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Sample records for asynchronous particle tracking

  1. 3D asynchronous particle tracking in single and dual continuum matrix-fractures. Application to nuclear waste storage; Modelisation 3D du transport particulaire asynchrone en simple et double continuum matrice-fractures: application au stockage de dechets nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, M.Ph

    2008-06-15

    This PhD research was conducted as a collaboration between Laboratoire National d'Hydraulique et Environnement (LNHE) from EDF R and D and the Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse (IMFT) in the frame of a CIFRE contract. This PhD thesis aims at providing LNHE a reliable numerical model to study the feasibility of a nuclear waste storage in deep geological structures. The main focus of the thesis is put on developing and implementing a Random Walk Particle Method (RWPM) to model contaminant transport in 3D heterogeneous and fractured porous media. In its first part, the report presents the Lagrangian particle tracking method used to model transport in heterogeneous media with a direct high resolution approach. The solute plume is discretized into concentration packets: particles. The model tracks each particle based on a time-explicit displacement algorithm according to an advective component and a diffusive random component. The method is implemented on a hydraulic model discretized on a 3D unstructured tetrahedral finite element mesh. We focus on techniques to overcome problems due to the discontinuous transport parameters and the unstructured mesh. First, we introduce an asynchronous time-stepping approach to deal with the numerical and overshoot errors that occur with conventional RWPM. Then, a filtering method is applied to smooth discontinuous transport parameters (pre-processing). Finally, once the particle displacements are computed, we propose several filtering and sampling methods to obtain concentrations from particle positions (post-processing). Applications of these methods are presented with cases of tracer advection-dispersion in homogeneous and heterogeneous media. For dense fracture networks, direct high resolution methods are very time consuming and need a lot of computational resources. So, as an alternative to the discrete approach, a dual-continuum representation is used, in the second part of the report, to describe the porous

  2. Selective particle capture by asynchronously beating cilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-12-01

    Selective particle filtration is fundamental in many engineering and biological systems. For example, many aquatic microorganisms use filter feeding to capture food particles from the surrounding fluid, using motile cilia. One of the capture strategies is to use the same cilia to generate feeding currents and to intercept particles when the particles are on the downstream side of the cilia. Here, we develop a 3D computational model of ciliary bands interacting with flow suspended particles and calculate particle trajectories for a range of particle sizes. Consistent with experimental observations, we find optimal particle sizes that maximize capture rate. The optimal size depends nonlinearly on cilia spacing and cilia coordination, synchronous vs. asynchronous. These parameters affect the cilia-generated flow field, which in turn affects particle trajectories. The low capture rate of smaller particles is due to the particles' inability to cross the flow streamlines of neighboring cilia. Meanwhile, large particles have difficulty entering the sub-ciliary region once advected downstream, also resulting in low capture rates. The optimal range of particle sizes is enhanced when cilia beat asynchronously. These findings have potentially important implications on the design and use of biomimetic cilia in processes such as particle sorting in microfluidic devices.

  3. Asynchronous Event-Driven Particle Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donev, A

    2007-08-30

    We present, in a unifying way, the main components of three asynchronous event-driven algorithms for simulating physical systems of interacting particles. The first example, hard-particle molecular dynamics (MD), is well-known. We also present a recently-developed diffusion kinetic Monte Carlo (DKMC) algorithm, as well as a novel stochastic molecular-dynamics algorithm that builds on the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC). We explain how to effectively combine event-driven and classical time-driven handling, and discuss some promises and challenges for event-driven simulation of realistic physical systems.

  4. Asynchronous Event-Driven Particle Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donev, A

    2007-02-28

    We present in a unifying way the main components of three examples of asynchronous event-driven algorithms for simulating physical systems of interacting particles. The first example, hard-particle molecular dynamics (MD), is well-known. We also present a recently-developed diffusion kinetic Monte Carlo (DKMC) algorithm, as well as a novel event-driven algorithm for Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC). Finally, we describe how to combine MD with DSMC in an event-driven framework, and discuss some promises and challenges for event-driven simulation of realistic physical systems.

  5. Fuzzy Logic Particle Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    A new all-electronic Particle Image Velocimetry technique that can efficiently map high speed gas flows has been developed in-house at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Particle Image Velocimetry is an optical technique for measuring the instantaneous two component velocity field across a planar region of a seeded flow field. A pulsed laser light sheet is used to illuminate the seed particles entrained in the flow field at two instances in time. One or more charged coupled device (CCD) cameras can be used to record the instantaneous positions of particles. Using the time between light sheet pulses and determining either the individual particle displacements or the average displacement of particles over a small subregion of the recorded image enables the calculation of the fluid velocity. Fuzzy logic minimizes the required operator intervention in identifying particles and computing velocity. Using two cameras that have the same view of the illumination plane yields two single exposure image frames. Two competing techniques that yield unambiguous velocity vector direction information have been widely used for reducing the single-exposure, multiple image frame data: (1) cross-correlation and (2) particle tracking. Correlation techniques yield averaged velocity estimates over subregions of the flow, whereas particle tracking techniques give individual particle velocity estimates. For the correlation technique, the correlation peak corresponding to the average displacement of particles across the subregion must be identified. Noise on the images and particle dropout result in misidentification of the true correlation peak. The subsequent velocity vector maps contain spurious vectors where the displacement peaks have been improperly identified. Typically these spurious vectors are replaced by a weighted average of the neighboring vectors, thereby decreasing the independence of the measurements. In this work, fuzzy logic techniques are used to determine the true

  6. A Synchronous-Asynchronous Particle Swarm Optimisation Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Azlina Ab Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the original particle swarm optimisation (PSO algorithm, the particles’ velocities and positions are updated after the whole swarm performance is evaluated. This algorithm is also known as synchronous PSO (S-PSO. The strength of this update method is in the exploitation of the information. Asynchronous update PSO (A-PSO has been proposed as an alternative to S-PSO. A particle in A-PSO updates its velocity and position as soon as its own performance has been evaluated. Hence, particles are updated using partial information, leading to stronger exploration. In this paper, we attempt to improve PSO by merging both update methods to utilise the strengths of both methods. The proposed synchronous-asynchronous PSO (SA-PSO algorithm divides the particles into smaller groups. The best member of a group and the swarm’s best are chosen to lead the search. Members within a group are updated synchronously, while the groups themselves are asynchronously updated. Five well-known unimodal functions, four multimodal functions, and a real world optimisation problem are used to study the performance of SA-PSO, which is compared with the performances of S-PSO and A-PSO. The results are statistically analysed and show that the proposed SA-PSO has performed consistently well.

  7. FAST: A fully asynchronous and status-tracking pattern for geoprocessing services orchestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huayi; You, Lan; Gui, Zhipeng; Gao, Shuang; Li, Zhenqiang; Yu, Jingmin

    2014-09-01

    Geoprocessing service orchestration (GSO) provides a unified and flexible way to implement cross-application, long-lived, and multi-step geoprocessing service workflows by coordinating geoprocessing services collaboratively. Usually, geoprocessing services and geoprocessing service workflows are data and/or computing intensive. The intensity feature may make the execution process of a workflow time-consuming. Since it initials an execution request without blocking other interactions on the client side, an asynchronous mechanism is especially appropriate for GSO workflows. Many critical problems remain to be solved in existing asynchronous patterns for GSO including difficulties in improving performance, status tracking, and clarifying the workflow structure. These problems are a challenge when orchestrating performance efficiency, making statuses instantly available, and constructing clearly structured GSO workflows. A Fully Asynchronous and Status-Tracking (FAST) pattern that adopts asynchronous interactions throughout the whole communication tier of a workflow is proposed for GSO. The proposed FAST pattern includes a mechanism that actively pushes the latest status to clients instantly and economically. An independent proxy was designed to isolate the status tracking logic from the geoprocessing business logic, which assists the formation of a clear GSO workflow structure. A workflow was implemented in the FAST pattern to simulate the flooding process in the Poyang Lake region. Experimental results show that the proposed FAST pattern can efficiently tackle data/computing intensive geoprocessing tasks. The performance of all collaborative partners was improved due to the asynchronous mechanism throughout communication tier. A status-tracking mechanism helps users retrieve the latest running status of a GSO workflow in an efficient and instant way. The clear structure of the GSO workflow lowers the barriers for geospatial domain experts and model designers to

  8. Fuzzy logic particle tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1993-01-01

    Fuzzy logic has proven to be a simple and robust method for process control. Instead of requiring a complex model of the system, a user defined rule base is used to control the process. In this paper the principles of fuzzy logic control are applied to Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV). Two frames of digitally recorded, single exposure particle imagery are used as input. The fuzzy processor uses the local particle displacement information to determine the correct particle tracks. Fuzzy PTV is an improvement over traditional PTV techniques which typically require a sequence (greater than 2) of image frames for accurately tracking particles. The fuzzy processor executes in software on a PC without the use of specialized array or fuzzy logic processors. A pair of sample input images with roughly 300 particle images each, results in more than 200 velocity vectors in under 8 seconds of processing time.

  9. An Asynchronous Neuromorphic Event-Driven Visual Part-Based Shape Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverter Valeiras, David; Lagorce, Xavier; Clady, Xavier; Bartolozzi, Chiara; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Benosman, Ryad

    2015-12-01

    Object tracking is an important step in many artificial vision tasks. The current state-of-the-art implementations remain too computationally demanding for the problem to be solved in real time with high dynamics. This paper presents a novel real-time method for visual part-based tracking of complex objects from the output of an asynchronous event-based camera. This paper extends the pictorial structures model introduced by Fischler and Elschlager 40 years ago and introduces a new formulation of the problem, allowing the dynamic processing of visual input in real time at high temporal resolution using a conventional PC. It relies on the concept of representing an object as a set of basic elements linked by springs. These basic elements consist of simple trackers capable of successfully tracking a target with an ellipse-like shape at several kilohertz on a conventional computer. For each incoming event, the method updates the elastic connections established between the trackers and guarantees a desired geometric structure corresponding to the tracked object in real time. This introduces a high temporal elasticity to adapt to projective deformations of the tracked object in the focal plane. The elastic energy of this virtual mechanical system provides a quality criterion for tracking and can be used to determine whether the measured deformations are caused by the perspective projection of the perceived object or by occlusions. Experiments on real-world data show the robustness of the method in the context of dynamic face tracking.

  10. Two-Particle Asynchronous Quantum Correlation: Wavefunction Collapse Acting as a Beamsplitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, F. V.; Browne, R. S.

    2016-03-01

    A two-body quantum correlation is calculated for a particle reflecting from a moving mirror. Correlated interference results when the incident and reflected particle substates and their associated mirror substates overlap. Using the Copenhagen interpretation of measurement, an asynchronous joint probability density (PDF), which is a function both of the different positions and different times at which the particle and mirror are measured, is derived assuming that no interaction occurs between each measurement. Measurement of the particle first, in the correlated interference region, results in a splitting of the mirror substate into ones which have and have not reflected the particle. An analog of the interference from the Doppler effect for only measurements of the particle (a marginal PDF), in this two-body system, is shown to be a consequence of the asynchronous measurement. The simplification obtained for a microscopic particle reflecting from a mesoscopic or macroscopic mirror is used to illustrate asynchronous correlation interferometry. In this case, the small displacement between these mirror states can yield negligible environmental decoherence times. In addition, interference of these mirror states does not vanish in the limit of large mirror mass due to the small momentum exchange in reflecting a microscopic particle.

  11. Robust Fault-Tolerant Tracking Control for Nonlinear Networked Control System: Asynchronous Switched Polytopic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoyang Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the robust fault-tolerant tracking control problem for networked control system (NCS. Firstly, considering the locally overlapped switching law widely existed in engineering applications, the NCS is modeled as a locally overlapped switched polytopic system to reduce designing conservatism and solving complexity. Then, switched parameter dependent fault-tolerant tracking controllers are constructed to deal with the asynchronous switching phenomenon caused by the updating delays of the switching signals and weighted coefficients. Additionally, the global uniform asymptotic stability in the mean (GUAS-M and desired weighted l2 performance are guaranteed by combining the switched parameter dependent Lyapunov functional method with the average dwell time (ADT method, and the feasible conditions for the fault-tolerant tracking controllers are obtained in the form of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs. Finally, the performance of the proposed approach is verified on a highly maneuverable technology (HiMAT vehicle’s tracking control problem. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Fast TPC Online Tracking on GPUs and Asynchronous Data Processing in the ALICE HLT to facilitate Online Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, David; Gorbunov, Sergey; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Breitner, Timo; Kretz, Matthias; Lindenstruth, Volker

    2015-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Heavy Ion Experiment) is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which is today the most powerful particle accelerator worldwide. The High Level Trigger (HLT) is an online compute farm of about 200 nodes, which reconstructs events measured by the ALICE detector in real-time. The HLT uses a custom online data-transport framework to distribute data and workload among the compute nodes. ALICE employs several calibration-sensitive subdetectors, e.g. the TPC (Time Projection Chamber). For a precise reconstruction, the HLT has to perform the calibration online. Online- calibration can make certain Offline calibration steps obsolete and can thus speed up Offline analysis. Looking forward to ALICE Run III starting in 2020, online calibration becomes a necessity. The main detector used for track reconstruction is the TPC. Reconstructing the trajectories in the TPC is the most compute-intense step during event reconstruction. Therefore, a fast tracking implementation is of great importance. Reconstructed TPC tracks build the basis for the calibration making a fast online-tracking mandatory. We present several components developed for the ALICE High Level Trigger to perform fast event reconstruction and to provide features required for online calibration. As first topic, we present our TPC tracker, which employs GPUs to speed up the processing, and which bases on a Cellular Automaton and on the Kalman filter. Our TPC tracking algorithm has been successfully used in 2011 and 2012 in the lead-lead and the proton-lead runs. We have improved it to leverage features of newer GPUs and we have ported it to support OpenCL, CUDA, and CPUs with a single common source code. This makes us vendor independent. As second topic, we present framework extensions required for online calibration. The extensions, however, are generic and can be used for other purposes as well. We have extended the framework to support asynchronous compute

  13. Beam particle tracking for MUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, Anusha; MUSE Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The proton radius puzzle is the 7 σ disagreement between the proton radius extracted from the measured muonic hydrogen Lamb shift and the proton radius extracted from the regular hydrogen Lamb shift and elastic ep scattering form factor data. So far there is no generally accepted resolution to the puzzle. The explanations for the discrepancy include new degrees of freedom beyond the Standard Model. The MUon Scattering Experiment (MUSE) will simultaneously measure ep and μp scattering at the Paul Scherrer Institute, using the πM1 beam line at 100-250 MeV/c to cover a four-momentum transfer range of Q2=0.002-0.07 (GeV/c)2. Due to the large divergence of the secondary muon beam, beam particle trajectories are needed for every event. They are measured by a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) tracking telescope consisting of three 10x10 cm2 triple-GEM chambers. Fast segmented scintillator paddles provide precise timing information. The GEM detectors, their performance in test beam times, and plans and milestones will be discussed. This work has been supported by DOE DE-SC0012589 and NSF HRD-1649909. DOE DE-SC0012589 and NSF HRD-1649909.

  14. Bayesian target tracking based on particle filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    For being able to deal with the nonlinear or non-Gaussian problems, particle filters have been studied by many researchers. Based on particle filter, the extended Kalman filter (EKF) proposal function is applied to Bayesian target tracking. Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, the resampling step, etc novel techniques are also introduced into Bayesian target tracking. And the simulation results confirm the improved particle filter with these techniques outperforms the basic one.

  15. Better track leads to new particles

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "Dutch researcher Thijs Cornelissen developed an algorithm to reconstruct the particle tracks and that is being used in a European research institute for particle physics. His method provides greater insights into the origine of particles that arise as a result of collisions." (1/2 page)

  16. 3D scanning particle tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Klaus; Holzner, Markus; Lüthi, Beat; Guala, Michele; Liberzon, Alexander; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2005-11-01

    In this article, we present an experimental setup and data processing schemes for 3D scanning particle tracking velocimetry (SPTV), which expands on the classical 3D particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) through changes in the illumination, image acquisition and analysis. 3D PTV is a flexible flow measurement technique based on the processing of stereoscopic images of flow tracer particles. The technique allows obtaining Lagrangian flow information directly from measured 3D trajectories of individual particles. While for a classical PTV the entire region of interest is simultaneously illuminated and recorded, in SPTV the flow field is recorded by sequential tomographic high-speed imaging of the region of interest. The advantage of the presented method is a considerable increase in maximum feasible seeding density. Results are shown for an experiment in homogenous turbulence and compared with PTV. SPTV yielded an average 3,500 tracked particles per time step, which implies a significant enhancement of the spatial resolution for Lagrangian flow measurements.

  17. Bayesian Particle Tracking of Traffic Flows

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We develop a Bayesian particle filter for tracking traffic flows that is capable of capturing non-linearities and discontinuities present in flow dynamics. Our model includes a hidden state variable that captures sudden regime shifts between traffic free flow, breakdown and recovery. We develop an efficient particle learning algorithm for real time on-line inference of states and parameters. This requires a two step approach, first, resampling the current particles, with a mixture predictive ...

  18. Discovery Mondays - 'Particle tracks: Seeing the invisible'

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Simulation of particle tracks in the CMS detector. How can you 'see' something as infinitesimal and fleeting as an elementary particle that defeats even the most powerful microscope? Well, physicists have detectors to snoop on them. Unlike biologists looking at bacteria, physicists don't see the particles themselves. They study their impact on sensitive materials as they pass through them at ultra high speed, a bit like seeing plane vapour trails in a clear sky. At the next Discovery Monday you will be able to find out about the different methods used at CERN to detect particles. There will be demonstrations of the cloud chamber, where particles leave tell-tale evidence of their passage in tracks of droplets. You will also learn about past and current particle track detection techniques and how the tracks are reconstructed into magnificent composite images. Don't miss this opportunity to learn about the various ways of 'seeing' particles. The event will be conducted in French. Come along to the Microcosm ...

  19. Optimal Heating in Heat-Treatment Process Based on Grey Asynchronous Particle Swarm Optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    To ensure plate heating quality and reduce energy consumption in heat-treatment process, optimal heating for plates in a roller hearth furnace was investigated and a new strategy for heating procedure optimization was developed. During solving process, plate temperature forecast model based on heat transfer mechanics was established to calculate plate temperature with the assumed heating procedure. In addition, multi-objective feature of optimal heating was analyzed. And the method, which is composed of asynchronous particle swarm optimization and grey relational analysis, was adopted for solving the multi-objective problem. The developed strategy for optimizing heating has been applied to the mass production. The result indicates that the absolute plate discharging temperature deviation between measured value and target value does not exceed ± 8 ℃, and the relative deviation is less than ± 0.77%.

  20. Formation of Charged Particle Tracks in Solids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mukhtar A. Rana

    2006-01-01

    A criterion for formation of etchabJe tracks in solids is suggested using the well-known concepts of ionization and thermal spikes, diffusion process with useful and justified assumptions, and present or published experimental and theoretical investigations on the same subject. The suggested criterion is useful for a wide spectrum of researchers including development and applications of track recording materials, ions implantation, sputtering and other areas, which include interactions of charged particles with solids.

  1. Fast particle tracking with wake fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohlus, M.; Floettmann, K.; Henning, C.

    2012-01-15

    Tracking calculations of charged particles in electromagnetic fields require in principle the simultaneous solution of the equation of motion and of Maxwell's equations. In many tracking codes a simpler and more efficient approach is used: external fields like that of the accelerating structures are provided as field maps, generated in separate computations and for the calculation of self fields the model of a particle bunch in uniform motion is used. We describe how an externally computed wake function can be approximated by a table of Taylor coefficients and how the wake field kick can be calculated for the particle distribution in a tracking calculation. The integrated kick, representing the effect of a distributed structure, is applied at a discrete time. As an example, we use our approach to calculate the emittance growth of a bunch in an undulator beam pipe due to resistive wall wake field effects. (orig.)

  2. Dominant Correlogram Based Particle Filter Tracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Yan-fen; SHI Peng-fei

    2005-01-01

    A novel dominant correlogram based particle filter was proposed for an object tracking in visual surveillance. Particle filter outperforms the Kalman filter in non-linear and non-Gaussian estimation problem. This paper proposed incorporating spatial information into visual feature, and yields a reliable likelihood description of the observation and prediction. A similarity-ratio is defined to evaluate the effectivity of different similarity measurements in weighing samples. The experimental results demonstrate the effective and robust performance compared with the histogram based tracking in traffic scenes.

  3. Particle Filter for Estimation and Tracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-zhen WANG; Zeng-shun ZHAO; Xiao-wei AN; Shu-xia TIAN

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the particle filter technique has been widely used in tracking, estimation and navigation. In this paper, the authors described several practical filters including the general practical, the extended Kaman practical, and the unscented particle filters. And they explained the degeneracy problem in the practical filter process, and introduced some solved methods. Finally they demonstrated the estimation of different particle filters in non-liner and non-Gaussian situation respectively. The result proved the unscented particle filter had the best performance.

  4. Tracking particles by passing messages between images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kroc, Lukas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zdeborova, Lenka [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Krakala, Florent [ESPCI; Vergassola, M [CNRS

    2009-01-01

    Methods to extract information from the tracking of mobile objects/particles have broad interest in biological and physical sciences. Techniques based on the simple criterion of proximity in time-consecutive snapshots are useful to identify the trajectories of the particles. However, they become problematic as the motility and/or the density of the particles increases because of the uncertainties on the trajectories that particles have followed during the acquisition time of the images. Here, we report efficient methods for learning parameters of the dynamics of the particles from their positions in time-consecutive images. Our algorithm belongs to the class of message-passing algorithms, also known in computer science, information theory and statistical physics under the name of Belief Propagation (BP). The algorithm is distributed, thus allowing parallel implementation suitable for computations on multiple machines without significant inter-machine overhead. We test our method on the model example of particle tracking in turbulent flows, which is particularly challenging due to the strong transport that those flows produce. Our numerical experiments show that the BP algorithm compares in quality with exact Markov Chain Monte-Carlo algorithms, yet BP is far superior in speed. We also suggest and analyze a random-distance model that provides theoretical justification for BP accuracy. Methods developed here systematically formulate the problem of particle tracking and provide fast and reliable tools for its extensive range of applications.

  5. Passive target tracking using marginalized particle filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A marginalized particle filtering(MPF)approach is proposed for target tracking under the background of passive measurement.Essentially,the MPF is a combination of particle filtering technique and Kalman filter.By making full use of marginalization,the distributions of the tractable linear part of the total state variables are updated analytically using Kalman filter,and only the lower-dimensional nonlinear state variable needs to be dealt with using particle filter.Simulation studies are performed on an illustrative example,and the results show that the MPF method leads to a significant reduction of the tracking errors when compared with the direct particle implementation.Real data test results also validate the effectiveness of the presented method.

  6. The probe rules in single particle tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Mathias P.; Lagerholm, B. Christoffer

    2011-01-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) enables light microscopy at a sub-diffraction limited spatial resolution by a combination of imaging at low molecular labeling densities and computational image processing. SPT and related single molecule imaging techniques have found a rapidly expanded use within...

  7. 3D scanning particle tracking velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyer, Klaus; Holzner, Markus; Guala, Michele; Liberzon, Alexander; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang [Swiss Federal Institut of Technology Zurich, Institut fuer Hydromechanik und Wasserwirtschaft, Zuerich (Switzerland); Luethi, Beat [Risoe National Laboratory, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2005-11-01

    In this article, we present an experimental setup and data processing schemes for 3D scanning particle tracking velocimetry (SPTV), which expands on the classical 3D particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) through changes in the illumination, image acquisition and analysis. 3D PTV is a flexible flow measurement technique based on the processing of stereoscopic images of flow tracer particles. The technique allows obtaining Lagrangian flow information directly from measured 3D trajectories of individual particles. While for a classical PTV the entire region of interest is simultaneously illuminated and recorded, in SPTV the flow field is recorded by sequential tomographic high-speed imaging of the region of interest. The advantage of the presented method is a considerable increase in maximum feasible seeding density. Results are shown for an experiment in homogenous turbulence and compared with PTV. SPTV yielded an average 3,500 tracked particles per time step, which implies a significant enhancement of the spatial resolution for Lagrangian flow measurements. (orig.)

  8. Tracking of human head with particle filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Chao

    2009-01-01

    To cope with the problem of tracking a human head in a complicated scene, we propose a method that adopts human skin color and hair color integrated with a kind of particle filter named condensation algorithm. Firstly, a novel method is presented to set up human head color model using skin color and hair color separately based on region growing. Compared with traditional human face model, this method is more precise and works well when human turns around and the face disappears in the image. Then a novel method is presented to use color model in condensation algorithm more effectively. In this method, a combination of edge detection result, color segmentation result and color edge detection result in an Omega window is used to measure the scale and position of human head in condensation. Experiments show that this approach can track human head in complicated scene even when human turns around or the distance of tracking a human head changes quickly.

  9. Nuclear track radiography of 'hot' aerosol particles

    CERN Document Server

    Boulyga, S F; Kievets, M K; Lomonosova, E M; Zhuk, I V; Yaroshevich, O I; Perelygin, V P; Petrova, R I; Brandt, R; Vater, P

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear track radiography was applied to identify aerosol 'hot' particles which contain elements of nuclear fuel and fallout after Chernobyl NPP accident. For the determination of the content of transuranium elements in radioactive aerosols the measurement of the alpha-activity of 'hot' particles by SSNTD was used in this work, as well as radiography of fission fragments formed as a result of the reactions (n,f) and (gamma,f) in the irradiation of aerosol filters by thermal neutrons and high energy gamma quanta. The technique allowed the sizes and alpha-activity of 'hot' particles to be determined without extracting them from the filter, as well as the determination of the uranium content and its enrichment by sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U, sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu and sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Pu isotopes. Sensitivity of determination of alpha activity by fission method is 5x10 sup - sup 6 Bq per particle. The software for the system of image analysis was created. It ensured the identification of track clusters on an optical imag...

  10. Extending particle tracking capability with Delaunay triangulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kejia; Anthony, Stephen M; Granick, Steve

    2014-04-29

    Particle tracking, the analysis of individual moving elements in time series of microscopic images, enables burgeoning new applications, but there is need to better resolve conformation and dynamics. Here we describe the advantages of Delaunay triangulation to extend the capabilities of particle tracking in three areas: (1) discriminating irregularly shaped objects, which allows one to track items other than point features; (2) combining time and space to better connect missing frames in trajectories; and (3) identifying shape backbone. To demonstrate the method, specific examples are given, involving analyzing the time-dependent molecular conformations of actin filaments and λ-DNA. The main limitation of this method, shared by all other clustering techniques, is the difficulty to separate objects when they are very close. This can be mitigated by inspecting locally to remove edges that are longer than their neighbors and also edges that link two objects, using methods described here, so that the combination of Delaunay triangulation with edge removal can be robustly applied to processing large data sets. As common software packages, both commercial and open source, can construct Delaunay triangulation on command, the methods described in this paper are both computationally efficient and easy to implement.

  11. Charged Particle Tracking with the Timepix ASIC

    CERN Document Server

    Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Collins, P; Crossley, M; Dumps, R; Gersabeck, M; Gligorov, Vladimir V; Llopart, X; Nicol, M; Poikela, T; Cabruja, Enric; Fleta, C; Lozano, M; Pellegrini, G; Bates, R; Eklund, L; Hynds, D; Ferre Llin, L; Maneuski, D; Parkes, C; Plackett, R; Rodrigues, E; Stewart, G; Akiba, K; van Beuzekom, M; Heijne, V; Heijne, E H M; Gordon, H; John, M; Gandelman, M; Esperante, D; Gallas, A; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Bayer, F; Michel, T; Needham, M; Artuso, M; Badman, R; Borgia, A; Garofoli, J; Wang, J; Xing, Z; Buytaert, Jan; Leflat, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    A prototype particle tracking telescope has been constructed using Timepix and Medipix ASIC hybrid pixel assemblies as the six sensing planes. Each telescope plane consisted of one 1.4 cm2 assembly, providing a 256x256 array of 55 micron square pixels. The telescope achieved a pointing resolution of 2.3 micron at the position of the device under test. During a beam test in 2009 the telescope was used to evaluate in detail the performance of two Timepix hybrid pixel assemblies; a standard planar 300 micron thick sensor, and 285 micron thick double sided 3D sensor. This paper describes a detailed charge calibration study of the pixel devices, which allows the true charge to be extracted, and reports on measurements of the charge collection characteristics and Landau distributions. The planar sensor achieved a best resolution of 4.0 micron for angled tracks, and resolutions of between 4.4 and 11 micron for perpendicular tracks, depending on the applied bias voltage. The double sided 3D sensor, which has signific...

  12. Discovery Mondays - The detectors: tracking particles

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    View of a module from the LHCb vertex detector, which will be presented at the next Discovery Monday. How do you observe the invisible? In order to deepen still further our knowledge of the infinitely small, physicists accelerate beams of particles and generate collisions between them at extraordinary energies. The collisions give birth to showers of new particles. What are they? In order to find out, physicists slip into the role of detectives thanks to the detectors. At the next Discovery Monday you will find out about the different methods used at CERN to detect particles. A cloud chamber will allow you to see the tracks of cosmic particles live. You will also be given the chance to see real modules for the ATLAS and for the LHCb experiments. Strange materials will be on hand, such as crystals that are heavier than iron and yet as transparent as glass... Come to the Microcosm and become a top detective yourself! This event will take place in French. Join us at the Microcosm (Reception Building 33, M...

  13. Measuring the 3D motion of particles in microchannel acoustophoresis using astigmatism particle tracking velocimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustsson, P.; Barnkob, Rune; Bruus, Henrik;

    2012-01-01

    We introduce full three-dimensional tracking of particles in an acoustophoresis microchannel using Astigmatism Particle Tracking Velocimetry (APTV) [1]. For the first time the interaction between acoustic streaming and the primary acoustic radiation force in microchannel acoustophoresis...

  14. The Timepix telescope for charged particle tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynds, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    The Timepix telescope has been developed as a general purpose tool for studying the performance of position sensitive charged particle detectors. Initiated as part of the infrastructure for the development of a new vertex detector for the LHCb experiment, the system was extended under the FP7 project AIDA to allow its use as an external facility by several groups within both the high energy and medical physics communities. Based at the CERN SPS, high track rates (up to 18 kHz), precise spatial resolution at the device under test (down to 1.6 μm), and a flexible integration method have all been demonstrated. The telescope is constructed using the Timepix ASIC, a hybrid pixel chip with an active area of 14×14 mm2.

  15. A novel clustering approach to positron emission particle tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiggins, Cody, E-mail: cwiggin2@vols.utk.edu [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 1408 Circle Drive, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Santos, Roque; Ruggles, Arthur [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Nuclear Engineering (United States)

    2016-03-01

    A novel approach to positron emission particle tracking is presented based on determining regions of space with high density of line of response crossing via clustering. The method is shown to be able to accurately track multiple particles in systems where the number of particles is unknown and in which particles can enter and leave the field of view of the scanning system. This method is explored in various environments and its parametric dependence is studied. - Highlights: • A new approach to positron emission particle tracking is presented. • Using G-means clustering, multiple particle tracking is enabled. • Multiple and variable number particle tracking is explored. • Parametric dependence of algorithm is studied.

  16. COLLABORATIVE TRACKING VIA PARTICLE FILTER IN WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zhenya; Zheng Baoyu; Xu Li; Li Shitang

    2008-01-01

    Target tracking is one of the main applications of wireless sensor networks. Optimized computation and energy dissipation are critical requirements to save the limited resource of the sensor nodes. A framework and analysis for collaborative tracking via particle filter are presented in this paper.Collaborative tracking is implemented through sensor selection, and results of tracking are propagated among sensor nodes. In order to save communication resources, a new Ganssian sum particle filter,called Gaussian sum quasi particle filter, to perform the target tracking is presented, in which only mean and covariance of mixands need to be communicated. Based on the Gaussian sum quasi particle filter, a sensor selection criterion is proposed, which is computationally much simpler than other sensor selection criterions. Simulation results show that the proposed method works well for target tracking.

  17. Target tracking in glint noise using a MCMC particle filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Hongtao; Jing Zhongliang; Li Anping; Hu Shiqiang; Tian Hongwei

    2005-01-01

    In radar target tracking application, the observation noise is usually non-Gaussian, which is also referred as glint noise. The performances of conventional trackers degra de severely in the presence of glint noise. An improved particle filter, Markov chain Monte Carlo particle filter (MCMC-PF), is applied to cope with radar target tracking when the measurements are perturbed by glint noise. Tracking performance of the filter is demonstrated in the present of glint noise by computer simulation.

  18. Nuclear Track Detectors. Searches for Exotic Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomelli, G

    2008-01-01

    We used Nuclear Track Detectors (NTD) CR39 and Makrofol for many purposes: i) Exposures at the SPS and at lower energy accelerator heavy ion beams for calibration purposes and for fragmentation studies. ii) Searches for GUT and Intermediate Mass Magnetic Monopoles (IMM), nuclearites, Q-balls and strangelets in the cosmic radiation. The MACRO experiment in the Gran Sasso underground lab, with ~1000 m^2 of CR39 detectors (plus scintillators and streamer tubes), established an upper limit for superheavy GUT poles at the level of 1.4x10^-16 cm^-2 s^-1 sr^-1 for 4x10^-5 particles. iii) Environmental studies, radiation monitoring, neutron dosimetry.

  19. Particle Tracking in Circular Accelerators Using the Exact Hamiltonian in SixTrack

    CERN Document Server

    Fjellstrom, Mattias; Hansson, Johan

    2013-12-13

    Particle motion in accelerators is in general complex. Tracking codes are developed to simulate beam dynamics in accelerators. SixTrack is a long lived particle tracking code maintained at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. A particle accelerator consists of a large number of magnets and other electromagnetic devices that guide the particle through the accelerator. Each device defines its own equation of motion, which often cannot be solved exactly. For this purpose, a number of approximations are introduced in order to facilitate the solution and to speed up the computation. In a high-energy accelerator, the particle has small transverse momentum components. This is exploited in the small-angle approximation. In this approximation the equations of motion are expanded to a low order in the transverse momentum components. In low-energy particle accelerators, or in tracking with large momentum deviations, this approximation is invalid. The equations of motion of a particle passing through a f...

  20. Tracking of colloidal particles using microscopic image sequence analysis - Application to particulate microelectrophoresis and particle deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, PJ; Busscher, HJ

    1997-01-01

    A method for colloidal particle tracking in microscopic video image sequences is presented, based upon minimization of a matrix containing the distances between predicted and measured particle positions within a field of view. The software required for particle tracking can be easily implemented in

  1. Optical tracking of nanoscale particles in microscale environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, P. P.; Liddle, J. A.; Stavis, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    The trajectories of nanoscale particles through microscale environments record useful information about both the particles and the environments. Optical microscopes provide efficient access to this information through measurements of light in the far field from nanoparticles. Such measurements necessarily involve trade-offs in tracking capabilities. This article presents a measurement framework, based on information theory, that facilitates a more systematic understanding of such trade-offs to rationally design tracking systems for diverse applications. This framework includes the degrees of freedom of optical microscopes, which determine the limitations of tracking measurements in theory. In the laboratory, tracking systems are assemblies of sources and sensors, optics and stages, and nanoparticle emitters. The combined characteristics of such systems determine the limitations of tracking measurements in practice. This article reviews this tracking hardware with a focus on the essential functions of nanoparticles as optical emitters and microenvironmental probes. Within these theoretical and practical limitations, experimentalists have implemented a variety of tracking systems with different capabilities. This article reviews a selection of apparatuses and techniques for tracking multiple and single particles by tuning illumination and detection, and by using feedback and confinement to improve the measurements. Prior information is also useful in many tracking systems and measurements, which apply across a broad spectrum of science and technology. In the context of the framework and review of apparatuses and techniques, this article reviews a selection of applications, with particle diffusion serving as a prelude to tracking measurements in biological, fluid, and material systems, fabrication and assembly processes, and engineered devices. In so doing, this review identifies trends and gaps in particle tracking that might influence future research. PMID:27213022

  2. Positron emission particle tracking-Application and labelling techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David J.Parker; Xianfeng Fan

    2008-01-01

    The positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) technique has been widely used in science and engineering to obtain detailed information on the motion and flow fields of fluids or granular materials in multiphase systems, for example, fluids in rock cracks, chemical reactors and food processors; dynamic behaviour of granular materials in chemical reactors, granulators, mixers, dryers, rotating kilns and ball mills. The information obtained by the PEPT technique can be used to optimise the design, operational conditions for a wide range of industrial process systems, and to evaluate modelling work. The technique is based on tracking radioactively labelled particles (up to three particles) by detecting the pairs of back-to-back 511 ke V -γ-rays arising from annihilation of emitted positrons. It therefore involves a positron camera, location algorithms for calculating the tracer location and speed, and tracer labelling techniques. This paper will review the particle tracking technique from tracking algorithm, tracer labelling to their application.

  3. Multi-Color Single Particle Tracking with Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Eva Arnspang; Brewer, J. R.; Lagerholm, B. C.

    2012-01-01

    . multiplex single molecule sensitivity applications such as single particle tracking (SPT). In order to fully optimize single molecule multiplex application with QDs, we have in this work performed a comprehensive quantitative investigation of the fluorescence intensities, fluorescence intensity fluctuations...

  4. 3D particle tracking velocimetry using dynamic discrete tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Alpers, Andreas; Moseev, Dmitry; Salewski, Mirko

    2013-01-01

    Particle tracking velocimetry in 3D is becoming an increasingly important imaging tool in the study of fluid dynamics, combustion as well as plasmas. We introduce a dynamic discrete tomography algorithm for reconstructing particle trajectories from projections. The algorithm is efficient for data from two projection directions and exact in the sense that it finds a solution consistent with the experimental data. Non-uniqueness of solutions can be detected and solutions can be tracked individually.

  5. 3D particle tracking velocimetry using dynamic discrete tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alpers, Andreas; Gritzmann, Peter; Moseev, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    Particle tracking velocimetry in 3D is becoming an increasingly important imaging tool in the study of fluid dynamics and combustion as well as plasmas. We introduce a dynamic discrete tomography algorithm for reconstructing particle trajectories from projections. The algorithm is efficient...... for data from two projection directions and exact in the sense that it finds a solution consistent with the experimental data. Non-uniqueness of solutions can be detected and solutions can be tracked individually....

  6. Particle tracking modeling of sediment-laden jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, S. N.; Lee, J. H. W.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a general model to predict the particulate transport and deposition from a sediment-laden horizontal momentum jet. A three-dimensional (3-D) stochastic particle tracking model is developed based on the governing equation of particle motion. The turbulent velocity fluctuations are modelled by a Lagrangian velocity autocorrelation function that captures the trapping of sediment particles in turbulent eddies, which result in the reduction of settling velocity. Using classical solutions of mean jet velocity, and turbulent fluctuation and dissipation rate profiles derived from computational fluid dynamics calculations of a pure jet, the equation of motion is solved numerically to track the particle movement in the jet flow field. The 3-D particle tracking model predictions of sediment deposition and concentration profiles are in excellent agreement with measured data. The computationally demanding Basset history force is shown to be negligible in the prediction of bottom deposition profiles.

  7. PARTICLE FILTER BASED VEHICLE TRACKING APPROACH WITH IMPROVED RESAMPLING STAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Leong Khong

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Optical sensors based vehicle tracking can be widely implemented in traffic surveillance and flow control. The vast development of video surveillance infrastructure in recent years has drawn the current research focus towards vehicle tracking using high-end and low cost optical sensors. However, tracking vehicles via such sensors could be challenging due to the high probability of changing vehicle appearance and illumination, besides the occlusion and overlapping incidents. Particle filter has been proven as an approach which can overcome nonlinear and non-Gaussian situations caused by cluttered background and occlusion incidents. Unfortunately, conventional particle filter approach encounters particle degeneracy especially during and after the occlusion. Particle filter with sampling important resampling (SIR is an important step to overcome the drawback of particle filter, but SIR faced the problem of sample impoverishment when heavy particles are statistically selected many times. In this work, genetic algorithm has been proposed to be implemented in the particle filter resampling stage, where the estimated position can converge faster to hit the real position of target vehicle under various occlusion incidents. The experimental results show that the improved particle filter with genetic algorithm resampling method manages to increase the tracking accuracy and meanwhile reduce the particle sample size in the resampling stage.

  8. Simultaneous Eye Tracking and Blink Detection with Interactive Particle Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan M. Trivedi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a system that simultaneously tracks eyes and detects eye blinks. Two interactive particle filters are used for this purpose, one for the closed eyes and the other one for the open eyes. Each particle filter is used to track the eye locations as well as the scales of the eye subjects. The set of particles that gives higher confidence is defined as the primary set and the other one is defined as the secondary set. The eye location is estimated by the primary particle filter, and whether the eye status is open or closed is also decided by the label of the primary particle filter. When a new frame comes, the secondary particle filter is reinitialized according to the estimates from the primary particle filter. We use autoregression models for describing the state transition and a classification-based model for measuring the observation. Tensor subspace analysis is used for feature extraction which is followed by a logistic regression model to give the posterior estimation. The performance is carefully evaluated from two aspects: the blink detection rate and the tracking accuracy. The blink detection rate is evaluated using videos from varying scenarios, and the tracking accuracy is given by comparing with the benchmark data obtained using the Vicon motion capturing system. The setup for obtaining benchmark data for tracking accuracy evaluation is presented and experimental results are shown. Extensive experimental evaluations validate the capability of the algorithm.

  9. Multiple object detection and tracking with pseudo-particle filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baolong GUO; Wei SUN

    2009-01-01

    To tackle the divergence of the classical particle filter method for multiple object tracking in image sequences, a new particle filter, called pseudoparticle filter (PPF), is proposed. The PPF invokes subset particles of generic particle filters to form a continuous estimate of the posterior density function of the objects.After sampling-importance resampling (SIR), the subset particles converge to the observations. It is proved that,using an appropriate kernel function of the mean shiift algorithm, we can get the subset particles of the observations and the fixed points of clustering results as the state of the objects. A multiple object data association and state estimation technique is proposed to resolve the subset particles correspondence ambiguities that arise when multiple objects are present. Experimental results demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of the algorithm for single and multiple object tracking.

  10. 3D particle tracking velocimetry using dynamic discrete tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alpers, Andreas; Gritzmann, Peter; Moseev, Dmitry;

    2015-01-01

    Particle tracking velocimetry in 3D is becoming an increasingly important imaging tool in the study of fluid dynamics and combustion as well as plasmas. We introduce a dynamic discrete tomography algorithm for reconstructing particle trajectories from projections. The algorithm is efficient...

  11. Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) for Fluid Flow Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langford, Seth, E-mail: utne@utk.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee-Knoxville, 315 Pasqua Nuclear Engineering, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Wiggins, Cody, E-mail: cwiggin2@vols.utk.edu [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 401 Nielsen Physics Building, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Tenpenny, Daniel; Ruggles, Arthur [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee-Knoxville, 315 Pasqua Nuclear Engineering, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • A new method for tracking multiple particles using positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) is introduced. • PEPT measurement of flow in a rectangular channel is tested against PIV and PTV. • Further work is identified to improve performance of PEPT for flow measurement. - Abstract: Positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) is used to study the behavior of flow in a rectangular test section. A multiple-particle tracking technique (multi-PEPT) is proposed and tested using a once-through flow system and a preclinical positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. This measurement is then compared to particle image velocimetry (PIV) and high-speed particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) studies of the same test section. Uncertainties in the established flow measurement methods used to validate the PEPT performance are quantified. Mean flow velocity are compared as measured by the three methods. Minor variations are exposed in the data comparisons, and uncertainty exists due to the statistical nature of our PEPT method. Nonetheless, multi-PEPT is shown to be capable as a means of examining characteristics of a complex flow regime.

  12. Near-wall velocity measurements by Particle-Shadow-Tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Lancien, Pierre; Métivier, François; 10.1007/s00348-007-0260-z

    2009-01-01

    We report a new method to measure the velocity of a fluid in the vicinity of a wall. The method, that we call Particle-Shadow Tracking (PST), simply consists in seeding the fluid with a small number of fine tracer particles of density close to that of the fluid. The position of each particle and of its shadow on the wall are then tracked simultaneously, allowing one to accurately determine the distance separating tracers from the wall and therefore to extract the velocity field. We present an application of the method to the determination of the velocity profile inside a laminar density current flowing along an inclined plane.

  13. Discovery Mondays - The detectors: tracking particles

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    View of a module from the LHCb vertex detector, which will be presented at the next Discovery Monday. How do you observe the invisible? In order to deepen still further our knowledge of the infinitely small, physicists accelerate beams of particles at close to the speed of light, then generate collisions between them at extraordinary energies, giving birth to showers of new particles. What are these particles? In order to find out, physicists transform themselves into detectives with the help of the detectors. Located around the collision area, these exceptional machines are made up of various layers, each of which detects and measures specific properties of the particles that travel through them. Powerful computers then reconstruct their trajectory and record their charge, mass and energy in order to build up a kind of particle ID card. At the next Discovery Monday you will be able to find out about the different methods used at CERN to detect particles. A cloud chamber will provide live images of the trac...

  14. Luminescent sensors for tracking spatial particle distributions in an explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin R.; Gunawidjaja, Ray; Diez-y-Riega, Helena; Eilers, Hergen; Svingala, Forrest R.; Daniels, Amber; Lightstone, James M.

    2017-01-01

    We previously developed and tested thermally sensitive particles that, when seeded into an explosive event, flow with the expanding post-detonation fireball and provide ex-situ measurements of this thermal environment. This current work presents the development and testing of tracking particles that are used in concert with the thermally sensitive particles to encode the initial positions of materials recovered for ex-situ analysis. These tracking sensors consist of fully-crystallized (c) rare-earth-doped yttria particles such as c-Dy:Y2O3, c-Sm:Y2O3, and c-Er,Yb:Y2O3. The temperature sensors consist of mixtures of precursor (p) and fully crystallized materials such as p-Eu:Y2O3/c-Tb:Y2O3 or p-Eu:ZrO2. Three mixtures containing one of the tracking sensors and one of the temperature sensing mixtures are placed at different locations within the chamber. Post-detonation, the tracking particles in the debris are excited by 355 nm light, resulting in different color luminescence, and allowing for potential visual inspection of the particle distribution originating from the different locations. Meanwhile, the temperature is determined from spectral changes of the precursor sensor materials or by comparison of the precursor sensor materials with the Tb:Y2O3 intensity reference.

  15. Integrating the Projective Transform with Particle Filtering for Visual Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beghdadi A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the projective particle filter, a Bayesian filtering technique integrating the projective transform, which describes the distortion of vehicle trajectories on the camera plane. The characteristics inherent to traffic monitoring, and in particular the projective transform, are integrated in the particle filtering framework in order to improve the tracking robustness and accuracy. It is shown that the projective transform can be fully described by three parameters, namely, the angle of view, the height of the camera, and the ground distance to the first point of capture. This information is integrated in the importance density so as to explore the feature space more accurately. By providing a fine distribution of the samples in the feature space, the projective particle filter outperforms the standard particle filter on different tracking measures. First, the resampling frequency is reduced due to a better fit of the importance density for the estimation of the posterior density. Second, the mean squared error between the feature vector estimate and the true state is reduced compared to the estimate provided by the standard particle filter. Third, the tracking rate is improved for the projective particle filter, hence decreasing track loss.

  16. TrackMate: An open and extensible platform for single-particle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Perry, Nick; Schindelin, Johannes; Hoopes, Genevieve M; Reynolds, Gregory D; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Bednarek, Sebastian Y; Shorte, Spencer L; Eliceiri, Kevin W

    2017-02-15

    We present TrackMate, an open source Fiji plugin for the automated, semi-automated, and manual tracking of single-particles. It offers a versatile and modular solution that works out of the box for end users, through a simple and intuitive user interface. It is also easily scriptable and adaptable, operating equally well on 1D over time, 2D over time, 3D over time, or other single and multi-channel image variants. TrackMate provides several visualization and analysis tools that aid in assessing the relevance of results. The utility of TrackMate is further enhanced through its ability to be readily customized to meet specific tracking problems. TrackMate is an extensible platform where developers can easily write their own detection, particle linking, visualization or analysis algorithms within the TrackMate environment. This evolving framework provides researchers with the opportunity to quickly develop and optimize new algorithms based on existing TrackMate modules without the need of having to write de novo user interfaces, including visualization, analysis and exporting tools. The current capabilities of TrackMate are presented in the context of three different biological problems. First, we perform Caenorhabditis-elegans lineage analysis to assess how light-induced damage during imaging impairs its early development. Our TrackMate-based lineage analysis indicates the lack of a cell-specific light-sensitive mechanism. Second, we investigate the recruitment of NEMO (NF-κB essential modulator) clusters in fibroblasts after stimulation by the cytokine IL-1 and show that photodamage can generate artifacts in the shape of TrackMate characterized movements that confuse motility analysis. Finally, we validate the use of TrackMate for quantitative lifetime analysis of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in plant cells.

  17. Target tracking in infrared imagery using a novel particle filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fanglin Wang; Erqi Liu; Jie Yang; Shengyang Yu; Yue Zhou

    2009-01-01

    To address two challenging problems in infrared target tracking, target appearance changes and unpre-dictable abrupt motions, a novel particle filtering based tracking algorithm is introduced. In this method, a novel saliency model is proposed to distinguish the salient target from background, and the eigenspace model is invoked to adapt target appearance changes. To account for the abrupt motions efficiently, a two-step sampling method is proposed to combine the two observation models. The proposed tracking method is demonstrated through two real infrared image sequences, which include the changes of luminance and size, and the drastic abrupt motions of the target.

  18. Video Based Moving Object Tracking by Particle Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Zahidul Islam

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Usually, the video based object tracking deal with non-stationary image stream that changes over time. Robust and Real time moving object tracking is a problematic issue in computer vision research area. Most of the existing algorithms are able to track only inpredefined and well controlled environment. Some cases, they don’t consider non-linearity problem. In our paper, we develop such a system which considers color information, distance transform (DT based shape information and also nonlinearity. Particle filtering has been proven very successful for non-gaussian and non-linear estimation problems. We examine the difficulties of video based tracking and step by step we analyze these issues. In our firstapproach, we develop the color based particle filter tracker that relies on the deterministic search of window, whose color content matches a reference histogram model. A simple HSV histogram-based color model is used to develop this observation system. Secondly, wedescribe a new approach for moving object tracking with particle filter by shape information. The shape similarity between a template and estimated regions in the video scene is measured by their normalized cross-correlation of distance transformed images. Our observation system of particle filter is based on shape from distance transformed edge features. Template is created instantly by selecting any object from the video scene by a rectangle. Finally, inthis paper we illustrate how our system is improved by using both these two cues with non linearity.

  19. A novel particle tracking algorithm using polar coordinate system similarity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaodong Ruan; Wenfeng Zhao; Yunming Chen

    2005-01-01

    A new algorithm using polar coordinate system similarity (PCSS) for tracking particle in particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) is proposed. The essence of the algorithm is to consider simultaneously the changes of the distance and angle of surrounding particles relative to the object particle.Monte Carlo simulations of a solid body rotational flow and a parallel shearing flow are used to investigate flows measurable by PCSS and the influences of experimental parameters on the implementation of the new algorithm. The results indicate that the PCSS algorithm can be applied to flows subjected to strong rotation and is not sensitive to experimental parameters in comparison with the conventional binary image cross-correlation (BICC) algorithm. Finally, PCSS is applied to images of a real experiment.

  20. SimTrack: A compact c++ library for particle orbit and spin tracking in accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yun [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-06-24

    SimTrack is a compact c++ library of 6-d symplectic element-by-element particle tracking in accelerators originally designed for head-on beam-beam compensation simulation studies in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides a 6-d symplectic orbit tracking with the 4th order symplectic integration for magnet elements and the 6-d symplectic synchro-beam map for beam-beam interaction. Since its inception in 2009, SimTrack has been intensively used for dynamic aperture calculations with beam-beam interaction for RHIC. Recently, proton spin tracking and electron energy loss due to synchrotron radiation were added. In this article, I will present the code architecture, physics models, and some selected examples of its applications to RHIC and a future electron-ion collider design eRHIC.

  1. SimTrack: A compact c++ code for particle orbit and spin tracking in accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yun

    2015-11-01

    SimTrack is a compact c++ code of 6-d symplectic element-by-element particle tracking in accelerators originally designed for head-on beam-beam compensation simulation studies in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides a 6-d symplectic orbit tracking with the 4th order symplectic integration for magnet elements and the 6-d symplectic synchro-beam map for beam-beam interaction. Since its inception in 2009, SimTrack has been intensively used for dynamic aperture calculations with beam-beam interaction for RHIC. Recently, proton spin tracking and electron energy loss due to synchrotron radiation were added. In this paper, I will present the code architecture, physics models, and some selected examples of its applications to RHIC and a future electron-ion collider design eRHIC.

  2. Tracking Intermittently Speaking Multiple Speakers Using a Particle Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Quinlan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of tracking multiple intermittently speaking speakers is difficult as some distinct problems must be addressed. The number of active speakers must be estimated, these active speakers must be identified, and the locations of all speakers including inactive speakers must be tracked. In this paper we propose a method for tracking intermittently speaking multiple speakers using a particle filter. In the proposed algorithm the number of active speakers is firstly estimated based on the Exponential Fitting Test (EFT, a source number estimation technique which we have proposed. The locations of the speakers are then tracked using a particle filtering framework within which the decomposed likelihood is used in order to decouple the observed audio signal and associate each element of the decomposed signal with an active speaker. The tracking accuracy is then further improved by the inclusion of a silence region detection step and estimation of the noise-only covariance matrix. The method was evaluated using live recordings of 3 speakers and the results show that the method produces highly accurate tracking results.

  3. A Geometric Particle Filter for Template-Based Visual Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghyun Kwon; Hee Seok Lee; Park, Frank C; Kyoung Mu Lee

    2014-04-01

    Existing approaches to template-based visual tracking, in which the objective is to continuously estimate the spatial transformation parameters of an object template over video frames, have primarily been based on deterministic optimization, which as is well-known can result in convergence to local optima. To overcome this limitation of the deterministic optimization approach, in this paper we present a novel particle filtering approach to template-based visual tracking. We formulate the problem as a particle filtering problem on matrix Lie groups, specifically the three-dimensional Special Linear group SL(3) and the two-dimensional affine group Aff(2). Computational performance and robustness are enhanced through a number of features: (i) Gaussian importance functions on the groups are iteratively constructed via local linearization; (ii) the inverse formulation of the Jacobian calculation is used; (iii) template resizing is performed; and (iv) parent-child particles are developed and used. Extensive experimental results using challenging video sequences demonstrate the enhanced performance and robustness of our particle filtering-based approach to template-based visual tracking. We also show that our approach outperforms several state-of-the-art template-based visual tracking methods via experiments using the publicly available benchmark data set.

  4. Adaptive mean-shift tracking with auxiliary particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junqiu; Yagi, Yasushi

    2009-12-01

    We present a new approach for robust and efficient tracking by incorporating the efficiency of the mean-shift algorithm with the multihypothesis characteristics of particle filtering in an adaptive manner. The aim of the proposed algorithm is to cope with problems that were brought about by sudden motions and distractions. The mean-shift tracking algorithm is robust and effective when the representation of a target is sufficiently discriminative, the target does not jump beyond the bandwidth, and no serious distractions exist. We propose a novel two-stage motion estimation method that is efficient and reliable. If a sudden motion is detected by the motion estimator, some particle-filtering-based trackers can be used to outperform the mean-shift algorithm, at the expense of using a large particle set. In our approach, the mean-shift algorithm is used, as long as it provides reasonable performance. Auxiliary particles are introduced to cope with distractions and sudden motions when such threats are detected. Moreover, discriminative features are selected according to the separation of the foreground and background distributions when threats do not exist. This strategy is important, because it is dangerous to update the target model when the tracking is in an unsteady state. We demonstrate the performance of our approach by comparing it with other trackers in tracking several challenging image sequences.

  5. Physical Models for Particle Tracking Simulations in the RF Gap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishlo, Andrei P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holmes, Jeffrey A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This document describes the algorithms that are used in the PyORBIT code to track the particles accelerated in the Radio-Frequency cavities. It gives the mathematical description of the algorithms and the assumptions made in each case. The derived formulas have been implemented in the PyORBIT code. The necessary data for each algorithm are described in detail.

  6. Modified unscented particle filter for nonlinear Bayesian tracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A modified unscented particle filtering scheme for nonlinear tracking is proposed,in view of the potential drawbacks (such as,particle impoverishment and numerical sensitivity in calculating the prior) of the conventional unscented particle filter (UPF) confronted in practice.Specifically,a different derivation of the importance weight is presented in detail.The proposed method can avoid the calculation of the prior and reduce the effects of the impoverishment problem caused by sampling from the proposal distribution.Simulations have been performed using two illustrative examples and results have been provided to demonstrate the validity of the modified UPF as well as its improved performance over the conventional one.

  7. Evaluation of nanoparticle tracking analysis for total virus particle determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramberger Petra

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The NanoSight LM10 with Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA software was evaluated for the quantification of latex particles, adenovirus 5, and influenza virus. The inter-day variability was determined by measuring the same sample over several consecutive days and the method’s accuracy was demonstrated by using known concentrations of the subject particles. NTA analysis was also used to quantify chromatographic fractions of adenovirus and influenza virus after purification on a CIM monolithic column. NTA results were compared and evaluated against hemagglutination (HA and end point dilution assay, determining total and infection virus particle number, respectively. The results demonstrated that nanoparticle tracking analysis is a method for fast estimation of virus concentration in different samples. In addition, it can provide a better insight into the sample status, regarding the level of virus aggregation.

  8. Kassiopeia: A Modern, Extensible C++ Particle Tracking Package

    CERN Document Server

    Furse, Daniel; Trost, Nikolaus; Babutzka, Martin; Barrett, John P; Behrens, Jan; Buzinksy, Nicholas; Corona, Thomas; Enomoto, Sanshiro; Erhard, Moritz; Formaggio, Joseph A; Glück, Ferenc; Harms, Fabian; Heizmann, Florian; Hilk, Daniel; Käfer, Wolfgang; Kleesiek, Marco; Leiber, Benjamin; Mertens, Susanne; Oblath, Noah S; Renschler, Pascal; Schwarz, Johannes; Slocum, Penny L; Wandkowsky, Nancy; Wierman, Kevin; Zacher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Kassiopeia particle tracking framework is an object-oriented software package using modern C++ techniques, written originally to meet the needs of the KATRIN collaboration. Kassiopeia features a new algorithmic paradigm for particle tracking simulations which targets experiments containing complex geometries and electromagnetic fields, with high priority put on calculation efficiency, customizability, extensibility, and ease of use for novice programmers. To solve Kassiopeia's target physics problem the software is capable of simulating particle trajectories governed by arbitrarily complex differential equations of motion, continuous physics processes that may in part be modeled as terms perturbing that equation of motion, stochastic processes that occur in flight such as bulk scattering and decay, and stochastic surface processes occuring at interfaces, including transmission and reflection effects. This entire set of computations takes place against the backdrop of a rich geometry package which serves a...

  9. Tracking Submicron Particles in Microchannel Flow by Microscopic Holography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗锐; 刘石

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional tracking of submicron particles in flows in a micro-channel was carried out using in-line holographic microscopy.A fixed single 0.5 μm fluorescent particle was identified and isolated from dust particles or overlapped particle pair using the laser induced fluorescent(LIF) method.Then in-line microscopic holograms of the fixed single particle were obtained at different positions on the optical axis,i.e.the defocus distances.The holograms of the single particle were used as the model templates with the known defocus distances.The particles in the in-line microscopic holograms of flow in the microchannel were then identified and located to obtain their two-dimensional positions.The defocus distances of those particles were determined by matching each hologram pattern to one of the model templates obtained in the single particle test.Finally the three-dimensional position and velocity of each particle were obtained.

  10. Channel Tracking Using Particle Filtering in Unresolvable Multipath Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Bertozzi

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new timing error detector for timing tracking loops inside the Rake receiver in spread spectrum systems. Based on a particle filter, this timing error detector jointly tracks the delays of each path of the frequency-selective channels. Instead of using a conventional channel estimator, we have introduced a joint time delay and channel estimator with almost no additional computational complexity. The proposed scheme avoids the drawback of the classical early-late gate detector which is not able to separate closely spaced paths. Simulation results show that the proposed detectors outperform the conventional early-late gate detector in indoor scenarios.

  11. Investigation of granular impact using positron emission particle tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy O.

    2015-04-01

    We present results from an experimental study of granular impact using a combination of high-speed video and positron emission particle tracking (PEPT). The PEPT technique exploits the annihilation of photons from positron decay to determine the position of tracer particles either inside a small granular bed or attached to the object which impacts the bed. We use dense spheres as impactors and the granular beds are comprised of glass beads which are fluidised to achieve a range of different initial packing states. For the first time, we have simultaneously investigated both the trajectory of the sphere, the motion of particles in a 3-D granular bed and particles which jump into the resultant jet, which arises from the collapse of the cavity formed by the impacting sphere.

  12. Visual Tracking Using an Insect Vision Embedded Particle Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Particle filtering (PF based object tracking algorithms have drawn great attention from lots of scholars. The core of PF is to predict the possible location of the target via the state transition model. One commonly adopted approach is resorting to prior motion cues under the smooth motion assumption, which performs well when the target moves with a relatively stable velocity. However, it would possibly fail if the target is undergoing abrupt motion. To address this problem, inspired by insect vision, we propose a simple yet effective visual tracking framework based on PF. Utilizing the neuronal computational model of the insect vision, we estimate the motion of the target in a novel way so as to refine the position state of propagated particles using more accurate transition mode. Furthermore, we design a novel sample optimization framework where local and global search strategies are jointly used. In addition, we propose a new method to monitor long duration severe occlusion and we could recover the target. Experiments on publicly available benchmark video sequences demonstrate that the proposed tracking algorithm outperforms the state-of-the art methods in challenging scenarios, especially for tracking target which is undergoing abrupt motion or fast movement.

  13. Particle tracking velocimetry of a gliding arc discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    A 35 kHz AC gliding arc discharge at atmospheric pressure is generated between two diverging electrodes and extended by an air flow. The gas flow velocity is measured by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) while the moving velocity of the plasma column of the gliding arc discharge is measured...... by analyzing the movie taken by a high-speed camera. The two-dimensional velocity vector of the gas flow and of the gliding arc in the imaging plane was determined....

