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Sample records for asymptomatic metastatic colorectal

  1. Asymptomatic primary tumour in incurable metastatic colorectal cancer: is there a role for surgical resection prior to systematic therapy or not?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narimantas E. Samalavicius

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The role of the resection of asymptomatic primary colorectal cancer in patients with incurable disease is questionable. Aim: To evaluate the impact of the resection of asymptomatic primary tumour on overall survival in patients with unresectable distant metastases. Material and methods : Patients treated in the National Cancer Institute, Lithuania, in the period 2008–2012, were selected retrospectively. The main inclusion criteria were: metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC, endoscopically and histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma, without any symptoms for urgent operation, and at least one cycle of palliative chemotherapy administered. Information on patients’ age, gender, tumour histology, localization of the tumour, regional lymph node involvement, number of metastatic sites, surgery and systemic treatment was collected prospectively. Eligible patients for the study were divided into two groups according to the initial treatment – surgery (patients who underwent primary tumour resection and chemotherapy (patients who received chemotherapy without surgery. The impact of initial treatment strategy, tumour size and site, regional lymph nodes, grade of differentiation of adenocarcinoma and application of biotherapy on overall cumulative survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. To compare survival between groups the log-rank test was used. Cox regression analysis was employed to assess the effects of variables on patient survival. Results: The study group consisted of 183 patients: 103 men and 80 women. The median age was 66 years (range: 37–91. There were no notable imbalances with regard to age, gender, number of metastatic sites, metastases (such as pulmonary, peritoneal, liver, metastases into non-regional lymph nodes and other metastases, the number of received cycles of chemotherapy, first line chemotherapy type or biological therapy. Only 27 (14.8% patients received biological therapy and the majority of

  2. A window of opportunity phase II study of enzastaurin in chemonaive patients with asymptomatic metastatic colorectal cancer

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    Glimelius, B; Lahn, M; Gawande, S

    2010-01-01

    (PFS) rate in a window study design. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Chemonaive patients with asymptomatic mCRC who did not require immediate chemotherapy-induced tumor reduction received a 400-mg thrice daily loading dose of enzastaurin on day 1 of cycle 1, followed by 500 mg once daily for the remaining 28-day...... cycles. Progression was assessed on the basis of radiographic imaging, rise in carcinoembryonic antigen or lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels or by appearance of clinical symptoms. RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients received daily enzastaurin. The 6-month PFS rate was 28% [95% confidence interval (CI) 13......%-45%] and median PFS was 1.9 months (95% CI 1.8-4.5 months). Twelve (43%) patients had stable disease with a median duration of 6.1 months. The survival rate at 20 months was 77% (95% CI 47%-92%). No grade 4 toxicity was reported and grade 3 toxic effects were observed in three patients with one patient showing...

  3. Metastatic paediatric colorectal carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Woods, R

    2012-03-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented to our unit with crampy abdominal pain, change in bowel habit, a subjective impression of weight loss and a single episode of haematochezia. She was found to have a rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma and proceeded to laparoscopic anterior resection, whereupon peritoneal metastases were discovered. She received chemotherapy and is alive and well ten month later with no radiological evidence of disease. Colorectal carcinoma is rare in the paediatric population but is increasing in incidence. Early diagnosis is critical to enable optimal outcomes.

  4. Ziv-aflibercept in metastatic colorectal cancer

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    Patel A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Anuj Patel, Weijing Sun Division of Hematology-Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: The combination of cytotoxic chemotherapy and antiangiogenic agents has become a conventional treatment option for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Ziv-aflibercept is a fusion protein which acts as a decoy receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A, VEGF-B, and placental growth factor (PlGF; it was approved in combination with 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer that is resistant to or has progressed after an oxaliplatin-containing fluoropyrimidine-based regimen. Herein we review the role of tumor angiogenesis as the rationale for antiangiogenic therapy, the clinical data associated with ziv-aflibercept, and its current role as a treatment option compared to other antiangiogenic agents, such as bevacizumab and regorafenib. Keywords: aflibercept, angiogenesis, colorectal cancer

  5. Asymptomatic brain metastases in patients with cutaneous metastatic malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukauskaite, Ruta; Schmidt, Henrik; Asmussen, Jon Thor

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the frequency of asymptomatic brain metastases detected by computed tomography (CT) scans in patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma referred to first-line systemic treatment. Between 1995 and 2009, 697 Danish patients were screened with a contrast...

  6. Immunotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer

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    Ellebaek, Eva; Andersen, Mads Hald; Svane, Inge Marie

    2012-01-01

    Although no immunotherapeutic treatment is approved for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, promising results from clinical trials suggest that several immunotherapeutic strategies may prove efficacious and applicable to this group of patients. This review describes the immunogenicity of CRC...... and presents the most interesting strategies investigated so far: cancer vaccination including antigen-defined vaccination and dendritic cell vaccination, chemo-immunotherapy, and adoptive cell transfer. Future treatment options as well as the possibility of combining existing therapies will be discussed along...

  7. Prevalence and risk factors of asymptomatic colorectal diverticulosis in Taiwan.

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    Wang, Fu-Wei; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Tu, Ming-Shium; King, Tai-Ming; Wang, Jui-Ho; Hsu, Chao-Wen; Hsu, Ping-I; Chen, Wen-Chi

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of asymptomatic colorectal diverticulosis in Taiwanese general population. From January 2009 to December 2011, consecutive asymptomatic subjects undergoing a health check-up were evaluated by colonoscopy. The colorectal diverticulosis was assessed, and a medical history and demographic data were obtained from each subject. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to search the risk factors of colorectal diverticulosis. Of the 1899 asymptomatic subjects, the prevalence of colorectal diverticulosis was 13.5%. On univariate logistic regression analysis, age over 60 years old, male, adenomatous polyp, current smoking and heavy alcohol consumption were significantly associated with diverticulosis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that age over 60 years old (relative risk [RR], 2.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.64-6.47), adenomatous polyps (RR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.18-4.61) and heavy alcohol consumption (RR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.04-3.08) were independent predictors for colorectal diverticulosis. The prevalence of asymptomatic colorectal diverticulosis was 13.5% in Taiwan. Age over 60 years old, adenomatous polyp and heavy alcohol consumption may affect the risk of development of the disease.

  8. Cetuximab in treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

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    Guren, Tormod Kyrre; Thomsen, Maria Morandi; Kure, Elin H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The NORDIC-VII study is a randomised phase III trial of cetuximab plus continuous or intermittent fluorouracil, folinic acid, and oxaliplatin (Nordic FLOX) vs FLOX alone in first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. The present report presents an updated and final survival......, neither on progression-free nor overall survival. However, the outcomes in a subset of patients, which, after the first eight treatment cycles, received cetuximab alone, suggested a beneficial effect of cetuximab monotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Adding cetuximab to Nordic FLOX did not provide any clinical...

  9. Molecularly targeted drugs for metastatic colorectal cancer

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    Cheng YD

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ying-dong Cheng, Hua Yang, Guo-qing Chen, Zhi-cao Zhang Department of General Surgery, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China Abstract: The survival rate of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC has significantly improved with applications of molecularly targeted drugs, such as bevacizumab, and led to a substantial improvement in the overall survival rate. These drugs are capable of specifically targeting the inherent abnormal pathways in cancer cells, which are potentially less toxic than traditional nonselective chemotherapeutics. In this review, the recent clinical information about molecularly targeted therapy for mCRC is summarized, with specific focus on several of the US Food and Drug Administration-approved molecularly targeted drugs for the treatment of mCRC in the clinic. Progression-free and overall survival in patients with mCRC was improved greatly by the addition of bevacizumab and/or cetuximab to standard chemotherapy, in either first- or second-line treatment. Aflibercept has been used in combination with folinic acid (leucovorin–fluorouracil–irinotecan (FOLFIRI chemotherapy in mCRC patients and among patients with mCRC with wild-type KRAS, the outcomes were significantly improved by panitumumab in combination with folinic acid (leucovorin–fluorouracil–oxaliplatin (FOLFOX or FOLFIRI. Because of the new preliminary studies, it has been recommended that regorafenib be used with FOLFOX or FOLFIRI as first- or second-line treatment of mCRC chemotherapy. In summary, an era of new opportunities has been opened for treatment of mCRC and/or other malignancies, resulting from the discovery of new selective targeting drugs. Keywords: metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC, antiangiogenic drug, bevacizumab, aflibercept, regorafenib, cetuximab, panitumumab, clinical trial, molecularly targeted therapy

  10. Chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and cetuximab in metastatic colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, J.; Koopman, M.; Cats, A.; Rodenburg, C.J.; Creemers, G.J.M.; Schrama, J.G.; Erdkamp, F.L.G.; Vos, A.H.; van Groeningen, C.J.; Sinnige, H.A.M.; Richel, D.J.; Voest, E.E.; Dijkstra, J.R.; Vink-Börger, M.E.; Antonini, N.F.; Mol, L.; van Krieken, J.H.J.M.; Dalesio, O.; Punt, C.J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Fluoropyrimidine- based chemotherapy plus the anti - vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody bevacizumab is standard first- line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer. We studied the effect of adding the anti - epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody cetuximab to

  11. Unusual asymptomatic presentation of bladder cancer metastatic to the penis.

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    Giunchi, Francesca; Vasuri, Francesco; Valerio, Vagnoni; Montagnani, Ilaria; Nelli, Federico; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Raspollini, Maria Rosaria

    2017-06-01

    Penile metastasis is an extremely rare event and mainly originate from primary pelvic tumor sites such us urinary bladder, gastro-intestinal tract and prostate and more rarely from respiratory system, bone tumors and melanoma. Here we describe the unusual presentation of two bladder urothelial cancer metastatic to the penis with no relevant clinical symptoms. Namely, a 69 years-old man with a warthy lesions of the foreskin and the glans misunderstood for a condylomata that at histological and immunohistochemical analysis showed a bladder urothelial carcinoma; and a 71 years-old man with reddish skin lesion of the glans, a previous history of bladder and urethral carcinoma and histological pagetoid spread of urothelial cancer to the glans. Recurrent bladder urothelial carcinoma is usually a visceral disease that rarely presents as a superficial asymptomatic skin lesion. The two reported cases were asymptomatic superficial penis metastases with a relatively slow growth and a fairy good prognosis after conservative surgical approach. Accurate clinical examination of the penis is mandatory for males with history of bladder cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Intrahepatic therapy for liver-dominant metastatic colorectal cancer

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    De Groote, Kerlijne; Prenen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    In patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, the liver is the most common site of metastatic disease. In patients with liver-dominant disease, consideration needs to be given to locoregional treatments such as hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, transarterial chemoembolisation and selective internal radiation therapy because hepatic metastases are a major cause of liver failure especially in chemorefractory disease. In this review we provide insights on the published literature for loco...

  13. Visualising and quantifying angiogenesis in metastatic colorectal cancer

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    Hansen, Torben Frøstrup; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Jakobsen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in tumour growth and dissemination. We have recently shown that blood vessel density, determined by image analysis based on microRNA-126 (miRNA-126) in situ hybridization (ISH) in the primary tumours of metastatic colorectal cancers (mCRC), is predictive...

  14. Optimal duration of systemic treatment in metastatic colorectal cancer

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    Simkens, Lieke H. J.; Koopman, Miriam; Punt, Cornelis J. A.

    2014-01-01

    With the currently available cytotoxic and targeted drugs, metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) may be controlled by systemic treatment for a significant period of time. However, many questions remain about the optimal use of drugs and duration of treatment. We reviewed the data from clinical trials

  15. Liver-directed therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer.

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    Kelly, Ciara M; Kemeny, Nancy E

    2017-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is a significant global health issue with over 1 million cases diagnosed annually throughout the world. 15% of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer will have liver metastases and 60% will develop liver metastases if they have metastatic disease. Oligometastatic colorectal cancer confined to the liver represents an intermediate state in the evolution of metastatic capacity that opens the opportunity for local interventions. Areas covered: The literature supports long-term survival if patients undergo liver resection of colorectal metastases. This article reviews the liver-directed therapeutic strategies available for the management of metastatic liver disease including hepatic arterial infusion therapy, radiofrequency ablation, radiation therapy and transarterial chemoembolization. Expert commentary: Great advances have been made with the use of liver directed therapies. In the USA using hepatic arterial infusions with FUDR and Decadron along with systemic therapy, 5 year survivals after liver resection have improved. In Europe with the use of HAI of Oxaliplatin, more patients have been able to get to resection and have obtained higher survival rates, even in second line therapy. New advances in ablative therapy have improved results to get all disease treated at resection for the treatment of reccurrence.

  16. OPTIMIZATION OF METASTATIC COLORECTAL CANCER TREATMENT WITH RAS MUTATIONS

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    L. V. Bolotina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Current knowledge concerning impact of certain mutations on targeted therapy efficacy underlines the necessity to perform genetical analysis in order to choose appropriate treatment. Panitumumab addition to 1st line metastatic colorectal cancer chemotherapy in patients with wild-type RAS allows to achieve median progression-free survival up to 13 months and median overall survival of 41,3 months.

  17. Third-line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer

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    Gundgaard, M.G.; Ehrnrooth, E.; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2008-01-01

    , panitumumab. As a result, third-line treatment is now a necessary step in the optimal treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a literature review of English language publications on third-line therapy for MCRC from January 2000 to April 2007. Data......BACKGROUND: The past years' therapy for colorectal cancer has evolved rapidly with the introduction of novel cytotoxic agents such as irinotecan, capecitabine and oxaliplatin. Further advances have been achieved with the integration of targeted agents such as bevacizumab, cetuximab and recently......OS of 16 months. With irinotecan and 5-FU, mOS around 8 months were reported and with cetuximab combined with irinotecan, the highest mOS was 9.8 months. CONCLUSION: Third-line therapy in advanced colorectal cancer may improve mOS for patients with MCRC. Therefore, randomized studies should be conducted...

  18. [Colonoscopic screening of asymptomatic individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer].

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    Maxim, Maria; Trifan, Anca; Stanciu, C

    2010-01-01

    First-degree relatives of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients are at increased risk for developing colorectal neoplasm. The aim of our study was to evaluate the use of total colonoscopy as the screening test in asymptomatic individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy was performed in 125 asymptomatic individuals (64 men and 61 women; mean age 51.7 +/- 11.5 years, range 24-77 years) who had one or two first-degree relatives with CRC. Forty-five colorectal lesions were found in 36 subjects (28.8%): one (0.8%) adenocarcinoma, and 44 polyps (31 adenomas; 13 hiperplasic) (28.0%). The cecum was intubated in 96% of cases, and the procedure was generally well tolerated without complications. Total colonoscopy is a useful and safe screening procedure for the examinations of asymptomatic individuals with a family history of CRC.

  19. KRAS mutational concordance between primary and metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma

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    PALIOGIANNIS, PANAGIOTIS; COSSU, ANTONIO; TANDA, FRANCESCO; PALMIERI, GIUSEPPE; PALOMBA, GRAZIA

    2014-01-01

    KRAS mutation analysis is commonly performed on tissue samples obtained from primary colorectal cancers (CRCs). The metastatic lesions of CRC are usually considered as qualitatively similar or even identical to the primary tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spectrum and distribution of KRAS mutations in a large collection of CRCs, while also evaluating the concordance of primary and metastatic lesions among available paired specimens from the same patients. A total of 729 patients with histologically confirmed advanced CRC at the University Hospital and Local Health Unit (Sassari, Italy) were included. Clinical and pathological features were obtained from medical records and/or pathology reports. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples were used for mutation analysis. Genomic DNA was isolated using a standard protocol; the coding sequence and splice junctions of exons 2 and 3 in the KRAS gene were screened by direct automated sequencing. Overall, 219 (30%) KRAS mutations were found; 208 (30.1%) were identified in the 690 primary tumors and 11 (28.2%) in the 39 metastatic tissue samples. Among the 31 (4.3%) patients who had paired samples of primary CRC and synchronous or asynchronous metastases, 28 (90.3%) showed consistent mutation patterns between the primary tumors and metastatic lesions. In one case, an additive mutation (Q61L) was found in the metastatic tissue, while two other discrepant cases exhibited a different mutation distribution; Q61H in the primitive lesion and G13V in the metastatic lesion in one case, and a mutated primary tumor (Q61L) and wild-type metastasis in another case. The results of this study confirm that a high concordance exists between the results of KRAS mutation analysis performed in primitive and metastatic CRCs; independent subclones may be generated in a limited amount of patients. PMID:25202344

  20. Targeting metastatic colorectal cancer – present and emerging treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciombor KK

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Kristen K Ciombor,1 Jordan Berlin21Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, OH, USA; 2Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Metastatic colorectal cancer is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the US and around the world. While several novel cytotoxic and biologic therapies have been developed and proven efficacious in the past two decades, their optimal use in terms of patient selection, drug combinations, and regimen sequences has yet to be defined. Recent investigations regarding anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapies include the comparison of single-agent panitumumab and cetuximab, the benefit of adding cetuximab to chemotherapy in the conversion therapy setting, the comparison of cetuximab and bevacizumab when added to first-line chemotherapy, and predictive biomarkers beyond KRAS exon 2 (codons 12 and 13 mutations. With respect to anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapies, new data on continuing bevacizumab beyond disease progression on a bevacizumab-containing chemotherapy regimen, the addition of bevacizumab to triplet chemotherapy in the first-line setting, maintenance therapy with bevacizumab plus either capecitabine or erlotinib, the addition of aflibercept to chemotherapy, and regorafenib as monotherapy have emerged. Recent scientific and technologic advances in the field of metastatic colorectal cancer promise to elucidate the biological underpinnings of this disease and its therapies for the goal of improving personalized treatments for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.Keywords: cetuximab, panitumumab, bevacizumab, aflibercept, regorafenib, biomarker

  1. Bevacizumab maintenance in metastatic colorectal cancer: How long?

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    De Stefano, Alfonso; Moretto, Roberto; Cella, Chiara Alessandra; Romano, Francesco Jacopo; Raimondo, Lucia; Fiore, Giovanni; Di Pietro, Francesca; Pepe, Stefano; De Placido, Sabino; Carlomagno, Chiara

    2014-11-16

    The management of patients with non-progressive metastatic colorectal cancer after six months of treatment has not yet been codified. The most relevant concerns are the effectiveness of maintenance vs discontinuation, and the tolerability of prolonged treatment. Here we report the case of a 72-year-old man affected by colorectal cancer with lung metastases who achieved a complete response after receiving capecitabine, oxaliplatin and bevacizumab for six months, and bevacizumab alone for six months. Bevacizumab was continued as maintenance regimen for more than three years. It was discontinued because of an arthroplasty. Fifty-eight months after beginning first-line treatment, the patient remains free from relapse. Adverse effects were minimal and easily controlled.

  2. miR-345 in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jakob V; Rossi, Simona; Jensen, Benny V

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have important regulatory functions in cellular processes and have shown promising potential as prognostic markers for disease outcome in patients with cancer. The aim of the present study was to find miRNA expression profiles in whole blood that were prognostic...... for overall survival (OS) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treated with cetuximab and irinotecan. METHODS: From 138 patients with mCRC in 3rd line therapy with cetuximab and irinotecan in a prospective phase II study, 738 pretreatment miRNAs were isolated and profiled from whole blood...

  3. Arctigenin Inhibits Lung Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer by Regulating Cell Viability and Metastatic Phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Yo-Han Han; Ji-Ye Kee; Dae-Seung Kim; Jeong-geon Mun; Mi-Young Jeong; Sang-Hyun Park; Byung-Min Choi; Sung-Joo Park; Hyun-Jung Kim; Jae-Young Um; Seung-Heon Hong

    2016-01-01

    Arctigenin (ARC) has been shown to have an anti-cancer effect in various cell types and tissues. However, there have been no studies concerning metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we investigated the anti-metastatic properties of ARC on colorectal metastasis and present a potential candidate drug. ARC induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CT26 cells through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway via MAPKs signaling. In several metastatic phenotypes, ARC controlled epithelial-mese...

  4. A simple scoring model for advanced colorectal neoplasm in asymptomatic subjects aged 40-49 years.

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    Park, Yoo Mi; Kim, Hee Sun; Park, Jae Jun; Baik, Su Jung; Youn, Young Hoon; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Park, Hyojin

    2017-01-09

    Limited data are available for advanced colorectal neoplasm in asymptomatic individuals aged 40-49 years. We aimed to identify risk factors and develop a simple prediction model for advanced colorectal neoplasm in these persons. Clinical data were collected on 2781 asymptomatic subjects aged 40-49 years who underwent colonoscopy for routine health examination. Subjects were randomly allocated to a development or validation set. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine predictors of advanced colorectal neoplasm. The prevalence of overall and advanced colorectal neoplasm was 20.2 and 2.5% respectively. Older age (45-49 years), male sex, positive serology of Helicobacter pylori, and high triglyceride and low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels were independently associated with an increased risk of advanced colorectal neoplasm. BMI (body mass index) was not significant in multivariable analysis. We developed a simple scoring model for advanced colorectal neoplasm (range 0-9). A cutoff of ≥4 defined 43% of subjects as high risk for advanced colorectal neoplasm (sensitivity, 79%; specificity, 58%; area under the receiver operating curve = 0.72) in the validation datasets. Older age (45-49 years), male sex, positive serology of H. pylori, high triglyceride level, and low HDL level were identified as independent risk factors for advanced colorectal neoplasm.

  5. Prevalence and characteristics of nonpolypoid colorectal neoplasm in an asymptomatic and average-risk Chinese population.

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    Chiu, Han-Mo; Lin, Jaw-Town; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Lee, Yi-Chia; Liao, Wei-Chih; Liang, Jin-Tung; Shun, Chia-Tung; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Wu, Ming-Shiang

    2009-04-01

    Evidence from Japanese studies suggests that nonpolypoid colorectal neoplasia (NP-CRN) tends to be more pathologically advanced than polypoid neoplasia. However, data are limited regarding the prevalence of NP-CRN in an average-risk population. In addition, the diagnostic yield of the fecal occult blood test (FOBT) in relation to different types of colorectal neoplasms remains unclear. We prospectively investigated the prevalence and characteristics of polypoid and nonpolypoid colorectal lesions in an asymptomatic and average-risk Chinese population. The study included 12,731 asymptomatic Chinese subjects (8372 of whom were average-risk subjects) who underwent screening colonoscopy. The prevalence, histopathologic findings, and topographic distribution of polypoid and nonpolypoid colorectal lesions were determined and analyzed. The diagnostic yield of FOBT, in relation to lesion morphology, also was assessed. NP-CRN was detected in 552 (4.3%) asymptomatic and 348 (4.2%) average-risk subjects. The prevalence of depressed NP-CRN was 0.18% in both asymptomatic and average-risk subjects. A higher proportion of smaller-sized but high-grade dysplasia and invasive carcinoma beyond the submucosal layer was noted for depressed NP-CRN compared with flat NP-CRN or polypoid neoplasia. The diagnostic yield of FOBT was comparable in depressed lesions and their polypoid counterparts. The prevalence of NP-CRN is substantial in both asymptomatic and average-risk Chinese individuals. Some subcategories of NP-CRN in this population tend to have more advanced pathologic characteristics. These findings may lead to modification of screening and prevention strategies for colorectal cancer.

  6. Cell-Free DNA in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

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    Spindler, Karen-Lise G; Boysen, Anders K; Pallisgård, Niels

    2017-01-01

    of tumor-specific mutations, whereas the use of total cell-free DNA (cfDNA) quantification is somehow controversial and sparsely described in the literature, but holds important clinical information in itself. The purpose of the present report was to present a systematic review and meta...... independent investigators. Eligibility criteria were (a) total cfDNA analysis, (b) mCRC, and (c) prognostic value during palliative treatment. The preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were followed, and meta-analysis applied on both aggregate data extraction...... therapy. Small fragments of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) can be measured in a simple blood sample. This report presents the first meta-analysis of the prognostic value of total cfDNA measurement in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Data from 1,076 patients confirmed that patients...

  7. Treatment advances in liver-limited metastatic colorectal cancer.

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    Alberts, Steven R; Poston, Graeme J

    2011-12-01

    Over the last several decades advances in the management and treatment of patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC) has changed a disease with a dismal prognosis to one with a potential for cure in some patients. Advances have been made through coordinated management of patients by surgeons, medical oncologists, radiologists, and other health care professionals coupled with advances in treatment options. Although these advances have clearly impacted patient outcomes, it is clear that the benefit of traditional surgical approaches and the use of cytoxic chemotherapy are reaching a plateau. Continued research to develop new and more active therapies, including targeted or biologic agents, is needed. This review discusses the advances made in management of patients with liver-limited metastatic disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Raltitrexed combined with bevacizumab in heavily pretreated metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available No standard chemotherapy regimen has been established for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC after progression on 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan. Here, we report the combination of raltitrexed and bevacizumab as a salvage regimen for the treatment of three heavily pretreated patients with KRAS mutant mCRC. All three patients had stable disease (SD according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST criteria, progression free survival (PFS were 3.0, 3.2 months for the first two patients and have not been reached for over 5 months for the third patient and no severe adverse effect was observed. The combination of raltitrexed plus bevacizumab in mCRC seems worthy of further investigation.

  9. FCGR polymorphisms and cetuximab efficacy in chemorefractory metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geva, Ravit; Vecchione, Loredana; Kalogeras, Konstantinos T

    2015-01-01

    of 0.6 in progression-free survival (PFS) for FCGR2A-HH versus the rest and FCGR3A-VV versus the rest, with an 80% power, 80 Kirsten Rat Sarcoma Viral Oncogene Homolog (KRAS) wild-type (KRAS-WT) and 52 KRAS-WT patients are required, respectively. This leads to a total sample size of 952 and 619......OBJECTIVE: We aimed to better clarify the role of germline variants of the FCG2 receptor, FCGR2A-H131R and FCGR3A-V158F, on the therapeutic efficacy of cetuximab in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). A large cohort with sufficient statistical power was assembled. DESIGN: To show a HR advantage...

  10. Effects of symptomatic and asymptomatic isolates of Blastocystis hominis on colorectal cancer cell line, HCT116.

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    Chan, Kok Hoe; Chandramathi, Samudi; Suresh, Kumar; Chua, Kek Heng; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani

    2012-06-01

    The pathogenesis of Blastocystis hominis in human hosts has always been a matter of debate as it is present in both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. A recent report showed that B. hominis isolated from an asymptomatic individual could facilitate the proliferation and growth of existing cancer cells while having the potential to downregulate the host immune response. The present study investigated the differences between the effects of symptomatic and asymptomatic derived solubilized antigen of B. hominis (Blasto-Ag) on the cell viability and proliferation of colorectal cancer cells. Besides that, the gene expression of cytokine and nuclear transcriptional factors in response to the symptomatic and asymptomatic B. hominis antigen in HCT116 was also compared. In the current study, an increase in cell proliferation was observed in HCT116 cells which led to the speculation that B. hominis infection could facilitate the growth of colorectal cancer cells. In addition, a more significant upregulation of Th2 cytokines observed in HCT116 may lead to the postulation that symptomatic Blasto-Ag may have the potential in weakening the cellular immune response, allowing the progression of existing tumor cells. The upregulation of nuclear factor kappa light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) was observed in HCT116 exposed to symptomatic Blasto-Ag, while asymptomatic Blasto-Ag exhibited an insignificant effect on NF-κB gene expression in HCT116. HCT116 cells exposed to symptomatic and asymptomatic Blasto-Ag caused a significant upregulation of CTSB which lead to the postulation that the Blasto-Ag may enhance the invasive and metastasis properties of colorectal cancer. In conclusion, antigen isolated from a symptomatic individual is more pathogenic as compared to asymptomatic isolates as it caused a more extensive inflammatory reaction as well as more enhanced proliferation of cancer cells.

  11. MTHFR polymorphisms and capecitabine-induced toxicity in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Huis-Tanja, Lieke H.; Gelderblom, Hans; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan

    2013-01-01

    Objective The availability of current chemotherapeutic options for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) has increased survival, but it is also accompanied by considerable morbidity. Fluoropyrimidines are the mainstay of systemic therapy. Germline pharmacogenetic markers involved in 5-fluorouracil

  12. The clinical significance of circulating tumor cells in non-metastatic colorectal cancer - A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, M; Jess, Per

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Finding a clinical tool to improve the risk stratification and identifying those colorectal cancer patients with an increased risk of recurrence is of great importance. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC) in peripheral blood can be a strong marker of poor prognosis in patients...... with metastatic disease, but the prognostic role of CTC in non-metastatic colorectal cancer is less clear. The aim of this review is to examine the possible clinical significance of circulating tumor cells in non-metastatic colorectal cancer (TNM-stage I-III) with the primary focus on detection methods...... and prognosis. METHODS: The PubMed and Cochrane database and reference lists of relevant articles were searched for scientific literature published in English from January 2000 to June 2010. We included studies with non-metastatic colorectal cancer (TNM-stage I-III) and CTC detected pre- and/or post...

  13. Targeted Therapy Combined with Immune Modulation Using Gold Nanoparticles for Treating Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    stimulate the body’s immune system to target and attack cancer cells. Another part of our research includes coating these gold nanoparticles with...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0427 TITLE: Targeted Therapy Combined with Immune Modulation Using Gold Nanoparticles for Treating Metastatic Colorectal... Nanoparticles for Treating Metastatic Colorectal Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0427 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Branden Moriarity, Tim

  14. Survival of metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with chemotherapy in Alberta (1995?2004)

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yiqun; Qiu, Zhenguo; Kamruzzaman, Anmmd; Snodgrass, Tom; Scarfe, Andrew; Bryant, Heather E.

    2009-01-01

    Goals of work Clinical trials have suggested that advances in chemotherapy significantly improve the survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Comparable evidence from clinical practice is scarce. This study aims to investigate the survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with chemotherapy in Alberta, Canada. Patients and methods Trends of relative survival of patients diagnosed in 1994?2003 were assessed using Alberta Cancer Registry (ACR) data. The median...

  15. Screening strategies for colorectal cancer in asymptomatic adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeon, D Kim; Ruffin, Mack T

    2014-06-01

    This article provides an update for the primary care community on the evidence and recommendations for colorectal cancer screening in the adult population without symptoms at average and increased risk, excluding patients with high-risk genetic syndromes. The current and possible new screening strategies are reviewed, along with clinical wisdom related to the implementation of each method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. CLINICAL CASE OF A MASSIVE ISOLA TED METASTATIC ADRENAL LESION IN COLORECT AL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Moshurov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe liver, lungs, parietal and visceral peritoneum have traditionally been considered to be the main target organs of metastatic colorectal cancer. The isolated adrenal metastasis in colorectal cancer is rare, in the literature there are single observations of clinical cases of successful surgical treatment of such patients. This article presents the clinical observation of successful surgical treatment of patients with colorectal cancer with massive isolated adrenal metastases.

  17. Downregulation of osteoprotegerin expression in metastatic colorectal carcinoma predicts recurrent metastasis and poor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ahrim; Do, Sung-Im; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Youn-Wha

    2016-11-29

    We recently reported the downregulation of osteoprotegerin expression in primary colorectal carcinoma and its significant association with aggressive oncogenic behavior, which suggest that this process contributes to colorectal carcinoma development and progression. In this study, we used immunohistochemical staining to evaluate osteoprotegerin expression in 81 colorectal liver metastasis tissue samples and investigated its possible association with the clinicopathological characteristics and outcomes of patients with colorectal liver metastasis. These tissues exhibited significantly reduced expression of osteoprotegerin compared to primary colorectal carcinomas and normal colorectal mucosa. This reduced expression was significantly associated with the extent of colorectal liver metastasis, including multiplicity of metastatic tumors, involvement of the bilateral hepatic lobes, and higher histological grade. In addition, reduced osteoprotegerin expression was an independent significant predictor of recurrent liver metastasis and prognostic factor for reduced patient survival. These findings suggest that osteoprotegerin expression may be a novel predictor of recurrent liver metastasis and a prognostic biomarker in patients with colorectal liver metastasis. Patients harboring colorectal liver metastasis with reduced osteoprotegerin expression should be carefully monitored after hepatic resection for colorectal liver metastasis to enable early detection of potentially resectable metastatic recurrences.

  18. Cavernous sinus syndrome associated with metastatic colorectal cancer and perineural spread along the trigeminal nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassrallah, Georges; Sun, Vincent; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Mikhail, Mikel; Arthurs, Bryan

    2017-06-01

    We report the case of a patient with cavernous sinus syndrome associated with biopsy-confirmed metastasis from colorectal cancer. A patient known for laryngeal carcinoma and metastatic colorectal carcinoma presented with symptoms of left trigeminal neuralgia and progressive, near-complete ophthalmoplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass in the left cavernous sinus, extending into Meckel's cave with perineural spread along the mandibular branch of the left trigeminal nerve. A transsphenoidal biopsy was performed and demonstrated metastatic colon adenocarcinoma. We review the existing literature on colorectal cancer associated cavernous sinus syndrome. Cavernous sinus metastasis from colorectal cancer is exceedingly rare. We report the second case of this entity with histopathologic confirmation, and the first case with concurrent perineural spread involving the trigeminal nerve. Cavernous sinus metastasis may represent a poor prognostic factor in colorectal cancer.

  19. TRAP1 protein signature predicts outcome in human metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalena, Francesca; Simeon, Vittorio; Vita, Giulia; Bochicchio, Annamaria; Possidente, Luciana; Sisinni, Lorenza; Lettini, Giacomo; Condelli, Valentina; Matassa, Danilo Swann; Li Bergolis, Valeria; Fersini, Alberto; Romito, Sante; Aieta, Michele; Ambrosi, Antonio; Esposito, Franca; Landriscina, Matteo

    2017-03-28

    TRAP1 is a HSP90 molecular chaperone upregulated in colorectal carcinomas and involved in control of intracellular signaling, cell cycle, apoptosis and drug resistance, stemness and bioenergetics through co-traslational regulation of a network of client proteins. Thus, the clinical significance of TRAP1 protein network was analyzed in human colorectal cancers. TRAP1 and/or its client proteins were quantified, by immunoblot analysis, in 60 surgical specimens of colorectal carcinomas at different stages and, by immunohistochemistry, in 9 colorectal adenomatous polyps, 11 in situ carcinomas and 55 metastatic colorectal tumors. TRAP1 is upregulated at the transition between low- and high-grade adenomas, in in situ carcinomas and in about 60% of human colorectal carcinomas, being downregulated only in a small cohort of tumors. The analysis of TCGA database showed that a subgroup of colorectal tumors is characterized by gain/loss of TRAP1 copy number, this correlating with its mRNA and protein expression. Interestingly, TRAP1 is co-expressed with the majority of its client proteins and hierarchical cluster analysis showed that the upregulation of TRAP1 and associated 6-protein signature (i.e., IF2α, eF1A, TBP7, MAD2, CDK1 and βCatenin) identifies a cohort of metastatic colorectal carcinomas with a significantly shorter overall survival (HR 5.4; 95% C.I. 1.1-26.6; p=0.037). Consistently, the prognostic relevance of TRAP1 was confirmed in a cohort of 55 metastatic colorectal tumors. Finally, TRAP1 positive expression and its prognostic value are more evident in left colon cancers. These data suggest that TRAP1 protein network may provide a prognostic signature in human metastatic colorectal carcinomas.

  20. Bevacizumab in combination with cetuximab and irinotecan after failure of cetuximab and irinotecan in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn Ole; Pfeiffer, Per; Nielsen, Dorte

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of concurrent administration of irinotecan with the two monoclonal antibodies cetuximab and bevacizumab as fourth line therapy in heavily pretreated patients with metastatic colorectal cancer were evaluated.......The efficacy and safety of concurrent administration of irinotecan with the two monoclonal antibodies cetuximab and bevacizumab as fourth line therapy in heavily pretreated patients with metastatic colorectal cancer were evaluated....

  1. Colonoscopic screening of asymptomatic first-degree relatives of colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croitoru, Liliana; Trifan, Anca; Maxim, Maria Rusu; Girleanu, Irina; Hulub, Angela; Dimache, Mihaela; Stanciu, C

    2010-01-01

    First-degree relatives of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients are at increased risk for developing colorectal neoplasm, and current guidelines recommend screening colonoscopy in such individuals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of colonoscopy as the screening test in asymptomatic first-degree relatives of CRC patients. Colonoscopy was performed in 102 asymptomatic individuals who had at least one first-degree relatives with CRC. Subjects included in the screening program were aged between 36 and 72 years, and majority came from two counties (Suceava, Iaşi) located in north-eastern Romania. Thirty colorectal lesions were found in 17 individuals: two (6.6%) had adenocarcinomas, and remaining 15 patients had 28 polypoid lesions: 14 (46.6%) adenomas, 5 (16.6%) tubulovillous adenomas, 3 (10%) adenomas with high grade dysplasia and 6 (20%) had hyperplasic polyps. Colonoscopy is a useful, feasible and safety initial screening tool for first-degree relatives of patients with CRC.

  2. Arctigenin Inhibits Lung Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer by Regulating Cell Viability and Metastatic Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yo-Han; Kee, Ji-Ye; Kim, Dae-Seung; Mun, Jeong-Geon; Jeong, Mi-Young; Park, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Byung-Min; Park, Sung-Joo; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Um, Jae-Young; Hong, Seung-Heon

    2016-08-27

    Arctigenin (ARC) has been shown to have an anti-cancer effect in various cell types and tissues. However, there have been no studies concerning metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we investigated the anti-metastatic properties of ARC on colorectal metastasis and present a potential candidate drug. ARC induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CT26 cells through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway via MAPKs signaling. In several metastatic phenotypes, ARC controlled epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through increasing the expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expressions of mesenchymal markers; N-cadherin, vimentin, β-catenin, and Snail. Moreover, ARC inhibited migration and invasion through reducing of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 expressions. In an experimental metastasis model, ARC significantly inhibited lung metastasis of CT26 cells. Taken together, our study demonstrates the inhibitory effects of ARC on colorectal metastasis.

  3. Arctigenin Inhibits Lung Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer by Regulating Cell Viability and Metastatic Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yo-Han Han

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Arctigenin (ARC has been shown to have an anti-cancer effect in various cell types and tissues. However, there have been no studies concerning metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC. In this study, we investigated the anti-metastatic properties of ARC on colorectal metastasis and present a potential candidate drug. ARC induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CT26 cells through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway via MAPKs signaling. In several metastatic phenotypes, ARC controlled epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT through increasing the expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expressions of mesenchymal markers; N-cadherin, vimentin, β-catenin, and Snail. Moreover, ARC inhibited migration and invasion through reducing of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions. In an experimental metastasis model, ARC significantly inhibited lung metastasis of CT26 cells. Taken together, our study demonstrates the inhibitory effects of ARC on colorectal metastasis.

  4. Bevacizumab with chemotherapy in patients with KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer: Czech registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubáčková, Kateřina; Bortlíček, Zbyněk; Pikus, Tomáš; Linke, Zdeněk; Pokorná, Petra; Vyzula, Rostislav; Prausová, Jana

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective analysis investigated the effectiveness of combination therapy with bevacizumab and chemotherapy in the first-line treatment of patients with KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer. Patients with KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer in the CORECT registry who initiated treatment with bevacizumab between 2008 and 2012 were enrolled. Overall survival and progression-free survival were the main effectiveness end points. A total of 981 patients were enrolled. Median progression-free survival was 11.3 months (95% CI: 10.7-11.8) and median overall survival was 28.4 months (95% CI: 26.2-30.6). The most common adverse events were thromboembolic disease (4%) and hypertension (3.5%). This retrospective analysis shows the effectiveness of bevacizumab with chemotherapy in patients with KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer.

  5. Should capecitabine replace 5-fluorouracil in the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado, Carlos; García-Paredes, Beatriz; Sotelo, Miguel Jhonatan; Sastre, Javier; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Fluoropyrimidines play a central role in the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Our aim was to review whether capecitabine was a safer, non-inferior, economically superior and more convenient alternative to 5-fluorouracil. Capecitabine has previously been compared to 5-fluorouracil-either as a monotherapy or in combination with oxaliplatin, irinotecan, or biological drugs-and has been found to have comparable efficacy and safety profiles. Furthermore, pharmacoeconomic data and patients’ preferences for oral chemotherapy further favor capecitabine. Therefore, capecitabine appears to be an effective and safe alternative to fluorouracil in the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:24876731

  6. Survival benefit associated with surgical oophorectomy in patients with colorectal cancer metastatic to the ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Christopher R; George, Ben; Viswanathan, Chitra; Bhadkamkar, Nishin A; Wen, Sijin; Baladandayuthapani, Veerarabhadran; You, Y Nancy; Kopetz, Edmund S; Overman, Michael J; Kee, Bryan K; Eng, Cathy

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the outcome of patients with colorectal cancer metastatic to the ovary and the impact of surgical oophorectomy on the outcome. We conducted a retrospective evaluation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer to the ovary. Of 3776 female patients with colorectal cancer seen at MD Anderson from 2001-2008, 110 (2.9%) were identified as having metastases to the ovary. The Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test were used to examine the survival functions. Seventy-one patients (64.5%) had disease metastatic to the ovary at the time of initial presentation; in 39 patients (35.5%) the ovaries were a site of relapse after previous curative colorectal surgical resection. Patients who presented with ovarian relapse after previous colorectal surgery and who underwent oophorectomy had a median survival of 50 months compared with 12 months for those who did not (P cancer metastatic to the ovary may derive a survival benefit from palliative oophorectomy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Outcomes in Patients with Obstructive Jaundice from Metastatic Colorectal Cancer and Implications for Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Shawnn D.; Albert, Scott; Shirley, Lawrence; Schmidt, Carl; Abdel-Misih, Sherif; El-Dika, Samer; Groce, J. Royce; Wu, Christina; Goldberg, Richard M.; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Bloomston, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer can develop jaundice from intrahepatic or extrahepatic causes. Currently, there is little data on the underlying causes and overall survival after onset of jaundice. The purpose of this study was to characterize the causes of jaundice and determine outcomes. Methods Six hundred twenty-nine patients treated for metastatic colorectal cancer between 2004 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Those developing jaundice were grouped as having intrahepatic or extrahepatic obstruction. Demographics, clinicopathologic, and outcome data were analyzed. Results Sixty-two patients with metastatic colorectal cancer developed jaundice. Intrahepatic biliary obstruction was most common, occurring in younger patients. Time from metastatic diagnosis to presentation of jaundice was similar between groups, as was the mean number of prior lines of chemotherapy. Biliary decompression was successful 41.7 % of the time and was attempted more commonly for extrahepatic causes. Median overall survival after onset of jaundice was 1.5 months and it was similar between groups, but improved to 9.6 months in patients who were able to receive further chemotherapy. Conclusions Jaundice due to metastatic colorectal cancer is an ominous finding, representing aggressive tumor biology or exhaustion of therapies. Biliary decompression is often difficult and should only be pursued when additional treatment options are available. PMID:25300799

  8. Sipuleucel-T: Autologous Cellular Immunotherapy for Men with Asymptomatic or Minimally Symptomatic Metastatic Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Sims

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sipuleucel T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy designed to stimulate an immune response in men diagnosed with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate resistant (hormone refractory prostate cancer. Sipuleucel T improves overall survival and provides an additional treatment option for this patient population.

  9. Molecular markers in circulating tumour cells from metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gazzaniga, Paola; Gradilone, Angela; Petracca, Arianna; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Raimondi, Cristina; Iacovelli, Roberto; Naso, Giuseppe; Cortesi, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The prognosis of metastatic cancer patients is still largely affected by treatment failure, mainly due to drug resistance. The hypothesis that chemotherapy might miss circulating tumour cells (CTCs) and particularly a subpopulation of more aggressive, stem-like CTCs, characterized by multidrug resistance, has been recently raised. We investigated the prognostic value of drug resistance and stemness markers in CTCs from metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with oxaliplatin (L...

  10. Administration of cetuximab every 2 weeks in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabernero, Josep; Pfeiffer, Per; Cervantes, Andrés

    2008-01-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to present the available evidence for the administration of cetuximab on an every-2-weeks basis in combination with irinotecan in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Cetuximab is an epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted IgG(1) monoclonal antibody that is ...

  11. Interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein as prognostic biomarkers in metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Maria; Kersten, Christian; Sorbye, Halfdan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to explore the prognostic significance of IL-6 and markers of systemic inflammatory response (SIR), in particular C-reactive protein (CRP), in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients, in the total study population and according to RAS and BRAF mutation status. Results...

  12. Decoy receptor 1 (DCR1) promoter hypermethylation and response to irinotecan in metastatic colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, Linda J W; Trooskens, Geert; Snaebjornsson, Petur; Coupe, Veerle M. H.; Mongera, Sandra; Haan, Josien C.; Richman, Susan D.; Koopman, Miriam|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/298209640; Tol, Jolien; Meyer, Tim; Louwagie, Joost; Dehaspe, Luc; van Grieken, Nicole C. T.; Ylstra, Bauke; Verheul, Henk M. W.; van Engeland, Manon; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Herman, James G; Quirke, Philip; Seymour, Matthew T; Punt, Cornelis J A; van Criekinge, Wim; Carvalho, Beatriz; Meijer, Gerrit A.

