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Sample records for asymptomatic urinary tract

  1. Asymptomatic urinary tract infection among pregnant women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A good proportion of pregnant women patronize traditional birth homes in Nigeria for ante-natal care. This study aimed at determining the prevalence, risk factors, and susceptibility profile of etiologic agents of urinary tract infection among ante-natal attendees in a traditional birth home in Benin City, Nigeria.

  2. Resistance of Uropathogens in Asymptomatic Urinary Tract Infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Worldwide the surveillance of antimicrobial resistance among urinary tract pathogens is useful to determine the important trend and geographical variation of uropathogens. The study evaluated the pathogen frequency, resistance rate and pattern among HIV-infected Nigerians. Midstream urine samples taken for culture ...

  3. [The frequencies of both urinary tract infection and asymptomatic bacteriuria increase with age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2013-11-18

    Urinary tract infection is common in the elderly, and the prevalence increases with age due to pathological changes in the urinary tract and common use of bladder catheter. The increasing incidence of asymptomatic bacteriuria, together with fewer classical dysuria symptoms complicates the diagnosis in the elderly. There is also an increasing prevalence of complicated urinary tract infection including septicaemia. Due to an increase in antibiotic resistance urine culture should precede the choice of antibiotic treatment. Treatment duration is seven days; 14 days in patients with pyelonephritis. Adverse effects are notably higher in the elderly.

  4. Molecular Analysis of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Escherichia coli Strain VR50 Reveals Adaptation to the Urinary Tract by Gene Acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beatson, Scott A.; Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Totsika, Makrina

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common infectious diseases of humans, with Escherichia coli responsible for >80% of all cases. One extreme of UTI is asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU), which occurs as an asymptomatic carrier state that resembles commensalism. To understand the evol......Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common infectious diseases of humans, with Escherichia coli responsible for >80% of all cases. One extreme of UTI is asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU), which occurs as an asymptomatic carrier state that resembles commensalism. To understand...

  5. Global gene expression profiling of the asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strain 83972 in the human urinary tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Klemm, Per

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are an important health problem worldwide, with many million cases each year. Escherichia coli is the most common organism causing UTIs in humans. The asymptomatic bacteriuria E. coli strain 83972 is an excellent colonizer of the human urinary tract, where it causes...... long-term bladder colonization. The strain has been used for prophylactic purposes in patients prone to more severe and recurrent UTIs. For this study, we used DNA microarrays to monitor the expression profile of strain 83972 in the human urinary tract. Significant differences in expression levels were...

  6. Albumin excretion rate is not affected by asymptomatic urinary tract infection: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Cristina; Simó, Rafael

    2004-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate whether asymptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI) significantly influences the level of albumin excretion rate (AER) in diabetic patients. We screened prospectively for UTI and AER in 765 type 2 diabetic subjects. AER was determined before and after antimicrobial therapy in those patients in whom an asymptomatic UTI was diagnosed (n = 59). To interpret the clinical significance of AER changes, the coefficient of biological variation (CVb) of the AER (CVb-AER) was assessed in a control group of type 2 diabetic patients without UTI (n = 56). AER did not change after antimicrobial treatment either in the whole group of patients with UTI (pre: 13.8 microg/min [0.1-195] vs. post: 8.5 microg/min [0.1-185]; P = 0.1) or in those patients in whom the infection was eradicated (pre: 11.7 microg/min [0.1-195] vs. post: 7.1 microg/min [0.1-185]; NS). The CVb-AER was 64% in the control group and was inversely correlated with AER (r = -0.44; P = 0.001). The decrease of AER after antimicrobial therapy (55%) did not exceed the biological variation of AER (64%). Finally, UTI did not significantly influence the classification of diabetic patients as normo- or microalbuminuric. Asymptomatic UTI does not increase AER in type 2 diabetic patients. Therefore, our results suggest that testing for UTI is not necessary when AER is measured in diabetic patients.

  7. Biofilm formation by asymptomatic and virulent urinary tract infectious Escherichia coli strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Ferrieres, Lionel; Klemm, Per

    2007-01-01

    have investigated the biofilm-forming capacity on abiotic surfaces of groups of ABU strains and UPEC strains in human urine. We found that there is a strong bias; ABU strains were significantly better biofilm formers than UPEC strains. Our data suggest that biofilm formation in urinary tract infectious...

  8. Asymptomatic urinary tract infection among pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic of Hawassa Referral Hospital, Southern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, Endale; Teshome, Million; Merid, Yared; Kibret, Belayhun; Shimelis, Techalew

    2014-03-17

    Untreated asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) during pregnancy may cause serious complications including pyelonephritis and delivery of premature or low-birth-weight infants. However, little is known about asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy in Ethiopia. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria, bacterial agents, and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern in pregnant women attending antenatal clinic of the Hawassa Teaching and Referral Hospital. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a total of 244 pregnant women with no sign and symptom of urinary tract infection from March 2012 to September 2012. Clean catch mid-stream urine samples were collected from all study participants using sterile containers. Urine samples were cultured using standard bacteriological methods. Identification of suspected colonies and antibiotic sensitivity testing were done. Out of 244 pregnant women, 46(18.8%) were positive for asymptomatic bacteriuria (Colony Forming Unit ≥ 105/mL). There was no difference in prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria with respect to age (p = 0.07) and trimester (p = 0.27).The most frequently isolated bacteria were coagulase negative Staphylococcus (32.6%), followed by Escherichia coli (26.1%), and Staphylococcus auerus (13%). The susceptibility rate of bacterial isolate was highest for norfloxacin (64.7%) and lowest for ampicillin (17.6%). The high prevalence of ASB in pregnant women warrant the need to screen all pregnant women and treat those infected with appropriate antimicrobial regimens in order to reduce its complications.

  9. Genetic variation of the human urinary tract innate immune response and asymptomatic bacteriuria in women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R Hawn

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Although several studies suggest that genetic factors are associated with human UTI susceptibility, the role of DNA variation in regulating early in vivo urine inflammatory responses has not been fully examined. We examined whether candidate gene polymorphisms were associated with altered urine inflammatory profiles in asymptomatic women with or without bacteriuria.We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB in 1,261 asymptomatic women ages 18-49 years originally enrolled as participants in a population-based case-control study of recurrent UTI and pyelonephritis. We genotyped polymorphisms in CXCR1, CXCR2, TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, and TIRAP in women with and without ASB. We collected urine samples and measured levels of uropathogenic bacteria, neutrophils, and chemokines.Polymorphism TLR2_G2258A, a variant associated with decreased lipopeptide-induced signaling, was associated with increased ASB risk (odds ratio 3.44, 95%CI; 1.65-7.17. Three CXCR1 polymorphisms were associated with ASB caused by gram-positive organisms. ASB was associated with urinary CXCL-8 levels, but not CXCL-5, CXCL-6, or sICAM-1 (P< or =0.0001. Urinary levels of CXCL-8 and CXCL-6, but not ICAM-1, were associated with higher neutrophil levels (P< or =0.0001. In addition, polymorphism CXCR1_G827C was associated with increased CXCL-8 levels in women with ASB (P = 0.004.TLR2 and CXCR1 polymorphisms were associated with ASB and a CXCR1 variant was associated with urine CXCL-8 levels. These results suggest that genetic factors are associated with early in vivo human bladder immune responses prior to the development of symptomatic UTIs.

  10. Predictive value of Escherichia coli susceptibility in strains causing asymptomatic bacteriuria for women with recurrent symptomatic urinary tract infections receiving prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerepoot, M. A. J.; den Heijer, C. D. J.; Penders, J.; Prins, J. M.; Stobberingh, E. E.; Geerlings, S. E.

    2012-01-01

    A significant proportion of women develop a recurrence following an initial urinary tract infection (UTI). In women with recurrent UTI, the predictive value of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) for the development of a subsequent UTI has not yet been established and it is not known whether information

  11. Chronic asymptomatic pyuria precedes overt urinary tract infection and deterioration of renal function in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang Jin Ho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urinary tract infection (UTI occurs in 30%-50% of individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. However, the clinical relevance of asymptomatic pyuria in ADPKD patients remains unknown. Methods We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 256 ADPKD patients who registered to the ADPKD clinic at Seoul National University Hospital from Aug 1999 to Aug 2010. We defined the asymptomatic pyuria as more than 5-9 white blood cells in high-power field with no related symptoms or signs of overt UTI. Patients were categorized into 2 groups depending on its duration and frequency: Group A included non-pyuria and transient pyuria patients; Group B included recurrent and persistent pyuria patients. The association between asymptomatic pyuria and both the development of overt UTI and the deterioration of renal function were examined. Results With a mean follow-up duration of 65.3 months, 176 (68.8% out of 256 patients experienced 681 episodes of asymptomatic pyuria and 50 episodes of UTI. The annual incidence of asymptomatic pyuria was 0.492 episodes/patient/year. The patients in group B showed female predominance (58.5% vs. 42.0%, P=0.01 and experienced an upper UTI more frequently (hazard ratio: 4.612, 95% confidence interval: 1.735-12.258; P=0.002, adjusted for gender and hypertension. The annual change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (ΔeGFR was significantly larger in magnitude in group B than in group A (-2.7��4.56 vs. -1.17±5.8, respectively; P=0.01. Age and Group B found to be the independent variables for ΔeGFR and developing end-stage renal disease (16.0% vs. 4.3%, respectively; P=0.001. Conclusions Chronic asymptomatic pyuria may increase the risk of developing overt UTI and may contribute to declining renal function in ADPKD.

  12. Prevalence and association of asymptomatic prostatitis with urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The link between prostatitis and urinary tract infections (UTIs) has been acknowledged but documented incidences of asymptomatic prostatitis remains a course for concern. This study therefore, assesses the prevalence and association of asymptomatic prostatitis with urinary tract infections among apparently healthy men in ...

  13. Molecular Analysis of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Escherichia coli Strain VR50 Reveals Adaptation to the Urinary Tract by Gene Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Totsika, Makrina; Forde, Brian M.; Watts, Rebecca E.; Mabbett, Amanda N.; Szubert, Jan M.; Sarkar, Sohinee; Phan, Minh-Duy; Peters, Kate M.; Petty, Nicola K.; Alikhan, Nabil-Fareed; Sullivan, Mitchell J.; Gawthorne, Jayde A.; Stanton-Cook, Mitchell; Nhu, Nguyen Thi Khanh; Chong, Teik Min; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan; Hancock, Viktoria; Ussery, David W.; Ulett, Glen C.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common infectious diseases of humans, with Escherichia coli responsible for >80% of all cases. One extreme of UTI is asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU), which occurs as an asymptomatic carrier state that resembles commensalism. To understand the evolution and molecular mechanisms that underpin ABU, the genome of the ABU E. coli strain VR50 was sequenced. Analysis of the complete genome indicated that it most resembles E. coli K-12, with the addition of a 94-kb genomic island (GI-VR50-pheV), eight prophages, and multiple plasmids. GI-VR50-pheV has a mosaic structure and contains genes encoding a number of UTI-associated virulence factors, namely, Afa (afimbrial adhesin), two autotransporter proteins (Ag43 and Sat), and aerobactin. We demonstrated that the presence of this island in VR50 confers its ability to colonize the murine bladder, as a VR50 mutant with GI-VR50-pheV deleted was attenuated in a mouse model of UTI in vivo. We established that Afa is the island-encoded factor responsible for this phenotype using two independent deletion (Afa operon and AfaE adhesin) mutants. E. coli VR50afa and VR50afaE displayed significantly decreased ability to adhere to human bladder epithelial cells. In the mouse model of UTI, VR50afa and VR50afaE displayed reduced bladder colonization compared to wild-type VR50, similar to the colonization level of the GI-VR50-pheV mutant. Our study suggests that E. coli VR50 is a commensal-like strain that has acquired fitness factors that facilitate colonization of the human bladder. PMID:25667270

  14. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is an independent predictor of urinary tract infections in an ambulatory cirrhotic population: a prospective evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Carrie; Kumar, Deepali; Carbonneau, Michelle; Keough, Adam; Ma, Mang; Tandon, Puneeta

    2014-07-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is a risk factor for urinary tract infections (UTIs) in many patients without liver disease. It remains unclear whether a diagnosis of ASB in an outpatient with cirrhosis could be utilized to predict the subsequent development of a UTI. We undertook this study to determine the prevalence and incidence of ASB in an outpatient population and its association with UTI. We prospectively evaluated 108 adult outpatients with cirrhosis over a 6-month period. Monthly midstream urines (MSU) were performed to detect the occurrence of UTI and ASB (culture of ≥10(8) CFU/L of a urinary pathogen in the absence of UTI symptoms). Of 108 patients enrolled, 99 completed at least one MSU, for a total of 489 MSUs. Total follow-up was 44 person-years. The incidences of ASB and UTI were 181 and 250 per 1000 person-years, respectively. The prevalences of ASB and UTI on the first MSU were 5 and 1%, respectively. In total, 8% of patients developed an episode of ASB and 11% developed a UTI during the study period. Univariate predictors of UTI were female gender, primary biliary cirrhosis, number of previous UTIs and preceding ASB. Preceding ASB was the only independent predictor of UTI on multivariate analysis, with an odds ratio of 6.2 (1.1-34.3), P = 0.04. Cirrhotic patients have higher rates of ASB and UTI than reported in the general population. ASB is an independent predictor of UTI. Further studies are necessary to determine whether routine screening and antimicrobial treatment of ASB is warranted. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    SBA National Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections and Catheterization in Children with Neurogenic Bladder ... To protect the kidneys from damage – By preventing urinary tract infections (UTI) – By identifying and treating vesicoureteral remux ( ...

  16. Genital and Urinary Tract Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... conditions > Genital and urinary tract defects Genital and urinary tract defects E-mail to a friend Please fill ... and extra fluids. What problems can genital and urinary tract defects cause? Genital and urinary tract defects affect ...

  17. Urinary Tract Infections (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weather Sports 5 Ideas for Eco-Friendly Celebrations Urinary Tract Infections KidsHealth > For Teens > Urinary Tract Infections Print ... especially girls — visit a doctor. What Is a Urinary Tract Infection? A bacterial urinary tract infection (UTI) is ...

  18. Urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2013-07-01

    The urinary tract is a common source for life-threatening infections. Most patients with sepsis or septic shock from a urinary source have complicated urinary tract infection. This article explains the epidemiology, risk factors, and treatment. Effective management, appropriate collection of microbiology specimens, prompt initiation of antimicrobial therapy, source control, and supportive therapy are described. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Misconceptions of Spanish general practitioners' attitudes toward the management of urinary tract infections and asymptomatic bacteriuria: an internet-based questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llor, C; Moragas, A; Hernández, S; Crispi, S; Cots, J M

    2017-10-01

    The diagnosis and management of urinary tract infections (UTI) vary widely across countries and practices. The objective of this study was to gain insight into general practitioners' (GP) perceptions on the current management of UTIs and asymptomatic bacteriuria in Spain. Cross-sectional, internet-based questionnaire study answered from July to September 2013. GPs affiliated with the largest Spanish scientific society in primary care (Sociedad Española de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria) were invited to participate in the study. They were asked about the tests ordered in both uncomplicated and complicated UTIs and about the management in three clinical scenarios, depicting a 50-year woman with: 1. An uncomplicated UTI, 2. A complicated UTI, and 3. An asymptomatic bacteriuria. The questionnaire was completed by 1,239 GPs (6.7%). Urine cultures were reportedly requested by 26.3% of the GPs in uncomplicated UTIs and by 71.8% of the cases corresponding to the complicated UTIs whereas it was declared that dipsticks were the preferred tests in only uncomplicated UTIs (38.2%). A total of 22% and 13.2% of the GPs stated that they would withhold antibiotic therapy in patients with low-count and high-count asymptomatic bacteriuria, respectively. GPs have important misconceptions as to the indications for ordering urine cultures and in interpreting the definitions of common UTIs and treating UTIs and asymptomatic bacteriuria. The unnecessary use of antibiotics in patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria is considerable in Spain.

  20. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... urinary tract. Let's find out more. What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract is actually a ... kidneys and make you very sick. How Do I Know if I Have a UTI? You may ...

  1. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... urinary tract infection, or UTI, you're probably thinking about peeing quite a lot. Why? Because it ... Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract is actually a system made up of these main parts: two kidneys ...

  2. Kidneys and Urinary Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treated with steroids. Urinary tract infection (UTI) is infection of a part of or throughout the urinary tract, usually caused by bacteria. UTIs are most commonly caused by intestinal bacteria, such as E. coli , that are normally found in feces. These bacteria ...

  3. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract is actually a system made up of these main parts: two kidneys ... ON THIS TOPIC Chronic Kidney Diseases Movie: Urinary System Your Urinary System Bedwetting Contact Us Print Resources ...

  4. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Skating Living With Stepparents Be a Green Kid Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth > For Kids > Urinary Tract Infections ( ... Let's find out more. What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract is actually a system made ...

  5. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... The Flu: Stop the Spread Your Heart & Circulatory System Taking Care of Your Teeth Bad Breath Urinary ... Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract is actually a system made up of these main parts: two kidneys ...

  6. Pediatric urinary tract infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blickman, J.G.

    1991-02-06

    Acute urinary tract infection (UTI) is an important cause of morbidity in children and may be complicated by congenital urinary tract abnormalities of a functional or anatomic nature which, predispose to recurrent UTI's that in turn may lead to renal failure and hypertension. Early radiologic and ultrasonographic investigations may reveal these anatomic anomalies in particular because the urinary tract, specifically in children, is not readily accessible to adequate clinical examinations Excretory urography (EU) has been considered as the 'gold standard' of upper urinary tract visualization, while the voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) was thought to be the preferential method of imaging of the lower urinary tract. Recently, major technical advances have altered this commonly accepted diagnostic workup. Although ultrasonography, radio-nuclide scanning and urodynamics have become important contributors to the understanding of pathophysiology of UTI's their value and place in assessment of the sequence of imaging has not been comprehensively studied. This thesis deals about the optimization of the choice and the order of the different imaging techniques used in the evaluation of children, younger than six year with UTI. (author). 243 refs.; 23 figs.; 8 tabs.

  7. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... UTIs) Print A A A What's in this article? What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? Urinary Tract ... The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart. ...

  8. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... UTIs) Print A A A What's in this article? What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? Urinary Tract ... serious because it can damage the kidneys and make you very sick. How Do I Know if ...

  9. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading What to Do in a Fire CPR: ... Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract is actually a system made up of these main parts: two kidneys ...

  10. Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on urinary tract infections is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are…

  11. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading About Recipes for Kids With Diabetes Can ... in your urinary tract. Let's find out more. What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract ...

  12. Urinary Tract and How It Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reflux The Urinary Tract & How It Works The Urinary Tract & How It Works What is the urinary tract and how does it work? The urinary tract ... the bladder through the urethra. Why is the urinary tract important? The urinary tract is important because it ...

  13. Upper urinary tract tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gandrup, Karen L; Nordling, Jørgen; Balslev, Ingegerd

    2014-01-01

    of invasive and non-invasive tumors in ureter and renal pelvis based on the enhancement measured with Hounsfield Units. PURPOSE: To examine the value of CTU using split-bolus technique to distinguish non-invasive from invasive urothelial carcinomas in the upper urinary tract. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients......, but the examination is useful to diagnose a tumor in the renal pelvis and the ureter....

  14. Urinary Tract Infections in the Older Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2016-08-01

    Urinary infection is the most common bacterial infection in elderly populations. The high prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in both men and women is benign and should not be treated. A diagnosis of symptomatic infection for elderly residents of long-term care facilities without catheters requires localizing genitourinary findings. Symptomatic urinary infection is overdiagnosed in elderly bacteriuric persons with nonlocalizing clinical presentations, with substantial inappropriate antimicrobial use. Residents with chronic indwelling catheters experience increased morbidity from urinary tract infection. Antimicrobial therapy is selected based on clinical presentation, patient tolerance, and urine culture results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Asymptomatic urinary tract infection among pregnant women receiving ante-natal care in a traditional birth home in Benin City, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladeinde, Bankole H; Omoregie, Richard; Oladeinde, Oladapo B

    2015-01-01

    A good proportion of pregnant women patronize traditional birth homes in Nigeria for ante-natal care. This study aimed at determining the prevalence, risk factors, and susceptibility profile of etiologic agents of urinary tract infection among ante-natal attendees in a traditional birth home in Benin City, Nigeria. Clean-catch urine was collected from 220 pregnant women attending a traditional birth home in Benin City, Nigeria. Urine samples were processed, and microbial isolates identified using standard bacteriological procedures. A cross-sectional study design was used. The prevalence of urinary tract infection among pregnant women was 55.0%, significantly affected by parity and gestational age (Pinfection was recorded among 13(10.7%) pregnant women, and was unaffected by maternal age, parity, gravidity, gestational age, and educational status. Irrespective of trimester Escherichia coli was the most prevalent etiologic agent of urinary tract infection, followed by Staphylococcus aureus. The flouroquinolones were the most effective antibacterial agents, while Sulphamethoxazole-trimetoprim, Amoxicillin, Nalidixic acid, and Nitrofurantoin had poor activity against uropathogens isolated. The prevalence of urinary tract infection among pregnant women was 55.0% and significantly affected by gestational age and parity. The most prevalent etiologic agent observed was Escherichia coli. With the exception of the flouroquinolones, aminoglycoside, and Amoxicillin-cluvanate, the activity of other antibiotics used on uropathogens were poor. Health education of the traditional birth attendant and her clients by relevant intervention agencies is strongly advocated.

  16. [Urinary tract infections in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Klaus Friedrich; Klempien, Ingo; Wiedemann, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Acute infection of the urinary tract is one of the most commonly encountered bacterial infections in the frail elderly population and is responsible for substantial morbidity and recurrent infections with antibiotic resistance. Although generally considered to be self-limiting without treatment or easily treated with a short antibiotic regime, urinary tract infections (UTIs) often have a dramatic history, associated with incomplete resolution and frequent recurrence. The biological complexity of the infections combined with a dramatic rise in antibiotic-resistant pathogens highlight the need for an anticipating strategy for therapy necessary for a rapid recovery. The first crucial step is the classification in asymptomatic bacteriuria or complicated pyelonephritis, on which the decision for the intensity of treatment and diagnostic effort is based. For the selection of empiric antibiotic therapy, knowledge about the predominant uropathogens as well as local resistance patterns is important. In this manner, most urinary tract infections in the elderly can be treated without greater expense.

  17. Urinary schistosomiasis and concomitant urinary tract pathogens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study on the prevalence of urinary schistosomiasis and concomitant urinary tract pathogens was carried out between August and December, 1998, among school children in Ibadan North Local Government Area. Terminal urine sample collected from only pupils in classes 3 to 6 for the study were analyzed accordingly ...

  18. Urinary Tract Infections in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Taskesen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTI are frequent conditions in children. Untreated urinary tract infections can lead to serious kidney problems that could threaten the life of the child. Therefore, early detection and treatment of urinary tract infection is important. In older children, urinary tract infections may cause obvious symptoms such as stomach ache and disuria. In infants and young children, UTIs may be harder to detect because of less specific symptoms. Recurrences are common in children with urinary abnormalities such as neurogenic bladder, vesicourethral reflux or those with very poor toilet and hygiene habits. This article reviews the diagnostic approach and presents the current data related to the roles of radiologic imaging, surgical correction and antibiotic prophylaxis of UTIs in children. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2009; 18(2.000: 57-69

  19. Nosocomial urinary tract infections: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovelli, Valerio; Gaziev, Gabriele; Topazio, Luca; Bove, Pierluigi; Vespasiani, Giuseppe; Finazzi Agrò, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infections are a common complication in healthcare systems worldwide. A review of the literature was performed in June 2014 using the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) database, through either PubMed or Ovid as a search engine, to identify publications regarding nosocomial urinary tract infections (NUTIs) definition, epidemiology, etiology and treatment.According to current definitions, more than 30% of nosocomial infections are urinary tract infections (UTIs). A UTI is defined 'nosocomial' (NUTI) when it is acquired in any healthcare institution or, more generally, when it is related to patient management. The origin of nosocomial bacteria is endogenous (the patient's flora) in two thirds of the cases. Patients with indwelling urinary catheters, those undergoing urological surgery and manipulations, long-stay elderly male patients and patients with debilitating diseases are at high risk of developing NUTIs. All bacterial NUTIs should be treated, whether the patient is harboring a urinary catheter or not. The length of treatment depends on the infection site. There is abundance of important guidance which should be considered to reduce the risk of NUTIs (hand disinfection with instant hand sanitizer, wearing non-sterile gloves permanently, isolation of infected or colonized catheterized patients). Patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria can generally be treated initially with catheter removal or catheter exchange, and do not necessarily need antimicrobial therapy. Symptomatic patients should receive antibiotic therapy. Resistance of urinary pathogens to common antibiotics is currently a topic of concern.

  20. Complicated Urinary Tract Infection in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LE Nicolle

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Complicated urinary tract infection occurs in individuals with functional or structural abnormalities of the genitourinary tract.OBJECTIVE: To review current knowledge relevant to complicated urinary tract infection, and to provide evidence-based recommendations for management.METHODS: The literature was reviewed through a PubMed search, and additional articles were identified by journal reference review. A draft guideline was prepared and critically reviewed by members of the Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada Guidelines Committee, with modifications incorporated following the review.RESULTS: Many urological abnormalities may be associated with complicated urinary infection. There is a wide spectrum of potential infecting organisms, and isolated bacteria tend to be more resistant to antimicrobial therapy. Morbidity and infection outcomes in subjects with complicated urinary infection are principally determined by the underlying abnormality rather than the infection. Principles of management include uniform collection of a urine specimen for culture before antimicrobial therapy, characterization of the underlying genitourinary abnormality, and nontreatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria except before an invasive genitourinary procedure. The antimicrobial regimen is determined by clinical presentation, patient tolerance, renal function and known or anticipated infecting organisms. If the underlying abnormality contributing to the urinary infection cannot be corrected, then early post-treatment recurrence of infection is anticipated.CONCLUSIONS: The management of complicated urinary infection is individualized depending on patient variables and the infecting organism. Further clinical investigations are necessary to assist in determining optimal antimicrobial regimens.

  1. The Genetics of Urinary Tract Infections and the Innate Defense of the Kidney and Urinary tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambite, Ines; Rydstrom, Gustav; Schwaderer, Andrew L.; Hains, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The urinary tract is a sterile organ system. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common and often serious infections. Research has focused on uropathogen, environment, and host factors leading to UTI pathogenesis. A growing body of evidence exists implicating genetic factors that can contribute to UTI risks. In this review, we highlight genetic variations in aspects of the innate immune system critical to the host response to uropathogens. This overview includes genetic variations in pattern recognition receptor molecules, chemokines/cytokines, and neutrophil activation. We also comprehensively cover murine knockout models of UTI, genetic variations involved in renal scarring as a result of ascending UTIs, and asymptomatic bacteriuria. PMID:27617139

  2. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ahhh! That feels better. continue Urinary Tract Troubles Girls are more likely than boys to get a ... away properly, they stay on your skin. In girls, this means they can grow near the opening ...

  3. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Kids for Teens Search Kids Home How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Recipes & Cooking ... that leads from your bladder out of your body. Ahhh! That feels better. continue Urinary Tract Troubles ...

  4. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if I Have a UTI? You may notice signs of a urinary tract infection before anyone else ... it smell bad when you pee? These are signs that you might have a bladder infection, so ...

  5. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For Kids / ...

  6. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Living With Stepparents Be a Green Kid Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth > For Kids > ... If they aren't wiped away properly, they stay on your skin. In girls, this means they ...

  7. Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is an infection in any part of your urinary system — your kidneys, ureters, bladder and urethra. Most infections ... begin to multiply in the bladder. Although the urinary system is designed to keep out such microscopic invaders, ...

  8. Catheter associated urinary tract infections

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection attributed to the use of an indwelling urinary catheter is one of the most common infections acquired by patients in health care facilities. As biofilm ultimately develops on all of these devices, the major determinant for development of bacteriuria is duration of catheterization. While the proportion of bacteriuric subjects who develop symptomatic infection is low, the high frequency of use of indwelling urinary catheters means there is a substantial burden attributab...

  9. Triggered Urine Interleukin-6 Correlates to Severity of Symptoms in Nonfebrile Lower Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundén, Fredrik; Butler, Daniel; Wullt, Björn

    2017-07-01

    Objective diagnosis of symptomatic urinary tract infections in patients prone to asymptomatic bacteriuria is compromised by local host responses that are already present and the positive urine culture. We investigated interleukin-6 as a biomarker for nonfebrile urinary tract infection severity and diagnostic thresholds for interleukin-6 and 8, and neutrophils to differentiate between asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract infection. Patients with residual urine and neurogenic bladders due to spinal lesions included in a long-term Escherichia coli 83972 asymptomatic bacteriuria inoculation trial were monitored for 2 years. Symptom scoring and urine sampling to estimate interleukin-6 and 8, and neutrophils were performed regularly monthly and at urinary tract infection episodes. Patients were followed in the complete study for a mean of 19 months (range 10 to 27) and those with asymptomatic bacteriuria with E. coli 83972 were followed a mean of 11 months (range 4 to 19). A total of 37 nonfebrile urinary tract infection episodes with complete data on interleukin-6 and 8, neutrophils and symptom scoring were documented. Interleukin-6 was the only marker that persistently increased during urinary tract infection compared to asymptomatic bacteriuria in pooled and paired intra-individual comparisons (p urinary tract infection symptoms (p urinary tract infection episodes. However, in urinary tract infections with worse symptoms interleukin-6 and neutrophils demonstrated equal good/excellent outcomes. Triggered interleukin-6 correlated to urinary tract infection symptom severity and demonstrated a promising differential diagnostic capacity to discriminate urinary tract infection from asymptomatic bacteriuria. Future studies should explore interleukin-6 as a biomarker of urinary tract infection severity and assess the treatment indication in nonfebrile urinary tract infections. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by

  10. Urinary Tract Infections in Older Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Lona; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs) in older women are commonly encountered in outpatient practice. OBJECTIVE To review management of asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic UTI and review prevention of recurrent UTIs in older community-dwelling women. EVIDENCE REVIEW A search of Ovid (Medline, PsycINFO, Embase) for English-language human studies conducted among adults aged 65 years and older and published in peer-reviewed journals from 1946 to November 20, 2013. RESULTS The clinical spectrum of UTIs ranges from asymptomatic bacteriuria, to symptomatic and recurrent UTIs, to sepsis associated with UTI requiring hospitalization. Recent evidence helps differentiate asymptomatic bacteriuria from symptomatic UTI. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is transient in older women, often resolves without any treatment, and is not associated with morbidity or mortality. The diagnosis of symptomatic UTI is made when a patient has both clinical features and laboratory evidence of a urinary infection. Absent other causes, patients presenting with any 2 of the following meet the clinical diagnostic criteria for symptomatic UTI: fever, worsened urinary urgency or frequency, acute dysuria, suprapubic tenderness, or costovertebral angle pain or tenderness. A positive urine culture (≥105 CFU/mL) with no more than 2 uropathogens and pyuria confirms the diagnosis of UTI. Risk factors for recurrent symptomatic UTI include diabetes, functional disability, recent sexual intercourse, prior history of urogynecologic surgery, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence. Testing for UTI is easily performed in the clinic using dipstick tests. When there is a low pretest probability of UTI, a negative dipstick result for leukocyte esterase and nitrites excludes infection. Antibiotics are selected by identifying the uropathogen, knowing local resistance rates, and considering adverse effect profiles. Chronic suppressive antibiotics for 6 to 12 months and

  11. [Temocillin and urinary tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, M; Bruyère, F; Roblot, F; Brureau, L

    2017-10-01

    Temocillin is an alternative to treat urinary tract infections with bacteria producing extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL). The objective is to evaluate the use of temocillin in urinary tract infections. A systematic review of literature was carried out according to PRISMA criteria. All national and international recommendations have been reviewed regarding the indication of the use of temocillin in urology. Data collection on the use of temocillin in urinary tract infection has been performed from the Cochrane, LILACS and the Medline database. The following keywords were used: temocillin, extended spectrum beta-lactamase, urinary tract infections, urine, prostate, epididymis, testis, diffusion, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics. The selection was based on the methodology, language of publication (English/French), relevance to the topic and date of publication of the articles collected. The endpoint was to provide exhaustive scientific information allowing urologists to use this antibiotic in febrile urinary infections. Bacteria producing ESBL has a relatively high susceptible to temocillin, ranging from 61 % to 90 %. These rates would allow its use in probabilistic. The dosage recommended is currently, in the normo-renal patient, 4g per day by intermittent infusion or continuously after a loading dose of 2g. Some studies argue, particularly in case of difficult clinical situations or obese patients, for administration of high doses (6g/24h) rather continuous infusion. There is no evident relationship between high doses and side effects. With an excellent urinary and prostatic diffusion, temocilllin might be recommend for the treatment of ESBL prostatitis. Temocillin is known to have good urinary and prostatic diffusion. According to our results, this antibiotics is now a reliable alternative for the treatment of documented ESBL urinary tract infections. 4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities among adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Fouad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities in adolescents, first morning clean mid-stream urine specimens were obtained from 2500 individuals and examined by dipstick and light microscopy. Adolescents with abnormal screening results were reexamined after two weeks and those who had abnormal results twice were subjected to systemic clinical examination and further clinical and laboratory investigations. Eight hundred and three (32.1% individuals had urinary abnormalities at the first screening, which significantly decreased to 345 (13.8% at the second screening, (P <0.001. Hematuria was the most common urinary abnormalities detected in 245 (9.8% adolescents who had persistent urine abnormalities; 228 (9.1% individuals had non glomerular hematuria. The hematuria was isolated in 150 (6% individuals, combined with leukocyturia in 83 (3.3% individuals, and combined with proteinuria in 12 (0.5% individuals. Leukocyturia was detected in 150 (6% of all studied adolescents; it was isolated in 39 (1.6% individuals and combined with proteinuria in 28 (1.1% of them. Asymp- tomatic bacteriuria was detected in 23 (0.9% of all studied adolescents; all the cases were females. Proteinuria was detected in 65 (2.6% of all the studied adolescents; 45 (1.8% indivi- duals had <0.5 g/day and twenty (0.8% individuals had 0.5-3 g/day. Asymptomatic urinary abnormalities were more common in males than females and adolescents from rural than urban areas (P <0.01 and (P <0.001, respectively. The present study found a high prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities among adolescents in our population.

  13. Hyperammonemia in Urinary Tract Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuneaki Kenzaka

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the incidence of hyperammonemia in urinary tract infections and explored the utility of urinary obstruction relief and antimicrobial administration to improve hyperammonemia.This was an observational study. Subjects were patients who were diagnosed with urinary tract infection and hospitalized between June 2008 and June 2009. We measured plasma ammonia levels on admission in patients who were clinically diagnosed with urinary tract infection and hospitalized. We assessed each patient's level of consciousness on admission using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS and performed urine and blood cultures. We also assessed hearing prior to hospitalization using the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG-PS. In cases with high ammonia levels on admission, plasma ammonia and GCS were measured 24 hours and 5-7 days later.Sixty-seven candidates were enrolled; of these, 60 cases (89.6% with bacterial cell counts ≥10(4 CFU/mL were studied. Five cases (8.3% presented with high plasma ammonia levels. Cases with hyperammonemia were significantly more likely to present with low GCS scores and urinary retention rate. All five cases received antimicrobial therapy with an indwelling bladder catheter to relieve urinary retention. The case 5 patient died shortly after admission due to complicated aspiration pneumonia; in the remaining cases, plasma ammonia levels were rapidly normalized and the level of consciousness improved.The occurrence of hyperammonemia in urinary tract infections is not rare. The cause of hyperammonemia is urinary retention obstruction. Therefore, along with antimicrobial administration, relief of obstruction is important for the treatment of hyperammonemia caused by this mechanism.

  14. Hyperammonemia in Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzaka, Tsuneaki; Kato, Ken; Kitao, Akihito; Kosami, Koki; Minami, Kensuke; Yahata, Shinsuke; Fukui, Miho; Okayama, Masanobu

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the incidence of hyperammonemia in urinary tract infections and explored the utility of urinary obstruction relief and antimicrobial administration to improve hyperammonemia. This was an observational study. Subjects were patients who were diagnosed with urinary tract infection and hospitalized between June 2008 and June 2009. We measured plasma ammonia levels on admission in patients who were clinically diagnosed with urinary tract infection and hospitalized. We assessed each patient's level of consciousness on admission using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and performed urine and blood cultures. We also assessed hearing prior to hospitalization using the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG-PS). In cases with high ammonia levels on admission, plasma ammonia and GCS were measured 24 hours and 5-7 days later. Sixty-seven candidates were enrolled; of these, 60 cases (89.6%) with bacterial cell counts ≥10(4) CFU/mL were studied. Five cases (8.3%) presented with high plasma ammonia levels. Cases with hyperammonemia were significantly more likely to present with low GCS scores and urinary retention rate. All five cases received antimicrobial therapy with an indwelling bladder catheter to relieve urinary retention. The case 5 patient died shortly after admission due to complicated aspiration pneumonia; in the remaining cases, plasma ammonia levels were rapidly normalized and the level of consciousness improved. The occurrence of hyperammonemia in urinary tract infections is not rare. The cause of hyperammonemia is urinary retention obstruction. Therefore, along with antimicrobial administration, relief of obstruction is important for the treatment of hyperammonemia caused by this mechanism.

  15. Preoperative urinary tract obstruction in scoliosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Kotani, Toshiaki; Mori, Kazuetsu; Kawamura, Ken; Ohtake, Akira

    2017-01-01

    While the association between scoliosis and cardiac and respiratory function impairments has been well characterized in clinical practice and research, the potential effect of scoliosis on urinary tract structure and renal function has received little attention. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the preoperative clinical characteristics of urinary tract structure and renal function in pediatric patients with idiopathic scoliosis, using a combination of blood tests, urinalysis, and imaging. Preoperative measures of urinary tract structure and renal function were obtained for 16 patients, 13-17 years old, scheduled for corrective surgery for idiopathic scoliosis. Preoperative assessment included blood test and urinalysis, combined with structural imaging on ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance urography (MRU), and radioisotope tracing (RI), using technetium-99 m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (99m Tc-MAG3). Differences in blood and urine tests between patients with and without urinary tract obstruction (UTO) were evaluated for significance using Mann-Whitney U test. For all 16 patients, blood tests and MRU were within normal limits. Dilatation of the renal pelvis was identified on US in eight patients (50.0%). UTO was identified on RI in six patients (37.5%). UTO was associated with elevated β2-microglobulin concentration. Urinary β2-microglobulin concentration >0.7 μg/mg Cr differentiated patients with UTO from those without UTO, with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 70%. β2-Microglobulin concentration may be a useful marker to screen for asymptomatic UTO in patients with idiopathic scoliosis. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  16. Urinary tract infections in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phé, Véronique; Pakzad, Mahreen; Curtis, Carmel; Porter, Bernadette; Haslam, Collette; Chataway, Jeremy; Panicker, Jalesh N

    2016-06-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are commonly reported by people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and significantly impact quality of life. To provide an overview of the problem of UTIs in PwMS and offer a practical approach for the diagnosis and management. A review of the literature through a Pubmed search up to October 2015 was performed using the following keywords: multiple sclerosis, neurogenic bladder, urinary tract infections, relapse, dipsticks, culture, recurrent and prevention. Noteworthy topics include the definition of a confirmed symptomatic UTI as a positive urine culture defined by >10(5) colony-forming units (CFU)/mL or >10(4) CFU/mL if a urethral catheter urine sample is taken, or any count of bacteria in a suprapubic bladder puncture specimen, both in addition to symptoms including fever, pain, changes in lower urinary tract symptoms or neurological status. Urinalysis is useful to exclude a UTI; however, on its own is insufficient to confirm a UTI, for which urine culture is required. Experts advise asymptomatic UTIs should not be treated except in the context of an acute relapse. From international guidelines, there is no validated strategy to prevent recurrent UTIs in PwMS. This review provides an overview of the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of UTIs in the setting of multiple sclerosis (MS). © The Author(s), 2016.

  17. Kidneys and Urinary Tract (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids Cold, Ice, and Snow Safety Kidneys and Urinary Tract KidsHealth > For Parents > Kidneys and Urinary Tract Print ... Los riñones y las vías urinarias Kidneys and Urinary Tract Basics Our bodies produce several kinds of wastes, ...

  18. Prevalence of urinary tract infection among pregnant women at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common bacterial infections during pregnancy and these infections. Untreated UTI can be associated with serious obstetric complications. This cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the prevalence of UTI among symptomatic and asymptomatic pregnant women ...

  19. Urinary tract infection in children.

    OpenAIRE

    Dighe, A M

    1984-01-01

    The issues of diagnosing and treating urinary tract infections and their role in development of renal injury are being actively discussed by scientists and practicing pediatricians. The article presents the most recent data on etiological factors, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of this disease. It provides recommendations on diagnosis and management of patients depending on their age. The article presents a discussion of antibacterial therapy course duration and indications for anti...

  20. URINARY TRACT INFECTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Margieva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The issues of diagnosing and treating urinary tract infections and their role in development of renal injury are being actively discussed by scientists and practicing pediatricians. The article presents the most recent data on etiological factors, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of this disease. It provides recommendations on diagnosis and management of patients depending on their age. The article presents a discussion of antibacterial therapy course duration and indications for anti-relapse treatment. The study demonstrates that intravenous antibacterial therapy must be launched immediately in neonates in the event of pyretic fever; empirical antibacterial therapy must be launched immediately in older children after diagnosis of the urinary tract infection has been confirmed; subsequently, treatment ought to be corrected depending on the results of a bacteriological trial, sensitivity to antibiotics and effectiveness of the prescribed antibiotic. Along with normalization of urination rhythm and water intake schedule, antibacterial preventive therapy might be considered, if effective, in the event of recurrent nature of the urinary tract infection. 

  1. Lower urinary tract dysfunction in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, AJ

    2016-01-01

    Lower urinary tract dysfunction in children can have many faces. It can present with incontinenece for urine, urinary tract infections or even constipation or loosing stools. All kinds of factors influencing the function of the pelvic floor muscle tension can have an impact on the lower urinary

  2. Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction in Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Klijn, Aart J.; Vijverberg, Marianne A. W.

    2012-01-01

    Up to 10% of school-age children suffer from recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) and/or urinary incontinence. Lower urinary tract problems are, together with asthma, the most important chronic disease of the pediatric age group. Diagnosis must discriminate among those children with functional

  3. Urinary tract infections and Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Payam; Behzadi, Elham; Ranjbar, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract candidiasis is known as the most frequent nosocomial fungal infection worldwide. Candida albicans is the most common cause of nosocomial fungal urinary tract infections; however, a rapid change in the distribution of Candida species is undergoing. Simultaneously, the increase of urinary tract candidiasis has led to the appearance of antifungal resistant Candida species. In this review, we have an in depth look into Candida albicans uropathogenesis and distribution of the three most frequent Candida species contributing to urinary tract candidiasis in different countries around the world. For writing this review, Google Scholar -a scholarly search engine- (http://scholar.google.com/) and PubMed database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) were used. The most recently published original articles and reviews of literature relating to the first three Candida species causing urinary tract infections in different countries and the pathogenicity of Candida albicans were selected and studied. Although some studies show rapid changes in the uropathogenesis of Candida species causing urinary tract infections in some countries, Candida albicans is still the most important cause of candidal urinary tract infections. Despite the ranking of Candida albicans as the dominant species for urinary tract candidiasis, specific changes have occurred in some countries. At this time, it is important to continue the surveillance related to Candida species causing urinary tract infections to prevent, control and treat urinary tract candidiasis in future.

  4. Catheter associated urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection attributed to the use of an indwelling urinary catheter is one of the most common infections acquired by patients in health care facilities. As biofilm ultimately develops on all of these devices, the major determinant for development of bacteriuria is duration of catheterization. While the proportion of bacteriuric subjects who develop symptomatic infection is low, the high frequency of use of indwelling urinary catheters means there is a substantial burden attributable to these infections. Catheter-acquired urinary infection is the source for about 20% of episodes of health-care acquired bacteremia in acute care facilities, and over 50% in long term care facilities. The most important interventions to prevent bacteriuria and infection are to limit indwelling catheter use and, when catheter use is necessary, to discontinue the catheter as soon as clinically feasible. Infection control programs in health care facilities must implement and monitor strategies to limit catheter-acquired urinary infection, including surveillance of catheter use, appropriateness of catheter indications, and complications. Ultimately, prevention of these infections will require technical advances in catheter materials which prevent biofilm formation.

  5. Catheter associated urinary tract infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection attributed to the use of an indwelling urinary catheter is one of the most common infections acquired by patients in health care facilities. As biofilm ultimately develops on all of these devices, the major determinant for development of bacteriuria is duration of catheterization. While the proportion of bacteriuric subjects who develop symptomatic infection is low, the high frequency of use of indwelling urinary catheters means there is a substantial burden attributable to these infections. Catheter-acquired urinary infection is the source for about 20% of episodes of health-care acquired bacteremia in acute care facilities, and over 50% in long term care facilities. The most important interventions to prevent bacteriuria and infection are to limit indwelling catheter use and, when catheter use is necessary, to discontinue the catheter as soon as clinically feasible. Infection control programs in health care facilities must implement and monitor strategies to limit catheter-acquired urinary infection, including surveillance of catheter use, appropriateness of catheter indications, and complications. Ultimately, prevention of these infections will require technical advances in catheter materials which prevent biofilm formation. PMID:25075308

  6. Urinary tract infections in special populations: diabetes, renal transplant, HIV infection, and spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2014-03-01

    Some populations have unique considerations relevant to complicated urinary tract infection. For patients with diabetes, renal transplant, HIV infection, and spinal cord injuries, approaches to management, including diagnosis and treatment, are generally similar to other patients with complicated urinary tract infection. In addition, there is no evidence that treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria leads to improved outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cranberries and lower urinary tract infection prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Hisano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lower urinary tract infections are very common diseases. Recurrent urinary tract infections remain challenging to treat because the main treatment option is long-term antibiotic prophylaxis; however, this poses a risk for the emergence of bacterial resistance. Some options to avoid this risk are available, including the use of cranberry products. This article reviews the key methods in using cranberries as a preventive measure for lower urinary tract infections, including in vitro studies and clinical trials.

  8. Surgical emergencies of the urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoughlin, M A

    2000-05-01

    True emergencies of the urinary tract center on three major issues, including uncontrolled renal hemorrhage, accumulation of urine within the peritoneal cavity or retroperitoneal space, and obstruction to urine outflow. Successful management of urinary tract emergencies in small animal patients is based not only on the severity of the injury or obstruction but on the condition of the patient at the time of diagnosis and the patient's response to medical stabilization. When most urinary tract emergencies are initially recognized, patients are metabolically and hemodynamically unstable. Therefore, urinary tract emergencies are first regarded as medical emergencies, and emergency surgical procedures are aimed at patient stabilization and lifesaving measures.

  9. Do type 1 fimbriae promote inflammation in the human urinary tract?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergsten, G.; Wullt, B.; Schembri, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Type 1 fimbriae have been implicated as virulence factors in animal models of urinary tract infection (UTI), but the function in human disease remains unclear. This study used a human challenge model to examine if type 1 fimbriae trigger inflammation in the urinary tract. The asymptomatic....... This was unexpected, as type 1 fimbriae enhanced the inflammatory response to the same strain in the murine urinary tract and as P fimbrial expression by E. coli 83972 enhances adherence and inflammation in challenged patients. We conclude that type 1 fimbriae do not contribute to the mucosal inflammatory response...... in the human urinary tract....

  10. Urinary tract infections in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chee Wei; Chlebicki, Maciej Piotr

    2016-09-01

    A urinary tract infection (UTI) is a collective term for infections that involve any part of the urinary tract. It is one of the most common infections in local primary care. The incidence of UTIs in adult males aged under 50 years is low, with adult women being 30 times more likely than men to develop a UTI. Appropriate classification of UTI into simple or complicated forms guides its management and the ORENUC classification can be used. Diagnosis of a UTI is based on a focused history, with appropriate investigations depending on individual risk factors. Simple uncomplicated cystitis responds very well to oral antibiotics, but complicated UTIs may require early imaging, and referral to the emergency department or hospitalisation to prevent urosepsis may be warranted. Escherichia coli remains the predominant uropathogen in acute community-acquired uncomplicated UTIs and amoxicillin-clavulanate is useful as a first-line antibiotic. Family physicians are capable of managing most UTIs if guided by appropriate history, investigations and appropriate antibiotics to achieve good outcomes and minimise antibiotic resistance. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  11. Frailty and Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suskind, Anne M

    2017-09-01

    The incidence of both frailty and lower urinary tract symptoms, including urinary incontinence, overactive bladder, underactive bladder, and benign prostatic hyperplasia, increases with age. However, our understanding of the relationship between frailty and lower urinary tract symptoms, both in terms of pathophysiology and in terms of the evaluation and management of such symptoms, is greatly lacking. This brief review will summarize definitions and measurement tools associated with frailty and will also review the existing state of the literature on frailty and lower urinary tract symptoms in older individuals.

  12. Urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformations in children: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Although the association of urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformation is not rare, their management poses challenges. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between urolithiasis and malformations of the urinary system. There were 34 patients (19 males and 15 females) with a mean age of ...

  13. [Urinary tract dysfunction in older patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdejo, Carlos; Méndez, Santiago; Salinas, Jesús

    2016-11-18

    Urinary tract dysfunction in older patients has a multifactorial aetiology and is not a uniform clinical condition. Changes due to physiological ageing as well as comorbidity and polypharmacy, can produce several dynamic conditions such as urinary incontinence and urinary retention. Lower urinary tract symptoms increase with age in both sexes and are a major problem in older patients due to their medical and psychosocial consequences. For these reasons, in assessing urinary dysfunction in older patients, we should consider external circumstances such as polypharmacy, poor mobility, affective and cognitive disorders and also accessibility to housing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Survey of risk factors urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Dehghani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Women are very susceptible to urinary tract infections and pregnancy raises the risk of urinary tract infection. In general, little information on the risk factors of urinary tract infection in pregnancy is underway. Urinary tract infection in pregnancy is an important risk factor for pregnancy dire consequences. The purpose of this study is to find risk factors associated with urinary tract infection in pregnant women. Methods: The study was observational and retrospective analysis was carried on in the winter of which 310 pregnant women participated in 11 health centers in Shahrekord. Of these 155 cases (patients and 155 controls (healthy that were matched for age Information required from the health records of pregnant women and complete Czech list of researcher whose validity was confirmed by experts were gathered. Information needed by pregnant women health records and complete list researcher was collected. Czech list contains a number of possible risk factors for illness and demographic characteristics of the study participants was Statistical analysis software spss version 16 by using chi square tests and logistic regression and t analysis was performed. Results: Among the variables vomiting (p = 0/00 a history of urinary tract infection in a previous pregnancy (P =.001, CI = 1.508-4.408, OR = 2.578 abortion own history (P =.014, CI = 1.165 -3.847, OR = 2.117, respectively, the most important risk factors for urinary tract infection in pregnant women were determined. Conclusion: Prevention and treatment of vomiting in pregnancy prevention of urinary tract infections during pregnancy. Prevention of abortion can play an important role in the prevention of urinary tract infection and its complications in pregnancy. The study also revealed a number of factors can have an impact on urinary tract infection in pregnancy that has not been enough attention and it is necessary that more attention be placed on health programs and

  15. Complicated urinary tract infection in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolle, LE

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Complicated urinary tract infection occurs in individuals with functional or structural abnormalities of the genitourinary tract.OBJECTIVE: To review current knowledge relevant to complicated urinary tract infection, and to provide evidence-based recommendations for management.METHODS: The literature was reviewed through a PubMed search, and additional articles were identified by journal reference review. A draft guideline was prepared and critically reviewed by members of the Ass...

  16. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Humberto R; Hickling, Duane R

    2016-02-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥10(3) CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5-14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required.

  17. Diabetes and Risk of Community-Acquired Respiratory Tract Infections, Urinary Tract Infections, and Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Reimar W.; Mor, Anil

    2013-01-01

    increase for hospitalization with pneumonia associated with diabetes. The increase of risk for tuberculosis is of similar magnitude in highly developed countries, and possibly higher in low-income countries. Poor glycemic control and long diabetes duration predict higher risk for both pneumonia...... and tuberculosis. Limited data is available for diabetes and influenza, yet both influenza and pneumococcal vaccination is recommended in patients with diabetes. Urinary tract infections: The risk of asymptomatic bacteriuria and cystitis is 1.5 to 2 times increased in diabetes patients, while their risk......This review provides an update on the risk of several important community-acquired infections seen in patients with diabetes: respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and bacteremia. Respiratory tract infections: Recent epidemiological evidence shows a modest (1.25 to 1.75-fold) risk...

  18. Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of liquids to help flush bacteria from your child’s urinary tract. Better bathroom habits and avoiding constipation may help prevent another UTI. Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Food choices do not help prevent or treat bladder ...

  19. Urinary tract infection in renal transplant recipients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    com. Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation. 2010 May;3(2):53-5. Country Data. AJNT. Abstract. Introduction: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the commonest bacterial infection occurring in renal transplant recipients, and it is associated ...