  14. Particle Tracking Model (PTM) with Coastal Modeling System (CMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-31

    System ( CMS ) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER...www.erdc.usace.army.mil/Missions/WaterResources/CIRP.aspx Coastal Inlets Research Program Particle Tracking Model (PTM) with Coastal Modeling System ( CMS ) The...System ( CMS ), which provides coupled wave and current forcing for PTM simulations. CMS -PTM is implemented in the Surface-water Modeling System, a

  15. Improved Likelihood Function in Particle-based IR Eye Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satria, R.; Sorensen, J.; Hammoud, R.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we propose a log likelihood-ratio function of foreground and background models used in a particle filter to track the eye region in dark-bright pupil image sequences. This model fuses information from both dark and bright pupil images and their difference image into one model. Our...... performance in challenging sequences with test subjects showing large head movements and under significant light conditions....

  16. Visual Tracking Using an Insect Vision Embedded Particle Filter

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Guo; Qingjie Zhao; Dongbing Gu

    2015-01-01

    Particle filtering (PF) based object tracking algorithms have drawn great attention from lots of scholars. The core of PF is to predict the possible location of the target via the state transition model. One commonly adopted approach is resorting to prior motion cues under the smooth motion assumption, which performs well when the target moves with a relatively stable velocity. However, it would possibly fail if the target is undergoing abrupt motion. To address this problem, inspired by inse...

  17. Real-time image processing for particle tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreizer, Mark; Ratner, David; Liberzon, Alex

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel high-speed particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) experimental system. Its novelty is due to the FPGA-based, real-time image processing "on camera". Instead of an image, the camera transfers to the computer using a network card, only the relevant information of the identified flow tracers. Therefore, the system is ideal for the remote particle tracking systems in research and industrial applications, while the camera can be controlled and data can be transferred over any high-bandwidth network. We present the hardware and the open source software aspects of the PTV experiments. The tracking results of the new experimental system has been compared to the flow visualization and particle image velocimetry measurements. The canonical flow in the central cross section of a a cubic cavity (1:1:1 aspect ratio) in our lid-driven cavity apparatus is used for validation purposes. The downstream secondary eddy (DSE) is the sensitive portion of this flow and its size was measured with increasing Reynolds number (via increasing belt velocity). The size of DSE estimated from the flow visualization, PIV and compressed PTV is shown to agree within the experimental uncertainty of the methods applied.

  18. The Timepix Telescope for High Performance Particle Tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Akiba, Kazuyoshi; van Beuzekom, Martin; van Beveren, Vincent; Borghi, Silvia; Boterenbrood, Henk; Buytaert, Jan; Collins, Paula; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dumps, Raphael; Eklund, Lars; Esperante, Daniel; Gallas, Abraham; Gordon, Hamish; van der Heijden, Bas; Hombach, Christoph; Hynds, Daniel; John, Malcolm; Leflat, Alexander; Li, Yi Ming; Longstaff, Ian; Morton, Alexander; Nakatsuka, Noritsugu; Nomerotski, Andre; Parkes, Chris; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Plackett, Richard; Reid, Matthew M; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Schindler, Heinrich; Szumlak, Tomasz; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Velthuis, Jaap; Wysokinski, Michal

    2013-01-01

    The Timepix particle tracking telescope has been developed as part of the LHCb VELO Upgrade project, supported by the Medipix Collaboration and the AIDA framework. It is a primary piece of infrastructure for the VELO Upgrade project and is being used for the development of new sensors and front end technologies for several upcoming LHC trackers and vertexing systems. The telescope is designed around the dual capability of the Timepix ASICs to provide information about either the deposited charge or the timing information from tracks traversing the 14 x 14mm matrix of 55 x 55 um pixels. The rate of reconstructed tracks available is optimised by taking advantage of the shutter driven readout architecture of the Timepix chip, operated with existing readout systems. Results of tests conducted in the SPS North Area beam facility at CERN show that the telescope typically provides reconstructed track rates during the beam spills of between 3.5 and 7.5 kHz, depending on beam conditions. The tracks are time stamped wi...

  19. 3-D imaging of particle tracks in solid state nuclear track detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wertheim

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that 3 to 5% of total lung cancer deaths in the UK may be associated with elevated radon concentration. Radon gas levels can be assessed using CR-39 plastic detectors which are often assessed by 2-D image analysis of surface images. 3-D analysis has the potential to provide information relating to the angle at which alpha particles impinge on the detector. In this study we used a "LEXT" OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Tokyo, Japan to image tracks on five CR-39 detectors. We were able to identify several patterns of single and coalescing tracks from 3-D visualisation. Thus this method may provide a means of detailed 3-D analysis of Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors.

  20. 3-D imaging of particle tracks in solid state nuclear track detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheim, D.; Gillmore, G.; Brown, L.; Petford, N.

    2010-05-01

    It has been suggested that 3 to 5% of total lung cancer deaths in the UK may be associated with elevated radon concentration. Radon gas levels can be assessed using CR-39 plastic detectors which are often assessed by 2-D image analysis of surface images. 3-D analysis has the potential to provide information relating to the angle at which alpha particles impinge on the detector. In this study we used a "LEXT" OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) to image tracks on five CR-39 detectors. We were able to identify several patterns of single and coalescing tracks from 3-D visualisation. Thus this method may provide a means of detailed 3-D analysis of Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors.

  1. Distributed Particle Filter for Target Tracking: With Reduced Sensor Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadesse Ghirmai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available For efficient and accurate estimation of the location of objects, a network of sensors can be used to detect and track targets in a distributed manner. In nonlinear and/or non-Gaussian dynamic models, distributed particle filtering methods are commonly applied to develop target tracking algorithms. An important consideration in developing a distributed particle filtering algorithm in wireless sensor networks is reducing the size of data exchanged among the sensors because of power and bandwidth constraints. In this paper, we propose a distributed particle filtering algorithm with the objective of reducing the overhead data that is communicated among the sensors. In our algorithm, the sensors exchange information to collaboratively compute the global likelihood function that encompasses the contribution of the measurements towards building the global posterior density of the unknown location parameters. Each sensor, using its own measurement, computes its local likelihood function and approximates it using a Gaussian function. The sensors then propagate only the mean and the covariance of their approximated likelihood functions to other sensors, reducing the communication overhead. The global likelihood function is computed collaboratively from the parameters of the local likelihood functions using an average consensus filter or a forward-backward propagation information exchange strategy.

  2. Single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bräuchle, Christoph; Michaelis, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Closing a gap in the literature, this handbook gathers all the information on single particle tracking and single molecule energy transfer. It covers all aspects of this hot and modern topic, from detecting virus entry to membrane diffusion, and from protein folding using spFRET to coupled dye systems, as well recent achievements in the field. Throughout, the first-class editors and top international authors present content of the highest quality, making this a must-have for physical chemists, spectroscopists, molecular physicists and biochemists.

  3. Tri-track: free software for large-scale particle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallotton, Pascal; Olivier, Sandra

    2013-04-01

    The ability to correctly track objects in time-lapse sequences is important in many applications of microscopy. Individual object motions typically display a level of dynamic regularity reflecting the existence of an underlying physics or biology. Best results are obtained when this local information is exploited. Additionally, if the particle number is known to be approximately constant, a large number of tracking scenarios may be rejected on the basis that they are not compatible with a known maximum particle velocity. This represents information of a global nature, which should ideally be exploited too. Some time ago, we devised an efficient algorithm that exploited both types of information. The tracking task was reduced to a max-flow min-cost problem instance through a novel graph structure that comprised vertices representing objects from three consecutive image frames. The algorithm is explained here for the first time. A user-friendly implementation is provided, and the specific relaxation mechanism responsible for the method's effectiveness is uncovered. The software is particularly competitive for complex dynamics such as dense antiparallel flows, or in situations where object displacements are considerable. As an application, we characterize a remarkable vortex structure formed by bacteria engaged in interstitial motility.

  4. Modeling reactive transport with particle tracking and kernel estimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbaralam, Maryam; Fernandez-Garcia, Daniel; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater reactive transport models are useful to assess and quantify the fate and transport of contaminants in subsurface media and are an essential tool for the analysis of coupled physical, chemical, and biological processes in Earth Systems. Particle Tracking Method (PTM) provides a computationally efficient and adaptable approach to solve the solute transport partial differential equation. On a molecular level, chemical reactions are the result of collisions, combinations, and/or decay of different species. For a well-mixed system, the chem- ical reactions are controlled by the classical thermodynamic rate coefficient. Each of these actions occurs with some probability that is a function of solute concentrations. PTM is based on considering that each particle actually represents a group of molecules. To properly simulate this system, an infinite number of particles is required, which is computationally unfeasible. On the other hand, a finite number of particles lead to a poor-mixed system which is limited by diffusion. Recent works have used this effect to actually model incomplete mix- ing in naturally occurring porous media. In this work, we demonstrate that this effect in most cases should be attributed to a defficient estimation of the concentrations and not to the occurrence of true incomplete mixing processes in porous media. To illustrate this, we show that a Kernel Density Estimation (KDE) of the concentrations can approach the well-mixed solution with a limited number of particles. KDEs provide weighting functions of each particle mass that expands its region of influence, hence providing a wider region for chemical reactions with time. Simulation results show that KDEs are powerful tools to improve state-of-the-art simulations of chemical reactions and indicates that incomplete mixing in diluted systems should be modeled based on alternative conceptual models and not on a limited number of particles.

  5. Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Robinson

    2000-04-07

    The purpose of the transport methodology and component analysis is to provide the numerical methods for simulating radionuclide transport and model setup for transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ) site-scale model. The particle-tracking method of simulating radionuclide transport is incorporated into the FEHM computer code and the resulting changes in the FEHM code are to be submitted to the software configuration management system. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) outlines the assumptions, design, and testing of a model for calculating radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. In addition, methods for determining colloid-facilitated transport parameters are outlined for use in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) analyses. Concurrently, process-level flow model calculations are being carrier out in a PMR for the unsaturated zone. The computer code TOUGH2 is being used to generate three-dimensional, dual-permeability flow fields, that are supplied to the Performance Assessment group for subsequent transport simulations. These flow fields are converted to input files compatible with the FEHM code, which for this application simulates radionuclide transport using the particle-tracking algorithm outlined in this AMR. Therefore, this AMR establishes the numerical method and demonstrates the use of the model, but the specific breakthrough curves presented do not necessarily represent the behavior of the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone.

  6. Shake-The-Box: Lagrangian particle tracking at high particle image densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanz, Daniel; Gesemann, Sebastian; Schröder, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    A Lagrangian tracking method is introduced, which uses a prediction of the particle distribution for the subsequent time-step as a mean to seize the temporal domain. Errors introduced by the prediction process are corrected by an image matching technique (`shaking' the particle in space), followed by an iterative triangulation of particles newly entering the measurement domain. The scheme was termed `Shake-The-Box' and previously characterized as `4D-PTV' due to the strong interaction with the temporal dimension. Trajectories of tracer particles are identified at high spatial accuracy due to a nearly complete suppression of ghost particles; a temporal filtering scheme further improves on accuracy and allows for the extraction of local velocity and acceleration as derivatives of a continuous function. Exploiting the temporal information enables the processing of densely seeded flows (beyond 0.1 particles per pixel, ppp), which were previously reserved for tomographic PIV evaluations. While TOMO-PIV uses statistical means to evaluate the flow (building an `anonymous' voxel space with subsequent spatial averaging of the velocity information using correlation), the Shake-The-Box approach is able to identify and track individual particles at numbers of tens or even hundreds of thousands per time-step. The method is outlined in detail, followed by descriptions of applications to synthetic and experimental data. The synthetic data evaluation reveals that STB is able to capture virtually all true particles, while effectively suppressing the formation of ghost particles. For the examined four-camera set-up particle image densities N I up to 0.125 ppp could be processed. For noise-free images, the attained accuracy is very high. The addition of synthetic noise reduces usable particle image density ( N I ≤ 0.075 ppp for highly noisy images) and accuracy (still being significantly higher compared to tomographic reconstruction). The solutions remain virtually free of ghost

  7. Optimization of detector positioning in the radioactive particle tracking technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Olivier; Dubé, David; Chaouki, Jamal; Bertrand, François

    2014-07-01

    The radioactive particle tracking (RPT) technique is a non-intrusive experimental velocimetry and tomography technique extensively applied to the study of hydrodynamics in a great variety of systems. In this technique, arrays of scintillation detector are used to track the motion of a single radioactive tracer particle emitting isotropic γ-rays. This work describes and applies an optimization strategy developed to find an optimal set of positions for the scintillation detectors used in the RPT technique. This strategy employs the overall resolution of the detectors as the objective function and a mesh adaptive direct search (MADS) algorithm to solve the optimization problem. More precisely, NOMAD, a C++ implementation of the MADS algorithm is used. First, the optimization strategy is validated using simple cases with known optimal detector configurations. Next, it is applied to a three-dimensional axisymmetric system (i.e. a vertical cylinder, which could represent a fluidized bed, bubble column, riser or else). The results obtained using the optimization strategy are in agreement with what was previously recommended by Roy et al. (2002) for a similar system. Finally, the optimization strategy is used for a system consisting of a partially filled cylindrical tumbler. The application of insights gained by the optimization strategy is shown to lead to a significant reduction in the error made when reconstructing the position of a tracer particle. The results of this work show that the optimization strategy developed is sensitive to both the type of objective function used and the experimental conditions. The limitations and drawbacks of the optimization strategy are also discussed.

  8. PEPT: An invaluable tool for 3-D particle tracking and CFD simulation verification in hydrocyclone studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Alex C.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Particle tracks in a hydrocyclone generated both experimentally by positron emission particle tracking (PEPT and numerically with Eulerian-Lagranian CFD have been studied and compared. A hydrocyclone with a cylinder-on-cone design was used in this study, the geometries used in the CFD simulations and in the experiments being identical. It is shown that it is possible to track a fast-moving particle in a hydrocyclone using PEPT with high temporal and spatial resolutions. The numerical 3-D particle trajectories were generated using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES turbulence model for the fluid and Lagrangian particle tracking for the particles. The behaviors of the particles were analyzed in detail and were found to be consistent between experiments and CFD simulations. The tracks of the particles are discussed and related to the fluid flow field visualized in the CFD simulations using the cross-sectional static pressure distribution.

  9. Volumetric microscale particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tianqi; Aramideh, Soroush; Ardekani, Arezoo M.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2016-11-01

    The steady-state flow through refractive-index-matched glass bead microchannels is measured using microscopic particle tracking velocimetry (μPTV). A novel technique is developed to volumetrically reconstruct particles from oversampled two-dimensional microscopic images of fluorescent particles. Fast oversampling of the quasi-steady-state flow field in the lateral direction is realized by a nano-positioning piezo stage synchronized with a fast CMOS camera. Experiments at different Reynolds numbers are carried out for flows through a series of both monodispersed and bidispersed glass bead microchannels with various porosities. The obtained velocity fields at pore-scale (on the order of 10 μm) are compared with direct numerical simulations (DNS) conducted in the exact same geometries reconstructed from micro-CT scans of the glass bead microchannels. The developed experimental method would serve as a new approach for exploring the flow physics at pore-scale in porous media, and also provide benchmark measurements for validation of numerical simulations.

  10. Automated single particle detection and tracking for large microscopy datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rhodri S; Yang, Lei; Dun, Alison; Smyth, Annya M; Duncan, Rory R; Rickman, Colin; Lu, Weiping

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in optical microscopy have enabled the acquisition of very large datasets from living cells with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. Our ability to process these datasets now plays an essential role in order to understand many biological processes. In this paper, we present an automated particle detection algorithm capable of operating in low signal-to-noise fluorescence microscopy environments and handling large datasets. When combined with our particle linking framework, it can provide hitherto intractable quantitative measurements describing the dynamics of large cohorts of cellular components from organelles to single molecules. We begin with validating the performance of our method on synthetic image data, and then extend the validation to include experiment images with ground truth. Finally, we apply the algorithm to two single-particle-tracking photo-activated localization microscopy biological datasets, acquired from living primary cells with very high temporal rates. Our analysis of the dynamics of very large cohorts of 10 000 s of membrane-associated protein molecules show that they behave as if caged in nanodomains. We show that the robustness and efficiency of our method provides a tool for the examination of single-molecule behaviour with unprecedented spatial detail and high acquisition rates.

  11. 3D measurement of the position of gold particles via evanescent digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, Shin-ichi; Unno, Noriyuki; Nakata, Shuichiro; Taniguchi, Jun

    2016-08-01

    A new technique based on digital holography and evanescent waves was developed for 3D measurements of the position of gold nanoparticles in water. In this technique, an intensity profile is taken from a holographic image of a gold particle. To detect the position of the gold particle with high accuracy, its holographic image is recorded on a nanosized step made of MEXFLON, which has a refractive index close to that of water, and the position of the particle is reconstructed by means of digital holography. The height of the nanosized step was measured by using a profilometer and the digitally reconstructed height of the glass substrate had good agreement with the measured value. Furthermore, this method can be used to accurately track the 3D position of a gold particle in water.

  12. Color-based tracking of plasma dust particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villamayor, Michelle Marie S., E-mail: mvillamayor@nip.upd.edu.ph; Soriano, Maricor N.; Ramos, Henry J. [National Institute of Physics, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines); Kato, Shuichi; Wada, Motoi [Graduate School of Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Color-based tracking to observe agglomeration of deposited particles inside a compact planar magnetron during plasma discharge was done by creating high dynamic range (HDR) images of photos captured by a Pentax K10D digital camera. Carbon erosion and redeposition was also monitored using the technique. The HDR images were subjected to a chromaticity-based constraint discoloration inside the plasma chamber indicating film formation or carbon redeposition. Results show that dust deposition occurs first near the evacuation pumps due to the pressure gradient and then accumulates at the positively charged walls of the chamber. This method can be applied to monitor dust formation during dusty plasma experiments without major modification of plasma devices, useful especially for large fusion reactors.

  13. Secondary particle tracks generated by ion beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Gustavo

    2015-05-01

    The Low Energy Particle Track Simulation (LEPTS) procedure is a powerful complementary tool to include the effect of low energy electrons and positrons in medical applications of radiation. In particular, for ion-beam cancer treatments provides a detailed description of the role of the secondary electrons abundantly generated around the Bragg peak as well as the possibility of using transmuted positron emitters (C11, O15) as a complement for ion-beam dosimetry. In this study we present interaction probability data derived from IAM-SCAR corrective factors for liquid environments. Using these data, single electron and positron tracks in liquid water and pyrimidine have been simulated providing information about energy deposition as well as the number and type of interactions taking place in any selected ``nanovolume'' of the irradiated area. In collaboration with Francisco Blanco, Universidad Complutense de Madrid; Antonio Mu noz, Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas Medioambientales y Tecnológicas and Diogo Almeida, Filipe Ferreira da Silva, Paulo Lim ao-Vieira, Universidade Nova de Lisboa. Supported by the Spanish and Portuguese governments.

  14. Robust and Adaptive Block Tracking Method Based on Particle Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Sun

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the field of video analysis and processing, object tracking is attracting more and more attention especially in traffic management, digital surveillance and so on. However problems such as objects’ abrupt motion, occlusion and complex target structures would bring difficulties to academic study and engineering application. In this paper, a fragmentsbased tracking method using the block relationship coefficient is proposed. In this method, we use particle filter algorithm and object region is divided into blocks initially. The contribution of this method is that object features are not extracted just from a single block, the relationship between current block and its neighbor blocks are extracted to describe the variation of the block. Each block is weighted according to the block relationship coefficient when the block is voted on the most matched region in next frame. This method can make full use of the relationship between blocks. The experimental results demonstrate that our method can provide good performance in condition of occlusion and abrupt posture variation.

  15. Monte Carlo N-Particle Tracking of Ultrafine Particle Flow in Bent Micro-Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casella, Andrew M.; Loyalka, Sudarsham K.

    2016-02-16

    The problem of large pressure-differential driven laminar convective-diffusive ultrafine aerosol flow through bent micro-tubes is of interest in several contemporary research areas including; release of contents from pressurized containment vessels, aerosol sampling equipment, advanced scientific instruments, gas-phase micro-heat exchangers, and microfluidic devices. In each of these areas, the predominant problem is the determination of the fraction of particles entering the micro-tube that is deposited within the tube and the fraction that is transmitted through. Due to the extensive parameter restrictions of this class of problems, a Lagrangian particle tracking method making use of the coupling of the analytical stream line solutions of Dean and the simplified Langevin equation is quite a useful tool in problem characterization. This method is a direct analog to the Monte Carlo N-Particle method of particle transport extensively used in nuclear physics and engineering. In this work, 10 nm diameter particles with a density of 1 g/cm3 are tracked within micro-tubes with toroidal bends with pressure differentials ranging between 0.2175 and 0.87 atmospheres. The tubes have radii of 25 microns and 50 microns and the radius of curvature is between 1 m and 0.3183 cm. The carrier gas is helium, and temperatures of 298 K and 558 K are considered. Numerical convergence is considered as a function of time step size and of the number of particles per simulation. Particle transmission rates and deposition patterns within the bent micro-tubes are calculated.

  16. 3D Shape-Encoded Particle Filter for Object Tracking and Its Application to Human Body Tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Chellappa, R; H. Moon

    2008-01-01

    Abstract We present a nonlinear state estimation approach using particle filters, for tracking objects whose approximate 3D shapes are known. The unnormalized conditional density for the solution to the nonlinear filtering problem leads to the Zakai equation, and is realized by the weights of the particles. The weight of a particle represents its geometric and temporal fit, which is computed bottom-up from the raw image using a shape-encoded filter. The main contribution of the paper is the d...

  17. Using FTK tracks for particle flow reconstruction at the high-level trigger of ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Jaeger, Benjamin Paul

    2016-01-01

    The Fast Tracker (FTK) enables the ATLAS high-level trigger (HLT) to have early access to global tracking information. The project of my Summer Student Internship at CERN was to investigate the potential of using particle flow reconstruction with FTK tracks at the ATLAS HLT. This report shortly summarizes my studies, ranging from comparison of FTK tracks with offline tracks to more sophisticated analyses, such as assessing the jet resolution and trigger related properties.

  18. Multi-color single particle tracking with quantum dots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva C Arnspang

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs have long promised to revolutionize fluorescence detection to include even applications requiring simultaneous multi-species detection at single molecule sensitivity. Despite the early promise, the unique optical properties of QDs have not yet been fully exploited in e. g. multiplex single molecule sensitivity applications such as single particle tracking (SPT. In order to fully optimize single molecule multiplex application with QDs, we have in this work performed a comprehensive quantitative investigation of the fluorescence intensities, fluorescence intensity fluctuations, and hydrodynamic radii of eight types of commercially available water soluble QDs. In this study, we show that the fluorescence intensity of CdSe core QDs increases as the emission of the QDs shifts towards the red but that hybrid CdSe/CdTe core QDs are less bright than the furthest red-shifted CdSe QDs. We further show that there is only a small size advantage in using blue-shifted QDs in biological applications because of the additional size of the water-stabilizing surface coat. Extending previous work, we finally also show that parallel four color multicolor (MC-SPT with QDs is possible at an image acquisition rate of at least 25 Hz. We demonstrate the technique by measuring the lateral dynamics of a lipid, biotin-cap-DPPE, in the cellular plasma membrane of live cells using four different colors of QDs; QD565, QD605, QD655, and QD705 as labels.

  19. Using interacting multiple model particle filter to track airborne targets hidden in blind Doppler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In airborne tracking, the blind Doppler makes the target undetectable, resulting in tracking difficulties. In this paper,we studied most possible blind-Doppler cases and summed them up into two types: targets' intentional tangential flying to radar and unintentional flying with large tangential speed. We proposed an interacting multiple model (IMM) particle filter which combines a constant velocity model and an acceleration model to handle maneuvering motions. We compared the IMM particle filter with a previous particle filter solution. Simulation results showed that the IMM particle filter outperforms the method in previous works in terms of tracking accuracy and continuity.

  20. CELL TRACKING USING PARTICLE FILTERS WITH IMPLICIT CONVEX SHAPE MODEL IN 4D CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY IMAGES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Nisha; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2016-01-01

    Bayesian frameworks are commonly used in tracking algorithms. An important example is the particle filter, where a stochastic motion model describes the evolution of the state, and the observation model relates the noisy measurements to the state. Particle filters have been used to track the lineage of cells. Propagating the shape model of the cell through the particle filter is beneficial for tracking. We approximate arbitrary shapes of cells with a novel implicit convex function. The importance sampling step of the particle filter is defined using the cost associated with fitting our implicit convex shape model to the observations. Our technique is capable of tracking the lineage of cells for nonmitotic stages. We validate our algorithm by tracking the lineage of retinal and lens cells in zebrafish embryos. PMID:27403085

  1. Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Robinson

    2004-10-21

    The purpose of this report is to document the abstraction model being used in total system performance assessment (TSPA) model calculations for radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ). The UZ transport abstraction model uses the particle-tracking method that is incorporated into the finite element heat and mass model (FEHM) computer code (Zyvoloski et al. 1997 [DIRS 100615]) to simulate radionuclide transport in the UZ. This report outlines the assumptions, design, and testing of a model for calculating radionuclide transport in the UZ at Yucca Mountain. In addition, methods for determining and inputting transport parameters are outlined for use in the TSPA for license application (LA) analyses. Process-level transport model calculations are documented in another report for the UZ (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]). Three-dimensional, dual-permeability flow fields generated to characterize UZ flow (documented by BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]; DTN: LB03023DSSCP9I.001 [DIRS 163044]) are converted to make them compatible with the FEHM code for use in this abstraction model. This report establishes the numerical method and demonstrates the use of the model that is intended to represent UZ transport in the TSPA-LA. Capability of the UZ barrier for retarding the transport is demonstrated in this report, and by the underlying process model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]). The technical scope, content, and management of this report are described in the planning document ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Transport Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171282]). Deviations from the technical work plan (TWP) are noted within the text of this report, as appropriate. The latest version of this document is being prepared principally to correct parameter values found to be in error due to transcription errors, changes in source data that were not captured in the report, calculation errors, and errors in interpretation of source data.

  2. Tracking parameter simulation for the Turkish accelerator center particle factory tracker system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapan, I., E-mail: ilhan@uludag.edu.tr; Pilicer, E.; Pilicer, F.B.

    2016-09-21

    The silicon tracker part of the Turkish Accelerator Center super charm particle factory detector was designed for effectively tracking charged particles with momentum values up to 2.0 GeV/c. In this work, the FLUKA simulation code has been used to estimate the track parameters and their resolutions in the designed tracker system. These results have been compared with those obtained by the tkLayout software package. The simulated track parameter resolutions are compatible with the physics goals of the tracking detector.

  3. 3D particle tracking velocimetry using dynamic discrete tomography for plasma physics applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moseev, Dmitry; Alpers, Andreas; Gritzmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    3D particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) is a diagnostic technique which is widely used for studying flows, combustion, and plasmas. Current tomographic particle tracking methods are based on the multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique and used for reconstructing the distribution of multi......-pixel sized particles as greylevel images. Reconstructions obtained by these methods do not necessarily match the experimental data. We propose a new algorithm which can be used for tracking dust particles in tokamaks and stellarators, as well as in low-temperature and complex plasmas. The dynamic discrete...... tomography algorithm is efficient for data from two projection directions and exact. The non-uniqueness can be detected and tracked individually. The algorithm performance is proportional to N3 on average where N is the number of particles in the reconstruction. There is a room for further improvement...

  4. Experimental impact features in Stardust aerogel: How track morphology reflects particle structure, composition, and density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearsley, Anton T.; Burchell, Mark J.; Price, Mark C.; Cole, Michael J.; Wozniakiewicz, Penelope J.; Ishii, Hope A.; Bradley, John P.; Fries, Marc; Foster, Nicholas J.

    2012-04-01

    The Stardust collector shows diverse aerogel track shapes created by impacts of cometary dust. Tracks have been classified into three broad types (A, B, and C), based on relative dimensions of the elongate "stylus" (in Type A "carrots") and broad "bulb" regions (Types B and C), with occurrence of smaller "styli" in Type B. From our experiments, using a diverse suite of projectile particles shot under Stardust cometary encounter conditions onto similar aerogel targets, we describe differences in impactor behavior and aerogel response resulting in the observed range of Stardust track shapes. We compare tracks made by mineral grains, natural and artificial aggregates of differing subgrain sizes, and diverse organic materials. Impacts of glasses and robust mineral grains generate elongate, narrow Type A tracks (as expected), but with differing levels of abrasion and lateral branch creation. Aggregate particles, both natural and artificial, of a wide range of compositions and volatile contents produce diverse Type B or C shapes. Creation of bulbous tracks is dependent upon impactor internal structure, grain size distribution, and strength, rather than overall grain density or content of volatile components. Nevertheless, pure organic particles do create Type C, or squat Type A* tracks, with length to width ratios dependent upon both specific organic composition and impactor grain size. From comparison with the published shape data for Stardust aerogel tracks, we conclude that the abundant larger Type B tracks on the Stardust collector represent impacts by particles similar to our carbonaceous chondrite meteorite powders.

  5. 4-D single particle tracking of synthetic and proteinaceous microspheres reveals preferential movement of nuclear particles along chromatin – poor tracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athale Chaitanya

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dynamics of nuclear organization, nuclear bodies and RNPs in particular has been the focus of many studies. To understand their function, knowledge of their spatial nuclear position and temporal translocation is essential. Typically, such studies generate a wealth of data that require novel methods in image analysis and computational tools to quantitatively track particle movement on the background of moving cells and shape changing nuclei. Results We developed a novel 4-D image processing platform (TIKAL for the work with laser scanning and wide field microscopes. TIKAL provides a registration software for correcting global movements and local deformations of cells as well as 2-D and 3-D tracking software. With this new tool, we studied the dynamics of two different types of nuclear particles, namely nuclear bodies made from GFP-NLS-vimentin and microinjected 0.1 μm – wide polystyrene beads, by live cell time-lapse microscopy combined with single particle tracking and mobility analysis. We now provide a tool for the automatic 3-D analysis of particle movement in parallel with the acquisition of chromatin density data. Conclusions Kinetic analysis revealed 4 modes of movement: confined obstructed, normal diffusion and directed motion. Particle tracking on the background of stained chromatin revealed that particle movement is directly related to local reorganization of chromatin. Further a direct comparison of particle movement in the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm exhibited an entirely different kinetic behaviour of vimentin particles in both compartments. The kinetics of nuclear particles were slightly affected by depletion of ATP and significantly disturbed by disruption of actin and microtubule networks. Moreover, the hydration state of the nucleus had a strong impact on the mobility of nuclear bodies since both normal diffusion and directed motion were entirely abolished when cells were challenged with 0.6 M

  6. Studying microstructural dynamics of complex fluids with particle tracking microrheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breedveld, Victor

    2004-11-01

    Over the last decade, particle tracking microrheology has matured as a new tool for complex fluids research. The main advantages of microrheology over traditional macroscopic rheometry are: the required sample size is extremely small ( ˜ 1 microliter); local viscoelastic properties in a sample can be probed with high spatial resolution ( ˜1-10 micrometer); and the sample is not disturbed by moving rheometer parts. I will present two examples of recent work in my group that highlight how these characteristics can be exploited to acquire unique information about the microstructure of complex fluids. First, we have studied protein unfolding. Traditionally, protein unfolding is studied with spectroscopic techniques (circular dichroism, NMR, fluorescence). Although viscosity has been listed in textbooks as a suitable technique, few -if any- quantitative rheological studies of unfolding have been reported, mainly due to technical difficulties. With microrheology, we have been able to quantify the size of the folded and unfolded protein, as well as the Gibbs free energy of unfolding, for aqueous bovine serum albumine solutions upon addition of urea as a denaturant. The results are in excellent agreement with literature data. Secondly, we have developed new technology for studying the microstructural dynamics of solvent-responsive complex fluids. In macroscopic rheometry it is virtually impossible to change solvent composition and measure the rheological response of a sample. By integrating microfluidics and microrheology we have been able to overcome this barrier: due to the micrometer lengthscales in microfluidiv devices, diffusive timescales in a dialysis set-up become short enough to achieve rapid and reversible changes in sample composition, without affecting the concentration of macromolecular components. Our dialysis cell for microrheology is a unique tool for studying the dynamics of structural and rheological changes induced by solvent composition. I will

  7. Improvement in fast particle track reconstruction with robust statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aartsen, M.G. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide 5005, SA (Australia); Abbasi, R. [Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Ackermann, M. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Aguilar, J.A. [Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire, Université de Genève, CH-1211Genève (Switzerland); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Altmann, D. [Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Auffenberg, J. [Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Baker, M. [Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Barwick, S.W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Baum, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

    2014-02-01

    The IceCube project has transformed 1 km{sup 3} of deep natural Antarctic ice into a Cherenkov detector. Muon neutrinos are detected and their direction is inferred by mapping the light produced by the secondary muon track inside the volume instrumented with photomultipliers. Reconstructing the muon track from the observed light is challenging due to noise, light scattering in the ice medium, and the possibility of simultaneously having multiple muons inside the detector, resulting from the large flux of cosmic ray muons. This paper describes work on two problems: (1) the track reconstruction problem, in which, given a set of observations, the goal is to recover the track of a muon; and (2) the coincident event problem, which is to determine how many muons are active in the detector during a time window. Rather than solving these problems by developing more complex physical models that are applied at later stages of the analysis, our approach is to augment the detector's early reconstruction with data filters and robust statistical techniques. These can be implemented at the level of on-line reconstruction and, therefore, improve all subsequent reconstructions. Using the metric of median angular resolution, a standard metric for track reconstruction, we improve the accuracy in the initial reconstruction direction by 13%. We also present improvements in measuring the number of muons in coincident events: we can accurately determine the number of muons 98% of the time.

  8. Tracking with particle filter for high-dimensional observation and state spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Dubuisson, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    This title concerns the use of a particle filter framework to track objects defined in high-dimensional state-spaces using high-dimensional observation spaces.  Current tracking applications require us to consider complex models for objects (articulated objects, multiple objects, multiple fragments, etc.) as well as multiple kinds of information (multiple cameras, multiple modalities, etc.). This book presents some recent research that considers the main bottleneck of particle filtering frameworks (high dimensional state spaces) for tracking in such difficult conditions.

  9. A Symplectic Multi-Particle Tracking Model for Self-Consistent Space-Charge Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Qiang, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Symplectic tracking is important in accelerator beam dynamics simulation. So far, to the best of our knowledge, there is no self-consistent symplectic space-charge tracking model available in the accelerator community. In this paper, we present a two-dimensional and a three-dimensional symplectic multi-particle spectral model for space-charge tracking simulation. This model includes both the effect from external fields and the effect of self-consistent space-charge fields using a split-operator method. Such a model preserves the phase space structure and shows much less numerical emittance growth than the particle-in-cell model in the illustrative examples.

  10. Using Gaussian Process Annealing Particle Filter for 3D Human Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rudzsky

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an approach for human body parts tracking in 3D with prelearned motion models using multiple cameras. Gaussian process annealing particle filter is proposed for tracking in order to reduce the dimensionality of the problem and to increase the tracker's stability and robustness. Comparing with a regular annealed particle filter-based tracker, we show that our algorithm can track better for low frame rate videos. We also show that our algorithm is capable of recovering after a temporal target loss.

  11. Space debris tracking based on fuzzy running Gaussian average adaptive particle filter track-before-detect algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torteeka, Peerapong; Gao, Peng-Qi; Shen, Ming; Guo, Xiao-Zhang; Yang, Da-Tao; Yu, Huan-Huan; Zhou, Wei-Ping; Zhao, You

    2017-02-01

    Although tracking with a passive optical telescope is a powerful technique for space debris observation, it is limited by its sensitivity to dynamic background noise. Traditionally, in the field of astronomy, static background subtraction based on a median image technique has been used to extract moving space objects prior to the tracking operation, as this is computationally efficient. The main disadvantage of this technique is that it is not robust to variable illumination conditions. In this article, we propose an approach for tracking small and dim space debris in the context of a dynamic background via one of the optical telescopes that is part of the space surveillance network project, named the Asia-Pacific ground-based Optical Space Observation System or APOSOS. The approach combines a fuzzy running Gaussian average for robust moving-object extraction with dim-target tracking using a particle-filter-based track-before-detect method. The performance of the proposed algorithm is experimentally evaluated, and the results show that the scheme achieves a satisfactory level of accuracy for space debris tracking.

  12. Aerogel Track Morphology: Measurement, Three Dimensional Reconstruction and Particle Location using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearsley, A. T.; Ball, A. D.; Wozniakiewicz, P. A.; Graham, G. A.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.; Horz, F.; See, T. H.

    2007-01-01

    The Stardust spacecraft returned the first undoubted samples of cometary dust, with many grains embedded in the silica aerogel collector . Although many tracks contain one or more large terminal particles of a wide range of mineral compositions , there is also abundant material along the track walls. To help interpret the full particle size, structure and mass, both experimental simulation of impact by shots and numerical modeling of the impact process have been attempted. However, all approaches require accurate and precise measurement of impact track size parameters such as length, width and volume of specific portions. To make such measurements is not easy, especially if extensive aerogel fracturing and discoloration has occurred. In this paper we describe the application and limitations of laser confocal imagery for determination of aerogel track parameters, and for the location of particle remains.

  13. Fluorescent detection of single tracks of alpha particles using lithium fluoride crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilski, P.; Marczewska, B.

    2017-02-01

    Lithium fluoride single crystals were successfully used for fluorescent imaging of single tracks of alpha particles. This was realized with a standard wide-field fluorescent microscope equipped with a 100× objective. Alpha particles create F2 and F3+ color centers in LiF crystals. The subsequent illumination with the blue light (wavelength around 445 nm), excites these centers and produces fluorescence with a broad band peaked at 670 nm. The observed tracks of alpha particles have diameter of about 500 nm. Focusing of the microscope at different depths in a LiF crystal, enables imaging changes of shape and position of tracks, allowing for visualization of their paths. These encouraging results are the first step towards practical application of LiF as fluorescent nuclear track detectors.

  14. Particle filter initialization in non-linear non-Gaussian radar target tracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    When particle filter is applied in radar target tracking,the accuracy of the initial particles greatly effects the results of filtering. For acquiring more accurate initial particles,a new method called"competition strategy algorithm"is presented.In this method,initial measurements give birth to several particle groups around them,regularly.Each of the groups is tested several times,separately,in the beginning periods,and the group that has the most number of efficient particles is selected as the initial particles.For this method,sample initial particles selected are on the basis of several measurements instead of only one first measurement,which surely improves the accuracy of initial particles.The method sacrifices initialization time and computation cost for accuracy of initial particles. Results of simulation show that it greely improves the accuracy of initial particles,which makes the effect of filtering much better.

  15. Improvement in Fast Particle Track Reconstruction with Robust Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohaichuk, S; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eisch, J; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grandmont, D T; Grant, D; Groß, A; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Jagielski, K; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leute, J; Lünemann, J; Macías, O; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Reimann, R; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Shanidze, R; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stanisha, N A; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zoll, M

    2013-01-01

    The IceCube project has transformed one cubic kilometer of deep natural Antarctic ice into a Cherenkov detector. Muon neutrinos are detected and their direction inferred by mapping the light produced by the secondary muon track inside the volume instrumented with photomultipliers. Reconstructing the muon track from the observed light is challenging due to noise, light scattering in the ice medium, and the possibility of simultaneously having multiple muons inside the detector, resulting from the large flux of cosmic ray muons. This manuscript describes work on two problems: (1) the track reconstruction problem, in which, given a set of observations, the goal is to recover the track of a muon; and (2) the coincident event problem, which is to determine how many muons are active in the detector during a time window. Rather than solving these problems by developing more complex physical models that are applied at later stages of the analysis, our approach is to augment the detectors early reconstruction with dat...

  16. Fast Visual Object Tracking Using Modified kalman and Particle Filtering Algorithms in the Presence of Occlusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.Mallikarjuna Rao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present day real time applications of visual object tracking in surveillance, it has become extremely complex, time consuming and tricky to do the tracking when there are occlusions are present for small duration or for longer time and also when it is done in outdoor environments. In these conditions, the target to be tracked can be lost for few seconds and that should be tracked as soon as possible. As from the literature it is observed that particle filter can be able to track the target robustly in different kinds of background conditions, and it’s robust to partial occlusion. However, this tracking cannot recover from large proportion of occlusion and complete occlusion, to avoid this condition, we proposed two new algorithms (modified kalman and modified particle filter for fast tracking of objects in the presence of occlusions. We considered the complete occlusion of tracking object and the main objective is how fast the system is able to track the object after the occlusion is crossed. From the experimental results, it is observed that the proposed algorithms have shown good improvement in results compared to the traditional methods.

  17. Tracking Particles in Flows near Invariant Manifolds via Balance Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Kuehn, Christian; Kuhlmann, Hendrik C

    2016-01-01

    Particles moving inside a fluid near, and interacting with, invariant manifolds is a common phenomenon in a wide variety of applications. One elementary question is whether we can determine once a particle has entered a neighbourhood of an invariant manifold, when it leaves again. Here we approach this problem mathematically by introducing balance functions, which relate the entry and exit points of a particle by an integral variational formula. We define, study, and compare different natural choices for balance functions and conclude that an efficient compromise is to employ normal infinitesimal Lyapunov exponents. We apply our results to two different model flows: a regularized solid-body rotational flow and the asymmetric Kuhlmann--Muldoon model developed in the context of liquid bridges. Furthermore, we employ full numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations of a two-way coupled particle in a shear--stress-driven cavity to test balance functions for a particle moving near an invariant wall. In co...

  18. Multiple Human Tracking Using Particle Filter with Gaussian Process Dynamical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jing

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a particle filter-based multitarget tracking method incorporating Gaussian process dynamical model (GPDM to improve robustness in multitarget tracking. With the particle filter Gaussian process dynamical model (PFGPDM, a high-dimensional target trajectory dataset of the observation space is projected to a low-dimensional latent space in a nonlinear probabilistic manner, which will then be used to classify object trajectories, predict the next motion state, and provide Gaussian process dynamical samples for the particle filter. In addition, Histogram-Bhattacharyya, GMM Kullback-Leibler, and the rotation invariant appearance models are employed, respectively, and compared in the particle filter as complimentary features to coordinate data used in GPDM. The simulation results demonstrate that the approach can track more than four targets with reasonable runtime overhead and performance. In addition, it can successfully deal with occasional missing frames and temporary occlusion.

  19. Positron emission particle tracking - a technique for studying flow within engineering equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, D.J.; Hawkesworth, M.R.; McNeil, P. (School of Physics and Space Research, Birmingham (United Kingdom)); Broadbent, C.J. (School of Chemical Engineering, Birmingham (United Kingdom)); Fowles, P. (School of Chemistry, Univ. Birmingham (United Kingdom))

    1993-03-10

    The use of the Birmingham positron camera for tracking positron-emitting particles within engineering structures has been investigated, using particles containing typically 4 MBq (100 [mu]Ci) [sup 18]F or [sup 22]Na. An algorithm for discarding [gamma]-ray trajectories corrupted by scattering, etc., and using the remaining trajectories to compute the particle's location in three dimensions has been developed, and its performance explained. A slowly moving particle can be located to within 1 mm several times per second, while a particle moving at 1 ms[sup -1] can be located to within 5 mm 50 times per second, through a considerable thickness of surrounding material. An example of results obtained from tracking a particle in a rotating drum of powder illustrates the potential value of the technique. (orig.).

  20. Compositional asynchronous membrane systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cosmin Bonchis; Cornel Izbasa; Gabriel Ciobanu

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithmic way of building complex membrane systems by coupling elementary membranes. Its application seems particularly valuable in the case of asynchronous membrane systems, since the resulting membrane system remains asynchronous. The composition method is based on a handshake mechanism implemented by using antiport rules and promoters.

  1. How to reverse time in stochastic particle tracking models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro

    2011-01-01

    Many oceanographic studies perform individual-based simulations of the transport and dispersal of particles such as fish larvae and eggs. An increasing number of these studies take place in reverse time, for example as to locate the origins of a particle observed at a given time and position. Thi...... probabilities. We illustrate the conceptual and algorithmic differences between the approaches. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  2. Particle tracking in kaon electroproduction with cathode-charge sampling in multi-wire proportional chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Achenbach, P; Bernauer, J C; Böhm, R; Bosnar, D; Bösz, M; Debenjak, L; Distler, M O; Esser, A; Friščić, I; de la Paz, M Gómez Rodríguez; Makek, M; Merkel, H; Müller, U; Nungesser, L; Pochodzalla, J; Potokar, M; Majos, S Sánchez; Schlimme, B S; Širca, S; Weinriefer, M; 10.1016/j.nima.2011.03.039

    2011-01-01

    Wire chambers are routinely operated as tracking detectors in magnetic spectrometers at high-intensity continuous electron beams. Especially in experiments studying reactions with small cross-sections the reaction yield is limited by the background rate in the chambers. One way to determine the track of a charged particle through a multi-wire proportional chamber (MWPC) is the measurement of the charge distribution induced on its cathodes. In practical applications of this read-out method, the algorithm to relate the measured charge distribution to the avalanche position is an important factor for the achievable position resolution and for the track reconstruction efficiency. An algorithm was developed for operating two large-sized MWPCs in a strong background environment with multiple-particle tracks. Resulting efficiencies were determined as a function of the electron beam current and on the signal amplitudes. Because of the different energy-losses of pions, kaons, and protons in the momentum range of the s...

  3. Particle tracking during Ostwald ripening using time-resolved laboratory X-ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werz, T., E-mail: thomas.werz@uni-ulm.de [Ulm University, Institute of Micro and Nanomaterials, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, 89081 (Germany); Baumann, M. [Ulm University, Institute of Micro and Nanomaterials, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, 89081 (Germany); Wolfram, U. [Ulm University, Institute of Orthopaedic Research and Biomechanics, Helmholtzstrasse 14, 89081 (Germany); Krill, C.E. [Ulm University, Institute of Micro and Nanomaterials, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, 89081 (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Laboratory X-ray microtomography is investigated as a method for obtaining time-resolved images of microstructural coarsening of the semisolid state of Al–5 wt.% Cu samples during Ostwald ripening. Owing to the 3D imaging capability of tomography, this technique uniquely provides access to the growth rates of individual particles, thereby not only allowing a statistical characterization of coarsening—as has long been possible by conventional metallography—but also enabling quantification of the influence of local environment on particle boundary migration. The latter information is crucial to understanding growth kinetics during Ostwald ripening at high volume fractions of the coarsening phase. Automated image processing and segmentation routines were developed to close gaps in the network of particle boundaries and to track individual particles from one annealing step to the next. The particle tracking success rate places an upper bound of only a few percent on the likelihood of segmentation errors for any given particle. The accuracy of particle size trajectories extracted from the time-resolved tomographic reconstructions is correspondingly high. Statistically averaged coarsening data and individual particle growth rates are in excellent agreement with the results of prior experimental studies and with computer simulations of Ostwald ripening. - Highlights: • Ostwald ripening in Al–5 wt.% Cu measured by laboratory X-ray microtomography • Time-resolved measurement of individual particle growth • Automated segmentation routines developed to close gaps in particle boundary network • Particle growth/shrinkage rates deviate from LSW model prediction.

  4. Correlation of Particle Traversals with Clonogenic Survival Using Cell-Fluorescent Ion Track Hybrid Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokic, Ivana; Niklas, Martin; Zimmermann, Ferdinand; Mairani, Andrea; Seidel, Philipp; Krunic, Damir; Jäkel, Oliver; Debus, Jürgen; Greilich, Steffen; Abdollahi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Development of novel approaches linking the physical characteristics of particles with biological responses are of high relevance for the field of particle therapy. In radiobiology, the clonogenic survival of cells is considered the gold standard assay for the assessment of cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Toward further development of next generation biodosimeters in particle therapy, cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detector (Cell-FIT-HD) was recently engineered by our group and successfully employed to study physical particle track information in correlation with irradiation-induced DNA damage in cell nuclei. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of Cell-FIT-HD as a tool to study the effects of clinical beams on cellular clonogenic survival. Tumor cells were grown on the fluorescent nuclear track detector as cell culture, mimicking the standard procedures for clonogenic assay. Cell-FIT-HD was used to detect the spatial distribution of particle tracks within colony-initiating cells. The physical data were associated with radiation-induced foci as surrogates for DNA double-strand breaks, the hallmark of radiation-induced cell lethality. Long-term cell fate was monitored to determine the ability of cells to form colonies. We report the first successful detection of particle traversal within colony-initiating cells at subcellular resolution using Cell-FIT-HD. PMID:26697410

  5. Intracellular particle tracking as a tool for tumor cell characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Yixuan; Duits, Michel H.G.; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of two types of intracellular probe particles, ballistically injected latex spheres and endogenous granules, in tumor cell lines of differerent metastatic potential: breast tumor cells (MCF-7 malignant, MCF-10A benign) and pancreas adenocarcinoma (PaTu8988T malignant, PaTu898

  6. Solar Flare Track Exposure Ages in Regolith Particles: A Calibration for Transmission Electron Microscope Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Eve L.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2015-01-01

    Mineral grains in lunar and asteroidal regolith samples provide a unique record of their interaction with the space environment. Space weathering effects result from multiple processes including: exposure to the solar wind, which results in ion damage and implantation effects that are preserved in the rims of grains (typically the outermost 100 nm); cosmic ray and solar flare activity, which result in track formation; and impact processes that result in the accumulation of vapor-deposited elements, impact melts and adhering grains on particle surfaces. Determining the rate at which these effects accumulate in the grains during their space exposure is critical to studies of the surface evolution of airless bodies. Solar flare energetic particles (mainly Fe-group nuclei) have a penetration depth of a few millimeters and leave a trail of ionization damage in insulating materials that is readily observable by transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging. The density of solar flare particle tracks is used to infer the length of time an object was at or near the regolith surface (i.e., its exposure age). Track measurements by TEM methods are routine, yet track production rate calibrations have only been determined using chemical etching techniques [e.g., 1, and references therein]. We used focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) sample preparation techniques combined with TEM imaging to determine the track density/exposure age relations for lunar rock 64455. The 64455 sample was used earlier by [2] to determine a track production rate by chemical etching of tracks in anorthite. Here, we show that combined FIB/TEM techniques provide a more accurate determination of a track production rate and also allow us to extend the calibration to solar flare tracks in olivine.

  7. Local characterization of hindered Brownian motion by using digital video microscopy and 3D particle tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Dettmer, Simon L; Pagliara, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    In this article we present methods for measuring hindered Brownian motion in the confinement of complex 3D geometries using digital video microscopy. Here we discuss essential features of automated 3D particle tracking as well as diffusion data analysis. By introducing local mean squared displacement-vs-time curves, we are able to simultaneously measure the spatial dependence of diffusion coefficients, tracking accuracies and drift velocities. Such local measurements allow a more detailed and appropriate description of strongly heterogeneous systems as opposed to global measurements. Finite size effects of the tracking region on measuring mean squared displacements are also discussed. The use of these methods was crucial for the measurement of the diffusive behavior of spherical polystyrene particles (505 nm diameter) in a microfluidic chip. The particles explored an array of parallel channels with different cross sections as well as the bulk reservoirs. For this experiment we present the measurement of local...

  8. Analytical Benchmarking, Precision Particle Tracking, Electric and Magnetic Storage Rings, Runge-Kutta, Predictor-Corrector

    CERN Document Server

    Metodiev, E M; Fandaros, M; Haciomeroglu, S; Huang, D; Huang, K L; Patil, A; Prodromou, R; Semertzidis, O A; Sharma, D; Stamatakis, A N; Orlov, Y F; Semertzidis, Y K

    2015-01-01

    A set of analytical benchmarks for tracking programs are required for precision storage ring experiments. To determine the accuracy of precision tracking programs in electric and magnetic rings, a variety of analytical estimates of particle and spin dynamics in the rings are developed and compared to the numerical results of tracking simulations. Initial discrepancies in the comparisons indicated the need for improvement of several of the analytical estimates. As an example, we find that the fourth order Runge-Kutta/Predictor-Corrector method was accurate but slow, and that it passed all the benchmarks it was tested against, often to the sub-part per billion level. Thus high precision analytical estimates and tracking programs based on fourth order Runge-Kutta/Predictor-Corrector integration can be used to benchmark faster tracking programs for accuracy.

  9. Analytical benchmarks for precision particle tracking in electric and magnetic rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metodiev, E.M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Harvard College, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, IBS, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); D' Silva, I.M.; Fandaros, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Gaisser, M. [Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, IBS, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hacıömeroğlu, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, IBS, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul 34469 (Turkey); Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Huang, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Huang, K.L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Harvard College, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Patil, A.; Prodromou, R.; Semertzidis, O.A.; Sharma, D.; Stamatakis, A.N. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Orlov, Y.F. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Semertzidis, Y.K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research, IBS, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-11

    To determine the accuracy of tracking programs for precision storage ring experiments, analytical estimates of particle and spin dynamics in electric and magnetic rings were developed and compared to the numerical results of a tracking program based on Runge–Kutta/Predictor–Corrector integration. Initial discrepancies in the comparisons indicated the need to improve several of the analytical estimates. In the end, this rather slow program passed all benchmarks, often agreeing with the analytical estimates to the part-per-billion level. Thus, it can in turn be used to benchmark faster tracking programs for accuracy.

  10. Multitarget Tracking of Pedestrians in Video Sequences Based on Particle Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Video target tracking is a critical problem in the field of computer vision. Particle filters have been proven to be very useful in target tracking for nonlinear and non-Gaussian estimation problems. Although most existing algorithms are able to track targets well in controlled environments, it is often difficult to achieve automated and robust tracking of pedestrians in video sequences if there are various changes in target appearance or surrounding illumination. To surmount these difficulties, this paper presents multitarget tracking of pedestrians in video sequences based on particle filters. In order to improve the efficiency and accuracy of the detection, the algorithm firstly obtains target regions in training frames by combining the methods of background subtraction and Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG and then establishes discriminative appearance model by generating patches and constructing codebooks using superpixel and Local Binary Pattern (LBP features in those target regions. During the process of tracking, the algorithm uses the similarity between candidates and codebooks as observation likelihood function and processes severe occlusion condition to prevent drift and loss phenomenon caused by target occlusion. Experimental results demonstrate that our algorithm improves the tracking performance in complicated real scenarios.

  11. Practical Implementation of New Particle Tracking Method to the Real Field of Groundwater Flow and Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Heejun

    2012-01-01

    In articles published in 2009 and 2010, Suk and Yeh reported the development of an accurate and efficient particle tracking algorithm for simulating a path line under complicated unsteady flow conditions, using a range of elements within finite elements in multidimensions. Here two examples, an aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) example and a landfill leachate migration example, are examined to enhance the practical implementation of the proposed particle tracking method, known as Suk's method, to a real field of groundwater flow and transport. Results obtained by Suk's method are compared with those obtained by Pollock's method. Suk's method produces superior tracking accuracy, which suggests that Suk's method can describe more accurately various advection-dominated transport problems in a real field than existing popular particle tracking methods, such as Pollock's method. To illustrate the wide and practical applicability of Suk's method to random-walk particle tracking (RWPT), the original RWPT has been modified to incorporate Suk's method. Performance of the modified RWPT using Suk's method is compared with the original RWPT scheme by examining the concentration distributions obtained by the modified RWPT and the original RWPT under complicated transient flow systems.

  12. Markerless human motion tracking using hierarchical multi-swarm cooperative particle swarm optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Sanjay; Zakaria, Nordin; Rambli, Dayang Rohaya Awang; Sulaiman, Suziah

    2015-01-01

    The high-dimensional search space involved in markerless full-body articulated human motion tracking from multiple-views video sequences has led to a number of solutions based on metaheuristics, the most recent form of which is Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). However, the classical PSO suffers from premature convergence and it is trapped easily into local optima, significantly affecting the tracking accuracy. To overcome these drawbacks, we have developed a method for the problem based on Hierarchical Multi-Swarm Cooperative Particle Swarm Optimization (H-MCPSO). The tracking problem is formulated as a non-linear 34-dimensional function optimization problem where the fitness function quantifies the difference between the observed image and a projection of the model configuration. Both the silhouette and edge likelihoods are used in the fitness function. Experiments using Brown and HumanEva-II dataset demonstrated that H-MCPSO performance is better than two leading alternative approaches-Annealed Particle Filter (APF) and Hierarchical Particle Swarm Optimization (HPSO). Further, the proposed tracking method is capable of automatic initialization and self-recovery from temporary tracking failures. Comprehensive experimental results are presented to support the claims.

  13. Experimental validation of granular dynamics simulations of gas-fluidised beds with homogeneous inflow conditions using Positron Emission Particle Tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoomans, B.P.B.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Mohd Salleh, M.; Seville, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    A hard-sphere granular dynamics model of a two-dimensional gas-fluidised bed was experimentally validated using Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT). In the model the Newtonian equations of motion are solved for each solid particle while taking into account the particle¿particle and particle¿w

  14. MOTION OF TRACER PARTICLES IN A CENTRIFUGAL PUMP AND ITS TRACKING CHARACTERISTICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ya-lin; YUAN Shou-qi; TANG Yue; YUAN Jian-ping

    2012-01-01

    The Basset-Boussinesq-Oseen (BBO) equation can be used for most flows to trace the motion of a particle,but in a centrifugal pump,among the forces that act on the particles,one should also include those due to the impeller rotation,as additional effects.This paper firstly reviews various approximations of the BBO equation for the motion of dispersion particles in a viscous fluid.Then based on the motion equation for particles in low Reynolds number centrifugal pumps,a formula for calculating the tracking characteristics of tracer particles is deduced through the Fourier integral transformation.After that the deviations of the particle motion from the fluid motion,as predicted by the various approximations,are discussed and compared.At last,with an emphasis on the Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) results,the tracking characteristics of particles are estimated.Also,advantages and disadvantages of different tracer particles are discussed and suitable tracer particles for application in PIV studies for flow fields in centrifugal pumps are suggested.

  15. Spin resonance strength calculation through single particle tracking for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dutheil, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ranjbar, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The strengths of spin resonances for the polarized-proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider are currently calculated with the code DEPOL, which numerically integrates through the ring based on an analytical approximate formula. In this article, we test a new way to calculate the spin resonance strengths by performing Fourier transformation to the actual transverse magnetic fields seen by a single particle traveling through the ring. Comparison of calculated spin resonance strengths is made between this method and DEPOL.

  16. Alpha particles energy estimation from track diameter development in a CR-39 detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azooz, Aassim A; Al-Jubbori, Mushtaq A

    2016-09-01

    The slight nonlinearity in temporal development of tracks diameter in CR-39 nuclear track detectors is examined with the aim of attempting to find if such nonlinearity can be directly related to the charged particle energy. Narrowly spaced etching time-diameter experimental data for alpha particles at five energy values and for one additional energy value etched at five different temperatures are obtained. Initial results show good indication that measuring such time-diameter relationship can form a useful energy estimation tool. Good consistency with other independent published results is obtained.

  17. Non-invasive studies of multiphase flow in process equipment. Positron emission particle tracking technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakin, B. V.; Adamsen, T. C. H.; Chang, Y.-F.; Kosinski, P.; Hoffmann, A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) is a novel experimental technique for non-invasive inspection of industrial fluid/particle flows. The method is based on the dynamic positioning of a positron-emitting, flowing object (particle) performed through the sensing of annihilation events and subsequent numerical treatment to determine the particle position. The present paper shows an integrated overview of PEPT studies which were carried out using a new PET scanner in the Bergen University Hospital to study multiphase flows in different geometric configurations.

  18. A feature point identification method for positron emission particle tracking with multiple tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Cody; Santos, Roque; Ruggles, Arthur

    2017-01-01

    A novel detection algorithm for Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) with multiple tracers based on optical feature point identification (FPI) methods is presented. This new method, the FPI method, is compared to a previous multiple PEPT method via analyses of experimental and simulated data. The FPI method outperforms the older method in cases of large particle numbers and fine time resolution. Simulated data show the FPI method to be capable of identifying 100 particles at 0.5 mm average spatial error. Detection error is seen to vary with the inverse square root of the number of lines of response (LORs) used for detection and increases as particle separation decreases.

  19. Three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry applied to granular flows down rotating chutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clercx, Herman; Shirsath, Sushil; Padding, Johan; Kuipers, Hans

    2014-11-01

    We report on the cross-validation of 3D particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) with other measurement techniques, such as particle image velocimetry (PIV), electronic ultrasonic sensor measurements for bed height and the discrete element model (DEM), for gaining more insight into the behavior of granular flows down inclined rotating chutes. In particular we aim at gaining access to Lagrangian displacement data of surface particles in granular flows and to obtain independent measurements of both the surface velocity and the bed height in the chute. The 3D-PTV method is based on imaging and tracking colored tracer particles that are introduced in the granular material, which are viewed from three directions. The three cameras collect consecutive frames a known Δt apart and the PTV algorithm for locating and tracking particles is used to determine particle trajectories and velocities. The PTV and PIV results are in good mutual agreement with regard to the streamwise and spanwise surface velocity. The particle bed height obtained from 3D-PTV was compared with data from an ultrasonic bed-height sensor and it is found to be in good mutual agreement, as was the case for the comparison between the experimental findings from 3D-PTV and simulations by DEM.

  20. Modeling nitrogen transport and transformation in aquifers using a particle-tracking approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhengtao; Welty, Claire; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2014-09-01

    We have integrated multispecies biodegradation and geochemical reactions into an existing particle-tracking code to simulate reactive transport in three-dimensional variably saturated media, with a focus on nitrification and denitrification processes. This new numerical model includes reactive air-phase transport so that gases such as N2 and CO2 can be tracked. Although nitrogen biodegradation is the primary problem addressed here, the method presented is also applicable to other reactive multispecies transport problems. We verified the model by comparison with (1) analytical solutions for saturated one- and two-dimensional cases; (2) a finite element model for a one-dimensional unsaturated case; and (3) laboratory observations for a one-dimensional saturated case. Good agreement between the new code and the verification problems is demonstrated. The new model can simulate nitrogen transport and transformation in a heterogeneous permeability field where sharp concentration gradients are present. An example application to nitrogen species biodegradation and transport of a plume emanating from a leaking sewer in a heterogeneous, variably saturated aquifer is presented to illustrate this capability. This example is a novel application of coupling unsaturated/saturated zone transport with nitrogen species biodegradation. The code has the computational advantages of particle-tracking algorithms, including local and global mass conservation and minimal numerical dispersion. We also present new methods for improving particle code efficiency by implementing the concept of tracking surplus/deficit particles and particle recycling in order to control the growth of particle numbers. The new model retains the advantages of the particle tracking approach such as allowing relatively low spatial and temporal resolutions to be used, while incorporating the robustness of grid-based Monod kinetics to simulate biogeochemical reactions.