    2017-01-01

    Diversity in colorectal cancer biology is associated with variable responses to standard chemotherapy. We aimed to identify and validate DNA hypermethylated genes as predictive biomarkers for irinotecan treatment of metastatic CRC patients. Candidate genes were selected from 389 genes involved in

  13. Molecular markers in circulating tumour cells from metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzaniga, Paola; Gradilone, Angela; Petracca, Arianna; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Raimondi, Cristina; Iacovelli, Roberto; Naso, Giuseppe; Cortesi, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The prognosis of metastatic cancer patients is still largely affected by treatment failure, mainly due to drug resistance. The hypothesis that chemotherapy might miss circulating tumour cells (CTCs) and particularly a subpopulation of more aggressive, stem-like CTCs, characterized by multidrug resistance, has been recently raised. We investigated the prognostic value of drug resistance and stemness markers in CTCs from metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with oxaliplatin (L-OHP) and 5-fluoruracil (5-FU) based regimens. Forty patients with metastatic colorectal cancer were enrolled. CTCs were isolated from peripheral blood and analysed for the expression of aldheyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), CD44, CD133 (used as markers of stemness), multidrug resistance related protein 5 (MRP5 used as marker of resistance to 5-FU and L-OHP) and survivin (used as a marker of apoptosis resistance). CTCs were found in 27/40 (67%) patients. No correlation was found between the expression of either CD44 and CD133 in CTCs and the outcome of patients, while a statistically significant shorter progression-free survival was found in patients with CTCs positive for the expression of ALDH1, survivin and MRP5. These results support the idea that isolating survivin and MRP5+ CTCs may help in the selection of metastatic colorectal cancer patients resistant to standard 5-FU and L-OHP based chemotherapy, for which alternative regimens may be appropriate. PMID:20597995

  14. Research progress on genetic heterogeneity between primary and paired metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, You-Wang; Wang, Kun-Hua

    2017-06-20

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in China. A standard practice in treating metastatic CRC (mCRC) is to predict benefits of the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody treatment based on the somatic mutation spectrum. Because metastatic samples are difficult to obtain clinically, primary tumors are normally used instead. However, due to the genetic heterogeneity between primary and paired metastatic tumors, primary site biopsy always underrepresents the mutational landscape of metastatic sites. Currently, the extent of genetic heterogeneity between primary and paired mCRC is still under debate. Here, we review comparative studies of primary and matched mCRC and discuss the underlying causes and potential strategies.

  15. Phase II trial of temsirolimus alone and in combination with irinotecan for KRAS mutant metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Sørensen, Morten; Pallisgaard, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Background. Patients with chemotherapy refractory metastatic colorectal cancer and KRAS mutations have no effective treatment option. The present study evaluated the efficacy of temsirolimus in chemotherapy refractory mCRC with KRAS mutations. Furthermore, we wanted to investigate if resistance...

  16. Critical appraisal of bevacizumab in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoratto F

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Federica Zoratto,1 Luigi Rossi,1 Angelo Zullo,2 Anselmo Papa,1 Eleonora Zaccarelli,1 Luigi Tomao,3 Erika Giordani,1 Maria Colonna,4 Giovanni Baiano,5 Silverio Tomao11Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, “Sapienza” University, Oncology Unit, “SM Goretti” Hospital, Latina; 2Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy Unit, “Nuovo Regina Margherita” Hospital, Rome; 3Biology Department, “Regina Elena National Cancer Institute”, Rome; 4Oncology Unit, “Don Luigi di Liegro” Hospital, Gaeta, 5Surgery Unit, “San Giovanni di Dio” Hospital, Fondi, ItalyAbstract: Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. The prognosis of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer in recent years has increased from 5 months with best supportive care to nearly 2 years with chemotherapy combined with bevacizumab, an antivascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody. New prognostic and predictive biomarkers have been identified to guide chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer, such as KRAS and BRAF oncogenes. However, the status of these oncogenes does not affect the efficacy of bevacizumab, and biomarkers predicting response to treatment with bevacizumab are still lacking. Addition of bevacizumab to regimens based on fluoropyrimidines or irinotecan has been shown to improve overall survival in treatment-naïve patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Similarly, a significant increase in overall survival rate is achieved by adding bevacizumab to fluoropyrimidines and oxaliplatin in patients with disease progression. Bevacizumab has been found to be effective even when used as third-line therapy and later. In addition, cohort studies have shown that bevacizumab improves survival significantly despite disease progression. Finally, bevacizumab therapy in the neoadjuvant setting for the treatment of liver metastasis is well tolerated, safe, and effective.Keywords: metastatic colorectal cancer

  17. Leptin receptor (Ob-R) mRNA expression and serum leptin concentration in patients with colorectal and metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkasap, N; Ozkurt, M; Erkasap, S; Yasar, F; Uzuner, K; Ihtiyar, E; Uslu, S; Kara, M; Bolluk, O

    2013-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of leptin on the progression of colorectal carcinoma to metastatic disease by analyzing the serum leptin concentration and Ob-R gene expression in colon cancer tissues. Tissue samples were obtained from 31 patients who underwent surgical resection for colon (18 cases) and metastatic colon (13 cases) cancer. Serum leptin concentration was determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Ob-R mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for both groups. ELISA data were analyzed by the Student t-test and RT-PCR data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U-test. RT-PCR results demonstrated that mRNA expression of Ob-R in human metastatic colorectal cancer was higher than in local colorectal cancer tissues. On the other hand, mean serum leptin concentration was significantly higher in local colorectal cancer patients compared to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The results of the present study suggest a role for leptin in the progression of colon cancer to metastatic disease without weight loss. In other words, significantly increased Ob-R mRNA expression and decreased serum leptin concentration in patients with metastatic colon cancer indicate that sensitization to leptin activity may be a major indicator of metastasis to the colon tissue and the determination of leptin concentration and leptin gene expression may be used to aid the diagnosis.

  18. Leptin receptor (Ob-R mRNA expression and serum leptin concentration in patients with colorectal and metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Erkasap

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of leptin on the progression of colorectal carcinoma to metastatic disease by analyzing the serum leptin concentration and Ob-R gene expression in colon cancer tissues. Tissue samples were obtained from 31 patients who underwent surgical resection for colon (18 cases and metastatic colon (13 cases cancer. Serum leptin concentration was determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and Ob-R mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR for both groups. ELISA data were analyzed by the Student t-test and RT-PCR data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U-test. RT-PCR results demonstrated that mRNA expression of Ob-R in human metastatic colorectal cancer was higher than in local colorectal cancer tissues. On the other hand, mean serum leptin concentration was significantly higher in local colorectal cancer patients compared to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The results of the present study suggest a role for leptin in the progression of colon cancer to metastatic disease without weight loss. In other words, significantly increased Ob-R mRNA expression and decreased serum leptin concentration in patients with metastatic colon cancer indicate that sensitization to leptin activity may be a major indicator of metastasis to the colon tissue and the determination of leptin concentration and leptin gene expression may be used to aid the diagnosis.

  19. Leptin receptor (Ob-R mRNA expression and serum leptin concentration in patients with colorectal and metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Erkasap

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of leptin on the progression of colorectal carcinoma to metastatic disease by analyzing the serum leptin concentration and Ob-R gene expression in colon cancer tissues. Tissue samples were obtained from 31 patients who underwent surgical resection for colon (18 cases and metastatic colon (13 cases cancer. Serum leptin concentration was determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and Ob-R mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR for both groups. ELISA data were analyzed by the Student t-test and RT-PCR data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U-test. RT-PCR results demonstrated that mRNA expression of Ob-R in human metastatic colorectal cancer was higher than in local colorectal cancer tissues. On the other hand, mean serum leptin concentration was significantly higher in local colorectal cancer patients compared to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The results of the present study suggest a role for leptin in the progression of colon cancer to metastatic disease without weight loss. In other words, significantly increased Ob-R mRNA expression and decreased serum leptin concentration in patients with metastatic colon cancer indicate that sensitization to leptin activity may be a major indicator of metastasis to the colon tissue and the determination of leptin concentration and leptin gene expression may be used to aid the diagnosis.

  20. Leptin receptor (Ob-R) mRNA expression and serum leptin concentration in patients with colorectal and metastatic colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erkasap, N.; Ozkurt, M. [Department of Physiology, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey); Erkasap, S.; Yasar, F. [Department of General Surgery, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey); Uzuner, K. [Department of Physiology, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey); Ihtiyar, E. [Department of General Surgery, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey); Uslu, S.; Kara, M. [Department of Biochemistry, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey); Bolluk, O. [Department of Biostatistics, Osmangazi University Medical Faculty, Meselik, Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2013-03-19

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of leptin on the progression of colorectal carcinoma to metastatic disease by analyzing the serum leptin concentration and Ob-R gene expression in colon cancer tissues. Tissue samples were obtained from 31 patients who underwent surgical resection for colon (18 cases) and metastatic colon (13 cases) cancer. Serum leptin concentration was determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Ob-R mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for both groups. ELISA data were analyzed by the Student t-test and RT-PCR data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U-test. RT-PCR results demonstrated that mRNA expression of Ob-R in human metastatic colorectal cancer was higher than in local colorectal cancer tissues. On the other hand, mean serum leptin concentration was significantly higher in local colorectal cancer patients compared to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The results of the present study suggest a role for leptin in the progression of colon cancer to metastatic disease without weight loss. In other words, significantly increased Ob-R mRNA expression and decreased serum leptin concentration in patients with metastatic colon cancer indicate that sensitization to leptin activity may be a major indicator of metastasis to the colon tissue and the determination of leptin concentration and leptin gene expression may be used to aid the diagnosis.

  1. Current treatment for colorectal cancer metastatic to the liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cromheecke, M; de Jong, KP; Hoekstra, HJ

    1999-01-01

    Surgery is currently the only available treatment option which offers the potential for cure for patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer. Of those who undergo a potentially curative operation for their primary tumour but subsequently recur, almost 80% will develop evidence of

  2. Mitochondrial microsatellite instability in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venderbosch, S.; van Vliet, S.; Craenmehr, M. H C; Simmer, F.; de Haan, A. F J; Punt, C. J A; Koopman, M.; Nagtegaal, I. D.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial microsatellite instability (mtMSI), a change in length in mtDNA microsatellite sequences between normal and tumor tissue, has been described as a frequent occurrence in colorectal cancer (CRC). We evaluated the prevalence and prognostic value of mtMSI and its relation to nuclear

  3. Durable response using regorafenib in an elderly patient with metastatic colorectal cancer: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang R

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ronald Tang,1 Tatiana Kain,2 June Herman,2 Tara Seery1 1Division of Hematology-Oncology, 2Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of California, Irvine, Orange, CA, USA Abstract: Regorafenib, an oral multikinase inhibitor, was approved in September 2012 by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Since this time, however, few case reports outlining real-world usage have been published in the literature. Here, we detail the clinical history of an elderly woman with KRAS wild-type colon cancer who received regorafenib after prior treatment with other agents. We show that by employing dose modification strategies to address adverse events, this patient was able to remain on therapy for 11 months and achieve stable disease. Keywords: regorafenib, metastatic colorectal cancer, oral multikinase inhibitor

  4. Topoisomerase I copy number alterations as biomarker for irinotecan efficacy in metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palshof, Jesper Andreas; Hogdall, Estrid Vilma Solyom; Poulsen, Tim Svenstrup

    2017-01-01

    Background No biomarker exists to guide the optimal choice of chemotherapy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. We examined the copy numbers (CN) of topoisomerase I (TOP1) as well as the ratios of TOP1/CEN-20 and TOP1/CEN-2 as biomarkers for irinotecan efficacy in patients...... with metastatic colorectal cancer. Methods From a national cohort, we identified 163 patients treated every third week with irinotecan 350 mg/m2 as second-line therapy. Among these 108 were eligible for analyses and thus entered the study. Primary tumors samples were collected and tissue microarray (TMA) blocks...... in search of a biomarker driven patient stratification. Other biomarkers to be paired with TOP1 CN are therefore highly warranted....

  5. Dual Inhibition of EGFR and VEGF in Heavily Pretreated Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn Ole; Markussen, Alice; Nielsen, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of combining irinotecan, bevacizumab, and cetuximab/panitumumab as a 4th-line treatment in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Methods: All patients had KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer and had previously...... received fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and cetuximab/panitumumab in a 1st, 2nd, and 3rd line setting. Most patients had previously received bevacizumab as well. All patients had progressed within 3 months after the last given treatment before starting the triple combination therapy every...... second week. Results: Sixty-three patients were evaluated. The triple combination therapy was well tolerated. The median progression-free survival was 6.1 months, and the median overall survival was 11.9 months. Four patients (6%) obtained a partial response, and 40 (63%) had stable disease. Conclusion...

  6. Molecular subtypes of metastatic colorectal cancer are associated with patient response to irinotecan-based therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rio, M; Mollevi, C; Bibeau, F; Vie, N; Selves, J; Emile, J-F; Roger, P; Gongora, C; Robert, J; Tubiana-Mathieu, N; Ychou, M; Martineau, P

    2017-05-01

    Currently, metastatic colorectal cancer is treated as a homogeneous disease and only RAS mutational status has been approved as a negative predictive factor in patients treated with cetuximab. The aim of this study was to evaluate if recently identified molecular subtypes of colon cancer are associated with response of metastatic patients to first-line therapy. We collected and analysed 143 samples of human colorectal tumours with complete clinical annotations, including the response to treatment. Gene expression profiling was used to classify patients in three to six classes using four different molecular classifications. Correlations between molecular subtypes, response to treatment, progression-free and overall survival were analysed. We first demonstrated that the four previously described molecular classifications of colorectal cancer defined in non-metastatic patients also correctly classify stage IV patients. One of the classifications is strongly associated with response to FOLFIRI (P=0.003), but not to FOLFOX (P=0.911) and FOLFIRI + Bevacizumab (P=0.190). In particular, we identify a molecular subtype representing 28% of the patients that shows an exceptionally high response rate to FOLFIRI (87.5%). These patients have a two-fold longer overall survival (40.1 months) when treated with FOLFIRI, as first-line regimen, instead of FOLFOX (18.6 months). Our results demonstrate the interest of molecular classifications to develop tailored therapies for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and a strong impact of the first-line regimen on the overall survival of some patients. This however remains to be confirmed in a large prospective clinical trial. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Oxidative stress may cause metastatic disease in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Edith Smed; Gögenur, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Despite surgical treatment of stage II colorectal cancer many patients will experience relapse. Inflammatory and immunologic reactions created due to the surgical stress response result in the production of reactive oxygen species. Oxidative stress in turn, may result in the stimulation of cancer...... cells that have not been cleared by the immune system to metastasize. In this paper we present an overview of studies where oxidative stress in relation to surgery has been linked to the development of metastatic disease....

  8. Treatment with capecitabine + bevacizumab following induction treatment with FOLFIRI + bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatlı, Ali Murat; Coşkun, Hasan Şenol; Uysal, Mükremin; Arslan, Deniz; Sezgin Göksu, Sema; Güenay Gündüz, Şeyda; Çakal, Selda; Bozcuk, Hakan Şat; Savaş, Burhan

    2014-01-01

    Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor, and it has been found to increase both progression-free survival and overall survival when it is combined with chemotherapeutic agents in the first-line and subsequent treatment of metastatic colorectal carcinoma. The objective of this study was to show the efficacy of maintenance treatment with capecitabine plus bevacizumab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who responded to treatment with FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab. The study included patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who received FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab as a first-line treatment. Patients who had objective response with FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab treatment after an average period of 6 months received a maintenance treatment with capecitabine plus bevacizumab (capecitabine 2 x 1000 mg/m2, 1 - 14 days, every 21 days, bevacizumab 7.5 mg/m2, every 21 days) until disease progression or toxicity. The time to progression on bevacizumab treatment was evaluated. A total of 29 patients (15 male, 14 female) were included. The mean age was 62 years. The mean number of cycles for maintenance treatment with capecitabine plus bevacizumab was 12. The median PFS was 16 ± 3 months, and OS was 42 ± 11 months. PFS and OS were remarkably higher in patients with a complete or near complete response to induction treatment. Fourteen patients (48%) experienced hand-foot syndrome associated with capecitabine plus bevacizumab treatment, without any severe toxicity. Inselected patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma who had a remarkable objective response to FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab treatment, a maintenance treatment with capecitabine plus bevacizumab following FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab until disease progression may be a suitable, effective and tolerable regimen, which requires further studies. PMID:25232406

  9. Primary tumor site and anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody benefit in metastatic colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dandan; Fu, Qiang; Li, Man; Li, Jun; Yin, Can; Zhao, Jin; Li, Feng

    2017-05-01

    This meta-analysis aimed to document the impact of primary tumor site on anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody (mAb) benefit in metastatic colorectal cancer. Tumors with metastatic left-sided colorectal cancer (LCC) were compared with tumors with metastatic right-sided colon cancer (RCC) with respect to anti-EGFR mAb objective response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) benefit. Comparing LCC with RCC, LCC was found to have significantly superior anti-EGFR mAb ORR (p analysis demonstrated that LCC had markedly superior anti-EGFR mAb treatment benefit compared with RCC.

  10. Microsatellite instability in metastatic colorectal cancer: a review of pathology, response to chemotherapy and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Kein-Leong

    2012-09-01

    Approximately 10% of colorectal carcinomas demonstrate microsatellite instability (MSI). Distinct from the majority of colorectal cancers with chromosomal instability (CIN) which harbour allelic imbalance from chromosomal polyploidy and aneuploidy, MSI tumours retain intact chromosomal numbers but contain microsatellite repeats due to deficiency in mismatch repair which are thought to contribute to the early steps of tumourigenesis in colorectal cancer. While emerging clinical data has highlighted improved prognosis of tumours with MSI in early colorectal cancer and potentially circumventing the need for adjuvant chemotherapy, the implications of MSI deficiency in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) remain uncertain. In order to assess the significance of MSI in mCRC, a broad literature review was carried out through online PubMed search on published articles encompassing pathological and clinical papers. This included pathological studies identifying the correlation with MSI status between primary sites and metastases, and chemotherapeutic studies assessing the impact of fluoropyrimidine-, irinotecan- and oxaliplatin-based regimens on mCRC with MSI.

  11. Subclonal Genomic Architectures of Primary and Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Based on Intratumoral Genetic Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Min; Jung, Seung-Hyun; An, Chang Hyeok; Lee, Sung Hak; Baek, In-Pyo; Kim, Min Sung; Park, Sung-Won; Rhee, Je-Keun; Lee, Sug-Hyung; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2015-10-01

    The intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and the evolution of genomic architectures associated with the development of distant metastases are not well understood in colorectal cancers. We performed multiregion biopsies of primary and liver metastatic regions from five colorectal cancers with whole-exome sequencing and copy number profiling. In addition to a substantial level of genetic ITH, multiregion genetic profiling identifies the subclonal mutational architecture, leading to the region-based or spatial categorization of somatic mutations and the inference of intratumoral evolutionary history of cancers. The universal mutations (those observed in all the regional biopsies) are enriched in known cancer genes such as APC and TP53 with distinct mutational spectra compared with biopsy- or region-specific mutations, suggesting that major operative mutational mechanisms and their selective pressures are not constant across the metastatic progression. The phylogenies inferred from genomic data show branching evolutionary patterns where some primary biopsies are often segregated with metastastic lesions. Our analyses also revealed that copy number changes such as the chromosomal gains of c-MYC and chromothripsis can be region specific and the potential source of genetic ITH. Our data show that the genetic ITH is prevalent in colorectal cancer serving as a potential driving force to generate metastasis-initiating clones and also as a means to infer the intratumoral evolutionary history of cancers. The paucity of recurrent metastasis-clonal events suggests that colorectal cancer distant metastases may not follow a uniform course of genomic evolution, which should be considered in the genetic diagnosis and the selection of therapeutic targets for the advanced colorectal cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Resembling Severe Preeclampsia in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raminder Kaur Khangura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer in women, it is a rare malignancy in pregnancy. Symptoms of CRC such as fatigue, malaise, nausea, vomiting, rectal bleeding, anemia, altered bowel habits, and abdominal mass are often considered typical symptoms of pregnancy. Many cases of CRC are diagnosed in advanced stages due to missed warning signs of CRC, which may be misinterpreted as normal symptoms related to pregnancy. This report reviews 2 cases of CRC diagnosed within a 4-month interval at our institution. Both cases were initially thought to be atypical presentations of preeclampsia. Prenatal history, hospital course, and postpartum course were reviewed for both patients. CRC is often diagnosed at advanced stages in pregnancy. Common physiological symptoms of pregnancy should be scrutinized carefully and worked up appropriately, especially if symptoms remain persistent or increase in intensity or severity.

  13. Hope, optimism and survival in a randomised trial of chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Penelope E; Stockler, M R; Zannino, D; Tebbutt, N C; Price, T J; Simes, R J; Wong, N; Pavlakis, N; Ransom, D; Moylan, E; Underhill, C; Wyld, D; Burns, I; Ward, R; Wilcken, N; Jefford, M

    2016-01-01

    Psychological responses to cancer are widely believed to affect survival. We investigated associations between hope, optimism, anxiety, depression, health utility and survival in patients starting first-line chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. Four hundred twenty-nine subjects with metastatic colorectal cancer in a randomised controlled trial of chemotherapy completed baseline questionnaires assessing the following: hopefulness, optimism, anxiety and depression and health utility. Hazard ratios (HRs) and P values were calculated with Cox models for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in univariable and multivariable analyses. Median follow-up was 31 months. Univariable analyses showed that OS was associated negatively with depression (HR 2.04, P optimism, anxiety or hopefulness. PFS was not associated with hope, optimism, anxiety or depression in any analyses. Depression and health utility, but not optimism, hope or anxiety, were associated with survival after controlling for known prognostic factors in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Further research is required to understand the nature of the relationship between depression and survival. If a causal mechanism is identified, this may lead to interventional possibilities.

  14. Reliability of KRAS mutation testing in metastatic colorectal cancer patients across five laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feigelson Heather

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the KRAS gene are associated with poor response to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Factors influencing KRAS test results in tumor specimens include: tumor heterogeneity, sample handling, slide preparation, techniques for tumor enrichment, DNA preparation, assay design and sensitivity. We evaluated comparability and consistency of KRAS test results among five laboratories currently being used to determine KRAS mutation status of metastatic colorectal cancer specimens in a large, multi-center observational study. Findings Twenty formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human colorectal cancer samples from colon resections previously tested for KRAS mutations were selected based on mutation status (6 wild type, 8 codon 12 mutations, and 6 codon 13 mutations. We found good agreement across laboratories despite differences in mutation detection methods. Eighteen of twenty samples (90% were concordant across all five labs. Discordant results are likely not due to laboratory error, but instead to tumor heterogeneity, contamination of the tumor sample with normal tissue, or analytic factors affecting assay sensitivity. Conclusions Our results indicate commercial and academic laboratories provide reliable results for the common KRAS gene mutations at codons 12 and 13 when an adequate percentage of tumor cells is present in the sample.

  15. Asymptomatic syringomyelia accompanied with metastatic cerebellar and spinal intramedullary lymphoma: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jia-Jia; Xu, Jin-Feng; Zheng, Xu-Ning; Peng, Guo-Ping

    2017-11-01

    Asympotamic syringomyelia accompanied with metastatic cerebellar and thoracic spinal intramedullary lymphoma is rare in clinical practice. If the intramedullary lymphoma is large enough, the patient will rapidly develop neurologic signs of spinal injury. The prognosis of this type of complication is always bad. Rapid and correct diagnosis and treatment is important for metastatic extranodal lymphoma with B cell of origin. Syringomyelia accompanied with metastatic cerebellar and thoracic spinal intramedullary lymphoma. The patient was treated with a combination of systemic chemotherapy and focal radiotherapy and intrathecal therapy. Resolution of metastatic lymphoma was not continued after conservative medical management and the patient died finally due to multiple organ failure. Syringomyelia can develop due to the metastatic thoracic intramedullary lymphoma in patients with diffuse malignant large B cell lymphoma. Early and accurate diagnosis, anti-lymphoma treatment, and timely neurosurgical intervention may delay the development of the disease.

  16. Developing a national database for metastatic colorectal cancer management: perspectives and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, K; Wong, H-L; Shapiro, J; Kosmider, S; Tie, J; Bae, S; Yip, D; McKendrick, J; Nott, L; Desai, J; Harold, M; Lipton, L; Stefanou, G; Lim, L; Parente, P; Gibbs, P

    2013-11-01

    The changing treatment landscape for metastatic colorectal cancer creates multiple potential treatment strategies. An Australian-centric database capturing comprehensive information across a range of treatment locations would create a valuable resource enabling multiple important research questions to be addressed. To establish a collection of a consensus dataset capturing treatment and outcomes at multiple public and private hospitals across Australia. An electronic database was developed by a panel of clinicians, to capture an agreed dataset for patients with newly diagnosed metastatic colorectal cancer. Of particular interest were clinician decision-making, the impact of comorbidities and the frequency of major adverse events. Since July 2009, data collection has been established at six public and eight private hospitals across three Australian states and territories. Successful linkage and analysis, with support from BioGrid Australia, of selected data on the initial 864 patients demonstrates that data can be captured from diverse sites, including public and private practice, that multiple factors impact on treatment delivered and outcomes achieved and that comprehensive data on rare but important adverse events can be captured. As a clinical research tool, the project has been highly successful, generating multiple presentations at national and international conferences related to a diverse range of research questions. Multistate, project-specific data collection involving large numbers of patients is achievable. Providing invaluable insight into the routine clinical management of metastatic colorectal cancer in the era of targeted therapies, this also creates a significant resource for research, including many questions not being addressed by clinical trials. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  17. ESMO consensus guidelines for the management of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Cutsem, E; Cervantes, A; Adam, R

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies in Western countries. Over the last 20 years, and the last decade in particular, the clinical outcome for patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) has improved greatly due not only to an increase in the number of patients being referred...... for and undergoing surgical resection of their localised metastatic disease but also to a more strategic approach to the delivery of systemic therapy and an expansion in the use of ablative techniques. This reflects the increase in the number of patients that are being managed within a multidisciplinary team...... environment and specialist cancer centres, and the emergence over the same time period not only of improved imaging techniques but also prognostic and predictive molecular markers. Treatment decisions for patients with mCRC must be evidence-based. Thus, these ESMO consensus guidelines have been developed...

  18. Risk factors for brain metastases in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Troels Dreier; Palshof, Jesper Andreas; Larsen, Finn Ole

    2017-01-01

    Background: Brain metastases (BM) from colorectal cancer (CRC) are rare, but the incidence is suspected to rise as treatment of metastatic (m) CRC improves. The aim of this study was to identify possible biological and clinical characteristics at initial presentation of mCRC that could predict...... patients had previously progression on 5-FU, irinotecan and oxaliplatin containing regimens and received CetIri treatment independent of RAS mutations status. We subsequently performed KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, PTEN, ERBB2 and EGFR sequencing of DNA extracted from primary tumor tissue. Results: Totally...

  19. Potentially resectable metastatic colorectal cancer: an individualized approach to conversion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Donatella; Leone, Francesco; D'Avanzo, Francesca; Ribero, Dario; Capussotti, Lorenzo; Aglietta, Massimo

    2014-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. In recent years, the survival of patients with metastatic disease has improved due to the developments in both medical and surgical care. Patients with technically unresectable metastatic disease could benefit from a multidisciplinary approach for their possible shift toward a technically resectable condition; the choice of the most effective systemic treatment is then crucial to allow conversion to resectability. Systemic conversion therapy may include chemotherapy agents' combinations (fluoropyrimidine, irinotecan and oxaliplatin), with or without targeted agents (cetuximab, panitumumab, bevacizumab). The choice of the best treatment option has to be evaluated by taking into account each patient's baseline characteristics, biological and pathological information and surgical strategy. In particular, the role of some biologic characteristics of the disease, namely the mutational status of EGFR-pathway oncogenes, is emerging as an important predictive factor of response to anti-EGFR targeted agents. Patients presenting with colorectal cancer metastases should be evaluated for multimodal management with curative intent as the appropriate chemotherapy regimen may induce tumor shrinkage, conversion to resectability and improved survival. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of KRAS Gene Mutations in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients in Kermanshah Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirifard, Nasrin; Sadeghi, Edris; Farshchian, Negin; Haghparast, Abbas; Choubsaz, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, colorectal cancer (CRC) is reported to be the fourth most common cancer in men and the third most common in women. KRAS is a protooncogene located on the short arm of chromosome 12. The aim of this study was to evaluate the KRAS oncogene and its relationship it with clinicopathologic features in 33 Kurdish patients. Metastatic CRC between 2012 and 2016 that came to Imam Reza hospital, Kermanshah province, Iran, were analysed for KRAS mutations using allele specific PCR primers and pyrosequencing. Correlations between variables was analyzed in PASW SPSS and overall survival curves were plotted in Graph Pad prism 5. The mean age for them at diagnosis was 51.5±12.6 years (range, 2276 years). Among the 33 patients that were sequenced, 12 samples in the KRAS gene had a nucleotide change, 11 in codon 12 and 1 in codon 13.There was no significant relationship between the mutation and clinical and pathological aspects of the disease. Knowledge of the KRAS status can help in decisionmaking to treat metastatic colorectal cancer patients more efficiently and increase survival. However, many Kurdish people due to economic problems are not able to do this valuable genetic test. In addition, we need more careful research of KRAS oncogene at the molecular level in young populations with more patients.

  1. Vertebral compression fractures after spine irradiation using conventional fractionation in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ree, Woo Joong; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Chang, Jee Suk; Kim, Hyun Ju; Choi, Seo Hee; Koom, Woong Sub [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate the risk of vertebral compression fracture (VCF) after conventional radiotherapy (RT) for colorectal cancer (CRC) with spine metastasis and to identify risk factors for VCF in metastatic and non-metastatic irradiated spines. We retrospectively reviewed 68 spinal segments in 16 patients who received conventional RT between 2009 and 2012. Fracture was defined as a newly developed VCF or progression of an existing fracture. The target volume included all metastatic spinal segments and one additional non-metastatic vertebra adjacent to the tumor-involved spines. The median follow-up was 7.8 months. Among all 68 spinal segments, there were six fracture events (8.8%) including three new VCFs and three fracture progressions. Observed VCF rates in vertebral segments with prior irradiation or pre-existing compression fracture were 30.0% and 75.0% respectively, compared with 5.2% and 4.7% for segments without prior irradiation or pre-existing compression fracture, respectively (both p < 0.05). The 1-year fracture-free probability was 87.8% (95% CI, 78.2-97.4). On multivariate analysis, prior irradiation (HR, 7.30; 95% CI, 1.31-40.86) and pre-existing compression fracture (HR, 18.45; 95% CI, 3.42-99.52) were independent risk factors for VCF. The incidence of VCF following conventional RT to the spine is not particularly high, regardless of metastatic tumor involvement. Spines that received irradiation and/or have pre-existing compression fracture before RT have an increased risk of VCF and require close observation.

  2. Improved survival in metastatic colorectal cancer is associated with adoption of hepatic resection and improved chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopetz, Scott; Chang, George J; Overman, Michael J; Eng, Cathy; Sargent, Daniel J; Larson, David W; Grothey, Axel; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Nagorney, David M; McWilliams, Robert R

    2009-08-01

    Fluorouracil/leucovorin as the sole therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) provides an overall survival of 8 to 12 months. With an increase in surgical resections of metastatic disease and development of new chemotherapies, indirect evidence suggests that outcomes for patients are improving in the general population, although the incremental gain has not yet been quantified. We performed a retrospective review of patients newly diagnosed with metastatic CRC treated at two academic centers from 1990 through 2006. Landmark analysis evaluated the association of diagnosis year and liver resection with overall survival. Additional survival analysis of the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database evaluated a similar population from 1990 through 2005. Two thousand four hundred seventy patients with metastatic CRC at diagnosis received their primary treatment at the two institutions during this time period. Median overall survival for those patients diagnosed from 1990 to 1997 was 14.2 months, which increased to 18.0, 18.6, and 29.3 months for patients diagnosed in 1998 to 2000, 2001 to 2003, and 2004 to 2006, respectively. Likewise, 5-year overall survival increased from 9.1% in the earliest time period to 19.2% in 2001 to 2003. Improved outcomes from 1998 to 2004 were a result of an increase in hepatic resection, which was performed in 20% of the patients. Improvements from 2004 to 2006 were temporally associated with increased utilization of new chemotherapeutics. In the SEER registry, overall survival for the 49,459 identified patients also increased in the most recent time period. Profound improvements in outcome in metastatic CRC seem to be associated with the sequential increase in the use of hepatic resection in selected patients (1998 to 2006) and advancements in medical therapy (2004 to 2006).

  3. Right- vs. Left-Sided Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Differences in Tumor Biology and Bevacizumab Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Ulivi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence of a different response to treatment with regard to the primary tumor localization (right-sided or left-sided in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC. We analyzed the different outcomes and biomolecular characteristics in relation to tumor localization in 122 of the 370 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer enrolled onto the phase III prospective multicenter “Italian Trial in Advanced Colorectal Cancer (ITACa”, randomized to receive first-line chemotherapy (CT or CT plus bevacizumab (CT + B. RAS and BRAF mutations; baseline expression levels of circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2, ephrin type-B receptor 4 (EPHB4, hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, and high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP; and inflammatory indexes such as the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, platelet-lymphocyte rate and systemic immune-inflammation index were evaluated. Patients with right-sided tumors showed a longer median progression-free survival in the CT + B arm than in the CT group (12.6 vs. 9.0 months, respectively, p = 0.017. Baseline inflammatory indexes were significantly higher in left-sided tumors, whereas eNOS and EPHB4 expression was significantly higher and BRAF mutation more frequent in right-sided tumors. Our data suggest a greater efficacy of the CT + B combination in right-sided mCRC, which might be attributable to the lower inflammatory status and higher expression of pro-angiogenic factors that appear to characterize these tumors.

  4. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 modulates invasion and metastatic potential of colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Muriel; Naudin, Cécile; Letourneur, Martine; Polrot, Mélanie; Renoir, Jack-Michel; Lazar, Vladimir; Dessen, Philippe; Roche, Serge; Bertoglio, Jacques; Pierre, Josiane

    2014-07-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 1 is an inducible negative regulator of cytokine signaling but its role in human cancer is not completely established. Here we report that, while SOCS1 is expressed in normal colonic epithelium and colon adenocarcinomas, its level decreases during progression of colon adenocarcinomas, the lowest level being found in the most aggressive stage and least differentiated carcinomas. Forced expression of SOCS1 in metastatic colorectal SW620 cells reverses many characteristics of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), as highlighted by the disappearance of the transcription factor ZEB1 and the mesenchymal form of p120ctn and the re-expression of E-cadherin. Furthermore, miRNA profiling indicated that SOCS1 also up-regulates the expression of the mir-200 family of miRNAs, which can promote the mesenchymal-epithelial transition and reduce tumor cell migration. Accordingly, overexpression of SOCS1 induced cell morphology changes and dramatically reduced tumor cell invasion in vitro. When injected in nude mice, SOCS1-expressing SW620 cells induced metastases in a smaller number of animals than parental SW620 cells, and did not generate any adrenal gland or bone metastasis. Overall, our results suggest that SOCS1 controls metastatic progression of colorectal tumors by preventing the mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET), including E-cadherin expression. This pathway may be associated with survival to colorectal cancer by reducing the capacity of generating metastases. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Neutropenia as a Predictive Factor in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treated With TAS-102.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamauchi, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Masuishi, Toshiki; Kito, Yosuke; Komori, Azusa; Tsushima, Takahiro; Narita, Yukiya; Todaka, Akiko; Ishihara, Makoto; Yokota, Tomoya; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Machida, Nozomu; Kadowaki, Shigenori; Fukutomi, Akira; Ura, Takashi; Onozawa, Yusuke; Ando, Masashi; Tajika, Masahiro; Muro, Kei; Yasui, Hirofumi; Mori, Keita; Taniguchi, Hiroya

    2017-03-01

    TAS-102 significantly improves overall survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The most common treatment-related adverse event of TAS-102 is bone marrow suppression, which leads to neutropenia. The potential predictive value of neutropenia caused by cytotoxic drugs has been reported in various types of cancer. We retrospectively analyzed 95 consecutive patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who received TAS-102 at 2 Japanese institutions between May 2014 and May 2015. To evaluate the association between efficacy and neutropenia, patients were divided into 4 categories according to the grade of neutropenia during the first cycle of TAS-102: Category A (grade 0-1), B (grade 2-4), C (grade 0-2), and D (grade 3-4). Patient characteristics were as follows: median age, 64 years; male, 58%; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0 to 1, 91%; primary site colon, 49%; KRAS exon 2 wild, 57%; and number of metastatic site ≥ 3, 55%. The disease control rate was significantly different between Category A and B (29.2% vs. 52.6%; P = .045) and between Category C and D (30.9% vs. 72.2%; P = .002). In multivariate analysis, Category D remained a significant predictive factor for progression-free survival compared with Category C (4.3 vs. 2.0 months; hazard ratio, 0.45; P = .01). Neutropenia caused by TAS-102 during the first cycle was associated with better efficacy. Neutropenia may be a surrogate marker for adequate antitumor doses of TAS-102. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of 42 Genes Linked to Stage II Colorectal Cancer Metastatic Relapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabeah A. Al-Temaimi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Metastasis remains the primary cause of CRC death. Predicting the possibility of metastatic relapse in early-stage CRC is of paramount importance to target therapy for patients who really need it and spare those with low-potential of metastasis. Ninety-six stage II CRC cases were stratified using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH data based on a predictive survival algorithm and supervised clustering. All genes included within the resultant copy number aberrations were each interrogated independently at mRNA level using CRC expression datasets available from public repositories, which included 1820 colon cancers, and 167 normal colon tissues. Reduced mRNA expression driven by copy number losses and increased expression driven by copy number gains revealed 42 altered transcripts (29 reduced and 13 increased transcripts associated with metastatic relapse, short disease-free or overall survival, and/or epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT. Resultant genes were classified based on gene ontology (GO, which identified four functional enrichment groups involved in growth regulation, genomic integrity, metabolism, and signal transduction pathways. The identified 42 genes may be useful for predicting metastatic relapse in stage II CRC. Further studies are necessary to validate these findings.

  7. Clinical Usefulness of Tools to Support Decision-making for Palliative Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhardt, Ellen G.; Révész, Dóra; Tamminga, Hans J.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Koopman, Mirjam; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Jansma, Ilse P.; de Vet, Henrica C. W.; Coupé, Veerle M. H.

    2017-01-01

    Decision-making regarding palliative treatment for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is complex and comprises numerous decisions. Decision-making should be guided by the premise of maintaining and/or improving patients' quality of life, by patient preference, and by the trade-off

  8. Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase III Trial of Ipilimumab Versus Placebo in Asymptomatic or Minimally Symptomatic Patients With Metastatic Chemotherapy-Naive Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Kwon, Eugene D; Drake, Charles G

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Ipilimumab increases antitumor T-cell responses by binding to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4. We evaluated treatment with ipilimumab in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patients with chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer without visceral metastases. Pat...

  9. Tucatinib (ONT-380) and Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With HER2+ Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-08

    Colorectal Adenocarcinoma; ERBB2 Gene Amplification; HER2/Neu Positive; KRAS wt Allele; NRAS wt Allele; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  10. Management of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: economic consequences of different treatment programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Lopatriello

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical pattern of Metastatic ColoRectal Cancer patients, receiving first-line infusional 5-FU or oral capecitabine (CAP chemotherapies, was valorized in the perspective of the Italian NHS. A cost-minimization analysis was implemented on the basis of retrospective data from 5 centers. 202 subjects: 126 receiving 5-FU-association, 10 5-FU-monotherapy; 31 CAP-association, 35 CAP-monotherapy. Therapeutic patterns differed as to chemotherapy administration resources consumption: 5-FU was administered in Day Hospital and CAP in the outpatient setting. Mean total cost/patient was in the range of € 6,841 (monotherapy-5-FU- € 12,620 (association-5-FU and € 2,056 (monotherapy-CAP-€ 9,745 (association-CAP. The infusional administration route of 5-FU was the driver of costs.

  11. Changes in mutational status during third-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Pallisgaard, Niels; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund

    2014-01-01

    KRAS and BRAF mutations are responsible for primary resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) MoAbs in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), but it is unknown what causes wildtype (wt) patients to develop resistance during treatment. We measured circulating free DNA (cfDNA), KRAS...... and BRAF in plasma and report the changes during third line treatment with cetuximab and irinotecan. One-hundred-and-eight patients received irinotecan 350 mg/m2 q3w and weekly cetuximab (250 mg/m2) until progression (RECIST) or unacceptable toxicity. cfDNA and number of mutated KRAS/BRAF alleles in plasma...... different types of mutations detected in the plasma, including synchronous KRAS and BRAF. Twelve patients had a primary KRAS mutant tumor, but wild-type disease according to baseline plasma analysis, eight of these obtained stabilization of disease. In five patients with primary wt disease a mutation...

  12. Neurological Toxicity in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients Treated with Modified FOLFOX6 plus Bevacizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Otsu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the toxicity and efficacy of modified FOLFOX6 plus bevacizumab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with particular regard to oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. Toxicity was graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI-CTCAE (version 3.0. The evaluation was especially focused on grade 2 oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. The estimated median treatment time to occurrence of grade 2 sensory neuropathy was 7.3 months. The estimated median cumulative dose to occurrence of grade 2 sensory neuropathy was 931 mg/m 2 . This study clarified the treatment time from first dose as well as the cumulative dose of oxaliplatin leading to grade 2 neuropathy. It may be important to institute some clinical countermeasures when grade 2 neuropathy occurs so as to reduce the chance of progression to irreversible grade 3 neuropathy.

  13. KRAS-mutated plasma DNA as predictor of outcome from irinotecan monotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, K G; Appelt, A L; Pallisgaard, N

    2013-01-01

    Background:We investigated the clinical implications of KRAS and BRAF mutations detected in both archival tumor tissue and plasma cell-free DNA in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with irinotecan monotherapy.Methods:Two hundred and eleven patients receiving second-line irinotecan (350...... with mutations detectable in plasma responded to therapy. Response rate and disease control rate in plasma KRAS wt patients were 19 and 66% compared with 0 and 37%, in patients with pKRAS mutations, (P=0.04 and 0.01). Tumor KRAS status was not associated with PFS but with OS in the validation cohort. Plasma BRAF...... mg m(-2) q3w) were included in two independent cohorts. Plasma was obtained from pretreatment EDTA blood-samples. Mutations were detected in archival tumour and plasma with qPCR methods.Results:Mutation status in tumor did not correlate to efficacy in either cohort, whereas none of the patients...

  14. Experience with S-1 in older Caucasian patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Stine Braendegaard; Zubcevic, Kanita; Qvortrup, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    of adverse events than capecitabine and may therefore be a suitable drug for elderly. However, data on the use of S-1 in Caucasian mCRC patients are lacking/scarce. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the present study we evaluated safety and the efficacy of S-1 alone or in combination with oxaliplatin (SOx......) or IRIS (n = 18) for mCRC. Median age was 76 years and most patients had a WHO performance status of 0 (32%) or 1 (56%). All patients were evaluable for response and safety. In the SOx group, 18 (41%) and 20 patients (45%) had partial response (PR) and stable disease (SD), respectively (disease control......BACKGROUND: An aging population will increase the number of older patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, there is limited knowledge about treatment in older patients as they are under-represented in clinical trials. The oral fluoropyrimidine S-1 is associated with a lower rate...

  15. The history of adoption of hepatic resection for metastatic colorectal cancer: 1984-95.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünhagen, D; Jones, R P; Treasure, T; Vasilakis, C; Poston, G J

    2013-06-01

    Liver resection for metastatic colorectal cancer became established without randomized trials. Proponents of surgical resection point out 5-year survival approaching 50% whilst critics question how much of the apparent effect is due to patient selection. A 2006 systematic review of reported outcomes provided the starting point for citation analysis followed by thematic analysis of the texts of the most cited papers. 54 reports from 1988 to 2002 cited 709 unique publications a total of 1714 times. The 15 most cited papers were explored in detail, and showed clear examples of duplicate reporting and overlapping data sets. Textual analysis revealed proposals for a randomized controlled trial, but this was argued to be unethical by others, and no trial was undertaken. This critical review reveals how the case for this surgery was made, and examines the arguments that influenced acceptance and adoption of this surgery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical trial enrollment, patient characteristics, and survival differences in prospectively registered metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorbye, Halfdan; Pfeiffer, Per; Cavalli-Björkman, Nina

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Trial accrual patterns were examined to determine whether metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients enrolled in trials are representative of a general cancer population concerning patient characteristics and survival. METHODS: A total of 760 mCRC patients referred for their first...... in 61% of the patients. Approximately one-third (36%) of patients receiving chemotherapy were included in a trial. The main reason for nonparticipation was failed eligibility criteria (69%). The median survival after chemotherapy was 15.8 months for all patients, and 18 months after combination...... chemotherapy. Trial patients had better prognostic characteristics and significantly longer survival than nontrial patients: 21.3 months versus 15.2 months when receiving combination chemotherapy. Poor performance status was the main reason for giving best supportive care only, and the median survival...