  20. Mechanisms of urinary tract sterility maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Okrągła

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically, urine and the urinary tract are maintained sterile because of physical and chemical properties of urine and the innate immune system’s action. The urinary tract is constantly exposed to the invasion of microorganisms from the exterior environment, also because of the anatomical placement of the urethra, in the vicinity of the rectum. Particularly vulnerable to urinary tract infections (UTI are women (an additional risk factor is pregnancy, but also the elderly and children. The main pathogens causing UTI are bacteria; in 70-95% of cases it is the bacterium Escherichia coli. Infections caused by viruses and fungi are less common and are associated with decreased immunity, pharmacotherapy, or some diseases. Bacteria have evolved a number of factors that facilitate the colonization of the urinary tract: the cover and cell membrane antigens O and K1, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, fimbriae, pile and cilia. On the other hand, the human organism has evolved mechanisms to hinder colonization of the urinary tract: mechanisms arising from the anatomical structure of the urinary tract, the physicochemical properties of the urine and the activity of the innate immune system, also known as non-specific, which isolates and destroys pathogens using immunological processes, and the mechanisms for release of antimicrobial substances such as Tamm-Horsfall protein, mucopolysaccharides, immunoglobulins IgA and IgG, lactoferrin, lipocalin, neutrophils, cytokines and antimicrobial peptides. This review aims to analyze the state of knowledge on the mechanisms to maintain the sterility of the urinary tract used by the human organism and bacterial virulence factors to facilitate the colonization of the urinary tract.

  1. Lower urinary tract dysfunction in cerebral palsy.

    OpenAIRE

    Reid, C. J.; Borzyskowski, M

    1993-01-01

    The clinical features and management of 27 children with cerebral palsy referred with symptoms of lower urinary tract dysfunction were reviewed. The mean age at referral was 9.9 years. Daytime urinary incontinence was the commonest presenting symptom. Videourodynamic studies were abnormal in 23 patients (85%). Only two children had evidence of upper renal tract damage. Treatment was determined by urodynamic findings, and led to improvement in symptoms in all patients for whom there was follow...

  2. Endometrioid carcinoma of the upper urinary tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni Jagdeesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report a second case of endometrioid carcinoma of the upper urinary tract presenting 17 years after hysterectomy for high grade adenocarcinoma of ovary. A 51-year-old nullipara presented to us with a complaint of hematuria. After complete work up, she underwent right radical nephro-ureterectomy with bladder cuff excision. The histology showed endometrioid carcinoma of upper urinary tract without any evidence of endometriosis.

  3. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Chronic Kidney Diseases Movie: Urinary System Your Urinary System Bedwetting Contact ... Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...

  4. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... You'll also want to stay away from foods and drinks that contain caffeine , such as cola ... For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Chronic Kidney Diseases Movie: Urinary System Your Urinary System Bedwetting Contact ...

  5. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Chronic Kidney Diseases Movie: Urinary System Your Urinary System Bedwetting ... Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...

  6. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Chronic Kidney Diseases Movie: Urinary System Your Urinary System Bedwetting Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend Permissions Guidelines ... Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart.com

  7. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Chronic Kidney Diseases Movie: Urinary System Your Urinary System Bedwetting Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend Permissions Guidelines ... Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart.com

  8. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Chronic Kidney Diseases Movie: Urinary System Your Urinary System Bedwetting View more ... Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...

  9. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... cotton underwear. Nylon underwear traps moisture near your body, especially when it's hot outside. Bacteria love to grow in warm, moist places. Gross! ... Urinary System Your Urinary System Bedwetting Contact Us ...

  10. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... cotton underwear. Nylon underwear traps moisture near your body, especially when it's hot outside. Bacteria love to grow in warm, moist places. Gross! Reviewed by: ... Urinary System Your Urinary System Bedwetting Contact ...

  11. Constipation and reversible urinary tract abnormalities.

    OpenAIRE

    Dohil, R.; Roberts, E.; Jones, K V; Jenkins, H R

    1994-01-01

    Urinary tract anomalies were prospectively investigated with ultrasound in 29 children with functional constipation. These children were compared before and after treatment with 451 age matched healthy controls without constipation. The bladder residue and upper renal tract dilatation after micturition were significantly increased in the group with constipation and improved after treatment.

  12. Complete renal fusion in a child with recurrent urinary tract infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gun, Saul [Department of Surgery, Faculdade de Medicina de Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Conjunto Hospitalar de Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Ciantelli, Guilherme Lippi; Takahashi, Marilia Akemi Uzuelle; Brabo, Alexandre Mineto; Morais, Livea Athayde de; Figueiredo, Caio Barros, E-mail: gui_lippi@hotmail.com [Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas e da Saude da Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao Paulo (FCMS/PUC-SP), Sorocaba, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    Cake kidney, a rare anomaly of the urinary tract, may be diagnosed at any age range. During the investigation of recurrent urinary tract infection in a 12-year-old child, contrast-enhanced computed tomography demonstrated the presence of a right-sided ectopic kidney, with renal fusion, drained by two ureters. Prophylactic treatment with nitrofurantoin was instituted, and the patient currently remains asymptomatic. (author)

  13. Sleep Problems are Associated with Development and Progression of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: Results from REDUCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branche, Brandee L; Howard, Lauren E; Moreira, Daniel M; Roehrborn, Claus; Castro-Santamaria, Ramiro; Andriole, Gerald L; Hopp, Martin L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2017-09-01

    Although lower urinary tract symptoms and sleep problems often develop together, to our knowledge it is unknown whether sleep disturbances are linked to lower urinary tract symptoms development and progression. As measured by the 6-item MOS-Sleep (Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale) survey we examined the relationship between sleep problems, and the development and progression of lower urinary tract symptoms in the REDUCE (Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events) study. REDUCE was a randomized trial testing prostate cancer chemoprevention with dutasteride in men with prostate specific antigen 2.5 to 10 ng/ml and a negative biopsy. At baseline men completed MOS-Sleep and a scaled average was used to calculate the sleep score. Men were followed for 4 years and I-PSS (International Prostate Symptom Score) was completed at baseline and every 6 months. Asymptomatic men had I-PSS less than 8 while symptomatic men had I-PSS 8 or greater. In the placebo arm of 2,588 men not receiving α-blockers or 5α-reductase inhibitors at baseline we tested the association between sleep problems and lower urinary tract symptom development and progression using Cox models. During followup lower urinary tract symptoms developed in 209 of 1,452 asymptomatic men (14%) and 580 of 1,136 (51%) with lower urinary tract symptoms demonstrated progression. On multivariable analysis higher sleep scores were suggestively associated with increased lower urinary tract symptoms in asymptomatic men (quartile 4 vs 1 HR 1.41, 95% CI 0.92-2.17, p = 0.12) and with lower urinary tract symptom progression in symptomatic men (per 10 points of sleep score HR 1.06, 95% CI 1.01-1.12, p = 0.029). Among men with lower urinary tract symptoms worse sleep scores were associated with the progression of lower urinary tract symptoms and among asymptomatic men worse sleep scores were suggestively associated with the development of lower urinary tract symptoms. If confirmed, these data suggest that sleep

  14. The nature of immune responses to urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Soman N; Miao, Yuxuan

    2015-10-01

    The urinary tract is constantly exposed to microorganisms that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract, but generally the urinary tract resists infection by gut microorganisms. This resistance to infection is mainly ascribed to the versatility of the innate immune defences in the urinary tract, as the adaptive immune responses are limited particularly when only the lower urinary tract is infected. In recent years, as the strengths and weaknesses of the immune system of the urinary tract have emerged and as the virulence attributes of uropathogens are recognized, several potentially effective and unconventional strategies to contain or prevent urinary tract infections have emerged.

  15. Hypercalciuria in children with urinary tract symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallahzadeh M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed this prospective study to determine the urinary calcium to creatinine ratio (Ca/Cr in children with different urinary symptoms. We studied 523 children in our neph-rology clinic with an age range of 3 to 14 years (mean= 8 and male to female ratio of 0.61. All the children had at least one of the urinary tract symptoms (dysuria, frequency, urgency, abdo-minal and/or flank pain, diurnal incontinence or enuresis, microscopic hematuria, urinary tract infection or urolithiasis. Fasting urine was collected for measuring calcium and creatinine and the results were compared to the values for the normal Iranian children. Ca/Cr ratio of more than 0.2 (mg/mg was considered as hypercalciuria. Of all the patients, 166 (31.3% were hypercalciuric. Urine Ca/Cr ratio was significantly higher in all the subgroups with one or more of the urinary symptoms (P< 0.001. We conclude that urine Ca/Cr ratio is significantly increased in children with all types of urinary symptoms. We recommend measuring urinary calcium in all children with urinary tract symptoms, especially if unexplained.

  16. Lower urinary tract development and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouly, Hila Milo; Lu, Weining

    2013-01-01

    Congenital Anomalies of the Lower Urinary Tract (CALUT) are a family of birth defects of the ureter, the bladder and the urethra. CALUT includes ureteral anomalies such as congenital abnormalities of the ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) and ureterovesical junction (UVJ), and birth defects of the bladder and the urethra such as bladder-exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC), prune belly syndrome (PBS), and posterior urethral valves (PUV). CALUT is one of the most common birth defects and is often associated with antenatal hydronephrosis, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), urinary tract obstruction, urinary tract infections (UTI), chronic kidney disease and renal failure in children. Here, we discuss the current genetic and molecular knowledge about lower urinary tract development and genetic basis of CALUT in both human and mouse models. We provide an overview of the developmental processes leading to the formation of the ureter, bladder, and urethra, and different genes and signaling pathways controlling these developmental processes. Human genetic disorders that affect the ureter, bladder and urethra and associated gene mutations are also presented. As we are entering the post-genomic era of personalized medicine, information in this article may provide useful interpretation for the genetic and genomic test results collected from patients with lower urinary tract birth defects. With evidence-based interpretations, clinicians may provide more effective personalized therapies to patients and genetic counseling for their families. PMID:23408557

  17. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Does Eating Turkey Make Me Sleepy? Weight and Diabetes Carbohydrates and Diabetes Five Steps for Fighting Stress How Cliques Make Kids Feel Left Out Urinary ...

  18. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Your pee smells bad. These things happen because bacteria have caused an infection somewhere in your urinary ... shorter than boys' urethras. The shorter urethra means bacteria can get up into the bladder more easily ...

  19. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Weight and Diabetes Five Steps for Fighting Stress How Cliques Make Kids Feel Left Out Urinary ... Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart.com

  1. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... Work? Is Dieting OK for Kids? What's the Right Weight for Me? Your Teeth Heart Murmurs Urinary ... kidney infection and you should see a doctor right away. previous continue What Will the Doctor Do? ...

  2. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... drink something, no matter how busy you are. Water and cranberry juice are two good choices. Those ... System Your Urinary System Bedwetting Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend Permissions Guidelines About KidsHealth ...

  3. Clinical implications of the microbiome in urinary tract diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiergeist, Andreas; Gessner, André

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to outline and evaluate the most recent literature on the role of the microbiome in urinary tract diseases. High throughput molecular DNA sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes enabled the analysis of complex microbial communities inhabiting the human urinary tract. Several recent studies have identified bacterial taxa of the urinary microbiome to impact urinary tract diseases including interstitial cystitis, urgency urinary incontinence or calcium oxalate stone formation. Furthermore, treatment of urinary tract infections by antibiotics globally impacts community profiles of the intestinal microbiota and might indirectly influence human health. Alternative treatment options like application of probiotics for the treatment of urinary tract infections are currently under investigation. The urinary microbiome and its relationship to urinary tract diseases is currently under comprehensive investigation. Further studies are needed to shed light on the role of commensal microbiota for urinary tract infections.

  4. Upper urinary tract. Pyelography and interventional procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, H.S.; Dorph, S.

    Pyelography is superior to all other imaging techniques for the demonstration of fine detail in the pelveocalyceal system and the ureter. For almost 90 years it has been performed through a retrogradely inserted catheter, but during the recent 30 years antegrade injection via a transparenchymally inserted needle or catheter has become an accepted alternative, especially in case of dilated upper urinary tract. Both methods have their advantages and their disadvantages. This article presents a review of indications, techniques, and complications. Furthermore, interventional procedures on the upper urinary tract - such as stent placement and baloon dilatation - are now handled by the radiologist, mainly through an antegrade approach. These therapeutic procedures are also reviewed.

  5. Urinary Tract Infection in Febrile Children with Sickle Cell Anaemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eastern Nigeria. Children with this disease have increased tendency to develop frequent and severe infections especially of the urinary tract, bones and lungs. The prevalence of urinary tract infection (UTI) has however not been reported in this part ...

  6. Urinary tract infection in women - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most urinary tract infections (UTIs) are caused by bacteria that enter the urethra and travel to the bladder. This can ... BATHING AND HYGIENE To prevent future urinary tract infections, ... believe make infections more likely. Change your pad each time ...

  7. Detecting Kidney and Urinary Tract Abnormalities Before Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A to Z Health Guide Detecting Kidney and Urinary Tract Abnormalities Before Birth Print Email Ultrasound examinations are ... impact on the child's overall health. What causes urinary tract abnormalities to occur before birth? In about one ...

  8. Medical Prescription Pitfalls of Uncomplicated Urinary Tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical Prescription Pitfalls of Uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infections in Government Healthcare Facilities in Zambia. ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader). If you would like more information about how ...

  9. Medical Prescription Pitfalls of Uncomplicated Urinary Tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this evaluation was to identify pitfalls in medical prescriptions of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in government healthcare facilities in Zambia. Design: This was a cross sectional and government healthcare facilities were conveniently sampled. Main outcome measures: Rate of compliance to ...

  10. Urinary Tract Infection in Children: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Hamid

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the most common paediatric infections. By the time children are 5 years old, about 8% of girls and about 1-2% of boys have had at least one episode of UTI. UTIs are caused mainly by colonic bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, followed by Klebsiella and Proteus. However, any organism that gains access to the urinary tract system may cause infection, including fungi (Candida species and viruses. In some instances, UTI results in recognition of an important underlying structural abnormality of the urinary tract. The febrile infant or child with clinically significant bacteriuria and no other site of infection to explain the fever, even in the absence of systemic symptoms has UTI. Signs and symptoms of UTIs vary depending on the child's age and on which part of the urinary tract is infected. The diagnosis of UTI is based on routine microscopic examination and culture of a properly collected urine specimen. Imaging studies are done in selected patients to identify anatomic abnormalities. Most cases of uncomplicated UTI respond readily to outpatient antibiotic treatment without further sequelae. All patients should have close follow-up to evaluate response to antibiotics and to prevent the development of long term complication.

  11. Pyoderma gangrenosum and urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chopra A

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available A case of pyoderma gangrenosum is reported in a 52 - year - old man who had skin lesions without any association. On investigation urinary tract infection was detected. Treatment of UTI led to spontaneous healing of the lesions in short period thus avoiding the need of oral corticosteroids.

  12. Febrile urinary tract infections: pyelonephritis and urosepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Holleman, Frits; Geerlings, Suzanne E.

    2016-01-01

    Complicated infections of the urinary tract (UTI) including pyelonephritis and urosepsis are also called febrile UTI. This review describes insights from the literature on this topic since July 2014. Recent studies regarding risk factors and consequences of febrile UTI confirmed existing knowledge.

  13. Review Article Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections and

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-11-07

    Nov 7, 2007 ... ureteric reflux and other risk factors for renal damage: Identification of high- and low-risk children. Acta. Paediatr.Suppl. 1999; Nov;88(431):31-9. Van Gool JD, Hjalmas K, Tamminen Mobius T, Olbing. H. Historical clues to the complex of dysfunctional voiding, urinary tract infection and vesicoureteral reflux.

  14. Update in adult urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2011-12-01

    Urinary tract infection remains a common problem for many populations. Recent studies have expanded our understanding of the host innate immune response and its role in the familial association observed for recurrent uncomplicated urinary tract infection in healthy women. Therapeutic management for uncomplicated infection has been compromised by increasing antimicrobial resistance, particularly global dissemination of the CTXM-15 extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli ST-131 strain. Prevention strategies exploring non-antimicrobial approaches continue to show limited promise, and approaches to limit empiric antimicrobials are now being explored. For complicated urinary tract infection, increasing antimicrobial resistance limits therapeutic options for many patients. In addition to ESBL producing E. coli, NDM-1 E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae and other resistant Gram negatives, such as Acinetobacter species, are being isolated more frequently. There has been renewed interest in catheter-acquired urinary tract infection, the most common health-care associated infection, with several recent evidence-based guidelines for infection prevention available. However, technologic progress in development of adherence-resistant catheter materials remains disappointing.

  15. Urinary Tract Infections in Children : EAU/ESPU Guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, Raimund; Dogan, Hasan S.; Hoebeke, Piet; Kocvara, Radim; Nijman, Rien J. M.; Radmayr, Christian; Tekgul, Serdar

    Context: In 30% of children with urinary tract anomalies, urinary tract infection (UTI) can be the first sign. Failure to identify patients at risk can result in damage to the upper urinary tract. Objective: To provide recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment, and imaging of children presenting

  16. Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Urinary Incontinence During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balik, Gülşah; Güven, Emine Seda G; Tekin, Yeşim B; Şentürk, Şenol; Kağitci, Mehmet; Üstüner, Işık; Mete Ural, Ülkü; Şahin, Figen K

    2016-05-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) can frequently be seen in pregnant women. Pregnancy and delivery have been considered as risk factors in the occurrence of pelvic floor dysfunction and determinants of LUTS. The main associated risk factor is parity. In the present study, we aim to determine the frequency of LUTS and urinary incontinence (UI) during pregnancy and the associated risk factors. This prospective study was carried out in a total of 250 women during their 28- and 40-gestational week checks. The Urinary Distress Inventory-6, the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire-7, and International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form were used to determine LUTS and its effect on quality of life. The mean age and gestational age of the participants were 29.41 ± 5.70 year (range 18-44) and 35.45 ± 2.98 weeks (range 28-40), respectively. The prevalence of LUTS was 81.6%. The prevalence of UI during pregnancy was 37.2%. Stress urinary incontinence, urge urinary incontinence and mixed urinary incontinence were diagnosed as 15.6, 4.8 and 16.8%, respectively. We found that advanced age, smoking and multiparity were risk factors associated with incontinence. Incontinence reduced pregnant women's quality of life. Lower urinary tract symptoms are commonly seen among pregnant women and these symptoms negatively affect the quality of life of pregnant women. Advanced age, smoking and multiparity were risk factors associated with urinary incontinence and LUTS. Obstetricians should be on the lookout for individual urological problems in pregnancy. Resolving any urological issues and cessation of smoking for the affected individuals will help alleviate the problem. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Enterobius vermicularis in the male urinary tract: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahariou, Athanasios; Karamouti, Maria; Papaioannou, Polyanthi

    2007-11-14

    Enterobius vermicularis is an intestinal nematode of humans. Adults usually have low worm burdens and are asymptomatic. Ectopic infections in the pelvic area or urinary tract rarely occur in women. We report a case of the patient with mild voiding difficulties such as urgency, frequency, nocturia, dysuria, mild low back pain or perineal discomfort. The patient's prostatic secretions showed a large number of inflammatory cells and several eggs. The size and the shape of the eggs identified them as a group of E. vermicularis. On examination we found a soft palpable material which was 5 mm diameter in size and spherical shape. Palpation gave the impression of a tissue than a stone. An incision was performed and a 4 mm long living worm was found. The microscopic examination identified the worm as E- vermicularis. It is an extremely rare manifestation of enterobius vermicularis infection since an intestinal-breeding worm is rarely found in the male genital tract.

  18. Enterobius vermicularis in the male urinary tract: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahariou Athanasios

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enterobius vermicularis is an intestinal nematode of humans. Adults usually have low worm burdens and are asymptomatic. Ectopic infections in the pelvic area or urinary tract rarely occur in women. We report a case of the patient with mild voiding difficulties such as urgency, frequency, nocturia, dysuria, mild low back pain or perineal discomfort. The patient's prostatic secretions showed a large number of inflammatory cells and several eggs. The size and the shape of the eggs identified them as a group of E. vermicularis. On examination we found a soft palpable material which was 5 mm diameter in size and spherical shape. Palpation gave the impression of a tissue than a stone. An incision was performed and a 4 mm long living worm was found. The microscopic examination identified the worm as E- vermicularis. It is an extremely rare manifestation of enterobius vermicularis infection since an intestinal-breeding worm is rarely found in the male genital tract.

  19. Neuropeptides in Lower Urinary Tract (LUT) Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arms, Lauren; Vizzard, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous neuropeptide/receptor systems including vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide, substance P, neurokinin A, bradykinin, and endothelin-1 are expressed in the lower urinary tract (LUT) in both neural and non-neural (e.g., urothelium) components. LUT neuropeptide immunoreactivity is present in afferent and autonomic efferent neurons innervating the bladder and urethra and in the urothelium of the urinary bladder. Neuropeptides have tissue-specific distributions and functions in the LUT and exhibit neuroplastic changes in expression and function with LUT dysfunction following neural injury, inflammation and disease. LUT dysfunction with abnormal voiding including urinary urgency, increased voiding frequency, nocturia, urinary incontinence and pain may reflect a change in the balance of neuropeptides in bladder reflex pathways. LUT neuropeptide/receptor systems may represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21290237

  20. Catheter-associated urinary tract infection: does changing the definition change quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, Matthew J; Metlay, Joshua P

    2013-03-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently narrowed its definition of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) to exclude asymptomatic bacteriuria. Although CAUTI rates decreased after the definition was changed, rates of related measures remained relatively stagnant, which indicates that longitudinal measurements of CAUTI may be misleading and that the change in definition did not itself impact care.

  1. Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection: Does Changing the Definition Change Quality?

    OpenAIRE

    Press, Matthew J.; Metlay, Joshua P.

    2013-01-01

    The CDC recently narrowed its definition of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) to exclude asymptomatic bacteriuria. While CAUTI rates declined after the definition changed, rates of related measures remained relatively stagnant, indicating that longitudinal measurements of CAUTI may be misleading and that the definition change itself did not impact care.

  2. Neural Control of the Lower Urinary Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groat, William C.; Griffiths, Derek; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes anatomical, neurophysiological, pharmacological, and brain imaging studies in humans and animals that have provided insights into the neural circuitry and neurotransmitter mechanisms controlling the lower urinary tract. The functions of the lower urinary tract to store and periodically eliminate urine are regulated by a complex neural control system in the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral autonomic ganglia that coordinates the activity of smooth and striated muscles of the bladder and urethral outlet. The neural control of micturition is organized as a hierarchical system in which spinal storage mechanisms are in turn regulated by circuitry in the rostral brain stem that initiates reflex voiding. Input from the forebrain triggers voluntary voiding by modulating the brain stem circuitry. Many neural circuits controlling the lower urinary tract exhibit switch-like patterns of activity that turn on and off in an all-or-none manner. The major component of the micturition switching circuit is a spinobulbospinal parasympathetic reflex pathway that has essential connections in the periaqueductal gray and pontine micturition center. A computer model of this circuit that mimics the switching functions of the bladder and urethra at the onset of micturition is described. Micturition occurs involuntarily in infants and young children until the age of 3 to 5 years, after which it is regulated voluntarily. Diseases or injuries of the nervous system in adults can cause the re-emergence of involuntary micturition, leading to urinary incontinence. Neuroplasticity underlying these developmental and pathological changes in voiding function is discussed. PMID:25589273

  3. Biofabrication and biomaterials for urinary tract reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsawy MM

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Moustafa M Elsawy,1–3 Achala de Mel1 1Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, Royal Free Hospital, NHS Trust, University College London (UCL, 2Division of Reconstructive Urology, University College London Hospitals (uclh, London, UK; 3Urology Department, School of Medicine, Alexandria, University, Alexandria, EgyptAbstract: Reconstructive urologists are constantly facing diverse and complex pathologies that require structural and functional restoration of urinary organs. There is always a demand for a biocompatible material to repair or substitute the urinary tract instead of using patient’s autologous tissues with its associated morbidity. Biomimetic approaches are tissue-engineering tactics aiming to tailor the material physical and biological properties to behave physiologically similar to the urinary system. This review highlights the different strategies to mimic urinary tissues including modifications in structure, surface chemistry, and cellular response of a range of biological and synthetic materials. The article also outlines the measures to minimize infectious complications, which might lead to graft failure. Relevant experimental and preclinical studies are discussed, as well as promising biomimetic approaches such as three-dimensional bioprinting. Keywords: reconstruction, biofunctionalization, tissue engineering, urinary tract

  4. Urinary tract infections in surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Duane, Therese M

    2014-12-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) are common in surgical patients. CAUTI are associated with adverse patient outcomes, and negatively affects public safety reporting and reimbursement. Inappropriate catheter use and prolonged catheter duration are major risk factors for CAUTI. CAUTI pathogenesis and treatment are complicated by the presence of biofilms. Prevention strategies include accurate identification and tracking of CAUTIs, and the development of institutional guidelines for the appropriate use, duration, alternatives, and removal of indwelling urinary catheters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections Management in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Badr, Ahmed; Al-Shaikh, Ghadeer

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most frequent clinical bacterial infections in women, accounting for nearly 25% of all infections. Around 50–60% of women will develop UTIs in their lifetimes. Escherichia coli is the organism that causes UTIs in most patients. Recurrent UTIs (RUTI) are mainly caused by reinfection by the same pathogen. Having frequent sexual intercourse is one of the greatest risk factors for RUTIs. In a subgroup of individuals with coexisting morbid conditions, complicated RUTIs can lead to upper tract infections or urosepsis. Although the initial treatment is antimicrobial therapy, use of different prophylactic regimens and alternative strategies are available to reduce exposure to antibiotics. PMID:23984019

  6. Urinary tract infections in the critical care unit: A brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Satyen; Mishra, Sandeep Kumar

    2013-11-01

    The use of indwelling catheters in the Critical Care Units (CCUs) has a major role in determining the incidence and the morbidity as well as mortality from hospital-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs). Instituting evidence-based protocols can significantly reduce both the prevalence of indwelling catheterization as well as the incidence of hospital-acquired UTIs. The prevalence of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) in the CCUs is directly linked to the widespread use of indwelling catheters in these settings. CAUTIs result in significant cost escalation for individual hospitals as well as the healthcare system as a whole. A UTI is an inflammatory response to colonization of the urinary tract, most commonly by bacteria or fungi. A UTI should be differentiated from the mere detection of bacteria in the urinary tract. This condition, referred to as asymptomatic bacteriuria, is common and does not require treatment, especially in the patient with an indwelling urinary catheter. A CAUTI occurs when a patient with an indwelling urinary catheter develops 2 or more signs or symptoms of a UTI such as hematuria, fever, suprapubic or flank pain, change in urine character, and altered mental status. CAUTI is classified as a complicated UTI. The current review highlights the important management issues in critical care patients having CAUTI. We performed a MEDLINE search using combinations of keywords such as urinary tract infection, critical care unit and indwelling urinary catheter. We reviewed the relevant publications with regard to CAUTI in patients in CCU.

  7. Value of cystography in urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncrieff, M W; Whitelaw, R

    1976-01-01

    Fifty-one children with a bacteriologically proven urinary tract infection had both an intravenous urogram (IVU) and a micturating cystogram. The IVU was normal in 35. Only 6 of these children showed reflux in the cystogram, affecting 7 of the 70 ureters at risk. Since reflux on its own does not cause renal damage, which occurs only with super-added infection, detection of reflux is not important providing the urine is kept sterile. We suggest that cystography be deferred providing the IVU is normal until recurrent infections occur while under hospital care, and, with this policy this unpleasant and sometimes hazardous investigation could be avoided in many children with a single urinary tract infection. PMID:1008600

  8. Urinary tract infections; problems in medical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    JAWETZ, E

    1953-08-01

    The lesion principally responsible for chronic, or recurrent, urinary tract infection is a focus in the interstitial tissue of the kidney. Most cursory antimicrobial therapy suppresses the manifestations of lower urinary tract involvement but does not eradicate the renal focus. In order to cure rather than merely suppress the infection, it is imperative that, as early as possible, steps be taken to isolate and identify the etiologic microorganism and to determine its sensitivity to antimicrobial agents. Based on this information sufficient amounts of drug should be given for an adequate period (probably at least two weeks) to eradicate the infection within the renal tissue. Such a program would tend to reduce the number of cases in which irreversible renal failure develops from chronic pyelonephritis.

  9. Imaging in childhood urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccabona, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common query in pediatric radiology. Imaging for and after UTI is still a heavily debated topic with different approaches, as thorough evidence to decide upon a definite algorithm is scarce. This review article tries to address the clinical rational of the various approaches (general imaging, top-down or bottom-up, selected and individualized imaging concepts…), describes the available imaging modalities and the respective findings in imaging children with UTI, and proposes an imaging algorithm for the work-up of children during and after UTI discussing the "pros and cons" of the different attitudes. In summary, imaging by US is generally considered for all infants and children with a febrile or complicated (upper) UTI, particularly without previously known urinary tract anatomy. The further work-up (searching for renal scarring and assessment of vesico-ureteric reflux) is then decided according to these initial findings as well as the clinical presentation, course, and scenario.

  10. Agalactiae in uncomplicated urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Jermakow

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background . Urinary tract infections (UTIs represent 10-20% of all community-acquired infections. Escherichia coli remains the most commonly isolated microorganism. Because of the dominance of these bacteria, routine laboratory tests are not recommended in making the first UTI diagnosis. However, careful monitoring of all etiological agents of ncomplicated UTIs should be an important strategy for empirical therapy. Objectives . A determination of the incidence of UTI bacterial etiological agents in outpatients. Material and methods. The results of urine cultures were analyzed. The samples were obtained in the period from 01.2011 to 03.2013 from outpatients of all age groups. Results . The rods of Escherichia coli were the most frequently identified microorganisms responsible for uncomplicated UTIs. They were isolated from 52% of infected patients. Every fourth case of UTI indicated the participation of Enterococcus spp. And Streptococcus agalactiae . The next 21% of infections were caused by Gram-negative bacteria other than E. coli . The role of coagulase-negative staphylococci was insignificant and equaled less than 2%. Conclusions . Despite the dominant role of E. coli in urinary tract infections, there has been a decrease in the frequency of its isolation. However, the natural resistance of Enterococcus spp. to antibiotics increases the number of urinary tract infections caused by these bacteria. Streptococcus agalactiae is a UTI cause with similar frequency in women of reproductive age and postmenopausal women. Monitoring of the incidence of uncomplicated infections facilitates empirical treatment and prevents UTI recurrence.

  11. [COMPLICATED URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS IN THE ELDERLY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćosić, I; Ćosić, V

    2016-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common bacterial infections involving lower (cystitis, prostatitis) or upper (pyelonephritis, renal abscess, perinephric abscess) urinary tract. Differentiation of complicated and uncomplicated UTI is usually based on the presence of structural or functional urinary tract abnormalities, which can increase the risk of treatment failure and development of serious complications. Factors that increase the risk are foreign bodies, stones, obstruction, neurogenic bladder, kidney transplantation, immunosuppression, and pregnancy. Complicated UTI includes a spectrum of conditions that increase the risk of treatment failure, as well as of serious complications such as bacteremia and sepsis, perinephric abscess, renal impairment and emphysematous pyelonephritis. To avoid the potentially devastating outcomes, appropriate diagnostic procedures, antibiotic and surgical treatment, and appropriate follow-up are required. The incidence of complicated UTI will grow in the future due to general aging of the population, increasing incidence of diabetes, and ever growing number of immunocompromised and immunosuppressed patients. It is of key importance to recognize complicated UTI on time, and treat it wisely and aggressively to reduce duration of the disease and the risk of antibiotic resistance.

  12. Proteus mirabilis and Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Jessica N.; Pearson, Melanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative bacterium which is well-known for its ability to robustly swarm across surfaces in a striking bulls’-eye pattern. Clinically, this organism is most frequently a pathogen of the urinary tract, particularly in patients undergoing long-term catheterization. This review covers P. mirabilis with a focus on urinary tract infections (UTI), including disease models, vaccine development efforts, and clinical perspectives. Flagella-mediated motility, both swimming and swarming, is a central facet of this organism. The regulation of this complex process and its contribution to virulence is discussed, along with the type VI-secretion system-dependent intra-strain competition which occurs during swarming. P. mirabilis uses a diverse set of virulence factors to access and colonize the host urinary tract, including urease and stone formation, fimbriae and other adhesins, iron and zinc acquisition, proteases and toxins, biofilm formation, and regulation of pathogenesis. While significant advances in this field have been made, challenges remain to combatting complicated UTI and deciphering P. mirabilis pathogenesis. PMID:26542036

  13. [Urinary tract infection by Candida species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pedraza Avilés, Alberto; Luís Hernández, Rosalina; Luna Avila, Jesús; Dávila Mendoza, Rocío; Ortiz Zaragoza, Catalina

    2006-01-01

    To determine the frequency and characteristics of urinary tract infection (UTI) by Candida in diabetic patients (with and without symptoms) and to compare them with non-diabetic patients (with and without symptoms). Longitudinal, descriptive, and observational study. Study conducted at the "Dr Ignacio Chavez" Clinic of family medicine, ISSSTE: Mexico. There were 2 kinds of patients; 1 with diabetes mellitus diagnosis (DM) with and without clinical picture of probable urinary tract infection (UTI), and 1 without DM and with and without clinical picture of probable UTI. A urine culture and a confidential questionnaire were administered to find the presence of urinary symptoms and likely risk factors associated with the infection. To associate these risks, the chi2 statistical method was used, with significance at 95% and Fisher's Exact Test for small frequencies, using the EpiInfo V.6.0 program. Two hundred thirty seven patients between 28 and 82 years old were included. The prevalence of urinary infection by Candida was 5.1%, but only 33% of these had C albicans. There was no association between candidiasis and factors like age, sex, or presence of DM, but it was related to previous treatments, previous UTI and the evolution time of DM. The conscious search by both doctor and laboratory for Candida micro-organisms as factors causing UTI is important. This is especially so in those patients with factors of risk that may condition Candida's presence.

  14. Epidemiology of urinary tract infections in Hiroshima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, L.R.; Phair, J.P.; Seki, Masafumi; Hamilton, H.B.; Nefzger, M.D.

    1964-08-19

    The present study was conducted at ABCC on a sample of Hiroshima residents systematically seleced for determining the influence on general health status of exposure to the atomic bomb of 1945. A survey for urinary infections was taken on persons in the sample examined in the ABCC clinic over a 1-year period: approximately 3000 women and 2000 men. The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence of urinary infection and to study the relation between bacteriuria and various aspects of the general examination, particularly blood pressure. In addition, the rates of urinary tract infection in the clinic were compared with the rates of chronic pyelonephritis at autopsy. Results showed that infections were much more common in women than in men and rose with age in both sexes. The greatest increase in the prevalence was found in women age 60 years and over was due to coliform bacteria in all but a few instances. There was no difference in hematuria, glycosuria, diabetes, serum cholesterol, blood groups, electrocardiograms, audiometry, vibrometry, hemoglobin levels or height-weight ratios. Blood pressure is higher in infected women as compared with noninfected women and the finding of higher rates for cardiac enlargement suggests that this small difference in blood pressures may have biological significance. However, the data do not permit a conclusion as to whether the urinary infections were responsible for the higher blood pressure levels, or whether the higher blood pressure levels increased the frequency of detectable infection. The difference between the clinical rates of urinary infection in men and women, and the pathological diagnosis of pyelonephritis in the same population, supports a previous suggestion that much of what is called pyelonephritis at autopsy is not due to urinary tract infection. 27 references, 2 figures, 10 tables.

  15. Native and contrast-radiographic examination of the urinary tract

    OpenAIRE

    Govorčin Mira; Hadnađev Dušan; Stojanović Sanja; Lučić Zorka; Lukač Ilona

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Plain x-rays and contrast urography are important for diagnosing urinary tract diseases. The first plain film of the urinary tract was made in 1896, and the first tests using contrasts started in 1904. Excretory urography has been used since 1930. Plain film of the urinary tract Plain films of the urinary tract are used in the kidney area, the area of the ureter and urinary bladder. They also show structures (lumbar and sacral spine and pelvis), muscles (m. iliopsoas) as well as ...

  16. Anatomy and histology of the lower urinary tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pradidarcheep, Wisuit; Wallner, Christian; Dabhoiwala, Noshir F.; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2011-01-01

    The function of the lower urinary tract is basically storage of urine in the bladder and the at-will periodic evacuation of the stored urine. Urinary incontinence is one of the most common lower urinary tract disorders in adults, but especially in the elderly female. The urethra, its sphincters, and

  17. Neurophysiology of the lower urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckel, Jonathan M; Holstege, Gert

    2011-01-01

    The lower urinary tract (LUT) has two functions: (1) the storage of waste products in the form of urine and (2) the elimination of those wastes through micturition. The LUT operates in a simple "on-off" fashion, either storing urine or releasing it during voiding. While this activity may seem simple, micturition is controlled by a complex set of peripheral neurons that are, in turn, coordinated by cell groups in the spinal cord, brainstem, and brain. When this careful coordination is interrupted, the control of the bladder is lost, resulting in incontinence or retention of urine. The purpose of this chapter is to review how the neural systems coordinating the activity of the lower urinary tract form neural circuits that are responsible for either maintaining continence (the storage reflex) or inducing micturition (the voiding reflex). We will also discuss the brain centers that enable higher organisms to voluntarily choose the time and place for voiding. Finally, we will discuss how defects in the pathways controlling micturition can lead to urinary incontinence and which treatments may normalize LUT function.

  18. Symptoms and risk factors associated with first urinary tract infection in college age women: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Charles R; Thomas, Tami L; Reyes, Leticia; White, C LeAnn; Canales, Benjamin K; Brown, Mary B

    2013-03-01

    We identified epidemiological risk factors for the initial urinary tract infection in females of college age compared to age matched controls. We performed a prospective cohort study from July 2001 to January 2006 at the student health care facility at our institution. A total of 180 women experiencing a first urinary tract infection were compared to 80 asymptomatic women with no urinary tract infection history who served as controls. Urinalysis and urine culture were done at study enrollment. Questionnaires were used to obtain information on clinical symptoms and behaviors, including sexual and dietary practices, and alcohol consumption. Logistic regression was performed to identify potential risk factors in women who presented with an initial urinary tract infection compared with controls. Principal component analysis was then done to identify key sexual activity variables for multiple regression models. Urinary frequency and urgency were the most common urinary tract infection symptoms. Recent sexual activity was a significant risk factor for urinary tract infection with vaginal intercourse (p = 0.002) and the number of sexual partners in the last 2 weeks (p associated with 2 of the 3 main principal components of sexual activity. Caffeinated beverage consumption also increased the risk of urinary tract infection (p risk of urinary tract infection. Alcohol consumption frequency and amount correlated with these behaviors. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Urinary alkalisation for symptomatic uncomplicated urinary tract infection in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kane, Dermot B; Dave, Sameer K; Gore, Neel; Patel, Farhaan; Hoffmann, Tammy C; Trill, Jeanne L; Del Mar, Chris B

    2016-04-19

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common bacterial infection in women, characterised by dysuria and urinary frequency. Urinary alkalisers are widely used in some countries for the symptomatic treatment of uncomplicated UTI, and they are recommended in some national formularies. However, there is a lack of empirical evidence to support their use for UTI and some healthcare guidelines advise against their use. We aimed to look at the benefits and harms of the use of urinary alkalisers for the treatment of uncomplicated UTIs in adult women. We searched the Cochrane Kidney and Transplant Specialised Register to 19 January 2016 through contact with the Trials Search Co-ordinator using search terms relevant to this review. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs on the use of (any) urinary alkalisers (either exclusively or non-exclusively) for the symptomatic treatment of uncomplicated UTI amongst women aged 16 and over, were included. Studies were eligible if they included patients whose diagnosis of UTI was decided by symptoms alone, or positive urine dipstick test or urine culture; and patients with recurrent UTI, provided patients had no symptoms of UTI in the two weeks prior to the onset of symptoms that lead them to seek medical advice. Studies were ineligible if they studied patients with complicated UTIs; immune-compromising conditions; acute pyelonephritis; or chronic conditions such as interstitial cystitis. Three authors independently assessed and screened papers, and this was repeated by two separate authors (independently). An additional investigator acted as arbitrator, where necessary. There were no papers which fulfilled the inclusion criteria for this review, and therefore no data extraction was performed. Our search identified 172 potential studies for inclusion. However, following assessment none fulfilled the inclusion criteria for this review. Until relevant evidence is generated from randomised trials, the safety

  20. Prevention and treatment of complicated urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Yamamoto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A complicated urinary tract infection (UTI has relapsing and refractory characteristics, and is sometimes life-threatening because of patient predisposing factors as well as the recent worldwide spread of multi-drug resistant bacteria. Patients with complicated UTI should be treated with effective antimicrobial therapy along with appropriate urological intervention to remove predisposing factors when the symptoms are associated. By contrast, routine use of antimicrobial prophylaxis for asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB is not recommended, as that would contribute to an increase in even more resistant pathogens. Here, four classifications of complicated UTI, which are considered to be clinically important for general urologists, are reviewed, including UTI in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM and those with a neurogenic bladder, as well as catheter-associated UTI (CAUTI and obstructive pyelonephritis secondary to urolithiasis. Appropriate treatment approaches can only be chosen by proper understanding of the etiologies of complicated UTI, as well as correct diagnostic strategies and treatment options.

  1. Comparative Genomics of Escherichia coli Strains Causing Urinary Tract Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria; Schembri, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    The virulence determinants of uropathogenic Escherichia coli have been studied extensively over the years, but relatively little is known about what differentiates isolates causing various types of urinary tract infections. In this study, we compared the genomic profiles of 45 strains from a range...... of different clinical backgrounds, i.e., urosepsis, pyelonephritis, cystitis, and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU), using comparative genomic hybridization analysis. A microarray based on 31 complete E. coli sequences was used. It emerged that there is little correlation between the genotypes of the strains...... disease categories were identified. Among these were two genomic islands, namely, pathogenicity island (PAI)-CFT073-serU and PAI-CFT073-pheU, which were significantly more associated with the pyelonephritis and urosepsis isolates than with the ABU and cystitis isolates. These two islands harbor genes...

  2. Lower urinary tract symptoms after subtotal versus total abdominal hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lea Laird; Møller, Lars Mikael Alling; Gimbel, Helga

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common after hysterectomy and increase after menopause. We aimed to compare subtotal with total abdominal hysterectomy regarding LUTS, including urinary incontinence (UI) subtypes, 14 years after hysterectomy. Main results from ...

  3. Urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformations in children: a retrospective study of 34 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahed, Jamila; Jouini, Riadh; Krichene, Imed; Maazoun, Kaies; Brahim, Mohamed Ben; Nouri, Abdellatif

    2011-01-01

    Although the association of urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformation is not rare, their management poses challenges. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between urolithiasis and malformations of the urinary system. There were 34 patients (19 males and 15 females) with a mean age of 4.8 years (range, 2 months to 14 years). All patients had urinary lithiasis with a urinary tract malformation. Abdominal pain was the most frequent clinical symptom (38%). Urinary infection was found in 7 patients (21%) and macroscopic haematuria was present in 10 patients (29%). The most frequent urinary tract malformations were megaureter (8 cases), uretero-pelvic junction obstruction (7 cases) and vesico-ureteric reflux (8 cases), but its malformative origin could not be confirmed. Treatment consisted of lithiasis extraction in 32 cases associated with specific treatment of the uropathy in 27 cases. Postoperative outcome was uneventful in all cases. In fact, urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformation association is not rare. Indeed, 9-34% of urinary lithiasis are noted to be associated with urinary tract malformation. Positive diagnosis relies specifically on kidney ultrasound, intravenous urography, and urethrocystography. Treatment depends on the type of urinary tract malformation, localisation and size of the urinary lithiasis. In conclusion, urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformation association is a frequent eventuality. Surgical intervention is the usual mode of treatment.

  4. Urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformations in children: A retrospective study of 34 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila Chahed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although the association of urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformation is not rare, their management poses challenges. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between urolithiasis and malformations of the urinary system. There were 34 patients (19 males and 15 females with a mean age of 4.8 years (range, 2 months to 14 years. All patients had urinary lithiasis with a urinary tract malformation. Abdominal pain was the most frequent clinical symptom (38%. Urinary infection was found in 7 patients (21% and macroscopic haematuria was present in 10 patients (29%. The most frequent urinary tract malformations were megaureter (8 cases, uretero-pelvic junction obstruction (7 cases and vesico-ureteric reflux (8 cases, but its malformative origin could not be confirmed. Treatment consisted of lithiasis extraction in 32 cases associated with specific treatment of the uropathy in 27 cases. Postoperative outcome was uneventful in all cases. In fact, urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformation association is not rare. Indeed, 9-34% of urinary lithiasis are noted to be associated with urinary tract malformation. Positive diagnosis relies specifically on kidney ultrasound, intravenous urography, and urethrocystography. Treatment depends on the type of urinary tract malformation, localisation and size of the urinary lithiasis. Conclusion: In conclusion, urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformation association is a frequent eventuality. Surgical intervention is the usual mode of treatment.

  5. Body growth in urinary tract malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, C; Schaefer, F; Schärer, K

    1993-04-01

    Body height and height velocity were analysed in 54 children with obstructive urinary tract malformations over a mean period of 8.7 years, using new auxological methods. At the time of diagnosis, 9% of patients had a height of more than 2 standard deviations below the normal mean. Mean relative height changed significantly from the first to the last observation, the standard deviation score (SDS) increasing from -0.16 to +0.36 in patients with hydronephrosis compared with normal children (P pubertal spurt. Final height and target height calculated from parents' height differed only slightly from that of the normal population.

  6. Urinary Tract Infection: Pathogenesis and Outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Lisa K; Hunstad, David A

    2016-11-01

    The clinical syndromes comprising urinary tract infection (UTI) continue to exert significant impact on millions of patients worldwide, most of whom are otherwise healthy women. Antibiotic therapy for acute cystitis does not prevent recurrences, which plague up to one fourth of women after an initial UTI. Rising antimicrobial resistance among uropathogenic bacteria further complicates therapeutic decisions, necessitating new approaches based on fundamental biological investigation. In this review, we highlight contemporary advances in the field of UTI pathogenesis and how these might inform both our clinical perspective and future scientific priorities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Urinary Tract Infection: Pathogenesis and Outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Lisa K.; Hunstad, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical syndromes comprising urinary tract infection (UTI) continue to exert significant impact on millions of patients worldwide, most of whom are otherwise healthy women. Antibiotic therapy for acute cystitis does not prevent recurrences, which plague up to one fourth of women after an initial UTI. Rising antimicrobial resistance among uropathogenic bacteria further complicates therapeutic decisions, necessitating new approaches based on fundamental biological investigation. In this review, we highlight contemporary advances in the field of UTI pathogenesis and how these might inform both our clinical perspective and future scientific priorities. PMID:27692880

  8. Can low urinary tract symptoms influence postprostatectomy urinary incontinence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienza, Antonio; Hevia, Mateo; Merino, Imanol; Diez-Caballero, Fernando; Rosell, David; Pascual, Juan I; Zudaire, Juan J; Robles, José E

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze what kind of urinary symptoms patients have before receiving treatment by radical prostatectomy (RP), and to evaluate their influence on urinary incontinence (UI). Between 2002 and 2012, 758 consecutive patients underwent RP for clinically localized prostate cancer (PCa). Surgery was carried out by open retropubic RP in 545 (73.1%) of patients and laparoscopic RP in 201 (27%) by 5 surgeons who were excluded from data collection and analysis. The following symptoms were collected from the last urological check-ups or pre-operative consultation and classified as: storage symptoms, voiding symptoms, post micturition symptoms, history of acute urinary retention, benign prostatic hyperplasia treatment, history of transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). A total of 661 patients were included on analysis: 136 (20.6%) patients reported low urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), 162 (24.5%) were considered incontinent after RP, and 45 (33.1%) of them reported LUTS before surgery. Postprostatectomy urinary incontinence (PPUI) was significantly different in patients with LUTS (117 [22.3%] vs. 45 [33.1%], P=0.009). The presence of any LUTS influence significantly in the appearance of PPUI (OR=1.72 [95% CI: 1.14-2.6), P=0.01). TURP is independently influential in PPUI (OR=6.13 [95% CI: 1.86-20.18], P=0.003). A patient with LUTS before surgery has an increased risk of 70% or even 200% to suffer PPUI and a patient who received treatment by TURP is 6 times at higher risk of PPUI. In conclusion, patients with LUTS are likely to present PPUI. History of TURP is influential by itself over PPUI. A good preoperative consultation is important to assess continence status and to create realistic expectations to patients before RP.

  9. Urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformations in children: A retrospective study of 34 cases

    OpenAIRE

    Jamila Chahed; Riadh Jouini; Imed Krichene; Kaies Maazoun; Mohamed Ben Brahim; Abdellatif Nouri

    2011-01-01

    Background: Although the association of urinary lithiasis and urinary tract malformation is not rare, their management poses challenges. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between urolithiasis and malformations of the urinary system. There were 34 patients (19 males and 15 females) with a mean age of 4.8 years (range, 2 months to 14 years). All patients had urinary lithiasis with a urinary tract malformation. Abdominal pain was the most frequent clinical symptom (38%). Uri...

  10. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy in patients with urinary tract abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violette, Philippe D; Dion, Marie; Tailly, Thomas; Denstedt, John D; Razvi, Hassan

    2014-12-01

    Patients with urinary tract abnormalities are at an increased risk of stone formation. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) plays an important role in the treatment of this patient population; however, outcomes are less well defined compared with patients with normal urinary tract anatomy. Our objective was to evaluate the influence of urinary tract abnormalities on intraoperative and postoperative outcomes with PCNL. We report on a single-center prospective database of 2284 consecutive PCNLs in 1935 patients from 1990 to 2012. For the purposes of this analysis, patients were categorized by the presence or absence of a urinary tract abnormality. Multivariable analyses were used to identify independent predictors of the length of hospital stay, operative time, complications, and residual stones at discharge and 3 months. A urinary tract abnormality was present in 14.4% (n=330) of the cohort. On univariable analysis, patients with urinary tract abnormalities were more likely to present with urinary tract infection (28% vs 19%, Purinary tract abnormality was predictive of residual stone at discharge, need for a secondary procedure, but did not increase the risk of residual stone at 3 months or the development of complications. Operative time and hospital stay were only moderately prolonged. Patients with urinary tract abnormalities who undergo PCNL have a higher risk of residual stones at discharge and need for secondary procedures, but comparable complication rates, operative time, and hospital stay.

  11. Presumptive pseudohypoaldosteronism secondary to chronic urinary tract obstruction from sloughed urinary bladder mucosa and urinary tract infection in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlum, Lisa M; Rollings, Christopher; Basseches, Jessica; Bracker, Kiko

    2010-12-01

    To describe a case of presumptive secondary pseudohypoaldosteronism (PHA) in a cat with urinary tract infection and chronic urethral obstruction. The obstruction was believed to have resulted from sloughed urinary bladder mucosa secondary to pressure necrosis. A 5-year-old, 4 kg, castrated male Siamese cat presented for vomiting and stranguria. Medical history included a perineal urethrostomy for urethral obstruction. Physical examination revealed a large, painful, nonexpressible urinary bladder. Point-of-care testing demonstrated electrolyte derangements consistent with a postrenal azotemia and metabolic acidosis. Results of urine culture was positive for bacterial growth. Diagnostic imaging revealed presence of retroperitoneal fluid, marked urinary bladder wall thickening, bilateral hydroureter, mild bilateral pyelectasia, and small nephroliths. The patient was treated for a urinary tract obstruction and infection. In the 3 weeks following initial discharge, the patient was evaluated on multiple occasions for lethargy, intermittent vomiting, inappropriate urination, and progressive polyuria and polydipsia. Although the urinary bladder was easily expressed during repeat examinations, it was persistently distended and subjectively thickened upon palpation. Repeat ultrasound of the urinary tract showed evidence of sloughed tissue in the bladder lumen, likely secondary to chronic urethral obstruction and pressure necrosis. A cystotomy was performed to remove the necrotic tissue, and a revised perineal urethrostomy was done due to a partial urethral stricture. Bladder biopsies were obtained at this time. Postoperatively, the cat was reported by the owners to be urinating normally but continued to be polyuric and polydipsic in the week following discharge. One week after surgery, the cat presented in hypovolemic shock with laboratory findings consistent with a presumptive diagnosis of secondary PHA. PHA has not been reported previously in a cat. This case report

  12. 77 FR 11133 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Complicated Urinary Tract Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... guidance for industry entitled ``Complicated Urinary Tract Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment... treatment of complicated urinary tract infections (cUTIs). Specifically, this guidance addresses FDA's... guidance for industry entitled ``Complicated Urinary Tract Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment...

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility of some urinary tract clinical isolates to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Klebsiella spp., Proteus spp. and Staphylococcus spp. were moderately sensitive to ciprofloxacillin (14, 15 and 18 mm/5 μg ml-1) respectively. All the organisms were resistant to minocycline and cefuroxine. Ciprofloxacillin appeared to be the drug of choice for the treatment of urinary tract infection. Keywords: Urinary tract ...

  14. a seven months retrospective study on urinary tract infection among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    It is the most common infectious complication associated with serious risk in pregnancy and responsible for a high rate of morbidity ... Key words: Urinary Tract Infection, Uropathogen, Retrospective Study, Kano. INTRODUCTION. Urinary tract ... Other common pathogens include Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus ...

  15. Classification of pediatric urinary tract dilation: the new language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Jeanne S; Koning, Jeffrey L; Back, Susan J; Nguyen, Hiep T; Phelps, Andrew; Darge, Kassa

    2017-08-01

    The multidisciplinary consensus on the classification of prenatal and postnatal urinary tract dilation (UTD classification system) was created to unify the language used to describe urinary tract dilation on antenatal and postnatal ultrasound examinations and thereby facilitate communication among providers and improve outcomes research. The background and new classification system are described in this review, with imaging examples.

  16. The prevalence of urinary tract infections among pregnant women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common problem amongst pregnant women. This study assesses the prevalence of urinary tract infection in pregnant women attending antenatal clinic at a primary health care center in Ekpoma, Edo State, Nigeria. A total of 200 early morning midstream urine samples were collected ...

  17. Prevalence of Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) in sexually active ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aresearch to investigate the prevalence of urinary tract infections in sexually active women (18 – 41 years) from selected health care centres in Abakaliki was carried out. Attempt was made to fined out the number of treated cases, aetiologic agents and age range with highest incdence o urinary tract infections over the study ...