  1. Three-dimensional textural and compositional analysis of particle tracks and fragmentation history in aerogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebel, Denton S.; Greenberg, Michael; Rivers, Mark L.; Newville, Matthew; (AMNH)

    2010-05-04

    We report analyses of aerogel tracks using (1) synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (XRCMT), (2) laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM), and (3) synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) of particles and their paths resulting from simulated hypervelocity impacts (1-2), and a single {approx}1 mm aerogel track from the Stardust cometary sample collector (1-3). Large aerogel pieces can be imaged sequentially, resulting in high spatial resolution images spanning many tomographic fields of view ('lambda-tomography'). We report calculations of energy deposited, and tests on aromatic hydrocarbons showing no alteration in tomography experiments. Imaging at resolutions from -17 to -1 micron/pixel edge (XRCMT) and to <100 nm/pixel edge (LCSM) illustrates track geometry and interaction of particles with aerogel, including rifling, particle fragmentation, and final particle location. We present a 3-D deconvolution method using an estimated point-spread function for aerogel, allowing basic corrections of LCSM data for axial distortion. LCSM allows rapid, comprehensive, non-destructive, high information return analysis of tracks in aerogel keystones, prior to destructive grain extraction. SRXRF with LCSM allows spatial correlation of grain size, chemical, and mineralogical data. If optical methods are precluded in future aerogel capture missions, XRCMT is a viable 3D imaging technique. Combinations of these methods allow for complete, nondestructive, quantitative 3-D analysis of captured materials at high spatial resolution. This data is fundamental to understanding the hypervelocity particle-aerogel interaction histories of Stardust grains.

  2. Holographic time-resolved particle tracking by means of three-dimensional volumetric deconvolution

    CERN Document Server

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    Holographic particle image velocimetry allows tracking particle trajectories in time and space by means of holography. However, the drawback of the technique is that in the three-dimensional particle distribution reconstructed from a hologram, the individual particles can hardly be resolved due to the superimposed out-of-focus signal from neighboring particles. We demonstrate here a three-dimensional volumetric deconvolution applied to the reconstructed wavefront which results in resolving all particles simultaneously in three-dimensions. Moreover, we apply the three-dimensional volumetric deconvolution to reconstructions of a time-dependent sequence of holograms of an ensemble of polystyrene spheres moving in water. From each hologram we simultaneously resolve all particles in the ensemble in three dimensions and from the sequence of holograms we obtain the time-resolved trajectories of individual polystyrene spheres.

  3. Applying Particle Tracking Model In The Coastal Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 ERDC/CHL CHETN-IV-78 January 2011 2 Figure 1. CMS domain, grid, and bathymetry . CMS-Flow is driven by...through the simulation. At the end of the simulation, about 65 percent of the released clay particles are considered “ dead ,” ERDC/CHL CHETN-IV-78 January...2011 11 which means that they are either permanently buried at the sea bed or have moved out of the model domain. Figure 11. Specifications of

  4. A transition radiation detector which features accurate tracking and dE/dx particle identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, E.; Lissauer, D.; McCorkle, S.; Polychronakos, V.; Takai, H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Chi, C.Y.; Nagamiya, S.; Sippach, W.; Toy, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.F.; Wiggins, C.; Willis, W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Cherniatin, V.; Dolgoshein, B. [Moscow Inst. of Physics and Engineering, Moscow (Russia Federation); Bennett, M.; Chikanian, A.; Kumar, S.; Mitchell, J.T.; Pope, K. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1991-12-31

    We describe the results of a test run involving a Transition Radiation Detector that can both distinguish electrons from pions with momenta greater than 0.7 GeV/c and simultaneously track particles passing through the detector. The particle identification is accomplished through a combination of the detection of Transition Radiation from the electron and the differences in electron and pion energy loss (dE/dx) in the detector. The dE/dx particle separation is most efficient below 2 GeV/c while particle ID utilizing Transition Radiation is effective above 1.5 GeV/c. Combined, the electron-pion separation is better than 5 {times} l0{sup 2}. The single-wire, track-position resolution for the TRD is {approximately}230{mu}m.

  5. A transition radiation detector which features accurate tracking and dE/dx particle identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, E.; Lissauer, D.; McCorkle, S.; Polychronakos, V.; Takai, H. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Chi, C.Y.; Nagamiya, S.; Sippach, W.; Toy, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.F.; Wiggins, C.; Willis, W. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)); Cherniatin, V.; Dolgoshein, B. (Moscow Inst. of Physics and Engineering (Russian Federation)); Bennett, M.; Chikanian, A.; Kumar, S.; Mitchell, J.T.; Pope, K. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States))

    1993-04-01

    The authors describe the results of a test run involving a Transition Radiation Detector that can both distinguish electrons from pions with momenta greater than 0.7 GeV/c and simultaneously track particles passing through the detector. The particle identification is accomplished through a combination of the detection of Transition Radiation from the electron and the differences in electron and pion energy loss (dE/dx) in the detector. The dE/dx particle separation is most efficient below 2 GeV/c while particle ID utilizing Transition Radiation is effective above 1.5 GeV/c. Combined, the electron-pion separation is better than 5 x 10[sup 2]. The single-wire, track-position resolution for the TRD is [approximately] [mu]m.

  6. A transition radiation detector for RHIC featuring accurate tracking and dE/dx particle identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, E.; Lissauer, D.; McCorkle, S.; Polychronakos, V.; Takai, H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Chi, C.Y.; Nagamiya, S.; Sippach, W.; Toy, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.F.; Wiggins, C.; Willis, W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Cherniatin, V.; Dolgoshein, B. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Engineering, (Russian Federation); Bennett, M.; Chikanian, A.; Kumar, S.; Mitchell, J.T.; Pope, K. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1991-12-31

    We describe the results of a test ran involving a Transition Radiation Detector that can both distinguish electrons from pions which momenta greater titan 0.7 GeV/c and simultaneously track particles passing through the detector. The particle identification is accomplished through a combination of the detection of Transition Radiation from the electron and the differences in electron and pion energy loss (dE/dx) in the detector. The dE/dx particle separation is most, efficient below 2 GeV/c while particle ID utilizing Transition Radiation effective above 1.5 GeV/c. Combined, the electron-pion separation is-better than 5 {times} 10{sup 2}. The single-wire, track-position resolution for the TRD is {approximately}230 {mu}m.

  7. 3D tracking the Brownian motion of colloidal particles using digital holographic microscopy and joint reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Verrier, Nicolas; Fournel, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    In-line digital holography is a valuable tool for sizing, locating and tracking micro- or nano-objects in a volume. When a parametric imaging model is available, Inverse Problems approaches provide a straightforward estimate of the object parameters by fitting data with the model, thereby allowing accurate reconstruction. As recently proposed and demonstrated, combining pixel super-resolution techniques with Inverse Problems approaches improves the estimation of particle size and 3D-position. Here we demonstrate the accurate tracking of colloidal particles in Brownian motion. Particle size and 3D-position are jointly optimized from video holograms acquired with a digital holographic microscopy set up based on a "low-end" microscope objective ($\\times 20$, $\\rm NA\\ 0.5$). Exploiting information redundancy makes it possible to characterize particles with a standard deviation of 15 nm in size and a theoretical resolution of 2 x 2 x 5 nm$^3$ for position under additive white Gaussian noise assumption.

  8. Method for tracking nanogel particles in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Brandon L; Lien, Yeong-Hau H; Mazar, Carla; Salkini, Mohamad W; Cai, Tong; Hu, Zhibing; Marquez, Manuel; Garcia, Antonio A

    2008-07-01

    Hydrogels made of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) can be synthesized in the form of highly monodispersed nanoparticles. After synthesis, NIPA hydrogel nanoparticles (nanogels) can be labeled by Alexa Fluor 488 carboxylic acid, 2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl ester through amine-terminated functional groups. This choice of dye is complementary to other biological labeling methods for in vivo studies. When the nanogel/dye nanoparticles are injected into rabbits, they can be imaged via tissue sectioning and confocal microscopy, while nanoparticle concentration can be determined by fluorescent microplate assays. Time-course persistence of nanoparticles in the circulatory system can be readily tracked by direct assay of plasma and urine samples using 485 nm excitation and 538 emission wavelengths to keep background fluorescence to nearly the same level as that found using an empty well. Depending upon how the nanoparticles are injected, circulatory system concentrations can reach high concentrations and diminish to low levels or gradually increase and gradually decrease over time. Injection in the femoral artery results in a rapid spike in circulating nanogel/dye concentration, while injection into the renal artery results in a more gradual increase.

  9. 3D head pose estimation and tracking using particle filtering and ICP algorithm

    KAUST Repository

    Ben Ghorbel, Mahdi

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of 3D head pose estimation and tracking. Existing approaches generally need huge database, training procedure, manual initialization or use face feature extraction manually extracted. We propose a framework for estimating the 3D head pose in its fine level and tracking it continuously across multiple Degrees of Freedom (DOF) based on ICP and particle filtering. We propose to approach the problem, using 3D computational techniques, by aligning a face model to the 3D dense estimation computed by a stereo vision method, and propose a particle filter algorithm to refine and track the posteriori estimate of the position of the face. This work comes with two contributions: the first concerns the alignment part where we propose an extended ICP algorithm using an anisotropic scale transformation. The second contribution concerns the tracking part. We propose the use of the particle filtering algorithm and propose to constrain the search space using ICP algorithm in the propagation step. The results show that the system is able to fit and track the head properly, and keeps accurate the results on new individuals without a manual adaptation or training. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010.

  10. Correlation of Particle Traversals with Clonogenic Survival Using Cell-Fluorescent Ion Track Hybrid Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana eDokic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Development of novel approaches linking the physical characteristics of particles with biological responses are of high relevance for the field of particle therapy. In radiobiology, the clonogenic survival of cells is considered the gold standard assay for assessment of cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Towards further development of next generation biodosimeters in particle therapy, cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detector (Cell-FIT-HD was recently engineered by our group and successfully employed to study physical particle track information in correlation with irradiation- induced DNA damage in cell nuclei. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of Cell-FIT-HD as a tool to study the effects of clinical beams on cellular clonogenic survival. Tumor cells were grown on the FNTD as cell culture, mimicking the standard procedures for clonogenic assay. Cell-FIT-HD was used to detect the spatial distribution of particle tracks within colony-initiating cells. The physical data were associated to radiation induced foci as surrogates for DNA double strand breakages (DSB, the hallmark of radiation ‐induced cell lethality. Long‐term cell fate was monitored to determine the ability of cells to form colonies. We report the first successful detection of particle traversal within colony-initiating cells at subcellular resolution using Cell-FIT-HD.

  11. User guide for MODPATH version 6 - A particle-tracking model for MODFLOW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, David W.

    2012-01-01

    MODPATH is a particle-tracking post-processing model that computes three-dimensional flow paths using output from groundwater flow simulations based on MODFLOW, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) finite-difference groundwater flow model. This report documents MODPATH version 6. Previous versions were documented in USGS Open-File Reports 89-381 and 94-464. The program uses a semianalytical particle-tracking scheme that allows an analytical expression of a particle's flow path to be obtained within each finite-difference grid cell. A particle's path is computed by tracking the particle from one cell to the next until it reaches a boundary, an internal sink/source, or satisfies another termination criterion. Data input to MODPATH consists of a combination of MODFLOW input data files, MODFLOW head and flow output files, and other input files specific to MODPATH. Output from MODPATH consists of several output files, including a number of particle coordinate output files intended to serve as input data for other programs that process, analyze, and display the results in various ways. MODPATH is written in FORTRAN and can be compiled by any FORTRAN compiler that fully supports FORTRAN-2003 or by most commercially available FORTRAN-95 compilers that support the major FORTRAN-2003 language extensions.

  12. High throughput on-chip analysis of high-energy charged particle tracks using lensfree imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Wei; Shabbir, Faizan; Gong, Chao; Gulec, Cagatay; Pigeon, Jeremy; Shaw, Jessica; Greenbaum, Alon; Tochitsky, Sergei; Joshi, Chandrashekhar [Electrical Engineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Ozcan, Aydogan, E-mail: ozcan@ucla.edu [Electrical Engineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Bioengineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI), University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-04-13

    We demonstrate a high-throughput charged particle analysis platform, which is based on lensfree on-chip microscopy for rapid ion track analysis using allyl diglycol carbonate, i.e., CR-39 plastic polymer as the sensing medium. By adopting a wide-area opto-electronic image sensor together with a source-shifting based pixel super-resolution technique, a large CR-39 sample volume (i.e., 4 cm × 4 cm × 0.1 cm) can be imaged in less than 1 min using a compact lensfree on-chip microscope, which detects partially coherent in-line holograms of the ion tracks recorded within the CR-39 detector. After the image capture, using highly parallelized reconstruction and ion track analysis algorithms running on graphics processing units, we reconstruct and analyze the entire volume of a CR-39 detector within ∼1.5 min. This significant reduction in the entire imaging and ion track analysis time not only increases our throughput but also allows us to perform time-resolved analysis of the etching process to monitor and optimize the growth of ion tracks during etching. This computational lensfree imaging platform can provide a much higher throughput and more cost-effective alternative to traditional lens-based scanning optical microscopes for ion track analysis using CR-39 and other passive high energy particle detectors.

  13. Particle filtering for tracking of GLUT4 vesicles in TIRF microscpy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiangping; Liu, Xiaofang; Xu, Wenglong; Yan, Dandan; Chen, Yongli

    2009-10-01

    GLUT4 is responsible for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake into fat cells and description of the dynamic behavior of it can give insight in some working mechanisms and structures of these cells. Quantitative analysis of the dynamical process requires tracking of hundreds of GLUT4 vesicles characterized as bright spots in noisy image sequences. In this paper, a 3D tracking algorithm built in Bayesian probabilistic framework is put forward, combined with the unique features of the TIRF microscopy. A brightness-correction procedure is firstly applied to ensure that the intensity of a vesicle is constant along time and is only affected by spatial factors. Then, tracking is formalized as a state estimation problem and a developed particle filter integrated by a sub-optimizer that steers the particles towards a region with high likelihood is used. Once each tracked vesicle is located in image plane, the depth information of a granule can be indirectly inferred according to the exponential relationship between its intensity and its vertical position. The experimental results indicate that the vesicles are tracked well under different motion styles. More, the algorithm provides the depth information of the tracked vesicle.

  14. G4beamline Particle Tracking in Matter Dominated Beam Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.J. Roberts, K.B. Beard, S. Ahmed, D. Huang, D.M. Kaplan

    2011-03-01

    The G4beamline program is a useful and steadily improving tool to quickly and easily model beam lines and experimental equipment without user programming. It has both graphical and command-line user interfaces. Unlike most accelerator physics codes, it easily handles a wide range of materials and fields, being particularly well suited for the study of muon and neutrino facilities. As it is based on the Geant4 toolkit, G4beamline includes most of what is known about the interactions of particles with matter. We are continuing the development of G4beamline to facilitate its use by a larger set of beam line and accelerator developers. A major new feature is the calculation of space-charge effects. G4beamline is open source and freely available at http://g4beamline.muonsinc.com

  15. Charged particle tracking through electrostatic wire meshes using the finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, L. J.; Karamyshev, O.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-06-01

    Wire meshes are used across many disciplines to accelerate and focus charged particles, however, analytical solutions are non-exact and few codes exist which simulate the exact fields around a mesh with physical sizes. A tracking code based in Matlab-Simulink using field maps generated using finite element software has been developed which tracks electrons or ions through electrostatic wire meshes. The fields around such a geometry are presented as an analytical expression using several basic assumptions, however, it is apparent that computational calculations are required to obtain realistic values of electric potential and fields, particularly when multiple wire meshes are deployed. The tracking code is flexible in that any quantitatively describable particle distribution can be used for both electrons and ions as well as other benefits such as ease of export to other programs for analysis. The code is made freely available and physical examples are highlighted where this code could be beneficial for different applications.

  16. Particle filter based visual tracking with multi-cue adaptive fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anping Li; Zhongliang Jing; Shiqiang Hu

    2005-01-01

    @@ To improve the robustness of visual tracking in complex environments such as: cluttered backgrounds, partial occlusions, similar distraction and pose variations, a novel tracking method based on adaptive fusion and particle filter is proposed in this paper. In this method, the image color and shape cues are adaptively fused to represent the target observation; fuzzy logic is applied to dynamically adjust each cue weight according to its associated reliability in the past frame; particle filter is adopted to deal with non-linear and non-Gaussian problems in visual tracking. The method is demonstrated to be robust to illumination changes, pose variations, partial occlusions, cluttered backgrounds and camera motion for a test image sequence.

  17. Multiple Maneuvering Target Tracking by Improved Particle Filter Based on Multiscan JPDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The multiple maneuvering target tracking algorithm based on a particle filter is addressed. The equivalent-noise approach is adopted, which uses a simple dynamic model consisting of target state and equivalent noise which accounts for the combined effects of the process noise and maneuvers. The equivalent-noise approach converts the problem of maneuvering target tracking to that of state estimation in the presence of nonstationary process noise with unknown statistics. A novel method for identifying the nonstationary process noise is proposed in the particle filter framework. Furthermore, a particle filter based multiscan Joint Probability Data Association (JPDA filter is proposed to deal with the data association problem in a multiple maneuvering target tracking. In the proposed multiscan JPDA algorithm, the distributions of interest are the marginal filtering distributions for each of the targets, and these distributions are approximated with particles. The multiscan JPDA algorithm examines the joint association events in a multiscan sliding window and calculates the marginal posterior probability based on the multiscan joint association events. The proposed algorithm is illustrated via an example involving the tracking of two highly maneuvering, at times closely spaced and crossed, targets, based on resolved measurements.

  18. Particle Filtering for Obstacle Tracking in UAS Sense and Avoid Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Elena Tirri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstacle detection and tracking is a key function for UAS sense and avoid applications. In fact, obstacles in the flight path must be detected and tracked in an accurate and timely manner in order to execute a collision avoidance maneuver in case of collision threat. The most important parameter for the assessment of a collision risk is the Distance at Closest Point of Approach, that is, the predicted minimum distance between own aircraft and intruder for assigned current position and speed. Since assessed methodologies can cause some loss of accuracy due to nonlinearities, advanced filtering methodologies, such as particle filters, can provide more accurate estimates of the target state in case of nonlinear problems, thus improving system performance in terms of collision risk estimation. The paper focuses on algorithm development and performance evaluation for an obstacle tracking system based on a particle filter. The particle filter algorithm was tested in off-line simulations based on data gathered during flight tests. In particular, radar-based tracking was considered in order to evaluate the impact of particle filtering in a single sensor framework. The analysis shows some accuracy improvements in the estimation of Distance at Closest Point of Approach, thus reducing the delay in collision detection.

  19. Calibrations of CR39 and Makrofol nuclear track detectors and search for exotic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, M; Auriemma, G; Bakari, D; Baldini, A; Barbarino, G C; Barish, B C; Battistoni, G; Becherini, Y; Bellotti, R; Bemporad, C; Bernardini, P; Bilokon, H; Bloise, C; Bower, C; Brigida, M; Bussino, S; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Campana, D; Carboni, M; Caruso, R; Cecchini, S; Cei, F; Chiarella, V; Chiarusi, T; Choudhary, B C; Coutu, S; Cozzi, M; De Cataldo, G; De Marzo, C; De Mitri, I; De Vincenzi, M; Dekhissi, H; Derkaoui, J; Di Credico, A; Erriquez, O; Favuzzi, C; Forti, C; Fusco, P; Giacomelli, G; Giannini, G; Giglietto, N; Giorgini, M; Grassi, M; Grillo, A; Guarino, F; Gustavino, C; Habig, A; Hanson, K; Heinz, R; Iarocci, E; Katsavounidis, E; Katsavounidis, I; Kearns, E; Kim, H; Kumar, A; Kyriazopoulou, S; Lamanna, E; Lane, C; Levin, D S; Lipari, P; Longley, N P; Longo, M J; Loparco, F; Maaroufi, F; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Manzoor, S; Margiotta, A; Marini, A; Martello, D; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Matteuzzi, D; Mazziotta, M N; Michael, D G; Monacelli, P; Montaruli, T; Monteno, M; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Nicolò, D; Nolty, R; Orth, C; Osteria, G; Palamara, O; Patera, V; Patrizii, L; Pazzi, R; Peck, C W; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; Pistilli, P; Popa, V; Rainó, A; Reynoldson, J; Ronga, F; Rrhioua, A; Satriano, C; Scapparone, E; Scholberg, K; Sciubba, A; Serra, P; Sioli, M; Sirri, G; Sitta, M; Spinelli, P; Spinetti, M; Spurio, M; Steinberg, R; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Surdo, A; Tarle, G; Togo, V; Vakili, M; Walter, C W; Webb, R; 10.1016/S0920-5632(03)02249-7

    2003-01-01

    We present the final results of the search for exotic massive particles in the cosmic radiation performed with the MACRO underground experiment. Magnetic monopoles and nuclearites flux upper limits obtained with the CR39 nuclear track subdetector, the scintillation and streamer tube subdetectors are given. Searches at high altitude with the SLIM experiment are in progress.

  20. Guitarist Fingertip Tracking by Integrating a Bayesian Classifier into Particle Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chutisant Kerdvibulvech

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a vision-based method for tracking guitar fingerings made by guitar players. We present it as a new framework for tracking colored finger markers by integrating a Bayesian classifier into particle filters. This adds the useful abilities of automatic track initialization and recovery from tracking failures in a dynamic background. Furthermore, by using the online adaptation of color probabilities, this method is able to cope with illumination changes. Augmented Reality Tag (ARTag is then utilized to calculate the projection matrix as an online process which allows the guitar to be moved while being played. Representative experimental results are also included. The method presented can be used to develop the application of human-computer interaction (HCI to guitar playing by recognizing the chord being played by a guitarist in virtual spaces. The aforementioned application would assist guitar learners by allowing them to automatically identify if they are using the correct chords required by the musical piece.

  1. Automatic track recognition for large-angle minimum ionizing particles in nuclear emulsions

    CERN Document Server

    Fukuda, T; Ishida, H; Matsumoto, T; Matsuo, T; Mikado, S; Nishimura, S; Ogawa, S; Shibuya, H; Sudou, J; Ariga, A; Tufanli, S

    2014-01-01

    We previously developed an automatic track scanning system which enables the detection of large-angle nuclear fragments in the nuclear emulsion films of the OPERA experiment. As a next step, we have investigated this system's track recognition capability for large-angle minimum ionizing particles $(1.0 \\leq |tan \\theta| \\leq 3.5)$. This paper shows that, for such tracks, the system has a detection efficiency of 95$\\%$ or higher and reports the achieved angular accuracy of the automatically recognized tracks. This technology is of general purpose and will likely contribute not only to various analyses in the OPERA experiment, but also to future experiments, e.g. on low-energy neutrino and hadron interactions, or to future research on cosmic rays using nuclear emulsions carried by balloons.

  2. Kalman-Filter-Based Particle Tracking on Parallel Architectures at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Cerati, Giuseppe; Lantz, Steven; McDermott, Kevin; Riley, Dan; Tadel, Matevž; Wittich, Peter; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avi

    2016-01-01

    Power density constraints are limiting the performance improvements of modern CPUs. To address this we have seen the introduction of lower-power, multi-core processors such as GPGPU, ARM and Intel MIC. To stay within the power density limits but still obtain Moore's Law performance/price gains, it will be necessary to parallelize algorithms to exploit larger numbers of lightweight cores and specialized functions like large vector units. Track finding and fitting is one of the most computationally challenging problems for event reconstruction in particle physics. At the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), for example, this will be by far the dominant problem. The need for greater parallelism has driven investigations of very different track finding techniques such as Cellular Automata or Hough Transforms. The most common track finding techniques in use today, however, are those based on the Kalman Filter. Significant experience has been accumulated with these techniques on real tracking detector sy...

  3. A microstrip silicon telescope for high performance particle tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietti, D.; Berra, A.; Prest, M.; Vallazza, E.

    2013-11-01

    Bent crystals are thin silicon/germanium devices that act as a bulk dipole magnet and thus are able to deflect relativistic charged particle beams with high efficiency (up to 98%). To study their behavior on extracted beamlines in terms of deflection capability and efficiency, a fast and high position resolution telescope is needed such as the INSULAB telescope. It consists in several modules equipped with double or single side silicon detectors readout by different ASICs. The Data Acquisition system is designed to work with pulsed beams minimizing the dead time to allow the collection of a large statistics in a short time. It is based on custom VME readout/memory boards for the data storage and 12 bit ADC custom boards for the signal digitization; the present maximum DAQ rate is 6 kHz. A detailed description of the detectors, the ASICs and the readout system together with the results obtained at the SPS H4 and PS T9 CERN beamlines in terms of spatial resolution and charge sharing are presented.

  4. Multiple particle tracking in 3-D+t microscopy: method and application to the tracking of endocytosed quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovesio, Auguste; Liedl, Tim; Emiliani, Valentina; Parak, Wolfgang J; Coppey-Moisan, Maité; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe

    2006-05-01

    We propose a method to detect and track multiple moving biological spot-like particles showing different kinds of dynamics in image sequences acquired through multidimensional fluorescence microscopy. It enables the extraction and analysis of information such as number, position, speed, movement, and diffusion phases of, e.g., endosomal particles. The method consists of several stages. After a detection stage performed by a three-dimensional (3-D) undecimated wavelet transform, we compute, for each detected spot, several predictions of its future state in the next frame. This is accomplished thanks to an interacting multiple model (IMM) algorithm which includes several models corresponding to different biologically realistic movement types. Tracks are constructed, thereafter, by a data association algorithm based on the maximization of the likelihood of each IMM. The last stage consists of updating the IMM filters in order to compute final estimations for the present image and to improve predictions for the next image. The performances of the method are validated on synthetic image data and used to characterize the 3-D movement of endocytic vesicles containing quantum dots.

  5. Method based on the double sideband technique for the dynamic tracking of micrometric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Claudio; Lizana, Angel; Iemmi, Claudio; Campos, Juan

    2016-06-01

    Digital holography (DH) methods are of interest in a large number of applications. Recently, the double sideband (DSB) technique was proposed, which is a DH based method that, by using double filtering, provides reconstructed images without distortions and is free of twin images by using an in-line configuration. In this work, we implement a method for the investigation of the mobility of particles based on the DSB technique. Particle holographic images obtained using the DSB method are processed with digital picture recognition methods, allowing us to accurately track the spatial position of particles. The dynamic nature of the method is achieved experimentally by using a spatial light modulator. The suitability of the proposed tracking method is validated by determining the trajectory and velocity described by glass microspheres in movement.

  6. Modulation of solar flare particles and track density profiles in gas-rich meteorite grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    A solution is presented to the problem concerning the time-averaged solar flare particle flux as a function of kinetic energy and distance from the sun for a given particle injection spectrum at the sun within the framework of standard diffusion-convection-adiabatic deceleration theory with the diffusion coefficient independent of distance from the sun. Results of the calculations which give best agreement with observations at 1 AU are presented and discussed, with particular reference to their implications for gas-rich meteorites. Normalization at the orbit of earth is achieved via observed track density versus depth profiles in lunar vug crystals. It is shown that if gas-rich meteorite grains were irradiated in the asteroid belt and if source and modulation parameters have changed little since irradiation, the track density should be 'harder' than the lunar vug profile by about 0.2-0.3 in the index. Quantitative estimation of solar flare particle exposure ages is discussed.

  7. Dissecting the cell entry pathway of dengue virus by single-particle tracking in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilde M van der Schaar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is an enveloped RNA virus that causes the most common arthropod-borne infection worldwide. The mechanism by which DENV infects the host cell remains unclear. In this work, we used live-cell imaging and single-virus tracking to investigate the cell entry, endocytic trafficking, and fusion behavior of DENV. Simultaneous tracking of DENV particles and various endocytic markers revealed that DENV enters cells exclusively via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The virus particles move along the cell surface in a diffusive manner before being captured by a pre-existing clathrin-coated pit. Upon clathrin-mediated entry, DENV particles are transported to Rab5-positive endosomes, which subsequently mature into late endosomes through acquisition of Rab7 and loss of Rab5. Fusion of the viral membrane with the endosomal membrane was primarily detected in late endosomal compartments.

  8. Elastic collisions of classical point particles on a finite frictionless linear track with perfectly reflecting endpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, R.

    2006-03-01

    Repeated elastic collisions of point particles on a finite frictionless linear track with perfectly reflecting endpoints are considered. The problem is analysed by means of an elementary linear algebra approach. It is found that, starting with a state consisting of a projectile particle in motion at constant velocity and a target particle at rest in a fixed known position, the points at which collisions occur on track, when plotted versus progressive numerals, corresponding to the collisions themselves, show periodic patterns for a rather large choice of values of the initial position x(0) and on the mass ratio r. For certain values of these parameters, however, only regular behaviour over a large number of collisions is detected.

  9. Particle position and velocity measurement in dusty plasmas using particle tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yan; Goree, J.; Haralson, Zach; Wong, Chun-Shang; Kananovich, A.; Li, Wei

    2016-06-01

    > Methods of imaging and image analysis are presented for dusty plasma experiments. Micron-sized polymer spheres, electrically suspended in a partially ionized gas, are illuminated by a sheet of laser light and imaged by video cameras. Image analysis methods yield particle positions and velocities of individual particles in each video image. Methods to minimize errors in the particle positions and velocities, which are now commonly used in the dusty plasma community, are described.

  10. VOLTAGE REGULATORS ASYNCHRONOUS GENERATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigorash O. V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A promising is currently the use of asynchronous generators with capacitive excitation as a source of electricity in stand-alone power systems. Drive asynchronous generators may exercise as a thermal engine and wind wheel wind power plant or turbines of small hydropower plants. The article discusses the structural and schematics of voltage stabilizers and frequency of asynchronous generators with improved operational and technical specifications. Technical novelty of design solutions of the magnetic system and stabilizers asynchronous generator of electricity parameters confirmed by the patents for the invention of the Russian Federation. The proposed technical solution voltage stabilizer asynchronous generators, can reduce the weight of the block capacitors excitation and reactive power compensation, as well as to simplify the control system power circuit which has less power electronic devices. For wind power plants it is an important issue not only to stabilize the voltage of the generator, but also the frequency of the current. Recommend functionality stabilizer schemes parameters of electric power made for direct frequency converters with artificial and natural switching power electronic devices. It is also proposed as part of stabilization systems use single-phase voltage, three-phase transformers with rotating magnetic field, reduce the level of electromagnetic interference generated by power electronic devices for switching, enhance the efficiency and reliability of the stabilizer.

  11. Improved estimation of anomalous diffusion exponents in single particle tracking experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bronshtein, Eldad Kepten Irena

    2013-01-01

    The Mean Square Displacement is a central tool in the analysis of Single Particle Tracking experiments, shedding light on various biophysical phenomena. Frequently, parameters are extracted by performing time-averages on single particle trajectories followed by ensemble averaging. This procedure however, suffers from two systematic errors when applied to particles that perform anomalous diffusion. The first is significant at short time lags and is induced by measurement errors. The second arises from the natural heterogeneity in biophysical systems. We show how to estimate and correct these two errors and improve the estimation of the anomalous parameters for the whole particle distribution. As a consequence we manage to characterize ensembles of heterogeneous particles even for rather short and noisy measurements where regular time averaged mean square displacement analysis fails. We apply this method to both simulations and in vivo measurements of telomere diffusion in 3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. ...

  12. Surrogate-driven deformable motion model for organ motion tracking in particle radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassi, Aurora; Seregni, Matteo; Riboldi, Marco; Cerveri, Pietro; Sarrut, David; Battista Ivaldi, Giovanni; Tabarelli de Fatis, Paola; Liotta, Marco; Baroni, Guido

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is the development and experimental testing of a tumor tracking method for particle radiation therapy, providing the daily respiratory dynamics of the patient’s thoraco-abdominal anatomy as a function of an external surface surrogate combined with an a priori motion model. The proposed tracking approach is based on a patient-specific breathing motion model, estimated from the four-dimensional (4D) planning computed tomography (CT) through deformable image registration. The model is adapted to the interfraction baseline variations in the patient’s anatomical configuration. The driving amplitude and phase parameters are obtained intrafractionally from a respiratory surrogate signal derived from the external surface displacement. The developed technique was assessed on a dataset of seven lung cancer patients, who underwent two repeated 4D CT scans. The first 4D CT was used to build the respiratory motion model, which was tested on the second scan. The geometric accuracy in localizing lung lesions, mediated over all breathing phases, ranged between 0.6 and 1.7 mm across all patients. Errors in tracking the surrounding organs at risk, such as lungs, trachea and esophagus, were lower than 1.3 mm on average. The median absolute variation in water equivalent path length (WEL) within the target volume did not exceed 1.9 mm-WEL for simulated particle beams. A significant improvement was achieved compared with error compensation based on standard rigid alignment. The present work can be regarded as a feasibility study for the potential extension of tumor tracking techniques in particle treatments. Differently from current tracking methods applied in conventional radiotherapy, the proposed approach allows for the dynamic localization of all anatomical structures scanned in the planning CT, thus providing complete information on density and WEL variations required for particle beam range adaptation.

  13. The use of conformally-invariant equations to describe tracks of charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spivak-Lavrov, I.F. [Pedagogical Inst. of Aktyubinsk (Kazakhstan)

    1995-09-01

    To calculate tracks of charges particles in electric and magnetic fields, when they are doubly-measured, we have offered a method based on the application of new conformally-invariant variables. These variables are selected in such a way that they simplify the solution of the boundary problem for potentials. We have arrived at the relativistic conformally-invariant equations for tracks in the conic deflecting systems. We also suggest the results of numerical integration of the equations for the simple system with two electrodes. (orig.).

  14. A better understanding of biomass co-firing by developing an advanced non-spherical particle tracking model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup; Kær, Søren Knudsen;

    2004-01-01

    -area-to-volume ratio and thus experiences a totally different motion and reaction as a non-spherical particle. Therefore, an advanced non-spherical particle-tracking model is developed to calculate the motion and reaction of nonspherical biomass particles. The biomass particles are assumed as solid or hollow cylinders......-gradient force. Since the drag and lift forces are both shape factor- and orientation-dependent, coupled particle rotation equations are resolved to update particle orientation. In the reaction of biomass particles, the actual particle surface area available and the average oxygen mass flux at particle surface...

  15. Parallel computing of a digital hologram and particle searching for microdigital-holographic particle-tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, Shin-Ichi; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Sato, Kazuho; Ito, Tomoyoshi; Yamamoto, Keisuke

    2007-02-01

    We have developed a parallel algorithm for microdigital-holographic particle-tracking velocimetry. The algorithm is used in (1) numerical reconstruction of a particle image computer using a digital hologram, and (2) searching for particles. The numerical reconstruction from the digital hologram makes use of the Fresnel diffraction equation and the FFT (fast Fourier transform), whereas the particle search algorithm looks for local maximum graduation in a reconstruction field represented by a 3D matrix. To achieve high performance computing for both calculations (reconstruction and particle search), two memory partitions are allocated to the 3D matrix. In this matrix, the reconstruction part consists of horizontally placed 2D memory partitions on the x-y plane for the FFT, whereas, the particle search part consists of vertically placed 2D memory partitions set along the z axes. Consequently, the scalability can be obtained for the proportion of processor elements, where the benchmarks are carried out for parallel computation by a SGI Altix machine.

  16. Real-Time MRI-Guided Catheter Tracking Using Hyperpolarized Silicon Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Nicholas; Hu, Jingzhe; Shah, Jay V.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Cressman, Erik; Zacharias Millward, Niki; Menter, David G.; Marcus, Charles M.; Bhattacharya, Pratip K.

    2015-08-01

    Visualizing the movement of angiocatheters during endovascular interventions is typically accomplished using x-ray fluoroscopy. There are many potential advantages to developing magnetic resonance imaging-based approaches that will allow three-dimensional imaging of the tissue/vasculature interface while monitoring other physiologically-relevant criteria, without exposing the patient or clinician team to ionizing radiation. Here we introduce a proof-of-concept development of a magnetic resonance imaging-guided catheter tracking method that utilizes hyperpolarized silicon particles. The increased signal of the silicon particles is generated via low-temperature, solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization, and the particles retain their enhanced signal for ≥40 minutes—allowing imaging experiments over extended time durations. The particles are affixed to the tip of standard medical-grade catheters and are used to track passage under set distal and temporal points in phantoms and live mouse models. With continued development, this method has the potential to supplement x-ray fluoroscopy and other MRI-guided catheter tracking methods as a zero-background, positive contrast agent that does not require ionizing radiation.

  17. Magnetic poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and cellulose particles for MRI-based cell tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkansah, Michael K.; Thakral, Durga; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradable, superparamagnetic micro- and nanoparticles of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and cellulose were designed, fabricated and characterized for magnetic cell labeling. Monodisperse nanocrystals of magnetite were incorporated into micro- and nanoparticles of PLGA and cellulose with high efficiency using an oil-in-water single emulsion technique. Superparamagnetic cores had high magnetization (72.1 emu/g). The resulting polymeric particles had smooth surface morphology and high magnetite content (43.3 wt% for PLGA and 69.6 wt% for cellulose). While PLGA and cellulose nanoparticles displayed highest r2* values per millimole of iron (399 s-1mM-1 for cellulose and 505 s-1mM-1 for PLGA), micron-sized PLGA particles had a much higher r2* per particle than either. After incubation for a month in citrate buffer (pH 5.5), magnetic PLGA particles lost close to 50% of their initial r2* molar relaxivity, while magnetic cellulose particles remained intact, preserving over 85% of their initial r2* molar relaxivity. Lastly, mesenchymal stem cells and human breast adenocarcinoma cells were magnetically labeled using these particles with no detectable cytotoxicity. These particles are ideally suited for non-invasive cell tracking in vivo via MRI and due to their vastly different degradation properties, offer unique potential for dedicated use for either short (PLGA-based particles) or long term (cellulose-based particles) experiments. PMID:21404328

  18. Magnetic poly(lactide-co-glycolide) and cellulose particles for MRI-based cell tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkansah, Michael K; Thakral, Durga; Shapiro, Erik M

    2011-06-01

    Biodegradable, superparamagnetic microparticles and nanoparticles of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and cellulose were designed, fabricated, and characterized for magnetic cell labeling. Monodisperse nanocrystals of magnetite were incorporated into microparticles and nanoparticles of PLGA and cellulose with high efficiency using an oil-in-water single emulsion technique. Superparamagnetic cores had high magnetization (72.1 emu/g). The resulting polymeric particles had smooth surface morphology and high magnetite content (43.3 wt % for PLGA and 69.6 wt % for cellulose). While PLGA and cellulose nanoparticles displayed highest r 2* values per millimole of iron (399 sec(-1) mM(-1) for cellulose and 505 sec(-1) mM(-1) for PLGA), micron-sized PLGA particles had a much higher r 2* per particle than either. After incubation for a month in citrate buffer (pH 5.5), magnetic PLGA particles lost close to 50% of their initial r 2* molar relaxivity, while magnetic cellulose particles remained intact, preserving over 85% of their initial r 2* molar relaxivity. Lastly, mesenchymal stem cells and human breast adenocarcinoma cells were magnetically labeled using these particles with no detectable cytotoxicity. These particles are ideally suited for noninvasive cell tracking in vivo via MRI and due to their vastly different degradation properties, offer unique potential for dedicated use for either short (PLGA-based particles) or long-term (cellulose-based particles) experiments.

  19. Asynchronized synchronous machines

    CERN Document Server

    Botvinnik, M M

    1964-01-01

    Asynchronized Synchronous Machines focuses on the theoretical research on asynchronized synchronous (AS) machines, which are "hybrids” of synchronous and induction machines that can operate with slip. Topics covered in this book include the initial equations; vector diagram of an AS machine; regulation in cases of deviation from the law of full compensation; parameters of the excitation system; and schematic diagram of an excitation regulator. The possible applications of AS machines and its calculations in certain cases are also discussed. This publication is beneficial for students and indiv

  20. Modeling Bimolecular Reactions and Transport in Porous Media Via Particle Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Ding; David Benson; Amir Paster; Diogo Bolster

    2012-01-01

    We use a particle-tracking method to simulate several one-dimensional bimolecular reactive transport experiments. In this numerical method, the reactants are represented by particles: advection and dispersion dominate the flow, and molecular diffusion dictates, in large part, the reactions. The particle/particle reactions are determined by a combination of two probabilities dictated by the physics of transport and energetics of reaction. The first is that reactant particles occupy the same volume over a short time interval. The second is the conditional probability that two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. The first probability is a direct physical representation of the degree of mixing in an advancing displacement front, and as such lacks empirical parameters except for the user-defined number of particles. This number can be determined analytically from concentration autocovariance, if this type of data is available. The simulations compare favorably to two physical experiments. In one, the concentration of product, 1,2-naphthoquinoe-4-aminobenzene (NQAB) from reaction between 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonic acid (NQS) and aniline (AN), was measured at the outflow of a column filled with glass beads at different times. In the other, the concentration distribution of reactants (CuSO_4 and EDTA^{4-}) and products (CuEDTA^{4-}) were quantified by snapshots of transmitted light through a column packed with cryloite sand. The thermodynamic rate coefficient in the latter experiment was 10^7 times greater than the former experiment, making it essentially instantaneous. When compared to the solution of the advection-dispersion-reaction equation (ADRE) with the well-mixed reaction coefficient, the experiments and the particle-tracking simulations showed on the order of 20% to 40% less overall product, which is attributed to poor mixing. The poor mixing also leads to higher product concentrations on the edges of the mixing zones, which the particle

  1. On the dynamics of jellyfish locomotion via 3D particle tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Matthew; Kim, Jin-Tae; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) locomotion is experimentally studied via 3D particle tracking velocimetry. 3D locations of the bell tip are tracked over 1.5 cycles to describe the jellyfish path. Multiple positions of the jellyfish bell margin are initially tracked in 2D from four independent planes and individually projected in 3D based on the jellyfish path and geometrical properties of the setup. A cubic spline interpolation and the exponentially weighted moving average are used to estimate derived quantities, including velocity and acceleration of the jellyfish locomotion. We will discuss distinctive features of the jellyfish 3D motion at various swimming phases, and will provide insight on the 3D contraction and relaxation in terms of the locomotion, the steadiness of the bell margin eccentricity, and local Reynolds number based on the instantaneous mean diameter of the bell.

  2. Observations by electron microscopy of tracks of heavy particles in cellulose triacetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vareille, J.C. (Universite de Limoges, France); Decossas, J.L.; Moliton, J.P.; Teyssier, J.L.; Delaunay, B.

    1982-07-01

    Tracks of heavy charged particles have been observed in cellulose acetate by conventional electron microscopy (100 kV) and by high voltage microscopy (1, 2 MV). The tracks are formed of successive islets following each other at distances of 70 to 150 A. With the evolution of the diameter of these zones is shown the existence of a highly perturbed cylindrical volume (diameter 400 A for the case of krypton) corresponding to regions in which free radicals have been created. The different techniques used do not allow observation of the latent track because of the complications of energetic phenomena: the electron beam current density being limited, the contrast is small and hence the resolution is restricted.

  3. Two dimensional, electronic particle tracking in liquids with a graphene-based magnetic sensor array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Rodrigo F.; Engel, Michael; Steiner, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    The investigation and control of liquid flow at the nanometer scale is a key area of applied research with high relevance to physics, chemistry, and biology. We introduce a method and a device that allows the spatial resolution of liquid flow by integrating an array of graphene-based magnetic (Hall) sensors that is used for tracking the movement of magnetic nanoparticles immersed in a liquid under investigation. With a novel device concept based on standard integration processes and experimentally verified material parameters, we numerically simulate the performance of a single sensor pixel, as well as the whole sensor array, for tracking magnetic nanoparticles having typical properties. The results demonstrate that the device enables (a) the detection of individual nanoparticles in the liquid with high accuracy and (b) the reconstruction of a particle's flow-driven trajectory across the integrated sensor array with sub-pixel precision as a function of time, in what we call the ``Magnetic nanoparticle velocimetry'' technique. Since the method does not rely on optical detection, potential lab-on-chip applications include particle tracking and flow analysis in opaque media at the sub-micron scale.The investigation and control of liquid flow at the nanometer scale is a key area of applied research with high relevance to physics, chemistry, and biology. We introduce a method and a device that allows the spatial resolution of liquid flow by integrating an array of graphene-based magnetic (Hall) sensors that is used for tracking the movement of magnetic nanoparticles immersed in a liquid under investigation. With a novel device concept based on standard integration processes and experimentally verified material parameters, we numerically simulate the performance of a single sensor pixel, as well as the whole sensor array, for tracking magnetic nanoparticles having typical properties. The results demonstrate that the device enables (a) the detection of individual

  4. Passive Target Tracking in Non-cooperative Radar System Based on Particle Filtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shuo; TAO Ran

    2006-01-01

    We propose a target tracking method based on particle filtering(PF) to solve the nonlinear non-Gaussian target-tracking problem in the bistatic radar systems using external radiation sources. Traditional nonlinear state estimation method is extended Kalman filtering (EKF), which is to do the first level Taylor series extension. It will cause an inaccuracy or even a scatter estimation result on condition that there is either a highly nonlinear target or a large noise square-error. Besides, Kalman filtering is the optimal resolution under a Gaussian noise assumption, and is not suitable to the non-Gaussian condition. PF is a sort of statistic filtering based on Monte Carlo simulation that is using some random samples (particles) to simulate the posterior probability density of system random variables. This method can be used in any nonlinear random system. It can be concluded through simulation that PF can achieve higher accuracy than the traditional EKF.

  5. Single-sheet identification method of heavy charged particles using solid state nuclear track detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M F Zaki; A Abdel-Naby; A Ahmed Morsy

    2007-08-01

    The theoretical and experimental investigations of the penetration of charged particles in matter played a very important role in the development of modern physics. Solid state nuclear track detectors have become one of the most important tools for many branches of science and technology. An attempt has been made to examine the suitability of the single-sheet particle identification technique in CR-39 and CN-85 polycarbonate by plotting track cone length vs. residual range for different heavy ions in these detectors. So, the maximum etchable ranges of heavy ions such as 93Nb, 86Kr and 4He in CR-39 and 4He and 132Xe in CN-85 polycarbonate have been determined. The ranges of these ions in these detectors have also been computed theoretically using the Henke–Benton program. A reasonably good agreement has been observed between the experimentally and theoretically computed values.

  6. Three-dimensional textural and compositional analysis of particle tracks and fragmentation history in aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, D. S.; Greenberg, M.; Rivers, M. L.; Newville, M.

    2009-11-01

    We report analyses of aerogel tracks using (1 synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (XRCMT), (2) laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM), and (3) synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) of particles and their paths resulting from simulated hypervelocity impacts (1-2), and a single ~1 mm aerogel track from the Stardust cometary sample collector (1-3). Large aerogel pieces can be imaged sequentially, resulting in high spatial resolution images spanning many tomographic fields of view (‘lambda-tomography’). We report calculations of energy deposited, and tests on aromatic hydrocarbons showing no alteration in tomography experiments. Imaging at resolutions from ~17 to ~1 micron/pixel edge (XRCMT) and to nondestructive, quantitative 3-D analysis of captured materials at high spatial resolution. This data is fundamental to understanding the hypervelocity particle-aerogel interaction histories of Stardust grains.

  7. Particle Data Management Software for 3DParticle Tracking Velocimetry and Related Applications – The Flowtracks Package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef Meller

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV community employs several formats of particle information such as position and velocity as function of time, i.e. trajectory data, as a result of diverging needs unmet by existing formats, and a number of different, mostly home-grown, codes for handling the data. Flowtracks is a Python package that provides a single code base for accessing different formats as a database, i.e. storing data and programmatically manipulating them using format-agnostic data structures. Furthermore, it offers an HDF5-based format that is fast and extensible, obviating the need for other formats. The package may be obtained from https://github.com/OpenPTV/postptv and used as-is by many fluid-dynamics labs, or with minor extensions adhering to a common interface, by researchers from other fields, such as biology and population tracking.

  8. Application of nuclear particle tracks: A scanning x-ray microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, P.J.

    1991-09-30

    The scanning x-ray microscope (SXM) is a short-wavelength analog of a near-field optical-scanning microscope, promising spatial resolution of {approximately}100{angstrom} up to {approximately}5 keV x-ray energy. A portion of a synchrotron x-ray beam streams through an etched nuclear particle track in an opaque membrane and impinges on an object within the narrow stream. Scattered or transmitted x-rays are detected with a photon counter. The SXM is feasible because a useful number of synchrotron x-rays, even from a bend magnet, will stream through a small diameter pore. The properties and limitations of the SXM are discussed together with other submicroscopic applications of nuclear particle tracks. 14 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Numerical Study on the Particle Trajectory Tracking in a Micro-UV Bio-Fluorescence Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Sun-Seok; Cho, Moon-Young; Lee, Jong-Chul; Kim, Youn-Jea

    2015-03-01

    A micro-UV bio-fluorescence sensor was developed to detect primary biological aerosols including bacteria, bacterial spores, fungal spores, pollens, viruses, algae, etc. In order to effectively detect the bio-particles in a micro-UV bio-fluorescence sensor, numerical calculations were performed to adjust for appropriate flow conditions of the sensor by regulating the sample aerosols and sheath flow. In particular, a CFD-based model of hydrodynamic processes was developed by computing the trajectory of particles using commercially available ANSYS CFX-14 software and the Lagrangian tracking model. The established model was evaluated with regard to the variation of sheath flow rate and particle size. Results showed that the sheath flow was changed rapidly at the end of nozzle tip, but the sample particles moved near the center of aerosol jet for aerodynamic focusing with little deviation from the axis.

  10. Near-surface snow particle dynamics from particle tracking velocimetry and turbulence measurements during alpine blowing snow storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksamit, Nikolas O.; Pomeroy, John W.

    2016-12-01

    Many blowing snow conceptual and predictive models have been based on simplified two-phase flow dynamics derived from time-averaged observations of bulk flow conditions in blowing snow storms. Measurements from the first outdoor application of particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) of near-surface blowing snow yield new information on mechanisms for blowing snow initiation, entrainment, and rebound, whilst also confirming some findings from wind tunnel observations. Blowing snow particle movement is influenced by complex surface flow dynamics, including saltation development from creep that has not previously been measured for snow. Comparisons with 3-D atmospheric turbulence measurements show that blowing snow particle motion immediately above the snow surface responds strongly to high-frequency turbulent motions. Momentum exchange from wind to the dense near-surface particle-laden flow appears significant and makes an important contribution to blowing snow mass flux and saltation initiation dynamics. The more complete and accurate description of near-surface snow particle motions observable using PTV may prove useful for improving blowing snow model realism and accuracy.

  11. Registration of alpha particles in Makrofol-E nuclear track detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rammah, Y.S. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Menoufia University, Shebin El-Koom (Egypt); Abdalla, Ayman M., E-mail: aymanabdalla62@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Najran University, P. O. Box. 11001, Najran (Saudi Arabia); Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Najran University (Saudi Arabia); Ashraf, O., E-mail: osama.ashraf@edu.asu.edu.eg [Physics Department, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11575 (Egypt); Ashry, A.H. [Physics Department, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11575 (Egypt)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Makrofol-E detectors have been irradiated with alpha particles and fission fragments. • Fast detection of alpha particles in Makrofol-E detectors. • Bulk etching rate was calculated from fission track diameters. - Abstract: Fast detection of alpha particles in the range from 1 to 5 MeV in Makrofol-E polycarbonate nuclear track detectors (PCTDs) using a new chemical etchant was investigated. {sup 252}Cf and {sup 241}Am-thin open sources were used for irradiating Makrofol-E detectors with fission fragments and alpha particles in air at normal pressure and temperature (NPT). A chain of experimental work has been carried out using new etchants to register alpha particle in short time in Makrofol-E polycarbonate detectors. The etching efficiency were exhibited a clear dependence on the amount of methanol in the etching solution and etching time. The optimized chemical condition obtained at this stage of development for 200 μm Makrofol-E detectors are (8 ml of 10 N NaOH + 2 ml CH{sub 3}OH) etching solutions at 60 °C for 3 h. In this study; it is possible to observe energy detection windows for Makrofol-E detectors according to applied etching duration. Makrofol-E introduced the characteristic Bragg peak, which indicates the advantages of this detector as alpha spectrometer. Consequently, the suggested new etchant can be developed for heavy ions detection and monitoring radon levels and its daughters.

  12. Asynchronous Multiparty Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Geisler, Martin; Krøigaard, Mikkel

    2009-01-01

    We propose an asynchronous protocol for general multiparty computation. The protocol has perfect security and communication complexity  where n is the number of parties, |C| is the size of the arithmetic circuit being computed, and k is the size of elements in the underlying field. The protocol g...

  13. Asynchronous P300 BCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panicker, Rajesh; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan; Sun, Ying

    2010-01-01

    An asynchronous hybrid brain-computer interface (BCI) system combining the P300 and steady-state visually evoked potentials (SSVEP) paradigms is introduced. A P300 base system is used for information transfer, and is augmented to include SSVEP for control state detection. The proposed system has...

  14. Redundant Asynchronous Microprocessor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, G.; Johnston, J. O.; Dunn, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    Fault-tolerant computer structure called RAMPS (for redundant asynchronous microprocessor system) has simplicity of static redundancy but offers intermittent-fault handling ability of complex, dynamically redundant systems. New structure useful wherever several microprocessors are employed for control - in aircraft, industrial processes, robotics, and automatic machining, for example.

  15. Multiparty Asynchronous Session Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honda, Kohei; Yoshida, Nobuko; Carbone, Marco

    2016-01-01

    peers are directly abstracted as a global scenario. Global types retain the friendly type syntax of binary session types while specifying dependencies and capturing complex causal chains of multiparty asynchronous interactions. A global type plays the role of a shared agreement among communication peers...

  16. Track Structure and the Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, K.; Hada, M.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Track structure models predict that at a fixed value of LET, particles with lower charge number, Z will have a higher biological effectiveness compared to particles with a higher Z. In this report we investigated how track structure effects induction of chromosomal aberration in human cells. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with various energies of accelerated iron, silicon, neon, or titanium ions and chromosome damage was assessed in using three color FISH chromosome painting in chemically induced PCC samples collected a first cell division post irradiation. The LET values for these ions ranged from 30 to195 keV/micron. Of the particles studied, Neon ions have the highest biological effectiveness for induction of total chromosome damage, which is consistent with track structure model predictions. For complex-type exchanges 64 MeV/ u Neon and 450 MeV/u Iron were equally effective and induced the most complex damage. In addition we present data on chromosomes exchanges induced by six different energies of protons (5 MeV/u to 2.5 GeV/u). The linear dose response term was similar for all energies of protons suggesting that the effect of the higher LET at low proton energies is balanced by the production of nuclear secondaries from the high energy protons.

  17. Ground Moving Target Tracking with VS-IMM Using Mean Shift Unscented Particle Filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Caicai; CHEN Wei

    2011-01-01

    In order to track ground moving target,a variable structure interacting multiple model (VS-IMM)using mean shift unscented particle filter(MS-UPF)is proposed in this paper.In model-conditioned filtering,sample particles obtained from the unscented particle filter are moved towards the maximal posterior density estimation of the target state through mean shift.On the basis of stop model in VS-1MM,hide model is proposed.Once the target is obscured by terrain,the prediction at prior time is used instead of the measurement at posterior time; in addition,the road molel set used is not changed.A ground moving target indication(GMTI)radar is employed in three common simulation scenarios of ground target:entering or leaving a road,crossing a junction and no measurement.Two evaluation indexes,root mean square error(RMSE)and average normalized estimation error squared(ANEES),are used.The results indicate that when the road on which the target moving changes,the tracking accuracy is effectively improved in the proposed algorithm.Moreover,track interruption could be avoided if the target is moving too slowly or masked by terrain.

  18. Confocal microscopy in the analysis of the etched nuclear particle tracks in polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakes, J.; Schraube, H. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Gais, P. [GSF-Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie

    1995-01-01

    The possibility of the morphometric analysis of etched tracks, induced by protons and alpha particles in the organic polymer allyl diglycol carbonate (CR-39), using the confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM), was studied. The detectors were investigated in two groups of irradiation experiments, namely: (a) irradiated with mono-energetic neutrons of energy 1.2 MeV, (b) exposed to the alpha radiation from {sup 222}Rn and its progeny. Both groups were irradiated at normal incidence. Radiation-induced latent tracks were electrochemically etched, and their morphometric parameters were investigated in the reflection mode by using the 488-nm spectral line of an argon ion laser. A constant number of up to 200 optical sections in Z-scan mode was taken through each selected etched track at vertical spacings of 0.642 {mu}m. Successive reconstructions of Z-sections were used to determine the following parameters: the mead radius of the opening channel, the maximum diameter and the length of the track, and the angle of the track wall to the surface of the sample. (author).

  19. A computational framework for particle and whole cell tracking applied to a real biological dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng Wei; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar; Styles, Vanessa; Kuttenberger, Verena; Horn, Elias; von Guttenberg, Zeno; Madzvamuse, Anotida

    2016-05-24

    Cell tracking is becoming increasingly important in cell biology as it provides a valuable tool for analysing experimental data and hence furthering our understanding of dynamic cellular phenomena. The advent of high-throughput, high-resolution microscopy and imaging techniques means that a wealth of large data is routinely generated in many laboratories. Due to the sheer magnitude of the data involved manual tracking is often cumbersome and the development of computer algorithms for automated cell tracking is thus highly desirable. In this work, we describe two approaches for automated cell tracking. Firstly, we consider particle tracking. We propose a few segmentation techniques for the detection of cells migrating in a non-uniform background, centroids of the segmented cells are then calculated and linked from frame to frame via a nearest-neighbour approach. Secondly, we consider the problem of whole cell tracking in which one wishes to reconstruct in time whole cell morphologies. Our approach is based on fitting a mathematical model to the experimental imaging data with the goal being that the physics encoded in the model is reflected in the reconstructed data. The resulting mathematical problem involves the optimal control of a phase-field formulation of a geometric evolution law. Efficient approximation of this challenging optimal control problem is achieved via advanced numerical methods for the solution of semilinear parabolic partial differential equations (PDEs) coupled with parallelisation and adaptive resolution techniques. Along with a detailed description of our algorithms, a number of simulation results are reported on. We focus on illustrating the effectivity of our approaches by applying the algorithms to the tracking of migrating cells in a dataset which reflects many of the challenges typically encountered in microscopy data.

  20. Nanoparticle transport in heterogeneous porous media with particle tracking numerical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ngoc H.; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, transport and retention of nanoparticles that flow in suspension through packed beds with unconsolidated spheres and through consolidated Berea sandstone are numerically explored. The surfaces exhibit electrical charge heterogeneity where particles can deposit blocking the surrounding surface deposition sites. The lattice Boltzmann method with Lagrangian particle tracking are the techniques employed. Four ideal patterns of surface charge heterogeneity are adopted for the packed sphere beds, while a real distribution of charge heterogeneity is determined for the Berea core through micro-CT image segmentation. It is found that particle breakthrough curves do not reach a plateau, unless the pore surfaces are completely saturated. Surface saturation also enhances particle propagation because of the surface blocking mechanism, reducing the effective particle deposition rate. In addition, surface saturation mitigates the effect of the pattern of heterogeneity on particle retention, which might be pronounced when blocking is not taken into account. It is also observed from the case of Berea core that the heterogeneity of the mineralogical surfaces disturbs particle transport depending on the physicochemical properties of the surfaces. Likewise, similarity of the mineralogical surface properties is a prerequisite for the commonly used patch-wise model with Langmuirian blocking to reproduce nanoparticle breakthrough in such porous media.

  1. Nanoparticle transport in heterogeneous porous media with particle tracking numerical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ngoc H.; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V.

    2016-08-01

    In this article, transport and retention of nanoparticles that flow in suspension through packed beds with unconsolidated spheres and through consolidated Berea sandstone are numerically explored. The surfaces exhibit electrical charge heterogeneity where particles can deposit blocking the surrounding surface deposition sites. The lattice Boltzmann method with Lagrangian particle tracking are the techniques employed. Four ideal patterns of surface charge heterogeneity are adopted for the packed sphere beds, while a real distribution of charge heterogeneity is determined for the Berea core through micro-CT image segmentation. It is found that particle breakthrough curves do not reach a plateau, unless the pore surfaces are completely saturated. Surface saturation also enhances particle propagation because of the surface blocking mechanism, reducing the effective particle deposition rate. In addition, surface saturation mitigates the effect of the pattern of heterogeneity on particle retention, which might be pronounced when blocking is not taken into account. It is also observed from the case of Berea core that the heterogeneity of the mineralogical surfaces disturbs particle transport depending on the physicochemical properties of the surfaces. Likewise, similarity of the mineralogical surface properties is a prerequisite for the commonly used patch-wise model with Langmuirian blocking to reproduce nanoparticle breakthrough in such porous media.

  2. Analysis and Optimization of a Lagrangian Volcanic Ash Particle Tracking Model called Puff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, R.; Dean, K.