  17. Angiogenesis inhibitors and symptomatic anal ulcers in metastatic colorectal cancer patients *.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamo, Francesca; Lonardi, Sara; Salmaso, Beatrice; Lacognata, Carmelo; Battaglin, Francesca; Cavallin, Francesco; Saadeh, Luca; Murgioni, Sabina; Caruso, Antonino; Aliberti, Camillo; Zagonel, Vittorina; Castoro, Carlo; Scarpa, Marco

    2018-03-01

    Angiogenesis inhibitors are a standard first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer. Anal canal pain is a common adverse event, but its cause has never been described. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors and symptomatic anal ulcer development. This retrospective cohort study included all 601 consecutive metastatic colorectal cancer patients undergoing first line treatment from January 2010 to June 2016 at the Veneto Institute of Oncology. Details about patient characteristics, treatment and proctology reports were retrieved and compared. Vascularization of the anal canal was evaluated with contrast MRI. Fifty out of 601 patients reported perianal complaints during treatment and underwent proctologic evaluation. Among those, 16 were found to have an anal ulcer. Symptomatic anal ulcers occurred only in patients receiving bevacizumab (4.2% vs. 0% with other regimens, p = .009). The peak incidence was 4-8 weeks after treatment start. Vascularization of anal canal was significantly lower in patients treated with bevacizumab (p = .03). Hypertension and hemorrhoids were associated with a lower risk of anal ulcer occurrence (p = .009 and p = .036). Pain intensity was severe. All attempts at symptomatic treatment only led to transient benefit. The absence of symptomatic ulcers was protective against earlier permanent discontinuation of treatment (HR = .22, 95%CI: 0.04-0.62). The development of symptomatic anal ulcers in patients receiving angiogenesis inhibitor is a common adverse event which can compromise the continuation of cancer therapy. We recommend an early proctologic evaluation in case of anal symptoms with the aim to prevent and timely manage such complication.

  18. Anti-VEGF agents in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC: are they all alike?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif MW

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Wasif Saif GI Oncology Program, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that binds and neutralizes vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A, a key player in the angiogenesis pathway. Despite benefits of bevacizumab in cancer therapy, it is clear that the VEGF pathway is complex, involving multiple isoforms, receptors, and alternative ligands such as VEGF-B, and placental growth factor, which could enable escape from VEGF-A-targeted angiogenesis inhibition. Recently developed therapies have targeted other ligands in the VEGF pathway (eg, aflibercept, known as ziv-aflibercept in the United States, VEGF receptors (eg, ramucirumab, and their tyrosine kinase signaling (ie, tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The goal of the current review was to identify comparative preclinical data for the currently available VEGF-targeted therapies. Sources were compiled using PubMed searches (2007 to 2012, using search terms including, but not limited to: “bevacizumab,” “aflibercept,” “ramucirumab,” and “IMC-18F1.” Two preclinical studies were identified that compared bevacizumab and the newer agent, aflibercept. These studies identified some important differences in binding and pharmacodynamic activity, although the potential clinical relevance of these findings is not known. Newer antiangiogenesis therapies should help further expand treatment options for colorectal and other cancers. Comparative preclinical data on these agents is currently lacking. Keywords: aflibercept, antiangiogenesis, metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC, tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF

  19. Role of cetuximab in first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, Miguel Jhonatan; García-Paredes, Beatriz; Aguado, Carlos; Sastre, Javier; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo

    2014-04-21

    The treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) has evolved considerably in the last decade, currently allowing most mCRC patients to live more than two years. Monoclonal antibodies targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor play an important role in the current treatment of these patients. However, only antibodies directed against EGFR have a predictive marker of response, which is the mutation status of v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS). Cetuximab has been shown to be effective in patients with KRAS wild-type mCRC. The CRYSTAL study showed that adding cetuximab to FOLFIRI (regimen of irinotecan, infusional fluorouracil and leucovorin) significantly improved results in the first-line treatment of KRAS wild-type mCRC. However, results that evaluate the efficacy of cetuximab in combination with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in this setting are contradictory. On the other hand, recent advances in the management of colorectal liver metastases have improved survival in these patients. Adding cetuximab to standard chemotherapy increases the response rate in patients with wild-type KRAS and can thus increase the resectability rate of liver metastases in this group of patients. In this paper we review the different studies assessing the efficacy of cetuximab in the first-line treatment of mCRC.

  20. Response to PD-1 Blockade in Microsatellite Stable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Harboring a POLE Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jun; Wang, Chongkai; Lee, Peter P; Chu, Peiguo; Fakih, Marwan

    2017-02-01

    Recent clinical evidence has demonstrated that microsatellite instability (MSI) or defective mismatch repair (MMR) and high tumor mutational load can predict response to the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) receptor inhibitor pembrolizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Mutations in polymerase ε (POLE), a DNA polymerase involved in DNA replication and repair, contribute to an ultramutated but microsatellite stable (MSS) phenotype in colorectal tumors that is uniquely distinct from MSI tumors. This report presents the first case in the literature describing a clinical response to pembrolizumab in an 81-year-old man with treatment-refractory mCRC characterized by an MSS phenotype and POLE mutation identified on genomic profiling by next-generation sequencing. On tumor immunostaining, a large amount of CD8-positive tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) were present, with >90% of these expressing PD-1. More than 99% of PD-L1 expression was identified on nontumor cells in the tumor microenvironment that were close to the PD-1-positive CD8 TILs. mCRC tumors harboring POLE mutations represent a hypermutated phenotype that may predict response to anti-PD-1 therapy. Copyright © 2017 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  1. Rechallenge and maintenance therapy using cetuximab and chemotherapy administered to a patient with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian; Yang, Quan-Liang; Ling, Yang

    2017-02-14

    Cetuximab combined with chemotherapy is one of the first-line treatments of metastatic colorectal cancer. Although disease progression inevitably occurs, rechallenge and maintenance therapies using cetuximab-based regimens may be beneficial, particularly for patients with wild-type (WT) KRAS. A 47-year-old female patient who underwent right hemicolectomy presented with an ulcerative adenocarcinoma (grade 2) revealed by histopathological analysis. The patient received three cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy, but disease recurred 15 months later. Cetuximab and a FOLFOX-4 regimen were administered, followed by surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy that was administered for approximately one year. Three years after completing adjuvant therapy, her serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels rapidly increased, and enhanced computed tomography showed widespread metastases. Rechallenge with cetuximab and the FOLFIRI regimen was then initiated, and after 12 cycles, lesions in the lung and liver shrank significantly, and serum CEA levels dramatically declined. Maintenance therapy with cetuximab and capecitabine was then administered for 10 months until the metastatic lesions in the lung and liver enlarged. Rechallenge and maintenance therapy with cetuximab-based chemotherapy were relatively effective for managing a female patient with WT KRAS. Optimization of this strategy requires further in-depth investigations of more patients.

  2. Topoisomerase 1 Promoter Variants and Benefit from Irinotecan in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolicchi, Elisa; Vivaldi, Caterina; De Gregorio, Veronica; Crea, Francesco; Fornaro, Lorenzo; Masi, Gianluca; Loupakis, Fotios; Graziano, Francesco; Ronzoni, Monica; Ricci, Vincenzo; Falcone, Alfredo; Danesi, Romano

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase 1 (topo-1) is an important target for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlation between topo-1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and clinical outcome in metastatic CRC (mCRC) patients. With the use of specific software (PROMO 3.0), we performed an in silico analysis of topo-1 promoter SNPs; the rs6072249 and rs34282819 SNPs were included in the study. DNA was extracted from 105 mCRC patients treated with FOLFIRI ± bevacizumab in the first line. SNP genotyping was performed by real-time PCR. Genotypes were correlated with clinical parameters (objective response rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival). No single genotype was significantly associated with clinical variables. The G allelic variant of rs6072249 topo-1 SNP is responsible for GC factor and X-box-binding protein transcription factor binding. The same allelic variant showed a nonsignificant trend toward a shorter progression-free survival (GG, 7.5 months; other genotypes, 9.3 months; HR 1.823, 95% CI 0.8904-3.734; p = 0.1). Further analyses are needed to confirm that the topo-1 SNP rs6072249 and transcription factor interaction could be a part of tools to predict clinical outcome in mCRC patients treated with irinotecan-based regimens. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Age-dependent improvement in median and long-term survival in unselected population-based Nordic registries of patients with synchronous metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorbye, H; Cvancarova, M; Qvortrup, C

    2013-01-01

    In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) trials, median survival has increased from 6 months to above 20 months during the previous decades. Uncertainty exists in how this survival improvement has translated to the general mCRC population.......In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) trials, median survival has increased from 6 months to above 20 months during the previous decades. Uncertainty exists in how this survival improvement has translated to the general mCRC population....

  4. RAS mutations affect pattern of metastatic spread and increase propensity for brain metastasis in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaeger, Rona; Cowell, Elizabeth; Chou, Joanne F; Gewirtz, Alexandra N; Borsu, Laetitia; Vakiani, Efsevia; Solit, David B; Rosen, Neal; Capanu, Marinela; Ladanyi, Marc; Kemeny, Nancy

    2015-04-15

    RAS and PIK3CA mutations in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) have been associated with worse survival. We sought to evaluate the impact of RAS and PIK3CA mutations on cumulative incidence of metastasis to potentially curable sites of liver and lung and other sites such as bone and brain. We performed a computerized search of the electronic medical record of our institution for mCRC cases genotyped for RAS or PIK3CA mutations from 2008 to 2012. Cases were reviewed for patient characteristics, survival, and site-specific metastasis. Among the 918 patients identified, 477 cases were RAS wild type, and 441 cases had a RAS mutation (394 at KRAS exon 2, 29 at KRAS exon 3 or 4, and 18 in NRAS). RAS mutation was significantly associated with shorter median overall survival (OS) and on multivariate analysis independently predicted worse OS (HR, 1.6; P brain metastasis and on multivariate analysis was an independent predictor of involvement of these sites (HR, 1.5, 1.6, and 3.7, respectively). PIK3CA mutations occurred in 10% of the 786 cases genotyped, did not predict for worse survival, and did not exhibit a site-specific pattern of metastatic spread. The metastatic potential of CRC varies with the presence of RAS mutation. RAS mutation is associated with worse OS and increased incidence of lung, bone, and brain metastasis. An understanding of this site-specific pattern of spread may help to inform physicians' assessment of symptoms in patients with mCRC. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  5. Comparable survival outcome of metastatic colorectal cancer in Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients: Retrospective analysis of the South Australian metastatic colorectal cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Yoko; Karapetis, Christos S; Roder, David; Beeke, Carol; Hocking, Christopher; Roy, Amitesh C; Townsend, Amanda R; Padbury, Rob; Maddern, Guy; Price, Timothy J

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to investigate disparities in demographics, disease characteristics, treatment and overall survival between South Australian (SA) Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). This employs a retrospective population study using the SA mCRC registry. The SA mCRC registry identifies mCRC patients from hospital encounters, histopathology reports, medical oncology letters, clinician notification, attendances at multidisciplinary meetings and death audits by the SA Cancer Registry. A total of 2865 adult mCRC patients including 14 Indigenous patients were identified through the SA mCRC registry between February 2006 and August 2013. Patients were linked to the SA Cancer Registry to obtain Indigenous status. Demographic, disease and treatment characteristics were compared using Chi-squared test and t-test; while overall survival defined as time to any cause of death was analysed using Cox regression. No difference was observed for clinical characteristics, except for a higher proportion of Indigenous patients receiving chemotherapy (85.7% versus 58.5%; P = 0.04). The rate of liver surgery was similar across the two groups (21.0% versus 15.1%; P = 0.40). The median overall survivals were equivalent (11.9 months versus 15.1 months; hazard ratio = 1.00; 95% confidence interval for hazard ratio, 0.54-1.86). Clinical characteristics and survival outcomes were similar between Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients captured on the SA mCRC registry, and outcome of those who have an access to comprehensive cancer care appeared independent of Indigenous status and in line with large clinical trials. Underestimation of Indigenous cases due to their lower utilisation of cancer service could not be excluded and ultimately the accurate reporting of these patients is crucial. © 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  6. TIMP-1 and CEA as biomarkers in third-line treatment with irinotecan and cetuximab for metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, K. L. G.; Christensen, I. J.; Nielsen, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    KRAS wild-type (wt) status determines indication for treatment with combination therapy, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors, but still, the overall response rate in KRAS wt patients is less than 40 %. Consequently, the majority of patients will suffer from substantial side...... in colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical value of TIMP-1 in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treated with cetuximab and irinotecan. Patients with chemotherapy-resistant mCRC referred to third-line treatment with cetuximab (initial 400 mg/m(2...

  7. Adenoma, advanced adenoma and colorectal cancer prevalence in asymptomatic 40- to 49-year-old subjects with a first-degree family history of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio Blanco, G; Cretella, M; Paoluzi, O A; Caruso, A; Mannisi, E; Servadei, F; Romeo, S; Grasso, E; Sileri, P; Giannelli, M; Biancone, L; Palmieri, G; Pallone, F

    2013-09-01

    First-degree relatives (FDRs) of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) have an increased CRC risk. Few studies have addressed if adenoma and advanced adenoma risk is increased among individuals, 40-49 years of age, with a family history of CRC. Therefore, the aim of the study was to define the prevalence and location of adenoma, advanced adenoma and CRC, according to age, in asymptomatic individuals with a family history of CRC. Retrospective study of asymptomatic FDRs, 40 to ≥70 years of age undergoing first screening colonoscopy over a 3-year period, of CRC patients. Among 464 individuals studied, the prevalence of adenoma and advanced adenoma was 18.1% and 6.4%, respectively. According to age intervals, the prevalences of adenoma and advanced adenoma were 14% and 3.5%, respectively, in subjects 40-49 years of age; 14.4% and 6.3%, respectively, in subjects 50-59 years of age; 27% and 8%, respectively, in subjects 60-69 years of age; and 25% and 14%, respectively, in subjects ≥70 years of age; no significant difference was found among the four groups. No difference in lesion location was found, with similar numbers of preneoplastic lesions being present in the right colon and the left colon. CRC was diagnosed in three (0.64%) subjects, one of whom was in the 40-49 years age group. In our population of FDRs of CRC patients, 40-49 years of age, the prevalences of adenoma and advanced adenoma were similar to those observed in older subjects with the same CRC risk. Our data support the current indication to perform screening colonoscopy earlier than 45 years of age in subjects at high CRC risk. Colorectal Disease © 2013 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  8. Predictive biomarkers with potential of converting conventional chemotherapy to targeted therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Frank; Smith, David Hersi; Nygård, Sune Boris

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The availability of systemic chemotherapy regimens for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is based on the results from large prospective, randomized studies. The main chemotherapeutic drugs used in treatment of mCRC are the fluoropyrimidines (5-fluorouraci......: Several promising biomarker candidates were identified, notably thymidylate synthase for 5-FU, topoisomerase I for irinotecan and ERCC1 for oxaliplatin. However, these candidates warrant further analysis, where assay performance and clinical trial design should be in focus....

  9. PET and MRI of metastatic peritoneal and pulmonary colorectal cancer in mice with HER1-targeted 89Zr labeled panitumumab

    OpenAIRE

    Nayak, Tapan K.; Garmestani, Kayhan; Milenic, Diane E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2012-01-01

    Human Epidermal growth factor receptor (HER1) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Panitumumab is an anti-HER1 monoclonal antibody approved for use in CRC. However, little data exists regarding HER1 status in the corresponding distant metastases and corresponding little information is available regarding the localization of panitumumab at primary and metastatic lesions. The utility of PET and MRI using 89Zr-panitumumab to assess the status of HER1 in distant...

  10. Excessive collagen turnover products are released during colorectal cancer progression and elevated in serum from metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Stephanie Nina; Sanz-Pamplona, R.; Pedersen, Susanne Brix

    2016-01-01

    biomarkers were able to differentiate stage IV metastatic patients from all other stages. Combination of all markers with age and gender in a logistic regression model discriminated between metastatic and non-metastatic patients with an AUROC of 0.80. The data suggest that the levels of these collagen...

  11. Sodium hyaluronate enhances colorectal tumour cell metastatic potential in vitro and in vivo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tan, B

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Sodium hyaluronate has been used intraperitoneally to prevent postoperative adhesions. However, the effect of sodium hyaluronate on tumour growth and metastasis in vitro and in vivo is still unknown. METHODS: Human colorectal tumour cell lines SW480, SW620 and SW707 were treated with sodium hyaluronate (10-500 microg\\/ml) and carboxymethylcellulose (0.125-1 per cent), and tumour cell proliferation and motility were determined in vitro. For the in vivo experiments male BD IX rats were randomized to a sodium hyaluronate group (n = 11; intraperitoneal administration of 0.5 x 10(6) DHD\\/K12 tumour cells and 5 ml 0.4 per cent sodium hyaluronate) or a phosphate-buffered saline group (n = 11; 0.5 x 10(6) DHD\\/K12 tumour cells and 5 ml phosphate-buffered saline intraperitoneally). Four weeks later the intraperitoneal tumour load was visualized directly. RESULTS: In vitro sodium hyaluronate increased tumour cell proliferation and motility significantly. Sodium hyaluronate-induced tumour cell motility appeared to be CD44 receptor dependent, whereas sodium hyaluronate-induced tumour cell proliferation was CD44 receptor independent. In vivo there was a significantly higher total tumour nodule count in the peritoneal cavity of the sodium hyaluronate-treated group compared with the control (P = 0.016). CONCLUSION: Sodium hyaluronate enhances tumour metastatic potential in vitro and in vivo, which suggests that use of sodium hyaluronate to prevent adhesions in colorectal cancer surgery may also potentiate intraperitoneal tumour growth. Presented to the Patey Prize Session of the Surgical Research Society and the annual scientific meeting of the Association of Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland, Brighton, UK, 4-7 May 1999

  12. Does "conversion chemotherapy" really improve survival in metastatic colorectal cancer patients with liver-limited disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, K; Kanazawa, A; Iwamoto, S; Kato, T; Nakajima, A; Arimoto, A

    2014-04-01

    The clinical benefits of conversion chemotherapy followed by liver resection for initially unresectable colorectal liver metastases are still controversial. The criteria for unresectability vary from one team to another. To clarify this issue, we retrospectively assessed the survival and characteristics of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients with liver-limited disease (LLD) who underwent conversion therapy. Our criteria for resectability depended on the size of the remnant liver volume (>30 %) and expected function after removal of all metastases. Between December 2007 and September 2011, a total of 115 patients were diagnosed as having mCRC with LLD and received chemotherapy. Among them, 47 had tumors that were initially diagnosed as resectable. They underwent hepatic resection after chemotherapy (resected group). Of the 67 tumors were initially diagnosed as unresectable, 12 became resectable after chemotherapy (conversion group), leaving 55 tumors that remained unresectable after chemotherapy (unresected group). The median follow-up was 25.2 months. Hepatic resection was more invasive in the conversion group than in the resected group. Median disease-free survival was significantly higher in the resected group than in the conversion group (p = 0.013). Overall survival (OS) was also higher in the resected group, but the difference was not significant (p = 0.36). However, OS was significantly higher in the conversion group than in the unresected group (p = 0.034). Multivariate analysis of the resected and conversion groups showed that OS was significantly negatively influenced by abnormal carcinoembryonic antigen levels at surgery (p = 0.037) and a hospital stay >30 days (p = 0.009). Our results showed that conversion chemotherapy could contribute to longer OS in mCRC patients with LLD.

  13. Prognostic significance of K-Ras mutation rate in metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenzi, Bruno; Cremolini, Chiara; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Russo, Antonio; Mannavola, Francesco; Perrone, Giuseppe; Pantano, Francesco; Loupakis, Fotios; Rossini, Daniele; Ongaro, Elena; Bonazzina, Erica; Dell'Aquila, Emanuela; Imperatori, Marco; Zoccoli, Alice; Bronte, Giuseppe; De Maglio, Giovanna; Fontanini, Gabriella; Natoli, Clara; Falcone, Alfredo; Santini, Daniele; Onetti-Muda, Andrea; Siena, Salvatore; Tonini, Giuseppe; Aprile, Giuseppe

    2015-10-13

    Activating mutations of K-Ras gene have a well-established role as predictors of resistance to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. Their prognostic value is controversial, and no data regarding the prognostic value of mutation rate, defined as the percentage of mutated alleles/tumor sample, are available. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of K-Rasmutation rate in a homogenous cohort of mCRC patients receiving first-line doublet plus bevacizumab. This retrospective study enrolled 397 K-Ras mutant mCRC patients from 6 Italian centers, and 263 patients were fully evaluable for our analysis. K-Ras mutation rate was assessed by pyrosequencing. Patients with less than 60% of cancer cells in tumor tissue were excluded. No patients received anti-EGFR containing anticancer therapy, at any time. Median mutation rate was 40% and was adopted as cut-off. The primary and secondary endpoints were PFS and OS respectively. At univariate analysis, K-Ras mutation rate higher than 40% was significantly associated with lower PFS (7.3 vs 9.1 months; P < 0.0001) and OS (21 vs 31 months; P = 0.004). A multivariate model adjusted for age at diagnosis, site of origin of tumor tissue (primary vs metastases), referral center, number of metastatic sites, and first-line chemotherapy backbone, showed that K-Ras mutation rate remained a significant predictor of PFS and OS in the whole population. Our data demonstrate an association between K-Ras mutation rate and prognosis in mCRC patients treated with bevacizumab-containing first-line therapy. These data deserve to be verified in an independent validation set.

  14. Tumor budding predicts response to anti-EGFR therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlobec, Inti; Molinari, Francesca; Martin, Vittoria; Mazzucchelli, Luca; Saletti, Piercarlo; Trezzi, Rosangela; De Dosso, Sara; Vlajnic, Tatjana; Frattini, Milo; Lugli, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the evaluation of tumor budding can complement K-RAS analysis to improve the individualized prediction of response to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor based therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. METHODS: Forty-three patients with mCRC treated with cetuximab or panitumumab were entered into this study. According to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, 30 patients had stable or progressive disease (non-responsive), while 13 patients had a partial response. Tumor buds were evaluated from whole tissue sections stained for pan-cytokeratin, evaluated in the densest region using a 40 × objective and “high-grade” tumor budding was defined as 15 buds/high-power field. RESULTS: Tumor buds and K-RAS mutation both correctly classified 68% of patients. All patients with K-RAS mutation (n = 7) or high-grade tumor budding (n = 11) were non-responsive, of which 4 patients had both features. All 13 partial responders were K-RAS wild-type with low-grade tumor budding. Combined, the predictive value of K-RAS and tumor budding was 80%. Additionally, high-grade tumor budding was significantly related to worse progression-free survival [HR (95% CI): 2.8 (1.3-6.0, P = 0.008)]. CONCLUSION: If confirmed in larger cohorts, the addition of tumor budding to K-RAS analysis may represent an effective approach for individualized patient management in the metastatic setting. PMID:20939111

  15. 'Druggable' alterations detected by Ion Torrent in metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Weijia; Radovich, Milan; Zheng, Yulong; Fu, Cai-Yun; Zhao, Peng; Mao, Chengyu; Zheng, Yi; Zheng, Shusen

    2014-06-01

    The frequency and poor prognosis of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) emphasizes the requirement for improved biomarkers for use in the treatment and prognosis of mCRC. In the present study, somatic variants in exonic regions of key cancer genes were identified in mCRC patients. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues obtained by biopsy of the metastases of mCRC patients were collected, and the DNA was extracted and sequenced using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. For the targeted amplification of known cancer genes, the Ion AmpliSeq™ Cancer Panel, which is designed to detect 739 Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) mutations in 604 loci from 46 oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes using as little as 10 ng of input DNA, was used. The sequencing results were then analyzed using the Ampliseq™ Variant Caller plug-in within the Ion Torrent Suite software. In addition, Ingenuity Pathway software was used to perform a pathway analysis. The Cox regression analysis was also conducted to investigate the potential correlation between alteration numbers and clinical factors, including response rate, disease-free survival and overall survival. Among 10 specimens, 65 genetic alterations were identified in 24 genes following the exclusion of germline mutations using the SNP database, whereby 41% of the alterations were also present in the COSMIC database. No clinical factors were found to significantly correlate with the alteration numbers in the patients by statistical analysis. However, pathway analysis identified 'colorectal cancer metastasis signaling' as the most commonly mutated canonical pathway. This analysis further revealed mutated genes in the Wnt, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β/SMAD signaling pathways. Notably, 11 genes, including the expected APC, BRAF, KRAS, PIK3CA and TP53 genes, were mutated in at least two samples. Notably, 90% (9/10) of mCRC patients harbored at least one

  16. Safety and efficacy of nintedanib for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesco-Martinez, Maria Carmen; Sanchez-Torre, Ana; Garcia-Carbonero, Rocio

    2017-11-01

    Nintedanib (BIBF 1200) is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor that targets the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFR), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGFR) and fibroblast growth factor (FGFR) receptors. It is approved in Europe in combination with docetaxel for patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma who have progressed to first-line chemotherapy. However, its role in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is uncertain. Recent results from the LUME-Colon 1 pivotal phase III trial showed only a marginal increase in progression free survival over placebo in refractory mCRC patients, with a toxicity profile similar to other antiangiogenic agents, and no benefit in overall survival. Areas covered: The aim of this review is to summarize the pharmacology, efficacy and safety profile of nintedanib in the context of mCRC, and to provide some perspective regarding the role of this drug in clinical practice. Expert commentary: Nintedanib provides limited clinical benefit in refractory CRC and its use in this clinical setting is not warranted. Efforts shall continue to pursue the identification of predictive biomarkers that allow the selection of subpopulations with a greater likelihood to benefit from this therapeutic approach, in order to improve the benefit-risk and cost-benefit ratios of this and other antiangiogenic agents.

  17. Gemcitabine and capecitabine for heavily pre-treated metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise G; Pallisgaard, Niels; Andersen, Rikke F

    2014-01-01

    AIM: We investigated the efficacy and safety of capecitabine and gemcitabin (GemCap) in heavily pre-treated, therapy-resistant metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients and the clinical importance of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) measurement. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients' inclusion criteria included...... histopathologically-verified mCRC refractory to standard chemotherapy, adequate organ function and performance status. Treatment included capecitabine (2,000 mg/m(2) day on days 1-7 q2w) and gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m(2) on day 1). The number of DNA alleles was measured in pre-treatment plasma samples using an in......-house developed qPCR. RESULTS: Forty-nine patients were included in the study. GemCap was well-tolerated in the majority of patients. Disease control rate was 30%, median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) by intention-to-treat were 2.7 (95%CI=2.6-2.8) and 6.8 (95%CI=5.0-7.7) months. Median...

  18. Metabolomic NMR fingerprinting to identify and predict survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertini, Ivano; Cacciatore, Stefano; Jensen, Benny V

    2012-01-01

    Earlier detection of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) might improve their treatment and survival outcomes. In this study, we used proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) to profile the serum metabolome in patients with mCRC and determine whether a disease signature may exist...... survival (HR, 3.4; 95% confidence interval, 2.06-5.50; P = 1.33 × 10(-6)). A number of metabolites concurred with the (1)H-NMR fingerprint of mCRC, offering insights into mCRC metabolic pathways. Our findings establish that (1)H-NMR profiling of patient serum can provide a strong metabolomic signature of m...... that is strong enough to predict overall survival (OS). In 153 patients with mCRC and 139 healthy subjects from three Danish hospitals, we profiled two independent sets of serum samples in a prospective phase II study. In the training set, (1)H-NMR metabolomic profiling could discriminate patients with mCRC from...

  19. Aggressive Treatment of Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Increases Survival: A Scandinavian Single-Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer Watten Brudvik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We examined overall and disease-free survivals in a cohort of patients subjected to resection of liver metastasis from colorectal cancer (CRLM in a 10-year period when new treatment strategies were implemented. Methods. Data from 239 consecutive patients selected for liver resection of CRLM during the period from 2002 to 2011 at a single center were used to estimate overall and disease-free survival. The results were assessed against new treatment strategies and established risk factors. Results. The 5-year cumulative overall and disease-free survivals were 46 and 24%. The overall survival was the same after reresection, independently of the number of prior resections and irrespectively of the location of the recurrent disease. The time intervals between each recurrence were similar (11 ± 1 months. Patients with high tumor load given neoadjuvant chemotherapy had comparable survival to those with less extensive disease without neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Positive resection margin or resectable extrahepatic disease did not affect overall survival. Conclusion. Our data support that one still, and perhaps to an even greater extent, should seek an aggressive therapeutic strategy to achieve resectable status for recurrent hepatic and extrahepatic metastases. The data should be viewed in the context of recent advances in the understanding of cancer biology and the metastatic process.

  20. Distinct claudin expression profiles of hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic colorectal and pancreatic carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holczbauer, Ágnes; Gyöngyösi, Benedek; Lotz, Gábor; Szijártó, Attila; Kupcsulik, Péter; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Kiss, András

    2013-04-01

    Tight junction proteins, including claudins, are often dysregulated during carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Moreover, the claudin expression pattern usually varies between different tumor entities. We aimed to investigate claudin expression profiles of primary and metastatic liver malignancies. We analyzed claudin-1, -2, -3, -4, and -7 expression by quantitative immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. Twenty hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and liver metastases of 20 colorectal adenocarcinomas (CRLMs) and 15 pancreatic adenocarcinomas (PLMs) were studied together with paired surrounding non-tumorous liver samples and 5 normal liver samples. Strong claudin-3 and -7 immunohistochemical positivities were detected in CRLM samples, each with significantly stronger staining when compared with HCC and PLM groups. Claudin-1 protein was found highly expressed in CRLM, in contrast to lower expression in PLM and HCC. CRLMs and PLMs also were strongly positive for claudin-4, while being virtually undetectable in HCC. Claudin-2 showed strong positivity in non-tumorous liver tissue, whereas significantly weaker positivity was observed in all tumors. Differences in mRNA expression were mostly similar to those found by immunohistochemistry. In conclusion, HCC and both CRLM and PLM display distinct claudin expression profiles, which might provide better understanding of the pathobiology of these lesions and might be used for differential diagnosis.

  1. Fluorouracil, leucovorin and irinotecan associated with aflibercept can induce microscopic colitis in metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiringhelli, François; Vincent, Julie; Beltjens, Françoise; Bengrine, Leila; Ladoire, Sylvain

    2015-12-01

    Aflibercept is a recombinant fusion protein that acts as a soluble decoy receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). This molecule binds to all isoforms of VEGF-A as well as VEGF-B and placental growth factor, preventing them from activating their respective receptors. Aflibercept is used for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in association with irinotecan. For reasons that remain to be elucidated, the addition of aflibercept to irinotecan-based chemotherapy increases the incidence of grade 3-4 diarrhea. We performed systematic colonic biopsies in three patients with grade 3 diarrhea after introduction of fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan and aflibercept treatment for mCRC. For each patient, the diarrhea necessitated treatment discontinuation. Colonoscopy showed normal colonic mucosa. However, histopathological examination of the biopsies performed in these three patients revealed typical features of microscopic colitis. All three patients were treated with budesonide and mesalazine, leading to rapid regression of clinical symptoms. Chemotherapy was reintroduced in all patients, with only mild, grade 1 diarrhea under mesalazine and budesonide treatment. These are the first observations of aflibercept-induced microscopic colitis, and support the use of specific treatment on top of anti-diarrheal treatment in case of important digestive adverse events.

  2. Correlation between non-metastatic protein 23 expression and clinicopathological features of colorectal cancer in Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, J W; Chu, X Q

    2015-12-02

    The current meta-analysis was performed to investigate the association between non-metastatic protein 23 (NM23) expression, tumor pathology, and disease prognosis in colorectal cancer (CRC) among Asians. English and Chinese language-based electronic databases (e.g., PubMed, EBSCO, Ovid, Springerlink, Wiley, Web of Science, Wanfang databases, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP databases) were searched using search terms to identify published studies relevant to NM23 and CRC with immunohistochemistry. In total, 289 studies were identified through database searches, and 16 cohort studies (4 studies in English, 12 in Chinese) were chosen for meta-analysis, which included 1592 CRC patients. The results revealed that NM23 protein expression in CRC tissue was higher in patients with Dukes stages A and B than in patients with Dukes stages C and D. The NM23 protein was expressed at higher levels in well- and moderately differentiated tumors than in poorly differentiated tumors. The 5-year survival rate was also higher in CRC patients with NM23-positive tumors than in CRC patients with NM23-negative tumors. Significantly, 5-year tumor relapse and metastasis were lower in patients with NM23-positive tumors than in CRC patients with NM23-negative tumors. The findings suggest that NM23 expression status is associated with tumor aggressiveness and survival in CRC among Asians. Importantly, CRC patients with NM23-positive tumors had a better prognosis, and thus NM23 expression maybe used as a key prognostic indicator for CRC.

  3. Resilience and hope during advanced disease: a pilot study with metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Joao Paulo Consentino; da Silva, Amanda Gomes; Soares, Ivan Agurtov; Ashmawi, Hazem Adel; Vieira, Joaquim Edson

    2016-08-02

    The balance between hope-hopelessness plays an important role in the way terminally ill patients report quality of life, and personal resilience may be related to hope at the end of life. The objective of this study was to explore associations between personal resilience, hope, and other possible predictors of hope in advanced cancer patients. A cross-sectional pilot study was carried out with metastatic colorectal cancer patients in a tertiary hospital. The patients answered the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, Herth Hope Index, Barthel Index, an instrument addressing family and social support, visual-numeric scales for pain and suffering, a two-item screening for depression, socio-demographic and socio-economic information about the family. Forty-four patients were interviewed (mean age 56 years; range 29-86). A strong correlation was noted between resilience and hope (0.63; p patients, 20 presented with depressive symptoms. These depressive patients had lower resilience (p = 0.005) and hope (p = 0.003), and higher scores of suffering (p resilience and hope kept stable after adjusting for age, gender, and presence of depression (p resilience is a dynamic, changeable path that can improve hope, resilience-fostering interventions should be most valued in palliative care settings and should be commenced as soon as possible with cancer patients. Patients with advanced stages of non-malignant conditions would also probably benefit from such interventions.

  4. Gastrointestinal perforation in metastatic colorectal cancer patients with peritoneal metastases receiving bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohullah, Aflah; Wong, Hui-Li; Sjoquist, Katrin M; Gibbs, Peter; Field, Kathryn; Tran, Ben; Shapiro, Jeremy; Mckendrick, Joe; Yip, Desmond; Nott, Louise; Gebski, Val; Ng, Weng; Chua, Wei; Price, Timothy; Tebbutt, Niall; Chantrill, Lorraine

    2015-05-07

    To investigate the safety and efficacy of adding bevacizumab to first-line chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer patients with peritoneal disease. We compared rates of gastrointestinal perforation in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and peritoneal disease receiving first-line chemotherapy with and without bevacizumab in three distinct cohorts: (1) the AGITG MAX trial (Phase III randomised clinical trial comparing capecitabine vs capecitabine and bevacizumab vs capecitabine, bevacizumab and mitomycinC); (2) the prospective Treatment of Recurrent and Advanced Colorectal Cancer (TRACC) registry (any first-line regimen ± bevacizumab); and (3) two cancer centres in New South Wales, Australia [Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre and Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre (NSWCC) from January 2005 to Decenber 2012, (any first-line regimen ± bevacizumab). For the AGITG MAX trial capecitabine was compared to the other two arms (capecitabine/bevacizumab and capecitabine/bevacizumab/mitomycinC). In the AGITG MAX trial and the TRACC registry rates of gastrointestinal perforation were also collected in patients who did not have peritoneal metastases. Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival, chemotherapy duration, and overall survival. Time-to-event outcomes were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Eighty-four MAX, 179 TRACC and 69 NSWCC patients had peritoneal disease. There were no gastrointestinal perforations recorded in either the MAX subgroup or the NSWCC cohorts. Of the patients without peritoneal disease in the MAX trial, 4/300 (1.3%) in the bevacizumab arms had gastrointestinal perforations compared to 1/123 (0.8%) in the capecitabine alone arm. In the TRACC registry 3/126 (2.4%) patients who had received bevacizumab had a gastrointestinal perforation compared to 1/53 (1.9%) in the chemotherapy alone arm. In a further analysis of patients without peritoneal metastases in the TRACC registry, the rate of

  5. A prediction model for advanced colorectal neoplasia in an asymptomatic screening population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Noh; Son, Hee Jung; Choi, Sun Kyu; Chang, Dong Kyung; Kim, Young-Ho; Jung, Sin-Ho; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2017-01-01

    An electronic medical record (EMR) database of a large unselected population who received screening colonoscopies may minimize sampling error and represent real-world estimates of risk for screening target lesions of advanced colorectal neoplasia (CRN). Our aim was to develop and validate a prediction model for assessing the probability of advanced CRN using a clinical data warehouse. A total of 49,450 screenees underwent their first colonoscopy as part of a health check-up from 2002 to 2012 at Samsung Medical Center, and the dataset was constructed by means of natural language processing from the computerized EMR system. The screenees were randomized into training and validation sets. The prediction model was developed using logistic regression. The model performance was validated and compared with existing models using area under receiver operating curve (AUC) analysis. In the training set, age, gender, smoking duration, drinking frequency, and aspirin use were identified as independent predictors for advanced CRN (adjusted P < .01). The developed model had good discrimination (AUC = 0.726) and was internally validated (AUC = 0.713). The high-risk group had a 3.7-fold increased risk of advanced CRN compared to the low-risk group (1.1% vs. 4.0%, P < .001). The discrimination performance of the present model for high-risk patients with advanced CRN was better than that of the Asia-Pacific Colorectal Screening score (AUC = 0.678, P < .001) and Schroy's CAN index (AUC = 0.672, P < .001). The present 5-item risk model can be calculated readily using a simple questionnaire and can identify the low- and high-risk groups of advanced CRN at the first screening colonoscopy. This model may increase colorectal cancer risk awareness and assist healthcare providers in encouraging the high-risk group to undergo a colonoscopy.

  6. A systematic review of salvage therapy to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer previously treated with fluorouracil, oxaliplatin and irinotecan +/- targeted therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorte Lisbet; Palshof, Jesper Andreas; Larsen, Finn Ole

    2014-01-01

    in the third-line setting. We therefore performed a systematic review of the current literature on third or later lines of treatment to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer after the use of approved drugs or combinations. METHODS: A computer-based literature search was carried out using Pubmed and data...... in third- or later lines of treatment in metastatic colorectal cancer are highly warranted. Identification of predictive biomarkers and improvement of our understanding of molecular mechanisms is crucial.......UNLABELLED: Oxaliplatin, irinotecan and 5-fluorouracil in combination with or without targeted therapies are well-documented treatment options for first- and second-line treatments of metastatic colorectal cancer. However, there are much less data on the beneficial effect on systemic therapy...

  7. Degradation Rate of 5-Fluorouracil in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A New Predictive Outcome Biomarker?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Botticelli

    Full Text Available 5-FU based chemotherapy is the most common first line regimen used for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC. Identification of predictive markers of response to chemotherapy is a challenging approach for drug selection. The present study analyzes the predictive role of 5-FU degradation rate (5-FUDR and genetic polymorphisms (MTHFR, TSER, DPYD on survival.Genetic polymorphisms of MTHFR, TSER and DPYD, and the 5-FUDR of homogenous patients with mCRC were retrospectively studied. Genetic markers and the 5-FUDR were correlated with clinical outcome.133 patients affected by mCRC, treated with fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy from 2009 to 2014, were evaluated. Patients were classified into three metabolic classes, according to normal distribution of 5-FUDR in more than 1000 patients, as previously published: poor-metabolizer (PM with 5-FU-DR ≤ 0,85 ng/ml/106 cells/min (8 pts; normal metabolizer with 0,85 < 5-FU-DR < 2,2 ng/ml/106 cells/min (119 pts; ultra-rapid metabolizer (UM with 5-FU-DR ≥ 2,2 ng/ml/106 cells/min (6 pts. PM and UM groups showed a longer PFS respect to normal metabolizer group (14.5 and 11 months respectively vs 8 months; p = 0.029. A higher G3-4 toxicity rate was observed in PM and UM, respect to normal metabolizer (50% in both PM and UM vs 18%; p = 0.019. No significant associations between genes polymorphisms and outcomes or toxicities were observed.5-FUDR seems to be significantly involved in predicting survival of patients who underwent 5-FU based CHT for mCRC. Although our findings require confirmation in large prospective studies, they reinforce the concept that individual genetic variation may allow personalized selection of chemotherapy to optimize clinical outcomes.

  8. Joint prognostic effect of obesity and chronic systemic inflammation in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manasi S; Fogelman, David R; Raghav, Kanwal Pratap Singh; Heymach, John V; Tran, Hai T; Jiang, Zhi-Qin; Kopetz, Scott; Daniel, Carrie R

    2015-09-01

    Obesity is strongly linked with chronic systemic inflammation, and each has been linked with disease progression and survival in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). The authors investigated the joint prognostic effects of obesity and circulating cytokines in patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC), an understudied patient group. In 242 chemotherapy-naive patients with mCRC, the authors measured a multiplex cytokine panel and abstracted clinicopathological features, height, and weight from medical records. Overall survival (OS) was calculated from the date of mCRC diagnosis until the date of death from any cause and evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models. Cut points for cytokines were determined by restricted cubic spline regression. In multivariable models, elevated interleukin (IL)-8, IL-2 receptor alpha, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) emerged as significant predictors of poor OS (hazard ratio [HR] and 95% confidence interval [95% CI] for above vs below the (referent) knot point: 2.5 [95% CI, 1.7-3.7], 1.9 [95% CI, 1.3-2.7], and 2.2 [95% CI, 1.6-3.1], respectively; all PObesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2) ) was not found to be associated with OS, but appeared to modify the relationships observed with IL-8 and LDH, which were associated with a significant 4-fold and 5-fold risk of death, respectively, in obese patients compared with a 2-fold risk of death in nonobese patients (P for interaction of .06 and .04, respectively). Similar results emerged from joint effects analysis, in which obese patients with high IL-8 (or LDH) experienced the highest risk of death. Although obesity itself was not found to be independently associated with survival in patients with mCRC, the adverse prognostic significance of LDH and IL-8 was found to be enhanced in obese patients. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  9. Primary tumor location and bevacizumab effectiveness in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisen, M K; Johansen, J S; Dehlendorff, C; Larsen, J S; Osterlind, K; Hansen, J; Nielsen, S E; Pfeiffer, P; Tarpgaard, L S; Holländer, N H; Keldsen, N; Hansen, T F; Jensen, B B; Jensen, B V

    2013-10-01

    There is an unmet need for predictive markers for the antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We aimed to assess whether the location of the primary tumor is associated with bevacizumab effectiveness when combined with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPEOX) in the first-line treatment of patients with mCRC. A cohort of 667 consecutive patients with mCRC from the general community treated from 2006 to 2011 with CAPEOX and bevacizumab as standard first-line therapy was compared with a cohort of 213 patients treated with CAPEOX from 2003 to 2006, before bevacizumab was approved. Main outcome measures were progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Differences in outcome were tested using Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests, and multivariate analyses were carried out using Cox Proportional Hazards models. Patients treated with CAPEOX and bevacizumab with primary tumors originating in the sigmoid colon and rectum had a significantly better outcome than patients with primary tumors originating from the cecum to the descending colon, both for PFS (median PFS 9.3 versus 7.2 months; hazard ratio (HR) 0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.56-0.82) and for OS (median OS 23.5 versus 13.0 months; HR 0.47, 95% CI 0.38-0.57). This difference was confirmed in multivariate analyses after adjustment for other potentially prognostic factors. For patients treated with CAPEOX, there was no association between primary tumor location and outcome, neither in unadjusted nor adjusted analyses. The addition of bevacizumab to CAPEOX in first-line treatment of patients with mCRC may primarily benefit patients with primary tumors originating in the rectum and sigmoid colon. This hypothesis needs to be validated in data from completed randomized trials. NCT00212615.

  10. Feasibility and response of helical tomotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Catholic Kwandong University International St. Mary' s Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sun yun; Moon, Seong Kwon; Cho, Kwang Hwan; Shin, Eung Jin; Lee, Moon Sung; Ryu, Chang Beom; Ko, Bong Min; Yun, Ji Na [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To investigate the treatment outcome and the toxicity of helical tomotherapy (HT) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We retrospectively reviewed 18 patients with 31 lesions from mCRC treated with HT between 2009 and 2013. The liver (9 lesions) and lymph nodes (9 lesions) were the most frequent sites. The planning target volume (PTV) ranged from 12 to 1,110 mL (median, 114 mL). The total doses ranged from 30 to 70 Gy in 10-30 fractions. When the alpha/beta value for the tumor was assumed to be 10 Gy for the biologically equivalent dose (BED), the total doses ranged from 39 to 119 Gy{sub 10} (median, 55 Gy{sub 10}). Nineteen lesions were treated with concurrent chemotherapy (CCRT). With a median follow-up time of 16 months, the median overall survival for 18 patients was 33 months. Eight lesions (26%) achieved complete response. The 1- and 3-year local progression free survival (LPFS) rates for 31 lesions were 45% and 34%, respectively. On univariate analysis, significant parameters influencing LPFS rates were chemotherapy response before HT, aim of HT, CCRT, PTV, BED, and adjuvant chemotherapy. On multivariate analysis, PTV < or =113 mL and BED >48 Gy{sub 10} were associated with a statistically significant improvement in LFPS. During HT, four patients experienced grade 3 hematologic toxicities, each of whom had also received CCRT. The current study demonstrates the efficacy and tolerability of HT for mCRC. To define optimal RT dose according to tumor size of mCRC, further study should be needed.