  18. Novel Approaches to Preventing Urinary Tract Infection in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    Excretory urography , cystography, and cystoscopy in the evaluation of women with urinary tract infection. J. Urol., 123: 190, 1979. 8. Fowler J.E., Pulaski...E.T.: Excretory urography , cystography and cystoscopy in the evaluation of women with recurrent urinary tract infection. N. Engl. J. Med., 304: 462

  19. Lower Urinary Tract Endoscopic Procedures in Jos | Shu'aibu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Lower urinary tract endoscopy has become an important tool in everyday urologic practice. It offers unique opportunities for urologists to clinch diagnosis and /or offer therapeutic interventions. The objective of this study was to review the profile of lower urinary tract endoscopic procedures in two tertiary ...

  20. Urinary tract candidiasis in HIV+ patients and sensitivity patterns of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence of Candida urinary tract infections is gradually on the rise and is an important public health problem. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of urinary tract candidiasis (candiduria) in HIV positive patients in Dschang District Hospital and the antifungal susceptibility test of isolates. A total of.

  1. Urinary tract candidiasis in HIV+ patients and sensitivity patterns of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence of Candida urinary tract infections is gradually on the rise and is an important public health problem. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of urinary tract candidiasis (candiduria) in HIV positive patients in Dschang District Hospital and the antifungal susceptibility test of isolates. A total of 285 ...

  2. Congenital upper urinary tract abnormalities: new images of the same diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maranhao, Carol Pontes de Miranda; Santos, Carla Jotta dos [Clinica de Medicina Nuclear e Radiologia de Maceio (MedRadiUS), AL (Brazil); Miranda, Christiana Maia Nobre Rocha de; Farias, Lucas de Padua Gomes de; Padilha, Igor Gomes, E-mail: maiachristiana@globo.com [Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Maceio, AL (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    Congenital upper urinary tract abnormalities imply a variable clinical spectrum of morphofunctional changes ranging from asymptomatic conditions to renal failure and incompatibility with life. Computed tomography, which has overcome excretory urography imaging, has been playing a key role in the diagnosis of congenital anomalies, serving as a better guidance in the therapeutic and surgical decision-making process, besides acting as an essential tool in the identification of associated complications and aiding in the performance of minimally invasive surgery techniques. (author)

  3. Non-contrast thin-section helical CT of urinary tract calculi in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strouse, Peter J. [Section of Pediatric Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bates, Gregory D. [Department of Radiology, Columbus Children' s Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States); Bloom, David A. [Department of Pediatric Imaging, Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI (United States); Goodsitt, Mitchell M. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2002-05-01

    Background: Non-contrast thin-section helical CT has gained acceptance for the diagnosis of urinary tract calculi in adults, but experience with the technique in children is limited. Purpose: To evaluate the utility of non-contrast thin section helical CT for the diagnosis of urinary tract calculi in children. Materials and methods: Radiology databases at three pediatric institutions were searched to identify all pediatric patients evaluated by ''renal stone'' protocol CT scans (no oral or intravenous contrast, scans covering the entire urinary tract obtained in helical mode with narrow collimation (< 5 mm)). CT scans were reviewed for the primary finding of urinary tract calculi, for secondary signs of acute urinary tract obstruction and for evidence of alternative diagnoses. Medical records were reviewed to determine clinical presentation and to confirm the eventual diagnosis. Results: One hundred thirty-seven scans of 113 children (mean age: 11.2 years) were studied. Thirty-eight of 94 examinations (40%) performed on 82 children for acute pain and/or hematuria showed ureteral calculi. Alternative diagnoses were suggested by CT on 16 scans (17%). Twenty-eight scans were performed on 10 asymptomatic children with known calculus disease confirming renal stone burden on 21 scans (75%) and persistent ureteral calculi on 6 scans (21%). Upper tract calculi were demonstrated on 10 of 15 scans (67%) performed to evaluate for calculi in patients with known non-calculus genitourinary tract abnormalities. Conclusions: Non-contrast thin section helical CT is a useful method to diagnose urinary tract calculi in children. Radiation dose in this retrospective study may exceed the lowest possible radiation dose for diagnostic accuracy. Further research is needed to optimize CT imaging parameters, while maintaining diagnostic accuracy and minimizing radiation dose. (orig.)

  4. Ascending urinary tract infection in rats caused by Proteus mirabilis

    OpenAIRE

    Al Murayati, H. Y. A. [حيدر المراياتي; Al-Murayati, H. Y.; Al-Ani, I. M.; Gani, H. M.

    1997-01-01

    A model for ascending unobstructed urinary tract infection was developed in female rats to study the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection by Proteus mirabilis. Urinary bladders of rats were inoculated by I. V. cannula with 0.5 ml ofbrainheart infusion broth containing approximataly 3 x 108 living bacteria. Kidney, blood and urine samples collected at days 2, 4 and weeks 1-8 intervals were studied for renal infection as well as renal function tests. The results indicated the variation an...

  5. Ethiology of urinary tract infections in male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Pirali

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study is based on data from 4317 positive urine cultures collected at S. Orsola, Fondazione Poliambulanza Hospital of Brescia (Italy from 2007 to 2009.The patient group was heterogeneous and included in- and outpatients of both gender, ranging in age from 1 to 99 years. E. coli was the most frequently pathogen isolated in all the urine cultures independently from age or sex. Our findings differ from those of a similar study made in the U.S.A., where Enterococcus (Group D Streptococcus was the most frequently isolated pathogen in the urine cultures of the male subjects. These results suggest to maintain an identical empirical therapy in male and female because the most frequently isolated bacteria responsible of urinary tract infections are Gram negative.

  6. Pacemakers in the upper urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Benedetto, Antonina; Arena, Salvatore; Nicotina, Piero Antonio; Mucciardi, Giuseppe; Galì, Alessandro; Magno, Carlo

    2013-04-01

    Pacemakers in upper urinary tract (UUT) are still under study. We reviewed the role of some cells that seem to be involved in the propulsion of urinary bolus from UUT to the bladder. We focuses on evaluating studies on the mechanisms by which the UUT propels urine to the bladder via pacemaker cells. Electric active pacemaker cells generate pyeloureteric autorhythmicity driving adjacent smooth muscle cells (SMCs); it emphasizes the role of the interstitial cells of Cajal-like cells (ICC-LCs) localized in the UUT. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are now thought to cooperate in conducting and amplifying pacemaker activity in the UUT. These cells produce electrical slow-wave potentials and determine the propagation of peristaltic activity. Identification of ICC-LCs is facilitated by use of c-kit antibodies. Contraction waves arising from the UUT and the propagation of these waves may require the direct involvement of ICC-LCs, as c-kit immunoreactivity appears developmentally at the same time as coordinated unidirectional peristaltic contraction. ICC-LCs observed in the UUT have morphological features similar to those of c-kitpositive ICCs in the gastrointestinal tract. In addition to gastrointestinal motility, ICCs may also play a significant role in the propagation, coordination, and modulation of ureteropelvic peristalsis. Alterations in ICC-LCs are closely associated with a variety of motility disorders and many congenital urological diseases of the UUT such as primary obstructive megaureter, congenital ureteropelvic junction obstruction, and vesicoureteral reflux. These observations open the way for further investigations of this cell type. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Neuroanatomy of the lower urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckel, Jonathan M; Holstege, Gert

    2011-01-01

    The lower urinary tract (LUT), which consists of the urinary bladder and its outlet, the urethra, is responsible for the storage and periodic elimination of bodily waste in the form of urine. The LUT is controlled by a complex set of peripheral autonomic and somatic nerves, which in turn are controlled through neural pathways in the spinal cord and brain. This influence of the central nervous system allows for the conscious control of the bladder, allowing the individual to choose an appropriate place to urinate. Defects in the CNS pathways that control the LUT can lead to incontinence, an embarrassing condition that affects over 200 million people worldwide. As a first step in understanding the neural control of the bladder, we will discuss the neuroanatomy of the LUT, focusing first on the peripheral neural pathways, including the sensory pathways that transmit information on bladder filling and the motoneurons that control LUT muscle contractility. We will also discuss the organization of the central pathways in the spinal cord and brainstem that are responsible for coordinating bladder activity, promoting continuous storage of urine except for a few short minutes per day when micturition takes place. To conclude, we will discuss current studies underway that aim to elucidate the higher areas of the brain that control the voluntary nature of micturition in higher organisms.

  8. Prevalence of upper urinary tract anomalies in hospitalized premature infants with urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachharajani, A; Vricella, G J; Najaf, T; Coplen, D E

    2015-05-01

    The 2011 American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines address imaging after initial febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) in infants >2 months of age. We sought to determine the frequency of upper urinary tract anomalies (hydronephrosis and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR)) in hospitalized premature infants with UTI. We retrospectively reviewed the electronic medical records of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admissions at a tertiary care children's hospital between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2010. We queried the records for UTI, renal ultrasound (US) and voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG). We identified 3518 unique admissions. UTI occurred in 118 infants (3%). Sixty-nine (60%) had a normal US. Renal dilation was predominantly renal pelvic dilation (12%) and isolated caliectasis (22%). VUR was identified in 15 (14%) infants evaluated with a VCUG. VUR was identified in nine (12%) infants without and in seven (16%) with an abnormality on US. Reflux was identified in 7% of male and 38% of female infants with a UTI. Anatomic abnormalities of the upper urinary tract are uncommon in premature infants with a UTI that occurs during neonatal hospitalization. In concordance with the AAP guidelines, a VCUG may not be required in all NICU infants under age 2 months after a single UTI.

  9. Asymptomatic urinary anomalies, hematuria and proteinuria, in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velciov, Silvia; Gluhovschi, Gh; Sporea, I; Trandafirescu, Virginia; Petrica, Ligia; Bozdog, Gh; Gluhovschi, Cristina; Bob, F; Gădălean, Florica; Buzaş, Roxana; Bobu, Maria; Voicu, L

    2011-01-01

    The study assesses the presence of asymptomatic urinary anomalies in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Asymptomatic urinary anomalies are mainly due to glomerular nephritis, they being one of the forms of its manifestation, together with chronic nephrotic and nephritic syndromes. We identified urinary anomalies in 18 patients (20%) with bowel inflammatory disease that consisted of haematuria in 8 (9%) patients, isolated proteinuria in 5 (6%) patients and haematuria associated with proteinuria in 5 (6%) patients. Asymptomatic urinary anomalies were more frequent in patients with the Crohn disease than in those with ulcerative colitis. We identified RFG under 60ml/min in 4 patients with asymptomatic urinary anomalies. It is very easy to evaluate asymptomatic urinary anomalies with dipstick. This method is also required in current practice for patients with urinary anomalies for identifying the glomerular disease that might have caused them. One must take into consideration differential diagnosis with other diseases that can manifest themselves with proteinuria or isolated proteinuria. One must also take into account the fact that urinary anomalies may also be related to administration of 5-aminosalicylates.

  10. Antibiotic susceptibility of organisms causing urinary tract infection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotic susceptibility of organisms causing urinary tract infection in patients presenting at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi. ... encourage prudent use of antimicrobials. Objectives: To identify bacterial pathogens causing UTI and determine the association between the pathogens isolated from patients attending KNH.

  11. Visceral pain originating from the upper urinary tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Katja Venborg; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Frimodt-Møller, Poul Christian

    2010-01-01

    -visceral hyperalgesia. However, further studies are needed to better understand these visceral pain mechanisms with regard to optimising pain management. This review gives an introduction to visceral pain in general and upper urinary tract pain in particular, with special reference to pain pathways and pharmacological......Pain originating from the upper urinary tract is a common problem and stone colic is one of the most intense pain conditions that can be experienced in the clinic. The pain is difficult to alleviate and often leads to medical attention. In humans, pain mechanisms of the upper urinary tract pain...... are still poorly understood, which often leads to a trial and error approach in clinical pain management. Pain from the upper urinary tract seems to have all the characteristics of pure visceral pain, including referred pain with or without hyperalgesia/trophic changes in somatic tissues and viscero...

  12. Management of urinary tract emergencies in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Anusha; Drobatz, Kenneth J

    2013-07-01

    This article focuses on some of the most commonly seen urinary tract emergencies in dogs and cats, with emphasis on basic pathophysiology, diagnosis, and emergency management of these cases. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Recurrent urinary tract infection and functional voiding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, H Ravi; Kanitkar, Madhuri

    2008-08-01

    This study was carried out to determine the association of recurrent urinary tract infections with functional voiding disorders. Sixty eight children with suspected functional voiding disorders were prospectively evaluated clinically and by non-invasive urodynamics. Invasive urodynamics were carried out when indicated. Group I comprised 34 children with symptoms suggestive of functional voiding disorders and recurrent urinary tract infections (mean age 6.3+/-2 yr) and Group II comprised 34 children with symptoms suggestive of functional voiding disorders without recurrent urinary tract infections (mean age 6.7+/-2 yr). The underlying bladder abnormalities in Groups I and II were detrusor instability in 22 (64.7%) and 30 (88.2%), respectively (P>0.05) and dysynergic voiding in 10 (29.4%), and 1 (2.9%), respectively (P<0.05). Children with recurrent urinary tract infections are more likely to have a dysynergic voiding pattern than children presenting with other symptoms of functional voiding disorders.

  14. Gram-Positive Uropathogens, Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection, and the Emerging Microbiota of the Urinary Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Kimberly A.; Lewis, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are a common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI), particularly among individuals who are elderly, pregnant, or who have other risk factors for UTI. Here we review the epidemiology, virulence mechanisms, and host response to the most frequently isolated Gram-positive uropathogens: Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus agalactiae. We also review several emerging, rare, misclassified, and otherwise underreported Gram-positive pathogens of the urinary tract including Aerococcus, Corynebacterium, Actinobaculum, and Gardnerella. The literature strongly suggests that urologic diseases involving Gram-positive bacteria may be easily overlooked due to limited culture-based assays typically utilized for urine in hospital microbiology laboratories. Some UTIs are polymicrobial in nature, often involving one or more Gram-positive bacteria. We herein review the risk factors and recent evidence for mechanisms of bacterial synergy in experimental models of polymicrobial UTI. Recent experimental data has demonstrated that, despite being cleared quickly from the bladder, some Gram-positive bacteria can impact pathogenic outcomes of co-infecting organisms. When taken together, the available evidence argues that Gram-positive bacteria are important uropathogens in their own right, but that some can be easily overlooked because they are missed by routine diagnostic methods. Finally, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that a surprising variety of fastidious Gram-positive bacteria may either reside in or be regularly exposed to the urinary tract and further suggests that their presence is widespread among women, as well as men. Experimental studies in this area are needed; however, there is a growing appreciation that the composition of bacteria found in the bladder could be a potentially important determinant in urologic disease, including susceptibility to UTI. PMID:27227294

  15. Pathophysiology of nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms in older patients with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denys, Marie-Astrid; Decalf, Veerle; Kumps, Candy; Petrovic, Mirko; Goessaert, An-Sofie; Everaert, Karel

    2017-11-01

    To explore the mismatch between functional bladder capacity and nocturnal urine production, and to study the pathophysiology of an increased nocturnal urine production in older patients with urinary incontinence. The present prospective observational study included adults aged ≥65 years with urinary incontinence. Participants completed questionnaires, frequency volume charts and renal function profiles. The nocturnal lower urinary tract symptom index was defined as nocturnal urine output/maximum voided volume; the nocturnal polyuria index as nocturnal/24 h urine output. The median age (n = 95) was 74 years (69-79), 87% were women and 73% had nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms (nocturnal urinary incontinence or nocturia ≥2). Participants with nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms had a significantly higher nocturnal urine output (809 mL vs 650 mL; P = 0.001) and no significant difference in maximum voided volume (350 mL vs 437 mL; P = 0.079) compared with participants without nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms. Participants (nocturnal polyuria index >33% [n = 56], nocturnal polyuria index >40% [n = 42], nocturnal lower urinary tract symptom index >1.87 [n = 51]) showed higher night-time diuresis rates, free water and sodium clearance compared with during the daytime. Controls (nocturnal polyuria index ≤33% [n = 26], nocturnal polyuria index ≤40% [n = 40], nocturnal lower urinary tract symptom index ≤1.87 [n = 44]) had no circadian rhythm in their diuresis rate or sodium clearance, but more nocturnal free water clearance compared with during the daytime. The majority of older adults with urinary incontinence present nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms. An increased nocturnal sodium diuresis seems to be the only mechanism differentiating patients with nocturnal lower urinary tract symptoms from controls. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  16. Bacteriological study of urinary tract infection in antenatal care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Ritu, Singh Brij N, Begum Rehana, Yadav Ramesh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims & Objective: To isolate and diagnose the Uropathogens and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern in anti-natal care patient suffering from Urinary tract Infections. Material and Methods: 150 samples were collected by consent pregnant women between the age group of 18 to 40 years. A midstream clean catch is adequate, provided by all pregnant women’s through given careful instructions. For enumeration of bacteria we perform standard loop techniques method. The number of colonies counted or estimated, and this number used to calculate the number of viable bacteria per ml of urine. The bacterial strains were identified by colonies character stick, gram staining, morphological and biochemical character. The bacterial strains identification was done up to genus and species level. The antibiotics sensitivity test of bacterial strains was done as per CLSI guidelines by Kirby-Baure Disc Diffusion Methods. Results: The significant bactiurea was found in 50 patients among 150 patients used. The most commonly isolated bacteria was Escherichia coli 23(40% Klebsiellaaerogens 11 (22% Staphylococcus aureus 10 (20% Pseudomonas aerugenosa 4(8%.The incidence of bacteriuria among in their first pregnancy was 22.2%.The higher incidence of UTI in 2nd and 3rd trimester was found to have 31.4% & 40%. These studies were showing high level of resistance to first line antibiotics such as Cotrimaxozole. Conclusion: To minimizing the complication of the pregnant women should be educated about the physiology of pregnancy clinical presentation includes asymptomatic bacteria, acute cystitis & pyelonephritis. Pregnant women should be screened for asymptomatic bacteriuria by urine culture and treated with appropriate antibiotics. After the post treatment pregnant women should be examine again to confirm post treatment urine sterility.

  17. [Lower urinary tract dysfunction in Guillain-Barre syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, A; Mohr, M; Leistner, N; Tabaza, R; Anding, R; Brehmer, B; Kirschner-Hermanns, R

    2017-09-29

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) as acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy frequently leads to lower urinary tract dysfunction. The available knowledge in the medical literature is limited and good recommendations for diagnosis and therapy are rare. In this study, 189 patients with GBS were screened for lower urinary tract dysfunction. In symptomatic patients, a urodynamic study was performed. Detrusor contractility, post-void residual, and changes of the symptoms over time were studied. Overall Barthel index and urinary control Barthel index as well as the relationship of time after onset of the disease and post-void residual were studied as possible screening criteria for urodynamic assessment. According to the urinary control Barthel index (BI), 115 of 189 patients (61%) presented lower urinary tract symptoms sometime during the course of disease. In 28 patients, these symptoms were temporary during the acute phase. At the time of urological assessment, 87 patients had lower urinary tract symptoms. At the end of rehabilitation, 37 had no symptoms anymore (BI 10), 20 were able to control micturition to a certain extent (BI 5), and 30 had no lower urinary tract control (BI 0). There was a significant negative correlation between post-void residual volume and overall BI (ρ -0.5823, p < 0.0001) and BI for urinary tract control (ρ -0.6430, p < 0.0001). Overall BI and BI for urinary tract control are suitable screening criteria for urodynamic assessment.

  18. International Spinal Cord Injury Urinary Tract Infection Basic Data Set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetz, L L; Cardenas, D D; Kennelly, M

    2013-01-01

    To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Basic Data Set presenting a standardized format for the collection and reporting of a minimal amount of information on UTIs in daily practice or research.......To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Basic Data Set presenting a standardized format for the collection and reporting of a minimal amount of information on UTIs in daily practice or research....

  19. Urinary tract pathology in some Schistosoma haematobium infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB SERVER

    2007-01-18

    Jan 18, 2007 ... intensity of infection. Key words: Urinary tract pathology, Schistosoma haematobium, rural volunteers, Nigerian, Ultrasound, Light infection, heavy infection. INTRODUCTION. Urinary Schistosomiasis is a chronic parasitic infection of circulatory system caused by Schistosoma haematobium which affects the ...

  20. Evaluation of Screening Methods for the Detection of Urinary Tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Urinary tract infection occurs in all populations, but with particular impact in females of all ages, male at the two extremes of their life, renal transplant patients, and anyone with functional or structural abnormalities of the urinary system. Method: Evaluation of reagent strips, unspun gram stain urine and wet ...

  1. Antibiotic Sensitivity Pattern of Urinary Tract Pathogens in Port ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MIKE HORSFALL

    infections. @JASEM. Despite impressive advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs), these infections still remain a major clinical problem. Many consultations in general practice are because of urinary infections. (Sleigh and Timbury, 1986). UTIs, although ...

  2. Nosocomial infections: urinary tract infection in patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the aim of studying the pattern of urinary tract infection in patients with indwelling urinary catheter in the University College Hospital, Ibadan, a total of 164 patients were recruited. A questionnaire was administered to each pateint to provide information on demographic data, clinical diagnosis, and symptoms and signs ...

  3. Management of non-catheter-associated complicated urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dielubanza, Elodi J; Mazur, Daniel J; Schaeffer, Anthony J

    2014-03-01

    This article presents an overview of non-catheter-associated complicated urinary tract infection (UTI) from a urologic point of view. Discussion includes the evaluation and workup a complicated UTI through history, physical examination, laboratory analysis, and radiographic studies. Specific types of complicated UTI, such as urinary obstruction and renal abscess, are reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Metabolomics of urinary tract infection : a multiplatform approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacchiarotta, Tiziana

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is a complex clinical entity a common infectious disease that encompasses a variety of clinical syndromes with a positive bacterial culture as common denominator. This thesis provides an exhaustive exploratory study of the metabolic pattern of patients affected by urinary

  5. Antibiotic resistance in community-acquired urinary tract infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Caracas, Venezuela, and in Qin Pu, China. N EngJ J Med' 990; 323: 285-289. 3. Mabeck CE. Treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infection in non-pregnant women. Postgrad Med J 1972; 48: 69-75. 4. Brumfitt W, Hamilton-Miller JM. A review of the problem of urinary infection man- agement and the evaluation of a ...

  6. Chronic dehydration and symptomatic upper urinary tract stones in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: This (uncommon) occurrence of upper tract urolithiasis in young adults in Ibadan maybe related to chronic dehydration exacerbated by religious fasting. Further studies are required to explore this relation- ship,. Keywords: Urolithiasis, Upper Urinary Tract, Young. Adults, Nigeria, Dehydration, Religious fasting.

  7. Urinary tract infections in patients with spinal cord lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Bagi, P; Høiby, N

    2001-01-01

    Even though the mortality due to urinary tract complications has decreased dramatically during the last decades in individuals with spinal cord lesions (SCL), urinary tract infections (UTI) still cause significant morbidity in this population. Complicated UTI are caused by a much wider variety...... and local hygiene should be encouraged. If the patient has a reinfection or relapsing symptomatic UTI, it is important to check for inadequately treated infection and complications, which need special attention, in particular residual urine and urinary stones. No reliable evidence exists...... of the effectiveness of cranberry juice and other cranberry products. Prophylactic antibacterials should only be used in patients with recurrent UTI where no underlying cause can be found and managed, and in particular if the upper urinary tract is dilated. Antibacterials should not be used for the prevention of UTI...

  8. Serum cholesterol and risk of lower urinary tract symptoms progression: Results from the Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tom; Howard, Lauren E; Vidal, Adriana C; Moreira, Daniel M; Castro-Santamaria, Ramiro; Andriole, Gerald L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2017-02-01

    To determine if cholesterol is a risk factor for the development of lower urinary tract symptoms in asymptomatic men. A post-hoc analysis of the Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE) study was carried out in 2323 men with baseline International Prostate Symptom Score urinary tract symptoms, defined as first report of medical treatment, surgery or two reports of an International Prostate Symptom Score >14. A total of 253 men (10.9%) developed incident lower urinary tract symptoms. On crude analysis, higher high-density lipoprotein was associated with a decreased lower urinary tract symptoms risk (hazard ratio 0.89, P = 0.024), whereas total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein showed no association. After multivariable adjustment, the association between high-density lipoprotein and incident lower urinary tract symptoms remained significant (hazard ratio 0.89, P = 0.044), whereas no association was observed for low-density lipoprotein (P = 0.611). There was a trend for higher cholesterol to be linked with higher lower urinary tract symptoms risk, though this was not statistically significant (hazard ratio 1.04, P = 0.054). A higher cholesterol : high-density lipoprotein ratio was associated with increased lower urinary tract symptoms risk on crude (hazard ratio 1.11, P = 0.016) and adjusted models (hazard ratio 1.12, P = 0.012). Among asymptomatic men participating in the REDUCE study, higher cholesterol was associated with increased incident lower urinary tract symptoms risk, though the association was not significant. A higher cholesterol : high-density lipoprotein ratio was associated with increased incident lower urinary tract symptoms, whereas higher high-density lipoprotein was protective. These findings suggest dyslipidemia might play a role in lower urinary tract symptoms progression. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

  9. Secondary or Transient Pseudohypoaldosteronism Associated With Urinary Tract Anomaly and Urinary Infection: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Krishnappa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hyponatremia with hyperkalemia in infancy is a rare presentation, but may be due to aldosterone deficiency or end organ resistance to its action. There are few cases associating this condition with urinary tract infections or anatomic abnormalities that predispose to infection. Clinicians should have a high index of suspicion in diagnosing secondary pseudohypoaldosteronism (PHA due to its often atypical presentation. We describe ten month-old infant who presented with this condition and was found to have urinary tract infection complicating unilateral urinary tract anomaly, which may have strong association with renal tubular resistance to aldosterone.

  10. Specific selection for virulent urinary tract infectious Escherichia coli strains during catheter-associated biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrieres, Lionel; Hancock, Viktoria; Klemm, Per

    2007-01-01

    Biofilm-associated bacterial infections have a major impact on artificial implants such as urinary catheters, often with devastating consequences. The capacity of a microorganism to form a biofilm on a surface depends on the nature of the surface and its conditioning. When a urinary catheter...... microorganisms can attach. Urinary tract infectious (UTI) Escherichia coli range in pathogenicity and the damage they cause - from benign asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) strains, which inflict no or few problems to the host, to uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strains, which are virulent and often cause severe...... symptoms and complications. We have found that whereas ABU strains produce better biofilms on polystyrene and glass, UPEC strains have a clear competitive advantage during biofilm growth on catheter surfaces. Our results indicate that some silicone and silicone-latex catheters actually select...

  11. Recent Advances in Urinary Tract Reconstruction for Neuropathic Bladder in Children [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto I. Lopes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic bladder usually causes several limitations to patients’ quality of life, including urinary incontinence, recurrent urinary tract infections, and upper urinary tract damage. Its management has significantly changed over the last few years. The aim of our paper is to address some salient features of recent literature dealing with reconstructive procedures in pediatric and adolescent patients with lower urinary tract dysfunction.

  12. Development of the lower urinary tract and its functional disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peco-Antić Amira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A normal development of lower urinary tract function control evolves from involuntary bladder empting (incontinence during infancy to daytime urinary continence, and finally a successful day and night continence that is generally achieved by the 5th to 7th year of age. This gradual process primarily depends on the progressive maturation of the neural control of the lower urinary tract, but it is also influenced by behavioral training that evolves through social support. Functional voiding disorders (bladder dysfunction are common problems during childhood. They are present in 5-15 % of general pediatric population, and in one-fifth of school-age children or in over one-third of patients of the pediatric urologist or nephrologist. More than half of children with bladder dysfunction have vesicoureteral reflux, and more than two-thirds have recurrent urinary tract infections. There is also a frequent association of bladder dysfunction with constipation and encopresis (dysfunctional elimination syndrome. Bladder dysfunction may cause a permanent damage to the upper urinary tract and kidneys. In addition, urinary incontinence, as the most common manifestation of bladder dysfunction can be the cause of major stress in schoolage children and have a negative effect on the child’s feeling of self-esteem. Thus, a timely detection and treatment of this group of disorders in children is highly significant.

  13. Recurrent uncomplicated urinary tract infections in women: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosseir, Sandy B; Lind, Lawrence R; Winkler, Harvey A

    2012-03-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections most often present with symptoms of irritative voiding. In most cases, they are caused by reinfection with a previously isolated organism. Patients with one or more symptoms of uncomplicated recurrent urinary tract infection should undergo thorough examination and screening for underlying comorbidities that increase susceptibility. When frequent reinfections, empiric treatment relapse, persistent infections, or risk factors for complicated infections are encountered, patients may benefit from urodynamics, cystoscopy, renal ultrasound, intravenous urogram, or voiding cystourethrogram to evaluate for anatomic, functional, or metabolic abnormalities affecting the urinary tract (e.g., stones, stricture, obstruction, vesicoureteral reflux, lesions, detrusor underactivity). These patients may benefit from culture-guided empiric treatment and further evaluation by urology, nephrology, or infectious disease specialists. In patients with a history of uncomplicated urinary tract infections, empiric treatment guided by local antimicrobial resistance may efficiently treat a suspected recurrence. After successful treatment of the acute infection, postcoital prophylaxis, continuous prophylaxis, or self-start empiric treatment may be selected based on frequency of recurrent infections, temporal relation to intercourse, and patient characteristics. Ancillary measures such as probiotics, cranberry products, or local estrogen replacement may also be considered. This article will review the current definition, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, work-up, treatment, treatment side effects, and prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections in women. A suggested algorithm for evaluation and treatment based on current literature is provided.

  14. Risk factors for symptomatic urinary tract infections in individuals with chronic neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, J; Wöllner, J; Pannek, J

    2016-09-01

    Retrospective investigation. To investigate the association of patient and injury characteristics, as well as bladder management, with the occurrence of patient-reported, symptomatic urinary tract infection(s) UTI(s) in patients with chronic neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD). Tertiary urologic referral center. The patient database was screened for patients with chronic (>12 months) NLUTD who had presented between 2008 and 2012. Patient characteristics, bladder evacuation management, the annual number of patient-reported, symptomatic UTIs and the type of prophylactic treatment to prevent UTIs were collected. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the effects of the investigated risk factors on the occurrence of symptomatic UTI(s) and recurrent symptomatic UTIs (⩾3 annual UTIs). The data of 1104 patients with a mean NLTUD duration of 20.3±11.6 years were investigated. The evacuation method was a significant (P⩽0.004) predictor for the occurrence of symptomatic UTI and recurrent symptomatic UTIs. The greatest annual number of symptomatic UTIs was observed in patients using transurethral indwelling catheters, and the odds of experiencing a UTI and recurrent UTIs were increased more than 10- and 4-fold, respectively. The odds of a UTI or recurrent UTIs were also increased significantly (P⩽0.014) in patients using intermittent catheterization (IC). Botulinum toxin injections into the detrusor increased the odds of a UTI ~10-fold (P=0.03). The bladder evacuation method is the main predictor for symptomatic UTIs in individuals with NLUTD. Transurethral catheters showed the highest odds of symptomatic UTI and should be avoided whenever possible.

  15. Virulence and antimicrobial resistance of common urinary bacteria from asymptomatic students of Niger Delta University, Amassoma, Bayelsa State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebola Onanuga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Asymptomatic bacteriuria frequently occurs among all ages with the possibility of developing into urinary tract infections, and the antimicrobial resistance patterns of the etiologic organisms are essential for appropriate therapy. Thus, we investigated the virulence and antimicrobial resistance patterns of common urinary bacteria in asymptomatic students of Niger Delta University, Amassoma, Bayelsa State, Nigeria in a cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: Clean catch mid-stream early morning urine samples collected from 200 asymptomatic University students of aged ranges 15–30 years were cultured, screened and common bacteria were identified using standard microbiological procedures. The isolates were screened for hemolysin production and their susceptibility to antibiotics was determined using standard disc assay method. Results: A total prevalence rate of 52.0% significant bacteriuria was detected and it was significantly higher among the female with a weak association (χ2 = 6.01, phi = 0.173, P = 0.014. The Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus isolates were most frequently encountered among the isolated bacteria and 18 (12.7% of all the bacterial isolates produced hemolysins. All the bacterial isolates exhibited 50–100% resistance to the tested beta-lactam antibiotics, tetracycline and co-trimoxazole. The isolated bacteria were 85-100% multi-drug resistant. However, most of the isolates were generally susceptible to gentamicin and ofloxacin. The phenotypic detection of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases was 9 (9.6% among the tested Gram-negative bacterial isolates. Conclusions: The observed high proportions of multidrug resistant urinary bacteria among asymptomatic University students call for the need of greater control of antibiotic use in this study area.

  16. Uroflowmetry in the management of lower urinary tract symptoms of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes Silva, J A; Borges Carrerette, F; Damião, R

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate uroflow measurements in the initial management of lower urinary tract dysfunction in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy. A total of 54 patients was enrolled in this study. All patients reported their urinary symptoms and underwent a physical examination, renal and urinary tract ultrasonography, and uroflow assessment. Twenty-three patients were female. Mean age was 9 years and 6 months (SD: 2 years and 10 months), with a range of 5-18 years. Twenty-eight of the patients (51.8%) were symptomatic. Urgency (42.6%), urge incontinence (40.7%), and enuresis (16.7%) were the most frequently observed symptoms. No association was found between gender, ambulatory status, or distribution of the paralysis and uroflow parameters. Symptomatic patients presented a statistically lower maximum flow (Qmax) than asymptomatic patients (17.2 ± 7.8 ml/s vs 22.6 ± 7.5 ml/s, p = 0.013, respectively). Normal bell-shaped curves were observed more frequently in asymptomatic patients, while abnormal curves were observed more frequently in symptomatic patients (p = 0.022). Gender, ambulatory status, and the distribution of the paralysis do not affect Qmax rate or flow pattern. Symptomatic patients present lower Qmax and may also have an abnormal uroflow curve. Uroflowmetry may be useful in the initial urological evaluation. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women

    OpenAIRE

    Sudha Biradar Kerure; Rajeshwari Surpur; Sheela S. Sagarad; Sneha Hegadi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common bacterial infections during pregnancy. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is a major risk factor for the development of urinary tract infections during pregnancy and with further risk of preterm birth & pyelonephritis if untreated. Aims & Objectives: This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) in pregnant women & to isolate, identify and establish antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogens....

  18. Use of antibiotics for urinary tract infection in women undergoing surgery for urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldberg, Rikke; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler; Brostrøm, Søren

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the use of antibiotics for urinary tract infection (UTI) before and after surgery for urinary incontinence (UI); and for those with use of antibiotics before surgery, to estimate the risk of treatment for a postoperative UTI, relative to those without use of antibiotics...

  19. New paradigms of urinary tract infections: Implications for patient management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J Horvath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTIs represent one of the most commonly acquired diseases among the general population as well as hospital in-patients, yet remain difficult to effectively and consistently treat. High rates of recurrence, anatomic abnormalities, and functional disturbances of the urinary tract all contribute to the difficulty in management of these infections. However, recent advances reveal important molecular and genetic factors that contribute to bacterial invasion and persistence in the urinary tract, particularly for the most common causative agent, uropathogenic Escherichia coli. Recent studies using animal models of experimental UTIs have recently provided mechanistic insight into the clinical observations that question the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy in treatment. Ultimately, continuing research will be necessary to identify the best targets for effective treatment of this costly and widespread infectious disease.

  20. Urinary tract infections in children: EAU/ESPU guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Raimund; Dogan, Hasan S; Hoebeke, Piet; Kočvara, Radim; Nijman, Rien J M; Radmayr, Christian; Tekgül, Serdar

    2015-03-01

    In 30% of children with urinary tract anomalies, urinary tract infection (UTI) can be the first sign. Failure to identify patients at risk can result in damage to the upper urinary tract. To provide recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment, and imaging of children presenting with UTI. The recommendations were developed after a review of the literature and a search of PubMed and Embase. A consensus decision was adopted when evidence was low. UTIs are classified according to site, episode, symptoms, and complicating factors. For acute treatment, site and severity are the most important. Urine sampling by suprapubic aspiration or catheterisation has a low contamination rate and confirms UTI. Using a plastic bag to collect urine, a UTI can only be excluded if the dipstick is negative for both leukocyte esterase and nitrite or microscopic analysis is negative for both pyuria and bacteriuria. A clean voided midstream urine sample after cleaning the external genitalia has good diagnostic accuracy in toilet-trained children. In children with febrile UTI, antibiotic treatment should be initiated as soon as possible to eradicate infection, prevent bacteraemia, improve outcome, and reduce the likelihood of renal involvement. Ultrasound of the urinary tract is advised to exclude obstructive uropathy. Depending on sex, age, and clinical presentation, vesicoureteral reflux should be excluded. Antibacterial prophylaxis is beneficial. In toilet-trained children, bladder and bowel dysfunction needs to be excluded. The level of evidence is high for the diagnosis of UTI and treatment in children but not for imaging to identify patients at risk for upper urinary tract damage. In these guidelines, we looked at the diagnosis, treatment, and imaging of children with urinary tract infection. There are strong recommendations on diagnosis and treatment; we also advise exclusion of obstructive uropathy within 24h and later vesicoureteral reflux, if indicated. Copyright © 2014 European

  1. Gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance urography for upper urinary tract malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Naoki; Glockner, James F; Hartman, Robert P; King, Bernard F; Leibovich, Bradley C; Stanley, David W; Fitz-Gibbon, Patrick D; Kawashima, Akira

    2010-04-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the accuracy of gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance urography to detect upper urinary tract tumors. A total of 91 magnetic resonance urography studies for suspected upper tract malignancy were done in 70 males and 18 females with a mean age of 71.7 years. Breath hold coronal T2-weighted single shot fast spin-echo and breath-hold coronal 3-dimensional T1-weighted spoiled gradient-recalled echo images with fat suppression were obtained during the nephrographic and excretory phases after intravenous injection of gadolinium based contrast material. Two radiologists independently reviewed magnetic resonance images for a tumor by 4 regions (right/left and renal collecting system/ureter). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were calculated. A total of 35 urinary tract regions in 18 males and 7 females with a mean age of 70.4 years were confirmed to have an upper tract malignant tumor and 219 urinary tract regions were confirmed to be tumor-free. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to detect upper urinary tract malignancy were 74.3%, 96.8% and 93.7% for reviewer 1, and 62.9%, 96.3% and 91.7% for reviewer 2, respectively. When patients with a ureteral stent or nephrostomy tube were excluded from analysis, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 86.2%, 99.5% and 97.7% for reviewer 1, and 72.4%, 97.9% and 94.6% for reviewer 2, respectively. Gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance urography is accurate to detect upper urinary tract malignant tumors. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Constipation in Pediatric Patients with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Shujah; Nawaz, Gul; Jamil, Imran; Ur Rehman, Asad; Hussain, Ijaz; Akhter, Saeed

    2015-11-01

    To determine the frequency of constipation in patients with pediatric age group presenting with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS). Descriptive study. Outpatient Department of Urology in Pakistan Kidney Institute at Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, from November 2012 to February 2014. Two hundred pediatric patients presenting with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) were studied in terms of age, gender, obstructive and irritative types of LUTS along with any associated symptoms. Constipation was assessed by Bristol stool chart in these patients. Patients with exstrophy of bladder were excluded from the study. Descriptive statistics were measured for both qualitative and quantitative variables. For qualitative variables like gender, presenting symptoms, constipation and stool types, percentages and frequencies were calculated. For quantitative variables like age, percentages / mean ±SD were calculated. Mean age was 6.87 ±3.64 years with a range of 2 - 14 years. Constipation was found in 37.5% of the pediatric patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. Constipation is frequent and overlooked problem in pediatric patients having urinary symptoms. Irritative lower urinary tract symptoms are more common. Children up to 5 years of age are the most common sufferers. Knowing the burden of constipation in such patients can help physicians in better treatment of such cases.

  3. Urinary tract infections in patients with spinal cord lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Bagi, P; Høiby, N

    2001-01-01

    Even though the mortality due to urinary tract complications has decreased dramatically during the last decades in individuals with spinal cord lesions (SCL), urinary tract infections (UTI) still cause significant morbidity in this population. Complicated UTI are caused by a much wider variety...... with SCL. There is no doubt that the greatest risk for complicated UTI in these individuals is the use of an indwelling catheter. Intermittent catheterisation during the rehabilitation phase has been shown to lower the rate of UTI, and virtually eliminate many of the complications associated...

  4. Congenital piriform fossa sinus tract presenting as an asymptomatic neck mass in an infant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, David A. [Department of Pediatric Imaging, Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 3901 Beaubien Boulevard, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Adler, Brent H. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Radiological Institute, Columbus Children' s Hospital, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Forsythe, Robert C. [Department of Pediatrics, Columbus Children' s Hospital, Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Mutabagani, Khaled; Teich, Steven [Department of Surgery, Columbus Children' s Hospital, Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio (United States)

    2003-05-01

    A 5-month-old girl with an asymptomatic left-sided neck mass was demonstrated by ultrasound and upper gastrointestinal series (UGI), and confirmed at surgery, to have a congenital piriform fossa sinus tract (CPFST) that communicated with an intrathyroidal cyst. To demonstrate a case of CPFST presenting as an asymptomatic neck mass. Nearly all cases of CPFST present with infection or pain, making this case unique. Case report and review of the literature. CPFST with an associated cyst should be added to the differential diagnosis of asymptomatic cystic neck masses in infants, especially if the cyst is intrathyroidal by ultrasound. (orig.)

  5. The antenatal urinary tract dilation classification system accurately predicts severity of kidney and urinary tract abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, C D W; Lo, M; Bunchman, T E; Xiao, N

    2017-10-01

    Urinary tract dilation (UTD) is a commonly diagnosed prenatal condition; however, it is currently unknown which features lead to benign and resolving or pathologic abnormalities. A consensus UTD classification system (antenatal UTD classification, UTD-A) was created by Nguyen et al. in 2014 [1], but has not yet been validated. To evaluate the ability of the UTD-A system to identify kidney and urinary tract (KUT) abnormalities, assess whether UTD-A can predict severity of KUT conditions, and perform a cost analysis of screening ultrasound (US). A retrospective single-center study was conducted at an academic medical center. Inclusion criteria were: neonates in the well or sick nursery who had a complete abdominal or limited renal US performed in the first 30 days of life between January 01, 2011 and December 31, 2013. Data were collected on prenatal US characteristics from which UTD-A classification was retrospectively applied, and postnatal data were collected up to 2 years following birth. A total of 203 patients were identified. Of the 36 abnormal postnatal KUT diagnoses, 90% were identified prenatally as UTD A1 or UTD A2-3. The remaining 10% developed postnatal KUT abnormalities due to myelomeningocele, such as VUR or UTD, which were not evident prenatally. Overall sensitivity and specificity of the UTD-A system was 0.767 (95% CI 0.577, 0.901) and 0.836 (95% CI 0.758, 0.897), respectively, when resolved UTD was counted as a normal diagnosis. Postnatal diagnoses differed by UTD-A classification as shown in the Summary fig. Of all the obstructive uropathies, 90.9% occurred in the UTD A2-3 class and none occurred in UTD-A Normal. Rate of postnatally resolved UTD was significantly higher in the UTD A1 group (78%) compared with UTD A2-3 (31%) or UTD-A Normal (12%, all P system revealed important differences in the severity of UTD abnormalities. With repeated validation in larger cohorts, the UTD-A classification may be used to offer a prognosis for parents

  6. Urinary Screening for Detection of Asymptomatic Haematuria and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , a survey was carried out among pupils of two primary schools; one located in the urban area and the other in the periurban area of Port Harcourt Local Government Area. The prevalence rate of significant asymptomatic proteinuria was one ...

  7. The bacteriology of asymptomatic urinary tract infections among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The commonest organisms causing ASB among contraceptive users were mainly E.coli, Staph saprophyticus, Proteus spp and Kleb spp. The most effective antibiotics were nitrofurantoin, gentamicin, sparfloxacin and cefuroxime. Sensitivity to tetracycline, cotrimoxazole and streptomycin was poor. Similar to ...

  8. Problems in severe bilateral urinary tract anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Jørgen Mogens

    1989-01-01

    function. There were two deaths. Five children have severe and two a moderate reduction of renal function; twenty good renal function. There were ten nephrectomies and four heminephrectomies. Seven patients had a temporary and eight a permanent urinary diversion. However, four of the latter were later...

  9. The Diagnosis, Evaluation and Treatment of Acute and Recurrent Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becknell, Brian; Schober, Megan; Korbel, Lindsey; Spencer, John David

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is one of the most common bacterial infections encountered by pediatricians. Currently, the diagnosis and management of acute urinary tract infection and recurrent urinary tract infection in children remains controversial. Recently published guidelines and large clinical trials have attempted to clarify UTI diagnostic and management strategies. In this manuscript, we review the diagnosis and management of acute and recurrent urinary tract infection in the pediatric population. PMID:25421102

  10. effect of clean intermittent catheterization on lower urinary tract

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To investigate the effect of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) on the lower urinary tract in experimental animals. Patients and Methods Eight male spinalized cats were subjected to CIC for a period of 6 – 9 weeks. A urine specimen for culture was obtained weekly. A pathological examination of the proximal ...

  11. [Characteristic features of urinary tract infection in malnourished children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stârcea, Magdalena; Munteanu, Mihaela; Brumariu, O

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to prove a relationship between urinary tract infection and malnutrition in children 0-3 years old, hospitalized in the IVI Pediatric Clinic, Hospital St. Mary Iaşi, between January 2000 and December 2004. We have made a retrospective study for 298 infant and young children with urinary tract infection, 237 eutrophic and 61 malnourished. We studied comparatively the both groups with urinary tract infection (UTI), and we applied statistic methods for results. The statistic methods prove that relative risk for UTI increases in malnutrition, predictive positive value is 72.5%. The clinical manifestation is similar in malnourished and eutrophic, but many co morbidities were associated with dystrophic status. Malformation of urinary tract was associate two times more in malnourished child. The etiology of infection was dominated by Escherichia coli, Proteus and Klebsiella pneumoniae. In malnourished children 5% of UTI was determinate by opportunist etiological agents like: Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Acinetobacter. More frequently, bacterium develops resistance of antibiotics like amino-penicilina, Trimethoprim and Cephalosporin. Accurate and fast diagnosis and treatment of UTI in infant and child with malnutrition is the best way for nutritional rehabilitation and prevention of serious consequence.

  12. Bacterial Uropathogens in Urinary Tract Infection and Antibiotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacterial Uropathogens in Urinary Tract Infection and Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern in Jimma University Specialized Hospital, Southwest Ethiopia. ... isolates with very high resistance to the commonly prescribed drugs that in turn leaves the clinicians with very few alternative options of drugs for the treatment of UTIs.

  13. Incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) among pregnant women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... pregnant women in Ibadan, South-Western Nigeria. Okonko, I. O.1*, Ijandipe, L. A.2, ... This study reports the incidence of urinary tract infections (UTIs) among 80 pregnant women attending antenatal clinics at Oluyoro .... wrapped in aluminum foil and sterilized in a hot air oven at 160°C for 3 h. Media were ...

  14. Microbial resistance in patients with urinary tract infections in Al ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is an aggravating and common problem in human at sometimes during their life and may give more complications. Objective: To project antimicrobial resistance in patients with UTI as a wide problem among cases referred to the National Center of Public Health Laboratories in ...

  15. Urinary tract infections in symptomatic pregnant women attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract infections in symptomatic pregnant women attending university of Abuja teaching hospital, Gwagwalada, Nigeria. ... Overall E. coli and Staphylococcus saprophyticus were the predominant bacteria isolated (23.0% and 15.4%). Augumentin and levofloxacin had the best antibiogram profile against most of the ...

  16. Antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of symptomatic urinary tract infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of symptomatic urinary tract infection in pregnancy in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital. ... Most common was Proteus Mirabilis 24(33.3%), E. Coli 25(25%), staphylococcus Saprophyticus 12(16.6%) Kleibsella aerogenes 10(13.9%), Enterococcus Faecalis 6(8.3%) and Pseudomonas aeriginosa ...

  17. Urinary Tract Infection Caused by a Capnophilic Proteus mirabilis Strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trapman, M.; Ingen, J. van; Keijman, J.; Swanink, C.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    From a urine sample from a patient with a urinary tract infection, a carbon dioxide-dependent Proteus mirabilis strain was isolated. It is important to perform urine cultures in 5% carbon dioxide and an anaerobic atmosphere if bacteria prominent in Gram stains do not grow on routine media in ambient

  18. Prevalence of Urinary Tract Infection in Patients Undergoing Pelvic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Radiation therapy is known to induce the breakdown of certain body defence factors. In the patient who has carcinoma of the cervix, pelvic radiotherapy increases the risk of infection with both opportunistic and pathogenic agents,. Objectives: This study was done to determine the prevalence of urinary tract ...

  19. Diversity of Urinary Tract Pathogens and Drug Resistant Isolates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: This paper was mainly aimed to investigate drug resistance of the various urinary tract infection (UTI) pathogens from patients of different gender and age groups of Pakistanis. Method: For these purposes, urine samples of 109 patients were analyzed. Samples were screened on CLED agar. Antimicrobial ...

  20. Antibacterial susceptibility of some urinary tract pathogens to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract infection represents one of the most common diseases encountered in medical practice today and occurring from the neonate to the geriatric age group. Despite the widespread availability of antibiotics, it remains the most common bacterial infection in the human being. A total of 174 urine samples were ...

  1. Therapeutic management of Urinary Tract Infections (UTI): A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) is one of the most common diseases and a significant cause of morbidity in all age groups. There are large differences in the management of UTI with respect to definition, diagnosis and treatment. This retrospective study reviewed the diagnosis and drug treatment of UTI at the Teaching ...

  2. Urinary tract infections at Aga Khan University hospital Nairobi - A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In developing countries, most of these patients with urinary tract infections (UTI) are normally treated empirically and urine culture is usual ordered for as a last resort in patients refractory to antibiotic treatment. Objective: To explore the possibility of designing empiric antibiotic therapy for symptomatic UTI in ...

  3. Antibiotic Sensitivity of Bacterial Pathogens in Urinary Tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence and sensitivity trends of urinary tract bacterial isolates were determined through a cross sectional retrospective study at Muhimbili National Hospital in Dar es Salaam. Four hundred specimens from 274 inpatients and 126 outpatients were studied and anti microbial sensitivity test was done by the disc diffusion ...

  4. Lithium and renal and upper urinary tract tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A recent alarming finding suggested an increased risk of renal tumors among long-term lithium users. The objectives of the present study were to estimate rates of renal and upper urinary tract tumors (RUT), malignant and benign, among individuals exposed to successive prescriptions...

  5. Antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of organisms causing urinary tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As part of a larger project on childhood urinary tract infection, antimicrobial sensitivity tests were carried out on the bacterial isolates from the urine of febrile children seen at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Methodology: Midstream urine specimens were collected from 171 sickle cell anaemia children and ...

  6. Urinary Tract Infections in Children with Primary Nephrotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: The occurrence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in children with Nephrotic syndrome (NS) has been widely reported by various workers, but not much has been documented about its occurrence among children with acute glomerulonephritis (AGN). Hence, the level of susceptibility to UTI by both diseases has ...

  7. Antimicrobial resistance of bacterial isolates from urinary tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract infections are common health problems and vary according to geography and regions. A retrospective analysis was conducted to determine the antimicrobial resistance of bacterial isolates from urine at Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital from September 2003 to June 2008. From 529 urine specimens, bacterial ...

  8. Screening of febrile children on Hospital admission for urinary tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most often missed diagnosis in children in the tropics. This is because of the varied and similar presentation of UTI to other common illnesses. A total of 154 patients with various presumptive clinical diagnosis at admission were screened for the presence of UTI. Only 33 (21.4%) ...

  9. Infant feeding tube as urinary tract stent | Ekeke | Port Harcourt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The infant feeding tube is a cheap and readily available device with many uses in the urinary tract. Many types of stents are available in the market but among other factors, cost and affordability limit their use in developing countries and remote areas. Aim: To document experience with infant feeding tubes as ...

  10. Urinary tract infections in women | van Schoor | South African Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Symptoms suggestive of acute urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common reasons why women consult a health professional. Antimicrobial agents are usually prescribed for the treatment of symptomatic UTIs seen in clinical practice. However, the extensive use of antimicrobial agents for community-acquired UTIs has ...

  11. Antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of organisms causing urinary tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of organisms causing urinary tract infection in children with sickle cell anaemia in Ibadan, Nigeria. ... Conclusion: Aetiological agents of childhood UTI in this environment are resistant to most of the drugs commonly recommended for its treatment. Nalixidic acid and cefuroxime are ...

  12. Urinary tract infections at aga Khan University hospital nairobi - a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-11-06

    Nov 6, 2013 ... abstract. Background: in developing countries, most of these patients with urinary tract infections. (Uti) are normally treated empirically and urine culture is usual ordered for as a last resort in patients refractory to antibiotic treatment. Objective: to explore the possibility of designing empiric antibiotic therapy ...

  13. Predictors of Urinary Tract Infections in Nursing Students in India

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    demographic and social causes predisposing nursing students to urinary tract infections (UTI). The study has ... In view of the busy schedule of the nursing students in hospital, they may be spending most of the time in hospital; ... Considering the fact that there is a risk for hospital patients to acquire secondary UTI's, the ...

  14. Prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia in primary care, Port Harcourt, Nigeria. ... The prevalence of LUTS suggestive of BPH was 72.2% using the IPSS, and 60% had an enlarged prostate that was diagnosed through a digital rectal examination. The prevalence of bothersome ...

  15. Interventions for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Middleton, Philippa; Crowther, Caroline A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) are common in women who are pregnant and may cause serious adverse pregnancy outcomes for both mother and child including preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age babies. Interventions used to prevent RUTI in women who are pregnant can be

  16. how frequent should we investigate for urinary tract infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    John CC. Ogbe P. Donli A. Oguche S. The febrile child: how frequent should we investigate for urinary tract infection. Accepted: 3rd August 2015. Ocheke OI. John CC, Ogbe P, Donli A, Oguche S. Department of Paediatrics,. Jos University Teaching Hospital. P. M. B 2076, Jos, Nigeria. Email: ieocheke@yahoo.com. ( ).