    2002-12-01

    Volcanic ash tracking models are important for airborne and ground hazard mitigation. Volcanic ash can have devastating effects on aircraft during flight, and ground sedimentation is potentially hazardous in populated areas. Because ash dispersion is controlled primarily by atmospheric winds, analytic solutions are impractical and must be numerically solved. Two distinct modeling techniques, Lagrangian and Eulerian, are currently used for both regional and global tracking models. Recently, the Lagrangian technique has appeared to be more accurate and efficient for tracking volcanic ash plumes, particularly for small eruptions and at early times during the eruption. Modeling ash plume dispersion is complicated by several factors including particle sedimentation and aggregation, and varying wind-field dynamics from the near surface to upper atmosphere. Furthermore, there exists a very limited data set pertaining to past eruptions with which tracking models can be tested and validated. Due primarily to this dearth of data on past eruptions, tracking models have erred on the side of excess when including potentially important factors in describing particle dynamics. The most recent version of Puff includes eleven distinct, adjustable parameters that are intended to describe various processes that effect airborne particle dynamics. The analysis described here was undertaken to better understand the sensitivity of the model to each of the eleven parameters independently. As a result, an improved understanding of how best to parameterize the model has been gained, as well as several methods to optimize performance and the predictive capability has been discovered. Since Puff includes random perturbations in the ash particle trajectories using a Monte Carlo-type technique, large numbers of successive simulations were performed in the analysis, and the averaged overall behavior was analyzed. Model run groups of 100, 500, and 5000 simulations were performed. The eleven

  3. Single-particle tracking of murine polyoma virus-like particles on live cells and artificial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, Helge; Smith, Alicia E; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Lilie, Hauke; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Helenius, Ari

    2005-10-18

    The lateral mobility of individual murine polyoma virus-like particles (VLPs) bound to live cells and artificial lipid bilayers was studied by single fluorescent particle tracking using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The particle trajectories were analyzed in terms of diffusion rates and modes of motion as described by the moment scaling spectrum. Although VLPs bound to their ganglioside receptor in lipid bilayers exhibited only free diffusion, analysis of trajectories on live 3T6 mouse fibroblasts revealed three distinct modes of mobility: rapid random motion, confined movement in small zones (30-60 nm in diameter), and confined movement in zones with a slow drift. After binding to the cell surface, particles typically underwent free diffusion for 5-10 s, and then they were confined in an actin filament-dependent manner without involvement of clathrin-coated pits or caveolae. Depletion of cholesterol dramatically reduced mobility of VLPs independently of actin, whereas inhibition of tyrosine kinases had no effect on confinement. The results suggested that clustering of ganglioside molecules by the multivalent VLPs induced transmembrane coupling that led to confinement of the virus/receptor complex by cortical actin filaments.

  4. Clinically viable magnetic poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) particles for MRI-based cell tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Dorit; Nkansah, Michael K.; Bennewitz, Margaret F.; Tang, Kevin S.; Markakis, Eleni A.; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To design, fabricate, characterize and in vivo assay clinically viable magnetic particles for MRI-based cell tracking. Methods PLGA encapsulated magnetic nano- and microparticles were fabricated. Multiple biologically relevant experiments were performed to assess cell viability, cellular performance and stem cell differentiation. In vivo MRI experiments were performed to separately test cell transplantation and cell migration paradigms, as well as in vivo biodegradation. Results Highly magnetic nano- (~100 nm) and microparticles (~1–2 μm) were fabricated. Magnetic cell labeling in culture occurred rapidly achieving 3–50 pg Fe/cell at 3 hrs for different particles types, and >100 pg Fe/cell after 10 hours, without the requirement of a transfection agent, and with no effect on cell viability. The capability of magnetically labeled mesenchymal or neural stem cells to differentiate down multiple lineages, or for magnetically labeled immune cells to release cytokines following stimulation, was uncompromised. An in vivo biodegradation study revealed that NPs degraded ~80% over the course of 12 weeks. MRI detected as few as 10 magnetically labeled cells, transplanted into the brains of rats. Also, these particles enabled the in vivo monitoring of endogenous neural progenitor cell migration in rat brains over 2 weeks. Conclusion The robust MRI properties and benign safety profile of these particles make them promising candidates for clinical translation for MRI-based cell tracking. PMID:23568825

  5. Tracking down the links between charged particles and biological response: A UK perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Mark A.

    2013-07-01

    The UK has a long history of radiobiology research into charged particles, with interest likely to expand in the coming years following the recent government announcement of £250 million to build two proton beam therapy facilities in the UK. A brief overview of research and facilities past and present with respect to radiation protection and oncology along with biological consequences and underlying mechanisms will be presented and discussed. Increased knowledge of the mechanisms underpinning the radiation action on biological systems is important in understanding, not only the risks associated with exposure, but also in optimising radiotherapy treatment of cancer. Ionizing radiation is always in the form of structure tracks which are a unique characteristic of ionizing radiation alone producing damage grossly different and far more biologically effective than endogenous damage. The track structure is the prime determinant of biological response to DNA, with charged particles of increasing LET leading to an increase in the frequency and complexity of clustered DNA damage. High-LET particles will also produce non-homogeneous dose distribution through a cell nucleus resulting in correlated DNA breaks along the path of the particle and an increase in the probability of complex chromosomal rearrangements. However it is now well established that there is variety of phenomena that do not conform to the conventional paradigm of targeted radiobiology, but there is insufficient evidence to assess the implications of these non-targeted effects for radiotherapy or relevance to risk for human health.

  6. Low Latency High Throughout Circular Asynchronous FIFO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Yong; ZHOU Runde

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a circular first in first out (FIFO) and its protocols which have a very low la-tency while still maintaining high throughput. Unlike the existing serial FIFOs based on asynchronous micro-pipelines, this FIFO's cells communicate directly with the input and output ports through a common bus, which effectively eliminates the data movement from the input port to the output port, thereby reducing the latency and the power consumption. Furthermore, the latency does not increase with the number of FIFO stages. Single-track asynchronous protocols are used to simplify the FIFO controller design, with only three C-gates needed in each cell controller, which substantially reduces the area. Simulations with the TSMC 0.25 Ijm CMOS logic process show that the latency of the 4-stage FIFO is less than 581 ps and the throughput is higher than 2.2 GHz.

  7. Real-time optical imaging and tracking of micron-sized particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Feng; Song, Qi; Tien, En-kuang; Kalyoncu, Salih K.; Boyraz, Ozdal

    2009-12-01

    We report real-time imaging and dynamics monitoring of micrometer predefined and random sized particles by time-space-wavelength mapping technology using a single-detector. Experimentally, we demonstrate real-time line imaging of a 5 μm polystyrene microsphere, glass powder particles and patterns such as fingerprints with up to 5 μm resolution at 1 line/50 ns capture rate. By using the same setup, real-time displacement tracking of micrometer-size glass particles with 50 ns temporal resolution and up to 5 μm spatial resolution is achieved. We also show that existing correlation spectroscopy algorithms can be adopted to extract dynamic information in a complex environment.

  8. Three-dimensional single-particle tracking in live cells: news from the third dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, A.; Gorelashvili, M.; Schüller, V.; Wehnekamp, F.; Arcizet, D.; Katayama, Y.; Lamb, D. C.; Heinrich, D.

    2013-07-01

    Single-particle tracking (SPT) is of growing importance in the biophysical community. It is used to investigate processes such as drug and gene delivery, viral uptake, intracellular trafficking or membrane-bound protein mobility. Traditionally, SPT is performed in two dimensions (2D) because of its technical simplicity. However, life occurs in three dimensions (3D) and many methods have been recently developed to track particles in 3D. Now, is the third dimension worth the effort? Here we investigate the differences between the 2D and 3D analyses of intracellular transport with the 3D development of a time-resolved mean square displacement (MSD) analysis introduced previously. The 3D trajectories, and the 2D projections, of fluorescent nanoparticles were obtained with an orbital tracking microscope in two different cell types: in Dictyostelium discoideum ameba and in adherent, more flattened HuH-7 human cells. As expected from the different 3D organization of both cells’ cytoskeletons, a third of the active transport was lost upon projection in the ameba whereas the identification of the active phases was barely affected in the HuH-7 cells. In both cell types, we found intracellular diffusion to be anisotropic and the diffusion coefficient values derived from the 2D analysis were therefore biased.

  9. Two dimensional, electronic particle tracking in liquids with a graphene-based magnetic sensor array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Rodrigo F; Engel, Michael; Steiner, Mathias

    2016-07-14

    The investigation and control of liquid flow at the nanometer scale is a key area of applied research with high relevance to physics, chemistry, and biology. We introduce a method and a device that allows the spatial resolution of liquid flow by integrating an array of graphene-based magnetic (Hall) sensors that is used for tracking the movement of magnetic nanoparticles immersed in a liquid under investigation. With a novel device concept based on standard integration processes and experimentally verified material parameters, we numerically simulate the performance of a single sensor pixel, as well as the whole sensor array, for tracking magnetic nanoparticles having typical properties. The results demonstrate that the device enables (a) the detection of individual nanoparticles in the liquid with high accuracy and (b) the reconstruction of a particle's flow-driven trajectory across the integrated sensor array with sub-pixel precision as a function of time, in what we call the "Magnetic nanoparticle velocimetry" technique. Since the method does not rely on optical detection, potential lab-on-chip applications include particle tracking and flow analysis in opaque media at the sub-micron scale.

  10. Decoupling directed and passive motion in dynamic systems: particle tracking microrheology of sputum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Erika J; Sharma, Yasha; Fallica, Brian; Tierney, Dylan B; Fortune, Sarah M; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2013-04-01

    Probing the physical properties of heterogeneous materials is essential to understand the structure, function and dynamics of complex fluids including cells, mucus, and polymer solutions. Particle tracking microrheology is a useful method to passively probe viscoelastic properties on micron length scales by tracking the thermal motion of beads embedded in the sample. However, errors associated with active motion have limited the implementation to dynamic systems. We present a simple method to decouple active and Brownian motion, enabling particle tracking to be applied to fluctuating heterogeneous systems. We use the movement perpendicular to the major axis of motion in time to calculate rheological properties. Through simulated data we demonstrate that this method removes directed motion and performs equally well when there is no directed motion, with an average percent error of glycerol-water mixtures to show the capability to measure a range of materials. Finally, we use this technique to characterize the compliance of human sputum. We also investigate the effect of a liquefaction agent used to prepare sputum for diagnostic purposes. Our results suggest that the addition of high concentration sodium hydroxide increases sample heterogeneity by increasing the maximum observed creep compliance.

  11. Modeling secondary particle tracks generated by intermediate- and low-energy protons in water with the Low-Energy Particle Track Simulation code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhovtsev, Alexey; Traore, Ali; Muñoz, Antonio; Blanco, Francisco; García, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Using a recent extension of the Low-Energy Particle Track Simulation (LEPTS) Monte Carlo code, we model the slowing-down of heavy charged particles propagating in water, combined with an explicit molecular-level description of radiation effects due to the formation of secondary electrons, their propagation through the medium, and electron-induced molecular dissociations. As a case study, we consider the transport of protons with the initial energy of 1 MeV until their thermalization, so that we cover the energy range that contributes mainly to the energy deposition in the Bragg peak region. In order to include protons into the simulation procedure, a comprehensive dataset of integral and differential cross sections of elastic and inelastic scattering of intermediate- and low-energy protons from water molecules is created. Experimental and theoretical cross sections available in the literature are carefully examined, compared and verified. The ionization cross section by protons includes recent experimental measurements of the production of different charged fragments.

  12. A variational multiscale method for particle-cloud tracking in turbomachinery flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsini, A.; Rispoli, F.; Sheard, A. G.; Takizawa, K.; Tezduyar, T. E.; Venturini, P.

    2014-11-01

    We present a computational method for simulation of particle-laden flows in turbomachinery. The method is based on a stabilized finite element fluid mechanics formulation and a finite element particle-cloud tracking method. We focus on induced-draft fans used in process industries to extract exhaust gases in the form of a two-phase fluid with a dispersed solid phase. The particle-laden flow causes material wear on the fan blades, degrading their aerodynamic performance, and therefore accurate simulation of the flow would be essential in reliable computational turbomachinery analysis and design. The turbulent-flow nature of the problem is dealt with a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes model and Streamline-Upwind/Petrov-Galerkin/Pressure-Stabilizing/Petrov-Galerkin stabilization, the particle-cloud trajectories are calculated based on the flow field and closure models for the turbulence-particle interaction, and one-way dependence is assumed between the flow field and particle dynamics. We propose a closure model utilizing the scale separation feature of the variational multiscale method, and compare that to the closure utilizing the eddy viscosity model. We present computations for axial- and centrifugal-fan configurations, and compare the computed data to those obtained from experiments, analytical approaches, and other computational methods.

  13. Single particle tracking through highly scattering media with multiplexed two-photon excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perillo, Evan; Liu, Yen-Liang; Liu, Cong; Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2015-03-01

    3D single-particle tracking (SPT) has been a pivotal tool to furthering our understanding of dynamic cellular processes in complex biological systems, with a molecular localization accuracy (10-100 nm) often better than the diffraction limit of light. However, current SPT techniques utilize either CCDs or a confocal detection scheme which not only suffer from poor temporal resolution but also limit tracking to a depth less than one scattering mean free path in the sample (typically validated our microscope by tracking (1) fluorescent nanoparticles in a prescribed motion inside gelatin gel (with 1% intralipid) and (2) labeled single EGFR complexes inside skin cancer spheroids (at least 8 layers of cells thick) for ~10 minutes. Furthermore we discuss future capabilities of our multiplexed two-photon microscope design, specifically to the extension of (1) simultaneous multicolor tracking (i.e. spatiotemporal co-localization analysis) and (2) FRET studies (i.e. lifetime analysis). The high resolution, high depth penetration, and multicolor features of this microscope make it well poised to study a variety of molecular scale dynamics in the cell, especially related to cellular trafficking studies with in vitro tumor models and in vivo.

  14. Asynchronous DSP-core

    OpenAIRE

    Østvand, Jon

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis multipliers with and without completion detection has been implemented using a 90 nm library to compare their properties reguarding completion time, area and power consumption. The structures tested were array and shiftand-add multipliers. The results were that when having larger bit-lengths, an asynchronous shift-and-add multiplier with completion detection can yield good completion times compared to a regular shift-and-add multiplier. Due to the large cost in area and power c...

  15. Text Mining: (Asynchronous Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheema Khan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we tried to correlate text sequences those provides common topics for semantic clues. We propose a two step method for asynchronous text mining. Step one check for the common topics in the sequences and isolates these with their timestamps. Step two takes the topic and tries to give the timestamp of the text document. After multiple repetitions of step two, we could give optimum result.

  16. Direction Tracking of Multiple Moving Targets Using Quantum Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Hongyuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on weighted signal covariance (WSC matrix and maximum likelihood (ML estimation, a directionof-arrival (DOA estimation method of multiple moving targets is designed and named as WSC-ML in the presence of impulse noise. In order to overcome the shortcoming of the multidimensional search cost of maximum likelihood estimation, a novel continuous quantum particle swarm optimization (QPSO is proposed for this continuous optimization problem. And a tracking method of multiple moving targets in impulsive noise environment is proposed and named as QPSO-WSC-ML. Later, we make use of rank-one updating to update the weighted signal covariance matrix of WSC-ML. Simulation results illustrate the proposed QPSO-WSC-ML method is efficient and robust for the direction tracking of multiple moving targets in the presence of impulse noise.

  17. Dual-Channel Particle Filter Based Track-Before-Detect for Monopulse Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Cai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A particle filter based track-before-detect (PF-TBD algorithm is proposed for the monopulse high pulse repetition frequency (PRF pulse Doppler radar. The actual measurement model is adopted, in which the range is highly ambiguous and the sum and difference channels exist in parallel. A quantization method is used to approximate the point spread function to reduce the computation load. The detection decisions of the PF-TBD are fed to a binary integrator to further improve the detection performance. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can detect and track the low SNR target efficiently. The detection performance is improved significantly for both the single frame and the multiframe detection compared with the classical detector. A performance comparison with the PF-TBD using sum channel only is also supplied.

  18. Impact of electron irradiation on particle track etching response in polyallyl diglycol carbonate (PADC)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Mishra; S P Tripathy; A Kulshrestha; A Srivastava; S Ghosh; K K Dwivedi; D T Khathing; M Müller; D Fink

    2000-05-01

    In the present work, attempts have been made to investigate the modification in particle track etching response of polyallyl diglycol carbonate (PADC) due to impact of 2 MeV electrons. PADC samples pre-irradiated to 1, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 Mrad doses of 2 MeV electrons were further exposed to 140 MeV 28Si beam and dose-dependent track registration properties of PADC have been studied. Etch-rate values of the PADC irradiated to 100 Mrad dose electron was found to increase by nearly 4 times that of pristine PADC. The electron irradiation has promoted chain scissioning in PADC, thereby converting the polymer into an easily etchable polymer. Moreover, the etching response and the detection efficiency were found to improve by electron irradiation. Scanning electron microscopy of etched samples further revealed the surface damage in these irradiated PADCs

  19. Embedded Analytical Solutions Improve Accuracy in Convolution-Based Particle Tracking Models using Python

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starn, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Particle tracking often is used to generate particle-age distributions that are used as impulse-response functions in convolution. A typical application is to produce groundwater solute breakthrough curves (BTC) at endpoint receptors such as pumping wells or streams. The commonly used semi-analytical particle-tracking algorithm based on the assumption of linear velocity gradients between opposing cell faces is computationally very fast when used in combination with finite-difference models. However, large gradients near pumping wells in regional-scale groundwater-flow models often are not well represented because of cell-size limitations. This leads to inaccurate velocity fields, especially at weak sinks. Accurate analytical solutions for velocity near a pumping well are available, and various boundary conditions can be imposed using image-well theory. Python can be used to embed these solutions into existing semi-analytical particle-tracking codes, thereby maintaining the integrity and quality-assurance of the existing code. Python (and associated scientific computational packages NumPy, SciPy, and Matplotlib) is an effective tool because of its wide ranging capability. Python text processing allows complex and database-like manipulation of model input and output files, including binary and HDF5 files. High-level functions in the language include ODE solvers to solve first-order particle-location ODEs, Gaussian kernel density estimation to compute smooth particle-age distributions, and convolution. The highly vectorized nature of NumPy arrays and functions minimizes the need for computationally expensive loops. A modular Python code base has been developed to compute BTCs using embedded analytical solutions at pumping wells based on an existing well-documented finite-difference groundwater-flow simulation code (MODFLOW) and a semi-analytical particle-tracking code (MODPATH). The Python code base is tested by comparing BTCs with highly discretized synthetic steady

  20. Mineralogy of Stardust Track 112 Particle: Relation to Amoeboid Olivine Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, M.; Fagan, T.; Mikouchi, T.; Miyamoto, M.; Zolensky, M.; Ohsumi, K.

    2012-01-01

    The successful analysis of comet 81P/Wild 2 particles returned by the Stardust mission has revealed that the Wild 2 dust contains abundant silicate grains that are much larger than interstellar grains and appear to have formed in the inner regions of the solar nebula [1]. Wild 2 particles include minerals which are isotopically and mineralogically similar to CAIs [e.g., 2, 3] and chondrules [e.g., 4] in chondrites. In addition, particles similar to amoeboid olivine aggregates (AOAs) also have been discovered [5, 6,7]. C2067,2,112,1 is a terminal particle recovered from track #112 (T112). Nakamura-Messenger et al. [7] showed that the forsterite grain in T112 has O-16 enrichment of approximately 40 0/00 (vs. SMOW) and possibly formed together with AOAs. In this study, we have examined the mineralogy of the T112 particle and compared the possible relationships between T112 and AOAs in primitive meteorites.

  1. Improved estimation of anomalous diffusion exponents in single-particle tracking experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepten, Eldad; Bronshtein, Irena; Garini, Yuval

    2013-05-01

    The mean square displacement is a central tool in the analysis of single-particle tracking experiments, shedding light on various biophysical phenomena. Frequently, parameters are extracted by performing time averages on single-particle trajectories followed by ensemble averaging. This procedure, however, suffers from two systematic errors when applied to particles that perform anomalous diffusion. The first is significant at short-time lags and is induced by measurement errors. The second arises from the natural heterogeneity in biophysical systems. We show how to estimate and correct these two errors and improve the estimation of the anomalous parameters for the whole particle distribution. As a consequence, we manage to characterize ensembles of heterogeneous particles even for rather short and noisy measurements where regular time-averaged mean square displacement analysis fails. We apply this method to both simulations and in vivo measurements of telomere diffusion in 3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. The motion of telomeres is found to be subdiffusive with an average exponent constant in time. Individual telomere exponents are normally distributed around the average exponent. The proposed methodology has the potential to improve experimental accuracy while maintaining lower experimental costs and complexity.

  2. Behavioral synthesis of asynchronous circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents a method for behavioral synthesis of asynchronous circuits, which aims at providing a synthesis flow which uses and tranfers methods from synchronous circuits to asynchronous circuits. We move the synchronous behavioral synthesis abstraction into the asynchronous handshake...... is idle. This reduces unnecessary switching activity in the individual functional units and therefore the energy consumption of the entire circuit. A collection of behavioral synthesis algorithms have been developed allowing the designer to perform time and power constrained design space exploration...

  3. Potential of Thin Films for use in Charged Particle Tracking Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Metcalfe, J; Murphy, J; Quevedo, M; Smith, L; Alvarado, J; Gnade, B; Takai, H

    2014-01-01

    Thin Film technology has widespread applications in everyday electronics, notably Liquid Crystal Display screens, solar cells, and organic light emitting diodes. We explore the potential of this technology as charged particle radiation tracking detectors for use in High Energy Physics experiments such as those at the Large Hadron Collider or the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Through modern fabrication techniques, a host of semiconductor materials are available to construct thin, flexible detectors with integrated electronics with pixel sizes on the order of a few microns. We review the material properties of promising candidates, discuss the potential benefits and challenges associated with this technology, and review previously demonstrated applicability as a neutron detector.

  4. Development and applications of single particle orientation and rotational tracking in dynamic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kuangcai [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-02-19

    The goal of this study is to help with future data analysis and experiment designs in rotational dynamics research using DIC-based SPORT technique. Most of the current studies using DIC-based SPORT techniques are technical demonstrations. Understanding the mechanisms behind the observed rotational behaviors of the imaging probes should be the focus of the future SPORT studies. More efforts are still needed in the development of new imaging probes, particle tracking methods, instrumentations, and advanced data analysis methods to further extend the potential of DIC-based SPORT technique.

  5. Brightness through Local Constraint-LNA-Enhanced FIT Hybridization Probes for In Vivo Ribonucleotide Particle Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hövelmann, Felix; Gaspar, Imre; Loibl, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Imaging the dynamics of RNA in living cells is usually performed by means of transgenic approaches that require modification of RNA targets and cells. Fluorogenic hybridization probes would also allow the analysis of wild-type organisms. We developed nuclease-resistant DNA forced intercalation (FIT......) probes that combine the high enhancement of fluorescence upon hybridization with the high brightness required to allow tracking of individual ribonucleotide particles (RNPs). In our design, a single thiazole orange (TO) intercalator dye is linked as a nucleobase surrogate and an adjacent locked nucleic...

  6. Proceedings of the 3. conference: Particle track membranes and their applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The materials of the 3rd conference on Particle Track Membranes and Theirs Applications present actual state of art in the topic. The leading world institutions have presented their works on the technology of PTM production by interaction of ion beams with polymeric foils. The broad spectrum of PTM membranes have been shown, their properties have been described and their applicability discussed. A number of possible applications of PTM and also already realized in industry, medicine, biology and physical investigations have been presented. 29 lectures have been made in the course of conference.

  7. A Framework for Sediment Particle Tracking via Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakiris, Achilleas; Papanicolaou, Thanos; Abban, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The study of sedimentary and morphodynamic processes in riverine environments has recently been shifting from the traditional Eulerian, static perspective to a Lagrangian perspective, which considers the movement characteristics of the individual transported particles, such as their travel and resting distance and time. The Lagrangian framework, in turn allows to better study processes such as bedload particle diffusion, erosion and deposition within a river reach, to more accurately predict bedload fluxes especially through the use of stochastic Discrete Particle models. A technology that goes hand-in-hand with this Lagrangian perspective is Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID), which has been recently applied for tracking the movement of tagged sediment particles within the river continuum. RFID allows the wireless, bidirectional exchange of information between a base station, known as the reader, with a typically large number of transponders (or tags) via an (excitation) antenna. RFID allows essentially the unique, wireless detection and identification of a transponder over a distance. The goal of this study is to further enhance the utility of RFID in riverine applications by developing a framework that allows extracting the 3D location of RFID tagged sediment particles in nearly real-time. To address the goal of this coupled theoretical and experimental study, a semi-theoretical approach based on antenna inductive coupling was combined with experimental measurements for developing a relationship that provides an estimate of the distance between a tagged particle and the antenna using the Return Signal Strength Indication (RSSI). The RSSI quantifies the magnetic energy transmitted from the transponder to the antenna. The RFID system used in this study was a passive, Low-Frequency (LF) system, which ensured that the LF radio waves could penetrate through the river bed material. The RSSI of the signal transmitted from each transponder was measured with an

  8. Guidelines for the fitting of anomalous diffusion mean square displacement graphs from single particle tracking experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldad Kepten

    Full Text Available Single particle tracking is an essential tool in the study of complex systems and biophysics and it is commonly analyzed by the time-averaged mean square displacement (MSD of the diffusive trajectories. However, past work has shown that MSDs are susceptible to significant errors and biases, preventing the comparison and assessment of experimental studies. Here, we attempt to extract practical guidelines for the estimation of anomalous time averaged MSDs through the simulation of multiple scenarios with fractional Brownian motion as a representative of a large class of fractional ergodic processes. We extract the precision and accuracy of the fitted MSD for various anomalous exponents and measurement errors with respect to measurement length and maximum time lags. Based on the calculated precision maps, we present guidelines to improve accuracy in single particle studies. Importantly, we find that in some experimental conditions, the time averaged MSD should not be used as an estimator.

  9. PARTRACK - A particle tracking algorithm for transport and dispersion of solutes in a sparsely fractured rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Urban [Computer-aided Fluid Engineering AB, Norrkoeping (Sweden)

    2001-04-01

    A particle tracking algorithm, PARTRACK, that simulates transport and dispersion in a sparsely fractured rock is described. The main novel feature of the algorithm is the introduction of multiple particle states. It is demonstrated that the introduction of this feature allows for the simultaneous simulation of Taylor dispersion, sorption and matrix diffusion. A number of test cases are used to verify and demonstrate the features of PARTRACK. It is shown that PARTRACK can simulate the following processes, believed to be important for the problem addressed: the split up of a tracer cloud at a fracture intersection, channeling in a fracture plane, Taylor dispersion and matrix diffusion and sorption. From the results of the test cases, it is concluded that PARTRACK is an adequate framework for simulation of transport and dispersion of a solute in a sparsely fractured rock.

  10. A Framework for 3D Model-Based Visual Tracking Using a GPU-Accelerated Particle Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J A; Capson, D W

    2012-01-01

    A novel framework for acceleration of particle filtering approaches to 3D model-based, markerless visual tracking in monocular video is described. Specifically, we present a methodology for partitioning and mapping the computationally expensive weight-update stage of a particle filter to a graphics processing unit (GPU) to achieve particle- and pixel-level parallelism. Nvidia CUDA and Direct3D are employed to harness the massively parallel computational power of modern GPUs for simulation (3D model rendering) and evaluation (segmentation, feature extraction, and weight calculation) of hundreds of particles at high speeds. The proposed framework addresses the computational intensity that is intrinsic to all particle filter approaches, including those that have been modified to minimize the number of particles required for a particular task. Performance and tracking quality results for rigid object and articulated hand tracking experiments demonstrate markerless, model-based visual tracking on consumer-grade graphics hardware with pixel-level accuracy up to 95 percent at 60+ frames per second. The framework accelerates particle evaluation up to 49 times over a comparable CPU-only implementation, providing an increased particle count while maintaining real-time frame rates.

  11. An Efficient and Robust Method for Lagrangian Magnetic Particle Tracking in Fluid Flow Simulations on Unstructured Grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen Stuart, D.C.; Kleijn, C.R.; Kenjeres, S.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we report on a newly developed particle tracking scheme for fluid flow simulations on 3D unstructured grids, aiming to provide detailed insights in the particle behaviour in complex geometries. A possible field of applications is the Magnetic Drug Targeting (MDT) technique, on which th

  12. Numerical simulation of gas-liquid-solid flows using a combined front tracking and discrete particle method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sint Annaland, van M.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a hybrid model is presented for the numerical simulation of gas¿liquid¿solid flows using a combined front tracking (FT) and discrete particle (DP) approach applied for, respectively, dispersed gas bubbles and solid particles present in the continuous liquid phase. The hard sphere DP mo

  13. Cross-validation of 3D particle tracking velocimetry for the study of granular flows down rotating chutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shirsath, S.S.; Padding, J.T.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) is a promising technique to study the behavior of granular flows. The aim of this paper is to cross-validate 3D-PTV against independent or more established techniques, such as particle image velocimetry (PIV), electronic ultrasonic sensor meas

  14. In Situ Particle Tracking around kW Sized Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownstein, Ian; Dabiri, John

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory studies of model wind turbines are typically unable to match both the Reynolds number (Re) and tip speed ratio (TSR) of full-scale wind turbines. In order to match both relevant parameters, a quantitative flow visualization method was developed to take in situ measurements of the flow around full-scale wind turbines. The apparatus constructed was able to seed an approximately 9mx9mx5m volume in the wake of the turbine using artificial snow. Quantitative results were obtained by tracking the evolution of the snow using particle tracking algorithms. As a step toward full 3D-PTV measurements, results will be presented in which a 2D measurement is taken with a single camera positioned at the base of the turbine looking upward. The resulting tracking is therefore integrated in the span-wise direction. This method is demonstrated through a comparative study of a five-bladed VAWT producing power in different wind conditions at the Field Laboratory for Optimized Wind Energy (FLOWE) in Lancaster, CA. Future work to expand this method to 3D-PTV is also discussed.

  15. A comparison of positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) methods for analysis of a tube-in-shell heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Cody; Patel, Nitant; Ruggles, Arthur

    2016-03-01

    A positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) study of a stainless steel tube-in-shell heat exchanger is performed. Studies are performed using two different energy window settings. A new multiple particle tracking technique is introduced and used in this analysis. Results are compared to those obtained with previously established multiple particle tracking technique. Both techniques are found to be capable of flow imaging through opaque surfaces. No significant difference is observed between energy window settings using either method. Results from both methods are found to be qualitatively similar; however, it is observed that the new method exhibits consistently lower measurement uncertainty across the field of view of the scanner and is robust against the adverse effects of stationary particles in the flow field.

  16. Principles and biophysical applications of single particle super-localization and rotational tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Yan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    While conventional Single Particle Tracking (SPT) techniques acquire 2D or 3D trajectories of particle probes, we have developed Single Particle Orientation and Rotational Tracking (SPORT) techniques to extract orientation and rotational information. Combined with DIC microscopy, the SPORT technique has been applied in biophysical studies, including membrane diffusion and intracellular transport. The rotational dynamics of nanoparticle vectors on live cell membranes was recorded and its influence on the fate of these nanoparticle vectors was elucidated. The rotational motions of gold nanorods with various surface modifiers were tracked continuously at a temporal resolution of 5 ms under a DIC microscope. We found that the rotational behaviors of gold nanorod vectors are strongly related to their surface charge, specific surface functional groups, and the availability of receptors on cell membranes. The study of rotational Brownian motion of nanoparticles on cell membranes will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of drug delivery and provide guidance in designing surface modification strategies for drug delivery vectors under various circumstances. To characterize the rotation mode of surface functionalized gold nanorods on cell membranes, the SPORT technique is combined with the correlation analysis of the bright and dark DIC intensities. The unique capabilities of visualizing and understanding rotational motions of functionalized nanoparticles on live cell membranes allow us to correlate rotational and translational dynamics in unprecedented detail and provide new insights for complex membrane processes, including electrostatic interactions, ligand-receptor binding, and lateral (confined and hopping) diffusion of membrane receptors. Surface-functionalized nanoparticles interact with the membrane in fundamentally different ways and exhibit distinct rotational modes. The early events of particle-membrane approach and attachment are directly visualized

  17. Principles and biophysical applications of single particle super-localization and rotational tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yan

    While conventional Single Particle Tracking (SPT) techniques acquire 2D or 3D trajectories of particle probes, we have developed Single Particle Orientation and Rotational Tracking (SPORT) techniques to extract orientation and rotational information. Combined with DIC microscopy, the SPORT technique has been applied in biophysical studies, including membrane diffusion and intracellular transport. The rotational dynamics of nanoparticle vectors on live cell membranes was recorded and its influence on the fate of these nanoparticle vectors was elucidated. The rotational motions of gold nanorods with various surface modifiers were tracked continuously at a temporal resolution of 5 ms under a DIC microscope. We found that the rotational behaviors of gold nanorod vectors are strongly related to their surface charge, specific surface functional groups, and the availability of receptors on cell membranes. The study of rotational Brownian motion of nanoparticles on cell membranes will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of drug delivery and provide guidance in designing surface modification strategies for drug delivery vectors under various circumstances. To characterize the rotation mode of surface functionalized gold nanorods on cell membranes, the SPORT technique is combined with the correlation analysis of the bright and dark DIC intensities. The unique capabilities of visualizing and understanding rotational motions of functionalized nanoparticles on live cell membranes allow us to correlate rotational and translational dynamics in unprecedented detail and provide new insights for complex membrane processes, including electrostatic interactions, ligand-receptor binding, and lateral (confined and hopping) diffusion of membrane receptors. Surface-functionalized nanoparticles interact with the membrane in fundamentally different ways and exhibit distinct rotational modes. The early events of particle-membrane approach and attachment are directly visualized

  18. Investigating the role of vibrational excitation in simulating charged-particle tracks in liquid pyrimidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunger, Michael J.; Ratnavelu, Kuru; Buckman, Stephen J.; Jones, Darryl B.; Muñoz, Antonio; Blanco, Francisco; García, Gustavo

    2016-03-01

    We report on our results of a study into the sensitivity of charged-particle (electron) track simulations in liquid pyrimidine, to the vibrational cross sections and vibrational energy loss distribution function employed in those simulations. We achieve this by repeating the earlier investigation of Fuss et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 214701 (2015)], but now incorporating more accurate data for the vibrational integral cross sections and the energy loss distribution function that have recently become available. We find that while changes in absorbed dose or particle range are quite minor, due to the energy transferred via vibrational excitations being low in comparison to that for other processes such as ionisation, at the very end of the tracks, where non-ionizing interactions dominate, the significantly large numbers of vibrational excitation processes increases the electrons' ability to induce other effects (e.g. sample heating, bond breaking and radical formation) that might cause damage. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  19. Simulating nitrogen transport and transformation through urban riparian zones using a particle-tracking approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Z.; Welty, C.; Gold, A. J.; Groffman, P. M.; Kaushal, S.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrate is the most common and mobile form of nitrogen contaminant found in groundwater. Riparian zones, often identified as denitrification hot spots, play an important role in processing nitrate as it moves from uplands to streams through the subsurface. However, in urban areas, where groundwater flow paths may be altered by channel incision, it is not clear how riparian zone denitrification responds to such changes in groundwater flow paths. To quantify the effects of groundwater flow path changes on riparian zone denitrification, we are applying a recently-developed 3D numerical groundwater nitrogen transport model to this problem. Based on an existing particle-tracking code, SLIM-FAST, new components were added using the operator splitting technique to account for biogeochemical reactions. The model was verified with analytical solutions, other numerical codes, and laboratory experimental results. Here we report on application of the model to a hypothetical stream riparian site to evaluate nitrogen transformations under various groundwater flow conditions. The flow field is generated using the 3D groundwater flow code, ParFlow. The particle-tracking code uses the flow field as input and the movement and reactions of the nitrogen species are simulated by the code. Initial model simulation results confirm well-known behavior that as groundwater flow paths pass through DOC-rich riparian zones, higher denitrification rates are obtained. Ongoing simulations are being carried out to quantify the effect of stream downcutting on the denitrification process.

  20. Development of multi-spectral three-dimensional micro particle tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, Wei-Hsin

    2016-08-01

    The color-coded 3D micro particle tracking velocimetry system (CC3DμPTV) is a volumetric velocimetry technique that uses the defocusing digital particle image velocimetry (DDPIV) approach to reconstruct the 3D location of the particle. It is suited for microscopic flow visualization because of the single camera configuration. However, several factors limit the performance of the system. In this study, the limitation of the CC3DμPTV is discussed in detail and a new concept of a multi-camera 3D μ-PTV system is proposed to improve the performance of the original CC3DμPTV system. The system utilizes two dichroic beam splitters to separate the incoming light into 3 spectral ranges, and image with three monochrome image sensors. The use of a color-matched light source, off-center individual pinhole and monochrome image sensors allow the system to achieve better sensitivity and optical resolution. The use of coherent lasers light sources with high-speed cameras improves the velocity measurement dynamic range. The performance of the proposed multi-spectral system is first evaluated with a simulation model based on the finite element method (FEM). The performance is also compared numerically with the CC3DμPTV system. The test results show significant improvements on the signal to noise ratio and optical resolution. Originally presented in 11th International Symposium on Particle Image Velocimetry, Santa Barbara, California, September 14-16, 2015.

  1. Implementation Strategies for Large-Scale Transport Simulations Using Time Domain Particle Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, S.; Cvetkovic, V.; Mancillas, J.; Selroos, J.

    2008-12-01

    Time domain particle tracking is an emerging alternative to the conventional random walk particle tracking algorithm. With time domain particle tracking, particles are moved from node to node on one-dimensional pathways defined by streamlines of the groundwater flow field or by discrete subsurface features. The time to complete each deterministic segment is sampled from residence time distributions that include the effects of advection, longitudinal dispersion, a variety of kinetically controlled retention (sorption) processes, linear transformation, and temporal changes in groundwater velocities and sorption parameters. The simulation results in a set of arrival times at a monitoring location that can be post-processed with a kernel method to construct mass discharge (breakthrough) versus time. Implementation strategies differ for discrete flow (fractured media) systems and continuous porous media systems. The implementation strategy also depends on the scale at which hydraulic property heterogeneity is represented in the supporting flow model. For flow models that explicitly represent discrete features (e.g., discrete fracture networks), the sampling of residence times along segments is conceptually straightforward. For continuous porous media, such sampling needs to be related to the Lagrangian velocity field. Analytical or semi-analytical methods may be used to approximate the Lagrangian segment velocity distributions in aquifers with low-to-moderate variability, thereby capturing transport effects of subgrid velocity variability. If variability in hydraulic properties is large, however, Lagrangian velocity distributions are difficult to characterize and numerical simulations are required; in particular, numerical simulations are likely to be required for estimating the velocity integral scale as a basis for advective segment distributions. Aquifers with evolving heterogeneity scales present additional challenges. Large-scale simulations of radionuclide

  2. Visualisation of γH2AX foci caused by heavy ion particle traversal; distinction between core track versus non-track damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakako Izumi Nakajima

    Full Text Available Heavy particle irradiation produces complex DNA double strand breaks (DSBs which can arise from primary ionisation events within the particle trajectory. Additionally, secondary electrons, termed delta-electrons, which have a range of distributions can create low linear energy transfer (LET damage within but also distant from the track. DNA damage by delta-electrons distant from the track has not previously been carefully characterised. Using imaging with deconvolution, we show that at 8 hours after exposure to Fe (∼200 keV/µm ions, γH2AX foci forming at DSBs within the particle track are large and encompass multiple smaller and closely localised foci, which we designate as clustered γH2AX foci. These foci are repaired with slow kinetics by DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ in G1 phase with the magnitude of complexity diminishing with time. These clustered foci (containing 10 or more individual foci represent a signature of DSBs caused by high LET heavy particle radiation. We also identified simple γH2AX foci distant from the track, which resemble those arising after X-ray exposure, which we attribute to low LET delta-electron induced DSBs. They are rapidly repaired by NHEJ. Clustered γH2AX foci induced by heavy particle radiation cause prolonged checkpoint arrest compared to simple γH2AX foci following X-irradiation. However, mitotic entry was observed when ∼10 clustered foci remain. Thus, cells can progress into mitosis with multiple clusters of DSBs following the traversal of a heavy particle.

  3. Labeled Postings for Asynchronous Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ChanLin, Lih-Juan; Chen, Yong-Ting; Chan, Kung-Chi

    2009-01-01

    The Internet promotes computer-mediated communications, and so asynchronous learning network systems permit more flexibility in time, space, and interaction than synchronous mode of learning. The key point of asynchronous learning is the materials for web-aided teaching and the flow of knowledge. This research focuses on improving online…

  4. Integrating Geochemical Reactions with a Particle-Tracking Approach to Simulate Nitrogen Transport and Transformation in Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Z.; Welty, C.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    Lagrangian, particle-tracking models are commonly used to simulate solute advection and dispersion in aquifers. They are computationally efficient and suffer from much less numerical dispersion than grid-based techniques, especially in heterogeneous and advectively-dominated systems. Although particle-tracking models are capable of simulating geochemical reactions, these reactions are often simplified to first-order decay and/or linear, first-order kinetics. Nitrogen transport and transformation in aquifers involves both biodegradation and higher-order geochemical reactions. In order to take advantage of the particle-tracking approach, we have enhanced an existing particle-tracking code SLIM-FAST, to simulate nitrogen transport and transformation in aquifers. The approach we are taking is a hybrid one: the reactive multispecies transport process is operator split into two steps: (1) the physical movement of the particles including the attachment/detachment to solid surfaces, which is modeled by a Lagrangian random-walk algorithm; and (2) multispecies reactions including biodegradation are modeled by coupling multiple Monod equations with other geochemical reactions. The coupled reaction system is solved by an ordinary differential equation solver. In order to solve the coupled system of equations, after step 1, the particles are converted to grid-based concentrations based on the mass and position of the particles, and after step 2 the newly calculated concentration values are mapped back to particles. The enhanced particle-tracking code is capable of simulating subsurface nitrogen transport and transformation in a three-dimensional domain with variably saturated conditions. Potential application of the enhanced code is to simulate subsurface nitrogen loading to the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. Implementation details, verification results of the enhanced code with one-dimensional analytical solutions and other existing numerical models will be presented in

  5. Principles and biophysical applications of single particle super-localization and rotational tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Yan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    While conventional Single Particle Tracking (SPT) techniques acquire 2D or 3D trajectories of particle probes, we have developed Single Particle Orientation and Rotational Tracking (SPORT) techniques to extract orientation and rotational information. Combined with DIC microscopy, the SPORT technique has been applied in biophysical studies, including membrane diffusion and intracellular transport. The rotational dynamics of nanoparticle vectors on live cell membranes was recorded and its influence on the fate of these nanoparticle vectors was elucidated. The rotational motions of gold nanorods with various surface modifiers were tracked continuously at a temporal resolution of 5 ms under a DIC microscope. We found that the rotational behaviors of gold nanorod vectors are strongly related to their surface charge, specific surface functional groups, and the availability of receptors on cell membranes. The study of rotational Brownian motion of nanoparticles on cell membranes will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of drug delivery and provide guidance in designing surface modification strategies for drug delivery vectors under various circumstances. To characterize the rotation mode of surface functionalized gold nanorods on cell membranes, the SPORT technique is combined with the correlation analysis of the bright and dark DIC intensities. The unique capabilities of visualizing and understanding rotational motions of functionalized nanoparticles on live cell membranes allow us to correlate rotational and translational dynamics in unprecedented detail and provide new insights for complex membrane processes, including electrostatic interactions, ligand-receptor binding, and lateral (confined and hopping) diffusion of membrane receptors. Surface-functionalized nanoparticles interact with the membrane in fundamentally different ways and exhibit distinct rotational modes. The early events of particle-membrane approach and attachment are directly visualized

  6. A particle-tracking approach for accurate material derivative measurements with tomographic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novara, Matteo; Scarano, Fulvio

    2013-08-01

    The evaluation of the instantaneous 3D pressure field from tomographic PIV data relies on the accurate estimate of the fluid velocity material derivative, i.e., the velocity time rate of change following a given fluid element. To date, techniques that reconstruct the fluid parcel trajectory from a time sequence of 3D velocity fields obtained with Tomo-PIV have already been introduced. However, an accurate evaluation of the fluid element acceleration requires trajectory reconstruction over a relatively long observation time, which reduces random errors. On the other hand, simple integration and finite difference techniques suffer from increasing truncation errors when complex trajectories need to be reconstructed over a long time interval. In principle, particle-tracking velocimetry techniques (3D-PTV) enable the accurate reconstruction of single particle trajectories over a long observation time. Nevertheless, PTV can be reliably performed only at limited particle image number density due to errors caused by overlapping particles. The particle image density can be substantially increased by use of tomographic PIV. In the present study, a technique to combine the higher information density of tomographic PIV and the accurate trajectory reconstruction of PTV is proposed (Tomo-3D-PTV). The particle-tracking algorithm is applied to the tracers detected in the 3D domain obtained by tomographic reconstruction. The 3D particle information is highly sparse and intersection of trajectories is virtually impossible. As a result, ambiguities in the particle path identification over subsequent recordings are easily avoided. Polynomial fitting functions are introduced that describe the particle position in time with sequences based on several recordings, leading to the reduction in truncation errors for complex trajectories. Moreover, the polynomial regression approach provides a reduction in the random errors due to the particle position measurement. Finally, the acceleration

  7. RNA interference and single particle tracking analysis of hepatitis C virus endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coller, Kelly E; Berger, Kristi L; Heaton, Nicholas S; Cooper, Jacob D; Yoon, Rosa; Randall, Glenn

    2009-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) enters hepatocytes following a complex set of receptor interactions, culminating in internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. However, aside from receptors, little is known about the cellular molecular requirements for infectious HCV entry. Therefore, we analyzed a siRNA library that targets 140 cellular membrane trafficking genes to identify host genes required for infectious HCV production and HCV pseudoparticle entry. This approach identified 16 host cofactors of HCV entry that function primarily in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, including components of the clathrin endocytosis machinery, actin polymerization, receptor internalization and sorting, and endosomal acidification. We next developed single particle tracking analysis of highly infectious fluorescent HCV particles to examine the co-trafficking of HCV virions with cellular cofactors of endocytosis. We observe multiple, sequential interactions of HCV virions with the actin cytoskeleton, including retraction along filopodia, actin nucleation during internalization, and migration of internalized particles along actin stress fibers. HCV co-localizes with clathrin and the ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl prior to internalization. Entering HCV particles are associated with the receptor molecules CD81 and the tight junction protein, claudin-1; however, HCV-claudin-1 interactions were not restricted to Huh-7.5 cell-cell junctions. Surprisingly, HCV internalization generally occurred outside of Huh-7.5 cell-cell junctions, which may reflect the poorly polarized nature of current HCV cell culture models. Following internalization, HCV particles transport with GFP-Rab5a positive endosomes, which is consistent with trafficking to the early endosome. This study presents technical advances for imaging HCV entry, in addition to identifying new host cofactors of HCV infection, some of which may be antiviral targets.

  8. RNA interference and single particle tracking analysis of hepatitis C virus endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly E Coller

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV enters hepatocytes following a complex set of receptor interactions, culminating in internalization via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. However, aside from receptors, little is known about the cellular molecular requirements for infectious HCV entry. Therefore, we analyzed a siRNA library that targets 140 cellular membrane trafficking genes to identify host genes required for infectious HCV production and HCV pseudoparticle entry. This approach identified 16 host cofactors of HCV entry that function primarily in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, including components of the clathrin endocytosis machinery, actin polymerization, receptor internalization and sorting, and endosomal acidification. We next developed single particle tracking analysis of highly infectious fluorescent HCV particles to examine the co-trafficking of HCV virions with cellular cofactors of endocytosis. We observe multiple, sequential interactions of HCV virions with the actin cytoskeleton, including retraction along filopodia, actin nucleation during internalization, and migration of internalized particles along actin stress fibers. HCV co-localizes with clathrin and the ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl prior to internalization. Entering HCV particles are associated with the receptor molecules CD81 and the tight junction protein, claudin-1; however, HCV-claudin-1 interactions were not restricted to Huh-7.5 cell-cell junctions. Surprisingly, HCV internalization generally occurred outside of Huh-7.5 cell-cell junctions, which may reflect the poorly polarized nature of current HCV cell culture models. Following internalization, HCV particles transport with GFP-Rab5a positive endosomes, which is consistent with trafficking to the early endosome. This study presents technical advances for imaging HCV entry, in addition to identifying new host cofactors of HCV infection, some of which may be antiviral targets.

  9. Evaluation of Guiding Device for Downstream Fish Migration with in-Field Particle Tracking Velocimetry and CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staffan Lundstrom

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a fish guiding device located just upstream a hydropower plant is scrutinized. The device is designed to redirect surface orientated down-stream migrating fish (smolts away from the turbines towards a spillway that act as a relatively safe fishway. Particles are added up-stream the device and the fraction particles going to the spillway is measured. A two-frame Particle Tracking Velocimetry algorithm is used to derive the velocity field of the water. The experimental results are compared to simulations with CFD. If the smolts move passively as the particles used in the study the guiding device works very well and some modifications may optimize its performance. In-field Particle Tracking Velocimetry is a suitable technique for the current case and the results compare well with numerical simulations.

  10. Characterization of far-field jet flows from complex nozzles via Particle Tracking Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Tae; Liberzon, Alex; Zuniga Zamalloa, Carlo; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the advection, diffusion and mixing of turbulence and scalars of jet flows under various geometric configurations and Reynolds numbers is of high relevance in environmental and engineering applications. In this experimental study, we characterize the far-field turbulence of jet flows in the proximity of twelve rotor diameters downstream of a series of complex nozzle geometries. The jet flows are released into a still body of water from a series of nozzles of different cross sections but with common hydraulic diameter dh = 0.01 m at a Reynolds number Re = U0*dh/ ν approx. 7000, where U0 is the flow velocity at the outlet of the jet and ν is the kinematic viscosity of the flow. The system is closed-loop and seeded with particles of 100 μm diameter. Results are analyzed from Lagrangian and Eulerian frames of references via 3D particle tracking velocimetry (OpenPTV, www.openptv.net). Lagrangian features of the particles are characterized in terms of the nozzle geometries and high-order turbulence statistics are obtained at various planes within the interrogation volume, which mimics 3D PIV.

  11. GPU Multi-Scale Particle Tracking and Multi-Fluid Simulations of the Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, T.; Carscadden, J.; O'Donnell, D.; Winglee, R.; Harnett, E.; Cash, M.

    2007-12-01

    The properties of the radiation belts can vary dramatically under the influence of magnetic storms and storm-time substorms. The task of understanding and predicting radiation belt properties is made difficult because their properties determined by global processes as well as small-scale wave-particle interactions. A full solution to the problem will require major innovations in technique and computer hardware. The proposed work will demonstrates liked particle tracking codes with new multi-scale/multi-fluid global simulations that provide the first means to include small-scale processes within the global magnetospheric context. A large hurdle to the problem is having sufficient computer hardware that is able to handle the dissipate temporal and spatial scale sizes. A major innovation of the work is that the codes are designed to run of graphics processing units (GPUs). GPUs are intrinsically highly parallelized systems that provide more than an order of magnitude computing speed over a CPU based systems, for little more cost than a high end-workstation. Recent advancements in GPU technologies allow for full IEEE float specifications with performance up to several hundred GFLOPs per GPU and new software architectures have recently become available to ease the transition from graphics based to scientific applications. This allows for a cheap alternative to standard supercomputing methods and should increase the time to discovery. A demonstration of the code pushing more than 500,000 particles faster than real time is presented, and used to provide new insight into radiation belt dynamics.

  12. Registration of alpha particles in Makrofol-E nuclear track detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammah, Y. S.; Abdalla, Ayman M.; Ashraf, O.; Ashry, A. H.

    2016-06-01

    Fast detection of alpha particles in the range from 1 to 5 MeV in Makrofol-E polycarbonate nuclear track detectors (PCTDs) using a new chemical etchant was investigated. 252Cf and 241Am-thin open sources were used for irradiating Makrofol-E detectors with fission fragments and alpha particles in air at normal pressure and temperature (NPT). A chain of experimental work has been carried out using new etchants to register alpha particle in short time in Makrofol-E polycarbonate detectors. The etching efficiency were exhibited a clear dependence on the amount of methanol in the etching solution and etching time. The optimized chemical condition obtained at this stage of development for 200 μm Makrofol-E detectors are (8 ml of 10 N NaOH + 2 ml CH3OH) etching solutions at 60 °C for 3 h. In this study; it is possible to observe energy detection windows for Makrofol-E detectors according to applied etching duration. Makrofol-E introduced the characteristic Bragg peak, which indicates the advantages of this detector as alpha spectrometer. Consequently, the suggested new etchant can be developed for heavy ions detection and monitoring radon levels and its daughters.

  13. GPU-based quasi-real-time Track Recognition in Imaging Devices: from raw Data to Particle Tracks

    CERN Document Server

    Bozza, Cristiano; De Sio, Chiara; Stellacci, Simona Maria

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear emulsions as tracking devices have been used by recent experiments thanks to fast automatic microscopes for emulsion readout. Automatic systems are evolving towards GPU-based solutions. Real-time imaging is needed to drive the motion of the microscope axes and 3D track recognition occurs quasi-online in local GPU clusters. The algorithms implemented in the Quick Scanning System are sketched. Most of them are very general and might turn out useful for other detector

  14. Energy-efficient collaborative target tracking algorithm using cost-reference particle filtering in wireless acoustic sensor networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zhi-jun; WEI Jian-ming; LIU Hai-tao

    2009-01-01

    Target tracking is one of the most important applications of wireless sensor networks. Optimized computation and energy dissipation are critical requirements to save the limited resource of sensor nodes. A new robust and energy-efficient collaborative target tracking framework is proposed in this article. After a target is detected, only one active cluster is responsible for the tracking task at each time step. The tracking algorithm is distributed by passing the sensing and computation operations from one cluster to another. An event-driven cluster reforming scheme is also proposed for balancing energy consumption among nodes. Observations from three cluster members are chosen and a new class of particle filter termed cost-reference particle filter (CRPF) is introduced to estimate the target motion at the cluster head. This CRPF method is quite robust for wireless sensor network tracking applications because it drops the strong assumptions of knowing the probability distributions of the system process and observation noises. In simulation experiments, the performance of the proposed collaborative target tracking algorithm is evaluated by the metrics of tracking precision and network energy consumption.

  15. Advanced cell therapies: targeting, tracking and actuation of cells with magnetic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, John J; Patrick, P Stephen; Yu, Yichao; Lythgoe, Mark F; Kalber, Tammy L

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine would greatly benefit from a new platform technology that enabled measurable, controllable and targeting of stem cells to a site of disease or injury in the body. Superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles offer attractive possibilities in biomedicine and can be incorporated into cells, affording a safe and reliable means of tagging. This review describes three current and emerging methods to enhance regenerative medicine using magnetic particles to guide therapeutic cells to a target organ; track the cells using MRI and assess their spatial localization with high precision and influence the behavior of the cell using magnetic actuation. This approach is complementary to the systemic injection of cell therapies, thus expanding the horizon of stem cell therapeutics.

  16. User guide for MODPATH Version 7—A particle-tracking model for MODFLOW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, David W.

    2016-09-26

    MODPATH is a particle-tracking post-processing program designed to work with MODFLOW, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) finite-difference groundwater flow model. MODPATH version 7 is the fourth major release since its original publication. Previous versions were documented in USGS Open-File Reports 89–381 and 94–464 and in USGS Techniques and Methods 6–A41.MODPATH version 7 works with MODFLOW-2005 and MODFLOW–USG. Support for unstructured grids in MODFLOW–USG is limited to smoothed, rectangular-based quadtree and quadpatch grids.A software distribution package containing the computer program and supporting documentation, such as input instructions, output file descriptions, and example problems, is available from the USGS over the Internet (http://water.usgs.gov/ogw/modpath/).

  17. Stochastic particle barcoding for single-cell tracking and multiparametric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellarnau, M; Szeto, G L; Su, H-W; Tokatlian, T; Love, J C; Irvine, D J; Voldman, J

    2015-01-27

    This study presents stochastic particle barcoding (SPB), a method for tracking cell identity across bioanalytical platforms. In this approach, single cells or small collections of cells are co-encapsulated within an enzymatically-degradable hydrogel block along with a random collection of fluorescent beads, whose number, color, and position encode the identity of the cell, enabling samples to be transferred in bulk between single-cell assay platforms without losing the identity of individual cells. The application of SPB is demonstrated for transferring cells from a subnanoliter protein secretion/phenotyping array platform into a microtiter plate, with re-identification accuracies in the plate assay of 96±2%. Encapsulated cells are recovered by digesting the hydrogel, allowing subsequent genotyping and phenotyping of cell lysates. Finally, a model scaling is developed to illustrate how different parameters affect the accuracy of SPB and to motivate scaling of the method to thousands of unique blocks.

  18. Application of Gauss's law space-charge limited emission model in iterative particle tracking method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altsybeyev, V. V.; Ponomarev, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    The particle tracking method with a so-called gun iteration for modeling the space charge is discussed in the following paper. We suggest to apply the emission model based on the Gauss's law for the calculation of the space charge limited current density distribution using considered method. Based on the presented emission model we have developed a numerical algorithm for this calculations. This approach allows us to perform accurate and low time consumpting numerical simulations for different vacuum sources with the curved emitting surfaces and also in the presence of additional physical effects such as bipolar flows and backscattered electrons. The results of the simulations of the cylindrical diode and diode with elliptical emitter with the use of axysimmetric coordinates are presented. The high efficiency and accuracy of the suggested approach are confirmed by the obtained results and comparisons with the analytical solutions.

  19. A positron emission particle tracking investigation of the flow regimes in tumbling mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, I.; Pathmathas, T.

    2017-01-01

    Using positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) data we recover key granular rheology ingredients (velocity, shear rate, volume concentration, bed depth) for developing, testing and calibrating granular flow models. In this regard, 5 mm glass beads were rotated within a 476 mm diameter mill fitted with angled lifter bars along the inner azimuthal walls and operated in batch mode across a range of drum rotation speeds that span cascading and cataracting Froude regimes. After averaging the PEPT outputs into representative volume elements, subsequent continuum analysis of the flowing layer revealed a rich coexistence of flow regimes: a quasi-static layer dominated by frictional interactions, a dense, liquid-like layer that is stressed by frictional and collisional interactions, and an inertial layer that interacts mainly through collisions. Combining the inertial number with an empirically formulated dilatancy law and the measured granular rheological ingredients then facilitated the recovery of the total depth-dependent pressure of the free surface layer.

  20. Using particle filter to track horizontal variations of atmospheric duct structure from radar sea clutter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. F. Zhao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of estimating range-varying parameters of the height-dependent refractivity over the sea surface from radar sea clutter. In the forward simulation, the split-step Fourier parabolic equation (PE is used to compute the radar clutter power in the complex refractive environments. Making use of the inherent Markovian structure of the split-step Fourier PE solution, the refractivity from clutter (RFC problem is formulated within a nonlinear recursive Bayesian state estimation framework. Particle filter (PF that is a technique for implementing a recursive Bayesian filter by Monte Carlo simulations is used to track range-varying characteristics of the refractivity profiles. Basic ideas of employing PF to solve RFC problem are introduced. Both simulation and real data results are presented to check up the feasibility of PF-RFC performances.

  1. Irreproducibility of Diffusion Coefficients in Single-Particle-Tracking Measurements in Heterogeneous Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Akimoto, Takuma

    2016-01-01

    Local diffusion coefficients in living cells are highly heterogeneous and may change over time. Such a time-dependent and spatially heterogeneous environment results in irreproducibility of single-particle-tracking measurements. Here, we provide rigorous descriptions of equilibrium and non-equilibrium diffusion processes for a heterogeneous diffusion model in living cells. We give exact solutions for the mean square displacement (MSD) and the relative standard deviation of the time-averaged MSD for equilibrium and non-equilibrium situations. We find that the time-averaged MSD grows linearly with time and that the diffusion coefficients are intrinsically random in non-equilibrium situations. Our findings pave the way for a theoretical understanding of irreproducible diffusion coefficients in cell biology.

  2. Pro asynchronous programming with .NET

    CERN Document Server

    Blewett, Richard; Ltd, Rock Solid Knowledge

    2014-01-01

    Pro Asynchronous Programming with .NET teaches the essential skill of asynchronous programming in .NET. It answers critical questions in .NET application development, such as: how do I keep my program responding at all times to keep my users happy how do I make the most of the available hardware how can I improve performanceIn the modern world, users expect more and more from their applications and devices, and multi-core hardware has the potential to provide it. But it takes carefully crafted code to turn that potential into responsive, scalable applications.With Pro Asynchronous Programming

  3. Combined application of alpha-track and fission-track techniques for detection of plutonium particles in environmental samples prior to isotopic measurement using thermo-ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Gyu; Suzuki, Daisuke; Esaka, Fumitaka; Magara, Masaaki; Kimura, Takaumi

    2011-07-15

    The fission track technique is a sensitive detection method for particles which contain radio-nuclides like (235)U or (239)Pu. However, when the sample is a mixture of plutonium and uranium, discrimination between uranium particles and plutonium particles is difficult using this technique. In this study, we developed a method for detecting plutonium particles in a sample mixture of plutonium and uranium particles using alpha track and fission track techniques. The specific radioactivity (Bq/g) for alpha decay of plutonium is several orders of magnitude higher than that of uranium, indicating that the formation of the alpha track due to alpha decay of uranium can be disregarded under suitable conditions. While alpha tracks in addition to fission tracks were detected in a plutonium particle, only fission tracks were detected in a uranium particle, thereby making the alpha tracks an indicator for detecting particles containing plutonium. In addition, it was confirmed that there is a linear relationship between the numbers of alpha tracks produced by plutonium particles made of plutonium certified standard material and the ion intensities of the various plutonium isotopes measured by thermo-ionization mass spectrometry. Using this correlation, the accuracy in isotope ratios, signal intensity and measurement errors is presumable from the number of alpha tracks prior to the isotope ratio measurements by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. It is expected that this method will become an effective tool for plutonium particle analysis. The particles used in this study had sizes between 0.3 and 2.0 μm.

  4. Application of Continuous-Time Batch Markovian Arrival Processes and Particle Tracking Model to Probabilistic Sediment Transport Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Christina; Hung, Serena

    2016-04-01

    To more precisely describe particle movement in surface water, both the random particle arrival process at the receiving water and the stochastic particle movement in the receiving water should be carefully considered in sediment transport modeling. In this study, a stochastic framework is developed for a probabilistic description of discrete particle transport through a probability density function of sediment concentrations and transport rates. In order to more realistically describe the particle arrivals into receiving waters at random times and with a probabilistic particle number in each arrival, the continuous-time batch Markovian arrival process is introduced. The particle tracking model (PTM) composed of physically based stochastic differential equations (SDEs) for particle trajectory is then used to depict the random movement of particles in the receiving water. Particle deposition and entrainment processes are considered in the model. It is expected that the particle concentrations in the receiving water and particle transport rates can be mathematically expressed as a stochastic process. Compared with deterministic modeling, the proposed approach has the advantage of capturing any randomly selected scenarios (or realizations) of flow and sediment properties. Availability of a more sophisticated stochastic process for random particle arrival processes can assist in quantifying the probabilistic characteristics of sediment transport rates and concentrations. In addition, for a given turbidity threshold, the risk of exceeding a pre-established water quality standard can be quantified as needed.

