally find good qualitative agreement between the two techniques, all liquid crystalline systems are found to relax faster when studied with microrheology. The most plausible explanation for this difference is due to the different length scales probed by the two techniques: that is, microscopical relaxation on these structured fluids, is likely to occur at

  10. Nuclear Track Detectors. Searches for Exotic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomelli, G.; Togo, V.

    We used Nuclear Track Detectors (NTD) CR39 and Makrofol for many purposes: (i) Exposures at the SPS and at lower energy accelerator heavy ion beams for calibration purposes and for fragmentation studies. (ii) Searches for GUT and Intermediate Mass Magnetic Monopoles (IMM), nuclearites, Q-balls and strangelets in the cosmic radiation. The MACRO experiment in the Gran Sasso underground lab, with ˜1,000 m2 of CR39 detectors (plus scintillators and streamer tubes), established an upper limit for superheavy GUT poles at the level of 1.4 × 10-16 cm-2 s-1 sr-1for 4 ×10-5SLIM experiment at the high altitude Chacaltaya lab (5,230 m a.s.l.), using 427 m2 of CR39 detectors exposed for 4.22 years, gave an upper limit for IMMs of ˜1.3 × 10-15 cm-2 s-1 sr-1. The experiments yielded interesting upper limits also on the fluxes of the other mentioned exotic particles. (iii) Environmental studies, radiation monitoring, neutron dosimetry.

  11. Nuclear Track Detectors. Searches for Exotic Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomelli, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    We used Nuclear Track Detectors (NTD) CR39 and Makrofol for many purposes: i) Exposures at the SPS and at lower energy accelerator heavy ion beams for calibration purposes and for fragmentation studies. ii) Searches for GUT and Intermediate Mass Magnetic Monopoles (IMM), nuclearites, Q-balls and strangelets in the cosmic radiation. The MACRO experiment in the Gran Sasso underground lab, with ~1000 m^2 of CR39 detectors (plus scintillators and streamer tubes), established an upper limit for superheavy GUT poles at the level of 1.4x10^-16 cm^-2 s^-1 sr^-1 for 4x10^-5 particles. iii) Environmental studies, radiation monitoring, neutron dosimetry.

  12. Particle Tracking in Circular Accelerators Using the Exact Hamiltonian in SixTrack

    CERN Document Server

    Fjellstrom, Mattias; Hansson, Johan

    2013-12-13

    Particle motion in accelerators is in general complex. Tracking codes are developed to simulate beam dynamics in accelerators. SixTrack is a long lived particle tracking code maintained at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. A particle accelerator consists of a large number of magnets and other electromagnetic devices that guide the particle through the accelerator. Each device defines its own equation of motion, which often cannot be solved exactly. For this purpose, a number of approximations are introduced in order to facilitate the solution and to speed up the computation. In a high-energy accelerator, the particle has small transverse momentum components. This is exploited in the small-angle approximation. In this approximation the equations of motion are expanded to a low order in the transverse momentum components. In low-energy particle accelerators, or in tracking with large momentum deviations, this approximation is invalid. The equations of motion of a particle passing through a f...

  13. Particle Tracking Model (PTM) with Coastal Modeling System (CMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-04

    Coastal Inlets Research Program Particle Tracking Model ( PTM ) with Coastal Modeling System (CMS) The Particle Tracking Model ( PTM ) is a Lagrangian...currents and waves. The Coastal Inlets Research Program (CIRP) supports the PTM with the Coastal Modeling System (CMS), which provides coupled wave...and current forcing for PTM simulations. CMS- PTM is implemented in the Surface-water Modeling System, a GUI environment for input development

  14. Particle filter-based prognostic approach for railway track geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Madhav; Odelius, Johan; Thaduri, Adithya; Nissen, Arne; Rantatalo, Matti

    2017-11-01

    Track degradation of ballasted railway track systems has to be measured on a regular basis, and these tracks must be maintained by tamping. Tamping aims to restore the geometry to its original shape to ensure an efficient, comfortable and safe transportation system. To minimize the disturbance introduced by tamping, this action has to be planned in advance. Track degradation forecasts derived from regression methods are used to predict when the standard deviation of a specific track section will exceed a predefined maintenance or safety limit. This paper proposes a particle filter-based prognostic approach for railway track degradation; this approach is demonstrated by examining different railway switches. The standard deviation of the longitudinal track degradation is studied, and forecasts of the maintenance limit intersection are derived. The particle filter-based prognostic results are compared with the standard regression method results for four railway switches, and the particle filter method shows similar or better result for the four cases. For longer prediction times, the error of the proposed method is equal to or smaller than that of the regression method. The main advantage of the particle filter-based prognostic approach is its ability to generate a probabilistic result based on input parameters with uncertainties. The distributions of the input parameters propagate through the filter, and the remaining useful life is presented using a particle distribution.

  15. PARTICLE FILTER BASED VEHICLE TRACKING APPROACH WITH IMPROVED RESAMPLING STAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Leong Khong

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Optical sensors based vehicle tracking can be widely implemented in traffic surveillance and flow control. The vast development of video surveillance infrastructure in recent years has drawn the current research focus towards vehicle tracking using high-end and low cost optical sensors. However, tracking vehicles via such sensors could be challenging due to the high probability of changing vehicle appearance and illumination, besides the occlusion and overlapping incidents. Particle filter has been proven as an approach which can overcome nonlinear and non-Gaussian situations caused by cluttered background and occlusion incidents. Unfortunately, conventional particle filter approach encounters particle degeneracy especially during and after the occlusion. Particle filter with sampling important resampling (SIR is an important step to overcome the drawback of particle filter, but SIR faced the problem of sample impoverishment when heavy particles are statistically selected many times. In this work, genetic algorithm has been proposed to be implemented in the particle filter resampling stage, where the estimated position can converge faster to hit the real position of target vehicle under various occlusion incidents. The experimental results show that the improved particle filter with genetic algorithm resampling method manages to increase the tracking accuracy and meanwhile reduce the particle sample size in the resampling stage.

  16. Simultaneous Eye Tracking and Blink Detection with Interactive Particle Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan M. Trivedi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a system that simultaneously tracks eyes and detects eye blinks. Two interactive particle filters are used for this purpose, one for the closed eyes and the other one for the open eyes. Each particle filter is used to track the eye locations as well as the scales of the eye subjects. The set of particles that gives higher confidence is defined as the primary set and the other one is defined as the secondary set. The eye location is estimated by the primary particle filter, and whether the eye status is open or closed is also decided by the label of the primary particle filter. When a new frame comes, the secondary particle filter is reinitialized according to the estimates from the primary particle filter. We use autoregression models for describing the state transition and a classification-based model for measuring the observation. Tensor subspace analysis is used for feature extraction which is followed by a logistic regression model to give the posterior estimation. The performance is carefully evaluated from two aspects: the blink detection rate and the tracking accuracy. The blink detection rate is evaluated using videos from varying scenarios, and the tracking accuracy is given by comparing with the benchmark data obtained using the Vicon motion capturing system. The setup for obtaining benchmark data for tracking accuracy evaluation is presented and experimental results are shown. Extensive experimental evaluations validate the capability of the algorithm.

  17. 3D particle tracking velocimetry using dynamic discrete tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alpers, Andreas; Gritzmann, Peter; Moseev, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    Particle tracking velocimetry in 3D is becoming an increasingly important imaging tool in the study of fluid dynamics and combustion as well as plasmas. We introduce a dynamic discrete tomography algorithm for reconstructing particle trajectories from projections. The algorithm is efficient for d...

  18. 3D particle tracking velocimetry using dynamic discrete tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alpers, A.; Gritzmann, P.; Moseev, D.; Salewski, M.

    2015-01-01

    Particle tracking velocimetry in 3D is becoming an increasingly important imaging tool in the study of fluid dynamics and combustion as well as plasmas. We introduce a dynamic discrete tomography algorithm for reconstructing particle trajectories from projections. The algorithm is efficient for data

  19. Discovery Mondays - The detectors: tracking particles

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    View of a module from the LHCb vertex detector, which will be presented at the next Discovery Monday. How do you observe the invisible? In order to deepen still further our knowledge of the infinitely small, physicists accelerate beams of particles at close to the speed of light, then generate collisions between them at extraordinary energies, giving birth to showers of new particles. What are these particles? In order to find out, physicists transform themselves into detectives with the help of the detectors. Located around the collision area, these exceptional machines are made up of various layers, each of which detects and measures specific properties of the particles that travel through them. Powerful computers then reconstruct their trajectory and record their charge, mass and energy in order to build up a kind of particle ID card. At the next Discovery Monday you will be able to find out about the different methods used at CERN to detect particles. A cloud chamber will provide live images of the trac...

  20. Fast TPC Online Tracking on GPUs and Asynchronous Data Processing in the ALICE HLT to facilitate Online Calibration

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00248142; Gorbunov, Sergey; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Breitner, Timo; Kretz, Matthias; Lindenstruth, Volker

    2015-12-23

    ALICE (A Large Heavy Ion Experiment) is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which is today the most powerful particle accelerator worldwide. The High Level Trigger (HLT) is an online compute farm of about 200 nodes, which reconstructs events measured by the ALICE detector in real-time. The HLT uses a custom online data-transport framework to distribute data and workload among the compute nodes.ALICE employs several calibration-sensitive subdetectors, e.g. the TPC (Time Projection Chamber). For a precise reconstruction, the HLT has to perform the calibration online. Online- calibration can make certain Offline calibration steps obsolete and can thus speed up Offline analysis. Looking forward to ALICE Run III starting in 2020, online calibration becomes a necessity.The main detector used for track reconstruction is the TPC. Reconstructing the trajectories in the TPC is the most compute-intense step during event reconstruction. Therefore, a fast tracking implementation i...

  1. 3D Rainbow Particle Tracking Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Pablo, Andres A.; Xiong, Jinhui; Idoughi, Ramzi; Aljedaani, Abdulrahman B.; Dun, Xiong; Fu, Qiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2017-11-01

    A single color camera is used to reconstruct a 3D-3C velocity flow field. The camera is used to record the 2D (X,Y) position and colored scattered light intensity (Z) from white polyethylene tracer particles in a flow. The main advantage of using a color camera is the capability of combining different intensity levels for each color channel to obtain more depth levels. The illumination system consists of an LCD projector placed perpendicularly to the camera. Different intensity colored level gradients are projected onto the particles to encode the depth position (Z) information of each particle, benefiting from the possibility of varying the color profiles and projected frequencies up to 60 Hz. Chromatic aberrations and distortions are estimated and corrected using a 3D laser engraved calibration target. The camera-projector system characterization is presented considering size and depth position of the particles. The use of these components reduces dramatically the cost and complexity of traditional 3D-PTV systems.

  2. Integrating the Projective Transform with Particle Filtering for Visual Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beghdadi A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the projective particle filter, a Bayesian filtering technique integrating the projective transform, which describes the distortion of vehicle trajectories on the camera plane. The characteristics inherent to traffic monitoring, and in particular the projective transform, are integrated in the particle filtering framework in order to improve the tracking robustness and accuracy. It is shown that the projective transform can be fully described by three parameters, namely, the angle of view, the height of the camera, and the ground distance to the first point of capture. This information is integrated in the importance density so as to explore the feature space more accurately. By providing a fine distribution of the samples in the feature space, the projective particle filter outperforms the standard particle filter on different tracking measures. First, the resampling frequency is reduced due to a better fit of the importance density for the estimation of the posterior density. Second, the mean squared error between the feature vector estimate and the true state is reduced compared to the estimate provided by the standard particle filter. Third, the tracking rate is improved for the projective particle filter, hence decreasing track loss.

  3. Multitarget Tracking by Improved Particle Filter Based on Unscented Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazhao Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the problem of multitarget tracking in cluttered environment. To reduce the dependency on the noise priori knowledge, an improved particle filtering (PF data association approach is presented based on the filter (HF. This approach can achieve higher robustness in the condition that the measurement noise prior is unknown. Because of the limitations of the HF in nonlinear tracking, we first present the unscented filter (HUF by embedding the unscented transform (UT into the extended filter (HEF structure. Then the HUF is incorporated into the Rao-Blackwellized particle filter (RBPF framework to update the particles. Simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms in linear and nonlinear multitarget tracking.

  4. High-precision, large-volume, particle tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Bratzler, U

    1998-01-01

    Muon measurement in the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to be built at the European Center for Particle Physics, CERN, requires a tracking precision of 50 mu m along particle trajectories of typical path lengths of $9 5-20 m. The overall active area to be covered by the tracking devices, so-called Monitored Drift Tube Chambers, is 5,500 m/sup 2/. Requirements on fabrication, chamber alignment and operation are, in many respects, unprecedented and $9 can only be met by a combination of novel optical monitoring devices and a high-precision chamber construction technique. (1 refs).

  5. TrackMate: An open and extensible platform for single-particle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Perry, Nick; Schindelin, Johannes; Hoopes, Genevieve M; Reynolds, Gregory D; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Bednarek, Sebastian Y; Shorte, Spencer L; Eliceiri, Kevin W

    2017-02-15

    We present TrackMate, an open source Fiji plugin for the automated, semi-automated, and manual tracking of single-particles. It offers a versatile and modular solution that works out of the box for end users, through a simple and intuitive user interface. It is also easily scriptable and adaptable, operating equally well on 1D over time, 2D over time, 3D over time, or other single and multi-channel image variants. TrackMate provides several visualization and analysis tools that aid in assessing the relevance of results. The utility of TrackMate is further enhanced through its ability to be readily customized to meet specific tracking problems. TrackMate is an extensible platform where developers can easily write their own detection, particle linking, visualization or analysis algorithms within the TrackMate environment. This evolving framework provides researchers with the opportunity to quickly develop and optimize new algorithms based on existing TrackMate modules without the need of having to write de novo user interfaces, including visualization, analysis and exporting tools. The current capabilities of TrackMate are presented in the context of three different biological problems. First, we perform Caenorhabditis-elegans lineage analysis to assess how light-induced damage during imaging impairs its early development. Our TrackMate-based lineage analysis indicates the lack of a cell-specific light-sensitive mechanism. Second, we investigate the recruitment of NEMO (NF-κB essential modulator) clusters in fibroblasts after stimulation by the cytokine IL-1 and show that photodamage can generate artifacts in the shape of TrackMate characterized movements that confuse motility analysis. Finally, we validate the use of TrackMate for quantitative lifetime analysis of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in plant cells. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A fast numerical integrator for relativistic charged particle tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Ji

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we report on a fast second-order numerical integrator to solve the Lorentz force equations of a relativistic charged particle in electromagnetic fields. This numerical integrator shows less numerical error than the popular Boris algorithm in tracking the relativistic particle subject to electric and magnetic space-charge fields and requires less number of operations than another recently proposed relativistic integrator.

  7. Physical Models for Particle Tracking Simulations in the RF Gap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishlo, Andrei P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holmes, Jeffrey A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This document describes the algorithms that are used in the PyORBIT code to track the particles accelerated in the Radio-Frequency cavities. It gives the mathematical description of the algorithms and the assumptions made in each case. The derived formulas have been implemented in the PyORBIT code. The necessary data for each algorithm are described in detail.

  8. A new GUI based toolbox to compare particle tracking approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Matthew; Münch, Gerald; Vallotton, Pascal

    2013-10-01

    A plethora of powerful particle tracking algorithms is available to the quantitative biologist to follow targets such as vesicles, single proteins, or cells. The question of which technique to use for particular applications has become an important topic in the discipline. We have developed a friendly graphical user interface, which generates synthetic data sets corresponding to fields of moving point-like targets. Thus, the ground truth is available and algorithms may be compared on relevant dynamics. We present this framework by applying it to four different particle tracking software and use Icy to compare the ground truth with the results produced by these algorithms. Our tool will be useful to those researchers interested to evaluate the performance of tracking algorithms in circumstances that are more general than random motion, or more general than mere translational motion perturbed by noise.

  9. SimTrack: A compact c++ library for particle orbit and spin tracking in accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yun [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-06-24

    SimTrack is a compact c++ library of 6-d symplectic element-by-element particle tracking in accelerators originally designed for head-on beam-beam compensation simulation studies in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides a 6-d symplectic orbit tracking with the 4th order symplectic integration for magnet elements and the 6-d symplectic synchro-beam map for beam-beam interaction. Since its inception in 2009, SimTrack has been intensively used for dynamic aperture calculations with beam-beam interaction for RHIC. Recently, proton spin tracking and electron energy loss due to synchrotron radiation were added. In this article, I will present the code architecture, physics models, and some selected examples of its applications to RHIC and a future electron-ion collider design eRHIC.

  10. Optimizing experimental parameters for tracking of diffusing particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Christian L.

    2016-01-01

    We describe how a single-particle tracking experiment should be designed in order for its recorded trajectories to contain the most information about a tracked particle's diffusion coefficient. The precision of estimators for the diffusion coefficient is affected by motion blur, limited photon...... statistics, and the length of recorded time series. We demonstrate for a particle undergoing free diffusion that precision is negligibly affected by motion blur in typical experiments, while optimizing photon counts and the number of recorded frames is the key to precision. Building on these results, we...... describe for a wide range of experimental scenarios how to choose experimental parameters in order to optimize the precision. Generally, one should choose quantity over quality: experiments should be designed to maximize the number of frames recorded in a time series, even if this means lower information...

  11. Evaluation of nanoparticle tracking analysis for total virus particle determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramberger Petra

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The NanoSight LM10 with Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA software was evaluated for the quantification of latex particles, adenovirus 5, and influenza virus. The inter-day variability was determined by measuring the same sample over several consecutive days and the method’s accuracy was demonstrated by using known concentrations of the subject particles. NTA analysis was also used to quantify chromatographic fractions of adenovirus and influenza virus after purification on a CIM monolithic column. NTA results were compared and evaluated against hemagglutination (HA and end point dilution assay, determining total and infection virus particle number, respectively. The results demonstrated that nanoparticle tracking analysis is a method for fast estimation of virus concentration in different samples. In addition, it can provide a better insight into the sample status, regarding the level of virus aggregation.

  12. Joint Audio-Visual Tracking Using Particle Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry N. Zotkin

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available It is often advantageous to track objects in a scene using multimodal information when such information is available. We use audio as a complementary modality to video data, which, in comparison to vision, can provide faster localization over a wider field of view. We present a particle-filter based tracking framework for performing multimodal sensor fusion for tracking people in a videoconferencing environment using multiple cameras and multiple microphone arrays. One advantage of our proposed tracker is its ability to seamlessly handle temporary absence of some measurements (e.g., camera occlusion or silence. Another advantage is the possibility of self-calibration of the joint system to compensate for imprecision in the knowledge of array or camera parameters by treating them as containing an unknown statistical component that can be determined using the particle filter framework during tracking. We implement the algorithm in the context of a videoconferencing and meeting recording system. The system also performs high-level semantic analysis of the scene by keeping participant tracks, recognizing turn-taking events and recording an annotated transcript of the meeting. Experimental results are presented. Our system operates in real-time and is shown to be robust and reliable.

  13. Channel Tracking Using Particle Filtering in Unresolvable Multipath Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Bertozzi

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new timing error detector for timing tracking loops inside the Rake receiver in spread spectrum systems. Based on a particle filter, this timing error detector jointly tracks the delays of each path of the frequency-selective channels. Instead of using a conventional channel estimator, we have introduced a joint time delay and channel estimator with almost no additional computational complexity. The proposed scheme avoids the drawback of the classical early-late gate detector which is not able to separate closely spaced paths. Simulation results show that the proposed detectors outperform the conventional early-late gate detector in indoor scenarios.

  14. Investigation of granular impact using positron emission particle tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy O.

    2015-04-01

    We present results from an experimental study of granular impact using a combination of high-speed video and positron emission particle tracking (PEPT). The PEPT technique exploits the annihilation of photons from positron decay to determine the position of tracer particles either inside a small granular bed or attached to the object which impacts the bed. We use dense spheres as impactors and the granular beds are comprised of glass beads which are fluidised to achieve a range of different initial packing states. For the first time, we have simultaneously investigated both the trajectory of the sphere, the motion of particles in a 3-D granular bed and particles which jump into the resultant jet, which arises from the collapse of the cavity formed by the impacting sphere.

  15. The Timepix Telescope for high performance particle tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiba, K. [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Ronning, P. [CERN, The European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Beuzekom, M. van; Beveren, V. van [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Borghi, S. [University of Manchester, Manchester, Lancashire (United Kingdom); Boterenbrood, H. [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Buytaert, J.; Collins, P. [CERN, The European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Dosil Suárez, A. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Dumps, R. [CERN, The European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Eklund, L. [Glasgow University, Glasgow, Lanarkshire (United Kingdom); Esperante, D.; Gallas, A. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Gordon, H. [University of Oxford, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Heijden, B. van der [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hombach, C. [University of Manchester, Manchester, Lancashire (United Kingdom); Hynds, D. [Glasgow University, Glasgow, Lanarkshire (United Kingdom); John, M. [University of Oxford, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Leflat, A. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Li, Y. [University of Oxford, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); and others

    2013-09-21

    The Timepix particle tracking telescope has been developed as part of the LHCb VELO Upgrade project, supported by the Medipix Collaboration and the AIDA framework. It is a primary piece of infrastructure for the VELO Upgrade project and is being used for the development of new sensors and front end technologies for several upcoming LHC trackers and vertexing systems. The telescope is designed around the dual capability of the Timepix ASICs to provide information about either the deposited charge or the timing information from tracks traversing the 14×14 mm matrix of 55×55μm pixels. The rate of reconstructed tracks available is optimised by taking advantage of the shutter driver readout architecture of the Timepix chip, operated with existing readout systems. Results of tests conducted in the SPS North Area beam facility at CERN show that the telescope typically provides reconstructed track rates during the beam spills of between 3.5 and 7.5 kHz, depending on beam conditions. The tracks are time stamped with 1 ns resolution with an efficiency of above 98% and provide a pointing resolution at the centre of the telescope of ∼1.6μm. By dropping the time stamping requirement the rate can be increased to ∼15kHz, at the expense of a small increase in background. The telescope infrastructure provides CO{sub 2} cooling and a flexible mechanical interface to the device under test, and has been used for a wide range of measurements during the 2011–2012 data taking campaigns. -- Highlights: • We provide a technical description of the Timepix Telescope for particle tracking applications. • We demonstrate the spatial and timing resolution to be 2μm and 1 ns respectively. • The maximum particle rate is 7.5 kHz with highly resolved timing and spacing. • The maximum particle rate is 15 kHz with only highly resolved spacing. • We briefly describe the software and tracking algorithms used to achieve this.

  16. Particle tracking velocimetry of a gliding arc discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    A 35 kHz AC gliding arc discharge at atmospheric pressure is generated between two diverging electrodes and extended by an air flow. The gas flow velocity is measured by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) while the moving velocity of the plasma column of the gliding arc discharge is measured...... by analyzing the movie taken by a high-speed camera. The two-dimensional velocity vector of the gas flow and of the gliding arc in the imaging plane was determined....

  17. Particle Tracking and Simulation on the .NET Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Hiroshi; Scarvie, Tom

    2006-06-19

    Particle tracking and simulation studies are becoming increasingly complex. In addition to the use of more sophisticated graphics, interactive scripting is becoming popular. Compatibility with different control systems requires network and database capabilities. It is not a trivial task to fulfill all the various requirements without sacrificing runtime performance. We evaluated the effectiveness of the .NET framework by converting a C++ simulation code to C. The portability to other platforms is mentioned in terms of Mono.

  18. High throughput inclusion body sizing: Nano particle tracking analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichelt, Wieland N; Kaineder, Andreas; Brillmann, Markus; Neutsch, Lukas; Taschauer, Alexander; Lohninger, Hans; Herwig, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    The expression of pharmaceutical relevant proteins in Escherichia coli frequently triggers inclusion body (IB) formation caused by protein aggregation. In the scientific literature, substantial effort has been devoted to the quantification of IB size. However, particle-based methods used up to this point to analyze the physical properties of representative numbers of IBs lack sensitivity and/or orthogonal verification. Using high pressure freezing and automated freeze substitution for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) the cytosolic inclusion body structure was preserved within the cells. TEM imaging in combination with manual grey scale image segmentation allowed the quantification of relative areas covered by the inclusion body within the cytosol. As a high throughput method nano particle tracking analysis (NTA) enables one to derive the diameter of inclusion bodies in cell homogenate based on a measurement of the Brownian motion. The NTA analysis of fixated (glutaraldehyde) and non-fixated IBs suggests that high pressure homogenization annihilates the native physiological shape of IBs. Nevertheless, the ratio of particle counts of non-fixated and fixated samples could potentially serve as factor for particle stickiness. In this contribution, we establish image segmentation of TEM pictures as an orthogonal method to size biologic particles in the cytosol of cells. More importantly, NTA has been established as a particle-based, fast and high throughput method (1000-3000 particles), thus constituting a much more accurate and representative analysis than currently available methods. Copyright © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. The Timepix Telescope for High Performance Particle Tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Akiba, Kazuyoshi; van Beuzekom, Martin; van Beveren, Vincent; Borghi, Silvia; Boterenbrood, Henk; Buytaert, Jan; Collins, Paula; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dumps, Raphael; Eklund, Lars; Esperante, Daniel; Gallas, Abraham; Gordon, Hamish; van der Heijden, Bas; Hombach, Christoph; Hynds, Daniel; John, Malcolm; Leflat, Alexander; Li, Yi Ming; Longstaff, Ian; Morton, Alexander; Nakatsuka, Noritsugu; Nomerotski, Andre; Parkes, Chris; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Plackett, Richard; Reid, Matthew M; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Schindler, Heinrich; Szumlak, Tomasz; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Velthuis, Jaap; Wysokinski, Michal

    2013-01-01

    The Timepix particle tracking telescope has been developed as part of the LHCb VELO Upgrade project, supported by the Medipix Collaboration and the AIDA framework. It is a primary piece of infrastructure for the VELO Upgrade project and is being used for the development of new sensors and front end technologies for several upcoming LHC trackers and vertexing systems. The telescope is designed around the dual capability of the Timepix ASICs to provide information about either the deposited charge or the timing information from tracks traversing the 14 x 14mm matrix of 55 x 55 um pixels. The rate of reconstructed tracks available is optimised by taking advantage of the shutter driven readout architecture of the Timepix chip, operated with existing readout systems. Results of tests conducted in the SPS North Area beam facility at CERN show that the telescope typically provides reconstructed track rates during the beam spills of between 3.5 and 7.5 kHz, depending on beam conditions. The tracks are time stamped wi...

  20. Kassiopeia: a modern, extensible C++ particle tracking package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furse, Daniel; Groh, Stefan; Trost, Nikolaus; Babutzka, Martin; Barrett, John P.; Behrens, Jan; Buzinsky, Nicholas; Corona, Thomas; Enomoto, Sanshiro; Erhard, Moritz; Formaggio, Joseph A.; Glück, Ferenc; Harms, Fabian; Heizmann, Florian; Hilk, Daniel; Käfer, Wolfgang; Kleesiek, Marco; Leiber, Benjamin; Mertens, Susanne; Oblath, Noah S.; Renschler, Pascal; Schwarz, Johannes; Slocum, Penny L.; Wandkowsky, Nancy; Wierman, Kevin; Zacher, Michael

    2017-05-01

    The Kassiopeia particle tracking framework is an object-oriented software package using modern C++ techniques, written originally to meet the needs of the KATRIN collaboration. Kassiopeia features a new algorithmic paradigm for particle tracking simulations which targets experiments containing complex geometries and electromagnetic fields, with high priority put on calculation efficiency, customizability, extensibility, and ease-of-use for novice programmers. To solve Kassiopeia's target physics problem the software is capable of simulating particle trajectories governed by arbitrarily complex differential equations of motion, continuous physics processes that may in part be modeled as terms perturbing that equation of motion, stochastic processes that occur in flight such as bulk scattering and decay, and stochastic surface processes occurring at interfaces, including transmission and reflection effects. This entire set of computations takes place against the backdrop of a rich geometry package which serves a variety of roles, including initialization of electromagnetic field simulations and the support of state-dependent algorithm-swapping and behavioral changes as a particle’s state evolves. Thanks to the very general approach taken by Kassiopeia it can be used by other experiments facing similar challenges when calculating particle trajectories in electromagnetic fields. It is publicly available at https://github.com/KATRIN-Experiment/Kassiopeia.

  1. Measuring the 3D motion of particles in microchannel acoustophoresis using astigmatism particle tracking velocimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustsson, P.; Barnkob, Rune; Bruus, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    We introduce full three-dimensional tracking of particles in an acoustophoresis microchannel using Astigmatism Particle Tracking Velocimetry (APTV) [1]. For the first time the interaction between acoustic streaming and the primary acoustic radiation force in microchannel acoustophoresis are exami...... relative to the influence from the acoustic radiation force. The current study opens the route to optimized acoustophoretic system design and operation to enable manipulation of small biological components such as spores, bacteria and viruses....... are examined in three dimensions. We have quantified the velocity of particles driven by the primary acoustic radiation force and acoustic streaming, respectively, using 0.5-μm and 5-μm particles. Increased ultrasound frequency and lowered viscosity of the medium reduced the influence of acoustic streaming...

  2. Targeted particle tracking in computational models of human carotid bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Ian

    2011-12-01

    A significant and largely unsolved problem of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of flow in anatomically relevant geometries is that very few calculated pathlines pass through regions of complex flow. This in turn limits the ability of CFD-based simulations of imaging techniques (such as MRI) to correctly predict in vivo performance. In this work, I present two methods designed to overcome this filling problem, firstly, by releasing additional particles from areas of the flow inlet that lead directly to the complex flow region ("preferential seeding") and, secondly, by tracking particles both "downstream" and "upstream" from seed points within the complex flow region itself. I use the human carotid bifurcation as an example of complex blood flow that is of great clinical interest. Both idealized and healthy volunteer geometries are investigated. With uniform seeding in the inlet plane (in the common carotid artery (CCA)) of an idealized bifurcation geometry, approximately half the particles passed through the internal carotid artery (ICA) and half through the external carotid artery. However, of those particles entering the ICA, only 16% passed directly through the carotid bulb region. Preferential seeding from selected regions of the CCA was able to increase this figure to 47%. In the second method, seeding of particles within the carotid bulb region itself led to a very high proportion (97%) of pathlines running from CCA to ICA. Seeding of particles in the bulb plane of three healthy volunteer carotid bifurcation geometries led to much better filling of the bulb regions than by particles seeded at the inlet alone. In all cases, visualization of the origin and behavior of recirculating particles led to useful insights into the complex flow patterns. Both seeding methods produced significant improvements in filling the carotid bulb region with particle tracks compared with uniform seeding at the inlet and led to an improved understanding of the complex

  3. Distributed Particle Filter for Target Tracking: With Reduced Sensor Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadesse Ghirmai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available For efficient and accurate estimation of the location of objects, a network of sensors can be used to detect and track targets in a distributed manner. In nonlinear and/or non-Gaussian dynamic models, distributed particle filtering methods are commonly applied to develop target tracking algorithms. An important consideration in developing a distributed particle filtering algorithm in wireless sensor networks is reducing the size of data exchanged among the sensors because of power and bandwidth constraints. In this paper, we propose a distributed particle filtering algorithm with the objective of reducing the overhead data that is communicated among the sensors. In our algorithm, the sensors exchange information to collaboratively compute the global likelihood function that encompasses the contribution of the measurements towards building the global posterior density of the unknown location parameters. Each sensor, using its own measurement, computes its local likelihood function and approximates it using a Gaussian function. The sensors then propagate only the mean and the covariance of their approximated likelihood functions to other sensors, reducing the communication overhead. The global likelihood function is computed collaboratively from the parameters of the local likelihood functions using an average consensus filter or a forward-backward propagation information exchange strategy.

  4. Apparatus and method for tracking a molecule or particle in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, James H [Los Alamos, NM; Goodwin, Peter M [Los Alamos, NM; Lessard, Guillaume [Santa Fe, NM

    2009-03-03

    An apparatus and method were used to track the movement of fluorescent particles in three dimensions. Control software was used with the apparatus to implement a tracking algorithm for tracking the motion of the individual particles in glycerol/water mixtures. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the tracking algorithms in combination with the apparatus may be used for tracking the motion of single fluorescent or fluorescently labeled biomolecules in three dimensions.

  5. Single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bräuchle, Christoph; Michaelis, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Closing a gap in the literature, this handbook gathers all the information on single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer. It covers all aspects of this hot and modern topic, from detecting virus entry to membrane diffusion, and from protein folding using spFRET to coupled dye systems, as well recent achievements in the field. Throughout, the first-class editors and top international authors present content of the highest quality, making this a must-have for physical chemists, spectroscopists, molecular physicists and biochemists.

  6. Improved Likelihood Function in Particle-based IR Eye Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satria, R.; Sorensen, J.; Hammoud, R.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we propose a log likelihood-ratio function of foreground and background models used in a particle filter to track the eye region in dark-bright pupil image sequences. This model fuses information from both dark and bright pupil images and their difference image into one model. Our...... enhanced tracker overcomes the issues of prior selection of static thresholds during the detection of feature observations in the bright-dark difference images. The auto-initialization process is performed using cascaded classifier trained using adaboost and adapted to IR eye images. Experiments show good...

  7. Generalized Asynchronous Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Kudryashova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper consider a mathematical model of a concurrent system, the special case of which is an asynchronous system. Distributed asynchronous automata are introduced here. It is proved that Petri nets and transition systems with independence can be considered as distributed asynchronous automata. Time distributed asynchronous automata are defined in a standard way by correspondence which relates events with time intervals. It is proved that the time distributed asynchronous automata generalize time Petri nets and asynchronous systems.

  8. Tri-track: free software for large-scale particle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallotton, Pascal; Olivier, Sandra

    2013-04-01

    The ability to correctly track objects in time-lapse sequences is important in many applications of microscopy. Individual object motions typically display a level of dynamic regularity reflecting the existence of an underlying physics or biology. Best results are obtained when this local information is exploited. Additionally, if the particle number is known to be approximately constant, a large number of tracking scenarios may be rejected on the basis that they are not compatible with a known maximum particle velocity. This represents information of a global nature, which should ideally be exploited too. Some time ago, we devised an efficient algorithm that exploited both types of information. The tracking task was reduced to a max-flow min-cost problem instance through a novel graph structure that comprised vertices representing objects from three consecutive image frames. The algorithm is explained here for the first time. A user-friendly implementation is provided, and the specific relaxation mechanism responsible for the method's effectiveness is uncovered. The software is particularly competitive for complex dynamics such as dense antiparallel flows, or in situations where object displacements are considerable. As an application, we characterize a remarkable vortex structure formed by bacteria engaged in interstitial motility.

  9. Multi-target Particle Filter Tracking Algorithm Based on Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hong-Xia

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the multi-target tracking efficiency for wireless sensor networks and solve the problem of data transmission, analyzed existing particle filter tracking algorithm, ensure that one of the core technology for wireless sensor network performance. In this paper, from the basic theory of target tracking, in-depth analysis on the basis of the principle of particle filter, based on dynamic clustering, proposed the multi-target Kalman particle filter (MEPF algorithm, through the expansion of Calman filter (EKF to generate the proposal distribution, a reduction in the required number of particles to improve the particle filter accuracy at the same time, reduce the computational complexity of target tracking algorithm, thus reducing the energy consumption. Application results show that the MEPF in the proposed algorithm can achieve better tracking of target tracking and forecasting, in a small number of particles still has good tracking accuracy.

  10. Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Robinson

    2000-04-07

    The purpose of the transport methodology and component analysis is to provide the numerical methods for simulating radionuclide transport and model setup for transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ) site-scale model. The particle-tracking method of simulating radionuclide transport is incorporated into the FEHM computer code and the resulting changes in the FEHM code are to be submitted to the software configuration management system. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) outlines the assumptions, design, and testing of a model for calculating radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. In addition, methods for determining colloid-facilitated transport parameters are outlined for use in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) analyses. Concurrently, process-level flow model calculations are being carrier out in a PMR for the unsaturated zone. The computer code TOUGH2 is being used to generate three-dimensional, dual-permeability flow fields, that are supplied to the Performance Assessment group for subsequent transport simulations. These flow fields are converted to input files compatible with the FEHM code, which for this application simulates radionuclide transport using the particle-tracking algorithm outlined in this AMR. Therefore, this AMR establishes the numerical method and demonstrates the use of the model, but the specific breakthrough curves presented do not necessarily represent the behavior of the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone.

  11. Optimization of detector positioning in the radioactive particle tracking technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Olivier; Dubé, David; Chaouki, Jamal; Bertrand, François

    2014-07-01

    The radioactive particle tracking (RPT) technique is a non-intrusive experimental velocimetry and tomography technique extensively applied to the study of hydrodynamics in a great variety of systems. In this technique, arrays of scintillation detector are used to track the motion of a single radioactive tracer particle emitting isotropic γ-rays. This work describes and applies an optimization strategy developed to find an optimal set of positions for the scintillation detectors used in the RPT technique. This strategy employs the overall resolution of the detectors as the objective function and a mesh adaptive direct search (MADS) algorithm to solve the optimization problem. More precisely, NOMAD, a C++ implementation of the MADS algorithm is used. First, the optimization strategy is validated using simple cases with known optimal detector configurations. Next, it is applied to a three-dimensional axisymmetric system (i.e. a vertical cylinder, which could represent a fluidized bed, bubble column, riser or else). The results obtained using the optimization strategy are in agreement with what was previously recommended by Roy et al. (2002) for a similar system. Finally, the optimization strategy is used for a system consisting of a partially filled cylindrical tumbler. The application of insights gained by the optimization strategy is shown to lead to a significant reduction in the error made when reconstructing the position of a tracer particle. The results of this work show that the optimization strategy developed is sensitive to both the type of objective function used and the experimental conditions. The limitations and drawbacks of the optimization strategy are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. PEPT: An invaluable tool for 3-D particle tracking and CFD simulation verification in hydrocyclone studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Alex C.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Particle tracks in a hydrocyclone generated both experimentally by positron emission particle tracking (PEPT and numerically with Eulerian-Lagranian CFD have been studied and compared. A hydrocyclone with a cylinder-on-cone design was used in this study, the geometries used in the CFD simulations and in the experiments being identical. It is shown that it is possible to track a fast-moving particle in a hydrocyclone using PEPT with high temporal and spatial resolutions. The numerical 3-D particle trajectories were generated using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES turbulence model for the fluid and Lagrangian particle tracking for the particles. The behaviors of the particles were analyzed in detail and were found to be consistent between experiments and CFD simulations. The tracks of the particles are discussed and related to the fluid flow field visualized in the CFD simulations using the cross-sectional static pressure distribution.

  13. A Comprehensive Evaluation of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NanoSight) for Characterization of Proteinaceous Submicron Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tian, X.; Nejadnik, M.R.; Baunsgaard, D.; Henriksen, A.; Rischel, C.; Jiskoot, W.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) has attracted great interest for application in the field of submicron particle characterization for biopharmaceuticals. It has the virtue of direct sample visualization and particle-by-particle tracking, but the complexity of method development has limited its

  14. Automated single particle detection and tracking for large microscopy datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rhodri S.; Yang, Lei; Dun, Alison; Smyth, Annya M.; Duncan, Rory R.; Rickman, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in optical microscopy have enabled the acquisition of very large datasets from living cells with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. Our ability to process these datasets now plays an essential role in order to understand many biological processes. In this paper, we present an automated particle detection algorithm capable of operating in low signal-to-noise fluorescence microscopy environments and handling large datasets. When combined with our particle linking framework, it can provide hitherto intractable quantitative measurements describing the dynamics of large cohorts of cellular components from organelles to single molecules. We begin with validating the performance of our method on synthetic image data, and then extend the validation to include experiment images with ground truth. Finally, we apply the algorithm to two single-particle-tracking photo-activated localization microscopy biological datasets, acquired from living primary cells with very high temporal rates. Our analysis of the dynamics of very large cohorts of 10 000 s of membrane-associated protein molecules show that they behave as if caged in nanodomains. We show that the robustness and efficiency of our method provides a tool for the examination of single-molecule behaviour with unprecedented spatial detail and high acquisition rates. PMID:27293801

  15. Steady-state particle tracking in the object-oriented regional groundwater model ZOOMQ3D

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, C.R.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the development of a steady-state particle tracking code for use in conjunction with the object-oriented regional groundwater flow model, ZOOMQ3D (Jackson, 2001). Like the flow model, the particle tracking software, ZOOPT, is written using an object-oriented approach to promote its extensibility and flexibility. ZOOPT enables the definition of steady-state pathlines in three dimensions. Particles can be tracked in both the forward and reverse directions en...

  16. On the calibration of astigmatism particle tracking velocimetry for microflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cierpka, C.; Rossi, M.; Segura, R.; Kähler, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Astigmatism particle tracking velocimetry (APTV) is a method to determine three components (3C) of the velocity field in a volume (3D) using a single camera. The depth position of the particles is coded by optical distortions caused by a cylindrical lens in the optical setup. This technique is particularly suited for microfluidic applications as measurement errors due to spatial averaging and depth of correlation, typically encountered with μPIV approaches, are eliminated so that the measurement precision is enhanced. Unfortunately, the current state of the technique is limited by the small measurement region achievable with the current calibration procedures as well as by higher order image aberrations (Cierpka et al 2010 Meas. Sci. Technol. 21 045401). In order to extend the size of the measurement volume and to account for all image aberrations, a new intrinsic calibration procedure, based on the imaging function of the particles, is proposed in the paper at hand. It provides an extended measurement depth, taking into account all image aberrations. In this work, the calibration procedure was applied to a μPIV arrangement but could also be implemented on macroscopic experimental setups. The calibration procedure is qualified with synthetic data as well as Poiseuille flow in a straight rectangular micro-channel with a cross-sectional area of 200 × 500 µm2. The three-dimensional velocity distribution of the whole channel was resolved via APTV with uncertainties of 0.9% and 3.7% of the centerline velocity, uc, for the in-plane and out-of-plane components, respectively. Further investigations using different cylindrical-lens focal lengths, magnifications and particle sizes provide information about achievable measurement depths and help to design and adapt the optimal system for the desired experiment.

  17. Multi-Color Single Particle Tracking with Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Eva Arnspang; Brewer, J. R.; Lagerholm, B. C.

    2012-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have long promised to revolutionize fluorescence detection to include even applications requiring simultaneous multi-species detection at single molecule sensitivity. Despite the early promise, the unique optical properties of QDs have not yet been fully exploited in e. g....... multiplex single molecule sensitivity applications such as single particle tracking (SPT). In order to fully optimize single molecule multiplex application with QDs, we have in this work performed a comprehensive quantitative investigation of the fluorescence intensities, fluorescence intensity fluctuations...... further show that there is only a small size advantage in using blue-shifted QDs in biological applications because of the additional size of the water-stabilizing surface coat. Extending previous work, we finally also show that parallel four color multicolor (MC)-SPT with QDs is possible at an image...

  18. Quantum dynamics of a particle in a tracking chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Figari, Rodolfo

    2014-01-01

    In the original formulation of quantum mechanics the existence of a precise border between a microscopic world, governed by quantum mechanics, and a macroscopic world, described by classical mechanics was assumed. Modern theoretical and experimental physics has moved that border several times, carefully investigating its definition and making available to observation larger and larger quantum systems. The present book examines a paradigmatic case of the transition from quantum to classical behavior: A quantum particle is revealed in a tracking chamber as a trajectory obeying the laws of classical mechanics. The authors provide here a purely quantum-mechanical description of this behavior, thus helping to illuminate the nature of the border between the quantum and the classical.

  19. Solving Time-Fractional Advection-Dispersion Equation by Variable Weights Particle Tracking Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shaohua; Jiang, Jianguo; Wu, Jichun

    2017-09-01

    Particle tracking method is an efficient and reliable method to solve time-fractional advection-dispersion equation, which can describe anomalous transport in heterogeneous porous media. However, this method will lead to severe fluctuation or disappearance of solutions if the concentration value is small. A variable weights method is developed to conquer the shortcoming of particle tracking method. Then, one-dimensional and two-dimensional time-fractional advection-dispersion equations are solved by the variable weights particle tracking method. Compared to traditional particle tracking method, the variable weights version may eliminate the fluctuation and improve the accuracy by orders of magnitude without more computational cost.

  20. Micro-heterogeneity of corn hulls cellulosic fiber biopolymer studied by multiple-particle tracking (MPT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A novel technique named multiple-particle tracking (MPT) was used to investigate the micro-structural heterogeneities of Z-trim, a zero calorie cellulosic fiber biopolymer produced from corn hulls. The Multiple-Particle Tracking (MPT) method was used in this study, which was originally described by ...

  1. Evaluation of Approaches for Tracking Virus Particles in Fluorescence Microscopy Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinez, W. J.; Lampe, M.; Wörz, S.; Müller, B.; Eils, R.; Rohr, K.

    Tracking virus particles in fluorescence microscopy image sequences enables the characterization of the dynamical behavior of these objects. Several approaches have been developed for the task of virus tracking. However, few studies have quantitatively evaluated the performance of the different approaches. Such a comparison is essential to predict the performance of the approaches under realistic conditions. In this paper, we present a quantitative evaluation of eight approaches for tracking virus particles. We have investigated deterministic and probabilistic approaches. The evaluation is based on nine real microscopy image sequences of virus particles, for which ground truth was obtained by manual tracking.

  2. Non-iterative double-frame 2D/3D particle tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Thomas; Hain, Rainer; Kähler, Christian J.

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, the detection of individual particle images and their tracking over time to determine the local flow velocity has become quite popular for planar and volumetric measurements. Particle tracking velocimetry has strong advantages compared to the statistical analysis of an ensemble of particle images by means of cross-correlation approaches, such as particle image velocimetry. Tracking individual particles does not suffer from spatial averaging and therefore bias errors can be avoided. Furthermore, the spatial resolution can be increased up to the sub-pixel level for mean fields. A maximization of the spatial resolution for instantaneous measurements requires high seeding concentrations. However, it is still challenging to track particles at high seeding concentrations, if no time series is available. Tracking methods used under these conditions are typically very complex iterative algorithms, which require expert knowledge due to the large number of adjustable parameters. To overcome these drawbacks, a new non-iterative tracking approach is introduced in this letter, which automatically analyzes the motion of the neighboring particles without requiring to specify any parameters, except for the displacement limits. This makes the algorithm very user friendly and also offers unexperienced users to use and implement particle tracking. In addition, the algorithm enables measurements of high speed flows using standard double-pulse equipment and estimates the flow velocity reliably even at large particle image densities.

  3. Random Walk Particle Tracking For Multiphase Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanzi, Aaron; Yin, Xiaolong; Hrenya, Christine

    2017-11-01

    As computing capabilities have advanced, direct numerical simulation (DNS) has become a highly effective tool for quantitatively predicting the heat transfer within multiphase flows. Here we utilize a hybrid DNS framework that couples the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to the random walk particle tracking (RWPT) algorithm. The main challenge of such a hybrid is that discontinuous fields pose a significant challenge to the RWPT framework and special attention must be given to the handling of interfaces. We derive a method for addressing discontinuities in the diffusivity field, arising at the interface between two phases. Analytical means are utilized to develop an interfacial tracer balance and modify the RWPT algorithm. By expanding the modulus of the stochastic (diffusive) step and only allowing a subset of the tracers within the high diffusivity medium to undergo a diffusive step, the correct equilibrium state can be restored (globally homogeneous tracer distribution). The new RWPT algorithm is implemented within the SUSP3D code and verified against a variety of systems: effective diffusivity of a static gas-solids mixture, hot sphere in unbounded diffusion, cooling sphere in unbounded diffusion, and uniform flow past a hot sphere.

  4. CELL TRACKING USING PARTICLE FILTERS WITH IMPLICIT CONVEX SHAPE MODEL IN 4D CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY IMAGES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Nisha; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2014-10-01

    Bayesian frameworks are commonly used in tracking algorithms. An important example is the particle filter, where a stochastic motion model describes the evolution of the state, and the observation model relates the noisy measurements to the state. Particle filters have been used to track the lineage of cells. Propagating the shape model of the cell through the particle filter is beneficial for tracking. We approximate arbitrary shapes of cells with a novel implicit convex function. The importance sampling step of the particle filter is defined using the cost associated with fitting our implicit convex shape model to the observations. Our technique is capable of tracking the lineage of cells for nonmitotic stages. We validate our algorithm by tracking the lineage of retinal and lens cells in zebrafish embryos.

  5. A feature point identification method for positron emission particle tracking with multiple tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiggins, Cody, E-mail: cwiggin2@vols.utk.edu [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 1408 Circle Drive, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Santos, Roque [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Nuclear Engineering (United States); Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Departamento de Ciencias Nucleares (Ecuador); Ruggles, Arthur [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Nuclear Engineering (United States)

    2017-01-21

    A novel detection algorithm for Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) with multiple tracers based on optical feature point identification (FPI) methods is presented. This new method, the FPI method, is compared to a previous multiple PEPT method via analyses of experimental and simulated data. The FPI method outperforms the older method in cases of large particle numbers and fine time resolution. Simulated data show the FPI method to be capable of identifying 100 particles at 0.5 mm average spatial error. Detection error is seen to vary with the inverse square root of the number of lines of response (LORs) used for detection and increases as particle separation decreases. - Highlights: • A new approach to positron emission particle tracking is presented. • Using optical feature point identification analogs, multiple particle tracking is achieved. • Method is compared to previous multiple particle method. • Accuracy and applicability of method is explored.

  6. Tracking parameter simulation for the Turkish accelerator center particle factory tracker system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapan, I., E-mail: ilhan@uludag.edu.tr; Pilicer, E.; Pilicer, F.B.

    2016-09-21

    The silicon tracker part of the Turkish Accelerator Center super charm particle factory detector was designed for effectively tracking charged particles with momentum values up to 2.0 GeV/c. In this work, the FLUKA simulation code has been used to estimate the track parameters and their resolutions in the designed tracker system. These results have been compared with those obtained by the tkLayout software package. The simulated track parameter resolutions are compatible with the physics goals of the tracking detector.

  7. 4-D single particle tracking of synthetic and proteinaceous microspheres reveals preferential movement of nuclear particles along chromatin – poor tracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athale Chaitanya

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dynamics of nuclear organization, nuclear bodies and RNPs in particular has been the focus of many studies. To understand their function, knowledge of their spatial nuclear position and temporal translocation is essential. Typically, such studies generate a wealth of data that require novel methods in image analysis and computational tools to quantitatively track particle movement on the background of moving cells and shape changing nuclei. Results We developed a novel 4-D image processing platform (TIKAL for the work with laser scanning and wide field microscopes. TIKAL provides a registration software for correcting global movements and local deformations of cells as well as 2-D and 3-D tracking software. With this new tool, we studied the dynamics of two different types of nuclear particles, namely nuclear bodies made from GFP-NLS-vimentin and microinjected 0.1 μm – wide polystyrene beads, by live cell time-lapse microscopy combined with single particle tracking and mobility analysis. We now provide a tool for the automatic 3-D analysis of particle movement in parallel with the acquisition of chromatin density data. Conclusions Kinetic analysis revealed 4 modes of movement: confined obstructed, normal diffusion and directed motion. Particle tracking on the background of stained chromatin revealed that particle movement is directly related to local reorganization of chromatin. Further a direct comparison of particle movement in the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm exhibited an entirely different kinetic behaviour of vimentin particles in both compartments. The kinetics of nuclear particles were slightly affected by depletion of ATP and significantly disturbed by disruption of actin and microtubule networks. Moreover, the hydration state of the nucleus had a strong impact on the mobility of nuclear bodies since both normal diffusion and directed motion were entirely abolished when cells were challenged with 0.6 M

  8. Using Image Attributes to Assure Accurate Particle Size and Count Using Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defante, Adrian P; Vreeland, Wyatt N; Benkstein, Kurt D; Ripple, Dean C

    2017-12-23

    Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) obtains particle size by analysis of particle diffusion through a time series of micrographs and particle count by a count of imaged particles. The number of observed particles imaged is controlled by the scattering cross-section of the particles and by camera settings such as sensitivity and shutter speed. Appropriate camera settings are defined as those that image, track, and analyze a sufficient number of particles for statistical repeatability. Here, we test if image attributes, features captured within the image itself, can provide measurable guidelines to assess the accuracy for particle size and count measurements using NTA. The results show that particle sizing is a robust process independent of image attributes for model systems. However, particle count is sensitive to camera settings. Using open-source software analysis, it was found that a median pixel area, 4 pixels 2 , results in a particle concentration within 20% of the expected value. The distribution of these illuminated pixel areas can also provide clues about the polydispersity of particle solutions prior to using a particle tracking analysis. Using the median pixel area serves as an operator-independent means to assess the quality of the NTA measurement for count. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Computationally efficient angles-only tracking with particle flow filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Russell; Wettergren, Thomas A.

    2015-05-01

    Particle filters represent the current state of the art in nonlinear, non-Gaussian filtering. They are easy to implement and have been applied in numerous domains. That being said, particle filters can be impractical for problems with state dimensions greater than four, if some other problem specific efficiencies can't be identified. This "curse of dimensionality" makes particle filters a computationally burdensome approach, and the associated re-sampling makes parallel processing difficult. In the past several years an alternative to particle filters dubbed particle flows has emerged as a (potentially) much more efficient method to solving non-linear, non-Gaussian problems. Particle flow filtering (unlike particle filtering) is a deterministic approach, however, its implementation entails solving an under-determined system of partial differential equations which has infinitely many potential solutions. In this work we apply the filters to angles-only target motion analysis problems in order to quantify the (if any) computational gains over standard particle filtering approaches. In particular we focus on the simplest form of particle flow filter, known as the exact particle flow filter. This form assumes a Gaussian prior and likelihood function of the unknown target states and is then linearized as is standard practice for extended Kalman filters. We implement both particle filters and particle flows and perform numerous numerical experiments for comparison.

  10. Multiple Model Particle Filtering For Multi-Target Tracking

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hero, Alfred; Kreucher, Chris; Kastella, Keith

    2004-01-01

    ...). Estimation of the JMPD is done in a Bayesian framework and provides a method for tracking multiple targets which allow nonlinear target motion and measurement to state coupling as well as non...

  11. A SUNTANS-based unstructured grid local exact particle tracking model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangliang; Chua, Vivien P.

    2016-07-01

    A parallel particle tracking model, which employs the local exact integration method to achieve high accuracy, has been developed and embedded in an unstructured-grid coastal ocean model, Stanford Unstructured Nonhydrostatic Terrain-following Adaptive Navier-Stokes Simulator (SUNTANS). The particle tracking model is verified and compared with traditional numerical integration methods, such as Runge-Kutta fourth-order methods using several test cases. In two-dimensional linear steady rotating flow, the local exact particle tracking model is able to track particles along the circular streamline accurately, while Runge-Kutta fourth-order methods produce trajectories that deviate from the streamlines. In periodically varying double-gyre flow, the trajectories produced by local exact particle tracking model with time step of 1.0 × 10- 2 s are similar to those trajectories obtained from the numerical integration methods with reduced time steps of 1.0 × 10- 4 s. In three-dimensional steady Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) flow, the trajectories integrated with the local exact particle tracking model compares well with the approximated true path. The trajectories spiral upward and their projection on the x- y plane is a periodic ellipse. The trajectories derived with the Runge-Kutta fourth-order method deviate from the approximated true path, and their projections on the x- y plane are unclosed ellipses with growing long and short axes. The spatial temporal resolution needs to be carefully chosen before particle tracking models are applied. Our results show that the developed local exact particle tracking model is accurate and suitable for marine Lagrangian (trajectory-based)-related research.

  12. Magnifying and Tracking Observation of Micro PET Particles Passing through a Plane Premixed Flame Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohiwa, Norio; Ishino, Yojiro; Tomatsu, Takanori; Yamakita, Ryuji

    In order to observe detailed behavior of micro plastic particles under rapid heating, a fundamental investigation is made by introducing two ingenious devices; one is the construction of a plane laminar premixed burner exhibiting extremely excellent two-dimensionality, the other is the construction of a magnifying particle-tracking system composed of a pair of rotating plane mirrors and a fixed high-speed video camera. Taking account of the flow patterns obtained using a PIV/PTV system, a series of heating processes from melting to burning of micro PET particles passing through a laminar flame sheet is optically observed. It is found that the proposed high-speed and magnifying tracking system can realize a wide straight range of particle tracking up to 50 mm and clarify many interesting facts concerning the ignition and burning processes of micro PET particles.