  11. Tolerability of Capecitabine Monotherapy in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A Real-World Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicher, Laura W; de Graaf, Jacques C; Coers, Wilko; Tascilar, Metin; de Groot, Jan Willem B

    2017-03-01

    Capecitabine monotherapy is a treatment option for selected patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) and is administered to up to 17% of patients. Data are limited with regard to adverse events and dosing practices associated with capecitabine monotherapy in real-world situations. The aim of this study was to provide real-world data on adverse event rates and dose adjustments/discontinuations associated with capecitabine monotherapy in patients with mCRC. This retrospective study analyzed data from CRC patients scheduled to receive up to eight planned cycles of capecitabine monotherapy between 2009 and 2013 at a single large community hospital in The Netherlands. Data on adverse events (hand-foot syndrome [HFS], gastrointestinal (GI) events, hematological adverse events, and cardiotoxicity), as well as relative dose intensities (RDIs), dose reductions, and discontinuations, were evaluated. Data from 86 patients (45 females; mean age at the start of treatment, 69 years) were included. A total of 46.5% of patients experienced HFS and 44.2% experienced a GI event at some time during treatment. Hematological events and cardiotoxicity were rare. Most patients (77%) started at below the recommended dose, and patients at the lowest dose also had the lowest median RDIs. Dose reductions and discontinuations occurred in 15-25% of patients who experienced HFS or GI event over the course of eight cycles. HFS and GI events were very common in patients treated with capecitabine monotherapy in a real-world clinical setting. Most patients started treatment at below the recommended dose, and 15-25% of patients who had HFS or a GI event had a dose reduction or discontinuation.

  12. Clinico-pathological nomogram for predicting BRAF mutational status of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loupakis, Fotios; Moretto, Roberto; Aprile, Giuseppe; Muntoni, Marta; Cremolini, Chiara; Iacono, Donatella; Casagrande, Mariaelena; Ferrari, Laura; Salvatore, Lisa; Schirripa, Marta; Rossini, Daniele; De Maglio, Giovanna; Fasola, Gianpiero; Calvetti, Lorenzo; Pilotto, Sara; Carbognin, Luisa; Fontanini, Gabriella; Tortora, Giampaolo; Falcone, Alfredo; Sperduti, Isabella; Bria, Emilio

    2016-01-12

    In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), BRAFV600E mutation has been variously associated to specific clinico-pathological features. Two large retrospective series of mCRC patients from two Italian Institutions were used as training-set (TS) and validation-set (VS) for developing a nomogram predictive of BRAFV600E status. The model was internally and externally validated. In the TS, data from 596 mCRC patients were gathered (RAS wild-type (wt) 281 (47.1%); BRAFV600E mutated 54 (9.1%)); RAS and BRAFV600E mutations were mutually exclusive. In the RAS-wt population, right-sided primary (odds ratio (OR): 7.80, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.05-19.92), female gender (OR: 2.90, 95% CI 1.14-7.37) and mucinous histology (OR: 4.95, 95% CI 1.90-12.90) were independent predictors of BRAFV600E mutation, with high replication at internal validation (100%, 93% and 98%, respectively). A predictive nomogram was calculated: patients with the highest score (right-sided primary, female and mucinous) had a 81% chance to bear a BRAFV600E-mutant tumour; accuracy measures: AUC=0.812, SE:0.034, sensitivity:81.2%; specificity:72.1%. In the VS (508 pts, RAS wt: 262 (51.6%), BRAFV600E mutated: 49 (9.6%)), right-sided primary, female gender and mucinous histology were confirmed as independent predictors of BRAFV600E mutation with high accuracy. Three simple and easy-to-collect characteristics define a useful nomogram for predicting BRAF status in mCRC with high specificity and sensitivity.

  13. Next generation sequencing identifies 'interactome' signatures in relapsed and refractory metastatic colorectal cancer.

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    Johnson, Benny; Cooke, Laurence; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2017-02-01

    In the management of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), KRAS, NRAS and BRAF mutational status individualizes therapeutic options and identify a cohort of patients (pts) with an aggressive clinical course. We hypothesized that relapsed and refractory mCRC pts develop unique mutational signatures that may guide therapy, predict for a response and highlight key signaling pathways important for clinical decision making. Relapsed and refractory mCRC pts (N=32) were molecularly profiled utilizing commercially available next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms. Web-based bioinformatics tools (Reactome/Enrichr) were utilized to elucidate mutational profile linked pathways-networks that have the potential to guide therapy. Pts had progressed on fluoropyrimidines, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, bevacizumab, cetuximab and/or panitumumab. Most common histology was adenocarcinoma (colon N=29; rectal N=3). Of the mutations TP53 was the most common, followed by APC, KRAS, PIK3CA, BRAF, SMAD4, SPTA1, FAT1, PDGFRA, ATM, ROS1, ALK, CDKN2A, FBXW7, TGFBR2, NOTCH1 and HER3. Pts had on average had ≥5 unique mutations. The most frequent activated signaling pathways were: HER2, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), p38 through BRAF-MEK cascade via RIT and RIN, ARMS-mediated activation of MAPK cascade, and VEGFR2. Dominant driver oncogene mutations do not always equate to oncogenic dependence, hence understanding pathogenic 'interactome(s)' in individual pts is key to both clinically relevant targets and in choosing the next best therapy. Mutational signatures derived from corresponding 'pathway-networks' represent a meaningful tool to (I) evaluate functional investigation in the laboratory; (II) predict response to drug therapy; and (III) guide rational drug combinations in relapsed and refractory mCRC pts.

  14. EMAST is associated with a poor prognosis in microsatellite instable metastatic colorectal cancer.

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    Sabine Venderbosch

    Full Text Available To determine the frequency and prognostic value of elevated microsatellite alterations at selected tetranucleotide repeats (EMAST in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC patients in relation to microsatellite instability (MSI status and MSH3 protein expression.The frequency of EMAST was evaluated in mCRC patients with MSI tumors and microsatellite stable (MSS tumors. A literature overview was performed to compare the frequency of EMAST in our study with existing data. Immunohistochemistry for MSH3 was compared with EMAST status. Outcome was studied in terms of overall survival (OS of mCRC patients with MSI and MSS tumors.EMAST was evaluated in 89 patients with MSI tumors (including 39 patients with Lynch syndrome and 94 patients with MSS tumors. EMAST was observed in 45.9% (84 out of 183 of patients, with an increased frequency in MSI tumors (79.8% versus 13.8%, p < 0.001. We found no correlation between EMAST and MSH3 protein expression. There was no effect of EMAST on prognosis in patients with MSS tumors, but patients with MSI / non-EMAST tumors had a significantly better prognosis than patients with MSI / EMAST tumors (OS: HR 3.22, 95% CI 1.25-8.30.Frequency of EMAST was increased in mCRC patients with MSI tumors, compared to MSS tumors. Our data suggest that the presence of EMAST correlates with worse OS in these patients. There was no effect of EMAST on the prognosis of patients with MSS tumors. A limitation of our study is the small number of patients in our subgroup analysis.

  15. Developments in treating metastatic colorectal cancer: Recent international reports from ASCO 2007 and 2008

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    Michel Ducreux

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Michel DucreuxGastro-Intestinal Unit, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif Cedex, France; Department of Oncology, Paul Brousse University Hospital, Villejuif, France; Paris-Sud XI University, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, FranceIntroduction: Treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC, employing various schedules, combinations, and regimens utilizing 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, capecitabine, bevacizumab, and cetuximab, currently achieves an overall survival that extends to approximately two years. Major questions regarding optimal management of mCRC await resolution.Methods: A thorough review was conducted of all mCRC abstracts, posters, and other presentations at the 2007 meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO. Information was analyzed in relationship to previously published research to determine the potential impact of new data on current and future mCRC management strategies and patient outcomes. Updated data presented at ASCO 2008 relevant to these findings was also analyzed.Discussion: Ongoing challenges in mCRC treatment include defining the optimal role of targeted agents such as cetuximab and bevacizumab, elaborating the mechanisms underlying their toxicities, resolving the benefits of adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients who are candidates for surgical resection, establishing whether there are substantive differences between sequential and combination chemotherapy regimens, and determining the safety and tolerability of chemotherapy in elderly subjects.Conclusion: Recent reports presented at ASCO 2007 and 2008 indicate incremental improvements in care of patients with mCRC. Nevertheless, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, 5-FU, and to an increasing extent the targeted biologic agents bevacizumab and cetuximab continue unchallenged as first-line and later selections.Keywords: chemotherapy, combination chemotherapy, irinotecan, bevacizumab, cetuximab

  16. Prognostic factors and a survival score for patients with metastatic spinal cord compression from colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, D.; Douglas, S.; Huttenlocher, S. [Luebeck Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Veninga, T. [Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bajrovic, A. [University Medical Center Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Rudat, V. [Saad Specialist Hospital Al-Khobar (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schild, S.E. [Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-12-15

    Background: This study aimed to identify independent prognostic factors and to create a survival score for patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) from colorectal cancer (CRC). Patients and methods: Data from 121 patients irradiated for MSCC from CRC were retrospectively analyzed. Eleven potential prognostic factors were investigated including tumor type, age, gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score (ECOG-PS), number of involved vertebrae, ambulatory status prior to radiotherapy (RT), other bone metastases, visceral metastases, interval from cancer diagnosis to RT of MSCC, time of developing motor deficits prior to RT, and the RT schedule. Results: On multivariate analysis, improved motor function was significantly associated with an ECOG-PS of 1-2 (p = 0.011) and a slower development of motor deficits (p < 0.001). Improved local control was significantly associated with absence of visceral metastases (p = 0.043) and longer-course RT (p = 0.008). Improved survival was significantly associated with an ECOG-PS of 1-2 (p < 0.001), ambulatory status (p < 0.001), absence of visceral metastases (p < 0.001), and a slower development of motor deficits (p = 0.047). These four prognostic factors were included in a survival score. The score for each factor was determined by dividing the 6-month survival rate by 10. The prognostic score represented the sum of the factor scores. Four prognostic groups were designed; the 6-month survival rates were 0% for 8-12 points, 26% for 13-18 points, 62% for 20-23 points, and 100% for 24-27 points (p < 0.001). Conclusion: This study identified several independent prognostic factors for treatment outcomes in patients irradiated for MSCC from CRC. The survival prognosis of these patients can be estimated with a new score. (orig.)

  17. EMAST is associated with a poor prognosis in microsatellite instable metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venderbosch, Sabine; van Lent-van Vliet, Shannon; de Haan, Anton F J; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; Goossens, Monique; Punt, Cornelis J A; Koopman, Miriam; Nagtegaal, Iris D

    2015-01-01

    To determine the frequency and prognostic value of elevated microsatellite alterations at selected tetranucleotide repeats (EMAST) in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients in relation to microsatellite instability (MSI) status and MSH3 protein expression. The frequency of EMAST was evaluated in mCRC patients with MSI tumors and microsatellite stable (MSS) tumors. A literature overview was performed to compare the frequency of EMAST in our study with existing data. Immunohistochemistry for MSH3 was compared with EMAST status. Outcome was studied in terms of overall survival (OS) of mCRC patients with MSI and MSS tumors. EMAST was evaluated in 89 patients with MSI tumors (including 39 patients with Lynch syndrome) and 94 patients with MSS tumors. EMAST was observed in 45.9% (84 out of 183) of patients, with an increased frequency in MSI tumors (79.8% versus 13.8%, p < 0.001). We found no correlation between EMAST and MSH3 protein expression. There was no effect of EMAST on prognosis in patients with MSS tumors, but patients with MSI / non-EMAST tumors had a significantly better prognosis than patients with MSI / EMAST tumors (OS: HR 3.22, 95% CI 1.25-8.30). Frequency of EMAST was increased in mCRC patients with MSI tumors, compared to MSS tumors. Our data suggest that the presence of EMAST correlates with worse OS in these patients. There was no effect of EMAST on the prognosis of patients with MSS tumors. A limitation of our study is the small number of patients in our subgroup analysis.

  18. Beyond KRAS: Predictive factors of the efficacy of anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer.

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    De Stefano, Alfonso; Carlomagno, Chiara

    2014-08-07

    Systematic analysis of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway revealed that biomarkers could be used to predict the response to and outcome of anti-EGFR therapies in patients affected by metastatic colorectal cancer. We have conducted a review on the most recent findings and advances on this topic. To this aim, we searched the PubMed database for articles devoted to predictive and prognostic biomarkers for patients administered cetuximab- and panitumumab-based therapies. Here we review the state of the art and the controversies about the molecular factors known to be predictors of the efficacy of anti-EGFR therapy, namely, KRAS, BRAF, NRAS, PI3KCA and PTEN, and we discuss their prognostic value in colorectal cancer patients.

  19. Association between clinicopathological features and survival in patients with primary and paired metastatic colorectal cancer and KRAS mutation

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    Pang X

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Xue-Lian Pang,* Qiao-Xin Li,* Zhi-Ping Ma, Yi Shi, Yu-Qing Ma, Xin-Xia Li, Wen-Li Cui, Wei Zhang Department of Pathology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The KRAS gene mutation is involved in several types of tumors. However, the potential role of the KRAS mutation in human primary and paired metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC among different nationalities is poorly understood. In the present study, we assessed the relationship between KRAS mutation status and overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS in 230 patients with primary and paired metastatic CRC. The KRAS mutation rate in primary CRC tissue was 43.0% (99/230, which was higher than in paired metastatic CRC, which was 31.9% (23/72; P<0.001. Clinicopathologically, the KRAS gene mutation rate was higher in tumors that had infiltrated more deeply (T3, T4 and in lymph node (LN metastases (N1/N2 (P=0.029 and P=0.010, respectively. The KRAS gene status did not differ between the Han and Uyghur nationalities in both primary and metastatic CRC. In 72 paired cases, the KRAS mutation rate in primary CRC was significantly higher than in metastatic CRC (P<0.001 and in metastatic CRC that had infiltrated more deeply (T3, T4 (P=0.034. In the metastatic cases, the KRAS gene mutation rate was higher in patients aged over 65 years (P=0.035. Specifically, KRAS mutation was correlated with a poorer OS and DFS (P=0.004 and P=0.029, respectively. In our study, 35 patients with wild-type KRAS who received cetuximab targeted therapy had a better DFS than patients with mutant KRAS (P=0.029. The results of the current study demonstrate that the KRAS status is significantly associated with infiltrating LN metastases and the TNM stage in primary CRC. In addition, the results show that the KRAS mutation is significantly more common in primary tumors than in paired metastatic CRC, and

  20. Effects of KRAS, BRAF, NRAS, and PIK3CA mutations on the efficacy of cetuximab plus chemotherapy in chemotherapy-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer: a retrospective consortium analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Roock, Wendy; Claes, Bart; Bernasconi, David

    2010-01-01

    Following the discovery that mutant KRAS is associated with resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies, the tumours of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer are now profiled for seven KRAS mutations before receiving cetuximab or panitumumab. However, most patients...... with KRAS wild-type tumours still do not respond. We studied the effect of other downstream mutations on the efficacy of cetuximab in, to our knowledge, the largest cohort to date of patients with chemotherapy-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer treated with cetuximab plus chemotherapy in the pre...

  1. EGFR gene copy number predicts response to anti-EGFR treatment in RAS wild type and RAS/BRAF/PIK3CA wild type metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ålgars, Annika; Sundström, Jari; Lintunen, Minnamaija; Jokilehto, Terhi; Kytölä, Soili; Kaare, Milja; Vainionpää, Reetta; Orpana, Arto; Österlund, Pia; Ristimäki, Ari; Carpen, Olli; Ristamäki, Raija

    2017-02-15

    Anti-EGFR antibodies are used for the treatment of RAS wild type metastatic colorectal cancer. We previously showed that EGFR gene copy number (GCN) predicts response to anti-EGFR therapy in KRAS exon 2 wild type metastatic colorectal cancer. The aim of our study was to analyse the predictive role of EGFR GCN in RAS/BRAF/PIK3CA wild type metastatic colorectal cancer. The material included 102 patients with KRAS exon 2 wild type metastatic colorectal cancer treated with anti-EGFR ± cytotoxic therapy. Next generation sequencing was used for KRAS, NRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA gene mutation analyses. EGFR GCN was analysed by EGFR immunohistochemistry guided automated silver in situ hybridisation. Increased EGFR GCN (≥4.0) predicted a better response and prolonged progression free survival in anti-EGFR treated RAS/BRAF/PIK3CA wild type patients (Log-rank test, p = 0.0004). In contrast, survival of RAS/BRAF/PIK3CA wild type, EGFR GCN below 4.0 patients did not differ from patients with mutant RAS, BRAF or PIK3CA. Our study indicates that EGFR GCN predicts anti-EGFR treatment efficacy in patients with RAS/BRAF/PIK3CA wt metastatic CRC. Tumours with EGFR GCN below 4.0 appear to be as refractory to anti-EGFR treatment as tumours with mutation in any of the RAS/RAF/PIK3CA pathway genes. © 2016 UICC.

  2. Systematic review and economic evaluation of bevacizumab and cetuximab for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappenden, P; Jones, R; Paisley, S; Carroll, C

    2007-03-01

    To assess the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bevacizumab and cetuximab in the treatment of individuals with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Searches of main electronic databases were conducted in April and May 2005. For the assessment of bevacizumab, trials were included if they recruited participants with untreated metastatic CRC for first-line treatment. Only trials comparing bevacizumab in combination with irinotecan and/or established fluorouracil (5-FU)-containing or releasing regimens given as first-line therapy were included. For the assessment of cetuximab, trials were included if they recruited participants with epidermal growth-factor receptor-expressing metastatic CRC who had previously failed irinotecan-including therapy. Independent cost-effectiveness models of bevacizumab and cetuximab were developed using survival modelling methods. Adding bevacizumab to irinotecan in combination with 5-FU/folic acid (FA) plus irinotecan resulted in a statistically significant increase in median overall survival (OS) of 4.7 months. Adding bevacizumab to 5-FU/FA resulted in a non-significant increase in median OS of 3.7 months within one study and 7.7 months in another. Adding bevacizumab to irinotecan, fluorouracil and leucovorin (IFL) resulted in a statistically significant increase in median progression-free survival (PFS) of 4.4 months. Adding bevacizumab to 5-FU/FA resulted in a statistically significant increase in median PFS of 3.7 months, and a statistically significant increase in time to disease progression of 3.8 months compared to FU/FA alone. An overall tumour response rate of 44.8% was reported for bevacizumab plus IFL compared to 34.8% for IFL plus placebo. This addition was statistically significant. The addition of bevacizumab to 5-FU/FA resulted in a significant difference in tumour response rate within one study, but not another. Bevacizumab in combination with IFL or 5-FU/FA was observed to result in an increase of grade 3

  3. 5-FU Based Maintenance Therapy in RAS Wild Type Metastatic Colorectal Cancer After Induction With FOLFOX Plus Panitumumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-17

    Colorectal Adenocarcinoma; RAS Wild Type; Stage III Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer AJCC v7

  4. Impact of a family history of colorectal cancer on the prevalence of advanced adenomas of the rectosigmoid colon at flexible sigmoidoscopy in 3147 asymptomatic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strum, Williamson B

    2006-11-01

    Flexible sigmoidoscopy is advised as a screening test for colorectal cancer for persons with a family history of late-onset colorectal cancer. The expected outcome for this approach is not well established. We designed a large, prospective study of an unselected population to assess the impact of a family history of one first-degree relative with colorectal cancer on the prevalence of advanced adenomas at screening flexible sigmoidoscopy. We evaluated 8121 patients referred for flexible sigmoidoscopy between 1997 and 1999 and 3147 patients met the inclusion criteria. The 3147 patients were divided into 210 with a family history of colorectal cancer and 2937 without a family history and analyzed for differences in the prevalence of advanced adenomas. Of the 210 with a family history, 3 had an advanced adenoma of the rectosigmoid colon (1.4%) Of the 2937 without a family history, 52 had an advanced adenoma of the rectosigmoid colon (1.8%), including 2 cancers. These differences were not significant. In conclusion, a family history of colorectal cancer had no impact on the prevalence of advanced adenomas in asymptomatic patients at screening flexible sigmoidoscopy. The prevalence rates for advanced adenomas and carcinomas of the rectosigmoid colon were low.

  5. Identification of Novel Biomarkers for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Using Angiogenesis-Antibody Array and Intracellular Signaling Array.

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    Seyung Chung

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the three leading causes for cancer mortality. CRC kills over 600,000 people annually worldwide. The most common cause of death from CRC is the metastasis to distant organs. However, biomarkers for CRC metastasis remain ill-defined. We compared primary and metastatic CRC cell lines for their angiogenesis-protein profiles and intracellular signaling profiles to identify novel biomarkers for CRC metastasis. To this end, we used primary and metastatic CRC cell lines as a model system and normal human colon cell line as a control. The angiogenesis profiles two isogenic CRC cell lines, SW480 and SW620, and HT-29 and T84 revealed that VEGF was upregulated in both SW620 and T84 whereas coagulation factor III, IGFBP-3, DPP IV, PDGF AA/AB, endothelin I and CXCL16 were downregulated specifically in metastatic cell lines. Furthermore, we found that TIMP-1, amphiregulin, endostatin, angiogenin were upregulated in SW620 whereas downregulated in T84. Angiogenin was downregulated in T84 and GM-CSF was also downregulated in SW620. To induce CRC cell metastasis, we treated cells with pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. Upon IL-6 treatment, epithelial-mesenchymal transition was induced in CRC cells. When DLD-1 and HT-29 cells were treated with IL-6; Akt, STAT3, AMPKα and Bad phosphorylation levels were increased. Interestingly, SW620 showed the same signal activation pattern with IL-6 treatment of HT-29 and DLD-1. Our data suggest that Akt, STAT3, AMPKα and Bad activation can be biomarkers for metastatic colorectal cancer. IL-6 treatment specifically reduced phosphorylation levels of EGFR, HER2 receptor, Insulin R and IGF-1R in receptor tyrosine kinase array study with HT-29. Taken together, we have identified novel biomarkers for metastatic CRC through the angiogenesis-antibody array and intracellular signaling array studies. Present study suggests that those novel biomarkers can be used as CRC prognosis biomarkers, and as

  6. FOLFOXIRI Plus Bevacizumab as Conversion Therapy for Patients With Initially Unresectable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review and Pooled Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Gianluca; Petrelli, Fausto; Ghidini, Michele; Russo, Alessandro; Passalacqua, Rodolfo; Barni, Sandro

    2017-07-13

    The combination of fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan plus bevacizumab (FOLFOXIRI-Bev) is an established and effective first-line chemotherapy regimen for metastatic colorectal cancer. However, resection rates of metastases and overall survival with this schedule have never been systematically evaluated in published studies including, but not limited to, the TRIBE (TRIplet plus BEvacizumab) trial. To assess the clinical efficacy of FOLFOXIRI-Bev, including outcomes and rates of surgical conversions. A systematic review was conducted in October 2016 in concordance with the PRISMA guidelines of PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, SCOPUS, Web of Science, Google Scholar, CINAHL, Ovid, and EMBASE using the terms FOLFOXIRI and bevacizumab and (colorectal cancer). Clinical trials, retrospective case series, and prospective case series that used FOLFOXIRI-Bev for the treatment of initially unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer in humans were included. Individual case reports and retrospective case series with fewer than 10 patients were excluded. Data were extracted independently by 2 reviewers on a predesigned, standardized form. Ultimately, data were aggregated to obtain the pooled effect size of efficacy, according to the random-effects model and weighted for the number of patients included in each trial. Median overall survival and progression-free survival, overall response rates, and rates of R0 surgical conversions and overall surgical conversions. Eleven FOLFOXIRI-Bev studies published between 2010 and 2016 met the inclusion criteria and were pooled for analysis. The studies included 889 patients, with 877 patients clinically evaluable for overall response rates. The objective response rate to FOLFOXIRI-Bev was 69% (95% CI, 65%-72%; I2 = 25%). The rate of overall surgical conversions was 39.1% (95% CI, 26.9%-52.8%), and the rate of R0 surgical conversions was 28.1% (95% CI, 18.1%-40.8%). Median pooled overall survival was 30

  7. Continuous versus intermittent chemotherapy strategies in metastatic colorectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, S R; Cosby, R; Asmis, T; Chan, K; Hammad, N; Krzyzanowska, M K

    2015-03-01

    An important goal of intermittent strategies of delivering systemic treatment as first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is to maintain efficacy while improving patients' quality of life (QoL). Given the varying impact on efficacy demonstrated in individual randomized, controlled trials (RCTs), a systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs of these intermittent strategies was carried out. Relevant databases were systematically searched for the period 2000-2014. RCTs that compared a continuous versus intermittent strategy of delivering systemic treatment were identified by a systematic review. Overall survival (OS) hazard ratios (HRs) were extracted from the most recently reported trial results. The results of identified trials were clinically homogeneous so the data were pooled using Review Manager software (RevMan 5.1). Eleven RCTs were identified (n = 4 854). For the eight (n = 4508) trials with available HRs, the treatment patients received after induction was: none (five trials, n = 3036), fluoropyrimidine (one trial, n = 620), and biologic (two trials, n = 852). There were no statistically significant survival differences observed between the continuous and intermittent chemotherapy strategies. There was no statistically significant difference observed between continuous and intermittent strategies [HR = 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.96-1.10, P = 0.38)]. Subgroup analyses demonstrated results were generally robust across induction and maintenance regimens. One subgroup analysis of the three trials (CAIRO3, OPTIMOX2, COIN, n = 2403) with combination treatment induction and no maintenance until progression revealed a statistically, but nonclinically significant benefit for continuous treatment (HR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.00-1.20, P = 0.049). QoL life was either the same in both arms in two trials (n = 912) or improved in the intermittent strategy arm in one trial (n = 1630). Intermittent strategies of delivering systemic treatment of mCRC do

  8. Proxies of quality of life in metastatic colorectal cancer: analyses in the RECOURSE trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cutsem, Eric; Falcone, Alfredo; Garcia-Carbonero, Rocio; Komatsu, Yoshito; Pastorino, Alessandro; Peeters, Marc; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Yoshino, Takayuki; Zaniboni, Alberto; Amellal, Nadia; Kanehisa, Akira; Winkler, Robert; Makris, Lukas; Mayer, Robert J; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Tabernero, Josep

    2017-01-01

    Background In the pivotal phase III, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled RECOURSE study, treatment with trifluridine/tipiracil was well tolerated and associated with prolonged progression-free and overall survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). There was no formal analysis of quality of life (QoL) in RECOURSE. The aim of the present analysis was to assess proxies of QoL during the RECOURSE treatment period, in terms of adverse events (AEs) likely to affect QoL and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS). Patients and methods Enrolled patients had documented, previously treated (≥2 prior chemotherapy lines) mCRC and an ECOG PS of 0 or 1. Patients received best supportive care plus trifluridine/tipiracil 35 mg/m2 twice daily (n=534) or placebo (n=266) in a 28-day cycle. AEs analysed included nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, dysgeusia and fatigue/asthenia. ECOG PS was determined at baseline, on day 1 of each treatment cycle, at treatment end and 30 days post-treatment discontinuation. Results AEs that affect QoL were more frequent in patients treated with trifluridine/tipiracil than placebo. Median treatment duration for patients experiencing at least one of these AEs was longer than that observed for the overall RECOURSE population (trifluridine/tipiracil: 12 vs 7 weeks; placebo: 10 vs 6 weeks). Versus placebo, the duration of most AEs was longer in trifluridine/tipiracil recipients; however, all AEs except nausea and vomiting occupied a lower proportion of the total treatment period. Of the patients who had their PS recorded at discontinuation, PS was maintained in 67% and 63% of trifluridine/tipiracil and placebo recipients, and 84% and 81% of the trifluridine/tipiracil and placebo patients remained at a PS of 0 or 1 at discontinuation. Conclusions Analysis of ECOG PS and AEs thought to affect QoL in the RECOURSE patient population suggests that trifluridine/tipiracil treatment does not result in a

  9. The Prognostic Significance of Metabolic Response Heterogeneity in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Hendlisz

    Full Text Available Tumoral heterogeneity is a major determinant of resistance in solid tumors. FDG-PET/CT can identify early during chemotherapy non-responsive lesions within the whole body tumor load. This prospective multicentric proof-of-concept study explores intra-individual metabolic response (mR heterogeneity as a treatment efficacy biomarker in chemorefractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC.Standardized FDG-PET/CT was performed at baseline and after the first cycle of combined sorafenib (600mg/day for 21 days, then 800mg/day and capecitabine (1700 mg/m²/day administered D1-14 every 21 days. MR assessment was categorized according to the proportion of metabolically non-responding (non-mR lesions (stable FDG uptake with SUVmax decrease <15% among all measurable lesions.Ninety-two patients were included. The median overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS were 8.2 months (95% CI: 6.8-10.5 and 4.2 months (95% CI: 3.4-4.8 respectively. In the 79 assessable patients, early PET-CT showed no metabolically refractory lesion in 47%, a heterogeneous mR with at least one non-mR lesion in 32%, and a consistent non-mR or early disease progression in 21%. On exploratory analysis, patients without any non-mR lesion showed a significantly longer PFS (HR 0.34; 95% CI: 0.21-0.56, P-value <0.001 and OS (HR 0.58; 95% CI: 0.36-0.92, P-value 0.02 compared to the other patients. The proportion of non-mR lesions within the tumor load did not impact PFS/OS.The presence of at least one metabolically refractory lesion is associated with a poorer outcome in advanced mCRC patients treated with combined sorafenib-capecitabine. Early detection of treatment-induced mR heterogeneity may represent an important predictive efficacy biomarker in mCRC.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01290926.

  10. Chemotherapy rechallenge after regorafenib treatment in metastatic colorectal cancer: still hope after the last hope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertocchi, Paola; Aroldi, Francesca; Prochilo, Tiziana; Meriggi, Fausto; Beretta, Giordano Domenico; Zaniboni, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    The introduction of biological agents in cancer therapy is changing the progression of metastatic colorectal cancer. Currently, resistance to biological agents is an emerging problem; the progression of the disease is caused by the development of resistant clones. According to some authors, these clones can be re-sensitized to traditional and previously utilized chemotherapy agents. The results of the CORRECT study demonstrated the efficacy of regorafenib monotherapy in both KRAS wild type and mutant pretreated patients (pts). Two recent reports showed the potential of reintroduction of chemotherapy, even after treatment with regorafenib. We performed a retrospective review of clinical data from patients treated with regorafenib at our institution between March 2012 and March 2013. We analysed patient characteristics, KRAS/NRAS status, response to treatment (evaluated by RECIST v1.1 criteria) and survival. Regorafenib was administered to 128 patients, and 11 (8.6%) received post-regorafenib therapy (to our knowledge). Seven (63.6%) patients were wild type for KRAS/NRAS. Post-regorafenib therapy represented for all the patients at least the fourth line: all the pts received both oxaliplatin- and irinotecan-based chemotherapy, all of them were treated with bevacizumab, and 7 patients also received cetuximab. Eight patients (72.7%) were treated with standard chemotherapy after regorafenib (irinotecan monotherapy, capecitabine plus oxaliplatin or irinotecan, dacarbazine or raltitrexed), while 3 patients received an experimental therapy (clinical trial). Nine of the 11 (81.8%) patients had PD and 2 patients had SD. The median progression-free survival was 1.6+ months (range 0.5-3.5), the median OS post-regorafenib was 2.1+ months (range 0.5-10.2) and the 6-month OS was 27.3%. Our retrospective analysis showed that after regorafenib therapy, re-introduction of chemotherapy is possible. Unfortunately, we reported a high percentage of disease progression beyond regorafenib

  11. Total lesion glycolysis (TLG) as an imaging biomarker in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with regorafenib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Yoojoo; Lee, Kyung-Hun [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, 101 Daehang-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bang, Ji-In; Paeng, Jin Chul [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, 101 Daehang-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sae-Won [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, 101 Daehang-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jee Hyun [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Geyonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Gyeong Hoon [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Kyu Joo [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae-You [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, 101 Daehang-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    This study was performed to evaluate whether fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) could predict treatment outcome of regorafenib in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Previously treated refractory mCRC patients were enrolled into a prospective biomarker study of regorafenib. For this sub-study, the results of FDG PET/CT scans at baseline and after two cycles of treatment were analyzed. Various metabolic parameters obtained from PET images were analyzed in relation to treatment outcome. A total of 40 patients were evaluable for PET image analysis. Among various PET parameters, total lesion glycolysis (TLG) measured in the same target lesions for RECIST 1.1 analysis were the most significant in predicting prognosis, with the lowest p-value observed in TLG calculated using the margin threshold of 40 % (TLG{sub 40} {sub %}). Further analysis using TLG{sub 40} {sub %} showed significantly longer overall survival (OS) in patients with lower baseline TLG{sub 40} {sub %} (<151.8) (p = 0.003, median 14.2 vs. 9.1 months in <151.8 and ≥151.8, respectively). Patients showing higher decrease in TLG{sub 40} {sub %} after treatment showed significantly longer progression-free survival (PFS) (p = 0.001, median 8.0 vs. 2.4 months in % ΔTLG{sub 40} {sub %} < -9.6 % and ≥ -9.6 %, respectively) and OS (p = 0.002, median 16.4 vs. 9.1 months in % ΔTLG{sub 40} {sub %} < -9.6 % and ≥ -9.6 %, respectively). The same cutoff could discriminate patients with longer survival among the patients who were under the stable disease category according to RECIST 1.1 (median PFS 8.4 vs. 6.8 months, p = 0.020; median OS 18.3 vs. 11.5 months, p = 0.049). Measurement of TLG can predict treatment outcome of regorafenib in mCRC. (orig.)

  12. The impact of bone marrow micrometastases on metastatic disease-free survival in patients with colorectal carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, O J

    2012-02-03

    AIMS: The biological relevance of bone marrow micrometastases (BMM) in colorectal cancer remains unknown. Here, we investigate their nature by examining the impact of the presence of BMM on metastatic disease-free survival in a cohort of patients with this disease. METHODS: Sixty-three consecutive patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer of any stage were studied after approval of the study protocol by the local ethics committee and with full individual informed consent. All had bilateral iliac crest bone marrow aspirates prior to operation. Aspirates were then examined for the presence of aberrant cytokeratin-18-positive cells by a blinded observer using both flow cytometric and APAAP immunohistochemical techniques. RESULTS: Mean follow-up after surgery was 4.6 years (range 1.9-6.9) for those without hepatic metastases at diagnosis. Seven of 34 patients with Dukes\\' stage A or B developed metastatic disease after a mean interval of 4.7 years (range 3.8-6.8). However, only 2 of these patients demonstrated BMM at the time of surgery. Nine of 15 patients with Dukes\\' C carcinoma at the time of surgery subsequently developed metastases after a mean interval of 4.4 years (range 1.9-6.9). Again, only two of these patients had BMM detectable initially. In only three of the 14 patients known to have metastases at the time of operation (i.e. Dukes\\'\\'D\\' disease) were BMM found. CONCLUSION: The presence of BMM as detected by this methodology was not predictive of tumour recurrence or metastasis. This study does not support the consideration of adjuvant therapy based on the presence of BMM at a single pre-operative time point in patients with colorectal cancer.

  13. Improved Survival in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Is Associated With Adoption of Hepatic Resection and Improved Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scott Kopetz; George J. Chang; Michael J. Overman; Cathy Eng; Daniel J. Sargent; David W. Larson; Axel Grothey; Jean-Nicolas Vauthey; David M. Nagorney; Robert R. McWilliams

    2009-01-01

    .... With an increase in surgical resections of metastatic disease and development of new chemotherapies, indirect evidence suggests that outcomes for patients are improving in the general population...

  14. Microsatellite instability does not predict the efficacy of chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer. A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Guetz, Gaëtan; Uzzan, Bernard; Nicolas, Patrick; Schischmanoff, Olivier; Perret, Gerard-Yves; Morere, Jean-François

    2009-05-01

    Microsatellite Instability (MSI) status is a good prognostic factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) but its predictive value for chemosensitivity remains controversial. A previous meta-analysis (MA) in the adjuvant setting showed that MSI-high (H) status did not predict the efficacy of chemotherapy. The predictive value of MSI status on the effect of metastatic chemotherapy was investigated by MA. Studies were identified by electronic search through PubMed, Embase and ASCO proceedings online databases, using several key words (colorectal cancer, chemotherapy, microsatellite instability). For each study, the ratio of response rate (RR), complete (CR) and partial response (PR) divided by stable disease and progression was calculated. From 190 articles and 100 abstracts, only eight independent studies were selected. The data were analysed with a random-effect model (due to heterogeneity between studies) using EasyMA software. Statistical calculations were performed on six studies representing 964 patients (mean age 63 years; 91 MSI-H; 873 microsatellite stable (MSS) tumours). A total of 287 patients received 5-fluorouracil (5FU)-based chemotherapy, whereas 678 patients received combinations of 5FU or capecitabine with oxaliplatin and/or irinotecan. No benefit of metastatic chemotherapy in terms of RR for MSI-H patients compared with MSS patients was found. The global hazard ratio (HR) for RR was 0.82 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.95; 0.65-1.03; p=0.09). MSI status does not predict the effect of chemotherapy which is similar in MSI-H and MSS metastatic CRC tumours.

  15. Changes in circulating microRNA-126 during treatment with chemotherapy and bevacizumab predicts treatment response in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T F; Carlsen, A L; Heegaard, N H H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study investigated the predictive value of circulating microRNA-126 (cir-miRNA-126) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treated with first-line chemotherapy combined with bevacizumab.METHODS: The study included 68 patients. Blood samples (plasma) were collected b...

  16. EGF61A>G polymorphism as predictive marker of clinical outcome to first-line capecitabine and oxaliplatin in metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Andersen, R F; Jensen, Lars Henrik

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of the present study was to investigate polymorphisms related to the metabolism of fluoropyrimidine and oxaliplatin, thymidylate synthase (TS) and excision repair cross-complementing gene 1 (ERCC1) 118, in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with capecitabine...

  17. Maintenance treatment with capecitabine and bevacizumab versus observation in metastatic colorectal cancer : updated results and molecular subgroup analyses of the phase 3 CAIRO3 study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goey, K K H; Elias, S G|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/261632590; van Tinteren, H.; Laclé, M M; Willems, S M; Offerhaus, G J A; de Leng, W W J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304822140; Strengman, E|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304815195; ten Tije, Albert J; Creemers, Geert Jan M; van der Velden, A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/20448295X; de Jongh, Felix E; Erdkamp, Frans L G; Tanis, B C; Punt, C. J A; Koopman, M

    2017-01-01

    Background: The phase 3 CAIRO3 study showed that capecitabine plus bevacizumab (CAP-B) maintenance treatment after six cycles capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab (CAPOX-B) in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients is effective, without compromising quality of life. In this post hoc

  18. Phase III trial of cetuximab with continuous or intermittent fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (Nordic FLOX) versus FLOX alone in first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tveit, Kjell Magne; Guren, Tormod; Glimelius, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    The NORDIC-VII multicenter phase III trial investigated the efficacy of cetuximab when added to bolus fluorouracil/folinic acid and oxaliplatin (Nordic FLOX), administered continuously or intermittently, in previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The influence of KRAS mutation...

  19. RAS testing practices and RAS mutation prevalence among patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: results from a Europe-wide survey of pathology centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boleij, A.; Tack, V.; Taylor, A.; Kafatos, G.; Jenkins-Anderson, S.; Tembuyser, L.; Dequeker, E.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment options for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) include anti-epithelial growth factor therapies, which, in Europe, are indicated in patients with RAS wild-type tumours only and require prior mutation testing of "hot-spot" codons in exons 2, 3 and 4 of KRAS and

  20. Prevalence of RAS mutations and individual variation patterns among patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: A pooled analysis of randomised controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, M.; Kafatos, G.; Taylor, A.; Gastanaga, V.M.; Oliner, K.S.; Hechmati, G.; Terwey, J.H.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors to treat metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients requires prior confirmation of tumour wild type (WT) RAS mutation status (exons 2/3/4 for KRAS or NRAS). This retrospective pooled analysis aims to robustly estimate RAS mutation

  1. Quantitative cell-free DNA, KRAS, and BRAF mutations in plasma from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer during treatment with cetuximab and irinotecan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Pallisgaard, Niels; Vogelius, Ivan Storgaard

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the levels of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in plasma from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in relation to third-line treatment with cetuximab and irinotecan and the quantitative relationship of cfDNA with tumor-specific mutations in plasma....

  2. Induction of p53-Specific Immunity by a p53 Synthetic Long Peptide Vaccine in Patients Treated for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speetjens, Frank M.; Kuppen, PeterJ. K.; Welters, Marij. J. P.; Essahsah, Farah; van den Brink, Anne Marie E. G. Voet; Lantrua, M. Graziella Kallenberg; Valentijn, A. Rob P. M.; Oostendorp, Jaap; Fathers, Lorraine M.; Nijman, Hans W.; Drijfhout, Jan W.; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Melief, Cornelis J. M.; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The tumor-associated self-antigen p53 is commonly overexpressed in cancer, including colorectal cancer, and can serve as a target for immunotherapy. The safety and immunogenicity of a p53 synthetic long peptide (p53-SLP) vaccine were investigated in patients treated for metastatic

  3. High Plasma TIMP-1 and Serum CEA Levels during Combination Chemotherapy for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Are Significantly Associated with Poor Outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldulaymi, Bahir; Byström, Per; Berglund, Ake

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether combination chemotherapy leads to early changes in plasma TIMP-1 and serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), and whether such changes relate to subsequent objective response, time to progression (TTP) and ove...

  4. Assessment of the topoisomerase I gene copy number as a predictive biomarker of objective response to irinotecan in metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygård, Sune Boris; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Nielsen, Signe Lykke

    2014-01-01

    (TOP1) copy number and objective response following irinotecan treatment in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Materials and methods. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples from 78 patients, who received irinotecan monotherapy in second line, were included. TOP1 was assessed...

  5. Comparison of EORTC criteria and PERCIST for PET/CT response evaluation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with irinotecan and cetuximab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skougaard, Kristin; Nielsen, Dorte; Jensen, Benny Vittrup

    2013-01-01

    The study aim was to compare European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria with PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) for response evaluation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with a combination of the chemotherapeutic drug irinotecan...

  6. The importance of KRAS mutations and EGF61A>G polymorphism to the effect of cetuximab and irinotecan in metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Pallisgaard, N; Rasmussen, Anders Aamann

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effect of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies (mAb) in metastatic colorectal cancer seems limited to KRAS wild-type (wt) tumours, but still a major fraction of KRASwt patients are nonresponders and supplementary selection criteria are needed. We investigated me...

  7. The predictive value of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA and PTEN for anti-EGFR treatment in metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Christina; Bergmann, Troels K; Henrichsen-Schnack, Tine

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In metastatic colorectal cancer, mutation testing for KRAS exon 2 is widely implemented to select patients with wild-type tumors for treatment with the monocloncal anti-EGFR antibodies cetuximab and panitumumab. The added predictive value of additional biomarkers in the RAS-RAF-MAPK a......BACKGROUND: In metastatic colorectal cancer, mutation testing for KRAS exon 2 is widely implemented to select patients with wild-type tumors for treatment with the monocloncal anti-EGFR antibodies cetuximab and panitumumab. The added predictive value of additional biomarkers in the RAS......-RAF-MAPK and PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathways in colorectal cancer is uncertain, which led us to systematically review the impact of alterations in KRAS (outside of exon 2), NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA and PTEN in relation to the clinical benefit from anti-EGFR treatment. METHODS: In total, 22 studies that include 2395 patients...

  8. Biomarkers predicting resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer with wild-type KRAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu J

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Jiang Liu,* Jing Hu,* Lei Cheng, Wei Ren, Mi Yang, Baorui Liu, Li Xie, Xiaoping Qian The Comprehensive Cancer Center of Drum-Tower Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Clinical Cancer Institute of Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: EGFR pathway is an important therapeutic target in human tumors, including metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC. The advent of EGFR-targeted monoclonal antibodies panitumumab and cetuximab has generated promise for the treatment of mCRC and has largely improved patients’ progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS. However, treatment with anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies is only effective in a subset of mCRC patients with wild-type KRAS. This indicates that there are other factors affecting the efficacy of anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies. Existing studies have demonstrated that among colorectal cancer patients with wild-type KRAS, harboring mutations of BRAF, PIK3CA, NRAS, or PTEN-null may demonstrate resistance to anti-EGFR-targeted therapy, and biomarkers detection can provide better-personalized treatment for mCRC patients. How to identify and reverse the secondary resistance to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody therapy is also another great challenge to improve the anti-EGFR efficacy in wild-type KRAS mCRC patients. Finally, both of the molecular mechanisms of response and acquired resistance would be important for the directions of future research. This review focuses on how to further improve the predictive value of anti-EGFR therapies and how to also try and avoid futile treatment for wild-type KRAS colorectal cancer patients. Keywords: colorectal cancer, EGFR, BRAF, RAS, cetuximab, panitumumab

  9. Isolated asymptomatic masseter muscle metastasis as first sign of metastatic disease in a patient with known melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjorup, Caroline Asirvatham; Hendel, Helle Westergren; Svane, Inge Marie

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman diagnosed with a nodular melanoma on the right shoulder had a PET/CT scan 13 months later demonstrating a FDG-avid mass in the left masseter muscle, which was asymptomatic and not clinically evident. Pathologic analysis confirmed metastasis of melanoma. Further subcutaneous...