  5. Improvements on Particle Tracking Velocimetry: model-free calibration and noiseless measurement of second order statistics of the velocity field

    CERN Document Server

    Machicoane, Nathanael; Bourgoin, Mickael; Aliseda, Alberto; Volk, Romain

    2016-01-01

    This article describes two independent developments aimed at improving the Particle Tracking Method for measurements of flow or particle velocities. First, a stereoscopic multicamera calibration method that does not require any optical model is described and evaluated. We show that this new calibration method gives better results than the most commonly-used technique, based on the Tsai camera/optics model. Additionally, the methods uses a simple interpolant to compute the transformation matrix and it is trivial to apply for any experimental fluid dynamics visualization set up. The second contribution proposes a solution to remove noise from Eulerian measurements of velocity statistics obtained from Particle Tracking velocimetry, without the need of filtering and/or windowing. The novel method presented here is based on recomputing particle displacement measurements from two consecutive frames for multiple different time-step values between frames. We show the successful application of this new technique to re...

  6. Experimental study of aortic flow in the ascending aorta via Particle Tracking Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülan, Utku; Lüthi, Beat; Holzner, Markus; Liberzon, Alex; Tsinober, Arkady; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2012-11-01

    A three-dimensional, pulsatile flow in a realistic phantom of a human ascending aorta with compliant walls is investigated in vitro. Three-Dimensional Particle Tracking Velocimetry (3D-PTV), an image-based, non-intrusive measuring method is used to analyze the aortic flow. The flow velocities and the turbulent fluctuations are determined. The velocity profile at the inlet of the ascending aorta is relatively flat with a skewed profile toward the inner aortic wall in the early systole. In the diastolic phase, a bidirectional flow is observed with a pronounced retrograde flow developing along the inner aortic wall, whereas the antegrade flow migrates toward the outer wall of the aorta. The spatial and temporal evolution of the vorticity field shows that the vortices begin developing along the inner wall during the deceleration phase and attenuate in the diastolic phase. The change in the cross-sectional area is more distinct distal to the inlet cross section. The mean kinetic energy is maximal in the peak systole, whereas the turbulent kinetic energy increases in the deceleration phase and reaches a maximum in the beginning of the diastolic phase. Finally, in a Lagrangian analysis, the temporal evolution of particle dispersion was studied. It shows that the dispersion is higher in the deceleration phase and in the beginning of the diastole, whereas in systole, it is smaller but non-negligible.

  7. Three-dimensional Particle Tracking Velocimetry for Turbulence Applications: Case of a Jet Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Tae; Kim, David; Liberzon, Alex; Chamorro, Leonardo P

    2016-02-27

    3D-PTV is a quantitative flow measurement technique that aims to track the Lagrangian paths of a set of particles in three dimensions using stereoscopic recording of image sequences. The basic components, features, constraints and optimization tips of a 3D-PTV topology consisting of a high-speed camera with a four-view splitter are described and discussed in this article. The technique is applied to the intermediate flow field (5 particles as well as curvature of the flow path, which are obtained from the Frenet-Serret equation. Estimation of the 3D velocity and turbulence fields around the jet core axis at a cross-plane located at ten diameters downstream of the jet is compared with literature, and the power spectrum of the large-scale streamwise velocity motions is obtained at various radial distances from the jet core.

  8. Particle tracking via RFID technology to monitor bedload sediment dynamics in mountain streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Matteo; Fraccarollo, Luigi; Corbo, Simona; Maggioni, Alberto; Brardinoni, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    In this contribution we present preliminary results on the monitoring of bedload entrainment and transport in two mountain streams, the Grigno Creek (90 km2) and its tributary, the Tolvà Creek (14 km2), located in Valsugana, Autonomous Province of Trento. In particular, we monitor bedload by means of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology in conjunction with Passive Integrated Transponders (PIT) (e.g., Lamarre et al., 2005) injected into pebble-to-cobble sized tracer stones (b-axis ranging from 30 to 130 mm). In the Grigno Creek 120 PITs were released in December 2013 along a 100-m channel reach and have been surveyed 10 times. In the Tolvà Creek 100 PITs were released in July 2013 along a 100-m channel reach, and the site has been surveyed 4 times. Particle tracking is conducted by integrating two complementary antenna types: (i) a portable one, which enables to estimate travel distances of tagged clasts; and (ii) a set of four fixed antennas (25m apart from each other), which allows detecting motion/rest periods of particles, entrainment thresholds and transport velocities. Particle tracking is combined with on-site high-frequency (i.e., 10 minutes) water stage monitoring. Salt dilution method is monthly applied to relate flow discharge to water stage. The analyzed river reaches extend over different morphologic units (steps, pools, glides and boulder-cascades). We are looking to estimate (i) the channel forming discharge; (ii) a quantitative evaluation of specific bedload transport. These information will be associated to the surficial bed texture and bed morphology. Data collected from fixed and mobile antennas will enable to infer statistical information of the trajectories run by tracer ensemble, in particular the step lengths, the total travel distances and the rest periods. Lamarre H., MacVicar B., Roy A.G. 2005 Using Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags to investigate sediment transport in gravel-bed rivers. Journal of Sedimentary Research

  9. Dependence of alpha particle track diameter on the free volume holes size using positron annihilation lifetime technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gamal, S.; Abdalla, Ayman M.; Abdel-Hady, E. E.

    2015-09-01

    The alpha particle track diameter dependence of the free volume holes size (Vf) in DAM-ADC and CR-39 nuclear track detectors was investigated using positron annihilation lifetime technique. The effect of temperature on the alpha particle track diameter and free volume were also investigated in the T-range (RT-130 °C). The obtained results revealed that the values of ortho-positronium lifetime τ3 and Vf increases while I3 slightly increases as T increases for the two detectors. The values of τ3, Vf and I3 are higher in CR-39 than DAM-ADC. The interpretation of obtained results is based on the fact that increasing T leads to significant enhancement of thermal expansion of the polymer matrix and consequently Vf increases. The track diameter increases as T increases. This can be explained by the fact that the increase in T increases the crystal size and Vf in the polymer. A relationship between Vf and the alpha particle track diameter was obtained. Moreover results of detector irradiation, along with free volume evaluation are addressed and thoroughly discussed.

  10. Dependence of alpha particle track diameter on the free volume holes size using positron annihilation lifetime technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gamal, S. [Physics Department, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy, 11711 Cairo (Egypt); Abdalla, Ayman M., E-mail: aymanabdalla62@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Najran University, Najran (Saudi Arabia); Centre for Advanced Materials and Nano-Engineering, Najran University, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Abdel-Hady, E.E. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Minia University, BO 61519, Minia (Egypt)

    2015-09-15

    The alpha particle track diameter dependence of the free volume holes size (V{sub f}) in DAM–ADC and CR-39 nuclear track detectors was investigated using positron annihilation lifetime technique. The effect of temperature on the alpha particle track diameter and free volume were also investigated in the T-range (RT-130 °C). The obtained results revealed that the values of ortho-positronium lifetime τ{sub 3} and V{sub f} increases while I{sub 3} slightly increases as T increases for the two detectors. The values of τ{sub 3}, V{sub f} and I{sub 3} are higher in CR-39 than DAM–ADC. The interpretation of obtained results is based on the fact that increasing T leads to significant enhancement of thermal expansion of the polymer matrix and consequently V{sub f} increases. The track diameter increases as T increases. This can be explained by the fact that the increase in T increases the crystal size and V{sub f} in the polymer. A relationship between V{sub f} and the alpha particle track diameter was obtained. Moreover results of detector irradiation, along with free volume evaluation are addressed and thoroughly discussed.

  11. A flame particle tracking analysis of turbulence–chemistry interaction in hydrogen–air premixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Uranakara, Harshavardhana A.

    2015-11-21

    Interactions of turbulence, molecular transport, and energy transport, coupled with chemistry play a crucial role in the evolution of flame surface geometry, propagation, annihilation, and local extinction/re-ignition characteristics of intensely turbulent premixed flames. This study seeks to understand how these interactions affect flame surface annihilation of lean hydrogen–air premixed turbulent flames. Direct numerical simulations (DNSs) are conducted at different parametric conditions with a detailed reaction mechanism and transport properties for hydrogen–air flames. Flame particle tracking (FPT) technique is used to follow specific flame surface segments. An analytical expression for the local displacement flame speed (Sd) of a temperature isosurface is considered, and the contributions of transport, chemistry, and kinematics on the displacement flame speed at different turbulence-flame interaction conditions are identified. In general, the displacement flame speed for the flame particles is found to increase with time for all conditions considered. This is because, eventually all flame surfaces and their resident flame particles approach annihilation by reactant island formation at the end of stretching and folding processes induced by turbulence. Statistics of principal curvature evolving in time, obtained using FPT, suggest that these islands are ellipsoidal on average enclosing fresh reactants. Further examinations show that the increase in Sd is caused by the increased negative curvature of the flame surface and eventual homogenization of temperature gradients as these reactant islands shrink due to flame propagation and turbulent mixing. Finally, the evolution of the normalized, averaged, displacement flame speed vs. stretch Karlovitz number are found to collapse on a narrow band, suggesting that a unified description of flame speed dependence on stretch rate may be possible in the Lagrangian description.

  12. High rate particle tracking and ultra-fast timing with a thin hybrid silicon pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorini, M., E-mail: Massimiliano.Fiorini@cern.ch [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Aglieri Rinella, G. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Carassiti, V. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara (Italy); Ceccucci, A. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cortina Gil, E. [Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Cotta Ramusino, A. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara (Italy); Dellacasa, G.; Garbolino, S.; Jarron, P. [INFN Sezione di Torino (Italy); Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Mapelli, A. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Martin, E. [Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Mazza, G. [INFN Sezione di Torino (Italy); Morel, M.; Noy, M. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Nuessle, G. [Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Perktold, L.; Petagna, P. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); and others

    2013-08-01

    The Gigatracker (GTK) is a hybrid silicon pixel detector designed for the NA62 experiment at CERN. The beam spectrometer, made of three GTK stations, has to sustain high and non-uniform particle rate (∼1GHz in total) and measure momentum and angles of each beam track with a combined time resolution of 150 ps. In order to reduce multiple scattering and hadronic interactions of beam particles, the material budget of a single GTK station has been fixed to 0.5% X{sub 0}. The expected fluence for 100 days of running is 2×10{sup 14} 1 MeV n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}, comparable to the one foreseen in the inner trackers of LHC detectors during 10 years of operation. To comply with these requirements, an efficient and very low-mass (<0.15%X{sub 0}) cooling system is being constructed, using a novel microchannel cooling silicon plate. Two complementary read-out architectures have been produced as small-scale prototypes: one is based on a Time-over-Threshold circuit followed by a TDC shared by a group of pixels, while the other makes use of a constant-fraction discriminator followed by an on-pixel TDC. The read-out ASICs are produced in 130 nm IBM CMOS technology and will be thinned down to 100μm or less. An overview of the Gigatracker detector system will be presented. Experimental results from laboratory and beam tests of prototype bump-bonded assemblies will be described as well. These results show a time resolution of about 170 ps for single hits from minimum ionizing particles, using 200μm thick silicon sensors.

  13. High rate particle tracking and ultra-fast timing with a thin hybrid silicon pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Carassiti, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Cortina Gil, E.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Garbolino, S.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Mapelli, A.; Martin, E.; Mazza, G.; Morel, M.; Noy, M.; Nuessle, G.; Perktold, L.; Petagna, P.; Petrucci, F.; Poltorak, K.; Riedler, P.; Rivetti, A.; Statera, M.; Velghe, B.

    2013-08-01

    The Gigatracker (GTK) is a hybrid silicon pixel detector designed for the NA62 experiment at CERN. The beam spectrometer, made of three GTK stations, has to sustain high and non-uniform particle rate (∼ 1 GHz in total) and measure momentum and angles of each beam track with a combined time resolution of 150 ps. In order to reduce multiple scattering and hadronic interactions of beam particles, the material budget of a single GTK station has been fixed to 0.5% X0. The expected fluence for 100 days of running is 2 ×1014 1 MeV neq /cm2, comparable to the one foreseen in the inner trackers of LHC detectors during 10 years of operation. To comply with these requirements, an efficient and very low-mass (architectures have been produced as small-scale prototypes: one is based on a Time-over-Threshold circuit followed by a TDC shared by a group of pixels, while the other makes use of a constant-fraction discriminator followed by an on-pixel TDC. The read-out ASICs are produced in 130 nm IBM CMOS technology and will be thinned down to 100 μm or less. An overview of the Gigatracker detector system will be presented. Experimental results from laboratory and beam tests of prototype bump-bonded assemblies will be described as well. These results show a time resolution of about 170 ps for single hits from minimum ionizing particles, using 200 μm thick silicon sensors.

  14. Target Tracking Approximation Algorithms with Particle Filter Optimization and Fault-Tolerant Analysis in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Gao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to process target tracking approximation with unknown motion state models beforehand in a two-dimensional field of binary proximity sensors, the algorithms based on cost functions of particle filters and near-linear curve simple optimization are proposed in this paper. Through moving target across detecting intersecting fields of sensor nodes sequentially, cost functions are introduced to solve target tracking approximation and velocity estimation which is not similar to traditional particle filters that rely on probabilistic assumptions about the motion states. Then a near-linear curve geometric approach is used to simplify and easily describe target trajectories that are below a certain error measure. Because there maybe some sensor nodes invalid in practice, so a fault-tolerant detection is applied to avoid the nodes’ reporting fault and also improve accuracy of tracking at the same time. The validity of our algorithms is demonstrated through simulation results.

  15. A new method for measuring ion clusters produced by charged particles in nanometre track sections of DNA size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pszona, S.; Kula, J.; Marjanska, S.

    2000-06-01

    A new method is presented for measuring the frequency distribution of ion clusters, formed in nanometre sections of track, by charged particles. The simulated nanometer-size sites are produced in a device, called the Jet Counter. It consists of a pulse-operated valve which injects an expanding jet of nitrogen gas into an interaction chamber. The resulting distributions of ion clusters produced by alpha particle tracks (from 241Am) in sections ranging from 2 to around 10 nm at unit density in nitrogen gas have been measured. Analysis of the experimental results confirm that the primary ionisation distributions produced in the nanometer sections comply with the Poisson distribution. The ionisation cluster distributions produced in the 2-10 nm track-segments are the first ever to be determined experimentally.

  16. A new method for measuring ion clusters produced by charged particles in nanometre track sections of DNA size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pszona, S. E-mail: pszona@ipj.gov.pl; Kula, J.; Marjanska, S

    2000-06-11

    A new method is presented for measuring the frequency distribution of ion clusters, formed in nanometre sections of track, by charged particles. The simulated nanometer-size sites are produced in a device, called the Jet Counter. It consists of a pulse-operated valve which injects an expanding jet of nitrogen gas into an interaction chamber. The resulting distributions of ion clusters produced by alpha particle tracks (from {sup 241}Am) in sections ranging from 2 to around 10 nm at unit density in nitrogen gas have been measured. Analysis of the experimental results confirm that the primary ionisation distributions produced in the nanometer sections comply with the Poisson distribution. The ionisation cluster distributions produced in the 2-10 nm track-segments are the first ever to be determined experimentally.

  17. Spatio-temporal auxiliary particle filtering with l1-norm-based appearance model learning for robust visual tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Du Yong; Jeon, Moongu

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we propose an efficient and accurate visual tracker equipped with a new particle filtering algorithm and robust subspace learning-based appearance model. The proposed visual tracker avoids drifting problems caused by abrupt motion changes and severe appearance variations that are well-known difficulties in visual tracking. The proposed algorithm is based on a type of auxiliary particle filtering that uses a spatio-temporal sliding window. Compared to conventional particle filtering algorithms, spatio-temporal auxiliary particle filtering is computationally efficient and successfully implemented in visual tracking. In addition, a real-time robust principal component pursuit (RRPCP) equipped with l(1)-norm optimization has been utilized to obtain a new appearance model learning block for reliable visual tracking especially for occlusions in object appearance. The overall tracking framework based on the dual ideas is robust against occlusions and out-of-plane motions because of the proposed spatio-temporal filtering and recursive form of RRPCP. The designed tracker has been evaluated using challenging video sequences, and the results confirm the advantage of using this tracker.

  18. Lagrangian 3D particle tracking in high-speed flows: Shake-The-Box for multi-pulse systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novara, Matteo; Schanz, Daniel; Reuther, Nico; Kähler, Christian J.; Schröder, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The Shake-The-Box (STB) particle tracking technique, recently introduced for time-resolved 3D particle image velocimetry (PIV) images, is applied here to data from a multi-pulse investigation of a turbulent boundary layer flow with adverse pressure gradient in air at 36 m/s ( Re τ = 10,650). The multi-pulse acquisition strategy allows for the recording of four-pulse long time-resolved sequences with a time separation of a few microseconds. The experimental setup consists of a dual-imaging system and a dual-double-cavity laser emitting orthogonal polarization directions to separate the four pulses. The STB particle triangulation and tracking strategy is adapted here to cope with the limited amount of realizations available along the time sequence and to take advantage of the ghost track reduction offered by the use of two independent imaging systems. Furthermore, a correction scheme to compensate for camera vibrations is discussed, together with a method to accurately identify the position of the wall within the measurement domain. Results show that approximately 80,000 tracks can be instantaneously reconstructed within the measurement volume, enabling the evaluation of both dense velocity fields, suitable for spatial gradients evaluation, and highly spatially resolved boundary layer profiles. Turbulent boundary layer profiles obtained from ensemble averaging of the STB tracks are compared to results from 2D-PIV and long-range micro particle tracking velocimetry; the comparison shows the capability of the STB approach in delivering accurate results across a wide range of scales.

  19. Measuring the viscous and elastic properties of single cells using video particle tracking microrheology

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Rebecca Louisa; Li, Xiang; Glidle, Andrew; Carlsson, Allan; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple and \\emph{non-invasive} experimental procedure to measure the linear viscoelastic properties of cells by passive video particle tracking microrheology. In order to do this, a generalised Langevin equation is adopted to relate the time-dependent thermal fluctuations of a bead, chemically bound to the cell's \\emph{exterior}, to the frequency-dependent viscoelastic moduli of the cell. It is shown that these moduli are related to the cell's cytoskeletal structure, which in this work is changed by varying the solution osmolarity from iso- to hypo-osmotic conditions. At high frequencies, the viscoelastic moduli frequency dependence changes from $\\propto \\omega^{3/4}$ found in iso-osmotic solutions to $\\propto \\omega^{1/2}$ in hypo--osmotic solutions; the first situation is typical of bending modes in isotropic \\textit{in vitro} reconstituted F--actin networks, and the second could indicate that the restructured cytoskeleton behaves as a gel with "\\textit{dangling branches}". The insights gained ...

  20. Single particle tracking with sterol modulation reveals the cholesterol-mediated diffusion properties of integrin receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Neha; Syed, Aleem; Sander, Suzanne; Smith, Emily A.

    2014-12-01

    A combination of sterol modulation with cyclodextrins plus fluorescence microscopy revealed a biophysical mechanism behind cholesterol’s influence on the diffusion of a ubiquitous class of receptors called integrins. The heterogeneous diffusion of integrins bound to ligand-coated quantum dots was measured using single particle tracking (SPT), and the ensemble changes in integrin diffusion were measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). A 25 ± 1% reduction of membrane cholesterol resulted in three significant changes to the diffusion of ligand-bound αPS2CβPS integrins as measured by SPT. There was a 23% increase in ligand-bound mobile integrins; there was a statistically significant increase in the average diffusion coefficient inside zones of confined diffusion, and histograms of confined integrin trajectories showed an increased frequency in the range of 0.1-1 μm2 s-1 and a decreased frequency in the 0.001-0.1 μm2 s-1 range. No statistical change was measured in the duration of confinement nor the size of confined zones. Restoring the cholesterol-depleted cells with exogenous cholesterol or exogenous epicholesterol resulted in similar diffusion properties. Epicholesterol differs from cholesterol in the orientation of a single hydroxyl group. The ability of epicholesterol to substitute for cholesterol suggests a biophysical mechanism for cholesterol’s effect on integrin diffusion. Influences of bilayer thickness, viscosity and organization are discussed as possible explanations for the measured changes in integrin diffusion when the membrane cholesterol concentration is reduced.

  1. Uncovering homo-and hetero-interactions on the cell membrane using single particle tracking approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Manzo, Carlo; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F.

    2016-03-01

    The plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells is responsible for a myriad of functions that regulate cell physiology and plays a crucial role in a multitude of processes that include adhesion, migration, signaling recognition and cell-cell communication. This is accomplished by specific interactions between different membrane components such as lipids and proteins on the lipid bilayer but also through interactions with the underlying cortical actin cytoskeleton on the intracellular side and the glycocalyx matrix in close proximity to the extracellular side. Advanced biophysical techniques, including single particle tracking (SPT) have revealed that the lateral diffusion of molecular components on the plasma membrane represents a landmark manifestation of such interactions. Indeed, by studying changes in the diffusivity of individual membrane molecules, including sub-diffusion, confined diffusion and/or transient arrest of molecules in membrane compartments, it has been possible to gain insight on the nature of molecular interactions and to infer on its functional role for cell response. In this review, we will revise some exciting results where SPT has been crucial to reveal homo- and hetero-interactions on the cell membrane.

  2. Quantum dot-loaded monofunctionalized DNA icosahedra for single-particle tracking of endocytic pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Dhiraj; Arumugam, Senthil; Nasilowski, Michel; Joshi, Himanshu; Wunder, Christian; Chambon, Valérie; Prakash, Ved; Grazon, Chloé; Nadal, Brice; Maiti, Prabal K.; Johannes, Ludger; Dubertret, Benoit; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2016-12-01

    Functionalization of quantum dots (QDs) with a single biomolecular tag using traditional approaches in bulk solution has met with limited success. DNA polyhedra consist of an internal void bounded by a well-defined three-dimensional structured surface. The void can house cargo and the surface can be functionalized with stoichiometric and spatial precision. Here, we show that monofunctionalized QDs can be realized by encapsulating QDs inside DNA icosahedra and functionalizing the DNA shell with an endocytic ligand. We deployed the DNA-encapsulated QDs for real-time imaging of three different endocytic ligands—folic acid, galectin-3 (Gal3) and the Shiga toxin B-subunit (STxB). Single-particle tracking of Gal3- or STxB-functionalized QD-loaded DNA icosahedra allows us to monitor compartmental dynamics along endocytic pathways. These DNA-encapsulated QDs, which bear a unique stoichiometry of endocytic ligands, represent a new class of molecular probes for quantitative imaging of endocytic receptor dynamics.

  3. A particle-tracking model for simulating pollutant dispersion in the Strait of Gibraltar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periáñez, R

    2004-10-01

    A particle-tracking model to simulate the dispersion of contaminants in the Strait of Gibraltar has been developed. The model solves the hydrodynamic equations off-line and tidal analysis is carried out to determine tidal constants for the two main constituents. Tidal constants and residuals are stored in files that are read by the dispersion model. A lagrangian approach is used to solve dispersion; diffusion and decay are simulated by a Monte Carlo method. A method for assessing the areas of the Strait with higher probability of being affected by contamination occurring after an accident in the shipping routes is given. Generally speaking, the fate of a pollutant discharge strongly depends on wind conditions. Winds from the east tend to retain contamination into the Strait. As a consequence, transverse mixing occurs and both Spain and Morocco coasts are affected by contamination. Under calm conditions and west winds, contaminants are flushed out of the Strait faster and transverse mixing does not occur. Thus, only part of Morocco coast has a higher probability of being affected by contamination.

  4. A review of progress in single particle tracking: from methods to biophysical insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Carlo; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F

    2015-12-01

    Optical microscopy has for centuries been a key tool to study living cells with minimum invasiveness. The advent of single molecule techniques over the past two decades has revolutionized the field of cell biology by providing a more quantitative picture of the complex and highly dynamic organization of living systems. Amongst these techniques, single particle tracking (SPT) has emerged as a powerful approach to study a variety of dynamic processes in life sciences. SPT provides access to single molecule behavior in the natural context of living cells, thereby allowing a complete statistical characterization of the system under study. In this review we describe the foundations of SPT together with novel optical implementations that nowadays allow the investigation of single molecule dynamic events with increasingly high spatiotemporal resolution using molecular densities closer to physiological expression levels. We outline some of the algorithms for the faithful reconstruction of SPT trajectories as well as data analysis, and highlight biological examples where the technique has provided novel insights into the role of diffusion regulating cellular function. The last part of the review concentrates on different theoretical models that describe anomalous transport behavior and ergodicity breaking observed from SPT studies in living cells.

  5. Particle tracking velocimetry applied to estimate the pressure field around a Savonius turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Yuichi; Nakada, Taishi; Suzuki, Takao; Yamamoto, Fujio

    2007-08-01

    Particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) is applied to flows around a Savonius turbine. The velocity vector field measured with PTV is utilized to estimate the pressure field around the turbine, as well as to evaluate the torque performance. The main objective of the work is the establishment of the pressure estimation scheme required to discuss the turbine performance. First, the PTV data are interpolated on a regular grid with a fourth-order ellipsoidal differential equation to generate velocity vectors satisfying the third-order spatio-temporal continuity both in time and space. Second, the phase-averaged velocity vector information with respect to the turbine angle is substituted into three different types of pressure-estimating equations, i.e. the Poisson equation, the Navier-Stokes equation and the sub-grid scale model of turbulence. The results obtained based on the Navier-Stokes equation are compared with those based on the Poisson equation, and have shown several merits in employing the Navier-Stokes-based method for the PTV measurement. The method is applied to a rotating turbine with the tip-speed ratio of 0.5 to find the relationship between torque behaviour and flow structure in a phase-averaged sense. We have found that a flow attached to the convex surface of the blades induces low-pressure regions to drive the turbine, namely, the lift force helps the turbine blades to rotate even when the drag force is insufficient. Secondary mechanisms of torque generation are also discussed.

  6. Single-particle tracking of quantum dot-conjugated prion proteins inside yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, Toshikazu; Kawai-Noma, Shigeko [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B56, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Pack, Chan-Gi [Cellular Informatics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Terajima, Hideki [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B56, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Yajima, Junichiro; Nishizaka, Takayuki [Department of Physics, Gakushuin University, 1-5-1 Mejiro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8588 (Japan); Kinjo, Masataka [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Dynamics, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Taguchi, Hideki, E-mail: taguchi@bio.titech.ac.jp [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B56, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We develop a method to track a quantum dot-conjugated protein in yeast cells. {yields} We incorporate the conjugated quantum dot proteins into yeast spheroplasts. {yields} We track the motions by conventional or 3D tracking microscopy. -- Abstract: Yeast is a model eukaryote with a variety of biological resources. Here we developed a method to track a quantum dot (QD)-conjugated protein in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We chemically conjugated QDs with the yeast prion Sup35, incorporated them into yeast spheroplasts, and tracked the motions by conventional two-dimensional or three-dimensional tracking microscopy. The method paves the way toward the individual tracking of proteins of interest inside living yeast cells.

  7. Numerical issues in Lagrangian tracking and topological evolution of fluid particles in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, C.; Hackl, J.; Stegeman, P.; Borrell, G.; Soria, J.

    2014-04-01

    The determination of the local Lagrangian evolution of the flow topology in wall-bounded turbulence, and of the Lagrangian evolution associated with entrainment across the turbulent / non-turbulent interface into a turbulent boundary layer, require accurate tracking of a fluid particle and its local velocity gradients. This paper addresses the implementation of fluid-particle tracking in both a turbulent boundary layer direct numerical simulation and in a fully developed channel flow simulation. Determination of the sub-grid particle velocity is performed using both cubic B-spline, four-point Hermite spline and higher-order Hermite spline interpolation. Both wall-bounded flows show similar oscillations in the Lagrangian tracers of both velocity and velocity gradients, corresponding to the movement of particles across the boundaries of computational cells. While these oscillation in the particle velocity are relatively small and have negligible effect on the particle trajectories for time-steps of the order of CFL = 0.1, they appear to be the cause of significant oscillations in the evolution of the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor.

  8. A New Method for Tracking Individual Particles During Bed Load Transport in a Gravel-Bed River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, M.; Marquis, G. A.; Roy, A. G.; Chaire de Recherche Du Canada En Dynamique Fluviale

    2010-12-01

    Many particle tracers (passive or active) have been developed to study gravel movement in rivers. It remains difficult, however, to document resting and moving periods and to know how particles travel from one deposition site to another. Our new tracking method uses the Hobo Pendant G acceleration Data Logger to quantitatively describe the motion of individual particles from the initiation of movement, through the displacement and to the rest, in a natural gravel river. The Hobo measures the acceleration in three dimensions at a chosen temporal frequency. The Hobo was inserted into 11 artificial rocks. The rocks were seeded in Ruisseau Béard, a small gravel-bed river in the Yamaska drainage basin (Québec) where the hydraulics, particle sizes and bed characteristics are well known. The signals recorded during eight floods (Summer and Fall 2008-2009) allowed us to develop an algorithm which classifies the periods of rest and motion. We can differentiate two types of motion: sliding and rolling. The particles can also vibrate while remaining in the same position. The examination of the movement and vibration periods with respect to the hydraulic conditions (discharge, shear stress, stream power) showed that vibration occurred mostly before the rise of hydrograph and allowed us to establish movement threshold and response times. In all cases, particle movements occurred during floods but not always in direct response to increased bed shear stress and stream power. This method offers great potential to track individual particles and to establish a spatiotemporal sequence of the intermittent transport of the particle during a flood and to test theories concerning the resting periods of particles on a gravel bed.

  9. Asynchronous Bounded Expected Delay Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Bakhshi, Rena; Fokkink, Wan; Pang, Jun

    2010-01-01

    The commonly used asynchronous bounded delay (ABD) network models assume a fixed bound on message delay. We propose a probabilistic network model, called asynchronous bounded expected delay (ABE) model. Instead of a strict bound, the ABE model requires only a bound on the expected message delay. While the conditions of ABD networks restrict the set of possible executions, in ABE networks all asynchronous executions are possible, but executions with extremely long delays are less probable. In contrast to ABD networks, ABE networks cannot be synchronised efficiently. At the example of an election algorithm, we show that the minimal assumptions of ABE networks are sufficient for the development of efficient algorithms. For anonymous, unidirectional ABE rings of known size N we devise a probabilistic leader election algorithm having average message and time complexity O(N).

  10. Developing new optical imaging techniques for single particle and molecule tracking in live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is a far-field as well as wide-field optical imaging technique. Since it is non-invasive and requires no sample staining, DIC microscopy is suitable for tracking the motion of target molecules in live cells without interfering their functions. In addition, high numerical aperture objectives and condensers can be used in DIC microscopy. The depth of focus of DIC is shallow, which gives DIC much better optical sectioning ability than those of phase contrast and dark field microscopies. In this work, DIC was utilized to study dynamic biological processes including endocytosis and intracellular transport in live cells. The suitability of DIC microscopy for single particle tracking in live cells was first demonstrated by using DIC to monitor the entire endocytosis process of one mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) into a live mammalian cell. By taking advantage of the optical sectioning ability of DIC, we recorded the depth profile of the MSN during the endocytosis process. The shape change around the nanoparticle due to the formation of a vesicle was also captured. DIC microscopy was further modified that the sample can be illuminated and imaged at two wavelengths simultaneously. By using the new technique, noble metal nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes were selectively imaged. Among all the examined metal nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles in rod shapes were found to be especially useful. Due to their anisotropic optical properties, gold nanorods showed as diffraction-limited spots with disproportionate bright and dark parts that are strongly dependent on their orientation in the 3D space. Gold nanorods were developed as orientation nanoprobes and were successfully used to report the self-rotation of gliding microtubules on kinesin coated substrates. Gold nanorods were further used to study the rotational motions of cargoes during the endocytosis and intracellular transport processes in live mammalian

  11. Intra-Nuclear Single-Particle Tracking (I-SPT) to Reveal the Functional Architecture of Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Récamier, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome architecture needs to be investigated in relation with the chemical function of DNA. The kinetics of gene expression, DNA replication, and repair are driven by the mechanisms by which a functional nuclear protein finds its substrate in the nucleus. Single-particle tracking (SPT) is a method to quantify fluorescent molecules dynamics from the tracks of the single molecules recorded by high-resolution microscopes. SPT offers direct observation of the movement and single-molecule resolution. Usually SPT is performed on membranes because of higher contrast. Here, we introduce a novel method to record the trajectories of weakly fluorescent molecules in the nucleus of living cells. I-SPT uses some specific detection and analysis tools to enable the computation of reliable statistics on nuclear particle movement.

  12. Flow speed alters the apparent size and concentration of particles measured using NanoSight nanoparticle tracking analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, M; Brown, O S; Stone, P R; Cree, L M; Chamley, L W

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) is commonly used to count and size nano-sized particles. A sample loading pump can be used to analyse a larger sample volume, but it is unclear whether accuracy is affected. Using a NanoSight NS300 with the manufacturer-supplied pump, we examined synthetic silica and latex microspheres, liposomes and placental extracellular vesicles at different flow speeds. Analysis at flow speeds of 20 or 50 significantly reduced the measured concentration and mean/modal size of particles, particularly for mono-dispersed samples. We identify sample flow speed as a crucial instrument setting which should be reported in all studies that use NTA.

  13. Convergence of lateral dynamic measurements in the plasma membrane of live cells from single particle tracking and STED-FCS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerholm, B. Christoffer; Andrade, Débora M.; Clausen, Mathias P.

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) in combination with the super-resolution imaging method STED (STED-FCS), and single-particle tracking (SPT) are able to directly probe the lateral dynamics of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane of live cells at spatial scales much below the diff...... embryo fibroblasts results in an unhindered, intra-compartment, diffusion coefficient of ≈0.7-1.0 μm2 s-1, and a compartment size of about 100-150 nm....

  14. Belief Consensus Algorithms for Distributed Target Tracking in Wireless Sensor Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Savic, Vladimir; Zazo, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    In distributed target tracking in wireless sensor networks (WSN), agreement on the target state is usually achieved by the construction and maintenance of a communication path. Such an approach lack robustness to failures, and is not applicable to asynchronous networks. Recently, methods have been proposed that can solve these problems using consensus algorithms. However, these methods suffer from at least one of the following problems: i) they do not use fastest consensus methods, and ii) they cannot handle all parametric and nonparametric likelihood functions. In this paper, we propose a general framework for target tracking using distributed particle filtering (DPF) based on three asynchronous belief consensus (BC) algorithms: standard belief consensus (SBC), broadcast gossip (BG), and belief propagation (BP). Since DPF can be also solved (without consensus) by exchanging the observed data, we determine under which conditions BC-based methods are preferred. Finally, we perform extensive simulations to anal...

  15. Tracking human position and lower body parts using Kalman and particle filters constrained by human biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez del Rincon, Jesús; Makris, Dimitrios; Orrite Urunuela, Carlos; Nebel, Jean-Christophe

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, a novel framework for visual tracking of human body parts is introduced. The approach presented demonstrates the feasibility of recovering human poses with data from a single uncalibrated camera by using a limb-tracking system based on a 2-D articulated model and a double-tracking strategy. Its key contribution is that the 2-D model is only constrained by biomechanical knowledge about human bipedal motion, instead of relying on constraints that are linked to a specific activity or camera view. These characteristics make our approach suitable for real visual surveillance applications. Experiments on a set of indoor and outdoor sequences demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on tracking human lower body parts. Moreover, a detail comparison with current tracking methods is presented.

  16. Asymptotic behavior of asynchronous stochasticapproximation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方海涛; 陈翰馥

    2001-01-01

    The pathwise convergence of a distributed, asynchronous stochastic approximation (SA) scheme is analyzed. The conditions imposed on the step size and noise are the weakest in comparison with the existing ones. The step sizes in different processors are allowed to be different, and the time_delays between processors are also allowed to be different and even time_varying.

  17. Acquiring Knowledge from Asynchronous Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Yiong Hwee; Webster, Len

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses a study which was designed to explore how online scaffolding can be incorporated to support knowledge acquisition in asynchronous discussion. A group of Singapore preservice teachers engaged in collaborative critiquing of videos before they embarked on their video projects to illustrate what constitutes good and bad video…

  18. Asynchronous sequential machine design and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Tinder, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Asynchronous Sequential Machine Design and Analysis provides a lucid, in-depth treatment of asynchronous state machine design and analysis presented in two parts: Part I on the background fundamentals related to asynchronous sequential logic circuits generally, and Part II on self-timed systems, high-performance asynchronous programmable sequencers, and arbiters.Part I provides a detailed review of the background fundamentals for the design and analysis of asynchronous finite state machines (FSMs). Included are the basic models, use of fully documented state diagrams, and the design and charac

  19. Recovering the Elemental Composition of Comet Wild 2 Dust in Five Stardust Impact Tracks and Terminal Particles in Aerogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, H A; Brennan, S; Bradley, J P; Luening, K; Ignatyev, K; Pianetta, P

    2007-01-04

    The elemental (non-volatile) composition of five Stardust impact tracks and terminal particles left from capture of Comet 81P/Wild 2 dust were mapped in a synchrotron x-ray scanning microprobe with full fluorescence spectra at each pixel. Because aerogel includes background levels of several elements of interest, we employ a novel 'dual threshold' approach to discriminate against background contaminants: an upper threshold, above which a spectrum contains cometary material plus aerogel and a lower threshold below which it contains only aerogel. The difference between normalized cometary-plus-background and background-only spectra is attributable to cometary material. The few spectra in between are discarded since misallocation is detrimental: cometary material incorrectly placed in the background spectrum is later subtracted from the cometary spectrum, doubling the loss of reportable cometary material. This approach improves precision of composition quantification. We present the refined whole impact track and terminal particle elemental abundances for the five impact tracks. One track shows mass increases in Cr and Mn (1.4x), Cu, As and K (2x), Zn (4x) and total mass (13%) by dual thresholds compared to a single threshold. Major elements Fe and Ni are not significantly affected. The additional Cr arises from cometary material containing little Fe. We exclude Au intermixed with cometary material because it is found to be a localized surface contaminant carried by comet dust into an impact track. The dual threshold technique can be used in other situations where elements of interest in a small sample embedded in a matrix are also present in the matrix itself.

  20. Simultaneous Multi-vehicle Detection and Tracking Framework with Pavement Constraints Based on Machine Learning and Particle Filter Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ke; HUANG Zhi; ZHONG Zhihua

    2014-01-01

    Due to the large variations of environment with ever-changing background and vehicles with different shapes, colors and appearances, to implement a real-time on-board vehicle recognition system with high adaptability, efficiency and robustness in complicated environments, remains challenging. This paper introduces a simultaneous detection and tracking framework for robust on-board vehicle recognition based on monocular vision technology. The framework utilizes a novel layered machine learning and particle filter to build a multi-vehicle detection and tracking system. In the vehicle detection stage, a layered machine learning method is presented, which combines coarse-search and fine-search to obtain the target using the AdaBoost-based training algorithm. The pavement segmentation method based on characteristic similarity is proposed to estimate the most likely pavement area. Efficiency and accuracy are enhanced by restricting vehicle detection within the downsized area of pavement. In vehicle tracking stage, a multi-objective tracking algorithm based on target state management and particle filter is proposed. The proposed system is evaluated by roadway video captured in a variety of traffics, illumination, and weather conditions. The evaluating results show that, under conditions of proper illumination and clear vehicle appearance, the proposed system achieves 91.2% detection rate and 2.6% false detection rate. Experiments compared to typical algorithms show that, the presented algorithm reduces the false detection rate nearly by half at the cost of decreasing 2.7%–8.6% detection rate. This paper proposes a multi-vehicle detection and tracking system, which is promising for implementation in an on-board vehicle recognition system with high precision, strong robustness and low computational cost.

  1. Eruptions on the fast track: application of Particle Tracking Velocimetry algorithms to visual and thermal high-speed videos of Strombolian explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, Damien; Monica, Moroni; Jacopo, Taddeucci; Luca, Shindler; Piergiorgio, Scarlato

    2013-04-01

    Strombolian eruptions are characterized by mild, frequent explosions that eject gas and ash- to bomb-sized pyroclasts into the atmosphere. Studying these explosions is crucial, both for direct hazard assessment and for understanding eruption dynamics. Conventional thermal and optical imaging already allows characterizing several eruptive processes, but the quantification of key parameters linked to magma properties and conduit processes requires acquiring images at higher frequency. For example, high speed imaging already demonstrated how the size and the pressure of the gas bubble are linked to the decay of the ejection velocity of the particles, and the origin of the bombs, either fresh or recycled material, could be linked to their thermal evolution. However, the manual processing of the images is time consuming. Consequently, it does not allows neither the routine monitoring nor averaged statistics, since only a few relevant particles - usually the fastest - of a few explosions can be taken into account. In order to understand the dynamics of strombolian eruption, and particularly their cyclic behavior, the quantification of the total mass, heat and energy discharge are a crucial point. In this study, we use a Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) algorithm jointly to traditional images processing to automatically extract the above parameters from visible and thermal high-speed videos of individual Strombolian explosions. PTV is an analysis technique where each single particle is detected and tracked during a series of images. Velocity, acceleration, and temperature can then be deduced and time averaged to get an extensive overview of each explosion. The suitability of PTV and its potential limitations in term of detection and representativity is investigated in various explosions of Stromboli (Italy), Yasur (Vanuatu) and Fuego (Guatemala) volcanoes. On most event, multiple sub-explosion are visible. In each sub-explosion, trends are noticeable : (1) the ejection

  2. Test of scintillator bars coupled to Silicon Photomultipliers for a charged particle tracking device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchini, S.; D'Antone, I.; Esposti, L. Degli; Lax, I.; Mandrioli, G.; Mauri, N.; Pasqualini, L.; Patrizii, L.; Pozzato, M.; Sirri, G.; Tenti, M.

    2017-02-01

    This work is the first step in the implementation of a tracking detector for instrumenting a light spectrometer to study O(1 GeV) νμ CC interactions. A spatial resolution of O(1 mm) is required for the precise determination of momentum and charge of muons produced in such interactions. A tracking system prototype composed of planes of scintillator bars coupled to Silicon Photomultipliers in analog mode readout has been developed. The devised system provides a spatial resolution of better than 2 mm in reconstructing muon tracks. Results obtained in laboratory tests and with cosmic ray muons are discussed.

  3. Flow Mapping in a Gas-Solid Riser via Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthanna Al-Dahhan; Milorad P. Dudukovic; Satish Bhusarapu; Timothy J. O' hern; Steven Trujillo; Michael R. Prairie

    2005-06-04

    Statement of the Problem: Developing and disseminating a general and experimentally validated model for turbulent multiphase fluid dynamics suitable for engineering design purposes in industrial scale applications of riser reactors and pneumatic conveying, require collecting reliable data on solids trajectories, velocities ? averaged and instantaneous, solids holdup distribution and solids fluxes in the riser as a function of operating conditions. Such data are currently not available on the same system. Multiphase Fluid Dynamics Research Consortium (MFDRC) was established to address these issues on a chosen example of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) reactor, which is widely used in petroleum and chemical industry including coal combustion. This project addresses the problem of lacking reliable data to advance CFB technology. Project Objectives: The objective of this project is to advance the understanding of the solids flow pattern and mixing in a well-developed flow region of a gas-solid riser, operated at different gas flow rates and solids loading using the state-of-the-art non-intrusive measurements. This work creates an insight and reliable database for local solids fluid-dynamic quantities in a pilot-plant scale CFB, which can then be used to validate/develop phenomenological models for the riser. This study also attempts to provide benchmark data for validation of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) codes and their current closures. Technical Approach: Non-Invasive Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT) technique provides complete Eulerian solids flow field (time average velocity map and various turbulence parameters such as the Reynolds stresses, turbulent kinetic energy, and eddy diffusivities). It also gives directly the Lagrangian information of solids flow and yields the true solids residence time distribution (RTD). Another radiation based technique, Computed Tomography (CT) yields detailed time averaged local holdup profiles at

  4. Use of a ground-water flow model with particle tracking to evaluate ground-water vulnerability, Clark County, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, D.T.; Wilkinson, J.M.; Orzol, L.L.

    1996-01-01

    A ground-water flow model was used in conjunction with particle tracking to evaluate ground-water vulnerability in Clark County, Washington. Using the particle-tracking program, particles were placed in every cell of the flow model (about 60,000 particles) and tracked backwards in time and space upgradient along flow paths to their recharge points. A new computer program was developed that interfaces the results from a particle-tracking program with a geographic information system (GIS). The GIS was used to display and analyze the particle-tracking results. Ground-water vulnerability was evaluated by selecting parts of the ground-water flow system and combining the results with ancillary information stored in the GIS to determine recharge areas, characteristics of recharge areas, downgradient impact of land use at recharge areas, and age of ground water. Maps of the recharge areas for each hydrogeologic unit illustrate the presence of local, intermediate, or regional ground-water flow systems and emphasize the three-dimensional nature of the ground-water flow system in Clark County. Maps of the recharge points for each hydrogeologic unit were overlaid with maps depicting aquifer sensitivity as determined by DRASTIC (a measure of the pollution potential of ground water, based on the intrinsic characteristics of the near-surface unsaturated and saturated zones) and recharge from on-site waste-disposal systems. A large number of recharge areas were identified, particularly in southern Clark County, that have a high aquifer sensitivity, coincide with areas of recharge from on-site waste-disposal systems, or both. Using the GIS, the characteristics of the recharge areas were related to the downgradient parts of the ground-water system that will eventually receive flow that has recharged through these areas. The aquifer sensitivity, as indicated by DRASTIC, of the recharge areas for downgradient parts of the flow system was mapped for each hydrogeologic unit. A number of

  5. Kernel density estimation and marginalized-particle based probability hypothesis density filter for multi-target tracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张路平; 王鲁平; 李飚; 赵明

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of the probability hypothesis density (PHD) algorithm based particle filter (PF) in terms of number estimation and states extraction of multiple targets, a new probability hypothesis density filter algorithm based on marginalized particle and kernel density estimation is proposed, which utilizes the idea of marginalized particle filter to enhance the estimating performance of the PHD. The state variables are decomposed into linear and non-linear parts. The particle filter is adopted to predict and estimate the nonlinear states of multi-target after dimensionality reduction, while the Kalman filter is applied to estimate the linear parts under linear Gaussian condition. Embedding the information of the linear states into the estimated nonlinear states helps to reduce the estimating variance and improve the accuracy of target number estimation. The meanshift kernel density estimation, being of the inherent nature of searching peak value via an adaptive gradient ascent iteration, is introduced to cluster particles and extract target states, which is independent of the target number and can converge to the local peak position of the PHD distribution while avoiding the errors due to the inaccuracy in modeling and parameters estimation. Experiments show that the proposed algorithm can obtain higher tracking accuracy when using fewer sampling particles and is of lower computational complexity compared with the PF-PHD.

  6. A comparison of particle-tracking and solute transport methods for simulation of tritium concentrations and groundwater transit times in river water

    OpenAIRE

    Gusyev, M. A.; D. Abrams; Toews, M. W.; U. Morgenstern; M. K. Stewart

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to simulate tritium concentrations and groundwater transit times in river water with particle-tracking (MODPATH) and compare them to solute transport (MT3DMS) simulations. Tritium measurements in river water are valuable for the calibration of particle-tracking and solute transport models as well as for understanding of watershed storage dynamics. In a previous study, we simulated tritium concentrations in river water of the western Lake Taupo...

  7. Assessment of particle-tracking models for dispersed particle-laden flows implemented in OpenFOAM and ANSYS FLUENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Greifzu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study two benchmark problems for turbulent dispersed particle-laden flow are investigated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD. How the CFD programs OpenFOAM and ANSYS FLUENT model these flows is tested and compared. The numerical results obtained with Lagrangian–Eulerian (LE point-particle (PP models for Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS simulations of the fluid flow in steady state and transient modes are compared with the experimental data available in the literature. The effect of the dispersion model on the particle motion is investigated in particular, as well as the order of coupling between the continuous carrier phase and the dispersed phase. First, a backward-facing step (BFS case is validated. As a second case, the confined bluff body (CBB is used. The simulated fluid flows correspond well with the experimental data for both test cases. The results for the dispersed solid phase reveal a good accordance between the simulation results and the experiments. It seems that particle dispersion is slightly under-predicted when ANSYS FLUENT is used, whereas the applied solver in OpenFOAM overestimates the dispersion somewhat. Only minor differences between the coupling schemes are detected due to the low volume fractions and mass loadings that are investigated. In the BFS test case the importance of the spatial dimension of the numerical model is demonstrated. Even if it is reasonable to assume a two-dimensional fluid flow structure, it is crucial to simulate the turbulent particle-laden flow with a three-dimensional model since the turbulent dispersion of the particles is three-dimensional.

  8. Single-particle tracking of immunoglobulin E receptors (FcεRI) in micron-sized clusters and receptor patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spendier, Kathrin; Lidke, Keith A; Lidke, Diane S; Thomas, James L

    2012-02-17

    When mast cells contact a monovalent antigen-bearing fluid lipid bilayer, IgE-loaded FcεRI receptors aggregate at contact points and trigger degranulation and the release of immune activators. We used two-color total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and single-particle tracking to show that most fluorescently labeled receptor complexes diffuse freely within these micron-size clusters, with a diffusion coefficient comparable to free receptors in resting cells. At later times, when the small clusters coalesce to form larger patches, receptors diffuse even more rapidly. In all cases, Monte Carlo diffusion simulations ensured that the tracking results were free of bias, and distinguished biological from statistical variation. These results show the diversity in receptor mobility in mast cells, demonstrating at least three distinct states of receptor diffusivity.

  9. A Rao-Blackwellized particle filter for joint parameter estimation and biomass tracking in a stochastic predator-prey system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Fernández, Laura; Gilioli, Gianni; Lanzarone, Ettore; Miguez, Joaquin; Pasquali, Sara; Ruggeri, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Diego P

    2014-06-01

    Functional response estimation and population tracking in predator-prey systems are critical problems in ecology. In this paper we consider a stochastic predator-prey system with a Lotka-Volterra functional response and propose a particle filtering method for: (a) estimating the behavioral parameter representing the rate of effective search per predator in the functional response and (b) forecasting the population biomass using field data. In particular, the proposed technique combines a sequential Monte Carlo sampling scheme for tracking the time-varying biomass with the analytical integration of the unknown behavioral parameter. In order to assess the performance of the method, we show results for both synthetic and observed data collected in an acarine predator-prey system, namely the pest mite Tetranychus urticae and the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis.

  10. Quantification of Vortex Generation Due to Non-Equilibrium Electrokinetics at the Micro/Nanochannel Interface: Particle Tracking Velocimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Jun Lee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe a quantitative study of vortex generation due to non-equilibrium electrokinetics near a micro/nanochannel interface. The microfluidic device is comprised of a microchannel with a set of nanochannels. These perm-selective nanochannels induce flow instability and thereby produce strong vortex generation. We performed tracking visualization of fluorescent microparticles to obtain velocity fields. Particle tracking enables the calculation of an averaged velocity field and the velocity fluctuations. We characterized the effect of applied voltages and electrolyte concentrations on vortex formation. The experimental results show that an increasing voltage or decreasing concentration results in a larger vortex region and a strong velocity fluctuation. We calculate the normalized velocity fluctuation—whose meaning is comparable to turbulent intensity—and we found that it is as high as 0.12. This value is indicative of very efficient mixing, albeit with a small Reynolds number.

  11. Advanced algorithms for mobile robot motion planning and tracking in structured static environments using particle swarm optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćosić Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An approach to intelligent robot motion planning and tracking in known and static environments is presented in this paper. This complex problem is divided into several simpler problems. The first is generation of a collision free path from starting to destination point, which is solved using a particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm. The second is interpolation of the obtained collision-free path, which is solved using a radial basis function neural network (RBFNN, and trajectory generation, based on the interpolated path. The last is a trajectory tracking problem, which is solved using a proportional-integral (PI controller. Due to uncertainties, obstacle avoidance is still not ensured, so an additional fuzzy controller is introduced, which corrects the control action of the PI controller. The proposed solution can be used even in dynamic environments, where obstacles change their position in time. Simulation studies were realized to validate and illustrate this approach.

  12. A comparison of single particle tracking and temporal image correlation spectroscopy for quantitative analysis of endosome motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, F. W.; Wustner, D.

    2013-01-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) is becoming a standard method to extract transport parameters from time-lapse image sequences of fluorescent vesicles in living cells. Another method to obtain these data is temporal image correlation spectroscopy (TICS), but this method is less often used for measu......Single particle tracking (SPT) is becoming a standard method to extract transport parameters from time-lapse image sequences of fluorescent vesicles in living cells. Another method to obtain these data is temporal image correlation spectroscopy (TICS), but this method is less often used...... for measurement of intracellular vesicle transport. Here, we present an extensive comparison of SPT and TICS. First we examine the effect of photobleaching, shading and noise on SPT and TICS analysis using simulated image sequences. To this end, we developed a simple photophysical model, which relates spatially...... varying illumination intensity to the bleaching propensity and fluorescence intensity of the moving particles. We found that neither SPT nor TICS are affected by photobleaching per se, but the transport parameters obtained by both methods are sensitive to the signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, the number...

  13. Asynchronous control for networked systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rubio, Francisco; Bencomo, Sebastián

    2015-01-01

    This book sheds light on networked control systems; it describes different techniques for asynchronous control, moving away from the periodic actions of classical control, replacing them with state-based decisions and reducing the frequency with which communication between subsystems is required. The text focuses specially on event-based control. Split into two parts, Asynchronous Control for Networked Systems begins by addressing the problems of single-loop networked control systems, laying out various solutions which include two alternative model-based control schemes (anticipatory and predictive) and the use of H2/H∞ robust control to deal with network delays and packet losses. Results on self-triggering and send-on-delta sampling are presented to reduce the need for feedback in the loop. In Part II, the authors present solutions for distributed estimation and control. They deal first with reliable networks and then extend their results to scenarios in which delays and packet losses may occur. The novel ...

  14. Detection of accelerated particles from pulsed plasma discharge using solid state nuclear track detector

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G M El-Aragi; U Seddik; A Abd El-Haliem

    2007-04-01

    The ion beam of a Mather-type 23.25 J plasma focus device operated with air filling at 10 Torr was registered using CR-39 nuclear track detector. The irradiated samples were etched in NaOH solution at 70°C for 1 h. It is found here that plasma beam contains multi-components of microbeams. The individual track density of microbeams is estimated and the total current density of the plasma stream is measured to be 1.2 mA/cm2. A model for counting the track density of individual microbeams is proposed here. Faraday cup measurements showed the ion pulse with energy ranging from 5.8 keV to 3.3 keV.

  15. Light Particle Tracking Model for Simulating Bed Sediment Transport Load in River Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel E. Herrera-Díaz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work a fast computational particles tracer model is developed based on Particle-In-Cell method to estimate the sediment transport in the access zone of a river port area. To apply the particles tracer method, first it is necessary to calculate the hydrodynamic fields of the study zone to determine the velocity fields in the three directions. The particle transport is governed mainly by the velocity fields and the turbulent dispersion. The mechanisms of dispersion and resuspension of particles are based in stochastic models, which describes the movement through a probability function. The developed code was validated using two well known cases with a discrete transformation obtaining a max relative error around 4.8% in both cases. The simulations were carried out with 350,000 particles allowing us to determine under certain circumstances different hydrodynamic scenarios where the zones are susceptible to present erosion and siltation at the entrance of the port.

  16. GAMIFICATION IN ASYNCHRONOUS EDUCATION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. P. Dyakonov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The author of the paper discourses on the prospects of education in the context of the global tendency towards informatization and virtualization of the modern world, influence of these processes on personalized senses of education and educational values and related problems of methodological and technological education in relation to the personalized meanings and educational values. Educational individualization is defined by the author as the most expected way of educational evolution. Distance learning is studied as the main example of the modern transformative educational model. Asynchronous education is explored and characterized as one of the distance learning examples. While defining what asynchronous distance learning is, the author explores its role in the specifics of forming a subject to subject educational approach, while forecasting difficulties in creating holistic asynchronous educational environment. Gamification techniques in the educational process are studied with their respective opportunities and threats, examples in grad and post grad professional studies are provided, including but not limited to foreign language studies. Addictiveness as the goal and means of a build in gamification process is explored as the way to bridge the gap between students and the educators. The author studies gamification in the context of minimizing negative connotations from the educational process, while controversies between pain and game approaches of getting knowledge are brought into light.

  17. Particle tracking velocimetry and particle image velocimetry study of the slow motion of rough and smooth solid spheres in a yield-stress fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holenberg, Yulia; Lavrenteva, Olga M; Shavit, Uri; Nir, Avinoam

    2012-12-01

    We report experimental evidence of an effect opposite to the "solidification" of small bubbles in liquid where the surface can become immobile. Namely, it is demonstrated that smooth solid spheres falling in a yield-stress fluid under the action of gravity can behave similar to drops. Particle tracking velocimetry was used to determine the shape of the yielded region around solid spherical particles undergoing slow stationary motion in 0.07% w/w Carbopol gel due to gravity under creeping flow conditions. The flow field inside the yielded region was determined by particle image velocimetry. It was found that the shape of the yielded region and the flow field around slow-moving rough particles is similar to the published results of numerical simulations, whereas those around smooth spheres resemble the experimental results obtained for viscous drops. The effect was explained by a slip of the gel on the smooth surface. Most likely, the slip originated from seepage of clean water from the gel, forming a thin lubricating layer near the solid surface.

  18. Dissecting the Cell Entry Pathway of Dengue Virus by Single-Particle Tracking in Living Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Rust, Michael J.; Chen, Chen; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Wilschut, Jan; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2008-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an enveloped RNA virus that causes the most common arthropod-borne infection worldwide. The mechanism by which DENV infects the host cell remains unclear. In this work, we used live-cell imaging and single-virus tracking to investigate the cell entry, endocytic trafficking, an

  19. Real-time optical tracking for motion compensated irradiation with scanned particle beams at CNAO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattori, G., E-mail: giovanni.fattori@psi.ch [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Seregni, M. [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Pella, A. [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Riboldi, M. [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Capasso, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Donetti, M. [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Ciocca, M. [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Giordanengo, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Pullia, M. [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Marchetto, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Baroni, G. [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2016-08-11

    Purpose: We describe the interface developed at the National Center for Oncological Hadrontherapy in Pavia to provide the dose delivery systems with real time respiratory motion information captured with an optical tracking system. An experimental study is presented to assess the technical feasibility of the implemented organ motion compensation framework, by analyzing the film response when irradiated with proton beams. Methods: The motion monitoring solution is based on a commercial hardware for motion capture running in-house developed software for respiratory signal processing. As part of the integration, the latency of data transmission to the dose delivery system was experimentally quantified and accounted for by signal time prediction. A respiratory breathing phantom is presented and used to test tumor tracking based either on the optical measurement of the target position or internal-external correlation models and beam gating, as driven by external surrogates. Beam tracking was tested considering the full target motion excursion (25×18 mm), whereas it is limited to 6×2 mm in the gating window. The different motion mitigation strategies were evaluated by comparing the experimental film responses with respect to static irradiation conditions. Dose inhomogeneity (IC) and conformity (CI) are provided as main indexes for dose quality assessment considering the irradiation in static condition as reference. Results: We measured 20.6 ms overall latency for motion signal processing. Dose measurements showed that beam tracking largely preserved dose homogeneity and conformity, showing maximal IC and CI variations limited to +0.10 and −0.01 with respect to the static reference. Gating resulted in slightly larger discrepancies (ΔIC=+0.20, ΔCI=−0.13) due to uncompensated residual motion in the gating window. Conclusions: The preliminary beam tracking and gating results verified the functionality of the prototypal solution for organ motion compensation based on

  20. Infrared Spectroscopy of Wild 2 Particle Hypervelocity Tracks in Stardust Aerogel: Evidence for the presence of Volatile Organics in Comet Dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajt, S; Sandford, S A; Flynn, G J; Matrajt, G; Snead, C J; Westphal, A J; Bradley, J P

    2007-08-28

    Infrared spectroscopy maps of some tracks, made by cometary dust from 81P/Wild 2 impacting Stardust aerogel, reveal an interesting distribution of volatile organic material. Out of six examined tracks three show presence of volatile organic components possibly injected into the aerogel during particle impacts. When particle tracks contained excess volatile organic material, they were found to be -CH{sub 2}-rich. Off-normal particle tracks could indicate impacts by lower velocity particles that could have bounced off the Whipple shield, therefore carry off some contamination from it. However, this theory is not supported by data that show excess organic-rich material in normal and off-normal particle tracks. It is clear that the population of cometary particles impacting the Stardust aerogel collectors also include grains that contained little or none of this volatile organic component. This observation is consistent with the highly heterogeneous nature of the collected grains, as seen by a multitude of other analytical techniques. We propose that at least some of the volatile organic material might be of cometary origin based on supporting data shown in this paper. However, we also acknowledge the presence of carbon (primarily as -CH{sub 3}) in the original aerogel, which complicates interpretation of these results.

  1. Improved Particle Filter for Passive Target Tracking%改进粒子滤波在被动目标跟踪中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓小龙; 谢剑英; 杨煜普

    2005-01-01

    As a new method for dealing with any nonlinear or non-Gaussian distributions, based on the Monte Carlo methods and Bayesian filtering, particle filters (PF) are favored by researchers and widely applied in many fields. Based on particle filtering, an improved extended Kalman filter (EKF) proposal distribution is presented. Evaluation of the weights is simplified and other improved techniques including the residual resampling step and Markov Chain Monte Carlo method are introduced for target tracking. Performances of the EKF, basic PF and the improved PF are compared in target tracking examples. The simulation results confirm that the improved particle filter outperforms the others.