  13. Improvement in fast particle track reconstruction with robust statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Altmann, D.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohaichuk, S.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Brown, A. M.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Carson, M.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Christy, B.; Clark, K.; Clevermann, F.; Coenders, S.; Cohen, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; De Clercq, C.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eberhardt, B.; Eisch, J.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Frantzen, K.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grandmont, D. T.; Grant, D.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallen, P.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Heereman, D.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Jagielski, K.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jero, K.; Jlelati, O.; Kaminsky, B.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krasberg, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Landsman, H.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leute, J.; Lünemann, J.; Macías, O.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Reimann, R.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Salameh, T.; Sander, H.-G.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheriau, F.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Schulz, O.; Seckel, D.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Shanidze, R.; Sheremata, C.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Toscano, S.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Weaver, Ch.; Wellons, M.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Ziemann, J.; Zierke, S.; Zoll, M.; Recht, B.; Ré, C.

    2014-02-01

    The IceCube project has transformed 1 km3 of deep natural Antarctic ice into a Cherenkov detector. Muon neutrinos are detected and their direction is inferred by mapping the light produced by the secondary muon track inside the volume instrumented with photomultipliers. Reconstructing the muon track from the observed light is challenging due to noise, light scattering in the ice medium, and the possibility of simultaneously having multiple muons inside the detector, resulting from the large flux of cosmic ray muons. This paper describes work on two problems: (1) the track reconstruction problem, in which, given a set of observations, the goal is to recover the track of a muon; and (2) the coincident event problem, which is to determine how many muons are active in the detector during a time window. Rather than solving these problems by developing more complex physical models that are applied at later stages of the analysis, our approach is to augment the detector's early reconstruction with data filters and robust statistical techniques. These can be implemented at the level of on-line reconstruction and, therefore, improve all subsequent reconstructions. Using the metric of median angular resolution, a standard metric for track reconstruction, we improve the accuracy in the initial reconstruction direction by 13%. We also present improvements in measuring the number of muons in coincident events: we can accurately determine the number of muons 98% of the time.

  14. Using Gaussian Process Annealing Particle Filter for 3D Human Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rudzsky

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an approach for human body parts tracking in 3D with prelearned motion models using multiple cameras. Gaussian process annealing particle filter is proposed for tracking in order to reduce the dimensionality of the problem and to increase the tracker's stability and robustness. Comparing with a regular annealed particle filter-based tracker, we show that our algorithm can track better for low frame rate videos. We also show that our algorithm is capable of recovering after a temporal target loss.

  15. Particle filtering in the Hough space for instrument tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climent, Joan; Hexsel, Roberto A

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we present a real-time tracking system of surgical instruments in laparoscopic operations. We combine Condensation tracking, with the Hough Transform in order to obtain an efficient and accurate tracking. The Condensation algorithm performs well in heavy clutter, and the Hough Transform is robust under illumination changes, occlusion and distractions. The Hough array is computed using the gradient direction image obtained by means of a Principal Component Analysis. This improves accuracy in the determination of edge orientation and speeds up computation of the Hough Transform. The experiments on image sequences of actual laparoscopic surgical operations show that the instrument tip is located even in the presence of smoke, occlusions or motion blurring. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. How to reverse time in stochastic particle tracking models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro

    2011-01-01

    Many oceanographic studies perform individual-based simulations of the transport and dispersal of particles such as fish larvae and eggs. An increasing number of these studies take place in reverse time, for example as to locate the origins of a particle observed at a given time and position...

  17. Pipelined Asynchronous Cache Design

    OpenAIRE

    Nyströem, Mika

    1997-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of pipelined asynchronous cache memories. The work is done in the context of the performance characteristics of memories and transistor logic of a late 1990's high-performance asynchronous microprocessor. We describe the general framework of asynchronous memory systems, caching, and those system characteristics that make caching of growing importance and keep it an interesting research topic. Finally, we present the main contribution of this work, whi...

  18. 3D Shape-Encoded Particle Filter for Object Tracking and Its Application to Human Body Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Chellappa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a nonlinear state estimation approach using particle filters, for tracking objects whose approximate 3D shapes are known. The unnormalized conditional density for the solution to the nonlinear filtering problem leads to the Zakai equation, and is realized by the weights of the particles. The weight of a particle represents its geometric and temporal fit, which is computed bottom-up from the raw image using a shape-encoded filter. The main contribution of the paper is the design of smoothing filters for feature extraction combined with the adoption of unnormalized conditional density weights. The “shape filter” has the overall form of the predicted 2D projection of the 3D model, while the cross-section of the filter is designed to collect the gradient responses along the shape. The 3D-model-based representation is designed to emphasize the changes in 2D object shape due to motion, while de-emphasizing the variations due to lighting and other imaging conditions. We have found that the set of sparse measurements using a relatively small number of particles is able to approximate the high-dimensional state distribution very effectively. As a measures to stabilize the tracking, the amount of random diffusion is effectively adjusted using a Kalman updating of the covariance matrix. For a complex problem of human body tracking, we have successfully employed constraints derived from joint angles and walking motion.

  19. 3D Shape-Encoded Particle Filter for Object Tracking and Its Application to Human Body Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chellappa R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a nonlinear state estimation approach using particle filters, for tracking objects whose approximate 3D shapes are known. The unnormalized conditional density for the solution to the nonlinear filtering problem leads to the Zakai equation, and is realized by the weights of the particles. The weight of a particle represents its geometric and temporal fit, which is computed bottom-up from the raw image using a shape-encoded filter. The main contribution of the paper is the design of smoothing filters for feature extraction combined with the adoption of unnormalized conditional density weights. The "shape filter" has the overall form of the predicted 2D projection of the 3D model, while the cross-section of the filter is designed to collect the gradient responses along the shape. The 3D-model-based representation is designed to emphasize the changes in 2D object shape due to motion, while de-emphasizing the variations due to lighting and other imaging conditions. We have found that the set of sparse measurements using a relatively small number of particles is able to approximate the high-dimensional state distribution very effectively. As a measures to stabilize the tracking, the amount of random diffusion is effectively adjusted using a Kalman updating of the covariance matrix. For a complex problem of human body tracking, we have successfully employed constraints derived from joint angles and walking motion.

  20. A Gaussian process guided particle filter for tracking 3D human pose in video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedai, Suman; Bennamoun, Mohammed; Huynh, Du Q

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a hybrid method that combines Gaussian process learning, a particle filter, and annealing to track the 3D pose of a human subject in video sequences. Our approach, which we refer to as annealed Gaussian process guided particle filter, comprises two steps. In the training step, we use a supervised learning method to train a Gaussian process regressor that takes the silhouette descriptor as an input and produces multiple output poses modeled by a mixture of Gaussian distributions. In the tracking step, the output pose distributions from the Gaussian process regression are combined with the annealed particle filter to track the 3D pose in each frame of the video sequence. Our experiments show that the proposed method does not require initialization and does not lose tracking of the pose. We compare our approach with a standard annealed particle filter using the HumanEva-I dataset and with other state of the art approaches using the HumanEva-II dataset. The evaluation results show that our approach can successfully track the 3D human pose over long video sequences and give more accurate pose tracking results than the annealed particle filter.

  1. Particle Filter Design Using Importance Sampling for Acoustic Source Localisation and Tracking in Reverberant Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williamson Robert C

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequential Monte Carlo methods have been recently proposed to deal with the problem of acoustic source localisation and tracking using an array of microphones. Previous implementations make use of the basic bootstrap particle filter, whereas a more general approach involves the concept of importance sampling. In this paper, we develop a new particle filter for acoustic source localisation using importance sampling, and compare its tracking ability with that of a bootstrap algorithm proposed previously in the literature. Experimental results obtained with simulated reverberant samples and real audio recordings demonstrate that the new algorithm is more suitable for practical applications due to its reinitialisation capabilities, despite showing a slightly lower average tracking accuracy. A real-time implementation of the algorithm also shows that the proposed particle filter can reliably track a person talking in real reverberant rooms.

  2. Particle Filter Design Using Importance Sampling for Acoustic Source Localisation and Tracking in Reverberant Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Eric A.; Williamson, Robert C.

    2006-12-01

    Sequential Monte Carlo methods have been recently proposed to deal with the problem of acoustic source localisation and tracking using an array of microphones. Previous implementations make use of the basic bootstrap particle filter, whereas a more general approach involves the concept of importance sampling. In this paper, we develop a new particle filter for acoustic source localisation using importance sampling, and compare its tracking ability with that of a bootstrap algorithm proposed previously in the literature. Experimental results obtained with simulated reverberant samples and real audio recordings demonstrate that the new algorithm is more suitable for practical applications due to its reinitialisation capabilities, despite showing a slightly lower average tracking accuracy. A real-time implementation of the algorithm also shows that the proposed particle filter can reliably track a person talking in real reverberant rooms.

  3. Aerogel Track Morphology: Measurement, Three Dimensional Reconstruction and Particle Location using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearsley, A. T.; Ball, A. D.; Wozniakiewicz, P. A.; Graham, G. A.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.; Horz, F.; See, T. H.

    2007-01-01

    The Stardust spacecraft returned the first undoubted samples of cometary dust, with many grains embedded in the silica aerogel collector . Although many tracks contain one or more large terminal particles of a wide range of mineral compositions , there is also abundant material along the track walls. To help interpret the full particle size, structure and mass, both experimental simulation of impact by shots and numerical modeling of the impact process have been attempted. However, all approaches require accurate and precise measurement of impact track size parameters such as length, width and volume of specific portions. To make such measurements is not easy, especially if extensive aerogel fracturing and discoloration has occurred. In this paper we describe the application and limitations of laser confocal imagery for determination of aerogel track parameters, and for the location of particle remains.

  4. Fluorescent detection of single tracks of alpha particles using lithium fluoride crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilski, P., E-mail: pawel.bilski@ifj.edu.pl; Marczewska, B.

    2017-02-01

    Lithium fluoride single crystals were successfully used for fluorescent imaging of single tracks of alpha particles. This was realized with a standard wide-field fluorescent microscope equipped with a 100× objective. Alpha particles create F{sub 2} and F{sub 3}{sup +} color centers in LiF crystals. The subsequent illumination with the blue light (wavelength around 445 nm), excites these centers and produces fluorescence with a broad band peaked at 670 nm. The observed tracks of alpha particles have diameter of about 500 nm. Focusing of the microscope at different depths in a LiF crystal, enables imaging changes of shape and position of tracks, allowing for visualization of their paths. These encouraging results are the first step towards practical application of LiF as fluorescent nuclear track detectors.

  5. Space debris tracking based on fuzzy running Gaussian average adaptive particle filter track-before-detect algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torteeka, Peerapong; Gao, Peng-Qi; Shen, Ming; Guo, Xiao-Zhang; Yang, Da-Tao; Yu, Huan-Huan; Zhou, Wei-Ping; Zhao, You

    2017-02-01

    Although tracking with a passive optical telescope is a powerful technique for space debris observation, it is limited by its sensitivity to dynamic background noise. Traditionally, in the field of astronomy, static background subtraction based on a median image technique has been used to extract moving space objects prior to the tracking operation, as this is computationally efficient. The main disadvantage of this technique is that it is not robust to variable illumination conditions. In this article, we propose an approach for tracking small and dim space debris in the context of a dynamic background via one of the optical telescopes that is part of the space surveillance network project, named the Asia-Pacific ground-based Optical Space Observation System or APOSOS. The approach combines a fuzzy running Gaussian average for robust moving-object extraction with dim-target tracking using a particle-filter-based track-before-detect method. The performance of the proposed algorithm is experimentally evaluated, and the results show that the scheme achieves a satisfactory level of accuracy for space debris tracking.

  6. Precise particle tracking against a complicated background: polynomial fitting with Gaussian weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Salman S; Waigh, Thomas A; Zhao, Xiubo; Lu, Jian R

    2007-10-09

    We present a new particle tracking software algorithm designed to accurately track the motion of low-contrast particles against a background with large variations in light levels. The method is based on a polynomial fit of the intensity around each feature point, weighted by a Gaussian function of the distance from the centre, and is especially suitable for tracking endogeneous particles in the cell, imaged with bright field, phase contrast or fluorescence optical microscopy. Furthermore, the method can simultaneously track particles of all different sizes, and allows significant freedom in their shape. The algorithm is evaluated using the quantitative measures of accuracy and precision of previous authors, using simulated images at variable signal-to-noise ratios. To these we add new tests: the error due to a non-uniform background, and the error due to two particles approaching each other. Finally the tracking of particles in real cell images is demonstrated. The method is made freely available for non-commercial use as a software package with a graphical user-interface, which can be run within the Matlab programming environment.

  7. 3D particle tracking velocimetry using dynamic discrete tomography for plasma physics applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moseev, Dmitry; Alpers, Andreas; Gritzmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    -pixel sized particles as greylevel images. Reconstructions obtained by these methods do not necessarily match the experimental data. We propose a new algorithm which can be used for tracking dust particles in tokamaks and stellarators, as well as in low-temperature and complex plasmas. The dynamic discrete...... tomography algorithm is efficient for data from two projection directions and exact. The non-uniqueness can be detected and tracked individually. The algorithm performance is proportional to N3 on average where N is the number of particles in the reconstruction. There is a room for further improvement...

  8. A hand tracking algorithm with particle filter and improved GVF snake model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi-qi; Wu, Ai-guo; Dong, Na; Shao, Yi-zhe

    2017-07-01

    To solve the problem that the accurate information of hand cannot be obtained by particle filter, a hand tracking algorithm based on particle filter combined with skin-color adaptive gradient vector flow (GVF) snake model is proposed. Adaptive GVF and skin color adaptive external guidance force are introduced to the traditional GVF snake model, guiding the curve to quickly converge to the deep concave region of hand contour and obtaining the complex hand contour accurately. This algorithm realizes a real-time correction of the particle filter parameters, avoiding the particle drift phenomenon. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can reduce the root mean square error of the hand tracking by 53%, and improve the accuracy of hand tracking in the case of complex and moving background, even with a large range of occlusion.

  9. Tracking and Particle Identification at LHCb and Strange Hadron Production in Events with Z Boson

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00392146; Serra, N.; Mueller, K; Steinkamp, O

    The Lhcb experiment, located at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, is a high energy particle physics experiment dedicated to precision measurements of events containing beauty and charm quarks. The detector is built as a single-arm forward spectrometer. It uses tracking stations upstream and downstream of its dipole magnet to measure the trajectories and momenta of charged particles. This thesis describes the improvements to the track reconstruction algorithm, which were implemented for the second run of the LHC that started in spring 2015. Furthermore, the method to confirm the performance numbers on data is presented. In addition to the tracking system, the detector uses two Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors, upstream and downstream of the dipole magnet, together with the calorimeter and muon system, for particle identification. The detector response for the particle identification is known to be poorly modelled, since the dependence on environmental variables like temperature and pressure inside the gas mo...

  10. Local characterization of hindered Brownian motion by using digital video microscopy and 3D particle tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dettmer, Simon L.; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Pagliara, Stefano [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 19 J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    In this article we present methods for measuring hindered Brownian motion in the confinement of complex 3D geometries using digital video microscopy. Here we discuss essential features of automated 3D particle tracking as well as diffusion data analysis. By introducing local mean squared displacement-vs-time curves, we are able to simultaneously measure the spatial dependence of diffusion coefficients, tracking accuracies and drift velocities. Such local measurements allow a more detailed and appropriate description of strongly heterogeneous systems as opposed to global measurements. Finite size effects of the tracking region on measuring mean squared displacements are also discussed. The use of these methods was crucial for the measurement of the diffusive behavior of spherical polystyrene particles (505 nm diameter) in a microfluidic chip. The particles explored an array of parallel channels with different cross sections as well as the bulk reservoirs. For this experiment we present the measurement of local tracking accuracies in all three axial directions as well as the diffusivity parallel to the channel axis while we observed no significant flow but purely Brownian motion. Finally, the presented algorithm is suitable also for tracking of fluorescently labeled particles and particles driven by an external force, e.g., electrokinetic or dielectrophoretic forces.

  11. Adaptive hybrid likelihood model for visual tracking based on Gaussian particle filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Tan, Yihua; Tian, Jinwen

    2010-07-01

    We present a new scheme based on multiple-cue integration for visual tracking within a Gaussian particle filter framework. The proposed method integrates the color, shape, and texture cues of an object to construct a hybrid likelihood model. During the measurement step, the likelihood model can be switched adaptively according to environmental changes, which improves the object representation to deal with the complex disturbances, such as appearance changes, partial occlusions, and significant clutter. Moreover, the confidence weights of the cues are adjusted online through the estimation using a particle filter, which ensures the tracking accuracy and reliability. Experiments are conducted on several real video sequences, and the results demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively track objects in complex scenarios. Compared with previous similar approaches through some quantitative and qualitative evaluations, the proposed method performs better in terms of tracking robustness and precision.

  12. Particle tracking in kaon electroproduction with cathode-charge sampling in multi-wire proportional chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Achenbach, P; Bernauer, J C; Böhm, R; Bosnar, D; Bösz, M; Debenjak, L; Distler, M O; Esser, A; Friščić, I; de la Paz, M Gómez Rodríguez; Makek, M; Merkel, H; Müller, U; Nungesser, L; Pochodzalla, J; Potokar, M; Majos, S Sánchez; Schlimme, B S; Širca, S; Weinriefer, M; 10.1016/j.nima.2011.03.039

    2011-01-01

    Wire chambers are routinely operated as tracking detectors in magnetic spectrometers at high-intensity continuous electron beams. Especially in experiments studying reactions with small cross-sections the reaction yield is limited by the background rate in the chambers. One way to determine the track of a charged particle through a multi-wire proportional chamber (MWPC) is the measurement of the charge distribution induced on its cathodes. In practical applications of this read-out method, the algorithm to relate the measured charge distribution to the avalanche position is an important factor for the achievable position resolution and for the track reconstruction efficiency. An algorithm was developed for operating two large-sized MWPCs in a strong background environment with multiple-particle tracks. Resulting efficiencies were determined as a function of the electron beam current and on the signal amplitudes. Because of the different energy-losses of pions, kaons, and protons in the momentum range of the s...

  13. A new tracking algorithm for multiple colloidal particles close to contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücel, Harun; Turan Okumuşoğlu, Nazmi

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a new algorithm based on radial symmetry center method to track colloidal particles close to contact, where the optical images of the particles start to overlap in digital video microscopy. This overlapping effect is important to observe the pair interaction potential in colloidal studies and it appears as additional interaction in the measurement of the interaction with conventional tracking analysis. The proposed algorithm in this work is simple, fast and applicable for not only two particles but also three and more particles without any modification. The algorithm uses gradient vectors of the particle intensity distribution, which allows us to use a part of the symmetric intensity distribution in the calculation of the actual particle position. In this study, simulations are performed to see the performance of the proposed algorithm for two and three particles, where the simulation images are generated by using fitted curve to experimental particle image for different sized particles. As a result, the algorithm yields the maximum error smaller than 2 nm for 5.53 μm silica particles in contact condition.

  14. Investigation on microfluidic particles manipulation by holographic 3D tracking strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacace, Teresa; Paturzo, Melania; Memmolo, Pasquale; Vassalli, Massimo; Fraldi, Massimiliano; Mensitieri, Giuseppe; Ferraro, Pietro

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate a 3D holographic tracking method to investigate particles motion in a microfluidic channel while unperturbed while inducing their migration through microfluidic manipulation. Digital holography (DH) in microscopy is a full-field, label-free imaging technique able to provide quantitative phase-contrast. The employed 3D tracking method is articulated in steps. First, the displacements along the optical axis are assessed by numerical refocusing criteria. In particular, an automatic refocusing method to recover the particles axial position is implemented employing a contrast-based refocusing criterion. Then, the transverse position of the in-focus object is evaluated through quantitative phase map segmentation methods and centroid-based 2D tracking strategy. The introduction of DH is thus suggested as a powerful approach for control of particles and biological samples manipulation, as well as a possible aid to precise design and implementation of advanced lab-on-chip microfluidic devices.

  15. Spin resonance strength calculation through single particle tracking for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dutheil, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ranjbar, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The strengths of spin resonances for the polarized-proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider are currently calculated with the code DEPOL, which numerically integrates through the ring based on an analytical approximate formula. In this article, we test a new way to calculate the spin resonance strengths by performing Fourier transformation to the actual transverse magnetic fields seen by a single particle traveling through the ring. Comparison of calculated spin resonance strengths is made between this method and DEPOL.

  16. Lunar surface phenomena - Solar flare track gradients, microcraters, and accretionary particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanford, G. E.; Fruland, R. M.; Mckay, D. S.; Morrison, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Data are presented concerning the energy spectra of solar flare particles and the distribution of particles producing submicron diameter craters. Processes which alter the albedo and possibly the chemistry of exposed lunar surfaces are also considered. Measurements are reported of solar flare track gradients in rock 64455 which is sufficiently young to have uneroded surfaces on its sides. Attention is also given to accretionary particles adhering to host surfaces, microcraters on soil particles, and microcraters on the oriented surfaces of sample 76015 from a boulder at Station 6 of the Apollo 17 site.

  17. Solar Flare Track Exposure Ages in Regolith Particles: A Calibration for Transmission Electron Microscope Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Eve L.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2015-01-01

    Mineral grains in lunar and asteroidal regolith samples provide a unique record of their interaction with the space environment. Space weathering effects result from multiple processes including: exposure to the solar wind, which results in ion damage and implantation effects that are preserved in the rims of grains (typically the outermost 100 nm); cosmic ray and solar flare activity, which result in track formation; and impact processes that result in the accumulation of vapor-deposited elements, impact melts and adhering grains on particle surfaces. Determining the rate at which these effects accumulate in the grains during their space exposure is critical to studies of the surface evolution of airless bodies. Solar flare energetic particles (mainly Fe-group nuclei) have a penetration depth of a few millimeters and leave a trail of ionization damage in insulating materials that is readily observable by transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging. The density of solar flare particle tracks is used to infer the length of time an object was at or near the regolith surface (i.e., its exposure age). Track measurements by TEM methods are routine, yet track production rate calibrations have only been determined using chemical etching techniques [e.g., 1, and references therein]. We used focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) sample preparation techniques combined with TEM imaging to determine the track density/exposure age relations for lunar rock 64455. The 64455 sample was used earlier by [2] to determine a track production rate by chemical etching of tracks in anorthite. Here, we show that combined FIB/TEM techniques provide a more accurate determination of a track production rate and also allow us to extend the calibration to solar flare tracks in olivine.

  18. The new approach for infrared target tracking based on the particle filter algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hang; Han, Hong-xia

    2011-08-01

    Target tracking on the complex background in the infrared image sequence is hot research field. It provides the important basis in some fields such as video monitoring, precision, and video compression human-computer interaction. As a typical algorithms in the target tracking framework based on filtering and data connection, the particle filter with non-parameter estimation characteristic have ability to deal with nonlinear and non-Gaussian problems so it were widely used. There are various forms of density in the particle filter algorithm to make it valid when target occlusion occurred or recover tracking back from failure in track procedure, but in order to capture the change of the state space, it need a certain amount of particles to ensure samples is enough, and this number will increase in accompany with dimension and increase exponentially, this led to the increased amount of calculation is presented. In this paper particle filter algorithm and the Mean shift will be combined. Aiming at deficiencies of the classic mean shift Tracking algorithm easily trapped into local minima and Unable to get global optimal under the complex background. From these two perspectives that "adaptive multiple information fusion" and "with particle filter framework combining", we expand the classic Mean Shift tracking framework .Based on the previous perspective, we proposed an improved Mean Shift infrared target tracking algorithm based on multiple information fusion. In the analysis of the infrared characteristics of target basis, Algorithm firstly extracted target gray and edge character and Proposed to guide the above two characteristics by the moving of the target information thus we can get new sports guide grayscale characteristics and motion guide border feature. Then proposes a new adaptive fusion mechanism, used these two new information adaptive to integrate into the Mean Shift tracking framework. Finally we designed a kind of automatic target model updating strategy

  19. Optimized UAV object tracking framework based on Integrated Particle filter with ego-motion transformation matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askar Wesam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vision based object tracking problem still a hot and important area of research specially when the tracking algorithms are performed by the aircraft unmanned vehicle (UAV. Tracking with the UAV requires special considerations due to the flight maneuvers, environmental conditions and aircraft moving camera. The ego motion calculations can compensate the effect of the moving background resulted from the moving camera. In this paper an optimized object tracking framework is introduced to tackle this problem based on particle filter. It integrates the calculated ego motion transformation matrix with the dynamic model of the particle filter during the prediction stage. Then apply the correction stage on the particle filter observation model which based on two kinds of features includes Haar-like Rectangles and edge orientation histogram (EOH features. The Gentle AdaBoost classifier is used to select the most informative features as a preliminary step. The experimental results achieved more than 94.6% rate of successful tracking during different scenarios of the VIVID database in real time tracking speed.

  20. Markerless human motion tracking using hierarchical multi-swarm cooperative particle swarm optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Sanjay; Zakaria, Nordin; Rambli, Dayang Rohaya Awang; Sulaiman, Suziah

    2015-01-01

    The high-dimensional search space involved in markerless full-body articulated human motion tracking from multiple-views video sequences has led to a number of solutions based on metaheuristics, the most recent form of which is Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). However, the classical PSO suffers from premature convergence and it is trapped easily into local optima, significantly affecting the tracking accuracy. To overcome these drawbacks, we have developed a method for the problem based on Hierarchical Multi-Swarm Cooperative Particle Swarm Optimization (H-MCPSO). The tracking problem is formulated as a non-linear 34-dimensional function optimization problem where the fitness function quantifies the difference between the observed image and a projection of the model configuration. Both the silhouette and edge likelihoods are used in the fitness function. Experiments using Brown and HumanEva-II dataset demonstrated that H-MCPSO performance is better than two leading alternative approaches-Annealed Particle Filter (APF) and Hierarchical Particle Swarm Optimization (HPSO). Further, the proposed tracking method is capable of automatic initialization and self-recovery from temporary tracking failures. Comprehensive experimental results are presented to support the claims.

  1. Markerless human motion tracking using hierarchical multi-swarm cooperative particle swarm optimization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Saini

    Full Text Available The high-dimensional search space involved in markerless full-body articulated human motion tracking from multiple-views video sequences has led to a number of solutions based on metaheuristics, the most recent form of which is Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO. However, the classical PSO suffers from premature convergence and it is trapped easily into local optima, significantly affecting the tracking accuracy. To overcome these drawbacks, we have developed a method for the problem based on Hierarchical Multi-Swarm Cooperative Particle Swarm Optimization (H-MCPSO. The tracking problem is formulated as a non-linear 34-dimensional function optimization problem where the fitness function quantifies the difference between the observed image and a projection of the model configuration. Both the silhouette and edge likelihoods are used in the fitness function. Experiments using Brown and HumanEva-II dataset demonstrated that H-MCPSO performance is better than two leading alternative approaches-Annealed Particle Filter (APF and Hierarchical Particle Swarm Optimization (HPSO. Further, the proposed tracking method is capable of automatic initialization and self-recovery from temporary tracking failures. Comprehensive experimental results are presented to support the claims.

  2. Modeling nitrogen transport and transformation in aquifers using a particle-tracking approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhengtao; Welty, Claire; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2014-09-01

    We have integrated multispecies biodegradation and geochemical reactions into an existing particle-tracking code to simulate reactive transport in three-dimensional variably saturated media, with a focus on nitrification and denitrification processes. This new numerical model includes reactive air-phase transport so that gases such as N2 and CO2 can be tracked. Although nitrogen biodegradation is the primary problem addressed here, the method presented is also applicable to other reactive multispecies transport problems. We verified the model by comparison with (1) analytical solutions for saturated one- and two-dimensional cases; (2) a finite element model for a one-dimensional unsaturated case; and (3) laboratory observations for a one-dimensional saturated case. Good agreement between the new code and the verification problems is demonstrated. The new model can simulate nitrogen transport and transformation in a heterogeneous permeability field where sharp concentration gradients are present. An example application to nitrogen species biodegradation and transport of a plume emanating from a leaking sewer in a heterogeneous, variably saturated aquifer is presented to illustrate this capability. This example is a novel application of coupling unsaturated/saturated zone transport with nitrogen species biodegradation. The code has the computational advantages of particle-tracking algorithms, including local and global mass conservation and minimal numerical dispersion. We also present new methods for improving particle code efficiency by implementing the concept of tracking surplus/deficit particles and particle recycling in order to control the growth of particle numbers. The new model retains the advantages of the particle tracking approach such as allowing relatively low spatial and temporal resolutions to be used, while incorporating the robustness of grid-based Monod kinetics to simulate biogeochemical reactions.

  3. Ionization distribution near a relativistic particle track in gas

    CERN Document Server

    Grichine, V M

    2009-01-01

    The space distribution of ionization produced by relativistic charged particle around its trajectory is discussed in the framework of photo-absorption ionization model. The mean root square transverse radius of the ionization space distribution shows relativistic rise. The rise is due to relativistic increasing of Cherenkov photon generation. The photons with energy more than the first ionization potential have small but finite range which is typically much more than the range of an electron with the same energy. Calculations illustrating this effect were done using the gas mixture proposed for ALICE LHC time projection chamber.

  4. A transition radiation detector for RHIC featuring accurate tracking and dE/dx particle identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, E.; Lissauer, D.; McCorkle, S.; Polychronakos, V.; Takai, H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Chi, C.Y.; Nagamiya, S.; Sippach, W.; Toy, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.F.; Wiggins, C.; Willis, W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Cherniatin, V.; Dolgoshein, B. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Engineering, (Russian Federation); Bennett, M.; Chikanian, A.; Kumar, S.; Mitchell, J.T.; Pope, K. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1991-12-31

    We describe the results of a test ran involving a Transition Radiation Detector that can both distinguish electrons from pions which momenta greater titan 0.7 GeV/c and simultaneously track particles passing through the detector. The particle identification is accomplished through a combination of the detection of Transition Radiation from the electron and the differences in electron and pion energy loss (dE/dx) in the detector. The dE/dx particle separation is most, efficient below 2 GeV/c while particle ID utilizing Transition Radiation effective above 1.5 GeV/c. Combined, the electron-pion separation is-better than 5 {times} 10{sup 2}. The single-wire, track-position resolution for the TRD is {approximately}230 {mu}m.

  5. Method for tracking nanogel particles in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Brandon L; Lien, Yeong-Hau H; Mazar, Carla; Salkini, Mohamad W; Cai, Tong; Hu, Zhibing; Marquez, Manuel; Garcia, Antonio A

    2008-07-01

    Hydrogels made of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) can be synthesized in the form of highly monodispersed nanoparticles. After synthesis, NIPA hydrogel nanoparticles (nanogels) can be labeled by Alexa Fluor 488 carboxylic acid, 2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl ester through amine-terminated functional groups. This choice of dye is complementary to other biological labeling methods for in vivo studies. When the nanogel/dye nanoparticles are injected into rabbits, they can be imaged via tissue sectioning and confocal microscopy, while nanoparticle concentration can be determined by fluorescent microplate assays. Time-course persistence of nanoparticles in the circulatory system can be readily tracked by direct assay of plasma and urine samples using 485 nm excitation and 538 emission wavelengths to keep background fluorescence to nearly the same level as that found using an empty well. Depending upon how the nanoparticles are injected, circulatory system concentrations can reach high concentrations and diminish to low levels or gradually increase and gradually decrease over time. Injection in the femoral artery results in a rapid spike in circulating nanogel/dye concentration, while injection into the renal artery results in a more gradual increase.

  6. Real time micro/nano particle detection and tracking with nanosecond resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Feng; Song, Qi; Tien, En-kuang; Boyraz, Ozdal

    2009-08-01

    Real-time optical imaging and tracking of particles in a complex environment to understand coordinated events has attracted researchers from various areas such as biomechanics. Here, we report a way for real time detection and tracking of micron size particles in time-space-wavelength mapping technology by using a single detector. Experimentally, we demonstrate real time tracking of micron size glass particles with 50ns temporal resolution and fiber laser to emit 50nm short pulses at 1550nm. Following a dispersive time wavelength mapping in a chirped fiber grating and space-time-wavelength mapping through a diffraction grating with 600lines/mm, we generate an elliptical beam where each wavelength component corresponds to different time and position in space. Then the generated beam is focused on an image plane by using 20X-40X microscope objectives. The presence of particles on the image plane induces amplitude modulation on each pulse which is captured in real time by a high speed digitizing oscilloscope with 20GS/s sampling rate. The trajectory of the particle is extracted from the dynamic amplitude modulation in a post processing. The same system has also been utilized for imaging of particles by using one dimensional scanning.

  7. Minimizing biases associated with tracking analysis of submicron particles in heterogeneous biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Nunn, Kenetta L; Harit, Dimple; McKinley, Scott A; Lai, Samuel K

    2015-12-28

    Tracking the dynamic motion of individual nanoparticles or viruses offers quantitative insights into their real-time behavior and fate in different biological environments. Indeed, particle tracking is a powerful tool that has facilitated the development of drug carriers with enhanced penetration of mucus, brain tissues and other extracellular matrices. Nevertheless, heterogeneity is a hallmark of nanoparticle diffusion in such complex environments: identical particles can exhibit strongly hindered or unobstructed diffusion within microns of each other. The common practice in 2D particle tracking, namely analyzing all trackable particle traces with equal weighting, naturally biases towards rapidly diffusing sub-populations at shorter time scales. This in turn results in misrepresentation of particle behavior and a systematic underestimate of the time necessary for a population of nanoparticles to diffuse specific distances. We show here via both computational simulation and experimental data that this bias can be rigorously corrected by weighing the contribution by each particle trace on a 'frame-by-frame' basis. We believe this methodology presents an important step towards objective and accurate assessment of the heterogeneous transport behavior of submicron drug carriers and pathogens in biological environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. 3D head pose estimation and tracking using particle filtering and ICP algorithm

    KAUST Repository

    Ben Ghorbel, Mahdi

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of 3D head pose estimation and tracking. Existing approaches generally need huge database, training procedure, manual initialization or use face feature extraction manually extracted. We propose a framework for estimating the 3D head pose in its fine level and tracking it continuously across multiple Degrees of Freedom (DOF) based on ICP and particle filtering. We propose to approach the problem, using 3D computational techniques, by aligning a face model to the 3D dense estimation computed by a stereo vision method, and propose a particle filter algorithm to refine and track the posteriori estimate of the position of the face. This work comes with two contributions: the first concerns the alignment part where we propose an extended ICP algorithm using an anisotropic scale transformation. The second contribution concerns the tracking part. We propose the use of the particle filtering algorithm and propose to constrain the search space using ICP algorithm in the propagation step. The results show that the system is able to fit and track the head properly, and keeps accurate the results on new individuals without a manual adaptation or training. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010.

  9. An expectation maximization based method for subcellular particle tracking using multi-angle TIRF microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang; Shen, Hongying; De Camilli, Pietro; Toomre, Derek K; Duncan, James S

    2011-01-01

    Multi-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (MA-TIRFM) is a new generation of TIRF microscopy to study cellular processes near dorsal cell membrane in 4 dimensions (3D+t). To perform quantitative analysis using MA-TIRFM, it is necessary to track subcellular particles in these processes. In this paper, we propose a method based on a MAP framework for automatic particle tracking and apply it to track clathrin coated pits (CCPs). The expectation maximization (EM) algorithm is employed to solve the MAP problem. To provide the initial estimations for the EM algorithm, we develop a forward filter based on the most probable trajectory (MPT) filter. Multiple linear models are used to model particle dynamics. For CCP tracking, we use two linear models to describe constrained Brownian motion and fluorophore variation according to CCP properties. The tracking method is evaluated on synthetic data and results show that it has high accuracy. The result on real data confirmed by human expert cell biologists is also presented.

  10. High throughput on-chip analysis of high-energy charged particle tracks using lensfree imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Wei; Shabbir, Faizan; Gong, Chao; Gulec, Cagatay; Pigeon, Jeremy; Shaw, Jessica; Greenbaum, Alon; Tochitsky, Sergei; Joshi, Chandrashekhar [Electrical Engineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Ozcan, Aydogan, E-mail: ozcan@ucla.edu [Electrical Engineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Bioengineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI), University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-04-13

    We demonstrate a high-throughput charged particle analysis platform, which is based on lensfree on-chip microscopy for rapid ion track analysis using allyl diglycol carbonate, i.e., CR-39 plastic polymer as the sensing medium. By adopting a wide-area opto-electronic image sensor together with a source-shifting based pixel super-resolution technique, a large CR-39 sample volume (i.e., 4 cm × 4 cm × 0.1 cm) can be imaged in less than 1 min using a compact lensfree on-chip microscope, which detects partially coherent in-line holograms of the ion tracks recorded within the CR-39 detector. After the image capture, using highly parallelized reconstruction and ion track analysis algorithms running on graphics processing units, we reconstruct and analyze the entire volume of a CR-39 detector within ∼1.5 min. This significant reduction in the entire imaging and ion track analysis time not only increases our throughput but also allows us to perform time-resolved analysis of the etching process to monitor and optimize the growth of ion tracks during etching. This computational lensfree imaging platform can provide a much higher throughput and more cost-effective alternative to traditional lens-based scanning optical microscopes for ion track analysis using CR-39 and other passive high energy particle detectors.

  11. Particle Filtering for Obstacle Tracking in UAS Sense and Avoid Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Elena Tirri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstacle detection and tracking is a key function for UAS sense and avoid applications. In fact, obstacles in the flight path must be detected and tracked in an accurate and timely manner in order to execute a collision avoidance maneuver in case of collision threat. The most important parameter for the assessment of a collision risk is the Distance at Closest Point of Approach, that is, the predicted minimum distance between own aircraft and intruder for assigned current position and speed. Since assessed methodologies can cause some loss of accuracy due to nonlinearities, advanced filtering methodologies, such as particle filters, can provide more accurate estimates of the target state in case of nonlinear problems, thus improving system performance in terms of collision risk estimation. The paper focuses on algorithm development and performance evaluation for an obstacle tracking system based on a particle filter. The particle filter algorithm was tested in off-line simulations based on data gathered during flight tests. In particular, radar-based tracking was considered in order to evaluate the impact of particle filtering in a single sensor framework. The analysis shows some accuracy improvements in the estimation of Distance at Closest Point of Approach, thus reducing the delay in collision detection.

  12. Calibrations of CR39 and Makrofol nuclear track detectors and search for exotic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togo, V.

    2003-09-01

    We present the final results of the search for exotic massive particles in the cosmic radiation performed with the MACRO underground experiment. Magnetic monopoles and nuclearites flux upper limits obtained with the CR39 nuclear track subdetector, the scintillation and streamer tube subdetectors are given. Searches at high altitude with the SLIM experiment are in progress.

  13. Multiple Maneuvering Target Tracking by Improved Particle Filter Based on Multiscan JPDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The multiple maneuvering target tracking algorithm based on a particle filter is addressed. The equivalent-noise approach is adopted, which uses a simple dynamic model consisting of target state and equivalent noise which accounts for the combined effects of the process noise and maneuvers. The equivalent-noise approach converts the problem of maneuvering target tracking to that of state estimation in the presence of nonstationary process noise with unknown statistics. A novel method for identifying the nonstationary process noise is proposed in the particle filter framework. Furthermore, a particle filter based multiscan Joint Probability Data Association (JPDA filter is proposed to deal with the data association problem in a multiple maneuvering target tracking. In the proposed multiscan JPDA algorithm, the distributions of interest are the marginal filtering distributions for each of the targets, and these distributions are approximated with particles. The multiscan JPDA algorithm examines the joint association events in a multiscan sliding window and calculates the marginal posterior probability based on the multiscan joint association events. The proposed algorithm is illustrated via an example involving the tracking of two highly maneuvering, at times closely spaced and crossed, targets, based on resolved measurements.

  14. Infrared small target tracking based on sample constrained particle filtering and sparse representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Ren, Kan; Wan, Minjie; Gu, Guohua; Chen, Qian

    2017-12-01

    Infrared search and track technology for small target plays an important role in infrared warning and guidance. In view of the tacking randomness and uncertainty caused by background clutter and noise interference, a robust tracking method for infrared small target based on sample constrained particle filtering and sparse representation is proposed in this paper. Firstly, to distinguish the normal region and interference region in target sub-blocks, we introduce a binary support vector, and combine it with the target sparse representation model, after which a particle filtering observation model based on sparse reconstruction error differences between sample targets is developed. Secondly, we utilize saliency extraction to obtain the high frequency area in infrared image, and make it as a priori knowledge of the transition probability model to limit the particle filtering sampling process. Lastly, the tracking result is brought about via target state estimation and the Bayesian posteriori probability calculation. Theoretical analyses and experimental results show that our method can enhance the state estimation ability of stochastic particles, improve the sparse representation adaptabilities for infrared small targets, and optimize the tracking accuracy for infrared small moving targets.

  15. Calibrations of CR39 and Makrofol nuclear track detectors and search for exotic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, M; Auriemma, G; Bakari, D; Baldini, A; Barbarino, G C; Barish, B C; Battistoni, G; Becherini, Y; Bellotti, R; Bemporad, C; Bernardini, P; Bilokon, H; Bloise, C; Bower, C; Brigida, M; Bussino, S; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Campana, D; Carboni, M; Caruso, R; Cecchini, S; Cei, F; Chiarella, V; Chiarusi, T; Choudhary, B C; Coutu, S; Cozzi, M; De Cataldo, G; De Marzo, C; De Mitri, I; De Vincenzi, M; Dekhissi, H; Derkaoui, J; Di Credico, A; Erriquez, O; Favuzzi, C; Forti, C; Fusco, P; Giacomelli, G; Giannini, G; Giglietto, N; Giorgini, M; Grassi, M; Grillo, A; Guarino, F; Gustavino, C; Habig, A; Hanson, K; Heinz, R; Iarocci, E; Katsavounidis, E; Katsavounidis, I; Kearns, E; Kim, H; Kumar, A; Kyriazopoulou, S; Lamanna, E; Lane, C; Levin, D S; Lipari, P; Longley, N P; Longo, M J; Loparco, F; Maaroufi, F; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Manzoor, S; Margiotta, A; Marini, A; Martello, D; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Matteuzzi, D; Mazziotta, M N; Michael, D G; Monacelli, P; Montaruli, T; Monteno, M; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Nicolò, D; Nolty, R; Orth, C; Osteria, G; Palamara, O; Patera, V; Patrizii, L; Pazzi, R; Peck, C W; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; Pistilli, P; Popa, V; Rainó, A; Reynoldson, J; Ronga, F; Rrhioua, A; Satriano, C; Scapparone, E; Scholberg, K; Sciubba, A; Serra, P; Sioli, M; Sirri, G; Sitta, M; Spinelli, P; Spinetti, M; Spurio, M; Steinberg, R; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Surdo, A; Tarle, G; Togo, V; Vakili, M; Walter, C W; Webb, R; 10.1016/S0920-5632(03)02249-7

    2003-01-01

    We present the final results of the search for exotic massive particles in the cosmic radiation performed with the MACRO underground experiment. Magnetic monopoles and nuclearites flux upper limits obtained with the CR39 nuclear track subdetector, the scintillation and streamer tube subdetectors are given. Searches at high altitude with the SLIM experiment are in progress.

  16. Simple method for particle tracking with coherent synchrotron radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Borland

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR is of great interest to those designing accelerators as drivers for free-electron lasers (FELs. Although experimental evidence is incomplete, CSR is predicted to have potentially severe effects on the emittance of high-brightness electron beams. The performance of an FEL depends critically on the emittance, current, and energy spread of the beam. Attempts to increase the current through magnetic bunch compression can lead to increased emittance and energy spread due to CSR in the dipoles of such a compressor. The code elegant was used for design and simulation of the bunch compressor [M. Borland et al., in Proceedings of the 2000 Linear Accelerator Conference, Monterey, CA (SLAC, Menlo Park, CA, 2001, p. 863] for the low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL FEL [S. V. Milton et al., Phys. Rev. Let. 85, 988 (1999] at the Advanced Photon Source (APS. In order to facilitate this design, a fast algorithm was developed based on the 1D formalism of Saldin and co-workers [E. L. Saldin, E. A. Schneidmiller, and M. V. Yurkov, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 398, 373 (1997]. In addition, a method of including CSR effects in drift spaces following the chicane magnets was developed and implemented. The algorithm is fast enough to permit running hundreds of tolerance simulations including CSR for 50 000 particles. This article describes the details of the implementation and shows results for the APS bunch compressor.

  17. A particle filtering approach for spatial arrival time tracking in ocean acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rashi; Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni

    2011-06-01

    The focus of this work is on arrival time and amplitude estimation from acoustic signals recorded at spatially separated hydrophones in the ocean. A particle filtering approach is developed that treats arrival times as "targets" and tracks their "location" across receivers, also modeling arrival time gradient. The method is evaluated via Monte Carlo simulations and is compared to a maximum likelihood estimator, which does not relate arrivals at neighboring receivers. The comparison demonstrates a significant advantage in using the particle filter. It is also shown that posterior probability density functions of times and amplitudes become readily available with particle filtering. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  18. Guitarist Fingertip Tracking by Integrating a Bayesian Classifier into Particle Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chutisant Kerdvibulvech

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a vision-based method for tracking guitar fingerings made by guitar players. We present it as a new framework for tracking colored finger markers by integrating a Bayesian classifier into particle filters. This adds the useful abilities of automatic track initialization and recovery from tracking failures in a dynamic background. Furthermore, by using the online adaptation of color probabilities, this method is able to cope with illumination changes. Augmented Reality Tag (ARTag is then utilized to calculate the projection matrix as an online process which allows the guitar to be moved while being played. Representative experimental results are also included. The method presented can be used to develop the application of human-computer interaction (HCI to guitar playing by recognizing the chord being played by a guitarist in virtual spaces. The aforementioned application would assist guitar learners by allowing them to automatically identify if they are using the correct chords required by the musical piece.

  19. Particle tracking with iterated Kalman filters and smoothers the PMHT algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Strandlie, A

    1999-01-01

    We introduce the Probabilistic Multi-Hypothesis Tracking (PMHT) algorithm for particle tracking in high-energy physics detectors. This algorithm has been developed recently for tracking multiple targets in clutter, and it is based on maximum likelihood estimation with help of the EM algorithm. The resulting algorithm basically consists of running several iterated and coupled Kalman filters and smoothers in parallel. It is similar to the Elastic Arms algorithm, but it possesses the additional feature of being able to take process noise into account, as for instance multiple Coulomb scattering. Herein, we review its basic properties and derive a generalized version of the algorithm by including a deterministic annealing scheme. Further developments of the algorithm in order to improve the performance are also discussed. In particular, we propose to modify the hit-to-track assignment probabilities in order to obtain competition between hits in the same detector layer. Finally, we present results of an implementa...

  20. Measuring the 3D motion of particles in microchannel acoustophoresis using astigmatism particle tracking velocimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustsson, P.; Barnkob, Rune; Bruus, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    are examined in three dimensions. We have quantified the velocity of particles driven by the primary acoustic radiation force and acoustic streaming, respectively, using 0.5-μm and 5-μm particles. Increased ultrasound frequency and lowered viscosity of the medium reduced the influence of acoustic streaming...

  1. Method based on the double sideband technique for the dynamic tracking of micrometric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Claudio; Lizana, Angel; Iemmi, Claudio; Campos, Juan

    2016-06-01

    Digital holography (DH) methods are of interest in a large number of applications. Recently, the double sideband (DSB) technique was proposed, which is a DH based method that, by using double filtering, provides reconstructed images without distortions and is free of twin images by using an in-line configuration. In this work, we implement a method for the investigation of the mobility of particles based on the DSB technique. Particle holographic images obtained using the DSB method are processed with digital picture recognition methods, allowing us to accurately track the spatial position of particles. The dynamic nature of the method is achieved experimentally by using a spatial light modulator. The suitability of the proposed tracking method is validated by determining the trajectory and velocity described by glass microspheres in movement.

  2. Dissecting the cell entry pathway of dengue virus by single-particle tracking in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilde M van der Schaar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is an enveloped RNA virus that causes the most common arthropod-borne infection worldwide. The mechanism by which DENV infects the host cell remains unclear. In this work, we used live-cell imaging and single-virus tracking to investigate the cell entry, endocytic trafficking, and fusion behavior of DENV. Simultaneous tracking of DENV particles and various endocytic markers revealed that DENV enters cells exclusively via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The virus particles move along the cell surface in a diffusive manner before being captured by a pre-existing clathrin-coated pit. Upon clathrin-mediated entry, DENV particles are transported to Rab5-positive endosomes, which subsequently mature into late endosomes through acquisition of Rab7 and loss of Rab5. Fusion of the viral membrane with the endosomal membrane was primarily detected in late endosomal compartments.

  3. Track-Before-Detect Algorithm for Weak Extended Target Based on Particle Filter under Clutter Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Sunyong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Track-Before-Detect (TBD algorithm based on the particle filter is proposed for weak extended target detection and tracking in low signal to clutter noise radio. The rod-shaped object is analyzed by dividing the cell on range and azimuth under the Weibull clutter. On the basis of a point target, the likelihood function and particle weights can be obtained by the target spread function. In the TBD algorithm, the binary target variable and the target shape parameters is added to the state vector and the scattering points in the sample collection is given based on the particle filter, which can detect and estimate the target state and the shape parameters under the clutter environment. Simulation results show that the stability of the algorithm is very good.

  4. Particle tracking in kaon electroproduction with cathode-charge sampling in multi-wire proportional chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achenbach, P.; Ayerbe Gayoso, C.; Bernauer, J. C.; Böhm, R.; Bosnar, D.; Bösz, M.; Debenjak, L.; Distler, M. O.; Esser, A.; Friščić, I.; Gómez Rodríguez de la Paz, M.; Makek, M.; Merkel, H.; Müller, U.; Nungesser, L.; Pochodzalla, J.; Potokar, M.; Sánchez Majos, S.; Schlimme, B. S.; Širca, S.; Weinriefer, M.

    2011-06-01

    Wire chambers are routinely operated as tracking detectors in magnetic spectrometers at high-intensity continuous electron beams. Especially in experiments studying reactions with small cross-sections the reaction yield is limited by the background rate in the chambers. One way to determine the track of a charged particle through a multi-wire proportional chamber (MWPC) is the measurement of the charge distribution induced on its cathodes. In practical applications of this read-out method, the algorithm to relate the measured charge distribution to the avalanche position is an important factor for the achievable position resolution and for the track reconstruction efficiency. An algorithm was developed for operating two large-sized MWPCs in a strong background environment with multiple-particle tracks. Resulting efficiencies were determined as a function of the electron beam current and on the signal amplitudes. Because of the different energy-losses of pions, kaons, and protons in the momentum range of the spectrometer the efficiencies depend also on the particle species.

  5. TRACKER: A particle image tracking (PIT) technique dedicated to nonsmooth motions involved in granular packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, Gaël; Richefeu, Vincent

    2013-06-01

    We present a new approach to assess the 2D motion of rigid bodies in granular materials. Although it was adapted from Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique, the heart of the presented technique relies on specific treatments related to the discrete nature of grain-displacement fields. The code called TRACKER has been developed to process the digital images and measure the in-plane displacement and rotation of each individual grain from one image to another. A remarkable feature is the use of a specific strategy that allows tracking all particles, without losing any of them (which is a typical problem when tracking assemblies of discrete particles over many images). This is achieved by a two-step procedure, where, in case of problematic tracking of a grain, the size of the search zone is increased in an adaptive manner, i.e., taking into account the results of tracking in the neighborhood of the particle. The accuracy of the measured displacements and rotations was tested on both perfect synthetic images and digital photographs of a sheared assembly of grains. The accurate assessment of the grain kinematics opens very interesting perspectives, especially in the study of displacement fluctuations in granular media.

  6. Parallelized Kalman-Filter-Based Reconstruction of Particle Tracks on Many-Core Processors and GPUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerati, Giuseppe; Elmer, Peter; Krutelyov, Slava; Lantz, Steven; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Masciovecchio, Mario; McDermott, Kevin; Riley, Daniel; Tadel, Matevž; Wittich, Peter; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avi

    2017-08-01

    For over a decade now, physical and energy constraints have limited clock speed improvements in commodity microprocessors. Instead, chipmakers have been pushed into producing lower-power, multi-core processors such as Graphical Processing Units (GPU), ARM CPUs, and Intel MICs. Broad-based efforts from manufacturers and developers have been devoted to making these processors user-friendly enough to perform general computations. However, extracting performance from a larger number of cores, as well as specialized vector or SIMD units, requires special care in algorithm design and code optimization. One of the most computationally challenging problems in high-energy particle experiments is finding and fitting the charged-particle tracks during event reconstruction. This is expected to become by far the dominant problem at the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), for example. Today the most common track finding methods are those based on the Kalman filter. Experience with Kalman techniques on real tracking detector systems has shown that they are robust and provide high physics performance. This is why they are currently in use at the LHC, both in the trigger and offine. Previously we reported on the significant parallel speedups that resulted from our investigations to adapt Kalman filters to track fitting and track building on Intel Xeon and Xeon Phi. Here, we discuss our progresses toward the understanding of these processors and the new developments to port the Kalman filter to NVIDIA GPUs.

  7. Parallelized Kalman-Filter-Based Reconstruction of Particle Tracks on Many-Core Processors and GPUs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerati Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For over a decade now, physical and energy constraints have limited clock speed improvements in commodity microprocessors. Instead, chipmakers have been pushed into producing lower-power, multi-core processors such as Graphical Processing Units (GPU, ARM CPUs, and Intel MICs. Broad-based efforts from manufacturers and developers have been devoted to making these processors user-friendly enough to perform general computations. However, extracting performance from a larger number of cores, as well as specialized vector or SIMD units, requires special care in algorithm design and code optimization. One of the most computationally challenging problems in high-energy particle experiments is finding and fitting the charged-particle tracks during event reconstruction. This is expected to become by far the dominant problem at the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC, for example. Today the most common track finding methods are those based on the Kalman filter. Experience with Kalman techniques on real tracking detector systems has shown that they are robust and provide high physics performance. This is why they are currently in use at the LHC, both in the trigger and offine. Previously we reported on the significant parallel speedups that resulted from our investigations to adapt Kalman filters to track fitting and track building on Intel Xeon and Xeon Phi. Here, we discuss our progresses toward the understanding of these processors and the new developments to port the Kalman filter to NVIDIA GPUs.

  8. Enhancement of Particle Track Etch Rate in CR-39 by UV Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Micah; Ume, Rubab; McLean, James; Sangster, Craig; Regan, Sean

    2015-11-01

    The use of CR-39 plastic as a Solid State Nuclear Track Detector is effective for obtaining data in high-energy particle experiments including inertial confinement fusion. To reveal particle tracks after irradiation, CR-39 is chemically etched at elevated temperatures with NaOH, producing signal pits at the nuclear track sites that are measurable by an optical microscope. CR-39 pieces sometimes also exhibit etch-induced noise, either surface features not caused by nuclear particles. When CR-39 is exposed to high intensity UV light after nuclear irradiation with 5.4 MeV alpha particles and before etching, an increase in etch rates and pit diameters is observed, though UV exposure can also increase noise. We have determined that light from a low pressure mercury vapor lamp (predominantly wavelength 253.7 nm) increases etch rates and pit diameters while causing minimal background noise. Heating CR-39 to elevated temperatures (~80 °C) during UV exposure also improves the signal-to-noise ratio for this process. Surprisingly, initial data from CR-39 irradiated with 3.4 MeV protons and exposed to UV show reduced pit diameters. This material is based in part upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  9. Optimal design of radioactive particle tracking experiments for flow mapping in opaque multiphase reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Shantanu; Larachi, Faical; Al-Dahhan, M H; Duduković, M P

    2002-03-01

    In the past decade, radioactive particle tracking techniques have emerged in the field of chemical engineering and have become increasingly popular for non-invasive flow mapping of the hydrodynamics in multiphase reactors. Based on gamma-ray sensitization of an array of scintillation detectors, the Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT) technique measures flow fields by monitoring the actual motion path of a single discrete radioactive flow follower which has the physical properties of the phase whose motion is being followed. A limitation to the accuracy of CARPT lies in the error associated with the reconstruction of the tracer particle position which affects the space-resolution capability of the technique. It is of interest, therefore, to minimize this error by choosing wisely the best hardware and an optimal configuration of CARPT detectors' array. Such choices are currently based on experience, without firm scientific basis. In this paper, through theoretical modeling and simulation, we describe how the accuracy of a radioactive particle tracking setup may be assessed a priori. Through an example of a proposed implementation of CARPT on a gas-solids riser, we demonstrate how this knowledge can be used for choosing the hardware required for the experiment. Finally, we show how the optimal arrangement of detectors can be effected for maximum accuracy for a given amount of monetary investment for the experiment.