  17. Bacteriology of urinary tract infection among patients with acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacteriology of urinary tract infection among patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Jos, Nigeria. GTA Jombo, DZ Egah, JA Ayeni, EB Banwat, JA Ayeni. Abstract. No Abstract. Nigerian Journal of Medicine Vol. 14(4) October-December 2005: 422-424. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  18. Bacteriology of urinary tract infection and antimicrobial sensitivities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the serious bacterial infections in febrile young children, which may cause chronic morbidities. Studies from different parts of Nigeria have shown varying pattern in its bacteriology and antibiotic sensitivities. Antimicrobial resistance rate among uropathogens is an increasing ...

  19. Transient pseudohypoaldosteronism and urinary tract infection: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajeddini A

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available A 43-day old infant with myelomeningocele was evaluated for feeding problems and ill appearance. The presence of metabolic acidosis, hyponatermia and hypercalemia suggested renal tubular acidosis type IV. Later examination showed urinary tract infection together with bilateral vesicoureteral reflux. After treatment of the infection, metabolic acidosis and electrolyte imbalances were resolved and the diagnosis of pseudohypoaldosteronism was confirmed.

  20. Non-Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Urinary Tract Infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerepoot, Mariëlle; Geerlings, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Increasing antimicrobial resistance has stimulated interest in non-antibiotic prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs). Well-known steps in the pathogenesis of UTIs are urogenital colonization and adherence of uropathogens to uroepithelial cell receptors. To prevent colonization in

  1. Prostate Cancer Case Finding In Patients With Lower Urinary Tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    East and Central African Journal of Surgery Volume 9 Number 2 - December2004. 17. Prostate Cancer Case Finding In Patients With Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms In A Private. Hospital In Dar-Es-Salaam. Yongolo CMS. Senior Lecturer, Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences. P.O. Box 7845 Dar-es-Salaam, ...

  2. Lower urinary tract symptoms after total and subtotal hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimbel, Helga; Zobbe, Vibeke; Andersen, Birthe Jakobsen

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this Danish multicenter trial was to compare the proportion of women with lower urinary tract symptoms after total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH) and subtotal abdominal hysterectomy (SAH) for benign uterine disorders. A total of 319 women were randomized to TAH (n = 158) or SAH (n = 161)...

  3. Urinary Tract Infection in Children with Acute Glomerulonephritis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is a prospective study of 47 cases of acute glomerunephritis seen in paediatric ward of Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano over a 5year period; they were evaluated for prevalence of urinary tract infection, urine specimen were obtained by midstream urine following careful cleaning of the orifices with chlorhexidine.

  4. Childhood Urinary Tract Infection in Abakaliki: Etiological Organisms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common childhood infection in the Tropics which causes significant illness and is frequently missed, probably because of its non-specific presentation and similarity with other common illnesses. Objectives: To determine the prevalence, common etiological agents, and the ...

  5. Urinary tract infections at aga Khan University hospital nairobi - a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-11

    Jun 11, 2013 ... Micro-organisms can reach the urinary tract by haematogenous or lymphatic spread, but there is abundant clinical and experimental evidence to show that the ascent of micro-organisms from the urethra is the most common pathway leading to a UTI, especially organisms of enteric origin (that is, Escherichia ...

  6. Antibiogram of nosocomial urinary tract infections in Felege Hiwot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nosocomial infections increase the cost of medical care, extend hospital stay and reflect on the morbidity and mortality of the admitted patients. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common nosocomial infections in humans. Objectives: To determine the prevalence and antibiogram of nosocomial ...

  7. Improving antibiotic use for complicated urinary tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoorenberg, V.

    2014-01-01

    Guidelines for antimicrobial treatment are important in the process of improving antibiotic use, because they describe appropriate antibiotic use. In this thesis, we demonstrated the value of appropriate antibiotic use (i.e. guideline adherence) in patients with a complicated urinary tract infection

  8. Treatment failures after antibiotic therapy of uncomplicated urinary tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Lars; Dessau, Ram B; Hallas, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The efficacy of sulfamethizole and pivmecillinam in the treatment of urinary tract infections (UTI) has been questioned because of an increase in the prevalence of resistant strains. The aim of this study was to describe the risk of treatment failures over the last 10 years. DESIGN: R...

  9. Urinary tract infection in renal transplant recipients | Elkehili | Arab ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the commonest bacterial infection occurring in renal transplant recipients, and it is associated with significant morbidity. This study aimed to assess the characteristics of all UTI episodes diagnosed in renal transplant patients who attended regularly for follow up in the nephrology ...

  10. Prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-10-15

    Oct 15, 2012 ... a focused history, physical examination and an assessment of bother.6. The prostate and lower urinary tract symptoms. Prostatic disease causes considerable morbidity in ageing men. BPH can lead to bothersome LUTS .... A computer-generated table of random numbers was used to select informed and ...

  11. Urinary Tract Infections amongst Pregnant Women Attending A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) constitutes a major health problem in pregnant women due to their relatively short urethra, which promotes the ascending of the pathogens to the bladder, urethra and the kidneys. It is also more common in pregnant women due to the anatomical and physiological changes that occur during ...

  12. Incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) among pregnant women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study reports the incidence of urinary tract infections (UTIs) among 80 pregnant women attending antenatal clinics at Oluyoro Catholic Hospital (OCH), Ibadan, Nigeria, as well as the isolation and identification of the pathogens responsible for the infection. A total of 80 clean voided mid-stream urine samples were ...

  13. Medical prescription pitfalls of uncomplicated urinary tract infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Key words: Drug errors; urinary tract infection; adverse drug reactions; drug – drug interactions; Zambia. *Corresponding Author. Professor Chola Besa. Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics,. Michael Chilufya Sata School of Medicine,. Copperbelt University,. P.O. Box 71191, Ndola, Zambia. E-mail: BesaChola@aol.com.

  14. Antibiotic Resistance in Urinary Tract Infections in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Ronald P.; Haith, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine resistance to antibiotics of "Escherichia coli" in uncomplicated urinary tract infections (uUTIs) in female college students. Participants: Symptomatic patients presenting to a student health service from September 2008 to December 2009. Methods: Clean catch midstream urine samples were tested for urinalysis (UA) and…

  15. The etiology and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of urinary tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The etiology and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of urinary tract infections at a private Nigerian teaching hospital in South West Nigeria. ... The risk factors for UTI were female gender (p = 0.00), Diabetes mellitus (p = 0.03) and genitourinary surgery (p = 0.04). Effective antibiotics in-vitro to Escherichia coli were ...

  16. Predictors of Urinary Tract Infections in Nursing Students in India

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    demographic and social causes predisposing nursing students to urinary tract infections (UTI). The study has revealed the prevalence rate of UTI as >19%. The authors have mentioned that the subjects were residing in the nursing hostel. It must be noted that most of the nursing students spend significant time in the hospital ...

  17. Chronic dehydration and symptomatic upper urinary tract stones in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chronic dehydration and symptomatic upper urinary tract stones in young adults in Ibadan, Nigeria. ... West African Journal of Medicine. Journal Home ... Patients and Methods: We reviewed all cases of renal stones referred to a single Consultant in a Teaching Hospital in Southwestern Nigeria over a two year period.

  18. Management of Urinary Tract Infections in Children | Schellack ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) are a common occurrence in paediatrics. UTIs present in children as fever, anorexia, vomiting, lethargy and dysuria. Approximately 80% of the time, Escherichia coli is the causative bacteria in paediatrics, however, fungal UTI caused by Candida species can occur in premature infants. With an ...

  19. [Diagnosis and management of urinary tract dilatations detected in utero].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Stephan; Guignard, Jean-Pierre

    2002-12-01

    About 1% of the newborns show abnormalities of the urinary tract, representing 25% of the antenatally detected malformations. Most of these urinary abnormalities are detected by prenatal ultrasound between the 14th and the 22nd week of gestation. Their outcome is determined during the first weeks of pregnancy and depends on the degree of renal impairment and the presence of associated extrarenal malformations. Establishing the outcome is often difficult, however it can be predicted by ultrasound and biochemistry of fetal urine. Prenatal management should consist in follow-up and careful organisation of the postnatal management of congenital uropathies. Every antenatally dilated urinary tract requires postnatal investigation. Postnatal ultrasound on the 3rd to 4th day of life is recommended for confirming or excluding urinary abnormalities. In case of persistence, ultrasound has to be completed by other radiologic methods. Voiding cystourethrography and/or nuclear renography allow to identify the origin of the observed abnormalities. Apart from a few situations needing immediate correction, surgical treatment is rarely indicated. The principal of postnatal management is prevention of urinary tract infections by antibiotic prophylaxis and a close follow-up until adulthood.

  20. Cranberries for preventing urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth G. Jepson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cranberries have been used widely for several decades for the prevention and treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs. This is the third update of our review first published in 1998 and updated in 2004 and 2008. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of cranberry products in preventing UTIs in susceptible populations. METHODS: Search methods: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library and the Internet. We contacted companies involved with the promotion and distribution of cranberry preparations and checked reference lists of review articles and relevant studies. Date of search: July 2012. Selection criteria: All randomised controlled trials (RCTs or quasi-RCTs of cranberry products for the prevention of UTIs. Data collection and analysis: Two authors independently assessed and extracted data. Information was collected on methods, participants, interventions and outcomes (incidence of symptomatic UTIs, positive culture results, side effects, adherence to therapy. Risk ratios (RR were calculated where appropriate, otherwise a narrative synthesis was undertaken. Quality was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. MAIN RESULTS: This updated review includes a total of 24 studies (six cross-over studies, 11 parallel group studies with two arms; five with three arms, and two studies with a factorial design with a total of 4473 participants. Ten studies were included in the 2008 update, and 14 studies have been added to this update. Thirteen studies (2380 participants evaluated only cranberry juice/concentrate; nine studies (1032 participants evaluated only cranberry tablets/capsules; one study compared cranberry juice and tablets; and one study compared cranberry capsules and tablets. The comparison/control arms were placebo, no treatment, water, methenamine hippurate, antibiotics, or lactobacillus. Eleven studies were not included in the meta

  1. Drug utilization study of antibiotics for urinary tract infections in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A drug utilization pattern of antibiotics for urinary tract infections in 200 cases above 18 years of age was done at Katuri Medical College Hospital, Guntur, India. The antibiotic sensitivity profile of the microorganism causing urinary tract infections was studied in cases diagnosed as urinary tract infection. The patients with ...

  2. Outcome of Open Surgery for Urinary Tract Calculi at Jos University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Outcome of Open Surgery for Urinary Tract Calculi at Jos University Teaching Hospital. SI Shu'aibu, CG Ofoha, IC Akpayak, NK Dakum, VM Ramyil. Abstract. Background: Urinary tract calculi are common affliction of humans. Surgeries to remove stones from the urinary tract are among the oldest forms of open surgery.

  3. Value of non-contrast CT examination of the urinary tract (stone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohamed Samir Shaaban

    2015-09-04

    Sep 4, 2015 ... Abstract Background: Urolithiasis is one of the most common urinary tract diseases worldwide, with a wide range of affected age groups. Non-contrast CT examination of the urinary tract is the gold-standard examination for detection and characterization of urinary tract stones, with great impact upon the ...

  4. Value of non-contrast CT examination of the urinary tract (stone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Urolithiasis is one of the most common urinary tract diseases worldwide, with a wide range of affected age groups. Non-contrast CT examination of the urinary tract is the gold-standard examination for detection and characterization of urinary tract stones, with great impact upon the choice of method of ...

  5. Urinary complications of gynecologic surgery: iatrogenic urinary tract system injuries in obstetrics and gynecology operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, E; Ozturk, U; Celen, S; Sucak, A; Gunel, M; Guney, G; Imamoglu, M A; Danisman, A N

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate iatrogenic urinary tract system injuries in obstetrics and gynecology operations and compare the results with the literature. We examined the records of patients who had obstetric and gynecology operations at the Ministry of Health, Dr. Zekai Tahir Burak Women's Health, Training and Research Hospital between June 2007 and June 2010. All the patients who were diagnosed as having urinary system injuries in either the intraoperative or postoperative period were determined. During this period, 25,998 gynecologic and obstetrical operations were performed, 0.03% ureteric, 0.20% bladder, and one case of urethral injury, in a total of 0.24% urinary tract injuries were observed. The bladder was the most frequently injured organ. Total urinary tract injury rates were 0.79% (0.49% bladder, 0.24% ureteral) in gynecologic operations and 0.19% (0.18% bladder and 0.01% ureteral) in obstetric operations. Urinary system injuries are seen in approximately 1% of all gynecologic and obstetric surgeries. The complication rates observed in our patients were comparable with the other studies in the literature. A gynecologic surgeon must become familiar with the anatomy of the urinary tract and must be aware of common intraoperative and postoperative complications to decrease the risk of morbidity.

  6. Management of urinary tract infections in patients with neurogenic bladder: challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannek, Jürgen; Wöllner, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common morbidities in persons with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD). They are associated with a significant morbidity and mortality, and they affect the quality of life of the affected patients. Diagnosis and treatment of UTI in this group of patients are challenging. In this review, the current strategies regarding diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are summarized. it is important to correctly diagnose a UTI, as treatment of bacteriuria should strictly be avoided. A UTI is defined as a combination of laboratory findings (leukocyturia and bacteriuria) and symptoms. Laboratory findings without symptoms are classified as asymptomatic bacteriuria. Routine urine screening is not advised. Only UTI should be treated; treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria is not indicated. Prior to treatment, urine for a urine culture should be obtained. Antibiotic treatment for ~7 days is advised. In recurrent UTI, bladder management should be optimized and morphologic causes for UTI should be excluded. If UTIs persist, medical prophylaxis should be considered. Currently, no prophylactic measure with evidence-based efficacy exists. Long-term antibiotic prophylaxis should be used merely as an ultimate measure. Among the various mentioned innovative approaches for UTI prevention, bacteriophages, intravesical instillations, complementary and alternative medicine techniques, and probiotics seem to be most promising. Recently, several promising innovative options for UTI prophylaxis have been developed which may help overcome the current therapeutic dilemma. However, further well designed studies are necessary to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these approaches.

  7. Urinary tract injuries in laparoscopic hysterectomy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, Marisa R; Bardsley, Tyler R; Sharp, Howard T

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review was to estimate the incidence of urinary tract injuries associated with laparoscopic hysterectomy and describe the long-term sequelae of these injuries and the impact of early recognition. Studies were identified by searching the PubMed database, spanning the last 10 years. The key words "ureter" or "ureteral" or "urethra" or "urethral" or "bladder" or "urinary tract" and "injury" and "laparoscopy" or "robotic" and "gynecology" were used. Additionally, a separate search was done for "routine cystoscopy" and "gynecology." The inclusion criteria were published articles of original research referring to urologic injuries occurring during either laparoscopic or robotic surgery for gynecologic indications. Only English language articles from the past 10 years were included. Studies with less than 100 patients and no injuries reported were excluded. No robotic series met these criteria. A primary search of the database yielded 104 articles, and secondary cross-reference yielded 6 articles. After reviewing the abstracts, 40 articles met inclusion criteria and were reviewed in their entirety. Of those 40 articles, 3 were excluded because of an inability to extract urinary tract injuries from total injuries. Statistical analysis was performed using a generalized linear mixed effects model. The overall urinary tract injury rate for laparoscopic hysterectomy was 0.73%. The bladder injury rate ranged from 0.05% to 0.66% across procedure types, and the ureteral injury rate ranged from 0.02% to 0.4% across procedure type. In contrast to earlier publications, which cited unacceptably high urinary tract injury rates, laparoscopic hysterectomy appears to be safe regarding the bladder and ureter. Copyright © 2014 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Metabolic Adaptations of Uropathogenic E. coli in the Urinary Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riti Mann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli ordinarily resides in the lower gastrointestinal tract in humans, but some strains, known as Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC, are also adapted to the relatively harsh environment of the urinary tract. Infections of the urine, bladder and kidneys by UPEC may lead to potentially fatal bloodstream infections. To survive this range of conditions, UPEC strains must have broad and flexible metabolic capabilities and efficiently utilize scarce essential nutrients. Whole-organism (or “omics” methods have recently provided significant advances in our understanding of the importance of metabolic adaptation in the success of UPECs. Here we describe the nutritional and metabolic requirements for UPEC infection in these environments, and focus on particular metabolic responses and adaptations of UPEC that appear to be essential for survival in the urinary tract.

  9. Metabolic Adaptations of Uropathogenic E. coli in the Urinary Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Riti; Mediati, Daniel G; Duggin, Iain G; Harry, Elizabeth J; Bottomley, Amy L

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli ordinarily resides in the lower gastrointestinal tract in humans, but some strains, known as Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), are also adapted to the relatively harsh environment of the urinary tract. Infections of the urine, bladder and kidneys by UPEC may lead to potentially fatal bloodstream infections. To survive this range of conditions, UPEC strains must have broad and flexible metabolic capabilities and efficiently utilize scarce essential nutrients. Whole-organism (or "omics") methods have recently provided significant advances in our understanding of the importance of metabolic adaptation in the success of UPECs. Here we describe the nutritional and metabolic requirements for UPEC infection in these environments, and focus on particular metabolic responses and adaptations of UPEC that appear to be essential for survival in the urinary tract.

  10. Metabolic Adaptations of Uropathogenic E. coli in the Urinary Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Riti; Mediati, Daniel G.; Duggin, Iain G.; Harry, Elizabeth J.; Bottomley, Amy L.

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli ordinarily resides in the lower gastrointestinal tract in humans, but some strains, known as Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), are also adapted to the relatively harsh environment of the urinary tract. Infections of the urine, bladder and kidneys by UPEC may lead to potentially fatal bloodstream infections. To survive this range of conditions, UPEC strains must have broad and flexible metabolic capabilities and efficiently utilize scarce essential nutrients. Whole-organism (or “omics”) methods have recently provided significant advances in our understanding of the importance of metabolic adaptation in the success of UPECs. Here we describe the nutritional and metabolic requirements for UPEC infection in these environments, and focus on particular metabolic responses and adaptations of UPEC that appear to be essential for survival in the urinary tract. PMID:28642845

  11. Management of urinary tract infections in patients with neurogenic bladder: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pannek J

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Jürgen Pannek, Jens Wöllner Neuro-Urology, Swiss Paraplegic Center, Nottwil, Switzerland Introduction: Urinary tract infections (UTIs are one of the most common morbidities in persons with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD. They are associated with a significant morbidity and mortality, and they affect the quality of life of the affected patients. Diagnosis and treatment of UTI in this group of patients are challenging. In this review, the current strategies regarding diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are summarized. Diagnostics: it is important to correctly diagnose a UTI, as treatment of bacteriuria should strictly be avoided. A UTI is defined as a combination of laboratory findings (leukocyturia and bacteriuria and symptoms. Laboratory findings without symptoms are classified as asymptomatic bacteriuria. Routine urine screening is not advised. Treatment: Only UTI should be treated; treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria is not indicated. Prior to treatment, urine for a urine culture should be obtained. Antibiotic treatment for ~7 days is advised. Prevention: In recurrent UTI, bladder management should be optimized and morphologic causes for UTI should be excluded. If UTIs persist, medical prophylaxis should be considered. Currently, no prophylactic measure with evidence-based efficacy exists. Long-term antibiotic prophylaxis should be used merely as an ultimate measure. Among the various mentioned innovative approaches for UTI prevention, bacteriophages, intravesical instillations, complementary and alternative medicine techniques, and probiotics seem to be most promising. Conclusion: Recently, several promising innovative options for UTI prophylaxis have been developed which may help overcome the current therapeutic dilemma. However, further well designed studies are necessary to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these approaches. Keywords: neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, spinal cord injury, prophylaxis

  12. Asymptomatic colonization of upper respiratory tract by potential bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Rupak; Sujatha, S; Parija, S C; Bhat, B V

    2010-07-01

    To screen for asymptomatic respiratory carriage of S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and Group A Streptococcus (GAS) in children attending JIPMER, correlate carriage rate with different socio-demographic factors and to detect antimicrobial resistance among the isolates. Throat swabs were collected from both in patients and out patients (1 organism. Antibiotic resistance was highest in S. pneumoniae with 66.7% of strains resistant to penicillin. MDR strains were also encountered. Erythromycin resistance was observed in both H. influenzae (28.4%) and GAS (22%). No statistically significant association was found between the carriage rate of these organisms and different socio-demographic factors. S. pneumoniae carriage rate was comparatively higher in the Community and its antimicrobial resistance is an issue to address.

  13. [A retrospective review of children hospitalised with urinary tract calculi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsgaard, Maria; Larsen, Maiken Kudahl

    2008-06-02

    The incidence of urinary stones in Danish children is unknown. An estimate from The National Diagnosis Registry in Denmark is approximately 1:13,500. The purpose was to estimate the incidence of urinary stones and their composition in children in relation to sex, age and family history. A retrospective review of all children presented at Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, or Roskilde Hospital from October 1999 through October 2005 with urinary tract calculi. 42 patients with an average age of 7.9 years. The sex ratio was 1.7 boys to 1 girl. 7 were of an ethnic origin other than Danish. 12, all boys, had inborn urogenital tract malformation. Two had secondary malformation and one had inborn error of metabolism. The incidence of urogenital infection was higher in children with malformation. In 26 patients, stone analysis and composition were available. 54% of the stones had a calcium component. One third of the children had a family history of urolithiasis. Urinary tract stone is a rather difficult pediatric diagnosis. The most frequent symptom is abdominal pain. Ultrasound established the diagnosis in 50% of cases. All concrements were diagnosed with excretory urogram or computerized tomography. 30% of the children had a family history of urolithiasis. This confirms the importance of metabolic screening and stone analysis in children.

  14. Diagnosing urinary tract abnormalities: intravenous urography or CT urography?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abou El-Ghar M

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed Abou El-Ghar, Huda Refaie, Doaa Sharaf, Tarek El-Diasty Radiology Department, Urology and Nephrology Center, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt Abstract: For many years, intravenous urography (IVU was the modality of choice for diagnosing urinary tract abnormalities. IVU has many drawbacks including poor diagnostic accuracy in diagnosis and characterization of parenchymal lesions, also in cases of nonfunctioning kidneys. It has little diagnostic role to detect the cause of obstruction in absence of radio-opaque stones along the course of the urinary tract (UT. In the last two decades, with the era of the computed tomography (CT, CT has become the gold standard for diagnosis of urinary stones, while multiphasic CT urography (CTU has become the most useful diagnostic tool in different UT abnormalities including complex congenital anomalies, trauma, infection and tumors. Also, the “one-stop-shop” use of CTU in different anomalies including vascular, parenchymal, and urothelial evaluation has a great impact in management of patients. CT has many disadvantages over IVU including its high cost and the higher radiation dose but it is more effective than IVU. Keywords: CTU, IVU, urinary tract, obstruction, tumor, congenital

  15. [Prevalence of urinary tract symptoms in women with diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Rodríguez, Javier; Carbajal-Ramírez, Angélica; Meza-Vázquez, Héctor; Moreno-Palacios, Jorge; Serrano-Brambila, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the prevalence of urinary tract symptoms and the impact in the quality of life in women with diabetes, the association with DM and neuropathy evolution time and glycemic control. A cohort of women from the DiabetIMSS program was evaluated from January 2011 to 2013. The personal history, time of DM diagnosis, neuropathy, urinary symptoms, glycemic control and quality of life impact were noted. A total of 169 women were evaluated. The median age was 58 years (29-85) and DM main evolution time was 9 years (0.5-31). Urinary tract symptoms were present in 128 (75.7 %) patients. Stress and urge incontinence were predominantly present (45.3 and 40.6 % respectively), followed by obstructive and irritative symptoms (25 and 10.1 % respectively). The impact in the quality of life was mild-moderate in 91.1 % of the patients. At least one criteria for neuropathy was noted in 154 (91.1 %) patients. Neuropathy evolution time was longer in the symptomatic group (12 vs 4.8 months). Symptoms were mainly present in patients with more than one year of neuropathy; p < 0.05. There is a high prevalence of urinary tract symptoms in diabetic women. The only associated risk factor was neuropathy. No significative association was found between the rest of the factors.

  16. Nosocomial urinary tract infection. Risk factors, rates and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Asmary, Saeed M; Al-Helali, Nabil S; Abdel-Fattah, Moataz M; Al-Jabban, Tawfiq M; Al-Bamri, Abdellatif M

    2004-07-01

    This report aims at both estimation of the rates of overall nosocomial and urinary tract infection (UTI) and their linear trends as well as studying the potential risk factors of patients admitted to Al-Hada, Rehab and Prince Sultan military hospitals and developed nosocomial UTIs (NUTIs). A case-control study on 206 discharged patients with confirmed UTI and 618 controls without UTI was carried out between August 2001 through to July 2003 to study risk factors for nosocomial UTI as well as hospital records during the period (1998-2002) were reviewed for calculation of the overall annual nosocomial infection and nosocomial UTI rates. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that duration of hospital stay, unit of admission, history of diabetes mellitus or debilitating diseases, and duration and number of urinary catheters were independently associated with increased risk of NUTIs. The mean incidence rate of overall nosocomial infection along the study period (1998-2002) was 2.82, while the mean incidence rate of UTI nosocomial infection was 0.85 per 100 discharged patients. Urinary tract infection represents approximately 31.7% of overall nosocomial infection throughout the study period. Urinary tract infections comprise approximately one third of nosocomial infections. The results, thus, indicated that to reduce the incidence of UTI nosocomial infection, it was important to take factors that can be managed into consideration. Therefore, the involved persons should pay more attention and set practical and effective guidelines for the hospital.

  17. Leiomyoma of Urinary Bladder Presenting with Febrile Urinary Tract Infection: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Ra'ed Ghassan; Murshidi, Mujalli Mhailan; Abu Shahin, Nisreen; Murshidi, Muayyad Mujalli

    2016-01-01

    Leiomyomas of urinary bladder constitute only about 0.43% of all bladder tumors. Only about 250 cases were reported in English literature. This is the first reported case of bladder leiomyoma to present with febrile urinary tract infection. We report a case of a 37- year old male who presented with febrile urinary tract infection. Imaging showed a bladder lesion. This lesion was managed by transurethral resection. Pathologic diagnosis was bladder leiomyoma. Although bladder leiomyomas are benign, they can cause serious sequelae, including serious urinary tract infections as the case we present here shows. This is why it is important to early diagnose and treat this condition. This case highlights the importance of early introduction of imaging in patients presenting with severe urinary tract infections. Failure to diagnose this lesion as the underlying cause of infection may have easily led to recurrence of similar severe life-threatening infections. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Upper urinary tract carcinoma in Lynch syndrome cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, David G; Wagner, David G; Holmäng, Sten; Johansson, Sonny L; Lynch, Henry T

    2011-05-01

    Patients with Lynch syndrome are much more likely to have generally rare upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma but not bladder urothelial carcinoma. While the risk has been quantified, to our knowledge there is no description of how this population of patients with Lynch syndrome and upper urinary tract cancer differs from the general population with upper urinary tract cancer. We obtained retrospective data on a cohort of patients with Lynch syndrome from the Hereditary Cancer Center in Omaha, Nebraska and compared the data to those on a control general population from western Sweden. These data were supplemented by a new survey about exposure to known risk factors. Of the patients with Lynch syndrome 91% had mutations in MSH2 rather than in MSH1 and 79% showed upper tract urothelial carcinoma a mean of 15.85 years after prior Lynch syndrome-type cancer. Median age at diagnosis was 62 years vs 70 in the general population (p Lynch syndrome 51% had urothelial carcinoma in the ureter while it occurred in the renal pelvis in 65% of the general population (p = 0.0013). Similar numbers of high grade tumors were found in the Lynch syndrome and general populations (88% and 74%, respectively, p = 0.1108). Upper urinary tract tumors develop at a younger age and are more likely to be in the ureter with an almost equal gender ratio in patients with Lynch syndrome. It has high grade potential similar to that in the general population. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Urinary β-HCG in Benign and Malignant Urinary Tract Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-B. Halim

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Detectable leve ls of HCG have been reported in conditions other th an normal pregnancy, including threatened abortion, ectopic pregnancy, trophoblastic tumors, carcinomas of the stomach, liver, pancreas and breast as well as multiple myeloma and melanoma. The present study was conducted to estimate urinary β-HCG in bladder cancer and benign urinary tract disorders. 163 individuals were included, 68 with bladder cancer (60 males and 8 females, 64 with benign urinary tract diseases (55 males and 9 females and 31 normal healthy controls (26 males and 5 females. Urinary β-HCG was estimated by the ELISA technique using the reagents supplied by DRG International Inc., Germany. Results of th e study revealed an overexpression of β-HCG in mali gnant and benign urinary tract diseases. 60.3% of the cancer patients and 29.7% of patients with benign diseases showed urinary β-HCG values above the upper limit of the control group (2mIU/ml .

  20. Prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Gard, Gunvor; Klarskov, Peter

    2008-01-01

    , symptoms of urinary incontinence on admission, and use of analgesics were significantly associated with severity, whereas the prevalence and bother of LUTS could not be associated with other patient characteristics. CONCLUSION: LUTS are highly prevalent in stroke patients and have a major impact on daily......AIMS: The aims of this study were primarily to investigate the prevalence, severity and impact on daily life of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) in a clinical sample of stroke patients and secondly to identify factors associated with LUTS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a cross...

  1. Short- and long-term outcome after perineal urethrostomy in 86 cats with feline lower urinary tract disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruda, L; Heiene, R

    2012-12-01

    Perineal urethrostomy is a surgical method for alleviating urethral obstruction in cats with complicated or recurrent obstructive feline lower urinary tract disease. However, long-term outcome of perineal urethrostomy in cats with feline lower urinary tract disease has only been described in studies with relatively few cats. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term prognosis, recurrent episodes, quality of life and survival times in cats with feline lower urinary tract disease who underwent perineal urethrostomy. Data was collected from 86 cats from medical records, including 75 cats with at least 6 months survival, whose owners responded by questionnaire-based telephone interviews. Long-term follow-up ranged from 1·0 to 10·4 years. The median survival time for all cats was 3·5 years after surgery. Forty-seven cats were still alive at the time of the study. Five cats (5·8%) did not survive the first 14 days after perineal urethrostomy surgery; another six cats (7·0%) did not survive 6 months. Seventy-five cats (87%) lived longer than 6 months; 45 (60%) of these were asymptomatic after surgery; 8 of 75 cats (10·7%) experienced severe signs of recurrent feline lower urinary tract disease. For 19 cats, data were available for more than 6 years. Among these, 13 cats were still alive at the time of this study. The six non-surviving cats had all been euthanased for diseases unrelated to the urinary tract. Eighty-eight percent of the owners categorised their cat's long-term quality of life as good. This study shows that long-term quality of life after perineal urethrostomy in cats with obstructive feline lower urinary tract disease is good (as assessed by owners) and the recurrence rate is low. © 2012 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  2. Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections Management in Women: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Badr, Ahmed; Al-Shaikh, Ghadeer

    2013-08-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most frequent clinical bacterial infections in women, accounting for nearly 25% of all infections. Around 50-60% of women will develop UTIs in their lifetimes. Escherichia coli is the organism that causes UTIs in most patients. Recurrent UTIs (RUTI) are mainly caused by reinfection by the same pathogen. Having frequent sexual intercourse is one of the greatest risk factors for RUTIs. In a subgroup of individuals with coexisting morbid conditions, complicated RUTIs can lead to upper tract infections or urosepsis. Although the initial treatment is antimicrobial therapy, use of different prophylactic regimens and alternative strategies are available to reduce exposure to antibiotics.

  3. Neuromodulation for Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction – An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahid Hussain

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to provide an update on the use of neuromodulation using sacral nerve stimulation for the treatment of disorders of the lower urinary tract. Neuromodulation using the InterStim® system (Medtronic Inc. is now accepted as an established therapeutic option for patients with detrusor overactivity, and for women with retention or severe voiding difficulties. However, the use of nerve stimulation in modulating lower urinary tract function has to be regarded as a technique that is in its infancy. Much has yet to be learned about the mechanism by which neuromodulation exerts its effects and there is a need to better define the clinical indications for the treatment. There is also work to be done in terms of optimising stimulation delivery, both in anatomical and electronic terms.

  4. RATIONAL THERAPY OF URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN IN CROATIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milošević, Danko; Batinić, Danica; Trkulja, Vladimir; Andrašević, Arjana Tambić; Grčić, Borislav Filipović; Vrljičak, Kristina; Nogalo, Boro; Turudić, Daniel; Spajić, Marija

    2016-09-01

    Resistance to chemotherapeutics used in the treatment of urinary tract infection is increasing throughout the world. Taking into account clinical experiences, as well as current bacterial resistance in Croatia and neighboring countries, the selection of antibiotic should be the optimal one. Treatment of urinary tract infection in children is particularly demanding due to their age and inclination to severe systemic reaction and renal scarring. If parenteral antibiotics are administered initially, it should be switched to oral medication as soon as possible. Financial aspects of antimicrobial therapy are also very important with the main goal to seek the optimal cost/benefit ratio. Financial orientation must appreciate the basic primum non nocere as a conditio sine qua non postulate as well.

  5. Susceptibility of Urinary Tract Bacteria to Newer Antimicrobial Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjula Mehta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTIs are among the commonest types of bacterial infections. The antibiotic treatment for UTIs is associated with important medical and economic implications. Many different microorganisms can cause UTIs though the most common pathogens are E. coli and members of family Enterobacteriaceae. The knowledge of etiology and antibiotic resistance pattern of the organisms causing urinary tract infection is essential. The present study was undertaken to evaluate trends of antibiotic susceptibility of commonly isolated uropathogens using newer antimicrobial agents, prulifloxacin, fosfomycin (FOM and doripenem. We conclude that maintaining a record of culture results and the antibiogram may help clinicians to determine the empirical and/or specific treatment based on the antibiogram of the isolate for better therapeutic outcome.

  6. URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS—Problems in Medical Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawetz, Ernest

    1953-01-01

    The lesion principally responsible for chronic, or recurrent, urinary tract infection is a focus in the interstitial tissue of the kidney. Most cursory antimicrobial therapy suppresses the manifestations of lower urinary tract involvement but does not eradicate the renal focus. In order to cure rather than merely suppress the infection, it is imperative that, as early as possible, steps be taken to isolate and identify the etiologic microorganism and to determine its sensitivity to antimicrobial agents. Based on this information sufficient amounts of drug should be given for an adequate period (probably at least two weeks) to eradicate the infection within the renal tissue. Such a program would tend to reduce the number of cases in which irreversible renal failure develops from chronic pyelonephritis. PMID:13067022

  7. Chronic dehydration and symptomatic upper urinary tract stones in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Pierre voie urinaire supérieur (upper urinary tract stones) sont assez peu courants au Nigeria et le plus souvent vus chez des hommes de quarantes et ... Patients et Méthodes: Nous avons fait le bilan de tous les ca de pierres rénaux envoyés chez un seul specialise dans un centre hospitalier universitaire au ...

  8. Urinary Tract Infection In Young Healthy Women Following ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    requis pour une infection de la vessie peut être facilitée par les rapports sexuels, ce qui a été démontré pour comme étant un facteur de risque important et un indice .... A diagnosis of acute UTI was made. A urine test showed leucocyte count of .... Urinary Tract Infection in Post-Menopausal Women. J. Gen Intern Med 2008; ...

  9. [Mucosal immunity with emphasis on urinary tract immunity and diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejsek, J; Kudlová, M; Kolácková, M; Novosad, J

    2008-05-01

    Protective immune response in urinary tract is frequently impaired in patients with diabetes. Immunity in this mucosal compartment displays unique characteristics; e.g. absence of physiological microflora and lack of mucus. Pathogens are identified by the PRR receptors expressed on both epithelial and immune cells. Inflammatory response characterised by the acumulation ofgranulocytes is followed. Both protective and harm characteristics of inflammatory response are inseparable linked and delineated by gene polymorphisms in PRR receptors.

  10. Non-Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Urinary Tract Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Mariëlle Beerepoot; Suzanne Geerlings

    2016-01-01

    Increasing antimicrobial resistance has stimulated interest in non-antibiotic prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs). Well-known steps in the pathogenesis of UTIs are urogenital colonization and adherence of uropathogens to uroepithelial cell receptors. To prevent colonization in postmenopausal women, vaginal, but not oral, estrogens have been shown to restore the vagina lactobacilli flora, reduce vaginal colonization with Enterobacteriaceae, and reduce the number of UTIs co...

  11. Urinary tract infections: etiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of uropathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Laneve

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary tract infections are a serious health problem affecting millions of people each year.They are the second most common type of infection in the body.The objective of study was to determine the etiology and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of urinary tract infections pathogens isolated in our Patology Clinic laboratory. Materials and Methods: During the period July 2007- July 2008,were analysed 1422 urine samples.The determination of the total microbe load were acquire with an kit of the BIO-DETECTOR while the identification of germs with Apy sistem. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were assaied with the ATB UR strip. Results: About the total of samples analysed, 320 (22% had significant bacteriuria. Escherichia coli was the most common etiologic agent isolated (62%, followed by Klebsiella ssp. (10%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5,95% and Proteus mirabilis (5%. Gram-positive bacteria accounted for only 7.32% , with prevalence of Staphylococcus ssp (5,32 and Enterococcus spp (2%. The most effective antibiotics for Gram- were: Imipenem, Amikacin, Ceftazidime and Cefotaxim, while for Gram+ were: Minocyclin,Vancomycin and Oxacillin. Conclusion: Escherichia coli was the microrganism more frequently isolated between Gram negative bacteria with very susceptible to Amoxicillin. Currently, the empirical use of Cotrimoxazole and Amoxicillin is not recommended for Enterobacteriaceae. Urinary tract infections are more common in women than in men. Men are more likely to get a UTI once past the age of 65. Current data on the prevalence of multidrug resistance among urinary tract isolates should be a consideration to change the current empiric treatment of IVU.

  12. Urinary tract infection : a serious health problem in old women

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Irene

    2011-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common bacterial infection in women of all ages but the incidence and prevalence increase with age. Despite the high incidence of UTI, little is known about its impact on morale or subjective wellbeing and daily life in old women. UTI in older people can be a complex problem in terms of approach to diagnosis, treatment and prevention because in these patients it frequently presents with a range of atypical symptoms such as delirium, gastrointestinal signs an...

  13. Surveillance of acute community acquired urinary tract bacterial infections

    OpenAIRE

    Sibanarayan Rath; Padhy, Rabindra N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To record the antibiotic resistance of community acquired uropathogens over a period of 24 months (May 2011–April 2012). Methods: Urine samples from patients of outpatient department (OPD) were used for isolating urinary tract infection (UTI)-causing bacteria that were cultured on suitable selective media and identified by biochemical tests. Their antibiograms were ascertained by Kirby–Bauer's disc diffusion method, using 17 antibiotics of 5 different classes. Results: From 2...

  14. Pheochromocytoma presenting as recurrent urinary tract infections : a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MEntee Gerard P

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pheochromocytomas are rare, potentially fatal, neuroendocrine tumors of the adrenal medulla or extra-adrenal paraganglia. Their clinical presentation varies greatly from the classic triad of episodic headache, diaphoresis and tachycardia to include a spectrum of non-specific symptomatology. Case presentation A 43-year-old Caucasian woman was referred to us from primary care services with a three-month history of recurrent urinary tract infections on a background of hypertension, latent autoimmune diabetes of adulthood and autoimmune hypothyroidism. At 38 years she required insulin therapy. Despite medication compliance and dietary control, she reported a recent history of increased insulin requirements and uncontrolled hypertension with concomitant recurrent urinary tract infections. A renal ultrasound examination, to rule out underlying renal pathology, revealed an incidental 8cm right adrenal mass of both solid and cystic components. A subsequent computed tomography of her abdomen and pelvis confirmed a solid heterogeneous mass consistent with a pheochromocytoma. There were no other features suggestive of multiple endocrine neoplasia. Urinary collection over 24 hours revealed grossly elevated levels of catecholamines and metabolites. Following an open right adrenalectomy, our patient's insulin requirements were significantly reduced and her symptoms resolved. Two weeks post-operatively, an iodine-131-metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy was negative for residual tumor and metastatic disease. Urinary catecholamine and metabolite concentrations were within the normal range at a follow-up six months later. Conclusion Pheochromocytoma is a rare catecholamine-producing tumor requiring a high index of suspicion for early diagnosis. Our case report serves to highlight the importance of considering pheochromocytoma as a differential diagnosis in the atypical setting of recurrent urinary tract infections and concomitant autoimmune

  15. Catheter-related urinary tract infection: practical management in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2014-01-01

    From 5-10% of elderly residents of long-term care facilities require chronic indwelling catheters for management of urine voiding. These residents are always bacteriuric, because of biofilm formation along the catheter, and experience increased morbidity associated with urinary tract infection. A wide variety of bacteria or yeast species are isolated. Occasional episodes of symptomatic infection may be accompanied by localizing genitourinary findings. However, when fever is present and there are no localizing findings, symptomatic infection is a diagnosis of exclusion. Many of these episodes are not from a urinary source, so critical clinical evaluation is always necessary. A urine specimen for culture should be obtained from patients with symptomatic infection prior to institution of antimicrobial therapy. When the catheter has been present for 2 weeks or longer, it should be replaced and the urine specimen collected through the new catheter. This provides a specimen of bladder urine without biofilm contamination, and catheter replacement also improves clinical outcomes. Treatment algorithms with a goal of limiting inappropriate treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria have been developed. Empiric antimicrobial therapy should be avoided when possible. Guidelines for prevention of catheter-acquired urinary infection should be followed. The most important of these is to avoid use of a urinary catheter whenever possible and, when there is no longer an indication for the catheter, to remove it promptly.

  16. Genetics of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Zwolińska

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT occur at a frequency of 1 in 500 live births and are a common cause of renal insufficiency in childhood. CAKUT encompass a wide spectrum of malformations including anomalies of the kidney, collecting system, bladder and urethra. Most cases of CAKUT are sporadic and limited to the urinary tract, but some of them are syndromic or associated with positive family history. To understand the basis of human renal anomalies, knowledge of kidney and urinary tract development is necessary. This process is very complicated, requires precise integration of a variety of progenitor cell populations of diverse embryonic origins and is controlled by many factors at every stage of development. This review focuses on the genetic factors leading to developmental errors of important morphogenetic processes, particularly in metanephric kidney induction and ureteric bud branching. The essential results of genetic studies in regard to CAKUT, performed on experimental models and in humans, are presented. However, further investigations are required to complete understanding of the complex molecular network, which will help us to determine novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for CAKUT.

  17. Role of pelvic floor in lower urinary tract function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chermansky, Christopher J; Moalli, Pamela A

    2016-10-01

    The pelvic floor plays an integral part in lower urinary tract storage and evacuation. Normal urine storage necessitates that continence be maintained with normal urethral closure and urethral support. The endopelvic fascia of the anterior vaginal wall, its connections to the arcus tendineous fascia pelvis (ATFP), and the medial portion of the levator ani muscles must remain intact to provide normal urethral support. Thus, normal pelvic floor function is required for urine storage. Normal urine evacuation involves a series of coordinated events, the first of which involves complete relaxation of the external urethral sphincter and levator ani muscles. Acquired dysfunction of these muscles will initially result in sensory urgency and detrusor overactivity; however, with time the acquired voiding dysfunction can result in intermittent urine flow and incomplete bladder emptying, progressing to urinary retention in severe cases. This review will start with a discussion of normal pelvic floor anatomy and function. Next various injuries to the pelvic floor will be reviewed. The dysfunctional pelvic floor will be covered subsequently, with a focus on levator ani spasticity and stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Finally, future research directions of the interaction between the pelvic floor and lower urinary tract function will be discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Use of urinary gram stain for detection of urinary tract infection in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, G R; Lewander, W J; Cimini, D M; Josephson, S L; Linakis, J G

    1995-01-01

    To determine whether Gram stain of urine is more sensitive than urinalysis in detecting urinary tract infection in infants. Prospective series. Urban teaching hospital emergency department. Two hundred seven infants 6 months old or less, from whom a catheterized or suprapubically aspirated urine specimen was obtained for culture. Urinary Gram stain, culture, and urinalysis were performed. With culture results as the validating standard, the Gram stain sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were compared with urinalysis, including leukocyte esterase, nitrite, pyuria, and bacteriuria. The prevalence of positive cultures was 8.7% (18 of 207). Gram stain had higher sensitivity than overall urinalysis (94% versus 67%, P stain appears to be more reliable than urinalysis in detecting urinary tract infection in young infants.

  19. Assessing Urinary Tract Junction Obstruction Defects by Methylene Blue Dye Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Kangsun

    2017-10-12

    Urinary tract junction obstruction defects are congenital anomalies inducing hydronephrosis and hydroureter. Murine urinary tract junction obstruction defects can be assessed by tracking methylene blue dye flow within the urinary system. Methylene blue dye is injected into the renal pelvis of perinatal embryonic kidneys and dye flow is monitored from the renal pelvis of the kidney through the ureter and into the bladder lumen after applying hydrostatic pressure. Dye accumulation will be evident in the bladder lumen of the normal perinatal urinary tract, but will be constrained between the renal pelvis and the end point of an abnormal ureter, if urinary tract obstructions occur. This method facilitates the confirmation of urinary tract junction obstructions and visualization of hydronephrosis and hydroureter. This manuscript describes a protocol for methylene blue dye injection into the renal pelvis to confirm urinary tract junction obstructions.

  20. Diagnostic value of 64-slice spiral computed tomography imaging of the urinary tract during the excretory phase for urinary tract obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, De-Li; Jia, Guang-Sheng; Chen, Peng; Liu, Xin-Ding; Shu, Sheng-Jie; Ling, Zai-Sheng; Fan, Ting-Ting; Shen, Xiu-Fen; Zhang, Jin-Ling

    2017-11-01

    The present study aimed to assess the diagnostic value of 64-slice spiral computed tomography (CT) imaging of the urinary tract during the excretory phase for urinary tract obstruction. CT imaging of the urinary tract during the excretory phase was performed in 46 patients that had been diagnosed with urinary tract obstruction by B-mode ultrasound imaging or clinical manifestations. It was demonstrated that out of the 46 patients, 18 had pelvic and ureteral calculi, 12 cases had congenital malformations, 3 had ureteral stricture caused by urinary tract infection and 13 cases had malignant tumors of the urinary tract. The average X-ray dose planned for the standard CT scan of the urinary tract group 1 was 14.11±5.45 mSv, while the actual X-ray dose administered for the CT scan during the excretory phase group 2 was 9.01±4.56 mSv. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (t=15.36; Pexcretory phase has a high diagnostic value for urinary tract obstruction.

  1. Lower urinary tract symptoms and urinary incontinence in a geriatric cohort - a population-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrberger, Clemens; Madersbacher, Stephan; Jungwirth, Susanne; Fischer, Peter; Tragl, Karl-Heinz

    2012-11-01

    To assess prevalence and severity of lower urinary tract function in 85-year-old men and women. Little is known on the prevalence of lower urinary tract dysfunction in this geriatric age group, which is now the fastest growing sector of the population worldwide. The Vienna Trans-Danube Aging study (VITA) is a longitudinal, population-based study initiated in 2000 that included men/women aged 75 years living in a well-defined area in Vienna. The main purpose of the VITA study was to identify risk factors for incident Alzheimer's disease. All study participants alive in 2010 were contacted by mail to complete a detailed questionnaire on various aspects of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and urinary incontinence (UI). The response rate was 68%, resulting in a total of 262 questionnaires available for analysis (men n= 96; women n= 166). All study participants were 85 years of age. Urinary incontinence defined as any involuntary loss during the past 4 weeks was reported by 24% of men and 35% of women (P= 0.04). Stress UI was more frequent in women (39%) than in men (14%, P 0.05). Nocturia more often than twice was more prevalent in men (69%) than in women (49%) (P= 0.02). Overactive bladder, according to International Continence Society criteria, was present in 55% of women and 50% of men. No difference regarding quality of life impairment as the result of LUTS and UI was noticed between sexes. A few co-morbidities were identified to correlate with UI and storage symptoms. These data provide insights into the prevalence and severity of LUTS and UI in individuals in their eighties, to our knowledge the largest population-based study in this age group. Demographic changes in upcoming decades underline the importance of a thorough understanding of lower urinary tract dysfunction in a geriatric population. © 2012 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  2. Labial fusion causing urinary incontinence and recurrent urinary tract infection in a postmenopausal female: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirim, Ayhan; Hasirci, Eray

    2011-01-01

    A 73-year-old postmenopausal woman was admitted with recurrent urinary tract infection and a history of incontinence. General physical examination was normal. Complete labial fusion was noticed on genital examination. Surgical intervention was performed. This therapy alleviated incontinence and recurrent urinary tract infection.

  3. The Difference of Nosocomial Urinary Tract Infection Risk Based on Chateterization Urine, Age, and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edel Weisela Permata Sari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial urinary tract infection is common occurs in patients with indwelling urinary chateter. Factors that caused nosocomial urinary tract infection are host, agent, and chateterization urine. The aim of this research was to analyze risk difference nosocomial urinary tract infection based on chateterization urine, age, and diabetes mellitus (DM. This study used case control with sample size 20 for each group. Case sample was patients who diagnosed urinary tract infection, while control sampel was patients who not diagnosed urinary tract infection in Haji Hospital Surabaya on 2013 until 2014. The independent variables were duration of chateterization, frequency of chateterization, age, and DM, while dependent variable was nosocomial urinary tract infection. Those variables was analyze with risk difference (RD in Epi Info. The result showed that risk difference nosocomial urinary tract infection based on duration of chateterization is RD = 0,52 it means if changing chateter was done every seven days used, it can prevent 0,52 from 0,71 or 73,53% urinary tract infection cases, frequency of chateterization is RD = 0,43956 it means if decrease frequency of chateterization until one time used, it can prevent 0,44 from 0,79 or 55,94% urinary tract infection cases, age is RD = 0,40 it means if insertion of urine catheter as indicated and right procedure in patient with >55 old it can prevent 0,40 from 0,68 or 59,26% urinary tract infection cases, and DM is RD = 0,42 it means if preventing toward DM, it can prevent 0,42 from 0,75 or 55,56% urinary tract infection cases. Keyword: chateterization urine, age, diabetes mellitus, nosocomial urinary tract infection

  4. The Effect of Urinary Catheters on Microbial Biofilms and Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmusaoglu, Sahra; Yurdugül, Seyhun; Metin, Ahmet; Vehid, Suphi

    2017-03-16

    The aims of this study were to determine relationship between biofilm producer microorganisms attached to urinary catheters (UCs) and urinary catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs), to determine the rate of CAUTI development and the relationship between CAUTI and catheterization period in catheterized patients. Urinary catheters from 143 inpatients who were hospitalized in Abant Izzet Baysal University Hospital Urinary Service, and urine samples of these patients before and after catheterization of urinarycatheter were collected. Culture-based microbiological evaluation of urinary catheters removed from inpatient and urine samples collected from inpatients were performed before and after catheterization of urinary catheter to identify various organisms and determine biofilm production by them. The incidence of CAUTIs was 13% (18/143) in catheterized inpatients. Biofilm producer microorganisms such as Escherichia coli (E. coli ), Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis that were isolated from UCs removed from inpatients were found to cause CAUTI (P < .001). Incidence of CAUTIs is increased by the usage of UCs and prolonged catheterization period.

  5. Anatomy and physiology of the lower urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groat, William C; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Functions of the lower urinary tract to store and periodically eliminate urine are regulated by a complex neural control system in the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral autonomic ganglia that coordinates the activity of smooth and striated muscles of the bladder and urethral outlet. Neural control of micturition is organized as a hierarchic system in which spinal storage mechanisms are in turn regulated by circuitry in the rostral brainstem that initiates reflex voiding. Input from the forebrain triggers voluntary voiding by modulating the brainstem circuitry. Many neural circuits controlling the lower urinary tract exhibit switch-like patterns of activity that turn on and off in an all-or-none manner. The major component of the micturition switching circuit is a spinobulbospinal parasympathetic reflex pathway that has essential connections in the periaqueductal gray and pontine micturition center. A computer model of this circuit that mimics the switching functions of the bladder and urethra at the onset of micturition is described. Micturition occurs involuntarily during the early postnatal period, after which it is regulated voluntarily. Diseases or injuries of the nervous system in adults cause re-emergence of involuntary micturition, leading to urinary incontinence. The mechanisms underlying these pathologic changes are discussed. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Association Between Early Idiopathic Neonatal Jaundice and Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Murat; Sarici, S Ümit; Yurdugül, Yüksel; Akpinar, Melis; Altun, Demet; Özcan, Begüm; Serdar, Muhittin A; Sarici, Dilek

    2017-01-01

    Etiologic role, incidence, demographic, and response-to-treatment characteristics of urinary tract infection (UTI) among neonates, its relationship with significant neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, and abnormalities of the urinary system were studied in a prospective investigation in early (⩽10 days) idiopathic neonatal jaundice in which all other etiologic factors of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia were ruled out. Urine samples for microscopic and bacteriologic examination were obtained with bladder catheterization from 155 newborns with early neonatal jaundice. Newborns with a negative urine culture and with a positive urine culture were defined as group I and group II, respectively, and the 2 groups were compared with each other. The incidence of UTI in whole of the study group was 16.7%. Serum total and direct bilirubin levels were statistically significantly higher in group II when compared with group I (P = .005 and P = .001, respectively). Decrease in serum total bilirubin level at the 24th hour of phototherapy was statistically significantly higher in group I compared with group II (P = .022). Urinary tract infection should be investigated in the etiologic evaluation of newborns with significant hyperbilirubinemia. The possibility of UTI should be considered in jaundiced newborns who do not respond to phototherapy well or have a prolonged duration of phototherapy treatment.