  2. Tracking control of colloidal particles through non-homogeneous stationary flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Híjar, Humberto

    2013-12-21

    We consider the problem of controlling the trajectory of a single colloidal particle in a fluid with steady non-homogeneous flow. We use a Langevin equation to describe the dynamics of this particle, where the friction term is assumed to be given by the Faxén's Theorem for the force on a sphere immersed in a stationary flow. We use this description to propose an explicit control force field to be applied on the particle such that it will follow asymptotically any given desired trajectory, starting from an arbitrary initial condition. We show that the dynamics of the controlled particle can be mapped into a set of stochastic harmonic oscillators and that the velocity gradient of the solvent induces an asymmetric coupling between them. We study the particular case of a Brownian particle controlled through a plane Couette flow and show explicitly that the velocity gradient of the solvent renders the dynamics non-stationary and non-reversible in time. We quantify this effect in terms of the correlation functions for the position of the controlled particle, which turn out to exhibit contributions depending exclusively on the non-equilibrium character of the state of the solvent. In order to test the validity of our model, we perform simulations of the controlled particle moving in a simple shear flow, using a hybrid method combining molecular dynamics and multi-particle collision dynamics. We confirm numerically that the proposed guiding force allows for controlling the trajectory of the micro-sized particle by obligating it to follow diverse specific trajectories in fluids with homogeneous shear rates of different strengths. In addition, we find that the non-equilibrium correlation functions in simulations exhibit the same qualitative behavior predicted by the model, thus revealing the presence of the asymmetric non-equilibrium coupling mechanism induced by the velocity gradient.

  3. Tracking control of colloidal particles through non-homogeneous stationary flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Híjar, Humberto, E-mail: humberto.hijar@lasallistas.org.mx [Grupo de Sistemas Inteligentes, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad La Salle, Benjamín Franklin 47, 06140, Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2013-12-21

    We consider the problem of controlling the trajectory of a single colloidal particle in a fluid with steady non-homogeneous flow. We use a Langevin equation to describe the dynamics of this particle, where the friction term is assumed to be given by the Faxén's Theorem for the force on a sphere immersed in a stationary flow. We use this description to propose an explicit control force field to be applied on the particle such that it will follow asymptotically any given desired trajectory, starting from an arbitrary initial condition. We show that the dynamics of the controlled particle can be mapped into a set of stochastic harmonic oscillators and that the velocity gradient of the solvent induces an asymmetric coupling between them. We study the particular case of a Brownian particle controlled through a plane Couette flow and show explicitly that the velocity gradient of the solvent renders the dynamics non-stationary and non-reversible in time. We quantify this effect in terms of the correlation functions for the position of the controlled particle, which turn out to exhibit contributions depending exclusively on the non-equilibrium character of the state of the solvent. In order to test the validity of our model, we perform simulations of the controlled particle moving in a simple shear flow, using a hybrid method combining molecular dynamics and multi-particle collision dynamics. We confirm numerically that the proposed guiding force allows for controlling the trajectory of the micro-sized particle by obligating it to follow diverse specific trajectories in fluids with homogeneous shear rates of different strengths. In addition, we find that the non-equilibrium correlation functions in simulations exhibit the same qualitative behavior predicted by the model, thus revealing the presence of the asymmetric non-equilibrium coupling mechanism induced by the velocity gradient.

  4. Model Selection Coupled with a Particle Tracking Proxy Using Surface Deformation Data for Monitoring CO2 Plume Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, B.; Nwachukwu, A.; Srinivasan, S.; Wheeler, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    This study formulates a framework of a model selection that refines geological models for monitoring CO2 plume migration. Special emphasis is placed on CO2 injection, and the particular techniques that are used for this study including model selection, particle tracking proxies, and partial coupling of flow and geomechanics. The proposed process starts with generating a large initial ensemble of reservoir models that reflect a prior uncertainty in reservoir description, including all plausible geologic scenarios. These models are presumed to be conditioned to available static data. In the absence of production or injection data, all prior reservoir models are regarded as equiprobable. Thus, the model selection algorithm is applied to select a few representative reservoir models that are more consistent with observed dynamic responses. A quick assessment of the models must then be performed to evaluate their dynamic characteristics and flow connectivity. This approach develops a particle tracking proxy and a finite element method solver for solving the flow equation and the stress problem, respectively. The shape of CO2 plume is estimated using a particle-tracking proxy that serves as a fast approximation of finite-difference simulation models. Sequentially, a finite element method solver is coupled with the proxy for analyzing geomechanical effects resulting from CO2 injection. A method is then implemented to group the models into clusters based on similarities in the estimated responses. The posterior model set is chosen as the cluster that produces the minimum deviation from the observed field data. The efficacy of non-dominated sorting based on Pareto-optimality is also tested in the current model selection framework. The proposed scheme is demonstrated on a carbon sequestration project in Algeria. Coupling surface deformation data with well injection data enhances the efficiency of tracking the CO2 plume. Therefore, this algorithm provides a probabilistic

  5. Scale-Dependent Fracture-Matrix Interactions and Their Impact on Radionuclide Transport: Development of efficient particle-tracking methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajaram, Harihar [University of Colorado, Boulder; Brutz, Michael [University of Colorado, Boulder; Klein, Dylan R [University of Colorado, Boulder; Mallikamas, Wasin [University of Colorado, Boulder

    2014-09-18

    Matrix Diffusion and Adsorption within a rock matrix are important mechanisms for retarding transport of radionuclides in fractured rock. Due to computational limitations and difficulties in characterizing complex subsurface systems, diffusive exchange between a fracture network and surrounding rock matrix is often modeled using simplified conceptual representations. There is significant uncertainty in “effective” parameters used in these models, such as the “effective matrix diffusivity”. Often, these parameters are estimated by fitting sparse breakthrough data, and estimated values fall outside meaningful ranges, because simplified interpretive models do not consider complex three-dimensional flow. There is limited understanding of the relationship between the effective parameters and rock mass characteristics including network structure and matrix properties. There is also evidence for an apparent scale-dependence in “effective matrix diffusion” coefficients. These observations raise questions on whether fracture-matrix interaction parameters estimated from small-scale tracer tests can be used for predicting radionuclide fate and transport at the scale of DOE field sites. High-resolution three-dimensional Discrete-Fracture-Network-Matrix (DFNM) models based on well-defined local scale transport equations can help to address some of these questions. Due to tremendous advances in computational technology over the last 10 years, DFNM modeling in relatively large domains is now feasible. The overarching objective of our research is to use DFNM modeling to improve fundamental understanding of how effective parameters in conceptual models are related to fracture network structure and matrix properties. An advanced three-dimensional DFNM model is being developed, which combines upscaled particle-tracking algorithms for fracture-matrix interaction and a parallel fracture-network flow simulator. The particle-tracking algorithms allow complexity in flow fields

  6. Applications of particle-tracking techniques to bank infiltration: a case study from El Paso, Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Fattah, Ahmad; Langford, Richard; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents results of a small scale study that utilized particle-tracking techniques to evaluate transport of river water through an alluvial aquifer in a bank infiltration testing site in El Paso, Texas, USA. The particle-tracking survey was used to better define filtration parameters. Several simulations were generated to allow visualization of the effects of well placement and pumping rate on flow paths, travel time, the size of the pumping influence zone, and proportion of river-derived water and groundwater mixing in the pumping well. Simulations indicate that migration of river water into the aquifer is generally slow. Most water does not arrive at the well by the end of an 18-day pumping period at 0.54 m3/min pumping rate for a well located 18 m from the river. Forty-four percent of the water pumped from the well was river water. The models provided important information needed to design appropriate sampling schedules for bank filtration practices and ensured meeting adequate soil-retention times. The pumping rate has more effect on river water travel time than the location of the pumping well from the river. The examples presented in this paper indicate that operating the pumping well at a doubled distance from the river increased the time required for the water to travel to the well, but did not greatly change the capture zone.

  7. A novel asynchronous access method with binary interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres-Solis Jorge

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditionally synchronous access strategies require users to comply with one or more time constraints in order to communicate intent with a binary human-machine interface (e.g., mechanical, gestural or neural switches. Asynchronous access methods are preferable, but have not been used with binary interfaces in the control of devices that require more than two commands to be successfully operated. Methods We present the mathematical development and evaluation of a novel asynchronous access method that may be used to translate sporadic activations of binary interfaces into distinct outcomes for the control of devices requiring an arbitrary number of commands to be controlled. With this method, users are required to activate their interfaces only when the device under control behaves erroneously. Then, a recursive algorithm, incorporating contextual assumptions relevant to all possible outcomes, is used to obtain an informed estimate of user intention. We evaluate this method by simulating a control task requiring a series of target commands to be tracked by a model user. Results When compared to a random selection, the proposed asynchronous access method offers a significant reduction in the number of interface activations required from the user. Conclusion This novel access method offers a variety of advantages over traditionally synchronous access strategies and may be adapted to a wide variety of contexts, with primary relevance to applications involving direct object manipulation.

  8. Initial recombination in the track of heavy charged particles: Numerical solution for air filled ionization chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Bassler, Niels; Tölli, Heikki

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Modern particle therapy facilities enable sub-millimeter precision in dose deposition. Here, also ionization chambers (ICs) are used, which requires knowledge of the recombination effects. Up to now, recombination is corrected using phenomenological approaches for practical reasons...

  9. Simulated tritium concentrations in river waters of the western Lake Taupo catchment, New Zealand with MODPATH particle tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Gusyev

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We simulated in a previous study tritium concentrations in the river waters of the western Lake Taupo catchment (WLTC using MODFLOW/MT3DMS model (Gusyev et al., 2013. The model was calibrated to match simulated tritium to measured tritium in river waters at baseflows of the Waihaha, Whanganui, Whareroa, Kuratau and Omori river catchments of the WLTC. Following from this work we now utilized the same MODFLOW model for the WLTC to calculate the pathways of groundwater particles (and their corresponding tritium concentrations using steady-state particle tracking with MODPATH. In order to simulate baseflow tritium concentrations with MODPATH, transit time distributions (TTDs such as cumulative frequency distribution (CFD and probability density function (PDF are generated with particle tracking for the river networks of the five WLTC catchment outflows. Then, PDFs are used in the convolution integral with tritium concentration time series obtained in the precipitation. The resulting MODPATH tritium concentrations yield a very good match to measured tritium concentrations and are similar to the MT3DMS simulated tritium concentrations, with the greatest variation occurring around the bomb peak. MODPATH and MT3DMS also yield similar Mean Transit Times (MTT of groundwater contribution to river baseflows, but the actual shape of the TTDs is strikingly different. While both distributions provide valuable information, the methodologies used to derive the TTDs are fundamentally different and hence must be interpreted differently. With the current models setting, only the methodology used with MODPATH provides the true TTD for use with the convolution integral.

  10. Dynamic melting and impurity particle tracking in continuously adjustable AC magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojarevics, V.; Pericleous, K.

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of semi-levitation melting is extended to account for the presence of particles (impurities, broken metal dendrite agglomerates, bubbles) during the full melting cycle simulated numerically using the pseudo-spectral schemes. The AC coil is dynamically moving with the melt front progress, while the generated Joule heat serves to enhance the melting rate. The electromagnetic force is decomposed into the time average and the oscillating parts. The time average effects on the particle transport are investigated previously using approximations derived for a locally uniform magnetic field. This paper presents expressions for the skin-layer type of the AC force containing also the pulsating part which contributes to the particle drag by the ‘history’ and ‘added mass’ contributions. The intense turbulence in the bulk of molten metal additionally contributes to the particle dispersion. The paper attempts to demonstrate the importance of each of the mentioned effects onto the particle transport during the melting until the final pouring stage. The method could be extended to similar AC field controlled melting/solidification processes.

  11. The camera method, or how to track numerically a deformable particle moving in a fluid network

    CERN Document Server

    Moreau, Baptiste; Flaud, Patrice; Mauroy, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this work is to follow the displacement and possible deformation of a free particle in a fluid flow in 2D axi-symmetry, 2D or 3D using the classical finite elements method without the usual drawbacks finite elements bring for fluid-structure interaction, i.e. huge numerical problems and strong mesh distortions. Working with finite elements is a choice motivated by the fact that finite elements are well known by a large majority of researchers and are easy to manipulate. The method we describe in this paper, called the camera method, is well adapted to the study of a single particle in a network and most particularly when the study focuses on the particle behaviour. The camera method is based on two principles: 1/ the fluid structure interaction problem is restricted to a neighbourhood of the particle, thus reducing drastically the number of degrees of freedom of the problem; 2/ the neighbourhood mesh moves and rotates with the particle, thus avoiding most of the mesh distortions that occur in a st...

  12. Production of microspheres for the computer automated radioactive particle tracking technique (CARPT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Wilson S., E-mail: wilson@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pinto, Jose Carlos C.S., E-mail: pinto@peq.coppe.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Quimica; Nele, Marcio, E-mail: nele@eq.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    2013-07-01

    The CARPT technique is a non-destructive test that uses a radiotracer in the form of a single particle to determine patterns of fluid displacement or to develop numerical models for multiphase dynamic systems. Through it, velocity profiles of fluids or even concentration profiles of a phase can be visualized and the diagnose of phenomena in industrial processes related to fluid dynamics can be performed (e.g. recirculations, eddies, segregation zones or diffusivities ). In this work, spherical shaped particles composed of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and lanthanum oxide, about 0,2 mm in diameter, were obtained. They showed a satisfactory behavior in water after they had been dried for 24 h. In this manner, the synthesized spheres with a mean density of 1003,2 ± 0,1 kg/m{sup 3}, containing a lanthanum oxide fractional mass of about 5 %, are prompt to be tested as a new type of radioactive tracer particle. (author)

  13. Fluorescence labelling as tool for zeolite particle tracking in nanoremediation approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillies, Glenn; Mackenzie, Katrin; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter; Georgi, Anett

    2016-04-15

    Colloidal Fe-zeolites such as Fe-BEA-35 are currently under study as new adsorbent and catalyst materials for in-situ chemical oxidation with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. As for nanoremediation in general, the availability of suitable particle detection methods is a requirement for successful process development and particle tracing. Detection and distinguishing between natural colloids and introduced particles with a similar composition are a challenge. By means of fluorescence labelling, a highly specific detection option for Fe-BEA-35 was developed. ‘Ship-in-a-bottle’ synthesis of fluorescein within the zeolite pores, which was applied for the first time for a BEA type zeolite, provides a product with stable and non-extractable fluorescence. When the fluorescent labelled zeolite is added at a concentration of 1 wt.% referring to the total zeolite mass, a very low detection limit of 1 mg/L of total zeolite is obtained. Compared to commonly applied turbidity measurements, detection via fluorescence labelling is much more specific and sensitive. Fluorescence is only marginally affected by carboxymethyl cellulose, which is frequently applied as stabilizer in application suspensions but will be depleted upon contact with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Transport properties of fluorescent labelled and non-labelled Fe-zeolite particles are in agreement as determined in a column study with quartz sand and synthetic groundwater (classified as very hard). - Highlights: • Fluorescent BEA zeolite was prepared for first time by ‘ship-in-a-bottle’ synthesis. • Fluorescein synthesized inside zeolite channels is stable and non-extractable. • Detection limit of Fe-zeolite particles in suspension with 1 wt.% fluorescent zeolite is 1 mg/L. • Transport properties of fluorescent and Fe-loaded BEA particles are identical.

  14. Asynchronous Learning Forums for Business Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Christine Cope; Wulf, Catharina

    2009-01-01

    The use of IT as a facilitator for student collaboration in higher business education has grown rapidly since 2000. Asynchronous discussion forums are used abundantly for collaborative training purposes and for teaching students business-relevant tools for their future careers. This article presents an analysis of the asynchronous discussion forum…

  15. Asynchronous Parallelization of a CFD Solver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S. Abdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A Navier-Stokes equations solver is parallelized to run on a cluster of computers using the domain decomposition method. Two approaches of communication and computation are investigated, namely, synchronous and asynchronous methods. Asynchronous communication between subdomains is not commonly used in CFD codes; however, it has a potential to alleviate scaling bottlenecks incurred due to processors having to wait for each other at designated synchronization points. A common way to avoid this idle time is to overlap asynchronous communication with computation. For this to work, however, there must be something useful and independent a processor can do while waiting for messages to arrive. We investigate an alternative approach of computation, namely, conducting asynchronous iterations to improve local subdomain solution while communication is in progress. An in-house CFD code is parallelized using message passing interface (MPI, and scalability tests are conducted that suggest asynchronous iterations are a viable way of parallelizing CFD code.

  16. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure iIduced by HZE Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  17. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure Induced by HZE Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  18. Virtual Particle Image Tracking Method Based on Cross-correlation%基于互相关的虚拟粒子图像示踪方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王莉君; 朱建新; 范程华

    2012-01-01

    Searching tracking particles in complex fluid field always involves great difficulties due to its poor following performance. In order to solve the problem, this paper proposes a novel virtual particle image tracking method and applies it in the fluid field analysis. By selecting predetermined image blocks as virtual tracking particles, the movement of fluid can be vividly illustrated by tracking the movement of these virtual particles with image cross-correlation algorithm. Experimental results show that the tracking error in two successive images can be as low as 10"2 pixel, and the method has the merits of high accuracy and flexibility.%针对复杂流场中示踪粒子跟随性差、追踪困难等问题,提出一种新的虚拟粒子图像示踪方法,用于进行复杂流场分析.通过选定特定区域的图像作为虚拟示踪粒子,利用互相关算法追踪这些粒子的运动,以生动地表征粒子在图像内的运动情况.实验结果表明,采用该方法在流场进行示踪时,2帧图像间的误差大约在10.2像素量级,精度较高,适应性较好.

  19. Effect Of The LEBT Solenoid Magnetic Field On The Beam Generation For Particle Tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Yarmohammadi Satri, M; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2013-01-01

    Linac4 is a 160 MeV H- linear accelerator which will replace the 50 MeV proton Linac2 for upgrade of the LHC injectors with higher intensity and eventually an increase of the LHC luminosity. Linac4 structure is a source, a 45 keV low energy beam transport line (LEBT) with two solenoids, a 3 MeV Radiofrequency Quadrupole (RFQ), a Medium Energy Beam Transport line (MEBT), a 50 Mev DTL, a 100 Mev CCDTL and PIMS up to 160 Mev. We use Travel v4.07 and PathManager code for simulation. Firstly, we need to a file as a source and defining the beginning point (last point in tracking back) of simulation. We recognise the starting point base on the solenoid magnetic property of LEBT.

  20. Fluidity evaluation of cell membrane model formed on graphene oxide with single particle tracking using quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Motegi, Toshinori; Iwasa, Seiji; Sandhu, Adarsh; Tero, Ryugo

    2015-04-01

    The lipid bilayer is the fundamental structure of plasma membranes, and artificial lipid bilayer membranes are used as model systems of cell membranes. Recently we reported the formation of a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) on graphene oxide (GO) by the vesicle fusion method. In this study, we conjugated a quantum dot (Qdot) on the SLB surface as a fluorescence probe brighter than dye-labeled lipid molecules, to qualitatively evaluate the fluidity of the SLB on GO by the single particle tracking method. We obtained the diffusion coefficient of the Qdot-conjugated lipids in the SLB on GO. We also performed the Qdot conjugation on the SLB containing a lipid conjugated with polyethylene glycol, to prevent the nonspecific adsorption of Qdots. The difference in the diffusion coefficients between the SLBs on the GO and the bare SiO2 regions was evaluated from the trajectory of single Qdot-conjugated lipid diffusing between the two regions.

  1. FFT integration of instantaneous 3D pressure gradient fields measured by Lagrangian particle tracking in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, F.; Schanz, D.; Gesemann, S.; Schröder, A.

    2016-09-01

    Pressure gradient fields in unsteady flows can be estimated through flow measurements of the material acceleration in the fluid and the assumption of the governing momentum equation. In order to derive pressure from its gradient, almost exclusively two numerical methods have been used to spatially integrate the pressure gradient until now: first, direct path integration in the spatial domain, and second, the solution of the Poisson equation for pressure. Instead, we propose an alternative third method that integrates the pressure gradient field in Fourier space. Using a FFT function, the method is fast and easy to implement in programming languages for scientific computing. We demonstrate the accuracy of the integration scheme on a synthetic pressure field and apply it to an experimental example based on time-resolved material acceleration data from high-resolution Lagrangian particle tracking with the Shake-The-Box method.

  2. Ionization Cluster Size Distributions Created by Low Energy Electrons and Alpha Particles in Nanometric Track Segment in Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Bantsar, Aliaksandr

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of ionizing radiation with nanometric targets is a field of interest for many branches of science such as: radiology, oncology, radiation protection and nanoelectronics. A new experimental technique known as nanodosimetry has been developed for the qualitative as well as quantitative description of these types of interactions. The work presented here is a contribution to this development, namely by further improvement of the new experimental technique called the Jet Counter, originally developed at the Andrzej So{\\l}tan Institute for Nuclear Studies. The Jet Counter is a unique device in the world for studying the interaction of low energy electrons with nanometer targets in the range 2-10 nm (in unit density). The basic experimental result is the frequency distribution of ionization cluster size produced by ionizing particles in a gaseous (nitrogen or propane) nanometric track segment. The first experimental data on the frequency distribution of ionization cluster size produced by low energy ...

  3. Azimuth and Elevation Dynamic Tracking of UAVs via 3-Axial ULA and Particle Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Papaiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs localization has become crucial in recent years, mainly for navigation or self-positioning and for UAV based security monitoring and surveillance. In this paper, azimuth and elevation radio positioning of UAVs are considered. The localization is based on multiple differential phase-of-arrival measures exploiting a 3-Axial Uniform Linear Array of antennas. An ad hoc particle filtering algorithm is applied to improve the positioning performance using a dynamic motion model. A novel adaptive algorithm, namely, Particles Swarm Adaptive Scattering (PSAS, is proposed to increment the algorithm stability and precision. To assess performance a Confined Area Random Aerial Trajectory Emulator (CARATE algorithm has been developed to generate actual paths of flying UAVs. The algorithm performance is compared with the baseline method and with the average trajectory Cramér Rao lower bound to show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  4. Finite-particle tracking reveals submicroscopic-size changes of mitochondria during transport in mitral cell dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennerich, Arne; Schild, Detlev

    2006-03-01

    The mechanisms of molecular motor regulation during bidirectional organelle transport are still uncertain. There is, for instance, the unsettled question of whether opposing motor proteins can be engaged in a tug-of-war. Clearly, any non-synchronous activation of the molecular motors of one cargo can principally lead to changes in the cargo's shape and size; the cargo's size and shape parameters would certainly be observables of such changes. We therefore set out to measure position, shape and size parameters of fluorescent mitochondria (during their transport) in dendrites of cultured neurons using a finite-particle tracking algorithm. Our data clearly show transport-related submicroscopic-size changes of mitochondria. The observed displacements of the mitochondrial front and rear ends are consistent with a model in which microtubule plus- and minus-end-directed motor proteins or motors of the same type but moving along anti-parallel microtubules are often out-of-phase and occasionally engaged in a tug-of-war. Mostly the leading and trailing ends of mitochondria undergo similar characteristic movements but with a substantial time delay between the displacements of both ends, a feature reminiscent of an inchworm-like motility mechanism. More generally, we demonstrate that observing the position, shape and size of actively transported finite objects such as mitochondria can yield information on organelle transport that is generally not accessible by tracking the organelles' centroid alone.

  5. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT): Straw Tubes for Tracking and Particle Identification at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mindur, Bartosz; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three inner detector tracking subsystems and consists of 300000 thin-walled drift tubes (“straw tubes”) that are 4 mm in diameter. The TRT system provides 30 space points with 130 micron resolution for charged tracks with |η| 0.5 GeV/c. The TRT also provides electron identification capability by detecting transition radiation (TR) X-ray photons in a Xe-based working gas mixture. Compared to Run 1, the LHC beams now provide a higher center of mass energy (13 TeV), more bunches with a reduced spacing (25 ns), and more particles in each bunch leading to very challenging, higher occupancies in the TRT. We will present TRT modifications made for Run 2 for in areas: to improve response to the expected much higher rate of hits and to mitigate leaks of the Xe-based active gas mixture. The higher rates required changes to the data acquisition system and introduction of validity gate to reject out-of-time hits. Radiation-induced gain changes in ...

  6. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT): Straw Tubes for Tracking and Particle Identification at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mindur, Bartosz; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three inner detector tracking subsystems and consists of $\\sim$300000 thin-walled drift tubes (``straw tubes'') that are 4~mm in diameter. The TRT system provides $\\sim$30 space points with $\\sim$130 micron resolution for charged tracks with $|\\eta| $ 0.5 GeV/c. The TRT also provides electron identification capability by detecting transition radiation (TR) X-ray photons in an Xe-based working gas mixture. Compared to Run 1, the LHC beams now provide a higher centre of mass energy (13 TeV), more bunches with a reduced spacing (25 ns), and more particles in each bunch leading to very challenging, higher occupancies in the TRT. Significant modifications of the TRT detector have been made for LHC Run 2 mainly to improve response to the expected much higher rate of hits and to mitigate leaks of the Xe-based active gas mixture. The higher rates required changes to the data acquisition system and introduction of validity gate to reject out-of-time ...

  7. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT): Straw tubes for tracking and particle identification at the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindur, Bartosz

    2017-02-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three inner detector tracking subsystems and consists of ∼300,000 thin-walled drift tubes (;straw tubes;) that are 4 mm in diameter. The TRT system provides ∼ 30 space points with ∼130 micron resolution for charged tracks with | η | 0.5 GeV / c . The TRT also provides electron identification capability by detecting transition radiation (TR) X-ray photons in an Xe-based working gas mixture. Compared to Run 1, the LHC beams now provide a higher centre of mass energy (13 TeV), more bunches with a reduced spacing (25 ns), and more particles in each bunch leading to very challenging, higher occupancies in the TRT. Significant modifications of the TRT detector have been made for LHC Run 2 mainly to improve response to the expected much higher rate of hits and to mitigate leaks of the Xe-based active gas mixture. The higher rates required changes to the data acquisition system and introduction of validity gate to reject out-of-time hits. Many gas leaks were repaired and the gas system was modified to use a cheaper Ar-based gas mixture in some channels. A likelihood method was introduced to optimise the TRT electron identification.

  8. Experimental and Particle-Tracking Model Analysis of Anomalous Transport and Sorption of Nickel in Natural Soil Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edery, Y.; Rubin, S.; Dror, I.; Berkowitz, B.

    2012-12-01

    Nickel migration measured in laboratory-scale, natural soil column experiments is shown to display anomalous (non-Fickian) transport and non-equilibrium adsorption and desorption patterns. Similar experiments using a conservative tracer also exhibit anomalous behavior. In parallel batch experiments, adsorption and desorption isotherms demonstrate hysteresis, indicating some permanent adsorption. While adsorption is described by the Langmuir isotherm, equilibrium concentrations are higher than those predicted by the same model for desorption. Furthermore, batch and flow-through column experiments show the occurrence of ion exchange of nickel with magnesium and potassium in the soil; aluminum and other ion concentrations are also affected by the presence of nickel. Strong retention of nickel during transport in soil columns leads to delayed initial breakthrough (~40 pore volumes), slow increase in concentration, and extended concentration tailing at long times. Standard models, including two-site non-equilibrium formulations, fail to capture these features quantitatively. We describe the mechanisms of transport and adsorption/desorption in terms of a continuous time random walk (CTRW) model, and use a particle tracking formulation to simulate the nickel migration in the column. This approach allows us to capture the non-Fickian transport and the subtle local effects of adsorption and desorption. The model uses transport parameters estimated from the conservative tracer and, as a starting point, adsorption/desorption parameters based on the batch experiments to account for the reactions. It is shown that the batch parameters under-estimate the actual adsorption in the column. The CTRW particle tracking model is shown to capture both the full evolution of the measured breakthrough curve and the measured spatial concentration profile. Analysis of these results provides further understanding of the interaction and dynamics between transport and sorption mechanisms in

  9. Twin screw wet granulation: the study of a continuous twin screw granulator using Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kai T; Ingram, Andy; Rowson, Neil A

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) techniques are utilised to track the trajectory of single particles through the mixing and conveying zones of a Twin Screw Granulator (TSG). A TSG consisting of conveying zones and mixing zones is used in this study. The mixing zones are arranged with kneading discs at an angle of 30°, 60° or 90°. Experiments were carried out using different mixing configurations with various screw speed and total mass flow rate. The PEPT data obtained were then utilised to obtain the residence time distribution (RTD) and the Peclet number in an attempt to gain some insight into the mixing of the process. The fill level of the granulator was also estimated to study the mechanism of granulation. As might be expected, it was shown that the residence time of the granulation process increases with decreasing screw speed. It also increases with increasing angle of the arrangement of kneading blocks in the mixing zones, but will decreases when powder feed rate is increased. The fill level of the mixing zone in particular increases when the screw speed decreases or when powder feed rate increases. Furthermore, the fill level of the granulator will increase when the mixing zone configuration changes from 30° to 90°. It is shown that the granulator is never fully filled, even using 90° mixer elements implying limited compaction which may explain why the granules produced are porous compared with those from a high shear mixer. Interestingly, the RTD analysis reveals that the extent of axial mixing in the mixing zone of the granulator does not change significantly for different configurations and process conditions. There is evidence of a tail in the RTD which implies some material hold up and channelling.

  10. A Monte Carlo Study of the Momentum Dependence on the Results of Tracking Unknown Particle Species in the BaBar Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewerynek, Stephen; /British Columbia U.

    2007-04-06

    The BABAR experiment is composed of an international collaboration that will test the Standard Model prediction of CP violation. To accomplish this a new detector was constructed at the asymmetric B Factory, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The tests will shed some light on the origins of CP violation, which is an important aspect in explaining the matter/antimatter asymmetry in the universe. In particular, the BABAR experiment will measure CP violation in the neutral B meson system. In order to succeed, the BABAR experiment requires excellent track fitting and particle species identification. Prior to the current study, track fitting was done using only one particle species--the pion. But given the momentum dependence on the accuracy of the results from this choice of particle species, a better algorithm needed to be developed. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out and a new algorithm utilizing all five particle species present in the BABAR detector was created.

  11. Three-dimensional particle tracking method using FPGA-based real-time image processing and four-view image splitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreizer, Mark; Liberzon, Alex

    2011-03-01

    We present a cost-effective solution of the three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) system based on the real-time image processing method (Kreizer et al. Exp Fluids 48:105-110, 2010) and a four-view image splitter. The image processing algorithm, based on the intensity threshold and intensity gradients estimated using the fixed-size Sobel kernel, is implemented on the field-programmable gate array integrated into the camera electronics. It enables extracting positions of tracked objects, such as tracers or large particles, in real time. The second major component of this system is a four-view split-screen device that provides four views of the observation volume from different angles. An open-source ray-tracing software package allows for a customized optical setup for the given experimental settings of working distances and camera parameters. The specific design enables tracking in larger observation volumes when compared to the designs published up to date. The present cost-effective solution is complemented with open-source particle tracking software that receives raw data acquired by the real-time image processing system and returns trajectories of the identified particles. The combination of these components simplifies the 3D-PTV technique by reducing the size and increasing recording speed and storage capabilities. The system is capable to track a multitude of particles at high speed and stream the data over the computer network. The system can provide a solution for the remotely controlled tracking experiments, such as in microgravity, underwater or in applications with harsh experimental conditions.

  12. Two particle tracking and detection in a single Gaussian beam optical trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, P; Yogesha; Iyengar, Shruthi S; Bhattacharya, Sarbari; Ananthamurthy, Sharath

    2016-01-20

    We have studied in detail the situation wherein two microbeads are trapped axially in a single-beam Gaussian intensity profile optical trap. We find that the corner frequency extracted from a power spectral density analysis of intensity fluctuations recorded on a quadrant photodetector (QPD) is dependent on the detection scheme. Using forward- and backscattering detection schemes with single and two laser wavelengths along with computer simulations, we conclude that fluctuations detected in backscattering bear true position information of the bead encountered first in the beam propagation direction. Forward scattering, on the other hand, carries position information of both beads with substantial contribution from the bead encountered first along the beam propagation direction. Mie scattering analysis further reveals that the interference term from the scattering of the two beads contributes significantly to the signal, precluding the ability to resolve the positions of the individual beads in forward scattering. In QPD-based detection schemes, detection through backscattering, thereby, is imperative to track the true displacements of axially trapped microbeads for possible studies on light-mediated interbead interactions.

  13. An Adaptive Particle Filtering Approach to Tracking Modes in a Varying Shallow Ocean Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J V

    2011-03-22

    The shallow ocean environment is ever changing mostly due to temperature variations in its upper layers (< 100m) directly affecting sound propagation throughout. The need to develop processors that are capable of tracking these changes implies a stochastic as well as an 'adaptive' design. The stochastic requirement follows directly from the multitude of variations created by uncertain parameters and noise. Some work has been accomplished in this area, but the stochastic nature was constrained to Gaussian uncertainties. It has been clear for a long time that this constraint was not particularly realistic leading a Bayesian approach that enables the representation of any uncertainty distribution. Sequential Bayesian techniques enable a class of processors capable of performing in an uncertain, nonstationary (varying statistics), non-Gaussian, variable shallow ocean. In this paper adaptive processors providing enhanced signals for acoustic hydrophonemeasurements on a vertical array as well as enhanced modal function estimates are developed. Synthetic data is provided to demonstrate that this approach is viable.

  14. Identification of Λ -> pμ-νμ events using particle tracking detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumley, Rajan; McCracken, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Study of semi-leptonic hyperon decays could reveal possible disagreements with Standard Model (SM) predictions in which lepton universality (LFU) is presumed. Modern nuclear physics experiments such as CLAS and Glue-X have the capability to produce and reconstruct hyperons, including the Λ baryon, in large numbers, however identification of semi-leptonic decay events such as Λ -> pμ-νμ is difficult for two reasons. First, the missing momentum carried by the neutrino decreases kinematic constraints. Second, the background of hadronic decay events in which the pion decays via π- ->μ-νμ in proximity to the Λ decay vertex necessitates the use of vertexing information. We present a set of techniques, developed in a Monte Carlo-based analysis, for separating small semi-leptonic decay signal from much more prevalent hadronic decay backgrounds. These techniques rely on kinematic observables and, more crucially, tracking and vertexing information. In addition we present a study of signal/background separability and its dependance on a detector's vertexing resolution.

  15. High-contrast single-particle tracking by selective focal plane illumination microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Jörg G; Veith, Roman; Siebrasse, Jan-Peter; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2008-05-12

    Wide-field single molecule microscopy is a versatile tool for analyzing dynamics and molecular interactions in biological systems. In extended three-dimensional systems, however, the method suffers from intrinsic out-of-focus fluorescence. We constructed a high-resolution selective plane illumination microscope (SPIM) to efficiently solve this problem. The instrument is an optical sectioning microscope featuring the high speed and high sensitivity of a video microscope. We present theoretical calculations and quantitative measurements of the illumination light sheet thickness yielding 1.7 microm (FWHM) at 543 nm, 2.0 microm at 633 nm, and a FWHM of the axial point spread function of 1.13 microm. A direct comparison of selective plane and epi-illumination of model samples with intrinsic background fluorescence illustrated the clear advantage of SPIM for such samples. Single fluorescent quantum dots in aqueous solution are readily visualized and tracked proving the suitability of our setup for the study of fast and dynamic processes in spatially extended biological specimens.

  16. Micro-fabricated Silicon Devices for Advanced Thermal Management and Integration of Particle Tracking Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Romagnoli, Giulia; Gambaro, Carla

    Since their first studies targeting the cooling of high-power computing chips, micro-channel devices are proven to provide a very efficient cooling system. In the last years micro-channel cooling has been successfully applied to the cooling of particle detectors at CERN. Thanks to their high thermal efficiency, they can guarantee a good heat sink for the cooling of silicon trackers, fundamental for the reduction of the radiation damage caused by the beam interactions. The radiation damage on the silicon detector is increasing with temperature and furthermore the detectors are producing heat that should be dissipated in the supporting structure. Micro-channels guarantee a distributed and uniform thermal exchange, thanks to the high flexibility of the micro-fabrication process that allows a large variety of channel designs. The thin nature of the micro-channels etched inside silicon wafers, is fulfilling the physics requirement of minimization of the material crossed by the particle beam. Furthermore micro-chan...

  17. A regional-scale particle-tracking method for nonstationary fractured media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohman, Johan; Niemi, Auli; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2004-11-01

    A regional scale transport model is introduced that is applicable to non-stationary and statistically inhomogeneous fractured media, provided that hydraulic flow, but not necessarily solute transport, can be approximated by equivalent continuum properties at some block scale. Upscaled flow and transport block properties are transferred from multiple fracture network realizations to a regional model with grid elements of equal size to that found valid for continuum approximation of flow. In the large-scale model, flow is solved in a stochastic continuum framework, whereas the transport calculations employ a random walk procedure. Block-wise transit times are sampled from distributions linked to each block-conductivity based on its underlying fracture network. To account for channeled transport larger than the block scale, several alternatives in sampling algorithm are introduced and compared. The most reasonable alternative incorporates a spatial persistence length in sampling the particle transit times; this tracer transport persistence length is related to interblock channeling, and is quantified by the number N of blocks. The approach is demonstrated for a set of field data, and the obtained regional-scale particle breakthroughs are analyzed. These are fitted to the one-dimensional advective-dispersive equation to determine an effective macroscale dispersion coefficient. An interesting finding is that this macroscale dispersion coefficient is found to be a linear function of the transport persistence, N, with a slope equal to a representative mean block-scale dispersion coefficient and a constant that incorporates background dispersion arising from the regional heterogeneous conductivity field.

  18. Confined Diffusion Without Fences of a G-Protein-Coupled Receptor as Revealed by Single Particle Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daumas, Frédéric; Destainville, Nicolas; Millot, Claire; Lopez, André; Dean, David; Salomé, Laurence

    2003-01-01

    Single particle tracking is a powerful tool for probing the organization and dynamics of the plasma membrane constituents. We used this technique to study the μ-opioid receptor belonging to the large family of the G-protein-coupled receptors involved with other partners in a signal transduction pathway. The specific labeling of the receptor coupled to a T7-tag at its N-terminus, stably expressed in fibroblastic cells, was achieved by colloidal gold coupled to a monoclonal anti T7-tag antibody. The lateral movements of the particles were followed by nanovideomicroscopy at 40 ms time resolution during 2 min with a spatial precision of 15 nm. The receptors were found to have either a slow or directed diffusion mode (10%) or a walking confined diffusion mode (90%) composed of a long-term random diffusion and a short-term confined diffusion, and corresponding to a diffusion confined within a domain that itself diffuses. The results indicate that the confinement is due to an effective harmonic potential generated by long-range attraction between the membrane proteins. A simple model for interacting membrane proteins diffusion is proposed that explains the variations with the domain size of the short-term and long-term diffusion coefficients. PMID:12524289

  19. A Chaos-Enhanced Particle Swarm Optimization with Adaptive Parameters and Its Application in Maximum Power Point Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Yi Hong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes an enhanced particle swarm optimization scheme that improves upon the performance of the standard particle swarm optimization algorithm. The proposed algorithm is based on chaos search to solve the problems of stagnation, which is the problem of being trapped in a local optimum and with the risk of premature convergence. Type 1′′ constriction is incorporated to help strengthen the stability and quality of convergence, and adaptive learning coefficients are utilized to intensify the exploitation and exploration search characteristics of the algorithm. Several well known benchmark functions are operated to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. The test performance of the proposed method is compared with those of other popular population-based algorithms in the literature. Simulation results clearly demonstrate that the proposed method exhibits faster convergence, escapes local minima, and avoids premature convergence and stagnation in a high-dimensional problem space. The validity of the proposed PSO algorithm is demonstrated using a fuzzy logic-based maximum power point tracking control model for a standalone solar photovoltaic system.

  20. Asynchronous design of Networks-on-Chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparsø, Jens

    2007-01-01

    The Network-on-chip concept has evolved as a solution to a broad range of problems related to the design of complex systems-on-chip (SoC) with tenths or hundreds of (heterogeneous) IP-cores. The paper introduces the NoC concept, identifies a range of possible timing organizations (globally......-synchronous, mesochronous, globally-asynchronous locally-synchronous and fully asynchronous), discusses the circuitry needed to implement these timing methodologies, and provides some implementation details for a couple of asynchronous NoCs designed at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). The paper is written...

  1. Burst-Mode Asynchronous Controllers on FPGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte L. Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available FPGAs have been mainly used to design synchronous circuits. Asynchronous design on FPGAs is difficult because the resulting circuit may suffer from hazard problems. We propose a method that implements a popular class of asynchronous circuits, known as burst mode, on FPGAs based on look-up table architectures. We present two conditions that, if satisfied, guarantee essential hazard-free implementation on any LUT-based FPGA. By doing that, besides all the intrinsic advantages of asynchronous over synchronous circuits, they also take advantage of the shorter design time and lower cost associated with FPGA designs.

  2. TRACKING AND MONITORING OF TAGGED OBJECTS EMPLOYING PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION ALGORITHM IN A DEPARTMENTAL STORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrajit Bhattacharya

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The present paper proposes a departmental store automation system based on Radio Frequency Identification (RFID technology and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO algorithm. The items in the departmental store spanned over different sections and in multiple floors, are tagged with passive RFID tags. The floor is divided into number of zones depending on different types of items that are placed in their respective racks. Each of the zones is placed with one RFID reader, which constantly monitors the items in their zone and periodically sends that information to the application. The problem of systematic periodic monitoring of the store is addressed in this application so that the locations, distributions and demands of every item in the store can be invigilated with intelligence. The proposed application is successfully demonstrated on a simulated case study.

  3. High gain micro-channel plate multipliers for particle tracking or single photo-electron counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oba, K.; Rehak, P.; Smith, S.D.

    1980-01-01

    Micro-channel plate multipliers have been used to detect the passage of relativistic charged particles. Measurements of the detection efficiency and pulse height response versus micro-channel plate gain are presented for one, two and three micro-channel plate arrays. Values describing temporal response and transit time jitter are also given. In a separate measurement, the response of a single micro-channel plate to individual slow electrons (less than or equal to 1 keV) was studied. By using a special technique output bunches as small as three electrons may be seen for low average micro-channel plate gain. The results of attempts to improve the micro-channel plate response are also presented.

  4. Open LED Illuminator: A Simple and Inexpensive LED Illuminator for Fast Multicolor Particle Tracking in Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens B Bosse

    Full Text Available Dual-color live cell fluorescence microscopy of fast intracellular trafficking processes, such as axonal transport, requires rapid switching of illumination channels. Typical broad-spectrum sources necessitate the use of mechanical filter switching, which introduces delays between acquisition of different fluorescence channels, impeding the interpretation and quantification of highly dynamic processes. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs, however, allow modulation of excitation light in microseconds. Here we provide a step-by-step protocol to enable any scientist to build a research-grade LED illuminator for live cell microscopy, even without prior experience with electronics or optics. We quantify and compare components, discuss our design considerations, and demonstrate the performance of our LED illuminator by imaging axonal transport of herpes virus particles with high temporal resolution.

  5. Combination of Annealing Particle Filter and Belief Propagation for 3D Upper Body Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Renna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D upper body pose estimation is a topic greatly studied by the computer vision society because it is useful in a great number of applications, mainly for human robots interactions including communications with companion robots. However there is a challenging problem: the complexity of classical algorithms that increases exponentially with the dimension of the vectors’ state becomes too difficult to handle. To tackle this problem, we propose a new approach that combines several annealing particle filters defined independently for each limb and belief propagation method to add geometrical constraints between individual filters. Experimental results on a real human gestures sequence will show that this combined approach leads to reliable results.

  6. Study of latent and etched tracks by a charged particle transmission technique

    CERN Document Server

    Vacik, J; Hnatowicz, V; Fink, D; Kobayashi, Y; Hirata, K; Apel, P Y; Strauss, P

    1999-01-01

    A recently suggested technique for non-destructive investigation of inhomogeneities in thin objects, which is based on the measurement of the energy spectra of charged particles transmitted through the object, is used for the study of thermal annealing of 10-20 mu m thick polyethylene terephtalate, polypropylene and polycarbonate foils irradiated with 1-10 MeV/amu heavy ions. At elevated temperature a foil linear contraction is observed on pristine and irradiated material. Also the foil roughness increases with increasing temperature. On the same foils with etched pores 0.5-1.0 mu m in diameter, the thermal annealing results in gradual closing of the pores up to about 30% of their initial diameter at the temperatures of 150-175 deg. C. At higher temperatures the pore diameter increases and achieves its initial value.

  7. Size measurement uncertainties of near-monodisperse, near-spherical nanoparticles using transmission electron microscopy and particle-tracking analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Temmerman, Pieter-Jan; Verleysen, Eveline; Lammertyn, Jeroen; Mast, Jan

    2014-10-01

    Particle-tracking analysis (PTA) in combination with systematic imaging, automatic image analysis, and automatic data processing is validated for size measurements. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with a systematic selection procedure for unbiased random image collection, semiautomatic image analysis, and data processing is validated for size, shape, and surface topology measurements. PTA is investigated as an alternative for TEM for the determination of the particle size in the framework of the EC definition of nanomaterial. The intra-laboratory validation study assessing the precision and accuracy of the TEM and PTA methods consists of series of measurements on three gold reference materials with mean area-equivalent circular diameters of 8.9 nm (RM-8011), 27.6 nm (RM-8012), and 56.0 nm (RM-8013), and two polystyrene materials with modal hydrodynamic diameters of 102 nm (P1) and 202 nm (H1). By obtaining a high level of automation, PTA proves to give precise and non-biased results for the modal hydrodynamic diameter in size range between 30 and 200 nm, and TEM proves to give precise and non-biased results for the mean area-equivalent circular diameter in the size range between 8 and 200 nm of the investigated near-monomodal near-spherical materials. The expanded uncertainties of PTA are about 9 % and are determined mainly by the repeatability uncertainty. This uncertainty is two times higher than the expanded uncertainty of 4 % obtained by TEM for analyses on identical materials. For the investigated near-monomodal and near-spherical materials, PTA can be used as an alternative to TEM for measuring the particle size, with exception of 8.9 nm gold, because this material has a size below the detection limit of PTA.

  8. Asynchronous networks and event driven dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bick, Christian; Field, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Real-world networks in technology, engineering and biology often exhibit dynamics that cannot be adequately reproduced using network models given by smooth dynamical systems and a fixed network topology. Asynchronous networks give a theoretical and conceptual framework for the study of network dynamics where nodes can evolve independently of one another, be constrained, stop, and later restart, and where the interaction between different components of the network may depend on time, state, and stochastic effects. This framework is sufficiently general to encompass a wide range of applications ranging from engineering to neuroscience. Typically, dynamics is piecewise smooth and there are relationships with Filippov systems. In this paper, we give examples of asynchronous networks, and describe the basic formalism and structure. In the following companion paper, we make the notion of a functional asynchronous network rigorous, discuss the phenomenon of dynamical locks, and present a foundational result on the spatiotemporal factorization of the dynamics for a large class of functional asynchronous networks.

  9. Asynchronous stochastic approximation with differential inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The asymptotic pseudo-trajectory approach to stochastic approximation of Benaïm, Hofbauer and Sorin is extended for asynchronous stochastic approximations with a set-valued mean field. The asynchronicity of the process is incorporated into the mean field to produce convergence results which remain similar to those of an equivalent synchronous process. In addition, this allows many of the restrictive assumptions previously associated with asynchronous stochastic approximation to be removed. The framework is extended for a coupled asynchronous stochastic approximation process with set-valued mean fields. Two-timescales arguments are used here in a similar manner to the original work in this area by Borkar. The applicability of this approach is demonstrated through learning in a Markov decision process.

  10. 3D Particle Track Reconstrution in a Single Layer Cadmium-Telluride Hybrid Active Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Filipenko, Mykhaylo; Anton, Gisela; Michel, Thilo

    2014-01-01

    In the past 20 years the search for neutrinoless double beta decay has driven many developements in all kind of detector technology. A new branch in this field are highly-pixelated semiconductor detectors - such as the CdTe-Timepix detectors. It compromises a cadmium-telluride sensor of 14 mm x 14 mm x 1 mm size with an ASIC which has 256 x 256 pixel of 55 \\textmu m pixel pitch and can be used to obtain either spectroscopic or timing information in every pixel. In regular operation it can provide a 2D projection of particle trajectories; however, three dimensional trajectories are desirable for neutrinoless double beta decay and other applications. In this paper we present a method to obtain such trajectories. The method was developed and tested with simulations that assume some minor modifications to the Timepix ASIC. Also, we were able to test the method experimentally and in the best case achieved a position resolution of about 90 \\textmu m with electrons of 4.4 GeV.

  11. Tracking the virus-like particles of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus in insect cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanapi, Ummi Fairuz; Yong, Chean Yeah; Goh, Zee Hong; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Yeap, Swee Keong

    2017-01-01

    Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNv) poses a major threat to the prawn industry. Currently, no effective vaccine and treatment are available to prevent the spread of MrNv. Its infection mechanism and localisation in a host cell are also not well characterised. The MrNv capsid protein (MrNvc) produced in Escherichia coli self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs) resembling the native virus. Thus, fluorescein labelled MrNvc VLPs were employed as a model to study the virus entry and localisation in Spodoptera frugiperda, Sf9 cells. Through fluorescence microscopy and sub-cellular fractionation, the MrNvc was shown to enter Sf9 cells, and eventually arrived at the nucleus. The presence of MrNvc within the cytoplasm and nucleus of Sf9 cells was further confirmed by the Z-stack imaging. The presence of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl), genistein, methyl-β-cyclodextrin or chlorpromazine (CPZ) inhibited the entry of MrNvc into Sf9 cells, but cytochalasin D did not inhibit this process. This suggests that the internalisation of MrNvc VLPs is facilitated by caveolae- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The whole internalisation process of MrNvc VLPs into a Sf9 cell was recorded with live cell imaging. We have also identified a potential nuclear localisation signal (NLS) of MrNvc through deletion mutagenesis and verified by classical-NLS mapping. Overall, this study provides an insight into the journey of MrNvc VLPs in insect cells. PMID:28194311

  12. Tracking the virus-like particles of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus in insect cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ummi Fairuz Hanapi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNv poses a major threat to the prawn industry. Currently, no effective vaccine and treatment are available to prevent the spread of MrNv. Its infection mechanism and localisation in a host cell are also not well characterised. The MrNv capsid protein (MrNvc produced in Escherichia coli self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs resembling the native virus. Thus, fluorescein labelled MrNvc VLPs were employed as a model to study the virus entry and localisation in Spodoptera frugiperda, Sf9 cells. Through fluorescence microscopy and sub-cellular fractionation, the MrNvc was shown to enter Sf9 cells, and eventually arrived at the nucleus. The presence of MrNvc within the cytoplasm and nucleus of Sf9 cells was further confirmed by the Z-stack imaging. The presence of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, genistein, methyl-β-cyclodextrin or chlorpromazine (CPZ inhibited the entry of MrNvc into Sf9 cells, but cytochalasin D did not inhibit this process. This suggests that the internalisation of MrNvc VLPs is facilitated by caveolae- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The whole internalisation process of MrNvc VLPs into a Sf9 cell was recorded with live cell imaging. We have also identified a potential nuclear localisation signal (NLS of MrNvc through deletion mutagenesis and verified by classical-NLS mapping. Overall, this study provides an insight into the journey of MrNvc VLPs in insect cells.

  13. Analysis and interpretation of two-dimensional single-particle tracking microscopy measurements: effect of local surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Damien

    2008-06-01

    Methodological advances in light microscopy have made it possible to record the motions of individual lipid and protein molecules resident in the membrane of living cells down to the nanometer level of precision in the x, y plane. Such measurement of a single molecule's trajectory for a sufficiently long period of time or the measurement of multiple molecules' trajectories for a shorter period of time can in principle provide the necessary information to derive the particle's macroscopic two-dimensional-diffusion coefficient-a quantity of vital biological interest. However, one drawback of the light microscopy procedures used in such experiments is their relatively poor discriminatory capability for determining spatial differences along the z axis in comparison to those in the x, y plane. In this study we used computer simulation to examine the likely effect of local surface roughness over the nanometer to micrometer scale on the determination of diffusion constants in the membrane bilayer by the use of such optical-microscope-based single-particle tracking (SPT) procedures. We specifically examined motion of a single molecule along (i) a locally planar and (ii) a locally rough surface. Our results indicate a need for caution in applying overly simplistic analytical strategies to the analysis of data from SPT measurements and provide upper and lower bounds for the likely degree of error introduced on the basis of surface roughness effects alone. Additionally we present an empirical method based on an autocorrelation function approach that may prove useful in identifying the existence of surface roughness and give some idea of its extent.

  14. Quantification of the secondary flow in a radial coupled centrifugal blood pump based on particle tracking velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Nobuo; Masuda, Takaya; Iida, Tomoya; Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Fujimoto, Tetsuo; Takatani, Setsuo

    2005-01-01

    Secondary flow in the centrifugal blood pump helps to enhance the washout effect and to minimize thrombus formation. On the other hand, it has an adverse effect on pump efficiency. Excessive secondary flow may induce hemolytic effects. Understanding the secondary flow is thus important to the design of a compact, efficient, biocompatible blood pump. This study examined the secondary flow in a radial coupled centrifugal blood pump based on a simple particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) technique. A radial magnetically coupled centrifugal blood pump has a bell-shaped narrow clearance between the impeller inner radius and the pump casing. In order to vary the flow levels through the clearance area, clearance widths of 0.25 mm and 0.50 mm and impeller washout holes with diameters of 0 mm, 2.5 mm, and 4 mm were prepared. A high-speed video camera (2000 frames per second) was used to capture the particle images from which radial flow components were derived. The flow in the space behind the impeller was assumed to be laminar and Couette type. The larger the inner clearance or diameter of washout hole, the greater was the secondary flow rate. Without washout holes, the flow behind the impeller resulted in convection. The radial flow through the washout holes of the impeller was conserved in the radial as well as in the axial direction behind the impeller. The increase in the secondary flow reduced the net pump efficiency. Simple PTV was successful in quantifying the flow in the space behind the impeller. The results verified the hypothesis that the flow behind the impeller was theoretically Couette along the circumferential direction. The convection flow observed behind the impeller agreed with the reports of other researchers. Simple PTV was effective in understanding the fluid dynamics to help improve the compact, efficient, and biocompatible centrifugal blood pump for safe clinical applications.

  15. A New Numerical Approach to Evaluate Variation of Electric Field Strength at the End of Particle Trajectory in Nuclear Track Detectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xiu-Dong; Ali Mostofizadeh; HOU Chun-Feng; M.Reza Kardan

    2008-01-01

    A geometrical model for an electrochemical etching(ECE)track in a dielectric detector is defined and a primary programme is written to generate the track.The generated track is transformed to an M×N matrix of primary voltages.Using a numerical method,the matrix of final voltages is computed,and using another numerical approach.the electric field strengths in the elements of detector volume are computed.The final field strength at the end of particle trajectory is obtained.The results of our numerical computation show that there are exact correlations between the field strength at the end of particle trajectory and the parameters of track under ECE.It is found that although two traditional models of Mason and Smythe in dielectrics can be partly applied for short we find that there is an expressive relationship between the field strength and the incidence angle of impacted particle.while the mentioned traditional models are not able to explain this effect.

  16. Charge, energy and LET spectra of high LET primary and secondary particles in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors of the P0006 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csige, I.; Frigo, L. A.; Benton, E. V.; Oda, K.

    1995-01-01

    We have measured the charge, energy and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of about 800 high LET (LET(sub infinity) H2O greater than 50 keV/micron) particles in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors in the P0006 experiment of LDEF. Primary particles with residual range at the reference surface greater than about 2 microns and secondary particles produced in the detector material with total range greater than about 4 microns were measured. We have used a multi-etch technique and an internal calibration to identify and measure the energy of the particles at the reference surface. The LET spectrum was obtained from the charge and energy distribution of the particles.

  17. LIQUID PHASE FLOW ESTIMATION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOW USING INVERSE ANALYSIS AND PARTICLE TRACKING VELOCIMETRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Wen; MURAI Yuichi; SASAKI Toshio; YAMAMOTO Fujio

    2004-01-01

    An inverse analysis algorithm is proposed for estimating liquid phase flow field from measurement data of bubble motion. This kind of technology will be applied in future for various estimation of fluid flow in rivers, lakes, sea surface flow, and also microscopic channel flow as the problem-handling in civil, mechanical, electronic, and chemical engineering. The relationship between the dispersion motion and the carrier phase flow is governed and expressed by the translational motion equation of spherical dispersion. The equation consists of all the force components including inertia, added inertia, drag, lift, pressure gradient force and gravity force. Using this equation enables us to estimate the carrier phase flow structure using only the data of the dispersion motion. Whole field liquid flow structure is also estimated using spatial or temporal interpolation method. In order to verify this principle, the Taylor-Green vortex flow, and the Karman vortex shedding from a square cylinder have been chosen. The results show that the combination of the inverse analysis and Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) with the spatio-temporal post-processing algorithm could reconstruct well the carrier phase flow of the gas-liquid two-phase flow.

  18. Single Particle Tracking reveals two distinct environments for CD4 receptors at the surface of living T lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascalchi, Patrice; Lamort, Anne Sophie; Salome, Laurence [CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), F-31077 Toulouse (France); Dumas, Fabrice, E-mail: fabrice.dumas@ipbs.fr [CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), F-31077 Toulouse (France)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied the diffusion of single CD4 receptors on living lymphocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study reveals that CD4 receptors have either a random or confined diffusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dynamics of unconfined CD4 receptors was accelerated by a temperature raise. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dynamics of confined CD4 receptors was unchanged by a temperature raise. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results suggest the existence of two different environments for CD4 receptors. -- Abstract: We investigated the lateral diffusion of the HIV receptor CD4 at the surface of T lymphocytes at 20 Degree-Sign C and 37 Degree-Sign C by Single Particle Tracking using Quantum Dots. We found that the receptors presented two major distinct behaviors that were not equally affected by temperature changes. About half of the receptors showed a random diffusion with a diffusion coefficient increasing upon raising the temperature. The other half of the receptors was permanently or transiently confined with unchanged dynamics on raising the temperature. These observations suggest that two distinct subpopulations of CD4 receptors with different environments are present at the surface of living T lymphocytes.

  19. Nanoscopic substructures of raft-mimetic liquid-ordered membrane domains revealed by high-speed single-particle tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsiao-Mei; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Yen, Tzu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Lung

    2016-02-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane nanodomains that facilitate important cell functions. Despite recent advances in identifying the biological significance of rafts, nature and regulation mechanism of rafts are largely unknown due to the difficulty of resolving dynamic molecular interaction of rafts at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate organization and single-molecule dynamics of rafts by monitoring lateral diffusion of single molecules in raft-containing reconstituted membranes supported on mica substrates. Using high-speed interferometric scattering (iSCAT) optical microscopy and small gold nanoparticles as labels, motion of single lipids is recorded via single-particle tracking (SPT) with nanometer spatial precision and microsecond temporal resolution. Processes of single molecules partitioning into and escaping from the raft-mimetic liquid-ordered (Lo) domains are directly visualized in a continuous manner with unprecedented clarity. Importantly, we observe subdiffusion of saturated lipids in the Lo domain in microsecond timescale, indicating the nanoscopic heterogeneous molecular arrangement of the Lo domain. Further analysis of the diffusion trajectory shows the presence of nano-subdomains of the Lo phase, as small as 10 nm, which transiently trap the lipids. Our results provide the first experimental evidence of non-uniform molecular organization of the Lo phase, giving a new view of how rafts recruit and confine molecules in cell membranes.

  20. Nanoscopic substructures of raft-mimetic liquid-ordered membrane domains revealed by high-speed single-particle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsiao-Mei; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Yen, Tzu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane nanodomains that facilitate important cell functions. Despite recent advances in identifying the biological significance of rafts, nature and regulation mechanism of rafts are largely unknown due to the difficulty of resolving dynamic molecular interaction of rafts at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate organization and single-molecule dynamics of rafts by monitoring lateral diffusion of single molecules in raft-containing reconstituted membranes supported on mica substrates. Using high-speed interferometric scattering (iSCAT) optical microscopy and small gold nanoparticles as labels, motion of single lipids is recorded via single-particle tracking (SPT) with nanometer spatial precision and microsecond temporal resolution. Processes of single molecules partitioning into and escaping from the raft-mimetic liquid-ordered (Lo) domains are directly visualized in a continuous manner with unprecedented clarity. Importantly, we observe subdiffusion of saturated lipids in the Lo domain in microsecond timescale, indicating the nanoscopic heterogeneous molecular arrangement of the Lo domain. Further analysis of the diffusion trajectory shows the presence of nano-subdomains of the Lo phase, as small as 10 nm, which transiently trap the lipids. Our results provide the first experimental evidence of non-uniform molecular organization of the Lo phase, giving a new view of how rafts recruit and confine molecules in cell membranes.

  1. Single-particle tracking and modulation of cell entry pathways of a tetrahedral DNA nanostructure in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Le; Li, Jiang; Li, Qian; Huang, Qing; Shi, Jiye; Yan, Hao; Fan, Chunhai

    2014-07-21

    DNA is typically impermeable to the plasma membrane due to its polyanionic nature. Interestingly, several different DNA nanostructures can be readily taken up by cells in the absence of transfection agents, which suggests new opportunities for constructing intelligent cargo delivery systems from these biocompatible, nonviral DNA nanocarriers. However, the underlying mechanism of entry of the DNA nanostructures into the cells remains unknown. Herein, we investigated the endocytotic internalization and subsequent transport of tetrahedral DNA nanostructures (TDNs) by mammalian cells through single-particle tracking. We found that the TDNs were rapidly internalized by a caveolin-dependent pathway. After endocytosis, the TDNs were transported to the lysosomes in a highly ordered, microtubule-dependent manner. Although the TDNs retained their structural integrity within cells over long time periods, their localization in the lysosomes precludes their use as effective delivery agents. To modulate the cellular fate of the TDNs, we functionalized them with nuclear localization signals that directed their escape from the lysosomes and entry into the cellular nuclei. This study improves our understanding of the entry into cells and transport pathways of DNA nanostructures, and the results can be used as a basis for designing DNA-nanostructure-based drug delivery nanocarriers for targeted therapy.