  10. Modeling Bimolecular Reactions and Transport in Porous Media Via Particle Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Ding; David Benson; Amir Paster; Diogo Bolster

    2012-01-01

    We use a particle-tracking method to simulate several one-dimensional bimolecular reactive transport experiments. In this numerical method, the reactants are represented by particles: advection and dispersion dominate the flow, and molecular diffusion dictates, in large part, the reactions. The particle/particle reactions are determined by a combination of two probabilities dictated by the physics of transport and energetics of reaction. The first is that reactant particles occupy the same volume over a short time interval. The second is the conditional probability that two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. The first probability is a direct physical representation of the degree of mixing in an advancing displacement front, and as such lacks empirical parameters except for the user-defined number of particles. This number can be determined analytically from concentration autocovariance, if this type of data is available. The simulations compare favorably to two physical experiments. In one, the concentration of product, 1,2-naphthoquinoe-4-aminobenzene (NQAB) from reaction between 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonic acid (NQS) and aniline (AN), was measured at the outflow of a column filled with glass beads at different times. In the other, the concentration distribution of reactants (CuSO_4 and EDTA^{4-}) and products (CuEDTA^{4-}) were quantified by snapshots of transmitted light through a column packed with cryloite sand. The thermodynamic rate coefficient in the latter experiment was 10^7 times greater than the former experiment, making it essentially instantaneous. When compared to the solution of the advection-dispersion-reaction equation (ADRE) with the well-mixed reaction coefficient, the experiments and the particle-tracking simulations showed on the order of 20% to 40% less overall product, which is attributed to poor mixing. The poor mixing also leads to higher product concentrations on the edges of the mixing zones, which the particle

  11. Near-surface snow particle dynamics from particle tracking velocimetry and turbulence measurements during alpine blowing snow storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksamit, Nikolas O.; Pomeroy, John W.

    2016-12-01

    Many blowing snow conceptual and predictive models have been based on simplified two-phase flow dynamics derived from time-averaged observations of bulk flow conditions in blowing snow storms. Measurements from the first outdoor application of particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) of near-surface blowing snow yield new information on mechanisms for blowing snow initiation, entrainment, and rebound, whilst also confirming some findings from wind tunnel observations. Blowing snow particle movement is influenced by complex surface flow dynamics, including saltation development from creep that has not previously been measured for snow. Comparisons with 3-D atmospheric turbulence measurements show that blowing snow particle motion immediately above the snow surface responds strongly to high-frequency turbulent motions. Momentum exchange from wind to the dense near-surface particle-laden flow appears significant and makes an important contribution to blowing snow mass flux and saltation initiation dynamics. The more complete and accurate description of near-surface snow particle motions observable using PTV may prove useful for improving blowing snow model realism and accuracy.

  12. Asynchronized synchronous machines

    CERN Document Server

    Botvinnik, M M

    1964-01-01

    Asynchronized Synchronous Machines focuses on the theoretical research on asynchronized synchronous (AS) machines, which are "hybrids” of synchronous and induction machines that can operate with slip. Topics covered in this book include the initial equations; vector diagram of an AS machine; regulation in cases of deviation from the law of full compensation; parameters of the excitation system; and schematic diagram of an excitation regulator. The possible applications of AS machines and its calculations in certain cases are also discussed. This publication is beneficial for students and indiv

  13. On the dynamics of jellyfish locomotion via 3D particle tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Matthew; Kim, Jin-Tae; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) locomotion is experimentally studied via 3D particle tracking velocimetry. 3D locations of the bell tip are tracked over 1.5 cycles to describe the jellyfish path. Multiple positions of the jellyfish bell margin are initially tracked in 2D from four independent planes and individually projected in 3D based on the jellyfish path and geometrical properties of the setup. A cubic spline interpolation and the exponentially weighted moving average are used to estimate derived quantities, including velocity and acceleration of the jellyfish locomotion. We will discuss distinctive features of the jellyfish 3D motion at various swimming phases, and will provide insight on the 3D contraction and relaxation in terms of the locomotion, the steadiness of the bell margin eccentricity, and local Reynolds number based on the instantaneous mean diameter of the bell.

  14. Beam test of a 12-layer scintillating-fiber charged-particle tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, B.; Howell, B.L.; Koltick, D.; McIlwain, R.L.; Schmitz, C.J.; Shibata, E.I.; Zhou, Z.; Baumbaugh, B.; Ivancic, M.; Jaques, J.; Kehoe, R.; Kelley, M.; Mahoney, M.; Marchant, J.; Ruchti, R.; Wayne, M.; Atac, M.; Baumbaugh, A.; Elias, J.E.; Romero, A.; Chrisman, D.; Park, J.; Adams, M.R.; Chung, M.; Goldberg, H.; Margulies, S.; Solomon, J.; Chaney, R.; Orgeron, J.; Armstrong, T.; Lewis, R.A.; Mitchell, G.S.; Moore, R.S.; Passaneau, J.; Smith, G.A.; Corcoran, M.; Adams, D.; Bird, F.; Fenker, H.; Regan, T.; Thomas, J. (Dept. of Physics, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States) Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States) Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States) Dept. of Physics, Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States) Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States) Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Texas, Richardson, TX (United States) Dept. of Physics, Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States) Dept. of Physics, Rice Univ

    1994-02-01

    A 96-channel, 3-superlayer, scintillating-fiber tracking system has been tested in a 5 GeV/c [pi][sup -] beam. The scintillating fibers were 830 [mu]m in diameter, spaced 850 [mu]m apart, and 4.3 m in length. They were coupled to 6 m long, clear fiber waveguides and finally to visible light photon counters. A spatial resolution of [approx]150 [mu]m for a double-layered ribbon was achieved with this tracking system. This first prototype of a charged-particle tracking system configured for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration at the Superconducting Super Collider is a benchmark in verifying the expected number of photoelectrons from the fibers. (orig.)

  15. Registration of alpha particles in Makrofol-E nuclear track detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rammah, Y.S. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Menoufia University, Shebin El-Koom (Egypt); Abdalla, Ayman M., E-mail: aymanabdalla62@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Najran University, P. O. Box. 11001, Najran (Saudi Arabia); Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Najran University (Saudi Arabia); Ashraf, O., E-mail: osama.ashraf@edu.asu.edu.eg [Physics Department, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11575 (Egypt); Ashry, A.H. [Physics Department, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11575 (Egypt)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Makrofol-E detectors have been irradiated with alpha particles and fission fragments. • Fast detection of alpha particles in Makrofol-E detectors. • Bulk etching rate was calculated from fission track diameters. - Abstract: Fast detection of alpha particles in the range from 1 to 5 MeV in Makrofol-E polycarbonate nuclear track detectors (PCTDs) using a new chemical etchant was investigated. {sup 252}Cf and {sup 241}Am-thin open sources were used for irradiating Makrofol-E detectors with fission fragments and alpha particles in air at normal pressure and temperature (NPT). A chain of experimental work has been carried out using new etchants to register alpha particle in short time in Makrofol-E polycarbonate detectors. The etching efficiency were exhibited a clear dependence on the amount of methanol in the etching solution and etching time. The optimized chemical condition obtained at this stage of development for 200 μm Makrofol-E detectors are (8 ml of 10 N NaOH + 2 ml CH{sub 3}OH) etching solutions at 60 °C for 3 h. In this study; it is possible to observe energy detection windows for Makrofol-E detectors according to applied etching duration. Makrofol-E introduced the characteristic Bragg peak, which indicates the advantages of this detector as alpha spectrometer. Consequently, the suggested new etchant can be developed for heavy ions detection and monitoring radon levels and its daughters.

  16. Use of Particle Tracking to Determine Optimal Release Dates and Locations for Rehabilitated Neonate Sea Turtles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie A. Robson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea turtles found stranded on beaches are often rehabilitated before being released back into the wild. The location and date of release is largely selected on an informal basis, which may not maximize the chance of survival. As oceanic conditions have a large influence on the movements of neonate sea turtles, this study aimed to identify the best locations and months to release rehabilitated sea turtles that would assist in their transport by ocean currents to the habitat and thermal conditions required for their survival. A particle tracking model, forced by ocean surface velocity fields, was used to simulate the dispersal pathways of millions of passively drifting particles released from different locations in Western Australia. The particles represented rehabilitated, neonate turtles requiring oceanic habitats [green (Chelonia mydas, hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata and loggerheads (Caretta caretta] and flatback turtles (Natator depressus which require neritic habitats. The results clearly identified regions and months where ocean currents were more favorable for transport to suitable habitats. Tantabiddi, near Exmouth on the north-west coast, was consistently the best location for release for the oceanic species, with dominant offshore-directed currents and a very narrow continental shelf reducing the time taken for particles to be transported into deep water. In contrast, release locations with more enclosed geography, wide continental shelves, and/or proximity to cooler ocean temperatures were less successful. Our results produced a decision support system for the release of neonate marine turtles in Western Australia and our particle tracking approach has global transferability.

  17. Optimization of microchannel plate multipliers for tracking minimum-ionizing particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oba, K.; Rehak, P.; Potter, D.

    1981-01-01

    The progress in development of special Microchannel Plates for particle tracking is reported. The requirements of (1) high spatial resolution; (2) high density of information; and (3) rate capability were found to be satisfied in a thick Microchannel Plate with a CsI coating operating in a focusing magnetic field. The measurements of the Microchannel Plate detection efficiency, gain and noise are presented for several detectors. The pictures of the passage and interaction of the high energy charged particles inside the detector are shown.

  18. Two dimensional, electronic particle tracking in liquids with a graphene-based magnetic sensor array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Rodrigo F.; Engel, Michael; Steiner, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    The investigation and control of liquid flow at the nanometer scale is a key area of applied research with high relevance to physics, chemistry, and biology. We introduce a method and a device that allows the spatial resolution of liquid flow by integrating an array of graphene-based magnetic (Hall) sensors that is used for tracking the movement of magnetic nanoparticles immersed in a liquid under investigation. With a novel device concept based on standard integration processes and experimentally verified material parameters, we numerically simulate the performance of a single sensor pixel, as well as the whole sensor array, for tracking magnetic nanoparticles having typical properties. The results demonstrate that the device enables (a) the detection of individual nanoparticles in the liquid with high accuracy and (b) the reconstruction of a particle's flow-driven trajectory across the integrated sensor array with sub-pixel precision as a function of time, in what we call the ``Magnetic nanoparticle velocimetry'' technique. Since the method does not rely on optical detection, potential lab-on-chip applications include particle tracking and flow analysis in opaque media at the sub-micron scale.The investigation and control of liquid flow at the nanometer scale is a key area of applied research with high relevance to physics, chemistry, and biology. We introduce a method and a device that allows the spatial resolution of liquid flow by integrating an array of graphene-based magnetic (Hall) sensors that is used for tracking the movement of magnetic nanoparticles immersed in a liquid under investigation. With a novel device concept based on standard integration processes and experimentally verified material parameters, we numerically simulate the performance of a single sensor pixel, as well as the whole sensor array, for tracking magnetic nanoparticles having typical properties. The results demonstrate that the device enables (a) the detection of individual

  19. Particle Data Management Software for 3DParticle Tracking Velocimetry and Related Applications – The Flowtracks Package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef Meller

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV community employs several formats of particle information such as position and velocity as function of time, i.e. trajectory data, as a result of diverging needs unmet by existing formats, and a number of different, mostly home-grown, codes for handling the data. Flowtracks is a Python package that provides a single code base for accessing different formats as a database, i.e. storing data and programmatically manipulating them using format-agnostic data structures. Furthermore, it offers an HDF5-based format that is fast and extensible, obviating the need for other formats. The package may be obtained from https://github.com/OpenPTV/postptv and used as-is by many fluid-dynamics labs, or with minor extensions adhering to a common interface, by researchers from other fields, such as biology and population tracking.

  20. Application of nuclear particle tracks: A scanning x-ray microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, P.J.

    1991-09-30

    The scanning x-ray microscope (SXM) is a short-wavelength analog of a near-field optical-scanning microscope, promising spatial resolution of {approximately}100{angstrom} up to {approximately}5 keV x-ray energy. A portion of a synchrotron x-ray beam streams through an etched nuclear particle track in an opaque membrane and impinges on an object within the narrow stream. Scattered or transmitted x-rays are detected with a photon counter. The SXM is feasible because a useful number of synchrotron x-rays, even from a bend magnet, will stream through a small diameter pore. The properties and limitations of the SXM are discussed together with other submicroscopic applications of nuclear particle tracks. 14 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Modified iterated extended Kalman particle filter for single satellite passive tracking

    OpenAIRE

    WU, Panlong; KONG, Jianshou; BO, Yuming

    2013-01-01

    Single satellite-to-satellite passive tracking techniques have great significance in space surveillance systems. A new passive modified iterated extended Kalman particle filter (MIEKPF) using bearings-only measurements in the Earth-Centered Inertial Coordinate System is proposed. The modified iterated extended Kalman filter (MIEKF), with a new maximum likelihood iteration termination criterion, is used to generate the proposal distribution of the MIEKPF. Moreover, a new measurement u...

  2. Multiple object tracking in molecular bioimaging by Rao-Blackwellized marginal particle filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smal, I; Meijering, E; Draegestein, K; Galjart, N; Grigoriev, I; Akhmanova, A; van Royen, M E; Houtsmuller, A B; Niessen, W

    2008-12-01

    Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy imaging has rapidly evolved in the past decade and has opened new avenues for studying intracellular processes in vivo. Such studies generate vast amounts of noisy image data that cannot be analyzed efficiently and reliably by means of manual processing. Many popular tracking techniques exist but often fail to yield satisfactory results in the case of high object densities, high noise levels, and complex motion patterns. Probabilistic tracking algorithms, based on Bayesian estimation, have recently been shown to offer several improvements over classical approaches, by better integration of spatial and temporal information, and the possibility to more effectively incorporate prior knowledge about object dynamics and image formation. In this paper, we extend our previous work in this area and propose an improved, fully automated particle filtering algorithm for the tracking of many subresolution objects in fluorescence microscopy image sequences. It involves a new track management procedure and allows the use of multiple dynamics models. The accuracy and reliability of the algorithm are further improved by applying marginalization concepts. Experiments on synthetic as well as real image data from three different biological applications clearly demonstrate the superiority of the algorithm compared to previous particle filtering solutions.

  3. Nonlinear Vibration Signal Tracking of Large Offshore Bridge Stayed Cable Based on Particle Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Qingwei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The stayed cables are key stress components of large offshore bridge. The fault detection of stayed cable is very important for safe of large offshore bridge. A particle filter model and algorithm of nonlinear vibration signal are used in this paper. Firstly, the particle filter model of stayed cable of large offshore bridge is created. Nonlinear dynamic model of the stayed-cable and beam coupling system is dispersed in temporal dimension by using the finite difference method. The discrete nonlinear vibration equations of any cable element are worked out. Secondly, a state equation of particle filter is fitted by least square algorithm from the discrete nonlinear vibration equations. So the particle filter algorithm can use the accurate state equations. Finally, the particle filter algorithm is used to filter the vibration signal of bridge stayed cable. According to the particle filter, the de-noised vibration signal can be tracked and be predicted for a short time accurately. Many experiments are done at some actual bridges. The simulation experiments and the actual experiments on the bridge stayed cables are all indicating that the particle filter algorithm in this paper has good performance and works stably.

  4. Direct Comparison of Particle-Tracking and Sectional Approaches for Shock Driven Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A. Schwer

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Dispersed-phase flows are important for a wide variety of problems, and several numerical approaches for the solution of dispersed-phase flows have been proposed and implemented in the past. The present research implements two popular approaches to dispersed-phase flows: the Lagrangian particle-tracking approach and the Eulerian sectional approach. A direct comparison between the two methods is made for a range of shock driven seeded flow-fields. First, different drag models are investigated using the particle-tracking method for a range of conditions, and then direct comparisons between the two methods are made for shock speed attenuation and shock-wave profiles. In addition, resolution requirements are investigated to determine the number of sections and the number of particles required to obtain good agreement between the methods, and then two-dimensional simulations are done to investigate the effect of each method on more complicated flow-fields. Results showed both methods can be used to obtain very similar results, although each method has benefits and drawbacks. The glass particles were then replaced with water droplets, and the effect of vaporization and droplet breakup were then investigated. Although vaporization was well represented with the sectional approach, different droplet breakup models had to be implemented for the different approaches, with some significant differences in the resultant droplet distributions. The reason for this is that breakup models require a droplet deformation time before breaking up, and thus a droplet history. This droplet history is difficult to implement in sectional approaches (and Eulerian methods in general, and so the breakup model must be changed. Similar profiles could be reproduced with the sectional method, but significant differences persisted. The results did show, however, that the Eulerian sectional approach is a viable method for computing complex, multi-dimensional flow-fields and can

  5. Particle Filter with Integrated Voice Activity Detection for Acoustic Source Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehmann Eric A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In noisy and reverberant environments, the problem of acoustic source localisation and tracking (ASLT using an array of microphones presents a number of challenging difficulties. One of the main issues when considering real-world situations involving human speakers is the temporally discontinuous nature of speech signals: the presence of silence gaps in the speech can easily misguide the tracking algorithm, even in practical environments with low to moderate noise and reverberation levels. A natural extension of currently available sound source tracking algorithms is the integration of a voice activity detection (VAD scheme. We describe a new ASLT algorithm based on a particle filtering (PF approach, where VAD measurements are fused within the statistical framework of the PF implementation. Tracking accuracy results for the proposed method is presented on the basis of synthetic audio samples generated with the image method, whereas performance results obtained with a real-time implementation of the algorithm, and using real audio data recorded in a reverberant room, are published elsewhere. Compared to a previously proposed PF algorithm, the experimental results demonstrate the improved robustness of the method described in this work when tracking sources emitting real-world speech signals, which typically involve significant silence gaps between utterances.

  6. Asynchronous Multiparty Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Geisler, Martin; Krøigaard, Mikkel

    2009-01-01

    less than n/3 players. We also present a software framework for implementation of asynchronous protocols called VIFF (Virtual Ideal Functionality Framework), which allows automatic parallelization of primitive operations such as secure multiplications, without having to resort to complicated...

  7. Asynchronous P300 BCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panicker, Rajesh; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan; Sun, Ying

    2010-01-01

    An asynchronous hybrid brain-computer interface (BCI) system combining the P300 and steady-state visually evoked potentials (SSVEP) paradigms is introduced. A P300 base system is used for information transfer, and is augmented to include SSVEP for control state detection. The proposed system has...

  8. Tracking down the links between charged particles and biological response: A UK perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Mark A.

    2013-07-01

    The UK has a long history of radiobiology research into charged particles, with interest likely to expand in the coming years following the recent government announcement of £250 million to build two proton beam therapy facilities in the UK. A brief overview of research and facilities past and present with respect to radiation protection and oncology along with biological consequences and underlying mechanisms will be presented and discussed. Increased knowledge of the mechanisms underpinning the radiation action on biological systems is important in understanding, not only the risks associated with exposure, but also in optimising radiotherapy treatment of cancer. Ionizing radiation is always in the form of structure tracks which are a unique characteristic of ionizing radiation alone producing damage grossly different and far more biologically effective than endogenous damage. The track structure is the prime determinant of biological response to DNA, with charged particles of increasing LET leading to an increase in the frequency and complexity of clustered DNA damage. High-LET particles will also produce non-homogeneous dose distribution through a cell nucleus resulting in correlated DNA breaks along the path of the particle and an increase in the probability of complex chromosomal rearrangements. However it is now well established that there is variety of phenomena that do not conform to the conventional paradigm of targeted radiobiology, but there is insufficient evidence to assess the implications of these non-targeted effects for radiotherapy or relevance to risk for human health.

  9. Determination of coefficient of restitution for sediment saltation using high-speed 3D particle tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilusz, A. W.; Liu, X.; Ni, R.

    2016-12-01

    In sediment transport, particle collision, in conjunction with the associated momentum and energy loss, is a significant factor in determining particle trajectory. A portion of the momentum and energy lost can be attributed to viscous damping. Viscous damping plays a significant role in low momentum impacts where there is no significant particle deformation upon collision. Previous research has indicated that, for certain particle collisions, the particle motion can almost be completely dampened by this process. Viscous loss can be quantified by the coefficient of restitution. In numerical simulations, this coefficient has been applied to determine the downstream rebound velocity, with lower values resulting in greater momentum loss and higher values resulting in less momentum loss. Previous attempts to determine the coefficient of restitution have resulted in a wide range of values that are inconsistent with each other. One reason is that previous works have focused on a single or limited range of impact scenarios. The second reason is that many previous research studies were limited to 2-dimensional analysis methods which provided a less accurate picture at the moment of impact. This research uses modern 3-dimensional particle tracking technique and a wide range of impact scenarios to redefine the coefficient of restitution for low momentum impacts. The effect of video frame rate is also analyzed to capture the moment of impact.

  10. A better understanding of biomass co-firing by developing an advanced non-spherical particle tracking model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2004-01-01

    . To better understand biomass co-firing and therefore improve the design for co-firing biomass in wall-fired burners, the most commonly used spherical particle shape assumption is not used here, which may deviate a lot from reality for big biomass particles. A sphere gives a minimum in terms of the surface......-gradient force. Since the drag and lift forces are both shape factor- and orientation-dependent, coupled particle rotation equations are resolved to update particle orientation. In the reaction of biomass particles, the actual particle surface area available and the average oxygen mass flux at particle surface......-area-to-volume ratio and thus experiences a totally different motion and reaction as a non-spherical particle. Therefore, an advanced non-spherical particle-tracking model is developed to calculate the motion and reaction of nonspherical biomass particles. The biomass particles are assumed as solid or hollow cylinders...

  11. A novel technique for particle tracking in cold 2-dimensional fluidized beds - simulating fuel dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Pallares; Filip Johnsson [Chalmers University of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Department of Energy and Environment, Energy Conversion

    2006-04-15

    This paper presents a novel technique for particle tracking in 2-dimensional fluidized beds operated under ambient conditions. The method is applied to study the mixing mechanisms of fuel particles in fluidized beds and is based on tracking a phosphorescent tracer particle by means of video recording with subsequent digital image analysis. From this, concentration, velocity and dispersion fields of the tracer particle can be obtained with high accuracy. Although the method is restricted to 2-dimensional, it can be applied under flow conditions qualitatively resembling a fluidized-bed combustor. Thus, the experiments cover ranges of bed heights, gas velocities and fuel-to-bed material density and size ratios typical for fluidized-bed combustors. Also, several fluidization regimes (bubbling, turbulent, circulating and pneumatic) are included in the runs. A pattern found in all runs is that the mixing pattern of the tracer (fuel) solids is structured in horizontally aligned vortexes induced by the bubble flow. The main bubble paths always give a low concentration of tracer solids and with the tracer moving upwards, while the downflow of tracer particles in the dense bottom bed is found to take place in zones with low bubble density and at the sidewalls. The amount of bed material (bed height) has a strong influence on the bottom bed dynamics (development and coalescence of bubbles) and, consequently, on the solids mixing process. Local dispersion coefficients reach maximum values around the locations of bubble eruptions, while, in the presence of a dense bottom bed, an increase in fluidization velocity or amount of bed material enhances dispersion. Dispersion is found to be larger in the vertical than in the horizontal direction, confirming the critical character of lateral fuel dispersion in fluidized-bed combustors of large cross section.

  12. Evaluation of a Lagrangian Soot Tracking Method for the prediction of primary soot particle size under engine-like conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai Ong, Jiun; Pang, Kar Mun; Walther, Jens Honore

    2018-01-01

    surface ageing and oxidation rates on the primary soot particle size distribution. With the use of surface ageing, the predicted maximum primary soot particle sizes are closer to the experimentally measured maximum primary soot sizes. Also, the associated particle size distribution shows a lognormal shape......This paper reports the implementation and evaluation of a Lagrangian soot tracking (LST) method for the modeling of soot in diesel engines. The LST model employed here has the tracking capability of a Lagrangian method and the ability to predict primary soot particle sizing. The Moss-Brookes soot...... particles when the mass of incipient soot exceeds a designated threshold value. Their trajectories are then computed using the particle momentum equation. The change of primary soot particle size is dependent on the modified Lagrangian surface growth and soot oxidation models. Performance of the LST model...

  13. Direction Tracking of Multiple Moving Targets Using Quantum Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Hongyuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on weighted signal covariance (WSC matrix and maximum likelihood (ML estimation, a directionof-arrival (DOA estimation method of multiple moving targets is designed and named as WSC-ML in the presence of impulse noise. In order to overcome the shortcoming of the multidimensional search cost of maximum likelihood estimation, a novel continuous quantum particle swarm optimization (QPSO is proposed for this continuous optimization problem. And a tracking method of multiple moving targets in impulsive noise environment is proposed and named as QPSO-WSC-ML. Later, we make use of rank-one updating to update the weighted signal covariance matrix of WSC-ML. Simulation results illustrate the proposed QPSO-WSC-ML method is efficient and robust for the direction tracking of multiple moving targets in the presence of impulse noise.

  14. Dual-Channel Particle Filter Based Track-Before-Detect for Monopulse Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Cai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A particle filter based track-before-detect (PF-TBD algorithm is proposed for the monopulse high pulse repetition frequency (PRF pulse Doppler radar. The actual measurement model is adopted, in which the range is highly ambiguous and the sum and difference channels exist in parallel. A quantization method is used to approximate the point spread function to reduce the computation load. The detection decisions of the PF-TBD are fed to a binary integrator to further improve the detection performance. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can detect and track the low SNR target efficiently. The detection performance is improved significantly for both the single frame and the multiframe detection compared with the classical detector. A performance comparison with the PF-TBD using sum channel only is also supplied.

  15. Particle tracking single protein-functionalized quantum dot diffusion and binding at silica surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rife, Jack C; Long, James P; Wilkinson, John; Whitman, Lloyd J

    2009-04-09

    We evaluate commercial QD585 and QD605 streptavidin-functionalized quantum dots (QDs) for single-particle tracking microscopy at surfaces using total internal reflectance fluorescence and measure single QD diffusion and nonspecific binding at silica surfaces in static and flow conditions. The QD diffusion coefficient on smooth, near-ideal, highly hydroxylated silica surfaces is near bulk-solution diffusivity, as expected for repulsive surfaces, but many QD trajectories on rougher, less-than-ideal surfaces or regions display transient adsorptions. We attribute the binding to defect sites or adsorbates, possibly in conjunction with protein conformation changes, and estimate binding energies from the transient adsorption lifetimes. We also assess QD parameters relevant to tracking, including hydrodynamic radius, charge state, signal levels, blinking reduction with reducing solutions, and photoinduced blueing and bleaching.

  16. Rotational Kinematics Model Based Adaptive Particle Filter for Robust Human Tracking in Thermal Omnidirectional Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazhe Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel surveillance system named thermal omnidirectional vision (TOV system which can work in total darkness with a wild field of view. Different to the conventional thermal vision sensor, the proposed vision system exhibits serious nonlinear distortion due to the effect of the quadratic mirror. To effectively model the inherent distortion of omnidirectional vision, an equivalent sphere projection is employed to adaptively calculate parameterized distorted neighborhood of an object in the image plane. With the equivalent projection based adaptive neighborhood calculation, a distortion-invariant gradient coding feature is proposed for thermal catadioptric vision. For robust tracking purpose, a rotational kinematic modeled adaptive particle filter is proposed based on the characteristic of omnidirectional vision, which can handle multiple movements effectively, including the rapid motions. Finally, the experiments are given to verify the performance of the proposed algorithm for human tracking in TOV system.

  17. Multiparty Asynchronous Session Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honda, Kohei; Yoshida, Nobuko; Carbone, Marco

    2016-01-01

    . This work extends the foregoing theories of binary session types to multiparty, asynchronous sessions, which often arise in practical communication-centered applications. Presented as a typed calculus for mobile processes, the theory introduces a new notion of types in which interactions involving multiple......Communication is a central elements in software development. As a potential typed foundation for structured communication-centered programming, session types have been studied over the past decade for a wide range of process calculi and programming languages, focusing on binary (two-party) sessions...... peers are directly abstracted as a global scenario. Global types retain the friendly type syntax of binary session types while specifying dependencies and capturing complex causal chains of multiparty asynchronous interactions. A global type plays the role of a shared agreement among communication peers...

  18. Mineralogy of Stardust Track 112 Particle: Relation to Amoeboid Olivine Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, M.; Fagan, T.; Mikouchi, T.; Miyamoto, M.; Zolensky, M.; Ohsumi, K.

    2012-01-01

    The successful analysis of comet 81P/Wild 2 particles returned by the Stardust mission has revealed that the Wild 2 dust contains abundant silicate grains that are much larger than interstellar grains and appear to have formed in the inner regions of the solar nebula [1]. Wild 2 particles include minerals which are isotopically and mineralogically similar to CAIs [e.g., 2, 3] and chondrules [e.g., 4] in chondrites. In addition, particles similar to amoeboid olivine aggregates (AOAs) also have been discovered [5, 6,7]. C2067,2,112,1 is a terminal particle recovered from track #112 (T112). Nakamura-Messenger et al. [7] showed that the forsterite grain in T112 has O-16 enrichment of approximately 40 0/00 (vs. SMOW) and possibly formed together with AOAs. In this study, we have examined the mineralogy of the T112 particle and compared the possible relationships between T112 and AOAs in primitive meteorites.

  19. A Framework for Sediment Particle Tracking via Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakiris, Achilleas; Papanicolaou, Thanos; Abban, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The study of sedimentary and morphodynamic processes in riverine environments has recently been shifting from the traditional Eulerian, static perspective to a Lagrangian perspective, which considers the movement characteristics of the individual transported particles, such as their travel and resting distance and time. The Lagrangian framework, in turn allows to better study processes such as bedload particle diffusion, erosion and deposition within a river reach, to more accurately predict bedload fluxes especially through the use of stochastic Discrete Particle models. A technology that goes hand-in-hand with this Lagrangian perspective is Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID), which has been recently applied for tracking the movement of tagged sediment particles within the river continuum. RFID allows the wireless, bidirectional exchange of information between a base station, known as the reader, with a typically large number of transponders (or tags) via an (excitation) antenna. RFID allows essentially the unique, wireless detection and identification of a transponder over a distance. The goal of this study is to further enhance the utility of RFID in riverine applications by developing a framework that allows extracting the 3D location of RFID tagged sediment particles in nearly real-time. To address the goal of this coupled theoretical and experimental study, a semi-theoretical approach based on antenna inductive coupling was combined with experimental measurements for developing a relationship that provides an estimate of the distance between a tagged particle and the antenna using the Return Signal Strength Indication (RSSI). The RSSI quantifies the magnetic energy transmitted from the transponder to the antenna. The RFID system used in this study was a passive, Low-Frequency (LF) system, which ensured that the LF radio waves could penetrate through the river bed material. The RSSI of the signal transmitted from each transponder was measured with an

  20. Proceedings of the 3. conference: Particle track membranes and their applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The materials of the 3rd conference on Particle Track Membranes and Theirs Applications present actual state of art in the topic. The leading world institutions have presented their works on the technology of PTM production by interaction of ion beams with polymeric foils. The broad spectrum of PTM membranes have been shown, their properties have been described and their applicability discussed. A number of possible applications of PTM and also already realized in industry, medicine, biology and physical investigations have been presented. 29 lectures have been made in the course of conference.

  1. Development and applications of single particle orientation and rotational tracking in dynamic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kuangcai [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-02-19

    The goal of this study is to help with future data analysis and experiment designs in rotational dynamics research using DIC-based SPORT technique. Most of the current studies using DIC-based SPORT techniques are technical demonstrations. Understanding the mechanisms behind the observed rotational behaviors of the imaging probes should be the focus of the future SPORT studies. More efforts are still needed in the development of new imaging probes, particle tracking methods, instrumentations, and advanced data analysis methods to further extend the potential of DIC-based SPORT technique.

  2. Tracking reactive pollutants in large groundwater systems by particle-based simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbacher, T.; Sun, Y.; He, W.; Jang, E.; Delfs, J.; Shao, H.; Park, C.; Kolditz, O.

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide, great amounts of human and financial resources are being invested to protect and secure clean water resources. Especially in arid and semi-arid regions civilization depends on the availability of freshwater from the underlying aquifer systems where water quality and quantity are often dramatically deteriorating. Main reasons for the mitigation of water quality are extensive fertilizer use in agriculture and waste water from cities and various industries. It may be assumed that climate and demographic changes will add further stress to this situation in the future. One way to assess water quality is to model the coupled groundwater and chemical system, e.g.to assess the impact of possible contaminant precipitation, absorption and migration in subsurface media. Currently, simulating such scenarios at large scales is a challenging task due to the extreme computational load, numerical stability issues, scale-dependencies and spatially and temporally infrequently distributed or missing data, which can lead e.g. to in appropriate model simplifications and additionally uncertainties in the results. The simulation of advective-dispersive mass transport is usually solved by standard finite differences, finite element or finite volume methods. Particle tracking is an alternative method and commonly used e.g. to delineate contaminant travel times, with the advantage of being numerically more stable and computational less expensive. Since particle tracking is used to evaluate groundwater residence times, it seems natural and straightforward to include reactive processes to track geochemical changes as well. The main focus of the study is the evaluation of reactive transport processes at large scales. Therefore, a number of new methods have been developed and implemented into the OpenGeoSys project, which is a scientific, FEM-based, open source code for numerical simulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical processes in porous and fractured media (www

  3. Brownian motion studies of viscoelastic colloidal gels by rotational single particle tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengning Liang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal gels have unique properties due to a complex microstructure which forms into an extended network. Although the bulk properties of colloidal gels have been studied, there has been difficulty correlating those properties with individual colloidal dynamics on the microscale due to the very high viscosity and elasticity of the material. We utilize rotational X-ray tracking (RXT to investigate the rotational motion of component crystalline colloidal particles in a colloidal gel of alumina and decanoic acid. Our investigation has determined that the high elasticity of the bulk is echoed by a high elasticity experienced by individual colloidal particles themselves but also finds an unexpected high degree of rotational diffusion, indicating a large degree of freedom in the rotational motion of individual colloids even within a tightly bound system.

  4. Guidelines for the fitting of anomalous diffusion mean square displacement graphs from single particle tracking experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldad Kepten

    Full Text Available Single particle tracking is an essential tool in the study of complex systems and biophysics and it is commonly analyzed by the time-averaged mean square displacement (MSD of the diffusive trajectories. However, past work has shown that MSDs are susceptible to significant errors and biases, preventing the comparison and assessment of experimental studies. Here, we attempt to extract practical guidelines for the estimation of anomalous time averaged MSDs through the simulation of multiple scenarios with fractional Brownian motion as a representative of a large class of fractional ergodic processes. We extract the precision and accuracy of the fitted MSD for various anomalous exponents and measurement errors with respect to measurement length and maximum time lags. Based on the calculated precision maps, we present guidelines to improve accuracy in single particle studies. Importantly, we find that in some experimental conditions, the time averaged MSD should not be used as an estimator.

  5. Cross-validation of 3D particle tracking velocimetry for the study of granular flows down rotating chutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shirsath, S.S.; Padding, J.T; Clercx, H.J.H.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) is a promising technique to study the behavior of granular flows. The aim of this paper is to cross-validate 3D-PTV against independent or more established techniques, such as particle image velocimetry (PIV), electronic ultrasonic sensor

  6. Application of 3D hydrodynamic and particle tracking models for better environmental management of finfish culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Navas, Juan; Telfer, Trevor C.; Ross, Lindsay G.

    2011-04-01

    Hydrographic conditions, and particularly current speeds, have a strong influence on the management of fish cage culture. These hydrodynamic conditions can be used to predict particle movement within the water column and the results used to optimise environmental conditions for effective site selection, setting of environmental quality standards, waste dispersion, and potential disease transfer. To this end, a 3D hydrodynamic model, MOHID, has been coupled to a particle tracking model to study the effects of mean current speed, quiescent water periods and bulk water circulation in Mulroy Bay, Co. Donegal Ireland, an Irish fjard (shallow fjordic system) important to the aquaculture industry. A Lagangrian method simulated the instantaneous release of "particles" emulating discharge from finfish cages to show the behaviour of waste in terms of water circulation and water exchange. The 3D spatial models were used to identify areas of mixed and stratified water using a version of the Simpson-Hunter criteria, and to use this in conjunction with models of current flow for appropriate site selection for salmon aquaculture. The modelled outcomes for stratification were in good agreement with the direct measurements of water column stratification based on observed density profiles. Calculations of the Simpson-Hunter tidal parameter indicated that most of Mulroy Bay was potentially stratified with a well mixed region over the shallow channels where the water is faster flowing. The fjard was characterised by areas of both very low and high mean current speeds, with some areas having long periods of quiescent water. The residual current and the particle tracking animations created through the models revealed an anticlockwise eddy that may influence waste dispersion and potential for disease transfer, among salmon cages and which ensures that the retention time of waste substances from cages is extended. The hydrodynamic model results were incorporated into the ArcView TM GIS

  7. Stardust: An overview of the tracks in the aerogel (calibration, classification and particle size distribution)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, M. J.; Fairey, S. J.; Hörz, F.; Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Kearsley, A. T.; Brownlee, D. E.; See, T. H.; Westphal, A.; Green, S. F.; Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.

    2007-08-01

    The NASA Stardust mission (1) to comet P/Wild-2 returned to Earth in January 2006 carrying a cargo of dust captured in aerogel and residue rich craters in aluminium foils (2). Aerogel is a low density, highly porous material (3, 4). The aerogel that was carried by Stardust in the cometary dust collector trays was a SiO2 aerogel, arranged in blocks 4 cm x 2 cm (front face) and 3 cm deep, with density which varied smoothly from 5 mg/cc at the front surface to 50 mg/cc at the rear surface (5). A first look at the whole cometary dust tray at NASA showed that there were many impact features in the aerogel. During the Preliminary Examination period about 15% of the aerogel blocks were removed and studied in detail. The tracks observed in these blocks were classified into three groups: Type A were long relatively narrow tracks of "carrot shape", Type B tracks were again fairly long but had a large bulbous region at the top and appear like the bowl and stem of a flute champagne glass, Type C were purely bulbous tracks with no stem emerging beneath them. Data on the sizes and relative populations of these tracks will be given (also see (6)) along with a discussion of their implications for impactor composition. Laboratory calibrations of the impacts in aerogel have been carried out using glass beads and these permit an estimate of the size of the impactor based on the measured track properties (6). When applied to the tracks measured in the Stardust aerogel, a cumulative particle size distribution was obtained (7) which will be discussed. References (1) Brownlee D.E. et al., J. Geophys. Res. 108, E10, 8111, 2003. (2) Brownlee D.E. et al., Science 314, 1711 - 1716. 2006. (3) Kistler S.S., Nature 127, 741, 1931. (4) Burchell M.J. et al., Ann. Rev. Earth. Planet. Sci. 34, 385 - 418, 2006. (5) Tsou P. et al., J. Geophys. Res. 108(E10), 8113, 2003. (6) Burchell et al., submitted to MAPS, 2006. (7) Hörz F. et al., Science 314, 1716 - 1719, 2006.

  8. A multi-time-step noise reduction method for measuring velocity statistics from particle tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machicoane, Nathanaël; López-Caballero, Miguel; Bourgoin, Mickael; Aliseda, Alberto; Volk, Romain

    2017-10-01

    We present a method to improve the accuracy of velocity measurements for fluid flow or particles immersed in it, based on a multi-time-step approach that allows for cancellation of noise in the velocity measurements. Improved velocity statistics, a critical element in turbulent flow measurements, can be computed from the combination of the velocity moments computed using standard particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) or particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques for data sets that have been collected over different values of time intervals between images. This method produces Eulerian velocity fields and Lagrangian velocity statistics with much lower noise levels compared to standard PIV or PTV measurements, without the need of filtering and/or windowing. Particle displacement between two frames is computed for multiple different time-step values between frames in a canonical experiment of homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The second order velocity structure function of the flow is computed with the new method and compared to results from traditional measurement techniques in the literature. Increased accuracy is also demonstrated by comparing the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy measured from this function against previously validated measurements.

  9. Validation of a particle tracking analysis method for the size determination of nano- and microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestens, Vikram; Bozatzidis, Vassili; De Temmerman, Pieter-Jan; Ramaye, Yannic; Roebben, Gert

    2017-08-01

    Particle tracking analysis (PTA) is an emerging technique suitable for size analysis of particles with external dimensions in the nano- and sub-micrometre scale range. Only limited attempts have so far been made to investigate and quantify the performance of the PTA method for particle size analysis. This article presents the results of a validation study during which selected colloidal silica and polystyrene latex reference materials with particle sizes in the range of 20 nm to 200 nm were analysed with NS500 and LM10-HSBF NanoSight instruments and video analysis software NTA 2.3 and NTA 3.0. Key performance characteristics such as working range, linearity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, sensitivity, robustness, precision and trueness were examined according to recommendations proposed by EURACHEM. A model for measurement uncertainty estimation following the principles described in ISO/IEC Guide 98-3 was used for quantifying random and systematic variations. For nominal 50 nm and 100 nm polystyrene and a nominal 80 nm silica reference materials, the relative expanded measurement uncertainties for the three measurands of interest, being the mode, median and arithmetic mean of the number-weighted particle size distribution, varied from about 10% to 12%. For the nominal 50 nm polystyrene material, the relative expanded uncertainty of the arithmetic mean of the particle size distributions increased up to 18% which was due to the presence of agglomerates. Data analysis was performed with software NTA 2.3 and NTA 3.0. The latter showed to be superior in terms of sensitivity and resolution.

  10. Hybrid dynamic radioactive particle tracking (RPT) calibration technique for multiphase flow systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khane, Vaibhav; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna H.

    2017-04-01

    The radioactive particle tracking (RPT) technique has been utilized to measure three-dimensional hydrodynamic parameters for multiphase flow systems. An analytical solution to the inverse problem of the RPT technique, i.e. finding the instantaneous tracer positions based upon instantaneous counts received in the detectors, is not possible. Therefore, a calibration to obtain a counts-distance map is needed. There are major shortcomings in the conventional RPT calibration method due to which it has limited applicability in practical applications. In this work, the design and development of a novel dynamic RPT calibration technique are carried out to overcome the shortcomings of the conventional RPT calibration method. The dynamic RPT calibration technique has been implemented around a test reactor with 1foot in diameter and 1 foot in height using Cobalt-60 as an isotopes tracer particle. Two sets of experiments have been carried out to test the capability of novel dynamic RPT calibration. In the first set of experiments, a manual calibration apparatus has been used to hold a tracer particle at known static locations. In the second set of experiments, the tracer particle was moved vertically downwards along a straight line path in a controlled manner. The obtained reconstruction results about the tracer particle position were compared with the actual known position and the reconstruction errors were estimated. The obtained results revealed that the dynamic RPT calibration technique is capable of identifying tracer particle positions with a reconstruction error between 1 to 5.9 mm for the conditions studied which could be improved depending on various factors outlined here.

  11. Parallelized Kalman-Filter-Based Reconstruction of Particle Tracks on Many-Core Architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerati, Giuseppe [Fermilab; Elmer, Peter [Princeton U.; Krutelyov, Slava [UC, San Diego; Lantz, Steven [Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Lefebvre, Matthieu [Princeton U.; Masciovecchio, Mario [UC, San Diego; McDermott, Kevin [Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Riley, Daniel [Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Tadel, Matevž [UC, San Diego; Wittich, Peter [Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Würthwein, Frank [UC, San Diego; Yagil, Avi [UC, San Diego

    2017-11-16

    Faced with physical and energy density limitations on clock speed, contemporary microprocessor designers have increasingly turned to on-chip parallelism for performance gains. Examples include the Intel Xeon Phi, GPGPUs, and similar technologies. Algorithms should accordingly be designed with ample amounts of fine-grained parallelism if they are to realize the full performance of the hardware. This requirement can be challenging for algorithms that are naturally expressed as a sequence of small-matrix operations, such as the Kalman filter methods widely in use in high-energy physics experiments. In the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), for example, one of the dominant computational problems is expected to be finding and fitting charged-particle tracks during event reconstruction; today, the most common track-finding methods are those based on the Kalman filter. Experience at the LHC, both in the trigger and offline, has shown that these methods are robust and provide high physics performance. Previously we reported the significant parallel speedups that resulted from our efforts to adapt Kalman-filter-based tracking to many-core architectures such as Intel Xeon Phi. Here we report on how effectively those techniques can be applied to more realistic detector configurations and event complexity.

  12. Wavefronts matching: a novel paradigm for three-dimensional holographic particle tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memmolo, Pasquale; Miccio, Lisa; Merola, Francesco; Netti, Paolo A.; Ferraro, Pietro

    2015-05-01

    Digital Holography (DH) in microscopy allows to retrieve in an accurate way the spatial coordinates of multiple moving particles, performing 3D tracking of the sample in the entire field of view. In particular, a posteriori quantitative multifocus phase-contrast imaging, suitable for 3D tracking of micro-objects, is one of the main features of the holographic approach. However, classical methods need to decouple amplitude and phase contributions of the reconstructed complex wavefronts to calculate target positions in 3D, due to the fact that the lateral displacements can be calculated only after refocusing step. In order to overcome this limitation, recently, a novel method of the simultaneous calculation of both axial and lateral coordinates of moving particles has been proposed. This is based on the novel concept of wavefronts matching, i.e. the 3D positions of micro-object, moving in 3D volume, are obtained by aligning wo subsequent holographic complex reconstructions, calculated at the same distance. We test this approach in different experimental conditions in order to highlight its effectiveness in bio-microfluidic applications.

  13. Principles and biophysical applications of single particle super-localization and rotational tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Yan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    While conventional Single Particle Tracking (SPT) techniques acquire 2D or 3D trajectories of particle probes, we have developed Single Particle Orientation and Rotational Tracking (SPORT) techniques to extract orientation and rotational information. Combined with DIC microscopy, the SPORT technique has been applied in biophysical studies, including membrane diffusion and intracellular transport. The rotational dynamics of nanoparticle vectors on live cell membranes was recorded and its influence on the fate of these nanoparticle vectors was elucidated. The rotational motions of gold nanorods with various surface modifiers were tracked continuously at a temporal resolution of 5 ms under a DIC microscope. We found that the rotational behaviors of gold nanorod vectors are strongly related to their surface charge, specific surface functional groups, and the availability of receptors on cell membranes. The study of rotational Brownian motion of nanoparticles on cell membranes will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of drug delivery and provide guidance in designing surface modification strategies for drug delivery vectors under various circumstances. To characterize the rotation mode of surface functionalized gold nanorods on cell membranes, the SPORT technique is combined with the correlation analysis of the bright and dark DIC intensities. The unique capabilities of visualizing and understanding rotational motions of functionalized nanoparticles on live cell membranes allow us to correlate rotational and translational dynamics in unprecedented detail and provide new insights for complex membrane processes, including electrostatic interactions, ligand-receptor binding, and lateral (confined and hopping) diffusion of membrane receptors. Surface-functionalized nanoparticles interact with the membrane in fundamentally different ways and exhibit distinct rotational modes. The early events of particle-membrane approach and attachment are directly visualized

  14. Principles and biophysical applications of single particle super-localization and rotational tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yan

    While conventional Single Particle Tracking (SPT) techniques acquire 2D or 3D trajectories of particle probes, we have developed Single Particle Orientation and Rotational Tracking (SPORT) techniques to extract orientation and rotational information. Combined with DIC microscopy, the SPORT technique has been applied in biophysical studies, including membrane diffusion and intracellular transport. The rotational dynamics of nanoparticle vectors on live cell membranes was recorded and its influence on the fate of these nanoparticle vectors was elucidated. The rotational motions of gold nanorods with various surface modifiers were tracked continuously at a temporal resolution of 5 ms under a DIC microscope. We found that the rotational behaviors of gold nanorod vectors are strongly related to their surface charge, specific surface functional groups, and the availability of receptors on cell membranes. The study of rotational Brownian motion of nanoparticles on cell membranes will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of drug delivery and provide guidance in designing surface modification strategies for drug delivery vectors under various circumstances. To characterize the rotation mode of surface functionalized gold nanorods on cell membranes, the SPORT technique is combined with the correlation analysis of the bright and dark DIC intensities. The unique capabilities of visualizing and understanding rotational motions of functionalized nanoparticles on live cell membranes allow us to correlate rotational and translational dynamics in unprecedented detail and provide new insights for complex membrane processes, including electrostatic interactions, ligand-receptor binding, and lateral (confined and hopping) diffusion of membrane receptors. Surface-functionalized nanoparticles interact with the membrane in fundamentally different ways and exhibit distinct rotational modes. The early events of particle-membrane approach and attachment are directly visualized

  15. Implementation Strategies for Large-Scale Transport Simulations Using Time Domain Particle Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, S.; Cvetkovic, V.; Mancillas, J.; Selroos, J.

    2008-12-01

    Time domain particle tracking is an emerging alternative to the conventional random walk particle tracking algorithm. With time domain particle tracking, particles are moved from node to node on one-dimensional pathways defined by streamlines of the groundwater flow field or by discrete subsurface features. The time to complete each deterministic segment is sampled from residence time distributions that include the effects of advection, longitudinal dispersion, a variety of kinetically controlled retention (sorption) processes, linear transformation, and temporal changes in groundwater velocities and sorption parameters. The simulation results in a set of arrival times at a monitoring location that can be post-processed with a kernel method to construct mass discharge (breakthrough) versus time. Implementation strategies differ for discrete flow (fractured media) systems and continuous porous media systems. The implementation strategy also depends on the scale at which hydraulic property heterogeneity is represented in the supporting flow model. For flow models that explicitly represent discrete features (e.g., discrete fracture networks), the sampling of residence times along segments is conceptually straightforward. For continuous porous media, such sampling needs to be related to the Lagrangian velocity field. Analytical or semi-analytical methods may be used to approximate the Lagrangian segment velocity distributions in aquifers with low-to-moderate variability, thereby capturing transport effects of subgrid velocity variability. If variability in hydraulic properties is large, however, Lagrangian velocity distributions are difficult to characterize and numerical simulations are required; in particular, numerical simulations are likely to be required for estimating the velocity integral scale as a basis for advective segment distributions. Aquifers with evolving heterogeneity scales present additional challenges. Large-scale simulations of radionuclide

  16. Initial recombination in the track of heavy charged particles: numerical solution for air filled ionization chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Bassler, Niels; Tölli, Heikki; Jäkel, Oliver

    2012-03-01

    Modern particle therapy facilities enable sub-millimeter precision in dose deposition. Here, also ionization chambers (ICs) are used, which requires knowledge of the recombination effects. Up to now, recombination is corrected using phenomenological approaches for practical reasons. In this study the effect of the underlying dose distribution on columnar recombination, a quantitative model for initial recombination, is investigated. Jaffé's theory, formulated in 1913 quantifies initial recombination by elemental processes, providing an analytical (closed) solution. Here, we investigate the effect of the underlying charged carrier distribution around a carbon ion track. The fundamental partial differential equation, formulated by Jaffé, is solved numerically taking into account more realistic charge carrier distributions by the use of a computer program (Gascoigne 3D). The investigated charge carrier distributions are based on track structure models, which follow a 1/r(2) behavior at larger radii and show a constant value at small radii. The results of the calculations are compared to the initial formulation and to data obtained in experiments using carbon ion beams. The comparison between the experimental data and the calculations shows that the initial approach made by Jaffé is able to reproduce the effects of initial recombination. The amorphous track structure based charge carrier distribution does not reproduce the experimental data well. A small additional correction in the assessment of the saturation current or charge is suggested by the data. The established model of columnar recombination reproduces the experimental data well, whereas the extensions using track structure models do not show such an agreement. Additionally, the effect of initial recombination on the saturation curve (i.e. Jaffé plot) does not follow a linear behavior as suggested by current dosimetry protocols, therefore higher order corrections (such as the investigated ones) might be

  17. Direct measurement of particle size and 3D velocity of a gas-solid pipe flow with digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yingchun; Wu, Xuecheng; Yao, Longchao; Gréhan, Gérard; Cen, Kefa

    2015-03-20

    The 3D measurement of the particles in a gas-solid pipe flow is of great interest, but remains challenging due to curved pipe walls in various engineering applications. Because of the astigmatism induced by the pipe, concentric ellipse fringes in the hologram of spherical particles are observed in the experiments. With a theoretical analysis of the particle holography by an ABCD matrix, the in-focus particle image can be reconstructed by the modified convolution method and fractional Fourier transform. Thereafter, the particle size, 3D position, and velocity are simultaneously measured by digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry (DHPTV). The successful application of DHPTV to the particle size and 3D velocity measurement in a glass pipe's flow can facilitate its 3D diagnostics.

  18. Integrating Geochemical Reactions with a Particle-Tracking Approach to Simulate Nitrogen Transport and Transformation in Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Z.; Welty, C.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    Lagrangian, particle-tracking models are commonly used to simulate solute advection and dispersion in aquifers. They are computationally efficient and suffer from much less numerical dispersion than grid-based techniques, especially in heterogeneous and advectively-dominated systems. Although particle-tracking models are capable of simulating geochemical reactions, these reactions are often simplified to first-order decay and/or linear, first-order kinetics. Nitrogen transport and transformation in aquifers involves both biodegradation and higher-order geochemical reactions. In order to take advantage of the particle-tracking approach, we have enhanced an existing particle-tracking code SLIM-FAST, to simulate nitrogen transport and transformation in aquifers. The approach we are taking is a hybrid one: the reactive multispecies transport process is operator split into two steps: (1) the physical movement of the particles including the attachment/detachment to solid surfaces, which is modeled by a Lagrangian random-walk algorithm; and (2) multispecies reactions including biodegradation are modeled by coupling multiple Monod equations with other geochemical reactions. The coupled reaction system is solved by an ordinary differential equation solver. In order to solve the coupled system of equations, after step 1, the particles are converted to grid-based concentrations based on the mass and position of the particles, and after step 2 the newly calculated concentration values are mapped back to particles. The enhanced particle-tracking code is capable of simulating subsurface nitrogen transport and transformation in a three-dimensional domain with variably saturated conditions. Potential application of the enhanced code is to simulate subsurface nitrogen loading to the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. Implementation details, verification results of the enhanced code with one-dimensional analytical solutions and other existing numerical models will be presented in

  19. Visualisation of γH2AX Foci Caused by Heavy Ion Particle Traversal; Distinction between Core Track versus Non-Track Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Nakako Izumi; Brunton, Holly; Watanabe, Ritsuko; Shrikhande, Amruta; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Fujimori, Akira; Murakami, Takeshi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Jeggo, Penny; Shibata, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Heavy particle irradiation produces complex DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) which can arise from primary ionisation events within the particle trajectory. Additionally, secondary electrons, termed delta-electrons, which have a range of distributions can create low linear energy transfer (LET) damage within but also distant from the track. DNA damage by delta-electrons distant from the track has not previously been carefully characterised. Using imaging with deconvolution, we show that at 8 hours after exposure to Fe (∼200 keV/µm) ions, γH2AX foci forming at DSBs within the particle track are large and encompass multiple smaller and closely localised foci, which we designate as clustered γH2AX foci. These foci are repaired with slow kinetics by DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) in G1 phase with the magnitude of complexity diminishing with time. These clustered foci (containing 10 or more individual foci) represent a signature of DSBs caused by high LET heavy particle radiation. We also identified simple γH2AX foci distant from the track, which resemble those arising after X-ray exposure, which we attribute to low LET delta-electron induced DSBs. They are rapidly repaired by NHEJ. Clustered γH2AX foci induced by heavy particle radiation cause prolonged checkpoint arrest compared to simple γH2AX foci following X-irradiation. However, mitotic entry was observed when ∼10 clustered foci remain. Thus, cells can progress into mitosis with multiple clusters of DSBs following the traversal of a heavy particle. PMID:23967070

  20. Visualisation of γH2AX foci caused by heavy ion particle traversal; distinction between core track versus non-track damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakako Izumi Nakajima

    Full Text Available Heavy particle irradiation produces complex DNA double strand breaks (DSBs which can arise from primary ionisation events within the particle trajectory. Additionally, secondary electrons, termed delta-electrons, which have a range of distributions can create low linear energy transfer (LET damage within but also distant from the track. DNA damage by delta-electrons distant from the track has not previously been carefully characterised. Using imaging with deconvolution, we show that at 8 hours after exposure to Fe (∼200 keV/µm ions, γH2AX foci forming at DSBs within the particle track are large and encompass multiple smaller and closely localised foci, which we designate as clustered γH2AX foci. These foci are repaired with slow kinetics by DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ in G1 phase with the magnitude of complexity diminishing with time. These clustered foci (containing 10 or more individual foci represent a signature of DSBs caused by high LET heavy particle radiation. We also identified simple γH2AX foci distant from the track, which resemble those arising after X-ray exposure, which we attribute to low LET delta-electron induced DSBs. They are rapidly repaired by NHEJ. Clustered γH2AX foci induced by heavy particle radiation cause prolonged checkpoint arrest compared to simple γH2AX foci following X-irradiation. However, mitotic entry was observed when ∼10 clustered foci remain. Thus, cells can progress into mitosis with multiple clusters of DSBs following the traversal of a heavy particle.