  10. CT versus FDG-PET/CT response evaluation in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with irinotecan and cetuximab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skougaard, Kristin; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Nielsen, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    We compared morphologic computed tomography (CT)-based to metabolic fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT-based response evaluation in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and correlated the findings with survival and KRAS status. From 2006 to 2009, patients were...... included in a phase II trial and treated with cetuximab and irinotecan every second week. They underwent FDG-PET/CT examination at baseline and after every fourth treatment cycle. Response evaluation was performed prospectively according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST 1...... metabolic response (PMR) rate was 56%, stable metabolic disease rate 33%, and progressive metabolic disease (PMD) rate 11%. Response agreement was poor, κ-coefficient 0.19. Hazard ratio for overall survival for responders (PR/PMR) versus nonresponders (PD/PMD) was higher for CT- than for FDG-PET...

  11. High RBM3 expression is associated with an improved survival and oxaliplatin response in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siesing, Christina; Sorbye, Halfdan; Dragomir, Anca

    2017-01-01

    Background: High expression of the RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) has been shown to correlate, with prolonged survival in several malignant diseases and with the benefit of platinum-based chemotherapy in ovarian cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate RBM3 in metastatic colorectal cancer...... (mCRC) as a prognostic factor for overall survival and in relation to benefit of first-line chemotherapy. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining was conducted and evaluated in tumours from 455 mCRC patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression proportional hazards models were used to access...... RBM3 expression is an independent predictor of prolonged survival in mCRC patients, in particular in patients treated with first-line oxaliplatin based chemotherapy....

  12. Comparison of Quantitative Methods on FDG PET/CT for Treatment Response Evaluation of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Ji-In; Lim, Yoojoo; Paeng, Jin Chul; Han, Sae-Won; Park, Sohyun; Lee, Jung Min; Kim, Hyun Joo; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key; Kim, Tae-You; Kang, Keon Wook

    2017-06-01

    FDG PET is effective in treatment response evaluation of cancer. However, there is no standard method for quantitative evaluation of FDG PET, particularly regarding cytostatic drugs. We compared various FDG PET quantitative methods in terms of response determination. A total of 39 refractory metastatic colorectal cancer patients who received a multikinase inhibitor treatment were included. Baseline and posttreatment FDG PET/CT scans were performed before and two cycles after treatment. Standardized uptake value (SUV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) values using various margin thresholds (30-70 % of maximum SUV with increment 10 %, twice mean SUV of blood pool, SUV 3.0, and SUV 4.0) were measured, with measurement target of the hottest lesion or a maximum of five hottest lesions. Treatment response by the PERCIST criteria was also determined. Predictive values of the PET indexes were evaluated in terms of the treatment response determined by the RECIST 1.1 criteria. The agreement rate was 38 % between response determined by the PERCIST and the RECIST criteria (κ = 0.381). When patients were classified into disease control group (PR, SD) and non-control group (PD) by the RECIST criteria, percent changes of TLG with various margin thresholds (particularly, 30-50 % of maximum SUV) exhibited significant differences between the two groups, and high diagnostic power for the response by the RECIST criteria. TLG-based criteria, which used a margin threshold of 50 % of maximum SUV, exhibited a high agreement with the RECIST criteria compared with the PERCIST criteria (κ = 0.606). In metastatic colorectal cancer, FDG PET/CT could be effective for treatment response evaluation by using TLG measured by margin thresholds of 30-50 % of maximum SUV. Further studies are warranted regarding the optimal cutoff values for this method.

  13. Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio is a simple and novel biomarker for prediction of survival after radioembolization for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohme, Samer; Sukato, Daniel; Chalhoub, Didier; McDonald, Kerry Ann C A; Zajko, Albert; Amesur, Nikhil; Orons, Philip; Marsh, James W; Geller, David A; Tsung, Allan

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have reported that an elevated preoperative Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Ratio (NLR) is associated with poor prognosis in patients with various solid tumors including colorectal cancer (CRC). Here, we examine whether NLR predicts survival in patients with unresectable CRC metastases undergoing hepatic radioembolization. A retrospective review of 104 consecutive patients with unresectable metastatic CRC who were treated with radioembolization after failing first and second-line chemotherapy. Between 2002 and 2012, the median NLR for all patients was 4.6. Using receiver operating curve analysis, there was no difference between using an NLR cut-off of 4.6 or 5. Forty-eight patients had a high NLR of ≥5 and 56 patients had an NLR of <5. Patients in both groups had similar previous extensive chemotherapy and liver-directed interventions. The median survival of patients with high NLR was 5.6 months (range 4.9-7.9 months) compared with 10.6 months (range 8.3-17.0 months) for patients with low NLR; a significant difference was found in overall survival (log-rank test; p = 0.001). Other factors associated with risk of death were extrahepatic spread of disease, presence of pulmonary nodules, previous liver-targeted intervention, and radiographic response. On multivariate analysis, high NLR, progressive radiographic response, and presence of extrahepatic disease remained independently associated with increased risk of death. NLR is a simply attainable, inexpensive, and useful biomarker to predict outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer receiving radioembolization.

  14. Comparison of quantitative methods on FDG PET/CT for treatment response evaluation of metastatic colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Ji In; Paeng, Jin Chul; Park, So Hyun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-06-15

    FDG PET is effective in treatment response evaluation of cancer. However, there is no standard method for quantitative evaluation of FDG PET, particularly regarding cytostatic drugs. We compared various FDG PET quantitative methods in terms of response determination. A total of 39 refractory metastatic colorectal cancer patients who received a multikinase inhibitor treatment were included. Baseline and posttreatment FDG PET/CT scans were performed before and two cycles after treatment. Standardized uptake value (SUV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) values using various margin thresholds (30–70 % of maximum SUV with increment 10 %, twice mean SUV of blood pool, SUV 3.0, and SUV 4.0) were measured, with measurement target of the hottest lesion or a maximum of five hottest lesions. Treatment response by the PERCIST criteria was also determined. Predictive values of the PET indexes were evaluated in terms of the treatment response determined by the RECIST 1.1 criteria. The agreement rate was 38 % between response determined by the PERCIST and the RECIST criteria (κ = 0.381). When patients were classified into disease control group (PR, SD) and non-control group (PD) by the RECIST criteria, percent changes of TLG with various margin thresholds (particularly, 30–50 % of maximum SUV) exhibited significant differences between the two groups, and high diagnostic power for the response by the RECIST criteria. TLG-based criteria, which used a margin threshold of 50 % of maximum SUV, exhibited a high agreement with the RECIST criteria compared with the PERCIST criteria (κ = 0.606). In metastatic colorectal cancer, FDG PET/CT could be effective for treatment response evaluation by using TLG measured by margin thresholds of 30–50 % of maximum SUV. Further studies are warranted regarding the optimal cutoff values for this method.

  15. ABCC5 and ABCG1 polymorphisms predict irinotecan-induced severe toxicity in metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sylvia; Villeneuve, Lyne; Jonker, Derek; Couture, Félix; Laverdière, Isabelle; Cecchin, Erica; Innocenti, Federico; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Lévesque, Eric; Guillemette, Chantal

    2015-12-01

    Irinotecan is a cytotoxic agent used widely for the treatment of solid tumors, particularly for metastatic colorectal cancers. Treatment with this drug frequently results in severe neutropenia and diarrhea that can markedly impact the course of treatment and patients' quality of life. Pharmacogenomic tailoring of irinotecan-based chemotherapy has been the subject of several investigations, but with limited data on ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and solute carrier (SLC) transporter genes. In this study, we aimed to discover toxicity-associated markers in seven transporter genes participating in irinotecan pharmacokinetics involving the ABC transporter genes ABCB1, ABCC1, ABCC2, ABCC5, ABCG1, and ABCG2 and the solute carrier organic anion transporter gene SLCO1B1 and using a haplotype-tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (n=210 htSNPs) strategy. The profiles of 167 metastatic colorectal cancer Canadian patients treated with FOLFIRI-based regimens were examined and the findings were replicated in an independent cohort of 250 Italian patients. In combined cohorts, a two-marker ABCC5 rs3749438 and rs10937158 haplotype (T-C) predicted lower risk of severe diarrhea [odds ratio (OR) of 0.43; P=0.001]. The co-occurrence of ABCG1 rs225440T and ABCC5 rs2292997A predicted the risk of severe neutropenia (OR=5.93; P=0.0002), which was further improved when incorporating the well-known risk marker UGT1A1*28 rs8175347 (OR=7.68; P<0.0001). In contrast, carriers of one protective marker (UGT1 rs11563250G) but none of these risk alleles experienced significantly less severe neutropenia (8.2 vs. 34.0%; P<0.0001). This combination of predictive genetic markers could potentially lead to better risk assessment and may thus improve personalized treatment.

  16. Intact and cleaved plasma soluble urokinase receptor in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with oxaliplatin with or without cetuximab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarpgaard, Line S; Christensen, Ib J; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla

    2015-01-01

    Circulating forms of the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) are associated with prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer. Preclinical studies have shown that uPAR can influence the state of phosphorylation and signalling activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in ...... with FLOX + cetuximab as compared to patients with KRAS wild-type and high levels of suPAR. These results thus support the preclinical findings and should be further tested in an independent clinical data set.......) in a ligand-independent manner. The purpose of the study was to evaluate whether plasma soluble intact and cleaved uPAR(I-III)+(II-III) levels could identify a subpopulation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) where treatment with cetuximab would have a beneficial effect. Plasma samples were...... available from 453 patients treated in the NORDIC VII study. Patients were randomized between FLOX and FLOX + cetuximab. The levels of uPAR(I-III)+(II-III) were determined by time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay. We demonstrated that higher baseline plasma uPAR(I-III)+(II-III) levels were significantly...

  17. KRAS early testing: consensus initiative and cost-effectiveness evaluation for metastatic colorectal patients in an Italian setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Barone

    Full Text Available KRAS testing is relevant for the choice of the most appropriate first-line therapy of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC. Strategies for preventing unequal access to the test should be implemented, but their relevance in the practice is related to economic sustainability. The study adopted the Delphi technique to reach a consensus on several topics. Issues related to execution of KRAS testing were identified by an expert's board and proposed to 108 Italian oncologists and pathologists through two subsequent questionnaires. The emerging proposal was evaluated by decision analyses models employed by technology assessment agencies in order to assess cost-effectiveness. Alternative therapeutic strategies included most commonly used chemotherapy regimens alone or in combination with cetuximab or bevacizumab. The survey indicated that time interval for obtaining KRAS test should not exceed 15 days, 10 days being an optimal interval. To assure the access to proper treatment, a useful strategy should be to anticipate the test after radical resection in patients at high risk of relapse. Early KRAS testing in high risk CRC patients generates incremental cost-effectiveness ratios between 6,000 and 13,000 Euro per quality adjusted life year (QALY gained. In extensive sensitivity analyses ICER's were always below 15,000 Euro per QALY gained, far within the threshold of 60,000 Euro/QALY gained accepted by regulatory institutions in Italy. In metastatic CRC a time interval higher than 15 days for result of KRAS testing limits access to therapeutic choices. Anticipating KRAS testing before the onset of metastatic disease in patients at high risk does not affect the sustainability and cost-effectiveness profile of cetuximab in first-line mCRC. Early KRAS testing may prevent this inequality in high-risk patients, whether they develop metastases, and is a cost-effective strategy. Based on these results, present joined recommendations of Italian societies of

  18. OncoSurge: a strategy for improving resectability with curative intent in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poston, G.J.; Adam, R.; Alberts, S.; Curley, S.; Figueras, J.; Haller, D.; Kunstlinger, F.; Mentha, G.; Nordlinger, B.; Patt, Y.; Primrose, J.; Roh, M.; Rougier, P.; Ruers, T.J.M.; Schmoll, H.J.; Valls, C.; Vauthey, N.J.; Cornelis, M.; Kahan, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Most patients with colorectal liver metastases present to general surgeons and oncologists without a specialist interest in their management. Since treatment strategy is frequently dependent on the response to earlier treatments, our aim was to create a therapeutic decision model

  19. Clinicopathologic characteristics and gene expression analyses of non-KRAS 12/13, RAS-mutated metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, V K; Lucas, F A San; Overman, M J; Eng, C; Morelli, M P; Jiang, Z-Q; Luthra, R; Meric-Bernstam, F; Maru, D; Scheet, P; Kopetz, S; Vilar, E

    2014-10-01

    KRAS mutations in codons 12 and 13 are present in ∼40% of all colorectal cancers (CRC). Activating mutations in codons 61 and 146 of KRAS and in codons 12, 13, and 61 of NRAS also occur but are less frequent. The clinicopathologic features and gene expression profiles of this latter subpopulation of RAS-mutant colorectal tumors have not yet been clearly defined but in general are treated similarly to those with KRAS 12 or 13 mutations. Records of patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) treated at MD Anderson Cancer Center between December 2000 and August 2012 were reviewed for RAS (KRAS or NRAS) and BRAF mutation status, clinical characteristics, and survival outcomes. To study further with an independent cohort, data from The Cancer Genome Atlas were analyzed to define a gene expression signature for patients whose tumors feature these atypical RAS mutations and explore differences with KRAS 12/13-mutated colorectal tumors. Among the 484 patients reviewed, KRAS 12/13, KRAS 61/146, NRAS, and BRAF mutations were detected in 47.7%, 3.0%, 4.1%, and 7.4%, respectively, of patients who were tested for each of these aberrations. Lung metastases were more common in both the KRAS 12/13-mutated and atypical RAS-mutated cohorts relative to patients with RAS/BRAF wild-type tumors. Gene expression analyses revealed similar patterns regardless of the site of RAS mutation, and in silico functional algorithms predicted that KRAS and NRAS mutations in codons 12, 13, 61, and 146 alter the protein function and drive tumorgenesis. Clinicopathologic characteristics, survival outcomes, functional impact, and gene expression profiling were similar between patients with KRAS 12/13 and those with NRAS or KRAS 61/146-mutated mCRC. These clinical and bioinformatic findings support the notion that colorectal tumors driven by these RAS mutations are phenotypically similar. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights

  20. Cost-effectiveness analysis of cetuximab in treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer in Iranian pharmaceutical market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Davari

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The FOLFOX regimen + cetuximab provides lower costs per additional life years gained (more cost-effective compared with its alternatives in the treatment of patients with unresectable metastatic CRC. However, according to the WHO indicator, none of the cetuximab regimens could be considered as cost effective for the Iranian health care market.

  1. AGXT and ERCC2 polymorphisms are associated with clinical outcome in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with 5-FU/oxaliplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjersem, J B; Thomsen, M.; Guren, T

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate whether specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with influence on drug transport, biotransformation and repair mechanisms are associated with treatment outcome and toxicity in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We genotyped blood samples fro...... as markers of clinical outcome in oxaliplatin-treated mCRC patients. If validated in other studies, they could improve the selection of therapy in mCRC.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 11 August 2015; doi:10.1038/tpj.2015.54.......The objective of the study was to investigate whether specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with influence on drug transport, biotransformation and repair mechanisms are associated with treatment outcome and toxicity in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We genotyped blood samples from...

  2. Changes in circulating microRNA-126 during treatment with chemotherapy and bevacizumab predicts treatment response in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T F; Carlsen, A L; Heegaard, N H H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study investigated the predictive value of circulating microRNA-126 (cir-miRNA-126) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treated with first-line chemotherapy combined with bevacizumab.METHODS: The study included 68 patients. Blood samples (plasma) were collected b...... and bevacizumab in patients with mCRC, thus representing a possible biomarker for the resistance to anti-angiogenic containing treatments....

  3. Liver resection rate following downsizing chemotherapy with cetuximab in metastatic colorectal cancer: UK retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, H; Khan, A Z; Berry, D P; Cameron, I C; Pope, I; Sherlock, D; Helmy, S; Byrne, B; Thompson, M; Pulfer, A; Davidson, B

    2015-04-01

    The high objective response rate to cetuximab along with chemotherapy in patients with colorectal liver metastases makes it an effective downsizing protocol to facilitate surgery in those with initially unresectable disease. Adoption of this strategy has been variable in the UK. A retrospective observational study was conducted in 7 UK specialist liver surgical centres to describe the liver resection rate following a downsizing protocol of cetuximab and chemotherapy and to evaluate the quality and efficiency of processes by which the treatment was provided. Data were collected in 2012 by reviewing medical records of patients with colorectal metastases confined to the liver, defined as unresectable without downsizing therapy at first review by a specialist Multi Disciplinary Team (MDT). Sixty patients were included; 29 (48%) underwent liver resection following cetuximab and chemotherapy. Of the 29, 17 (59% or 28% of all patients) achieved R0 resection and 7 (24% or 12% of all patients) R1 resection. All treated patients were KRAS wild-type. In specialist liver surgical centres, where patients are evaluated for liver resection, optimal management by MDT using KRAS testing, cetuximab and chemotherapy results in a 28% R0 resection rate in patients with initially unresectable colorectal cancer liver metastases. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Distinct Claudin Expression Profiles of Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Metastatic Colorectal and Pancreatic Carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Holczbauer, Ágnes; Gyöngyösi, Benedek; Lotz, Gábor; Szijártó, Attila; Kupcsulik, Péter; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Kiss, András

    2013-01-01

    Tight junction proteins, including claudins, are often dysregulated during carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Moreover, the claudin expression pattern usually varies between different tumor entities. We aimed to investigate claudin expression profiles of primary and metastatic liver malignancies. We analyzed claudin-1, -2, -3, -4, and -7 expression by quantitative immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. Twenty hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and liver metastases of 20 col...

  5. Better long-term survival in young patients with non-metastatic colorectal cancer after surgery, an analysis of 69,835 patients in SEER database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingguo Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the long-term survival of colorectal cancer (CRC in young patients with elderly ones. METHODS: Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER population-based data, we identified 69,835 patients with non-metastatic colorectal cancer diagnosed between January 1, 1988 and December 31, 2003 treated with surgery. Patients were divided into young (40 years and under and elderly groups (over 40 years of age. Five-year cancer specific survival data were obtained. Kaplan-Meier methods were adopted and multivariable Cox regression models were built for the analysis of long-term survival outcomes and risk factors. RESULTS: Young patients showed significantly higher pathological grading (p<0.001, more cases of mucinous and signet-ring histological type (p<0.001, later AJCC stage (p<0.001, more lymph nodes (≥ 12 nodes dissected (p<0.001 and higher metastatic lymph node ratio (p<0.001. The 5-year colorectal cancer specific survival rates were 78.6% in young group and 75.3% in elderly group, which had significant difference in both univariate and multivariate analysis (P<0.001. Further analysis showed this significant difference only existed in stage II and III patients. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with elderly patients, young patients with colorectal cancer treated with surgery appear to have unique characteristics and a higher cancer specific survival rate although they presented with higher proportions of unfavorable biological behavior as well as advanced stage disease.

  6. Patient and physician preferences for anticancer drugs for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: a discrete-choice experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González JM

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Juan Marcos González,1 Sarika Ogale,2 Robert Morlock,2 Joshua Posner,1 Brett Hauber,1 Nicolas Sommer,2 Axel Grothey3 1Health Preference Assessment Department, RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2Genentech, South San Francisco, CA, 3Division of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Objective: Many publications describe preferences for colorectal cancer (CRC screening; however, few studies elicited preferences for anticancer-drug treatment for metastatic CRC (mCRC. This study was designed to elicit preferences and risk tolerance among patients and oncologists in the USA for anticancer drugs to treat mCRC. Materials and methods: Patients aged 18 years or older with a self-reported diagnosis of mCRC and board-certified (or equivalent oncologists who had treated patients with mCRC were recruited by two survey research companies from existing online patient panels in the USA. Additional oncologists were recruited from a list of US physicians. Patients and oncologists completed a discrete-choice experiment (DCE survey. DCEs offer a systematic method of eliciting preferences and quantifying both the relative importance of treatment attributes and the tradeoffs respondents are willing to make among benefits and risks. Treatment attributes in the DCE were progression-free survival (PFS and risks of severe papulopustular rash, serious hemorrhage, cardiopulmonary arrest, and gastrointestinal perforation. Patients’ and physicians’ maximum levels of acceptable treatment-related risks for two prespecified increases in efficacy were estimated. Results: A total of 127 patients and 150 oncologists completed the survey. Relative preferences for the treatment attributes in the study were mostly consistent with the expectation that better clinical outcomes were preferred over worse clinical outcomes. Risk tolerance varied between patients and physicians. On average, physicians were willing to tolerate higher risks than patients

  7. Tiam1 transgenic mice display increased tumor invasive and metastatic potential of colorectal cancer after 1,2-dimethylhydrazine treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Na Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: T lymphoma invasion and metastasis 1 (Tiam1 is a potential modifier of tumor development and progression. Our previous study in vitro and in nude mice suggested a promotion role of Tiam1 on invasion and metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC. In the present study, we generated Tiam1/C1199-CopGFP transgenic mice to investigate the tumorigenetic, invasive and metastatic alterations in the colon and rectum of wild-type and Tiam1 transgenic mice under 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH treatment. METHODS: Transgenic mice were produced by the method of pronuclear microinlectlon. Whole-body fluorescence imaging (Lighttools, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, PCR, and immunohistochemical techniques (IHC were applied sequentially to identify the transgenic mice. The carcinogen DMH (20 mg/kg was used to induce colorectal tumors though intraperitoneal (i.p. injections once a week for 24 weeks from the age of 4 weeks on Tiam1 transgenic or non-transgenic mice. RESULTS: We successfully generated Tiam1/C1199-CopGFP transgenic mice and induced primary tumors in the intestine of both wild type and Tiam1 transgenic mice by DMH treatment. In addition, Tiam1 transgenic mice developed larger and more aggressive neoplasm than wild-type mice. Moreover, immunohistochemical staining revealed that upregulation of Tiam1 was correlated with increased expression of β-Catenin and Vimentin, and downregulation of E-Cadherin in these mice. CONCLUSIONS: Our study has provided in vivo evidence supporting that Tiam1 promotes invasion and metastasis of CRC, most probably through activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, in a Tiam1 transgenic mouse model.

  8. Intra-patient Inter-metastatic Genetic Heterogeneity in Colorectal Cancer as a Key Determinant of Survival after Curative Liver Resection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Sveen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal instability is a well-defined hallmark of tumor aggressiveness and metastatic progression in colorectal cancer. The magnitude of genetic heterogeneity among distinct liver metastases from the same patient at the copy number level, as well as its relationship with chemotherapy exposure and patient outcome, remains unknown. We performed high-resolution DNA copy number analyses of 134 liver metastatic deposits from 45 colorectal cancer patients to assess: (i intra-patient inter-metastatic genetic heterogeneity using a heterogeneity score based on pair-wise genetic distances among tumor deposits; and (ii genomic complexity, defined as the proportion of the genome harboring aberrant DNA copy numbers. Results were analyzed in relation to the patients' clinical course; previous chemotherapy exposure and outcome after surgical resection of liver metastases. We observed substantial variation in the level of intra-patient inter-metastatic heterogeneity. Heterogeneity was not associated with the number of metastatic lesions or their genomic complexity. In metachronous disease, heterogeneity was higher in patients previously exposed to chemotherapy. Importantly, intra-patient inter-metastatic heterogeneity was a strong prognostic determinant, stronger than known clinicopathological prognostic parameters. Patients with a low level of heterogeneity (below the median level had a three-year progression-free and overall survival rate of 23% and 66% respectively, versus 5% and 18% for patients with a high level (hazard ratio0.4, 95% confidence interval 0.2-0.8, P = 0.01; and hazard ratio0.3,95% confidence interval 0.1-0.7, P = 0.007. A low patient-wise level of genomic complexity (below 25% was also a favorable prognostic factor; however, the prognostic association of intra-patient heterogeneity was independent of genomic complexity in multivariable analyses. In conclusion, intra-patient inter-metastatic genetic heterogeneity is a pronounced feature

  9. Metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma in cervicovaginal cytology specimens confirmed by immunocytochemical stains on liquid base specimens: Two study cases with review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zulfiqar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Only a few cases of adenocarcinoma (ACA metastatic to the female lower genital tract diagnosed on cervicovaginal Pap smear have been reported during the past several decades. Both conventional and liquid based cytology (LBC have limited sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing metastatic disease and immunocytochemical (ICC staining may be needed for confirming the diagnosis. We present two cases of metastatic colorectal ACA diagnosed on cervicovaginal ThinPrep (TP Pap smears, with one confirmed by ICC staining method. Recognition of extra-uterine malignancy in the cervicovaginal cytology specimen is critical for the disease diagnosis, prognosis, and the treatment. ICC staining performed on the residual LBC specimen is an important methodology to confirm the diagnosis.

  10. Sensitivity of 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography for advanced colorectal neoplasms: a large-scale analysis of 7505 asymptomatic screening individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Masau; Kakugawa, Yasuo; Terauchi, Takashi; Matsumoto, Minori; Saito, Hiroshi; Muramatsu, Yukio; Saito, Yutaka; Matsuda, Takahisa

    2016-12-01

    The sensitivity of 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for advanced colorectal neoplasms among healthy subjects is not yet fully understood. The present study aimed to clarify the sensitivity by analyzing large-scale data from an asymptomatic screening population. A total of 7505 asymptomatic screenees who underwent both FDG-PET and colonoscopy at our Cancer Screening Division between February 2004 and March 2013 were analyzed. FDG-PET and colonoscopy were performed on consecutive days, and each examination was interpreted in a blinded fashion. The results of the two examinations were compared for each of the divided six colonic segments, with those from colonoscopy being set as the reference. The relationships between the sensitivity of FDG-PET and clinicopathological features of advanced neoplasms were also evaluated. Two hundred ninety-one advanced neoplasms, including 24 invasive cancers, were detected in 262 individuals. Thirteen advanced neoplasms (advanced adenomas) were excluded from the analysis because of the coexistence of lesions in the same colonic segment. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of FDG-PET for advanced neoplasms were 16.9 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 12.7-21.8 %], 99.3 % (95 % CI 99.2-99.4 %), 13.5 % (95 % CI 10.1-17.6 %), and 99.4 % (95 % CI 99.3-99.5 %), respectively. The sensitivity was lower for lesions with less advanced histological grade, of smaller size, and flat-type morphology, and for those located in the proximal part of the colon. FDG-PET is believed to be difficult to use as a primary screening tool in population-based colorectal cancer screening because of its low sensitivity for advanced neoplasms. Even when it is used in opportunistic cancer screening, the limit of its sensitivity should be considered.

  11. Treatment with Antiangiogenic Drugs in Multiple Lines in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.-D. Hofheinz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC, continuing antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression might provide clinical benefit. We synthesized the available evidence in a meta-analysis. Patients and Methods. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies investigating the use of antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression. Eligible studies were randomized phase II/III trials. Primary endpoints were overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS. Secondary endpoints were the impact of continuing antiangiogenic drugs (i in subgroups, (ii in different types of compounds targeting the VEGF-axis (monoclonal antibodies versus tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and (iii on remission rates and prevention of progression. Results. Eight studies (3,668 patients were included. Continuing antiangiogenic treatment beyond progression significantly improved PFS (HR 0.64; 95%-CI, 0.55–0.75 and OS (HR 0.83; 95%-CI, 0.76–0.89. PFS was significantly improved in all subgroups with comparable HR. OS was improved in all subgroups stratified by age, gender, and ECOG status. The rate of patients achieving at least stable disease was improved with an OR of 2.25 (95%-CI, 1.41–3.58. Conclusions. This analysis shows a significant PFS and OS benefit as well as a benefit regarding disease stabilization when using antiangiogenic drugs beyond progression in mCRC. Future studies should focus on the optimal sequence of administering antiangiogenic drugs.

  12. High RBM3 expression is associated with an improved survival and oxaliplatin response in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Siesing

    Full Text Available High expression of the RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3 has been shown to correlate, with prolonged survival in several malignant diseases and with the benefit of platinum-based chemotherapy in ovarian cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate RBM3 in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC as a prognostic factor for overall survival and in relation to benefit of first-line chemotherapy.Immunohistochemical staining was conducted and evaluated in tumours from 455 mCRC patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression proportional hazards models were used to access the impact of RBM3 expression on overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS.High RBM3 expression, both nuclear and cytoplasmic, was an independent prognostic factor for prolonged OS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.50-0.90 and HR 0.66, 95% CI 0.48-0.91, respectively. PFS was significantly longer in patients with high RBM3 expression who had received first-line oxaliplatin based treatment, compared to those who had received irinotecan based treatment, both regarding nuclear and cytoplasmic expression (p-value 0.020 and 0.022 respectively.High RBM3 expression is an independent predictor of prolonged survival in mCRC patients, in particular in patients treated with first-line oxaliplatin based chemotherapy.

  13. A novel UGT1 marker associated with better tolerance against irinotecan-induced severe neutropenia in metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S; Laverdiere, I; Tourancheau, A; Jonker, D; Couture, F; Cecchin, E; Villeneuve, L; Harvey, M; Court, M H; Innocenti, F; Toffoli, G; Lévesque, E; Guillemette, C

    2015-12-01

    The risk of severe irinotecan-induced neutropenia has been shown to be related to the UGT1 variant UGT1A1*28, which increases exposure to the potent metabolite SN-38. Our goal was to identify a novel UGT1 marker(s) using 28 haplotype-tagged single nucleotide polymorphisms genotyped by mass spectrometry. By characterizing the UGT1 sequence from a cohort of 167 Canadian metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients and a validation cohort of 250 Italian mCRC patients, we found rs11563250G, located in the intergenic region downstream of UGT1, to be significantly associated with reduced risk of severe neutropenia (odds ratio (OR)=0.21; P=0.043 and OR=0.27; P=0.036, respectively, and OR=0.31 when combined; P=0.001), which remained significant upon correction for multiple testing in the combined cohort (P=0.041). For the two-marker haplotype rs11563250G and UGT1A1*1 (rs8175347 TA6), the OR was of 0.17 (P=0.0004). Genetic testing of this marker may identify patients who might benefit from increased irinotecan dosing.

  14. The impact of personalized medicine on survival: comparisons of results in metastatic breast, colorectal and non-small-cell lung cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Antonio; Torri, Valter; Garassino, Marina Chiara; Porcu, Luca; Galetta, Domenico

    2014-05-01

    Breast, colorectal and lung cancers represent the three most incident forms of cancer worldwide. Among these three "big killers", lung cancer is considered the one with the worst prognosis due to its high mortality even in early stages. Due to their more favorable prognosis, breast and colorectal cancers might appear to have benefited from major advances. Most oncologists who are faced with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) find the reported results very frustrating when compared with those for metastatic breast (MBC) and colorectal cancers (MCRC). The aim of this analysis was to quantify and compare the relative magnitude of overall survival (OS) improvements in the first-line approaches in metastatic NSCLC, MBC and MCRC through the analysis of the main landmark meta-analyses and randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of commercially available drugs. Five items were considered and analyzed for each cancer. Moreover we evaluated the real clinical impact of the results reported by each item on the entire population; for each "big killer" an overall hazard ratio (HR) was estimated: 0.88 (95%(+) CI: 0.72-1.07) for MBC, 0.94 (95%(+) CI: 0.82-1.07) for MCRC, and about 0.80 (95%(+) CI: 0.73-0.90) for advanced NSCLC. We showed that, in the last decades, these three tumors had important and constant OS improvements reached step by step. The relative magnitude of OS improvement seems higher in metastatic NSCLC than MBC and MCRC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Circulating Tumor Cell Count Correlates with Colorectal Neoplasm Progression and Is a Prognostic Marker for Distant Metastasis in Non-Metastatic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Shao, Hung-Jen; Wu, Jen-Chia; Lai-Ming, Jr.; Lu, Si-Hong; Hung, Tsung-Fu; Chiu, Yen-Chi; You, Jeng-Fu; Hsieh, Pao-Shiu; Yeh, Chien-Yuh; Hung, Hsin-Yuan; Chiang, Sum-Fu; Lin, Geng-Ping; Tang, Reiping; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-04-01

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proven as a prognostic marker for metastatic colorectal cancer (m-CRC) patients. However, the currently available techniques for capturing and enumerating CTCs lack of required sensitivity to be applicable as a prognostic marker for non-metastatic patients as CTCs are even more rare. We have developed a microfluidic device utilizing antibody-conjugated non-fouling coating to eliminate nonspecific binding and to promote the multivalent binding of target cells. We then established the correlation of CTC counts and neoplasm progression through applying this platform to capture and enumerate CTCs in 2 mL of peripheral blood from healthy (n = 27), benign (n = 21), non-metastatic (n = 95), and m-CRC (n = 15) patients. The results showed that the CTC counts progressed from 0, 1, 5, to 36. Importantly, after 2-year follow-up on the non-metastatic CRC patients, we found that those who had ≥5 CTCs were 8 times more likely to develop distant metastasis within one year after curable surgery than those who had neoplasm, thus CTC may be as a simple, independent prognostic marker for the non-metastatic CRC patients who are at high risk of early recurrence.

  16. Identification of a characteristic copy number alteration profile by high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism arrays associated with metastatic sporadic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-González, María; Fontanillo, Celia; Abad, María M; Gutiérrez, María L; Mota, Ines; Bengoechea, Oscar; Santos-Briz, Ángel; Blanco, Oscar; Fonseca, Emilio; Ciudad, Juana; Fuentes, Manuel; De Las Rivas, Javier; Alcazar, José A; García, Jacinto; Muñoz-Bellvis, Luís; Orfao, Alberto; Sayagués, José M

    2014-07-01

    Metastatic dissemination is the most frequent cause of death in patients with sporadic colorectal cancer (sCRC). It is believed that the metastatic process is related at least in part to a specific background of genetic alterations accumulated in cells from primary tumors, and the ability to detect such alterations is critical for the identification of patients with sCRC who are at risk of developing metastases. The authors used high-resolution, 500-K single nucleotide polymorphism arrays to identify copy number alteration profiles present at diagnosis in primary tumors from patients with metastatic (n = 23) versus nonmetastatic (n = 26) sCRC. The results revealed a characteristic pattern of copy number alterations in metastatic sCRC tumors that involved losses of 23 regions at chromosomes 1p, 17p, and 18q, together with gains of 35 regions at chromosomes 7 and 13q. In line with expectations, the copy number profile investigated involved multiple genes that were associated previously with sCRC (ie, SMAD2) and/or the metastatic process (ie, podocalyxin-like [PODXL]), and it also was associated with a poorer outcome. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  17. Derivation and validation of a scoring system to stratify the risk of advanced colorectal neoplasia in asymptomatic adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperiale, Thomas F.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Stump, Timothy E.; Glowinski, Elizabeth A.; Ransohoff, David F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Several methods are recommended equally strongly for colorectal cancer screening in average-risk persons. Risk stratification would enable tailoring of screening within this group, with less invasive tests (sigmoidoscopy or occult blood tests) for lower-risk persons and colonoscopy for higher-risk persons. Objective To create a risk index for advanced neoplasia (colorectal cancer and adenomas or serrated polyps ≥1.0 cm, villous histology, or high-grade dysplasia) anywhere in the colorectum, using the most common risk factors for colorectal neoplasia. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Multiple endoscopy units, primarily in the Midwest. Patients Persons aged 50 to 80 years undergoing initial screening colonoscopy (December 2004 to September 2011). Measurements Derivation and validation of a risk index based on points from regression coefficients for age, sex, waist circumference, cigarette smoking, and family history of colorectal cancer. Results Among 2993 persons in the derivation set, prevalence of advanced neoplasia was 9.4%. Risks for advanced neoplasia in persons at very low, low, intermediate, and high risk were 1.92% (95% CI, 0.63% to 4.43%), 4.88% (CI, 3.79% to 6.18%), 9.93% (CI, 8.09% to 12.0%), and 24.9% (CI, 21.1% to 29.1%), respectively (P neoplasia were 1.65% (CI, 0.20% to 5.84%), 3.31% (CI, 2.08% to 4.97%), 10.9% (CI, 8.26% to 14.1%), and 22.3% (CI, 16.9% to 28.5%), respectively (P neoplasia among average-risk persons by identifying lower-risk groups for which noncolonoscopy strategies may be effective and efficient and a higher-risk group for which colonoscopy may be preferred. PMID:26259154

  18. Current role of antibody therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, P; Qvortrup, C; Eriksen, Jesper Grau

    2007-01-01

    In less than 10 years, the number and importance of non-surgical treatment modalities in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) have increased dramatically, both in the adjuvant and the advanced settings. However, despite the improvement of cytotoxic therapy in CRC, many patients still develop pro...... arsenal in CRC to a great extent, but they will also add to the complexity of treatment of CRC. In this review, we summarize the current status of antibody therapy in patients with CRC. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-May-28......-specific mechanisms and thereby increase both efficacy and tolerance. A great number of 'targeted drugs' are being tested in clinical trials and some of these new drugs, like bevacizumab, cetuximab and panitumumab, are available for routine use in health care. These new targeted drugs will expand the therapeutic...

  19. Retrospective study of RAS/PIK3CA/BRAF tumor mutations as predictors of response to first-line chemotherapy with bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Izuma; Shinozaki, Eiji; Matsushima, Tomohiro; Wakatsuki, Takeru; Ogura, Mariko; Ichimura, Takashi; Ozaka, Masato; Takahari, Daisuke; Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Chin, Keisho; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Yamaguchi, Kensei

    2017-01-09

    After analysis of minor RAS mutations (KRAS exon 3, 4/NRAS) in the FIRE-3 and PRIME studies, an expanded range of RAS mutations were established as a negative predictive marker for the efficacy of anti-EGFR antibody treatment. BRAF and PIK3CA mutations may be candidate biomarkers for anti-EGFR targeted therapies. However, it remains unknown whether RAS/PIK3CA/BRAF tumor mutations can predict the efficacy of bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer. We assessed whether selection according to RAS/PIK3CA/BRAF mutational status could be beneficial for patients treated with bevacizumab as first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer. Of the 1001 consecutive colorectal cancer patients examined for RAS, PIK3CA, and BRAF tumor mutations using a multiplex kit (Luminex®), we studied 90 patients who received combination chemotherapy with bevacizumab as first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer. The objective response rate (ORR) and progression-free survival (PFS) were evaluated according to mutational status. The ORR was higher among patients with wild-type tumors (64.3%) compared to those with tumors that were only wild type with respect to KRAS exon 2 (54.8%), and the differences in ORR between patients with wild-type and mutant-type tumors were greater when considering only KRAS exon 2 mutations (6.8%) rather than RAS/PIK3CA/BRAF mutations (18.4%). There were no statistically significant differences in ORR or PFS between all wild-type tumors and tumors carrying any of the mutations. Multivariate analysis revealed that liver metastasis and RAS and BRAF mutations were independent negative factors for disease progression after first-line treatment with bevacizumab. Patient selection according to RAS/PIK3CA/BRAF mutations could help select patients who will achieve a better response to bevacizumab treatment. We found no clinical benefit of restricting combination therapy with bevacizumab for metastatic colorectal cancer patients with EGFR-wild type

  20. Bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as third- or later-line therapy in patients with heavily treated metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Q

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Qiong Yang,1–4,* Chenxi Yin,1,3,4,* Fangxin Liao,1,3,4 Yuanyuan Huang,1,3,4 Wenzhuo He,1,3,4 Chang Jiang,1,3,4 Guifang Guo,1,3,4 Bei Zhang,1,3,4 Liangping Xia1,3,41VIP Region, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Oncology, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China; 3State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China; 4Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Currently available third- or later-line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC is limited in its efficacy, with a weak survival benefit in patients who progressed after two or more lines of standard therapy. Our retrospective study aimed to explore the value of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy in this setting.Methods: Patients with mCRC who received fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan as first- and second-line chemotherapy were selected for inclusion. Treatment consisted of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy. Chemotherapy consisted mainly of oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and fluoropyrimidine.Results: Between February 2010 and December 2012, 35 consecutive patients with mCRC were treated with bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as a third- or later-line treatment. No complete responses, seven partial responses (20%, 22 stable disease responses (62.9%, and six progressive disease responses (17.1% were obtained, producing an objective response rate of 20% and a disease control rate of 82.9%. With a median follow-up of 11.3 months (range: 0.7–48.0 months, the median progression-free survival was 5.98 months (95% confidence interval: 4.76–7.2 months, and the median overall survival was 14.77 months (95% confidence interval: 11.45–18.1 months. In the univariate analysis

  1. BCAM and LAMA5 Mediate the Recognition between Tumor Cells and the Endothelium in the Metastatic Spreading of KRAS-Mutant Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, Alice; Cardaci, Sabrina; Lamba, Simona; Oddo, Daniele; Marchiò, Caterina; Cassoni, Paola; Amoreo, Carla Azzurra; Corti, Giorgio; Testori, Alessandro; Bussolino, Federico; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih; Corà, Davide; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Marchiò, Serena

    2016-10-01

    KRAS mutations confer adverse prognosis to colorectal cancer, and no targeted therapies have shown efficacy in this patient subset. Paracrine, nongenetic events induced by KRAS-mutant tumor cells are expected to result in specific deregulation and/or relocation of tumor microenvironment (TME) proteins, which in principle can be exploited as alternative therapeutic targets. A multimodal strategy combining ex vivo/in vitro phage display screens with deep-sequencing and bioinformatics was applied to uncover TME-specific targets in KRAS-mutant hepatic metastasis from colorectal cancer. Expression and localization of BCAM and LAMA5 were validated by immunohistochemistry in preclinical models of human hepatic metastasis and in a panel of human specimens (n = 71). The antimetastatic efficacy of two BCAM-mimic peptides was evaluated in mouse models. The role of BCAM in the interaction of KRAS-mutant colorectal cancer cells with TME cells was investigated by adhesion assays. BCAM and LAMA5 were identified as molecular targets within both tumor cells and TME of KRAS-mutant hepatic metastasis from colorectal cancer, where they were specifically overexpressed. Two BCAM-mimic peptides inhibited KRAS-mutant hepatic metastasis in preclinical models. Genetic suppression and biochemical inhibition of either BCAM or LAMA5 impaired adhesion of KRAS-mutant colorectal cancer cells specifically to endothelial cells, whereas adhesion to pericytes and hepatocytes was unaffected. These data show that the BCAM/LAMA5 system plays a functional role in the metastatic spreading of KRAS-mutant colorectal cancer by mediating tumor-TME interactions and as such represents a valuable therapeutic candidate for this large, currently untreatable patient group. Clin Cancer Res; 22(19); 4923-33. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Prolonged Pemetrexed Infusion Plus Gemcitabine in Refractory Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Preclinical Rationale and Phase II Study Results.

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    Passardi, Alessandro; Fanini, Francesca; Turci, Livia; Foca, Flavia; Rosetti, Paola; Ruscelli, Silvia; Casadei Gardini, Andrea; Valgiusti, Martina; Dazzi, Claudio; Marangolo, Maurizio

    2017-08-01

    Difficulties in translating in vitro results into clinical practice are inevitable.Further efforts to verify the efficacy of alternative schedules of pemetrexed in solid tumors are encouraged. We investigated the cytotoxic activity of pemetrexed in combination with several drugs (gemcitabine, carboplatin, vinorelbine, and mitomycin C) using different exposure schedules in three colon cancer cell lines. The best results were obtained with the following schedule: a prolonged pemetrexed exposure followed by a 48-hour wash-out and then gemcitabine. This combination was then advanced to a phase II clinical trial. Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer in progression after standard treatment were included in the study. Adequate bone marrow reserve, normal hepatic and renal function, and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0-2 were required. Treatment consisted of an 8-hour intravenous infusion of pemetrexed 150 mg/m(2) on day 1 and a 30-minute intravenous infusion of gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) on day 3 of each cycle, repeated every 14 days. Fourteen patients were enrolled onto the study (first step). No objective responses were seen, and evidence of stable disease was observed in only one of the 12 evaluable patients. The most important grade 3-4 side effects were hematological toxicity (neutropenia 64.2%, thrombocytopenia 71.4%, anemia 28.7%), fatigue (50.0%), and stomatitis (21.5%). Median overall survival and time to progression were 5.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.9-7.1) and 2.1 months (95% CI: 1.7-2.8), respectively. The experimental pemetrexed-gemcitabine combination proved to be inactive and moderately toxic. © AlphaMedPress; the data published online to support this summary is the property of the authors.