  2. Asynchronous Task-Based Polar Decomposition on Manycore Architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Sukkari, Dalal

    2016-10-25

    This paper introduces the first asynchronous, task-based implementation of the polar decomposition on manycore architectures. Based on a new formulation of the iterative QR dynamically-weighted Halley algorithm (QDWH) for the calculation of the polar decomposition, the proposed implementation replaces the original and hostile LU factorization for the condition number estimator by the more adequate QR factorization to enable software portability across various architectures. Relying on fine-grained computations, the novel task-based implementation is also capable of taking advantage of the identity structure of the matrix involved during the QDWH iterations, which decreases the overall algorithmic complexity. Furthermore, the artifactual synchronization points have been severely weakened compared to previous implementations, unveiling look-ahead opportunities for better hardware occupancy. The overall QDWH-based polar decomposition can then be represented as a directed acyclic graph (DAG), where nodes represent computational tasks and edges define the inter-task data dependencies. The StarPU dynamic runtime system is employed to traverse the DAG, to track the various data dependencies and to asynchronously schedule the computational tasks on the underlying hardware resources, resulting in an out-of-order task scheduling. Benchmarking experiments show significant improvements against existing state-of-the-art high performance implementations (i.e., Intel MKL and Elemental) for the polar decomposition on latest shared-memory vendors\\' systems (i.e., Intel Haswell/Broadwell/Knights Landing, NVIDIA K80/P100 GPUs and IBM Power8), while maintaining high numerical accuracy.

  3. Particle-tracking investigation of the retention of sucker larvae emerging from spawning grounds in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Tamara M.; Wherry, Susan A.; Simon, David C.; Markle, Douglas F.

    2014-01-01

    This study had two objectives: (1) to use the results of an individual-based particle-tracking model of larval sucker dispersal through the Williamson River delta and Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, to interpret field data collected throughout Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes, and (2) to use the model to investigate the retention of sucker larvae in the system as a function of Williamson River flow, wind, and lake elevation. This is a follow-up study to work reported in Wood and others (2014) in which the hydrodynamic model of Upper Klamath Lake was combined with an individual-based, particle-tracking model of larval fish entering the lake from spawning areas in the Williamson River. In the previous study, the performance of the model was evaluated through comparison with field data comprising larval sucker distribution collected in 2009 by The Nature Conservancy, Oregon State University (OSU), and the U.S. Geological Survey, primarily from the (at that time) recently reconnected Williamson River Delta and along the eastern shoreline of Upper Klamath Lake, surrounding the old river mouth. The previous study demonstrated that the validation of the model with field data was moderately successful and that the model was useful for describing the broad patterns of larval dispersal from the river, at least in the areas surrounding the river channel immediately downstream of the spawning areas and along the shoreline where larvae enter the lake. In this study, field data collected by OSU throughout the main body of Upper Klamath Lake, and not just around the Williamson River Delta, were compared to model simulation results. Because the field data were collected throughout the lake, it was necessary to include in the simulations larvae spawned at eastern shoreline springs that were not included in the earlier studies. A complicating factor was that the OSU collected data throughout the main body of the lake in 2011 and 2012, after the end of several years of larval drift

  4. Simulation of magnetic drug targeting through tracheobronchial airways in the presence of an external non-uniform magnetic field using Lagrangian magnetic particle tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourmehran, O., E-mail: oveis87@yahoo.com; Rahimi-Gorji, M.; Gorji-Bandpy, M., E-mail: gorji@nit.ac.ir; Gorji, T.B.

    2015-11-01

    Drug delivery technologies are an important area within biomedicine. Targeted drug delivery aims to reduce the undesired side effects of drug usage by directing or capturing the active agents near a desired site within the body. Herein, a numerical investigation of magnetic drug targeting (MDT) using aerosol drugs named polystyrene particle (PMS40) in human lung is presented considering one-way coupling on the transport and capture of the magnetic particle. A realistic 3D geometry based on CT scan images is provided for CFD simulation. An external non-uniform magnetic field is applied. Parametric investigation is conducted and the influence of particle diameter, magnetic source position, and magnetic number (Mn) on the deposition efficiency and particle behavior is reported. According to the results, the magnetic field increased deposition efficiency of particles in a target region, the efficiency of deposition and MDT technique has a direct relation with increasing the particle diameter for magnetic number of 1 Tesla (T) and lower (Mn≤1(T)). Also it can be seen that there is an inverse relation between the particle diameter and deposition efficiency when Mn is more than 1 (T). - Highlights: • A realistic 3D geometry of human tracheobronchial airway based on CT scan image. • External non-uniform magnetic field applied to target the magnetic drug career. • Lagrangian particle tracking using discrete phase model applied. • The efficiency of deposition is dependent of magnetic number and particle diameter.

  5. MCMC Particle Filter Using New Data Association Technique with Viterbi Filtered Gate Method for Multi-Target Tracking in Heavy Clutter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M.Saad

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Improving data association technique in dense clutter environment for multi-target tracking used in Markov chain Monte Carlo based particle filter (MCMC-PF are discussed in this paper. A new method named Viterbi filtered gate Markov chain Monte Carlo VFG-MCMC is introduced to avoid track swap and to overcome the issue of loosing track to highly maneuvering targets in the presence of more background clutter and false signals. An adaptive search based on Viterbi algorithm is then used to detect the valid filtered data point in each target gate. The detected valid point for each target is applied to the estimation algorithm of MCMC-PF during calculating the sampling weights. This proposed method makes the MCMC interacts only with the valid target that is candidate from the filtered gate and no more calculations are considered for invalid targets. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and better performance when compared to conventional algorithm MCMC-PF.

  6. Normalized and Asynchronous Mirror Alignment for Cherenkov Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Ahnen, M L; Balbo, M; Bergmann, M; Biland, A; Blank, M; Bretz, T; Bruegge, K A; Buss, J; Domke, M; Dorner, D; Einecke, S; Hempfling, C; Hildebrand, D; Hughes, G; Lustermann, W; Mannheim, K; Mueller, S A; Neise, D; Neronov, A; Noethe, M; Overkemping, A -K; Paravac, A; Pauss, F; Rhode, W; Shukla, A; Temme, F; Thaele, J; Toscano, S; Vogler, P; Walter, R; Wilbert, A

    2016-01-01

    Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) need imaging optics with large apertures and high image intensities to map the faint Cherenkov light emitted from cosmic ray air showers onto their image sensors. Segmented reflectors fulfill these needs, and as they are composed from mass production mirror facets they are inexpensive and lightweight. However, as the overall image is a superposition of the individual facet images, alignment is a challenge. Here we present a computer vision based star tracking alignment method, which also works for limited or changing star light visibility. Our method normalizes the mirror facet reflection intensities to become independent of the reference star's intensity or the cloud coverage. Using two CCD cameras, our method records the mirror facet orientations asynchronously of the telescope drive system, and thus makes the method easy to integrate into existing telescopes. It can be combined with remote facet actuation, but does not require one to work. Furthermore, it ca...

  7. Label-acquired magnetorotation for biosensing: An asynchronous rotation assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht, Ariel, E-mail: hecht@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2200 Bonisteel, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099 (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); Kinnunen, Paivo, E-mail: pkkinn@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); University of Michigan, Applied Physics Program, 2477 Randall Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120 (United States); McNaughton, Brandon, E-mail: bmcnaugh@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2200 Bonisteel, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099 (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); University of Michigan, Applied Physics Program, 2477 Randall Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120 (United States); Kopelman, Raoul, E-mail: kopelman@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2200 Bonisteel, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099 (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); University of Michigan, Applied Physics Program, 2477 Randall Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    This paper presents a novel application of magnetic particles for biosensing, called label-acquired magnetorotation (LAM). This method is based on a combination of the traditional sandwich assay format with the asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) method. In label-acquired magnetorotation, an analyte facilitates the binding of a magnetic label bead to a nonmagnetic solid phase sphere, forming a sandwich complex. The sandwich complex is then placed in a rotating magnetic field, where the rotational frequency of the sandwich complex is a function of the amount of analyte attached to the surface of the sphere. Here, we use streptavidin-coated beads and biotin-coated particles as analyte mimics, to be replaced by proteins and other biological targets in future work. We show this sensing method to have a dynamic range of two orders of magnitude.

  8. 基于粒子滤波的声源方位跟踪算法%SOUND SOURCE ORIENTATION TRACKING ALGORITHM BASED ON PARTICLE FILTERING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷侠; 蔡卫平; 徐健; 陆泽橼

    2012-01-01

    Aiming at speaker' s orientation tracking issue in reverberant environment, a sound source orientation tracking algorithm based on particle filtering is presented in this paper. According to the moving characteristic of the speaker, the algorithm sets up based on the Lan-gevin equations a dynamic model of sound source orientation, the steered response power with phase transform weight (SRP-PHAT) is used as the localisation function, and the particle filtering is employed to track the sound source orientation. The real acoustic data recorded in a typical meeting room using a small-scale microphone array is used for tracking experiments. Results show that the proposed algorithm can realise effectively the orientation tracking of the randomly walking speaker, in which, the root mean square error of tracking in direction of the horizontal angle and the elevation are all less than 5°.%针对混响环境中说话人方位跟踪问题,提出一种基于粒子滤波的声源方位跟踪算法.该算法根据说话人的运动特点,在Langevin方程的基础上构建声源方位的动态模型,采用相位变换加权的可控响应功率作为定位函数,运用粒子滤波对声源方位进行跟踪.使用典型会议室环境下小型麦克风阵列接收的真实数据来做实验.结果表明,该算法能有效地实现随机走动说话人的方位跟踪,并且在水平角和仰角方向的均方根误差均小于5..

  9. Simulation of Reclaimed-Water Injection and Pumping Scenarios and Particle-Tracking Analysis near Mount Pleasant, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkewich, Matthew D.; Campbell, Bruce G.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of injecting reclaimed water into the Middendorf aquifer beneath Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, was simulated using a groundwater-flow model of the Coastal Plain Physiographic Province of South Carolina and parts of Georgia and North Carolina. Reclaimed water, also known as recycled water, is wastewater or stormwater that has been treated to an appropriate level so that the water can be reused. The scenarios were simulated to evaluate potential changes in groundwater flow and groundwater-level conditions caused by injecting reclaimed water into the Middendorf aquifer. Simulations included a Base Case and two injection scenarios. Maximum pumping rates were simulated as 6.65, 8.50, and 10.5 million gallons per day for the Base Case, Scenario 1, and Scenario 2, respectively. The Base Case simulation represents a non-injection estimate of the year 2050 groundwater levels for comparison purposes for the two injection scenarios. For Scenarios 1 and 2, the simulated injection of reclaimed water at 3 million gallons per day begins in 2012 and continues through 2050. The flow paths and time of travel for the injected reclaimed water were simulated using particle-tracking analysis. The simulations indicated a general decline of groundwater altitudes in the Middendorf aquifer in the Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, area between 2004 and 2050 for the Base Case and two injection scenarios. For the Base Case, groundwater altitudes generally declined about 90 feet from the 2004 groundwater levels. For Scenarios 1 and 2, although groundwater altitudes initially increased in the Mount Pleasant area because of the simulated injection, these higher groundwater levels declined as Mount Pleasant Waterworks pumping increased over time. When compared to the Base Case simulation, 2050 groundwater altitudes for Scenario 1 are between 15 feet lower to 23 feet higher for production wells, between 41 and 77 feet higher for the injection wells, and between 9 and 23 feet higher for

  10. In vitro targeted magnetic delivery and tracking of superparamagnetic iron oxide particles labeled stem cells for articular cartilage defect repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yong; Jin, Xuhong; Dai, Gang; Liu, Jun; Chen, Jiarong; Yang, Liu

    2011-04-01

    To assess a novel cell manipulation technique of tissue engineering with respect to its ability to augment superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) labeled mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) density at a localized cartilage defect site in an in vitro phantom by applying magnetic force. Meanwhile, non-invasive imaging techniques were use to track SPIO-labeled MSCs by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Human bone marrow MSCs were cultured and labeled with SPIO. Fresh degenerated human osteochondral fragments were obtained during total knee arthroplasty and a cartilage defect was created at the center. Then, the osteochondral fragments were attached to the sidewalls of culture flasks filled with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) to mimic the human joint cavity. The SPIO-labeled MSCs were injected into the culture flasks in the presence of a 0.57 Tesla (T) magnetic force. Before and 90 min after cell targeting, the specimens underwent T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (SET2WI) sequence of 3.0 T MRI. MRI results were compared with histological findings. Macroscopic observation showed that SPIO-labeled MSCs were steered to the target region of cartilage defect. MRI revealed significant changes in signal intensity (P<0.01). HE staining exibited that a great number of MSCs formed a three-dimensional (3D) cell "sheet" structure at the chondral defect site. It was concluded that 0.57 T magnetic force permits spatial delivery of magnetically labeled MSCs to the target region in vitro. High-field MRI can serve as an very sensitive non-invasive technique for the visualization of SPIO-labeled MSCs.

  11. Breakup of Finite-Size Colloidal Aggregates in Turbulent Flow Investigated by Three-Dimensional (3D) Particle Tracking Velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Debashish; Babler, Matthaus U; Holzner, Markus; Soos, Miroslav; Lüthi, Beat; Liberzon, Alex; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2016-01-12

    Aggregates grown in mild shear flow are released, one at a time, into homogeneous isotropic turbulence, where their motion and intermittent breakup is recorded by three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV). The aggregates have an open structure with a fractal dimension of ∼2.2, and their size is 1.4 ± 0.4 mm, which is large, compared to the Kolmogorov length scale (η = 0.15 mm). 3D-PTV of flow tracers allows for the simultaneous measurement of aggregate trajectories and the full velocity gradient tensor along their pathlines, which enables us to access the Lagrangian stress history of individual breakup events. From this data, we found no consistent pattern that relates breakup to the local flow properties at the point of breakup. Also, the correlation between the aggregate size and both shear stress and normal stress at the location of breakage is found to be weaker, when compared with the correlation between size and drag stress. The analysis suggests that the aggregates are mostly broken due to the accumulation of the drag stress over a time lag on the order of the Kolmogorov time scale. This finding is explained by the fact that the aggregates are large, which gives their motion inertia and increases the time for stress propagation inside the aggregate. Furthermore, it is found that the scaling of the largest fragment and the accumulated stress at breakup follows an earlier established power law, i.e., dfrag ∼ σ(-0.6) obtained from laminar nozzle experiments. This indicates that, despite the large size and the different type of hydrodynamic stress, the microscopic mechanism causing breakup is consistent over a wide range of aggregate size and stress magnitude.

  12. Convergence of lateral dynamic measurements in the plasma membrane of live cells from single particle tracking and STED-FCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerholm, B. Christoffer; Andrade, Débora M.; Clausen, Mathias P.; Eggeling, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) in combination with the super-resolution imaging method STED (STED-FCS), and single-particle tracking (SPT) are able to directly probe the lateral dynamics of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane of live cells at spatial scales much below the diffraction limit of conventional microscopy. However, a major disparity in interpretation of data from SPT and STED-FCS remains, namely the proposed existence of a very fast (unhindered) lateral diffusion coefficient, ⩾5 µm2 s-1, in the plasma membrane of live cells at very short length scales, ≈⩽ 100 nm, and time scales, ≈1-10 ms. This fast diffusion coefficient has been advocated in several high-speed SPT studies, for lipids and membrane proteins alike, but the equivalent has not been detected in STED-FCS measurements. Resolving this ambiguity is important because the assessment of membrane dynamics currently relies heavily on SPT for the determination of heterogeneous diffusion. A possible systematic error in this approach would thus have vast implications in this field. To address this, we have re-visited the analysis procedure for SPT data with an emphasis on the measurement errors and the effect that these errors have on the measurement outputs. We subsequently demonstrate that STED-FCS and SPT data, following careful consideration of the experimental errors of the SPT data, converge to a common interpretation which for the case of a diffusing phospholipid analogue in the plasma membrane of live mouse embryo fibroblasts results in an unhindered, intra-compartment, diffusion coefficient of  ≈0.7-1.0 µm2 s-1, and a compartment size of about 100-150 nm.

  13. Imaging the fine-scale structure of the cellular actin cytoskeleton by Single Particle Tracking and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustata, Gina-Mirela

    It has been proposed that diffusion in the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells it is compartmentalized due to the interaction with the underlying actin-based membrane skeleton that comes into close proximity to the lipid bilayer. The cytoskeleton is a dynamic structure that maintains cell shape, enables cell motion, and plays important roles in both intra-cellular transport and cellular division. We show here the evidence of plasma membrane compartmentalization using Single Particle Tracking (SPT) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging. SPT of Quantum dot labeled lipid in the plasma membrane of live normal rat kidney cells show compartments ranging from 325 nm to 391 nm depending on the sampling time. Using AFM imaging of live NRK cell in the presence of phalloidin, the membrane compartmentalization it is visible with the average size of the compartments of 325 +/- 10 nm (the main peak is centered at 260 nm). Further, the underlying membrane skeleton in fixed cells was directly imaged after partial removal of the plasma membrane to reveal size of the membrane skeleton meshwork of 339 +/- 10 nm. A new method of measuring the characteristics of the actin meshwork was proposed. Probing the local compliance of the plasma membrane through the deflection of a soft AFM cantilever we can expect that the stiffness of the membrane will be higher at locations directly above a cortical actin. This new method provided information about the structure of the skeletal meshwork of neuronal cell body predicting an average compartment size of about 132 nm. This was confirmed through SPT of QD-lipid incorporated into the neuronal cell membrane.

  14. Dynamic micro-organization of P2X7 receptors revealed by PALM based single particle tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amulya Nidhi Shrivastava

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine triphosphate (ATP-gated P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs are members of the purinergic receptor family that are expressed in several cell types including neurons. A high concentration of ATP is required for the channel opening of P2X7Rs compared to other members of this receptor family. Recent work suggests that ATP binding to members of the P2X receptor family determines the diffusion and localization of these receptors on the plasma membrane of neurons. Here, we employed single particle tracking photoactivated localization microscopy (sptPALM to study the diffusion and ATP-dependence of rat P2X7Rs. Dendra2-tagged P2X7Rs were transfected in hippocampal neurons and imaged on proximal dendrites. Our results suggest the presence of two populations of P2X7Rs within the extra-synaptic membrane: a population composed of rapidly diffusing receptors and one stabilized within nanoclusters (~100 nm diameter. P2X7R trajectories were rarely observed at synaptic sites. P2X7R mutations in the ATP-binding site (K64A or the conserved phosphorylation site (K17A resulted in faster- and slower-diffusing receptors, respectively. Furthermore, ATP differentially accelerated wild type and K17A-mutant receptors but not K64A-mutant receptors. Our results indicate that receptor conformation plays a critical role in regulating ATP-mediated changes in P2X7R diffusion and micro-organization.

  15. Dynamic micro-organization of P2X7 receptors revealed by PALM based single particle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Amulya N; Rodriguez, Pamela C; Triller, Antoine; Renner, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-gated P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) are members of the purinergic receptor family that are expressed in several cell types including neurons. A high concentration of ATP is required for the channel opening of P2X7Rs compared to other members of this receptor family. Recent work suggests that ATP binding to members of the P2X receptor family determines the diffusion and localization of these receptors on the plasma membrane of neurons. Here, we employed single particle tracking photoactivated localization microscopy (sptPALM) to study the diffusion and ATP-dependence of rat P2X7Rs. Dendra2-tagged P2X7Rs were transfected in hippocampal neurons and imaged on proximal dendrites. Our results suggest the presence of two populations of P2X7Rs within the extra-synaptic membrane: a population composed of rapidly diffusing receptors and one stabilized within nanoclusters (~100 nm diameter). P2X7R trajectories were rarely observed at synaptic sites. P2X7R mutations in the ATP-binding site (K64A) or the conserved phosphorylation site (K17A) resulted in faster- and slower-diffusing receptors, respectively. Furthermore, ATP differentially accelerated wild type and K17A-mutant receptors but not K64A-mutant receptors. Our results indicate that receptor conformation plays a critical role in regulating ATP-mediated changes in P2X7R diffusion and micro-organization.

  16. The Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage: Track Structure Effects and Cytogenetic Signatures of High-LET Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, K.; Hada, M.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2012-01-01

    Track structure models predict that at a fixed value of LET, particles with lower charge number, Z will have a higher biological effectiveness compared to particles with a higher Z. In this report we investigated how track structure effects induction of chromosomal aberration in human cells. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with various energies of accelerated iron, silicon, neon, or titanium ions and chromosome damage was assessed in using three color FISH chromosome painting in chemically induced PCC samples collected a first cell division post irradiation. The LET values for these ions ranged from 30 to 195 keV/micrometers. Of the particles studied, Neon ions have the highest biological effectiveness for induction of total chromosome damage, which is consistent with track structure model predictions. For complex-type exchanges 64 MeV/ u Neon and 450 MeV/u Iron were equally effective and induced the most complex damage. In addition we present data on chromosomes exchanges induced by six different energies of protons (5 MeV/u to 2.5 GeV/u). The linear dose response term was similar for all energies of protons suggesting that the effect of the higher LET at low proton energies is balanced by the production of nuclear secondaries from the high energy protons. All energies of protons have a much higher percentage of complex-type chromosome exchanges than gamma rays, signifying a cytogenetic signature for proton exposures.

  17. Handbook of asynchronous machines with variable speed

    CERN Document Server

    Razik, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    This handbook deals with the asynchronous machine in its close environment. It was born from a reflection on this electromagnetic converter whose integration in industrial environments takes a wide part. Previously this type of motor operated at fixed speed, from now on it has been integrated more and more in processes at variable speed. For this reason it seemed useful, or necessary, to write a handbook on the various aspects from the motor in itself, via the control and while finishing by the diagnosis aspect. Indeed, an asynchronous motor is used nowadays in industry where variation speed a

  18. Existence test for asynchronous interval iterations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kaj; Caprani, O.; Stauning, Ole

    1997-01-01

    as a synchronous (sequential) interval iteration:In each iteration step all components of the iterate are calculatedbased on the previous iterate. In this case it is straight forward to base simple interval existence and non-existencetests on the calculations done in each step of the iteration. The search can also...... be performed as an asynchronous (parallel) iteration: Only a few components are changed in each stepand this calculation is in general based on components from differentprevious iterates. For the asynchronous iteration it turns out thatsimple tests of existence and non-existence can be based...

  19. A Provably Secure Asynchronous Proactive RSA Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Rui-shan; LI Qiang; CHEN Ke-fei

    2005-01-01

    The drawback of the first asynchronous proactive RSA scheme presented by Zhou in 2001, is that the se curity definition and security proof do not follow the approach of provable security. This paper presented a provably secure asynchronous proactive RSA scheme, which includes three protocols: initial key distribution protocol,signature generation protocol and share refreshing protocol. Taken these protocols together, a complete provably secure proactive RSA scheme was obtained. And the efficiency of the scheme is approximate to that of the scheme of Zhou.

  20. Processor arrays with asynchronous TDM optical buses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Zheng, S. Q.

    1997-04-01

    We propose a pipelined asynchronous time division multiplexing optical bus. Such a bus can use one of the two hardwared priority schemes, the linear priority scheme and the round-robin priority scheme. Our simulation results show that the performances of our proposed buses are significantly better than the performances of known pipelined synchronous time division multiplexing optical buses. We also propose a class of processor arrays connected by pipelined asynchronous time division multiplexing optical buses. We claim that our proposed processor array not only have better performance, but also have better scalabilities than the existing processor arrays connected by pipelined synchronous time division multiplexing optical buses.

  1. Synchronization of Asynchronous Switched Boolean Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Wang, Xingyuan; Lin, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the complete synchronizations for asynchronous switched Boolean network with free Boolean sequence controllers and close-loop controllers are studied. First, the basic asynchronous switched Boolean network model is provided. With the method of semi-tensor product, the Boolean dynamics is translated into linear representation. Second, necessary and sufficient conditions for ASBN synchronization with free Boolean sequence control and close-loop control are derived, respectively. Third, some illustrative examples are provided to show the efficiency of the proposed methods.

  2. A simple asynchronous replica-exchange implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Bussi, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of implementing asynchronous replica-exchange (or parallel tempering) molecular dynamics. In our scheme, the exchange attempts are driven by asynchronous messages sent by one of the computing nodes, so that different replicas are allowed to perform a different number of time-steps between subsequent attempts. The implementation is simple and based on the message-passing interface (MPI). We illustrate the advantages of our scheme with respect to the standard synchronous algorithm and we benchmark it for a model Lennard-Jones liquid on an IBM-LS21 blade center cluster.

  3. Bernoulli particle filter with observer altitude for maritime radiation source tracking in the presence of measurement uncertainty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Xiaobo; Fan Hongqi; Song Zhiyong; Fu Qiang

    2013-01-01

    For maritime radiation source target tracking in particular electronic counter measures (ECM) environment, there exists two main problems which can deteriorate the tracking perfor-mance of traditional approaches. The first problem is the poor observability of the radiation source. The second one is the measurement uncertainty which includes the uncertainty of the target appear-ing/disappearing and the detection uncertainty (false and missed detections). A novel approach is proposed in this paper for tracking maritime radiation source in the presence of measurement uncertainty. To solve the poor observability of maritime radiation source target, using the radiation source motion restriction, the observer altitude information is incorporated into the bearings-only tracking (BOT) method to obtain the unique target localization. Then the two uncertainties in the ECM environment are modeled by the random finite set (RFS) theory and the Bernoulli filtering method with the observer altitude is adopted to solve the tracking problem of maritime radiation source in such context. Simulation experiments verify the validity of the proposed approach for tracking maritime radiation source, and also demonstrate the superiority of the method compared with the traditional integrated probabilistic data association (IPDA) method. The tracking perfor-mance under different conditions, particularly those involving different duration of radiation source opening and switching-off, indicates that the method to solve our problem is robust and effective.

  4. Asynchronous Rumor Spreading on Random Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Panagiotou, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    We perform a thorough study of various characteristics of the asynchronous push-pull protocol for spreading a rumor on Erd\\H{o}s-R\\'enyi random graphs $G_{n,p}$, for any $p>c\\ln(n)/n$ with $c>1$. In particular, we provide a simple strategy for analyzing the asynchronous push-pull protocol on arbitrary graph topologies and apply this strategy to $G_{n,p}$. We prove tight bounds of logarithmic order for the total time that is needed until the information has spread to all nodes. Surprisingly, the time required by the asynchronous push-pull protocol is asymptotically almost unaffected by the average degree of the graph. Similarly tight bounds for Erd\\H{o}s-R\\'enyi random graphs have previously only been obtained for the synchronous push protocol, where it has been observed that the total running time increases significantly for sparse random graphs. Finally, we quantify the robustness of the protocol with respect to transmission and node failures. Our analysis suggests that the asynchronous protocols are particu...

  5. Asynchronous ASCII Event Count Status Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    IRIG STANDARD 215-12 TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND TIMING GROUP ASYNCHRONOUS ASCII EVENT COUNT STATUS CODES...Inter-range Instrumentation Group ( IRIG ) Standard for American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII)-formatted EC status transfer which can be...circuits and Ethernet networks. Provides systems engineers and equipment vendors with an Inter-range Instrumentation Group ( IRIG ) Standard for American

  6. Increasing Student Engagement Using Asynchronous Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northey, Gavin; Bucic, Tania; Chylinski, Mathew; Govind, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Student engagement is an ongoing concern for educators because of its positive association with deep learning and educational outcomes. This article tests the use of a social networking site (Facebook) as a tool to facilitate asynchronous learning opportunities that complement face-to-face interactions and thereby enable a stronger learning…

  7. Asynchronous stream processing with S-Net

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grelck, C.; Scholz, S.-B.; Shafarenko, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present the rationale and design of S-Net, a coordination language for asynchronous stream processing. The language achieves a near-complete separation between the application code, written in any conventional programming language, and the coordination/communication code written in S-Net. Our app

  8. A comparison of particle-tracking and solute transport methods for simulation of tritium concentrations and groundwater transit times in river water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusyev, M. A.; Abrams, D.; Toews, M. W.; Morgenstern, U.; Stewart, M. K.

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to simulate tritium concentrations and groundwater transit times in river water with particle-tracking (MODPATH) and compare them to solute transport (MT3DMS) simulations. Tritium measurements in river water are valuable for the calibration of particle-tracking and solute transport models as well as for understanding of watershed storage dynamics. In a previous study, we simulated tritium concentrations in river water of the western Lake Taupo catchment (WLTC) using a MODFLOW-MT3DMS model (Gusyev et al., 2013). The model was calibrated to measured tritium in river water at baseflows of the Waihaha, Whanganui, Whareroa, Kuratau, and Omori river catchments of the WLTC. Following from that work we now utilized the same MODFLOW model for the WLTC to calculate the pathways of groundwater particles (and their corresponding tritium concentrations) using steady-state particle tracking MODPATH model. In order to simulate baseflow tritium concentrations with MODPATH, transit time distributions (TTDs) are necessary to understand the lag time between the entry and discharge points of a tracer and are generated for the river networks of the five WLTC outflows. TTDs are used in the convolution integral with an input tritium concentration time series obtained from the precipitation measurements. The resulting MODPATH tritium concentrations yield a very good match to measured tritium concentrations and are similar to the MT3DMS-simulated tritium concentrations, with the greatest variation occurring around the bomb peak. MODPATH and MT3DMS also yield similar mean transit times (MTTs) of groundwater contribution to river baseflows, but the actual shape of the TTDs is strikingly different. While both distributions provide valuable information, the methodologies used to derive the TTDs are fundamentally different and hence must be interpreted differently. With the current MT3DMS model settings, only the methodology used with MODPATH provides the true TTD

  9. Trajectory exploration within asynchronous binary asteroid systems using refined Lagrangian coherent structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Haibin; Wu, Xiaoyu; Cui, Pingyuan

    2017-02-01

    Ground observations have found that asynchronous systems constitute most of the population of the near-Earth binary asteroids. This paper concerns the trajectory of a particle in the asynchronous system which is systematically described using periodic ellipsoidal and spherical body models. Due to the non-autonomous characteristics of the asynchronous system, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) are employed to identify the various dynamical behaviors. To enhance the accuracy of LCS, a robust LCS finding algorithm is developed incorporating hierarchical grid refinement, one-dimensional search and variational theory verification. In this way, the intricate dynamical transport boundaries are detected efficiently. These boundaries indicate that a total of 15 types of trajectories exist near asynchronous binary asteroids. According to their Kepler energy variations, these trajectories can be grouped into four basic categories, i.e., transitory, escape, impact and flyby trajectories. Furthermore, the influence of the ellipsoid's spin period on the dynamical behavior is discussed in the context of the change of dynamical regions. We found that the transitory and impact motions occur easily in the synchronous-like binary systems, in which the rotation period of the ellipsoid is nearly equal to that of the mutual orbit. Meanwhile, the results confirm a positive correlation between the spinning rate of the ellipsoid and the probability of the escape and flyby trajectories. The LCS also reveal a marked increase in trajectory diversity after a larger initial energy is selected.

  10. Search for long-lived supersymmetry particles by signature of a high track-multiplicity displaced vertex using the LHC-ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00360876

    Long-lived supersymmetry (SUSY) particles decaying within the tracking volume of the LHC-ATLAS Experiment can be reconstructed as a displaced vertex (DV). The search strategy involves attempting to reassemble the decay point of the long-lived particles (LLPs) by fitting vertices from the trajectories arising from the charged decay products. A search, looking for a signature of a massive high track-multiplicity DV has been conducted using data collected during 2012 by the LHC-ATLAS Experiment at $\\sqrt{s}~=~8$ TeV, equaling to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb$^{-1}$. A signature of a massive displaced vertex is especially powerful due to the lack of any heavy long-lived standard model particles. Thereby, giving an analysis that is nearly background free. This dissertation describes the new, much more generic, "$DV+\\text{jets}$" channel. In this channel events with high momentum jets and at least one displaced vertex are considered. Eliminating the requirement of an associated $\\mu$ generated, to date of w...

  11. Simulations of groundwater flow and particle-tracking analysis in the zone of contribution to a public-supply well in San Antonio, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Richard L.; Houston, Natalie A.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Fahlquist, Lynne S.; Kauffman, Leon J.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, a public-supply well in San Antonio, Texas, was selected for intensive study to assess the vulnerability of public-supply wells in the Edwards aquifer to contamination by a variety of compounds. A local-scale, steady-state, three-dimensional numerical groundwater-flow model was developed and used in this study to evaluate the movement of water and solutes from recharge areas to the selected public-supply well. Particle tracking was used to compute flow paths and advective traveltimes throughout the model area and to delineate the areas contributing recharge and zone of contribution for the selected public-supply well.

  12. Field calculations, single-particle tracking, and beam dynamics with space charge in the electron lens for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noll, Daniel [Goethe Univ., Frankfurt (Germany); Stancari, Giulio [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-11-17

    An electron lens is planned for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator as a nonlinear element for integrable dynamics, as an electron cooler, and as an electron trap to study space-charge compensation in rings. We present the main design principles and constraints for nonlinear integrable optics. A magnetic configuration of the solenoids and of the toroidal section is laid out. Singleparticle tracking is used to optimize the electron path. Electron beam dynamics at high intensity is calculated with a particle-in-cell code to estimate current limits, profile distortions, and the effects on the circulating beam. In the conclusions, we summarize the main findings and list directions for further work.

  13. Bayesian multiple target tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Streit, Roy L

    2013-01-01

    This second edition has undergone substantial revision from the 1999 first edition, recognizing that a lot has changed in the multiple target tracking field. One of the most dramatic changes is in the widespread use of particle filters to implement nonlinear, non-Gaussian Bayesian trackers. This book views multiple target tracking as a Bayesian inference problem. Within this framework it develops the theory of single target tracking, multiple target tracking, and likelihood ratio detection and tracking. In addition to providing a detailed description of a basic particle filter that implements

  14. Track finding efficiency in

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allmendinger, T.; Bhuyan, B.; Brown, D. N.; Choi, H.; Christ, S.; Covarelli, R.; Davier, M.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Hafner, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Long, O.; Lutz, A. M.; Martinelli, M.; Muller, D. R.; Nugent, I. M.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Purohit, M. V.; Prencipe, E.; Roney, J. M.; Simi, G.; Solodov, E. P.; Telnov, A. V.; Varnes, E.; Waldi, R.; Wang, W. F.; White, R. M.

    2012-12-10

    We describe several studies to measure the charged track reconstruction efficiency and asymmetry of the BaBar detector. The first two studies measure the tracking efficiency of a charged particle using τ and initial state radiation decays. The third uses the τ decays to study the asymmetry in tracking, the fourth measures the tracking efficiency for low momentum tracks, and the last measures the reconstruction efficiency of K$0\\atop{S}$ particles. The first section also examines the stability of the measurements vs. BaBar running periods.

  15. High speed versus pulsed images for micro-particle image velocimetry: a direct comparison of red blood cells versus fluorescing tracers as tracking particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Katie L; Fenech, Marianne

    2013-10-01

    High speed photography in micro-particle image velocimetry (μPIV) using red blood cells as tracer particles and the use of fluorescing tracer particles (in conjunction with pulsed images) are directly compared by using both methods simultaneously. Measurements are taken on the same blood sample in the same microchip using both methods. This work directly and statistically compares the two methods of μPIV measurement in a controlled in vitro environment for the first time in literature. The pulsed method using fluorescing tracer particles is found to decrease the depth of correlation as expected, and to better represent the shape of the velocity profile. Two methods of velocity characterization are used (single and double parameter) and the pulsed images provide better shape representation in both cases.

  16. Inhibition Controls Asynchronous States of Neuronal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Computations in cortical circuits require action potentials from excitatory and inhibitory neurons. In this mini-review, I first provide a quick overview of findings that indicate that GABAergic neurons play a fundamental role in coordinating spikes and generating synchronized network activity. Next, I argue that these observations helped popularize the notion that network oscillations require a high degree of spike correlations among interneurons which, in turn, produce synchronous inhibition of the local microcircuit. The aim of this text is to discuss some recent experimental and computational findings that support a complementary view: one in which interneurons participate actively in producing asynchronous states in cortical networks. This requires a proper mixture of shared excitation and inhibition leading to asynchronous activity between neighboring cells. Such contribution from interneurons would be extremely important because it would tend to reduce the spike correlation between neighboring pyramidal cells, a drop in redundancy that could enhance the information-processing capacity of neural networks. PMID:27274721

  17. Computing by Temporal Order: Asynchronous Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Vielhaber

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Our concern is the behaviour of the elementary cellular automata with state set 0,1 over the cell set Z/nZ (one-dimensional finite wrap-around case, under all possible update rules (asynchronicity. Over the torus Z/nZ (n<= 11,we will see that the ECA with Wolfram rule 57 maps any v in F_2^n to any w in F_2^n, varying the update rule. We furthermore show that all even (element of the alternating group bijective functions on the set F_2^n = 0,...,2^n-1, can be computed by ECA57, by iterating it a sufficient number of times with varying update rules, at least for n <= 10. We characterize the non-bijective functions computable by asynchronous rules.

  18. Inhibition Controls Asynchronous States of Neuronal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Computations in cortical circuits require action potentials from excitatory and inhibitory neurons. In this mini-review, I first provide a quick overview of findings that indicate that GABAergic neurons play a fundamental role in coordinating spikes and generating synchronized network activity. Next, I argue that these observations helped popularize the notion that network oscillations require a high degree of spike correlations among interneurons which, in turn, produce synchronous inhibition of the local microcircuit. The aim of this text is to discuss some recent experimental and computational findings that support a complementary view: one in which interneurons participate actively in producing asynchronous states in cortical networks. This requires a proper mixture of shared excitation and inhibition leading to asynchronous activity between neighboring cells. Such contribution from interneurons would be extremely important because it would tend to reduce the spike correlation between neighboring pyramidal cells, a drop in redundancy that could enhance the information-processing capacity of neural networks.

  19. Asynchronous exponential growth of a bacterial population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Boulanouar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we complete a study started earlier in [1,2] wherein a model of growing bacterial population has been the matter of a mathematical analysis. We show that the full model is governed by a strongly continuous semigroup. Beside the positivity and the irreducibility of the generated semigroup, we describe its asymptotic behavior in the uniform topology which leads to the asynchronous exponential growth of the bacterial population.

  20. Three-dimensional particle tracking around microstructures in water via total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and refractive-index-matching method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unno, Noriyuki; Nakata, Shuichiro; Satake, Shin-ichi; Taniguchi, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Multilayer nanoparticle image velocimetry (MnPIV) with a refractive-index-matching method is powerful technique for x- y- z (3D) flow measurement, because it can detect the 3D position of fluorescent particles with submicron resolution. In MnPIV, the intensity of fluorescence of a particle is used to estimate its z-position. However, it has been difficult to measure 3D flows around microstructures in water by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy because of light scattering caused by the different refractive indices of the structures and the working fluid. By using a thermal nanoimprinting technique, we succeeded in fabricating microstructures from a polymer resin whose refractive index is equal to that of water, and we used these microstructures to perform MnPIV in water. As a result of the match between the refractive index of water and that of the microstructures, we were able to perform 3D tracking of nanoparticles around the microstructures in water.

  1. Field calculations, single-particle tracking, and beam dynamics with space charge in the electron lens for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Noll, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    An electron lens is planned for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator as a nonlinear element for integrable dynamics, as an electron cooler, and as an electron trap to study space-charge compensation in rings. We present the main design principles and constraints for nonlinear integrable optics. A magnetic configuration of the solenoids and of the toroidal section is laid out. Single-particle tracking is used to optimize the electron path. Electron beam dynamics at high intensity is calculated with a particle-in-cell code to estimate current limits, profile distortions, and the effects on the circulating beam. In the conclusions, we summarize the main findings and list directions for further work.

  2. 基于Beowulf机群中改进粒子滤波的3D人体运动跟踪%Three-dimension human motion tracking based improved particle filter on Beowulf cluster system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李敏; 宋曰聪; 吴斌; 彭保

    2015-01-01

    According to the problem that the standard particle filter tracking algorithm in video 3D human motion track-ing cannot meet tracking accuracy and real time tracking at the same time for its intensive computation and particle degen-eracy and tracking failure. A novel improvement particle filter algorithm is proposed based on Beowulf cluster system par-allel computing. The new algorithm can realize automatic recovery from tracking failure by automatic initialization of 3D human body model parameters and adjustment of particle amount and template. The migration particle filter parallel algo-rithm which based on task dynamic allocation and low consumption communication strategy in Beowulf cluster system can overcome particle degeneracy problem and improve computation speed. The experimental result shows that particle degeneracy and tracking failure problems have been alleviated effectively, the computing time has been reduced, the track-ing precision has been improved, and the new way can meet the need of tracking accuracy and real time tracking at the same time.%针对标准的粒子滤波算法在视频三维人体运动跟踪中存在的计算量巨大、粒子退化、跟踪失效而无法同时满足跟踪精度和跟踪实时性要求的问题,提出了基于Beowulf机群中改进的粒子滤波新算法。新算法通过三维人体模型参数的自动初始化、粒子数目和模板的调整来实现跟踪失效的自动恢复,基于任务动态分配策略、低开销通信策略设计的Beowulf机群中的迁移式粒子滤波并行算法克服了粒子退化问题和提高了计算速度。实验结果显示:新方法有效地减轻了粒子退化和跟踪失效问题,降低了计算时间,提高了跟踪精度,能够同时满足三维人体运动跟踪精度和实时性的要求。

  3. Blending Online Asynchronous and Synchronous Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa C. Yamagata-Lynch

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article I will share a qualitative self-study about a 15-week blended 100% online graduate level course facilitated through synchronous meetings on Blackboard Collaborate and asynchronous discussions on Blackboard. I taught the course at the University of Tennessee (UT during the spring 2012 semester and the course topic was online learning environments. The primary research question of this study was: How can the designer/instructor optimize learning experiences for students who are studying about online learning environments in a blended online course relying on both synchronous and asynchronous technologies? I relied on student reflections of course activities during the beginning, middle, and the end of the semester as the primary data source to obtain their insights regarding course experiences. Through the experiences involved in designing and teaching the course and engaging in this study I found that there is room in the instructional technology research community to address strategies for facilitating online synchronous learning that complement asynchronous learning. Synchronous online whole class meetings and well-structured small group meetings can help students feel a stronger sense of connection to their peers and instructor and stay engaged with course activities. In order to provide meaningful learning spaces in synchronous learning environments, the instructor/designer needs to balance the tension between embracing the flexibility that the online space affords to users and designing deliberate structures that will help them take advantage of the flexible space.

  4. Asynchronous event-based binocular stereo matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogister, Paul; Benosman, Ryad; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Lichtsteiner, Patrick; Delbruck, Tobi

    2012-02-01

    We present a novel event-based stereo matching algorithm that exploits the asynchronous visual events from a pair of silicon retinas. Unlike conventional frame-based cameras, recent artificial retinas transmit their outputs as a continuous stream of asynchronous temporal events, in a manner similar to the output cells of the biological retina. Our algorithm uses the timing information carried by this representation in addressing the stereo-matching problem on moving objects. Using the high temporal resolution of the acquired data stream for the dynamic vision sensor, we show that matching on the timing of the visual events provides a new solution to the real-time computation of 3-D objects when combined with geometric constraints using the distance to the epipolar lines. The proposed algorithm is able to filter out incorrect matches and to accurately reconstruct the depth of moving objects despite the low spatial resolution of the sensor. This brief sets up the principles for further event-based vision processing and demonstrates the importance of dynamic information and spike timing in processing asynchronous streams of visual events.

  5. DNS of buoyancy-driven flows and Lagrangian particle tracking in a square cavity at high Rayleigh numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puragliesi, R., E-mail: riccardo.puragliesi@psi.ch [Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Laboratoire d' Ingenierie Numerique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Dehbi, A., E-mail: abdel.dehbi@psi.ch [Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Leriche, E., E-mail: emmanuel.leriche@univ-st-etienne.fr [Universite de Lyon, F-42023 Saint-Etienne, LMFA-UJM St-Etienne, CNRS UMR 5509 Universite de St-Etienne, 23 rue Docteur Paul Michelon, F-42023 Saint-Etienne (France); Soldati, A., E-mail: soldati@uniud.it [Dipartimento di Energetica e Macchine, Universita di Udine, Via delle Scienze 208, IT-33100 Udine (Italy); Deville, M.O., E-mail: michel.deville@epfl.ch [Laboratoire d' Ingenierie Numerique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: > 2D study of micro-size particle depletion driven by chaotic natural convective flows in square domains. > Description of velocity and temperature first and second moments with changing in the Rayleigh number. > Strong decoupling between the turbulent kinetic energy and the dissipation rate. > Particle recirculation sustained by the vertical hot boundary layer. > Deposition mostly induced by gravity, thermophoretic and lift forces are negligible. - Abstract: In this work we investigate numerically particle deposition in the buoyancy driven flow of the differentially heated cavity (DHC). We consider two values of the Rayleigh number (Ra = 10{sup 9}, 10{sup 10}) and three values of the particle diameter (d{sub p} = 15, 25, 35 [{mu}m]). We consider the cavity filled with air and particles with the same density of water {rho}{sub w} = 1000 [kg/m{sup 3}] (aerosol). We use direct numerical simulations (DNS) for the continuous phase, and we solve transient Navier-Stokes and energy transport equations written in an Eulerian framework, under the Boussinesq approximation, for the viscous incompressible Newtonian fluid with constant Prandtl number (Pr = 0.71). First- and second-order statistics are presented for the continuous phase as well as important quantities like turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and temperature variance with the associated production and dissipation fields. The TKE production shows different behaviour at the two Rayleigh numbers. The Lagrangian approach has been chosen for the dispersed phase description. The forces taken into account are drag, gravity, buoyancy, lift and thermophoresis. A first incursion in the sedimentation mechanisms is presented. Current results indicate that the largest contribution to particle deposition is caused by gravitational settling, but a strong recirculating zone, which liftoffs and segregates particles, contributes to decrease settling. Deposition takes place mostly at the bottom wall. The influence of lift

  6. Children's Comprehension of Sentences with Focus Particles and the Role of Cognitive Control: An Eye Tracking Study with German-Learning 4-Year-Olds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhle, Barbara; Fritzsche, Tom; Müller, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Children's interpretations of sentences containing focus particles do not seem adult-like until school age. This study investigates how German 4-year-old children comprehend sentences with the focus particle 'nur' (only) by using different tasks and controlling for the impact of general cognitive abilities on performance measures. Two sentence types with 'only' in either pre-subject or pre-object position were presented. Eye gaze data and verbal responses were collected via the visual world paradigm combined with a sentence-picture verification task. While the eye tracking data revealed an adult-like pattern of focus particle processing, the sentence-picture verification replicated previous findings of poor comprehension, especially for 'only' in pre-subject position. A second study focused on the impact of general cognitive abilities on the outcomes of the verification task. Working memory was related to children's performance in both sentence types whereas inhibitory control was selectively related to the number of errors for sentences with 'only' in pre-subject position. These results suggest that children at the age of 4 years have the linguistic competence to correctly interpret sentences with focus particles, which--depending on specific task demands--may be masked by immature general cognitive abilities.

  7. FPGA Architecture for Multi-Style Asynchronous Logic

    CERN Document Server

    Huot, N; Fesquet, L; Renaudin, M

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel FPGA architecture for implementing various styles of asynchronous logic. The main objective is to break the dependency between the FPGA architecture dedicated to asynchronous logic and the logic style. The innovative aspects of the architecture are described. Moreover the structure is well suited to be rebuilt and adapted to fit with further asynchronous logic evolutions thanks to the architecture genericity. A full-adder was implemented in different styles of logic to show the architecture flexibility.

  8. Designing asynchronous circuits using NULL convention logic (NCL)

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Designing Asynchronous Circuits using NULL Convention Logic (NCL) begins with an introduction to asynchronous (clockless) logic in general, and then focuses on delay-insensitive asynchronous logic design using the NCL paradigm. The book details design of input-complete and observable dual-rail and quad-rail combinational circuits, and then discusses implementation of sequential circuits, which require datapath feedback. Next, throughput optimization techniques are presented, including pipelining, embedding registration, early completion, and NULL cycle reduction. Subsequently, low-power design

  9. EPOS for Coordination of Asynchronous Sensor Webs Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop, integrate, and deploy software-based tools to coordinate asynchronous, distributed missions and optimize observation planning spanning simultaneous...

  10. On the rms errors and dynamic ranges of triple- and quadruple-pulse particle tracking velocimetry (PTV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liuyang; Adrian, Ronald; Gogineni, Sivaram

    2016-11-01

    Multi-pulse PTV extends conventional dual-pulse PTV by fitting a polynomial to particle locations measured from three or four pulses in a burst, aiming at more accurately resolving a particle short-period trajectory. Particle velocity and acceleration are then evaluated at an optimal time minimizing rms errors. Numerical simulations were performed to completely study the behaviors of position, velocity, and acceleration rms errors of triple- and quadruple-pulse PTV in a 4-D space spanned by four dimensionless variables - normalized time, normalized displacement, normalized particle locating noise, and acceleration factor. We compared three analysis methods - 3-pulse with quadratic fitting, 4-pulse with cubic fitting and 4-pulse with quadratic least-square fitting. In addition, generalized definitions of dynamic spatial range (DSR) and dynamic velocity range (DVR) are proposed for multi-pulse analyses. We calculated DSR ratios and DVR ratios between the multi-pulse and 2-pulse under various flow conditions and noise levels. It is found that the DSR and DVR could be improved by up to 100 times and 10 times, respectively, when the particle trajectory is strongly curved, deceleration is pronounced, and particle locations are accurately determined. This work is supported by ONR N00014-14-C-0095.

  11. Magnetic resonance hypointensive signal primarily originates from extracellular iron particles in the long-term tracking of mesenchymal stem cells transplanted in the infarcted myocardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Z

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Zheyong Huang,1,* Chenguang Li,1,* Shan Yang,2 Jianfeng Xu,1 Yunli Shen,3 Xinxing Xie,4 Yuxiang Dai,1 Hao Lu,1 Hui Gong,5 Aijun Sun,1 Juying Qian,1 Junbo Ge1 1Shanghai Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Cardiology, Shanghai East Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Cardiology, Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 5Institute of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: The long-lasting hypointensities in cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR were believed to originate from superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO-engulfed macrophages during long-term stem cell tracking. However, the iron clearance capacity of the ischemic heart was limited. Therefore, we speculated that the extracellular SPIO particles may also be involved in the generation of false-positive signals.Methods and results: Male swine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs were incubated with SPIO for 24 hours, and SPIO labeling had no significant effects on either cell viability or differentiation. In vitro studies showed that magnetic resonance failed to distinguish SPIO from living SPIO-MSCs or dead SPIO-MSCs. Two hours after the establishment of the female swine acute myocardial infarction model, 2×107 male SPIO-labeled MSCs (n=5 or unlabeled MSCs (n=5 were transextracardially injected into the infarcted myocardium at ten distinct sites. In vivo CMR with T2 star weighted imaging-flash-2D sequence revealed a signal void corresponding to the initial SPIO-MSC injection sites. At 6 months after transplantation, CMR identified 32 (64% of the 50 injection sites, where massive Prussian blue-positive iron

  12. Tracking the pathway of diesel exhaust particles from the nose to the brain by X-ray florescence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, Yasuto [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishigyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: y.matsui@health.env.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakai, Nobumitsu [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishigyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: sakai@health.env.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Tsuda, Akira [Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)], E-mail: atsuda@hsph.harvard.edu; Terada, Yasuko [JASRI, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)], E-mail: yterada@spring8.or.jp; Takaoka, Masaki [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishigyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: takaoka@epsehost.env.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Fujimaki, Hidekazu [Division of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan)], E-mail: fujimaki@nies.go.jp; Uchiyama, Iwao [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishigyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: uchiyama@health.env.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2009-08-15

    Studies have shown that exposure to nano-sized particles (< 50 nm) result in their translocation to the central nervous system through the olfactory nerve. Translocation commonly occurs via inhalation, ingestion and skin uptake. Little information is available on the specific pathway of cellular localization of nano-sized particles in the olfactory bulb. The nano-sized particles entrance into the postsynaptics cell is of particular interest because the mitral cell projects to the central nucleus of the amygdala and the piriform cortex. Therefore, our objective in this follow-up study has been to determine whether or not the mitral cells project nano-sized particles to the brain. Nano-sized particles in this study were generated using diesel exhaust. Lab mice were exposed for a period of 4 weeks. We employed synchrotron radiation (SPring-8, Japan) to determine the concentration levels of metal in the olfactory neuron pathway. Metal levels were assayed by mapping, using X-ray fluorescence analysis. The major metal components measured in the filter that collected the inhaled diesel exhaust particles were calcium, copper, iron, nickel and zinc. Our studies reveal an increase in the amount of nano-sized particles in the glomerular layer as well as in the neurons in the olfactory epithelium. Higher levels of nickel and iron were found in the olfactory epithelium's lamina propria mucosae in comparison to that in the control group. Higher levels of iron also were observed in the glomerular layer. Our studies do not clarify the specifics of metal adhesion and detachment. This remains to be one of the key issues requiring further clarification.

  13. High-speed (20  kHz) digital in-line holography for transient particle tracking and sizing in multiphase flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guildenbecher, Daniel R; Cooper, Marcia A; Sojka, Paul E

    2016-04-10

    High-speed (20 kHz) digital in-line holography (DIH) is applied for 3D quantification of the size and velocity of fragments formed from the impact of a single water drop onto a thin film of water and burning aluminum particles from the combustion of a solid rocket propellant. To address the depth-of-focus problem in DIH, a regression-based multiframe tracking algorithm is employed, and out-of-plane experimental displacement accuracy is shown to be improved by an order-of-magnitude. Comparison of the results with previous DIH measurements using low-speed recording shows improved positional accuracy with the added advantage of detailed resolution of transient dynamics from single experimental realizations. The method is shown to be particularly advantageous for quantification of particle mass flow rates. For the investigated particle fields, the mass flows rates, which have been automatically measured from single experimental realizations, are found to be within 8% of the expected values.

  14. On the local acceleration and flow trajectory of jet flows from circular and semi-circular pipes via 3D particle tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Tae; Liberzon, Alex; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2015-11-01

    The distinctive differences between two jet flows that share the same hydraulic diameter dh = 0.01 m and Re ~ 6000, but different (nozzle) shape are explored via 3D Particle Tracking Velocimetry using OpenPTV (http://www.openptv.net). The two jets are formed from circular and semicircular pipes and released in a quiescent water tank of 40 dh height, 40 dh wide, and 200 dh long. The recirculating system is seeded with 100 μm particles, where flow measurements are performed in the intermediate flow field (14.5 < x /dh <18.5) at 550Hz for a total of ~ 30,000 frames. Analysis is focused on the spatial distribution of the local flow acceleration and curvature of the Lagrangian trajectories. The velocity and acceleration of particles are estimated by low-pass filtering their position with a moving cubic spline fitting, while the curvature is obtained from the Frenet-Serret equations. Probability density functions (p.d.f.) of these quantities are obtained at various sub-volumes containing a given streamwise velocity range, and compared between the two cases to evaluate the memory effects in the intermediate flow field.

  15. A Prototype Combination TPC Cherenkov Detector with GEM Readout for Tracking and Particle Identification and its Potential Use at an Electron Ion Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Woody, Craig; Majka, Richard; Phipps, Michael; Purschke, Martin; Smirnov, Nikolai

    2015-01-01

    A prototype detector is being developed which combines the functions of a Time Projection Chamber for charged particle tracking and a Cherenkov detector for particle identification. The TPC consists of a 10x10x10 cm3 drift volume where the charge is drifted to a 10x10 cm2 triple GEM detector. The charge is measured on a readout plane consisting of 2x10 mm2 chevron pads which provide a spatial resolution ~ 100 microns per point in the chevron direction along with dE/dx information. The Cherenkov portion of the detector consists of a second 10x10 cm2 triple GEM with a photosensitive CsI photocathode on the top layer. This detector measures Cherenkov light produced in the drift gas of the TPC by high velocity particles which are above threshold. CF4 or CF4 mixtures will be used as the drift gas which are highly transparent to UV light and can provide excellent efficiency for detecting Cherenkov photons. The drift gas is also used as the operating gas for both GEM detectors. The prototype detector has been constr...

  16. Anomalous diffusion models and their properties: non-stationarity, non-ergodicity, and ageing at the centenary of single particle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, Ralf; Jeon, Jae-Hyung; Cherstvy, Andrey G; Barkai, Eli

    2014-11-28

    Modern microscopic techniques following the stochastic motion of labelled tracer particles have uncovered significant deviations from the laws of Brownian motion in a variety of animate and inanimate systems. Such anomalous diffusion can have different physical origins, which can be identified from careful data analysis. In particular, single particle tracking provides the entire trajectory of the traced particle, which allows one to evaluate different observables to quantify the dynamics of the system under observation. We here provide an extensive overview over different popular anomalous diffusion models and their properties. We pay special attention to their ergodic properties, highlighting the fact that in several of these models the long time averaged mean squared displacement shows a distinct disparity to the regular, ensemble averaged mean squared displacement. In these cases, data obtained from time averages cannot be interpreted by the standard theoretical results for the ensemble averages. Here we therefore provide a comparison of the main properties of the time averaged mean squared displacement and its statistical behaviour in terms of the scatter of the amplitudes between the time averages obtained from different trajectories. We especially demonstrate how anomalous dynamics may be identified for systems, which, on first sight, appear to be Brownian. Moreover, we discuss the ergodicity breaking parameters for the different anomalous stochastic processes and showcase the physical origins for the various behaviours. This Perspective is intended as a guidebook for both experimentalists and theorists working on systems, which exhibit anomalous diffusion.

  17. Globally coupled maps with asynchronous updating

    CERN Document Server

    Abramson, G; Abramson, Guillermo; Zanette, Damian H.

    1998-01-01

    We analyze a system of globally coupled logistic maps with asynchronous updating. We show that its dynamics differs considerably from that of the synchronous case. For growing values of the coupling intensity, an inverse bifurcation cascade replaces the structure of clusters and ordering in the phase diagram. We present numerical simulations and an analytical description based on an effective single-element dynamics affected by internal fluctuations. Both of them show how global coupling is able to suppress the complexity of the single-element evolution. We find that, in contrast to systems with synchronous update, internal fluctuations satisfy the law of large numbers.

  18. Probability-based particle detection that enables threshold-free and robust in vivo single-molecule tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carlas S; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Lidke, Keith A; Rieger, Bernd; Grunwald, David

    2015-11-01

    Single-molecule detection in fluorescence nanoscopy has become a powerful tool in cell biology but can present vexing issues in image analysis, such as limited signal, unspecific background, empirically set thresholds, image filtering, and false-positive detection limiting overall detection efficiency. Here we present a framework in which expert knowledge and parameter tweaking are replaced with a probability-based hypothesis test. Our method delivers robust and threshold-free signal detection with a defined error estimate and improved detection of weaker signals. The probability value has consequences for downstream data analysis, such as weighing a series of detections and corresponding probabilities, Bayesian propagation of probability, or defining metrics in tracking applications. We show that the method outperforms all current approaches, yielding a detection efficiency of >70% and a false-positive detection rate of <5% under conditions down to 17 photons/pixel background and 180 photons/molecule signal, which is beneficial for any kind of photon-limited application. Examples include limited brightness and photostability, phototoxicity in live-cell single-molecule imaging, and use of new labels for nanoscopy. We present simulations, experimental data, and tracking of low-signal mRNAs in yeast cells.

  19. Simulation of DNA Damage in Human Cells from Space Radiation Using a Physical Model of Stochastic Particle Tracks and Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; Hada, Megumi; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a recently developed model, in which chromosomes simulated by NASARTI (NASA Radiation Tracks Image) is combined with nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) in a voxelized space. The model produces the number of DSBs, as a function of dose for high-energy iron, oxygen, and carbon ions, and He ions. The combined model calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The merged computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The merged model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation.

  20. Normalized and asynchronous mirror alignment for Cherenkov telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Baack, D.; Balbo, M.; Bergmann, M.; Biland, A.; Blank, M.; Bretz, T.; Bruegge, K. A.; Buss, J.; Domke, M.; Dorner, D.; Einecke, S.; Hempfling, C.; Hildebrand, D.; Hughes, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mannheim, K.; Mueller, S. A.; Neise, D.; Neronov, A.; Noethe, M.; Overkemping, A.-K.; Paravac, A.; Pauss, F.; Rhode, W.; Shukla, A.; Temme, F.; Thaele, J.; Toscano, S.; Vogler, P.; Walter, R.; Wilbert, A.

    2016-09-01

    Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) need imaging optics with large apertures and high image intensities to map the faint Cherenkov light emitted from cosmic ray air showers onto their image sensors. Segmented reflectors fulfill these needs, and as they are composed from mass production mirror facets they are inexpensive and lightweight. However, as the overall image is a superposition of the individual facet images, alignment is a challenge. Here we present a computer vision based star tracking alignment method, which also works for limited or changing star light visibility. Our method normalizes the mirror facet reflection intensities to become independent of the reference star's intensity or the cloud coverage. Using two CCD cameras, our method records the mirror facet orientations asynchronously of the telescope drive system, and thus makes the method easy to integrate into existing telescopes. It can be combined with remote facet actuation, but does not require one to work. Furthermore, it can reconstruct all individual mirror facet point spread functions without moving any mirror. We present alignment results on the 4 m First Geiger-mode Avalanche Cherenkov Telescope (FACT).

  1. Tracking the pathway of diesel exhaust particles from the nose to the brain by X-ray florescence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yasuto; Sakai, Nobumitsu; Tsuda, Akira; Terada, Yasuko; Takaoka, Masaki; Fujimaki, Hidekazu; Uchiyama, Iwao

    2009-08-01

    Studies have shown that exposure to nano-sized particles (brain. Nano-sized particles in this study were generated using diesel exhaust. Lab mice were exposed for a period of 4 weeks. We employed synchrotron radiation (SPring-8, Japan) to determine the concentration levels of metal in the olfactory neuron pathway. Metal levels were assayed by mapping, using X-ray fluorescence analysis. The major metal components measured in the filter that collected the inhaled diesel exhaust particles were calcium, copper, iron, nickel and zinc. Our studies reveal an increase in the amount of nano-sized particles in the glomerular layer as well as in the neurons in the olfactory epithelium. Higher levels of nickel and iron were found in the olfactory epithelium's lamina propria mucosae in comparison to that in the control group. Higher levels of iron also were observed in the glomerular layer. Our studies do not clarify the specifics of metal adhesion and detachment. This remains to be one of the key issues requiring further clarification.