  7. Association Between Early Idiopathic Neonatal Jaundice and Urinary Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Özcan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Etiologic role, incidence, demographic, and response-to-treatment characteristics of urinary tract infection (UTI among neonates, its relationship with significant neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, and abnormalities of the urinary system were studied in a prospective investigation in early (≤10 days idiopathic neonatal jaundice in which all other etiologic factors of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia were ruled out. Patients and methods: Urine samples for microscopic and bacteriologic examination were obtained with bladder catheterization from 155 newborns with early neonatal jaundice. Newborns with a negative urine culture and with a positive urine culture were defined as group I and group II, respectively, and the 2 groups were compared with each other. Results: The incidence of UTI in whole of the study group was 16.7%. Serum total and direct bilirubin levels were statistically significantly higher in group II when compared with group I ( P = .005 and P = .001, respectively. Decrease in serum total bilirubin level at the 24th hour of phototherapy was statistically significantly higher in group I compared with group II ( P = .022. Conclusions: Urinary tract infection should be investigated in the etiologic evaluation of newborns with significant hyperbilirubinemia. The possibility of UTI should be considered in jaundiced newborns who do not respond to phototherapy well or have a prolonged duration of phototherapy treatment.

  8. Aspergillus infection in urinary tract post-ureteric stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections of the urinary tract are usually encountered following prolonged antibiotic use, instrumentation and indwelling urinary catheters. These type of infections are mostly seen in immuno-compromised patients. Candida is the most common among the fungal infections of urinary tract followed by Aspergillus infection. Here is a case report of a 26 year old diabetic female who presented with abdominal pain, fever, nausea and vomiting. She had undergone double-J stenting 15-20 days back. The cause of the symptoms was not detected till the patient underwent C.T Scan-KUB with excretory urography which showed the displaced D-J stent. Then on performing replacement of D-J stent, cystoscopy was done and the tissue sample was sent for microbiological and histopathological examination. On Microbiological examination, Aspergillus flavus was isolated from the tissue, which was culprit behind the disease. Patient was then treated with anti-fungal drugs, following which she gradually improved.

  9. Anatomy and histology of the lower urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradidarcheep, Wisuit; Wallner, Christian; Dabhoiwala, Noshir F; Lamers, Wouter H

    2011-01-01

    The function of the lower urinary tract is basically storage of urine in the bladder and the at-will periodic evacuation of the stored urine. Urinary incontinence is one of the most common lower urinary tract disorders in adults, but especially in the elderly female. The urethra, its sphincters, and the pelvic floor are key structures in the achievement of continence, but their basic anatomy is little known and, to some extent, still incompletely understood. Because questions with respect to continence arise from human morbidity, but are often investigated in rodent animal models, we present findings in human and rodent anatomy and histology. Differences between males and females in the role that the pelvic floor plays in the maintenance of continence are described. Furthermore, we briefly describe the embryologic origin of ureters, bladder, and urethra, because the developmental origin of structures such as the vesicoureteral junction, the bladder trigone, and the penile urethra are often invoked to explain (clinical) observations. As the human pelvic floor has acquired features in evolution that are typical for a species with bipedal movement, we also compare the pelvic floor of humans with that of rodents to better understand the rodent (or any other quadruped, for that matter) as an experimental model species. The general conclusion is that the "Bauplan" is well conserved, even though its common features are sometimes difficult to discern.

  10. Could Urinary Tract Infection Cause Female Stress Urinary Incontinence? A Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Fatemeh; Motaghed, Zahra; Abbaszadeh, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), the most common type of urinary incontinence (UI), is usually defined as leakage of urine during movement or activity which puts pressure on the bladder, such as coughing, sneezing, running or heavy lifting. It is reported in most countries that 15% to 40% of women struggle with SUI and its severe implications for daily life, including social interactions, sexuality, and psychological wellbeing. The aim of our study was to assess the relationship between urinary tract infection and the severity of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). This research was a cross-sectional study conducted in a public urology clinic in Tehran. The study population was all females with complaints of SUI who visited the clinic during 2014. We compared Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP) in two groups of patients, with and without history of urinary tract infection (UTI). According to the findings of our study, the mean VLPP was 83.10 cm H2O in the group with UTI history, and 81.29 cm H2O in those without history of UTI. The difference in VLPP between the two groups was not significant (P < 0.05), even after controlling for confounding variables including age, body mass index, history of hysterectomy and number of deliveries. Our study did not confirm a significant relationship between UTI and severity of SUI as measured by VLPP. A decisive opinion would require extensive future studies by prospective methods.

  11. Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection Among Renal Transplant Recipients: Risk Factors and Long-Term Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawab, Khaled Abdel; Gheith, Osama; Al Otaibi, Torki; Nampoory, Naryanam; Mansour, Hany; Halim, Medhat A; Nair, Prasad; Said, Tarek; Abdelmonem, Mohamed; El-Sayed, Ayman; Awadain, Waleed

    2017-04-01

    Urinary tract infection is the most common type of bacterial infection in kidney transplant procedures, with adverse effects on graft and patient survival. We aimed to evaluate the risk factors of recurrent urinary tract infection in renal transplant recipients and its impact on patient and graft survival. In a cohort of 1019 patients who were transplanted between 2000 and 2010 at Hamed Al-Essa Organ Transplant Center in Kuwait, 86% developed at least 1 episode of urinary tract infection, with only 6.2% of patients having recurrent infections. We compared patients with recurrent urinary tract infections (group 1) with those who had no recurrence (group 2) regarding their risk factors. Patients in group 1 were significantly younger than those in group 2 (34.9 ± 23 vs 42.8 ± 16 y; P urinary tract infections (P urinary tract infection among our renal transplant patients. However, recurrence did not adversely affect graft or patient survival.

  12. Diagnosis, prevention and treatment of urinary tract infections in older people.

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    Bardsley, Alison

    2017-02-28

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in older people, with the prevalence increasing with age in both sexes. UTI is a frequent reason for emergency admission to hospital. There are many conditions that contribute to older people being more at risk of UTI and the main preventive strategy is to avoid the use of indwelling urethral catheters. Where an indwelling catheter is inserted its continued use should be regularly reviewed and the catheter removed, especially if the reason for insertion is incontinence and the person becomes additionally incontinent of faeces. Diagnosis of UTI can be complex because older people do not always exhibit the signs and symptoms commonly associated with UTI. Diagnosis can be further complicated by a person's inability to provide a comprehensive history and by difficulties obtaining an uncontaminated, 'clean catch' urine specimen. Antibiotic therapy should not be used routinely for people with asymptomatic bacteriuria and, where antibiotics are required, healthcare professionals should follow local prescribing guidelines.

  13. Etiology of urinary tract infection in scholar children

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    Barroso Jr. Ubirajara

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To prospectively assess the prevalence of vesicourethral dysfunction in children over 3 years old, comparing it with the occurrence rate for other potential factors that cause urinary infection in this age range. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 36 girls and 9 boys were assessed, with mean age of 6.4 years, ranging from 3 to 13.9 years. These children were prospectively assessed regarding the presence of symptoms of lower urinary tract dysfunction. These data were compared with the retrospective assessment of other potential risk factors for urinary infection. Ultrasonography was performed in 28 children and voiding cystourethrogram was performed in 26 patients. RESULTS: Vesicourethral dysfunction was diagnosed in 39 (87% of the 45 children with urinary infection. Among these 39 patients, all had voiding urgency, 30 (77% had urinary incontinence, 12 (31% pollakiuria and 3 (8% presented infrequent voiding. Vaginal discharge was evidenced in 8 (22% girls and phimosis in 2 (22% boys. Obstipation was diagnosed in 10 (22% cases. Significant post-voiding residue was detected in 4 (13% of the 28 cases assessed. Vesicoureteral reflux was evidenced in 5 (19% of the 26 patients who underwent voiding cystourethrogram. In only 2 (4% cases there was not an apparent cause for the infection. CONCLUSION: Vesicourethral dysfunction is a major cause of urinary infection in children with ages above 3 years old. In cases where voiding dysfunction in not present, other predisposing factors must be assessed. However, only 4% of the patients did not present an apparent urologic cause for the infection.

  14. Radical and sparing surgical treatment of patients with upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinomas (UUT -TCC) - preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabłonowski, Zbigniew; Kędzierski, Robert; Sosnowski, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Tumors originating from transitional epithelium of the renal pelvis and ureter are infrequent. Their course is asymptomatic at early stages of the disease, and diagnosis and institution of appropriate treatment delayed. The aim of the study is to assess the results of treatment in patients with upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinomas (UUT-TCC). Fifteen patients treated in 2005-2010 for UUT-TCC were qualified for the retrospective study. Clinical symptoms, diagnostic methods, tumor location, clinical stage and histopathological characteristics of the tumors were assessed. Then, the instituted treatment and its results were analyzed. The average follow-up period was 51 month (range 6-65), UUT-TCC accounted for 6.7% of renal tumors treated. Concurrent treated vesical tumors were observed in 4 (26.7%) patients. Primary UUT-TCC was diagnosed in 10 (66.7%) patients. Radical surgery was performed in 10 (66.7%) patients, whereas 5 (33.3%) underwent sparing operations. Macroscopic hematuria was the predominant clinical symptom. In most cases T2-T3 clinical stage (60.0%) and high-grade (66.7%) were observed. Development of an upper urinary tract tumor after treatment of a vesical tumor was noted in 4 (26.7%) patients. During the follow-up period, urinary bladder carcinomas were diagnosed in 5 (33.3%) patients with primary upper urinary tract tumors. Nephroureterectomy remains the standard treatment for UUT-TCC. Organ-sparing surgery is possible in selected patients with low clinical stage and low grade tumors. Patients treated for urinary bladder carcinomas require regular monitoring of the upper urinary tract.

  15. "The creeping tumor:" An unusual presentation of upper urinary tract malignancy

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    Velaiyan Selvaraj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Upper urinary tract urothelial malignancy accounts for 5-10% of urothelial carcinomas. Synchronous bladder carcinoma occurs in 2-4% of patients with upper urinary tract tumors. Urothelial malignancy involving the entire upper urinary tract is an extremely rare entity. Most upper urinary tract malignancies are transitional cell carcinomas (TCC, of which the sarcomatoid variant is very rare. These tumors pose a challenge to the radiologist. We herein report a case of TCC involving the entire collecting system of the left kidney, extending down along the ureter and projecting as a mass in the bladder.

  16. Intractable urinary tract infection in a renal transplant recipient

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    Satish Renuka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTI are the most common bacterial infections after renal transplantation and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Recurrent or relapsing infections are not uncommon in the early post-transplant period and superadded fungal UTI can occur in these patients, posing a difficult therapeutic problem. Literature on recurrent UTI after transplant as well as the ideal approach to such patients is scanty. We present the case of a renal al-lograft recipient who presented with relapsing bacterial UTI complicated by systemic fungemia; also, a brief review of fungal UTI is attempted.

  17. Urinary tract infections: epidemiology, mechanisms of infection and treatment options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Mireles, Ana L.; Walker, Jennifer N.; Caparon, Michael; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a severe public health problem and are caused by a range of pathogens, but most commonly by Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. High recurrence rates and increasing antimicrobial resistance among uropathogens threaten to greatly increase the economic burden of these infections. In this Review, we discuss how basic science studies are elucidating the molecular details of the crosstalk that occurs at the host–pathogen interface, as well as the consequences of these interactions for the pathophysiology of UTIs. We also describe current efforts to translate this knowledge into new clinical treatments for UTIs. PMID:25853778

  18. International urinary tract imaging basic spinal cord injury data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Craggs, M; Kennelly, M

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To create an International Urinary Tract Imaging Basic Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Data Set within the framework of the International SCI Data Sets. SETTING: An international working group. METHODS: The draft of the Data Set was developed by a working group comprising members appointed...... by the Neurourology Committee of the International Continence Society, the European Association of Urology, the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA), the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS) and a representative of the Executive Committee of the International SCI Standards and Data Sets. The final version...

  19. Is Escherichia coli urinary tract infection a zoonosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, L.; Garneau, P.; Bruant, G.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that the Escherichia coli causing urinary tract infection (UTI) may come from meat and animals. The purpose was to investigate if a clonal link existed between E. coli from animals, meat and UTI patients. Twenty-two geographically and temporally matched B2 E. coli...... and kidney cultures. Further, isolates with the same gene profile also yielded similar bacterial counts in urine, bladder and kidneys. This study showed a clonal link between E. coli from meat and humans, providing solid evidence that UTI is zoonosis. The close relationship between community-dwelling human...

  20. Surveillance for urinary tract cancer in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Inge Thomsen; Myrhøj, Torben

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an inherited multiorgan cancer syndrome, which when caused by a germline mutation in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes is known as Lynch syndrome (LS). Mutation carriers are at risk for developing cancers primarily in the colon, rectum...... and endometrium, but also other extra-colonic cancers. Urinary tract cancers (UTC) have in many studies been reported increased in LS and it has been discussed among researchers and clinicians whether or not screening for urological tumours should be included in the surveillance programme and if so what screening...

  1. Endoluminal pharmacologic stimulation of the upper urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Jørn Skibsted

    2013-05-01

    The experiments performed in this PhD thesis were conducted at the Institute of Experimental Surgery, Skejby Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark and at the Laboratory of Animal Science, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. The thesis is based on 3 peer review articles published in international journals and a review. Diagnostic or therapeutic endoscopic upper urinary tract procedures are usually characterised as minimal invasive procedures and associated with a low complication rate. Most often fever or pain are seen and sometimes septicaemia. However, mucosa lesion or even ureteric ruptures are known complications. Research has suggested that high renal pelvic pressures generated during these procedures, might contribute to per-/postoperative complications seen, and even possible renal parenchymal damage. Nevertheless, local administration (endoluminal) of a relaxant drug has not previously been tried in order to lower renal pelvic pressure. The purposes of this thesis were to examine the effect of local administration (endoluminal) of the nonspecific β-adrenergic agonist ISOproterenol (ISO) on: 1) The normal pressure flow relation in porcine ureter, 2) The effect of endoluminal ISO perfusion during flexible ureterorenoscopy, 3) The pressure flow relation during semirigid ureterorenoscopy and 4) The cardiovascular system. Among other receptor-types β-adrenergic receptor are located in the upper urinary tract and the activation thereof mediates smooth muscle relaxation. We have shown - in an animal experimental model - that ISO added to the irrigation fluid had significant impact on the renal pelvic pressures generated during upper urinary tract endoscopy. ISO significantly and dose dependently reduced the normal pressure flow relations by approximately 80% without concomitant cardiovascular side effects or measurable plasma levels of ISO. During flexible ureterorenoscopy 0.1 µg/ml ISO added to the irrigation fluid significantly reduced renal pelvic pressure during

  2. Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections Management in Women; A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Badr

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTIs are one of the most frequent clinical bacterial infections in women, accounting for nearly 25% of all infections. Around 50–60% of women will develop UTIs in their lifetimes. Escherichia coli is the organism that causes UTIs in most patients. Recurrent UTIs (RUTI are mainly caused by reinfection by the same pathogen. Having frequent sexual intercourse is one of the greatest risk factors for RUTIs. In a subgroup of individuals with coexisting morbid conditions, complicated RUTIs can lead to upper tract infections or urosepsis. Although the initial treatment is antimicrobial therapy, use of different prophylactic regimens and alternative strategies are available to reduce exposure to antibiotics.

  3. The urinary microbiome and its contribution to lower urinary tract symptoms; ICI-RS 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Marcus J; Morris, Nicola; Apostolidis, Apostolos; Rahnama'i, Mohammad S; Marchesi, Julian R

    2017-04-01

    The microbiome is the term used for the symbiotic microbial colonisation of healthy organs. Studies have found bacterial identifiers within voided urine which is apparently sterile on conventional laboratory culture, and accordingly there may be health and disease implications. The International Consultation on Incontinence Research Society (ICI-RS) established a literature review and expert consensus discussion focussed on the increasing awareness of the urinary microbiome, and potential research priorities. The consensus considered the discrepancy between findings of conventional clinical microbiology methods, which generally rely on culture parameters predisposed towards certain "expected" organisms. Discrepancy between selective culture and RNA sequencing to study species-specific 16S ribosomal RNA is increasingly clear, and highlights the possibility that protective or harmful bacteria may be overlooked where microbiological methods are selective. There are now strong signals of the existence of a "core" urinary microbiome for the human urinary tract, particularly emerging with ageing. The consensus reviewed the potential relationship between a patient's microbiome and lower urinary tract dysfunction, whether low-count bacteriuria may be clinically significant and mechanisms which could associate micro-organisms with lower urinary tract symptoms. Key research priorities identified include the need to establish the scope of microbiome across the range of normality and clinical presentations, and gain consensus on testing protocols. Proteomics to study enzymatic and other functions may be necessary, since different bacteria may have overlapping phenotype. Longitudinal studies into risk factors for exposure, cumulative risk, and emergence of disease need to undertaken. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:850-853, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Endoscopic management of upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma.

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    Park, Bong Hee; Jeon, Seong Soo

    2013-07-01

    Upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) is relatively uncommon. Radical nephroureterectomy with an ipsilateral bladder cuff excision has been the gold standard treatment for UTUC. However, recent advances in technology have made possible the increased use of endoscopic management for the treatment of UTUC. The definitive goal of endoscopic management of UTUC is cancer control while maintaining renal function and the integrity of the urinary tract. Endoscopic management includes both the retrograde ureteroscopic and antegrade percutaneous approaches. The endoscopic management of UTUC is a reasonable alternative for patients with renal insufficiency or a solitary functional kidney, bilateral disease, or a significant comorbidity that precludes radical surgery. Select patients with a functional contralateral kidney who have low-grade, low-stage tumors may also be candidates for endoscopic management. The careful selection of patients is the most important point for the successful endoscopic management of UTUC. It is crucial that patients are compliant and motivated, because a lifetime protocol of strict surveillance is necessary. Adjuvant topical therapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin or mitomycin C can be used after endoscopic management of UTUC in an attempt to reduce recurrence. In this article, we review current endoscopic techniques, indications for endoscopic treatment, clinical outcomes of endoscopic management, adjuvant topical therapy, and surveillance in patients with UTUC.

  5. Rapid diagnosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa urinary tract infections by radioimmunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, R B; Wheat, L J; White, A

    1979-01-01

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay designed to detect serotype 6 Pseudomonas aeruginosa antigens was evaluated for its ability to rapidly diagnose urinary tract infections. Twelve P. aeruginosa serotypes were easily differentiated in the assay from eight other gram-negative bacterial species. During log-phase growth, the assay detected antigens in culture when approximately 10(6) or more serotype 6 P. aeruginosa organisms were present. Both cell-associated and solubilized antigens were detected. The assay detected antigens in 13 of 17 urine specimens which grew greater than 10(5) P. aeruginosa, 3 of 38 which grew other gram-negative rods, and none of 83 with no growth. Two of the three positive specimens from the other gram-negative rod group probably also contained P. aeruginosa. No preincubation of the urine specimens was required, and results were available within 2.5 h. The assay represents an improvement over other procedures for rapidly diagnosing urinary tract infections in that it allows diagnosis by species and should be adaptable to semiautomation. PMID:107191

  6. Etiologic study of urinary tract infection in dogs

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    Marcia Mery Kogika

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections were documented in 51 dogs. Several factors such as etiologic agents, localization of the infection, predisposing factors, sex, age, and breed were considered. The diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI was based on bacteriological investigation and it was considered positive when urine sample collected by catheterization contained more than 105 bacteria/ml. Mixed infection was found in 4 of the infected dogs, totallizing 55 isolates. Among them, Escherichia coli (35.3% was the most frequently isolated, followed by Staphylococcus sp. (23.5%, Proteus mirabilis (15.7%, Streptococcus sp. (13.7%, Klebsiella sp. (9.8%. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3.9%, Enterobacter cloacae (2.0%, Citrobacter freundii (2.0% and Providencia rettgeri (2.0%. As to antimicrobial susceptibility, norfloxacin and gentamicin were successful for the treatment of gram-negative microorganisms, while the most effective drugs for gram-positive bacteria were cephalothin and nitrofurantoin. UTI was observed more frequently in Cocker Spaniel and German Shepherd; male dogs were more involved, and pyelonephritis was the predominant disease observed. Infection was seen in all ages, but the frequency was higher in middle aged dogs. Urolithiasis were observed as common predisposing or underlying factors to UTI being, cither Staphylococcus sp. or Proteus mirabilis isolated in those cases which alkaline urine pH was observed.

  7. Advances in intravesical therapy for urinary tract disorders.

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    Tyagi, Pradeep; Kashyap, Mahendra; Hensley, Harvey; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Intravesical therapy is a valuable option in the clinical management of urinary tract disorders such as interstitial cystitis/ painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) and refractory overactive bladder. This review will cover the latest advances in this field using polymer and liposomes as delivery platform for drugs, protein and nucleic acids. This review summarizes the significance of intravesical therapy for lower urinary tract disorders. The recent advancement of liposomes as a drug delivery platform for botulinum toxin, tacrolimus and small interfering RNA is discussed. The importance of polymers forming indwelling devices and hydrogels are also discussed, where all preparations improved efficacy parameters in rodent models. Clinical experience of treating IC/PBS with indwelling devices and liposomes are summarized and preclinical evidence about the downregulation of target gene expression in rodent bladder with liposomes complexed with siRNA is also reviewed. There have been several advances in the field of intravesical therapy for improving clinical outcomes. One of the most promising research avenues is the repurposing of drugs, given previously by other routes of administration, such as tacrolimus. Intravesical therapy also opens up novel therapeutic targets with improved efficacy and safety for underactive bladder.

  8. An update on emerging therapies for urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Aneela; Alarfaj, Sumaiah; Darouiche, Rabih; Mohajer, Mayar

    2017-03-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common healthcare-acquired infections, and are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Worldwide use of antibiotics has led to a significant rise in resistant uropathogens emanating from both hospitals and communities. The huge concern of multidrug resistance (MDR) has led the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to encourage drug companies to invest in the development of new antibiotics. Area covered: In this review we summarized data on already approved antibiotics, and selected emerging therapies that are currently in phase II and III trials with emphasis on complicated urinary tract infections (cUTIs). We performed our search using PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov, Google Scholar and Pharmaprojects. Expert opinion: Efficacious antimicrobials are needed to overcome MDR organisms. There are several dugs in initial and later stages of development, but most of them lack full spectrum of activity against some Gram-negative organisms, particularly against MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Better understanding of the pathogenesis of UTI and genetic engineering of pathogens can provide new drugs to combat resistance in the future.

  9. Late renal sequelae in intravenously treated complicated urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro, Christine; Piepsz, Amy; Nogarède, Cécile; Tondeur, Marianne; Hainaut, Marc; Levy, Jack

    2013-09-01

    The treatment of complicated urinary tract infection in children is still a matter of debate. In our hospital, antimicrobial treatment is initiated intravenously, and the duration of this treatment is adapted according to the results of a Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy. This study was conducted to evaluate retrospectively the frequency and the importance of late renal sequelae when treating intravenously for 7 days those patients with an abnormal acute DMSA. A review was conducted of the medical charts of all patients consecutively admitted between 2005 and 2008 with positive urine culture and clinical and biological evidence of complicated urinary tract infection (UTI). There were 144 patients (59 %) with abnormal early DMSA scintigraphy and 98 (41 %) with normal scintigraphy. The median duration of intravenous treatment was 7.0 days in the children with DMSA lesions and 5.0 days in those without lesions. Obvious renal sequelae were observed on late DMSA scintigraphy in 4 (6 %) out of the 65 patients with an abnormal early DMSA who came back for control scintigraphy. Sequelae of acute DMSA lesions observed during complicated UTI treated 7 days intravenously were infrequent. Whether the mode and duration of antimicrobial treatment might explain the low rate of sequelae remains to be demonstrated.

  10. Prevalence and bacterial susceptibility of hospital acquired urinary tract infection

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    Dias Neto José Anastácio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Urinary tract infection is the most common nosocomially acquired infection. It is important to know the etiology and antibiotic susceptibility infectious agents to guide the initial empirical treatment. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of bacterial strains and their antibiotic susceptibility in nosocomially acquired urinary tract infection in a university hospital between January and June 2003. METHODS: We analyzed the data of 188 patients with positive urine culture (= 10(5 colony-forming units/mL following a period of 48 hours after admission. RESULTS: Half of patients were male. Mean age was 50.26 ± 22.7 (SD, range 3 months to 88 years. Gram-negative bacteria were the agent in approximately 80% of cases. The most common pathogens were E. coli (26%, Klebsiella sp. (15%, P. aeruginosa (15% and Enterococcus sp. (11%. The overall bacteria susceptibility showed that the pathogens were more sensible to imipenem (83%, second or third generation cephalosporin and aminoglycosides; and were highly resistant to ampicillin (27% and cefalothin (30%. It is important to note the low susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (42% and norfloxacin (43%. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that if one can not wait the results of urine culture, the best choices to begin empiric treatment are imipenem, second or third generation cephalosporin and aminoglycosides. Cefalothin and ampicillin are quite ineffective to treat these infections.

  11. Trends in cancer of the urinary bladder and urinary tract in elderly in Denmark, 2008-2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thor Knak; Jensen, Niels Viggo; Jørgensen, Simon Møller

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to examine the trends in incidence, mortality, survival, and prevalence of cancers of the urinary bladder and urinary tract in Denmark from 1980 to 2012 with particular focus on elderly patients over age 70 years. Design Cancer of the urinary bladder and urinary...... tract was defined as ICD-10 codes C67.9, D09.0, D41.4. Data were derived from the NORDCAN database with comparable data on cancer incidence, mortality, prevalence and relative survival in the Nordic countries, where the Danish data were delivered from the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Cause...

  12. Urinary Tract Stones and Osteoporosis: Findings From the Women’s Health Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Laura D; Hovey, Kathleen M; Andrews, Christopher A; Thomas, Fridtjof; Sorensen, Mathew D; Crandall, Carolyn J; Watts, Nelson B; Bethel, Monique; Johnson, Karen C

    2017-01-01

    Kidney and bladder stones (urinary tract stones) and osteoporosis are prevalent, serious conditions for postmenopausal women. Men with kidney stones are at increased risk of osteoporosis; however, the relationship of urinary tract stones to osteoporosis in postmenopausal women has not been established. The purpose of this study was to determine whether urinary tract stones are an independent risk factor for changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and incident fractures in women in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI). Data were obtained from 150,689 women in the Observational Study and Clinical Trials of the WHI with information on urinary tract stones status: 9856 of these women reported urinary tract stones at baseline and/or incident urinary tract stones during follow-up. Cox regression models were used to determine the association of urinary tract stones with incident fractures and linear mixed models were used to investigate the relationship of urinary tract stones with changes in BMD that occurred during WHI. Follow-up was over an average of 8 years. Models were adjusted for demographic and clinical factors, medication use, and dietary histories. In unadjusted models there was a significant association of urinary tract stones with incident total fractures (HR 1.10; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.17). However, in covariate adjusted analyses, urinary tract stones were not significantly related to changes in BMD at any skeletal site or to incident fractures. In conclusion, urinary tract stones in postmenopausal women are not an independent risk factor for osteoporosis. PMID:25990099

  13. Lower urinary tract symptoms that predict microscopic pyuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasriya, Rajvinder; Barcella, William; De Iorio, Maria; Swamy, Sheela; Gill, Kiren; Kupelian, Anthony; Malone-Lee, James

    2017-10-02

    Urinary dipsticks and culture analyses of a mid-stream urine specimen (MSU) at 105 cfu ml-1 of a known urinary pathogen are considered the gold standard investigations for diagnosing urinary tract infection (UTI). However, the reliability of these tests has been much criticised and they may mislead. It is now widely accepted that pyuria (≥1 WBC μl-1) detected by microscopy of a fresh unspun, unstained specimen of urine is the best biological indicator of UTI available. We aimed to scrutinise the greater potential of symptoms analysis in detecting pyuria and UTI. Lower urinary tract symptom (LUTS) descriptions were collected from patients with chronic lower urinary tract symptoms referred to a tertiary referral unit. The symptoms informed a 39-question inventory, grouped into storage, voiding, stress incontinence and pain symptoms. All questions sought a binary yes or no response. A bespoke software package was developed to collect the data. The study was powered to a sample of at least 1,990 patients, with sufficient power to analyse 39 symptoms in a linear model with an effect size of Cohen's f2 = 0.02, type 1 error probability = 0.05; and power (1-β); 95% where β is the probability of type 2 error). The inventory was administered to 2,050 female patients between August 2004 and November 2011. The data were collated and the following properties assessed: internal consistency, test-retest reliability, inter-observer reliability, internal responsiveness, external responsiveness, construct validity analysis and a comparison with the International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire for female lower urinary tract symptoms (ICIQ-FLUTS). The dependent variable used as a surrogate marker of UTI was microscopic pyuria. An MSU sample was sent for routine culture. The symptoms proved reliable predictors of microscopic pyuria. In particular, voiding symptoms correlated well with microscopic pyuria (χ2 = 88, df = 1, p < 0.001). The symptom

  14. Pad per day usage, urinary incontinence and urinary tract infections in nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omli, Ragnhild; Skotnes, Liv Heidi; Romild, Ulla; Bakke, August; Mykletun, Arnstein; Kuhry, Esther

    2010-09-01

    many elderly suffer from urinary incontinence and use absorbent pads. Pad use per day (PPD) is a frequently used measure of urinary incontinence. Nursing home residents are often dependent on help from nursing staff to change pads. This study was performed in order to determine whether PPD is a reliable method to quantify urinary incontinence in nursing home residents. Furthermore, the association between urinary tract infections (UTIs), PPD and fluid intake was studied. data were retrieved from a multicentre, prospective surveillance among nursing home residents. Data on the use of absorbent pads, fluid intake and incontinence volumes were collected during 48 h. During a 1-year follow-up period, data on UTIs were collected. in this study, 153 residents were included, of whom 118 (77%) used absorbent pads. Residents who used absorbent pads were at increased risk of developing UTIs compared to residents who did not use pads (41 vs 11%; P = 0.001). Daily fluid intake was not associated with UTIs (P = 0.46). The number of pad changes showed no correlation with the risk of developing UTIs (P = 0.62). Patients with a given PPD presented a wide range of incontinence volumes. the use of absorbent pads is associated with an increased risk of developing UTIs. PPD and daily fluid intake are not correlated with the risk of developing UTIs. PPD is an unreliable measure of urinary incontinence in nursing home residents.

  15. Effect of urinary tract infection on the urinary metabolic characteristic as a risk factor in producing urolithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Eskandarifar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Urinary metabolic disorders are one of the most common causes of stone formation in children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of urinary tract infections in the urinary metabolic characteristics as a risk factor in the incidence of urolithiasis. This case-control study was conducted in 222 children with urolithiasis in the range of 6 months to 16 years old in Sanandaj, Kurdistan, Iran during 2012-14. Patients were divided into two groups based on those with urinary tract infection and without urinary tract infection. Then, urine samples were collected from both groups, and levels of calcium, oxalate, citrate, uric acid, creatinine, and cysteine were measured. The collected information was analyzed using software SPSS (version 16. The ratio Average levels of calcium, magnesium, oxalate, cysteine, uric acid to creatinine in urine showed no significant difference between two groups based on statistical analysis. However, the amount of citrate to creatinine in children with urinary tract infection and urolithiasis was clearly less P=0.01. The results of this study show that the urinary tract infection cannot change the urinary metabolic characteristics, but it can be considered as a risk factor in kidney stone formation due to the reduced amount of citrate in the urine.

  16. Patients with Urinary Incontinence Appear More Likely to Develop Upper Urinary Tract Stones: A Nationwide, Population-Based Study with 8-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hsiao-Jen; Lin, Alex Tong-Long; Lin, Chih-Chieh; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chen, Kuang-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate associations between primary urinary incontinence and development of upper urinary tract stones in a nationwide population in Taiwan. Data of 1,777 adults with primary urinary incontinence and 26,655 controls (groups A, B, and C) without urinary incontinence at study inception were retrieved from the National Health Insurance System database in Taiwan and were analyzed retrospectively. No enrolled subjects had previous diagnosis of upper urinary tract stones or spinal cord injury. All subjects were followed through end of 2009, with a minimum follow-up of 8 years. A greater percentage of study subjects (334/1777, 18.8%) developed upper urinary tract stones than that of control groups A (865/8885, 9.7%) and B (888/8885, 10%), and C (930/8885, 10.5%) (all p-values Urinary incontinence was associated with significantly increased risk of developing urinary tract stones (HR 1.99, 95% CI, 1.70-2.34, p urinary tract stones (both p-values urinary incontinence was still associated with a significantly increased risk of developing upper urinary tract stones (HR 1.99, 95% CI = 1.76-2.26, p urinary incontinence suggests that urinary incontinence is associated with a significantly increased risk of developing upper urinary tract stones. Study findings suggest that physicians treating patients with urinary incontinence should give attention to early detection of upper urinary tract stones.

  17. Complicated urinary tract infection is associated with uroepithelial expression of proinflammatory protein S100A8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Leticia; Alvarez, Sophie; Allam, Ayman; Reinhard, Mary; Brown, Mary B

    2009-10-01

    F344 rats chronically infected with Ureaplasma parvum develop two distinct profiles: asymptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI) and UTI complicated by struvite urolithiasis. To identify factors that affect disease outcome, we characterized the temporal host immune response during infection by histopathologic analysis and in situ localization of U. parvum. We also used differential quantitative proteomics to identify distinguishing host cellular responses associated with complicated UTI. In animals in which microbial colonization was limited to the mucosal surface, inflammation was indistinguishable from that which occurred in sham-inoculated controls, and the inflammation resolved by 72 h postinoculation (p.i.) in both groups. However, inflammation persisted in animals with microbial colonization that extended into the deeper layers of the submucosa. Proteome profiling showed that bladder tissues from animals with complicated UTIs had significant increases (P complicated UTIs (2 weeks p.i.) had the highest concentrations of the proinflammatory protein S100A8 (P complicated UTIs (2 weeks p.i.), which was not detected in animals with asymptomatic UTIs (2 weeks p.i.) or in any bladder tissues harvested at earlier p.i. time points. Based on these results, we surmise that invasive colonization of the bladder triggers chronic inflammation and immune dysregulation, which may be critical to struvite formation.

  18. Prevalence and psychosocial impact of lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, Evaline; Messelink, Bert J.; Heijnen, Lily; de Groot, Imelda J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) frequently report lower urinary tract symptoms at the outpatient rehabilitation clinic. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms in the Dutch male DMD population and their effect on quality of life. A

  19. Prevalence and psychosocial impact of lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, H.A.R.; Messelink, B.J.; Heijnen, L.; Groot, I.J.M. de

    2009-01-01

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) frequently report lower urinary tract symptoms at the outpatient rehabilitation clinic. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms in the Dutch male DMD population and their effect on quality of life. A

  20. Urinary tract cancer and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer : Risks and screening options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, RH; Kiemeney, LALM; Witjes, JA; Vasen, HFA

    Purpose: We investigate the risk of the different types of urinary tract cancer in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families and review screening options. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively calculated the relative and cumulative risks of developing urinary tract cancer by comparing

  1. Co-existence of Enterobiasis, Urinary Tract Infection and Enuresis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enuresis was assessed using interviewer administered questionnaires. All Enterobius-and/or urinary tract infection-positive children were further evaluated to determine the combined effects of the first two problems on the occurrence of enuresis. The overall prevalence of enterobiasis, urinary tract infection, and enuresis in ...

  2. OPEN, RANDOMIZED COMPARISON OF PEFLOXACIN AND CEFOTAXIME IN THE TREATMENT OF COMPLICATED URINARY-TRACT INFECTIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TIMMERMAN, C; HOEPELMAN, [No Value; DEHOND, J; SCHREINEMACHERS, L; MENSINK, H; VERHOEF, J

    1992-01-01

    In an open, randomized study, the effect of pefloxacin (400 mg b.i.d.) was compared with that of cefotaxime (1 g t.i.d.) in the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections. In total 87 patients entered the study under the clinical diagnosis of complicated urinary tract infection, of whom 49

  3. Urinary tract infection: a cohort of older people with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Laís Samara de; Ercole, Flávia Falci; Oliveira, Danilo Ulisses de; Pinto, Tatiana Saraiva; Victoriano, Mariana Avendanha; Alcoforado, Carla Lúcia Goulart Constant

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate epidemiological aspects of urinary tract infection in older patients with urinary incontinence living in long-term care institutions in Belo Horizonte. Method: Concurrent cohort held from April 1st to October 1st, 2015. The study was conducted in two long-term care institutions in the city of Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, with 84 incontinent older people. Cumulative incidence of urinary tract infection was 19% (95% CI: 7.83-23.19) and the incidence density was 3.6 cases/100 people-month of follow-up period. The variables Bacteriuria and Institution presented statistical association with the occurrence of urinary tract infection. It is observed that the incidence of urinary tract infection in the study was smaller than in other similar international and national studies, however this is an important world health problem for the older population, with impact on mortality of these individuals. Avaliar aspectos epidemiológicos da infecção do trato urinário em pacientes idosos com incontinência urinária, residentes em instituições de longa permanência, de Belo Horizonte. Coorte concorrente realizada no período de 01 de abril a 01 de outubro de 2015. O estudo foi realizado em duas instituições de longa permanência, na cidade de Belo Horizonte, MG, com 84 idosos incontinentes. A incidência acumulada de infecção do trato urinário foi de 19% (IC 95%: 7,83-23,19) e a densidade de incidência foi de 3,6 casos/100 pessoas-mês de seguimento. As variáveis Bacteriúria e Instituição apresentaram associação estatística com a ocorrência de infecção do trato urinário. Observa-se que a incidência de infecção do trato urinário no estudo foi menor que em outros estudos nacionais e internacionais semelhantes, no entanto trata-se de um importante problema de saúde mundial para os idosos, com impacto na mortalidade desses indivíduos.

  4. Diagnostic performance of the urinary canine calgranulins in dogs with lower urinary or urogenital tract carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Romy M; McNiel, Elizabeth A; Grützner, Niels; Lanerie, David J; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2017-04-21

    Onset of canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) and prostatic carcinoma (PCA) is usually insidious with dogs presenting at an advanced stage of the disease. A biomarker that can facilitate early detection of TCC/PCA and improve patient survival would be useful. S100A8/A9 (calgranulin A/B or calprotectin) and S100A12 (calgranulin C) are expressed by cells of the innate immune system and are associated with several inflammatory disorders. S100A8/A9 is also expressed by epithelial cells after malignant transformation and is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and metastasis. S100A8/A9 is up-regulated in human PCA and TCC, whereas the results for S100A12 have been ambiguous. Also, the urine S100A8/A9-to-S100A12 ratio (uCalR) may have potential as a marker for canine TCC/PCA. Aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the urinary S100/calgranulins to detect TCC/PCA in dogs by using data and urine samples from 164 dogs with TCC/PCA, non-neoplastic urinary tract disease, other neoplasms, or urinary tract infections, and 75 healthy controls (nested case-control study). Urine S100A8/A9 and S100A12 (measured by species-specific radioimmunoassays and normalized against urine specific gravity [S100A8/A9 USG ; S100A12 USG ], urine creatinine concentration, and urine protein concentration and the uCalR were compared among the groups of dogs. S100A8/A9 USG had the highest sensitivity (96%) and specificity (66%) to detect TCC/PCA, with specificity reaching 75% after excluding dogs with a urinary tract infection. The uCalR best distinguished dogs with TCC/PCA from dogs with a urinary tract infection (sensitivity: 91%, specificity: 60%). Using a S100A8/A9 USG  ≥ 109.9 to screen dogs ≥6 years of age for TCC/PCA yielded a negative predictive value of 100%. S100A8/A9 USG and uCalR may have utility for diagnosing TCC/PCA in dogs, and S100A8/A9 USG may be a good screening test for canine TCC/PCA.

  5. Concept Analysis and Content Validation of Risk of Injury to the Urinary Tract: Nursing Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuio, Danielle C; de Carvalho, Emília C; Napoleão, Anamaria A

    2015-10-01

    To elaborate, propose, and validate risk for urinary tract injury as a nursing diagnosis. Methodology was divided into three phases: analysis of the concept of urinary tract injury, elaboration of the diagnosis, and validation by a group of specialists. Diagnosis label, definition, and inclusion in taxonomy were validated. In 15 risk factors proposed, 12 were validated. Risk of urinary tract injury was validated as a nursing diagnosis to contemplate the vulnerability of patients using urinary catheters. Identification of these risk factors contributes to the elaboration of care plans to improve quality of care. © 2014 NANDA International, Inc.

  6. Lower urinary tract symptoms and urinary flow rates in female patients with hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chen-Hsun; Chang, Tien-Chun; Guo, Ya-Jun; Chen, Shyh-Chyan; Yu, Hong-Jeng; Huang, Kuo-How

    2011-01-01

    To investigate lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and voiding function in a cohort of hyperthyroid women. The autonomic nervous system (ANS) imbalance has been thought to cause LUTS in hyperthyroidism. Between January 2008 and December 2008, 65 newly diagnosed, untreated female hyperthyroid patients were enrolled in this study. Another 62 age-matched healthy women were enrolled as a control group. Demographics, LUTS, urinary flow rates, hyperthyroid symptoms, and serum levels of thyroid hormones were recorded before and after the medical treatment for hyperthyroidism. Compared with the control group, the hyperthyroid patients had a higher mean symptom score of frequency (1.15 ± 1.75 vs 0.31 ± 1.05, P = .01), incomplete emptying (0.91 ± 1.47 vs 0.29 ± 1.12, P = .02), straining (1.05 ± 0.85 vs 0.27 ± 0.51, P flow rates improved significantly. The severity of LUTS was associated with neither serum levels of thyroid hormone nor other hyperthyroid symptoms. Hyperthyroid women have worse LUTS and lower peak flow rates than healthy controls. However, the severity of LUTS is only mild (IPSS flow rates improve after the treatment for hyperthyroidism. The exact mechanisms of LUTS and/or lower urinary tract dysfunction in hyperthyroidism require further investigation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence of urinary incontinence and lower urinary tract symptoms in school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akil, Ipek Ozunan; Ozmen, Dilek; Cetinkaya, Aynur Cakmakci

    2014-07-08

    To investigate the prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and urinary incontinence (UI) in elementary school aged children in Manisa. Dysfunctional Voiding and Incontinence Scoring System (DVIS) which was developed in Turkey is used. A total of 416 children, 216 (51.9%) male and 200 (48.1%) female were recruited in this study. Mean age of children was 10.35 ± 2.44 years (median10 years). Daytime UI frequency was 6.7% (28 child), nocturnal incontinence 16.6% (69 child) and combined daytime and nocturnal incontinence 4.1% (17 child). There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of nocturnal and or daytime UI between male and female gender. Mean DVIS score was 2.65 ± 3.95 and gender did not affect total DVIS points. The mean ages of achieving daytime bowel and bladder control were all significantly correlated with DVIS points. DVIS points were positively correlated with the history of UI of the family. Total points were increased when the father was unemployed. UI negatively influences health related quality of life of the family and child, so it is important that awareness of the UI and symptoms of lower urinary tract dysfunction.

  8. Anatomy and Physiology of the Urinary Tract: Relation to Host Defense and Microbial Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickling, Duane R; Sun, Tung-Tien; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2015-08-01

    The urinary tract exits to a body surface area that is densely populated by a wide range of microbes. Yet, under most normal circumstances, it is typically considered sterile, i.e., devoid of microbes, a stark contrast to the gastrointestinal and upper respiratory tracts where many commensal and pathogenic microbes call home. Not surprisingly, infection of the urinary tract over a healthy person's lifetime is relatively infrequent, occurring once or twice or not at all for most people. For those who do experience an initial infection, the great majority (70% to 80%) thankfully do not go on to suffer from multiple episodes. This is a far cry from the upper respiratory tract infections, which can afflict an otherwise healthy individual countless times. The fact that urinary tract infections are hard to elicit in experimental animals except with inoculum 3-5 orders of magnitude greater than the colony counts that define an acute urinary infection in humans (105 cfu/ml), also speaks to the robustness of the urinary tract defense. How can the urinary tract be so effective in fending off harmful microbes despite its orifice in a close vicinity to that of the microbe-laden gastrointestinal tract? While a complete picture is still evolving, the general consensus is that the anatomical and physiological integrity of the urinary tract is of paramount importance in maintaining a healthy urinary tract. When this integrity is breached, however, the urinary tract can be at a heightened risk or even recurrent episodes of microbial infections. In fact, recurrent urinary tract infections are a significant cause of morbidity and time lost from work and a major challenge to manage clinically. Additionally, infections of the upper urinary tract often require hospitalization and prolonged antibiotic therapy. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the basic anatomy and physiology of the urinary tract with an emphasis on their specific roles in host defense. We also highlight the

  9. Transient receptor potential channel superfamily: Role in lower urinary tract function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Teruyuki; Imamura, Tetsuya; Nakazawa, Masaki; Hiragata, Shiro; Nagai, Takashi; Minagawa, Tomonori; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Masakuni; Domen, Takahisa; Ishizuka, Osamu

    2015-11-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms associated with neurogenic bladder and overactive bladder syndrome are mediated in part by members of the transient receptor potential channel superfamily. The best studied member of this superfamily is the vanilloid receptor. Other transient receptor potential channels, such as the melastatin receptor and the ankyrin receptor, are also active in the pathogenesis of lower urinary tract dysfunction. However, the detailed mechanisms by which the transient receptor potential channels contribute to lower urinary tract symptoms are still not clear, and the therapeutic benefits of modulating transient receptor potential channel activity have not been proved in the clinical setting. In the present review, to better understand the pathophysiology and therapeutic potential for lower urinary tract symptoms, we summarize the presence and role of different members of the transient receptor potential channel superfamily in the lower urinary tract. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  10. Epidemiology of Urinary Tract Infections in Hospitolized Children in Fatemi-Sahamieh Hospital (2005-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R Shokrollahei

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and ObjectivesMorbidity and mortality of urinary tract infection is common in spite of prescription of effective new antibiotics. Chronic pyelonphritis is one of the important reasons of end stage renal failure. Our study is carried out on 167 children admitted in Fatemi koodacan Hospital due to urinary tract infection. Major goal of this study was determination of epidemiology of urinary tract infection.Methods This study was cross sectional descriptive and sampling method was census. Various Factors such as age, gender, causative pathogen, used antibiotics and required time for getting negative urine culture test were studied. data were collected by means questionnaire.ResultsAccording to the study urinary tract infection was more common in females (74.2% of all cases while in male neonates it is more common than females. Incidence peak of urinary tract infection is seen in children between 1-6 years old. The most common pathogens responsible to urinary tract infection was E. coli and Klebsiella. The most common background disease was vesicoureteral reflux. The most common prescribed antibiotic was ceftriaxone (65%. After 2 days of taking antibiotic the majority of patients (87.7% had negative urine culture.ConclusionIn our study E. coli and Klebsiella are the most common pathogen responsible to urinary tract infection. In our study the frequency of urinary tract infection with Proteus was low (only 1.1% in comparison with other studies. Other epidemiological indices in this study were comparable to previous studies.Keywords: Urinary Tract, Urinary Tract Infections, Children

  11. Cystectomy and Urinary Diversion for the Management of a Devastated Lower Urinary Tract Following Prostatic Cryotherapy and/or Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, Bryan S; Langenstroer, Peter; Guralnick, Michael L; Jacobsohn, Kenneth M; O'Connor, R Corey

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the outcomes and quality of life measures in men who underwent cystectomy and urinary diversion for devastating lower urinary tract toxicity after prostatic radiotherapy and/or cryotherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Records of patients who underwent cystectomy and urinary diversion for the management of a devastated lower urinary tract following prostatic radiotherapy or cryotherapy were reviewed retrospectively. A postoperative, retrospective quality of life (QOL) survey was designed specific to this patient subset and obtained by telephone interview. Extirpative surgery with urinary diversion for management of a devastated lower urinary tract was performed on 15 patients with a mean age of 72 years (range 63-82). Toxicities leading to bladder removal included bladder neck contractures, prostatic necrosis, incontinence, osteomyelitis, bladder calculi, fistulae, urethral strictures, abscesses, necrotizing fasciitis, and radiation/hemorrhagic cystitis. The mean number of failed conservative, minimally invasive interventions per patients prior to cystectomy was 3.7 (range 1-12). The average time period from major complication following radiotherapy/cryotherapy to cystectomy was 29.1 months (range 5-65). The QOL survey showed all of the patients who completed the survey (n = 13) would undergo the procedure again and 11 (85%) would have undergone the procedure an average of 13.2 months sooner (range 5-36). Toxicities secondary to prostatic radiotherapy or cryotherapy may be debilitating. Our results demonstrate that cystectomy with urinary diversion can improve QOL in patients with a devastated lower urinary tract.

  12. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Urinary Epithelial Cancer with Upper Urinary Tract Obstruction: Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, M.; Matsuzaki, K.; Kubo, H.; Nishitani, H. [Dept. of Radiology and Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Univ. of Tokushima, Tokushima (Japan)

    2008-12-15

    Background: Various malignant tumors of the body show high signal intensity on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI). In the genitourinary region, DWI is expected to have a role in detecting urinary epithelial cancer noninvasively. Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of DWI for the diagnosis of urinary epithelial cancer with upper urinary tract obstruction. Material and Methods: Twenty upper urinary tract cancers in 16 patients were evaluated by high-b-value DWI (b=800s/mm2). The signal intensity was visually evaluated, and the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were measured. Results: All urinary epithelial cancers showed high signal intensity on DWI. The ADC in cancerous lesions was 1.31{+-}0.27 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, which was significantly lower than that of the lumens of the ureter or renal pelvis (3.32{+-}0.44 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s; P<0.001). Maximum intensity projection images of DWI in combination with static-fluid MR urography provided three-dimensional entire urinary tract imaging with the extension of tumors. Conclusion: DWI is useful in the tumor detection and in evaluating the tumor extension of urinary epithelial cancer in patients with upper urinary tract obstruction.

  13. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Urinary Epithelial Cancer with Upper Urinary Tract Obstruction: Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, M.; Matsuzaki, K.; Kubo, H.; Nishitani, H. (Dept. of Radiology and Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Univ. of Tokushima, Tokushima (Japan))

    2008-12-15

    Background: Various malignant tumors of the body show high signal intensity on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI). In the genitourinary region, DWI is expected to have a role in detecting urinary epithelial cancer noninvasively. Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of DWI for the diagnosis of urinary epithelial cancer with upper urinary tract obstruction. Material and Methods: Twenty upper urinary tract cancers in 16 patients were evaluated by high-b-value DWI (b=800s/mm2). The signal intensity was visually evaluated, and the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were measured. Results: All urinary epithelial cancers showed high signal intensity on DWI. The ADC in cancerous lesions was 1.31+-0.27 x 10-3 mm2/s, which was significantly lower than that of the lumens of the ureter or renal pelvis (3.32+-0.44 x 10-3 mm2/s; P<0.001). Maximum intensity projection images of DWI in combination with static-fluid MR urography provided three-dimensional entire urinary tract imaging with the extension of tumors. Conclusion: DWI is useful in the tumor detection and in evaluating the tumor extension of urinary epithelial cancer in patients with upper urinary tract obstruction

  14. [Mortality predictive factors in patients with urinary sepsis associated to upper urinary tract calculi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, M; Iglesias, S; Serviá, L; Domingo, J; Gormaz, P; Vilanova, J; Gavilan, R; Trujillano, J

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the clinical characteristics of patients with urinary sepsis associated to ureteral calculi admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), and to identify predictors of mortality in the first 24 hours of admission. A retrospective observational study covering a 16-year period (2006-2011) was carried out. The combined clinical/surgical ICU of a secondary-level University hospital. All patients admitted to the ICU due to obstructive urinary sepsis. None. We analyzed general clinical and laboratory test and urological data. The diagnostic technique, affected side, decompression technique, isolated microorganism and antibiotic therapy used were also considered. The assessment of risk factors was performed by multiple logistic regression analysis. A total of 107 patients admitted to the ICU were included in the study, with a mortality rate of 19.6%. The diagnosis was mainly established by ultrasound, and the most commonly used decompression technique was retrograde JJ stenting. Microorganisms were isolated in 48.6% of the patients. In total, 20.6% of the patients had bacteremia. Multivariate analysis found age, acute renal failure and the use of vasoactive drugs administered continuously for the first 24 hours of admission to be independently associated to mortality. Advanced age, acute renal failure and the need for vasoactive drugs were associated to an increased risk of mortality in patients with urinary sepsis associated to upper urinary tract calculi. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis is caused by a Proteus urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebringer, Alan; Rashid, Taha

    2014-05-01

    Genetic, molecular and biological studies indicate that rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a severe arthritic disorder affecting approximately 1% of the population in developed countries, is caused by an upper urinary tract infection by the microbe, Proteus mirabilis. Elevated levels of specific antibodies against Proteus bacteria have been reported from 16 different countries. The pathogenetic mechanism involves six stages triggered by cross-reactive autoantibodies evoked by Proteus infection. The causative amino acid sequences of Proteus namely, ESRRAL and IRRET, contain arginine doublets which can be acted upon by peptidyl arginine deiminase thereby explaining the early appearance of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies in patients with RA. Consequently, RA patients should be treated early with anti-Proteus antibiotics as well as biological agents to avoid irreversible joint damages. © 2013 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Primary Small Cell Carcinoma of the Upper Urinary Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Ka-Siong Kho

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of primary extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma of the distal ureter, with a synchronous small cell carcinoma of the ipsilateral renal pelvis. These tumors, rarely reported in the urinary tract, are locally aggressive and have a poor prognosis. A 77-year-old male bedridden patient presented with fever and chills with left side-flank pain for 3 days. Following a diagnosis of ureteral urothelial carcinoma, hand-assisted laparoscopic nephroureterectomy with bladder cuff excision was carried out. Adjuvant chemotherapy was given after pathologic report of primary small cell carcinoma of the distal ureter and a synchronous small cell carcinoma of the ipsilateral renal pelvis. After 3 cycles of combination chemotherapy, the patient died 4 months postoperatively due to sepsis.