  3. Sensitive High-Resolution Melting Analysis for Screening of KRAS and BRAF Mutations in Iranian Human Metastatic Colorectal Cancers

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    Niya, Mohammad Hadi Karbalaie; Basi, Ali; Koochak, Aghigh; Tameshkel, Fahimeh Safarnezhad; Rakhshani, Nasser; Zamani, Farhad; Imanzade, Farid; Rezvani, Hamid; sereshki, Mohammad Mahdi Adib; Sohrabi, Masoud Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Investigations of methods for detection of mutations have uncovered major weaknesses of direct sequencing and pyrosequencing, with their high costs and low sensitivity in screening for both known and unknown mutations. High resolution melting (HRM) analysis is an alternative tool for the rapid detection of mutations. Here we describe the accuracy of HRM in screening for KRAS and BRAF mutations in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRCs) samples. Materials and Methods: A total of 1000 mCRC patients in Mehr Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from Feb 2008 to May 2012 were examined for KRAS mutations and 242 of them were selected for further assessment of BRAF mutations by HRM analysis. In order to calculate the sensitivity and specificity, HRM results were checked by pyrosequencing as the golden standard and Dxs Therascreen as a further method. Results: In the total of 1,000 participants, there were 664 (66.4%) with wild type and 336 (33.6%) with mutant codons 12 and/or 13 of the KRAS gene. Among 242 samples randomly checked for the BRAF gene, all were wild type by HRM. Pyrosequencing and Dxs Therascreen results were in line with those of the HRM. In this regard, the sensitivity and specificity of HRM were evaluated as 100%. Conclusion: The findings suggest that the HRM, in comparison with DNA sequencing, is a more appropriate method for precise scanning of KRAS and BRAF mutations. It is also possible to state that HRM may be an attractive technique for the detection of known or unknown somatic mutations in other genes. PMID:28122448

  4. Correlation of Hypertension and Proteinuria with Outcome in Elderly Bevacizumab-Treated Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliu, Jaime; Salud, Antonieta; Safont, Maria J.; García-Girón, Carlos; Aparicio, Jorge; Losa, Ferran; Bosch, Carlos; Escudero, Pilar; Casado, Enrique; Jorge, Monica; Bohn, Uriel; Pérez-Carrión, Ramon; Carmona, Alberto; Custodio, Ana B.; Maurel, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies suggest a relationship between hypertension and outcome in bevacizumab-treated patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We performed a retrospective analysis of two phase II studies (BECA and BECOX) to determine if hypertension and proteinuria predict outcome in elderly patients with mCRC treated with bevacizumab. Patients and Methods Patients ≥70 years of age received either capecitabine 1250 mg/m2 bid days 1–14 + bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg day 1 every 21 days (BECA study) or capecitabine 1000 mg/m2 bid days 1–14 with bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg and oxaliplatin 130 mg/m2 day 1 (BECOX study). The primary objective was to correlate hypertension and proteinuria with overall response rate (ORR), time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS). Secondary objectives included identification of risk factors associated with the development of hypertension and proteinuria and determining whether development of hypertension or proteinuria in the first 2 cycles was related to ORR, disease-control rate (DCR), TTP or OS. Results In total, 127 patients (median age 75.5 years) were included in the study. Hypertension correlated with DCR and OS; proteinuria correlated with ORR and DCR. Proteinuria or hypertension in the first 2 cycles did not correlate with efficacy. Risk factors for hypertension were female gender (odds ratio [OR] 0.241; P = 0.011) and more bevacizumab cycles (OR 1.112; P = 0.002); risk factors for proteinuria were diabetes (OR 3.869; P = 0.006) and more bevacizumab cycles (OR 1.181; Pproteinuria is correlated with ORR but not with OS and TTP. Both hypertension and proteinuria are associated with the duration of bevacizumab treatment and do not represent an independent prognostic factor. PMID:25602286

  5. Thymidylate synthase expression in circulating tumor cells: a new tool to predict 5-fluorouracil resistance in metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Emne Ali; Fanelli, Marcello Ferretti; Buim, Marcilei Eliza Cavicchioli; Machado Netto, Marcelo Calil; Gasparini Junior, José Luiz; Souza E Silva, Virgílio; Dettino, Aldo Lourenço Abbade; Mingues, Natalia Breve; Romero, Juliana Valim; Ocea, Luciana Menezes Mendonça; Rocha, Bruna Maria Malagoli; Alves, Vanessa Silva; Araújo, Daniel Vilarim; Chinen, Ludmilla Thomé Domingos

    2015-09-15

    Thymidylate synthase (TYMS) is an important enzyme for 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) metabolism in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. The search for this enzyme in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be a powerful tool to follow-up cancer patients. mCRC patients were enrolled before the beginning of 5-FU-based chemotherapy. The blood was filtered on Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor Cells (ISET), and the analysis of TYMS expression in CTCs was made by immunocytochemistry. Additionally, we verified TYMS staining in primary tumors and metastases from the same patients. There were included 54 mCRC patients and 47 of them received 5-FU-based chemotherapy. The median CTCs number was 2 per mL. We were not able to analyze immunocytochemistry in 13 samples (9 patients with absence of CTCs and 4 samples due to technical reasons). Therefore, TYMS expression on CTCs was analyzed in 34 samples and was found positive in 9 (26.5%). Six of these patients had tumor progression after treatment with 5-FU. We found an association between CTC TYMS staining and disease progression (DP), although without statistical significance (P = 0.07). TYMS staining in primary tumors and metastases tissues did not have any correlation with disease progression (P = 0.67 and P = 0.42 respectively). Patients who had CTC count above the median (2 CTCs/mL) showed more TYMS expression (P = 0.02) correlating with worse prognosis. Our results searching for TYMS staining in CTCs, primary tumors and metastases suggest that the analysis of TYMS can be useful tool as a 5-FU resistance predictor biomarker if analyzed in CTCs from mCRC patients. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of UICC.

  6. A modified TNM staging system for non-metastatic colorectal cancer based on nomogram analysis of SEER database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangxing; Li, Jun; Cai, Yibo; Tian, Yu; Chi, Shengqiang; Tong, Danyang; Hu, Yeting; Yang, Qi; Li, Jingsong; Poston, Graeme; Yuan, Ying; Ding, Kefeng

    2018-01-08

    To revise the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system for colorectal cancer (CRC) based on a nomogram analysis of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, and to prove the rationality of enhancing T stage's weighting in our previously proposed T-plus staging system. Total 115,377 non-metastatic CRC patients from SEER were randomly grouped as training and testing set by ratio 1:1. The Nomo-staging system was established via three nomograms based on 1-year, 2-year and 3-year disease specific survival (DSS) Logistic regression analysis of the training set. The predictive value of Nomo-staging system for the testing set was evaluated by concordance index (c-index), likelihood ratio (L.R.) and Akaike information criteria (AIC) for 1-year, 2-year, 3-year overall survival (OS) and DSS. Kaplan-Meier survival curve was used to valuate discrimination and gradient monotonicity. And an external validation was performed on database from the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University (SAHZU). Patients with T1-2 N1 and T1N2a were classified into stage II while T4 N0 patients were classified into stage III in Nomo-staging system. Kaplan-Meier survival curves of OS and DSS in testing set showed Nomo-staging system performed better in discrimination and gradient monotonicity, and the external validation in SAHZU database also showed distinctly better discrimination. The Nomo-staging system showed higher value in L.R. and c-index, and lower value in AIC when predicting OS and DSS in testing set. The Nomo-staging system showed better performance in prognosis prediction and the weight of lymph nodes status in prognosis prediction should be cautiously reconsidered.

  7. Discovery of methylated circulating DNA biomarkers for comprehensive non-invasive monitoring of treatment response in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barault, Ludovic; Amatu, Alessio; Siravegna, Giulia; Ponzetti, Agostino; Moran, Sebastian; Cassingena, Andrea; Mussolin, Benedetta; Falcomatà, Chiara; Binder, Alexandra M; Cristiano, Carmen; Oddo, Daniele; Guarrera, Simonetta; Cancelliere, Carlotta; Bustreo, Sara; Bencardino, Katia; Maden, Sean; Vanzati, Alice; Zavattari, Patrizia; Matullo, Giuseppe; Truini, Mauro; Grady, William M; Racca, Patrizia; Michels, Karin B; Siena, Salvatore; Esteller, Manel; Bardelli, Alberto; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Di Nicolantonio, Federica

    2017-10-05

    Mutations in cell-free circulating DNA (cfDNA) have been studied for tracking disease relapse in colorectal cancer (CRC). This approach requires personalised assay design due to the lack of universally mutated genes. In contrast, early methylation alterations are restricted to defined genomic loci allowing comprehensive assay design for population studies. Our objective was to identify cancer-specific methylated biomarkers which could be measured longitudinally in cfDNA (liquid biopsy) to monitor therapeutic outcome in patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC). Genome-wide methylation microarrays of CRC cell lines (n=149) identified five cancer-specific methylated loci (EYA4, GRIA4, ITGA4, MAP3K14-AS1, MSC). Digital PCR assays were employed to measure methylation of these genes in tumour tissue DNA (n=82) and cfDNA from patients with mCRC (n=182). Plasma longitudinal assessment was performed in a patient subset treated with chemotherapy or targeted therapy. Methylation in at least one marker was detected in all tumour tissue samples and in 156 mCRC patient cfDNA samples (85.7%). Plasma marker prevalence was 71.4% for EYA4, 68.5% for GRIA4, 69.7% for ITGA4, 69.1% for MAP3K14-AS1% and 65.1% for MSC. Dynamics of methylation markers was not affected by treatment type and correlated with objective tumour response and progression-free survival. This five-gene methylation panel can be used to circumvent the absence of patient-specific mutations for monitoring tumour burden dynamics in liquid biopsy under different therapeutic regimens. This method might be proposed for assessing pharmacodynamics in clinical trials or when conventional imaging has limitations. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Practical use of capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (CAPEOX) with bevacizumab for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer that cannot expect conversion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokomizo, Hajime; Yoshimatsu, Kazuhiko; Otani, Taisuke; Osawa, Gakuji; Nakayama, Mao; Matsumoto, Atsuo; Yano, Yuki; Okayama, Sachiyo; Naritaka, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    The cytotoxic regimens and bevacizumab (Bev) or anti-EGFR antibody are used for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) that can expect conversion therapy. In this paper, we would present our practical data including the response, survival and toxicity of the capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (CAPEOX) with Bev for mCRC that cannot expect conversion therapy. Nineteen patients with mCRC who were treated with CAPEOX with Bev were enrolled. All the patients had the disseminated hepatic, lung, peritoneal metastases or distant lymph node metastasis assessed as no possibility of R0 resection. The median age was 66 (45-85) years old. Target lesion was liver and lung in 9 patients, peritoneum in 5 patients and distant lymph node in 3 patients. CAPEOX with Bev therapy was administered for a median of 8.0 cycles (range, 4-21 cycles). In the 16 evaluable cases, there were no patient with complete response (CR), 9 patients with partial response (PR), 6 with stable disease (SD), and 1 with progressive disease. The objective response rate (CR plus PR) was 56.3%, and disease control rate (CR, PR plus SD) was 93.8%. The median TTP was 9.3 months and the median OS was 21.1 months. No patients treated with surgery even though the good responses were obtained. No severe hematologic adverse toxicities were observed except only one case with grade 3 platelet decrease. Nonhematologic grade 3 events were observed totally 8 patients including 3 for peripheral neuropathy, 2 for bilirubin, and 1 for nausea/vomiting, amylase and stomatitis. We obtained the quite good results of CAPEOX plus Bev as the first-line treatment practically. This regimen might be useful for mCRC that cannot expect conversion therapy.

  9. HER2 Amplification and Cetuximab Efficacy in Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Harboring Wild-type RAS and BRAF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jae Ho; Kim, Jihun; Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dalyong; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Sun Young; Kim, Kyu-Pyo; Yoon, Young-Kwang; Kim, Deokhoon; Chun, Sung-Min; Park, Yangsoon; Jang, Se Jin; Kim, Tae Won

    2017-09-01

    Cetuximab has shown clinical benefit in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) harboring wild-type RAS. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) amplification may be a mechanism of cetuximab resistance. We evaluated the association between HER2 amplification and cetuximab efficacy in patients with mCRC harboring wild-type RAS and BRAF. Between December 2003 and June 2013, we identified 142 patients with mCRC whose tumors harbored both wild-type exons 2, 3, and 4 in KRAS and NRAS, and wild-type exon 15 in BRAF using high throughput sequencing (OncoMap version 4.0). All patients received cetuximab after oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and fluoropyrimidine failure. HER2 status was determined using immunohistochemistry and silver in situ hybridization (SISH) and correlated with cetuximab efficacy. Of 142 RAS and BRAF wild-type tumors, we observed 7 cases (4.9%) of HER2 amplification by SISH. After a median follow-up of 13.2 months (range, 1.4-78.1 months), median progression-free survival (PFS) was significantly different according to HER2 status: 3.1 months in patients with HER2 amplification compared with 5.6 months in those with non-amplified HER2 (hazard ratio, 2.73; 95% confidence interval, 1.18-6.31; P = .019). Overall survival (OS) was not significantly different between groups, although there was a tendency towards shorter OS in patients with HER2-amplified tumors (hazard ratio, 1.31; 95% confidence interval, 0.61-2.82; 10.1 vs. 13.5 months; P = .488). HER2 amplification is predictive of shorter PFS after cetuximab treatment in patients with mCRC harboring wild-type RAS and BRAF. Further study is warranted for this patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficacy and safety of bevacizumab in combination with irinotecan and capecitabine in first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal carcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungić Saša

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The efficacy and safety of bevacizumab (BEV in combination with capecitabin and irinotecan in first-line therapy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC were studied. In order to improve safety and efficacy of chemotherapy, as well as to reduce adverse reactions to a minimum, doses of active agents applied were changed in relation to previously employed schedules. Methods. Patients with histologically documented mCRC with no previously received chemotherapy or with received adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy, which ended 6 months before capecitabin treatment (1000 mg/m2 per os from the 2nd to 8th day of each cycle, irinotecan (175 mg/m2 iv every 2 weeks, plus bevacizumab (5 mg/kg iv every 2 weeks were observed. Results. This prospective study included 35 patients of both sexes. The overall response rate (ORR of 28.6%, partial response (PR of 28.6%, progressive disease (PD of 28.6% and stable disease (SD of 42.8% were found. The progressionfree survival (PFS of the analyzed patients was 11.3 (95% CL: 9.1–12.9 months while overall survival (OS of the included patients was 25.2 (95% CL: 17.4–28.4 months and 117 adverse effects were recorded in 24 patients. Alopecia, nausea and vomiting, hemorrhage, hand-foot syndrome, diarrhea, abdominal pain, proteinuria, and hypertension (51.4%, 37.1%, 37.1%, 25.7%, 22.8%, 20.0%, 20.0% and 17.1%, respectively were most frequently observed adverse effects. Conclusion. The results of this clinical trial support and recommend the use of bevacizumab plus capecitabin and irinotecan in the doses and schedule applied throughout this study as the first-line treatment of mCRC patients.

  11. Physical function and quality of life in frail and/or elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with capecitabine and bevacizumab: an exploratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Peter; Hecht, J Randolph; Wang, He-Jing; Dichmann, Richard; Liem, Andre K D; Chan, David; Patel, Ravi; Hu, Edward H L; Tchekmedyian, Neres S; Wainberg, Zev A; Naeim, Arash

    2014-10-01

    Optimal treatment strategies in frail and/or elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer have not been well defined. Using data from a prospective, phase II study of elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with bevacizumab and capecitabine, we explored the differences in functional measure and quality of life (QoL) between patients with ECOG performance status (PS) 1 and 2. Geriatric functional measures included patient reported limitations in ADLs and IADLs, ECOG PS, 3-item recall, hearing acuity, and the "Get up and Go" test. QoL was assessed by means of the FACT-C questionnaire and the EQ-5D questionnaire. The prognostic impact of baseline characteristics on survival was studied using univariate Cox regression analysis. The majority (62%) of the 45 patients had an ECOG PS of 2. The ECOG PS 2 group had more limitations in IADLs, lower baseline QoL, and a lower patient-rated health score. For all participants, QoL significantly improved from baseline to the start of cycle 2 (FACT-C: 99.9 vs. 105.4, p=0.01) and did not deteriorate when baseline scores were compared to when participants went off study (FACT-C: 99.9 vs. 98.6, p=0.59). In the Cox-regression analysis, a positive "Get up and Go" test was prognostic for improved survival (HR=0.31, p=0.01). There is significant heterogeneity in functional measures and quality of life among elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with ECOG PS 1 and 2. The "Get up and Go" test may be a useful prognostic indicator for survival in this population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The association of colonoscopy quality indicators with the detection of screen-relevant lesions, adverse events, and postcolonoscopy cancers in an asymptomatic Canadian colorectal cancer screening population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilsden, Robert J; Dube, Catherine; Heitman, Steven J; Bridges, Ronald; McGregor, S Elizabeth; Rostom, Alaa

    2015-11-01

    Although several quality indicators of colonoscopy have been defined, quality assurance activities should be directed at the measurement of quality indicators that are predictive of key screening colonoscopy outcomes. The goal of this study was to examine the association among established quality indicators and the detection of screen-relevant lesions (SRLs), adverse events, and postcolonoscopy cancers. Historical cohort study. Canadian colorectal cancer screening center. A total of 18,456 asymptomatic men and women ages 40 to 74, at either average risk or increased risk for colorectal cancer because of a family history, who underwent a screening colonoscopy from 2008 to 2010. Using univariate and multivariate analyses, we explored the association among procedural quality indicators and 3 colonoscopy outcomes: detection of SRLs, adverse events, and postcolonoscopy cancers. The crude rates of SRLs, adverse events, and postcolonoscopy cancers were 240, 6.44, and .54 per 1000 colonoscopies, respectively. Several indicators, including endoscopist withdrawal time (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.2-1.4) and cecal intubation rate (OR, 13.9; 95% CI, 1.9-96.9), were associated with the detection of SRLs. No quality indicator was associated with the risk of adverse events. Endoscopist average withdrawal time over 6 minutes (OR, .12; 95% CI, .002-.85) and SRL detection rate over 20% (OR, .17; 95% CI, .03-.74) were associated with a reduced risk of postcolonoscopy cancers. Single-center study. Quality assurance programs should prioritize the measurement of endoscopist average withdrawal time and adenoma (SRL) detection rate. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effectiveness and Safety of Intensive Triplet Chemotherapy Plus Bevacizumab, FIr-B/FOx, in Young-Elderly Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Bruera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Four-drug regimens, such as FIr-B/FOx schedule, can improve efficacy of first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC patients. The present study specifically evaluates feasibility of FIr-B/FOx first-line intensive regimen in fit young-elderly MCRC patients, representing approximately 40% of overall MCRC patients. Activity, efficacy, and safety were equivalent to overall MCRC patients, not significantly different according to KRAS genotype. Clinical outcome was significantly prolonged in liver-limited compared to other/multiple metastatic disease. Safety evaluation of the individual young-elderly patient showed that limiting toxicity syndromes (LTS in multiple sites were significantly increased, compared to LTS in single site, with respect to non-elderly patients.

  14. Plasma YKL-40 in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with first line oxaliplatin-based regimen with or without cetuximab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarpgaard, Line Schmidt; Guren, Tormod K; Glimelius, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aim to test the hypothesis that high plasma YKL-40 is associated with short progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treated with first-line oxaliplatin and 5-flourouracil with or without cetuximab. PATIENTS...... AND METHODS: A total of 566 patients in the NORDIC VII Study were randomized 1∶1∶1 to arm A (Nordic FLOX), arm B (Nordic FLOX + cetuximab), or arm C (Nordic FLOX + cetuximab for 16 weeks followed by cetuximab alone as maintenance therapy). Pretreatment plasma samples were available from 510 patients. Plasma...

  15. Effect of First-Line Chemotherapy Combined With Cetuximab or Bevacizumab on Overall Survival in Patients With KRAS Wild-Type Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venook, Alan P.; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Innocenti, Federico; Fruth, Briant; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Schrag, Deborah; Greene, Claire; O’Neil, Bert H.; Atkins, James Norman; Berry, Scott; Polite, Blase N.; O’Reilly, Eileen M.; Goldberg, Richard M.; Hochster, Howard S.; Schilsky, Richard L.; Bertagnolli, Monica M.; El-Khoueiry, Anthony B.; Watson, Peter; Benson, Al B.; Mulkerin, Daniel L.; Mayer, Robert J.; Blanke, Charles

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Combining biologic monoclonal antibodies with chemotherapeutic cytotoxic drugs provides clinical benefit to patients with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer, but the optimal choice of the initial biologic therapy in previously untreated patients is unknown. OBJECTIVE To determine if the addition of cetuximab vsbevacizumab to the combination of leucovorin, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX6) regimen or the combination of leucovorin, fluorouracil, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI) regimen is superior as first-line therapy in advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type (wt) colorectal cancer. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Patients (≥18 years) enrolled at community and academic centers throughout the National Clinical Trials Network in the United States and Canada (November 2005-March 2012) with previously untreated advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer whose tumors were KRAS wt chose to take either the mFOLFOX6 regimen or the FOLFIRI regimen as chemotherapy and were randomized to receive either cetuximab (n = 578) or bevacizumab (n = 559). The last date of follow-up was December 15, 2015. INTERVENTIONS Cetuximab vs bevacizumab combined with either mFOLFOX6 or FOLFIRI chemotherapy regimen chosen by the treating physician and patient. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary end point was overall survival. Secondary objectives included progression-free survival and overall response rate, site-reported confirmed or unconfirmed complete or partial response. RESULTS Among 1137 patients (median age, 59 years; 440 [39%] women), 1074 (94%) of patients met eligibility criteria. As of December 15, 2015, median follow-up for 263 surviving patients was 47.4 months (range, 0–110.7 months), and 82% of patients (938 of 1137) experienced disease progression. The median overall survival was 30.0 months in the cetuximab-chemotherapy group and 29.0 months in the bevacizumab-chemotherapy group with a stratified hazard ratio (HR) of 0.88 (95% CI, 0.77–1.01; P = .08). The

  16. A safety and feasibility study of an allogeneic colon cancer cell vaccine administered with a granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor-producing bystander cell line in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lei; Edil, Barish H; Soares, Kevin C; El-Shami, Khaled; Uram, Jennifer N; Judkins, Carol; Zhang, Zhe; Onners, Beth; Laheru, Daniel; Pardoll, Drew; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Schulick, Richard D

    2014-11-01

    Despite recent advances in earlier detection and improvements in chemotherapy, the 5-year survival rate of patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma remains poor. Immunotherapy is a potentially effective therapeutic approach to the treatment of colorectal carcinoma. Preclinical studies have supported the antitumor activity of immunization with a granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) producing murine colon tumor cell vaccine. A novel colorectal cancer vaccine composed of irradiated, allogeneic human colon cancer cells and GM-CSF-producing bystander cells was developed and tested in combination with a single intravenous low dose of cyclophosphamide in a phase 1 study of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. A total of nine patients were enrolled onto and treated in this study. Six patients had a history of colorectal adenocarcinoma hepatic metastases and underwent curative metastasectomy, while three other patients had unresectable stage IV disease. This study demonstrates the safety and feasibility of this vaccine administered in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. At last follow-up, the six patients who underwent curative metastasectomy survived longer than 36 months, and four of these six patients were without disease recurrence. Immunologic correlate results suggest that the GM-CSF-producing colon cancer vaccine enhances the production of anti-MUC1 antibodies. This vaccine is feasible and safe. Future investigation of the efficacy and antitumor immunity of this vaccine is warranted.

  17. Identification of the biomarkers for the prediction of efficacy in first-line chemotherapy of metastatic colorectal cancer patients using SELDI-TOF-MS and artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ying; Tan, Chun-Wen; Shen, Hong; Yu, Jie-Kai; Fang, Xue-Feng; Jiang, Wen-Zhi; Zheng, Shu

    2012-01-01

    For patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, both FOLFOX regimen and FOLFIRI regimen are considered as first-line choices. There are no clinically useful markers that could predict the response to these regimens respectively. We aimed at identifying serum protein patterns which could predict the efficacy of chemotherapy. Serum from 70 patients diagnosed as metastatic colorectal cancer before first-line chemotherapy were collected and analyzed for protein patterns using ANN analysis of SELDI-TOF-MS. Among the 70 cases, 44 patients received FOLFOX chemotherapy, while the other 26 patients received FOLFIRI chemotherapy. After four cycles of the treatment, RECIST criteria were used to define the responders (R) and non-responders (NR). A potential predicting pattern consisting of 6 biomarkers was identified in the patients receiving FOLFOX chemotherapy. Using this predicting pattern, the responders could be separated from the non-responders with a sensitivity of 92.9% and a specificity of 81.3%. Another potential predicting pattern that consisted of 7 bio-markers was identified in the patients who have received FOLFIRI chemotherapy. The sensitivity and the specificity of this predicting pattern were 92.3% and 92.3% respectively. Two potential pat-terns for the prediction of efficacy of FOLFOX or FOLFIRI chemotherapy were established in this preliminary study.

  18. Detection of K-ras Mutations in Predicting Efficacy of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase (EGFR-TK Inhibitor in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze Li

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK inhibitors are useful in treating different advanced human cancers; however, their clinical efficacy varies. This study detected K-ras mutations to predict the efficacy of EGFR-TK inhibitor cetuximab treatment on Chinese patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC. A total of 87 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer were treated with cetuximab for 2-16 months, in combination with chemotherapy between August 2008 and July 2012, and tissue samples were used to detect K-ras mutations. The data showed that K-ras mutation occurred in 27/87 (31%. The objective response rates and disease control rate in K-ras wild type and mutant patients were 42% (25/60 versus 11% (3/27 (p<0.05 and 60% (36/60 versus 26% (7/27 (p<0.05, respectively. Patients with the wild-type K-ras had significantly higher median survival times and progression-free survival, than patients with mutated K-ras (21 months versus 17 months, p=0.017; 10 months versus 6 months, p=0.6. These findings suggest that a high frequency of K-ras mutations occurs in Chinese mCRC patients and that K-ras mutation is required to select patients for eligibility for cetuximab therapy. Further prospective studies using a large sample size are needed to confirm these preliminary findings.

  19. A Postauthorization Survey to Document the Therapeutic Management of Oxaliplatin as a First-Line Chemotherapy Regimen in South Africa in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia M. Dreosti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxaliplatin is a standard first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer. The objectives were to document the therapeutic management of oxaliplatin in South Africa, determine the incidence and severity of sensory neuropathy, and record the 2-year survival rate. Meccelox was a prospective, noncontrolled, open label, multicentre, observational survey of adult patients with stage IV metastatic colorectal cancer treated with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapeutic regimens. The study was conducted from August 2007 to November 2011 in 29 sites in South Africa by 66 participating treating physicians. Among the 195 enrolled patients, 61% were treated with FOLFOX regimen (5-fluorouracil/folinic acid plus oxaliplatin for an average of 12 cycles and 32% patients were treated with XELOX (capecitabine plus oxaliplatin for an average of 6–8 cycles, with the main reason for discontinuation being completion of the preplanned prescribed regimen. In Meccelox survey, 80% of patients were treated with intent of palliation. Overall 64% of patients reported symptoms of sensory neuropathy. The 2-year survival rate was 30%. Conclusions. Patients received a specified preplanned number of chemotherapy cycles rather than being treated until disease progression or toxicity. Both the incidence of neuropathy and the 2-year survival rate were less than previous reports.

  20. Efficacy of Low-Molecular-Weight Fucoidan as a Supplemental Therapy in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Lin Tsai

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low-molecular-weight fucoidan (LMF is widely used as a food supplement for cancer patients. However, all of the studies are in vitro or were conducted using mice. Therefore, powerful clinical evidence for LMF use is relatively weak. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LMF as a supplemental therapy to chemo-target agents in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC patients. Methods: We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of LMF as a supplemental therapy to chemotarget agents in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC. Sixty eligible patients with mCRC were included. Finally, 54 patients were enrolled, of whom 28 were included in the study group and 26 in the control group. The primary endpoint was the disease control rate (DCR, and secondary endpoints included the overall response rate (ORR, progression-free survival (PFS, overall survival (OS, adverse effects (AEs, and quality of life (QOL. Results: The DCRs were 92.8% and 69.2% in the study and control groups, respectively (p = 0.026, in a median follow-up period of 11.5 months. The OS, PFS, ORR, AEs, and QOL did not significantly differ between the two groups. Conclusion: This is the first clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of LMF as a supplemental therapy in the management of patients with mCRC. The results indicate that LMF combined with chemotarget agents significantly improved the DCR.

  1. Can preoperative CEA and CA19-9 serum concentrations suggest metastatic disease in colorectal cancer patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic Lalosevic, Milica; Stankovic, Sanja; Stojkovic, Mirjana; Markovic, Velimir; Dimitrijevic, Ivan; Lalosevic, Jovan; Petrovic, Jelena; Brankovic, Marija; Pavlovic Markovic, Aleksandra; Krivokapic, Zoran

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the efficiency of preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate cancer antigen (CA19-9) levels for diagnosing synchronous liver metastases and lymph node in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) patients. A total of 300 patients with histologically diagnosed CRC were included in this study between May 2014 and March 2015. The data were obtained prospectively from patient's medical records: medical history, demographics, tumor location, differentiation (grade), depth of the tumor (T), lymph node metastases (N), distant metastases (M), lymphatics, venous and perineural invasion, and disease stage. Tumor markers were measured with an electrochemiluminescent assay and the reference value was 5ng/ml for CEA and for Ca19-9, 37u/ml. There was A high statistically significant difference in the levels of serum CEA and CA19-9 between different disease stages of CRC (P<0.001). Regarding different T stages of CRC, We noticed a significant statistical difference in CEA (stage I 3.76±8.73; II 5.68±17.27, III 7.56±14.81, and IV 70.90±253.23) and CA 19-9 levels (stage I 9.65±11.03, II 9.83±11.09; III 19.58±36.91, and IV 228.9±985.38, respectively). The mean CEA and CA19-9 serum levels were significantly higher in patients with regional lymph nodes involvement (CEA 37.21±177.85 vs 4.79±9.90, CA19-9 119.51±687.71 VS 12.24±17.69, respectively, P<0.05) and in liver metastases (CEA 86.56±277.65 vs. 5.98±12.98, and CA19-9 273.27±1073.46 vs. 4.98±3142, respectively, with P<0.001) in comparison to patients without lymph node involvement and liver metastases. We noticed a cut-off value for lymph nodes involvement, for CEA and CA 19-9, 3.5 ng/mL and 7.5 U/mL, respectively. While, a cut-off value for the presence of synchronous liver metastases of these two markers was 3.5ng/mL AND 5.5 U/mL. Our study showed that tumor makers, CEA and CA19-9, can be used as diagnostic factors regarding the severity of CRC specifically to

  2. In Vivo Efficacy of Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell-Derived NK Cells in the Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veluchamy, John P; Lopez-Lastra, Silvia; Spanholtz, Jan; Bohme, Fenna; Kok, Nina; Heideman, Daniëlle A M; Verheul, Henk M W; Di Santo, James P; de Gruijl, Tanja D; van der Vliet, Hans J

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) act by inhibiting EGFR downstream signaling and by eliciting a natural killer (NK) cell-mediated antitumor response. The IgG1 mAb cetuximab has been used for treatment of RAS(wt) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients, showing limited efficacy. In the present study, we address the potential of adoptive NK cell therapy to overcome these limitations investigating two allogeneic NK cell products, i.e., allogeneic activated peripheral blood NK cells (A-PBNK) and umbilical cord blood stem cell-derived NK cells (UCB-NK). While cetuximab monotherapy was not effective against EGFR(-) RAS(wt), EGFR(+) RAS(mut), and EGFR(+) BRAF(mut) cells, A-PBNK were able to initiate lysis of EGFR(+) colon cancer cells irrespective of RAS or BRAF status. Cytotoxic effects of A-PBNK (but not UCB-NK) were further potentiated significantly by coating EGFR(+) colon cancer cells with cetuximab. Of note, a significantly higher cytotoxicity was induced by UCB-NK in EGFR(-)RAS(wt) (42 ± 8 versus 67 ± 7%), EGFR(+) RAS(mut) (20 ± 2 versus 37 ± 6%), and EGFR(+) BRAF(mut) (23 ± 3 versus 43 ± 7%) colon cancer cells compared to A-PBNK and equaled the cytotoxic efficacy of the combination of A-PBNK and cetuximab. The antitumor efficacy of UCB-NK cells against cetuximab-resistant human EGFR(+) RAS(mut) colon cancer cells was further confirmed in an in vivo preclinical mouse model where UCB-NK showed enhanced antitumor cytotoxicity against colon cancer independent of EGFR and RAS status. As UCB-NK have been proven safe in a recently conducted phase I clinical trial in acute myeloid leukemia, a fast translation into clinical proof of concept for mCRC could be considered.

  3. Lesion-based detection of early chemosensitivity using serial static FDG PET/CT in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buvat, Irene; Necib, Hatem [IMNC UMR 8165 CNRS - Paris 7 and Paris 11 Universities, Orsay cedex (France); Garcia, Camilo; Wagner, Antoine; Vanderlinden, Bruno; Flamen, Patrick [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Nuclear Medicine Department, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Emonts, Patrick [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Radiology Department, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Hendlisz, Alain [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Digestive Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-10-15

    Medical oncology needs early identification of patients that are not responding to systemic therapy. {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) performed before and early during treatment has been proposed for this purpose. However, the best way to assess the change in FDG uptake between two scans has not been identified. We studied cutoff thresholds to identify responding tumours as a function of the method used to measure tumour uptake. The study included 28 metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients who underwent 2 FDG PET/CT scans (baseline and at day 14 of the first course of polychemotherapy). For 78 tumour lesions, 4 standardized uptake value (SUV) indices were measured: maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}) and mean SUV in a region obtained using an isocontour (SUV{sub 40} {sub %}), with each of these SUV normalized either by the patient body weight (BW) or body surface area (BSA). The per cent change and absolute change in tumour uptake between the baseline and the early PET scans were measured based on these four indices. These changes were correlated to the RECIST 1.0-based response using contrast-enhanced CT at baseline and at 6-8 weeks on treatment. The 78 tumours were classified as non-responding (NRL, n = 58) and responding lesions (RL, n = 20). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves characterizing the performance in NRL/RL classification using early FDG PET uptake had areas under the curve between 0.75 and 0.84, without significant difference between the indices. The cutoff threshold in FDG uptake per cent change to get a 95 % sensitivity of RL detection depended on the way uptake was measured: -14 % (specificity of 53 %) and -22 % (specificity of 64 %) for SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub 40} {sub %}, respectively. Thresholds expressed as absolute SUV decrease instead of per cent change were less sensitive to the SUV definition: an SUV decline by 1.2 yielded a sensitivity of RL detection of 95 % for SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub 40

  4. Radioembolization as a Treatment Strategy for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer to the Liver: What Can We Learn from the SIRFLOX Trial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Bippan Singh; Nimeiri, Halla; Hickey, Ryan; Salem, Riad; Lewandowski, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    In the setting of liver metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC), radioembolization with yttrium-90 has been used to treat chemotherapy refractory disease with a growing interest to establish its efficacy in prospective trials combined with first- and second-line chemotherapy. SIRFLOX is an ongoing, multi-center, phase 3 randomized trial comparing first-line chemotherapy alone or in combination with yttrium-90 radioembolization in patients with CRC who have isolated liver metastases or liver-dominant metastases. Preliminary results from SIRFLOX demonstrate that radioembolization combined with first-line chemotherapy is safe and feasible. There was no significant difference in median overall progression-free survival (PFS) between the combined radioembolization-chemotherapy and chemotherapy-only arms (10.7 versus 10.2 months). Although the trial did not meet its primary endpoint of improved median PFS, there was a significant increase in the median hepatic PFS (20.5 versus 12.6 months; p = 0.02) favoring the combination arm. Thus, combining radioembolization with chemotherapy in the first-line setting may be most effective for liver-limited metastatic CRC. Since radioembolization targets liver disease, it is plausible that the trial failed to achieve an improvement in PFS given that 40 % of the SIRFLOX population had extra-hepatic disease. It is also possible that the overall median PFS may be a poor surrogate endpoint, and other endpoints like overall survival still needs to be delineated in this setting. In addition, it is crucial to document improvement or delay in time to deterioration in quality of life symptom endpoints in this population. SIRFLOX is the first of three prospective studies that assess the efficacy of adding radioembolization to first-line chemotherapy, and the combined data from these trials will provide the necessary power for an overall survival analysis. The final results of SIRFLOX will be eagerly awaited to determine if the increased

  5. The cost of systemic therapy for metastatic colorectal carcinoma in Slovenia: discrepancy analysis between cost and reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesti, Tanja; Boshkoska, Biljana Mileva; Kos, Mitja; Tekavčič, Metka; Ocvirk, Janja

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the direct medical costs of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treated at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana and to question the healthcare payment system in Slovenia. Using an internal patient database, the costs of mCRC patients were estimated in 2009 by examining (1) mCRC direct medical related costs, and (2) the cost difference between payment received by Slovenian health insurance and actual mCRC costs. Costs were analysed in the treatment phase of the disease by assessing the direct medical costs of hospital treatment with systemic therapy together with hospital treatment of side effects, without assessing radiotherapy or surgical treatment. Follow-up costs, indirect medical costs, and nonmedical costs were not included. A total of 209 mCRC patients met all eligibility criteria. The direct medical costs of mCRC hospitalization with systemic therapy in Slovenia for 2009 were estimated as the cost of medications (cost of systemic therapy + cost of drugs for premedication) + labor cost (the cost of carrying out systemic treatment) + cost of lab tests + cost of imaging tests + KRAS testing cost + cost of hospital treatment due to side effects of mCRC treatment, and amounted to €3,914,697. The difference between the cost paid by health insurance and actual costs, estimated as direct medical costs of hospitalization of mCRC patients treated with systemic therapy at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana in 2009, was €1,900,757.80. The costs paid to the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana by health insurance for treating mCRC with systemic therapy do not match the actual cost of treatment. In fact, the difference between the payment and the actual cost estimated as direct medical costs of hospitalization of mCRC patients treated with systemic therapy at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana in 2009 was €1,900,757.80. The model Australian Refined Diagnosis Related Groups (AR-DRG) for cost assessment in oncology being currently used

  6. Successful Multidisciplinary Treatment with Secondary Metastatic Liver Resection after Downsizing by Palliative Second-Line Treatment of Colorectal Cancer: A Curative Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wein, Axel; Siebler, Jürgen; Goertz, Ruediger; Wolff, Kerstin; Ostermeier, Nicola; Busse, Dagmar; Kremer, Andreas E; Koch, Franz; Hagel, Alexander; Farnbacher, Michael; Kammerer, Ferdinand J; Neurath, Markus F; Gruetzmann, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The prognostic outcome following progression after palliative first-line treatment for patients suffering from metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma is generally poor. Long-term relapse-free survival with palliative second-line treatment may be achieved in only a limited number of individual cases. A 37-year-old patient presented with bilobar liver metastases of colon cancer confirmed by histology with wild-type K-RAS (exon 2). Due to progressive disease after eight cycles of first-line therapy with FOLFIRI plus cetuximab, second-line chemotherapy with modified FOLFOX4 (mFOLFOX4) plus bevacizumab was initiated. During four cycles of mFOLFOX4 plus bevacizumab (2 months), no higher-grade toxicity occurred. Liver MRI with contrast medium revealed downsizing of the segment II/III metastases, as well as regressive, small, faint, hardly definable lesions in segments VI and IVb. The interdisciplinary tumor board of the University of Erlangen thus decided to perform resection of the liver metastases. Segments II and III were resected, and the liver metastases in segments IVa and VI were excised (R0). Histopathology confirmed three of the R0-resected metastases to be completely necrotic, with residual scarring. As perioperative therapy, four additional cycles of mFOLFOX4 plus bevacizumab were administered postoperatively. No higher-grade toxicity was observed. Three years after the initial diagnosis, the patient is relapse free, professionally fully reintegrated, and has an excellent performance status. Patients suffering from metastatic colorectal cancer may benefit from multidisciplinary treatment with secondary metastatic liver resection after downsizing by palliative second-line treatment. In individual cases, patients may even have a curative treatment option, provided that close interdisciplinary collaboration exists.

  7. High serum levels of interleukin-6 in patients with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer: the effect on the outcome and the response to chemotherapy plus bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Masayasu; Nagasaki, Takaya; Shiga, Kazuyoshi; Takahashi, Hiroki; Takeyama, Hiromitsu

    2017-04-01

    We evaluated the relationship of the pretreatment serum IL-6 levels with the outcome and treatment response in patients with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) who underwent bevacizumab-containing chemotherapy. In this retrospective study, the pretreatment serum IL-6 and plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels were measured in 113 patients with metastatic CRC. The cut-off values for these measurements, as determined by a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, were 4.3 and 66 pg/mL, respectively. The median follow-up period was 19 months (range 1-40 months). Sixty-three patients had primary cancer, and 38 had a metachronous recurrence. Thirty patients underwent curative resection, and 71 underwent chemotherapy, 53 of whom received bevacizumab-containing chemotherapy. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. The plasma VEGF levels and positive KRAS mutation status were not associated with the outcomes. However, high serum IL-6 levels were significantly associated with poorer OS and PFS in comparison to low serum IL-6 levels. A Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that high serum IL-6 levels were an independent risk factor for a poor outcome. In patients with metastatic CRC, high pretreatment serum IL-6 levels were associated with a poor outcome and bevacizumab resistance.

  8. A phase I/II, open-label, randomised study of nintedanib plus mFOLFOX6 versus bevacizumab plus mFOLFOX6 in first-line metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Cutsem, E.; Prenen, H.; D'Haens, G.; Bennouna, J.; Carrato, A.; Ducreux, M.; Bouché, O.; Sobrero, A.; Latini, L.; Staines, H.; Oum'Hamed, Z.; Dressler, H.; Studeny, M.; Capdevila, J.

    2015-01-01

    This randomised, open-label, phase I/II study evaluated the efficacy and safety of nintedanib, an oral, triple angiokinase inhibitor, combined with chemotherapy, relative to bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as first-line therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Patients with

  9. Review of the Clinical Evidence for the Use of DEBIRI in the Treatment of Colorectal Metastatic Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Shamar, E-mail: youn1862@umn.edu; D’Souza, Donna; Flanagan, Siobhan; Golzarian, Jafar [University of Minnesota, Department of Radiology, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Colorectal cancer is a common malignancy that most commonly metastasizes to the liver. There has been considerable effort in developing new treatment options for these patients. One method that has been developed for the treatment of colorectal metastases to the liver is irinotecan-loaded drug-eluting bead (DEBIRI) embolization. This article reviews the current literature on DEBIRI and discusses the state of current knowledge and possible areas of future investigation.

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of Treatment Sequences of Chemotherapies and Targeted Biologics for Elderly Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Rohan C; Du, Xianglin L; Robert, Morgan O; Lairson, David R

    2017-01-01

    Treatment patterns for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients have changed considerably over the last decade with the introduction of new chemotherapies and targeted biologics. These treatments are often administered in various sequences with limited evidence regarding their cost-effectiveness. To conduct a pharmacoeconomic evaluation of commonly administered treatment sequences among elderly mCRC patients. A probabilistic discrete event simulation model assuming Weibull distribution was developed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the following common treatment sequences: (a) first-line oxaliplatin/irinotecan followed by second-line oxaliplatin/irinotecan + bevacizumab (OI-OIB); (b) first-line oxaliplatin/irinotecan + bevacizumab followed by second-line oxaliplatin/irinotecan + bevacizumab (OIB-OIB); (c) OI-OIB followed by a third-line targeted biologic (OI-OIB-TB); and (d) OIB-OIB followed by a third-line targeted biologic (OIB-OIB-TB). Input parameters for the model were primarily obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked dataset for incident mCRC patients aged 65 years and older diagnosed from January 2004 through December 2009. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed to account for parameter uncertainty. Costs (2014 U.S. dollars) and effectiveness were discounted at an annual rate of 3%. In the base case analyses, at the willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $100,000/quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained, the treatment sequence OIB-OIB (vs. OI-OIB) was not cost-effective with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) per patient of $119,007/QALY; OI-OIB-TB (vs. OIB-OIB) was dominated; and OIB-OIB-TB (vs. OIB-OIB) was not cost-effective with an ICER of $405,857/QALY. Results similar to the base case analysis were obtained assuming log-normal distribution. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curves derived from a probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that at a WTP of $100,000/QALY gained, sequence

  11. Early 18F-FDG-PET/CT as a predictive marker for treatment response and survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with irinotecan and cetuximab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skougaard, Kristin; Nielsen, Dorte; Jensen, Benny Vittrup

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To clarify if early reduction in standard uptake value (SUV) could predict metabolic response, radiologic response and overall survival (OS) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer receiving third-line treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients were regardless of KRAS status......, included in this phase II trial. They were treated with the monoclonal antibody, cetuximab, and the chemotherapeutic drug, irinotecan, every second week. A F18-fluorodeoxy glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) was scheduled before the first and second treatment, respectively......, and then after every fourth treatment. Early metabolic response after one treatment and best overall metabolic response was calculated according to EORTC criteria (responders: ≥15% decrease in ∑SUVmax) and PERCIST (responders: ≥30% decrease in SULpeak). Best overall radiologic response was calculated according...

  12. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the vascular endothelial growth factor A gene predicts response to chemotherapy in patinets with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben Frøstrup; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund

    . These immature endothelial cells are known to be dependent on vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) as a survival factor. Recent evidence suggests a clinical importance of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP's) in the VEGF-A gene, but a possible association between these SNP's and the efficacy...... of chemotherapy has not been elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive and prognostic role of SNP's in the VEGF-A gene in relation to first line treatment with capecitabine and oxaliplatin in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Materials and methods: The study...... prospectively included 72 patients with mCRC. Genomic DNA was isolated from whole blood, and 4 SNP's in the VEGF-A gene were analysed by polymerase chain reaction. Clinical response was assessed by radiologic examination. The response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) were used for evaluation...