  2. 量子遗传优化粒子滤波的WSN目标跟踪算法%Wireless Sensor Networks Target Tracking Based on Particle Filtering Optimized by Quantum Genetic Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董跃钧; 李国伟

    2013-01-01

    In order to solve the problem of the diversity of particles degradation, improving wireless sensor network ( WSN) target tracking accuracy, a target tracking method based on particle filter optimized by quantum genetic algorithm is proposed. Quantum genetic algorithm not only increases the diversity of particles to prevent the particle degeneracy phenomenon, and improves the estimation, tracking ability and effectively shortens the calculation time. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm is very good, reduced particle degradation on the target tracking accuracy, improves the WSN target tracking accuracy and real-time tracking, the tracking results is satisfactory.%在无线传感器网络(WSN)目标跟踪应用中,传统粒子滤波算法存在多样性退化问题.为提高WSN目标跟踪精度,提出一种基于量子遗传算法优化粒子滤波的WSN目标跟踪方法.量子遗传算法不仅增加粒子多样性,防止粒子退化现象出现,有效缩短了计算时间且改善粒子跟踪能力.测试结果表明,所提出算法很好地减轻了粒子退化对目标跟踪精度影响,提高了WSN目标跟踪精度和跟踪的实时性,跟踪结果令人满意.

  3. Two Studies Examining Argumentation in Asynchronous Computer Mediated Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Richard; Jones, Sarah; Doherty, John

    2008-01-01

    Asynchronous computer mediated communication (CMC) would seem to be an ideal medium for supporting development in student argumentation. This paper investigates this assumption through two studies. The first study compared asynchronous CMC with face-to-face discussions. The transactional and strategic level of the argumentation (i.e. measures of…

  4. Asynchronous Learning Sources in a High-Tech Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhnik, Dan; Giat, Yahel; Sanderovitch, Yafit

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to characterize learning from asynchronous sources among research and development (R&D) personnel. It aims to examine four aspects of asynchronous source learning: employee preferences regarding self-learning; extent of source usage; employee satisfaction with these sources and the effect of the sources on the…

  5. Localized radio frequency communication using asynchronous transfer mode protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzke, Edward L.; Robertson, Perry J.; Pierson, Lyndon G.

    2007-08-14

    A localized wireless communication system for communication between a plurality of circuit boards, and between electronic components on the circuit boards. Transceivers are located on each circuit board and electronic component. The transceivers communicate with one another over spread spectrum radio frequencies. An asynchronous transfer mode protocol controls communication flow with asynchronous transfer mode switches located on the circuit boards.

  6. ASYNCHRONOUS BYZANTINE AGREEMENT PROTOCOL BASED ON VERIFIABLE SIGNATURE SHARING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Dongyao; Feng Dengguo

    2006-01-01

    An ([n / 3]- 1 )-resilient Asynchronous Byzantine Agreement Protocol (ABAP) that combines verifiable signature sharing and random secret sharing is proposed. The protocol works in the asynchronous network environment and produces Byzantine agreement within a fixed expected number of computational rounds. The correctness of the protocol is proved in theory.

  7. A search for new heavy particles in events with highly ionising, short tracks at the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenz, Teresa

    2016-06-15

    The main focus of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is to search for physics beyond the Standard Model and to measure Standard Model parameters. For both purposes it is essential to determine important performance parameters of the CMS detector. The here presented thesis contributes in a twofold way to the physics program of CMS. In the first part of this thesis, a search for physics beyond the Standard Model is presented. It is motivated by supersymmetric models with nearly mass-degenerate lightest neutralinos and lightest charginos. The small mass gap between chargino and neutralino can lead to long lifetimes of the chargino due to phase space suppression. Thus, the chargino can reach the tracking system before its decay. The here presented search targets chargino lifetimes of cτ ∼ 1-30 cm where most of the charginos decay in the first layers of the tracker. This search aims at increasing the search sensitivity of existing searches with respect to these models in a twofold way: first, the inclusion of tracks down to three measurements in the tracking system, and second, the discrimination against Standard Model background by the energy loss per path length. The search is performed on 19.7 fb{sup -1} of data recorded at the CMS experiment at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. No excess above the Standard Model expectation is found and the supersymmetric parameter space is constrained. The search can exclude supersymmetric models with chargino masses of 100 GeV down to lifetimes of cτ=2 cm and models with masses of 500 GeV down to lifetimes of cτ=70 cm. Current limits are confirmed and improvements of the order of 10-40 GeV in chargino mass are achieved. In the second part of the thesis, a measurement of the jet transverse-momentum resolution at 8 TeV at the CMS experiment is presented. In order to exploit the good energy resolution of the electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS detector, the measurement is performed using γ+jet events. Due

  8. Visualization of the flow profile inside a thinning filament during capillary breakup of a polymer solution via particle image velocimetry (PIV) and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV)

    CERN Document Server

    Gier, S

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the flow profile of a polymer solution in a thinning capillary bridge. Fluorescent tracer particles with a diameter of 3$\\mu$m were used to visualize the flow. The cylindrical shape of the filament introduced strong optical abberations that could be corrected for, and we were able to characterize the flow in filaments with a thickness ranging from 150 to 30 $\\mu$m. In the first regime when the filament was still sufficiently large, we used a PIV algorithm to deduce the flow field. At later stages when the number of particles in the observation plane decreased a PTV algorithm was used. The main two results of our measurements are as follows. First, the flow profile at the formation of the cylindrical filament is highly inhomogeneous and there is only flow in the outer parts of the filament. Second, we find that in most parts of the regime, where the temporal radius of the thinning filament can be fitted with an exponential law the flow indeed is purely extensional.

  9. Registration procedure for spatial correlation of physical energy deposition of particle irradiation and cellular response utilizing cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklas, M.; Zimmermann, F.; Schlegel, J.; Schwager, C.; Debus, J.; Jäkel, O.; Abdollahi, A.; Greilich, S.

    2016-09-01

    The hybrid technology cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD) enables the investigation of radiation-related cellular events along single ion tracks on the subcellular scale in clinical ion beams. The Cell-Fit-HD comprises a fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD, the physical compartment), a device for individual particle detection and a substrate for viable cell-coating, i.e. the biological compartment. To date both compartments have been imaged sequentially in situ by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). This is yet in conflict with a functional read-out of the Cell-Fit-HD utilizing a fast live-cell imaging of the biological compartment with low phototoxicity on greater time scales. The read-out of the biological from the physical compartment was uncoupled. A read-out procedure was developed to image the cell layer by conventional widefield microscopy whereas the FNTD was imaged by CLSM. Point mapping registration of the confocal and widefield imaging data was performed. Non-fluorescent crystal defects (spinels) visible in both read-outs were used as control point pairs. The accuracy achieved was on the sub-µm scale. The read-out procedure by widefield microscopy does not impair the unique ability of spatial correlation by the Cell-Fit-HD. The uncoupling will enlarge the application potential of the hybrid technology significantly. The registration allows for an ultimate correlation of microscopic physical beam parameters and cell kinetics on greater time scales. The method reported herein will be instrumental for the introduction of a novel generation of compact detectors facilitating biodosimetric research towards high-throughput analysis.

  10. Designing Asynchronous Circuits for Low Power: An IFIR Filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Skovby; Sparsø, Jens

    1999-01-01

    by numerically small samples). Apart from the improved RAM design, these measures are only viable in an asynchronous design. The principles and techniques explained in this paper are of a general nature, and they apply to the design of asynchronous low-power digital signal-processing circuits in a broader......This paper addresses the design of asynchronous circuits for low power through an example: a filter bank for a digital hearing aid. The asynchronous design re-implements an existing synchronous circuit which is used in a commercial product. For comparison, both designs have been fabricated...... in the same 0.7 /spl mu/m CMOS technology. When processing typical data (less than 50 dB sound pressure), the asynchronous control and data-path logic, an improved RAM design, and by a mechanism that adapts the number range to the actual need (exploiting the fact that typical audio signals are characterized...

  11. Design and Study on Sliding Mode Extremum Seeking Control of the Chaos Embedded Particle Swarm Optimization for Maximum Power Point Tracking in Wind Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Ho Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a sliding mode extremum seeking control (SMESC of chaos embedded particle swarm optimization (CEPSO Algorithm, applied to the design of maximum power point tracking in wind power systems. Its features are that the control parameters in SMESC are optimized by CEPSO, making it unnecessary to change the output power of different wind turbines, the designed in-repetition rate is reduced, and the system control efficiency is increased. The wind power system control is designed by simulation, in comparison with the traditional wind power control method, and the simulated dynamic response obtained by the SMESC algorithm proposed in this paper is better than the traditional hill-climbing search (HCS and extremum seeking control (ESC algorithms in the transient or steady states, validating the advantages and practicability of the method proposed in this paper.

  12. Energy deposition by a {sup 106}Ru/{sup 106}Rh eye applicator simulated using LEPTS, a low-energy particle track simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, M.C. [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Munoz, A.; Oller, J.C. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avenida Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Williart, A. [Departamento de Fisica de los Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Limao-Vieira, P. [Laboratorio de Colisoes Atomicas e Moleculares, Departamento de Fisica, CEFITEC, FCT-Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Borge, M.J.G.; Tengblad, O. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Huerga, C.; Tellez, M. [Hospital Universitario La Paz, Paseo de la Castellana 261, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Garcia, G., E-mail: g.garcia@iff.csic.es [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de los Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    The present study introduces LEPTS, an event-by-event Monte Carlo programme, for simulating an ophthalmic {sup 106}Ru/{sup 106}Rh applicator relevant in brachytherapy of ocular tumours. The distinctive characteristics of this code are the underlying radiation-matter interaction models that distinguish elastic and several kinds of inelastic collisions, as well as the use of mostly experimental input data. Special emphasis is placed on the treatment of low-energy electrons for generally being responsible for the deposition of a large portion of the total energy imparted to matter. - Highlights: > We present the Monte Carlo code LEPTS, a low-energy particle track simulation. > Carefully selected input data from 10 keV to 1 eV. > Application to an electron emitting Ru-106/Rh-106 plaque used in brachytherapy.

  13. Proposed Method for Estimating Traffic Accident Risk Factors Based on Object Tracking and Behavior Prediction Using Particle Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natori, Youichi; Kawamoto, Kazuhiko; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Hirota, Kaoru

    A traffic accident prediction method using a priori knowledge based on accident data is proposed for safe driving support. Implementation is achieved by an algorithm using particle filtering and fuzzy inference to estimate accident risk factors. With this method, the distance between the host vehicle and a vehicle ahead and their relative velocity and relative acceleration are obtained from the results of particle filtering of driving data and are used as attributes to build the relative driving state space. The attributes are evaluated as likelihoods and then consolidated as a risk level using fuzzy inference. Experimental validation was done using videos of general driving situations obtained with an on-vehicle CCD camera and one simulated accident situation created based on the video data. The results show that high risk levels were calculated with the proposed method in the early stages of the accident situations.

  14. Asynchronicity of facial blood perfusion in migraine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Zaproudina

    Full Text Available Asymmetrical changes in blood perfusion and asynchronous blood supply to head tissues likely contribute to migraine pathophysiology. Imaging was widely used in order to understand hemodynamic variations in migraine. However, mapping of blood pulsations in the face of migraineurs has not been performed so far. We used the Blood Pulsation Imaging (BPI technique, which was recently developed in our group, to establish whether 2D-imaging of blood pulsations parameters can reveal new biomarkers of migraine. BPI characteristics were measured in migraineurs during the attack-free interval and compared to healthy subjects with and without a family history of migraine. We found a novel phenomenon of transverse waves of facial blood perfusion in migraineurs in contrast to healthy subjects who showed synchronous blood delivery to both sides of the face. Moreover, the amplitude of blood pulsations was symmetrically distributed over the face of healthy subjects, but asymmetrically in migraineurs and subjects with a family history of migraine. In the migraine patients we found a remarkable correlation between the side of unilateral headache and the direction of the blood perfusion wave. Our data suggest that migraine is associated with lateralization of blood perfusion and asynchronous blood pulsations in the facial area, which could be due to essential dysfunction of the autonomic vascular control in the face. These findings may further enhance our understanding of migraine pathophysiology and suggest new easily available biomarkers of this pathology.

  15. Asynchronicity of facial blood perfusion in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaproudina, Nina; Teplov, Victor; Nippolainen, Ervin; Lipponen, Jukka A; Kamshilin, Alexei A; Närhi, Matti; Karjalainen, Pasi A; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical changes in blood perfusion and asynchronous blood supply to head tissues likely contribute to migraine pathophysiology. Imaging was widely used in order to understand hemodynamic variations in migraine. However, mapping of blood pulsations in the face of migraineurs has not been performed so far. We used the Blood Pulsation Imaging (BPI) technique, which was recently developed in our group, to establish whether 2D-imaging of blood pulsations parameters can reveal new biomarkers of migraine. BPI characteristics were measured in migraineurs during the attack-free interval and compared to healthy subjects with and without a family history of migraine. We found a novel phenomenon of transverse waves of facial blood perfusion in migraineurs in contrast to healthy subjects who showed synchronous blood delivery to both sides of the face. Moreover, the amplitude of blood pulsations was symmetrically distributed over the face of healthy subjects, but asymmetrically in migraineurs and subjects with a family history of migraine. In the migraine patients we found a remarkable correlation between the side of unilateral headache and the direction of the blood perfusion wave. Our data suggest that migraine is associated with lateralization of blood perfusion and asynchronous blood pulsations in the facial area, which could be due to essential dysfunction of the autonomic vascular control in the face. These findings may further enhance our understanding of migraine pathophysiology and suggest new easily available biomarkers of this pathology.

  16. Controllability of asynchronous Boolean multiplex control networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chao; Wang, Xingyuan; Liu, Hong

    2014-09-01

    In this article, the controllability of asynchronous Boolean multiplex control networks (ABMCNs) is studied. First, the model of Boolean multiplex control networks under Harvey' asynchronous update is presented. By means of semi-tensor product approach, the logical dynamics is converted into linear representation, and a generalized formula of control-depending network transition matrices is achieved. Second, a necessary and sufficient condition is proposed to verify that only control-depending fixed points of ABMCNs can be controlled with probability one. Third, using two types of controls, the controllability of system is studied and formulae are given to show: (a) when an initial state is given, the reachable set at time s under a group of specified controls; (b) the reachable set at time s under arbitrary controls; (c) the specific probability values from a given initial state to destination states. Based on the above formulae, an algorithm to calculate overall reachable states from a specified initial state is presented. Moreover, we also discuss an approach to find the particular control sequence which steers the system between two states with maximum probability. Examples are shown to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  17. Controllability of asynchronous Boolean multiplex control networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chao; Wang, Xingyuan; Liu, Hong

    2014-09-01

    In this article, the controllability of asynchronous Boolean multiplex control networks (ABMCNs) is studied. First, the model of Boolean multiplex control networks under Harvey' asynchronous update is presented. By means of semi-tensor product approach, the logical dynamics is converted into linear representation, and a generalized formula of control-depending network transition matrices is achieved. Second, a necessary and sufficient condition is proposed to verify that only control-depending fixed points of ABMCNs can be controlled with probability one. Third, using two types of controls, the controllability of system is studied and formulae are given to show: (a) when an initial state is given, the reachable set at time s under a group of specified controls; (b) the reachable set at time s under arbitrary controls; (c) the specific probability values from a given initial state to destination states. Based on the above formulae, an algorithm to calculate overall reachable states from a specified initial state is presented. Moreover, we also discuss an approach to find the particular control sequence which steers the system between two states with maximum probability. Examples are shown to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  18. Resynchronization of the Asynchronous Polar CD Ind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Gordon; Patterson, Joseph; de Miguel, Enrique; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Monard, Berto; Bolt, Greg; McCormick, Jennie; Rea, Robert; Allen, William

    2017-04-01

    CD Ind is one of only four confirmed asynchronous polars (APs). APs are strongly magnetic cataclysmic variables of the AM Herculis subclass with the characteristic that their white dwarfs rotate a few percent out of synchronism with their binary orbit. Theory suggests that nova eruptions disrupt previously synchronized states. Following the eruption, the system is expected to rapidly resynchronize over a timescale of centuries. The other three asynchronous polars—V1432 Aql, BY Cam, and V1500 Cyg—have resynchronization time estimates ranging from 100 to more than 3500 years, with all but one being less than 1200 years. We report on the analysis of over 46,000 observations of CD Ind taken between 2007 and 2016, combined with previous observations from 1996, and estimate a CD Ind resynchronization time of 6400 ± 800 years. We also estimate an orbital period of 110.820(1) minutes and a current (2016.4) white dwarf spin period of 109.6564(1) minutes.

  19. Contribution of various microenvironments to the daily personal exposure to ultrafine particles: Personal monitoring coupled with GPS tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekö, Gabriel; Kjeldsen, Birthe Uldahl; Olsen, Yulia; Schipperijn, Jasper; Wierzbicka, Aneta; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela; Toftum, Jørn; Loft, Steffen; Clausen, Geo

    2015-06-01

    Exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) may have adverse health effects. Central monitoring stations do not represent the personal exposure to UFP accurately. Few studies have previously focused on personal exposure to UFP. Sixty non-smoking residents living in Copenhagen, Denmark were asked to carry a backpack equipped with a portable monitor, continuously recording particle number concentrations (PN), in order to measure the real-time individual exposure over a period of ˜48 h. A GPS logger was carried along with the particle monitor and allowed us to estimate the contribution of UFP exposure occurring in various microenvironments (residence, during active and passive transport, other indoor and outdoor environments) to the total daily exposure. On average, the fractional contribution of each microenvironment to the daily integrated personal exposure roughly corresponded to the fractions of the day the subjects spent in each microenvironment. The home environment accounted for 50% of the daily personal exposure. Indoor environments other than home or vehicles contributed with ˜40%. The highest median UFP concentration was obtained during passive transport (vehicles). However, being in transit or outdoors contributed 5% or less to the daily exposure. Additionally, the subjects recorded in a diary the periods when they were at home. With this approach, 66% of the total daily exposure was attributable to the home environment. The subjects spent 28% more time at home according to the diary, compared to the GPS. These results may indicate limitations of using diaries, but also possible inaccuracy and miss-classification in the GPS data.

  20. A novel position and time sensing active pixel sensor with field-assisted electron collection for charged particle tracking and electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Geronimo, G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Instrumentation Division, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Deptuch, G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Instrumentation Division, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Dragone, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Instrumentation Division, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Radeka, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Instrumentation Division, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Rehak, P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Instrumentation Division, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)]. E-mail: rehak@bnl.gov; Castoldi, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. Ingegneria Nucleare, 20133 Milan (Italy); INFN Sez. Milano, 20133 Milan (Italy); Fazzi, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. Ingegneria Nucleare, 20133 Milan (Italy); INFN Sez. Milano, 20133 Milan (Italy); Gatti, E. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. Elettronica e Informazione, 20133 Milan (Italy); INFN Sez. Milano, 20133 Milan (Italy); Guazzoni, C. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. Elettronica e Informazione, 20133 Milan (Italy); INFN Sez. Milano, 20133 Milan (Italy); Rijssenbeek, M. [Physics Department of State University of New York at Stony Brook, NY 11790 (United States); Dulinski, W. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, 23 rue du Loess BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex (France); Besson, A. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, 23 rue du Loess BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex (France); Deveaux, M. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, 23 rue du Loess BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex (France); Winter, M. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, 23 rue du Loess BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex (France)

    2006-11-30

    A new type of active pixel sensors (APSs) to track charged particles for particle physics experiments or to count number of electrons that cross any pixel at the focal plane of electron microscopes is described. The electric field of desirable shape is created inside the active volume of the pixel introducing the drift component in the movement of the signal electrons towards charge collecting electrodes. The electric field results from the flow of {approx}100 mA/cm{sup 2} hole currents within individual pixels of the sensor. The proposed sensor is produced using a standard industrially available complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) process. There are two main advantages of the proposed detectors when compared to the present (February 2005) state-of-the-art, i.e. field-free APS sensors. The first advantage of a field-assisted transport mechanism is the reduction of the charge collection time and of the sharing of the signal electrons between adjacent pixels by diffusion. The second advantage is the freedom to use both kinds of MOS transistors within each pixel of the sensor. Thus, the full functional power of CMOS circuits can be embedded in situ. As an example, 16-bit scalers will be implemented in each pixel of the sensor for electron microscopy. The reduced collection time combined with the state-of-the-art electronics within each pixel provides the most complete information about the position and the timing of incident charged particles for particle physics experiments. Position resolution of new sensors was computationally simulated to be a few microns, that is, the same as the resolution of standard APSs. Moreover, the active depth of the sensor and the associate electronics is less than about 20 {mu}m and a thinned down sensor together with its beryllium backing can have a total thickness of less than 0.1% of one radiation length. The reduction of the thickness of the detector reduces the amount of multiple scattering within the detector. The

  1. Vertical distribution of buoyant Microcystis blooms in a Lagrangian particle tracking model for short-term forecasts in Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, M. D.; Anderson, E. J.; Wynne, T. T.; Stumpf, R. P.; Fanslow, D. L.; Kijanka, K.; Vanderploeg, H. A.; Strickler, J. R.; Davis, T. W.

    2016-07-01

    Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CHABs) are a problem in western Lake Erie, and in eutrophic fresh waters worldwide. Western Lake Erie is a large (3000 km2), shallow (8 m mean depth), freshwater system. CHABs occur from July to October, when stratification is intermittent in response to wind and surface heating or cooling (polymictic). Existing forecast models give the present location and extent of CHABs from satellite imagery, then predict two-dimensional (surface) CHAB movement in response to meteorology. In this study, we simulated vertical distribution of buoyant Microcystis colonies, and 3-D advection, using a Lagrangian particle model forced by currents and turbulent diffusivity from the Finite Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM). We estimated the frequency distribution of Microcystis colony buoyant velocity from measured size distributions and buoyant velocities. We evaluated several random-walk numerical schemes to efficiently minimize particle accumulation artifacts. We selected the Milstein scheme, with linear interpolation of the diffusivity profile in place of cubic splines, and varied the time step at each particle and step based on the curvature of the local diffusivity profile to ensure that the Visser time step criterion was satisfied. Inclusion of vertical mixing with buoyancy significantly improved model skill statistics compared to an advection-only model, and showed greater skill than a persistence forecast through simulation day 6, in a series of 26 hindcast simulations from 2011. The simulations and in situ observations show the importance of subtle thermal structure, typical of a polymictic lake, along with buoyancy in determining vertical and horizontal distribution of Microcystis.

  2. Dynamic micro-organization of P2X7 receptors revealed by PALM based single particle tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Shrivastava, Amulya N.; Rodriguez, Pamela C.; Triller, Antoine; Renner, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-gated P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) are members of the purinergic receptor family that are expressed in several cell types including neurons. A high concentration of ATP is required for the channel opening of P2X7Rs compared to other members of this receptor family. Recent work suggests that ATP binding to members of the P2X receptor family determines the diffusion and localization of these receptors on the plasma membrane of neurons. Here, we employed single particle t...

  3. A search for new heavy particles in events with highly ionising, short tracks at the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, Teresa; Schleper, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The main focus of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is to search for physics beyond the Standard Model and to measure Standard Model parameters. For both purposes it is essential to determine important performance parameters of the CMS detector. The here presented thesis contributes in a twofold way to the physics program of CMS. In the first part of this thesis, a search for physics beyond the Standard Model is presented. It is motivated by supersymmetric models with nearly mass-degenerate lightest neutralinos and lightest charginos. The small mass gap between chargino and neutralino can lead to long lifetimes of the chargino due to phase space suppression. Thus, the chargino can reach the tracking system before its decay. The here presented search targets chargino lifetimes of $\\text{c}\\tau \\approx 1 - 30\\,\\text{cm}$ where most of the charginos decay in the first layers of the tracker. This search aims at increasing the search sensitivity of existing searches with respect to these models...

  4. Analysis of Lagrangian stretching in turbulent channel flow using a database task-parallel particle tracking approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneveau, Charles; Johnson, Perry; Hamilton, Stephen; Burns, Randal

    2016-11-01

    An intrinsic property of turbulent flows is the exponential deformation of fluid elements along Lagrangian paths. The production of enstrophy by vorticity stretching follows from a similar mechanism in the Lagrangian view, though the alignment statistics differ and viscosity prevents unbounded growth. In this paper, the stretching properties of fluid elements and vorticity along Lagrangian paths are studied in a channel flow at Reτ = 1000 and compared with prior, known results from isotropic turbulence. To track Lagrangian paths in a public database containing Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) results, the task-parallel approach previously employed in the isotropic database is extended to the case of flow in a bounded domain. It is shown that above 100 viscous units from the wall, stretching statistics are equal to their isotropic values, in support of the local isotropy hypothesis. Normalized by dissipation rate, the stretching in the buffer layer and below is less efficient due to less favorable alignment statistics. The Cramér function characterizing cumulative Lagrangian stretching statistics shows that overall the channel flow has about half of the stretching per unit dissipation compared with isotropic turbulence. Supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant No. DGE-1232825, and by National Science Foundation Grants CBET-1507469, ACI-1261715, OCI-1244820 and by JHU IDIES.

  5. A test beam setup for the characterization of the Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode technology for particle tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilella, E., E-mail: evilella@el.ub.es [Department of Electronics, University of Barcelona (UB), C/Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Alonso, O. [Department of Electronics, University of Barcelona (UB), C/Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Trenado, J. [Department of Structure and Constituents of Matter, University of Barcelona (UB), C/Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Vila, A.; Casanova, R. [Department of Electronics, University of Barcelona (UB), C/Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Vos, M. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC), C/Catedratico Jose Beltran 2, 46980 Paterna (Spain); Garrido, L. [Department of Structure and Constituents of Matter, University of Barcelona (UB), C/Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Dieguez, A. [Department of Electronics, University of Barcelona (UB), C/Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-12-01

    It is well known that avalanche photodiodes operated in the Geiger mode above the breakdown voltage offer a virtually infinite gain and time accuracy in the picosecond range that can be used for single photon detection. However, their performance in particle detection still remains unexplored. In this contribution, we are going to expose different steps that we have taken in order to prove the efficiency of the Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes in the aforementioned field. In particular, we will present a setup for the characterization of these sensors in a test beam. The expected results of the test beam at DESY and CERN have been simulated with Geant4 and will also be exposed. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A Setup for characterization of the GAPD technology in a test beam is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two test beams at DESY (6 GeV) and CERN (120 GeV) are already planned at current time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A GAPD array has been designed and fabricated to fit the test beam requirements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have prepared a test beam setup to minimize the particle multiscattering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Expected results at DESY and CERN have been simulated with Geant4.

  6. Optimal visual simulation of the self-tracking combustion of the infrared decoy based on the particle system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qi; Duan, Jin; Wang, LiNing; Zhai, Di

    2016-09-01

    The high-efficiency simulation test of military weapons has a very important effect on the high cost of the actual combat test and the very demanding operational efficiency. Especially among the simulative emulation methods of the explosive smoke, the simulation method based on the particle system has generated much attention. In order to further improve the traditional simulative emulation degree of the movement process of the infrared decoy during the real combustion cycle, this paper, adopting the virtual simulation platform of OpenGL and Vega Prime and according to their own radiation characteristics and the aerodynamic characteristics of the infrared decoy, has simulated the dynamic fuzzy characteristics of the infrared decoy during the real combustion cycle by using particle system based on the double depth peeling algorithm and has solved key issues such as the interface, coordinate conversion and the retention and recovery of the Vega Prime's status. The simulation experiment has basically reached the expected improvement purpose, effectively improved the simulation fidelity and provided theoretical support for improving the performance of the infrared decoy.

  7. A test beam set-up for the characterization of the Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode technology for particle tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Vilella, A; Trenado, J; Vila, A; Casanova, R; Vos, M; Garrido, L; Dieguez, A

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that avalanche photodiodes operated in the Geiger mode above the breakdown voltage offer a virtually infinite gain and time accuracy in the picosecond range that can be used for single photon detection. However, their performance in particle detection still remains unexplored. In this contribution, we are going to expose different steps that we have taken in order to prove the efficiency of the Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes in the aforementioned field. In particular, we will present a setup for the characterization of these sensors in a test beam. The expected results of the test beam at DESY and CERN have been simulated with Geant4 and will also be exposed.

  8. A Lagrangian investigation of the small-scale features of turbulent entrainment through particle tracking and direct numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzner, Markus; Liberzon, A.; Nikitin, N.; L?Thi, B.; Kinzelbach, W.; Tsinober, A.

    We report an analysis of small-scale enstrophy = 50. The results are based on the Lagrangian viewpoint with the main focus on flow particle tracers crossing the turbulent/non-turbulent interface. This approach allowed a direct investigation of the key physical processes underlying the entrainment phenomenon and revealed the role of small-scale non-local, inviscid and viscous processes. We found that the entrainment mechanism is initiated by self-amplification of s2 through the combined effect of strain production and pressure--strain interaction. This process is followed by a sharp change of 2. Finally, shortly after the crossing of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface, production and dissipation of both enstrophy and strain reach a balance. The characteristic time scale of the described processes is the Kolmogorov time scale, . Locally, the characteristic velocity of the fluid relative to the turbulent/non-turbulent interface is the Kolmogorov velocity, uη.

  9. Commande adaptive d'une machine asynchrone

    OpenAIRE

    I. Slama-Belkhodja; De Fornel, B.

    1996-01-01

    Cat article décrit une stratégie de commande adaptive indirecte à Placement de Pôles (PP), appliquée à la commande en vitesse d'une machine asynchrone alimentée par un ensemble hacheur-filtre-onduleur de tension. L'algorithme des Moindres Carrés Récursifs (MCR) est utilisé pour l'identification des modèles de comportement type entrées/sorties. Un intérêt particulier est porté à la mise en oeuvre de cet algorithme et à la discussion de ses résultats, tenant compte des erreurs de modélisation e...

  10. Implementation of Universal Asynchronous Receiver and Transmitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payata Srikanth Yadav

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Universal Asynchronous Receiver Transmitter (UART is the serial communication protocol that is used for data exchange between computer & peripherals. UART is a low velocity, short-distance, low-cost protocol. UART includes three modules which are received, the baud rate generator and transmitter. The UART design with Very High Description Language can be integrated into the Field Programmable Gate Array to achieve stable data transmission and to make system reliable and compact. In the result and simulation part, this project will focus on check the receive data with error free & baud rate generation at different frequencies. Before synthesizing of UART a baud rate generator is incorporated into the system. We use the frequency divider which sets itself to required frequency for the functionality at lower frequency. All modules are designed using VERILOG and implemented on Xilinx Suite development board.

  11. Asynchronous Parallel Evolutionary Algorithms for Constrained Optimizations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Recently Guo Tao proposed a stochastic search algorithm in his PhD thesis for solving function op-timization problems. He combined the subspace search method (a general multi-parent recombination strategy) with the population hill-climbing method. The former keeps a global search for overall situation,and the latter keeps the convergence of the algorithm. Guo's algorithm has many advantages ,such as the sim-plicity of its structure ,the higher accuracy of its results, the wide range of its applications ,and the robustness of its use. In this paper a preliminary theoretical analysis of the algorithm is given and some numerical experiments has been done by using Guo's algorithm for demonstrating the theoretical results. Three asynchronous paral-lel evolutionary algorithms with different granularities for MIMD machines are designed by parallelizing Guo's Algorithm.

  12. Scalable asynchronous execution of cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folino, Gianluigi; Giordano, Andrea; Mastroianni, Carlo

    2016-10-01

    The performance and scalability of cellular automata, when executed on parallel/distributed machines, are limited by the necessity of synchronizing all the nodes at each time step, i.e., a node can execute only after the execution of the previous step at all the other nodes. However, these synchronization requirements can be relaxed: a node can execute one step after synchronizing only with the adjacent nodes. In this fashion, different nodes can execute different time steps. This can be a notable advantageous in many novel and increasingly popular applications of cellular automata, such as smart city applications, simulation of natural phenomena, etc., in which the execution times can be different and variable, due to the heterogeneity of machines and/or data and/or executed functions. Indeed, a longer execution time at a node does not slow down the execution at all the other nodes but only at the neighboring nodes. This is particularly advantageous when the nodes that act as bottlenecks vary during the application execution. The goal of the paper is to analyze the benefits that can be achieved with the described asynchronous implementation of cellular automata, when compared to the classical all-to-all synchronization pattern. The performance and scalability have been evaluated through a Petri net model, as this model is very useful to represent the synchronization barrier among nodes. We examined the usual case in which the territory is partitioned into a number of regions, and the computation associated with a region is assigned to a computing node. We considered both the cases of mono-dimensional and two-dimensional partitioning. The results show that the advantage obtained through the asynchronous execution, when compared to the all-to-all synchronous approach is notable, and it can be as large as 90% in terms of speedup.

  13. Evaluating the Efficiency of Asynchronous Systems with FASE

    CERN Document Server

    Buti, Federico; Corradini, Flavio; Di Berardini, Maria Rita; Vogler, Walter

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present FASE (Faster Asynchronous Systems Evaluation), a tool for evaluating the worst-case efficiency of asynchronous systems. The tool is based on some well-established results in the setting of a timed process algebra (PAFAS: a Process Algebra for Faster Asynchronous Systems). To show the applicability of FASE to concrete meaningful examples, we consider three implementations of a bounded buffer and use FASE to automatically evaluate their worst-case efficiency. We finally contrast our results with previous ones where the efficiency of the same implementations has already been considered.

  14. Magnetic Particle / Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In-Vitro MPI-Guided Real Time Catheter Tracking and 4D Angioplasty Using a Road Map and Blood Pool Tracer Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Salamon

    Full Text Available In-vitro evaluation of the feasibility of 4D real time tracking of endovascular devices and stenosis treatment with a magnetic particle imaging (MPI / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI road map approach and an MPI-guided approach using a blood pool tracer.A guide wire and angioplasty-catheter were labeled with a thin layer of magnetic lacquer. For real time MPI a custom made software framework was developed. A stenotic vessel phantom filled with saline or superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MM4 was equipped with bimodal fiducial markers for co-registration in preclinical 7T MRI and MPI. In-vitro angioplasty was performed inflating the balloon with saline or MM4. MPI data were acquired using a field of view of 37.3×37.3×18.6 mm3 and a frame rate of 46 volumes/sec. Analysis of the magnetic lacquer-marks on the devices were performed with electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry and micro-computed tomography.Magnetic marks allowed for MPI/MRI guidance of interventional devices. Bimodal fiducial markers enable MPI/MRI image fusion for MRI based roadmapping. MRI roadmapping and the blood pool tracer approach facilitate MPI real time monitoring of in-vitro angioplasty. Successful angioplasty was verified with MPI and MRI. Magnetic marks consist of micrometer sized ferromagnetic plates mainly composed of iron and iron oxide.4D real time MP imaging, tracking and guiding of endovascular instruments and in-vitro angioplasty is feasible. In addition to an approach that requires a blood pool tracer, MRI based roadmapping might emerge as a promising tool for radiation free 4D MPI-guided interventions.

  15. Free Thermal Convection Inside a Stably Stratified FLUID:A Study by Means of Three Dimensional Particle Tracking Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenedese, A.; Dore, V.; Moroni, M.

    2009-05-01

    experimental technique is required. The equipment employed is suitable for simultaneously providing temperatures inside the domain through thermocouples and Lagrangian particle trajectories obtained by using a 3D-PTV technique. The combined use of a vertical array of thermocouples and 3D-PTV allows, simultaneously, profiling temperature and the 3D velocity components. A properly calibrated stereoscopic system of three monochrome 25 fps CCD cameras has been employed. The combination of image and object space based information is applied to establish the spatio-temporal correspondences between particle position of consecutive time steps, resulting in the reconstruction of 3D trajectories. The vertical dimension of convective structures is associated to the mixing layer height, detected both employing temperature data and statistics of the velocity field. On the other hand, the spatial correlation of the velocity field, providing the plume horizontal dimension, allows the horizontal extension of the mixing region to be determined. This information coupled to the knowledge of the mixing layer height allows the spatial extension of the convective region to be fully described.

  16. Stand-Alone and Hybrid Positioning Using Asynchronous Pseudolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Gioia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available global navigation satellite system (GNSS receivers are usually unable to achieve satisfactory performance in difficult environments, such as open-pit mines, urban canyons and indoors. Pseudolites have the potential to extend GNSS usage and significantly improve receiver performance in such environments by providing additional navigation signals. This also applies to asynchronous pseudolite systems, where different pseudolites operate in an independent way. Asynchronous pseudolite systems require, however, dedicated strategies in order to properly integrate GNSS and pseudolite measurements. In this paper, several asynchronous pseudolite/GNSS integration strategies are considered: loosely- and tightly-coupled approaches are developed and combined with pseudolite proximity and receiver signal strength (RSS-based positioning. The performance of the approaches proposed has been tested in different scenarios, including static and kinematic conditions. The tests performed demonstrate that the methods developed are effective techniques for integrating heterogeneous measurements from different sources, such as asynchronous pseudolites and GNSS.

  17. Optimum Multiuser Detector for Multipath Slow Fading Asynchronous CDMA Channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangZhaocheng; YangZhixing; 等

    1995-01-01

    A structure of optimum multiuser detector for asynchronous CDMA in multipath slow fading channels is derived and the significant performance gain over the conventional RAKE receiv-er is shown by simulation.

  18. A proof system for asynchronously communicating deterministic processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, F.S.; van Hulst, M.

    1994-01-01

    We introduce in this paper new communication and synchronization constructs which allow deterministic processes, communicating asynchronously via unbounded FIFO buffers, to cope with an indeterminate environment. We develop for the resulting parallel programming language, which subsumes deterministi

  19. TCDQ-TCT retraction and losses during asynchronous beam dump

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, Chiara; Quaranta, Elena; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The protection provided by the TCDQs in case of asynchronous beam dump depends strongly on their correct setup. They have to respect the strict hierarchy of the full collimation system and shield the tertiary collimators in the experimental regions. This MD aimed at performing asynchronous beam dump tests with different configurations, in order to assess the minimum allowed retraction between TCTs and TCDQs and, as a consequence, on the The protection provided by the TCDQs in case of asynchronous beam dump depends strongly on their correct setup. They have to respect the strict hierarchy of the full collimation system and shield the tertiary collimators in the experimental regions. This MD aimed at performing asynchronous beam dump tests with different configurations, in order to assess the minimum allowed retraction between TCTs and TCDQs and, as a consequence, on the β* reach.

  20. Novel Asynchronous Wrapper and Its Application to GALS Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuang Shengxian; Peng Anjin; Lars Wanhammar

    2006-01-01

    An asynchronous wrapper with novel handshake circuits for data communication in globally asynchronous locally synchronous (GALS) systems is proposed. The handshake circuits include two communication ports and a local clock generator. Two approaches for the implementation of communication ports are presented, one with pure standard cells and the others with Müller-C elements. The detailed design methodology for GALS systems is given and the circuits are validated with VHDL and circuits simulation in standard CMOS technology.

  1. Experimental 3D Asynchronous Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    EXPERIMENTAL 3D ASYNCHRONOUS FIELD PROGRAMMABLE GATE ARRAY ( FPGA ) CORNELL UNIVERSITY MARCH 2015 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC...From - To) OCT 2011 – OCT 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE EXPERIMENTAL 3D ASYNCHRONOUS FIELD PROGRAMMABLE GATE ARRAY ( FPGA ) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...in collaboration with Albany’s College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 3D Technology, vertical interconnects, AFPGA, FPGA

  2. MODIFIED MICROPIPLINE ARCHITECTURE FOR SYNTHESIZABLE ASYNCHRONOUS FIR FILTER DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basel Halak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of asynchronous design approaches to construct digital signal processing (DSP systems is a rapidly growing research area driven by a wide range of emerging energy constrained applications such as wireless sensor network, portable medical devices and brain implants. The asynchronous design techniques allow the construction of systems which are samples driven, which means they only dissipate dynamic energy when there processing data and idle otherwise. This inherent advantage of asynchronous design over conventional synchronous circuits allows them to be energy efficient. However the implementation flow of asynchronous systems is still difficult due to its lack of compatibility with industrystandard synchronous design tools and modelling languages. This paper devises a novel asynchronous design for a finite impulse response (FIR filter, an essential building block of DSP systems, which is synthesizable and suitable for implementation using conventional synchronous systems design flow and tools. The proposed design is based on a modified version of the micropipline architecture and it is constructed using four phase bundled data protocol. A hardware prototype of the proposed filter has been developed on an FPGA, and systematically verified. The results prove correct functionality of the novel design and a superior performance compared to a synchronous FIR implementation. The findings of this work will allow a wider adoption of asynchronous circuits by DSP designers to harness their energy and performance benefits.

  3. Commande adaptive d'une machine asynchrone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slama-Belkhodja, I.; de Fornel, B.

    1996-06-01

    The paper deals with an indirect self-tuning speed control for an induction motor supplied by a chopper-filter-inverter system. Input/Output models are identified with the recursive least squares algorithm and the controller adaptation is based on a pole assignement strategy. Emphasis is put on the evaluation of the parameter identification in order to avoid instabilities because of disturbances or insufficient excitations. This is especially of importance when the adaptive control is carried out in closed loop systems and without additional test signals. Simulation results show the improvement of the dynamic responses and the robustness against load variations or parameters variations (rotor resistance, inertia). Cat article décrit une stratégie de commande adaptive indirecte à Placement de Pôles (PP), appliquée à la commande en vitesse d'une machine asynchrone alimentée par un ensemble hacheur-filtre-onduleur de tension. L'algorithme des Moindres Carrés Récursifs (MCR) est utilisé pour l'identification des modèles de comportement type entrées/sorties. Un intérêt particulier est porté à la mise en oeuvre de cet algorithme et à la discussion de ses résultats, tenant compte des erreurs de modélisation et de la nature peu riche en excitations des entrées du processus. Différents régimes transitoires ont été simulés pour apprécier l'apport de cette association (MCR-PP) : démarrages et inversion des sens de rotation, à vide et en charges, applications d'échelons de couple résistant, variations paramétriques. Les résultats permettent d'illustrer, tant au niveau des performances que de la robustesse, l'apport d'une telle commande adaptive pour des entraînements électriques avec une machine asynchrone.

  4. Intracellular dynamics and fate of polystyrene nanoparticles in A549 Lung epithelial cells monitored by image (cross-) correlation spectroscopy and single particle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, Sarah; Penjweini, Rozhin; Smisdom, Nick; Notelaers, Kristof; Nelissen, Inge; Hooyberghs, Jef; Ameloot, Marcel

    2015-10-01

    Novel insights in nanoparticle (NP) uptake routes of cells, their intracellular trafficking and subcellular targeting can be obtained through the investigation of their temporal and spatial behavior. In this work, we present the application of image (cross-) correlation spectroscopy (IC(C)S) and single particle tracking (SPT) to monitor the intracellular dynamics of polystyrene (PS) NPs in the human lung carcinoma A549 cell line. The ensemble kinetic behavior of NPs inside the cell was characterized by temporal and spatiotemporal image correlation spectroscopy (TICS and STICS). Moreover, a more direct interpretation of the diffusion and flow detected in the NP motion was obtained by SPT by monitoring individual NPs. Both techniques demonstrate that the PS NP transport in A549 cells is mainly dependent on microtubule-assisted transport. By applying spatiotemporal image cross-correlation spectroscopy (STICCS), the correlated motions of NPs with the early endosomes, late endosomes and lysosomes are identified. PS NPs were equally distributed among the endolysosomal compartment during the time interval of the experiments. The cotransport of the NPs with the lysosomes is significantly larger compared to the other cell organelles. In the present study we show that the complementarity of ICS-based techniques and SPT enables a consistent elaborate model of the complex behavior of NPs inside biological systems.

  5. MODPATH-LGR; documentation of a computer program for particle tracking in shared-node locally refined grids by using MODFLOW-LGR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Jesse E.; Hanson, R.T.; Mehl, Steffen W.; Hill, Mary C.

    2011-01-01

    The computer program described in this report, MODPATH-LGR, is designed to allow simulation of particle tracking in locally refined grids. The locally refined grids are simulated by using MODFLOW-LGR, which is based on MODFLOW-2005, the three-dimensional groundwater-flow model published by the U.S. Geological Survey. The documentation includes brief descriptions of the methods used and detailed descriptions of the required input files and how the output files are typically used. The code for this model is available for downloading from the World Wide Web from a U.S. Geological Survey software repository. The repository is accessible from the U.S. Geological Survey Water Resources Information Web page at http://water.usgs.gov/software/ground_water.html. The performance of the MODPATH-LGR program has been tested in a variety of applications. Future applications, however, might reveal errors that were not detected in the test simulations. Users are requested to notify the U.S. Geological Survey of any errors found in this document or the computer program by using the email address available on the Web site. Updates might occasionally be made to this document and to the MODPATH-LGR program, and users should check the Web site periodically.

  6. Final Technical Report on STTR Project DE-FG02-06ER86281 Particle Tracking in Matter-Dominated Beam Lines (G4beamline)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muons, Inc.

    2011-05-19

    This project has been for software development of the G4beamline [1] program, which is a particle-tracking simulation program based on the Geant4 toolkit [2], optimized for beam lines. This program can perform more realistic simulations than most alternatives, while being significantly easier to use by physicists. This project has fostered the general acceptance of G4beamline within the muon community, and has assisted in expanding its role outside that community. During this project, the G4beamline user community has grown from about a half-dozen users to more than 200 users around the world. This project also validated our business decision to keep G4beamline an open-source program, judging that an STTR project would provide more development resources than would marketing and selling the program. G4beamline is freely available to the physics community, and has been well validated against experiments and other codes within its domain. Muons, Inc. continues to support and develop the program, and a major part of the company's continued success and growth is directly related to our expertise in applying this program to interesting applications.

  7. Development of new techniques for three dimensional tracking of charged particles for possible applications in the search for neutrinoless double beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipenko, Mykhaylo

    2015-02-23

    Since its prediction in 1937, several generations of experimental physicists have tried to confirm the neutrinoless double beta decay. An observation would have fundamental consequences for the understanding of particle physics. However, the experimental requirements are very demanding wherefore the race is still ongoing between many collaborations. The main challenge in this field is the reduction of background. Any decay in the natural decay chain is orders of magnitude more likely than the neutrinoless double beta decay. The half-life of this decay is known to be longer than 10{sup 25} years. Therefore, any detector will see a vast majority of events which are not signal events. Such events have to be identified and rejected. Primarily, this is done by measuring the kinetic energy of the decay products but also the trajectory of the particles resulting from the decay can be used for identification. Within the scope of this thesis different techniques were developed and tested which can be used to record such trajectories. It was shown that trajectories can be used indeed to identify and distinguish different types of events. The hybrid semiconductor detector named Timepix was used to record two-dimensional tracks of Compton-scattered electrons and electron-positron pairs in a 1mm thick cadmium-telluride sensor layer. Artificial neural networks could successfully be employed to distinguish both event types. Furthermore, a ''proof-of-principle'' experiment was successfully performed where three dimensional trajectories of high energetic electrons could be reconstructed from data recorded with a similar Timepix detector. Also, a new concept, where three dimensional trajectories of ionizing particles are imaged by scintillation light, was developed and successfully tested. In a ''proof-of-principle'' experiment three dimensional trajectories of high energetic electrons through a scintillator were reconstructed from data taken

  8. Rapid, generalized adaptation to asynchronous audiovisual speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Burg, Erik; Goodbourn, Patrick T

    2015-04-01

    The brain is adaptive. The speed of propagation through air, and of low-level sensory processing, differs markedly between auditory and visual stimuli; yet the brain can adapt to compensate for the resulting cross-modal delays. Studies investigating temporal recalibration to audiovisual speech have used prolonged adaptation procedures, suggesting that adaptation is sluggish. Here, we show that adaptation to asynchronous audiovisual speech occurs rapidly. Participants viewed a brief clip of an actor pronouncing a single syllable. The voice was either advanced or delayed relative to the corresponding lip movements, and participants were asked to make a synchrony judgement. Although we did not use an explicit adaptation procedure, we demonstrate rapid recalibration based on a single audiovisual event. We find that the point of subjective simultaneity on each trial is highly contingent upon the modality order of the preceding trial. We find compelling evidence that rapid recalibration generalizes across different stimuli, and different actors. Finally, we demonstrate that rapid recalibration occurs even when auditory and visual events clearly belong to different actors. These results suggest that rapid temporal recalibration to audiovisual speech is primarily mediated by basic temporal factors, rather than higher-order factors such as perceived simultaneity and source identity.

  9. Asynchronous Rate Chaos in Spiking Neuronal Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harish, Omri; Hansel, David

    2015-01-01

    The brain exhibits temporally complex patterns of activity with features similar to those of chaotic systems. Theoretical studies over the last twenty years have described various computational advantages for such regimes in neuronal systems. Nevertheless, it still remains unclear whether chaos requires specific cellular properties or network architectures, or whether it is a generic property of neuronal circuits. We investigate the dynamics of networks of excitatory-inhibitory (EI) spiking neurons with random sparse connectivity operating in the regime of balance of excitation and inhibition. Combining Dynamical Mean-Field Theory with numerical simulations, we show that chaotic, asynchronous firing rate fluctuations emerge generically for sufficiently strong synapses. Two different mechanisms can lead to these chaotic fluctuations. One mechanism relies on slow I-I inhibition which gives rise to slow subthreshold voltage and rate fluctuations. The decorrelation time of these fluctuations is proportional to the time constant of the inhibition. The second mechanism relies on the recurrent E-I-E feedback loop. It requires slow excitation but the inhibition can be fast. In the corresponding dynamical regime all neurons exhibit rate fluctuations on the time scale of the excitation. Another feature of this regime is that the population-averaged firing rate is substantially smaller in the excitatory population than in the inhibitory population. This is not necessarily the case in the I-I mechanism. Finally, we discuss the neurophysiological and computational significance of our results. PMID:26230679

  10. Managing Asynchronous Data in ATLAS's Concurrent Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Leggett, Charles; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In order to be able to make effective use of emerging hardware, where the amount of memory available to any CPU is rapidly decreasing as the core count continues to rise, ATLAS has begun a migration to a concurrent, multi-threaded software framework, known as AthenaMT. Significant progress has been made in implementing AthenaMT - we can currently run realistic Geant4 simulations on massively concurrent machines. the migration of realistic prototypes of reconstruction workflows is more difficult, given the large amounts of legacy code and the complexity and challenges of reconstruction software. These types of workflows, however, are the types that will most benefit from the memory reduction features of a multi-threaded framework. One of the challenges that we will report on in this paper is the re-design and implementation of several key asynchronous technologies whose behaviour is radically different in a concurrent environment than in a serial one, namely the management of Conditions data and the Detector D...

  11. First measurement of the cross section for the production of hadrons with high transverse momenta at COMPASS, and developments for particle tracking in high-rate experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeppner, Christian C.

    2012-01-31

    In this dissertation, the first measurement of the luminosity for data from the COMPASS experiment is presented. The result is obtained by the direct measurement of the beam flux and the correction of all inefficiencies and dead times of the measurement. The normalized data set consists of about 30% of the COMPASS data recorded in 2004 and the effective integrated luminosity is 142.4 pb{sup -1} {+-} 10%, which is verified by the determination of the structure function F{sub 2} of the nucleon and its comparison to literature. Based on this result, the cross section for the quasi-real photoproduction of charged hadrons with high transverse momenta in muon-deuteron scattering at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=17.4 GeV is determined. The measurement of a hadron-production cross section in a thick solid-state target is quite challenging in comparison to collider measurements of such processes. The issue of secondary hadronic interactions in the target material is carefully studied and taken into account. The cross section is presented in bins of the pseudo-rapidity of the hadrons and separated by hadron charge. The results are discussed and compared to recent calculations of next-to-leading order perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics. This comparison serves as a test of the applicability of such calculations to the production of hadrons with high transverse momenta at COMPASS energies. The second part of this dissertation describes new developments for charged-particle tracking in high-rate experiments. The design of a new type of Time Projection Chamber (TPC), which employs GEM foils instead of proportional wires for gas amplification, is discussed. This technology opens up the possibility of using TPCs in experiments with trigger rates beyond about 1 kHz. Several important contributions to the GEM-TPC project are presented. Furthermore, a generic framework for track fitting in high-energy physics, called GENFIT, is introduced. This novel software is being used

  12. ASCERTAINMENT OF THE EQUIVALENT CIRCUIT PARAMETERS OF THE ASYNCHRONOUS MACHINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Safaryan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers experimental and analytical determination of the asynchronous machine equivalent-circuit parameters with application of the reference data. Transient processes investigation of the asynchronous machines necessitates the equivalent circuit parameters (resistance impedance, inductances and coefficient of the stator-rotor contours mutual inductance that help form the transitory-process mathematical simulation model. The reference books do not provide those parameters; they instead give the rated ones (active power, voltage, slide, coefficient of performance and capacity coefficient as well as the ratio of starting and nominal currents and torques. The noted studies on the asynchronous machine equivalent-circuits parametrization fail to solve the problems ad finem or solve them with admissions. The paper presents experimental and analytical determinations of the asynchronous machine equivalent-circuit parameters: the experimental one based on the results of two measurements and the analytical one where the problem boils down to solving a system of nonlineal algebraic equations. The authors investigate the equivalent asynchronous machine input-resistance properties and adduce the dependence curvatures of the input-resistances on the slide. They present a symbolic model for analytical parameterization of the asynchronous machine equivalent-circuit that represents a system of nonlineal equations and requires one of the rotor-parameters arbitrary assignment. The article demonstrates that for the asynchronous machine equivalent-circuit experimental parameterization the measures are to be conducted of the stator-circuit voltage, current and active power with two different slides and arbitrary assignment of one of the rotor parameters. The paper substantiates the fact that additional measurement does not discard the rotor-parameter choice arbitrariness. The authors establish that in motoring mode there is a critical slide by which the

  13. Probing the defect nanostructure of helium and proton tracks in LiF:Mg,Ti using optical absorption: Implications to track structure theory calculations of heavy charged particle relative efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliyahu, I., E-mail: ilan.eliyahu@gmail.com [Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beersheva 84105 (Israel); Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Horowitz, Y.S. [Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beersheva 84105 (Israel); Oster, L. [Sami Shamoon College of Engineering, Beersheva 84100 (Israel); Weissman, L.; Kreisel, A. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Girshevitz, O. [Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan 5290002, Israel. (Israel); Marino, S. [Radiological Research Accelerator Facility, Irvington, New York (United States); Druzhyna, S. [Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beersheva 84105 (Israel); Biderman, S. [Nuclear Research Center Negev, Beersheva (Israel); Mardor, I. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne 81800 (Israel)

    2015-04-15

    A major objective of track structure theory (TST) is the calculation of heavy charged particle (HCP) induced effects. Previous calculations have been based exclusively on the radiation action/dose response of the released secondary electrons during the HCP slowing down. The validity of this presumption is investigated herein using optical absorption (OA) measurements on LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) samples following irradiation with 1.4 MeV protons and 4 MeV He ions at levels of fluence from 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2} to 2 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −2}. The major bands in the OA spectrum are the 5.08 eV (F band), 4.77 eV, 5.45 eV and the 4.0 eV band (associated with the trapping structure leading to composite peak 5 in the thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve). The maximum intensity of composite peak 5 occurs at a temperature of ∼200 °C in the glow curve and is the glow peak used for most dosimetric applications. The TST calculations use experimentally measured OA dose response following low ionization density (LID) {sup 60}Co photon irradiation over the dose-range 10–10{sup 5} Gy for the simulation of the radiation action of the HCP induced secondary electron spectrum. Following proton and He irradiation the saturation levels of concentration for the F band and the 4.77 eV band are approximately one order of magnitude greater than following LID irradiation indicating enhanced HCP creation of the relevant defects. Relative HCP OA efficiencies, η{sub HCP}, are calculated by TST and are compared with experimentally measured values, η{sub m}, at levels of fluence from 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2} to 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2} where the response is linear due to negligible track overlap. For the F band, values of η{sub m}/η{sub HCP} = 2.0 and 2.6 for the He ions and protons respectively arise from the neglect of enhanced Fluorine vacancy/F center creation by the HCPs in the TST calculations. It is demonstrated that kinetic analysis simulating LID F band dose response with enhanced

  14. Atomic Particle Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1970-01-01

    This booklet tells how scientists observe the particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerges from an atomic nucleus. The equipment used falls into two general categories: counters which count each particle as it passes by, and track detectors, which make a photographic record of the particle's track.

  15. Analysis and Modeling of Wangqing Oil Shale Drying Characteristics in a Novel Fluidized Bed Dryer with Asynchronous Rotating Air Distributor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Ning; Zhou Yunlong; Miao Yanan

    2016-01-01

    In order to replace the conventional distributor, a novel asynchronous rotating air distributor, which can optimize the drying ability of lfuidized bed and strengthen the drying performance of oil shale particles, is creatively designed in this study. The rotating speed of the asynchronous rotating air distributor with an embedded center disk and an encircling disk is regulated to achieve the different air supply conditions. The impacts of different drying conditions on the drying characteristic of Wangqing oil shale particles are studied with the help of electronic scales. The dynamics of experimental data is analyzed with 9 common drying models. The results indicate that the particles distribution in lfuidized bed can be improved and the drying time can be reduced by decreasing the rotating speed of the embedded center disk and increasing the rotating speed of the encircling disk. The drying process of oil shale particles involves a rising drying rate period, a constant drying rate period and a falling drying rate period. Regulating the air distributor rotating speed reasonably will accelerate the shift of particles from the rising drying rate period to the falling drying rate period directly. The two-term model ifts properly the oil shale particles drying simulation among 9 drying models at different air supply conditions. Yet the air absorbed in the particles’ pores is diffused along with the moisture evaporation, and a small amount of moisture remains on the wall of lfuidized bed in each experiment, thus, the values of drying simulation are less than the experimental values.

  16. IHadoop: Asynchronous iterations for MapReduce

    KAUST Repository

    Elnikety, Eslam Mohamed Ibrahim

    2011-11-01

    MapReduce is a distributed programming frame-work designed to ease the development of scalable data-intensive applications for large clusters of commodity machines. Most machine learning and data mining applications involve iterative computations over large datasets, such as the Web hyperlink structures and social network graphs. Yet, the MapReduce model does not efficiently support this important class of applications. The architecture of MapReduce, most critically its dataflow techniques and task scheduling, is completely unaware of the nature of iterative applications; tasks are scheduled according to a policy that optimizes the execution for a single iteration which wastes bandwidth, I/O, and CPU cycles when compared with an optimal execution for a consecutive set of iterations. This work presents iHadoop, a modified MapReduce model, and an associated implementation, optimized for iterative computations. The iHadoop model schedules iterations asynchronously. It connects the output of one iteration to the next, allowing both to process their data concurrently. iHadoop\\'s task scheduler exploits inter-iteration data locality by scheduling tasks that exhibit a producer/consumer relation on the same physical machine allowing a fast local data transfer. For those iterative applications that require satisfying certain criteria before termination, iHadoop runs the check concurrently during the execution of the subsequent iteration to further reduce the application\\'s latency. This paper also describes our implementation of the iHadoop model, and evaluates its performance against Hadoop, the widely used open source implementation of MapReduce. Experiments using different data analysis applications over real-world and synthetic datasets show that iHadoop performs better than Hadoop for iterative algorithms, reducing execution time of iterative applications by 25% on average. Furthermore, integrating iHadoop with HaLoop, a variant Hadoop implementation that caches

  17. Track Reconstruction Performance in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Azzurri, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    The expected performance of track reconstruction with LHC events using the CMS silicon tracker is presented. Track finding and fitting is accomplished with Kalman Filter techniques that achieve efficiencies above 99\\% on single muons with $p_T >$1~GeV/c. Difficulties arise in the context of standard LHC events with a high density of charged particles, where the rate of fake combinatorial tracks is very large for low $p_T$ tracks, and nuclear interactions in the tracker material reduce the tracking efficiency for charged hadrons. Recent improvements with the CMS track reconstruction now allow to efficiently reconstruct charged tracks with $p_T$ down to few hundred MeV/c and as few as three crossed layers, with a very small fake fraction, by making use of an optimal rejection of fake tracks in conjunction with an iterative tracking procedure.

  18. DYNAMIC REGIMES OF ASYNCHRONOUS MOTORS WITH CONCATENATED CAPACITORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Malyar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Development of mathematical model for calculation of starting modes of asynchronous motor connected in series with capacitors. Method. Mathematical modeling of dynamic modes of asynchronous motors with lateral capacitor compensation of reactive power. Results. The calculation algorithm and results of mathematic modeling of processes during starting modes of asynchronous motor feeding from the network through capacitors connected in series are presented. It is shown that for some values of capacitance the self-excitation processes and subharmonic oscillations can appear. Scientific novelty. Mathematic modeling and research of processes in asynchronous motor under its feeding through capacitors is carried out for the first time. The calculation algorithm is based on the mathematical model of asynchronous motor with high level of adequacy, which takes into account the magnetic core saturation and the current displacement in limbs of the rotor. Practical implication. Developed mathematical model makes it possible to investigate the possibility of self-excitation modes appearing in condition of their feeding from line with lateral compensation of reactance in order to avoid the negative effects typical for them.

  19. Asynchronous reference frame agreement in a quantum network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Tanvirul; Wehner, Stephanie

    2016-03-01

    An efficient implementation of many multiparty protocols for quantum networks requires that all the nodes in the network share a common reference frame. Establishing such a reference frame from scratch is especially challenging in an asynchronous network where network links might have arbitrary delays and the nodes do not share synchronised clocks. In this work, we study the problem of establishing a common reference frame in an asynchronous network of n nodes of which at most t are affected by arbitrary unknown error, and the identities of the faulty nodes are not known. We present a protocol that allows all the correctly functioning nodes to agree on a common reference frame as long as the network graph is complete and not more than t\\lt n/4 nodes are faulty. As the protocol is asynchronous, it can be used with some assumptions to synchronise clocks over a network. Also, the protocol has the appealing property that it allows any existing two-node asynchronous protocol for reference frame agreement to be lifted to a robust protocol for an asynchronous quantum network.

  20. Current Trends in High-Level Synthesis of Asynchronous Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparsø, Jens

    2009-01-01

    .g. the Haste/TiDE tool from Handshake Solutions or the Balsa tool from the University of Manchester. The aims are to add highlevel synthesis capabilities to these tools and to extend the tools such that a wider range of (higher speed) micro-architectures can be generated. Another branch of research takes...... a conventional synchronous circuit as the starting point, and then adds some form of handshake-based flow-control. One approach keeps the global clock and implements discrete-time asynchronous operation. Another approach substitutes the clocked registers by asynchronous handshake-registers, thus creating truly...... continuous time asynchronous circuits that operate without a clock. The perspective here is that the substitution/conversion is done as the final step in an otherwise conventional synchronous design flow....