  17. Pathophysiological aspects of ureterorenoscopic management of upper urinary tract calculi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, Palle J S; Pedersen, Katja V; Lildal, Søren K

    2016-01-01

    of the ureter and strain-induced ureteral contractions (peristalsis). Different receptor types modulate this peristaltic activity. β-receptor agonists have been investigated in animal and human trials for the purpose of relaxing the ureter. In randomized, placebo-controlled trials in pigs and humans, usage...... ureterorenoscopy without access sheaths have been measured, thus by far exceeding the threshold for intrarenal backflow, potentially resulting in septic complications. Intrarenal pressure may be reduced by use of ureteral access sheaths, which, however, may cause ureteral damage due to the limited size...... of the β-receptor agonist isoproterenol in the irrigation fluid has shown a potential for reducing both intrarenal pressure and ureteral tone during ureterorenoscopy. SUMMARY: Upper urinary tract physiology has unique features that may be pushed into pathophysiological processes by the unique elements...

  18. Imaging of urinary tract lithiasis: who, when and how?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiorns, Melanie P. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-15

    Although infection remains a major aetiological factor in stone formation, especially in boys, there is increasing recognition of the numbers of children affected by a metabolic predisposition to stone formation and this proportion appears to be increasing, and hence every child who presents with urolithiasis should undergo a metabolic work-up. In a study performed in the UK, 44% of children had a metabolic abnormality, 30% were classified as infective, and 26% idiopathic. A study from Texas found a similar pattern. Coexisting urinary tract infection can of course mask underlying metabolic causes. The rate of stone recurrence is lower in children compared to adults and the majority of stone disease is now managed, as in adults, by lithotripsy or endourological techniques; open surgery has decreased dramatically. (orig.)

  19. Treatment and prophylaxis in pediatric urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Nickavar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is the most common serious bacterial infection in early life. Appropriate diagnosis and treatment prevent complications such as hypertension, proteinuria and end stage renal disease. A computerized search of MEDLINE, Embase and other databases was done to find the latest results about the treatment and prevention in pediatric UTI. Randomized control trials, systematic reviews and original articles were assessed. Search terms were "UTI, treatment, prophylaxis, prevention, and children". All children with complicated or simple UTI were included in our search study from neonatal period to late childhood and medical aspects of treatment were reviewed. Recently, treatment approaches have been changed by simplification of drug administration. Oral treatment is recommended especially in older infants and children instead of strict intravenous treatment and patient admission. In addition, prophylactic treatment becomes easier and limited to certain cases. In this article, we review the recent information and approaches in this setting.

  20. Nocardia veterana: disseminated infection with urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisnel, Elodie; Roseau, Jean-Baptiste; Landais, Cécile; Rodriguez-Nava, Veronica; Bussy, Emmanuel; Gaillard, Tiphaine

    2015-01-01

    Nocardia spp. are a group of aerobic actinomycetes widely distributed in soil, and associated with severe opportunistic infections, essentially pulmonary infections. We report the first case of disseminated infection associated with urinary tract infection caused by Nocardia veterana. The diagnosis was difficult; despite the presence of pulmonary nodules, the lung biopsies remained negative while only one aerobic blood culture and the urine culture were positive for N. veterana, identified after a 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis. Few cases of clinical importance due to N. veterana have been published since its characterization. The bacteriological diagnosis of nocardiosis can be difficult to establish because of the delayed growth and the specific techniques that are required. This case illustrates the necessity of performing specific investigations in immunocompromised patients who present with infectious disease because the severity of this infection requires early diagnosis and quick initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical analysis of urinary tract infection in patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y-H; Li, G-Q; Guo, S-M; Che, Y-N; Wang, X; Cheng, F-T

    2017-10-01

    To analyze the related influencing factors of urinary tract infection in patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). A total of 343 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia admitted to this hospital from January 2013 to December 2016, were selected and treated by TURP. Patients were divided into infection group and non-infection group according to the occurrence of urinary tract infection after operation. The possible influencing factors were collected to perform univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. There were 53 cases with urinary tract infection after operation among 343 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia, accounting for 15.5%. The univariate analysis displayed that the occurrence of urinary tract infection in patients undergoing TURP was closely associated with patient's age ≥ 65 years old, complicated diabetes, catheterization for urinary retention before operation, no use of antibiotics before operation and postoperative indwelling catheter duration ≥ 5 d (p complicated diabetes, catheterization before operation, indwelling catheter duration ≥ 5 d and no use of antibiotics before operation were risk factors of urinary tract infection in patients receiving TURP (p complicated diabetes and long-term indwelling catheter after operation, can increase the occurrence of urinary tract infection after TURP, while preoperative prophylactic utilization of anti-infective drugs can reduce the occurrence of postoperative urinary tract infection.

  2. Resistance of catheter-associated urinary tract infections to antibacterials

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    Verhaz Antonija

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI are the most common nosocomial infections. The worldwide data show the increasing resistance to conventional antibiotics among urinary tract pathogens. Aim. To evaluate the adequacy of initial antimicrobial therapy in relation to the antimicrobial resistance of pathogens responsible for CAUTI in Clinical Center of Banja Luka. Methods. A retrospective study on major causes of CAUTI, antibiotic resistance and treatment principles was conducted at four departments of the Clinical Center of Banja Luka from January 1st, 2000 to April 1st, 2003. Results. The results showed that 265 patients had developed CAUTI. The seven most commonly isolated microorganisms were, in descending order: E. coli (31.0%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (13.8%, Proteus mirabilis (12.9%, Gr. Klebsiella-Enterobacter (12.3%, Enterococcus spp. (5.2%, Pseudomonas spp. (4.3%, Serratia spp. (4.0%. The most common pathogens were highly resistant to ampicillin (64−100%, gentamycin (63−100%, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (68−100%, while some bacterias, like Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia spp. showed rates of ciprofloxacin resistance as high as 42.8% and 72.7%, respectively. In 55.5% of the cases, the initial antibiotic therapy was inadequate, and was corrected latter on. There were no standard therapeutic protocols for this type of nosocomial infections. Conclusion. The results of this study emphasized an urgency of the prevention and introduction of clinical protocols for better management of CAUTI. Treatment principles should better correspond to the antibiotic sensitivity of uropathogens.

  3. Neuromodulation of the neural circuits controlling the lower urinary tract.

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    Gad, Parag N; Roy, Roland R; Zhong, Hui; Gerasimenko, Yury P; Taccola, Giuliano; Edgerton, V Reggie

    2016-11-01

    The inability to control timely bladder emptying is one of the most serious challenges among the many functional deficits that occur after a spinal cord injury. We previously demonstrated that electrodes placed epidurally on the dorsum of the spinal cord can be used in animals and humans to recover postural and locomotor function after complete paralysis and can be used to enable voiding in spinal rats. In the present study, we examined the neuromodulation of lower urinary tract function associated with acute epidural spinal cord stimulation, locomotion, and peripheral nerve stimulation in adult rats. Herein we demonstrate that electrically evoked potentials in the hindlimb muscles and external urethral sphincter are modulated uniquely when the rat is stepping bipedally and not voiding, immediately pre-voiding, or when voiding. We also show that spinal cord stimulation can effectively neuromodulate the lower urinary tract via frequency-dependent stimulation patterns and that neural peripheral nerve stimulation can activate the external urethral sphincter both directly and via relays in the spinal cord. The data demonstrate that the sensorimotor networks controlling bladder and locomotion are highly integrated neurophysiologically and behaviorally and demonstrate how these two functions are modulated by sensory input from the tibial and pudental nerves. A more detailed understanding of the high level of interaction between these networks could lead to the integration of multiple neurophysiological strategies to improve bladder function. These data suggest that the development of strategies to improve bladder function should simultaneously engage these highly integrated networks in an activity-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Community acquired urinary tract infection: etiology and bacterial susceptibility

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    Dias Neto José Anastácio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Urinary tract infections (UTI are one of the most common infectious diseases diagnosed. UTI account for a large proportion of antibacterial drug consumption and have large socio-economic impacts. Since the majority of the treatments begins or is done completely empirically, the knowledge of the organisms, their epidemiological characteristics and their antibacterial susceptibility that may vary with time is mandatory. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to report the prevalence of uropathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility of the community acquired UTI diagnosed in our institution and to provide a national data. METHODS: We analyzed retrospectively the results of urine cultures of 402 patients that had community acquired urinary tract infection in the year of 2003. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients in this study was 45.34 ± 23.56 (SD years. There were 242 (60.2% females and 160 (39.8% males. The most commonly isolated organism was Escherichia coli (58%. Klebsiella sp. (8.4% and Enterococcus sp.(7.9% were reported as the next most common organisms. Of all bacteria isolated from community acquired UTI, only 37% were sensitive to ampicillin, 51% to cefalothin and 52% to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The highest levels of susceptibility were to imipenem (96%, ceftriaxone (90%, amikacin (90%, gentamicin (88%, levofloxacin (86%, ciprofloxacin (73%, nitrofurantoin (77% and norfloxacin (75%. CONCLUSION: Gram-negative agents are the most common cause of UTI. Fluoroquinolones remains the choice among the orally administered antibiotics, followed by nitrofurantoin, second and third generation cephalosporins. For severe disease that require parenteral antibiotics the choice should be aminoglycosides, third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones or imipenem, which were the most effective.

  5. Probiotics for preventing urinary tract infections in adults and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenger, Erin M; Tejani, Aaron M; Loewen, Peter S

    2015-12-23

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common bacterial infection that can lead to significant morbidity including stricture, abscess formation, fistula, bacteraemia, sepsis, pyelonephritis and kidney dysfunction. Mortality rates are reported to be as high as 1% in men and 3% in women due to development of pyelonephritis. Because probiotic therapy is readily available without a prescription, a review of their efficacy in the prevention of UTI may aid consumers in making informed decisions about potential prophylactic therapy. Institutions and caregivers also need evidence-based synopses of current evidence to make informed patient care decisions. Compared to placebo or no therapy, did probiotics (any formulation) provide a therapeutic advantage in terms of morbidity and mortality, when used to prevent UTI in susceptible patient populations?Compared to other prophylactic interventions, including drug and non-drug measures (e.g. continuous antibiotic prophylaxis, topical oestrogen, cranberry juice), did probiotics (any formulation) provide a therapeutic advantage in terms of morbidity and mortality when used to prevent UTIs in susceptible patient populations? We searched the Cochrane Kidney and Transplant Specialised Register to 21 September 2015 through contact with the Trials' Search Co-ordinator using search terms relevant to this review. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of susceptible patients (e.g. past history of UTI) or healthy people in which any strain, formulation, dose or frequency of probiotic was compared to placebo or active comparators were included. All RCTs and quasi-RCTs (RCTs in which allocation to treatment was obtained by alternation, use of alternate medical records, date of birth or other predictable methods) looking at comparing probiotics to no therapy, placebo, or other prophylactic interventions were included. Summary estimates of effect were obtained using a random-effects model, and results were expressed as risk ratios (RR) and their 95

  6. Purinoceptors as therapeutic targets for lower urinary tract dysfunction

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    Ford, Anthony P D W; Gever, Joel R; Nunn, Philip A; Zhong, Yu; Cefalu, Joseph S; Dillon, Michael P; Cockayne, Debra A

    2006-01-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are present in many common urological syndromes. However, their current suboptimal management by muscarinic and α1-adrenoceptor antagonists leaves a significant opportunity for the discovery and development of superior medicines. As potential targets for such therapeutics, purinoceptors have emerged over the last two decades from investigations that have established a prominent role for ATP in the regulation of urinary bladder function under normal and pathophysiological conditions. In particular, evidence suggests that ATP signaling via P2X1 receptors participates in the efferent control of detrusor smooth muscle excitability, and that this function may be heightened in disease and aging. ATP also appears to be involved in bladder sensation, via activation of P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptors on sensory afferent neurons, both within the bladder itself and possibly at central synapses. Such findings are based on results from classical pharmacological and localization studies in non-human and human tissues, knockout mice, and studies using recently identified pharmacological antagonists – some of which possess attributes that offer the potential for optimization into candidate drug molecules. Based on recent advances in this field, it is clearly possible that the development of selective antagonists for these receptors will occur that could lead to therapies offering better relief of sensory and motor symptoms for patients, while minimizing the systemic side effects that limit current medicines. PMID:16465177

  7. The role of environmental stress on lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Melissa T; Rodriguez, Larissa V

    2017-05-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) have been associated with comorbid conditions such as anxiety and depression. In addition, stress appears to influence the development or exacerbation of LUTS. This article seeks to review literature regarding the role of environmental stress on LUTS, focusing on findings presented in the last year. Numerous authors have published on the impact early childhood experiences, acute and chronic stress, and psychiatric illness play in the development of LUTS. The exact nature of the association between bladder symptoms and psychosocial measures remains unknown and is likely due to a complex interplay between heritability, psychosocial factors, and environmental stress. The proposed pathophysiological pathways involved in emotional states such as anxiety and depression, stress, and bladder function include activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, dysregulation of the serotonergic pathways, and central sensitization. Recent work has additionally suggested that urinary syndromes involving abnormal or augmented sensory input, such as overactive bladder and interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, may be a spectrum of the same disorder. There are numerous developments in our understanding of the role of environmental stress on the development and exacerbation of LUTS with new developments both clinically and in translational basic science work. Clinicians must acknowledge the high prevalence of affective disorders in patients with LUTS and realize their potential therapeutic influence. Simply addressing mechanisms at the level of the bladder alone may fail in a subpopulation of patients with LUTS who may have significant psychosocial drivers of their symptoms.

  8. Oestrogens for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, C; Aznar, M; Mejia, R; Albert, X; Ng, C W

    2008-04-16

    Recurrent urinary tract infection (RUTI) is defined as three episodes of urinary tract infection (UTI) in the previous 12 months or two episodes in the last six months. The main factors associated with RUTI in postmenopausal women are vesical prolapse, cystocoele, post-voidal residue and urinary incontinence, all associated with a decrease in oestrogen. The use of oestrogens to prevent RUTI has been proposed. To estimate the efficacy and safety of oral or vaginal oestrogens for preventing RUTI in postmenopausal women. We searched the Cochrane Renal Group's specialised register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (from 1950), EMBASE (from 1980), reference lists of articles without language restriction. Date of last search: February 2007. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in which postmenopausal women (more than 12 months since last menstrual period) diagnosed with RUTI received any type of oestrogen (oral , vaginal) versus placebo or any other intervention were included. Authors extracted data and assessed quality. Statistical analyses were performed using the random effects model and the results expressed as relative risk (RR) for dichotomous outcomes or mean difference (WMD) for continuous data with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Nine studies (3345 women) were included. Oral oestrogens did not reduce UTI compared to placebo (4 studies, 2798 women: RR 1.08, 95% CI 0.88 to 1.33). Vaginal oestrogens versus placebo reduced the number of women with UTIs in two small studies using different application methods. The RR for one was 0.25 (95% CI 0.13 to 0.50) and 0.64 (95% CI 0.47 to 0.86) in the second. Two studies compared oral antibiotics versus vaginal oestrogens (cream (1), pessaries (1)). There was very significant heterogeneity and the results could not be pooled. Vaginal cream reduced the proportion of UTIs compared to antibiotics in one study and in the second study antibiotics were superior to vaginal pessaries. Adverse events

  9. Our experience on developing urinary tract infections after transrectal prostate biopsy

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    Gülay Dede

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Prostate cancer is a common disease in men proportionally with age. For the diagnosis of prostate cancer, prostate biopsy be performed routinely in all centers so it has become today. Complications after prostate biopsy is a surgical procedure can be seen. The most important complications are urinary tract infection and sepsis. The use of prophylactic antibiotics before the procedure reduces the risk of infectious complications. In this study, infectious complications after transrectal prostate needle biopsy were evaluated for risk reduction practices are discussed. Methods: We evaluated infective complications after transrectal prostate needle biopsy in 276 patients admitted to our hospital in October 2009- October 2011 with high level of prostate-specific antigen, abnormal signs in transrectal ultrasound, abnormal digital rectal examination due to done transrectal prostate needle biopsy. Results: Transrectal prostate needle biopsy was performed to 276 cases and 59 (21% cases with hematuria, 21 (7% cases with hematospermia, 23 (8% cases with rectal bleeding, 6 (2.1% cases with asymptomatic bacteriuria, 12 (5.3% cases with in complicated urinary tract infection was detected. Three patients (1% had sepsis. 21 (7.3% patients had positive urine culture. Of them there were 20 positive cultures of E. coli and one Klebsiella spp. respectively. All of the bacteria cultured in twenty-one patients resistant to ciprofloxacin, while 90% to amikacin, 10% to amoxicillin-clavulanate, 35% to cefuroxime sodium and 40% were susceptible to ceftriaxone. Conclusion: Transrectal prostate needle biopsies of 276 patients, 21 (7.3% patients had positive urine culture. The most frequent complication was hematuria. The most serious complication of sepsis detected in three (1% patients.

  10. Hypercalciuria, a promoting factor to urinary tract infection in children

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    Gheissari Alaleh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the most common diseases of urogenital tract in children. Detecting predisposing factors for UTI takes an important place in managing patients with UTI. Recently, a few studies emphasized on idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH as a predisposing factor for UTI and dysfunctional voiding. Therefore, we carried out a survey to find out whether non-calculus IH is a contributing factor in children with the first attack of pyelonephritis. Materials and Methods: This is a case-control study carried out on 60 children aged 2-11 years admitted at St Al-Zahra hospital, Isfahan, Iran, with the first episode of upper UTI and 200 age- and gender-matched normal healthy children between September 2003 and February 2005. We used second fasting spot urine sample to measure calcium and creatinine. Two urine samples were obtained one week apart to increase the accuracy of measurement. All samples were collected after at least 6 weeks of completing the treatment course of pyelonephritis. Ultrasound examination and VCUG were performed in all patients before entering the survey as case group to rule out obstruction and VUR. Results: Mean age of case and control group were 4.86 ± 3.08 years and 4.22 ± 2.9 years, respectively. The mean calcium to creatinine ratio (Ca/Cr in case and control group were 0.308 ± 0.21 and 0.208 ± 0.12 mg/mg, respectively, P < 0.001. The difference between the mean values of these two groups was significant only in age group ≤6 years, P < 0.0001 and odds ratio was 2.1 (95% CI 1.03-7.8. After determining the mean values of urine Ca/Cr ration according to both age groups and gender, it was cleared that only significant difference was related to male < 6 years. Conclusion: The likelihood of hypercalciuria should be assessed especially in male children with UTI and without any urinary tract obstruction.

  11. Role of urinary cathelicidin LL-37 and human β-defensin 1 in uncomplicated Escherichia coli urinary tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karen L; Dynesen, Pia; Larsen, Preben

    2014-01-01

    Cathelicidin (LL-37) and human β-defensin 1 (hBD-1) are important components of the innate defense in the urinary tract. The aim of this study was to characterize whether these peptides are important for developing uncomplicated Escherichia coli urinary tract infections (UTIs...... indicate that the concentration of LL-37 in the urinary tract and low susceptibility to LL-37 may increase the likelihood of UTI in a complex interplay between host and pathogen attributes.......). This was investigated by comparing urinary peptide levels of UTI patients during and after infection to those of controls, as well as characterizing the fecal flora of participants with respect to susceptibility to LL-37 and in vivo virulence. Forty-seven UTI patients and 50 controls who had never had a UTI were...

  12. [The lithiasis in the upper urinary tract in children: endourological treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Otero, J; Gómez Fraile, A; Feltes Ochoa, J A; Fernández, I; López Vázquez, F; Aransay Bramtot, A

    2007-05-01

    Urolithiasis in the pediatric age is a growing problem. In the developed world they are of calcium oxalate and in the upper urinary tract. It is very similar to the presentation of lithiasis in adults, so we have to make an effort to apply the experience in this age to the children. The shock wave lithotripsy is admitted as the first treatment for this pathology in the pediatric population already. The endourological approach must be use as a common approach in this group. We present our technique and experience. A retrospective, descriptive study of the children diagnosed of lithiasis in the upper urinary tract that were treated by an endourological technique in our centre between January 1992 and January 2005. We gathered data on: 1.) Preoperative: age, sex, clinical manifestations, size (mm) and position of the lithiasis (we divided the upper urinary tract in: renal, proximal third, medial third and distal third) 2.) Operative variable: endourological technique: percutaneus neprolithotomy or ureteroscopy. Reconversion to open surgery. 3.) Postoperative variables: time since surgery, complications and the current state of the patient (ultrasonography and renal function). Seven children, 4 boys and 2 girls with an age range of 2,5 to 14 years, underwent operation using an endourological technique. Lumboabdominal pain was the main clinical manifestation (4/7). The lithiasis size was 4-7mm, with the exception of a staghorn calculis. The calculis were: 5 ureteral proximal, 1 ureteral distal and one in the kidney (staghound stone). We performed one percutaneus neprolithotomy for the staghorn calculi. We removed completly the stone and had no complications. The 6 other procedures were ureteroscopies. In 3 of them we removed the calculi (4/7 success rate of 57%). The rest procedures we needed to transform in open surgery. With a following time of 1-13 years all of them are asymptomatic, and with ultrasonography and renal function in the normal limits. We did see no

  13. Antibiotic resistance in children with recurrent or complicated urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, N; Quol, K; Al-Momani, T; Al-Awaisheh, F; Al-Kayed, D

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is certainly one of the most common childhood infections. Emerging resistance to the antibiotics is not unusual. Current hospitalization for children with urinary tract infection is reserved for severe or complicated cases. The aim of the present study was to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern among children with recurrent or complicated urinary tract infection. A retrospective study carried out at Prince Hashem hospital, Zarqa city, eastern Jordan and involved 336 episodes of culture proved urinary tract infection obtained from 121 patients with recurrent UTI, who used prophylactic antibiotics during the period from April 1, 2004 to December 31, 2006. The isolated microorganisms and there antibiotics susceptibility were studied. Seventy three patients (60.3%) were found to have some forms of urinary tract anomaly, significantly more prevalent among male children Pcomplicated rather than recurrent urinary tract infection (64.3% vs. 16.6%, Pcomplicated urinary tract infection. Proteus, Pseudomonas and Candida spp. were more prevalent in patients with complicated (Pcomplicated UTI.

  14. [Etiologic agents and risk factors in nosocomial urinary tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkoyun, Seviç; Kuloğlu, Figen; Tokuç, Burcu

    2008-04-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infection (NUSI) is one of the most common hospital acquired infections. In this study, we aimed to determine the risk factors, frequency and the bacterial etiology of NUSI in hospitalized patients at Trace University Hospital, Turkey. Between September 1st 2004 to March 1st 2005, 104 NUSI episodes from 91 adult patients (mean age; 60.8 +/- 16.1 years; 46 were female) were determined among 8704 patients admitted to the hospital. During the study period, cumulative incidence of NUSI was 1.04% and episode rate of NUSI was 1.19%. The most important risk factors for NUSI were detected as urinary catheterization (78.8%), antimicrobial therapy within the previous 15 days (60.6%), fecal incontinence (33.7%) and surgical operations [29.8% (42% of them were urological pertainings)]. In 37.8% of the episodes urinary catheterization was considered as performed unnecessarily. In 26% of the episodes another infection (pneumoniae, abdominal infection, wound infection) accompanied. The causative microorganisms were resistant to the antibiotics used for therapy in 93.6% of the episodes. A total of 118 microorganisms (14 were polymicrobial) have been isolated from the urine cultures. The most frequently isolated ones were Escherichia coil (n: 48; 40.8%), Candida spp. (n: 27; 23%), Enterococcus spp. (n: 13; 11%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n: 9; 7.6%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n: 8; 6.8%) and Acinetobacter spp. (n: 5; 4.2%). The highest susceptibility rates of E. coli isolates were against imipenem and nitrofurantoin (100%) and amikacin (97.7%), the lowest susceptibility rates were against ampicillin (26.7%) and amoxycillin-clavulonate (44.4%). No glycopeptid resistance was detected for Enterococcus spp. while the susceptibility rates to penicilin and nitrofurantoin were 38.5% and 63.6%, respectively. Since the number of the other bacterial species was low (coli and in 25% of K. pneumoniae isolates, and cases with ESBL producing strains had significiantly higher

  15. Diagnosis and management of urinary tract infections in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Jessica; Kitlowski, Andrew David; Ou, Derek; Bedolla, John

    2014-07-01

    Urinary tract infections are a heterogeneous group of disorders, involving infection of all or part of the urinary tract, and are defined by bacteria in the urine with clinical symptoms that may be acute or chronic. Approximately 1 million urinary tract infections are treated every year in United States emergency departments. The female-to-male ratio is 6:1. Urinary tract infections are categorized as upper versus lower tract involvement and as uncomplicated versus complicated. The emergency clinician must carefully categorize the infection and take into account patient host factors to optimally treat and disposition patients. A working knowledge of local or at least national susceptibility patterns of the most likely pathogens is essential. A variety of special populations exist that require special management, including pregnant females, patients with anatomic abnormalities, and instrumented patients.

  16. Obesity-Induced Diabetes and Lower Urinary Tract Fibrosis Promote Urinary Voiding Dysfunction in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaee-Kermani, Mehrnaz; Rodriguez-Nieves, Jose A.; Mehra, Rohit; Vezina, Chad A.; Sarma, Aruna V.; Macoska, Jill A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Progressive aging- and inflammation-associated fibrosis effectively remodels the extracellular matrix (ECM) to increase prostate tissue stiffness and reduce urethral flexibility, resulting in urinary flow obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). In the current study, we sought to test whether senescence-accelerated mouse prone (SAMP)6 mice, which were reported to develop prostatic fibrosis, would also develop LUTS, and whether these symptoms would be exacerbated by diet-induced obesity and concurrent Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). METHODS To accomplish this, SAMP6 and AKR/J background strain mice were fed regular mouse chow, low fat diet chow, or high fat diet chow for 8 months, then subjected to glucose tolerance tests, assessed for plasma insulin levels, evaluated for urinary voiding function, and assessed for lower urinary tract fibrosis. RESULTS The results of these studies show that SAMP6 mice and AKR/J background strain mice develop diet-induced obesity and T2DM concurrent with urinary voiding dysfunction. Moreover, urinary voiding dysfunction was more severe in SAMP6 than AKR/J mice and was associated with pronounced prostatic and urethral tissue fibrosis. CONCLUSIONS Taken together, these studies suggest that obesity, T2DM, lower urinary tract fibrosis, and urinary voiding dysfunction are inextricably and biologically linked. Prostate. PMID:23532836

  17. Risk factors for postoperative urinary tract infection following midurethral sling procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doganay, Melike; Cavkaytar, Sabri; Kokanali, Mahmut Kuntay; Ozer, Irfan; Aksakal, Orhan Seyfi; Erkaya, Salim

    2017-04-01

    To identify the potential risk factors for urinary tract infections following midurethral sling procedures. 556 women who underwent midurethral sling procedure due to stress urinary incontinence over a four-year period were reviewed in this retrospective study. Of the study population, 280 women underwent TVT procedures and 276 women underwent TOT procedures. Patients were evaluated at 4-8 weeks postoperatively and were investigated for the occurrence of a urinary tract infection. Patients who experienced urinary tract infection were defined as cases, and patients who didn't were defined as controls. All data were collected from medical records. Multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify the risk factors for urinary tract infection. Of 556 women, 58 (10.4%) were defined as cases while 498 (89.6%) were controls. The mean age of women in cases (57.8±12.9years) was significantly greater than in controls (51.8±11.2years) (purinary tract infection, concomitant vaginal hysterectomy and cystocele repair, TVT procedure and postoperative postvoiding residual bladder volume ≥100ml were more common in cases than in controls. However, in multivariate regression analysis model presence of preoperative urinary tract infection [OR (95% CI)=0.1 (0.1-0.7); p=0.013], TVT procedure [OR (95% CI)=8.4 (3.1-22.3); p=0.000] and postoperative postvoiding residual bladder volume ≥100ml [OR (95% CI)=4.6 (1.1-19.2); p=0.036] were significant independent risk factors for urinary tract infection following midurethral slings CONCLUSION: Urinary tract infection after midurethral sling procedures is a relatively common complication. The presence of preoperative urinary tract infection, TVT procedure and postoperative postvoiding residual bladder volume ≥100ml may increase the risk of this complication. Identification of these factors could help surgeons to minimize this complicationby developing effective strategies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Prognostic Value of Ultrasound Grading Systems in Prenatally Diagnosed Unilateral Urinary Tract Dilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalabre, Aurélien; Demède, Delphine; Gaillard, Ségolène; Pracros, Jean-Pierre; Mouriquand, Pierre; Mure, Pierre-Yves

    2017-04-01

    We compared the prognostic value of anteroposterior intrasinus diameter of the renal pelvis, urinary tract dilatation and the Society for Fetal Urology grading system in children with prenatally diagnosed unilateral urinary tract dilatation. All newborns with prenatally diagnosed unilateral urinary tract dilatation, normal bladder and anteroposterior intrasinus diameter 10 mm or greater on the first postnatal ultrasonography were prospectively enrolled from January 2011 to February 2015. Indications for surgery were recurrent febrile urinary tract infections and/or decrease of relative renal function more than 10% on serial isotope studies and/or increasing anteroposterior intrasinus diameter greater than 20% on serial ultrasounds. Sensitivity, specificity and ROC curves were calculated to evaluate the accuracy of anteroposterior intrasinus diameter, urinary tract dilatation and Society for Fetal Urology grading system in determining which children would need surgery within 24 months. A total of 57 males and 13 females were included. Of the patients 33 required surgery at a median age of 5 months (IQR 3.8 to 6.4). Urinary tract dilatation remained stable in 14 cases and decreased in 23 with a median followup of 42 months (IQR 25 to 67). Anteroposterior intrasinus diameter, urinary tract dilatation and Society for Fetal Urology scores were all correlated with the need for surgery. Anteroposterior intrasinus diameter with a threshold of 20 mm had the best prognostic value, with a sensitivity of 81.8% and a specificity of 91.7%. Our study confirms that the prognostic value was comparable between anteroposterior intrasinus diameter of the renal pelvis, urinary tract dilatation and Society for Fetal Urology grading system in newborns with prenatally diagnosed unilateral urinary tract dilatation. Anteroposterior intrasinus diameter and abnormal parenchymal thickness are the most important ultrasound criteria to identify children at risk for requiring surgery

  19. Incidentally discovered inverted papilloma of the urinary bladder in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hwan; Mah, Sang Yol; Chung, Byung Ha

    2010-02-01

    Inverted urothelial papilloma (IP) is an uncommon urothelial neoplasm. We aimed to determine the clinicopathologic characteristics of IP of the bladder and its association with prostate volume and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). From 1994 to 2008, 53 patients with urinary IP underwent transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) at our institution. We reviewed the clinicopathologic characteristics of IP of the bladder and its association with prostate volume and LUTS. The patient population consisted of 46 men and 7 women with a mean age of 56 years (male to female ratio 6.6:1). The most common presenting symptom was LUTS (33 men and 3 women). Of the 33 men with LUTS, the mean prostate volume before TURBT was 48.1 cc (range 21.8-109.3 cc). IP was found incidentally in 14 men on transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) and in 2 men during transurethral prostate resection. In IP located on the bladder neck of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), significantly higher obstructive symptoms and larger prostate volumes than that of other located IP with BPH were observed. This is the largest series of cases of urinary bladder IP reported from Korea. Despite the absence of agreement of its etiology, its presenting symptoms were related to LUTS and benign prostatic enlargement. TRUS may be helpful, especially in unresponsive patients with LUTS despite medical treatment.

  20. The findings reported in patients undergoing excretory urography for recurrent urinary tract infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, E. W. L.; Stephenson, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    There was little difference between the proportion of lesions found by excretion urography in patients with recurrent urinary tract infections referred by general practitioners or hospital staff, or between Horton General Hospital which is a district general hospital, and the United Oxford Hospitals, which is a teaching group. Many patients with urinary tract infections may be saved an unnecessary visit to the hospital consultant if this is first investigated by the general practitioner. About one fifth of all patients had significant lesions shown by excretory urography which suggests that the investigation is worthwhile in patients with recurrent urinary tract infections. PMID:1177211

  1. New Frontiers of Basic Science Research in Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazato, Minoru; Kadekawa, Katsumi; Kitta, Takeya; Wada, Naoki; Shimizu, Nobutaka; de Groat, William C; Birder, Lori A; Kanai, Anthony J; Saito, Seiichi; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2017-08-01

    The lower urinary tract's main functions are storage and elimination. The micturition reflex pathway is modulated by the spinobulbospinal reflex pathway as well as higher brain centers involved in the voluntary micturition control. Micturition is sensitive to numerous injuries, resulting in various types of dysfunction. Animal studies indicate that lower urinary tract dysfunction partly depends on plasticity of the neural pathways. Reflex plasticity is associated with changes in ion channels, receptors, and numerous mediators. Animal models may aid in understanding the mechanisms leading to pathologic conditions and the plasticity in reflex pathways to the lower urinary tract after neurogenic lesions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. A vision for the paediatrician].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios Loro, M L; Segura Ramírez, D K; Ordoñez Álvarez, F A; Santos Rodríguez, F

    2015-12-01

    The congenital abnormalities of kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are disorders with a high prevalence in the general population, with urinary tract dilations being the most frequent. CAKUT also account for the most important cause of chronic kidney disease in childhood. This paper focuses on the role of the primary care paediatrician in the diagnosis, assessment, and follow-up of children with CAKUT, with special emphasis on the associated urinary tract infections, the progression toward chronic renal failure, and the genetic basis. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Exploring relationships of catheter-associated urinary tract infection and blockage in people with long-term indwelling urinary catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Mary H; McMahon, James M; Crean, Hugh F; Brasch, Judith

    2017-09-01

    To describe and explore relationships among catheter problems in long-term indwelling urinary catheter users, including excess healthcare use for treating catheter problems. Long-term urinary catheter users experience repeated problems with catheter-related urinary tract infection and blockage of the device, yet little has been reported of the patterns and relationships among relevant catheter variables. Secondary data analysis was conducted from a sample in a randomised clinical trial, using data from the entire sample of 202 persons over 12 months' participation. Descriptive statistics were used to characterise the sample over time. Zero-inflated negative binomial models were employed for logistic regressions to evaluate predictor variables of the presence/absence and frequencies of catheter-related urinary tract infection and blockage. Catheter-related urinary tract infection was marginally associated with catheter blockage. Problems reported at least once per person in the 12 months were as follows: catheter-related urinary tract infection 57%, blockage 34%, accidental dislodgment 28%, sediment 87%, leakage (bypassing) 67%, bladder spasms 59%, kinks/twists 42% and catheter pain 49%. Regression analysis demonstrated that bladder spasms were significantly related to catheter-related urinary tract infection and sediment amount, and catheter leakages were marginally significantly and positively related to catheter-related urinary tract infection. Frequencies of higher levels of sediment and catheter leakage were significantly associated with higher levels of blockage, and being female was associated with fewer blockages. Persons who need help with eating (more disabled) were also more likely to have blockages. Catheter-related urinary tract infection and blockage appear to be related and both are associated with additional healthcare expenditures. More research is needed to better understand how to prevent adverse catheter outcomes and patterns of problems in

  4. Multiple virulence factors regulated by quorum sensing may help in establishment and colonisation of urinary tract by Pseudomonas aeruginosa during experimental urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Damage caused by an organism during infection is attributed to production of virulence factors. Different virulence factors produced by the organism contribute to its pathogenicity, individually. During infectious conditions, role of virulence factors produced by the pathogen is different, depending upon the site of involvement. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic nosocomial pathogen known to cause infections of the respiratory tract, burn wound, urinary tract and eye. Importance of virulence factors produced by P. Aeruginosa during infections such as keratitis, burn wound and respiratory tract is known. The present study was designed to understand the importance of different virulence factors of P. aeruginosa in urinary tract infection in vivo. Materials and methods: An ascending urinary tract infection model was established in mice using standard parent strain PAO1 and its isogenic mutant, JP2. Mice were sacrificed at different time intervals and renal tissue homogenates were used for estimation of renal bacterial load and virulence factors. Results: Both parent and mutant strains were able to reach the renal tissue. PAO 1 PAO1was isolated from renal tissue till day 5 post-infection. However, the mutant strain was unable to colonise the renal tissue. Failure of mutant strain to colonise was attributed to its inability to produce protease, elastase and rhamnolipid. Conclusion: This study suggests that protease, elastase and rhamnolipid contribute to pathogenesis and survival of P. aeruginosa during urinary tract infection.

  5. Upper Urinary Tract Tumors: Which Diagnostic Methods Are Needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruschke, Matthias; Kram, Wolfgang; Zimpfer, Annette; Kundt, Günther; Hakenberg, Oliver W

    2017-01-01

    We reviewed the data of patients with upper urinary tract (UUT) tumors to evaluate the effectiveness of diagnostic procedures. This retrospective study evaluated tumor characteristics, imaging procedures, epidemiological and follow-up data of 113 patients. We analyzed the importance of non-invasive and endoscopic diagnosis in addition to imaging as well as the influence of stage and grade on recurrence rate. Most tumors were urothelial carcinomas (92.9%). The cardinal symptoms were hematuria (40.7%), flank pain (2.7%), and urinary obstruction (14.2%). Forty-seven patients received intravenous urograms (IVUs), 57 retrograde ureteropyelography (RUP), 89 CTs, 6 an MRI. The correct positive tumor identification was reached by IVU in 27/47 patients, by RUP in 50/57, by CT in 74/89, and by MRI in 3/6 patients representing sensitivities of 57.4% (IVU), 87.7% (RUP), 83.1% (CT), and 50% (MRI). Sixty-four patients had urine cytology, which was correctly positive in 60.9% and 56 had a diagnostic ureterorenoscopy, which was correctly positive in 83.9%. During follow-up more than 20% of patients developed a recurrence. In patients with hematuria and flank pain, UUT must be considered a differential diagnosis. UUT to the extent of 76.6% showed more invasive growth (>Ta). Thus, rapid and efficient diagnosis based primarily on imaging is required. Contrast CT scan seems to be the imaging modality with the best performance. However, often only a combination of diagnostic procedures gives a certain diagnosis. Due to the high recurrence rate, close follow-up is needed. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Sacral neuromodulation in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöllner, J; Krebs, J; Pannek, J

    2016-02-01

    This is a retrospective chart analysis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of sacral neuromodulation (SNM) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD). This study was conducted in a spinal cord injury rehabilitation center in Switzerland. The charts of all patients who underwent SNM (testing and/or permanent implantation) because of NLUTD at our institution between 2007 and 2013 were evaluated. Treatment outcomes and complications were recorded. A total of 50 patients, 30 women and 20 men, with a mean age of 46 (±14) years, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The most frequent cause for SNM was spinal cord injury in 35 patients (70%). Median duration of the underlying disease was 9.5 (±9.3) years. In all, 35 patients (70%) received a permanent implant. The complication rate was 16% (8/50). At the last follow-up, SNM was in use in 32 patients. In 26 patients with SNM because of detrusor overactivity, voiding frequency per 24 h was significantly reduced from 9 to 6, and daily pad use rate was significantly improved (2.6 versus 0.6 pads per 24h). On comparing urodynamic assessment of detrusor function before and under SNM, no significant suppression of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) was detected. In nine patients with chronic neurogenic urinary retention, median postvoid residual urine was significantly reduced from 370 to 59 ml. In all, 94% of the patients were either very satisfied or satisfied with SNM. SNM might be an additional therapy option in carefully selected patients with NLUTD. On the basis of our results, urodynamic evaluation before SNM is mandatory, as the procedure does not seem to be suited to significantly alleviate NDO.

  7. [The role of the uretral catheter in the development of catheter- related urinary tract infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, A O; Govorov, A V; Shiryaev, A A; Pushkar, D Yu

    2017-12-01

    The most common source of nosocomial infection is the urinary tract, especially if they it is drained with a urethral catheter. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections account for at least 80% of all complicated urinary tract infections and are the most common type of hospital-acquired infection. Intestinal microflora plays the leading role in the pathogenesis of catheter-associated urinary tract infections, whereas the most important risk factor for their development is the long duration of urinary catheter drainage. In the case of short-term and intermittent catheterization, routine antibiotic prophylaxis is not required, but if a patient develops clinically significant infection, antibiotic therapy is required followed by definitive therapy based on culture. Urethral catheters coated with antimicrobial substances and anti-inflammatory agents can significantly reduce the adhesion and migration of bacteria, thereby reducing the incidence of urinary tract infections. Despite this, the incidence of catheter-associated infection remains high. We have reviewed recent literature related to catheter-associated urinary tract infections and the best means of preventing this condition.

  8. Managing therapeutic competition in patients with heart failure, lower urinary tract symptoms and incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Cara; Johnell, Kristina

    2014-02-01

    Up to 50% of heart failure patients suffer from lower urinary tract symptoms. Urinary incontinence has been associated with worse functional status in patients with heart failure, occurring three times more frequently in patients with New York Heart Association Class III and IV symptoms compared with those with milder disease. The association between heart failure and urinary symptoms may be directly attributable to worsening heart failure pathophysiology; however, medications used to treat heart failure may also indirectly provoke or exacerbate urinary symptoms. This type of drug-disease interaction, in which the treatment for heart failure precipitates incontinence, and removal of medications to relieve incontinence worsens heart failure, can be termed therapeutic competition. The mechanisms by which heart failure medication such as diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and β-blockers aggravate lower urinary tract symptoms are discussed. Initiation of a prescribing cascade, whereby antimuscarinic agents or β3-agonists are added to treat symptoms of urinary urgency and incontinence, is best avoided. Recommendations and practical tips are provided that outline more judicious management of heart failure patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. Compelling strategies to improve urinary outcomes include titrating diuretics, switching ACE inhibitors, treating lower urinary tract infections, appropriate fluid management, daily weighing, and uptake of pelvic floor muscle exercises.

  9. Prevalence and antibiogram of bacterial isolates from urinary tract infections at Dessie Health Research Laboratory, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulugeta Kibret

    2014-02-01

    Conclusions: In the study area resistance rates to erythromycin, amoxycillin and tetracycline were high. Since most isolates were sensitive to nitrofurantoin and gentamicin, they are considered as appropriate antimicrobials for empirical treatment urinary tract infections.

  10. Quorum sensing is necessary for the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during urinary tract infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kumar, Ravi; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2009-01-01

    .... To understand the role of quorum sensing in pathogenesis of urinary tract infections, wild type Pseudomonas aeruginosa, having both functional las and rhl quorum sensing systems, and its isogenic...

  11. Antibiotics for respiratory, ear and urinary tract disorders and consistency among GPs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, D.S.Y.; Kuyvenhoven, M.M.; Dijk, L. van; Verheij, T.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To describe specific diagnoses for which systemic antibiotics are prescribed, to assess adherence of antibiotic choice to national guidelines and to assess consistency among general practitioners (GPs) in prescribed volumes of antibiotics for respiratory, ear and urinary tract disorders.

  12. Type 1 fimbrial expression enhances Escherichia coli virulence for the urinary tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connell, Hugh; Agace, William; Klemm, Per

    1996-01-01

    of Escherichia coli for the urinary tract by promoting bacterial persistence and enhancing the inflammatory responce to infection. In a clinical study, we observed that disease severity was greater in children infected with E. coli O1:K1:H7 isolates expressing type 1 fimbriae than in those infected with type 1...... negative isolates of the same serotype. The E. coli O1:K1:H7 isolates had the same electrophoretic type, were hemolysin-negative, expressed P fimbriae, and carried the fim DNA sequences. When tested in a mouse urinary tract infection model, the type 1-positive E. coli O1:K1:H7 isolates survived inhigher...... urinary tract infection model. E. coli CN1016 reconstituted with type 1 fimbriae had restored virulence similar to that of the wild-type parent strain. These results show that type 1 fimbriae in the genetic background of a uropathogenic strain contribute to the pathogenesis of E. coli in the urinary tract....

  13. Urinary tract infections in general practice patients: diagnostic tests versus bacteriological culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nys, S.; Merode, T. van; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common bacterial infections encountered in general practice. For the optimal treatment the general practitioner (GP) should rely on the results of diagnostic tests and recent antimicrobial susceptibility of uropathogens. Patients and methods: In total

  14. Menorrhagia and Uterine Volume Associated with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Patients with Adenomyosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Li

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Lower urinary tract symptoms are prevalent in patients with symptomatic adenomyosis and greatly affect patients' quality of life. Menorrhagia and large uterine volume could be potential risk factors that increase the occurrence of moderate-to-severe LUTS.

  15. Reliability of dipstick assay in predicting urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anith Kumar Mambatta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Urine dipstick analysis is a quick, cheap and a useful test in predicting Urinary Tract Infection (UTI in hospitalized patients. Our aim is to evaluate the reliability (sensitivity of urine dipstick analysis against urine culture in the diagnosis of UTI. Materials and Methods: Patients admitted to our hospital suspected of having UTI, with positive urine cultures were included in this study from a 2-year period (January 2011 to December 2012. Dipstick urinalysis was done using multistix 10 SG (Siemens and clinitek advantus analyzer. The sensitivity of dipstick nitrites, leukocyte esterase and blood in these culture-positive UTI patients was calculated retrospectively. Results: Urine dipstick analysis of 635 urine culture-positive patients was studied. The sensitivity of nitrite alone and leukocyte esterase alone were 23.31% and 48.5%, respectively. The sensitivity of blood alone in positive urine culture was 63.94%, which was the highest sensitivity for a single screening test. The presence of leukocyte esterase and/or blood increased the sensitivity to 72.28%. The sensitivity was found to be the highest when nitrite, leukocyte and blood were considered together. Conclusions: Nitrite test and leukocyte esterase test when used individually is not reliable to rule out UTI. Hence, symptomatic UTI patients with negative dipstick assay should be subjected to urine culture for a proper management.

  16. Utility of Ultrasonography for Urinary Tract Infections of Infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Chul Ho; Kim, Yun Jeong [Dongnam Health Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    In this study, we investigated utility of ultrasonography for urinary tract infections of infants. The results of the research is as follows : 1. The number of infants under one year old was 100 out of 122 infants who were diagnosed as a unitary infection. The ratio of males to females was 1.7 : 1. Seventy-seven infants who underwent three kinds of radiologic examinations such as kidney sonography (51%), {sup 99m}TC DMSA-scan (42%), and VCUG (22%). 2. In comparison of correlation between kidney sonography and VCUG, the sensitivity of kidney sonography was 82% while the specificity of kidney sonography was 58%. In comparison of correlation between kidney sonography and {sup 99m}TC DMSA-scan, the sensitivity of kidney sonography was 66% while the specificity of kidney sonography was 67%. 3. Utility of kidney sonography showed the highest efficiency when we considered pain, discomfort, a sense of shame, psychological stress when infants may undergo at the examination, side-effect of a contrast agent after the examination, and complication of exposure to radiation.

  17. Urinary Tract Infection among Renal Transplant Recipients in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondos, Adnan S; Al-Moyed, Khaled A; Al-Robasi, Abdul Baki A; Al-Shamahy, Hassan A; Alyousefi, Naelah A

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common complication following kidney transplantation (KT), which could result in losing the graft. This study aims to identify the prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in Yemen and to determine the predisposing factors associated with post renal transplantation UTI. A cross sectional study included of 150 patients, who underwent KT was conducted between June 2010 and January 2011. A Morning mid-stream urine specimen was collected for culture and antibiotic susceptibility test from each recipient. Bacterial UTI was found in 50 patients (33.3%). The prevalence among females 40.3% was higher than males 29%. The UTI was higher in the age group between 41-50 years with a percentage of 28% and this result was statistically significant. Predisposing factors as diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder and polycystic kidney showed significant association. High relative risks were found for polycystic kidney = 13.5 and neurogenic bladder = 13.5. The most prevalent bacteria to cause UTI was Escherichia coli represent 44%, followed by Staphylococcus saprophyticus 34%. Amikacin was the most effective antibiotic against gram-negative isolates while Ciprofloxacin was the most effective antibiotic against Staphylococcus saprophyticus. In conclusion, there is high prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in Yemen. Diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder, polycystic kidney and calculi were the main predisposing factors.

  18. Urinary Tract Infection among Renal Transplant Recipients in Yemen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan S Gondos

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is the most common complication following kidney transplantation (KT, which could result in losing the graft. This study aims to identify the prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in Yemen and to determine the predisposing factors associated with post renal transplantation UTI. A cross sectional study included of 150 patients, who underwent KT was conducted between June 2010 and January 2011. A Morning mid-stream urine specimen was collected for culture and antibiotic susceptibility test from each recipient. Bacterial UTI was found in 50 patients (33.3%. The prevalence among females 40.3% was higher than males 29%. The UTI was higher in the age group between 41-50 years with a percentage of 28% and this result was statistically significant. Predisposing factors as diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder and polycystic kidney showed significant association. High relative risks were found for polycystic kidney = 13.5 and neurogenic bladder = 13.5. The most prevalent bacteria to cause UTI was Escherichia coli represent 44%, followed by Staphylococcus saprophyticus 34%. Amikacin was the most effective antibiotic against gram-negative isolates while Ciprofloxacin was the most effective antibiotic against Staphylococcus saprophyticus. In conclusion, there is high prevalence of bacterial UTI among KT recipients in Yemen. Diabetes mellitus, vesicoureteral reflux, neurogenic bladder, polycystic kidney and calculi were the main predisposing factors.

  19. Pediatric febrile urinary tract infections: the current state of play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hewitt Ian K

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Studies undertaken in recent years have improved our understanding regarding the consequences and management of febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs, which are amongst the most common serious bacterial infections in childhood, with renal scarring a frequent outcome. In the past pyelonephritic scarring of the kidney, often associated with vesico-ureteral reflux (reflux nephropathy was considered a frequent cause of chronic renal insufficiency in children. Increasing recognition as a consequence of improved antenatal ultrasound, that the majority of these children had congenital renal hypo-dysplasia, has resulted in a number of studies examining treatment strategies and outcomes following UTI. In recent years there is a developing consensus regarding the need for a less aggressive therapeutic approach with oral as opposed to intravenous antibiotics, and less invasive investigations, cystourethrography in particular, following an uncomplicated first febrile UTI. There does remain a concern that with this newer approach we may be missing a small subgroup of children more prone to develop severe kidney damage as a consequence of pyelonephritis, and in whom some form of intervention may prove beneficial. These concerns have meant that development of a universally accepted diagnostic protocol remains elusive.

  20. T-Box Genes in the Kidney and Urinary Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kispert, A

    2017-01-01

    T-box (Tbx) genes encode an ancient group of transcription factors that play important roles in patterning, specification, proliferation, and differentiation programs in vertebrate organogenesis. This is testified by severe organ malformation syndromes in mice homozygous for engineered null alleles of specific T-box genes and by the large number of human inherited organ-specific diseases that have been linked to mutations in these genes. One of the organ systems that has not been associated with loss of specific T-box gene function in human disease for long is the excretory system. However, this has changed with the finding that mutations in TBX18, a member of a vertebrate-specific subgroup within the Tbx1-subfamily of T-box transcription factor genes, cause congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract, predominantly hydroureter and ureteropelvic junction obstruction. Gene expression analyses, loss-of-function studies, and lineage tracing in the mouse suggest a primary role for this transcription factor in specifying the ureteric mesenchyme in the common anlage of the kidney, the ureter, and the bladder. We review the function of Tbx18 in ureterogenesis and discuss the body of evidence that Tbx18 and other members of the T-box gene family, namely, Tbx1, Tbx2, Tbx3, and Tbx20, play additional roles in development and homeostasis of other components of the excretory system in vertebrates. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pathogenesis and Laboratory Diagnosis of Childhood Urinary Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jharna Mandal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the most common infections of childhood. The clinical presentations are mostly non-specific or mild. As any episode of UTI can potentially damage the kidneys, timely diagnosis and treatment are necessary to prevent renal damage. Incidence of UTI varies depending on the age, gender, and race of the child. UTIs in children are commonly caused by bacteria, though viruses, fungi, and parasites are also occasionally involved. The pathogenesis of UTI is complex where several host and pathogen factors influence the course of the disease and its outcome. Urine culture is still considered the gold standard method for the diagnosis of UTI. The means of obtaining urine samples from children for culture involves urethral catheterisation and suprapubic aspiration. The conventional methods of antibiotic susceptibility testing are labour intensive and time exhaustive. With the advent of technology, many automated platforms are available which are rapid, involve less volume of the culture or the sample, and have high accuracy.

  2. Modern evaluation of lower urinary tract symptoms in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangera, Altaf; Chapple, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate and present the evidence for the use of different investigation modalities in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia/lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in 2014. Cystometry remains the gold standard in differentiating obstructed from nonobstructed men with LUTS. Prostatic ultrasound measures such as the intravesical prostatic protrusion may be useful in counselling men before a trail without catheter or commencing α antagonists. Using a higher cut-off, the bladder thickness/weight measurement has a higher sensitivity but lower specificity and may allow men with obstruction to be excluded from requiring cystometry. These and other techniques such as near-infrared spectroscopy, penile cuff compression and computational flow modelling have shown good correlation with cystometry but still require more data, technical refinement and standardization, before they can be considered to be appropriate in routine clinical practice. The last few years have seen an increase in the data regarding less invasive methods of cystometry. Although these do not provide the same information as cystometry, they may have a role in answering specific questions and counselling men with benign prostatic hyperplasia/LUTS. The key to incorporating these techniques in the assessment of men will lie with standardization and use for specific indications.