  13. A randomized study of KRAS-guided maintenance therapy with bevacizumab, erlotinib or metronomic capecitabine after first-line induction treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagman, H; Frödin, J-E; Berglund, Å

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Maintenance treatment (mt) with bevacizumab (bev) ± erlotinib (erlo) has modest effect after induction chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We hypothesized the efficacy of erlo to be dependent on KRAS mutational status and investigated this by exploring mt strategies......-free survival (PFS) rate (PFSr) at 3 months after start of mt. A pooled analysis of KRAS wt patients from the previous ACT study was performed. RESULTS: We included 233 patients. Median age was 64 years, 62% male, 68% ECOG 0, 52% with primary tumor in situ. A total of 138 patients started mt after randomization...... to influence the outcome of treatment with erlotinib. Metronomic cap warrants further investigation in mt strategies, given our explorative results. CLINICALTRIALSGOV: NCT01229813....

  14. Correlations of {sup 18}F-fluorothymidine uptake with pathological tumour size, Ki-67 and thymidine kinase 1 expressions in primary and metastatic lymph node colorectal cancer foci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajo, Masatoyo; Nakajo, Masayuki [Kagoshima University, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Nanpuh Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kagoshima (Japan); Kajiya, Yoriko; Tani, Atsushi [Nanpuh Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kagoshima (Japan); Goto, Yuko; Higashi, Michiyo [Kagoshima University, Department of Human Pathology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima, 890-8544 (Japan); Jinguji, Megumi; Fukukura, Yoshihiko [Kagoshima University, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Tanaka, Sadao [Nanpuh Hospital, Department of Pathology, Kagoshima (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    To examine correlations of {sup 18}F-fluorothymidine (FLT) uptake with pathological tumour size and immunohistochemical Ki-67, and thymidine kinase 1 (TK-1) expressions in primary and metastatic node colorectal cancer foci. Thirty primary cancers (PCs) and 37 metastatic nodes (MNs) were included. FLT uptake was assessed by visual scores (non-visible: 0-1 and visible: 2-4), standardized uptake value (SUV), and correlated with size, Ki-67, and TK-1. SUV was measured in visible lesions. FLT heterogeneity was assessed by visual scores (no heterogeneous uptake: 0 and heterogeneous uptake: 1-4). Forty-two lesions were visible. The visible group showed significantly higher values than the non-visible group in size, Ki-67, and TK-1 (each p < 0.05). Size correlated significantly with visual score (PC; ρ = 0.74 and MN; ρ = 0.63), SUVmax (PC; ρ = 0.49, and MN; ρ = 0.76), and SUVmean (PC; ρ = 0.40 and MN; ρ = 0.76) (each p < 0.05). Visual score correlated significantly with size (ρ = 0.86), Ki-67max (ρ = 0.35), Ki-67mean (ρ = 0.38), TK-1max (ρ = 0.35) and TK-1mean (ρ = 0.25) (each p < 0.05). No significant correlations were found between FLT uptake and Ki-67 or TK-1 in 42 visible lesions (each p > 0.05). Heterogeneous FLT uptake was noted in 73 % (22/30) of PCs. FLT uptake correlated with size. Heterogeneous FLT distribution in colorectal cancers may be one of the causes of weak or lack of FLT uptake/Ki-67 or TK-1 correlation. (orig.)

  15. Topical vitamin K1 may not be effective in preventing acneiform rash during cetuximab treatment in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jae-Cheol; Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Kyu-pyo; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Kim, Hwa Jung; Lee, Mi-Woo; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Jong Hoon; Kim, Tae Won

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have described the efficacy of topical vitamin K1 cream in the prevention and treatment of acneiform rash during cetuximab treatment. An interventional study with a historical control was conducted to investigate the efficacy of vitamin K1 cream for acneiform rash associated with cetuximab. For the historical control, data were collected from 40 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who had participated in a previous clinical trial of cetuximab plus irinotecan. The experimental group consisted of 61 patients who were instructed to prophylactically apply topical vitamin K1 cream beginning on the first day of cetuximab treatment. The incidence, severity, and time to occurrence of acneiform rash were compared between groups. The incidence of grade≥2 acneiform rash after 4 weeks of cetuximab treatment was 42.5% in the historical control group and 55.5% in the experimental group. The median time to grade≥2 rash in the experimental group was 4 weeks compared to 6 weeks in the historical control group (p=0.340). By multivariate analysis, male gender was the only independent risk factor for grade 2 or worse acneiform rash (HR=2.49; 95% CI, 1.27-4.88; p=0.007). Prophylactic application of topical vitamin K1 cream did not decrease the risk of acneiform rash (HR=1.33; 95% CI, 0.57-3.10; p=0.507). The prophylactic application of topical vitamin K1 cream did not translate into clinically meaningful benefit in terms of reducing acneiform rash in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with cetuximab.

  16. Analysis of Clinical End Points of Randomised Trials Including Bevacizumab and Chemotherapy versus Chemotherapy as First-line Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colloca, G; Venturino, A; Guarneri, D

    2016-10-01

    Progression-free survival is recognised as an appropriate end point for randomised clinical trials of chemotherapy of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, although it is not clear if it is reliable after chemotherapy plus bevacizumab. A literature search of randomised trials of systemic treatment including chemotherapy plus bevacizumab versus chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer was undertaken. For each trial the differences in overall survival and in either time-to-event or response-related end points were calculated. A Spearman test was carried out between the difference in each end point and the difference in survival. For the end points with the higher relationships with overall survival a regression analysis was carried out and R(2) (proportion of variability explained) was reported. Progression-free survival is closely related to overall survival (r=0.817; R(2)=0.706) and this relationship does not seem to be changed by the discontinuation of bevacizumab. The response-related end points have a better overall performance than the other time-to-event end points, even when only phase III trials are considered. In phase III trials, the disease control rate seems to be strongly related to overall survival (r=0.975; R(2)=0.889) and the overall response rate reports a good performance (r=0.866; R(2)=0.484). An open-label design and the timing of disease radiological evaluation do not seem to interfere with the correlation of differences of progression-free survival and overall survival. A validation of the disease control rate and the overall response rate as a surrogate end point of survival at a patient level and a standardised definition of the timing for their measurement are strongly recommended in trials of chemotherapy plus bevacizumab. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sequential HER2 blockade as effective therapy in chemorefractory, HER2 gene-amplified, RAS wild-type, metastatic colorectal cancer: learning from a clinical case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Erika; Troiani, Teresa; Sforza, Vincenzo; Martini, Giulia; Cardone, Claudia; Vitiello, Pietro Paolo; Ciardiello, Davide; Rachiglio, Anna Maria; Normanno, Nicola; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Marsoni, Silvia; Bardelli, Alberto; Siena, Salvatore; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2018-01-01

    Constitutive activation of HER2-dependent intracellular signalling by HER2 gene amplification or by HER2 mutations has been demonstrated as a mechanism of primary and secondary cancer resistance to cetuximab or panitumumab in preclinical and clinical models of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Both HER2 Amplification for Colorectal Cancer Enhanced Stratification (HERACLES) cohort A and My Pathway clinical trials provided clinical evidence that anti-HER2 therapies could be active in these patients. HER2 gene amplification and HER2 protein overexpression analysis were performed in tumour tissue by fluorescence in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry. HER2 positivity was defined according to HERACLES CRC-specific HER2 scoring criteria. DNA analysis for multiple assessment of gene mutations or amplifications was carried out with the next-generation sequencing (NGS) Ion AmpliSeq Colon and Lung Cancer Panel and by using a more extensive targeted high-multiplex PCR-based NGS panel (OncoMine Comprehensive Assay). We report the clinical case of a patient with HER2 gene amplified and RAS/BRAF wild-type mCRC who experienced a long lasting and relevant clinical efficacy from sequential anti-HER2 therapies (trastuzumab plus lapatinib, pertuzumab plus trastuzumab, trastuzumab emtansine, trastuzumab plus capecitabine) achieving a cumulative clinical benefit of 29 months, after failure of the first three lines of standard treatments, which included all the potentially active drugs in mCRC, and which accounted for only 14 months of disease control. HER gene amplification was confirmed by NGS on two different metastatic lesions during the evolution of the disease. The clinical case highlights the role of HER2 gene amplification as a key genetic driver of cancer development and progression in mCRC and suggests that sequential HER2 blockade could be a potential therapeutic strategy.

  18. Validation of claims algorithms for progression to metastatic cancer in patients with breast, non-small cell lung, and colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth L. Nordstrom

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Validated algorithms for identifying progression to metastatic cancer could permit the use of administrative claims databases for research in this area.Objective: To identify simple algorithms that could accurately detect cancer progression to metastatic breast, non-small cell lung, and colorectal cancer using medical and pharmacy claims data.Methods: Adults with stage I–III breast, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, or colorectal cancer (CRC in the Geisinger Health System from 2004–2011 were selected. Evidence of progression was extracted via manual chart review as the reference standard. In addition to secondary malignancy diagnosis (ICD-9 code for metastases, diagnoses, procedures, and treatments were selected with clinician input as indicators of cancer progression. Random forests models provided variable importance scores. In addition to codes for secondary malignancy, several more complex algorithms were constructed and performance measures calculated.Results: Among those with breast cancer (17/502 [3.4%] progressed, the performance of a secondary malignancy code was suboptimal (sensitivity: 64.7%; specificity: 86.0%; positive predictive value [PPV]: 13.9; negative predictive value [NPV]: 98.6%; requiring malignancy at another site or initiation of immunotherapy increased PPV and specificity but decreased sensitivity. For NSCLC (61/236 [25.8%] progressed codes for secondary malignancy alone (PPV: 47.4%; NPV: 84.8%; sensitivity: 60.7%; specificity: 76.6% performed similarly or better than more complex algorithms. For CRC (33/276 [12.0%] progressed, secondary malignancy codes had good specificity (92.7% and NPV (92.3% but low sensitivity (42.4% and PPV (43.8%; an algorithm with change in chemotherapy increased sensitivity but decreased other metrics.Conclusions: Selected algorithms performed similarly to the presence of a secondary tumor diagnosis code, with low sensitivity/PPV and higher specificity/NPV. Accurate

  19. Immunohistochemical Detection of Cancer Stem Cell Related Markers CD44 and CD133 in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients

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    Pavel Pitule

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The goal of this study was to semiquantitatively detect presence of cancer stem cells markers CD44 and CD133 in immunohistochemically stained paired samples of colorectal cancer (CRC and colorectal liver metastases (CLM. Level of staining intensity was compared to clinical and pathological characteristics of tumors with the aim to identify impact of CD44 or CD133 expression on tumor behavior. Patients and Methods. Formalin fixed paraffin embedded samples from 94 patients with colorectal tumor and liver metastases were collected at Sikl’s Department of Pathology. Samples were stained by antibodies against CD44 and CD133. Presence and intensity of staining was assessed semiquantitatively by three trained researchers. Results. Patients with higher level of CD133 staining in CRC had longer disease free interval (Cox-Mantel P=0.0244, whereas we found no relation between CD44 expression and overall survival or disease free interval. CD133 expression in CRC and CLM differed based on CRC grading; in case of CD44 we found differences in staining intensity in individual stages of tumor lymph node invasion. Conclusion. Effect of cancer stem cell markers on prognosis of colorectal cancer can vary depending on pathological classification of tumor, and we have shown that CD133, generally considered to be a negative marker, can bear also clinically positive prognostic information in group of patients with colorectal liver metastases.

  20. Primary mFOLFOX6 plus bevacizumab without resection of the primary tumor for patients presenting with surgically unresectable metastatic colon cancer and an intact asymptomatic colon cancer: definitive analysis of NSABP trial C-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCahill, Laurence E; Yothers, Greg; Sharif, Saima; Petrelli, Nicholas J; Lai, Lily Lau; Bechar, Naftali; Giguere, Jeffrey K; Dakhil, Shaker R; Fehrenbacher, Louis; Lopa, Samia H; Wagman, Lawrence D; O'Connell, Michael J; Wolmark, Norman

    2012-09-10

    Major concerns surround combining chemotherapy with bevacizumab in patients with colon cancer presenting with an asymptomatic intact primary tumor (IPT) and synchronous yet unresectable metastatic disease. Surgical resection of asymptomatic IPT is controversial. Eligibility for this prospective, multicenter phase II trial included Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status 0 to 1, asymptomatic IPT, and unresectable metastases. All received infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX6) combined with bevacizumab. The primary end point was major morbidity events, defined as surgical resection because of symptoms at or death related to the IPT. A 25% major morbidity rate was considered acceptable. Secondary end points included overall survival (OS) and minor morbidity related to IPT requiring hospitalization, transfusion, or nonsurgical intervention. Ninety patients registered between March 2006 and June 2009: 86 were eligible with follow-up, median age was 58 years, and 52% were female. Median follow-up was 20.7 months. There were 12 patients (14%) with major morbidity related to IPT: 10 required surgery (eight, obstruction; one, perforation; and one, abdominal pain), and two patients died. The 24-month cumulative incidence of major morbidity was 16.3% (95% CI, 7.6% to 25.1%). Eleven IPTs were resected without a morbidity event: eight for attempted cure and three for other reasons. Two patients had minor morbidity events only: one hospitalization and one nonsurgical intervention. Median OS was 19.9 months (95% CI, 15.0 to 27.2 months). This trial met its primary end point. Combining mFOLFOX6 with bevacizumab did not result in an unacceptable rate of obstruction, perforation, bleeding, or death related to IPT. Survival was not compromised. These patients can be spared initial noncurative resection of their asymptomatic IPT.

  1. Immunomodulatory effects in a phase II study of lenalidomide combined with cetuximab in refractory KRAS-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

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    Anita K Gandhi

    Full Text Available This study assessed the immunomodulatory effects in previously treated KRAS-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients participating in a phase II multicenter, open-label clinical trial receiving lenalidomide alone or lenalidomide plus cetuximab. The main findings show the T cell immunostimulatory properties of lenalidomide as the drug induced a decrease in the percentage CD45RA(+ naïve T cells 3-fold while increasing the percentage HLA-DR(+ activated T helper cells and percentage total CD45RO(+ CD8(+ memory T cytotoxic cells, 2.6- and 2.1-fold respectively (p<0.0001. In addition, lenalidomide decreased the percentage of circulating CD19(+ B cells 2.6-fold (p<0.0001. Lenalidomide increased a modest, yet significant, 1.4-fold change in the percentage of circulating natural killer cells. Our findings indicate that lenalidomide significantly activates T cells, suggestive of an immunotherapeutic role for this drug in settings of maintenance therapy and tumor immunity. Furthermore, reported for the first time is the effect of lenalidomide in combination with cetuximab on T cell function, including increases in circulating naïve and central memory T cells. In summary, lenalidomide and cetuximab have significant effects on circulating immune cells in patients with colorectal carcinoma.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01032291.

  2. Conversion to Resection in Patients Receiving Systemic Chemotherapy for Unresectable and/or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer-Predictive Factors and Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Hiroaki; Ishihara, Soichiro; Kawai, Kazushige; Hata, Keisuke; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Otani, Kensuke; Yasuda, Koji; Sasaki, Kazuhito; Kaneko, Manabu; Murono, Koji

    2017-10-19

    Systemic chemotherapy increases the possibility of resection in patients with initially unresectable colorectal cancer (CRC), especially patients with hepatic metastasis. However, the predictive factors and prognosis of conversion to resection after chemotherapy in patients with various organ metastases remain largely unknown. We reviewed the data from metastatic CRC (mCRC) patients who had received oxaliplatin- or irinotecan-based systemic chemotherapy from 2005 to 2016. The predictors for conversion to surgery were assessed by multivariate analyses. Cancer-free survival and overall survival after the initiation of treatment were compared between patients who had undergone successful conversion therapy and those who had undergone surgery first for resectable stage IV CRC. Of 99 mCRC patients receiving first-line chemotherapy, 23 underwent secondary surgical resection. Single organ metastasis, the presence of liver metastases, and the use of biologic agents were independent predictors of successful conversion therapy. The long-term survival of patients who underwent successful secondary surgery did not differ significantly from that of the 112 patients with resectable stage IV CRC who had undergone surgery first. Liver metastases and single organ metastasis were more likely to be resected after chemotherapy than were other metastatic lesions in mCRC. The use of biologic agents contributed to the increased conversion rate. Successful conversion resulted in outcomes similar to those of resectable stage IV CRC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of treatment outcome in metastatic colorectal cancer patients included in a clinical trial versus daily practice in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, L.; Koopman, M.; Gils, C.W. van; Ottevanger, P.B.; Punt, C.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The external validity of trial results is a matter of debate, and no strong evidence is available to support whether a trial may have a positive or a negative effect on the outcome of patients. Methods. We compared the results of stage IV colorectal cancer patients treated within a large

  4. Update on optimal treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer from the ACTG/AGITG expert meeting: ECCO 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Price, Timothy J.; Thavaneswaran, Subotheni; Burge, Matthew; Segelov, Eva; Haller, Daniel G.; Punt, Cornelis Ja; Arnold, Dirk; Karapetis, Christos S.; Tebbutt, Niall C.; Pavlakis, Nick; Gibbs, Peter; Shapiro, Jeremy D.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic CRC (mCRC) has evolved over the last 20 years, from fluoropyrimidines alone to combination chemotherapy and new biologic agents. Median overall survival is now over 24 months for RAS mutated (MT) patients and over 30 months for RAS wild-type (WT) patients. However, there

  5. Let-7 miRNA-binding site polymorphism in the KRAS 3′UTR; colorectal cancer screening population prevalence and influence on clinical outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin +/− cetuximab

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    Kjersem Janne B

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have reported associations between a variant allele in a let-7 microRNA complementary site (LCS6 within the 3′untranslated region (3′UTR of KRAS (rs61764370 and clinical outcome in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC patients receiving cetuximab. The variant allele has also been associated with increased cancer risk. We aimed to reveal the incidence of the variant allele in a colorectal cancer screening population and to investigate the clinical relevance of the variant allele in mCRC patients treated with 1st line Nordic FLOX (bolus 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid and oxaliplatin +/− cetuximab. Methods The feasibility of the variant allele as a risk factor for CRC was investigated by comparing the LCS6 gene frequencies in 197 CRC patients, 1060 individuals with colorectal polyps, and 358 healthy controls. The relationship between clinical outcome and LCS6 genotype was analyzed in 180 mCRC patients receiving Nordic FLOX and 355 patients receiving Nordic FLOX + cetuximab in the NORDIC-VII trial (NCT00145314. Results LCS6 frequencies did not vary between CRC patients (23%, individuals with polyps (20%, and healthy controls (20% (P = 0.50. No statistically significant differences were demonstrated in the NORDIC-VII cohort even if numerically increased progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS were found in patients with the LCS6 variant allele (8.5 (95% CI: 7.3-9.7 months versus 7.8 months (95% CI: 7.4-8.3 months, P = 0.16 and 23.5 (95% CI: 21.6-25.4 months versus 19.5 months (95% CI: 17.8-21.2 months, P = 0.31, respectively. Addition of cetuximab seemed to improve response rate more in variant carriers than in wild-type carriers (from 35% to 57% versus 44% to 47%, however the difference was not statistically significant (interaction P = 0.16. Conclusions The LCS6 variant allele does not seem to be a risk factor for development of colorectal polyps or CRC. No statistically significant effect of the

  6. B cells and ectopic follicular structures: novel players in anti-tumor programming with prognostic power for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

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    Anastasia Meshcheryakova

    Full Text Available Remarkably limited information is available about biological mechanisms that determine the disease entity of metastatic colorectal cancer in the liver (CRCLM with no good clinical parameters to estimate prognosis. For the last few years, understanding the relationship between tumor characteristics and local immune response has gained increasing attention. Given the multifaceted roles of B-cell-driven responses, we aimed to elucidate the immunological imprint of B lymphocytes at the metastatic site, the interrelation with macrophages, and their prognostic relevance. Here we present novel algorithm allowing to assess a link between the local patient-specific immunological capacity and clinical outcome. The microscopy-based imaging platform was used for automated scanning of large-scale tissue sections and subsequent qualitative and quantitative analyses of immune cell subtypes using lineage markers and single-cell recognition strategy. Results indicate massive infiltration of CD45-positive leukocytes confined to the metastatic border. We report for the first time the accumulation of CD20-positive B lymphocytes at the tumor-liver interface comprising the major population within the large CD45-positive aggregates. Strikingly, functionally active, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID-positive ectopic lymphoid structures were found to be assembled within the metastatic margin. Furthermore, the CD20-based data set revealed a strong prognostic power: patients with high CD20 content and/or ectopic follicles had significantly lower risk for disease recurrence as revealed by univariate analysis (p<0.001 for both and in models adjusted for clinicopathological variables (p<0.001 and p = 0.01, respectively, and showed prolonged overall survival. In contrast, CD68 staining-derived data set did not show an association with clinical outcome. Taken together, we nominate the magnitude of B lymphocytes, including those organized in ectopic follicles, as

  7. Skin toxicity and quality of life in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer during first-line panitumumab plus FOLFIRI treatment in a single-arm phase II study

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    Thaler Josef

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integument-related toxicities are common during epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-targeted therapy. Panitumumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody targeting the EGFR that significantly improves progression-free survival when added to chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who have wild-type (WT KRAS tumours. Primary efficacy and tolerability results from a phase II single-arm study of first-line panitumumab plus FOLFIRI in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer have been reported. Here we report additional descriptive tolerability and quality of life data from this trial. Methods Integument-related toxicities and quality of life were analysed; toxicities were graded using modified National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria. Kaplan-Meier estimates of time to and duration of first integument-related toxicity were prepared. Quality of life was measured using EuroQoL EQ-5D and EORTC QLQ-C30. Best overall response was analysed by skin toxicity grade and baseline quality of life. Change in quality of life was analysed by skin toxicity severity. Results 154 patients were enrolled (WT KRAS n = 86; mutant KRAS n = 59; most (98% experienced integument-related toxicities (most commonly rash [42%], dry skin [40%] and acne [36%]. Median time to first integument-related toxicity was 8 days; median duration was 334 days. Overall, proportionally more patients with grade 2+ skin toxicity responded (56% compared with those with grade 0/1 (29%. Mean overall EQ-5D health state index scores (0.81 vs. 0.78, health rating scores (72.5 vs. 71.0 and QLQ-C30 global health status scores (65.8 vs. 66.7 were comparable at baseline vs. safety follow-up (8 weeks after completion, respectively and appeared unaffected by skin toxicity severity. Conclusions First-line panitumumab plus FOLFIRI has acceptable tolerability and appears to have little impact on quality of life, despite the high incidence of integument

  8. Clinical utility of circulating DNA analysis for rapid detection of actionable mutations to select metastatic colorectal patients for anti-EGFR treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierry, A R; El Messaoudi, S; Mollevi, C; Raoul, J L; Guimbaud, R; Pezet, D; Artru, P; Assenat, E; Borg, C; Mathonnet, M; De La Fouchardière, C; Bouché, O; Gavoille, C; Fiess, C; Auzemery, B; Meddeb, R; Lopez-Crapez, E; Sanchez, C; Pastor, B; Ychou, M

    2017-09-01

    While tumor-tissue remains the 'gold standard' for genetic analysis in cancer patients, it is challenged with the advent of circulating cell-free tumor DNA (ctDNA) analysis from blood samples. Here, we broaden our previous study on the clinical validation of plasma DNA in metastatic colorectal cancer patients, by evaluating its clinical utility under standard management care. Concordance and data turnaround-time of ctDNA when compared with tumor-tissue analysis were studied in a real-time blinded prospective multicenter clinical study (n = 140 metastatic colorectal patients). Results are presented according to STARD criteria and were discussed in regard with clinical outcomes of patients. Much more mutations were found by ctDNA analysis: 59%, 11.8% and 14.4% of the patients were found KRAS, NRAS and BRAF mutant by ctDNA analysis instead of 44%, 8.8% and 7.2% by tumor-tissue analysis. Median tumor-tissue data turnaround-time was 16 days while 2 days for ctDNA analysis. Discordant samples analysis revealed that use of biopsy, long delay between tumor-tissue and blood collection and resection of the tumor at time of blood draw, tumor site, or type of tissue analyzed seem to affect concordance. Altogether, the clinical data with respect to the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor response (RAS status) and the prognosis (BRAF status) of those discordant patients do not appear contradictory to the mutational status as determined by plasma analysis. Lastly, we present the first distribution profile of the RAS and BRAF hotspot mutations as determined by ctDNA analysis (n = 119), revealing a high proportion of patients with multiple mutations (45% of the population and up to 5 mutations) and only 24% of WT scored patients for both genes. Mutation profile as determined from ctDNA analysis with using various detection thresholds highlights the importance of the test sensitivity. Our study showed that ctDNA could replace tumor-tissue analysis, and also clinical

  9. [Correlation analysis between abundance of K-ras mutation in plasma free DNA and its correlation with clinical outcome and prognosis in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yan-qing; Liu, Xiao-jing; Wang, Yan; Ge, Fei-jiao; Zhao, Chuan-hua; Fu, Ya-li; Lin, Li; Xu, Jian-ming

    2013-09-01

    To detect K-ras gene mutations in plasma free DNA by peptide nucleic acid clamp PCR assay (PNA-PCR) and nested primer PCR, and to analyze the correlation between K-ras mutations and prognosis in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Peripheral blood was collected and free DNA was extracted from plasma in 106 patients with mCRC. Nested primer PCR and PNA-PCR were used to detect K-ras gene mutation in the plasma free DNA. The patients were divided into three groups by K-ras status: wild-type group (wild-type determined by both methods), low mutation group (mutation by PNA-PCR method, wild-type by nested primer PCR method) and high mutation group (mutation by two methods). The correlation between K-ras mutations and prognosis was analyzed. The mutation rate of K-ras in tumor tissues of the 106 patients was 40.6%. The Mutation rate of K-ras in plasma free DNA detected by PNA-PCR was 31.1%, significantly higher than that of 15.1% detected by nested primer PCR (P = 0.006). The consistent rate of the K-ras status in plasma free DNA detected by PNA-PCR and that in tumor tissue detected by traditional method was up to 83.0%. The median overall survival (OS) of patients of the wild type, low mutation and high mutation groups was 23.5 months, 17.3 months and 13.9 months, respectively (P = 0.002). The median progression-free survival (PFS) of the K-ras wild-type, low mutation and high mutation groups with first-line chemotherapy was 6.8 months, 6.1 months and 3.2 months, respectively (P = 0.002), and the median OS of them were 23.0 months, 15.5 months and 13.9 months, respectively (P = 0.036). The overall response rate (ORR) was improved in the K-ras wide-type patients who received cetuximab combined with chemotherapy as first-line therapy (75.0% vs. 23.4%, P = 0.058). Cetuximab combined with in second-line therapy chemotherapy led to a significant improvement in disease control rate (DCR) ( 100% vs. 35.7%, P mutation in plasma free DNA can be used to substitute

  10. Tandem repeat variation near the HIC1 (hypermethylated in cancer 1) promoter predicts outcome of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Satoshi; Schirripa, Marta; Loupakis, Fotios; Cao, Shu; Zhang, Wu; Yang, Dongyun; Ning, Yan; Berger, Martin D; Miyamoto, Yuji; Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Iqubal, Syma; Barzi, Afsaneh; Cremolini, Chiara; Falcone, Alfredo; Battaglin, Francesca; Salvatore, Lisa; Borelli, Beatrice; Helentjaris, Timothy G; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2017-11-15

    The hypermethylated in cancer 1/sirtuin 1 (HIC1/SIRT1) axis plays an important role in regulating the nucleotide excision repair pathway, which is the main oxaliplatin-induced damage-repair system. On the basis of prior evidence that the variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) sequence located near the promoter lesion of HIC1 is associated with HIC1 gene expression, the authors tested the hypothesis that this VNTR is associated with clinical outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who receive oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. Four independent cohorts were tested. Patients who received oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy served as the training cohort (n = 218), and those who received treatment without oxaliplatin served as the control cohort (n = 215). Two cohorts of patients who received oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy were used for validation studies (n = 176 and n = 73). The VNTR sequence near HIC1 was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction analysis and gel electrophoresis and was tested for associations with the response rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival. In the training cohort, patients who harbored at least 5 tandem repeats (TRs) in both alleles had a significantly shorter PFS compared with those who had fewer than 4 TRs in at least 1 allele (9.5 vs 11.6 months; hazard ratio, 1.93; P = .012), and these findings remained statistically significant after multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-3.54; P = .018). This preliminary association was confirmed in the validation cohort, and patients who had at least 5 TRs in both alleles had a worse PFS compared with the other cohort (7.9 vs 9.8 months; hazard ratio, 1.85; P = .044). The current findings suggest that the VNTR sequence near HIC1 could be a predictive marker for oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Cancer 2017;123:4506-14. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  11. Comparison of EORTC criteria and PERCIST for PET/CT response evaluation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with irinotecan and cetuximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skougaard, Kristin; Nielsen, Dorte; Jensen, Benny Vittrup; Hendel, Helle Westergren

    2013-07-01

    The study aim was to compare European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria with PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) for response evaluation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with a combination of the chemotherapeutic drug irinotecan and the monoclonal antibody cetuximab. From 2006 to 2009, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer were prospectively included in a phase II trial evaluating the combination of irinotecan and cetuximab every second week, as third-line treatment. (18)F-FDG PET/CT was performed between 1 and 14 d before the first treatment and after every fourth treatment cycle until progression was identified by CT with Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Response evaluation with (18)F-FDG PET/CT was retrospectively performed according to both EORTC criteria and PERCIST, classifying the patients into 4 response categories: complete metabolic response (CMR), partial metabolic response (PMR), stable metabolic disease (SMD), and progressive metabolic disease (PMD). Individual best overall metabolic response (BOmR) was registered with both sets of criteria, as well as survival within response categories, and compared. A total of 61 patients and 203 PET/CT scans were eligible for response evaluation. With EORTC criteria, 38 had PMR, 16 had SMD, and 7 had PMD as their BOmR. With PERCIST, 34 had PMR, 20 had SMD, and 7 had PMD as their BOmR. None of the patients had CMR. There was agreement between EORTC criteria and PERCIST in 87% of the patients, and the corresponding κ-coefficient was 0.76. Disagreements were confined to PMR and SMD. Median overall survival (OS) in months with EORTC criteria was 14.2 in the PMR group and 7.2 in the combined SMD + PMD group. With PERCIST, it was 14.5 in the PMR group and 7.9 in the SMD + PMD group. Response evaluation with EORTC criteria and PERCIST gave similar responses and OS outcomes with good agreement on BOmR (κ-coefficient, 0.76) and

  12. Is short-course radiotherapy with high doses per fraction the appropriate regimen for metastatic spinal cord compression in colorectal cancer patients?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, D. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Medical Center Hamburg Eppendorf (Germany); Dahm-Daphi, J. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Medical Center Hamburg Eppendorf (Germany); Rudat, V. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, St. Josef Hospital, Ruhr Univ. Bochum (Germany); Schulte, R. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Stalpers, L.J.A. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Veninga, T. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Inst., Tilburg (Netherlands); Hoskin, P.J. [Dept. of Clinical Oncology, Mount Vernon Centre for Cancer Treatment, Northwood (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-15

    Background and purpose: various radiotherapy (RT) schedules are used worldwide for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). Every treatment session may cause discomfort to the mostly debilitated patients. A short overall treatment time appears beneficial, especially for MSCC patients with an extremely poor survival such as colorectal cancer patients. This study evaluates whether short-course RT (1 x 8 Gy given in 1 day, 5 x 4 Gy given in 1 week) is as effective as long-course RT (10 x 3 Gy given in 2 weeks, 15 x 2.5 Gy given in 3 weeks, 20 x 2 Gy given in 4 weeks) and whether higher doses per fraction (more cell kill) and shorter overall treatment time (less repopulation) can compensate for lower total doses. Patients and methods: 81 colorectal cancer patients with MSCC were retrospectively investigated. The following potential prognostic factors for functional outcome were analyzed: age, sex, performance status, number of involved vertebrae, ambulatory status before RT, time of developing motor deficits before RT, radiation regimen (short-course, n = 31, vs. long-course RT, n = 50). Results: improvement of motor function occurred in 14% of the patients, no change in 68%, and deterioration in 19%. There were no significant differences between short-course and long-course RT regarding improvement or deterioration of motor function (p = 0.50). Time of developing motor deficits before RT was the only significant prognostic parameter for functional outcome (> 7 days better than 1-7 days; p < 0.001). Conclusion: no significant difference was observed between short-course and long-course RT with respect to functional outcome. In the clinical situation, short-course RT may be considered preferable, as it means less patient discomfort. (orig.)

  13. IL-8 and eNOS polymorphisms predict bevacizumab-based first line treatment outcomes in RAS mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Salvatore, Mariantonietta; Pietrantonio, Filippo; Orlandi, Armando; Del Re, Marzia; Berenato, Rosa; Rossi, Ernesto; Caporale, Marta; Guarino, Donatella; Martinetti, Antonia; Basso, Michele; Mennitto, Roberta; Santonocito, Concetta; Mennitto, Alessia; Schinzari, Giovanni; Bossi, Ilaria; Capoluongo, Ettore; Danesi, Romano; de Braud, Filippo; Barone, Carlo

    2017-03-07

    Predictive biomarkers of efficacy and toxicity of bevacizumab have not yet been validated. This study assessed the influence of IL-8, eNOS and VEGF-A polymorphisms in RAS mutated metastatic colorectal cancer patients receiving bevacizumab-based chemotherapy. 120 patients treated with first-line combination FOLFOX6 plus bevacizumab were included. A historical cohort of 112 RAS mutated colorectal cancer patients treated with FOLFOX6 alone served as control group. The following SNPs were analyzed: IL-8 c.-251T>A; eNOS c.-786T>C and c.-894G>T; VEGF-A c.936C>T, c.958T>C, c.1154A>G and c.2578C>A. Correlation of SNPs, baseline IL-8 serum levels and bevacizumab-efficacy was done. In the bevacizumab group, carriers of the IL-8 alleles c.-251TA+AA showed a shorter PFS (P=0.002) and OS (P=0.03) compared to TT alleles. Patients with pre-treatment IL-8 8.25 pg/ml showed significantly longer median PFS and OS (PFS: 10.9 vs 7.6 months, P=0.005; OS: 30.7 vs 18.2 months, P18,25 pg/ml). IL-8 c.-251TA+AA carriers had significantly higher IL-8 levels (PT was found associated with higher severe toxicity (P=0.0002) in patients carrying the c.-894TT genotype. Although our data need prospective validation, IL-8 and eNOS SNPs may be have a role as predictive biomarkers for bevacizumab efficacy and toxicity.

  14. Prognostic value of microsatellite instability and p53 expression in metastatic colorectal cancer treated with oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nöpel-Dünnebacke, S; Schulmann, K; Reinacher-Schick, A; Porschen, R; Schmiegel, W; Tannapfel, A; Graeven, U

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of MSI-H and p53 overexpression in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treated with oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidine-based first line chemotherapy. Tumour samples were retrospectively obtained from 229 patients from a prospective randomised phase III trial of the AIO colorectal study group, comparing CAPOX and FUFOX in mCRC. Immunohistochemistry of p53 and MMR proteins as well as microsatellite analysis were performed. The incidence of MSI-H and p53 overexpression was 7.9 % and 65.4 %, respectively. MSI-H status was not correlated with ORR, PFS and OS. We observed a trend to lower DCR for MSI-H tumours (65 % vs. 85 %, p = 0.055). p53 overexpression was not correlated with DCR, ORR and PFS. The median OS of patients with tumors with p53 overexpression was significantly longer compared to tumors withhout p53 overexpression (19.6 vs. 15.8 months; p = 0.05). The post-progression survival (PPS) of p53-positive patients undergoing 2nd and/or 3rd line chemotherapy with irinotecan and/or cetuximab was significantly longer compared to p53-negative patients. MSI-H tumours tend to have lower disease control rates when treated with an oxaliplatin/fluoropyrmidin combination. mCRC patients with p53 overexpression undergoing an irinotecan containing second- or third-line chemotherapy after oxaliplatin failure have a significantly longer post-progression survival compared to patients without p53 overexpression. To validate the clinical impact of p53 in patients with mCRC treated with irinotecan- and/or cetuximab further studies are needed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. BRAFV600E mutation analysis in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC in daily clinical practice: correlations with clinical characteristics, and its impact on patients' outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacharenia Saridaki

    Full Text Available To prospectively evaluate the usefulness of the BRAFV600E mutation detection in daily clinical practice in patients with metastatic Colorectal Cancer (mCRC.504 mCRC patients treated with systemic chemotherapy ± biologics were analyzed.A statistically significant higher incidence of the BRAF mutation was observed in patients with ECOG-PS 2 (p=0.001, multiple metastatic sites (p=0.002,> 65 years old (p=0.004, primary tumors located in the colon (p<0.001, high-grade tumors (p=0.001 and in those with mucinous features (p=0.037. Patients with BRAFV600E mutated tumors had a statistically significantly reduced progression-free survival (PFS compared to wild-type (wt ones (4.1 and 11.6 months, respectively; p<0.001 and overall survival (OS (14.0 vs. 34.6 months, respectively; p<0.001. In the multivariate analysis the BRAFV600E mutation emerged as an independent factor associated with reduced PFS (HR: 4.1, 95% CI 2.7-6.2; p<0.001 and OS (HR: 5.9, 95% CI 3.7-9.5; p<0.001. Among the 273 patients treated with salvage cetuximab or panitumumab, the BRAFV600E mutation was correlated with reduced PFS (2.2 vs. 6.0 months; p<0.0001 and OS (4.3 vs. 17.4 months; p<0.0001.The presence of BRAFV600E-mutation in mCRC characterizes a subgroup of patients with distinct biologic, clinical and pathological features and is associated with very poor patients' prognosis.

  16. ICECREAM: randomised phase II study of cetuximab alone or in combination with irinotecan in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with either KRAS, NRAS, BRAF and PI3KCA wild type, or G13D mutated tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segelov, Eva; Waring, Paul; Desai, Jayesh; Wilson, Kate; Gebski, Val; Thavaneswaran, Subotheni; Elez, Elena; Underhill, Craig; Pavlakis, Nick; Chantrill, Lorraine; Nott, Louise; Jefford, Michael; Khasraw, Mustafa; Day, Fiona; Wasan, Harpreet; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Karapetis, Chris; Joubert, Warren; van Hazel, Guy; Haydon, Andrew; Price, Tim; Tejpar, Sabine; Tebbutt, Niall; Shapiro, Jeremy

    2016-05-31

    Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer whose disease has progressed on oxaliplatin- and irinotecan-containing regimens may benefit from EGFR-inhibiting monoclonal antibodies if they do not contain mutations in the KRAS gene (are "wild type"). It is unknown whether these antibodies, such as cetuximab, are more efficacious in refractory metastatic colorectal cancer as monotherapy, or in combination with irinotecan. Lack of mutation in KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA predicts response to EFGR-inhibitors. The ICECREAM trial examines the question of monotherapy versus combination with chemotherapy in two groups of patients: those with a "quadruple wild type" tumour genotype (no mutations in KRAS, NRAS, PI3KCA or BRAF genes) and those with the specific KRAS mutation in codon G13D, for whom possibly EGFR-inhibitor efficacy may be equivalent. ICECREAM is a randomised, phase II, open-label, controlled trial comparing the efficacy of cetuximab alone or with irinotecan in patients with "quadruple wild type" or G13D-mutated metastatic colorectal cancer, whose disease has progressed on, or who are intolerant of oxaliplatin- and fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy. The primary endpoint is the 6-month progression-free survival benefit of the treatment regimen. Secondary endpoints are response rate, overall survival, and quality of life. The tertiary endpoint is prediction of outcome with further biological markers. International collaboration has facilitated recruitment in this prospective trial of treatment in these infrequently found molecular subsets of colorectal cancer. This unique trial will yield prospective information on the efficacy of cetuximab and whether this is further enhanced with chemotherapy in two distinct populations of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: the "quadruple wild type", which may 'superselect' for tumours sensitive to EGFR-inhibition, and the rare KRAS G13D mutated tumours, which are also postulated to be sensitive to the drug. The focus on

  17. A gene expression predictor of response to EGFR-targeted therapy stratifies progression-free survival to cetuximab in KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Black Esther P

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab is used in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC, and predicting responsive patients garners great interest, due to the high cost of therapy. Mutations in the KRAS gene occur in ~40% of CRC and are a negative predictor of response to cetuximab. However, many KRAS-wildtype patients do not benefit from cetuximab. We previously published a gene expression predictor of sensitivity to erlotinib, an EGFR inhibitor. The purpose of this study was to determine if this predictor could identify KRAS-wildtype CRC patients who will benefit from cetuximab therapy. Methods Microarray data from 80 metastatic CRC patients subsequently treated with cetuximab were extracted from the study by Khambata-Ford et al. The study included KRAS status, response, and PFS for each patient. The gene expression data were scaled and analyzed using our predictive model. An improved predictive model of response was identified by removing features in the 180-gene predictor that introduced noise. Results Forty-three of eighty patients were identified as harboring wildtype-KRAS. When the model was applied to these patients, the predicted-sensitive group had significantly longer PFS than the predicted-resistant group (median 88 days vs. 56 days; mean 117 days vs. 63 days, respectively, p = 0.008. Kaplan-Meier curves were also significantly improved in the predicted-sensitive group (p = 0.0059, HR = 0.4109. The model was simplified to 26 of the original 180 genes and this further improved stratification of PFS (median 147 days vs. 56.5 days in the predicted sensitive and resistant groups, respectively, p Conclusion Our model of sensitivity to EGFR inhibition stratified PFS following cetuximab in KRAS-wildtype CRC patients. This study represents the first true external validation of a molecular predictor of response to cetuximab in KRAS-WT metastatic CRC. Our model may hold clinical utility for identifying patients responsive

  18. What could Nintedanib (BIBF 1120), a triple inhibitor of VEGFR, PDGFR, and FGFR, add to the current treatment options for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capdevila, Jaume; Carrato, Alfredo; Tabernero, Josep; Grande, Enrique

    2014-11-01

    Increasing knowledge of the pro-angiogenic processes involved in the progression of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) has resulted in the clinical development of several anti-angiogenic agents, with bevacizumab currently being the only approved agent for mCRC. Nintedanib (BIBF 1120) has been shown to block the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), and the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). By targeting FGFR signaling, nintedanib may overcome resistance to previous anti-VEGF treatments, and may represent a better approach in patients with high basal levels of circulating FGFs. In this article, the angiogenic mechanisms implicated in mCRC are reviewed (focusing on the signaling pathways activated by VEGFR, PDGFR, and FGFR), along with the clinical data for nintedanib in the context of other anti-angiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitors under clinical development for mCRC. Biomarkers that could predict response to nintedanib are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Baseline hemoglobin and liver function predict tolerability and overall survival of patients receiving radioembolization for chemotherapy-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Andrew S; Ball, David; Cohen, Steven J; Cohn, Michael; Coldwell, Douglas M; Drooz, Alain; Ehrenwald, Edward; Kanani, Samir; Moeslein, Fred M; Nutting, Charles W; Putnam, Samuel G; Rose, Steven C; Savin, Michael; Schirm, Sabine; Sharma, Navesh K; Wang, Eric

    2017-02-01

    Patients with liver metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) often benefit from receiving (90)Y-microsphere radioembolization (RE) administered via the hepatic arteries. Prior to delivery of liver-directed radiation, standard laboratory tests may assist in improving outcome by identifying correctable pre-radiation abnormalities. A database containing retrospective review of consecutively treated patients of mCRC from July 2002 to December 2011 at 11 US institutions was used. Data collected included background characteristics, prior chemotherapy, surgery/ablation, radiotherapy, vascular procedures, (90)Y treatment, subsequent adverse events and survival. Kaplan-Meier estimates compared the survival of patients across lines of chemotherapy. The following values were obtained within 10 days prior to each RE treatment: haemoglobin (HGB), albumin, alkaline phosphatase (Alk phosph), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), total bilirubin and creatinine. Common Terminology Criteria Adverse Events (CTCAEs) 3.0 grade was assigned to each parameter and analysed for impact on survival by line of chemotherapy. Consensus Guidelines were used to categorize the parameter grades as either within or outside guidelines for treatment. A total of 606 patients (370 male; 236 female) were studied with a median follow-up was 8.5 mo. (IQR 4.3-15.6) after RE. Fewer than 11% of patients were treated outside recommended RE guidelines, with albumin being the most common, 10.5% grade 2 (0 (P0 values are addressed prior to radiation delivery. HGB liver radiotherapy.

  20. Health-related quality of life in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, association with systemic inflammatory response and RAS and BRAF mutation status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Maria Morandi; Guren, Marianne Grønlie; Skovlund, Eva

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cetuximab on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in the NORDIC-VII trial on metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), and to assess HRQoL in relation to RAS and BRAF mutation status and inflammatory biomarkers. PATIENT AND METHODS: HRQo....... Patients with BRAF-mutated tumours reported poorer HRQoL at baseline and subsequent time points than patients with RAS-mutated or RAS/BRAF wild-type tumours. Patients with high serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) or C-reactive protein (CRP) had markedly impaired HRQoL compared to patients with normal levels......L was assessed using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 (QLQ-C30) at baseline, after every fourth cycle of chemotherapy, and at the end of treatment. HRQoL during 12 cycles of chemotherapy was evaluated over time, compared between treatment arms...