  1. Increase in the area of etched alpha-particle tracks in CR-39 plastic with increasing storage time under nitrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Bhakta, J R; Miles, J C H

    1999-01-01

    The area of etched tracks in CR-39 (polyallyl diglycol carbonate, PADC) exposed to alpha-particles from an americium-241 source has been investigated as a function of post-exposure storage time in a dry nitrogen atmosphere. Data were collected over 2.5 years and the results show that the nominal maximum area of the track area distribution increases with increasing storage time.

  2. WE-D-BRF-01: FEATURED PRESENTATION - Investigating Particle Track Structures Using Fluorescent Nuclear Track Detectors and Monte Carlo Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowdell, S; Paganetti, H; Schuemann, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Greilich, S [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, DKFZ - German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Zimmerman, F [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, DKFZ - German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Evans, C [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To report on the efforts funded by the AAPM seed funding grant to develop the basis for fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD) based radiobiological experiments in combination with dedicated Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) on the nanometer scale. Methods: Two confocal microscopes were utilized in this study. Two FNTD samples were used to find the optimal microscope settings, one FNTD irradiated with 11.1 MeV/u Gold ions and one irradiated with 428.77 MeV/u Carbon ions. The first sample provided a brightly luminescent central track while the latter is used to test the capabilities to observe secondary electrons. MCS were performed using TOPAS beta9 version, layered on top of Geant4.9.6p02. Two sets of simulations were performed, one with the Geant4-DNA physics list and approximating the FNTDs by water, a second set using the Penelope physics list in a water-approximated FNTD and a aluminum-oxide FNTD. Results: Within the first half of the funding period, we have successfully established readout capabilities of FNTDs at our institute. Due to technical limitations, our microscope setup is significantly different from the approach implemented at the DKFZ, Germany. However, we can clearly reconstruct Carbon tracks in 3D with electron track resolution of 200 nm. A second microscope with superior readout capabilities will be tested in the second half of the funding period, we expect an improvement in signal to background ratio with the same the resolution.We have successfully simulated tracks in FNTDs. The more accurate Geant4-DNA track simulations can be used to reconstruct the track energy from the size and brightness of the observed tracks. Conclusion: We have achieved the goals set in the seed funding proposal: the setup of FNTD readout and simulation capabilities. We will work on improving the readout resolution to validate our MCS track structures down to the nanometer scales.

  3. Plasma electron hole kinematics. II. Hole tracking Particle-In-Cell simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C.; Hutchinson, I. H. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The kinematics of a 1-D electron hole is studied using a novel Particle-In-Cell simulation code. A hole tracking technique enables us to follow the trajectory of a fast-moving solitary hole and study quantitatively hole acceleration and coupling to ions. We observe a transient at the initial stage of hole formation when the hole accelerates to several times the cold-ion sound speed. Artificially imposing slow ion speed changes on a fully formed hole causes its velocity to change even when the ion stream speed in the hole frame greatly exceeds the ion thermal speed, so there are no reflected ions. The behavior that we observe in numerical simulations agrees very well with our analytic theory of hole momentum conservation and the effects of “jetting.”.

  4. Using particle tracking to measure flow instabilities in an undergraduate laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Douglas H.; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2011-03-01

    Much of the drama and complexity of fluid flow occurs because its governing equations lack unique solutions. The observed behavior depends on the stability of the multitude of solutions, which can change with the experimental parameters. Instabilities cause sudden global shifts in behavior. We have developed a low-cost experiment to study a classical fluid instability. By using an electromagnetic technique, students drive Kolmogorov flow in a thin fluid layer and measure it quantitatively with a webcam. They extract positions and velocities from movies of the flow using Lagrangian particle tracking and compare their measurements to several theoretical predictions, including the effect of the drive current, the spatial structure of the flow, and the parameters at which instability occurs. The experiment can be tailored to undergraduates at any level or to graduate students by appropriate emphasis on the physical phenomena and the sophisticated mathematics that govern them.

  5. Development of Labview based data acquisition and multichannel analyzer software for radioactive particle tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Nur Aira Abd, E-mail: nur-aira@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Yussup, Nolida; Ibrahim, Maslina Bt. Mohd; Abdullah, Nor Arymaswati; Mokhtar, Mukhlis B. [Technical Support Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, 43000, Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Abdullah, Jaafar B.; Hassan, Hearie B. [Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, 43000, Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    A DAQ (data acquisition) software called RPTv2.0 has been developed for Radioactive Particle Tracking System in Malaysian Nuclear Agency. RPTv2.0 that features scanning control GUI, data acquisition from 12-channel counter via RS-232 interface, and multichannel analyzer (MCA). This software is fully developed on National Instruments Labview 8.6 platform. Ludlum Model 4612 Counter is used to count the signals from the scintillation detectors while a host computer is used to send control parameters, acquire and display data, and compute results. Each detector channel consists of independent high voltage control, threshold or sensitivity value and window settings. The counter is configured with a host board and twelve slave boards. The host board collects the counts from each slave board and communicates with the computer via RS-232 data interface.

  6. SPACE CHARGE SIMULATION METHODS INCORPORATED IN SOME MULTI - PARTICLE TRACKING CODES AND THEIR RESULTS COMPARISON.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BEEBE - WANG,J.; LUCCIO,A.U.; D IMPERIO,N.; MACHIDA,S.

    2002-06-03

    Space charge in high intensity beams is an important issue in accelerator physics. Due to the complicity of the problems, the most effective way of investigating its effect is by computer simulations. In the resent years, many space charge simulation methods have been developed and incorporated in various 2D or 3D multi-particle-tracking codes. It has becoming necessary to benchmark these methods against each other, and against experimental results. As a part of global effort, we present our initial comparison of the space charge methods incorporated in simulation codes ORBIT++, ORBIT and SIMPSONS. In this paper, the methods included in these codes are overviewed. The simulation results are presented and compared. Finally, from this study, the advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed.

  7. Fluorescent nuclear track images of Ag-activated phosphate glass irradiated with photons and heavy charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurobori, Toshio; Yanagida, Yuka; Kodaira, Satoshi; Shirao, Taichi

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we report about the demonstration of the nuclear track imaging capabilities of Ag-activated phosphate glass. A 375 nm laser and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) were respectively used for track excitation and detection. Specifically, the blue and orange radiophotoluminescent (RPL) tracks and dose distributions observed after irradiation with soft X-rays, gamma rays and heavy charged particles (HCPs) are examined. In addition, the origins of the reductions in RPL efficiency for high-dose X-ray irradiation and for irradiation with HCPs with high linear energy transfer (LET) values are investigated via a CLSM and a conventional fluorescent reader and discussed.

  8. GPU-based quasi-real-time Track Recognition in Imaging Devices: from raw Data to Particle Tracks

    CERN Document Server

    Bozza, Cristiano; De Sio, Chiara; Stellacci, Simona Maria

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear emulsions as tracking devices have been used by recent experiments thanks to fast automatic microscopes for emulsion readout. Automatic systems are evolving towards GPU-based solutions. Real-time imaging is needed to drive the motion of the microscope axes and 3D track recognition occurs quasi-online in local GPU clusters. The algorithms implemented in the Quick Scanning System are sketched. Most of them are very general and might turn out useful for other detector

  9. Method and system for detecting polygon boundaries of structures in images as particle tracks through fields of corners and pixel gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglieroni, David W [Pleasanton, CA; Manay, Siddharth [Livermore, CA

    2011-12-20

    A stochastic method and system for detecting polygon structures in images, by detecting a set of best matching corners of predetermined acuteness .alpha. of a polygon model from a set of similarity scores based on GDM features of corners, and tracking polygon boundaries as particle tracks using a sequential Monte Carlo approach. The tracking involves initializing polygon boundary tracking by selecting pairs of corners from the set of best matching corners to define a first side of a corresponding polygon boundary; tracking all intermediate sides of the polygon boundaries using a particle filter, and terminating polygon boundary tracking by determining the last side of the tracked polygon boundaries to close the polygon boundaries. The particle tracks are then blended to determine polygon matches, which may be made available, such as to a user, for ranking and inspection.

  10. A highly scalable particle tracking algorithm using partitioned global address space (PGAS) programming for extreme-scale turbulence simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buaria, D.; Yeung, P. K.

    2017-12-01

    A new parallel algorithm utilizing a partitioned global address space (PGAS) programming model to achieve high scalability is reported for particle tracking in direct numerical simulations of turbulent fluid flow. The work is motivated by the desire to obtain Lagrangian information necessary for the study of turbulent dispersion at the largest problem sizes feasible on current and next-generation multi-petaflop supercomputers. A large population of fluid particles is distributed among parallel processes dynamically, based on instantaneous particle positions such that all of the interpolation information needed for each particle is available either locally on its host process or neighboring processes holding adjacent sub-domains of the velocity field. With cubic splines as the preferred interpolation method, the new algorithm is designed to minimize the need for communication, by transferring between adjacent processes only those spline coefficients determined to be necessary for specific particles. This transfer is implemented very efficiently as a one-sided communication, using Co-Array Fortran (CAF) features which facilitate small data movements between different local partitions of a large global array. The cost of monitoring transfer of particle properties between adjacent processes for particles migrating across sub-domain boundaries is found to be small. Detailed benchmarks are obtained on the Cray petascale supercomputer Blue Waters at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. For operations on the particles in a 81923 simulation (0.55 trillion grid points) on 262,144 Cray XE6 cores, the new algorithm is found to be orders of magnitude faster relative to a prior algorithm in which each particle is tracked by the same parallel process at all times. This large speedup reduces the additional cost of tracking of order 300 million particles to just over 50% of the cost of computing the Eulerian velocity field at this scale. Improving support of PGAS models on

  11. Particle tracking via RFID technology to monitor bedload sediment dynamics in mountain streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Matteo; Fraccarollo, Luigi; Corbo, Simona; Maggioni, Alberto; Brardinoni, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    In this contribution we present preliminary results on the monitoring of bedload entrainment and transport in two mountain streams, the Grigno Creek (90 km2) and its tributary, the Tolvà Creek (14 km2), located in Valsugana, Autonomous Province of Trento. In particular, we monitor bedload by means of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology in conjunction with Passive Integrated Transponders (PIT) (e.g., Lamarre et al., 2005) injected into pebble-to-cobble sized tracer stones (b-axis ranging from 30 to 130 mm). In the Grigno Creek 120 PITs were released in December 2013 along a 100-m channel reach and have been surveyed 10 times. In the Tolvà Creek 100 PITs were released in July 2013 along a 100-m channel reach, and the site has been surveyed 4 times. Particle tracking is conducted by integrating two complementary antenna types: (i) a portable one, which enables to estimate travel distances of tagged clasts; and (ii) a set of four fixed antennas (25m apart from each other), which allows detecting motion/rest periods of particles, entrainment thresholds and transport velocities. Particle tracking is combined with on-site high-frequency (i.e., 10 minutes) water stage monitoring. Salt dilution method is monthly applied to relate flow discharge to water stage. The analyzed river reaches extend over different morphologic units (steps, pools, glides and boulder-cascades). We are looking to estimate (i) the channel forming discharge; (ii) a quantitative evaluation of specific bedload transport. These information will be associated to the surficial bed texture and bed morphology. Data collected from fixed and mobile antennas will enable to infer statistical information of the trajectories run by tracer ensemble, in particular the step lengths, the total travel distances and the rest periods. Lamarre H., MacVicar B., Roy A.G. 2005 Using Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags to investigate sediment transport in gravel-bed rivers. Journal of Sedimentary Research

  12. Pro asynchronous programming with .NET

    CERN Document Server

    Blewett, Richard; Ltd, Rock Solid Knowledge

    2014-01-01

    Pro Asynchronous Programming with .NET teaches the essential skill of asynchronous programming in .NET. It answers critical questions in .NET application development, such as: how do I keep my program responding at all times to keep my users happy how do I make the most of the available hardware how can I improve performanceIn the modern world, users expect more and more from their applications and devices, and multi-core hardware has the potential to provide it. But it takes carefully crafted code to turn that potential into responsive, scalable applications.With Pro Asynchronous Programming

  13. A flame particle tracking analysis of turbulence–chemistry interaction in hydrogen–air premixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Uranakara, Harshavardhana A.

    2015-11-21

    Interactions of turbulence, molecular transport, and energy transport, coupled with chemistry play a crucial role in the evolution of flame surface geometry, propagation, annihilation, and local extinction/re-ignition characteristics of intensely turbulent premixed flames. This study seeks to understand how these interactions affect flame surface annihilation of lean hydrogen–air premixed turbulent flames. Direct numerical simulations (DNSs) are conducted at different parametric conditions with a detailed reaction mechanism and transport properties for hydrogen–air flames. Flame particle tracking (FPT) technique is used to follow specific flame surface segments. An analytical expression for the local displacement flame speed (Sd) of a temperature isosurface is considered, and the contributions of transport, chemistry, and kinematics on the displacement flame speed at different turbulence-flame interaction conditions are identified. In general, the displacement flame speed for the flame particles is found to increase with time for all conditions considered. This is because, eventually all flame surfaces and their resident flame particles approach annihilation by reactant island formation at the end of stretching and folding processes induced by turbulence. Statistics of principal curvature evolving in time, obtained using FPT, suggest that these islands are ellipsoidal on average enclosing fresh reactants. Further examinations show that the increase in Sd is caused by the increased negative curvature of the flame surface and eventual homogenization of temperature gradients as these reactant islands shrink due to flame propagation and turbulent mixing. Finally, the evolution of the normalized, averaged, displacement flame speed vs. stretch Karlovitz number are found to collapse on a narrow band, suggesting that a unified description of flame speed dependence on stretch rate may be possible in the Lagrangian description.

  14. Particle-Tracking within an Ultra-High-Resolution Urban Domain Integrated with Best Management Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, S. R.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Best management practices (BMPs) are used to offset the impacts of urban developments known to decrease aquifer recharge, alter drainage networks, change feedbacks to the atmosphere and enhance contaminant transport. To evaluate the effectiveness of BMPs (i.e. engineered wetlands, grass swales, permeable pavements, etc.), a high-resolution study of these processes can be performed in the field using timely monitored instruments, or conceptually-based hydrologic models. However, this approach requires advancing stormwater modeling techniques using high performance computing. The goal of this work is to develop a novel approach to evaluate BMP implementation using an ultra-high-resolution domain and ParFlow, a physically-based hydrologic model that simulates surface and subsurface water interactions. This study domain is located in Aurora, CO, an area that experienced over 200% urban growth over the last 30 years. The ultra-high-resolution domain was constructed using LIDAR imagery and consisted of 1m x 1m horizontal resolution over a ~7.7 km by 2.1 km lateral extent up to 2 m in the subsurface, with a domain totaling more than 3x106unknowns. Three storm events (wet, dry and normal) were simulated with two pavement types, permeable (K=0.18 mhr-1,Φ=0.1) and impermeable (K=0.0018 mhr-1, Φ=0.06), amounting to 6 simulation scenarios. We investigated changes to stormwater routing and infiltration with and without BMP implementation. Contaminant transport was performed using SLIM-FAST, a Lagrangian, particle tracking approach that allows for complex, contaminant-loading scenarios common in the urban environment. Preliminary results show delayed particle movement within impermeable pavement scenarios and particle trapping along the gutters and rooftop locations. This approach is useful for evaluating the effectiveness of BMPs in trapping and reducing concentrations of emerging contaminants of concern within urban environments.

  15. Variation of alpha-particle track diameter in CR-39 as a function of residual energy and etching conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Khayrat, A H

    1999-01-01

    It has often been proposed that track diameter in etched detectors can be used for energy spectrometry. To test this proposition, the relationship between track diameter and energy of alpha particles, in the range 0.1-5.5 MeV, incident on CR-39 was studied. Two sets of detectors were irradiated by a collimated normally-incident beam of alpha-particles of different energies, using an Am-241 source. Different foils of the first set were etched for variable lengths of time in such a way that, in each case, the etchant reached the end of the latent track. Foils in the second set were etched for a fixed 'short' time of 2 h, for all alpha-energies. The linear rate of energy loss as well as the residual range of alpha-particles was determined by using Henke and Benton's computer program. It is found that, for 'short' etching times, the track diameter mimics the 'Bragg curve', i.e., at first it rises with falling energy, and then declines, after the peak, at lower energies. If, however, the track is always etched to ...

  16. Dependence of alpha particle track diameter on the free volume holes size using positron annihilation lifetime technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gamal, S. [Physics Department, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy, 11711 Cairo (Egypt); Abdalla, Ayman M., E-mail: aymanabdalla62@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Najran University, Najran (Saudi Arabia); Centre for Advanced Materials and Nano-Engineering, Najran University, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Abdel-Hady, E.E. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Minia University, BO 61519, Minia (Egypt)

    2015-09-15

    The alpha particle track diameter dependence of the free volume holes size (V{sub f}) in DAM–ADC and CR-39 nuclear track detectors was investigated using positron annihilation lifetime technique. The effect of temperature on the alpha particle track diameter and free volume were also investigated in the T-range (RT-130 °C). The obtained results revealed that the values of ortho-positronium lifetime τ{sub 3} and V{sub f} increases while I{sub 3} slightly increases as T increases for the two detectors. The values of τ{sub 3}, V{sub f} and I{sub 3} are higher in CR-39 than DAM–ADC. The interpretation of obtained results is based on the fact that increasing T leads to significant enhancement of thermal expansion of the polymer matrix and consequently V{sub f} increases. The track diameter increases as T increases. This can be explained by the fact that the increase in T increases the crystal size and V{sub f} in the polymer. A relationship between V{sub f} and the alpha particle track diameter was obtained. Moreover results of detector irradiation, along with free volume evaluation are addressed and thoroughly discussed.

  17. A review of design considerations for the sensor matrix in semiconductor pixel detectors for tracking in particle physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Sally E-mail: seidel@glueball.phys.unm.edu

    2001-06-11

    Methods have been developed to improve the reliability of silicon sensors, in particular for pixel detectors, and their resistance to radiation damage, as it is encountered in tracking detectors in particle physics experiments. The choice of wafer material, the processing techniques, and the sensor layout are discussed. Alternative semiconductor substrates and variations on the planar hybrid design are mentioned.

  18. On the shape of grade efficiency curves computed for centrifugal dedusters by CFD with Lagrangian particle tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, AC; Berrino, A; Ray, MB; Arastoopour, H

    1999-01-01

    The factors influencing the shapes of cyclone grade efficiency curves generated by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Lagrangian particle tracking are studied. Two software packages SPRINT and FLUENT were used for a complete picture. Computed curves both with and without the effect of turbulent

  19. Reducing energy with asynchronous circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Rivas Barragan, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Reducing energy consumption using asynchronous circuits. The elastic clocks approach has been implemented along with a closed-feedback loop in order to achieve a lower energy consumption along with more reliability in integrated circuits.

  20. Combining particle-tracking and geochemical data to assess public supply well vulnerability to arsenic and uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Stephen R.; Kauffman, Leon J.; Thomas, Mary Ann; Brown, Craig J.; McCarthy, Kathy A.; Eberts, Sandra M.; Rosen, Michael R.; Katz, Brian G.

    2009-09-01

    SummaryFlow-model particle-tracking results and geochemical data from seven study areas across the United States were analyzed using three statistical methods to test the hypothesis that these variables can successfully be used to assess public supply well vulnerability to arsenic and uranium. Principal components analysis indicated that arsenic and uranium concentrations were associated with particle-tracking variables that simulate time of travel and water fluxes through aquifer systems and also through specific redox and pH zones within aquifers. Time-of-travel variables are important because many geochemical reactions are kinetically limited, and geochemical zonation can account for different modes of mobilization and fate. Spearman correlation analysis established statistical significance for correlations of arsenic and uranium concentrations with variables derived using the particle-tracking routines. Correlations between uranium concentrations and particle-tracking variables were generally strongest for variables computed for distinct redox zones. Classification tree analysis on arsenic concentrations yielded a quantitative categorical model using time-of-travel variables and solid-phase-arsenic concentrations. The classification tree model accuracy on the learning data subset was 70%, and on the testing data subset, 79%, demonstrating one application in which particle-tracking variables can be used predictively in a quantitative screening-level assessment of public supply well vulnerability. Ground-water management actions that are based on avoidance of young ground water, reflecting the premise that young ground water is more vulnerable to anthropogenic contaminants than is old ground water, may inadvertently lead to increased vulnerability to natural contaminants due to the tendency for concentrations of many natural contaminants to increase with increasing ground-water residence time.

  1. Combining particle-tracking and geochemical data to assess public supply well vulnerability to arsenic and uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, S.R.; Kauffman, L.J.; Thomas, M.A.; Brown, C.J.; McCarthy, K.A.; Eberts, S.M.; Rosen, Michael R.; Katz, B.G.

    2009-01-01

    Flow-model particle-tracking results and geochemical data from seven study areas across the United States were analyzed using three statistical methods to test the hypothesis that these variables can successfully be used to assess public supply well vulnerability to arsenic and uranium. Principal components analysis indicated that arsenic and uranium concentrations were associated with particle-tracking variables that simulate time of travel and water fluxes through aquifer systems and also through specific redox and pH zones within aquifers. Time-of-travel variables are important because many geochemical reactions are kinetically limited, and geochemical zonation can account for different modes of mobilization and fate. Spearman correlation analysis established statistical significance for correlations of arsenic and uranium concentrations with variables derived using the particle-tracking routines. Correlations between uranium concentrations and particle-tracking variables were generally strongest for variables computed for distinct redox zones. Classification tree analysis on arsenic concentrations yielded a quantitative categorical model using time-of-travel variables and solid-phase-arsenic concentrations. The classification tree model accuracy on the learning data subset was 70%, and on the testing data subset, 79%, demonstrating one application in which particle-tracking variables can be used predictively in a quantitative screening-level assessment of public supply well vulnerability. Ground-water management actions that are based on avoidance of young ground water, reflecting the premise that young ground water is more vulnerable to anthropogenic contaminants than is old ground water, may inadvertently lead to increased vulnerability to natural contaminants due to the tendency for concentrations of many natural contaminants to increase with increasing ground-water residence time.

  2. Totally Asynchronous Interference Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Moshksar, Kamyar

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses an interference channel consisting of $\\mathbf{n}$ active users sharing $u$ frequency sub-bands. Users are asynchronous meaning there exists a mutual delay between their transmitted codes. A stationary model for interference is considered by assuming the starting point of an interferer's data is uniformly distributed along the codeword of any user. The spectrum is divided to private and common bands each containing $v_{\\mathrm{p}}$ and $v_{\\mathrm{c}}$ frequency sub-bands respectively. We consider a scenario where all transmitters are unaware of the number of active users and the channel gains. The optimum $v_{\\mathrm{p}}$ and $v_{\\mathrm{c}}$ are obtained such that the so-called outage capacity per user is maximized. If $\\Pr\\{\\mathbf{n}\\leq 2\\}=1$, upper and lower bounds on the mutual information between the input and output of the channel for each user are derived using a genie-aided technique. The proposed bounds meet each other as the code length grows to infinity yielding a closed ex...

  3. Toward utilization of MCNP5 particle track output file for simulation problems in photon spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovic, Jelena; Marinkovic, Predrag; Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera; Kaljevic, Jelica; Arandjic, Danijela; Lazarevic, Djordje

    2015-10-01

    Pulse height distribution (PHD) registered by a spectrometer is influenced by various physical phenomena such as photon interactions as well as disturbance produced by the electronic circuits inside the spectrometer. Therefore, spectrometry measurements of gamma and X-ray radiation inaccurately represent primary spectra. In order to overcome spectrum disruption, spectrum unfolding has to be applied. One of the common tools used in the unfolding process is Monte Carlo simulation of spectrometer response to monochromatic photons. The purpose of this work is to develop a new method for simulating CdTe semiconductor spectrometer response to monochromatic photons that can be further used for the spectrum unfolding procedure. The method is based upon post-processing of the particle track (PTRAC) output file generated by the MCNP5 program. In addition to the spectrometry output, this method provides information for each specific photon interaction inside the spectrometer active volume, which is required when taking into account spectrometer charge collection. The PTRAC generated detector response and the measured spectrum were in good agreement. The results obtained showed that this method can be used to generate precise response functions of gamma and X-ray spectrometers.

  4. Multiple-particle tracking measurements of heterogeneities in solutions of actin filaments and actin bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apgar, J; Tseng, Y; Fedorov, E; Herwig, M B; Almo, S C; Wirtz, D

    2000-08-01

    One of the central functions of actin cytoskeleton is to provide the mechanical support required for the establishment and maintenance of cell morphology. The mechanical properties of actin filament assemblies are a consequence of both the available polymer concentration and the actin regulatory proteins that direct the formation of higher order structures. By monitoring the displacement of well-dispersed microspheres via fluorescence microscopy, we probe the degree of spatial heterogeneity of F-actin gels and networks in vitro. We compare the distribution of the time-dependent mean-square displacement (MSD) of polystyrene microspheres imbedded in low- and high-concentration F-actin solutions, in the presence and absence of the F-actin-bundling protein fascin. The MSD distribution of a 2. 6-microM F-actin solution is symmetric and its standard deviation is similar to that of a homogeneous solution of glycerol of similar zero-shear viscosity. However, increasing actin concentration renders the MSD distribution wide and asymmetric, an effect enhanced by fascin. Quantitative changes in the shape of the MSD distribution correlate qualitatively with the presence of large heterogeneities in F-actin solutions produced by increased filament concentration and the presence of actin bundles, as detected by confocal microscopy. Multiple-particle tracking offers a new, quantitative method to characterize the organization of biopolymers in solution.

  5. Comparison of groundwater flow model particle tracking results and isotopic data in the Leon valley, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Garcia, G.; Cortes, A. S.; Martínez-Reyes, J.; Perez-Quezadas, J.; Grupo de Hidrologia Isotopica

    2013-05-01

    The study area is located in the Guanajuato state, north-west of Mexico City. The Leon Valley covers with groundwater its water demand estimated in about 20.6 m3/s. The constant population increase and related economic activities in the region have a steady growth in water needs. Related abstraction rate has produced an average drawdown of about 1.0 m/year in the last two decades. It suggests that present groundwater management needs to be reviewed. The groundwater management in the study area implies a possibility that abstraction will produce environmental impacts. This vital resource under stress becomes necessary to study its hydro-geologic functioning to achieve a scientific groundwater management in the valley. This investigation was based on the analysis and integration of existing information and the one generated in the field by the authors. Highlighted concepts were: i) the geologic structure of the area, ii) the hydraulic parameters and iii) the delta-deuterium and delta-oxigen-18 composition. This information was analysed integrally by means of applying a groundwater flow model (MODFLOW) and a particle-tracking model (FLOWPATH): the results were similar to flow paths and time-of travel interpretations derived from isotopic data.

  6. Particle tracking velocimetry applied to estimate the pressure field around a Savonius turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Yuichi; Nakada, Taishi; Suzuki, Takao; Yamamoto, Fujio

    2007-08-01

    Particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) is applied to flows around a Savonius turbine. The velocity vector field measured with PTV is utilized to estimate the pressure field around the turbine, as well as to evaluate the torque performance. The main objective of the work is the establishment of the pressure estimation scheme required to discuss the turbine performance. First, the PTV data are interpolated on a regular grid with a fourth-order ellipsoidal differential equation to generate velocity vectors satisfying the third-order spatio-temporal continuity both in time and space. Second, the phase-averaged velocity vector information with respect to the turbine angle is substituted into three different types of pressure-estimating equations, i.e. the Poisson equation, the Navier-Stokes equation and the sub-grid scale model of turbulence. The results obtained based on the Navier-Stokes equation are compared with those based on the Poisson equation, and have shown several merits in employing the Navier-Stokes-based method for the PTV measurement. The method is applied to a rotating turbine with the tip-speed ratio of 0.5 to find the relationship between torque behaviour and flow structure in a phase-averaged sense. We have found that a flow attached to the convex surface of the blades induces low-pressure regions to drive the turbine, namely, the lift force helps the turbine blades to rotate even when the drag force is insufficient. Secondary mechanisms of torque generation are also discussed.

  7. Study of contrail microphysics in the vortex phase with a Lagrangian particle tracking model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Unterstrasser

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Crystal sublimation/loss is a dominant feature of the contrail evolution during the vortex phase and has a substantial impact on the later contrail-to-cirrus transition. Previous studies showed that the fraction of crystals surviving the vortex phase depends primarily on relative humidity, temperature and the aircraft type. An existing model for contrail vortex phase simulations (with a 2-moment bulk microphysics scheme was upgraded with a newly developed state-of-the-art microphysics module (LCM which uses Lagrangian particle tracking. This allows for explicit process-oriented modelling of the ice crystal size distribution in contrast to the bulk approach. We show that it is of great importance to employ an advanced microphysics scheme to determine the crystal loss during the vortex phase. The LCM-model shows even larger sensitivities to the above mentioned key parameters than previously estimated with the bulk model. The impact of the initial crystal number is studied and for the first time also the initial width of the crystal size distribution. Both are shown to be relevant. This corroborates the need for a realistic representation of microphysical processes and knowledge of the ice phase characteristics.

  8. On the use of particle filters for electromagnetic tracking in high dose rate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Th I.; Lahmer, G.; Brandt, T.; Kallis, K.; Strnad, V.; Bert, Ch; Hensel, B.; Tomé, A. M.; Lang, E. W.

    2017-10-01

    Modern radiotherapy of female breast cancers often employs high dose rate brachytherapy, where a radioactive source is moved inside catheters, implanted in the female breast, according to a prescribed treatment plan. Source localization relative to the patient’s anatomy is determined with solenoid sensors whose spatial positions are measured with an electromagnetic tracking system. Precise sensor dwell position determination is of utmost importance to assure irradiation of the cancerous tissue according to the treatment plan. We present a hybrid data analysis system which combines multi-dimensional scaling with particle filters to precisely determine sensor dwell positions in the catheters during subsequent radiation treatment sessions. Both techniques are complemented with empirical mode decomposition for the removal of superimposed breathing artifacts. We show that the hybrid model robustly and reliably determines the spatial positions of all catheters used during the treatment and precisely determines any deviations of actual sensor dwell positions from the treatment plan. The hybrid system only relies on sensor positions measured with an EMT system and relates them to the spatial positions of the implanted catheters as initially determined with a computed x-ray tomography.

  9. Design and testing of monolithic active pixel sensors for charged particle tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Deptuch, G; Claus, G; Colledani, C; Dulinski, W; Gornushkin, Y; Husson, D; Riester, J L; Winter, M

    2002-01-01

    A monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) for charged particle tracking based on a novel detector structure has been proposed, simulated, fabricated and tested. This detector is inseparable from the readout electronics, since both of them are integrated on the same, low- resistivity silicon wafer standard for a CMOS process. The individual pixel is comprised of only three MOS transistors and a photodiode collecting the charge created in the thin undepleted epitaxial layer. This approach provides a low cost, high resolution and thin device with the whole detector area sensitive to radiation (100% fill factor). Detailed device simulations using the ISE-TCAD package have been carried out in order to study the charge. collection mechanism and to validate the proposed idea. In order to demonstrate viability of the technique, two prototype chips were successively fabricated using 0.6 mu m and 0.35 mu m CMOS processes. Both chips have been fully characterized. The pixel conversion gain has been calibrated using a /sup...

  10. Assessing the limits of hidden Markov model analysis for multi-state particle tracks in living systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Dylan

    Particle tracking offers significant insight into the molecular mechanics that govern the behavior of living cells. The analysis of molecular trajectories that transition between different motive states, such as diffusive, driven and tethered modes, is of considerable importance, with even single trajectories containing significant amounts of information about a molecule's environment and its interactions with cellular structures such as the cell cytoskeleton, membrane or extracellular matrix. Hidden Markov models (HMM) have been widely adopted to perform the segmentation of such complex tracks, however robust methods for failure detection are required when HMMs are applied to individual particle tracks and limited data sets. Here, we show that extensive analysis of hidden Markov model outputs using data derived from multi-state Brownian dynamics simulations can be used for both the optimization of likelihood models, and also to generate custom failure tests based on a modified Bayesian Information Criterion. In the first instance, these failure tests can be applied to assess the quality of the HMM results. In addition, they provide critical information for the successful design of particle tracking experiments where trajectories containing multiple mobile states are expected.

  11. Real-time multi-parameter spectroscopy and localization in three-dimensional single-particle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellriegel, Christian; Gratton, Enrico

    2009-02-06

    Tracking of single particles in optical microscopy has been employed in studies ranging from material sciences to biophysics down to the level of single molecules. The technique intrinsically circumvents ensemble averaging and may therefore reveal directly mechanistic details of the involved dynamic processes. Such processes range from translational and rotational motion to spectral dynamics. We distinguish between conventional a posteriori tracking of objects (e.g. from the sequences of images) and the experimentally more refined 'on-the-fly' tracking technique. In this technique, the observation volume of the microscope is kept centred with respect to the moving object via a feedback algorithm. This approach brings a series of advantages in comparison with the tracking from images, ranging from a superior spatio-temporal resolution (2-50nm and 1-32ms) to the capability of inferring additional data (e.g. fluorescence lifetime, emission spectrum, polarization, intensity dynamics) from an object as it moves over several microns in three dimensions. In this contribution, we describe the principle of the tracking technique as implemented on a two-photon laser scanning microscope and illustrate its capabilities with experimental data, from particles labelled with different dyes moving in a liquid to the characterization of small fluorescently labelled protein assemblies in living cells.

  12. CMS hardware track trigger: New opportunities for long-lived particle searches at the HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershtein, Yuri

    2017-08-01

    The planned upgrade of the CMS detector for the High Luminosity LHC allows us to find tracks in the silicon tracker for every single LHC collision and use them in the first level (hardware) trigger decision. So far, studies by CMS collaboration concentrated on the maintaining the overall trigger performance in the punishing pile up environment. We argue that the potential capabilities of the track trigger are much wider, and may offer groundbreaking opportunities for new physics searches. As an example, and to facilitate community discussion, we use a simple toy simulation to study rare Higgs decays into new particles with lifetime of order of a few mm.

  13. Time-Lapse Monitoring of DNA Damage Colocalized With Particle Tracks in Single Living Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFadden, Conor H. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hallacy, Timothy M. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas (United States); Flint, David B. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Granville, Dal A. [Department of Medical Physics, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Asaithamby, Aroumougame [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Centre, Dallas, Texas (United States); Sahoo, Narayan [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Akselrod, Mark S. [Crystal Growth Division, Landauer, Inc, Stillwater, Oklahoma (United States); Sawakuchi, Gabriel O., E-mail: gsawakuchi@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: Understanding the DNA damage and repair induced by hadron therapy (HT) beams is crucial for developing novel strategies to maximize the use of HT beams to treat cancer patients. However, spatiotemporal studies of DNA damage and repair for beam energies relevant to HT have been challenging. We report a technique that enables spatiotemporal measurement of radiation-induced damage in live cells and colocalization of this damage with charged particle tracks over a broad range of clinically relevant beam energies. The technique uses novel fluorescence nuclear track detectors with fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy in the beam line to visualize particle track traversals within the subcellular compartments of live cells within seconds after injury. Methods and Materials: We designed and built a portable fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscope for use in the beam path, coated fluorescence nuclear track detectors with fluorescent-tagged live cells (HT1080 expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein tagged to XRCC1, a single-strand break repair protein), placed the entire assembly into a proton therapy beam line, and irradiated the cells with a fluence of ∼1 × 10{sup 6} protons/cm{sup 2}. Results: We successfully obtained confocal images of proton tracks and foci of DNA single-strand breaks immediately after irradiation. Conclusions: This technique represents an innovative method for analyzing biological responses in any HT beam line at energies and dose rates relevant to therapy. It allows precise determination of the number of tracks traversing a subcellular compartment and monitoring the cellular damage therein, and has the potential to measure the linear energy transfer of each track from therapeutic beams.

  14. Development of hybrid particle tracking algorithms and their applications in airflow measurement within an aircraft cabin mock-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei

    Obtaining reliable experimental airflow data within an indoor environment is a challenging task and critical in studying and solving indoor air quality problems. The Hybrid Particle Tracking Velocimetry (HPTV) system is aimed at fulfilling this need. It was developed based on existing Particle Tracking Velocimety (PTV) and Volumetric Particle Tracking Velocimetry (VPTV) techniques. The HPTV system requires three charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras to view the illuminated flow field and capture the trajectories of the seeded particles. By adopting the hybrid spatial matching and object tracking algorithms, this system can acquire the 3-Dimensional velocity components within a large volume with relatively high spatial and temporal resolution. Synthetic images were employed to validate the performance of three components of the system: image processing, camera calibration and 3D velocity reconstruction. These three components are also the main error sources. The accuracy of the whole algorithm was analyzed and discussed through a back projection approach. The results showed that the algorithms performed effectively and accurately. The reconstructed 3D trajectories and streaks agreed well with the simulated streamline of the particles. As an overall testing and application of the system, HPTV was applied to measure the airflow pattern within a full-scale, five-row section of a Boeing 767-300 aircraft cabin mockup. A complete experimental procedure was developed and strictly followed throughout the experiment. Both global flow field at the whole cabin scale and the local flow field at the breathing zone of one passenger were studied. Each test case was also simulated numerically using a commercial computational fluid dynamic (CFD) package. Through comparison between the results from the numerical simulation and the experimental measurement, the potential model validation capability of the system was demonstrated. Possible reasons explaining the difference between

  15. Single-particle tracking of quantum dot-conjugated prion proteins inside yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, Toshikazu; Kawai-Noma, Shigeko [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B56, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Pack, Chan-Gi [Cellular Informatics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Terajima, Hideki [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B56, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Yajima, Junichiro; Nishizaka, Takayuki [Department of Physics, Gakushuin University, 1-5-1 Mejiro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8588 (Japan); Kinjo, Masataka [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Dynamics, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Taguchi, Hideki, E-mail: taguchi@bio.titech.ac.jp [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B56, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We develop a method to track a quantum dot-conjugated protein in yeast cells. {yields} We incorporate the conjugated quantum dot proteins into yeast spheroplasts. {yields} We track the motions by conventional or 3D tracking microscopy. -- Abstract: Yeast is a model eukaryote with a variety of biological resources. Here we developed a method to track a quantum dot (QD)-conjugated protein in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We chemically conjugated QDs with the yeast prion Sup35, incorporated them into yeast spheroplasts, and tracked the motions by conventional two-dimensional or three-dimensional tracking microscopy. The method paves the way toward the individual tracking of proteins of interest inside living yeast cells.

  16. Developing new optical imaging techniques for single particle and molecule tracking in live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is a far-field as well as wide-field optical imaging technique. Since it is non-invasive and requires no sample staining, DIC microscopy is suitable for tracking the motion of target molecules in live cells without interfering their functions. In addition, high numerical aperture objectives and condensers can be used in DIC microscopy. The depth of focus of DIC is shallow, which gives DIC much better optical sectioning ability than those of phase contrast and dark field microscopies. In this work, DIC was utilized to study dynamic biological processes including endocytosis and intracellular transport in live cells. The suitability of DIC microscopy for single particle tracking in live cells was first demonstrated by using DIC to monitor the entire endocytosis process of one mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) into a live mammalian cell. By taking advantage of the optical sectioning ability of DIC, we recorded the depth profile of the MSN during the endocytosis process. The shape change around the nanoparticle due to the formation of a vesicle was also captured. DIC microscopy was further modified that the sample can be illuminated and imaged at two wavelengths simultaneously. By using the new technique, noble metal nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes were selectively imaged. Among all the examined metal nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles in rod shapes were found to be especially useful. Due to their anisotropic optical properties, gold nanorods showed as diffraction-limited spots with disproportionate bright and dark parts that are strongly dependent on their orientation in the 3D space. Gold nanorods were developed as orientation nanoprobes and were successfully used to report the self-rotation of gliding microtubules on kinesin coated substrates. Gold nanorods were further used to study the rotational motions of cargoes during the endocytosis and intracellular transport processes in live mammalian

  17. Comparison of three-dimensional particle tracking and sizing using plenoptic imaging and digital in-line holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Elise M; Thurow, Brian S; Guildenbecher, Daniel R

    2016-08-10

    Digital in-line holography (DIH) and plenoptic photography are two techniques for single-shot, volumetric measurement of 3D particle fields. Here we present a comparison of the two methods by applying plenoptic imaging to experimental configurations that have been previously investigated with DIH. These experiments include the tracking of secondary droplets from the impact of a water drop on a thin film of water and tracking of pellets from a shotgun. Both plenoptic imaging and DIH successfully quantify the 3D nature of these particle fields. This includes measurement of the 3D particle position, individual particle sizes, and three-component velocity vectors. For the initial processing methods presented here, both techniques give out-of-plane positional accuracy of approximately 1-2 particle diameters. For a fixed image sensor, digital holography achieves higher effective in-plane spatial resolutions. However, collimated and coherent illumination makes holography susceptible to image distortion through index of refraction gradients, as demonstrated in the shotgun experiments. In contrast, plenoptic imaging allows for a simpler experimental configuration and, due to the use of diffuse, white-light illumination, plenoptic imaging is less susceptible to image distortion in the shotgun experiments.

  18. Radioactive Particle Tracking Technique with Concentrated {sup 68}Ga Source for Visualization of Water Flows in Digester with Vertical Impeller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jang-Guen; Moon, Jinho; Lim, Jaecheong; Jung, Sung-Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    It is very important to understand the dynamic behavior of mixing flow for operating digesters. Therefore, there have been incessant studies over the world to investigate hydrodynamic parameters of flows in digesters experimentally. In Korea, researchers at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) have been studying radioactive particle tracking (RPT) technique to tracks the trajectory of a single radioactive particle flowing along with flow current and then, hydrodynamics parameters are calculated based on the trajectory of particle. In this study, the RPT technique was carried out for the digester mixed by a vertical impeller to visualize water flow. In this study, the RPT technique was carried out to investigate water flows in digester mixed by vertical impeller. We used a {sup 68}Ga generator source as a radioactive particle by concentrating eluate for RPT to be independent of reactors, and that is the first attempt in the world. The reconstructed particle trajectory will be used to calculate hydrodynamics parameters to understand the dynamic behavior of flows in digester.

  19. A Preliminary Comparison of Three Dimensional Particle Tracking and Sizing using Plenoptic Imaging and Digital In-line Holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert; Munz, Elise Dahnke; Farias, Paul Abraham; Thurow, Brian S [Auburn U

    2015-12-01

    Digital in-line holography and plenoptic photography are two techniques for single-shot, volumetric measurement of 3D particle fields. Here we present a preliminary comparison of the two methods by applying plenoptic imaging to experimental configurations that have been previously investigated with digital in-line holography. These experiments include the tracking of secondary droplets from the impact of a water drop on a thin film of water and tracking of pellets from a shotgun. Both plenoptic imaging and digital in-line holography successfully quantify the 3D nature of these particle fields. This includes measurement of the 3D particle position, individual particle sizes, and three-component velocity vectors. For the initial processing methods presented here, both techniques give out-of-plane positional accuracy of approximately 1-2 particle diameters. For a fixed image sensor, digital holography achieves higher effective in-plane spatial resolutions. However, collimated and coherent illumination makes holography susceptible to image distortion through index of refraction gradients, as demonstrated in the shotgun experiments. On the other hand, plenotpic imaging allows for a simpler experimental configuration. Furthermore, due to the use of diffuse, white-light illumination, plenoptic imaging is less susceptible to image distortion in the shotgun experiments. Additional work is needed to better quantify sources of uncertainty, particularly in the plenoptic experiments, as well as develop data processing methodologies optimized for the plenoptic measurement.

  20. Tracking viral particles in the intestinal contents of the American bullfrog, Lithobates catesbeianus, by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Antonucci,A.M.; Catroxo,M.H.; Hipolito,M.; Takemoto,R.M.; Melo,N.A.; França,F.M.; Teixeira,P.C.; Ferreira,C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Feces are an important viral agent elimination route for infected carrier animals and in aquatic organisms these pathogenic agents can very rapidly propagate due to the habitation environment. The objective of this work is to track viral particles in the intestinal contents of bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) from five commercial frog farms in the region of Vale do Paraíba, in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, using negative contrast transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The Coronaviridae,...

  1. A C++ Framework for Conducting High-Speed, Long-Term Particle Tracking Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabel, A.C.; /SLAC

    2006-02-06

    For the purpose of conducting parallel, long-term tracking studies of storage rings such as the ones described in [3], [4], maximum execution speed is essential. We describe an approach involving metaprogramming techniques in C++ which results in execution speeds rivaling hand-optimized assembler code for a particular tracking lattice while retaining the generality and flexibility of an all-purpose tracking code.

  2. Assessing the efficacy of nano- and micro-sized magnetic particles as contrast agents for MRI cell tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Arthur; Herrmann, Anne; Moss, Diana; Sée, Violaine; Davies, Karen; Williams, Steve R; Murray, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Iron-oxide based contrast agents play an important role in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of labelled cells in vivo. Currently, a wide range of such contrast agents is available with sizes varying from several nanometers up to a few micrometers and consisting of single or multiple magnetic cores. Here, we evaluate the effectiveness of these different particles for labelling and imaging stem cells, using a mouse mesenchymal stem cell line to investigate intracellular uptake, retention and processing of nano- and microsized contrast agents. The effect of intracellular confinement on transverse relaxivity was measured by MRI at 7 T and in compliance with the principles of the '3Rs', the suitability of the contrast agents for MR-based cell tracking in vivo was tested using a chick embryo model. We show that for all particles tested, relaxivity was markedly reduced following cellular internalisation, indicating that contrast agent relaxivity in colloidal suspension does not accurately predict performance in MR-based cell tracking studies. Using a bimodal imaging approach comprising fluorescence and MRI, we demonstrate that labelled MSC remain viable following in vivo transplantation and can be tracked effectively using MRI. Importantly, our data suggest that larger particles might confer advantages for longer-term imaging.

  3. Assessing the efficacy of nano- and micro-sized magnetic particles as contrast agents for MRI cell tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Taylor

    Full Text Available Iron-oxide based contrast agents play an important role in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of labelled cells in vivo. Currently, a wide range of such contrast agents is available with sizes varying from several nanometers up to a few micrometers and consisting of single or multiple magnetic cores. Here, we evaluate the effectiveness of these different particles for labelling and imaging stem cells, using a mouse mesenchymal stem cell line to investigate intracellular uptake, retention and processing of nano- and microsized contrast agents. The effect of intracellular confinement on transverse relaxivity was measured by MRI at 7 T and in compliance with the principles of the '3Rs', the suitability of the contrast agents for MR-based cell tracking in vivo was tested using a chick embryo model. We show that for all particles tested, relaxivity was markedly reduced following cellular internalisation, indicating that contrast agent relaxivity in colloidal suspension does not accurately predict performance in MR-based cell tracking studies. Using a bimodal imaging approach comprising fluorescence and MRI, we demonstrate that labelled MSC remain viable following in vivo transplantation and can be tracked effectively using MRI. Importantly, our data suggest that larger particles might confer advantages for longer-term imaging.

  4. Multi-agent target tracking using particle filters enhanced with context data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Claessens, R

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The proposed framework for Multi-Agent Target Tracking supports i) tracking of objects and ii) search and rescue based on the fusion of very heterogeneous data. The system is based on a novel approach to fusing sensory observations, intelligence...

  5. Uncertainty quantification of seabed parameters for large data volumes along survey tracks with a tempered particle filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, J.; Quijano, J. E.; Dosso, S. E.; Holland, C. W.; Mandolesi, E.

    2016-12-01

    Geophysical seabed properties are important for the detection and classification of unexploded ordnance. However, current surveying methods such as vertical seismic profiling, coring, or inversion are of limited use when surveying large areas with high spatial sampling density. We consider surveys based on a source and receiver array towed by an autonomous vehicle which produce large volumes of seabed reflectivity data that contain unprecedented and detailed seabed information. The data are analyzed with a particle filter, which requires efficient reflection-coefficient computation, efficient inversion algorithms and efficient use of computer resources. The filter quantifies information content of multiple sequential data sets by considering results from previous data along the survey track to inform the importance sampling at the current point. Challenges arise from environmental changes along the track where the number of sediment layers and their properties change. This is addressed by a trans-dimensional model in the filter which allows layering complexity to change along a track. Efficiency is improved by likelihood tempering of various particle subsets and including exchange moves (parallel tempering). The filter is implemented on a hybrid computer that combines central processing units (CPUs) and graphics processing units (GPUs) to exploit three levels of parallelism: (1) fine-grained parallel computation of spherical reflection coefficients with a GPU implementation of Levin integration; (2) updating particles by concurrent CPU processes which exchange information using automatic load balancing (coarse grained parallelism); (3) overlapping CPU-GPU communication (a major bottleneck) with GPU computation by staggering CPU access to the multiple GPUs. The algorithm is applied to spherical reflection coefficients for data sets along a 14-km track on the Malta Plateau, Mediterranean Sea. We demonstrate substantial efficiency gains over previous methods. [This

  6. Simultaneous multi-vehicle detection and tracking framework with pavement constraints based on machine learning and particle filter algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Huang, Zhi; Zhong, Zhihua

    2014-11-01

    Due to the large variations of environment with ever-changing background and vehicles with different shapes, colors and appearances, to implement a real-time on-board vehicle recognition system with high adaptability, efficiency and robustness in complicated environments, remains challenging. This paper introduces a simultaneous detection and tracking framework for robust on-board vehicle recognition based on monocular vision technology. The framework utilizes a novel layered machine learning and particle filter to build a multi-vehicle detection and tracking system. In the vehicle detection stage, a layered machine learning method is presented, which combines coarse-search and fine-search to obtain the target using the AdaBoost-based training algorithm. The pavement segmentation method based on characteristic similarity is proposed to estimate the most likely pavement area. Efficiency and accuracy are enhanced by restricting vehicle detection within the downsized area of pavement. In vehicle tracking stage, a multi-objective tracking algorithm based on target state management and particle filter is proposed. The proposed system is evaluated by roadway video captured in a variety of traffics, illumination, and weather conditions. The evaluating results show that, under conditions of proper illumination and clear vehicle appearance, the proposed system achieves 91.2% detection rate and 2.6% false detection rate. Experiments compared to typical algorithms show that, the presented algorithm reduces the false detection rate nearly by half at the cost of decreasing 2.7%-8.6% detection rate. This paper proposes a multi-vehicle detection and tracking system, which is promising for implementation in an on-board vehicle recognition system with high precision, strong robustness and low computational cost.

  7. Recovering the Elemental Composition of Comet Wild 2 Dust in Five Stardust Impact Tracks and Terminal Particles in Aerogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, H A; Brennan, S; Bradley, J P; Luening, K; Ignatyev, K; Pianetta, P

    2007-01-04

    The elemental (non-volatile) composition of five Stardust impact tracks and terminal particles left from capture of Comet 81P/Wild 2 dust were mapped in a synchrotron x-ray scanning microprobe with full fluorescence spectra at each pixel. Because aerogel includes background levels of several elements of interest, we employ a novel 'dual threshold' approach to discriminate against background contaminants: an upper threshold, above which a spectrum contains cometary material plus aerogel and a lower threshold below which it contains only aerogel. The difference between normalized cometary-plus-background and background-only spectra is attributable to cometary material. The few spectra in between are discarded since misallocation is detrimental: cometary material incorrectly placed in the background spectrum is later subtracted from the cometary spectrum, doubling the loss of reportable cometary material. This approach improves precision of composition quantification. We present the refined whole impact track and terminal particle elemental abundances for the five impact tracks. One track shows mass increases in Cr and Mn (1.4x), Cu, As and K (2x), Zn (4x) and total mass (13%) by dual thresholds compared to a single threshold. Major elements Fe and Ni are not significantly affected. The additional Cr arises from cometary material containing little Fe. We exclude Au intermixed with cometary material because it is found to be a localized surface contaminant carried by comet dust into an impact track. The dual threshold technique can be used in other situations where elements of interest in a small sample embedded in a matrix are also present in the matrix itself.

  8. Flow Mapping in a Gas-Solid Riser via Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthanna Al-Dahhan; Milorad P. Dudukovic; Satish Bhusarapu; Timothy J. O' hern; Steven Trujillo; Michael R. Prairie

    2005-06-04

    Statement of the Problem: Developing and disseminating a general and experimentally validated model for turbulent multiphase fluid dynamics suitable for engineering design purposes in industrial scale applications of riser reactors and pneumatic conveying, require collecting reliable data on solids trajectories, velocities ? averaged and instantaneous, solids holdup distribution and solids fluxes in the riser as a function of operating conditions. Such data are currently not available on the same system. Multiphase Fluid Dynamics Research Consortium (MFDRC) was established to address these issues on a chosen example of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) reactor, which is widely used in petroleum and chemical industry including coal combustion. This project addresses the problem of lacking reliable data to advance CFB technology. Project Objectives: The objective of this project is to advance the understanding of the solids flow pattern and mixing in a well-developed flow region of a gas-solid riser, operated at different gas flow rates and solids loading using the state-of-the-art non-intrusive measurements. This work creates an insight and reliable database for local solids fluid-dynamic quantities in a pilot-plant scale CFB, which can then be used to validate/develop phenomenological models for the riser. This study also attempts to provide benchmark data for validation of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) codes and their current closures. Technical Approach: Non-Invasive Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT) technique provides complete Eulerian solids flow field (time average velocity map and various turbulence parameters such as the Reynolds stresses, turbulent kinetic energy, and eddy diffusivities). It also gives directly the Lagrangian information of solids flow and yields the true solids residence time distribution (RTD). Another radiation based technique, Computed Tomography (CT) yields detailed time averaged local holdup profiles at

  9. Assessment of particle-tracking models for dispersed particle-laden flows implemented in OpenFOAM and ANSYS FLUENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Greifzu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study two benchmark problems for turbulent dispersed particle-laden flow are investigated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD. How the CFD programs OpenFOAM and ANSYS FLUENT model these flows is tested and compared. The numerical results obtained with Lagrangian–Eulerian (LE point-particle (PP models for Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS simulations of the fluid flow in steady state and transient modes are compared with the experimental data available in the literature. The effect of the dispersion model on the particle motion is investigated in particular, as well as the order of coupling between the continuous carrier phase and the dispersed phase. First, a backward-facing step (BFS case is validated. As a second case, the confined bluff body (CBB is used. The simulated fluid flows correspond well with the experimental data for both test cases. The results for the dispersed solid phase reveal a good accordance between the simulation results and the experiments. It seems that particle dispersion is slightly under-predicted when ANSYS FLUENT is used, whereas the applied solver in OpenFOAM overestimates the dispersion somewhat. Only minor differences between the coupling schemes are detected due to the low volume fractions and mass loadings that are investigated. In the BFS test case the importance of the spatial dimension of the numerical model is demonstrated. Even if it is reasonable to assume a two-dimensional fluid flow structure, it is crucial to simulate the turbulent particle-laden flow with a three-dimensional model since the turbulent dispersion of the particles is three-dimensional.

  10. Use of a ground-water flow model with particle tracking to evaluate ground-water vulnerability, Clark County, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, D.T.; Wilkinson, J.M.; Orzol, L.L.

    1996-01-01

    A ground-water flow model was used in conjunction with particle tracking to evaluate ground-water vulnerability in Clark County, Washington. Using the particle-tracking program, particles were placed in every cell of the flow model (about 60,000 particles) and tracked backwards in time and space upgradient along flow paths to their recharge points. A new computer program was developed that interfaces the results from a particle-tracking program with a geographic information system (GIS). The GIS was used to display and analyze the particle-tracking results. Ground-water vulnerability was evaluated by selecting parts of the ground-water flow system and combining the results with ancillary information stored in the GIS to determine recharge areas, characteristics of recharge areas, downgradient impact of land use at recharge areas, and age of ground water. Maps of the recharge areas for each hydrogeologic unit illustrate the presence of local, intermediate, or regional ground-water flow systems and emphasize the three-dimensional nature of the ground-water flow system in Clark County. Maps of the recharge points for each hydrogeologic unit were overlaid with maps depicting aquifer sensitivity as determined by DRASTIC (a measure of the pollution potential of ground water, based on the intrinsic characteristics of the near-surface unsaturated and saturated zones) and recharge from on-site waste-disposal systems. A large number of recharge areas were identified, particularly in southern Clark County, that have a high aquifer sensitivity, coincide with areas of recharge from on-site waste-disposal systems, or both. Using the GIS, the characteristics of the recharge areas were related to the downgradient parts of the ground-water system that will eventually receive flow that has recharged through these areas. The aquifer sensitivity, as indicated by DRASTIC, of the recharge areas for downgradient parts of the flow system was mapped for each hydrogeologic unit. A number of

  11. Single particle tracking of internalized metallic nanoparticles reveals heterogeneous directed motion after clathrin dependent endocytosis in mouse chromaffin cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Manuela; Moya-Díaz, José; Gallo, Luciana I.; Marengo, Fernando D.; Estrada, Laura C.