  3. Recent advances in biosensor based diagnosis of urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M S; Ghosh, S; Nayak, S; Das, A P

    2016-06-15

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are potentially life threatening infections that are associated with high rates of incidence, recurrence and mortality. UTIs are characterized by several chronic infections which may lead to lethal consequences if left undiagnosed and untreated. The uropathogens are consistent across the globe. The most prevalent uropathogenic gram negative bacteria are Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumonia. Early detection and precise diagnosis of these infections will play a pivotal role in health care, pharmacological and biomedical sectors. A number of detection methods are available but their performances are not upto the mark. Therefore a more rapid, selective and highly sensitive technique for the detection and quantification of uropathogen levels in extremely minute concentrations need of the time. This review brings all the major concerns of UTI at one's doorstep such as clinical costs and incidence rate, several diagnostic approaches along with their advantages and disadvantages. Paying attention to detection approaches with emphasizing biosensor based recent developments in the quest for new diagnostics for UTI and the need for more sophisticated techniques in terms of selectivity and sensitivity is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical and economic implications of urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Samantha N; Comito, Rachel R; Nicolau, David P

    2017-08-01

    Urinary tract infections represent one of the most frequent reasons for hospitalization. As a result of their prevalence from community-based origins as well as those which develop in hospital setting, this constellation of infections represents a tremendous burden to the global healthcare system. Areas covered: Over the last several decades the management of these infections has become more complicated due to the underlying comorbid conditions of the patients as well as escalating antimicrobial resistance to many of the most frequently used oral and parenteral agents. One such example is the emergence of extend spectrum β-lactamase-producing (ESBL) bacteria that render many of the most frequently utilized oral and parenteral penicillin and cephalosporin based regimens of little clinical utility. As such new treatment strategies are required to effectively manage the growing population of patients with multi-drug resistant bacteria. Expert commentary: Herein, we review some of the current literature which reveals the challenges associated with the contemporary management of UTIs, while presenting strategies such as the implementation of clinical pathways that have the potential to enhance the quality and efficiency of care while reducing the overall cost of care.

  5. Treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms: agents for intraprostatic injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2013-04-01

    When the currently available pharmacotherapeutic principles used for treatment of male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) fail, transurethral resection of the prostate still remains the widely applied gold-standard therapy, since the majority of minimally invasive therapies have not achieved the same efficacy and/or lack an evidence base to support their routine use. Intraprostatic injection therapy, which probably is the oldest minimally invasive surgical treatment, has not been widely used, but recent reports of successful treatments with several new agents have renewed interest in this approach. Anhydrous ethanol still seems to be one of the most extensively studied injectables to date, but intraprostatic injection of botulinum toxin has received much recent attention, with regard to both its mechanism of action and efficacy. In addition, other agents such as NX-1207 and PRX302 have been reported to have promising effects. Injection therapy, using the transperineal, transrectal and transurethral routes for delivery of the active compounds, seems to be an effective minimally invasive surgical therapy for LUTS associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). However, further studies on mechanisms of action of the novel agents used, and controlled clinical trials documenting their efficacy and side-effects (which are largely lacking), are needed before their place in the treatment of BPH/LUTS can be properly assessed.

  6. Intraprostatic injections for lower urinary tract symptoms treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to review and discuss recently published (2013-2014) experimental and clinical studies of intraprostatic injection therapy as an alternative treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Recent focus has been on intraprostatic injection of botulinum toxin both with regard to mechanism of action and efficacy. In contrast to the promising findings in several previous studies, a recent large, randomized, placebo-controlled trial found no differences between onabotulinumtoxin A treatment and placebo. There is little new information on the use of anhydrous ethanol and agents such as NX-1207 and PRX302, which previously have been reported to have promising effects. Intraprostatic injection of different agents as a minimally invasive surgical therapy for LUTS associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia seems attractive and may have a potential as a treatment alternative, but so far, available results are not convincing. Further studies on the mechanisms of action of novel agents, and controlled clinical trials documenting their efficacy and side-effects when injected into the prostate are needed before their place in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia/LUTS can be properly assessed.

  7. Renal scar formation after urinary tract infection in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Seo Park

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is a common bacterial illness in children. Acute pyelonephritis in children may lead to renal scarring with the risk of later hypertension, preeclampsia during pregnancy, proteinuria, and renal insufficiency. Until now, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR has been considered the most important risk factor for post-UTI renal scar formation in children. VUR predisposes children with UTI to pyelonephritis, and both are associated with renal scarring. However, reflux nephropathy is not always acquired; rather, it reflects refluxassociated congenital dysplastic kidneys. The viewpoint that chronic kidney disease results from renal maldevelopment-associated VUR has led to questioning the utility of any regimen directed at identifying or treating VUR. Despite the recognition that underlying renal anomalies may be the cause of renal scarring that was previously attributed to infection, the prevention of renal scarring remains the goal of all therapies for childhood UTI. Therefore, children at high risk of renal scar formation after UTI should be treated and investigated until a large clinical study and basic research give us more information.

  8. Prevalence of vesicoureteral reflux in neonatal urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleper, Roxana; Krause, Irit; Eisenstein, Bella; Davidovits, Miriam

    2004-09-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) after a first episode of urinary tract infection (UTI) is apparently diagnosed much more frequently (25%-40%) in children than in neonates. The aims of the study were to determine the actual rate of VUR in neonates with UTI and to define the clinical clues to its diagnosis. The study sample included term infants with a diagnosis of UTI during their first month of life who were seen in this hospital between January 1997 and May 1999. All infants underwent complete diagnostic work-up (renal ultrasound and voiding cystourethrography [VCUG]). The medical files were reviewed for patient sex, age at UTI diagnosis, laboratory findings (including causative pathogen), and ultrasonographic findings. These parameters were correlated with the finding of VUR on VCUG. Sixty-four neonates (55 males, 9 females) with UTI were included in this study. UTI was 6 times more common in males than females, although the incidence of VUR was equal between the sexes (about 20%). The presence of VUR was associated with a significantly younger age at presentation of UTI (11.4+/-4 vs 16.9+/-6.6 days, p<0.01). VUR was diagnosed at a fourfold higher rate in neonates with Klebsiella-induced UTI compared to those with E. Coli-UTI. In 80% of those with significantly abnormal ultrasonographic findings VUR was found on VCUG. Jaundice was noted at UTI diagnosis 3 times more often in infants with VUR, and elevated creatinine level, 2.5 times more often.

  9. Allium Stents: A Novel Solution for the Management of Upper and Lower Urinary Tract Strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaher Bahouth

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Stents are widely use in endoscopic urological procedures. One of the most important indications is the treatment of urinary tract strictures. Allium™ Medical has introduced several types of stents for the treatment of different types of urinary tract strictures, based on anatomic location. All the stents are made of nitinol and coated with a co-polymer that reduces encrustations. These stents are self-expandable and have a large caliber and a high radial force. They have different shapes, designed especially for the treatment of each type of stricture. One of the most important features of Allium-manufactured stents is the ease of removal, due to their special unraveling feature. The company has introduced the Bulbar Urethral Stent (BUS for treatment of bulbar urethral strictures; a rounded stent available in different lengths. Initial data on 64 patients with bulbar urethral stricture treated with the BUS showed a significant improvement in symptoms, with minimal complications and few adverse events. For treatment of prostate obstruction in patients unfit for surgery or unwilling to undergo a classical prostatic surgery, the Triangular Prostatic Stent (TPS was introduced, which has a triangular shape that fits in the prostatic urethra. Its body has a high radial force attached to an anchor (which prevents migration through a trans-sphincteric wire (which reduces incontinence rate. Initial data on 51 patients showed significant improvement in symptoms and in urinary peak flow rate, with a relatively small number of complications. The Round Posterior Stent (RPS was designed for treatment of post radical prostatectomy bladder neck contracture. This short, round stent has an anchor, which is placed in the bladder neck. This stent being relatively new, the clinical data are still limited. Ureteral strictures can be treated with the Ureteral Stent (URS, which is round-shaped, available in different lengths, and has an anchor option (for very

  10. The efficiency of excretory urography to detect upper urinary tract tumors after cystectomy for urothelial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Claudia; Giannarini, Gianluca; Schumacher, Martin C; Thoeny, Harriet; Studer, Urs E; Burkhard, Fiona C

    2007-12-01

    We determined the efficiency of routine excretory urography for detecting tumor recurrence in the upper urinary tract after cystectomy and urinary diversion for bladder cancer. We evaluated 322 patients who underwent cystectomy and urinary diversion, and had undergone routine followup, including regular excretory urography 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 and 10 years after cystectomy. Upper urinary tract recurrence was found in 15 of the 322 patients (4.7%) patients. Eight of 15 cases were detected by routine excretory urography, resulting in a low efficiency of 0.75% (8 of 1,064 studies) for this method. The remaining 7 recurrences were detected as a result of symptoms such as macrohematuria or flank pain occurring between routine followup examinations. Patients were at up to 10 times higher risk for recurrence in the upper urinary tract if they had positive distal ureteral resection margins or a history of upper urinary tract tumors. Although the incidence of recurrence in the upper urinary tract increased 1.8-fold in patients with pTa/pT1 tumors, it remained relatively low at 8.4%. The incidence of recurrence in the upper urinary tract a median of 49 months (range 12 to 220) after cystectomy for transitional cell carcinoma was 4.7%. Because only half of these cases were detected by routine excretory urography, this should be limited to patients at high risk with a history of upper urinary tract tumors or positive ureteral margins. In the future other techniques, eg cytology of voided urine or new markers, should be evaluated to replace excretory urography for routine followup of patients after cystectomy for transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.

  11. Stenting Prior to Cystectomy is an Independent Risk Factor for Upper Urinary Tract Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Bernhard; Furrer, Marc A; Wuethrich, Patrick Y; Burkhard, Fiona C; Thalmann, George N; Roth, Beat

    2017-12-01

    Patients with bladder cancer who present with hydronephrosis may require drainage of the affected kidney before receiving further cancer treatment. Drainage can be done by retrograde stenting or percutaneously. However, retrograde stenting carries the risk of tumor cell spillage to the upper urinary tract. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether patients with bladder cancer are at higher risk for upper urinary tract recurrence if retrograde stenting has been performed prior to radical cystectomy. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 1,005 consecutive patients with bladder cancer who underwent radical cystectomy at our department between January 2000 and June 2016. Negative intraoperative ureteral margins were mandatory for study inclusion. Patients received regular followup according to our institutional protocol, including imaging of the upper urinary tract and urine cytology. Preoperative drainage of the upper urinary tract was performed in 114 of the 1,005 patients (11%), including in 53 (46%) by Double-J® stenting and in 61 (54%) by percutaneous nephrostomy. Recurrence developed in the upper urinary tract in 31 patients (3%) at a median of 17 months after cystectomy, including 7 of 53 (13%) in the Double-J group, 0% in the nephrostomy group and 24 of 891 (3%) in the no drainage group. Multivariate regression analysis revealed a higher risk of upper urinary tract recurrence if patients underwent Double-J stenting (HR 4.54, 95% CI 1.43-14.38, p = 0.01) and preoperative intravesical instillations (HR 2.94, 95% CI 1.40-6.16, p = 0.004). Patients who undergo Double-J stenting prior to radical cystectomy are at higher risk for upper urinary tract recurrence. If preoperative upper urinary tract drainage is required, percutaneous drainage might be recommended. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Risk Factors for Urinary Tract Infection following Mid Urethral Sling Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Humberto R; Mallick, Ranjeeta; Nitti, Victor W; Lavallée, Luke T; Breau, Rodney H; Hickling, Duane R

    2017-05-01

    Mid urethral sling surgery is common. Postoperative urinary tract infection rates vary in the literature and independent risk factors for urinary tract infection are not well defined. We sought to determine the incidence of and risk factors for urinary tract infection following mid urethral sling surgery. A retrospective cohort of females who underwent sling surgery was captured from the 2006 to 2014 NSQIP® (National Surgical Quality Improvement Program®) database. Exclusion criteria included male gender, nonelective surgery, totally dependent functional status, preoperative infection, prior surgery within 30 days, ASA® (American Society of Anesthesiologists®) Physical Status Classification 4 or greater, concomitant procedure and operative time greater than 60 minutes. The primary outcome was the incidence of urinary tract infection within 30 days of mid urethral sling surgery. Risk factors for urinary tract infection were assessed by examining patient demographic, comorbidity and surgical variables. Logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate the ORs of individual risk factors. Multivariable logistic regression was then performed to adjust for confounding. A total of 9,022 mid urethral sling surgeries were identified. The urinary tract infection incidence was 2.6%. Factors independently associated with an increased infection risk included age greater than 65 years (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.07-2.22), body mass index greater than 40 kg/m2 (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.23-2.92) and hospital admission (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.37-3.11). Mid urethral sling surgery performed by urologists carried a reduced risk of infection compared to the surgery done by gynecologists (OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.40-0.69). The urinary tract infection risk following mid urethral sling surgery in NSQIP associated hospitals is low. Novel patient and surgical factors for postoperative urinary tract infection have been identified and merit further study. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association

  13. Is Pelvic Floor Muscle Training Effective for Men With Poststroke Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Gard, Gunvor; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training in men with poststroke lower urinary tract symptoms. Thirty-one poststroke men, median age 68 years, were included in this single-blinded randomized controlled trial. Thirty participants, 15 in each group...... that pelvic floor muscle training has an effect for lower urinary tract symptoms, although statistical significance was only seen for pelvic floor muscle....

  14. Drug and Vaccine Development for the Treatment and Prevention of Urinary Tract Infections

    OpenAIRE

    O’Brien, Valerie P.; Hannan, Thomas J.; Nielsen, Hailyn V.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common bacterial infections in humans, affecting millions of people every year. UTI cause significant morbidity in women throughout their lifespan, in infant boys, in older men, in individuals with underlying urinary tract abnormalities, and in those that require long-term urethral catheterization, such as patients with spinal cord injuries or incapacitated individuals living in nursing homes. Serious sequelae include frequent recurrences, pye...

  15. Ceftazidime-avibactam: novel antimicrobial combination for the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidjanov, Jakhongir F; Fritzenwanker, Moritz; Hoffman, Ivan; Wagenlehner, Florian M

    2017-06-01

    Ceftazidime-avibactam is a combination of a third-generation cephalosporin and a novel non-beta-lactam beta-lactamase inhibitor. This combination was recently recommended for the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections, including acute pyelonephritis, in adults with limited or no alternative treatment options. The current review is aimed to determine activity, efficacy and safety of ceftazidime-avibactam in the treatment of patients with complicated urinary tract infections.

  16. Prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in stroke patients: a cross-sectional, clinical survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Gard, Gunvor; Klarskov, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The aims of this study were primarily to investigate the prevalence, severity and impact on daily life of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) in a clinical sample of stroke patients and secondly to identify factors associated with LUTS.......The aims of this study were primarily to investigate the prevalence, severity and impact on daily life of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) in a clinical sample of stroke patients and secondly to identify factors associated with LUTS....

  17. Paraganglioma of the Urinary Bladder: A Rare Cause of Hypertension and Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaaya, Gerard; Morales, Jorge; Castiglioni, Analia; Subhani, Noman; Asmar, Abdo

    2018-02-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a neoplasm, which develops from cells of the chromaffin tissues that are derived from the ectodermic neural system and mostly situated within the adrenal medulla. Approximately 15% of pheochromocytoma cases arise from extra-adrenal chromaffin tissue. Pheochromocytoma of the bladder is rare and accounts for less than 0.06% of all bladder neoplasms and less than 1% of all pheochromocytomas. We report a case of a young woman who presented with uncontrolled hypertension, recurrent urinary tract infections and micturition attacks and was found to have a metastatic bladder paraganglioma. In addition, we provide a summary table of the clinical manifestations of paragangliomas based on anatomic locations. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. The incidence of urinary tract cancers is related to preserved diuresis: a single-center report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premuzic, Vedran; Gamulin, Marija; Coric, Marijana; Jelakovic, Bojan

    2017-12-01

    Residual diuresis progressively decreases with longer dialysis vintage, and higher incidence of renal and urinary tract cancers was often observed in hemodialyzed patients compared to the general population so we hypothesized that patients without preserved residual diuresis have higher risk of renal and urinary tract cancers than patients with preserved residual diuresis. Retrospective clinical data and pathology reports were completed for 307 uremic patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis. Patients were divided into two subgroups regarding residual diuresis: the first group with residual diuresis  500 mL. Site- and type-specific cancers in our population of ESRD patients were all localized in estrogen-positive receptor organs. The increased risk of all types of urinary tract cancers occurred in the whole group, men and women, when compared to general population. There were a significantly higher number of patients with all types of cancers in the group with residual diuresis  500 mL. Importantly, all urinary tract cancers were present in patients with residual diuresis urinary tract cancers found in ESRD patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis is associated with lost residual diuresis. Residual diuresis in these patients might be considered a risk marker for future urinary tract cancers as well as already established markers.

  19. Hyperammonemia associated with distal renal tubular acidosis or urinary tract infection: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clericetti, Caterina M; Milani, Gregorio P; Lava, Sebastiano A G; Bianchetti, Mario G; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Giannini, Olivier

    2018-03-01

    Hyperammonemia usually results from an inborn error of metabolism or from an advanced liver disease. Individual case reports suggest that both distal renal tubular acidosis and urinary tract infection may also result in hyperammonemia. A systematic review of the literature on hyperammonemia secondary to distal renal tubular acidosis and urinary tract infection was conducted. We identified 39 reports on distal renal tubular acidosis or urinary tract infections in association with hyperammonemia published between 1980 and 2017. Hyperammonemia was detected in 13 children with distal renal tubular acidosis and in one adult patient with distal renal tubular acidosis secondary to primary hyperparathyroidism. In these patients a negative relationship was observed between circulating ammonia and bicarbonate levels (P urinary tract infection was complicated by acute hyperammonemia and symptoms and signs of acute neuronal dysfunction, such as an altered level of consciousness, convulsions and asterixis, often associated with signs of brain edema, such as anorexia and vomiting. Urea-splitting bacteria were isolated in 28 of the 31 cases. The urinary tract was anatomically or functionally abnormal in 30 of these patients. This study reveals that both altered distal renal tubular acidification and urinary tract infection may be associated with relevant hyperammonemia in both children and adults.

  20. Clinical Efficacy of Moringa oleifera Lam. Stems Bark in Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Anil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common problem in clinical practice. Usually they are asymptomatic and are commonly present with distressing symptoms like pain and burning sensation on urination. Antibiotics are widely used to treat UTIs; however, they have their own limitations like resistance, reinfection, and relapses. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the value of Moringa oleifera Lam. stem bark as a potential medicine for UTIs. Study Design. 30 patients with UTI were randomly divided into two groups with 15 patients in each group. Shigru bark was given to patients of the first group (trial group) and modern medicines were prescribed to the other group of patients. At least three follow-ups are taken in both groups at the end of every week of treatment. Results. After treatment 66.67 % were cured, 13.33 % improved, 13.33% patients have no change, and 6.67% relapsed in trial group and in control group 46.67% were cured, 26.66% improved, 6.67% patients have no change, and 20% relapsed. Interpretation and Conclusion. The trial drug is significant in the management of UTI. This study needs to be done on a large scale and for a long time.

  1. Urinary Tract Infections in Spinal Cord Injury Patients Undergoing Intermittent Catheterization Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Kirkland

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A prospective study was organized to assess whether feeding back infection rates to staff performing intermittent catheterization in spinal cord-injured patients would produce a fall in urinary tract infection rates. Over a 12 month period, infection rates for such procedures were reported to unit staff: reporting was combined with educational programs emphasizing aseptic catheterization techniques and the importance ofhandwashing. Overall infection rates for the 12 month period were 13.3 per 1000 days of intermittent catheterization - unchanged from the preceding six months (15.1 per 1000 days by retrospective chart review. Likewise, there was no statistically significant downward trend during the prospective phase of the study. A wide variety of infecting organisms were found, of which Klebsiella species (39%, Escherichia coli (18% and Enterobacter species (17% were most common: most infections were asymptomatic. Patients with complete cord lesions at or above the sixth thoracic spinal cord segment (T6 had a much higher incidence of infection (73% than those with incomplete lesions below T6 (33%.

  2. Optogenetic Modulation of Urinary Bladder Contraction for Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hong; Hong, Jin Ki; Jang, Ja Yun; An, Jieun; Lee, Kyu-Sung; Kang, Tong Mook; Shin, Hyun Joon; Suh, Jun-Kyo Francis

    2017-01-01

    As current clinical approaches for lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction such as pharmacological and electrical stimulation treatments lack target specificity, thus resulting in suboptimal outcomes with various side effects, a better treatment modality with spatial and temporal target-specificity is necessary. In this study, we delivered optogenetic membrane proteins, such as channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and halorhodopsin (NpHR), to bladder smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of mice using either the Cre-loxp transgenic system or a viral transfection method. The results showed that depolarizing ChR2-SMCs with blue light induced bladder contraction, whereas hyperpolarizing NpHR-SMCs with yellow light suppressed PGE2-induced overactive contraction. We also confirmed that optogenetic contraction of bladder smooth muscles in this study is not neurogenic, but solely myogenic, and that optogenetic light stimulation can modulate the urination in vivo. This study thus demonstrated the utility of optogenetic modulation of smooth muscle as a means to actively control the urinary bladder contraction with spatial and temporal accuracy. These features would increase the efficacy of bladder control in LUT dysfunctions without the side effects of conventional clinical therapies.

  3. Kluyvera urinary tract infection: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narchi, Hassib

    2005-06-01

    We report the occurrence of Kluyvera ascorbata urinary tact infection, presenting as acute pyelonephritis, in a 19-month-old girl without underlying uropathy. Quick response to antibiotic therapy was obtained, and there was no residual renal parenchymal damage. We review the literature of infections with this very uncommon organism with particular emphasis on pediatric urinary tract infections.

  4. Evaluation of CD4+/CD8+ status and urinary tract infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The CD4+ and the CD8+ counts were correlated with the ova of S. haematobium in their urine samples at r = 0.0108 and r = 0.516 respectively. The bacteriuria, urinary schistosomiasis and urinary tract co - infections namely; Escherichia coli, Proteus, Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staph.

  5. Therapeutic efficacy and safety of pidotimod in the treatment of urinary tract infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, E; Solli, R; Mei, V; Cera, R; Caramia, G; Carnelli, V; Ruffini, E; Venturoli, V; Corsini, A

    1994-12-01

    The activity of pidotimod ((R)-3-[(S)-(5-oxo-2-pyrrolidinyl) carbonyl]-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid, PGT/1A, CAS 121808-62-6) was studied vs. placebo in a double-blind, randomized, multicentre trial, involving 60 pediatric patients with recurrent urinary tract infections. Recovery from acute events was quicker with pidotimod than with placebo (9.6 vs. 12.3 days). In treated patients antibiotic therapy was shorter (6.9 vs. 8.3 days) and main symptomatic parameters (body temperature, vesical tenesmus, stranguria, pollakiuria, total number of symptoms, total symptomatic intensity, rate of asymptomatic patients, haematuria, leukocyturia, positive urinary culture) receded quickly. In patients receiving the drug as well as in patients treated with placebo changes in laboratory parameters were observed, indicating recovery from the acute infectious disease. A significant trend to normalization of the immune response, expressed by chemotaxis and index of leukocyte phagocytosis, was found only in patients treated with pidotimod. After the acute episode a significant decrease of risk of relapses (69%) was observed in these patients. If a relapse occurs, the response of treated patients is quicker (duration of fever, total time of relapses) than for control patients. These findings allow to correlate the individual immune response activation to the resistance to recurrent infections and also to a better response to therapy if the disease occurs and becomes clinically relevant. No side effects were observed. Mild reactions (4 nausea/vomiting, 1 erythema) occurred only in 5 patients (2 pidotimod, 3 placebo) but were attributed to concomitant antibiotic therapy. No alterations of main laboratory parameters were found. These findings confirm the tolerability of the drug also in long-term treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Development of a Vaccine against Escherichia coli Urinary Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry L. T. Mobley

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is the second most common infection in humans after those involving the respiratory tract. This results not only in huge annual economic costs, but in decreased workforce productivity and high patient morbidity. Most infections are caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC. Antibiotic treatment is generally effective for eradication of the infecting strain; however, documentation of increasing antibiotic resistance, allergic reaction to certain pharmaceuticals, alteration of normal gut flora, and failure to prevent recurrent infections represent significant barriers to treatment. As a result, approaches to prevent UTI such as vaccination represent a gap that must be addressed. Our laboratory has made progress toward development of a preventive vaccine against UPEC. The long-term research goal is to prevent UTIs in women with recurrent UTIs. Our objective has been to identify the optimal combination of protective antigens for inclusion in an effective UTI vaccine, optimal adjuvant, optimal dose, and optimal route of delivery. We hypothesized that a multi-subunit vaccine elicits antibody that protects against experimental challenge with UPEC strains. We have systematically identified four antigens that can individually protect experimentally infected mice from colonization of the bladder and/or kidneys by UPEC when administered intranasally with cholera toxin (CT as an adjuvant. To advance the vaccine for utility in humans, we will group the individual antigens, all associated with iron acquisition (IreA, Hma, IutA, FyuA, into an effective combination to establish a multi-subunit vaccine. We demonstrated for all four vaccine antigens that antigen-specific serum IgG represents a strong correlate of protection in vaccinated mice. High antibody titers correlate with low colony forming units (CFUs of UPEC following transurethral challenge of vaccinated mice. However, the contribution of cell-mediated immunity cannot

  7. Long-term outcomes of complete urinary tract exenteration for dialysis patients with urothelial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Chien-Hui; Yang, Wen-Horng

    2017-04-01

    To survey long-term outcomes of dialysis patients with urothelial cancers who have undergone complete urinary tract exenteration (bilateral nephroureterectomy and cystectomy). We retrospectively reviewed our patients with urinary tract urothelial cancer. Forty-two dialysis patients who underwent complete urinary tract exenteration were enrolled in our study. Seventeen patients had undergone one-stage complete urinary tract exenteration, and twenty-five patients had undergone multi-stage surgery. We reviewed the demographic, clinical, surgical, and pathological data to determine the clinical and pathologic variables that affected the survival between the two groups. Baseline demographics were comparable in both groups. There was no significant difference in age, American Society of Anesthesiologists class, Charlson index, or body mass index between the two groups. Furthermore, there was no statistically significant difference in estimated blood loss (1280 vs. 1440 ml) or total hospital stay (31 vs. 21 days). Simultaneous upper and lower tract tumors were noted in one-stage CUTE group In comparison with multi-stage surgery, one-stage surgery was associated with a higher complication rate (58.8 vs. 28%). Twenty-two patients were still alive at the end of the study, and 20 had died. The median survival period after confirmation of complete urinary tract exenteration status was 27.5 months. The overall survival was the same between the two groups. The Charlson comorbidity index was a mandatory indicator to predict long-term survival outcome. In dialysis patients with urothelial cancers who have undergone complete urinary tract exenteration, one-stage complete urinary tract exenteration had a high perioperative complication rate. The Charlson comorbidity index was a mandatory indicator to predict long-term survival outcome.

  8. Profile of urinary tract infections in paediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palak Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: This cross-sectional study was conducted at a tertiary care centre in Puducherry, south India, with the aim of finding the profile of the paediatric urinary tract infection (UTI, bacterial pathogens involved, and also to observe vesicoureteric reflux (VUR and renal scarring in these patients. Methods: A total of 524 paediatric patients ≤13 yr, suspected to have UTI, were included in the study. Urine samples were collected, processed for uropathogen isolation and antibiotic susceptibility test was performed as per the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. Thirty two culture proven children with UTI underwent micturating cysto-urethrography (MCU and dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA scanning was done for 69 children. Results: o0 f the 524 children, 186 (35.4% had culture proven UTI with 105 (56.4% being infants, 50 (27.4% between 1-5 yr, 30 (16.12% between 5-13 yr and 129 (69.35% males. Posterior urethral valve (PUV was noted in three, hydronephrosis in one, VUR in 18 and renal scarring in 33. VUR as well as renal scarring were more in males >1 yr of age. A significant association (P=0.0054 was noted with a combined sensitivity and specificity of these investigations being 83 and 90 per cent, respectively of the MCU and DMSA scans for detecting VUR. Escherichia coli was the most common pathogen isolated, sensitive to nitrofurantoin, followed by cefoperazone-sulbactam, aminoglycosides and meropenem. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results indicate that UTI varies with age and gender and extensive evaluation is required in boys under one year of age with UTI. This study also highlights the better efficacy of aminoglycosides, cefoperazone-sulbactam and nitrofurantoin in vitro compared with meropenem in Gram-negative uropathogens.

  9. Revised statement on management of urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, M; Kanitkar, M; Nammalwar, B R; Bagga, Arvind

    2011-09-01

    In 2001, the Indian Pediatric Nephrology Group formulated guidelines for management of patients with urinary tract infection (UTI). In view of emerging scientific literature, the recommendations have been reviewed. Following a preliminary meeting in November 2010, a document was circulated among the participants to arrive at a consensus on the evaluation and management of these patients. To revise and formulate guidelines on management of UTI in children. The need for accurate diagnosis of UTI is emphasized due to important implications concerning evaluation and follow up. Details regarding clinical features and diagnosis, choices and duration of therapy and protocol for follow up are discussed. UTI is diagnosed on a positive culture in a symptomatic child, and not merely by the presence of leukocyturia. The need for parenteral therapy in UTI in young infants and those showing toxicity is emphasized. Patients with aysmptomatic bacteriuria do not require treatment. The importance of bowel bladder dysfunction in the causation of recurrent UTI is highlighted. Infants with the first UTI should be evaluated with micturating cystourethrography. Vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) is initially managed with antibiotic prophylaxis. The prophylaxis is continued till 1 year of age in patients with VUR grades I and II, and till 5 years in those with higher grades of reflux or until it resolves. Patients and their families are counselled about the need for early recognition and therapy of UTI. Children with VUR should be followed up with serial ultrasonography and direct radionuclide cystograms every 2 years, while awaiting resolution. Siblings of patients with VUR should be screened by ultrasonography. Children with renal scars need long term follow up on yearly basis for growth, hypertension, proteinuria, and renal size and function.

  10. Measuring morbidity associated with urinary schistosomiasis: assessing levels of excreted urine albumin and urinary tract pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa-Figueiredo, José C; Basáñez, María-Gloria; Khamis, I Simba; Garba, Amadou; Rollinson, David; Stothard, J Russell

    2009-10-06

    Urinary schistosomiasis is responsible for a variety of debilitating conditions; foremost perhaps are urinary tract pathologies (UTPs). Although portable ultrasonography can be used to detect UTPs visually, there is still a need for rapid morbidity assessment (henceforth referred to as RaMA) tools that can be deployed in the field during implementation, monitoring and evaluation of control programmes. We therefore aimed to determine associations between excreted urine-albumin, as measured using a HemoCue photometer, and UTPs, as detected by ultrasonography, in children and adults from an urinary schistosomiasis endemic area in Zanzibar. In a survey of 140 school-children of both sexes (aged 9 to 15 yr) and 47 adult males (> or =16 yr) on the island of Unguja, the prevalence of egg-patent urinary schistosomiasis was 36.4% (CI(95) 28.5-45.0%) and 46.8% (CI(95) 32.1-61.9%) (P = 0.14), and that of UTPs was 39.4% (CI(95) 31.0-48.3%) and 64.4% (CI(95) 48.8-78.1%) (P = 0.006), respectively. In school-children, raised urine-albumin concentrations (>40 mg/L) were associated, albeit non-significantly, with prevalence of infection (OR = 3.1, P = 0.070), but more specifically and significantly with the prevalence of micro-haematuria (OR = 76.7, Palbumin excretion was associated with UTPs, particularly lesions of the bladder wall (OR = 8.4, P = 0.013). Albuminuria showed promising diagnostic performance, especially in school-aged children with sensitivity of 63.3% and specificity of 83.1% at detecting lower UTPs, i.e. bladder-wall lesions (ultrasonography as 'gold standard'). This study indicates that albuminuria assays could be used as a RaMA tool for monitoring UTP prevalence during control programmes, as well as a tool for selecting those with more chronic bladder-wall lesions without resorting to ultrasonography.

  11. Measuring morbidity associated with urinary schistosomiasis: assessing levels of excreted urine albumin and urinary tract pathologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José C Sousa-Figueiredo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Urinary schistosomiasis is responsible for a variety of debilitating conditions; foremost perhaps are urinary tract pathologies (UTPs. Although portable ultrasonography can be used to detect UTPs visually, there is still a need for rapid morbidity assessment (henceforth referred to as RaMA tools that can be deployed in the field during implementation, monitoring and evaluation of control programmes. We therefore aimed to determine associations between excreted urine-albumin, as measured using a HemoCue photometer, and UTPs, as detected by ultrasonography, in children and adults from an urinary schistosomiasis endemic area in Zanzibar.In a survey of 140 school-children of both sexes (aged 9 to 15 yr and 47 adult males (> or =16 yr on the island of Unguja, the prevalence of egg-patent urinary schistosomiasis was 36.4% (CI(95 28.5-45.0% and 46.8% (CI(95 32.1-61.9% (P = 0.14, and that of UTPs was 39.4% (CI(95 31.0-48.3% and 64.4% (CI(95 48.8-78.1% (P = 0.006, respectively. In school-children, raised urine-albumin concentrations (>40 mg/L were associated, albeit non-significantly, with prevalence of infection (OR = 3.1, P = 0.070, but more specifically and significantly with the prevalence of micro-haematuria (OR = 76.7, P<0.0001. In adults, elevated urine-albumin excretion was associated with UTPs, particularly lesions of the bladder wall (OR = 8.4, P = 0.013. Albuminuria showed promising diagnostic performance, especially in school-aged children with sensitivity of 63.3% and specificity of 83.1% at detecting lower UTPs, i.e. bladder-wall lesions (ultrasonography as 'gold standard'.This study indicates that albuminuria assays could be used as a RaMA tool for monitoring UTP prevalence during control programmes, as well as a tool for selecting those with more chronic bladder-wall lesions without resorting to ultrasonography.

  12. Comparative diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI using urinary nitrite and significant bacteriuria (SBU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Anuli S

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The clinical laboratory diagnosis of urinary tract infection was compared in two hundred (200 midstream urine samples using bacteria culture and urinary nitrite detection technique. The comparative susceptibility of the isolates to common antibiotics was evaluated using completely randomized design (CRD. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC for each antibiotics test was evaluated using standard laboratory procedures. Approximately fifty one percent (101/200 of urine samples that were culture yielded significant bacteriuria (SBU as compared to (32.59%, 65/200 which had positive nitrite detection. Also eighteen percent (18%, 35/200 of the negative nitrite detection test showed evidence of significant bacteriuria. Significant bacteriuria was significantly associated at p<0.05 with culture isolation technique. A total of nine (9 different bacterial isolates were detected in this study. The isolates and their frequency of occurrence were Escherichia coli 30(29.7%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 15(14.9%, Klebsiella pneumonia 13(12.8%, Enterococcus faecalis and Citrobacterfreundii 10(9.9, Proteus mirabilis 9(8.9, Staphylococcus aureus 8(7.7%, Serretiamarcesens and Streptococcus specie 3(3.0%.The mean total viable count ranged from 31.50±3.15x10 7 cfuml-1 to 262.5±1.09x10 8 cfuml-1. The antibiotics susceptibility profile reveals a high level of susceptibility of most isolates to Gentamycin(50%, Ciprofloxacin(83%, Tarivid(100%, Augumentin(50% and Levofloxacin(100% with mean zone of inhibition ranging from 18.6mm to 20.3mm. However, high resistance profile of hundred percent was observed with nalidixic acid, ampicillin and septrin while reflacin resistant rate was 66.7%. Intermediary susceptibility was observed with streptomycin (50% and ceporex (66.7%. This study therefore reveals the diagnostic superiority of culture method to urinary nitrite detection technique. In addition, it also reveals Escherichia coli

  13. Measuring Morbidity Associated with Urinary Schistosomiasis: Assessing Levels of Excreted Urine Albumin and Urinary Tract Pathologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa-Figueiredo, José C.; Basáñez, María-Gloria; Khamis, I. Simba; Garba, Amadou; Rollinson, David; Stothard, J. Russell

    2009-01-01

    Background Urinary schistosomiasis is responsible for a variety of debilitating conditions; foremost perhaps are urinary tract pathologies (UTPs). Although portable ultrasonography can be used to detect UTPs visually, there is still a need for rapid morbidity assessment (henceforth referred to as RaMA) tools that can be deployed in the field during implementation, monitoring and evaluation of control programmes. We therefore aimed to determine associations between excreted urine-albumin, as measured using a HemoCue photometer, and UTPs, as detected by ultrasonography, in children and adults from an urinary schistosomiasis endemic area in Zanzibar. Methodology/Principal Findings In a survey of 140 school-children of both sexes (aged 9 to 15 yr) and 47 adult males (≥16 yr) on the island of Unguja, the prevalence of egg-patent urinary schistosomiasis was 36.4% (CI95 28.5–45.0%) and 46.8% (CI95 32.1–61.9%) (P = 0.14), and that of UTPs was 39.4% (CI95 31.0–48.3%) and 64.4% (CI95 48.8–78.1%) (P = 0.006), respectively. In school-children, raised urine-albumin concentrations (>40 mg/L) were associated, albeit non-significantly, with prevalence of infection (OR = 3.1, P = 0.070), but more specifically and significantly with the prevalence of micro-haematuria (OR = 76.7, P<0.0001). In adults, elevated urine-albumin excretion was associated with UTPs, particularly lesions of the bladder wall (OR = 8.4, P = 0.013). Albuminuria showed promising diagnostic performance, especially in school-aged children with sensitivity of 63.3% and specificity of 83.1% at detecting lower UTPs, i.e. bladder-wall lesions (ultrasonography as ‘gold standard’). Conclusion/Significance This study indicates that albuminuria assays could be used as a RaMA tool for monitoring UTP prevalence during control programmes, as well as a tool for selecting those with more chronic bladder-wall lesions without resorting to ultrasonography. PMID:19806223

  14. A metaproteomics approach to elucidate host and pathogen protein expression during catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassek, Christian; Burghartz, Melanie; Chaves-Moreno, Diego; Otto, Andreas; Hentschker, Christian; Fuchs, Stephan; Bernhardt, Jörg; Jauregui, Ruy; Neubauer, Rüdiger; Becher, Dörte; Pieper, Dietmar H; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Riedel, Katharina

    2015-04-01

    Long-term catheterization inevitably leads to a catheter-associated bacteriuria caused by multispecies bacterial biofilms growing on and in the catheters. The overall goal of the presented study was (1) to unravel bacterial community structure and function of such a uropathogenic biofilm and (2) to elucidate the interplay between bacterial virulence and the human immune system within the urine. To this end, a metaproteomics approach combined with in vitro proteomics analyses was employed to investigate both, the pro- and eukaryotic protein inventory. Our proteome analyses demonstrated that the biofilm of the investigated catheter is dominated by three bacterial species, that is, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Morganella morganii, and Bacteroides sp., and identified iron limitation as one of the major challenges in the bladder environment. In vitro proteome analysis of P. aeruginosa and M. morganii isolated from the biofilm revealed that these opportunistic pathogens are able to overcome iron restriction via the production of siderophores and high expression of corresponding receptors. Notably, a comparison of in vivo and in vitro protein profiles of P. aeruginosa and M. morganii also indicated that the bacteria employ different strategies to adapt to the urinary tract. Although P. aeruginosa seems to express secreted and surface-exposed proteases to escape the human innate immune system and metabolizes amino acids, M. morganii is able to take up sugars and to degrade urea. Most interestingly, a comparison of urine protein profiles of three long-term catheterized patients and three healthy control persons demonstrated the elevated level of proteins associated with neutrophils, macrophages, and the complement system in the patient's urine, which might point to a specific activation of the innate immune system in response to biofilm-associated urinary tract infections. We thus hypothesize that the often asymptomatic nature of catheter-associated urinary tract infections

  15. Current status of minimally invasive management of pediatric upper urinary tract calculi

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    Kolla Surendra

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The surgical management of pediatric upper urinary tract calculi has evolved from open surgery to minimally invasive techniques. With advancement in instrumentation, endourological procedures are being performed more commonly in children. However, the endourological management of renal and ureteral stones in the pediatric population is considered challenging, owing to the smaller size of the urinary tract. Various minimally invasive techniques that are being applied in the management of pediatric urolithiasis, include shock wave lithitripsy (SWL, percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL, ureterorenoscopy and a combination of these procedures. The role of SWL is well established and is considered the first line of treatment in the management of urinary calculi in pediatric patients. Recent reports have confirmed the safety of PCNL and ureteroscopy in children, although they are not as widely practiced in children as in adults. This article reviews literature published till October 2005, pertaining to the minimally invasive management of pediatric upper urinary tract calculi.

  16. Virulence factors in Proteus bacteria from biofilm communities of catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hola, Veronika; Peroutkova, Tereza; Ruzicka, Filip

    2012-07-01

    More than 40% of nosocomial infections are those of the urinary tract, most of these occurring in catheterized patients. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters results not only in infection, but also various complications, such as blockage of catheters with crystalline deposits of bacterial origin, generation of gravels and pyelonephritis. The diversity of the biofilm microbial community increases with duration of catheter emplacement. One of the most important pathogens in this regard is Proteus mirabilis. The aims of this study were to identify and assess particular virulence factors present in catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) isolates, their correlation and linkages: three types of motility (swarming, swimming and twitching), the ability to swarm over urinary catheters, biofilm production in two types of media, urease production and adherence of bacterial cells to various types of urinary tract catheters. We examined 102 CAUTI isolates and 50 isolates taken from stool samples of healthy people. Among the microorganisms isolated from urinary catheters, significant differences were found in biofilm-forming ability and the swarming motility. In comparison with the control group, the microorganisms isolated from urinary catheters showed a wider spectrum of virulence factors. The virulence factors (twitching motility, swimming motility, swarming over various types of catheters and biofilm formation) were also more intensively expressed. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Bullying has a potential role in pediatric lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Philip T; Velez, Danielle; Faiena, Izak; Creenan, Eileen M; Barone, Joseph G

    2015-05-01

    National statistics estimate that a quarter of American school children are regularly bullied, making this issue the main parental concern and the leading form of school violence. To our knowledge no study in the literature has examined the association of bullying with lower urinary tract symptoms. We evaluated the relationship between being bullied and lower urinary tract symptoms in the pediatric population. We accrued 100 patients from a pediatric urology practice in prospective case-control fashion. The degree of lower urinary tract symptoms was determined by the voiding severity score obtained by a single pediatric urologist. Using the Peer Relations Questionnaire and a thermometer scale we surveyed participants for evidence of victimization from bullying and school related anxiety. We then correlated voiding symptom severity with the degree of bullying. After applying our study exclusion criteria we examined and analyzed data on 38 control children without lower urinary tract symptoms and on 38 children with lower urinary tract symptoms. Mean age was similar in the 2 groups. There were more females in the group with lower urinary tract symptoms (22 vs 13). Mean case voiding severity score was 3.82 (range 2 to 5). As measured by Bullied Index Score the degree of being bullied was significantly higher in the case group (4.76 vs 1.95, p bullying accounted for worse voiding severity scores (4.56 vs 3.67, p bullying is significantly associated with pediatric lower urinary tract symptoms and 2) physical forms of bullying accompany worsened symptoms. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Evaluation of Urinary Tract Dilation Classification System for Grading Postnatal Hydronephrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodhod, Amr; Capolicchio, John-Paul; Jednak, Roman; El-Sherif, Eid; El-Doray, Abd El-Alim; El-Sherbiny, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    We assessed the reliability and validity of the Urinary Tract Dilation classification system as a new grading system for postnatal hydronephrosis. We retrospectively reviewed charts of patients who presented with hydronephrosis from 2008 to 2013. We included patients diagnosed prenatally and those with hydronephrosis discovered incidentally during the first year of life. We excluded cases involving urinary tract infection, neurogenic bladder and chromosomal anomalies, those associated with extraurinary congenital malformations and those with followup of less than 24 months without resolution. Hydronephrosis was graded postnatally using the Society for Fetal Urology system, and then the management protocol was chosen. All units were regraded using the Urinary Tract Dilation classification system and compared to the Society for Fetal Urology system to assess reliability. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the validity of the Urinary Tract Dilation classification system in predicting hydronephrosis resolution and surgical intervention. A total of 490 patients (730 renal units) were eligible to participate. The Urinary Tract Dilation classification system was reliable in the assessment of hydronephrosis (parallel forms 0.92). Hydronephrosis resolved in 357 units (49%), and 86 units (12%) were managed by surgical intervention. The remainder of renal units demonstrated stable or improved hydronephrosis. Multivariate analysis revealed that the likelihood of surgical intervention was predicted independently by Urinary Tract Dilation classification system risk group, while Society for Fetal Urology grades were predictive of likelihood of resolution. The Urinary Tract Dilation classification system is reliable for evaluation of postnatal hydronephrosis and is valid in predicting surgical intervention. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Gunshot wounds to the lower urinary tract: A single-institution experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinman, Nadya M.; McAninch, Jack W.; Porten, Sima P.; Myers, Jeremy B.; Blaschko, Sarah D.; Bagga, Herman S.; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to analyze characteristics and outcomes of gunshot wounds to the lower urinary tract at our Level I trauma center. Our hypothesis is that gunshot wounds to the lower urinary tract have characteristic bullet trajectories, injury patterns, and associated injuries. METHODS Our prospective trauma database was composed of reviewed gunshot wounds to the lower urinary tract including the pelvic ureter, bladder, or urethra from 1989 through 2011. RESULTS We identified 50 patients (median age, 25 years; range, 3–53 years) with lower urinary tract injury. There was a mean of 2.3 bullets per patient (range, 1–8), with 26 patients injured from a single bullet. Urologic injury involving only the bladder occurred in 72% (36 of 50) of the patients. Ureteral injury was diagnosed in 20% (10 of 50) of the patients. Bullet trajectory was known in the majority of multiple bullet injuries and all cases involving a single bullet. All patients but one were managed operatively. During exploration, 90% (34 of 38) with transmural bladder injury had recognized bladder entry and exit wounds. Overall, 80% (40 of 50) had concurrent gastrointestinal injury. In patients with a single gunshot wound to the lower urinary tract, 58% (15 of 26) sustained concomitant intestinal injury, and 23% (6 of 26) sustained rectal injury. Of 20 posteroanterior gunshot wounds, 80% had buttock entry. All 10 single-bullet buttock-entry gunshot wounds injured the bladder. Isolated ureteral injury was associated with lower abdominal entry and anteroposterior trajectory. Urethral injury occurred in 4, with 75% upper-thigh entry. CONCLUSION Penetrating injuries to the lower urinary tract most commonly involve the bladder. During exploration for gunshot wounds to the bladder, two injury sites should be expected because failure to close may lead to complications. Gunshot wounds to the lower urinary tract often occur with concomitant bowel injury, with buttock entry. A multidisciplinary

  20. [Impact of an intervention to improve indwelling urinary catheter use and reduce urinary tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithson, A; Bosch, L; Ramos, X; Martínez-Santana, V

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of an intervention regarding the adequate use and improvement in the care of indwelling urinary catheters (IUC) and the frequency of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) in hospitalised patients. A quasi-experimental study was performed. Basic data on the use of IUC were recorded before and after the intervention, which consisted of training on IUC use and the implementation of reminders for their removal. There were 197 patients in the pre-intervention period and 194 in the post-intervention period. There was a non-significant decrease in the prevalence (17.3% versus 15.3%) and days with IUC (4.8±5.8 versus 4.3±4.2). There was an increase in adequately prescribed (41.1% versus 61.9%; P<.001) and attached IUC (0% vs 38.1%; P<.001), and a decrease in the urine collection bags on the floor (26.4% vs 6,2%; P<.001). The increase in the appropriate indications for IUC (86.8% vs 92.3%) and the decrease in CAUTI incidence density (2.1 vs 1.2 episodes/1,000 catheter days) were not significant, although above the standards. After the intervention there was a significant increase in the number of adequately prescribed and attached IUC, and a decrease in the number of urine collection bags on the floor. Improvement in IUC indication and frequency of CAUTI reached the quality standards. Educational activities and the use of reminders improve safety of hospitalised patients with IUC. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. COMMON ORGANISMS AND ANTIBIOTIC SENSITIVITY OF E COLI IN URINARY TRACT INFECTION, IN A TERTIARY CARE TEACHING HOSPITAL, NORTHERN KERALA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanavas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI includes a spectrum of Asymptomatic Bacteruria (ABU, Cystitis, Prostitis and Pyelonephritis. Except in ABU, UTI is represented by symptomatic disease that warrants antimicrobial therapy. 1 Many of the studies have shown increasing antibiotic resistance to these agents. This study consists of a retrospective observational study of culture and sensitivity of 150 urinary samples, collected from patients who presented with symptoms of UTI, in a tertiary care teaching hospital, Northern Kerala, irrespective of their age and sex for a period of six months from June 2015 to November 2015. These results are then analyzed to find common organisms causing UTI in different age groups in either sex and their respective antibiotic resistance are noted. Out of 150 urinary samples 69.34% were sterile, while 30.66% were culture positive. Among the culture positive patients sex distribution was almost equal, with a slight female predominance, having a contribution of 54.35% females and 45.65% males. The most common organism was found to be E.coli, which contributed more than 50 per cent of total culture positivity (54.35%. Others include Staphylococci, Klebsiella Pnuemoniae, Proteus species, Pseudomonas, Enterococci, Candida Albicans etc. Collateral damage is an ecological adverse effect that resist the use of a highly efficacious drug to be considered as first line agent. Our study shows that drugs causing minimal collateral damages like Nitrofurantoin and Fosfomycin can be used as first line agent for treatment of UTI.

  2. Is age at toilet training associated with the presence of vesicoureteral reflux or the occurrence of urinary tract infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, John J; Ahn, Hyeong Jun; Steinhardt, George F

    2009-07-01

    We sought to determine whether age at toilet training is influenced by a history of vesicoureteral reflux or urinary tract infection. We reviewed records on 1,184 patients treated at a pediatric urology practice. All patients had information available regarding age at toilet training, renal sonography and voiding cystourethrography, and presence or absence of urinary tract infection. We evaluated possible associations between vesicoureteral reflux and urinary tract infection, and age at toilet training. Of 1,184 patients 280 had unilateral reflux, 339 had bilateral reflux and 565 had normal anatomy. Also, 926 patients had urinary tract infections. Girls tended to be toilet trained 3 months earlier than boys (p toilet trained at similar ages. However, timing of the first urinary tract infection seemed to be associated with age at toilet training. For girls a urinary tract infection occurring earlier tended to delay toilet training, while earlier toilet training seemed to be associated with a later urinary tract infection (p toilet training seems to be independent of the presence of vesicoureteral reflux. Urinary tract infection itself is not necessarily associated with age at toilet training. However, timing of the first urinary tract infection seems to be related to age at toilet training.

  3. Asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Nielsen, E.M.; Klemm, Per

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) affect millions of people each year. Escherichia coli is the most common organism associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) in humans. Persons affected by ABU may carry a particular E. coli strain for extended periods of time without any symptoms. In contrast...... to uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) that cause symptomatic UTI, very little is known about the mechanisms by which these strains colonize the urinary tract. Here, we have investigated the growth characteristics in human urine as well as adhesin repertoire of nine ABU strains; the ability of ABU strains to compete...