    2018-01-01

    Most accepted single particle tracking methods are able to obtain high-resolution trajectories for relatively short periods of time. In this work we apply a straightforward combination of single-particle tracking microscopy and metallic nanoparticles internalization on mouse chromaffin cells to unveil the intracellular trafficking mechanism of metallic-nanoparticle-loaded vesicles (MNP-V) complexes after clathrin dependent endocytosis. We found that directed transport is the major route of MNP-Vs intracellular trafficking after stimulation (92.6% of the trajectories measured). We then studied the MNP-V speed at each point along the trajectory, and found that the application of a second depolarization stimulus during the tracking provokes an increase in the percentage of low-speed trajectory points in parallel with a decrease in the number of high-speed trajectory points. This result suggests that stimulation may facilitate the compartmentalization of internalized MNPs in a more restricted location such as was already demonstrated in neuronal and neuroendocrine cells (Bronfman et al 2003 J. Neurosci. 23 3209–20). Although further experiments will be required to address the mechanisms underlying this transport dynamics, our studies provide quantitative evidence of the heterogeneous behavior of vesicles mobility after endocytosis in chromaffin cells highlighting the potential of MNPs as alternative labels in optical microscopy to provide new insights into the vesicles dynamics in a wide variety of cellular environments.

  12. Improvements to the ShipIR/NTCS adaptive track gate algorithm and 3D flare particle model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Srinivasan; Vaitekunas, David A.; Gunter, Willem H.; February, Faith J.

    2017-05-01

    A key component in any image-based tracking system is the adaptive tracking algorithm used to segment the image into potential targets, rank-and-select the best candidate target, and gate the selected target to further improve tracker performance. Similarly, a key component in any soft-kill response to an incoming guided missile is the flare/chaff decoy used to distract or seduce the seeker homing system away from the naval platform. This paper describes the recent improvements to the naval threat countermeasure simulator (NTCS) of the NATO-standard ship signature model (ShipIR). Efforts to analyse and match the 3D flare particle model against actual IR measurements of the Chemring TALOS IR round resulted in further refinement of the 3D flare particle distribution. The changes in the flare model characteristics were significant enough to require an overhaul to the adaptive track gate (ATG) algorithm in the way it detects the presence of flare decoys and reacquires the target after flare separation. A series of test scenarios are used to demonstrate the impact of the new flare and ATG on IR tactics simulation.

  13. Quantification of Vortex Generation Due to Non-Equilibrium Electrokinetics at the Micro/Nanochannel Interface: Particle Tracking Velocimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Jun Lee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe a quantitative study of vortex generation due to non-equilibrium electrokinetics near a micro/nanochannel interface. The microfluidic device is comprised of a microchannel with a set of nanochannels. These perm-selective nanochannels induce flow instability and thereby produce strong vortex generation. We performed tracking visualization of fluorescent microparticles to obtain velocity fields. Particle tracking enables the calculation of an averaged velocity field and the velocity fluctuations. We characterized the effect of applied voltages and electrolyte concentrations on vortex formation. The experimental results show that an increasing voltage or decreasing concentration results in a larger vortex region and a strong velocity fluctuation. We calculate the normalized velocity fluctuation—whose meaning is comparable to turbulent intensity—and we found that it is as high as 0.12. This value is indicative of very efficient mixing, albeit with a small Reynolds number.

  14. Advanced algorithms for mobile robot motion planning and tracking in structured static environments using particle swarm optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćosić Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An approach to intelligent robot motion planning and tracking in known and static environments is presented in this paper. This complex problem is divided into several simpler problems. The first is generation of a collision free path from starting to destination point, which is solved using a particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm. The second is interpolation of the obtained collision-free path, which is solved using a radial basis function neural network (RBFNN, and trajectory generation, based on the interpolated path. The last is a trajectory tracking problem, which is solved using a proportional-integral (PI controller. Due to uncertainties, obstacle avoidance is still not ensured, so an additional fuzzy controller is introduced, which corrects the control action of the PI controller. The proposed solution can be used even in dynamic environments, where obstacles change their position in time. Simulation studies were realized to validate and illustrate this approach.

  15. No-slip consistent immersed boundary particle tracking to simulate impaction filtration in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghazaryan, L.; Lopez Penha, D.J.; Stolz, S.; Kuczaj, Arkadiusz K.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    2013-01-01

    n this paper, we present a new method for simulating the motion of a disperse particle phase in a carrier gas through porous media. We assume a sufficiently dilute particle-laden flow and compute, independently of the disperse phase, the steady laminar fluid velocity using the immersed boundary

  16. Asynchronous control for networked systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rubio, Francisco; Bencomo, Sebastián

    2015-01-01

    This book sheds light on networked control systems; it describes different techniques for asynchronous control, moving away from the periodic actions of classical control, replacing them with state-based decisions and reducing the frequency with which communication between subsystems is required. The text focuses specially on event-based control. Split into two parts, Asynchronous Control for Networked Systems begins by addressing the problems of single-loop networked control systems, laying out various solutions which include two alternative model-based control schemes (anticipatory and predictive) and the use of H2/H∞ robust control to deal with network delays and packet losses. Results on self-triggering and send-on-delta sampling are presented to reduce the need for feedback in the loop. In Part II, the authors present solutions for distributed estimation and control. They deal first with reliable networks and then extend their results to scenarios in which delays and packet losses may occur. The novel ...

  17. A comparison of single particle tracking and temporal image correlation spectroscopy for quantitative analysis of endosome motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, F. W.; Wustner, D.

    2013-01-01

    different methods for image denoising. Appropriate denoising significantly reduced the effect of noise and of immobile structures on both methods. Shape fluctuations of simulated particles had a more pronounced effect on TICS than on SPT analysis. In denoised images of fluorescent beads or cytosolic......Single particle tracking (SPT) is becoming a standard method to extract transport parameters from time-lapse image sequences of fluorescent vesicles in living cells. Another method to obtain these data is temporal image correlation spectroscopy (TICS), but this method is less often used...... for measurement of intracellular vesicle transport. Here, we present an extensive comparison of SPT and TICS. First we examine the effect of photobleaching, shading and noise on SPT and TICS analysis using simulated image sequences. To this end, we developed a simple photophysical model, which relates spatially...

  18. Application of a novel particle tracking algorithm in the flow visualization of an artificial abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Wang, Yuan; He, Wenbo; Yang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    A novel Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) algorithm based on Voronoi Diagram (VD) is proposed and briefed as VD-PTV. The robustness of VD-PTV for pulsatile flow is verified through a test that includes a widely used artificial flow and a classic reference algorithm. The proposed algorithm is then applied to visualize the flow in an artificial abdominal aortic aneurysm included in a pulsatile circulation system that simulates the aortic blood flow in human body. Results show that, large particles tend to gather at the upstream boundary because of the backflow eddies that follow the pulsation. This qualitative description, together with VD-PTV, has laid a foundation for future works that demand high-level quantification.

  19. Developing asynchronous online interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanborn, Heidi

    2016-09-01

    For many health programmes, developing interprofessional education (IPE) has been a challenge. Evidence on the best method for design and implementation of IPE has been slow to emerge, with little research on how to best incorporate IPE in the asynchronous online learning environment. This leaves online programmes with no clear guidance when embarking upon an initiative to integrate IPE into the curriculum. One tool that can be effective at guiding the incorporation of IPE across all learning platforms is the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) competencies. A project was designed to integrate the nationally defined IPEC competencies throughout an asynchronous, online baccalaureate nursing completion programme. A programme-wide review led to targeted revision of course and unit-level objectives, learning experiences, and assessments based on the IPEC framework. As a result of this effort, the programme curriculum now provides interprofessional learning activities across all courses. This report provides a method for using the IPEC competencies to incorporate IPE within various asynchronous learning assessments, assuring students learn about, with, and from other professions.

  20. Dissecting the Cell Entry Pathway of Dengue Virus by Single-Particle Tracking in Living Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Rust, Michael J.; Chen, Chen; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Wilschut, Jan; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2008-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an enveloped RNA virus that causes the most common arthropod-borne infection worldwide. The mechanism by which DENV infects the host cell remains unclear. In this work, we used live-cell imaging and single-virus tracking to investigate the cell entry, endocytic trafficking,

  1. Tracking control of colloidal particles through non-homogeneous stationary flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Híjar, Humberto, E-mail: humberto.hijar@lasallistas.org.mx [Grupo de Sistemas Inteligentes, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad La Salle, Benjamín Franklin 47, 06140, Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2013-12-21

    We consider the problem of controlling the trajectory of a single colloidal particle in a fluid with steady non-homogeneous flow. We use a Langevin equation to describe the dynamics of this particle, where the friction term is assumed to be given by the Faxén's Theorem for the force on a sphere immersed in a stationary flow. We use this description to propose an explicit control force field to be applied on the particle such that it will follow asymptotically any given desired trajectory, starting from an arbitrary initial condition. We show that the dynamics of the controlled particle can be mapped into a set of stochastic harmonic oscillators and that the velocity gradient of the solvent induces an asymmetric coupling between them. We study the particular case of a Brownian particle controlled through a plane Couette flow and show explicitly that the velocity gradient of the solvent renders the dynamics non-stationary and non-reversible in time. We quantify this effect in terms of the correlation functions for the position of the controlled particle, which turn out to exhibit contributions depending exclusively on the non-equilibrium character of the state of the solvent. In order to test the validity of our model, we perform simulations of the controlled particle moving in a simple shear flow, using a hybrid method combining molecular dynamics and multi-particle collision dynamics. We confirm numerically that the proposed guiding force allows for controlling the trajectory of the micro-sized particle by obligating it to follow diverse specific trajectories in fluids with homogeneous shear rates of different strengths. In addition, we find that the non-equilibrium correlation functions in simulations exhibit the same qualitative behavior predicted by the model, thus revealing the presence of the asymmetric non-equilibrium coupling mechanism induced by the velocity gradient.

  2. Real-time optical tracking for motion compensated irradiation with scanned particle beams at CNAO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattori, G., E-mail: giovanni.fattori@psi.ch [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Seregni, M. [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Pella, A. [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Riboldi, M. [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Capasso, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Donetti, M. [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Ciocca, M. [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Giordanengo, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Pullia, M. [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Marchetto, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Baroni, G. [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2016-08-11

    Purpose: We describe the interface developed at the National Center for Oncological Hadrontherapy in Pavia to provide the dose delivery systems with real time respiratory motion information captured with an optical tracking system. An experimental study is presented to assess the technical feasibility of the implemented organ motion compensation framework, by analyzing the film response when irradiated with proton beams. Methods: The motion monitoring solution is based on a commercial hardware for motion capture running in-house developed software for respiratory signal processing. As part of the integration, the latency of data transmission to the dose delivery system was experimentally quantified and accounted for by signal time prediction. A respiratory breathing phantom is presented and used to test tumor tracking based either on the optical measurement of the target position or internal-external correlation models and beam gating, as driven by external surrogates. Beam tracking was tested considering the full target motion excursion (25×18 mm), whereas it is limited to 6×2 mm in the gating window. The different motion mitigation strategies were evaluated by comparing the experimental film responses with respect to static irradiation conditions. Dose inhomogeneity (IC) and conformity (CI) are provided as main indexes for dose quality assessment considering the irradiation in static condition as reference. Results: We measured 20.6 ms overall latency for motion signal processing. Dose measurements showed that beam tracking largely preserved dose homogeneity and conformity, showing maximal IC and CI variations limited to +0.10 and −0.01 with respect to the static reference. Gating resulted in slightly larger discrepancies (ΔIC=+0.20, ΔCI=−0.13) due to uncompensated residual motion in the gating window. Conclusions: The preliminary beam tracking and gating results verified the functionality of the prototypal solution for organ motion compensation based on

  3. Infrared Spectroscopy of Wild 2 Particle Hypervelocity Tracks in Stardust Aerogel: Evidence for the presence of Volatile Organics in Comet Dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajt, S; Sandford, S A; Flynn, G J; Matrajt, G; Snead, C J; Westphal, A J; Bradley, J P

    2007-08-28

    Infrared spectroscopy maps of some tracks, made by cometary dust from 81P/Wild 2 impacting Stardust aerogel, reveal an interesting distribution of volatile organic material. Out of six examined tracks three show presence of volatile organic components possibly injected into the aerogel during particle impacts. When particle tracks contained excess volatile organic material, they were found to be -CH{sub 2}-rich. Off-normal particle tracks could indicate impacts by lower velocity particles that could have bounced off the Whipple shield, therefore carry off some contamination from it. However, this theory is not supported by data that show excess organic-rich material in normal and off-normal particle tracks. It is clear that the population of cometary particles impacting the Stardust aerogel collectors also include grains that contained little or none of this volatile organic component. This observation is consistent with the highly heterogeneous nature of the collected grains, as seen by a multitude of other analytical techniques. We propose that at least some of the volatile organic material might be of cometary origin based on supporting data shown in this paper. However, we also acknowledge the presence of carbon (primarily as -CH{sub 3}) in the original aerogel, which complicates interpretation of these results.

  4. Tracking of fuel particles after pin failure in nominal, loss-of-flow and shutdown conditions in the MYRRHA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckingham, Sophia; Planquart, Philippe [von Karman Institute, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, B-1640 Rhode-St-Genèse (Belgium); Van Tichelen, Katrien [SCK- CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Quantification of the design and safety of the MYRRHA reactor in the event of a pin failure. • Simulation of different accident scenarios in both forced and natural convection regime. • The accumulation areas at the free-surface in case of the least dense particles depend on the flow regime. • The densest particles form an important deposit at the bottom of the vessel. • Further study of the risk of core blockage requires a detailed model of the core. - Abstract: This work on fuel dispersion aims at quantifying the design and safety of the MYRRHA nuclear reactor. A number of accidents leading to the release of a secondary phase into the primary coolant loop are investigated. Among these scenarios, an incident leading to the failure of one or more of the fuel pins is simulated while the reactor is operating in nominal conditions, but also in natural convection regime either during accident transients such as loss-of-flow or during the normal shut-down of the reactor. Two single-phase CFD models of the MYRRHA reactor are constructed in ANSYS Fluent to represent the reactor in nominal and natural convection conditions. An Euler–Lagrange approach with one-way coupling is used for the flow and particle tracking. Firstly, a steady state RANS solution is obtained for each of the three conditions. Secondly, the particles are released downstream from the core outlet and particle distributions are provided over the coolant circuit. Their size and density are defined such that test cases represent potential extremes that may occur. Analysis of the results highlights different particle behaviors, depending essentially on gravity forces and kinematic effects. Statistical distributions highlight potential accumulation regions that may form at the free-surfaces, on top of the upper diaphragm plate or at the bottom of the vessel. These results help to localize regions of fuel accumulation in order to provide insight for development of strategies for

  5. Characterizing the lower log region of the atmospheric surface layer via large-scale particle tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi, Giuseppe A.; Sherry, Michael; Kinzel, Matthias; Rival, David E.

    2014-05-01

    As a first step toward characterizing coherent structures within the atmospheric surface layer (ASL), measurements obtained via a large-scale particle tracking velocimetry (LS-PTV) system were validated against wind-measurement station data as well as canonical turbulent boundary layer studies. The LS-PTV system resolves three-dimensional, Lagrangian tracks over a 16 m3 volume. Mean-velocity measurements, as well as vertical and shear Reynolds-stress measurements, generally agreed with wind-measurement station data and Reynolds-stress profiles referenced from literature. The probability distributions for streamwise, spanwise and vertical velocity-fluctuation components appear normally distributed about zero. Furthermore, the probability distributions for all three components of Lagrangian acceleration were exponential and followed the parametrization curve from LaPorta et al. (Lett Nat 409:1017-1019, 2001). Lastly, the vorticity probability distributions were exponential and symmetric about zero, which matches findings from Balint et al. (Fluid Mech 228:53-86, 1991). The vorticity intensity measured by the LS-PTV system was less than values from Priyadarshana et al. (Fluid Mech 570:307-346, 2007), which is attributed to the low spatial resolution. However, the average spacing of 0.5 m between tracer particles is deemed sufficient for the future characterization of vortical structures within the ASL.

  6. Applications of particle-tracking techniques to bank infiltration: a case study from El Paso, Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Fattah, Ahmad; Langford, Richard; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents results of a small scale study that utilized particle-tracking techniques to evaluate transport of river water through an alluvial aquifer in a bank infiltration testing site in El Paso, Texas, USA. The particle-tracking survey was used to better define filtration parameters. Several simulations were generated to allow visualization of the effects of well placement and pumping rate on flow paths, travel time, the size of the pumping influence zone, and proportion of river-derived water and groundwater mixing in the pumping well. Simulations indicate that migration of river water into the aquifer is generally slow. Most water does not arrive at the well by the end of an 18-day pumping period at 0.54 m3/min pumping rate for a well located 18 m from the river. Forty-four percent of the water pumped from the well was river water. The models provided important information needed to design appropriate sampling schedules for bank filtration practices and ensured meeting adequate soil-retention times. The pumping rate has more effect on river water travel time than the location of the pumping well from the river. The examples presented in this paper indicate that operating the pumping well at a doubled distance from the river increased the time required for the water to travel to the well, but did not greatly change the capture zone.

  7. Leveraging Time Series Analysis and Machine Learning to Quantify Intra and Inter Trajectory Heterogeneity in Particle Tracking Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Christopher

    Microscopy hardware is now capable of producing high accuracy position vs. time data characterizing fluorescently tagged molecules in live cells. However, analytical methods for efficiently quantifying molecular motion parameters from the raw 3D (or 2D) single particle tracking (SPT) data are underdeveloped. ''Downstream'' trajectory analysis methods have only begun to efficiently and reliably harness the wealth of statistical kinetic information buried in SPT time series. The lack of analytical methods is due in part to the numerous challenges facing the translation the noisy position measurement information encoded in image stacks into unambiguous and readily interpretable biophysical information quantities (e.g., instantaneous effective diffusivity, forces, molecular friction, etc.). Some of these challenges are caused by: the inherently stochastic (and often nonlinear) nature of the dynamics of molecules in live cells, the highly crowded and heterogeneous time changing micro-environment of live cells influencing the dynamics of tagged molecules, and artifacts induced by the measurement device (e.g.localization error and motion blur). This talk will demonstrate how the merging of ideas from high frequency financial time series analysis, machine learning, and nonparametric Bayesian statistics can address these challenges, overcome limitations inherent in classic SPT methods, and provide insight into various single particle tracking experiments. We will describe and illustrate the new SPT trajectory analysis methods and discuss how the methods can be used to more reliably estimate data-driven and physically interpretable models. Internal R&D funds provided by Ursa Analytics, Inc.

  8. Scale-Dependent Fracture-Matrix Interactions and Their Impact on Radionuclide Transport: Development of efficient particle-tracking methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajaram, Harihar [University of Colorado, Boulder; Brutz, Michael [University of Colorado, Boulder; Klein, Dylan R [University of Colorado, Boulder; Mallikamas, Wasin [University of Colorado, Boulder

    2014-09-18

    Matrix Diffusion and Adsorption within a rock matrix are important mechanisms for retarding transport of radionuclides in fractured rock. Due to computational limitations and difficulties in characterizing complex subsurface systems, diffusive exchange between a fracture network and surrounding rock matrix is often modeled using simplified conceptual representations. There is significant uncertainty in “effective” parameters used in these models, such as the “effective matrix diffusivity”. Often, these parameters are estimated by fitting sparse breakthrough data, and estimated values fall outside meaningful ranges, because simplified interpretive models do not consider complex three-dimensional flow. There is limited understanding of the relationship between the effective parameters and rock mass characteristics including network structure and matrix properties. There is also evidence for an apparent scale-dependence in “effective matrix diffusion” coefficients. These observations raise questions on whether fracture-matrix interaction parameters estimated from small-scale tracer tests can be used for predicting radionuclide fate and transport at the scale of DOE field sites. High-resolution three-dimensional Discrete-Fracture-Network-Matrix (DFNM) models based on well-defined local scale transport equations can help to address some of these questions. Due to tremendous advances in computational technology over the last 10 years, DFNM modeling in relatively large domains is now feasible. The overarching objective of our research is to use DFNM modeling to improve fundamental understanding of how effective parameters in conceptual models are related to fracture network structure and matrix properties. An advanced three-dimensional DFNM model is being developed, which combines upscaled particle-tracking algorithms for fracture-matrix interaction and a parallel fracture-network flow simulator. The particle-tracking algorithms allow complexity in flow fields

  9. Phase Space Invertible Asynchronous Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Wacker

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available While for synchronous deterministic cellular automata there is an accepted definition of reversibility, the situation is less clear for asynchronous cellular automata. We first discuss a few possibilities and then investigate what we call phase space invertible asynchronous cellular automata in more detail. We will show that for each Turing machine there is such a cellular automaton simulating it, and that it is decidable whether an asynchronous cellular automaton has this property or not, even in higher dimensions.

  10. Fluorescence labelling as tool for zeolite particle tracking in nanoremediation approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillies, Glenn; Mackenzie, Katrin; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter; Georgi, Anett

    2016-04-15

    Colloidal Fe-zeolites such as Fe-BEA-35 are currently under study as new adsorbent and catalyst materials for in-situ chemical oxidation with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. As for nanoremediation in general, the availability of suitable particle detection methods is a requirement for successful process development and particle tracing. Detection and distinguishing between natural colloids and introduced particles with a similar composition are a challenge. By means of fluorescence labelling, a highly specific detection option for Fe-BEA-35 was developed. ‘Ship-in-a-bottle’ synthesis of fluorescein within the zeolite pores, which was applied for the first time for a BEA type zeolite, provides a product with stable and non-extractable fluorescence. When the fluorescent labelled zeolite is added at a concentration of 1 wt.% referring to the total zeolite mass, a very low detection limit of 1 mg/L of total zeolite is obtained. Compared to commonly applied turbidity measurements, detection via fluorescence labelling is much more specific and sensitive. Fluorescence is only marginally affected by carboxymethyl cellulose, which is frequently applied as stabilizer in application suspensions but will be depleted upon contact with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Transport properties of fluorescent labelled and non-labelled Fe-zeolite particles are in agreement as determined in a column study with quartz sand and synthetic groundwater (classified as very hard). - Highlights: • Fluorescent BEA zeolite was prepared for first time by ‘ship-in-a-bottle’ synthesis. • Fluorescein synthesized inside zeolite channels is stable and non-extractable. • Detection limit of Fe-zeolite particles in suspension with 1 wt.% fluorescent zeolite is 1 mg/L. • Transport properties of fluorescent and Fe-loaded BEA particles are identical.

  11. Simulating biodegradation under mixing-limited conditions using Michaelis-Menten (Monod) kinetic expressions in a particle tracking model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dong; Benson, David A.

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that effective field-scale bioremediation reactions rates are significantly lower than batch- or lab-scale rates, when the same law of mass action is used to represent the reaction at both scales. The mismatch is usually attributed to poor mixing of reactants brought about by heterogeneity. A recent method, based on a purely Lagrangian particle tracking (PT) theoretical development, successfully reproduces the effects of mixing-limited bimolecular reaction (A + B → C) from two benchmark experiments. In this numerical method, the reactants are represented by particles, and the small-scale physics are directly translated into a combination of two probabilities that govern whether: (1) reactant particles are collocated during a short time interval, and (2) two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. The latter is due to thermodynamics and is independent of scale of mixing. The former directly accounts for the degree of mixing in any system. We extend the application of the PT method to biodegradation, which is commonly characterized by more complex Michaelis-Menten (Monod) chemical kinetics. The advantage of the PT method is that it explains the variation of reaction rate based on mixing-controlled particle collisions instead of using empirical parameters. The PT method not only matches the Michaelis-Menten (Monod) equation under ideal conditions, but also captures the characteristics of non-ideal conditions such as imperfect mixing, disequilibrium, and limited availability of the active sites. We show these using hypothetical systems and also successfully apply the method to a column study of carbon tetrachloride biodegradation.

  12. A novel asynchronous access method with binary interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres-Solis Jorge

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditionally synchronous access strategies require users to comply with one or more time constraints in order to communicate intent with a binary human-machine interface (e.g., mechanical, gestural or neural switches. Asynchronous access methods are preferable, but have not been used with binary interfaces in the control of devices that require more than two commands to be successfully operated. Methods We present the mathematical development and evaluation of a novel asynchronous access method that may be used to translate sporadic activations of binary interfaces into distinct outcomes for the control of devices requiring an arbitrary number of commands to be controlled. With this method, users are required to activate their interfaces only when the device under control behaves erroneously. Then, a recursive algorithm, incorporating contextual assumptions relevant to all possible outcomes, is used to obtain an informed estimate of user intention. We evaluate this method by simulating a control task requiring a series of target commands to be tracked by a model user. Results When compared to a random selection, the proposed asynchronous access method offers a significant reduction in the number of interface activations required from the user. Conclusion This novel access method offers a variety of advantages over traditionally synchronous access strategies and may be adapted to a wide variety of contexts, with primary relevance to applications involving direct object manipulation.

  13. Computer Vision Tracking Using Particle Filters for 3D Position Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    images taken over time. Currently photogrammetry and videogrammetry are used in a variety of fields from topographic mapping to film motion capture and...5 2.2 Photogrammetry ...focus on particle filters. 2.2 Photogrammetry Photogrammetry is the process of determining 3-D coordinates through images. The mathematical underpinnings

  14. Brightness through Local Constraint-LNA-Enhanced FIT Hybridization Probes for In Vivo Ribonucleotide Particle Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hövelmann, Felix; Gaspar, Imre; Loibl, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Imaging the dynamics of RNA in living cells is usually performed by means of transgenic approaches that require modification of RNA targets and cells. Fluorogenic hybridization probes would also allow the analysis of wild-type organisms. We developed nuclease-resistant DNA forced intercalation (FIT...... acid (LNA) unit serves to introduce a local constraint. This closes fluorescence decay channels and thereby increases the brightness of the probe-target duplexes. As few as two probes were sufficient to enable the tracking of oskar mRNPs in wild-type living Drosophila melanogaster oocytes....

  15. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure Induced by HZE Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  16. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure iIduced by HZE Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  17. New Software Techniques in Particle Physics and Improved Track Reconstruction for the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Hauth, Thomas; Pfeiffer, Andreas

    This thesis presents improvements of the processing speed of HEP applications by making better use of the vector units in modern CPUs. To cope with the increased amount of LHC data, the parallel computing power of GPUs are one option. GPU-optimized reconstruction algorithms which provide a high level of parallelism are presented. Furthermore, the decay of neutral kaons was used to show the benefits of the Geant4-based fitting method when applied to the mass reconstruction of particles.

  18. The Feasibility of Performing Particle Tracking Based Flow Measurements with Acoustic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Katija, K., S. P. Colin, J. H. Costello, and J. O. Dabiri. 2011. “Quantitatively Measuring In - Situ Flows Using a Self-Contained Underwater... Measurements with Acoustic Cameras” ERDC/CHL SR-17-1 ii Abstract Modern science lacks the capability to quantify flow velocity fields in turbid...transparent fluid (so the camera can observe the light reflected by the particles). Acoustic-based flow measurement equipment used in the field (e.g

  19. Modified particle filtering algorithm for single acoustic vector sensor DOA tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinbo; Sun, Haixin; Jiang, Liangxu; Shi, Yaowu; Wu, Yue

    2015-10-16

    The conventional direction of arrival (DOA) estimation algorithm with static sources assumption usually estimates the source angles of two adjacent moments independently and the correlation of the moments is not considered. In this article, we focus on the DOA estimation of moving sources and a modified particle filtering (MPF) algorithm is proposed with state space model of single acoustic vector sensor. Although the particle filtering (PF) algorithm has been introduced for acoustic vector sensor applications, it is not suitable for the case that one dimension angle of source is estimated with large deviation, the two dimension angles (pitch angle and azimuth angle) cannot be simultaneously employed to update the state through resampling processing of PF algorithm. To solve the problems mentioned above, the MPF algorithm is proposed in which the state estimation of previous moment is introduced to the particle sampling of present moment to improve the importance function. Moreover, the independent relationship of pitch angle and azimuth angle is considered and the two dimension angles are sampled and evaluated, respectively. Then, the MUSIC spectrum function is used as the "likehood" function of the MPF algorithm, and the modified PF-MUSIC (MPF-MUSIC) algorithm is proposed to improve the root mean square error (RMSE) and the probability of convergence. The theoretical analysis and the simulation results validate the effectiveness and feasibility of the two proposed algorithms.

  20. Modified Particle Filtering Algorithm for Single Acoustic Vector Sensor DOA Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinbo Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The conventional direction of arrival (DOA estimation algorithm with static sources assumption usually estimates the source angles of two adjacent moments independently and the correlation of the moments is not considered. In this article, we focus on the DOA estimation of moving sources and a modified particle filtering (MPF algorithm is proposed with state space model of single acoustic vector sensor. Although the particle filtering (PF algorithm has been introduced for acoustic vector sensor applications, it is not suitable for the case that one dimension angle of source is estimated with large deviation, the two dimension angles (pitch angle and azimuth angle cannot be simultaneously employed to update the state through resampling processing of PF algorithm. To solve the problems mentioned above, the MPF algorithm is proposed in which the state estimation of previous moment is introduced to the particle sampling of present moment to improve the importance function. Moreover, the independent relationship of pitch angle and azimuth angle is considered and the two dimension angles are sampled and evaluated, respectively. Then, the MUSIC spectrum function is used as the “likehood” function of the MPF algorithm, and the modified PF-MUSIC (MPF-MUSIC algorithm is proposed to improve the root mean square error (RMSE and the probability of convergence. The theoretical analysis and the simulation results validate the effectiveness and feasibility of the two proposed algorithms.

  1. Random-subset fitting of digital holograms for fast three-dimensional particle tracking [invited].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimiduk, Thomas G; Perry, Rebecca W; Fung, Jerome; Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2014-09-20

    Fitting scattering solutions to time series of digital holograms is a precise way to measure three-dimensional dynamics of microscale objects such as colloidal particles. However, this inverse-problem approach is computationally expensive. We show that the computational time can be reduced by an order of magnitude or more by fitting to a random subset of the pixels in a hologram. We demonstrate our algorithm on experimentally measured holograms of micrometer-scale colloidal particles, and we show that 20-fold increases in speed, relative to fitting full frames, can be attained while introducing errors in the particle positions of 10 nm or less. The method is straightforward to implement and works for any scattering model. It also enables a parallelization strategy wherein random-subset fitting is used to quickly determine initial guesses that are subsequently used to fit full frames in parallel. This approach may prove particularly useful for studying rare events, such as nucleation, that can only be captured with high frame rates over long times.

  2. Convergence of lateral dynamic measurements in the plasma membrane of live cells from single particle tracking and STED-FCS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerholm, B. Christoffer; Andrade, Débora M.; Clausen, Mathias P.

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) in combination with the super-resolution imaging method STED (STED-FCS), and single-particle tracking (SPT) are able to directly probe the lateral dynamics of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane of live cells at spatial scales much below...... the diffraction limit of conventional microscopy. However, a major disparity in interpretation of data from SPT and STED-FCS remains, namely the proposed existence of a very fast (unhindered) lateral diffusion coefficient, ≥5 μm2 s-1, in the plasma membrane of live cells at very short length scales, ≈ 100 nm...... that these errors have on the measurement outputs. We subsequently demonstrate that STED-FCS and SPT data, following careful consideration of the experimental errors of the SPT data, converge to a common interpretation which for the case of a diffusing phospholipid analogue in the plasma membrane of live mouse...

  3. Application of Gauss's law space-charge limited emission model in iterative particle tracking method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altsybeyev, V.V., E-mail: v.altsybeev@spbu.ru; Ponomarev, V.A.

    2016-11-01

    The particle tracking method with a so-called gun iteration for modeling the space charge is discussed in the following paper. We suggest to apply the emission model based on the Gauss's law for the calculation of the space charge limited current density distribution using considered method. Based on the presented emission model we have developed a numerical algorithm for this calculations. This approach allows us to perform accurate and low time consumpting numerical simulations for different vacuum sources with the curved emitting surfaces and also in the presence of additional physical effects such as bipolar flows and backscattered electrons. The results of the simulations of the cylindrical diode and diode with elliptical emitter with the use of axysimmetric coordinates are presented. The high efficiency and accuracy of the suggested approach are confirmed by the obtained results and comparisons with the analytical solutions.

  4. Asynchronous Parallelization of a CFD Solver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S. Abdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A Navier-Stokes equations solver is parallelized to run on a cluster of computers using the domain decomposition method. Two approaches of communication and computation are investigated, namely, synchronous and asynchronous methods. Asynchronous communication between subdomains is not commonly used in CFD codes; however, it has a potential to alleviate scaling bottlenecks incurred due to processors having to wait for each other at designated synchronization points. A common way to avoid this idle time is to overlap asynchronous communication with computation. For this to work, however, there must be something useful and independent a processor can do while waiting for messages to arrive. We investigate an alternative approach of computation, namely, conducting asynchronous iterations to improve local subdomain solution while communication is in progress. An in-house CFD code is parallelized using message passing interface (MPI, and scalability tests are conducted that suggest asynchronous iterations are a viable way of parallelizing CFD code.

  5. Effect Of The LEBT Solenoid Magnetic Field On The Beam Generation For Particle Tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Yarmohammadi Satri, M; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2013-01-01

    Linac4 is a 160 MeV H- linear accelerator which will replace the 50 MeV proton Linac2 for upgrade of the LHC injectors with higher intensity and eventually an increase of the LHC luminosity. Linac4 structure is a source, a 45 keV low energy beam transport line (LEBT) with two solenoids, a 3 MeV Radiofrequency Quadrupole (RFQ), a Medium Energy Beam Transport line (MEBT), a 50 Mev DTL, a 100 Mev CCDTL and PIMS up to 160 Mev. We use Travel v4.07 and PathManager code for simulation. Firstly, we need to a file as a source and defining the beginning point (last point in tracking back) of simulation. We recognise the starting point base on the solenoid magnetic property of LEBT.

  6. Initial recombination in the track of heavy charged particles: Numerical solution for air filled ionization chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Bassler, Niels; Tölli, Heikki

    2012-01-01

    . In this study the effect of the underlying dose distribution on columnar recombination, a quantitative model for initial recombination,is investigated. Material and Methods Jaffe’s theory, formulated in 1913 quantifies initial recombination by elemental processes, providing an analytical (closed) solution. Here...... in the assessment of the saturation current or charge is suggested by the data. Conclusion The established model of columnar recombination reproduces the experimental data well, whereas the extentions using track structure models do not show such an agreement. Additionally, the effect of initial recombination...... on the saturation curve (i.e. Jaffe plot) does not follow a linear behavior as suggested by current dosimetry protocols, therefore higher order corrections (such as the investigated ones) might be necessary....

  7. Experimental and Particle-Tracking Model Analysis of Anomalous Transport and Sorption of Nickel in Natural Soil Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edery, Y.; Rubin, S.; Dror, I.; Berkowitz, B.

    2012-12-01

    Nickel migration measured in laboratory-scale, natural soil column experiments is shown to display anomalous (non-Fickian) transport and non-equilibrium adsorption and desorption patterns. Similar experiments using a conservative tracer also exhibit anomalous behavior. In parallel batch experiments, adsorption and desorption isotherms demonstrate hysteresis, indicating some permanent adsorption. While adsorption is described by the Langmuir isotherm, equilibrium concentrations are higher than those predicted by the same model for desorption. Furthermore, batch and flow-through column experiments show the occurrence of ion exchange of nickel with magnesium and potassium in the soil; aluminum and other ion concentrations are also affected by the presence of nickel. Strong retention of nickel during transport in soil columns leads to delayed initial breakthrough (~40 pore volumes), slow increase in concentration, and extended concentration tailing at long times. Standard models, including two-site non-equilibrium formulations, fail to capture these features quantitatively. We describe the mechanisms of transport and adsorption/desorption in terms of a continuous time random walk (CTRW) model, and use a particle tracking formulation to simulate the nickel migration in the column. This approach allows us to capture the non-Fickian transport and the subtle local effects of adsorption and desorption. The model uses transport parameters estimated from the conservative tracer and, as a starting point, adsorption/desorption parameters based on the batch experiments to account for the reactions. It is shown that the batch parameters under-estimate the actual adsorption in the column. The CTRW particle tracking model is shown to capture both the full evolution of the measured breakthrough curve and the measured spatial concentration profile. Analysis of these results provides further understanding of the interaction and dynamics between transport and sorption mechanisms in

  8. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT): Straw Tubes for Tracking and Particle Identification at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mindur, Bartosz; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three inner detector tracking subsystems and consists of 300000 thin-walled drift tubes (“straw tubes”) that are 4 mm in diameter. The TRT system provides 30 space points with 130 micron resolution for charged tracks with |η| 0.5 GeV/c. The TRT also provides electron identification capability by detecting transition radiation (TR) X-ray photons in a Xe-based working gas mixture. Compared to Run 1, the LHC beams now provide a higher center of mass energy (13 TeV), more bunches with a reduced spacing (25 ns), and more particles in each bunch leading to very challenging, higher occupancies in the TRT. We will present TRT modifications made for Run 2 for in areas: to improve response to the expected much higher rate of hits and to mitigate leaks of the Xe-based active gas mixture. The higher rates required changes to the data acquisition system and introduction of validity gate to reject out-of-time hits. Radiation-induced gain changes in ...

  9. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT): Straw tubes for tracking and particle identification at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00220535; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three inner detector tracking subsystems and consists of ∼300,000 thin-walled drift tubes (“straw tubes”) that are 4 mm in diameter. The TRT system provides ∼30 space points with ∼130 micron resolution for charged tracks with |η| 0.5 GeV/c . The TRT also provides electron identification capability by detecting transition radiation (TR) X-ray photons in an Xe-based working gas mixture. Compared to Run 1, the LHC beams now provide a higher centre of mass energy (13 TeV), more bunches with a reduced spacing (25 ns), and more particles in each bunch leading to very challenging, higher occupancies in the TRT. Significant modifications of the TRT detector have been made for LHC Run 2 mainly to improve response to the expected much higher rate of hits and to mitigate leaks of the Xe-based active gas mixture. The higher rates required changes to the data acquisition system and introduction of validity gate to reject out-of-time hits. Man...

  10. Experimental investigation into the impact of a liquid droplet onto a granular bed using three-dimensional, time-resolved, particle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Edward J; Hargrave, Graham K; Cooper, James R; Kitchener, Ben G B; Parsons, Anthony J; Hewett, Caspar J M; Wainwright, John

    2014-03-01

    An experimental investigation into the interaction that occurs between an impacting water droplet and a granular bed of loose graded sand has been carried out. High-speed imaging, three-dimensional time-resolved particle tracking, and photogrammetric surface profiling have been used to examine individual impact events. The focus of the study is the quantification and trajectory analysis of the particles ejected from the sand bed, along with measurement of the change in bed morphology. The results from the experiments have detailed two distinct mechanisms of particle ejection: the ejection of water-encapsulated particles from the edge of the wetted region and the ejection of dry sand from the periphery of the impact crater. That the process occurs by these two distinct mechanisms has hitherto been unobserved. Presented in the paper are distributions of the particle ejection velocities, angles, and transport distances for both mechanisms. The ejected water-encapsulated particles, which are few in number, are characterized by low ejection angles and high ejection velocities, leading to large transport distances; the ejected dry particles, which are much greater in number, are characterized by high ejection angles and low velocities, leading to lower transport distances. From the particle ejection data, the momentum of the individual ballistic sand particles has been calculated; it was found that only 2% of the water-droplet momentum at impact is transferred to the ballistic sand particles. In addition to the particle tracking, surface profiling of the granular bed postimpact has provided detailed information on its morphology; these data have demonstrated the consistent nature of the craters produced by the impact and suggest that particle agglomerations released from their edges make up about twice the number of particles involved in ballistic ejection. It is estimated that, overall, about 4% of the water-droplet momentum is taken up in particle movement.

  11. A Direct Time-Domain Particle Tracking Method for Modeling Solute Transport in a Network of Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.-S.; Liou, T.-S.

    2009-04-01

    Modeling of solute transport in naturally fractured rocks is challenged by a suitable description of the inherent heterogeneity and associated uncertainty of the fracture network. Despite the success of discrete fracture network (DFN) models in reproducing geometric and structural properties of a fracture network, the extensive computational load of DFNs on numerical simulation of solute transport inevitably limits themselves to small-scale applications. Therefore, we have developed a direct time-domain particle tracking (TDPT) method for overcoming these difficulties. Transport processes considered in our TDPT model includes advection and hydrodynamic dispersion in the fracture and Fickian diffusion in the matrix. Mass exchange between fracture and matrix is also assumed by molecular diffusion. Decay and kinetic sorption onto fracture surfaces and within matrix pores are considered as well. This approach is different from other TDPTs in that particle arrival time can be sampled directly by a single step, and that hydrodynamic dispersion is taken into account for a reliable prediction of particle travel time. The ‘directedness' of our TDPT is achieved by neglecting aperture variability within a single fracture and by incorporating hydrodynamic dispersion into the transport model. Note, however, that a heterogeneous aperture field within the network is allowed in order to reflect large-scale flow channeling caused by velocity variation between fracture segments. We also derive a memory function to represent the retention process due to kinetic sorption and Fickian diffusion into rock matrix of limited size. Laplace domain transport model is first solved from a Lagragian perspective, which is then numerically inverted to get the particle arrival time. Simulation results in a single fracture show that early-time BTC characteristics are determined mainly by transport in the fracture. On the other hand, late-time BTC is controlled by retention-related processes such

  12. A Particle Filtering Approach to Joint Passive Radar Tracking and Target Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    1998. [46] J. S. Liu, Monte Carlo Strategies in Scientific Computing. New York, NY: Springer Verlag, 2001. [47] D. Crisan and A. Doucet, “A survey...Journal of Computational and Graphical Statistics, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 1–25, 1996. [61] D. Crisan , “Particle filters — A theoretical perspective,” in...filter for nonlinear problems,” IEE Proceedings–Radar, Sonar, and Navigation, vol. 146, pp. 2–7, February 1999. [63] D. Crisan , P. Del Moral, and T

  13. A Monte Carlo Study of the Momentum Dependence on the Results of Tracking Unknown Particle Species in the BaBar Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewerynek, Stephen; /British Columbia U.

    2007-04-06

    The BABAR experiment is composed of an international collaboration that will test the Standard Model prediction of CP violation. To accomplish this a new detector was constructed at the asymmetric B Factory, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The tests will shed some light on the origins of CP violation, which is an important aspect in explaining the matter/antimatter asymmetry in the universe. In particular, the BABAR experiment will measure CP violation in the neutral B meson system. In order to succeed, the BABAR experiment requires excellent track fitting and particle species identification. Prior to the current study, track fitting was done using only one particle species--the pion. But given the momentum dependence on the accuracy of the results from this choice of particle species, a better algorithm needed to be developed. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out and a new algorithm utilizing all five particle species present in the BABAR detector was created.

  14. Micro-fabricated Silicon Devices for Advanced Thermal Management and Integration of Particle Tracking Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Romagnoli, Giulia; Gambaro, Carla

    Since their first studies targeting the cooling of high-power computing chips, micro-channel devices are proven to provide a very efficient cooling system. In the last years micro-channel cooling has been successfully applied to the cooling of particle detectors at CERN. Thanks to their high thermal efficiency, they can guarantee a good heat sink for the cooling of silicon trackers, fundamental for the reduction of the radiation damage caused by the beam interactions. The radiation damage on the silicon detector is increasing with temperature and furthermore the detectors are producing heat that should be dissipated in the supporting structure. Micro-channels guarantee a distributed and uniform thermal exchange, thanks to the high flexibility of the micro-fabrication process that allows a large variety of channel designs. The thin nature of the micro-channels etched inside silicon wafers, is fulfilling the physics requirement of minimization of the material crossed by the particle beam. Furthermore micro-chan...

  15. A regional-scale particle-tracking method for nonstationary fractured media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohman, Johan; Niemi, Auli; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2004-11-01

    A regional scale transport model is introduced that is applicable to non-stationary and statistically inhomogeneous fractured media, provided that hydraulic flow, but not necessarily solute transport, can be approximated by equivalent continuum properties at some block scale. Upscaled flow and transport block properties are transferred from multiple fracture network realizations to a regional model with grid elements of equal size to that found valid for continuum approximation of flow. In the large-scale model, flow is solved in a stochastic continuum framework, whereas the transport calculations employ a random walk procedure. Block-wise transit times are sampled from distributions linked to each block-conductivity based on its underlying fracture network. To account for channeled transport larger than the block scale, several alternatives in sampling algorithm are introduced and compared. The most reasonable alternative incorporates a spatial persistence length in sampling the particle transit times; this tracer transport persistence length is related to interblock channeling, and is quantified by the number N of blocks. The approach is demonstrated for a set of field data, and the obtained regional-scale particle breakthroughs are analyzed. These are fitted to the one-dimensional advective-dispersive equation to determine an effective macroscale dispersion coefficient. An interesting finding is that this macroscale dispersion coefficient is found to be a linear function of the transport persistence, N, with a slope equal to a representative mean block-scale dispersion coefficient and a constant that incorporates background dispersion arising from the regional heterogeneous conductivity field.

  16. Using DNA-labelled nano- and microparticles to track particle transport in the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNew, Coy; Wang, Chaozi; Dahlke, Helen; Lyon, Steve; Walter, Todd

    2017-04-01

    By utilizing bio-molecular nanotechnology developed for nano-medicines and drug delivery, we are able to produce DNA-labelled nano- and microparticle tracers for use in a myriad of environmental systems. The use of custom sequenced DNA allows for the fabrication of an enormous number of uniquely labelled tracers with identical transport properties (approximately 1.61 x 1060 unique sequences), each independently quantifiable, that can be applied simultaneously in any hydrologic system. By controlling the fabrication procedure to produce particles of custom size and charge, we are able to tag each size-charge combination uniquely in order to directly probe the effect of these variables on the transport properties of the particles. Here we present our methods for fabrication, extraction, and analysis of the DNA nano- and microparticle tracers, along with results from several successful applications of the tracers, including transport and retention analysis at the lab, continuum, and field scales. To date, our DNA-labelled nano- and microparticle tracers have proved useful in surface and subsurface water applications, soil retention, and even subglacial flow pathways. The range of potential applications continue to prove nearly limitless.

  17. 3D joint speaker position and orientation tracking with particle filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Carlos; Hernando, Javier

    2014-01-29

    This paper addresses the problem of three-dimensional speaker orientation estimation in a smart-room environment equipped with microphone arrays. A Bayesian approach is proposed to jointly track the location and orientation of an active speaker. The main motivation is that the knowledge of the speaker orientation may yield an increased localization performance and vice versa. Assuming that the sound produced by the speaker is originated from his mouth, the center of the head is deduced based on the estimated head orientation. Moreover, the elevation angle of the head of the speaker can be partly inferred from the fast vertical movements of the computed mouth location. In order to test the performance of the proposed algorithm, a new multimodal dataset has been recorded for this purpose, where the corresponding 3D orientation angles are acquired by an inertial measurement unit (IMU) provided by accelerometers, magnetometers and gyroscopes in the three-axes. The proposed joint algorithm outperforms a two-step approach in terms of localization and orientation angle precision assessing the superiority of the joint approach.

  18. 3D Joint Speaker Position and Orientation Tracking with Particle Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Segura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of three-dimensional speaker orientation estimation in a smart-room environment equipped with microphone arrays. A Bayesian approach is proposed to jointly track the location and orientation of an active speaker. The main motivation is that the knowledge of the speaker orientation may yield an increased localization performance and vice versa. Assuming that the sound produced by the speaker is originated from his mouth, the center of the head is deduced based on the estimated head orientation. Moreover, the elevation angle of the head of the speaker can be partly inferred from the fast vertical movements of the computed mouth location. In order to test the performance of the proposed algorithm, a new multimodal dataset has been recorded for this purpose, where the corresponding 3D orientation angles are acquired by an inertial measurement unit (IMU provided by accelerometers, magnetometers and gyroscopes in the three-axes. The proposed joint algorithm outperforms a two-step approach in terms of localization and orientation angle precision assessing the superiority of the joint approach.

  19. An Adaptive Particle Filtering Approach to Tracking Modes in a Varying Shallow Ocean Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J V

    2011-03-22

    The shallow ocean environment is ever changing mostly due to temperature variations in its upper layers (< 100m) directly affecting sound propagation throughout. The need to develop processors that are capable of tracking these changes implies a stochastic as well as an 'adaptive' design. The stochastic requirement follows directly from the multitude of variations created by uncertain parameters and noise. Some work has been accomplished in this area, but the stochastic nature was constrained to Gaussian uncertainties. It has been clear for a long time that this constraint was not particularly realistic leading a Bayesian approach that enables the representation of any uncertainty distribution. Sequential Bayesian techniques enable a class of processors capable of performing in an uncertain, nonstationary (varying statistics), non-Gaussian, variable shallow ocean. In this paper adaptive processors providing enhanced signals for acoustic hydrophonemeasurements on a vertical array as well as enhanced modal function estimates are developed. Synthetic data is provided to demonstrate that this approach is viable.

  20. A multiplexed magnetic tweezer with precision particle tracking and bi-directional force control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Keith C; Clemmens, Emilie; Mahmoud, Hani; Kirkpatrick, Robin; Vizcarra, Juan C; Thomas, Wendy E

    2017-01-01

    In the past two decades, methods have been developed to measure the mechanical properties of single biomolecules. One of these methods, Magnetic tweezers, is amenable to aquisition of data on many single molecules simultaneously, but to take full advantage of this "multiplexing" ability, it is necessary to simultaneously incorprorate many capabilities that ahve been only demonstrated separately. Our custom built magnetic tweezer combines high multiplexing, precision bead tracking, and bi-directional force control into a flexible and stable platform for examining single molecule behavior. This was accomplished using electromagnets, which provide high temporal control of force while achieving force levels similar to permanent magnets via large paramagnetic beads. Here we describe the instrument and its ability to apply 2-260 pN of force on up to 120 beads simultaneously, with a maximum spatial precision of 12 nm using a variety of bead sizes and experimental techniques. We also demonstrate a novel method for increasing the precision of force estimations on heterogeneous paramagnetic beads using a combination of density separation and bi-directional force correlation which reduces the coefficient of variation of force from 27% to 6%. We then use the instrument to examine the force dependence of uncoiling and recoiling velocity of type 1 fimbriae from Eschericia coli (E. coli) bacteria, and see similar results to previous studies. This platform provides a simple, effective, and flexible method for efficiently gathering single molecule force spectroscopy measurements.

  1. Study of latent and etched tracks by a charged particle transmission technique

    CERN Document Server

    Vacik, J; Hnatowicz, V; Fink, D; Kobayashi, Y; Hirata, K; Apel, P Y; Strauss, P

    1999-01-01

    A recently suggested technique for non-destructive investigation of inhomogeneities in thin objects, which is based on the measurement of the energy spectra of charged particles transmitted through the object, is used for the study of thermal annealing of 10-20 mu m thick polyethylene terephtalate, polypropylene and polycarbonate foils irradiated with 1-10 MeV/amu heavy ions. At elevated temperature a foil linear contraction is observed on pristine and irradiated material. Also the foil roughness increases with increasing temperature. On the same foils with etched pores 0.5-1.0 mu m in diameter, the thermal annealing results in gradual closing of the pores up to about 30% of their initial diameter at the temperatures of 150-175 deg. C. At higher temperatures the pore diameter increases and achieves its initial value.

  2. Comparison of bulk and epitaxial 4H-SiC detectors for radiation hard particle tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Quinn, T; Bruzzi, M; Cunningham, W; Mathieson, K; Moll, M; Nelson, T; Nilsson, H E; Pintillie, I; Rahman, M; Reynolds, L; Sciortino, S; Sellin, P J; Strachan, H; Svensson, B G; Vaitkus, J

    2003-01-01

    Measurements and simulations have been carried out using bulk and epitaxial SiC detectors. Samples were irradiated to fluences of around 10**1**4 hardrons/cm**2. Material of thickness 40um gave a charge collection efficiency of 100% dropping to around 60% at 100mum thickness. Detailed MEDICI simulations incorporated the main defect levels in SiC, the vanadium center, Z-center and a mid-gap level as measured by deep level transient spectroscopy and other techniques. Calculated recombination currents and charge collection efficiencies at varying fluences were comparable to experimental data. The study suggests that SiC detectors will operate up to fluences around 10 **1**6/cm**2 as required by future particle physics experiments.

  3. Open LED Illuminator: A Simple and Inexpensive LED Illuminator for Fast Multicolor Particle Tracking in Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Jens B.; Tanneti, Nikhila S.; Hogue, Ian B.; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2015-01-01

    Dual-color live cell fluorescence microscopy of fast intracellular trafficking processes, such as axonal transport, requires rapid switching of illumination channels. Typical broad-spectrum sources necessitate the use of mechanical filter switching, which introduces delays between acquisition of different fluorescence channels, impeding the interpretation and quantification of highly dynamic processes. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs), however, allow modulation of excitation light in microseconds. Here we provide a step-by-step protocol to enable any scientist to build a research-grade LED illuminator for live cell microscopy, even without prior experience with electronics or optics. We quantify and compare components, discuss our design considerations, and demonstrate the performance of our LED illuminator by imaging axonal transport of herpes virus particles with high temporal resolution. PMID:26600461

  4. TRACKING AND MONITORING OF TAGGED OBJECTS EMPLOYING PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION ALGORITHM IN A DEPARTMENTAL STORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrajit Bhattacharya

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The present paper proposes a departmental store automation system based on Radio Frequency Identification (RFID technology and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO algorithm. The items in the departmental store spanned over different sections and in multiple floors, are tagged with passive RFID tags. The floor is divided into number of zones depending on different types of items that are placed in their respective racks. Each of the zones is placed with one RFID reader, which constantly monitors the items in their zone and periodically sends that information to the application. The problem of systematic periodic monitoring of the store is addressed in this application so that the locations, distributions and demands of every item in the store can be invigilated with intelligence. The proposed application is successfully demonstrated on a simulated case study.

  5. UmUTracker: A versatile MATLAB program for automated particle tracking of 2D light microscopy or 3D digital holography data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanqing; Stangner, Tim; Wiklund, Krister; Rodriguez, Alvaro; Andersson, Magnus

    2017-10-01

    We present a versatile and fast MATLAB program (UmUTracker) that automatically detects and tracks particles by analyzing video sequences acquired by either light microscopy or digital in-line holographic microscopy. Our program detects the 2D lateral positions of particles with an algorithm based on the isosceles triangle transform, and reconstructs their 3D axial positions by a fast implementation of the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld model using a radial intensity profile. To validate the accuracy and performance of our program, we first track the 2D position of polystyrene particles using bright field and digital holographic microscopy. Second, we determine the 3D particle position by analyzing synthetic and experimentally acquired holograms. Finally, to highlight the full program features, we profile the microfluidic flow in a 100 μm high flow chamber. This result agrees with computational fluid dynamic simulations. On a regular desktop computer UmUTracker can detect, analyze, and track multiple particles at 5 frames per second for a template size of 201 ×201 in a 1024 × 1024 image. To enhance usability and to make it easy to implement new functions we used object-oriented programming. UmUTracker is suitable for studies related to: particle dynamics, cell localization, colloids and microfluidic flow measurement. Program Files doi : http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/fkprs4s6xp.1 Licensing provisions : Creative Commons by 4.0 (CC by 4.0) Programming language : MATLAB Nature of problem: 3D multi-particle tracking is a common technique in physics, chemistry and biology. However, in terms of accuracy, reliable particle tracking is a challenging task since results depend on sample illumination, particle overlap, motion blur and noise from recording sensors. Additionally, the computational performance is also an issue if, for example, a computationally expensive process is executed, such as axial particle position reconstruction from digital holographic microscopy data. Versatile

  6. Size measurement uncertainties of near-monodisperse, near-spherical nanoparticles using transmission electron microscopy and particle-tracking analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Temmerman, Pieter-Jan; Verleysen, Eveline; Lammertyn, Jeroen; Mast, Jan

    2014-10-01

    Particle-tracking analysis (PTA) in combination with systematic imaging, automatic image analysis, and automatic data processing is validated for size measurements. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with a systematic selection procedure for unbiased random image collection, semiautomatic image analysis, and data processing is validated for size, shape, and surface topology measurements. PTA is investigated as an alternative for TEM for the determination of the particle size in the framework of the EC definition of nanomaterial. The intra-laboratory validation study assessing the precision and accuracy of the TEM and PTA methods consists of series of measurements on three gold reference materials with mean area-equivalent circular diameters of 8.9 nm (RM-8011), 27.6 nm (RM-8012), and 56.0 nm (RM-8013), and two polystyrene materials with modal hydrodynamic diameters of 102 nm (P1) and 202 nm (H1). By obtaining a high level of automation, PTA proves to give precise and non-biased results for the modal hydrodynamic diameter in size range between 30 and 200 nm, and TEM proves to give precise and non-biased results for the mean area-equivalent circular diameter in the size range between 8 and 200 nm of the investigated near-monomodal near-spherical materials. The expanded uncertainties of PTA are about 9 % and are determined mainly by the repeatability uncertainty. This uncertainty is two times higher than the expanded uncertainty of 4 % obtained by TEM for analyses on identical materials. For the investigated near-monomodal and near-spherical materials, PTA can be used as an alternative to TEM for measuring the particle size, with exception of 8.9 nm gold, because this material has a size below the detection limit of PTA.

  7. A comparison of single particle tracking and temporal image correlation spectroscopy for quantitative analysis of endosome motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, F W; Wüstner, D

    2013-11-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) is becoming a standard method to extract transport parameters from time-lapse image sequences of fluorescent vesicles in living cells. Another method to obtain these data is temporal image correlation spectroscopy (TICS), but this method is less often used for measurement of intracellular vesicle transport. Here, we present an extensive comparison of SPT and TICS. First we examine the effect of photobleaching, shading and noise on SPT and TICS analysis using simulated image sequences. To this end, we developed a simple photophysical model, which relates spatially varying illumination intensity to the bleaching propensity and fluorescence intensity of the moving particles. We found that neither SPT nor TICS are affected by photobleaching per se, but the transport parameters obtained by both methods are sensitive to the signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, the number of obtained trajectories in SPT is affected by noise. Diffusion constants determined by TICS are significantly overestimated when large immobile fluorescent structures are present in the image sequences, while the opposite is true for SPT. To improve the performance of both techniques, we compare three different methods for image denoising. Appropriate denoising significantly reduced the effect of noise and of immobile structures on both methods. Shape fluctuations of simulated particles had a more pronounced effect on TICS than on SPT analysis. In denoised images of fluorescent beads or cytosolic vesicles containing fluorescent protein NPC2 in human skin fibroblast cells, the transport parameters acquired by SPT and TICS were comparable emphasizing the value of both analysis methods. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2013 Royal Microscopical Society.

  8. Burst-Mode Asynchronous Controllers on FPGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte L. Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available FPGAs have been mainly used to design synchronous circuits. Asynchronous design on FPGAs is difficult because the resulting circuit may suffer from hazard problems. We propose a method that implements a popular class of asynchronous circuits, known as burst mode, on FPGAs based on look-up table architectures. We present two conditions that, if satisfied, guarantee essential hazard-free implementation on any LUT-based FPGA. By doing that, besides all the intrinsic advantages of asynchronous over synchronous circuits, they also take advantage of the shorter design time and lower cost associated with FPGA designs.

  9. Tracking the virus-like particles of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus in insect cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanapi, Ummi Fairuz; Yong, Chean Yeah; Goh, Zee Hong; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Yeap, Swee Keong

    2017-01-01

    Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNv) poses a major threat to the prawn industry. Currently, no effective vaccine and treatment are available to prevent the spread of MrNv. Its infection mechanism and localisation in a host cell are also not well characterised. The MrNv capsid protein (MrNvc) produced in Escherichia coli self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs) resembling the native virus. Thus, fluorescein labelled MrNvc VLPs were employed as a model to study the virus entry and localisation in Spodoptera frugiperda, Sf9 cells. Through fluorescence microscopy and sub-cellular fractionation, the MrNvc was shown to enter Sf9 cells, and eventually arrived at the nucleus. The presence of MrNvc within the cytoplasm and nucleus of Sf9 cells was further confirmed by the Z-stack imaging. The presence of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl), genistein, methyl-β-cyclodextrin or chlorpromazine (CPZ) inhibited the entry of MrNvc into Sf9 cells, but cytochalasin D did not inhibit this process. This suggests that the internalisation of MrNvc VLPs is facilitated by caveolae- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The whole internalisation process of MrNvc VLPs into a Sf9 cell was recorded with live cell imaging. We have also identified a potential nuclear localisation signal (NLS) of MrNvc through deletion mutagenesis and verified by classical-NLS mapping. Overall, this study provides an insight into the journey of MrNvc VLPs in insect cells. PMID:28194311

  10. Interpolation algorithm for asynchronous ADC-data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramburger, Stefan; Zinke, Benny; Killat, Dirk

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a modified interpolation algorithm for signals with variable data rate from asynchronous ADCs. The Adaptive weights Conjugate gradient Toeplitz matrix (ACT) algorithm is extended to operate with a continuous data stream. An additional preprocessing of data with constant and linear sections and a weighted overlap of step-by-step into spectral domain transformed signals improve the reconstruction of the asycnhronous ADC signal. The interpolation method can be used if asynchronous ADC data is fed into synchronous digital signal processing.

  11. Charge, energy and LET spectra of high LET primary and secondary particles in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors of the P0006 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csige, I.; Frigo, L. A.; Benton, E. V.; Oda, K.

    1995-01-01

    We have measured the charge, energy and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of about 800 high LET (LET(sub infinity) H2O greater than 50 keV/micron) particles in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors in the P0006 experiment of LDEF. Primary particles with residual range at the reference surface greater than about 2 microns and secondary particles produced in the detector material with total range greater than about 4 microns were measured. We have used a multi-etch technique and an internal calibration to identify and measure the energy of the particles at the reference surface. The LET spectrum was obtained from the charge and energy distribution of the particles.

  12. Beam Dynamics in the Accelerating RF Structures of the CTF2 Drive Beam Simulated with PARMELA Particle Tracking Program

    CERN Document Server

    Chanudet, M

    1999-01-01

    The behavior of the CTF2 drive beam is studied through the first elements of the line for a bunch train of 48'10nC. Simulations were realised with the PARMELA program which tracks particles through different RF and magnetic elements. Space charge and beam loading in RF structures are included in the calculations, but not the wakefields. In this note, all the beam, RF and magnetic parameters are chosen to approach the operational settings of the CTF2 at the end of 98 and the beginning of 99. Two configurations are reported and compared. The first is chosen to describe the Nov. 98 experimental layout. The second one with a booster section is proposed to improve the beam characteristics. The PARMELA beam generation is discussed. Then, the fields in the HCS sections are studied, a purely standing wave in the couplers is put in evidence and a model of the HCS is deduced and tested for the PARMELA simulations. The RF effects of the HCS section on the beam dynamics are demonstrated, in particular the critical focusi...

  13. Maximum Power Point Tracking for Cascaded PV-Converter Modules Using Two-Stage Particle Swarm Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Mingxuan; Duan, Qichang; Zhang, Li; Chen, Hao; Hu, Bei; Duan, Pan

    2017-08-24

    The paper presents a novel two-stage particle swarm optimization (PSO) for the maximum power point tracking (MPPT) control of a PV system consisting of cascaded PV-converter modules, under partial shading conditions (PSCs). In this scheme, the grouping method of the shuffled frog leaping algorithm (SFLA) is incorporated with the basic PSO algorithm, ensuring fast and accurate searching of the global extremum. An adaptive speed factor is also introduced to improve its convergence speed. A PWM algorithm enabling permuted switching of the PV sources is applied. The method enables this PV system to achieve the maximum power generation for any number of PV and converter modules. Simulation studies of the proposed MPPT scheme are performed on a system having two chained PV buck-converter modules and a dc-ac H-bridge connected at its terminals for supplying an AC load. The results show that this type of PV system allows each module to achieve the maximum power generation according its illumination level without affecting the others, and the proposed new control method gives significantly higher power output compared with the conventional P&O and PSO methods.

  14. Lipid Diffusion in Supported Lipid Bilayers: A Comparison between Line-Scanning Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and Single-Particle Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Rose

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion in lipid membranes is an essential component of many cellular process and fluorescence a method of choice to study membrane dynamics. The goal of this work was to directly compare two common fluorescence methods, line-scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and single-particle tracking, to observe the diffusion of a fluorescent lipophilic dye, DiD, in a complex five-component mitochondria-like solid-supported lipid bilayer. We measured diffusion coefficients of \\(D_{\\text{FCS}} \\sim\\ 3 \\(μ\\text{m}^2\\cdot\\text{s}^{-1}\\ and \\(D_{\\text{SPT}} \\sim\\ 2 \\( μ\\text{m}^2\\cdot\\text{s}^{-1}\\, respectively. These comparable, yet statistically different values are used to highlight the main message of the paper, namely that the two considered methods give access to distinctly different dynamic ranges: \\(D \\gtrsim\\ 1 \\(μ\\text{m}^2\\cdot\\text{s}^{-1}\\ for FCS and \\(D \\lesssim\\ 5 \\(μ\\text{m}^2\\cdot\\text{s}^{-1}\\ for SPT (with standard imaging conditions. In the context of membrane diffusion, this means that FCS allows studying lipid diffusion in fluid membranes, as well as the diffusion of loosely-bound proteins hovering above the membrane. SPT, on the other hand, is ideal to study the motions of membrane-inserted proteins, especially those presenting different conformations, but only allows studying lipid diffusion in relatively viscous membranes, such as supported lipid bilayers and cell membranes.

  15. Wireless Networks with Asynchronous Users

    CERN Document Server

    Moshksar, Kamyar

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses an interference channel consisting of $\\mathbf{n}$ active users sharing $u$ frequency sub-bands. Users are asynchronous meaning there exists a mutual delay between their transmitted codes. A stationary model for interference is considered by assuming the starting point of an interferer's data is uniformly distributed along the codeword of any user. This model is not ergodic, however, we show that the noise plus interference process satisfies an Asymptotic Equipartition Property (AEP) under certain conditions. This enables us to define achievable rates in the conventional Shannon sense. The spectrum is divided to private and common bands. Each user occupies its assigned private band and the common band upon activation. In a scenario where all transmitters are unaware of the number of active users and the channel gains, the optimum spectrum assignment is obtained such that the so-called outage capacity per user is maximized. If $\\Pr\\{\\mathbf{n}>2\\}>0$, all users follow a locally Randomized ...

  16. Inferring Latent States and Refining Force Estimates via Hierarchical Dirichlet Process Modeling in Single Particle Tracking Experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher P Calderon

    Full Text Available Understanding the basis for intracellular motion is critical as the field moves toward a deeper understanding of the relation between Brownian forces, molecular crowding, and anisotropic (or isotropic energetic forcing. Effective forces and other parameters used to summarize molecular motion change over time in live cells due to latent state changes, e.g., changes induced by dynamic micro-environments, photobleaching, and other heterogeneity inherent in biological processes. This study discusses limitations in currently popular analysis methods (e.g., mean square displacement-based analyses and how new techniques can be used to systematically analyze Single Particle Tracking (SPT data experiencing abrupt state changes in time or space. The approach is to track GFP tagged chromatids in metaphase in live yeast cells and quantitatively probe the effective forces resulting from dynamic interactions that reflect the sum of a number of physical phenomena. State changes can be induced by various sources including: microtubule dynamics exerting force through the centromere, thermal polymer fluctuations, and DNA-based molecular machines including polymerases and protein exchange complexes such as chaperones and chromatin remodeling complexes. Simulations aiming to show the relevance of the approach to more general SPT data analyses are also studied. Refined force estimates are obtained by adopting and modifying a nonparametric Bayesian modeling technique, the Hierarchical Dirichlet Process Switching Linear Dynamical System (HDP-SLDS, for SPT applications. The HDP-SLDS method shows promise in systematically identifying dynamical regime changes induced by unobserved state changes when the number of underlying states is unknown in advance (a common problem in SPT applications. We expand on the relevance of the HDP-SLDS approach, review the relevant background of Hierarchical Dirichlet Processes, show how to map discrete time HDP-SLDS models to classic SPT

  17. Asynchronous Task-Based Polar Decomposition on Manycore Architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Sukkari, Dalal

    2016-10-25

    This paper introduces the first asynchronous, task-based implementation of the polar decomposition on manycore architectures. Based on a new formulation of the iterative QR dynamically-weighted Halley algorithm (QDWH) for the calculation of the polar decomposition, the proposed implementation replaces the original and hostile LU factorization for the condition number estimator by the more adequate QR factorization to enable software portability across various architectures. Relying on fine-grained computations, the novel task-based implementation is also capable of taking advantage of the identity structure of the matrix involved during the QDWH iterations, which decreases the overall algorithmic complexity. Furthermore, the artifactual synchronization points have been severely weakened compared to previous implementations, unveiling look-ahead opportunities for better hardware occupancy. The overall QDWH-based polar decomposition can then be represented as a directed acyclic graph (DAG), where nodes represent computational tasks and edges define the inter-task data dependencies. The StarPU dynamic runtime system is employed to traverse the DAG, to track the various data dependencies and to asynchronously schedule the computational tasks on the underlying hardware resources, resulting in an out-of-order task scheduling. Benchmarking experiments show significant improvements against existing state-of-the-art high performance implementations (i.e., Intel MKL and Elemental) for the polar decomposition on latest shared-memory vendors\\' systems (i.e., Intel Haswell/Broadwell/Knights Landing, NVIDIA K80/P100 GPUs and IBM Power8), while maintaining high numerical accuracy.

  18. Remote Asynchronous Message Service Gateway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shin-Ywan; Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    The Remote Asynchronous Message Service (RAMS) gateway is a special-purpose AMS application node that enables exchange of AMS messages between nodes residing in different AMS "continua," notionally in different geographical locations. JPL s implementation of RAMS gateway functionality is integrated with the ION (Interplanetary Overlay Network) implementation of the DTN (Delay-Tolerant Networking) bundle protocol, and with JPL s implementation of AMS itself. RAMS protocol data units are encapsulated in ION bundles and are forwarded to the neighboring RAMS gateways identified in the source gateway s AMS management information base. Each RAMS gateway has interfaces in two communication environments: the AMS message space it serves, and the RAMS network - the grid or tree of mutually aware RAMS gateways - that enables AMS messages produced in one message space to be forwarded to other message spaces of the same venture. Each gateway opens persistent, private RAMS network communication channels to the RAMS gateways of other message spaces for the same venture, in other continua. The interconnected RAMS gateways use these communication channels to forward message petition assertions and cancellations among themselves. Each RAMS gateway subscribes locally to all subjects that are of interest in any of the linked message spaces. On receiving its copy of a message on any of these subjects, the RAMS gateway node uses the RAMS network to forward the message to every other RAMS gateway whose message space contains at least one node that has subscribed to messages on that subject. On receiving a message via the RAMS network from some other RAMS gateway, the RAMS gateway node forwards the message to all subscribers in its own message space.

  19. Particle-tracking code (track3d) for convective solute transport modelling in the geosphere: Description and user`s manual; Programme de reperage de particules (track3d) pour la modelisation du transport par convection des solutes dans la geosphere: description et manuel de l`utilisateur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakka, B.W.; Chan, T.

    1994-12-01

    A deterministic particle-tracking code (TRACK3D) has been developed to compute convective flow paths of conservative (nonreactive) contaminants through porous geological media. TRACK3D requires the groundwater velocity distribution, which, in our applications, results from flow simulations using AECL`s MOTIF code. The MOTIF finite-element code solves the transient and steady-state coupled equations of groundwater flow, solute transport and heat transport in fractured/porous media. With few modifications, TRACK3D can be used to analyse the velocity distributions calculated by other finite-element or finite-difference flow codes. This report describes the assumptions, limitations, organization, operation and applications of the TRACK3D code, and provides a comprehensive user`s manual.

  20. Label-acquired magnetorotation for biosensing: An asynchronous rotation assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht, Ariel, E-mail: hecht@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2200 Bonisteel, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099 (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); Kinnunen, Paivo, E-mail: pkkinn@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); University of Michigan, Applied Physics Program, 2477 Randall Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120 (United States); McNaughton, Brandon, E-mail: bmcnaugh@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2200 Bonisteel, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099 (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); University of Michigan, Applied Physics Program, 2477 Randall Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120 (United States); Kopelman, Raoul, E-mail: kopelman@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2200 Bonisteel, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099 (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); University of Michigan, Applied Physics Program, 2477 Randall Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    This paper presents a novel application of magnetic particles for biosensing, called label-acquired magnetorotation (LAM). This method is based on a combination of the traditional sandwich assay format with the asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) method. In label-acquired magnetorotation, an analyte facilitates the binding of a magnetic label bead to a nonmagnetic solid phase sphere, forming a sandwich complex. The sandwich complex is then placed in a rotating magnetic field, where the rotational frequency of the sandwich complex is a function of the amount of analyte attached to the surface of the sphere. Here, we use streptavidin-coated beads and biotin-coated particles as analyte mimics, to be replaced by proteins and other biological targets in future work. We show this sensing method to have a dynamic range of two orders of magnitude.

  1. Convergence of lateral dynamic measurements in the plasma membrane of live cells from single particle tracking and STED-FCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerholm, B. Christoffer; Andrade, Débora M.; Clausen, Mathias P.; Eggeling, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) in combination with the super-resolution imaging method STED (STED-FCS), and single-particle tracking (SPT) are able to directly probe the lateral dynamics of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane of live cells at spatial scales much below the diffraction limit of conventional microscopy. However, a major disparity in interpretation of data from SPT and STED-FCS remains, namely the proposed existence of a very fast (unhindered) lateral diffusion coefficient, ⩾5 µm2 s-1, in the plasma membrane of live cells at very short length scales, ≈⩽ 100 nm, and time scales, ≈1-10 ms. This fast diffusion coefficient has been advocated in several high-speed SPT studies, for lipids and membrane proteins alike, but the equivalent has not been detected in STED-FCS measurements. Resolving this ambiguity is important because the assessment of membrane dynamics currently relies heavily on SPT for the determination of heterogeneous diffusion. A possible systematic error in this approach would thus have vast implications in this field. To address this, we have re-visited the analysis procedure for SPT data with an emphasis on the measurement errors and the effect that these errors have on the measurement outputs. We subsequently demonstrate that STED-FCS and SPT data, following careful consideration of the experimental errors of the SPT data, converge to a common interpretation which for the case of a diffusing phospholipid analogue in the plasma membrane of live mouse embryo fibroblasts results in an unhindered, intra-compartment, diffusion coefficient of  ≈0.7-1.0 µm2 s-1, and a compartment size of about 100-150 nm.

  2. Investigating longitudinal changes in the mechanical properties of MCF-7 cells exposed to paclitaxol using particle tracking microrheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kaffas, Ahmed; Bekah, Devesh; Rui, Min; Kumaradas, J. Carl; Kolios, Michael C.

    2013-02-01

    Evidence suggests that compression and shear wave elastography are sensitive to the mechanical property changes occuring in dying cells following chemotherapy, and can hence be used to monitor cancer treatment response. A qualitative and quantitative understanding of the mechanical changes at the cellular level would allow to better infer how these changes affect macroscopic tissue mechanical properties and therefore allow the optimization of elastographic techniques (such as shear wave elastography) for the monitoring of cancer therapy. We used intracellular particle tracking microrheology (PTM) to investigate the mechanical property changes of cells exposed to paclitaxol, a mitotic inhibitor used in cancer chemotherapy. The average elastic and viscous moduli of the cytoplasm of treated MCF-7 breast cancer cells were calculated for frequency ranges between 0.2 and 100 rad s-1 (corresponding to 0.03 and 15.92 Hz, respectively). A significant increase in the complex shear modulus of the cell cytoplasm was detected at 12 h post treatment. At 24 h after drug exposure, the elastic and viscous moduli increased by a total of 191.3 Pa (>8000×) and 9 Pa (˜9×), respectively for low frequency shear modulus measurements (at 1 rad s-1). At higher frequencies (10 rad s-1), the elastic and viscous moduli increased by 188.5 Pa (˜60×) and 1.7 Pa (˜1.1×), respectively. Our work demonstrates that PTM can be used to measure changes in the mechanical properties of treated cells and that cell elasticity significantly increases by 24 h after chemotherapy exposure.

  3. Comparison of particle-tracking and lumped-parameter age-distribution models for evaluating vulnerability of production wells to contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberts, S. M.; Böhlke, J. K.; Kauffman, L. J.; Jurgens, B. C.

    2012-03-01

    Environmental age tracers have been used in various ways to help assess vulnerability of drinking-water production wells to contamination. The most appropriate approach will depend on the information that is available and that which is desired. To understand how the well will respond to changing nonpoint-source contaminant inputs at the water table, some representation of the distribution of groundwater ages in the well is needed. Such information for production wells is sparse and difficult to obtain, especially in areas lacking detailed field studies. In this study, age distributions derived from detailed groundwater-flow models with advective particle tracking were compared with those generated from lumped-parameter models to examine conditions in which estimates from simpler, less resource-intensive lumped-parameter models could be used in place of estimates from particle-tracking models. In each of four contrasting hydrogeologic settings in the USA, particle-tracking and lumped-parameter models yielded roughly similar age distributions and largely indistinguishable contaminant trends when based on similar conceptual models and calibrated to similar tracer data. Although model calibrations and predictions were variably affected by tracer limitations and conceptual ambiguities, results illustrated the importance of full age distributions, rather than apparent tracer ages or model mean ages, for trend analysis and forecasting.

  4. The Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage: Track Structure Effects and Cytogenetic Signatures of High-LET Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, K.; Hada, M.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2012-01-01

    Track structure models predict that at a fixed value of LET, particles with lower charge number, Z will have a higher biological effectiveness compared to particles with a higher Z. In this report we investigated how track structure effects induction of chromosomal aberration in human cells. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with various energies of accelerated iron, silicon, neon, or titanium ions and chromosome damage was assessed in using three color FISH chromosome painting in chemically induced PCC samples collected a first cell division post irradiation. The LET values for these ions ranged from 30 to 195 keV/micrometers. Of the particles studied, Neon ions have the highest biological effectiveness for induction of total chromosome damage, which is consistent with track structure model predictions. For complex-type exchanges 64 MeV/ u Neon and 450 MeV/u Iron were equally effective and induced the most complex damage. In addition we present data on chromosomes exchanges induced by six different energies of protons (5 MeV/u to 2.5 GeV/u). The linear dose response term was similar for all energies of protons suggesting that the effect of the higher LET at low proton energies is balanced by the production of nuclear secondaries from the high energy protons. All energies of protons have a much higher percentage of complex-type chromosome exchanges than gamma rays, signifying a cytogenetic signature for proton exposures.

  5. Comparison of particle-tracking and lumped-parameter age-distribution models for evaluating vulnerability of production wells to contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberts, S.M.; Böhlke, J.K.; Kauffman, L.J.; Jurgens, B.C.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental age tracers have been used in various ways to help assess vulnerability of drinking-water production wells to contamination. The most appropriate approach will depend on the information that is available and that which is desired. To understand how the well will respond to changing nonpoint-source contaminant inputs at the water table, some representation of the distribution of groundwater ages in the well is needed. Such information for production wells is sparse and difficult to obtain, especially in areas lacking detailed field studies. In this study, age distributions derived from detailed groundwater-flow models with advective particle tracking were compared with those generated from lumped-parameter models to examine conditions in which estimates from simpler, less resource-intensive lumped-parameter models could be used in place of estimates from particle-tracking models. In each of four contrasting hydrogeologic settings in the USA, particle-tracking and lumped-parameter models yielded roughly similar age distributions and largely indistinguishable contaminant trends when based on similar conceptual models and calibrated to similar tracer data. Although model calibrations and predictions were variably affected by tracer limitations and conceptual ambiguities, results illustrated the importance of full age distributions, rather than apparent tracer ages or model mean ages, for trend analysis and forecasting.

  6. Asynchronous Message Service Reference Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    This software provides a library of middleware functions with a simple application programming interface, enabling implementation of distributed applications in conformance with the CCSDS AMS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems Asynchronous Message Service) specification. The AMS service, and its protocols, implement an architectural concept under which the modules of mission systems may be designed as if they were to operate in isolation, each one producing and consuming mission information without explicit awareness of which other modules are currently operating. Communication relationships among such modules are self-configuring; this tends to minimize complexity in the development and operations of modular data systems. A system built on this model is a society of generally autonomous, inter-operating modules that may fluctuate freely over time in response to changing mission objectives, modules functional upgrades, and recovery from individual module failure. The purpose of AMS, then, is to reduce mission cost and risk by providing standard, reusable infrastructure for the exchange of information among data system modules in a manner that is simple to use, highly automated, flexible, robust, scalable, and efficient. The implementation is designed to spawn multiple threads of AMS functionality under the control of an AMS application program. These threads enable all members of an AMS-based, distributed application to discover one another in real time, subscribe to messages on specific topics, and to publish messages on specific topics. The query/reply (client/server) communication model is also supported. Message exchange is optionally subject to encryption (to support confidentiality) and authorization. Fault tolerance measures in the discovery protocol minimize the likelihood of overall application failure due to any single operational error anywhere in the system. The multi-threaded design simplifies processing while enabling application nodes to

  7. Handbook of asynchronous machines with variable speed

    CERN Document Server

    Razik, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    This handbook deals with the asynchronous machine in its close environment. It was born from a reflection on this electromagnetic converter whose integration in industrial environments takes a wide part. Previously this type of motor operated at fixed speed, from now on it has been integrated more and more in processes at variable speed. For this reason it seemed useful, or necessary, to write a handbook on the various aspects from the motor in itself, via the control and while finishing by the diagnosis aspect. Indeed, an asynchronous motor is used nowadays in industry where variation speed a

  8. A simple asynchronous replica-exchange implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Bussi, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of implementing asynchronous replica-exchange (or parallel tempering) molecular dynamics. In our scheme, the exchange attempts are driven by asynchronous messages sent by one of the computing nodes, so that different replicas are allowed to perform a different number of time-steps between subsequent attempts. The implementation is simple and based on the message-passing interface (MPI). We illustrate the advantages of our scheme with respect to the standard synchronous algorithm and we benchmark it for a model Lennard-Jones liquid on an IBM-LS21 blade center cluster.

  9. Particle detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    1999-01-01

    Introduction, interaction of radiation with matter measurement of momentum of charged particles, of energy of e/gamma, hadrons, identification of particles. Design of HEP detectors. Principle of operation and performance of tracking sub-detectors, calorimeters and muon system.

  10. Asynchronous parallel search in global optimization problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archetti, F.; Schoen, F.

    1982-01-01

    A class of asynchronous parallel search methods is proposed in order to solve the global optimization problem on a multiprocessor system, consisting of several processors which can communicate through a set of global variables contained in a memory shared by all processors. The speed-up ratio and memory contension effects are experimentally analyzed for some algorithms of this class. 6 references.

  11. Asynchronous stream processing with S-Net

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grelck, C.; Scholz, S.-B.; Shafarenko, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present the rationale and design of S-Net, a coordination language for asynchronous stream processing. The language achieves a near-complete separation between the application code, written in any conventional programming language, and the coordination/communication code written in S-Net. Our

  12. Increasing Student Engagement Using Asynchronous Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northey, Gavin; Bucic, Tania; Chylinski, Mathew; Govind, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Student engagement is an ongoing concern for educators because of its positive association with deep learning and educational outcomes. This article tests the use of a social networking site (Facebook) as a tool to facilitate asynchronous learning opportunities that complement face-to-face interactions and thereby enable a stronger learning…

  13. Asynchronous versus Synchronous Learning in Pharmacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motycka, Carol A.; St. Onge, Erin L.; Williams, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To better understand the technology being used today in pharmacy education through a review of the current methodologies being employed at various institutions. Also, to discuss the benefits and difficulties of asynchronous and synchronous methodologies, which are being utilized at both traditional and distance education campuses.…

  14. Dynamic Performances of Asynchronous Machines | Ubeku ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dynamic performance of electrical machines is affected by low and unbalanced voltages, frequency variations in its supply systems and pulsating load torques. In this paper the d-q axis model in the synchronous reference frame is used in the dynamic analysis on the performance of an asynchronous machine working ...

  15. Search for long-lived supersymmetry particles by signature of a high track-multiplicity displaced vertex using the LHC-ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00360876

    Long-lived supersymmetry (SUSY) particles decaying within the tracking volume of the LHC-ATLAS Experiment can be reconstructed as a displaced vertex (DV). The search strategy involves attempting to reassemble the decay point of the long-lived particles (LLPs) by fitting vertices from the trajectories arising from the charged decay products. A search, looking for a signature of a massive high track-multiplicity DV has been conducted using data collected during 2012 by the LHC-ATLAS Experiment at $\\sqrt{s}~=~8$ TeV, equaling to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb$^{-1}$. A signature of a massive displaced vertex is especially powerful due to the lack of any heavy long-lived standard model particles. Thereby, giving an analysis that is nearly background free. This dissertation describes the new, much more generic, "$DV+\\text{jets}$" channel. In this channel events with high momentum jets and at least one displaced vertex are considered. Eliminating the requirement of an associated $\\mu$ generated, to date of w...

  16. Tracking suspended particle transport via radium isotopes ((226)Ra and (228)Ra) through the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Richard N; Burnett, William C; Opsahl, Stephen P; Santos, Isaac R; Misra, Sambuddha; Froelich, Philip N

    2013-02-01

    Suspended particles in rivers can carry metals, nutrients, and pollutants downstream which can become bioactive in estuaries and coastal marine waters. In river systems with multiple sources of both suspended particles and contamination sources, it is important to assess the hydrologic conditions under which contaminated particles can be delivered to downstream ecosystems. The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River system in the southeastern United States represents an ideal system to study these hydrologic impacts on particle transport through a heavily-impacted river (the Chattahoochee River) and one much less impacted by anthropogenic activities (the Flint River). We demonstrate here the utility of natural radioisotopes as tracers of suspended particles through the ACF system, where particles contaminated with arsenic (As) and antimony (Sb) have been shown to be contributed from coal-fired power plants along the Chattahoochee River, and have elevated concentrations in the surficial sediments of the Apalachicola Bay Delta. Radium isotopes ((228)Ra and (226)Ra) on suspended particles should vary throughout the different geologic provinces of this river system, allowing differentiation of the relative contributions of the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers to the suspended load delivered to Lake Seminole, the Apalachicola River, and ultimately to Apalachicola Bay. We also use various geochemical proxies ((40)K, organic carbon, and calcium) to assess the relative composition of suspended particles (lithogenic, organic, and carbonate fractions, respectively) under a range of hydrologic conditions. During low (base) flow conditions, the Flint River contributed 70% of the suspended particle load to both the Apalachicola River and the bay, whereas the Chattahoochee River became the dominant source during higher discharge, contributing 80% of the suspended load to the Apalachicola River and 62% of the particles entering the estuary. Neither of these hydrologic

  17. Trajectory exploration within asynchronous binary asteroid systems using refined Lagrangian coherent structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Haibin; Wu, Xiaoyu; Cui, Pingyuan

    2017-02-01

    Ground observations have found that asynchronous systems constitute most of the population of the near-Earth binary asteroids. This paper concerns the trajectory of a particle in the asynchronous system which is systematically described using periodic ellipsoidal and spherical body models. Due to the non-autonomous characteristics of the asynchronous system, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) are employed to identify the various dynamical behaviors. To enhance the accuracy of LCS, a robust LCS finding algorithm is developed incorporating hierarchical grid refinement, one-dimensional search and variational theory verification. In this way, the intricate dynamical transport boundaries are detected efficiently. These boundaries indicate that a total of 15 types of trajectories exist near asynchronous binary asteroids. According to their Kepler energy variations, these trajectories can be grouped into four basic categories, i.e., transitory, escape, impact and flyby trajectories. Furthermore, the influence of the ellipsoid's spin period on the dynamical behavior is discussed in the context of the change of dynamical regions. We found that the transitory and impact motions occur easily in the synchronous-like binary systems, in which the rotation period of the ellipsoid is nearly equal to that of the mutual orbit. Meanwhile, the results confirm a positive correlation between the spinning rate of the ellipsoid and the probability of the escape and flyby trajectories. The LCS also reveal a marked increase in trajectory diversity after a larger initial energy is selected.

  18. Single-Particle Tracking Shows that a Point Mutation in the Carnivore Parvovirus Capsid Switches Binding between Host-Specific Transferrin Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donald W.; Allison, Andrew B.; Bacon, Kaitlyn B.

    2016-01-01

    Determining how viruses infect new hosts via receptor-binding mechanisms is important for understanding virus emergence. We studied the binding kinetics of canine parvovirus (CPV) variants isolated from raccoons—a newly recognized CPV host—to different carnivore transferrin receptors (TfRs) using single-particle tracking. Our data suggest that CPV may utilize adhesion-strengthening mechanisms during TfR binding and that a single mutation in the viral capsid at VP2 position 300 can profoundly alter receptor binding and infectivity. PMID:26889026

  19. Field calculations, single-particle tracking, and beam dynamics with space charge in the electron lens for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noll, Daniel [Goethe Univ., Frankfurt (Germany); Stancari, Giulio [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-11-17

    An electron lens is planned for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator as a nonlinear element for integrable dynamics, as an electron cooler, and as an electron trap to study space-charge compensation in rings. We present the main design principles and constraints for nonlinear integrable optics. A magnetic configuration of the solenoids and of the toroidal section is laid out. Singleparticle tracking is used to optimize the electron path. Electron beam dynamics at high intensity is calculated with a particle-in-cell code to estimate current limits, profile distortions, and the effects on the circulating beam. In the conclusions, we summarize the main findings and list directions for further work.

  20. Simulations of groundwater flow and particle-tracking analysis in the zone of contribution to a public-supply well in San Antonio, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Richard L.; Houston, Natalie A.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Fahlquist, Lynne S.; Kauffman, Leon J.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, a public-supply well in San Antonio, Texas, was selected for intensive study to assess the vulnerability of public-supply wells in the Edwards aquifer to contamination by a variety of compounds. A local-scale, steady-state, three-dimensional numerical groundwater-flow model was developed and used in this study to evaluate the movement of water and solutes from recharge areas to the selected public-supply well. Particle tracking was used to compute flow paths and advective traveltimes throughout the model area and to delineate the areas contributing recharge and zone of contribution for the selected public-supply well.

  1. Verification of Building Blocks for Asynchronous Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freek Verbeek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Scalable formal verification constitutes an important challenge for the design of asynchronous circuits. Deadlock freedom is a property that is desired but hard to verify. It is an emergent property that has to be verified monolithically. We present our approach to using ACL2 to verify necessary and sufficient conditions over asynchronous delay-insensitive primitives. These conditions are used to derive SAT/SMT instances from circuits built out of these primitives. These SAT/SMT instances help in establishing absence of deadlocks. Our verification effort consists of building an executable checker in the ACL2 logic tailored for our purpose. We prove that this checker is correct. This approach enables us to prove ACL2 theorems involving defun-sk constructs and free variables fully automatically.

  2. Asynchronous Gossip for Averaging and Spectral Ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkar, Vivek S.; Makhijani, Rahul; Sundaresan, Rajesh

    2014-08-01

    We consider two variants of the classical gossip algorithm. The first variant is a version of asynchronous stochastic approximation. We highlight a fundamental difficulty associated with the classical asynchronous gossip scheme, viz., that it may not converge to a desired average, and suggest an alternative scheme based on reinforcement learning that has guaranteed convergence to the desired average. We then discuss a potential application to a wireless network setting with simultaneous link activation constraints. The second variant is a gossip algorithm for distributed computation of the Perron-Frobenius eigenvector of a nonnegative matrix. While the first variant draws upon a reinforcement learning algorithm for an average cost controlled Markov decision problem, the second variant draws upon a reinforcement learning algorithm for risk-sensitive control. We then discuss potential applications of the second variant to ranking schemes, reputation networks, and principal component analysis.

  3. Existence test for asynchronous interval iterations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kaj; Caprani, O.; Stauning, Ole

    1997-01-01

    In the search for regions that contain fixed points ofa real function of several variables, tests based on interval calculationscan be used to establish existence ornon-existence of fixed points in regions that are examined in the course ofthe search. The search can e.g. be performed...... as a synchronous (sequential) interval iteration:In each iteration step all components of the iterate are calculatedbased on the previous iterate. In this case it is straight forward to base simple interval existence and non-existencetests on the calculations done in each step of the iteration. The search can also...... be performed as an asynchronous (parallel) iteration: Only a few components are changed in each stepand this calculation is in general based on components from differentprevious iterates. For the asynchronous iteration it turns out thatsimple tests of existence and non-existence can be based...

  4. Computing by Temporal Order: Asynchronous Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Vielhaber

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Our concern is the behaviour of the elementary cellular automata with state set 0,1 over the cell set Z/nZ (one-dimensional finite wrap-around case, under all possible update rules (asynchronicity. Over the torus Z/nZ (n<= 11,we will see that the ECA with Wolfram rule 57 maps any v in F_2^n to any w in F_2^n, varying the update rule. We furthermore show that all even (element of the alternating group bijective functions on the set F_2^n = 0,...,2^n-1, can be computed by ECA57, by iterating it a sufficient number of times with varying update rules, at least for n <= 10. We characterize the non-bijective functions computable by asynchronous rules.

  5. Asynchronous Communication Scheme For Hypercube Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Herb S.

    1988-01-01

    Scheme devised for asynchronous-message communication system for Mark III hypercube concurrent-processor network. Network consists of up to 1,024 processing elements connected electrically as though were at corners of 10-dimensional cube. Each node contains two Motorola 68020 processors along with Motorola 68881 floating-point processor utilizing up to 4 megabytes of shared dynamic random-access memory. Scheme intended to support applications requiring passage of both polled or solicited and unsolicited messages.

  6. Quantifying the residence time and flushing characteristics of a shallow, back-barrier estuary: Application of hydrodynamic and particle tracking models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defne, Zafer; Ganju, Neil K.

    2015-01-01

    Estuarine residence time is a major driver of eutrophication and water quality. Barnegat Bay-Little Egg Harbor (BB-LEH), New Jersey, is a lagoonal back-barrier estuary that is subject to anthropogenic pressures including nutrient loading, eutrophication, and subsequent declines in water quality. A combination of hydrodynamic and particle tracking modeling was used to identify the mechanisms controlling flushing, residence time, and spatial variability of particle retention. The models demonstrated a pronounced northward subtidal flow from Little Egg Inlet in the south to Pt. Pleasant Canal in the north due to frictional effects in the inlets, leading to better flushing of the southern half of the estuary and particle retention in the northern estuary. Mean residence time for BB-LEH was 13 days but spatial variability was between ∼0 and 30 days depending on the initial particle location. Mean residence time with tidal forcing alone was 24 days (spatial variability between ∼0 and 50 days); the tides were relatively inefficient in flushing the northern end of the Bay. Scenarios with successive exclusion of physical processes from the models revealed that meteorological and remote offshore forcing were stronger drivers of exchange than riverine inflow. Investigations of water quality and eutrophication should take into account spatial variability in hydrodynamics and residence time in order to better quantify the roles of nutrient loading, production, and flushing.

  7. Children's Comprehension of Sentences with Focus Particles and the Role of Cognitive Control: An Eye Tracking Study with German-Learning 4-Year-Olds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Höhle

    Full Text Available Children's interpretations of sentences containing focus particles do not seem adult-like until school age. This study investigates how German 4-year-old children comprehend sentences with the focus particle 'nur' (only by using different tasks and controlling for the impact of general cognitive abilities on performance measures. Two sentence types with 'only' in either pre-subject or pre-object position were presented. Eye gaze data and verbal responses were collected via the visual world paradigm combined with a sentence-picture verification task. While the eye tracking data revealed an adult-like pattern of focus particle processing, the sentence-picture verification replicated previous findings of poor comprehension, especially for 'only' in pre-subject position. A second study focused on the impact of general cognitive abilities on the outcomes of the verification task. Working memory was related to children's performance in both sentence types whereas inhibitory control was selectively related to the number of errors for sentences with 'only' in pre-subject position. These results suggest that children at the age of 4 years have the linguistic competence to correctly interpret sentences with focus particles, which--depending on specific task demands--may be masked by immature general cognitive abilities.

  8. Blending Online Asynchronous and Synchronous Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa C. Yamagata-Lynch

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article I will share a qualitative self-study about a 15-week blended 100% online graduate level course facilitated through synchronous meetings on Blackboard Collaborate and asynchronous discussions on Blackboard. I taught the course at the University of Tennessee (UT during the spring 2012 semester and the course topic was online learning environments. The primary research question of this study was: How can the designer/instructor optimize learning experiences for students who are studying about online learning environments in a blended online course relying on both synchronous and asynchronous technologies? I relied on student reflections of course activities during the beginning, middle, and the end of the semester as the primary data source to obtain their insights regarding course experiences. Through the experiences involved in designing and teaching the course and engaging in this study I found that there is room in the instructional technology research community to address strategies for facilitating online synchronous learning that complement asynchronous learning. Synchronous online whole class meetings and well-structured small group meetings can help students feel a stronger sense of connection to their peers and instructor and stay engaged with course activities. In order to provide meaningful learning spaces in synchronous learning environments, the instructor/designer needs to balance the tension between embracing the flexibility that the online space affords to users and designing deliberate structures that will help them take advantage of the flexible space.

  9. Experimental investigation of pebble flow dynamics using radioactive particle tracking technique in a scaled-down Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khane, Vaibhav; Said, I.A.; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna H., E-mail: aldahhanm@mst.edu

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Pebble Flow fields at Pebble Bed Modular Reactor was investigated. • Radioactive Particle Tracking (RPT) technique has been used. • Plug flow type velocity profile is suggested at upper cylindrical region. - Abstract: The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a type of very-high-temperature reactor (VHTR) that is conceptually very similar to moving bed reactors used in the chemical and petrochemical industries. In a PBMR core, nuclear fuel is in the form of pebbles and moves slowly under the influence of gravity. In this work, an integrated experimental and computational study of granular flow in a scaled-down cold flow PBMR was performed. A continuous pebble re-circulation experimental set-up, mimicking the flow of pebbles in a PBMR was designed and developed. An experimental investigation of pebble flow dynamics in a scaled down test reactor was carried out using a non-invasive radioactive particle tracking (RPT) technique that used a cobalt-60 based tracer to mimic pebbles in terms of shape, size and density. A cross-correlation based position reconstruction algorithm and RPT calibration data were used to obtain results about Lagrangian trajectories, the velocity field, and residence time distributions. The RPT technique results a serve as a benchmark data for assessing contact force models used in the discrete element method (DEM) simulations.

  10. Tracking the pathway of diesel exhaust particles from the nose to the brain by X-ray florescence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, Yasuto [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishigyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: y.matsui@health.env.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakai, Nobumitsu [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishigyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: sakai@health.env.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Tsuda, Akira [Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)], E-mail: atsuda@hsph.harvard.edu; Terada, Yasuko [JASRI, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)], E-mail: yterada@spring8.or.jp; Takaoka, Masaki [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishigyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: takaoka@epsehost.env.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Fujimaki, Hidekazu [Division of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan)], E-mail: fujimaki@nies.go.jp; Uchiyama, Iwao [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishigyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: uchiyama@health.env.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2009-08-15

    Studies have shown that exposure to nano-sized particles (< 50 nm) result in their translocation to the central nervous system through the olfactory nerve. Translocation commonly occurs via inhalation, ingestion and skin uptake. Little information is available on the specific pathway of cellular localization of nano-sized particles in the olfactory bulb. The nano-sized particles entrance into the postsynaptics cell is of particular interest because the mitral cell projects to the central nucleus of the amygdala and the piriform cortex. Therefore, our objective in this follow-up study has been to determine whether or not the mitral cells project nano-sized particles to the brain. Nano-sized particles in this study were generated using diesel exhaust. Lab mice were exposed for a period of 4 weeks. We employed synchrotron radiation (SPring-8, Japan) to determine the concentration levels of metal in the olfactory neuron pathway. Metal levels were assayed by mapping, using X-ray fluorescence analysis. The major metal components measured in the filter that collected the inhaled diesel exhaust particles were calcium, copper, iron, nickel and zinc. Our studies reveal an increase in the amount of nano-sized particles in the glomerular layer as well as in the neurons in the olfactory epithelium. Higher levels of nickel and iron were found in the olfactory epithelium's lamina propria mucosae in comparison to that in the control group. Higher levels of iron also were observed in the glomerular layer. Our studies do not clarify the specifics of metal adhesion and detachment. This remains to be one of the key issues requiring further clarification.

  11. Particle Tracking Facilitates Real Time Capable Motion Correction in 2D or 3D Two-Photon Imaging of Neuronal Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Aghayee

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The application of 2-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM techniques to measure the dynamics of cellular calcium signals in populations of neurons is an extremely powerful technique for characterizing neural activity within the central nervous system. The use of TPLSM on awake and behaving subjects promises new insights into how neural circuit elements cooperatively interact to form sensory perceptions and generate behavior. A major challenge in imaging such preparations is unavoidable animal and tissue movement, which leads to shifts in the imaging location (jitter. The presence of image motion can lead to artifacts, especially since quantification of TPLSM images involves analysis of fluctuations in fluorescence intensities for each neuron, determined from small regions of interest (ROIs. Here, we validate a new motion correction approach to compensate for motion of TPLSM images in the superficial layers of auditory cortex of awake mice. We use a nominally uniform fluorescent signal as a secondary signal to complement the dynamic signals from genetically encoded calcium indicators. We tested motion correction for single plane time lapse imaging as well as multiplane (i.e., volume time lapse imaging of cortical tissue. Our procedure of motion correction relies on locating the brightest neurons and tracking their positions over time using established techniques of particle finding and tracking. We show that our tracking based approach provides subpixel resolution without compromising speed. Unlike most established methods, our algorithm also captures deformations of the field of view and thus can compensate e.g., for rotations. Object tracking based motion correction thus offers an alternative approach for motion correction, one that is well suited for real time spike inference analysis and feedback control, and for correcting for tissue distortions.

  12. Particle Tracking Facilitates Real Time Capable Motion Correction in 2D or 3D Two-Photon Imaging of Neuronal Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghayee, Samira; Winkowski, Daniel E; Bowen, Zachary; Marshall, Erin E; Harrington, Matt J; Kanold, Patrick O; Losert, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    The application of 2-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) techniques to measure the dynamics of cellular calcium signals in populations of neurons is an extremely powerful technique for characterizing neural activity within the central nervous system. The use of TPLSM on awake and behaving subjects promises new insights into how neural circuit elements cooperatively interact to form sensory perceptions and generate behavior. A major challenge in imaging such preparations is unavoidable animal and tissue movement, which leads to shifts in the imaging location (jitter). The presence of image motion can lead to artifacts, especially since quantification of TPLSM images involves analysis of fluctuations in fluorescence intensities for each neuron, determined from small regions of interest (ROIs). Here, we validate a new motion correction approach to compensate for motion of TPLSM images in the superficial layers of auditory cortex of awake mice. We use a nominally uniform fluorescent signal as a secondary signal to complement the dynamic signals from genetically encoded calcium indicators. We tested motion correction for single plane time lapse imaging as well as multiplane (i.e., volume) time lapse imaging of cortical tissue. Our procedure of motion correction relies on locating the brightest neurons and tracking their positions over time using established techniques of particle finding and tracking. We show that our tracking based approach provides subpixel resolution without compromising speed. Unlike most established methods, our algorithm also captures deformations of the field of view and thus can compensate e.g., for rotations. Object tracking based motion correction thus offers an alternative approach for motion correction, one that is well suited for real time spike inference analysis and feedback control, and for correcting for tissue distortions.

  13. EPOS for Coordination of Asynchronous Sensor Webs Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop, integrate, and deploy software-based tools to coordinate asynchronous, distributed missions and optimize observation planning spanning simultaneous...

  14. High-speed (20  kHz) digital in-line holography for transient particle tracking and sizing in multiphase flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guildenbecher, Daniel R; Cooper, Marcia A; Sojka, Paul E

    2016-04-10

    High-speed (20 kHz) digital in-line holography (DIH) is applied for 3D quantification of the size and velocity of fragments formed from the impact of a single water drop onto a thin film of water and burning aluminum particles from the combustion of a solid rocket propellant. To address the depth-of-focus problem in DIH, a regression-based multiframe tracking algorithm is employed, and out-of-plane experimental displacement accuracy is shown to be improved by an order-of-magnitude. Comparison of the results with previous DIH measurements using low-speed recording shows improved positional accuracy with the added advantage of detailed resolution of transient dynamics from single experimental realizations. The method is shown to be particularly advantageous for quantification of particle mass flow rates. For the investigated particle fields, the mass flows rates, which have been automatically measured from single experimental realizations, are found to be within 8% of the expected values.

  15. Evaluation of Different Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Surface Coatings for Single-Particle Tracking Applications in Biological Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhenghong; Danné, Noémie; Godin, Antoine Guillaume; Lounis, Brahim; Cognet, Laurent

    2017-11-16

    Fluorescence imaging of biological systems down to the single-molecule level has generated many advances in cellular biology. For applications within intact tissue, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are emerging as distinctive single-molecule nanoprobes, due to their near-infrared photoluminescence properties. For this, SWCNT surfaces must be coated using adequate molecular moieties. Yet, the choice of the suspension agent is critical since it influences both the chemical and emission properties of the SWCNTs within their environment. Here, we compare the most commonly used surface coatings for encapsulating photoluminescent SWCNTs in the context of bio-imaging applications. To be applied as single-molecule nanoprobes, encapsulated nanotubes should display low cytotoxicity, and minimal unspecific interactions with cells while still being highly luminescent so as to be imaged and tracked down to the single nanotube level for long periods of time. We tested the cell proliferation and cellular viability of each surface coating and evaluated the impact of the biocompatible surface coatings on nanotube photoluminescence brightness. Our study establishes that phospholipid-polyethylene glycol-coated carbon nanotube is the best current choice for single nanotube tracking experiments in live biological samples.

  16. Simulation of DNA Damage in Human Cells from Space Radiation Using a Physical Model of Stochastic Particle Tracks and Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; Hada, Megumi; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a recently developed model, in which chromosomes simulated by NASARTI (NASA Radiation Tracks Image) is combined with nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) in a voxelized space. The model produces the number of DSBs, as a function of dose for high-energy iron, oxygen, and carbon ions, and He ions. The combined model calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The merged computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The merged model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation.

  17. Implementing e-Transactions with Asynchronous Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Frolund, Svend; Guerraoui, Rachid

    2000-01-01

    An e-Transaction is one that executes exactly-once despite failures. This paper describes a distributed protocol that implements the abstraction of e-Transactionsin three-tier architectures. Three-tier architectures are typically Internet-oriented architectures, where the end-user interacts with front-end clients (e.g., browsers) that invoke middle-tier application servers (e.g., web servers) to access back-end databases. We implement the e-Transaction abstraction using an asynchronous replic...

  18. Development of a Detailed Microphysics Cirrus Model Tracking Aerosol Particles' Histories for Interpretation of the Recent INCA Campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Monier, Marie; Wobrock, Wolfram; Gayet, Jean-François; Flossmann, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    International audience; Cirrus clouds play an important role in the earth's energy balance. To quantify their impact, information is needed on their microstructure and more precisely on the number and size of the ice crystals. With the anthropogenic activity, more and more aerosol particles and water vapor are released even at the altitude where cirrus clouds are formed. Cirrus clouds formed in a polluted air mass may have different microphysical properties and, therefore, a different impact ...

  19. Assessing the Efficacy of Nano- and Micro-Sized Magnetic Particles as Contrast Agents for MRI Cell Tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Arthur Taylor; Anne Herrmann; Diana Moss; Violaine Sée; Karen Davies; Williams, Steve R.; Patricia Murray

    2014-01-01

    Iron-oxide based contrast agents play an important role in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of labelled cells in vivo. Currently, a wide range of such contrast agents is available with sizes varying from several nanometers up to a few micrometers and consisting of single or multiple magnetic cores. Here, we evaluate the effectiveness of these different particles for labelling and imaging stem cells, using a mouse mesenchymal stem cell line to investigate intracellular uptake, retention and pr...

  20. Energy deposition by a {sup 106}Ru/{sup 106}Rh eye applicator simulated using LEPTS, a low-energy particle track simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, M.C. [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Munoz, A.; Oller, J.C. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avenida Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Williart, A. [Departamento de Fisica de los Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Limao-Vieira, P. [Laboratorio de Colisoes Atomicas e Moleculares, Departamento de Fisica, CEFITEC, FCT-Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Borge, M.J.G.; Tengblad, O. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Huerga, C.; Tellez, M. [Hospital Universitario La Paz, Paseo de la Castellana 261, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Garcia, G., E-mail: g.garcia@iff.csic.es [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de los Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    The present study introduces LEPTS, an event-by-event Monte Carlo programme, for simulating an ophthalmic {sup 106}Ru/{sup 106}Rh applicator relevant in brachytherapy of ocular tumours. The distinctive characteristics of this code are the underlying radiation-matter interaction models that distinguish elastic and several kinds of inelastic collisions, as well as the use of mostly experimental input data. Special emphasis is placed on the treatment of low-energy electrons for generally being responsible for the deposition of a large portion of the total energy imparted to matter. - Highlights: > We present the Monte Carlo code LEPTS, a low-energy particle track simulation. > Carefully selected input data from 10 keV to 1 eV. > Application to an electron emitting Ru-106/Rh-106 plaque used in brachytherapy.

  1. FACT. Normalized and asynchronous mirror alignment for Cherenkov telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Sebastian Achim [ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Buss, Jens [TU Dortmund (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) need fast and large imaging optics to map the faint Cherenkov light emitted in cosmic ray air showers onto their image sensors. Segmented reflectors are inexpensive, lightweight and offer good image quality. However, alignment of the mirror facets remains a challenge. A good alignment is crucial in IACT observations to separate gamma rays from hadronic cosmic rays. We present a star tracking alignment method which is not restricted to clear nights. It normalizes the mirror facet reflections to be independent of the reference star or the cloud coverage. It records asynchronously of the telescope drive which makes the method easy to integrate in existing telescopes. It can be combined with remote facet actuation, but it does not need one to work. Furthermore, it can reconstruct all individual mirror facet point spread functions. We present the method and alignment results on the First Geiger-mode Photo Diode Avalanche Cherenkov Telescope (FACT) on the Canary Island of La Palma, Spain.

  2. Performance Studies for Protection Against Asynchronous Dumps in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, T; Bracco, C; Goddard, B; Meddahi, M

    2010-01-01

    The LHC beam dump system has to safely dispose all beams in a wide energy range of 450 GeV to 7 TeV. A 3 ms abort gap in the beam structure for the switch-on of the extraction kicker field ideally allows a loss-free extraction under normal operating conditions. However, a low number of asynchronous beam aborts is to be expected from reliability calculations and from the first year's operational experience with the beam dump kickers. For such cases, MAD-X simulations including all optics and alignment errors have been performed to determine loss patterns around the LHC as a function of the position of the main protection elements in interaction region six. Special attention was paid to the beam load on the tungsten collimators which protect the triplets in the LHC experimental insertions, and the tracking results compared with semi-analytical numerical estimates. The simulations are also compared to the results of beam commissioning of these protection devices.

  3. Registration procedure for spatial correlation of physical energy deposition of particle irradiation and cellular response utilizing cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklas, M.; Zimmermann, F.; Schlegel, J.; Schwager, C.; Debus, J.; Jäkel, O.; Abdollahi, A.; Greilich, S.

    2016-09-01

    The hybrid technology cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD) enables the investigation of radiation-related cellular events along single ion tracks on the subcellular scale in clinical ion beams. The Cell-Fit-HD comprises a fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD, the physical compartment), a device for individual particle detection and a substrate for viable cell-coating, i.e. the biological compartment. To date both compartments have been imaged sequentially in situ by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). This is yet in conflict with a functional read-out of the Cell-Fit-HD utilizing a fast live-cell imaging of the biological compartment with low phototoxicity on greater time scales. The read-out of the biological from the physical compartment was uncoupled. A read-out procedure was developed to image the cell layer by conventional widefield microscopy whereas the FNTD was imaged by CLSM. Point mapping registration of the confocal and widefield imaging data was performed. Non-fluorescent crystal defects (spinels) visible in both read-outs were used as control point pairs. The accuracy achieved was on the sub-µm scale. The read-out procedure by widefield microscopy does not impair the unique ability of spatial correlation by the Cell-Fit-HD. The uncoupling will enlarge the application potential of the hybrid technology significantly. The registration allows for an ultimate correlation of microscopic physical beam parameters and cell kinetics on greater time scales. The method reported herein will be instrumental for the introduction of a novel generation of compact detectors facilitating biodosimetric research towards high-throughput analysis.

  4. Two Studies Examining Argumentation in Asynchronous Computer Mediated Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Richard; Jones, Sarah; Doherty, John

    2008-01-01

    Asynchronous computer mediated communication (CMC) would seem to be an ideal medium for supporting development in student argumentation. This paper investigates this assumption through two studies. The first study compared asynchronous CMC with face-to-face discussions. The transactional and strategic level of the argumentation (i.e. measures of…

  5. Considerations regarding asynchronous motor rotor parameters determination by FEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivian Chiver

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some considerations about asynchronous motor rotor parameters determination, using software based on finite elements method (FEM. For this, 2D magnetostatic and time harmonic analysis will be realized, at different frequencies, in case of a three phase asynchronous motor.

  6. Integrating Asynchronous Digital Design Into the Computer Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. C.; Al-Assadi, W. K.; Di, J.