  4. Urinary tract infections in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puntis, D; Malik, S; Saravanan, V; Rynne, M; Heycock, C; Hamilton, J; Kelly, C A

    2013-03-01

    Co-morbidity from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has recently focussed on outcomes of cardiovascular and pulmonary disease, but serious infections are an increasingly well-recognised complication of RA. Recent work has demonstrated how the incidence of pneumonia can be reduced in RA, but little attention has been paid to the incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in RA or to the associated co-morbidity. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence of UTI leading to hospitalisation in a large cohort of patients with RA and investigate which factors contributed to this. This study assessed all patients with RA hospitalised over a 12-month period with a discharge diagnosis including UTI. Patients were identified through a PAS records search in a single large centre. Historical case controls without RA matched for age and gender were identified from the literature. Clinical notes were manually examined by two observers. We recorded: age, gender, duration of RA, number of UTI, all RA therapy, co-morbidity, results of urine and blood cultures with antimicrobial sensitivities, readmission rates, treatment and outcome. We calculated the relative risk (RR) of developing UTI in patients with RA and the factors influencing this. From a population of 2,200 RA patients, the overall annual incidence of hospitalisation with UTI amongst RA patients was 2.09 %, as against 0.97 and 0.91 % for two control groups (RR = 2.16 and 2.29). Most patients (90 %) were female, and the group mean age was 76 years. The use of long-term oral steroids as sole therapy was associated with a RR of 6.8 for UTI (p = 0.002) while failure to take disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) was associated with a similar RR of 6.7 (p = 0.001). Positive cultures for Escherichia coli were found in 51 % of RA patients. Relevant co-morbidities included permanent catheters, vaginal prolapse, cancer and diabetes. Recurrence of UTI within a year was common. RA was associated with a higher

  5. Urinary tract infections in pregnant women with coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olén, Ola; Montgomery, Scott M; Ekbom, Anders; Bollgren, Ingela; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2007-02-01

    Previous research has indicated a link between coeliac disease (CD) and urinary tract infection (UTI). The objective of this study was to assess the risk of UTI and repeated episodes of UTI before the current pregnancy in women with diagnosed or undiagnosed CD. A national registry-based cohort study restricted to pregnant women was used in this investigation, with linkage between the Swedish National Medical Birth Registry and the National Inpatient Registry. We analysed the risk of UTI during pregnancy from 1973 to 1989 in 212 pregnancies to women who had received a diagnosis of CD prior to giving birth and in 786 pregnancies to women diagnosed after giving birth. We also assessed the risk of repeated episodes of UTI before the current pregnancy according to data in the national birth records of 1990-2001 in 617 women with CD diagnosed prior to giving birth and 109 women diagnosed after giving birth. UTI during pregnancy: UTI occurred during 19,139/1,678,304 pregnancies to women who had never had a diagnosis of CD, compared with in 12/786 pregnancies to women with undiagnosed CD (adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=1.37; 95% CI=0.78-2.43; p=0.276) and in 0/212 pregnancies to women with diagnosed CD (AOR=0.06; 95% CI=0.00-8.94; p=0.277) (ORs adjusted for maternal age, parity, nationality and calendar period). Repeated episodes of UTI before the current pregnancy: among 692,991 women who had never had a diagnosis of CD, 74,776 reported repeated episodes of UTI, compared with 14/101 women with undiagnosed CD (AOR=1.39; 95% CI=0.79-2.45; p=0.255) and 69/566 women with diagnosed CD (AOR=1.02; 95% CI=0.79-1.32; p=0.864) (ORs adjusted for maternal age, parity, nationality, calendar period and civil status). Adjustment for smoking in a subset of patients with available data did not change the risk estimates. It cannot be ruled out that undiagnosed CD in pregnant women is associated with a small, increased risk of UTI. In pregnant women with diagnosed CD, there seems to be no

  6. [Impact of pharmaceutical interventions on antibiotic therapy of urinary tract infections in rehabilitation center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochefolle, A; Maison, O; Chazaud, C; Rioufol, C; Rode, G; Luaute, J; Jacquin-Courtois, S; Guinet-Lacoste, A; Carré, E

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of medico-pharmaceutical partnership on the quality of antibiotic treatment in urinary tract infection (UTI) within rehabilitation center. All antibiotic prescriptions were validated by the pharmacist at the start of treatment and twice a week. All patients with symptomatic urinary tract infection between January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 were included in this study. Addition to awareness among specifiers to promoting the appropriate use of antibiotics, the pharmacist suggested pharmaceutical interventions (PI) in order to improve the quality of antibiotic treatments. At the same time, 3 quality indicators (QI) were followed: duration, dosage, antibiotic susceptibility. The compliance rates of this 3 QI allowed to assess the quality of the antibiotic treatment in urinary tract infection. The study population included 154 patients corresponding to 252 UTI. Sixty-eight PI were made by pharmacist about urinary tract infection treatment (overdosage or under-dosing, duration unknown, inadequate route of administration). These QI achieved 96.4% compliance with duration, 98.8% compliance with dosage and 99.2% with the antibiotic susceptibility. This study allowed showing the medico-pharmaceutical impact on the quality of antibiotic treatments in UTI. The awareness among specifiers with a daily validation of prescription by the pharmacist allowed to improve urinary tract infections care in rehabilitation center. 4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in kidney and lower urinary tract development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kenneth A; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Bates, Carlton M

    2016-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) and FGF ligands are highly expressed in the developing kidney and lower urinary tract. Several classic studies showed many effects of exogenous FGF ligands on embryonic renal tissues in vitro and in vivo. Another older landmark publication showed that mice with a dominant negative Fgfr fragment had severe renal dysplasia. Together, these studies revealed the importance of FGFR signaling in kidney and lower urinary tract development. With the advent of modern gene targeting techniques, including conditional knockout approaches, several publications have revealed critical roles for FGFR signaling in many lineages of the kidney and lower urinary tract at different stages of development. FGFR signaling has been shown to be critical for early metanephric mesenchymal patterning, Wolffian duct patterning including induction of the ureteric bud, ureteric bud branching morphogenesis, nephron progenitor survival and nephrogenesis, and bladder mesenchyme patterning. FGFRs pattern these tissues by interacting with many other growth factor signaling pathways. Moreover, the many genetic Fgfr and Fgf animal models have structural defects mimicking numerous congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract seen in humans. Finally, many studies have shown how FGFR signaling is critical for kidney and lower urinary tract patterning in humans.

  8. MR urography versus retrograde pyelography/ureteroscopy for the exclusion of upper urinary tract malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.S., E-mail: kslee@bidmc.harvard.ed [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Zeikus, E. [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); DeWolf, W.C. [Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Rofsky, N.M.; Pedrosa, I. [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Aim: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance urography (MRU) versus retrograde pyelography and/or ureteroscopy (RPU) in the detection of upper urinary tract neoplasms. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 35 patients with suspected upper urinary tract malignancy who underwent MRU and RPU within 6-months in our institution during the study period (February 2002 to January 2007). MRU and RPU reports were reviewed and results recorded. For each patient, the urinary tract was sub-divided into four regions for analysis: left kidney/renal pelvis, left ureter, right kidney/renal pelvis, and right ureter. MRU and RPU results for each patient were compared to a reference standard and the diagnostic performance of both techniques was compared. Results: A total of 113 regions were analysed on MRU and 90 regions on RPU. Nineteen neoplasms were identified. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for the detection of urinary tract neoplasms were 63, 91, 60, and 92% for MRU, respectively, and 53, 97, 83, and 88% for RPU, respectively. These differences were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion: The high negative predictive value of MRU in the present series supports its use as a non-invasive screening examination for excluding the presence of upper urinary tract malignancy.

  9. Treatment outcomes of oral sitafloxacin in acute complicated urinary tract infection and pyelonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manosuthi, Weerawat; Wiboonchutikul, Surasak

    2016-01-01

    Data on the success rate of sitafloxacin treatment in acute complicated urinary tract infection and pyelonephritis are limited. To determine the success rate of a new oral fluoroquinolone, sitafloxacin, in acute complicated urinary tract infection and pyelonephritis. A prospective study of 30 patients who were diagnosed with acute complicated urinary tract infection and pyelonephritis was conducted. Oral sitafloxacin 50 mg twice a day was given for 7 days. All patients were followed up at baseline, day 7, and day 14. The patient sample included 67 % females; the mean ± SD age was 49 ± 13 years. Twenty-one (70 %) patients had acute pyelonephritis and 9 (30 %) had complicated urinary tract infections. Twenty-two patients were positive for uropathogens. The most frequently isolated pathogen was E. coli 11 non-extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing and 5 ESBL-producing strains. Of the 22 isolated uropathogens, 19 (86 %) isolates were sensitive to sitafloxacin. At day 14, 29 of 30 (97 %) were clinically cured and 21 of 22 (95 %) were microbiologically cured. No patients discontinued sitafloxacin due to adverse events. These results support the use of oral sitafloxacin in complicated urinary tract infections and acute pyelonephritis. However, further larger studies are required to confirm these results.

  10. An Investigation of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Women Aged 40 and Over.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, Neziha; Oskay, Umran

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and associated risk factors in women aged 40 years and over. The study was carried out with a total of 312 women. The data were collected between 1 January 2009 and 30 July 2010. As research instruments, an interview form of 19 questions that questioned personal characteristics and was developed by researchers, and the Bristol Female Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (BFLUTS) Questionnaire evaluating lower urinary tract symptoms were used. Linear regression analysis was used to detect associated risk factors. The rates of urgency, urinary incontinence, nocturia, and frequency symptoms were 61.5, 52.2, 18.9, and 25%, respectively. BFLUTS total scores increased with age, but the present study has detected no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05). BFLUTS scores of the women demonstrated statistically significant differences according to several risk factors including menopause status (P = 0.03), presence of chronic illness (P = 0.000), medicine use (P = 0.000), recurrent urinary tract infections (P = 0.000), body mass index (BMI) (P = 0.004), delivery number (P = 0.005) and chronic constipation (P = 0.002). Multiple linear regression analysis determined that frequent urinary tract infections, presence of chronic illness, chronic constipation, BMI and number of deliveries were significantly related to LUTS development. The most common LUTS was urgency in women aged 40 years and older. Recurrent urinary tract infection was determined as the most significant risk factor for LUTS, followed by chronic illness, chronic constipation, higher BMI and parity. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Escherichia coli Isolates Causing Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Catheterized and Noncatheterized Individuals Possess Similar Virulence Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watts, Rebecca E; Hancock, Viktoria; Ong, Cheryl-lynn Y

    2010-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common infectious diseases of humans, with Escherichia coli being responsible for >80% of all cases. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) occurs when bacteria colonize the urinary tract without causing clinical symptoms and can affect both catheterized...

  12. Anatomo-pathological and epidemiological analysis of urinary tract lesions in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina da Fonseca Sapin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: In dogs, diseases of the urinary tract are common and can be caused by disorders of varied etiology. The objective of this study was to classify qualitatively and quantitatively urinary tract lesions of 363 dogs, which were classified according to its anatomical distribution and etiology. The data was obtained from the revision of 36 years of protocols from the Regional Laboratory of Diagnosis (LRD/UFPel and it represents 4.0% of diagnoses from a total of 8980 for that period and species. Renal injury accounted for 93.1% of cases, with 309 being primary kidney lesions; from which the main lesions were the tubulointerstitial nephritis (142 cases often associated with Leptospirosis (47. Injuries of lower urinary tract accounted for 6.9% of the cases where acute cystitis stands out (19. In this study, renal failure, acute or chronic, represented an important cause of death in dogs.

  13. Long-Term Lithium Use and Risk of Renal and Upper Urinary Tract Cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Hallas, Jesper; Jensen, Boye L

    2015-01-01

    stratified by stage and subtype of upper urinary tract cancer revealed slight but nonsignificant increases in the ORs for localized disease (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.8-3.0) and for renal pelvis/ureter cancers (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 0.5-5.4). In conclusion, in our nationwide case-control study, use of lithium......Lithium induces proliferation in the epithelium of renal collecting ducts. A recent small-scale cohort study reported a strong association between use of lithium and increased risk of renal neoplasia. We therefore conducted a large-scale pharmacoepidemiologic study of the association between long......-term use of lithium and risk of upper urinary tract cancer, including renal cell cancer and cancers of the renal pelvis or ureter. We identified all histologically verified upper urinary tract cancer cases in Denmark between 2000 and 2012 from the Danish Cancer Registry. A total of 6477 cases were matched...

  14. Evidence of the Impact of Diet, Fluid Intake, Caffeine, Alcohol and Tobacco on Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Catherine S; Erickson, Bradley A; Messersmith, Emily E; Pelletier-Cameron, Anne; Lai, H Henry; Kreder, Karl J; Yang, Claire C; Merion, Robert M; Bavendam, Tamara G; Kirkali, Ziya

    2017-11-01

    Diet, fluid intake and caffeine, alcohol and tobacco use may have effects on lower urinary tract symptoms. Constructive changes in these modifiable nonurological factors are suggested to improve lower urinary tract symptoms. To better understand the relationship between nonurological factors and lower urinary tract symptoms, we performed a systematic literature review to examine, grade and summarize reported associations between lower urinary tract symptoms and diet, fluid intake and caffeine, tobacco and alcohol use. We performed PubMed® searches for eligible articles providing evidence on associations between 1 or more nonurological factors and lower urinary tract symptoms. A modified Oxford scale was used to grade the evidence. We reviewed 111 articles addressing diet (28 studies), fluid intake (21) and caffeine (21), alcohol (26) and tobacco use (44). The evidence grade was generally low (6% level 1, 24% level 2, 11% level 3 and 59% level 4). Fluid intake and caffeine use were associated with urinary frequency and urgency in men and women. Modest alcohol use was associated with decreased likelihood of benign prostatic hyperplasia diagnosis and reduced lower urinary tract symptoms in men. Associations between lower urinary tract symptoms and ingestion of certain foods and tobacco were inconsistent. Evidence of associations between lower urinary tract symptoms and diet, fluid intake and caffeine, alcohol and tobacco use is sparse and mostly observational. However, there is evidence of associations between increased fluid and caffeine intake and urinary frequency/urgency, and between modest alcohol intake and decreased benign prostatic hyperplasia diagnosis and lower urinary tract symptoms. Given the importance of these nonurological factors in daily life, and their perceived impact on lower urinary tract symptoms, higher quality evidence is needed. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  15. Prevalence of urinary tract symptoms in women with diabetes mellitus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jiménez-Rodríguez, Javier; Carbajal-Ramírez, Angélica; Meza-Vázquez, Héctor; Moreno-Palacios, Jorge; Serrano-Brambila, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    .... A cohort of women from the DiabetIMSS program was evaluated from January 2011 to 2013. The personal history, time of DM diagnosis, neuropathy, urinary symptoms, glycemic control and quality of life impact were noted...

  16. Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: Outcomes following a Conservative Management Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Robert A; Pisansky, Andrew; Fleck, Joseph; Hoversten, Patrick; Cotter, Katherine J; Katorski, Jenna; Liberman, Daniel; Elliott, Sean P

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral palsy is characterized by motor impairment following injury to the developing brain. Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction is estimated to affect at least a third of children with cerebral palsy. However there are limited data as patients transition to adulthood. We sought to describe the symptoms, sequelae and management of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction in adults with cerebral palsy. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of adult patients with cerebral palsy between 2011 and 2014. Patients with prior bladder reconstruction or catheterization based bladder drainage were excluded from study. Cerebral palsy severity was determined using GMFCS (Gross Motor Function Classification System). A conservative evaluation and treatment paradigm was used. Noninvasive treatments were encouraged. Specifically clean intermittent catheterization, which is often not feasible, is avoided unless urinary retention, hydronephrosis or refractory lower urinary tract symptoms develop. There were 121 patients included in final analysis. Median age was 25 and 61 patients (50%) had GMFCS level V. Noninvasive management failed in 28 of 121 patients (23%) as defined by hydronephrosis in 9, persistent urinary retention in 10 and refractory lower urinary tract symptoms/incontinence in 9. Urethral clean intermittent catheterization was poorly tolerated. Of all patients 25% showed evidence of urolithiasis during the study period. Surgical intervention was rare and associated with significant morbidity. Adults with cerebral palsy may present with variable signs and symptoms of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. Conservative treatment was successful in more than 75% of patients. Clean intermittent catheterization was poorly tolerated in patients in whom conservative treatment failed. Surgical intervention was rarely indicated and it should be reserved for select individuals. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc

  17. Changes in Bacterial Resistance Patterns of Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections and Rationale for Empirical Antibiotic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçe, İbrahim; Çiçek, Neslihan; Güven, Serçin; Altuntaş, Ülger; Bıyıklı, Neşe; Yıldız, Nurdan; Alpay, Harika

    2017-09-29

    The causative agent spectrum and resistance patterns of urinary tract infections in children are affected by many factors. To demonstrate antibiotic resistance in urinary tract infections and changing ratio in antibiotic resistance by years. Retrospective cross-sectional study. We analysed antibiotic resistance patterns of isolated Gram (-) bacteria during the years 2011-2014 (study period 2) in children with urinary tract infections. We compared these findings with data collected in the same centre in 2001-2003 (study period 1). Four hundred and sixty-five uncomplicated community-acquired Gram (-) urinary tract infections were analysed from 2001-2003 and 400 from 2011-2014. Sixty-one percent of patients were female (1.5 girls : 1 boy). The mean age of children included in the study was 3 years and 9 months. Escherichia coli was the predominant bacteria isolated during both periods of the study (60% in study period 1 and 73% in study period 2). Bacteria other than E. coli demonstrated a higher level of resistance to all of the antimicrobials except trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole than E. coli bacteria during the years 2011-2014. In our study, we found increasing resistance trends of urinary pathogens for cefixime (from 1% to 15%, pUrinary pathogens showed a decreasing trend for nitrofurantoin (from 17% to 7%, p=0.0001). No significant trends were detected for ampicillin (from 69% to 71%), amoxicillin-clavulanate (from 44% to 43%), cefazolin (from 39% to 32%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (from 32% to 31%), cefuroxime (from 21% to 18%) and ceftriaxone (from 10% to 14%) between the two periods (p>0.05). In childhood urinary tract infections, antibiotic resistance should be evaluated periodically and empiric antimicrobial therapy should be decided according to antibiotic sensitivity results.

  18. Urinary tract injuries during cesarean section in patients with morbid placental adherence: retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanwar, Ahmed; Al-Sayed, Helmy M; Ibrahim, Ahmed M; Elkotb, Ahmed M; Abdelshafy, Ahmed; Abdelhadi, Rasha; Abbas, Ahmed M; Abdelmenam, Hend S; Fares, Tamer; Nossair, Wael; Abdallah, Ameer A; Sabaa, Haitham; Nawara, Maii

    2017-12-03

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the cases of lower urinary tract injuries during cesarean section with or without hysterectomy in cases with morbid placental adherence. This record based retrospective study was conducted at Ain Shams University Maternity Hospital in Cairo, Egypt during the period between January 2014 and December 2016. It included all patients who had urinary tract injuries during cesarean section with or without hysterectomy in the cases with morbid placental adherence and they were collected from files of pregnant women who were admitted at hospital planned for termination of pregnancy. Patients were enrolled in four groups, Group 1: cases without urinary tract injuries. Group 2: cases with injuries to the bladder. Group 3: cases with injuries of the ureter. Group 4: cases with injuries to the bladder and ureter. This study gave us new information about the incidence of urinary tract injuries during cesarean section with morbid adherence placenta was 21.7% (Bladder 11.7%, Ureter 4.7%, and bladder with ureter 5.3%). There were various types of repair of urinary tract injury, as the following, bladder repair 10.8%, ureteric catheterization 0.9%, ureterovesical repair or reimplantation 1.5%, bladder repair and ureterovesical 1.2%, bladder repair and ureteric catheterization 2.3%, ureteric catheterization and ureterovesical 1.5 and 6.4% of cases needed urologic consultations. There is a real relation between urinary tract injury and obesity (55.3%). Bladder invasion was found in only 26.9% of all cases according to sonography findings. Most of the cases were delivered by cesarean section in 67.5%, and the remainders were delivered by cesarean hysterectomy 32.5%. About 96.5% of cases needed a blood transfusion. The morbid adherent placenta is still a challenge, which faces us as obstetricians, due to high morbidity and mortality. A multidisciplinary team is mandatory to avoid complications.

  19. Urinary tract infection in full-term newborn infants: risk factor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falcão Mário Cícero

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the correlation of risk factors to the occurrence of urinary tract infection in full-term newborn infants. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrospective study (1997 including full-term infants having a positive urine culture by bag specimen. Urine collection was based on: fever, weight loss > 10% of birth weight, nonspecific symptoms (feeding intolerance, failure to thrive, hypoactivity, debilitate suction, irritability, or renal and urinary tract malformations. In these cases, another urine culture by suprapubic bladder aspiration was collected to confirm the diagnosis. To compare and validate the risk factors in each group, the selected cases were divided into two groups: Group I - positive urine culture by bag specimen collection and negative urine culture by suprapubic aspiration, and Group II - positive urine culture by bag specimen collection and positive urine culture by suprapubic aspiration . RESULTS: Sixty one infants were studied, Group I, n = 42 (68.9% and Group II, n = 19 (31.1%. The selected risk factors (associated infectious diseases, use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, renal and urinary tract malformations, mechanical ventilation, parenteral nutrition and intravascular catheter were more frequent in Group II (p<0.05. Through relative risk analysis, risk factors were, in decreasing importance: parenteral nutrition, intravascular catheter, associated infectious diseases, use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, mechanical ventilation, and renal and urinary tract malformations. CONCLUSION: The results showed that parenteral nutrition, intravascular catheter, and associated infectious diseases contributed to increase the frequency of neonatal urinary tract infection, and in the presence of more than one risk factor, the occurrence of urinary tract infection rose up to 11 times.

  20. Intravesical gentamicin for recurrent urinary tract infection in patients with intermittent bladder catheterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nieuwkoop, C; den Exter, P L; Elzevier, H W; den Hartigh, J; van Dissel, J T

    2010-12-01

    Clean intermittent catheterisation (CIC) of the bladder is used to imitate normal bladder emptying in patients with bladder dysfunction. CIC is associated with urinary tract infection (UTI) that may be difficult to treat in the case of antimicrobial resistance. The aim of this study was to establish the effect and safety of intravesical gentamicin treatment in such settings. In 2009, intravesical gentamicin treatment was started in selected patients. Here we describe our experience with two patients treated until March 2010. Two patients using CIC suffering recurrent UTI with multiresistant Escherichia coli were treated with daily administration of 80 mg intravesical gentamicin. On treatment they appeared asymptomatic. During 8- and 9-month follow-up they were free of UTI, urine cultures were negative and there were no side effects. A systematic review was conducted through searches of PubMed and other databases. Clinical trials that met the eligibility criteria and displayed the efficacy or safety of intravesical aminoglycoside treatment in patients using CIC were studied. Study selection was performed by two independent reviewers. Eight studies were included for review. Owing to study heterogeneity, a meta-analysis could not be performed. Of four controlled studies using neomycin or kanamycin, two demonstrated a significant reduction in bacteriuria, whilst two other trials did not. One case series on neomycin/polymyxin showed that the majority of patients still developed bacteriuria. Three case series using gentamicin all pointed towards a significant reduction in bacteriuria and UTIs. There were no clinically relevant side effects reported but follow-up in all studies was limited. Although data are limited, intravesical treatment with gentamicin might be a reasonable treatment option in selected patients practicing CIC who suffer recurrent UTIs with highly resistant microorganisms. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy

  1. Impact of polymicrobial biofilms in catheter-associated urinary tract infections

    OpenAIRE

    Azevedo, AS; Almeida, C; L. F. Melo; Azevedo, NF

    2017-01-01

    Recent reports have demonstrated that most biofilms involved in catheter-associated urinary tract infections are polymicrobial communities, with pathogenic microorganisms (e.g. Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae) and uncommon microorganisms (e.g. Delftia tsuruhatensis, Achromobacter xylosoxidans) frequently co-inhabiting the same urinary catheter. However, little is known about the interactions that occur between different microorganisms and how they impact biofil...

  2. Hemangioma of the prostate--an unusual cause of lower urinary tract symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serizawa, Reza R; Nørgaard, Nis; Horn, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hemangioma of the prostate gland is extremely rare and only a few cases have been reported. There have been several cases of hemangioma of posterior urethra, urinary bladder and periprostatic plexus in the literature, all presenting with hematuria or hematospermia. Diagnosis of prostatic hemangio...... is difficult due to its rarity and unspecific symptoms such as hematuria, hematospermia or lower urinary tract symptoms. It cannot be detected by conventional examinations such as cystoscopy or standard rectal ultrasonography....

  3. Hemangioma of the prostate--an unusual cause of lower urinary tract symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serizawa, Reza R; Nørgaard, Nis; Horn, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hemangioma of the prostate gland is extremely rare and only a few cases have been reported. There have been several cases of hemangioma of posterior urethra, urinary bladder and periprostatic plexus in the literature, all presenting with hematuria or hematospermia. Diagnosis of prostatic hemangioma...... is difficult due to its rarity and unspecific symptoms such as hematuria, hematospermia or lower urinary tract symptoms. It cannot be detected by conventional examinations such as cystoscopy or standard rectal ultrasonography....

  4. CorynebacteriulTI group D2 urinary tract infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biochemical features of the CGD2 organism iso- lated are compared with previously reponed data8. (Table I). The API Coryne profile of 2001004 identi- fied the organism as belonging to CGD2,' which is a factor in cases of asymptomatic bacteraemia, uncom- plicated cystitis, encrusted cystitis, pyelonephritis, bac-.

  5. Oral immunotherapy of recurrent urinary tract infections: a double-blind placebo-controlled multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, C C; Corbusier, A; Michiels, H; Taenzer, H J

    1993-09-01

    We treated 166 patients suffering from recurrent urinary tract infections under double-blind conditions for 3 months with 1 capsule daily of either the immunostimulating bacterial extract (85) or a placebo (81), followed by a 3-month observation period without the test drugs. The bacterial extract exerted a significant beneficial curative action and long-term consolidative effect on the frequency of recurrent urinary tract infections with marked improvements in the characteristic signs and symptoms. It was significantly superior to placebo for the majority of the assessed parameters: number of recurrent urinary tract infections, bacteriuria, leukocyturia, erythrocyturia, nitrituria, albuminuria and casts in urine. Consumption of antibiotics, chemotherapeutics, urinary antiseptics or disinfectants was significantly less under active drug therapy compared to placebo. Tolerance was good with only 2 side effects reported in 2 patients (2%) in the active group compared to 11 among 5 (6%) in the placebo group. Therefore, the bacterial extract can be considered an efficient and well tolerated drug for the treatment of urinary tract infections, and their accompanying signs and symptoms, as well as for decreasing the risk of recurrences and the need for antibiotics and other antibacterial drugs.

  6. DIAGNOSIS OF CULTURE POSITIVE URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS AND THEIR ANTIMICROBIAL SENSITIVITY PROFILE IN TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prince Sreekumar Pius

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Urinary tract infection is very common all over the world and in India more than 10 million cases are reported per year. It is one of the common infections diagnosed in the outpatients as well as the hospitalised patients. Empirical treatment of community acquired urinary tract infections are determined by the antibiotic sensitivity in a population. This study was conducted to determine the antimicrobial sensitivity amongst the uropathogens to help establish local guidelines on treatment of urinary tract infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this study, we collected 1306 samples from patients in whom we suspected to have urinary tract infection based on clinical signs and symptoms (e.g. with fever (greater than 38°C without another explanation or from a patient who had at least one urinary symptom (dysuria, urgency, frequency, or suprapubic pain or tenderness in our hospital during January 2016-June 2016. RESULTS Urine cultures were positive for 18% of the patients. Among these cultures, Klebsiella pneumonia (41%, Escherichia coli (35% and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (7% were the common organisms found. Highest antimicrobial sensitivity amongst these pathogens was found with cefoperazone/sulbactam and amikacin. CONCLUSION Cefoperazone/sulbactam and amikacin were the highly sensitive systemic antibiotics while ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin were the sensitive oral antibiotics in our locality.

  7. Risk Factors for Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infections in a Pediatric Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nora G; Marchalik, Daniel; Lipsky, Andrew; Rushton, H Gil; Pohl, Hans G; Song, Xiaoyan

    2016-04-01

    Catheter associated urinary tract infections are an essential measure for health care quality improvement that affects reimbursement through hospital acquired condition reduction programs in adult patients. With the mounting importance of preventing such infections we evaluated risk factors for acquiring catheter associated urinary tract infections in pediatric patients. All catheter associated urinary tract infections were identified at 1 pediatric institution from September 2010 to August 2014 from a prospective database maintained by the infection control office. To identify risk factors patients with a catheter associated urinary tract infection were individually matched to control patients with a urinary catheter but without infection by age, gender, date and the hospital location of the infection in 1:2 fashion. A total of 50 patients with catheter associated urinary tract infection were identified and matched to 100 control patients. Compared to controls the patients with infection were more likely to have a catheter in place for longer (2.9 days, OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.01, 1.15, p = 0.02). They were also more likely to be on contact precautions (OR 4.00, 95% CI 1.73, 9.26, p = 0.001), and have concurrent infections (OR 3.04, 95% CI 1.39, 6.28, p = 0.005) and a history of catheterization (OR 3.24, 95% CI 1.55, 6.77, p = 0.002). Using a conditional multivariate regression model the 3 most predictive variables were duration of catheter drainage, contact isolation status and history of catheterization. Longer duration of urinary catheter drainage, positive contact precautions status and a history of catheterization appear to be associated with a higher risk of catheter associated urinary tract infection in hospitalized pediatric patients. Physicians should attempt to decrease the duration of catheterization, especially in patients who meet these criteria, to minimize the risk of catheter associated urinary tract infection. Copyright © 2016 American Urological

  8. [Complete lower urinary tract duplication with true diphallia associated to anorrectal and neural malformations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirao, M J; Zambudio, G; Nortes, L; Jiménez, J I Ruiz

    2008-10-01

    We report a case of complete urinary tract duplication with true diphallia associated to intestinal and neural anomalies. Complete penile duplication with hypospadias and bifidum scrotum were showed. Moreover, he had got anorrectal disease (anterior anus) and neural tube defects (myelomeningocele). Radiological and functional studies were performed and complete duplication lower urinary tract with coordinate miction were found. Combined surgical approach were used: perineal to remove lateralized and hypospadic penile and abdominal for cystoplasty. We report a case due to the extremely low prevalence. Only 15 cases have been described in the literature.

  9. An Urethral Stone Mimicking Urinary Tract Infection in a Twenty-six-month-old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Giray Sönmez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 26-month-old boy, who was misdiagnosed with urinary tract infection, was admitted to our hospital with increasing complaints of uneasiness, vomiting and nausea. On physical examination, a urethral stone was suspected and was confirmed by plain urinary tract x-ray. In children, the clinical features of a urethral stone may be overlooked because children are not able to express their complaints fully. Therefore, a detailed and careful physical examination is of great importance. In this paper, we present the rare case of urethral stone in a child and a review of the literature.

  10. Urinary tract infection and enuresis in children with chronic functional constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Basiratnia, Mitra; Matin, Marzieh; Hamidpour, Laleh; Haghighat, Mahmood; Imanieh, Mohammad Hadi

    2013-09-01

    There is still controversy regarding the possible role of chronic functional constipation in disorders of the urinary tract, specifically urinary tract infection (UTI) and enuresis. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of (UTI) and enuresis in children with chronic functional constipation. We included 120 children (60.8% girls) with chronic functional constipation based on the Rome III criteria. Detailed history of UTI and enuresis or symptoms pointing to these diagnoses was obtained. Urinalysis, urine culture, and abdominal ultrasonography were performed for all of the participants. The mean age of the patients was 7.4 ± 3.2 years. Seventy-five percent of the patients had constipation for more than 1 year. The most common urinary symptoms were dysuria (16.7%), urinary frequency (12.5%), and dribbling (4.2%). The frequencies of nocturnal and daytime enuresis were 22.5% and 3.3%, respectively. Pyuria was seen in 10 girls (8.3%). Overall, 7 patients (5.8 %) had a positive urine culture, of whom all were girls and 6 had pyuria. Urinary tract ultrasonography was normal in these patients. Urinary symptoms, especially nocturnal enuresis, were found in a significant number of children who had chronic functional constipation, but UTI was not so common in the present study. Therefore, we suggest that nocturnal enuresis be considered in children with chronic functional constipation, but screening for UTI is not recommended in these patients.

  11. Vitamin D-deficient mice have more invasive urinary tract infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olof Hertting

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency is a common health problem with consequences not limited to bone and calcium hemostasis. Low levels have also been linked to tuberculosis and other respiratory infections as well as autoimmune diseases. We have previously shown that supplementation with vitamin D can induce the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin during ex vivo infection of human urinary bladder. In rodents, however, cathelicidin expression is not linked to vitamin D and therefore this vitamin D-related effect fighting bacterial invasion is not relevant. To determine if vitamin D had further protective mechanisms during urinary tract infections, we therefore used a mouse model. In vitamin D-deficient mice, we detected more intracellular bacterial communities in the urinary bladder, higher degree of bacterial spread to the upper urinary tract and a skewed cytokine response. Furthermore, we show that the vitamin D receptor was upregulated in the urinary bladder and translocated into the cell nucleus after E. coli infection. This study supports a more general role for vitamin D as a local immune response mediator in the urinary tract.

  12. Vitamin D-deficient mice have more invasive urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertting, Olof; Lüthje, Petra; Sullivan, Devin; Aspenström, Pontus; Brauner, Annelie

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is a common health problem with consequences not limited to bone and calcium hemostasis. Low levels have also been linked to tuberculosis and other respiratory infections as well as autoimmune diseases. We have previously shown that supplementation with vitamin D can induce the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin during ex vivo infection of human urinary bladder. In rodents, however, cathelicidin expression is not linked to vitamin D and therefore this vitamin D-related effect fighting bacterial invasion is not relevant. To determine if vitamin D had further protective mechanisms during urinary tract infections, we therefore used a mouse model. In vitamin D-deficient mice, we detected more intracellular bacterial communities in the urinary bladder, higher degree of bacterial spread to the upper urinary tract and a skewed cytokine response. Furthermore, we show that the vitamin D receptor was upregulated in the urinary bladder and translocated into the cell nucleus after E. coli infection. This study supports a more general role for vitamin D as a local immune response mediator in the urinary tract.

  13. Interplay between bladder microbiota and urinary antimicrobial peptides: mechanisms for human urinary tract infection risk and symptom severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhouse, Vanessa; Gao, Xiang; Dong, Qunfeng; Nelson, David E; Toh, Evelyn; McKinley, Kathleen; Schreckenberger, Paul; Shibata, Noriko; Fok, Cynthia S; Mueller, Elizabeth R; Brubaker, Linda; Wolfe, Alan J; Radek, Katherine A

    2014-01-01

    Resident bacterial communities (microbiota) and host antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are both essential components of normal host innate immune responses that limit infection and pathogen induced inflammation. However, their interdependence has not been investigated in the context of urinary tract infection (UTI) susceptibility. Here, we explored the interrelationship between the urinary microbiota and host AMP responses as mechanisms for UTI risk. Using prospectively collected day of surgery (DOS) urine specimens from female pelvic floor surgery participants, we report that the relative abundance and/or frequency of specific urinary microbiota distinguished between participants who did or did not develop a post-operative UTI. Furthermore, UTI risk significantly correlated with both specific urinary microbiota and β-defensin AMP levels. Finally, urinary AMP hydrophobicity and protease activity were greater in participants who developed UTI, and correlated positively with both UTI risk and pelvic floor symptoms. These data demonstrate an interdependency between the urinary microbiota, AMP responses and symptoms, and identify a potential mechanism for UTI risk. Assessment of bacterial microbiota and host innate immune AMP responses in parallel may identify increased risk of UTI in certain populations.

  14. Interplay between bladder microbiota and urinary antimicrobial peptides: mechanisms for human urinary tract infection risk and symptom severity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Nienhouse

    Full Text Available Resident bacterial communities (microbiota and host antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are both essential components of normal host innate immune responses that limit infection and pathogen induced inflammation. However, their interdependence has not been investigated in the context of urinary tract infection (UTI susceptibility. Here, we explored the interrelationship between the urinary microbiota and host AMP responses as mechanisms for UTI risk. Using prospectively collected day of surgery (DOS urine specimens from female pelvic floor surgery participants, we report that the relative abundance and/or frequency of specific urinary microbiota distinguished between participants who did or did not develop a post-operative UTI. Furthermore, UTI risk significantly correlated with both specific urinary microbiota and β-defensin AMP levels. Finally, urinary AMP hydrophobicity and protease activity were greater in participants who developed UTI, and correlated positively with both UTI risk and pelvic floor symptoms. These data demonstrate an interdependency between the urinary microbiota, AMP responses and symptoms, and identify a potential mechanism for UTI risk. Assessment of bacterial microbiota and host innate immune AMP responses in parallel may identify increased risk of UTI in certain populations.

  15. EFFECTS OF 2,3,7,8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD) ON FETAL MOUSE URINARY TRACT EPITHELIUM IN VITRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), produces hydronephrosis by altering the differentiation and proliferation of ureteric epithelial cells in the embryonic C57BL/6N mouse urinary tract. This study examines the effects of TCDD on late gestation fetal urinary tract cells u...

  16. Hospitalization for community-acquired febrile urinary tract infection: Validation and impact assessment of a clinical prediction rule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalenhoef, J.E. (Janneke E.); van der Starre, W.E. (Willize E.); A. Vollaard (Albert); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); Delfos, N.M. (Nathalie M.); E.M.S. Leyten (Eliane M. S.); Koster, T. (Ted); Ablij, H.C. (Hans C.); J.W. van 't Wout (Jan ); J.T. van Dissel (Jaap); C. van Nieuwkoop (Cees)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: There is a lack of severity assessment tools to identify adults presenting with febrile urinary tract infection (FUTI) at risk for complicated outcome and guide admission policy. We aimed to validate the Prediction Rule for Admission policy in Complicated urinary Tract

  17. Assessment of lower urinary tract function in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Atsuko; Kondoh, Tatsuro; Noguchi, Mitsuru; Hatada, Teppei; Tohbu, Shohei; Mori, Ken-Ichi; Matsuo, Manabu; Kunitsugu, Ichiro; Kanetake, Hiroshi; Moriuchi, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-01

    Despite the fact that functional lower urinary tract symptoms are common among people with Down syndrome (DS), their voiding function has not been studied precisely. Our goal was to assess the lower urinary tract functions in DS. Fifty-five DS children aged 5-15 years old and 35 age-matched control children were evaluated by ultrasonography and uroflowmetry. Eleven (20%) DS children had no uresiesthesia, 21 (38%) were urinated under guidance, nine (16%) urinated fewer than three times a day, two (4%) urinated more than 10 times a day, three (5%) used diapers, and 26 (47%) had urinary incontinence. Seven (13%), 15 (27%), and 10 (18%) DS children had weak, prolonged and intermittent urination, respectively, and seven (13%) had urination with straining. In contrast, none of the control subjects had urinary problems. In the uroflowmetrical analysis, 10 (18%), 20 (37%), 11 (20%) and five (9%) DS children showed "bell-shaped," "plateau," "staccato" and "interrupted" patterns, respectively; the remaining nine (16%) could not be analyzed. In contrast, 21 (60%), one (3%), four (11%), three (9%) and two (6%) control subjects showed bell-shaped, tower-shaped, plateau, staccato and interrupted patterns, respectively; the remaining four (11%) could not be analyzed. Residual urine was demonstrated in four (7%) DS children and one (3%) control child. Lower urinary tract symptoms and abnormal uroflowmetry findings, which can lead to further progressive renal and urinary disorders, are common in DS children. Therefore, lower urinary tract functions should be assessed at the life-long regular medical check-ups for subjects with DS. © 2014 The Authors. Pediatrics International published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japan Pediatric Society.

  18. Cross-sectional imaging of complicated urinary infections affecting the lower tract and male genital organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonolini, Massimo; Ippolito, Sonia

    2016-10-01

    Complicated urinary tract infections (C-UTIs) are those associated with structural or functional genitourinary abnormalities or with conditions that impair the host defence mechanisms, leading to an increased risk of acquiring infection or failing therapy. C-UTIs occur in patients with risk factors such as neurogenic dysfunction, bladder outlet obstruction, obstructive uropathy, bladder catheterisation, urologic instrumentation or indwelling stent, urinary tract post-surgical modifications, chemotherapy- or radiation-induced damage, renal impairment, diabetes and immunodeficiency.Multidetector CT and MRI allow comprehensive investigation of C-UTIs and systemic infection from an unknown source. Based upon personal experience at a tertiary care hospital focused on the treatment of infectious illnesses, this pictorial essay reviews with examples the clinical features and cross-sectional imaging findings of C-UTIs affecting the lower urinary tract and male genital organs. The disorders presented include acute infectious cystitis, bladder mural abscesses, infections of the prostate and seminal vesicles, acute urethritis and related perineal abscesses, funiculitis, epididymo-orchitis and scrotal abscesses. Emphasis is placed on the possible differential diagnoses of lower C-UTIs.The aim is to provide radiologists greater familiarity with these potentially severe disorders which frequently require intensive in-hospital antibiotic therapy, percutaneous drainage or surgery. Teaching Points • Complicated urinary tract infections occur in patients with structural or functional risk factors.• CT and MRI comprehensively investigate complicated urinary infections and sepsis from unknown sources.• Infections of the urinary bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, urethra and scrotum are presented.• Emphasis is placed on differential diagnoses of complicated lower urogenital infections.• Unsuspected urinary infections may be detected on CT performed for other clinical

  19. Cross-sectional imaging of complicated urinary infections affecting the lower tract and male genital organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Tonolini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Complicated urinary tract infections (C-UTIs are those associated with structural or functional genitourinary abnormalities or with conditions that impair the host defence mechanisms, leading to an increased risk of acquiring infection or failing therapy. C-UTIs occur in patients with risk factors such as neurogenic dysfunction, bladder outlet obstruction, obstructive uropathy, bladder catheterisation, urologic instrumentation or indwelling stent, urinary tract post-surgical modifications, chemotherapy- or radiation-induced damage, renal impairment, diabetes and immunodeficiency. Multidetector CT and MRI allow comprehensive investigation of C-UTIs and systemic infection from an unknown source. Based upon personal experience at a tertiary care hospital focused on the treatment of infectious illnesses, this pictorial essay reviews with examples the clinical features and cross-sectional imaging findings of C-UTIs affecting the lower urinary tract and male genital organs. The disorders presented include acute infectious cystitis, bladder mural abscesses, infections of the prostate and seminal vesicles, acute urethritis and related perineal abscesses, funiculitis, epididymo-orchitis and scrotal abscesses. Emphasis is placed on the possible differential diagnoses of lower C-UTIs. The aim is to provide radiologists greater familiarity with these potentially severe disorders which frequently require intensive in-hospital antibiotic therapy, percutaneous drainage or surgery. Teaching Points • Complicated urinary tract infections occur in patients with structural or functional risk factors. • CT and MRI comprehensively investigate complicated urinary infections and sepsis from unknown sources. • Infections of the urinary bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, urethra and scrotum are presented. • Emphasis is placed on differential diagnoses of complicated lower urogenital infections. • Unsuspected urinary infections may be detected on CT

  20. Rising prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in urinary tract infections during pregnancy: Necessity for exploring newer treatment options

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    Meher Rizvi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary tract infections (UTI are one of the most common medical complications of pregnancy. The emergence of drug resistance and particularly the Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase production by Escherichia coli and methicillin resistance in Staphylococci, limits the choice of antimicrobials. Materials and Methods: Patients in different stages of pregnancy with or without symptoms of urinary tract infection attending the antenatal clinic of obstetrics and gynaecology were screened for significant bacteriuria, by standard loop method on 5% sheep blood agar and teepol lactose agar. Isolates were identified by using standard biochemical tests and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done using Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method. Results: A total of 4290 (51.2% urine samples from pregnant females showed growth on culture. Prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria 3210 (74.8% was higher than symptomatic UTI 1080 (25.2%. Escherichia coli was the most common pathogen accounting for 1800 (41.9% of the urinary isolates. Among the gram-positive cocci, coagulase negative species of Staphylococci 270 (6.4% were the most common pathogen. Significantly high resistance was shown by the gram negative bacilli as well as gram positive cocci to the β-lactam group of antimicrobials, flouroquinolones and aminoglycosides. Most alarming was the presence of ESBL in 846 (47% isolates of Escherichia coli and 344 (36.9% isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae, along with the presence of methicillin resistance in 41% of Staphylococcus species and high-level aminoglycoside resistance in 45(30% isolates of Enterococcus species. Glycopeptides and carbepenems were the only group of drugs to which all the strains of gram positive cocci and gram negative bacilli were uniformly sensitive, respectively. Conclusions: Regular screening should be done for the presence of symptomatic or asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy and specific guidelines should be issued for testing

  1. Urinary tract pathology in some Schistosoma haematobium infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The parasitological investigation assessing the ova of Schistosoma haematobium in urine of 138 volunteers in Ihieve-Ogben, Edo State, Nigeria revealed a prevalence of 43 (31.2%). Children had a higher prevalence of urinary schistosomiasis 30 (41.1%) than their adult counterparts 13 (20.0%). More volunteers had light ...

  2. Can the composition of the intestinal microbiota predict the development of urinary tract infections?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Heijer, Casper Dj; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Prins, Jan M.; Beerepoot, Marielle A. J.; Stobberingh, Ellen E.; Penders, John

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate whether intestinal microbiota predicts the development of new-onset urinary tract infections (UTIs) in postmenopausal women with prior recurrent UTIs (rUTIs). Fecal samples (n = 40) originated from women with rUTI who received 12 months' prophylaxis of either

  3. The association between lower urinary tract symptoms and sexual dysfunction: fact or fiction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Marleen; Skrekas, Thomas; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.

    2005-01-01

    Both lower urinary tract symptoms and sexual dysfunction are common conditions in aging men. In the past few years, increasing attention has been paid to the question of whether these conditions are associated in any way. The conventional belief of the majority of urologists so far has been that the

  4. Comparative effectiveness of antibiotics for uncomplicated urinary tract infections: Network meta-analysis of randomized trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knottnerus, Bart J.; Grigoryan, Larissa; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; Moll van Charante, Eric P.; Verheij, Theo J. M.; Kessels, Alphons G. H.; ter Riet, Gerben

    2012-01-01

    The efficacies and adverse effects of different antibiotics for uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) have been studied by standard meta-analytic methods using pairwise direct comparisons of antimicrobial treatments: the effects of one treatment are compared to those of either another

  5. Genital and urinary tract infections in diabetes: impact of pharmacologically-induced glucosuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerlings, Suzanne; Fonseca, Vivian; Castro-Diaz, David; List, James; Parikh, Shamik

    2014-01-01

    Predisposition to genital infections and urinary tract infections (UTIs) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) results from several factors such as glucosuria, adherence of bacteria to the uroepithelium and immune dysfunction. The tendency to develop these infections could be even higher in patients

  6. A clinical and molecular review of inverted papilloma of the urinary tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter Hjorth; Vainer, Ben; Hermann, Gregers Gautier

    2015-01-01

    Inverted papilloma (IP) of the urinary tract is classified by the World Health Organisation as a non-invasive urothelial tumour with normal to minimal cytological atypia of the neoplastic cells. During the 1980s, it came under suspicion of having a premalignant or malignant potential and of being...

  7. The Effect of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolates on the Urinary Tract Pathogens to Infants In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho Seok; Kim, Won Yong

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are common clinical problems in children, even though lots of treatment strategies have been tried. Many studies of the application of probiotics for urinary tract infection in female adults exist, but there is a lack of studies in children. The aims of this study were to screen probiotic strains for inhibiting the uropathogens in vitro, to find candidates for in vivo study. Nine strains of E. coli were isolated from children with urinary tract infection and six uropathogens were obtained from Korean Colletion for Type Cultures and American Type Culture Collection. Also 135 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains were isolated from healthy children, and were identified through physiologic, biochemical methods, 16S rDNA PCR, and data analysis. And with agar disk diffusion assay technique the antimicrobial activities of these LAB strains against those uropathogens were examined. Three strains of separated LAB strains demonstrated major antimicrobial activity against all the uropathogens. In the agar disk diffusion assay technique, antimicrobial activities increased most in the 4th day culture broth with separated Lactobacillus. In summary, some LAB can be used as candidates to develop the probiotic microorganisms that inhibit uropathogens in children, and are expected to be applied to treatment and prevention of pediatric urinary tract infection. PMID:19194563

  8. Multi-slice computed tomography urography after diuretic injection in children with urinary tract dilatation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosucu, P.; Ahmetoglu, A.; Imamoglu, M.; Cay, A.; Ozdemir, O.; Dinc, H.; Kosucu, M.; Sari, A.; Saruhan, H.; Gumele, H.R. [Farabi Hospital, Trabzon (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology

    2004-02-01

    To evaluate the potential use of multi-slice computed tomography urography (MSCTU) after diuretic injection in children with urinary tract dilatation. MSCTU was performed in 19 patients (11 boys, 8 girls, mean age 5.4 years) with suspicion of urinary tract obstruction and dilatation. Furosemide, 1 mg/kg, was injected 3 min before contrast material administration and followed by a bolus of 30 ml of physiologic saline solution immediately after application of contrast material. Excretory-phase images were obtained through the abdomen and pelvis beginning 10 min after initiation of the injection of contrast material. Maximum intensity projection (MIP) and volume rendering (VR) images were post-processed to obtain urographic views. MSCTU revealed pathology in 16 of 19 patients, while 3 patients had normal findings. Ureteropelvic obstruction was found in 4 patients, obstructive megaureter in 8. Both ureteropelvic obstruction and obstructive megaureter were disclosed in 1 patient, partial ureteral duplication in 1 patient, and both complete ureteral duplication and ureterocele in 2 patients. In all patients, MIP and VR images could satisfactorily show the pathologies of the urinary tract. The estimated effective average doses of MSCTU were higher than IVU. Preliminary results of furosemide-enhanced MSCTU demonstrated consistently dilated urinary tracts, obstruction levels, and underlying pathologies better than US and IVU.

  9. the management of upper urinary tract obstruction in resource-poor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    open surgery. Twelve of 13 patients with. 31. Penal izntxaénnert: (310$: mun aim at. Fig. 1: Clinical features of upper urinary tract obstruction. renal pelvic stones had open pyelolithotomy, while 6 of 7 patients with congenital pelviure- teric junction obstruction were offered open pyeloplasty. Two patients had unilateral ne-.

  10. Balloon Dilatation of Iatrogenic Ureteral Strictures after Upper Urinary Tract Reconstruction

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    Enes Duman

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Balloon dilatation can be used safely in both antegrade and retrograde approaches because of lower profile of balloon catheters, so it could be considered as a first line treatment option after failed surgical treatment of upper urinary tract stenosis in children. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(2.000: 311-316

  11. Pediatric urinary tract infection: imaging techniques with special reference to voiding cystoerethrography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Blickman

    1991-01-01

    textabstractUrinary tract infection (UTI) is the second most common infection in childhood. Large hospital-based pediatric series report an incidence of 3-5%. Dickinson prospectively determined that 1.7/1000 boys and 3.1/1 000 girls annually present with a UTI. This corresponds to about 780

  12. Disruption of ROBO2 is associated with urinary tract anomalies and confers risk of vesicoureteral reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Weining; van Eerde, Albertien M.; Fan, Xueping; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Ferguson, Heather; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Fan, Yanli; Xi, Qiongchao; Li, Qing-Gang; Sanlaville, Damien; Andrews, William; Sundaresan, Vasi; Bi, Weimin; Yan, Jiong; Giltay, Jacques C.; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Feather, Sally A.; Woolf, Adrian S.; Rao, Yi; Lupski, James R.; Eccles, Michael R.; Quade, Bradley J.; Gusella, James F.; Morton, Cynthia C.; Maas, Richard L.

    2007-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) include vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). VUR is a complex, genetically heterogeneous developmental disorder characterized by the retrograde flow of urine from the bladder into the ureter and is associated with reflux nephropathy, the cause of

  13. Evaluation and management of post-transurethral resection of the prostate lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chughtai, Bilal; Simma-Chiang, Vannita; Kaplan, Steven A

    2014-09-01

    Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) continues to be the most common treatment in the operative management of benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Several other modalities have shown equivalence to TURP. However, even after surgical treatment, up to one third of patients have bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). This review discusses the pathophysiology, evaluation, and management options for patients with LUTS after TURP.

  14. Role of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Virulence Factors in Development of Urinary Tract Infection and Kidney Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Bien

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC is a causative agent in the vast majority of urinary tract infections (UTIs, including cystitis and pyelonephritis, and infectious complications, which may result in acute renal failure in healthy individuals as well as in renal transplant patients. UPEC expresses a multitude of virulence factors to break the inertia of the mucosal barrier. In response to the breach by UPEC into the normally sterile urinary tract, host inflammatory responses are triggered leading to cytokine production, neutrophil influx, and the exfoliation of infected bladder epithelial cells. Several signaling pathways activated during UPEC infection, including the pathways known to activate the innate immune response, interact with calcium-dependent signaling pathways. Some UPEC isolates, however, might possess strategies to delay or suppress the activation of components of the innate host response in the urinary tract. Studies published in the recent past provide new information regarding how virulence factors of uropathogenic E. coli are involved in activation of the innate host response. Despite numerous host defense mechanisms, UPEC can persist within the urinary tract and may serve as a reservoir for recurrent infections and serious complications. Presentation of the molecular details of these events is essential for development of successful strategies for prevention of human UTIs and urological complications associated with UTIs.

  15. Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms, Erectile Dysfunction, and Quality of Life in Poststroke Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Gard, Gunvor; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to compare lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), erectile dysfunction (ED), and quality of life (QoL) in poststroke and healthy men. Thirty poststroke men with stroke-related LUTS, and as controls, 96 healthy men participated in this controlled, cross-sectional study...

  16. Significance of Pyuria in the Diagnosis of Urinary Tract Infection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in children, especially in those with sickle cell disease, who are at higher risk of infections. It will be useful to have a simple test which can be used in resource limited health facilities as a means of screening such children for UTI with the view to ...

  17. review article urinary tract infections in a tertiary hospital in abuja

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    ABSTRACT. Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections. In uncomplicated cases the infection is easily treated with a course of antibiotic, but there is increased resistance to many of these antibiotics. Objective: To determine the profile of UTI among patients using National ...

  18. Accurate and fast diagnostic algorithm for febrile urinary tract infections in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieteling, E.; van de Leur, J. J. C. M.; Stegeman, C. A.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.

    Background: The urine dipstick that detects nitrite and leukocyte esterase, and urine sediment is commonly used to diagnose or exclude urinary tract infections (UTIs) as the source of infection in febrile patients admitted to the emergency department of Dutch hospitals. However, the diagnostic

  19. Comparison of different computer models of the neural control system of the lower urinary tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duin, F.; Rosier, P. F.; Bemelmans, B. L.; Wijkstra, H.; Debruyne, F. M.; van Oosterom, A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a series of five models that were formulated for describing the neural control of the lower urinary tract in humans. A parsimonious formulation of the effect of the sympathetic system, the pre-optic area, and urethral afferents on the simulated behavior are included. In spite of

  20. Surface charge-conversion polymeric nanoparticles for photodynamic treatment of urinary tract bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shijie; Qiao, Shenglin; Li, Lili; Qi, Guobin; Lin, Yaoxin; Qiao, Zengying; Wang, Hao; Shao, Chen

    2015-12-11

    Urinary tract infections are typical bacterial infections which result in a number of economic burdens. With increasing antibiotic resistance, it is urgent that new approaches are explored that can eliminate pathogenic bacteria without inducing drug resistance. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a new promising tactic. It is a gentle in situ photochemical reaction in which a photosensitizer (PS) generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) under laser irradiation. In this work, we have demonstrated Chlorin e6 (Ce6) encapsulated charge-conversion polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) for efficiently targeting and killing pathogenic bacteria in a weakly acidic urinary tract infection environment. Owing to the surface charge conversion of NPs in an acidic environment, the NPs exhibited enhanced recognition for Gram-positive (ex. S. aureus) and Gram-negative (ex. E. coli) bacteria due to the charge interaction. Also, those NPs showed significant antibacterial efficacy in vitro with low cytotoxicity. The MIC value of NPs to E. coli is 17.91 μg ml(-1), compared with the free Ce6 value of 29.85 μg ml(-1). Finally, a mouse acute cystitis model was used to assess the photodynamic therapy effects in urinary tract infections. A significant decline (P photodynamic therapy treatment. And the plated counting results revealed a remarkable bacterial cells drop (P < 0.05) in the sacrificed bladder tissue. Above all, this nanotechnology strategy opens a new door for the treatment of urinary tract infections with minimal side effects.