    2010-01-01

    As demand increases for circuits with higher performance, higher complexity, and decreased feature size, asynchronous (clockless) paradigms will become more widely used in the semiconductor industry, as evidenced by the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors' (ITRS) prediction of a likely shift from synchronous to asynchronous design…

  7. Designing Asynchronous Circuits for Low Power: An IFIR Filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Skovby; Sparsø, Jens

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses the design of asynchronous circuits for low power through an example: a filter bank for a digital hearing aid. The asynchronous design re-implements an existing synchronous circuit which is used in a commercial product. For comparison, both designs have been fabricated...

  8. The search for primary particle tracks in nucleon-nucleus interactions with gamma ray energy ΣEγ ≥ 3 TeV registered in stratospheric X-ray emulsion chambers using data of the RUNJOB experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zayarnaya I.S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present here the result of a retreatment of data from the RUNJOB (RUssia-Nippon JOint Balloon experiment of nucleon-nucleus interactions registered in stratospheric X-ray emulsion chambers (REC using a new method for searching and tracing of galactic particles in nuclear emulsions. In about halfcof these interactions (∼ 50 recorded in REC RUNJOB‘96-3B, RUNJOB‘97-6A and RUNJOB‘99-11A,B with energy released in the electromagnetic component ΣEγ ≥ 3 TeV and ΣEγ ≥ 5 TeV respectively, single charged particle tracks are not found within the search area defined individually by the particle track location accuracy. The absence of primary proton tracks is consistent with the original treatment of the RUNJOB experimental data. There is a difference in the zenith angular distribution for two groups of events in which a single charged particle track is observed or absent. The average penetration depth of the primary particles in REC to the interaction vertex in the zenith angle range from 60∘ to 79∘ differs by a factor two for these groups.

  9. A search for new heavy particles in events with highly ionising, short tracks at the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, Teresa; Schleper, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The main focus of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is to search for physics beyond the Standard Model and to measure Standard Model parameters. For both purposes it is essential to determine important performance parameters of the CMS detector. The here presented thesis contributes in a twofold way to the physics program of CMS. In the first part of this thesis, a search for physics beyond the Standard Model is presented. It is motivated by supersymmetric models with nearly mass-degenerate lightest neutralinos and lightest charginos. The small mass gap between chargino and neutralino can lead to long lifetimes of the chargino due to phase space suppression. Thus, the chargino can reach the tracking system before its decay. The here presented search targets chargino lifetimes of $\\text{c}\\tau \\approx 1 - 30\\,\\text{cm}$ where most of the charginos decay in the first layers of the tracker. This search aims at increasing the search sensitivity of existing searches with respect to these models...

  10. High-resolution recording of particle tracks with in-line holography in a large cryogenic bubble chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Harigel, G G

    2000-01-01

    Holography has been used successfully in combination with conventional optics for the first time in a large cryogenic bubble chamber, the 15-Foot Bubble Chamber at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), during a physics run in a high-energy neutrino beam. The innovative system combined the reference beam with the object beam, irradiating a conical volume of ~1.5 m/sup 3/. Bubble tracks from neutrino interactions with a width of ~120 mu m have been recorded with good contrast. The ratio of intensities of the object light to the reference light striking the film is called the beam branching ratio (BBR). We obtained in our experiment an exceedingly small minimum-observable ratio of BBR=(0.54/0.21)*10/sup -7/. The technology has the potential for a wide range of applications. This paper describes the various difficulties in achieving the success. It required the development of laser pulse stretching via enhanced closed loop control with slow Q-switching, to overcome excessive heating of the cryogenic l...

  11. A test beam set-up for the characterization of the Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode technology for particle tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Vilella, A; Trenado, J; Vila, A; Casanova, R; Vos, M; Garrido, L; Dieguez, A

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that avalanche photodiodes operated in the Geiger mode above the breakdown voltage offer a virtually infinite gain and time accuracy in the picosecond range that can be used for single photon detection. However, their performance in particle detection still remains unexplored. In this contribution, we are going to expose different steps that we have taken in order to prove the efficiency of the Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes in the aforementioned field. In particular, we will present a setup for the characterization of these sensors in a test beam. The expected results of the test beam at DESY and CERN have been simulated with Geant4 and will also be exposed.

  12. Rectification of Image Velocity Results (RIVeR): A simple and user-friendly toolbox for large scale water surface Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalano, Antoine; García, Carlos Marcelo; Rodríguez, Andrés

    2017-12-01

    LSPIV (Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry) and LSPTV (Large Scale Particle Tracking Velocimetry) are used as relatively low-cost and non-intrusive techniques for water-surface velocity analysis and flow discharge measurements in rivers or large-scale hydraulic models. This paper describes a methodology based on state-of-the-art tools (for example, that apply classical PIV/PTV analysis) resulting in large-scale surface-flow characterization according to the first operational version of the RIVeR (Rectification of Image Velocity Results). RIVeR is developed in Matlab and is designed to be user-friendly. RIVeR processes large-scale water-surface characterization such as velocity fields or individual trajectories of floating tracers. This work describes the wide range of application of the techniques for comparing measured surface flows in hydraulic physical models to flow discharge estimates for a wide range of flow events in rivers (for example, low and high flows).

  13. Asynchronous machines. Direct torque control; Machines asynchrones. Commande par controle direct de couple

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornel, B. de [Institut National Polytechnique, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2006-05-15

    The asynchronous machine, with its low cost and robustness, is today the most widely used motor to make speed variators. However, its main drawback is that the same current generates both the magnetic flux and the torque, and thus any torque variation creates a flux variation. Such a coupling gives to the asynchronous machine a nonlinear behaviour which makes its control much more complex. The direct self control (DSC) method has been developed to improve the low efficiency of the scalar control method and for the specific railway drive application. The direct torque control (DTC) method is derived from the DSC method but corresponds to other type of applications. The DSC and DTC algorithms for asynchronous motors are presented in this article: 1 - direct control of the stator flux (DSC): principle, flux control, torque control, switching frequency of the inverter, speed estimation; 2 - direct torque control (DTC): principle, electromagnetic torque derivative, signals shape and switching frequency, some results, DTC speed variator without speed sensor, DTC application to multi-machine multi-converter systems; 3 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  14. Error characterization for asynchronous computations: Proxy equation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallai, Gabriella; Mittal, Ankita; Girimaji, Sharath

    2017-11-01

    Numerical techniques for asynchronous fluid flow simulations are currently under development to enable efficient utilization of massively parallel computers. These numerical approaches attempt to accurately solve time evolution of transport equations using spatial information at different time levels. The truncation error of asynchronous methods can be divided into two parts: delay dependent (EA) or asynchronous error and delay independent (ES) or synchronous error. The focus of this study is a specific asynchronous error mitigation technique called proxy-equation approach. The aim of this study is to examine these errors as a function of the characteristic wavelength of the solution. Mitigation of asynchronous effects requires that the asynchronous error be smaller than synchronous truncation error. For a simple convection-diffusion equation, proxy-equation error analysis identifies critical initial wave-number, λc. At smaller wave numbers, synchronous error are larger than asynchronous errors. We examine various approaches to increase the value of λc in order to improve the range of applicability of proxy-equation approach.

  15. Commande adaptive d'une machine asynchrone

    OpenAIRE

    Slama-Belkhodja, I.; De Fornel, B.

    1996-01-01

    Cat article décrit une stratégie de commande adaptive indirecte à Placement de Pôles (PP), appliquée à la commande en vitesse d'une machine asynchrone alimentée par un ensemble hacheur-filtre-onduleur de tension. L'algorithme des Moindres Carrés Récursifs (MCR) est utilisé pour l'identification des modèles de comportement type entrées/sorties. Un intérêt particulier est porté à la mise en oeuvre de cet algorithme et à la discussion de ses résultats, tenant compte des erreurs de modélisation e...

  16. Asynchronous parallel pattern search for nonlinear optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. D. Hough; T. G. Kolda; V. J. Torczon

    2000-01-01

    Parallel pattern search (PPS) can be quite useful for engineering optimization problems characterized by a small number of variables (say 10--50) and by expensive objective function evaluations such as complex simulations that take from minutes to hours to run. However, PPS, which was originally designed for execution on homogeneous and tightly-coupled parallel machine, is not well suited to the more heterogeneous, loosely-coupled, and even fault-prone parallel systems available today. Specifically, PPS is hindered by synchronization penalties and cannot recover in the event of a failure. The authors introduce a new asynchronous and fault tolerant parallel pattern search (AAPS) method and demonstrate its effectiveness on both simple test problems as well as some engineering optimization problems

  17. A Block-Asynchronous Relaxation Method for Graphics Processing Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antz, Hartwig [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Tomov, Stanimire [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Dongarra, Jack [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Heuveline, Vincent [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (KIT) (Germany)

    2011-11-30

    In this paper, we analyze the potential of asynchronous relaxation methods on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). For this purpose, we developed a set of asynchronous iteration algorithms in CUDA and compared them with a parallel implementation of synchronous relaxation methods on CPU-based systems. For a set of test matrices taken from the University of Florida Matrix Collection we monitor the convergence behavior, the average iteration time and the total time-to-solution time. Analyzing the results, we observe that even for our most basic asynchronous relaxation scheme, despite its lower convergence rate compared to the Gauss-Seidel relaxation (that we expected), the asynchronous iteration running on GPUs is still able to provide solution approximations of certain accuracy in considerably shorter time then Gauss- Seidel running on CPUs. Hence, it overcompensates for the slower convergence by exploiting the scalability and the good fit of the asynchronous schemes for the highly parallel GPU architectures. Further, enhancing the most basic asynchronous approach with hybrid schemes – using multiple iterations within the ”subdomain” handled by a GPU thread block and Jacobi-like asynchronous updates across the ”boundaries”, subject to tuning various parameters – we manage to not only recover the loss of global convergence but often accelerate convergence of up to two times (compared to the effective but difficult to parallelize Gauss-Seidel type of schemes), while keeping the execution time of a global iteration practically the same. This shows the high potential of the asynchronous methods not only as a stand alone numerical solver for linear systems of equations fulfilling certain convergence conditions but more importantly as a smoother in multigrid methods. Due to the explosion of parallelism in todays architecture designs, the significance and the need for asynchronous methods, as the ones described in this work, is expected to grow.

  18. Magnetic Particle / Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In-Vitro MPI-Guided Real Time Catheter Tracking and 4D Angioplasty Using a Road Map and Blood Pool Tracer Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, Johannes; Hofmann, Martin; Jung, Caroline; Kaul, Michael Gerhard; Werner, Franziska; Them, Kolja; Reimer, Rudolph; Nielsen, Peter; Vom Scheidt, Annika; Adam, Gerhard; Knopp, Tobias; Ittrich, Harald

    2016-01-01

    In-vitro evaluation of the feasibility of 4D real time tracking of endovascular devices and stenosis treatment with a magnetic particle imaging (MPI) / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) road map approach and an MPI-guided approach using a blood pool tracer. A guide wire and angioplasty-catheter were labeled with a thin layer of magnetic lacquer. For real time MPI a custom made software framework was developed. A stenotic vessel phantom filled with saline or superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MM4) was equipped with bimodal fiducial markers for co-registration in preclinical 7T MRI and MPI. In-vitro angioplasty was performed inflating the balloon with saline or MM4. MPI data were acquired using a field of view of 37.3×37.3×18.6 mm3 and a frame rate of 46 volumes/sec. Analysis of the magnetic lacquer-marks on the devices were performed with electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry and micro-computed tomography. Magnetic marks allowed for MPI/MRI guidance of interventional devices. Bimodal fiducial markers enable MPI/MRI image fusion for MRI based roadmapping. MRI roadmapping and the blood pool tracer approach facilitate MPI real time monitoring of in-vitro angioplasty. Successful angioplasty was verified with MPI and MRI. Magnetic marks consist of micrometer sized ferromagnetic plates mainly composed of iron and iron oxide. 4D real time MP imaging, tracking and guiding of endovascular instruments and in-vitro angioplasty is feasible. In addition to an approach that requires a blood pool tracer, MRI based roadmapping might emerge as a promising tool for radiation free 4D MPI-guided interventions.

  19. Magnetic Particle / Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In-Vitro MPI-Guided Real Time Catheter Tracking and 4D Angioplasty Using a Road Map and Blood Pool Tracer Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Salamon

    Full Text Available In-vitro evaluation of the feasibility of 4D real time tracking of endovascular devices and stenosis treatment with a magnetic particle imaging (MPI / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI road map approach and an MPI-guided approach using a blood pool tracer.A guide wire and angioplasty-catheter were labeled with a thin layer of magnetic lacquer. For real time MPI a custom made software framework was developed. A stenotic vessel phantom filled with saline or superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MM4 was equipped with bimodal fiducial markers for co-registration in preclinical 7T MRI and MPI. In-vitro angioplasty was performed inflating the balloon with saline or MM4. MPI data were acquired using a field of view of 37.3×37.3×18.6 mm3 and a frame rate of 46 volumes/sec. Analysis of the magnetic lacquer-marks on the devices were performed with electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry and micro-computed tomography.Magnetic marks allowed for MPI/MRI guidance of interventional devices. Bimodal fiducial markers enable MPI/MRI image fusion for MRI based roadmapping. MRI roadmapping and the blood pool tracer approach facilitate MPI real time monitoring of in-vitro angioplasty. Successful angioplasty was verified with MPI and MRI. Magnetic marks consist of micrometer sized ferromagnetic plates mainly composed of iron and iron oxide.4D real time MP imaging, tracking and guiding of endovascular instruments and in-vitro angioplasty is feasible. In addition to an approach that requires a blood pool tracer, MRI based roadmapping might emerge as a promising tool for radiation free 4D MPI-guided interventions.

  20. TH-A-19A-07: The Effect of Particle Tracking Step Size Limit On Monte Carlo- Computed LET Spectrum of Therapeutic Proton Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, F; Bronk, L; Kerr, M; Titt, U; Taleei, R; Mirkovic, D; Zhu, X; Grosshans, D; Mohan, R [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of charged particle tracking step size limit in the determination of the LET spectrum of therapeutic proton beams using Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: The LET spectra at different depths in a water phantom from a 79.7 MeV spot-scanning proton beam were calculated using Geant4. Five different tracking step limits 0.5 mm, 0.1 mm, 0.05 mm, 0.01 mm and 1 μm were adopted. The field size was set to 10×10 cm{sup 2} on the isocenter plane. A 40×40×6 cm{sup 3} water phantom was modelled as the irradiation target. The voxel size was set to 1×1×0.5 mm{sup 3} to obtain high resolution results. The LET spectra were scored ranging from 0.01 keV/μm to 10{sup 4}keV/μm in the logarithm scale. In addition, the proton energy spectra at different depths were also scored. Results: The LET spectra calculated using different step size limits were compared at four depths along the Bragg curve. At any depths, the spread of the LET spectra increases with the decrease of step size limit. In the dose buildup region (z = 1.9 cm) and in the region proximal to the Bragg peak (z = 3.95 cm), the frequency mean LET does not vary with decreasing step size limit. At Bragg peak (z = 4.75 cm) and in the distal edge (z = 4.85 cm), frequency mean LET decreases with decreasing step size limit. The energy spectrum at any specified depths does not vary with the step size limit. Conclusion: The calculated LET has a spectral distribution rather than a single value at any depths along the Bragg curve and the spread of the computed spectrum depends on the tracking step limit. Incorporating the LET spectrum distribution into the robust IMPT optimization plan may provide more accurate biological dose distribution than using the dose- or fluence-averaged LET. NIH Program Project Grant P01CA021239.

  1. Calculating track thrust with track functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsi-Ming; Procura, Massimiliano; Thaler, Jesse; Waalewijn, Wouter J.

    2013-08-01

    In e+e- event shapes studies at LEP, two different measurements were sometimes performed: a “calorimetric” measurement using both charged and neutral particles and a “track-based” measurement using just charged particles. Whereas calorimetric measurements are infrared and collinear safe, and therefore calculable in perturbative QCD, track-based measurements necessarily depend on nonperturbative hadronization effects. On the other hand, track-based measurements typically have smaller experimental uncertainties. In this paper, we present the first calculation of the event shape “track thrust” and compare to measurements performed at ALEPH and DELPHI. This calculation is made possible through the recently developed formalism of track functions, which are nonperturbative objects describing how energetic partons fragment into charged hadrons. By incorporating track functions into soft-collinear effective theory, we calculate the distribution for track thrust with next-to-leading logarithmic resummation. Due to a partial cancellation between nonperturbative parameters, the distributions for calorimeter thrust and track thrust are remarkably similar, a feature also seen in LEP data.

  2. Asynchronous Geiger-mode APD cameras with free-running InGaAsP pixels (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzler, Mark; Salzano, Gennaro; Entwistle, Mark; Jiang, Xudong; Owens, Mark; Piccione, Brian; Wilton, Sam; Slomkowski, Krystyna; Roszko, Scott C.; Wei, Esther

    2017-05-01

    We describe Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GmAPD) cameras designed with asynchronous free-running operation that supports single-photon direct detection and coherent detection 3D LiDAR imaging as well as free-running applications such as free-space optical communications and target acquisition and tracking. Each free-running pixel in the 32x32 focal plane array performs independent time-of-flight measurements with a selectable reset time between 0.1 and 10 μs. Asynchronous reporting of time-of-flight and pixel location data allows continuous operation for arbitrarily long periods of time at sampling rates exceeding 0.7 Gsample/s. We report results for cameras optimized for operation using either 1.0 or 1.5 μm LiDAR sources.

  3. TCDQ-TCT retraction and losses during asynchronous beam dump

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, Chiara; Quaranta, Elena; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The protection provided by the TCDQs in case of asynchronous beam dump depends strongly on their correct setup. They have to respect the strict hierarchy of the full collimation system and shield the tertiary collimators in the experimental regions. This MD aimed at performing asynchronous beam dump tests with different configurations, in order to assess the minimum allowed retraction between TCTs and TCDQs and, as a consequence, on the The protection provided by the TCDQs in case of asynchronous beam dump depends strongly on their correct setup. They have to respect the strict hierarchy of the full collimation system and shield the tertiary collimators in the experimental regions. This MD aimed at performing asynchronous beam dump tests with different configurations, in order to assess the minimum allowed retraction between TCTs and TCDQs and, as a consequence, on the β* reach.

  4. Verification and Planning for Stochastic Processes with Asynchronous Events

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Younes, Hakan L

    2005-01-01

    .... The most common assumption is that of history-independence: the Markov assumption. In this thesis, the author considers the problems of verification and planning for stochastic processes with asynchronous events, without relying on the Markov assumption...

  5. Adaptive wavefront control with asynchronous stochastic parallel gradient descent clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorontsov, Mikhail A; Carhart, Gary W

    2006-10-01

    A scalable adaptive optics (AO) control system architecture composed of asynchronous control clusters based on the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) optimization technique is discussed. It is shown that subdivision of the control channels into asynchronous SPGD clusters improves the AO system performance by better utilizing individual and/or group characteristics of adaptive system components. Results of numerical simulations are presented for two different adaptive receiver systems based on asynchronous SPGD clusters-one with a single deformable mirror with Zernike response functions and a second with tip-tilt and segmented wavefront correctors. We also discuss adaptive wavefront control based on asynchronous parallel optimization of several local performance metrics-a control architecture referred to as distributed adaptive optics (DAO). Analysis of the DAO system architecture demonstrated the potential for significant increase of the adaptation process convergence rate that occurs due to partial decoupling of the system control clusters optimizing individual performance metrics.

  6. Final Technical Report on STTR Project DE-FG02-06ER86281 Particle Tracking in Matter-Dominated Beam Lines (G4beamline)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muons, Inc.

    2011-05-19

    This project has been for software development of the G4beamline [1] program, which is a particle-tracking simulation program based on the Geant4 toolkit [2], optimized for beam lines. This program can perform more realistic simulations than most alternatives, while being significantly easier to use by physicists. This project has fostered the general acceptance of G4beamline within the muon community, and has assisted in expanding its role outside that community. During this project, the G4beamline user community has grown from about a half-dozen users to more than 200 users around the world. This project also validated our business decision to keep G4beamline an open-source program, judging that an STTR project would provide more development resources than would marketing and selling the program. G4beamline is freely available to the physics community, and has been well validated against experiments and other codes within its domain. Muons, Inc. continues to support and develop the program, and a major part of the company's continued success and growth is directly related to our expertise in applying this program to interesting applications.

  7. Development of groundwater vulnerability zones in a data-scarce eogenetic karst area using Head-Guided Zonation and particle-tracking simulation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaas, Dua K S Y; Imteaz, Monzur Alam; Arulrajah, Arul

    2017-10-01

    Delineation of groundwater vulnerability zones based on a valid groundwater model is crucial towards an accurate design of management strategies. However, limited data often restrain the development of a robust groundwater model. This study presents a methodology to develop groundwater vulnerability zones in a data-scarce area. The Head-Guided Zonation (HGZ) method was applied on the recharge area of Oemau Spring in Rote Island, Indonesia, which is under potential risk of contamination from rapid land use changes. In this method the model domain is divided into zones of piecewise constant into which the values of subsurface properties are assigned in the parameterisation step. Using reverse particle-tracking simulation on the calibrated and validated groundwater model, the simulation results (travel time and pathline trajectory) were combined with the potential groundwater contamination risk from human activities (land use type and current practice) to develop three vulnerability zones. The corresponding preventive management strategies were proposed to protect the spring from contamination and to ensure provision of safe and good quality water from the spring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Single Particle Tracking Confirms That Multivalent Tat Protein Transduction Domain-induced Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan Cross-linkage Activates Rac1 for Internalization*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Junji; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Gonda, Kohsuke; Roy, Chandra Nath; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Higuchi, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism by which HIV-1-Tat protein transduction domain (TatP) enters the cell remains unclear because of an insufficient understanding of the initial kinetics of peptide entry. Here, we report the successful visualization and tracking of TatP molecular kinetics on the cell surface with 7-nm spatial precision using quantum dots. Strong cell binding was only observed with a TatP valence of ≥8, whereas monovalent TatP binding was negligible. The requirement of the cell-surface heparan sulfate (HS) chains of HS proteoglycans (HSPGs) for TatP binding and intracellular transport was demonstrated by the enzymatic removal of HS and simultaneous observation of two individual particles. Multivalent TatP induces HSPG cross-linking, recruiting activated Rac1 to adjacent lipid rafts and thereby enhancing the recruitment of TatP/HSPG to actin-associated microdomains and its internalization by macropinocytosis. These findings clarify the initial binding mechanism of TatP to the cell surface and demonstrate the importance of TatP valence for strong surface binding and signal transduction. Our data also shed light on the ability of TatP to exploit the machinery of living cells, using HSPG signaling to activate Rac1 and alter TatP mobility and internalization. This work should guide the future design of TatP-based peptides as therapeutic nanocarriers with efficient transduction. PMID:21199870

  9. Single particle tracking confirms that multivalent Tat protein transduction domain-induced heparan sulfate proteoglycan cross-linkage activates Rac1 for internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Junji; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Gonda, Kohsuke; Roy, Chandra Nath; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Higuchi, Hideo

    2011-03-25

    The mechanism by which HIV-1-Tat protein transduction domain (TatP) enters the cell remains unclear because of an insufficient understanding of the initial kinetics of peptide entry. Here, we report the successful visualization and tracking of TatP molecular kinetics on the cell surface with 7-nm spatial precision using quantum dots. Strong cell binding was only observed with a TatP valence of ≥8, whereas monovalent TatP binding was negligible. The requirement of the cell-surface heparan sulfate (HS) chains of HS proteoglycans (HSPGs) for TatP binding and intracellular transport was demonstrated by the enzymatic removal of HS and simultaneous observation of two individual particles. Multivalent TatP induces HSPG cross-linking, recruiting activated Rac1 to adjacent lipid rafts and thereby enhancing the recruitment of TatP/HSPG to actin-associated microdomains and its internalization by macropinocytosis. These findings clarify the initial binding mechanism of TatP to the cell surface and demonstrate the importance of TatP valence for strong surface binding and signal transduction. Our data also shed light on the ability of TatP to exploit the machinery of living cells, using HSPG signaling to activate Rac1 and alter TatP mobility and internalization. This work should guide the future design of TatP-based peptides as therapeutic nanocarriers with efficient transduction.

  10. Atomic Particle Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1970-01-01

    This booklet tells how scientists observe the particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerges from an atomic nucleus. The equipment used falls into two general categories: counters which count each particle as it passes by, and track detectors, which make a photographic record of the particle's track.

  11. Control of asynchronous motors. Volume 1. Modeling, vectorial control and direct torque control; Commande des moteurs asynchrones. Volume 1. Modelisation, controle vectoriel et DTC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canudas de Wit, C. [Ecole Nationale Superieure d' Ingenieurs de Genie Chimique, ENSIGC, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2000-07-01

    This first volume deals with the problems of control of asynchronous motors in industrial environments: industrial environment, variable speed, asynchronous motors and power supplies, modeling, direct torque control laws, control by controlled limit cycles under frequency constraints. (J.S.)

  12. Eventual Leader Service in Unreliable Asynchronous Systems: Why? How?

    OpenAIRE

    Raynal, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Providing processes with an {\\it eventual leader} service is an important issue when one has to design and implement a middleware layer on top of a failure-prone asynchronous distributed system. This invited lecture investigates this problem. It first shows that such a service cannot be built if the underlying system is fully asynchronous. Then, the paper visits several additional behavioral assumptions that have been proposed in the literature to cope with this impossibility and presents cor...

  13. Experimental 3D Asynchronous Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    EXPERIMENTAL 3D ASYNCHRONOUS FIELD PROGRAMMABLE GATE ARRAY ( FPGA ) CORNELL UNIVERSITY MARCH 2015 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC...From - To) OCT 2011 – OCT 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE EXPERIMENTAL 3D ASYNCHRONOUS FIELD PROGRAMMABLE GATE ARRAY ( FPGA ) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...in collaboration with Albany’s College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 3D Technology, vertical interconnects, AFPGA, FPGA

  14. Rapid, generalized adaptation to asynchronous audiovisual speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Burg, Erik; Goodbourn, Patrick T

    2015-04-07

    The brain is adaptive. The speed of propagation through air, and of low-level sensory processing, differs markedly between auditory and visual stimuli; yet the brain can adapt to compensate for the resulting cross-modal delays. Studies investigating temporal recalibration to audiovisual speech have used prolonged adaptation procedures, suggesting that adaptation is sluggish. Here, we show that adaptation to asynchronous audiovisual speech occurs rapidly. Participants viewed a brief clip of an actor pronouncing a single syllable. The voice was either advanced or delayed relative to the corresponding lip movements, and participants were asked to make a synchrony judgement. Although we did not use an explicit adaptation procedure, we demonstrate rapid recalibration based on a single audiovisual event. We find that the point of subjective simultaneity on each trial is highly contingent upon the modality order of the preceding trial. We find compelling evidence that rapid recalibration generalizes across different stimuli, and different actors. Finally, we demonstrate that rapid recalibration occurs even when auditory and visual events clearly belong to different actors. These results suggest that rapid temporal recalibration to audiovisual speech is primarily mediated by basic temporal factors, rather than higher-order factors such as perceived simultaneity and source identity. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Managing Asynchronous Data in ATLAS's Concurrent Framework

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00100895; The ATLAS collaboration; Baines, John; Bold, Tomasz; Calafiura, Paolo; Cranshaw, Jack; Dotti, Andrea; Farrell, Steven; Malon, David; Stewart, Graeme; Snyder, Scott; van Gemmeren, Peter; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Wynne, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    In order to be able to make effective use of emerging hardware, where the amount of memory available to any CPU is rapidly decreasing as the core count continues to rise, ATLAS has begun a migration to a concurrent, multi-threaded software framework, known as AthenaMT. Significant progress has been made in implementing AthenaMT - we can currently run realistic Geant4 simulations on massively concurrent machines. the migration of realistic prototypes of reconstruction workflows is more difficult, given the large amounts of legacy code and the complexity and challenges of reconstruction software. These types of workflows, however, are the types that will most benefit from the memory reduction features of a multi-threaded framework. One of the challenges that we will report on in this paper is the re-design and implementation of several key asynchronous technologies whose behaviour is radically different in a concurrent environment than in a serial one, namely the management of Conditions data and the Detector D...

  16. Asynchronous Forums in EAP: Assessment Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Kol

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a pilot and a subsequent study that focused on the assessment of student writing in asynchronous text-stimulated forum discussions. The study, which was conducted in advanced English for Academic Purposes (EAP courses, aimed at determining suitable assessment criteria for written academic discussions. In addition, the study tapped student attitudes toward forums, checked the effect of forum participation on student writing, and characterized the text-stimulated forum discussions.Based on a content analysis of the pilot data, the constructs of reflection and interaction were selected as assessment criteria to be evaluated in the main study. These criteria were found to be usable but insufficient for student assessment in the EAP courses. A questionnaire showed that the student attitudes were positive and that most students felt that their writing improved, even though an analysis of language complexity showed no significant improvement. A qualitative analysis of the transcripts revealed deep student involvement with the content and with their peers as well as an academic register interspersed with conversational interactions.

  17. First measurement of the cross section for the production of hadrons with high transverse momenta at COMPASS, and developments for particle tracking in high-rate experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeppner, Christian C.

    2012-01-31

    In this dissertation, the first measurement of the luminosity for data from the COMPASS experiment is presented. The result is obtained by the direct measurement of the beam flux and the correction of all inefficiencies and dead times of the measurement. The normalized data set consists of about 30% of the COMPASS data recorded in 2004 and the effective integrated luminosity is 142.4 pb{sup -1} {+-} 10%, which is verified by the determination of the structure function F{sub 2} of the nucleon and its comparison to literature. Based on this result, the cross section for the quasi-real photoproduction of charged hadrons with high transverse momenta in muon-deuteron scattering at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=17.4 GeV is determined. The measurement of a hadron-production cross section in a thick solid-state target is quite challenging in comparison to collider measurements of such processes. The issue of secondary hadronic interactions in the target material is carefully studied and taken into account. The cross section is presented in bins of the pseudo-rapidity of the hadrons and separated by hadron charge. The results are discussed and compared to recent calculations of next-to-leading order perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics. This comparison serves as a test of the applicability of such calculations to the production of hadrons with high transverse momenta at COMPASS energies. The second part of this dissertation describes new developments for charged-particle tracking in high-rate experiments. The design of a new type of Time Projection Chamber (TPC), which employs GEM foils instead of proportional wires for gas amplification, is discussed. This technology opens up the possibility of using TPCs in experiments with trigger rates beyond about 1 kHz. Several important contributions to the GEM-TPC project are presented. Furthermore, a generic framework for track fitting in high-energy physics, called GENFIT, is introduced. This novel software is being used

  18. ASCERTAINMENT OF THE EQUIVALENT CIRCUIT PARAMETERS OF THE ASYNCHRONOUS MACHINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Safaryan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers experimental and analytical determination of the asynchronous machine equivalent-circuit parameters with application of the reference data. Transient processes investigation of the asynchronous machines necessitates the equivalent circuit parameters (resistance impedance, inductances and coefficient of the stator-rotor contours mutual inductance that help form the transitory-process mathematical simulation model. The reference books do not provide those parameters; they instead give the rated ones (active power, voltage, slide, coefficient of performance and capacity coefficient as well as the ratio of starting and nominal currents and torques. The noted studies on the asynchronous machine equivalent-circuits parametrization fail to solve the problems ad finem or solve them with admissions. The paper presents experimental and analytical determinations of the asynchronous machine equivalent-circuit parameters: the experimental one based on the results of two measurements and the analytical one where the problem boils down to solving a system of nonlineal algebraic equations. The authors investigate the equivalent asynchronous machine input-resistance properties and adduce the dependence curvatures of the input-resistances on the slide. They present a symbolic model for analytical parameterization of the asynchronous machine equivalent-circuit that represents a system of nonlineal equations and requires one of the rotor-parameters arbitrary assignment. The article demonstrates that for the asynchronous machine equivalent-circuit experimental parameterization the measures are to be conducted of the stator-circuit voltage, current and active power with two different slides and arbitrary assignment of one of the rotor parameters. The paper substantiates the fact that additional measurement does not discard the rotor-parameter choice arbitrariness. The authors establish that in motoring mode there is a critical slide by which the

  19. Asynchronous Task-Based Polar Decomposition on Single Node Manycore Architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Sukkari, Dalal E.

    2017-09-29

    This paper introduces the first asynchronous, task-based formulation of the polar decomposition and its corresponding implementation on manycore architectures. Based on a formulation of the iterative QR dynamically-weighted Halley algorithm (QDWH) for the calculation of the polar decomposition, the proposed implementation replaces the original LU factorization for the condition number estimator by the more adequate QR factorization to enable software portability across various architectures. Relying on fine-grained computations, the novel task-based implementation is capable of taking advantage of the identity structure of the matrix involved during the QDWH iterations, which decreases the overall algorithmic complexity. Furthermore, the artifactual synchronization points have been weakened compared to previous implementations, unveiling look-ahead opportunities for better hardware occupancy. The overall QDWH-based polar decomposition can then be represented as a directed acyclic graph (DAG), where nodes represent computational tasks and edges define the inter-task data dependencies. The StarPU dynamic runtime system is employed to traverse the DAG, to track the various data dependencies and to asynchronously schedule the computational tasks on the underlying hardware resources, resulting in an out-of-order task scheduling. Benchmarking experiments show significant improvements against existing state-of-the-art high performance implementations for the polar decomposition on latest shared-memory vendors\\' systems, while maintaining numerical accuracy.

  20. IHadoop: Asynchronous iterations for MapReduce

    KAUST Repository

    Elnikety, Eslam Mohamed Ibrahim

    2011-11-01

    MapReduce is a distributed programming frame-work designed to ease the development of scalable data-intensive applications for large clusters of commodity machines. Most machine learning and data mining applications involve iterative computations over large datasets, such as the Web hyperlink structures and social network graphs. Yet, the MapReduce model does not efficiently support this important class of applications. The architecture of MapReduce, most critically its dataflow techniques and task scheduling, is completely unaware of the nature of iterative applications; tasks are scheduled according to a policy that optimizes the execution for a single iteration which wastes bandwidth, I/O, and CPU cycles when compared with an optimal execution for a consecutive set of iterations. This work presents iHadoop, a modified MapReduce model, and an associated implementation, optimized for iterative computations. The iHadoop model schedules iterations asynchronously. It connects the output of one iteration to the next, allowing both to process their data concurrently. iHadoop\\'s task scheduler exploits inter-iteration data locality by scheduling tasks that exhibit a producer/consumer relation on the same physical machine allowing a fast local data transfer. For those iterative applications that require satisfying certain criteria before termination, iHadoop runs the check concurrently during the execution of the subsequent iteration to further reduce the application\\'s latency. This paper also describes our implementation of the iHadoop model, and evaluates its performance against Hadoop, the widely used open source implementation of MapReduce. Experiments using different data analysis applications over real-world and synthetic datasets show that iHadoop performs better than Hadoop for iterative algorithms, reducing execution time of iterative applications by 25% on average. Furthermore, integrating iHadoop with HaLoop, a variant Hadoop implementation that caches

  1. Gigabit Ethernet Asynchronous Clock Compensation FIFO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhachek, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Clock compensation for Gigabit Ethernet is necessary because the clock recovered from the 1.25 Gb/s serial data stream has the potential to be 200 ppm slower or faster than the system clock. The serial data is converted to 10-bit parallel data at a 125 MHz rate on a clock recovered from the serial data stream. This recovered data needs to be processed by a system clock that is also running at a nominal rate of 125 MHz, but not synchronous to the recovered clock. To cross clock domains, an asynchronous FIFO (first-in-first-out) is used, with the write pointer (wprt) in the recovered clock domain and the read pointer (rptr) in the system clock domain. Because the clocks are generated from separate sources, there is potential for FIFO overflow or underflow. Clock compensation in Gigabit Ethernet is possible by taking advantage of the protocol data stream features. There are two distinct data streams that occur in Gigabit Ethernet where identical data is transmitted for a period of time. The first is configuration, which happens during auto-negotiation. The second is idle, which occurs at the end of auto-negotiation and between every packet. The identical data in the FIFO can be repeated by decrementing the read pointer, thus compensating for a FIFO that is draining too fast. The identical data in the FIFO can also be skipped by incrementing the read pointer, which compensates for a FIFO draining too slowly. The unique and novel features of this FIFO are that it works in both the idle stream and the configuration streams. The increment or decrement of the read pointer is different in the idle and compensation streams to preserve disparity. Another unique feature is that the read pointer to write pointer difference range changes between compensation and idle to minimize FIFO latency during packet transmission.

  2. Slab track

    OpenAIRE

    Golob, Tina

    2014-01-01

    The last 160 years has been mostly used conventional track with ballasted bed, sleepers and steel rail. Ensuring the high speed rail traffic, increasing railway track capacities, providing comfortable and safe ride as well as high reliability and availability railway track, has led to development of innovative systems for railway track. The so-called slab track was first built in 1972 and since then, they have developed many different slab track systems around the world. Slab track was also b...

  3. Simulations of Groundwater Flow and Particle Tracking Analysis in the Area Contributing Recharge to a Public-Supply Well near Tampa, Florida, 2002-05

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Christy A.; Kauffman, Leon J.; Katz, Brian G.; Metz, Patricia A.; McBride, W. Scott; Berndt, Marian P.

    2009-01-01

    Shallow ground water in the north-central Tampa Bay region, Florida, is affected by elevated nitrate concentrations, the presence of volatile organic compounds, and pesticides as a result of groundwater development and intensive urban land use. The region relies primarily on groundwater for drinking-water supplies. Sustainability of groundwater quality for public supply requires monitoring and understanding of the mechanisms controlling the vulnerability of public-supply wells to contamination. A single public-supply well was selected for intensive study based on the need to evaluate the dominant processes affecting the vulnerability of public-supply wells in the Upper Floridan aquifer in the City of Temple Terrace near Tampa, Florida, and the presence of a variety of chemical constituents in water from the well. A network of 29 monitoring wells was installed, and water and sediment samples were collected within the area contributing recharge to the selected public-supply well to support a detailed analysis of physical and chemical conditions and processes affecting the water chemistry in the well. A three-dimensional, steady-state groundwater flow model was developed to evaluate the age of groundwater reaching the well and to test hypotheses on the vulnerability of the well to nonpoint source input of nitrate. Particle tracking data were used to calculate environmental tracer concentrations of tritium and sulfur hexafluoride and to calibrate traveltimes and compute flow paths and advective travel times in the model area. The traveltime of particles reaching the selected public-supply well ranged from less than 1 day to 127.0 years, with a median of 13.1 years; nearly 45 percent of the simulated particle ages were less than about 10 years. Nitrate concentrations, derived primarily from residential/commercial fertilizer use and atmospheric deposition, were highest (2.4 and 6.11 milligrams per liter as nitrogen, median and maximum, respectively) in shallow

  4. Large Radius Tracking at the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lutz, Margaret Susan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Many exotics and SUSY models include particles which are long lived resulting in decays which are highly displaced from the proton-proton interaction point (IP). The standard track reconstruction algorithm used by the ATLAS collaboration is optimized for tracks from “primary” particles, which originate close to the IP. Thus, tight restrictions on the transverse and longitudinal impact parameters, as well as on several other tracking variables, are applied to improve the track reconstruction performance and to reduce the fake rate. This track reconstruction is very efficient for primary particles, but not for the non-prompt particles mentioned above.  In order to reconstruct tracks with large impact parameters due to displaced decays, a tracking algorithm has been optimized to re-run with loosened requirements over the hits left over after standard track reconstruction has finished. Enabling this “retracking” has significantly increased the efficiency of reconstructing tracks from displaced decays, wh...

  5. A Binary Array Asynchronous Sorting Algorithm with Using Petri Nets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voevoda, A. A.; Romannikov, D. O.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays the tasks of computations speed-up and/or their optimization are actual. Among the approaches on how to solve these tasks, a method applying approaches of parallelization and asynchronization to a sorting algorithm is considered in the paper. The sorting methods are ones of elementary methods and they are used in a huge amount of different applications. In the paper, we offer a method of an array sorting that based on a division into a set of independent adjacent pairs of numbers and their parallel and asynchronous comparison. And this one distinguishes the offered method from the traditional sorting algorithms (like quick sorting, merge sorting, insertion sorting and others). The algorithm is implemented with the use of Petri nets, like the most suitable tool for an asynchronous systems description.

  6. Molecular mechanisms for synchronous, asynchronous, and spontaneous neurotransmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Pascal S; Regehr, Wade G

    2014-01-01

    Most neuronal communication relies upon the synchronous release of neurotransmitters, which occurs through synaptic vesicle exocytosis triggered by action potential invasion of a presynaptic bouton. However, neurotransmitters are also released asynchronously with a longer, variable delay following an action potential or spontaneously in the absence of action potentials. A compelling body of research has identified roles and mechanisms for synchronous release, but asynchronous release and spontaneous release are less well understood. In this review, we analyze how the mechanisms of the three release modes overlap and what molecular pathways underlie asynchronous and spontaneous release. We conclude that the modes of release have key fusion processes in common but may differ in the source of and necessity for Ca(2+) to trigger release and in the identity of the Ca(2+) sensor for release.

  7. A Loosely Synchronizing Asynchronous Router for TDM-Scheduled NOCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotleas, Ioannis; Humphreys, Dean; Sørensen, Rasmus Bo

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an asynchronous router design for use in time-division-multiplexed (TDM) networks-on-chip. Unlike existing synchronous, mesochronous and asynchronous router designs with similar functionality, the router is able to silently skip over cycles/TDM-slots where no traffic...... is scheduled and hence avoid all switching activity in the idle links and router ports. In this way switching activity is reduced to the minimum possible amount. The fact that this relaxed synchronization is sufficient to implement TDM scheduling represents a contribution at the conceptual level. The idea can...... only be implemented using asynchronous circuit techniques. To this end, the paper explores the use of “click-element” templates. Click-element templates use only flipflops and conventional gates, and this greatly simplifies the design process when using conventional EDA tools and standard cell...

  8. Asynchronous glaciations in arid continental climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batbaatar, Jigjidsurengiin; Gillespie, Alan R.; Fink, David; Matmon, Ari; Fujioka, Toshiyuki

    2018-02-01

    Mountain glaciers at ∼26-19 ka, during the global Last Glacial Maximum near the end of the last 105 yr glacial cycle, are commonly considered on the basis of dating and field mapping in several well-studied areas to have been the largest of the late Quaternary and to have advanced synchronously from region to region. However, a numerical sensitivity model (Rupper and Roe, 2008) predicts that the fraction of ablation due to melting varies across Central Asia in proportion to the annual precipitation. The equilibrium-line altitude of glaciers across this region likely varies accordingly: in high altitude, cold and arid regions sublimation can ablate most of the ice, whereas glaciers fed by high precipitation cannot ablate completely due to sublimation alone, but extend downhill until higher temperatures there cause them to melt. We have conducted field studies and 10Be dating at five glaciated sites along a precipitation gradient in Mongolia to test the Rupper/Roe model. The sites are located in nearby 1.875 × 1.875° cells of the Rupper/Roe model, each with a different melt fraction, in this little-studied region. The modern environment of the sites ranges from dry subhumid in the north (47.7° N) to arid in the south (45° N). Our findings show that the maximum local advances in the dry subhumid conditions predated the global Last Glacial Maximum and were likely from MIS 3. However, we also found that at ∼8-7 ka a cirque glacier in one mountain range of the arid Gobi desert grew to a magnitude comparable to that of the local maximum extent. This Holocene maximum occurred during a regional pluvial period thousands of years after the retreat of the Pleistocene glaciers globally. This asynchronous behavior is not predicted by the prevailing and generally correct presumption that glacier advances are dominantly driven by temperature, although precipitation also plays a role. Our findings are consistent with and support the Rupper/Roe model, which calls for

  9. Design issues in the semantics and scheduling of asynchronous tasks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, Stephen L.

    2013-07-01

    The asynchronous task model serves as a useful vehicle for shared memory parallel programming, particularly on multicore and manycore processors. As adoption of model among programmers has increased, support has emerged for the integration of task parallel language constructs into mainstream programming languages, e.g., C and C++. This paper examines some of the design decisions in Cilk and OpenMP concerning semantics and scheduling of asynchronous tasks with the aim of informing the efforts of committees considering language integration, as well as developers of new task parallel languages and libraries.

  10. On the theoretical gap between synchronous and asynchronous MPC protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beerliová-Trubíniová, Zuzana; Hirt, Martin; Nielsen, Jesper Buus

    2010-01-01

    that in the cryptographic setting (with setup), the sole reason for it is the distribution of inputs: given an oracle for input distribution, cryptographically-secure asynchronous MPC is possible with the very same condition as synchronous MPC, namely t ..., we show that such an input-distribution oracle can be reduced to an oracle that allows each party to synchronously broadcast one single message. This means that when one single round of synchronous broadcast is available, then asynchronous MPC is possible at the same condition as synchronous MPC...

  11. DESIGN METHODOLOGY OF SELF-EXCITED ASYNCHRONOUS GENERATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berzan V.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper sets out the methodology of designing an asynchronous generator with capacitive self-excitation. It is known that its design is possible on the basis of serial synchronous motor with squirrel cage rotor. With this approach, the design reworked only the stator winding of electrical machines, making it cost-effectively implement the creation of the generator. Therefore, the methodology for the design, optimization calculations, the development scheme and the stator winding excitation system gain, not only of practical interest, and may also be useful for specialists in the field of electrical machines in the design of asynchronous generators.

  12. Comparison of particle-tracking and lumped-parameter models for determining groundwater age distributions and nitrate in water-supply wells, Central Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgens, B. C.; Bohlke, J. K.; Kauffman, L. J.; Belitz, K.

    2013-12-01

    Age distributions for 30 production wells (mostly public-supply) were determined using two methods: 1) calibration of age tracer data with lumped parameter models (LPMs) and 2) by advective particle tracking (PT) simulations using MODPATH and a regional steady-state groundwater flow model. The LPMs were calibrated with measurements of 3H, 3He(trit), and 14C by minimizing the Chi-square test statistic using a non-linear solver. A partial exponential model (PEM) was the primary LPM used in this study and a combination of two PEMs were used in cases where binary age mixtures were identified. The PEM is a reformulated version of the exponential model that is parameterized to simulate the age distribution in a well that is screened over any finite interval within the aquifer. The regional numerical model was calibrated to water-levels and gradients, and simulated PT age tracer concentrations were calibrated to the MODPATH porosity value. Age distributions were then used to predict nitrate concentrations in wells using agricultural application rates of nitrate in the central eastside of the San Joaquin Valley, California. Both methods showed that wells in the study area captured groundwater with a broad range of ages, spanning decades to millennia. Age distributions from the LPMs predicted age tracer and nitrate concentrations more accurately than the regional PT simulation; whereas PT simulations incorporating more detailed information about water-levels and hydraulic gradients near wells also provided good fits. 14C concentrations were not simulated well by the regional steady-state model, especially for wells with a significant fraction of old groundwater, because the model simulates the current, perturbed system and does not simulate recharge rates and velocities of the predevelopment system. Results from the LPMs yielded an average recharge rate of 0.55 m/yr, which was similar to the average recharge rate of 0.54 m/yr determined from a water budget analysis for the

  13. MATCH package for the ANL three-view geometry program. [For matching particle tracks from various views to obtain proper input for TVGP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieraltowski, G.F.

    1976-02-01

    The ANL MATCH package consists of a set of 13 subroutines which are linked to the current 12-foot and 15-foot versions of the ANL TVGP program. Their purpose is to match the tracks from the various measured views to obtain a proper matched set of tracks to be processed by TVGP. The MATCH package can effectively handle up to 20 tracks per event measured in 2 or 3 views and, in cases of ambiguous match solutions, allow up to 10 match ambiguities. A basic assumption made is that the same number of tracks is measured in each view. MATCH can work in either two or three measured views with the assumption that, if only two views are measured, the last point measured on each track is a good representation of the true end-point of the track. This is not to say that, if this assumption is false, that MATCH cannot obtain a match solution. It is true, however, that the probability of obtaining a match solution is inversely proportional both to the number of tracks per vertex and to the momentum of the tracks. Current uses of MATCH are in obtaining match solutions for two-view K/sup -/p (6.5 GeV/c) events measured on POLLY III and in obtaining match solutions for events with large numbers of tracks (3 to 10) produced by an anti ..nu.. p interaction in the FNAL 15-foot bubble chamber with a spectrum of momentum values ranging from 5 to 25 Gev/c. (RWR)

  14. THE ASYNCHRONOUS MACHINE WITH THE MASSIVE FERROMAGNETIC ROTOR AND CAPACITOR EXCITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birladean A.A.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available An asynchronous machine with a massive ferromagnetic rotor of the various designs, improving its energy indicators is considered. Elaboration and experimental tests results of the asynchronous machine working in a generating mode at the lowered speed of rotation of a massive ferromagnetic rotor are presented. Conditions and possibilities of the asynchronous generator creation with capacitor excitation on the basis of the asynchronous machine with a massive rotor are shown as well.

  15. Bubble chamber: colour enhanced tracks

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    This artistically-enhanced image of real particle tracks was produced in the Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC). Liquid hydrogen is used to create bubbles along the paths of the particles as a piston expands the medium. A magnetic field is produced in the detector causing the particles to travel in spirals, allowing charge and momentum to be measured.

  16. Spirit Leaves Telling Tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Scientists have found clues about the nature of martian soil through analyzing wheel marks from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit in this image. The image was taken by Spirit's rear hazard-identification camera just after the rover drove approximately 1 meter (3 feet) northwest off the Columbia Memorial Station (lander platform) early Thursday morning. That the wheel tracks are shallow indicates the soil has plenty of strength to support the moving rover. The well-defined track characteristics suggest the presence of very fine particles in the martian soil (along with larger particles). Scientists also think the soil may have some cohesive properties.

  17. Promoting and Scaffolding Argumentation through Reflective Asynchronous Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huann-shyang; Hong, Zuway-R.; Lawrenz, Frances

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to explore the impact of asynchronous discussion on the quality and complexity of college students' arguments. Three different cohorts of students registered in a physical science course in 2009 Fall, 2010 Spring, and 2010 Fall semesters were briefly supported with scaffolding in class and then…

  18. Asynchronous online foresight panels: the case of wildfire management

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Bengston; Robert L. Olson

    2015-01-01

    Text-based asynchronous online conferencing involves structured online discussion and deliberation among multiple participants from multiple sites in which there is a delay in interaction between contributors. This method has been widely used for a variety of purposes in higher education and other settings, but has not been commonly used in futures research. This paper...

  19. Numerical simulation of three phase asynchronous motor to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Numerical simulation of three phase asynchronous motor to diagnose precisely the stator unbalanced voltage anomaly. ... First, the stator currents data pattern is used as a preliminary diagnosis. ... This similarity leads to uncertainty in the detection of the fault, which makes imperative the use of complementary technique.

  20. Selective distortion of body image by asynchronous visuotactile stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Marcos, Daniel; Martini, Matteo; Fuentes, Christina T; Bellido Rivas, Anna I; Haggard, Patrick; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V

    2017-12-18

    In the rubber hand illusion (RHI), a rubber hand is felt as being part of one's body. This illusion is evoked by providing synchronous visuotactile stimulation to the fake and real hands. Asynchronous visuotactile stimulation is known not to produce such an illusion of ownership, being commonly used as the control condition. Here we explored the impact of synchronous and asynchronous visuotactile stimulation on the body image. We combined the induction of the RHI with a quantitative test for the internal representation of body metrics (i.e., the positions of key fiducial points on the body relative to each other). We found a significant recalibration of the upper/lower arm lengths following asynchronous visuotactile stimulation. In particular, we observed a selective elongation of the lower arm, a distortion typical of deafferentation. Conversely, synchronous visuotactile stimulation did not alter the estimation of the arm segments' length. Our findings are consistent with a dynamic internal representation of body image that is continuously updated based on incoming multisensory information. Furthermore, the use of asynchronous multisensory stimulation as a neutral condition should be reconsidered since it introduces changes in the body image. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Study of a centrifugal pump, asynchronous motor and inverter, using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... concept to the study of a three-phase inverter, asynchronous motor and centrifugal pump. It presents the realization of the rectangular control using a micro controller (ATMEGA 168). The signals generated by the micro controller have been used to program the parallel port of a computer. By reading the recorded bits of the ...

  2. Student Moderators in Asynchronous Online Discussion: A Question of Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingaro, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Much current research exalts the benefits of having students facilitate weekly discussions in asynchronous online courses. This study seeks to add to what is known about student moderation through an analysis of the types of questions students use to spur each discussion. Prior experimental work has demonstrated that the types of questions posed…

  3. Asynchronous updating of threshold-coupled chaotic neurons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We study a network of chaotic model neurons incorporating threshold- activated coupling. We obtain a wide range of spatiotemporal patterns under varying degrees of asynchronicity in the evolution of the neuronal components. For instance, we find that sequential updating of threshold-coupled chaotic neurons ...

  4. Asynchronous updating of threshold-coupled chaotic neurons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study a network of chaotic model neurons incorporating threshold activated coupling. We obtain a wide range of spatiotemporal patterns under varying degrees of asynchronicity in the evolution of the neuronal components. For instance, we find that sequential updating of threshold-coupled chaotic neurons can yield ...

  5. Designing Communities of Learners for Asynchronous Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, Leslie

    1998-01-01

    Describes the need for learning communities within the context of asynchronous distance education. Highlights include the relationship of community and distance learners; community as social reinforcement and as information exchange; and types of communities, including academic support communities, intellectual support communities, and…

  6. Cyber Asynchronous versus Blended Cyber Approach in Distance English Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zi-Gang

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to compare the single cyber asynchronous learning approach with the blended cyber learning approach in distance English education. Two classes of 70 students participated in this study, which lasted one semester of about four months, with one class using the blended approach for their English study and the other only using the…

  7. Asynchronous Assessment in a Large Lecture Marketing Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, W. Scott; Schetzsle, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    Asynchronous assessment, which includes quizzes or exams online or outside class, offers marketing educators an opportunity to make more efficient use of class time and to enhance students' learning experiences by giving them more flexibility and choice in their assessment environment. In this paper, we examine the performance difference between…

  8. Designing a Web-Based Asynchronous Innovation/Entrepreneurism Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandforoush, Parviz

    2017-01-01

    Teaching an online fully asynchronous information technology course that requires students to ideate, build an e-commerce website, and develop an effective business plan involves a well-developed and highly engaging course design. This paper describes the design, development, and implementation of such a course and presents information on…

  9. Numerical simulation of three phase asynchronous motor to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Simulation numérique du moteur asynchrone triphasé pour diagnostiquer précisément le défaut du déséquilibre de ..... carrying more energy [9]. This severity index assumes values ..... its spectrum in normal circumstance. It was theoretically predicted that in this condition, the EPVA signature would be free from any spectral.

  10. Development of speech glimpsing in synchronously and asynchronously modulated noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Joseph W; Buss, Emily; Grose, John H

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated development of the ability to integrate glimpses of speech in modulated noise. Noise was modulated synchronously across frequency or asynchronously such that when noise below 1300 Hz was "off," noise above 1300 Hz was "on," and vice versa. Asynchronous masking was used to examine the ability of listeners to integrate speech glimpses separated across time and frequency. The study used the Word Intelligibility by Picture Identification (WIPI) test and included adults, older children (age 8-10 yr) and younger children (5-7 yr). Results showed poorer masking release for the children than the adults for synchronous modulation but not for asynchronous modulation. It is possible that children can integrate cues relatively well when all intervals provide at least partial speech information (asynchronous modulation) but less well when some intervals provide little or no information (synchronous modulation). Control conditions indicated that children appeared to derive less benefit than adults from speech cues below 1300 Hz. This frequency effect was supported by supplementary conditions where the noise was unmodulated and the speech was low- or high-pass filtered. Possible sources of the developmental frequency effect include differences in frequency weighting, effective speech bandwidth, and the signal-to-noise ratio in the unmodulated noise condition.

  11. Reconceptualising Moderation in Asynchronous Online Discussions Using Grounded Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachopoulos, Panos; Cowan, John

    2010-01-01

    This article reports a grounded theory study of the moderation of asynchronous online discussions, to explore the processes by which tutors in higher education decide when and how to moderate. It aims to construct a theory of e-moderation based on some key factors which appear to influence e-moderation. It discusses previous research on the…

  12. Adding the Human Touch to Asynchronous Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Cynthia Wheatley

    2018-01-01

    For learners to actively accept responsibility in a virtual classroom platform, it is necessary to provide special motivation extending across the traditional classroom setting into asynchronous online learning. This article explores specific ways to do this that bridge the gap between ground and online students' learning experiences, and how…

  13. Miscellany of Students' Satisfaction in an Asynchronous Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbi-Siaw, Otu; Owusu-Agyeman, Yaw

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the determinants of students' satisfaction in an asynchronous learning environment using seven key considerations: the e-learning environment, student-content interaction, student and student interaction, student-teacher interaction, group cohesion and timely participation, knowledge of Internet usage, and satisfaction. The…

  14. An improved modelling of asynchronous machine with skin-effect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The conventional method of analysis of Asynchronous machine fails to give accurate results especially when the machine is operated under high rotor frequency. At high rotor frequency, skin-effect dominates causing the rotor impedance to be frequency dependant. This paper therefore presents an improved method of ...

  15. Solid state nuclear track detection principles, methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Durrani, S A; ter Haar, D

    1987-01-01

    Solid State Nuclear Track Detection: Principles, Methods and Applications is the second book written by the authors after Nuclear Tracks in Solids: Principles and Applications. The book is meant as an introduction to the subject solid state of nuclear track detection. The text covers the interactions of charged particles with matter; the nature of the charged-particle track; the methodology and geometry of track etching; thermal fading of latent damage trails on tracks; the use of dielectric track recorders in particle identification; radiation dossimetry; and solid state nuclear track detecti

  16. Application of a simple asynchronous mechanical light chopper to multielectron coincidence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Kenji; Suzuki, Isao H. [Photon Factory, IMSS, KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Penent, Francis; Lablanquie, Pascal [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie (UPMC), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); CNRS, LCPMR(UMR 7614), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Hikosaka, Yasumasa; Shigemasa, Eiji [UVSOR Facility, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Eland, John H. D. [PTCL, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    A simple asynchronous mechanical light chopper, based on modification of a turbo-molecular pump, has been developed to extend the interval between light pulses in single bunch operation at the Photon Factory storage ring. A pulse repetition rate of 80 kHz was achieved using a cylinder rotating at 48000 rpm, with 100 slits of 80 {mu}m width. This allows absolute timing of particles up to 12.48 {mu}s instead of the single-bunch period of 624 ns. We have applied the chopper together with a light pulse monitor to measure multielectron coincidence spectra using a magnetic bottle time-of-flight electron spectrometer. With such a system, the electron energies are determined without any ambiguity, the folding of coincidence spectra disappears and the effect of false coincidences is drastically reduced.

  17. Video Object Tracking in Neural Axons with Fluorescence Microscopy Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Yuan

    2014-01-01

    tracking. In this paper, we describe two automated tracking methods for analyzing neurofilament movement based on two different techniques: constrained particle filtering and tracking-by-detection. First, we introduce the constrained particle filtering approach. In this approach, the orientation and position of a particle are constrained by the axon’s shape such that fewer particles are necessary for tracking neurofilament movement than object tracking techniques based on generic particle filtering. Secondly, a tracking-by-detection approach to neurofilament tracking is presented. For this approach, the axon is decomposed into blocks, and the blocks encompassing the moving neurofilaments are detected by graph labeling using Markov random field. Finally, we compare two tracking methods by performing tracking experiments on real time-lapse image sequences of neurofilament movement, and the experimental results show that both methods demonstrate good performance in comparison with the existing approaches, and the tracking accuracy of the tracing-by-detection approach is slightly better between the two.

  18. Online Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for other purposes, such as research, measurement, and fraud prevention. Mobile browsers work much like traditional web ... users’ Do Not Track preferences. Can I block online tracking? Consumers can learn about tracker-blocking browser ...

  19. Track based Alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector Tracking System

    CERN Document Server

    Schieck, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    ATLAS is a multipurpose experiment that records the LHC collisions. In order to reconstruct trajectories of charged particle, ATLAS is equipped with a tracking system built using different technologies, silicon planar sensors (pixel and microstrips) and drift‐tube detectors. In order to achieve its scientific goals, the ATLAS tracking system requires to determine accurately its almost 700,000 degrees of freedom. The demanded precision for the alignment of the silicon sensors is below 10 micrometers. This implies to use a large sample of high momentum and isolated tracks. The high level trigger selects and stores those tracks in a calibration stream. Tracks from cosmic trigger during empty LHC bunches are also used as input for the alignment. The implementation of the track based alignment within the ATLAS software unifies different alignment approaches and allows the alignment of all tracking subsystems together. Primary vertexing and beam spot constraints have been implemented, as well as constraints on th...

  20. Pre-synthesis Optimization for Asynchronous Circuits Using Compiler Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanzadeh, Sharareh; Najibi, Mehrdad; Pedram, Hossein

    The effectiveness of traditional compiler techniques employed in high-level synthesis of synchronous circuits aiming to present a generic code is studied for asynchronous synthesis by considering the special features of these circuits. The compiler methods can be used innovatively to improve the synthesis results in both power consumption and area. The compiler methods like speculation, loop invariant code motion and condition expansion are applicable in decreasing mass of handshaking circuits and intermediate modules. Moreover, they eliminate conditional access to variables and ports and reducing the amount of completion detection circuits. The approach is superimposed on to Persia synthesis toolset as a presynthesis source-to-source transformation phase, and results shows on average 22% improvement in terms of area and 24 % in power consumption for asynchronous benchmarks.

  1. Mixing rich and asynchronous communication for new service development performance

    OpenAIRE

    Storey, Chris; Perks, Helen

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the nature of relationships between internal communication modes, new service development (NSD) competencies (specifically learning and development competencies) and NSD performance. To do so, it draws on and advances communication theory by comparing and contrasting the contingent approach, favoured by media richness theory and media synchronicity theory, with the multiplicative manner of dual coding theory. Antecedent roles of rich and asynchronous communication modes ...

  2. Asynchronous Multi-Party Computation with Quadratic Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirt, Martin; Nielsen, Jesper Buus; Przydatek, Bartosz

    2008-01-01

    We present an efficient protocol for secure multi-party computation in the asynchronous model with optimal resilience. For n parties, up to t < n/3 of them being corrupted, and security parameter κ, a circuit with c gates can be securely computed with communication complexity O(cn^2k) bits, which...... circuit randomization due to Beaver (Crypto’91), and an abstraction of certificates, which can be of independent interest....

  3. Marine Forces Reserve: Accelerating Knowledge Flow through Asynchronous Learning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-19

    Substantial evidence indicates that—with informed instruction design and appropriate pedagogy —the efficacy of online education and training is...efficacy of online education and training is at least 3 comparable to that of classroom teaching. Indeed, the educational psychology literature is...learning in an education environment, and we adapt such highly effective asynchronous learning techniques and technologies to the I-I training task

  4. IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL OF AN ASYNCHRONOUS MACHINE USING NEURAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A ZERGAOUI

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the application of artificial neural networks to the identification and control of the asynchronous motor, which is a complex nonlinear system with variable internal dynamics.  We show that neural networks can be applied to control the stator currents of the induction motor.  The results of the different simulations are presented to evaluate the performance of the neural controller proposed.

  5. Psychophysiological effects of synchronous versus asynchronous music during cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Harry B T; Karageorghis, Costas I; Romer, Lee M; Bishop, Daniel T

    2014-02-01

    Synchronizing movement to a musical beat may reduce the metabolic cost of exercise, but findings to date have been equivocal. Our aim was to examine the degree to which the synchronous application of music moderates the metabolic demands of a cycle ergometer task. Twenty-three recreationally active men made two laboratory visits. During the first visit, participants completed a maximal incremental ramp test on a cycle ergometer. At the second visit, they completed four randomized 6-min cycling bouts at 90% of ventilatory threshold (control, metronome, synchronous music, and asynchronous music). Main outcome variables were oxygen uptake, HR, ratings of dyspnea and limb discomfort, affective valence, and arousal. No significant differences were evident for oxygen uptake. HR was lower under the metronome condition (122 ± 15 bpm) compared to asynchronous music (124 ± 17 bpm) and control (125 ± 16 bpm). Limb discomfort was lower while listening to the metronome (2.5 ± 1.2) and synchronous music (2.3 ± 1.1) compared to control (3.0 ± 1.5). Both music conditions, synchronous (1.9 ± 1.2) and asynchronous (2.1 ± 1.3), elicited more positive affective valence compared to metronome (1.2 ± 1.4) and control (1.2 ± 1.2), while arousal was higher with synchronous music (3.4 ± 0.9) compared to metronome (2.8 ± 1.0) and control (2.8 ± 0.9). Synchronizing movement to a rhythmic stimulus does not reduce metabolic cost but may lower limb discomfort. Moreover, synchronous music has a stronger effect on limb discomfort and arousal when compared to asynchronous music.

  6. Two refractory Wild 2 terminal particles from a carrot-shaped track characterized combining MIR/FIR/Raman microspectroscopy and FE-SEM/EDS analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotundi, A.; Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Ferrari, M.; Della Corte, V.; Baratta, G. A.; Brunetto, R.; Dartois, E.; Djouadi, Z.; Merouane, S.; Borg, J.; Brucato, J. R.; Sergeant D'Hendecourt, L.; Mennella, V.; Palumbo, M. E.; Palumbo, P.

    2014-04-01

    We present the analyses results of two bulk Terminal Particles, C2112,7,171,0,0 and C2112,9,171,0,0, derived from the Jupiter-family comet 81P/Wild 2 returned by the Stardust mission. Each particle embedded in a slab of silica aerogel was pressed in a diamond cell. This preparation, as expected, made it difficult to identify the minerals and organic materials present in these particles. This problem was overcome using a combination of three different analytical techniques, viz. FE-SEM/EDS, IR, and Raman microspectroscopy that allowed identifying the minerals and small amounts of amorphous carbon present in both particles. TP2 and TP3 were dominated by Ca-free and low-Ca, Mg-rich, Mg,Fe-olivine. The presence of melilite in both particles is supported by IR microspectroscopy, but is not confirmed by Raman microspectroscopy, possibly because the amounts are too small to be detected. TP2 and TP3 show similar silicate mineral compositions, but Ni-free and low-Ni, subsulfur (Fe,Ni)S grains are present in TP2 only. TP2 contains indigenous amorphous carbon hot spots; no indigenous carbon was identified in TP3. These nonchondritic particles probably originated in a differentiated body. This work found an unanticipated carbon contamination following the FE-SEM/EDS analyses. It is suggested that organic materials in the embedding silica aerogel are irradiated during FE-SEM/EDS analyses creating a carbon gas that develops a strong fluorescence continuum. The combination of the selected analytical techniques can be used to characterize bulk Wild 2 particles without the need of extraction and removal of the encapsulating aerogel. This approach offers a relatively fast sample preparation procedure, but compressing the samples can cause spurious artifacts, viz. silica contamination. Because of the combination of techniques, we account for these artifacts.

  7. World's largest air shower array now on track of super-high-energy cosmic-rays Pierre Auger Observatory seeks source of highest-energy extraterrestrial particles

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "With the completion of its hundredth surface detector, the Pierre Auger Observatory, under construction in Argentina, this week became the largest cosmic-ray air shower array in the world. Managed by scientists at the Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the Pierre Auger project so far encompasses a 70-square-mile array of detectors that are tracking the most violent-and perhaps most puzzling- processes in the entire universe" (1 page).

  8. Dynamic modeling of an asynchronous squirrel-cage machine; Modelisation dynamique d'une machine asynchrone a cage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerette, D.

    2009-07-01

    This document presented a detailed mathematical explanation and validation of the steps leading to the development of an asynchronous squirrel-cage machine. The MatLab/Simulink software was used to model a wind turbine at variable high speeds. The asynchronous squirrel-cage machine is an electromechanical system coupled to a magnetic circuit. The resulting electromagnetic circuit can be represented as a set of resistances, leakage inductances and mutual inductances. Different models were used for a comparison study, including the Munteanu, Boldea, Wind Turbine Blockset, and SimPowerSystem. MatLab/Simulink modeling results were in good agreement with the results from other comparable models. Simulation results were in good agreement with analytical calculations. 6 refs, 2 tabs, 9 figs.

  9. ON THE ISSUE OF VECTOR CONTROL OF THE ASYNCHRONOUS MOTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. I. Firago

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the issue of one of the widespread types of vector control realization for the asynchronous motors with a short-circuited rotor. Of all more than 20 vector control types known presently, the following are applied most frequently: direct vector control with velocity pickup (VP, direct vector control without VP, indirect vector control with VP and indirect vector control without VP. Despite the fact that the asynchronous-motor indirect vector control without VP is the easiest and most spread, the absence of VP does not allow controlling the motor electromagnetic torque at zero velocity. This is the reason why for electric motor drives of such requirements they utilize the vector control with a velocity transducer. The systems of widest dissemination became the direct and indirect vector control systems with X-axis alignment of the synchronously rotating x–y-coordinate frame along the rotor flux-linkage vector inasmuch as this provides the simplest correlations for controlling variables. Although these two types of vector control are well presented in literature, a number of issues concerning their realization and practical application require further elaboration. These include: the block schemes adequate representation as consisted with the modern realization of vector control and clarification of the analytical expressions for evaluating the regulator parameters.The authors present a technique for evaluating the dynamics of an asynchronous electric motor drive with direct vector control and x-axis alignment along the vector of rotor flux linkage. The article offers a generalized structure of this vector control type with detailed description of its principal blocks: controlling system, frequency converter, and the asynchronous motor.The paper presents a direct vector control simulating model developed in the MatLab environment on the grounds of this structure. The authors illustrate the described technique with the results

  10. Pharmacists' perception of synchronous versus asynchronous distance learning for continuing education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Eric C

    2014-02-12

    To evaluate and compare pharmacists' satisfaction with the content and learning environment of a continuing education program series offered as either synchronous or asynchronous webinars. An 8-lecture series of online presentations on the topic of new drug therapies was offered to pharmacists in synchronous and asynchronous webinar formats. Participants completed a 50-question online survey at the end of the program series to evaluate their perceptions of the distance learning experience. Eighty-two participants completed the survey instrument (41 participants from the live webinar series and 41 participants from the asynchronous webinar series.) Responses indicated that while both groups were satisfied with the program content, the asynchronous group showed greater satisfaction with many aspects of the learning environment. The synchronous and asynchronous webinar participants responded positively regarding the quality of the programming and the method of delivery, but asynchronous participants rated their experience more positively overall.

  11. Symplectic Tracking of Multi-Isotopic Heavy-Ion Beams in SixTrack

    CERN Document Server

    Hermes, Pascal; De Maria, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    The software SixTrack provides symplectic proton tracking over a large number of turns. The code is used for the tracking of beam halo particles and the simulation of their interaction with the collimators to study the efficiency of the LHC collimation system. Tracking simulations for heavy-ion beams require taking into account the mass to charge ratio of each particle because heavy ions can be subject to fragmentation at their passage through the collimators. In this paper we present the derivation of a Hamiltonian for multi-isotopic heavy-ion beams and symplectic tracking maps derived from it. The resulting tracking maps were implemented in the tracking software SixTrack. With this modification, SixTrack can be used to natively track heavy-ion beams of multiple isotopes through a magnetic accelerator lattice.

  12. The ALICE inner tracking system

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    The inner tracking system measures the direction of particles produced in the collision of the two beams. Gas in the system is ionised as particles pass through. These ions then drift in a high voltage to strip electrodes where the position is read-off electronically.

  13. Particle size distribution of exosomes and microvesicles determined by transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry, nanoparticle tracking analysis, and resistive pulse sensing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pol, E; Coumans, F. A. W; Grootemaat, A. E; Gardiner, C; Sargent, I. L; Harrison, P; Sturk, A; Leeuwen, T. G; Nieuwland, R

    2014-01-01

    ... the particle size distribution (PSD) of vesicles . The PSD describes the concentration as a function of size, and defines which vesicle types are measured . Unexpectedly, our simulations predicted that each method would obtain a different PSD, thereby hampering data interpretation, data comparison, and standardization. In this study, w...

  14. Single Particle Tracking Confirms That Multivalent Tat Protein Transduction Domain-induced Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan Cross-linkage Activates Rac1 for Internalization*

    OpenAIRE

    Imamura, Junji; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Gonda, Kohsuke; Roy, Chandra Nath; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Higuchi, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism by which HIV-1-Tat protein transduction domain (TatP) enters the cell remains unclear because of an insufficient understanding of the initial kinetics of peptide entry. Here, we report the successful visualization and tracking of TatP molecular kinetics on the cell surface with 7-nm spatial precision using quantum dots. Strong cell binding was only observed with a TatP valence of ≥8, whereas monovalent TatP binding was negligible. The requirement of the cell-surface heparan sulf...

  15. Track reconstruction in CMS high luminosity environment

    CERN Document Server

    Goetzmann, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The CMS tracker is the largest silicon detector ever built, covering 200 square meters and providing an average of 14 high-precision measurements per track. Tracking is essential for the reconstruction of objects like jets, muons, electrons and tau leptons starting from the raw data from the silicon pixel and strip detectors. Track reconstruction is widely used also at trigger level as it improves objects tagging and resolution.The CMS tracking code is organized in several levels, known as iterative steps, each optimized to reconstruct a class of particle trajectories, as the ones of particles originating from the primary vertex or displaced tracks from particles resulting from secondary vertices. Each iterative step consists of seeding, pattern recognition and fitting by a kalman filter, and a final filtering and cleaning. Each subsequent step works on hits not yet associated to a reconstructed particle trajectory.The CMS tracking code is continuously evolving to make the reconstruction computing load compat...

  16. Track reconstruction in CMS high luminosity environment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067159

    2016-01-01

    The CMS tracker is the largest silicon detector ever built, covering 200 square meters and providing an average of 14 high-precision measurements per track. Tracking is essential for the reconstruction of objects like jets, muons, electrons and tau leptons starting from the raw data from the silicon pixel and strip detectors. Track reconstruction is widely used also at trigger level as it improves objects tagging and resolution.The CMS tracking code is organized in several levels, known as iterative steps, each optimized to reconstruct a class of particle trajectories, as the ones of particles originating from the primary vertex or displaced tracks from particles resulting from secondary vertices. Each iterative step consists of seeding, pattern recognition and fitting by a kalman filter, and a final filtering and cleaning. Each subsequent step works on hits not yet associated to a reconstructed particle trajectory.The CMS tracking code is continuously evolving to make the reconstruction computing load compat...

  17. Behavioral Synthesis of Asynchronous Circuits Using Syntax Directed Translation as Backend

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard; Sparsø, Jens; Madsen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The current state-of-the art in high-level synthesis of asynchronous circuits is syntax directed translation, which performs a one-to-one mapping of a HDL-description into a corresponding circuit. This paper presents a method for behavioral synthesis of asynchronous circuits which builds on top...... of syntax directed translation, and which allows the designer to perform automatic design space exploration guided by area or speed constraints. The paper presents an asynchronous implementation template consisting of a data-path and a control unit and its implementation using the asynchronous hardware...

  18. Asynchronous parallel generating set search for linearly-constrained optimization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolda, Tamara G.; Griffin, Joshua; Lewis, Robert Michael

    2007-04-01

    We describe an asynchronous parallel derivative-free algorithm for linearly-constrained optimization. Generating set search (GSS) is the basis of ourmethod. At each iteration, a GSS algorithm computes a set of search directionsand corresponding trial points and then evaluates the objective function valueat each trial point. Asynchronous versions of the algorithm have been developedin the unconstrained and bound-constrained cases which allow the iterations tocontinue (and new trial points to be generated and evaluated) as soon as anyother trial point completes. This enables better utilization of parallel resourcesand a reduction in overall runtime, especially for problems where the objec-tive function takes minutes or hours to compute. For linearly-constrained GSS,the convergence theory requires that the set of search directions conform to the3 nearby boundary. The complexity of developing the asynchronous algorithm forthe linearly-constrained case has to do with maintaining a suitable set of searchdirections as the search progresses and is the focus of this research. We describeour implementation in detail, including how to avoid function evaluations bycaching function values and using approximate look-ups. We test our imple-mentation on every CUTEr test problem with general linear constraints and upto 1000 variables. Without tuning to individual problems, our implementationwas able to solve 95% of the test problems with 10 or fewer variables, 75%of the problems with 11-100 variables, and nearly half of the problems with100-1000 variables. To the best of our knowledge, these are the best resultsthat have ever been achieved with a derivative-free method. Our asynchronousparallel implementation is freely available as part of the APPSPACK software.4

  19. a Beat Perioid Observation of the Asynchronous Polar by Cam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainger, Jonathan

    We propose to observe the hard X-ray bright asynchronous polar BY Cam throughout its beat cycle in order to investigate the changes in the magnetic capture of the accretion stream as the secondary star changes in azimuth with respect to the white dwarf. Regular snap-shots of the light curve will reveal the order behind the chaos. Previous observations have been taken in 3 days or less, our monitoring plan over 21 days offers the only real hope of understanding these difficult systems.

  20. Creating video-annotated discussions: An asynchronous alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig D. Howard

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the authors illustrate the design and development of a pedagogical intervention using video annotations in a pre-service teacher education courrse. An annotation platform was selected and video was shot to create a video backdrop on which asynchronous discussions would take place. The article addresses design considerations in the selection of video, the editing process, and the development of a tutorial to lead learners through their first experience with this form of discussion. Learner participation samples were collected, and an analysis of the design process concludes the article.

  1. Positive semidefinite integrated covariance estimation, factorizations and asynchronicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauri, Orimar; Lunde, Asger; Laurent, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    An estimator of the ex-post covariation of log-prices under asynchronicity and microstructure noise is proposed. It uses the Cholesky factorization of the covariance matrix in order to exploit the heterogeneity in trading intensities to estimate the different parameters sequentially with as many...... observations as possible. The estimator is positive semidefinite by construction. We derive asymptotic results and confirm their good finite sample properties by means of a Monte Carlo simulation. In the application we forecast portfolio Value-at-Risk and sector risk exposures for a portfolio of 52 stocks. We...

  2. The braided Ptolemy-Thompson group $T^*$ is asynchronously combable

    OpenAIRE

    Funar, Louis; Kapoudjian, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    The braided Ptolemy-Thompson group $T^*$ is an extension of the Thompson group $T$ by the full braid group $B_{\\infty}$ on infinitely many strands. This group is a simplified version of the acyclic extension considered by Greenberg and Sergiescu, and can be viewed as a mapping class group of a certain infinite planar surface. In a previous paper we showed that $T^*$ is finitely presented. Our main result here is that $T^*$ (and $T$) is asynchronously combable. The method of proof is inspired ...

  3. Discovery of nucler tracks in interplanetary dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, J P; Brownlee, D E; Fraundorf, P

    1984-12-21

    Nuclear tracks have been identified in interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) collected from the stratosphere. The presence of tracks unambiguously confirms the extraterrestrial nature of IDP's, and the high track densities (10(10) to 10(11) per square centimeter) suggest an exposure age of approximately 10(4) years within the inner solar system. Tracks also provide an upper temperature limit for the heating of IDP's during atmospheric entry, thereby making it possible to distinguish between pristine and thermally modified micrometeorites.

  4. Timber tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Düdder, Boris; Ross, Omry

    2017-01-01

    Managing and verifying forest products in a value chain is often reliant on easily manipulated document or digital tracking methods - Chain of Custody Systems. We aim to create a new means of tracking timber by developing a tamper proof digital system based on Blockchain technology. Blockchain...

  5. THE SIX-WHEEL FRIGHT TRUCK LOCOMOTIVE OF DOUBLE DELIVERY USES RADIO-FREQUENCY TRANSFER WITH PADDING AND ASYNCHRONIZED TRACTION IMPELLENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Visin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Our research offers a new perspective loading pattern of the 12-wheel double-feed freight electric locomotive with the asynchronous tractive motor using an adapter transformer with the high-frequency uncoupler. This will make it possible to decrease the traction-feeding transformer mass 2.3 times, to remove the current pulse advancing on the track circuit and therefore the influence on the work of the ALSE and CBS. So the railway traffic safety will be increased considerably.

  6. A Scheduling Discipline for Latency and Bandwidth Guarantees in Asynchronous Network-on-Chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Tobias; Sparsø, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Guaranteed services (GS) are important in that they provide predictability in the complex dynamics of shared communication structures. This paper discusses the implementation of GS in asynchronous Network-on-Chip. We present a novel scheduling discipline called Asynchronous Latency Guarantee (ALG...

  7. Adding effect of current displacement and magnetic circuit saturation in an asynchronous motor mathematical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Tsodik

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A methodology of an asynchronous motor mathematical model synthesis is described. Experiments are suggested to be conducted in the following sequence. Geometrical models are first built in AutoCAD, then imported to Comsol Multiphysics, and further processed in Matlab with computation of coefficients and dependences applied in the asynchronous motor mathematical model.

  8. Using Television Sitcoms to Facilitate Asynchronous Discussions in the Online Communication Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolman, Elizabeth; Asbury, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Asynchronous discussions are a useful instructional resource in the online communication course. In discussion groups students have the opportunity to actively participate and interact with students and the instructor. Asynchronous communication allows for flexibility because "participants can interact with significant amounts of time between…

  9. Analysing High School Students' Participation and Interaction in an Asynchronous Online Project-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Quek Choon

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to replicate and extend a previous study which was conducted on primary school students' asynchronous online project-based learning. In this study, 276 high school students' participation and interaction in a project-based learning environment was mediated by an asynchronous computer-mediated communication (CMC) tool. The students'…

  10. First Evaluation of the CPU, GPGPU and MIC Architectures for Real Time Particle Tracking based on Hough Transform at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, V.; Lujan, P.; Karpusenko, V.; Vladimirov, A.

    2014-04-07

    Recent innovations focused around {\\em parallel} processing, either through systems containing multiple processors or processors containing multiple cores, hold great promise for enhancing the performance of the trigger at the LHC and extending its physics program. The flexibility of the CMS/ATLAS trigger system allows for easy integration of computational accelerators, such as NVIDIA's Tesla Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) or Intel's \\xphi, in the High Level Trigger. These accelerators have the potential to provide faster or more energy efficient event selection, thus opening up possibilities for new complex triggers that were not previously feasible. At the same time, it is crucial to explore the performance limits achievable on the latest generation multicore CPUs with the use of the best software optimization methods. In this article, a new tracking algorithm based on the Hough transform will be evaluated for the first time on a multi-core Intel Xeon E5-2697v2 CPU, an NVIDIA Tesla K20c GPU, and an Intel \\x...

  11. Experience with synchronous and asynchronous digital control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenie, V. A.; Chacon, C. V.; Lock, W. P.

    1986-01-01

    Flight control systems have undergone a revolution since the days of simple mechanical linkages; presently the most advanced systems are full-authority, full-time digital systems controlling unstable aircraft. With the use of advanced control systems, the aerodynamic design can incorporate features that allow greater performance and fuel savings, as can be seen on the new Airbus design and advanced tactical fighter concepts. These advanced aircraft will be and are relying on the flight control system to provide the stability and handling qualities required for safe flight and to allow the pilot to control the aircraft. Various design philosophies have been proposed and followed to investigate system architectures for these advanced flight control systems. One major area of discussion is whether a multichannel digital control system should be synchronous or asynchronous. This paper addressed the flight experience at the Dryden Flight Research Facility of NASA's Ames Research Center with both synchronous and asynchronous digital flight control systems. Four different flight control systems are evaluated against criteria such as software reliability, cost increases, and schedule delays.

  12. Experience with synchronous and asynchronous digital control systems. [for flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenie, Victoria A.; Chacon, Claude V.; Lock, Wilton P.

    1986-01-01

    Flight control systems have undergone a revolution since the days of simple mechanical linkages; presently the most advanced systems are full-authority, full-time digital systems controlling unstable aircraft. With the use of advanced control systems, the aerodynamic design can incorporate features that allow greater performance and fuel savings, as can be seen on the new Airbus design and advanced tactical fighter concepts. These advanced aircraft will be and are relying on the flight control system to provide the stability and handling qualities required for safe flight and to allow the pilot to control the aircraft. Various design philosophies have been proposed and followed to investigate system architectures for these advanced flight control systems. One major area of discussion is whether a multichannel digital control system should be synchronous or asynchronous. This paper addressed the flight experience at the Dryden Flight Research Facility of NASA's Ames Research Center with both synchronous and asynchronous digital flight control systems. Four different flight control systems are evaluated against criteria such as software reliability, cost increases, and schedule delays.

  13. The Role of Online Instructors in Asynchronous Discussion Forums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddison, Sarah T.; Mazzolini, M. M.; Gay, P. L.

    2007-05-01

    We present qualitative results and advice on the role of online instructors in asynchronous discussion forums and the technologies used to support online interactive learning. Results are based on six years of designing, coordinating, evaluating and teaching into the distance learning program Swinburne Astronomy Online. We discuss why we chose to use asynchronous rather than synchronous discussion forums and how we have implemented them; how we train our online instructors and their role as a 'guide on the side'; techniques for moderating the volume of forum postings while ensuring a constructive learning environment; and methods for dealing with both mixed class preparedness and 'challenging' students within an online environment. Our research into the interaction between students and instructors in online forums provides some interesting (and often counter-intuitive) insights into the relationship between the number and length of student postings and the posting patterns of their instructors. We compare these results with qualitative feedback from both students and instructors on their perception of the online learning and teaching experience.

  14. Formation of the wide asynchronous binary asteroid population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, Seth A. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Science, UCB 391, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Scheeres, Daniel J.; McMahon, Jay [Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, UCB 429, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We propose and analyze a new mechanism for the formation of the wide asynchronous binary population. These binary asteroids have wide semimajor axes relative to most near-Earth and main belt asteroid systems. Confirmed members have rapidly rotating primaries and satellites that are not tidally locked. Previously suggested formation mechanisms from impact ejecta, from planetary flybys, and directly from rotational fission events cannot satisfy all of the observations. The newly hypothesized mechanism works as follows: (1) these systems are formed from rotational fission, (2) their satellites are tidally locked, (3) their orbits are expanded by the binary Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (BYORP) effect, (4) their satellites desynchronize as a result of the adiabatic invariance between the libration of the secondary and the mutual orbit, and (5) the secondary avoids resynchronization because of the YORP effect. This seemingly complex chain of events is a natural pathway for binaries with satellites that have particular shapes, which define the BYORP effect torque that acts on the system. After detailing the theory, we analyze each of the wide asynchronous binary members and candidates to assess their most likely formation mechanism. Finally, we suggest possible future observations to check and constrain our hypothesis.

  15. An Asynchronous IEEE Floating-Point Arithmetic Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel R. Noche

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available An asynchronous floating-point arithmetic unit is designed and tested at the transistor level usingCadence software. It uses CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor and DCVS (differentialcascode voltage switch logic in a 0.35 µm process using a 3.3 V supply voltage, with dual-rail data andsingle-rail control signals using four-phase handshaking.Using 17,085 transistors, the unit handles single-precision (32-bit addition/subtraction, multiplication,division, and remainder using the IEEE 754-1985 Standard for Binary Floating-Point Arithmetic, withrounding and other operations to be handled by separate hardware or software. Division and remainderare done using a restoring subtractive algorithm; multiplication uses an additive algorithm. Exceptionsare noted by flags (and not trap handlers and the output is in single-precision.Previous work on asynchronous floating-point arithmetic units have mostly focused on single operationssuch as division. This is the first work to the authors' knowledge that can perform floating-point addition,multiplication, division, and remainder using a common datapath.

  16. Asynchronous Detection of Trials Onset from Raw EEG Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Gordo, M A; Grima Murcia, M D; Padilla, Pablo; Pelayo, F; Fernandez, E

    2016-11-01

    Clinical processing of event-related potentials (ERPs) requires a precise synchrony between the stimulation and the acquisition units that are guaranteed by means of a physical link between them. This precise synchrony is needed since temporal misalignments during trial averaging can lead to high deviations of peak times, thus causing error in diagnosis or inefficiency in classification in brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Out of the laboratory, mobile EEG systems and BCI headsets are not provided with the physical link, thus being inadequate for acquisition of ERPs. In this study, we propose a method for the asynchronous detection of trials onset from raw EEG without physical links. We validate it with a BCI application based on the dichotic listening task. The user goal was to attend the cued auditory message and to report three keywords contained in it while ignoring the other message. The BCI goal was to detect the attended message from the analysis of auditory ERPs. The rate of successful onset detection in both synchronous (using the real onset) and asynchronous (blind detection of trial onset from raw EEG) was 73% with a synchronization error of less than 1[Formula: see text]ms. The level of synchronization provided by this proposal would allow home-based acquisition of ERPs with low cost BCI headsets and any media player unit without physical links between them.

  17. Asynchronous cracking with dissimilar paths in multilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Bongkyun; Kim, Byungwoon; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Sumigawa, Takashi; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2017-11-16

    Multilayer graphene consists of a stack of single-atomic-thick monolayer graphene sheets bound with π-π interactions and is a fascinating model material opening up a new field of fracture mechanics. In this study, fracture behavior of single-crystalline multilayer graphene was investigated using an in situ mode I fracture test under a scanning electron microscope, and abnormal crack propagation in multilayer graphene was identified for the first time. The fracture toughness of graphene was determined from the measured load-displacement curves and the realistic finite element modelling of specimen geometries. Nonlinear fracture behavior of the multilayer graphene is discussed based on nonlinear elastic fracture mechanics. In situ scanning electron microscope images obtained during the fracture test showed asynchronous crack propagation along independent paths, causing interlayer shear stress and slippages. We also found that energy dissipation by interlayer slippages between the graphene layers is the reason for the enhanced fracture toughness of multilayer graphene. The asynchronous cracking with independent paths is a unique cracking and toughening mechanism for single-crystalline multilayer graphene, which is not observed for the monolayer graphene. This could provide a useful insight for the design and development of graphene-based composite materials for structural applications.

  18. Asynchronous replica exchange software for grid and heterogeneous computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallicchio, Emilio; Xia, Junchao; Flynn, William F.; Zhang, Baofeng; Samlalsingh, Sade; Mentes, Ahmet; Levy, Ronald M.

    2015-11-01

    Parallel replica exchange sampling is an extended ensemble technique often used to accelerate the exploration of the conformational ensemble of atomistic molecular simulations of chemical systems. Inter-process communication and coordination requirements have historically discouraged the deployment of replica exchange on distributed and heterogeneous resources. Here we describe the architecture of a software (named ASyncRE) for performing asynchronous replica exchange molecular simulations on volunteered computing grids and heterogeneous high performance clusters. The asynchronous replica exchange algorithm on which the software is based avoids centralized synchronization steps and the need for direct communication between remote processes. It allows molecular dynamics threads to progress at different rates and enables parameter exchanges among arbitrary sets of replicas independently from other replicas. ASyncRE is written in Python following a modular design conducive to extensions to various replica exchange schemes and molecular dynamics engines. Applications of the software for the modeling of association equilibria of supramolecular and macromolecular complexes on BOINC campus computational grids and on the CPU/MIC heterogeneous hardware of the XSEDE Stampede supercomputer are illustrated. They show the ability of ASyncRE to utilize large grids of desktop computers running the Windows, MacOS, and/or Linux operating systems as well as collections of high performance heterogeneous hardware devices.

  19. Asynchronously sampled blind source separation for coherent optical links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detwiler, Thomas F.; Searcy, Steven M.; Stark, Andrew J.; Ralph, Stephen E.; Basch, Bert E.

    2011-01-01

    Polarization multiplexing is an integral technique for generating spectrally efficient 100 Gb/s and higher optical links. Post coherent detection DSP-based polarization demultiplexing of QPSK links is commonly performed after timing recovery. We propose and demonstrate a method of asynchronous blind source separation using the constant modulus algorithm (CMA) on the asynchronously sampled signal to initially separate energy from arbitrarily aligned polarization states. This method lends well to implementation as it allows for an open-loop sampling frequency for analog-to-digital conversion at less than twice the symbol rate. We show that the performance of subsequent receiver functions is enhanced by the initial pol demux operation. CMA singularity behavior is avoided through tap settling constraints. The method is applicable to QPSK transmissions and many other modulation formats as well, including general QAM signals, offset-QPSK, and CPM, or a combination thereof. We present the architecture and its performance under several different formats and link conditions. Comparisons of complexity and performance are drawn between the proposed architecture and conventional receivers.

  20. Emergence of Asynchronous Local Clocks in Excitable Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerum, Richard Carl; Fabry, Ben; Metzner, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Excitable media such as the myocardium or the brain consist of arrays of coupled excitable elements, in which the local excitation of a single element can propagate to its neighbors in the form of a non-linear autowave. Since each element has to pass through a refractory period immediately after excitation, the frequency of autowaves is self-limiting. In this work, we consider the case where each element is spontaneously excited at a fixed average rate and thereby initiates a new autowave. Although these spontaneous self-excitation events are modelled as independent Poisson point processes with exponentially distributed waiting times, the travelling autowaves lead collectively to a non-exponential, unimodal waiting time distribution for the individual elements. With increasing system size, a global 'clock' period T emerges as the most probable waiting time for each element, which fluctuates around T with an increasingly small but non-zero variance. This apparent synchronization between asynchronous, temporally uncorrelated point processes differs from synchronization effects between perfect oscillators interacting in a phase-aligning manner. Finally, we demonstrate that asynchronous local clocks also emerge in non-homogeneous systems in which the rates of self-excitation are different for all individuals, suggesting that this novel mechanism can occur in a wide range of excitable media.

  1. Spatiotemporal Features for Asynchronous Event-based Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier eLagorce

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bio-inspired asynchronous event-based vision sensors are currently introducing a paradigm shift in visual information processing. These new sensors rely on a stimulus-driven principle of light acquisition similar to biological retinas. They are event-driven and fully asynchronous, thereby reducing redundancy and encoding exact times of input signal changes, leading to a very precise temporal resolution. Approaches for higher-level computer vision often rely on the realiable detection of features in visual frames, but similar definitions of features for the novel dynamic and event-based visual input representation of silicon retinas have so far been lacking. This article addresses the problem of learning and recognizing features for event-based vision sensors, which capture properties of truly spatiotemporal volumes of sparse visual event information. A novel computational architecture for learning and encoding spatiotemporal features is introduced based on a set of predictive recurrent reservoir networks, competing via winner-take-all selection. Features are learned in an unsupervised manner from real-world input recorded with event-based vision sensors. It is shown that the networks in the architecture learn distinct and task-specific dynamic visual features, and can predict their trajectories over time.

  2. Luge Track Safety

    CERN Document Server

    Hubbard, Mont

    2012-01-01

    Simple geometric models of ice surface shape and equations of motion of objects on these surfaces can be used to explain ejection of sliders from ice tracks. Simulations using these can be used to explain why certain design features can be viewed as proximate causes of ejection from the track and hence design flaws. This paper studies the interaction of a particle model for the luge sled (or its right runner) with the ice fillet commonly connecting inside vertical walls and the flat track bottom. A numerical example analyzes the 2010 luge accident at the Vancouver Olympics. It shows that this runner-fillet interaction, and specifically the fillet's positive curvature up the inside wall, can cause a vertical velocity more than sufficient to clear the outside exit wall. In addition its negative curvature along the track, together with large vertical velocity, explains loss of fillet or wall contact and slider ejection. This exposes the fillet along inside walls as a track design flaw. A more transparent design ...

  3. Clean tracks for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    First cosmic ray tracks in the integrated ATLAS barrel SCT and TRT tracking detectors. A snap-shot of a cosmic ray event seen in the different layers of both the SCT and TRT detectors. The ATLAS Inner Detector Integration Team celebrated a major success recently, when clean tracks of cosmic rays were detected in the completed semiconductor tracker (SCT) and transition radiation tracker (TRT) barrels. These tracking tests come just months after the successful insertion of the SCT into the TRT (See Bulletin 09/2006). The cosmic ray test is important for the experiment because, after 15 years of hard work, it is the last test performed on the fully assembled barrel before lowering it into the ATLAS cavern. The two trackers work together to provide millions of channels so that particles' tracks can be identified and measured with great accuracy. According to the team, the preliminary results were very encouraging. After first checks of noise levels in the final detectors, a critical goal was to study their re...

  4. Odd tracks at hadron colliders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Patrick; Papucci, Michele; Volansky, Tomer

    2012-07-20

    New physics that exhibits irregular tracks such as kinks, intermittent hits, or decay in flight may easily be missed at hadron colliders. We demonstrate this by studying viable models of light, O(10  GeV), colored particles that decay predominantly inside the tracker. Such particles can be produced at staggering rates, and yet, may not be identified or triggered on at the LHC, unless specifically searched for. In addition, the models we study provide an explanation for the original measurement of the anomalous charged track distribution by CDF. The presence of irregular tracks in these models reconcile that measurement with the subsequent reanalysis and the null results of ATLAS and CMS. Our study clearly illustrates the need for a comprehensive study of irregular tracks at the LHC.

  5. Reconstructing events, from electronic signals to tracks

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Reconstructing tracks in the events taken by LHC experiments is one of the most challenging and computationally expensive software tasks to be carried out in the data processing chain. A typical LHC event is composed of multiple p-p interactions, each leaving signals from many charged particles in the detector and jus building up an environment of unprecedented complexity. In the lecture I will give an overview of event reconstruction in a typical High Energy Physics experiment. After an introduction to particle tracking detectors I will discuss the concepts and techniques required to master the tracking challenge at the LHC. I will explain how track propagation in a realistic detector works, present different techniques for track fitting and track finding. At the end we will see how all of those techniques play together in the ATLAS track reconstruction application.

  6. Tracking FEMA

    OpenAIRE

    Leskanic, Tyler; Kays, Kevin; Maier, Emily; Cannon, Seth

    2015-01-01

    The zip archive attached to this project is the compressed TrackingFEMA Git repository. It contains the CMS (RefineryCMS - Rails), processing scripts, as well as visualization sample code. The processing scripts are in a folder called TrackingFEMAProcessing. The visualizations are contained in Visualization. The rest of the rails files are contained within the usual Ruby on Rails file system structure. The finished product is a website visualizing the efforts of disaster response organizat...

  7. Primary Surface Particle Motion as a Mechanism for YORP-Driven Binary Asteroid Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahnestock, Eugene G.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2008-09-01

    Within the largest class of binary asteroid systems -- asynchronous binaries typified by 1999 KW4 -- we hypothesize continued YORP spin-up of the rapidly rotating primary leads to recurring episodic lofting motion of primary equator regolith. We theorize this is a mechanism for transporting YORP-injected angular momentum from primary spin into the mutual orbit. This both enables binary primaries to continue to spin at near surface fission rates and produces continued orbit expansion on time scales several times faster than expansion predicted by tidal dissipation alone. This is distinct from the Binary Yorp (BYORP) phenomenon, not studied in this work but to be added to it later. We evaluate our hypotheses using a combination of techniques for an example binary system. First high-fidelity dynamic simulation of surface-originating particles in the full-detail gravity field of the binary components, themselves propagated according to the full two body problem, gives particle final disposition (return impact, transfer impact, escape). Trajectory end states found for regolith lofted at different initial primary spin rates and relative poses are collected into probability matrices, allowing probabilistic propagation of surface particles for long durations at low computational cost. We track changes to mass, inertia dyad, rotation state, and centroid position and velocity for each component in response to this mapped particle motion. This allows tracking of primary, secondary, and mutual orbit angular momenta over time, clearly demonstrating the angular momentum transfer mechanism and validating our hypotheses. We present current orbit expansion rates and estimated orbit size doubling times consistent with this mechanism, for a few binary systems. We also discuss ramifications of this type of rapid binary evolution towards separation, including the frequency with which "divorced binaries" on similar heliocentric orbits are produced, formation of triple systems such as

  8. A candidate for production of a top quark pair in CMS, where both top quarks decay into a W and a b quark, and both W particles decay into a muon and neutrino. This results in 2 muons (red tracks), 2 jets tagged as b-quark jets and missing energy (from the escaping neutrinos).

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    A candidate for production of a top quark pair in CMS, where both top quarks decay into a W and a b quark, and both W particles decay into a muon and neutrino. This results in 2 muons (red tracks), 2 jets tagged as b-quark jets and missing energy (from the escaping neutrinos).

  9. Study of Track Reconstruction for DAMPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tong-suo; Lei, Shi-jun; Zang, Jing-jing; Chang, Jin; Wu, Jian

    2017-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is aimed to study the existence and distribution of dark matter via the observation of high-energy particles in space with a large energy bandwidth, high energy resolution, and high spatial resolution. The track reconstruction is to restore the positions and angles of the incident particles using the multiple observations of different channels at different positions, and its accuracy determines the angular resolution of the explorer. The track reconstruction is mainly based on the observations of two sub-detectors, namely, the Silicon Tracker (STK) and the BGO (Bi4Ge3O12) calorimeter. In accordance with the design and structure of the two sub-detectors, and using the data collected during the beam tests and ground tests of cosmic rays, we discuss in detail the method of track reconstruction for the DAMPE, which includes mainly three basic procedures: the selection of track hits, the fitting of track hits, and the judgement of the optimal track. Since an energetic particle most probably leaves multiple hits in different layers of the STK and BGO crystals, we first provide a method to obtain a rough track in the BGO calorimeter by the centroid method, and hereby to constrain the track hits in the STK. Then for the selected one group of possible track hits in the STK, we apply two different algorithms, the Kalman filter and the least square linear fitting, to fit these track hits. The consistency of the results obtained independently via the two algorithms confirms the validity of our track reconstruction results. Finally, several criteria for picking out the most possible track among all the tracks found in the reconstruction by combining the results of the BGO calorimeter and STK are discussed. Using the track reconstruction method proposed in this article and the beam test data, we confirm that the angular resolution of the DAMPE satisfies its design requirement.

  10. Frog: Asynchronous Graph Processing on GPU with Hybrid Coloring Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Xuanhua; Luo, Xuan; Liang, Junling; Zhao, Peng; Di, Sheng; He, Bingsheng; Jin, Hai

    2018-01-01

    GPUs have been increasingly used to accelerate graph processing for complicated computational problems regarding graph theory. Many parallel graph algorithms adopt the asynchronous computing model to accelerate the iterative convergence. Unfortunately, the consistent asynchronous computing requires locking or atomic operations, leading to significant penalties/overheads when implemented on GPUs. As such, coloring algorithm is adopted to separate the vertices with potential updating conflicts, guaranteeing the consistency/correctness of the parallel processing. Common coloring algorithms, however, may suffer from low parallelism because of a large number of colors generally required for processing a large-scale graph with billions of vertices. We propose a light-weight asynchronous processing framework called Frog with a preprocessing/hybrid coloring model. The fundamental idea is based on Pareto principle (or 80-20 rule) about coloring algorithms as we observed through masses of realworld graph coloring cases. We find that a majority of vertices (about 80%) are colored with only a few colors, such that they can be read and updated in a very high degree of parallelism without violating the sequential consistency. Accordingly, our solution separates the processing of the vertices based on the distribution of colors. In this work, we mainly answer three questions: (1) how to partition the vertices in a sparse graph with maximized parallelism, (2) how to process large-scale graphs that cannot fit into GPU memory, and (3) how to reduce the overhead of data transfers on PCIe while processing each partition. We conduct experiments on real-world data (Amazon, DBLP, YouTube, RoadNet-CA, WikiTalk and Twitter) to evaluate our approach and make comparisons with well-known non-preprocessed (such as Totem, Medusa, MapGraph and Gunrock) and preprocessed (Cusha) approaches, by testing four classical algorithms (BFS, PageRank, SSSP and CC). On all the tested applications and

  11. Null-space Monte Carlo particle tracking to assess groundwater PCE (Tetrachloroethene) diffuse pollution in north-eastern Milan functional urban area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Luca; Colombo, Loris; Formentin, Giovanni

    2018-04-15

    The Lombardy Region in Italy is one of the most urbanized and industrialized areas in Europe. The presence of countless sources of groundwater pollution is therefore a matter of environmental concern. The sources of groundwater contamination can be classified into two different categories: 1) Point Sources (PS), which correspond to areas releasing plumes of high concentrations (i.e. hot-spots) and 2) Multiple-Point Sources (MPS) consisting in a series of unidentifiable small sources clustered within large areas, generating an anthropogenic diffuse contamination. The latter category frequently predominates in European Functional Urban Areas (FUA) and cannot be managed through standard remediation techniques, mainly because detecting the many different source areas releasing small contaminant mass in groundwater is unfeasible. A specific legislative action has been recently enacted at Regional level (DGR IX/3510-2012), in order to identify areas prone to anthropogenic diffuse pollution and their level of contamination. With a view to defining a management plan, it is necessary to find where MPS are most likely positioned. This paper describes a methodology devised to identify the areas with the highest likelihood to host potential MPS. A groundwater flow model was implemented for a pilot area located in the Milan FUA and through the PEST code, a Null-Space Monte Carlo method was applied in order to generate a suite of several hundred hydraulic conductivity field realizations, each maintaining the model in a calibrated state and each consistent with the modelers' expert-knowledge. Thereafter, the MODPATH code was applied to generate back-traced advective flowpaths for each of the models built using the conductivity field realizations. Maps were then created displaying the number of backtracked particles that crossed each model cell in each stochastic calibrated model. The result is considered to be representative of the FUAs areas with the highest likelihood to host

  12. Asynchronous onset of eutrophication among shallow prairie lakes of the Northern Great Plains, Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheaux, Heather; Leavitt, Peter R; Jackson, Leland J

    2016-01-01

    Coherent timing of agricultural expansion, fertilizer application, atmospheric nutrient deposition, and accelerated global warming is expected to promote synchronous fertilization of regional surface waters and coherent development of algal blooms and lake eutrophication. While broad-scale cyanobacterial expansion is evident in global meta-analyses, little is known of whether lakes in discrete catchments within a common lake district also exhibit coherent water quality degradation through anthropogenic forcing. Consequently, the primary goal of this study was to determine whether agricultural development since ca. 1900, accelerated use of fertilizer since 1960, atmospheric deposition of reactive N, or regional climate warming has resulted in coherent patterns of eutrophication of surface waters in southern Alberta, Canada. Unexpectedly, analysis of sedimentary pigments as an index of changes in total algal abundance since ca. 1850 revealed that while total algal abundance (as β-carotene, pheophytin a) increased in nine of 10 lakes over 150 years, the onset of eutrophication varied by a century and was asynchronous across basins. Similarly, analysis of temporal sequences with least-squares regression revealed that the relative abundance of cyanobacteria (echinenone) either decreased or did not change significantly in eight of the lakes since ca. 1850, whereas purple sulfur bacteria (as okenone) increased significantly in seven study sites. These patterns are consistent with the catchment filter hypothesis, which posits that lakes exhibit unique responses to common forcing associated with the influx of mass as water, nutrients, or particles. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. An Asynchronous Cellular Automata-Based Adaptive Illumination Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandini, Stefania; Bonomi, Andrea; Vizzari, Giuseppe; Acconci, Vito

    The term Ambient Intelligence refers to electronic environments that are sensitive and responsive to the presence of people; in the described scenario the environment itself is endowed with a set of sensors (to perceive humans or other physical entities such as dogs, bicycles, etc.), interacting with a set of actuators (lights) that choose their actions (i.e. state of illumination) in an attempt improve the overall experience of these users. The model for the interaction and action of sensors and actuators is an asynchronous Cellular Automata (CA) with memory, supporting a self-organization of the system as a response to the presence and movements of people inside it. The paper will introduce the model, as well as an ad hoc user interface for the specification of the relevant parameters of the CA transition rule that determines the overall system behaviour.

  14. Research on the displacement control method of asynchronous modular contactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gong; Ming, Zong

    2017-01-01

    Ac contactor is a kind of low voltage electrical appliances with large usage and wide application. Because of the frequent operation, contactor life must be long enough to ensure the reliable operation of power system. The electrical life of the contactor, as the key to affect the service life of the contactor, is mainly affected by the arc developed in the breaking and closing course. This paper concentrates on a new type of asynchronous modular contactor. To get the contactor movement characteristics, the dynamic model of the electromagnetic system is established by MATLAB/SIMULINK. Then, according to the displacement curve of contactor, the breaking process and closing process is planned. The thought of closed loop control, by adjusting the parameters of PID controller, enables the contactor to operate as the planning displacement curve. In addition, to achieve no arc or micro arc breaking and no bounce or micro bounce closing , a displacement closed loop control system for contactor is designed.

  15. Estimation of delays in generalized asynchronous Boolean networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Haimabati; Layek, Ritwik Kumar

    2016-10-20

    A new generalized asynchronous Boolean network (GABN) model has been proposed in this paper. This continuous-time discrete-state model captures the biological reality of cellular dynamics without compromising the computational efficiency of the Boolean framework. The GABN synthesis procedure is based on the prior knowledge of the logical structure of the regulatory network, and the experimental transcriptional parameters. The novelty of the proposed methodology lies in considering different delays associated with the activation and deactivation of a particular protein (especially the transcription factors). A few illustrative examples of some well-studied network motifs have been provided to explore the scope of using the GABN model for larger networks. The GABN model of the p53-signaling pathway in response to γ-irradiation has also been simulated in the current paper to provide an indirect validation of the proposed schema.

  16. H∞ Controller Design for Asynchronous Hybrid Systems with Multiple Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiang Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solutions for the H∞ synthesis problems of asynchronous hybrid systems with input-output delays are proposed. The continuous-time lifting approach of sampled-data systems is extended to a hybrid system with multiple delays, and some feasible formulas to calculate the operators of the equivalent discrete-time (DT system are given. Different from the existing methods derived from symplectic pair theory or by state augmentation, a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional to solve the synthesis problem is explicitly constructed. The delay-dependent stability conditions we obtained can be described in terms of nonstrict linear matrix inequalities (LMIs, which are much more convenient to be solved by LMI tools.

  17. A parallel asynchronous decomposition for on-line contingency planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramesh, V.C. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States). Electrical and Computer Engineering Dept.; Talukdar, S.N. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Engineering Design Research Center

    1995-12-31

    Traditional formulations of security-constrained-optimal-power-flows represent contingencies by hard constraints. The disadvantages are four-fold. First, the conflicts among contingencies must be arbitrated apriori, before their effects are known. Second, the feasible region shrinks with increase in the number of contingencies. Third, computational time increases with the number of contingencies. Fourth, hard constraints provide poor models of fuzzy quantities such as equipment ratings and operating guidelines. This paper develops a modeling framework without these disadvantages. Specifically, it allows for soft constraints and always has feasible solutions. The effects of conflicts among contingencies are displayed so system operators can arbitrate them in an informed manner. Moreover, each contingency can be handled asynchronously and in parallel. In other words, the computational time, for handling an arbitrarily large number of contingencies, remains the same as for performing an optimal power flow without any contingencies (provided that a computer is dedicated to each contingency).

  18. A parallel asynchronous decomposition for on-line contingency planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramesh, V.C. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States). Electrical and Computer Engineering Dept.; Talukdar, S.N. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Engineering Design Research Center

    1996-02-01

    Traditional formulations of security-constrained-optimal-power-flows represent contingencies by hard constraints. The disadvantages are four-fold. First, the conflicts among contingencies must be arbitrated a priori, before their effects are known. Second, the feasible region shrinks with increase in the number of contingencies. Third, computational time increases with the number of contingencies. Fourth, hard constraints provide poor models of fuzzy quantities such as equipment ratings and operating guidelines. This paper develops a modeling framework without these disadvantages. Specifically, it allows for soft constraints and always has feasible solutions. The effects of conflicts among contingencies are displayed so system operators can arbitrate them in an informed manner. Moreover, each contingency can be handled asynchronously and in parallel. In other words, the computational time, for handling an arbitrarily large number of contingencies, remains the same as for performing an optimal power flow without any contingencies (provided that a computer is dedicated to each contingency).

  19. Sideband-Harmonic Instability of Paralleled Inverters with Asynchronous Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Dongsheng; Wang, Xiongfei; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    Paralleled inverters with asynchronous carriers are increasingly emerging into renewable power plants and other power-electronic-based power systems. The sideband harmonics resulting from the pulse width modulation tend to be different from one inverter to another, which may trigger sideband-harmonic...... resonances among the paralleled inverters. To address the sideband-harmonic instability, the nonlinearity of the digital pulse width modulator is analyzed first in this paper based on the harmonic balance principle. It is revealed that the dynamic sideband components corresponding to a given small......-signal perturbation can be far below the Nyquist frequency, and they may not be effectively attenuated by anti-aliasing filters. A multi-frequency impedance model is then developed for the inverter, which characterizes the dynamic coupling between the perturbed frequency component and the sideband frequency component...

  20. Indoor Positioning for Smartphones Using Asynchronous Ultrasound Trilateration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Carswell

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern smartphones are a great platform for Location Based Services (LBS. While outdoor LBS for smartphones has proven to be very successful, indoor LBS for smartphones has not yet fully developed due to the lack of an accurate positioning technology. In this paper we present an accurate indoor positioning approach for commercial off-the-shelf (COTS smartphones that uses the innate ability of mobile phones to produce ultrasound, combined with Time-Difference-of-Arrival (TDOA asynchronous trilateration. We evaluate our indoor positioning approach by describing its strengths and weaknesses, and determine its absolute accuracy. This is accomplished through a range of experiments that involve variables such as position of control point microphones, position of phone within the room, direction speaker is facing and presence of user in the signal path. Test results show that our Lok8 (locate mobile positioning system can achieve accuracies better than 10 cm in a real-world environment.