  1. Clinical parameters to guide decision-making in elderly metastatic colorectal CANCER patients treated with intensive cytotoxic and anti-angiogenic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruera, Gemma; Russo, Antonio; Galvano, Antonio; Rizzo, Sergio; Ricevuto, Enrico

    2017-06-06

    Bevacizumab addiction to triplet chemotherapy, according to FIr-B/FOx schedule, as first-line treatment in young-elderly metastatic colorectal CANCER (MCRC) patients may be more effective. Tailored treatments show worse clinical outcome in unfit patients. Elderly patients were clinically evaluated according to age and comorbidity (Cumulative Illness Rating Scale) to select FIr-B/FOx regimen in fit or tailored treatments in unfit elderly. Limiting toxicity syndromes (LTS) were evaluated. At 17 months follow-up, in 28 young-elderly patients treated with first line FIr-B/FOx: objective response rate (ORR) 79%, progression-free survival (PFS) 11 months, overall survival (OS) 21 months. Clinical outcome was not significantly different according to KRAS genotype. G3-4 toxicities were diarrhea 21%, mucositis 11%, neutropenia 11%. LTS were 46%, significantly more multiple than single site. At 8 months follow-up, in 37 unfit patients: ORR 37%, PFS 7 months, OS 13 months. PFS was significantly different in KRAS wild-type compared to mutant patients, while not OS. PFS and OS were significantly worse in KRAS c.35 G > A compared to wild-type and/or other mutant. Careful decision-making process including evaluation of patient's fitness, and individual safety should be included to select FIr-B/FOx intensive first line regimen in young-elderly MCRC patients. KRAS, and specifically c.35 G > A mutant genotype, may significantly affect clinical outcome in patients unfit for FIr-B/FOx.

  2. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging predicts survival in patients with liver-predominant metastatic colorectal cancer shortly after selective internal radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmeel, Frederic Carsten; Simon, Birgit; Luetkens, Julian Alexander; Traeber, Frank; Schmeel, Leonard Christopher; Schild, Hans Heinz; Hadizadeh, Dariusch Reza [University Hospital Bonn, Rheinische-Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitaet Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Sabet, Amir [University Hospital Bonn, Rheinische-Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitaet Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); University Hospital Essen, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Ezziddin, Samer [University Hospital Bonn, Rheinische-Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitaet Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); University Hospital Saarland, Universitaet des Saarlandes, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Homburg (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    To investigate whether quantifications of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can predict overall survival (OS) in patients with liver-predominant metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) following selective internal radiation therapy with {sup 90}Yttrium-microspheres (SIRT). Forty-four patients underwent DWI 19 ± 16 days before and 36 ± 10 days after SIRT. Tumour-size and intratumoral minimal ADC (minADC) values were measured for 132 liver metastases on baseline and follow-up DWI. Optimal functional imaging response to treatment was determined by receiver operating characteristics and defined as ≥22 % increase in post-therapeutic minADC. Survival analysis was performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox-regression comparing various variables with potential impact on OS. Median OS was 8 months. The following parameters were significantly associated with median OS: optimal functional imaging response (18 vs. 5 months; p < 0.001), hepatic tumour burden <50 % (8 vs. 5 months; p = 0.018), Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance scale <1 (10 vs. 4 months; p = 0.012) and progressive disease according to Response and Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (8 vs. 3 months; p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, optimal functional imaging response and hepatic tumour burden remained independent predictors of OS. Functional imaging response assessment using minADC changes on DWI may predict survival in CRC shortly after SIRT. (orig.)

  3. Prognostic and predictive role of neutrophil/lymphocytes ratio in metastatic colorectal cancer: a retrospective analysis of the TRIBE study by GONO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Aquila, E; Cremolini, C; Zeppola, T; Lonardi, S; Bergamo, F; Masi, G; Stellato, M; Marmorino, F; Schirripa, M; Urbano, F; Ronzoni, M; Tomasello, G; Zaniboni, A; Racca, P; Buonadonna, A; Allegrini, G; Fea, E; Di Donato, S; Chiara, S; Tonini, G; Tomcikova, D; Boni, L; Falcone, A; Santini, D

    2018-01-08

    Neutrophil/Lymphocyte ratio (NLR), defined as absolute neutrophils count divided by absolute lymphocytes count, has been reported as poor prognostic factor in several neoplastic diseases but only a few data are available about unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients (pts). The aim of our study was to evaluate the prognostic and predictive role of NLR in the TRIBE trial. Pts enrolled in TRIBE trial were included. TRIBE is a multicentre phase III trial randomizing unresectable and previously untreated mCRC pts to receive FOLFOXIRI or FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab. A cut-off value of 3 was adopted to discriminate pts with low (NLR analysis. As secondary analysis, NLR was treated as an ordinal variable with three levels based on terciles distribution. NLR at baseline was available for 413 patients. After multiple imputation at univariate analysis, patients with high NLR had significantly shorter PFS (HR: 1.27 [95%CI:1.05-1.55], p=0.017) and OS (HR: 1.56 [95%CI: 1.25-1.95], padvantage of the triplet is independent of NLR at baseline.

  4. A Q-TWiST analysis comparing panitumumab plus best supportive care (BSC) with BSC alone in patients with wild-type KRAS metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Zhao, Z; Barber, B; Sherrill, B; Peeters, M; Wiezorek, J

    2011-06-07

    Panitumumab+best supportive care (BSC) significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) vs BSC alone in patients with chemo-refractory wild-type KRAS metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We applied the quality-adjusted time without symptoms of disease or toxicity (Q-TWiST) analysis to provide an integrated measure of clinical benefit, with the objective of comparing quality-adjusted survival between the two arms. As the trial design allowed patients on BSC alone to receive panitumumab after disease progression, which confounded overall survival (OS), the focus of this analysis was on PFS. For each treatment group, the time spent in the toxicity (grade 3 or 4 adverse events; TOX), time without symptoms of disease or toxicity (TWiST), and relapse (after disease progression; REL) states were estimated by the product-limit method, and adjusted using utility weights derived from patient-reported EuroQoL 5-dimensions measures. Sensitivity analyses were performed in which utility weights (varying from 0 to 1) were applied to time in the TOX and REL health states. There was a significant difference between groups favouring panitumumab+BSC in quality-adjusted PFS (12.3 weeks vs 5.8 weeks, respectively, PBSC significantly improved quality-adjusted survival compared with BSC alone.

  5. Hepatic resection for non-colorectal and non-neuroendocrine metastatic cancer: indications and results in ten resectable cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Renato Pais Costa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report the early postoperative results and long-termsurvival on ten patients undergoing hepatectomy for treatmentof non-colorectal and non-neuroendocrine hepatic metastases.The study was carried out by the General Surgery Service of theDepartment of Digestive Tract Surgery of the Teaching Hospital ofthe Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, São Paulo, Brazil.Methods: Complete follow-up data were available on 28 patientswith hepatic metastases who were operated on between January2002 and January 2007. Ten patients presented non-colorectal andnon-neuroendocrine primary neoplasms, and comprised the sampleof this study. There were five males and five females, mean age of53 years (28 to 68 years. The right lobe was involved in five patientsand the left lobe in five individuals. The number of metastasesranged from one to four. All metastases were unilateral. All primarytumors were identified. The histological types were adenocarcinoma(n = 7, germinative tumor (n = 1, melanoma (n = 1 and sarcoma(n = 1. The primary sites were: gastric (n = 1, kidney (n = 1,adrenal (n = 1, breast (n = 2, testicle (n = 1, ovary (n = 2,acral melanoma (n = 1 and retroperitoneal sarcoma (n = 1. Allpatients presented metachronous metastases. The median intervalbetween primary tumor treatment and diagnosis of metastases was20 months (12 to 33 months. Six patients received chemotherapyand four patients underwent exclusively surgical treatment. Results:There were seven major hepatic resections (three or more Couinaudsegments and three minor hepatic resections. The operative timevaried from 180 to 425 minutes with a median duration of 240minutes. Five patients received transfusions; blood loss ranged from200 to 3,000 ml. There were two postoperative complications andboth patients were re-operated (biliary fistula = 1; intra-abdominalabscess = 1. There were no postoperative deaths. All resectionswere R0. The three-year overall survival rate was 50%. Five

  6. Impact of a family history of colorectal cancer on the prevalence of advanced neoplasia at colonoscopy in 4,967 asymptomatic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Franklin C; Strum, Williamson B

    2012-12-01

    A family history of colorectal cancer is considered an independent risk factor for advanced neoplasia at colonoscopy. The expected outcome for screening colonoscopy in patients with a family history is not well established in all populations. We designed a large, prospective study of an unselected population in San Diego, California to assess the impact of a family history of colorectal cancer on the prevalence of advanced neoplasia on screening colonoscopy. We evaluated 6,905 consecutive patients referred for colonoscopy between January 2005 and December 2006. Of the 4,967 who met the inclusion criteria, the mean age was 58.8 and consisted of 58.6% women. Overall 930 (18.7%) had neoplasia and 249 (5%) had advanced neoplasia, eight (0.16%) of which were cancer. The 4,967 patients were divided into 643 with and 4,324 without a family history of colorectal cancer. Of the 643 patients with a family history, 38 (5.9%) had advanced neoplasia, one of which was cancer. Of the 4,324 patients without a family history, 211 (4.9%) had advanced neoplasia including seven cancers. The relative risk for finding advanced neoplasia in patients with a single affected first degree relative was 1.21 (95% CI, 0.87-1.69; P = 0.31). A family history of one first-degree relative with colorectal cancer did not predict a significantly higher prevalence of advanced neoplasia at screening colonoscopy in this Southwestern cohort.

  7. Efficient fluorescence detection of protoporphyrin IX in metastatic lymph nodes of murine colorectal cancer stained with indigo carmine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Hisataka; Harada, Yoshinori; Minamikawa, Takeo; Kato, Yoshiyuki; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Otsuji, Eigo; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Tanaka, Hideo

    2017-09-01

    Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), a biochemical converted from 5-aminolevulinc acid (5-ALA) in living cells, is useful for intraoperative fluorescent detection of cancer metastasis in lymph nodes (LNs). However, unknown is whether the fluorescence of PpIX can be detected in the LNs when they coexist with indigo carmine, a blue dye commonly used for identification of sentinel LNs during surgery. To address this issue, we sought to evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of PpIX fluorescence in the presence of indigo carmine in a mouse LN metastasis model of rectal cancer after administration of 5-ALA. Spectral analysis of pure chemicals revealed that the absorption spectrum of indigo carmine widely overlapped with the fluorescence spectrum of PpIX specifically at the peak of 632nm, a common emission wavelength for detecting PpIX, but not at the other peak of 700nm. Due to such spectral overlap, the PpIX fluorescence intensity was significantly attenuated by mixture with indigo carmine at 632nm, but not at 700nm. Accordingly, fluorescent measurements of the mouse metastatic LN revealed more intense presentation of PpIX at 700nm than at 632nm, indicating that the diagnostic usefulness is greater at 700nm than at 632nm for the indigo carmine-dyed LNs after administration of 5-ALA. From these observations, we propose that the fluorescence measurement is more efficient at 700nm than at 632nm for detection of PpIX in metastatic LNs stained with indigo carmine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical value of a one-stop-shop low-dose lung screening combined with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for the detection of metastatic lung nodules from colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yeon Hee; Lim, Seok Tae; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University-Biomedical Research Institute, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Cyclotron Research Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapeutic Medicine Research Center, Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of additional low-dose high-resolution lung computed tomography (LD-HRCT) combined with 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography with CT (18F-FDG PET/CT) compared with conventional lung setting image of 18F-FDG PET/CT for the detection of metastatic lung nodules from colorectal cancer. From January 2011 to September 2011, 649 patients with colorectal cancer underwent additional LD-HRCT at maximum inspiration combined with 18F-FDG PET/CT. Forty-five patients were finally diagnosed to have lung metastasis based on histopathologic study or clinical follow-up. Twenty-five of the 45 patients had ≤5 metastatic lung nodules and the other 20 patients had  >5 metastatic nodules. One hundred and twenty nodules in the 25 patients with ≤5 nodules were evaluated by conventional lung setting image of 18F-FDG PET/CT and by additional LD-HRCT respectively. Sensitivities, specificities, diagnostic accuracies, positive predictive values (PPVs), and negative predictive values (NPVs) of conventional lung setting image of 18F-FDG PET/CT and additional LD-HRCT were calculated using standard formulae. The McNemar test and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis were performed. Of the 120 nodules in the 25 patients with ≤5 metastatic lung nodules, 66 nodules were diagnosed as metastatic. Eleven of the 66 nodules were confirmed histopathologically and the others were diagnosed by clinical follow-up. Conventional lung setting image of 18F-FDG PET/CT detected 40 of the 66 nodules and additional LD-HRCT detected 55 nodules. All 15 nodules missed by conventional lung setting imaging but detected by additional LD-HRCT were <1 cm in size. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of the modalities were 60.6 %, 85.2 %, and 71.1 % for conventional lung setting image and 83.3 %, 88.9 %, and 85.8 % for additional LD-HRCT. By ROC analysis, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) of conventional

  9. Robust evidence for long-term survival with {sup 90}Y radioembolization in chemorefractory liver-predominant metastatic colorectal cancer

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    Jakobs, T.F. [Barmherzige Brueder Munich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Munich (Germany); Paprottka, K.J.; Raessler, F.; Strobl, F.; Trumm, C.G.; Sommer, W.; Paprottka, P.M. [LMU - University of Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Lehner, S.; Ilhan, H.; Fendler, W.P. [LMU - University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Our aim was to provide further evidence for the efficacy/safety of radioembolization using yttrium-90-resin microspheres for unresectable chemorefractory liver metastases from colorectal cancer (mCRC). We followed 104 consecutively treated patients until death. Overall survival (OS) was calculated from the day of the first radioembolization procedure. Response was defined by changes in tumour volume as defined by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST) v1.0 and/or a ≥30 % reduction in serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) at 3 months. Survival varied between 23 months in patients who had a complete response to prior chemotherapy and 13 months in patients with a partial response or stable disease. Median OS also significantly improved (from 5.8 months to 17.1 months) if response durability to radioembolization extended beyond 6 months. Patients with a positive trend in CEA serum levels (≥30 % reduction) at 3 months post-radioembolization also had a survival advantage compared with those who did not: 15.0 vs 6.7 months. Radioembolization was well tolerated. Grade 3 increases in bilirubin were reported in 5.0 % of patients at 3 months postprocedure. After multiple chemotherapies, many patients still have a good performance status and are eligible for radioembolization. This single procedure can achieve meaningful survivals and is generally well tolerated. (orig.)

  10. Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (veno-occlusive disease in a patient receiving bevacizumab for metastatic colorectal cancer: a case report

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    Agarwal Vijay

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present the case of a patient with colon cancer who, while receiving bevacizumab, developed sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (veno-occlusive disease (SOSVOD. Certain antitumour agents such as 6-mercaptopurine and 6-thioguanine have also been reported to initiate hepatic SOSVOD in isolated cases. There have been no reports so far correlating bevacizumab with SOSVOD. Case presentation A 77-year-old man was being treated with oxaliplatin and a modified de Gramont regimen of 5-fluorouracil for metastatic colon cancer. Bevacizumab (7.5 mg/kg was added from the seventh cycle onwards. Protracted neutropenia and thrombocytopenia led to discontinuation of oxaliplatin after the ninth cycle. A computed tomography scan showed complete response and bevacizumab was continued for another 3 months, after which time the patient developed right hypochondrial pain, transudative ascites, splenomegaly and abnormal liver function tests. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed oesophageal varices. Liver biopsy showed features considered to be consistent with SOSVOD. Bevacizumab was stopped and a policy of watchful waiting was adopted. He tolerated the acute damage to his liver and subsequently the ascites resolved and liver function tests normalised. Conclusion We need to be aware that bevacizumab can cause sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (veno-occlusive disease and that the occurrence of ascites should not be attributed to progressive disease without appropriate evaluation.

  11. A phase I/II study of biweekly capecitabine and irinotecan plus bevacizumab as second-line chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

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    Suenaga M

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitsukuni Suenaga,1 Nobuyuki Mizunuma,1 Satoshi Matsusaka,1 Eiji Shinozaki,1 Masato Ozaka,1 Mariko Ogura,1 Keisho Chin,1 Toshiharu Yamaguchi2 1Department of Gastroenterology, 2Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Cancer Institute Hospital of Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo, Japan Background: Triweekly capecitabine plus irinotecan (XELIRI is not completely regarded as a valid substitute for fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC because of the potential for greater toxicity. We conducted a phase I/II study to assess the efficacy and safety of biweekly XELIRI plus bevacizumab (BV as second-line chemotherapy for mCRC.Methods: Patients with mCRC who had received prior chemotherapy including oxaliplatin and BV and had a UGT1A1 genotype of wild-type or heterozygous for UGT1A1*6 or *28 were eligible for this study. Treatment comprised capecitabine 1,000 mg/m2 twice daily from the evening of day 1 to the morning of day 8, intravenous irinotecan on day 1, and BV 5 mg/kg on day 1 every 2 weeks. The phase I study consisted of two steps (irinotecan 150 and 180 mg/m2, and dose-limiting toxicity was assessed during the first treatment cycle. The primary endpoint of the phase II study was progression-free survival (PFS.  Results: The recommended dose of irinotecan was determined to be 180 mg/m2 in the phase I study. Between November 2010 and August 2013, 44 patients were enrolled in phase II. The patients’ characteristics were as follows (N=44: median age, 60 years (range 32–80; male/female, 21/23; and UGT1A1 wild-type/heterozygous, 29/15. The median PFS was 6.8 months (95% confidence interval, 5.3–8.2 months, and the primary endpoint was met. Median overall survival was 18.3 months. The response rate was 22.7%. There was no significant difference in PFS or overall survival according to UGT1A1 status. Grade 3 or higher adverse events were mainly neutropenia in six

  12. Metastatic adenocarcinoma in a thyroid colloid nodule: a rare presentation of colon cancer.

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    Osin, P; Shiloni, E; Pikarsky, A J; Okon, E

    1996-08-01

    Colorectal cancer can remain asymptomatic for years. Frequently symptoms develop insidiously and may often remain unnoticed for long periods, even in the presence of disseminated disease. We herein report an unusual case of a patient with carcinoma of the sigmoid colon and multiple liver metastases. The diagnosis was established only after the patient was operated on for a large colloid nodule, a single microscopic metastatic focus being noticed in the histologic sections. The differential diagnosis compared with the columnar type of papillary carcinoma is discussed.

  13. Targeting Colorectal Cancer Proliferation, Stemness and Metastatic Potential Using Brassicaceae Extracts Enriched in Isothiocyanates: A 3D Cell Model-Based Study

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    Lucília P. Pereira

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC recurrence is often attributable to circulating tumor cells and/or cancer stem cells (CSCs that resist to conventional therapies and foster tumor progression. Isothiocyanates (ITCs derived from Brassicaceae vegetables have demonstrated anticancer effects in CRC, however little is known about their effect in CSCs and tumor initiation properties. Here we examined the effect of ITCs-enriched Brassicaceae extracts derived from watercress and broccoli in cell proliferation, CSC phenotype and metastasis using a previously developed three-dimensional HT29 cell model with CSC-like traits. Both extracts were phytochemically characterized and their antiproliferative effect in HT29 monolayers was explored. Next, we performed cell proliferation assays and flow cytometry analysis in HT29 spheroids treated with watercress and broccoli extracts and respective main ITCs, phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC and sulforaphane (SFN. Soft agar assays and relative quantitative expression analysis of stemness markers and Wnt/β-catenin signaling players were performed to evaluate the effect of these phytochemicals in stemness and metastasis. Our results showed that both Brassicaceae extracts and ITCs exert antiproliferative effects in HT29 spheroids, arresting cell cycle at G2/M, possibly due to ITC-induced DNA damage. Colony formation and expression of LGR5 and CD133 cancer stemness markers were significantly reduced. Only watercress extract and PEITC decreased ALDH1 activity in a dose-dependent manner, as well as β-catenin expression. Our research provides new insights on CRC therapy using ITC-enriched Brassicaceae extracts, specially watercress extract, to target CSCs and circulating tumor cells by impairing cell proliferation, ALDH1-mediated chemo-resistance, anoikis evasion, self-renewal and metastatic potential.

  14. Role of Kras status in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer receiving first-line chemotherapy plus bevacizumab: a TTD group cooperative study.

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    Eduardo Díaz-Rubio

    Full Text Available In the MACRO study, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC were randomised to first-line treatment with 6 cycles of capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX plus bevacizumab followed by either single-agent bevacizumab or XELOX plus bevacizumab until disease progression. An additional retrospective analysis was performed to define the prognostic value of tumour KRAS status on progression-free survival (PFS, overall survival (OS and response rates.KRAS data (tumour KRAS status and type of mutation were collected by questionnaire from participating centres that performed KRAS analyses. These data were then cross-referenced with efficacy data for relevant patients in the MACRO study database. KRAS status was analysed in 394 of the 480 patients (82.1% in the MACRO study. Wild-type (WT KRAS tumours were found in 219 patients (56% and mutant (MT KRAS in 175 patients (44%. Median PFS was 10.9 months for patients with WT KRAS and 9.4 months for patients with MT KRAS tumours (p=0.0038; HR: 1.40; 95% CI:1.12-1.77. The difference in OS was also significant: 26.7 months versus 18.0 months for WT versus MT KRAS, respectively (p=0.0002; HR: 1.55; 95% CI: 1.23-1.96. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that KRAS was an independent variable for both PFS and OS. Responses were observed in 126 patients (57.5% with WT KRAS tumours and 76 patients (43.4% with MT KRAS tumours (p=0.0054; OR: 1.77; 95% CI: 1.18-2.64.This analysis of the MACRO study suggests a prognostic role for tumour KRAS status in patients with mCRC treated with XELOX plus bevacizumab. For both PFS and OS, KRAS status was an independent factor in univariate and multivariate analyses.

  15. STRATEGIC-1: A multiple-lines, randomized, open-label GERCOR phase III study in patients with unresectable wild-type RAS metastatic colorectal cancer.

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    Chibaudel, Benoist; Bonnetain, Franck; Tournigand, Christophe; de Larauze, Marine Hug; de Gramont, Armand; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Paget, Jérôme; Hadengue, Alexandra; Notelet, Dominique; Benetkiewicz, Magdalena; André, Thierry; de Gramont, Aimery

    2015-07-04

    The management of unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is a comprehensive treatment strategy involving several lines of therapy, maintenance, salvage surgery, and treatment-free intervals. Besides chemotherapy (fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, irinotecan), molecular-targeted agents such as anti-angiogenic agents (bevacizumab, aflibercept, regorafenib) and anti-epidermal growth factor receptor agents (cetuximab, panitumumab) have become available. Ultimately, given the increasing cost of new active compounds, new strategy trials are needed to define the optimal use and the best sequencing of these agents. Such new clinical trials require alternative endpoints that can capture the effect of several treatment lines and be measured earlier than overall survival to help shorten the duration and reduce the size and cost of trials. STRATEGIC-1 is an international, open-label, randomized, multicenter phase III trial designed to determine an optimally personalized treatment sequence of the available treatment modalities in patients with unresectable RAS wild-type mCRC. Two standard treatment strategies are compared: first-line FOLFIRI-cetuximab, followed by oxaliplatin-based second-line chemotherapy with bevacizumab (Arm A) vs. first-line OPTIMOX-bevacizumab, followed by irinotecan-based second-line chemotherapy with bevacizumab, and by an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody with or without irinotecan as third-line treatment (Arm B). The primary endpoint is duration of disease control. A total of 500 patients will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to one of the two treatment strategies. The STRATEGIC-1 trial is designed to give global information on the therapeutic sequences in patients with unresectable RAS wild-type mCRC that in turn is likely to have a significant impact on the management of this patient population. The trial is open for inclusion since August 2013. STRATEGIC-1 is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01910610, 23 July, 2013

  16. Early post-treatment FDG PET predicts survival after {sup 90}Y microsphere radioembolization in liver-dominant metastatic colorectal cancer

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    Sabet, Amir; Aouf, Anas; Sabet, Amin; Ghamari, Shahab; Biersack, Hans-Juergen [University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Meyer, Carsten; Pieper, Claus C. [University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Mayer, Karin [University Hospital, Department of Medicine and Oncology, Bonn (Germany); Ezziddin, Samer [University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Saarland University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Homburg (Germany)

    2014-10-29

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of early metabolic response 4 weeks post-treatment using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in patients with unresectable hepatic metastases of colorectal cancer (CRC) undergoing radioembolization (RE) with {sup 90}Y-labelled microspheres. A total of 51 consecutive patients with liver-dominant metastases of CRC were treated with RE and underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT at baseline and 4 weeks after RE. In each patient, three hepatic metastases with the highest maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) were selected as target lesions. Metabolic response was defined as >50 % reduction of tumour to liver ratios. Survival analyses using Kaplan-Meier and multivariate analyses were performed to identify prognostic factors for overall survival (OS). Investigated baseline characteristics included age (>60 years), performance status (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group >1), bilirubin (>1.0 mg/dl), hepatic tumour burden (>25 %) and presence of extrahepatic disease. The median OS after RE was 7 months [95 % confidence interval (CI) 5-8]; early metabolic responders (n = 33) survived longer than non-responders (p < 0.001) with a median OS of 10 months (95 % CI 3-16) versus 4 months (95 % CI 2-6). Hepatic tumour burden also had significant impact on treatment outcome (p < 0.001) with a median OS of 5 months (95 % CI, 3-7) for patients with >25 % metastatic liver replacement vs 14 months (95 % CI 6-22) for the less advanced patients. Both factors (early metabolic response and low hepatic tumour burden) remained as independent predictors of improved survival on multivariate analysis. These are the first findings to show that molecular response assessment in CRC using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT appears feasible as early as 4 weeks post-RE, allowing risk stratification and potentially facilitating early response-adapted treatment strategies. (orig.)

  17. Statin use is not associated with improved progression free survival in cetuximab treated KRAS mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients: results from the CAIRO2 study.

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    Lisanne L Krens

    Full Text Available Statins may inhibit the expression of the mutant KRAS phenotype by preventing the prenylation and thus the activation of the KRAS protein. This study was aimed at retrospectively evaluating the effect of statin use on outcome in KRAS mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients (mCRC treated with cetuximab. Treatment data were obtained from patients who were treated with capecitabine, oxaliplatin bevacizumab ± cetuximab in the phase III CAIRO2 study. A total of 529 patients were included in this study, of whom 78 patients were on statin therapy. In patients with a KRAS wild type tumor (n = 321 the median PFS was 10.3 vs. 11.4 months for non-users compared to statin users and in patients with a KRAS mutant tumor (n = 208 this was 7.6 vs. 6.2 months, respectively. The hazard ratio (HR for PFS for statin users was 1.12 (95% confidence interval 0.78-1.61 and was not influenced by treatment arm, KRAS mutation status or the KRAS*statin interaction. Statin use adjusted for covariates was not associated with increased PFS (HR = 1.01, 95% confidence interval 0.71-1.54. In patients with a KRAS wild type tumor the median OS for non-users compared to statin users was 22.4 vs. 19.8 months and in the KRAS mutant tumor group the OS was 18.1 vs. 14.5 months. OS was significantly shorter in statin users versus non-users (HR = 1.54; 95% confidence interval 1.06-2.22. However, statin use, adjusted for covariates was not associated with increased OS (HR = 1.41, 95% confidence interval 0.95-2.10. In conclusion, the use of statins at time of diagnosis was not associated with an improved PFS in KRAS mutant mCRC patients treated with chemotherapy and bevacizumab plus cetuximab.

  18. Impact of Serum Apolipoprotein A-I on Prognosis and Bevacizumab Efficacy in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: a Propensity Score-Matched Analysis

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    Qi Quan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We aimed to investigate the role of apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I as a predictor of prognosis and treatment efficacy of bevacizumab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC treated with first-line chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study on consecutive patients who were diagnosed with mCRC at Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center. According to their pretreatment ApoA-I level, patients were divided into low– and high–ApoA-I groups. Propensity score-matched method was performed to balance baseline characteristics between two groups. Based on whether they accepted bevacizumab as a first-line therapy, patients were further divided into the chemo + bevacizumab group and the chemo group. Overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS were assessed with Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test, and Cox regression. RESULTS: The optimal cutoff value for the ApoA-I level was determined to be 1.105 g/l. In the propensity-matched cohort of 508 patients, low ApoA-I was significantly associated with inferior OS (P < .001 and PFS (P < .001 than high ApoA-I. Multivariate analysis showed that ApoA-I level was an independent prognostic maker of OS (P < .001 and PFS (P = .001. PFS (P < .001 in either the high– or low–ApoA-I groups could be extended significantly after the administration of bevacizumab, and patients with a high ApoA-I level also had a better OS in the chemo + bevacizumab group than the chemo group (P = .049. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with a low ApoA-I level have poor prognoses, and they did not display an OS benefit from bevacizumab.

  19. The predictive value of microRNA-126 in relation to first line treatment with capecitabine and oxaliplatin in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

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    Hansen Torben

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNA-126 is the only microRNA (miRNA known to be endothelial cell-specific influencing angiogenesis in several ways. The aim of the present study was to analyse the possible predictive value of miRNA-126 in relation to first line capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC. Methods The study included 89 patients with mCRC. In situ hybridization (ISH was performed to detect miRNA-126 in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue from primary tumours. The expression of miRNA-126, area per image (μm2, was measured using image analysis. Clinical response was evaluated according to RECIST. Progression free survival (PFS was compared using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log rank test. Tumours were classified as low or high miRNA-126 expressing tumours using the median value from the patients with response as cut-off. Results The median miRNA-126 expression level was significantly higher in patients responding to XELOX, 3629 μm2 (95% CI, 2566-4846, compared to the patients not responding, 1670 μm2 (95% CI, 1436-2041, p p Conclusions Angiogenesis quantified by ISH of miRNA-126 was related to response to first line XELOX in patients with mCRC, translating to a significant difference in PFS. The predictive value of miRNA-126 remains to be further elucidated in prospective studies.

  20. Clinical outcome of patients with chemorefractory metastatic colorectal cancer treated with trifluridine/tipiracil (TAS-102): a single Italian institution compassionate use programme.

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    Sforza, Vincenzo; Martinelli, Erika; Cardone, Claudia; Martini, Giulia; Napolitano, Stefania; Vitiello, Pietro Paolo; Vitale, Pasquale; Zanaletti, Nicoletta; Reginelli, Alfonso; Bisceglie, Maurizio Di; Latiano, Tiziana Pia; Bochicchio, Anna Maria; Cecere, Fabiana; Selvaggi, Francesco; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Troiani, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    TAS-102 improves overall survival (OS) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) refractory to standard treatments. However, predictive biomarkers of efficacy are currently lacking. We treated a cohort of 43 chemorefractory mCRC patients treated with TAS-102, in a single institution expanded access, compassionate use programme. We stratified patients in two groups according to number of cycles received (<6 cycles and ≥6 cycles). OS, progression-free survival (PFS) and safety were evaluated. Thirteen out of 43 patients (30%) obtained a clinically relevant disease control with TAS-102 therapy. Eleven of them were treated for ≥6 cycles with TAS-102, reaching a median PFS of 7.5 months (95% CI 5.8 to 9.2 months) and a median OS of 11.2 months (95% CI range not reached yet). A trend towards significance (p=0.08) between a good performance status and response to TAS-102 was observed. Further, 7 out of the 11 TAS-102 long-treated patients achieved a clinical benefit from a previous treatment with regorafenib. A significant correlation between regorafenib and TAS-102 clinical efficacy was observed (p=0.008). Six out 13 regorafenib-naïve patients were treated with regorafenib after progression from TAS-102. All these patients achieved SD with a median duration of treatment with regorafenib of 6.1 months (range, 1.6-6.7). Patients with mCRC in good clinical conditions, even though having been heavily pretreated with all the available treatment options, could obtain a significant clinical benefit from treatment with TAS-102. Moreover, a previous clinical benefit obtained with regorafenib is potentially predictive of clinical efficacy of subsequent TAS-102 treatment.

  1. Geriatric factors analyses from FFCD 2001-02 phase III study of first-line chemotherapy for elderly metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

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    Aparicio, Thomas; Gargot, Dany; Teillet, Laurent; Maillard, Emilie; Genet, Dominique; Cretin, Jacques; Locher, Christophe; Bouché, Olivier; Breysacher, Gilles; Seitz, Jean-François; Gasmi, Mohamed; Stefani, Laetitia; Ramdani, Mohamed; Lecomte, Thierry; Auby, Dominique; Faroux, Roger; Bachet, Jean-Baptiste; Lepère, Céline; Khemissa, Faiza; Sobhani, Iradj; Boulat, Olivier; Mitry, Emmanuel; Jouve, Jean-Louis

    2017-03-01

    Several predictors of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) outcomes have been described. Specific geriatric characteristics could be of interest to determine prognosis. Elderly patients (75+) with previously untreated mCRC were randomly assigned to receive infusional 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy, either alone (FU) or in combination with irinotecan (IRI). Geriatric evaluations were included as an optional procedure. The predictive value of geriatric parameters was determined for the objective response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). From June 2003 to May 2010, the FFCD 2001-02 randomised trial enrolled 282 patients. A baseline geriatric evaluation was done in 123 patients; 62 allocated to the FU arm and 61 to the IRI arm. The baseline Charlson index was ≤1 in 75%, Mini-Mental State Examination was ≤27/30 in 31%, Geriatric Depression Scale was >2 in 10% and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) was impaired in 34% of the patients. Multivariate analyses revealed that no geriatric parameter was predictive for ORR or PFS. Normal IADL was independently associated with better OS. The benefit of doublet chemotherapy on PFS differed in subgroups of patients ≤80 years, with unresected primary tumour, leucocytes >11,000 mm3 and carcinoembryonic antigen >2N. There was a trend towards better OS in patients with normal IADL. The autonomy score was an independent predictor for OS. A trend toward a better efficacy of doublet chemotherapy in some subgroups of patients was reported and should be further explored. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Beyond KRAS mutation status: influence of KRAS copy number status and microRNAs on clinical outcome to cetuximab in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

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    Mekenkamp Leonie JM

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background KRAS mutation is a negative predictive factor for treatment with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR antibodies in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC. Novel predictive markers are required to further improve the selection of patients for this treatment. We assessed the influence of modification of KRAS by gene copy number aberration (CNA and microRNAs (miRNAs in correlation to clinical outcome in mCRC patients treated with cetuximab in combination with chemotherapy and bevacizumab. Methods Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded primary tumour tissue was used from 34 mCRC patients in a phase III trial, who were selected based upon their good (n = 17 or poor (n = 17 progression-free survival (PFS upon treatment with cetuximab in combination with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab. Gene copy number at the KRAS locus was assessed using high resolution genome-wide array CGH and the expression levels of 17 miRNAs targeting KRAS were determined by real-time PCR. Results Copy number loss of the KRAS locus was observed in the tumour of 5 patients who were all good responders including patients with a KRAS mutation. Copy number gains in two wild-type KRAS tumours were associated with a poor PFS. In KRAS mutated tumours increased miR-200b and decreased miR-143 expression were associated with a good PFS. In wild-type KRAS patients, miRNA expression did not correlate with PFS in a multivariate model. Conclusions Our results indicate that the assessment of KRAS CNA and miRNAs targeting KRAS might further optimize the selection of mCRC eligible for anti-EGFR therapy.

  3. HER2 gene copy number status may influence clinical efficacy to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, V; Landi, L; Molinari, F; Fountzilas, G; Geva, R; Riva, A; Saletti, P; De Dosso, S; Spitale, A; Tejpar, S; Kalogeras, K T; Mazzucchelli, L; Frattini, M; Cappuzzo, F

    2013-01-01

    Background: In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), KRAS is the only validated biomarker used to select patients for administration of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted therapies. To identify additional predictive markers, we investigated the importance of HER2, the primary EGFR dimerisation partner, in this particular disease. Methods: We evaluated the HER2 gene status by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) in 170 KRAS wild-type mCRC patients treated with cetuximab or panitumumab. Results: Depending on HER2 gene copy number status, patients showed three distinct cytogenetic profiles: 4% of patients had HER2 gene amplification (R:HER2/CEP17⩾2) in all neoplastic cells (HER2-all-A), 61% of patients had HER2 gain due to polysomy or to gene amplification in minor clones (HER2-FISH+*), and 35% of patients had no or slight HER2 gain (HER2-FISH−). These subgroups were significantly correlated with different clinical behaviours, in terms of response rate (RR; P=0.0006), progression-free survival (PFS; PHER2-all-A profile experienced the worst outcome, patients with HER2-FISH− profile showed an intermediate behaviour and patients with HER2-FISH+* profile were related to the highest survival probability (median PFS in months: 2.5 vs 3.9 vs 7.6, respectively; median OS in months: 4.2 vs 9.7 vs 13, respectively). Conclusion: HER2 gene copy number status may influence the clinical response to anti-EGFR-targeted therapy in mCRC patients. PMID:23348520

  4. Axitinib and/or bevacizumab with modified FOLFOX-6 as first-line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer: a randomized phase 2 study.

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    Infante, Jeffrey R; Reid, Tony R; Cohn, Allen L; Edenfield, William J; Cescon, Terrence P; Hamm, John T; Malik, Imtiaz A; Rado, Thomas A; McGee, Philip J; Richards, Donald A; Tarazi, Jamal; Rosbrook, Brad; Kim, Sinil; Cartwright, Thomas H

    2013-07-15

    In this multicenter, open-label, randomized phase 2 trial, the authors evaluated the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor axitinib, bevacizumab, or both in combination with chemotherapy as first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Patients with previously untreated mCRC were randomized 1:1:1 to receive continuous axitinib 5 mg twice daily, bevacizumab 5 mg/kg every 2 weeks, or axitinib 5 mg twice daily plus bevacizumab 2 mg/kg every 2 weeks, each in combination with modified 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin/oxaliplatin (FOLFOX-6). The primary endpoint was the objective response rate (ORR). In all, 126 patients were enrolled from August 2007 to September 2008. The ORR was numerically inferior in the axitinib arm (n = 42) versus the bevacizumab arm (n = 43; 28.6% vs 48.8%; 1-sided P = .97). Progression-free survival (PFS) (11.0 months vs 15.9 months; 1-sided P = .57) and overall survival (OS) (18.1 months vs 21.6 months; 1-sided P = .69) also were numerically inferior in the axitinib arm. Similarly, efficacy endpoints for the axitinib/bevacizumab arm (n = 41) were numerically inferior (ORR, 39%; PFS, 12.5 months; OS, 19.7 months). The patients who received axitinib had fewer treatment cycles compared with other arms. Common all-grade adverse events across all 3 treatment arms were fatigue, diarrhea, and nausea (all ≥49%). Hypertension and headache were more frequent in the patients who received axitinib. Patients in the bevacizumab arm had the longest treatment exposures and the highest rates of peripheral neuropathy. Neither the addition of continuous axitinib nor the axitinib/bevacizumab combination to FOLFOX-6 improved ORR, PFS, or OS compared with bevacizumab as first-line treatment of mCRC. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  5. Phase II study of S-1 plus leucovorin in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: Regimen of 1 week on, 1 week off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Xu, Ruihua; Xu, Jianming; Denda, Tadamichi; Ikejiri, Koji; Shen, Lin; Toh, Yasushi; Shimada, Ken; Kato, Takeshi; Sakai, Kenji; Yamamoto, Manabu; Mishima, Hideyuki; Wang, Jinwan; Baba, Hideo

    2017-10-01

    A phase II study of S-1 plus leucovorin (LV) given in a 4-week schedule (2 weeks' administration followed by 2 weeks' rest) for patients with untreated metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) showed that the combination was effective, but grade 3 toxicities (diarrhea, stomatitis and anorexia) occurred at a relatively high rate. In this phase II study, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of a 2-week schedule of S-1 plus LV. Patients with mCRC received oral S-1 (40-60 mg) and LV (25 mg) twice daily for 1 week, followed by 1 week's rest. Treatment was repeated until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint was response rate. The pharmacokinetics of S-1 and LV in Chinese patients were evaluated on day 1 of the first cycle. Seventy-three patients were enrolled in Japan and China. Of 71 eligible patients, the response rate was 53.5%, and the disease control rate was 83.1%. Median progression-free survival and median overall survival were 6.5 and 24.3 months, respectively. The incidences of grade 3 toxicities were diarrhea 8.3%, stomatitis 8.3%, anorexia 2.8% and neutropenia 9.7%. There were no treatment-related deaths. The pharmacokinetics profiles of S-1 plus LV in Chinese patients were similar to those in Japanese patients. This 2-week schedule of S-1 plus LV showed good efficacy and better tolerability than the 4-week schedule. This therapy will be the base regimen for mCRC to be added by other cytotoxic or molecular-targeted drugs. The optimized treatment schedule for S-1 plus LV was 1 week on and 1 week off. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  6. Metabolic response to preoperative chemotherapy predicts prognosis for patients undergoing surgical resection of colorectal cancer metastatic to the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Lawrence F; Williams, David S; Lee, Sze Ting; Scott, Andrew M; Christophi, Christopher; Muralidharan, Vijayaragavan

    2014-07-01

    Biological characteristics of colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRCLM) are increasingly recognized as major determinants of patient outcome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of metabolic response to preoperative chemotherapy as quantified by (18)F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) for patients undergoing liver resection of CRCLM. All patients (n = 80) who had staging PET before liver resection for CRCLM at Austin Health in Melbourne between 2004 and 2011 were included. Thirty-seven patients had PET and CT imaging before and after preoperative chemotherapy. Semiquantitative PET parameters-maximum standardized uptake variable (SUVmax), metabolic tumour volume (MTV), and total glycolytic volume (TGV)-were derived. Metabolic response was determined by the proportional change in PET parameters (∆SUVmax, ∆MTV, ∆TGV). Prognostic scores, CT RECIST response, and tumour regression grading (TRG) were also assessed. Correlation to recurrence-free (RFS) and overall survival (OS) was assessed using Kaplan-Meier survival and multivariate analysis. Semiquantitative parameters on staging PET before chemotherapy were not predictive of prognosis, whereas all parameters after chemotherapy were prognostic for RFS and OS. Only ∆SUVmax was predictive of RFS and OS on multivariate analysis. Patients with metabolically responsive tumours had an OS of 86 % at 3 years vs. 38 % with nonresponsive or progressive tumours (p = 0.003). RECIST and TRG did not predict outcome. Tumour metabolic response to preoperative chemotherapy as quantified by PET is predictive of prognosis in patients undergoing resection of CRCLM. Assessing metabolic response uniquely characterizes tumour biology, which may allow future optimization of patient and treatment selection.

  7. Preoperative prediction and prevention of intraoperative acute liver failure after major liver resection for metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: improve the results of treatment of patients with metastatic cancer of liver by reducing the risk of post-resection liver failure based on the assessment of liver functional reserve.Materials and methods. The study included 2 independent samples of patients underwent surgery for liver metastases in the department of abdominal oncology at the P. A. Herzen Moscow Oncological Research Institute. Group 1 included 47 patients: in addition to the standard treatment algorithm they underwent 13C methacetin breath test and dynamic scintigraphy of liver in the preoperative stage. Patients from the group 2 (n = 30 underwent standard clinical and laboratory examination, without preoperative evaluation of liver functional reserves; the level of total bilirubin, albumin and prothrombin time showed no decrease in liver function. Post-resection liver failure was established based on 50/50 criterion when evaluated on the 5th postoperative day.Results. The analysis of operational characteristics of functional tests showed absolute sensitivity of 13C methacetin breath test (SE ≥ 100 % and negative predictive value (–VP ≥ 100 % in case of integrated application of 2 diagnostic methods. An incidence of post-resection acute liver failure in the study group was significantly 2.2-fold lower than in the control group – 10.6 % and 23.3 %, respectively (p < 0.001.Conclusion. Combination of preoperative dynamic scintigraphy of liver with 13C methacetin breath test allows to perform comprehensive assessment of liver functional reserves, and it can greatly improve preoperative assessment and postoperative results of anatomic resections in patients with liver metastases.

  8. Prevalence and risk factors of advanced colorectal neoplasms in asymptomatic Korean people between 40 and 49 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Ja Eun; Kim, Kyung-Jo; Park, Hye Won; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Choe, Jae Won; Chang, Hye-Sook; Lee, Ji Young; Myung, Seung-Jae; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Kim, Jin-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Current guidelines recommend colon cancer screening for persons aged over 50 years. However, there are few data on colorectal cancer screening in 40- to 49-year-olds. This study assessed the prevalence and risk factors of colorectal neoplasms in 40- to 49-year-old Koreans. We analyzed the results of screening colonoscopies of 6680 persons 40-59 years of age (2206 aged 40-49 and 4474 aged 50-59 years). The prevalence of overall and advanced neoplasms in the 40- to 49-year age group was lower than in the 50- to 59-year age group (26.7% and 2.4% vs 37.8% and 3.5%, respectively). However, the prevalence of overall and advanced neoplasms increased to 39.1% and 5.4%, respectively, in 45- to 49-year-old individuals with metabolic syndrome. In the 40- to 49-year age group, age, current smoking, and metabolic syndrome were associated with an increased risk of advanced neoplasms (odds ratio [OR] 1.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.30; OR 3.12, 95% CI 1.20-8.12; and OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.09-3.67, respectively). Individuals aged 40-49 years had a lower prevalence of colorectal neoplasms than those aged 50-59 years, but some 40- to 49-year-olds showed a similar prevalence to those aged 50-59 years. Age, current smoking habits, and metabolic syndrome are associated with an increased risk of advanced neoplasms in subjects aged 40-49 years. Further studies are needed to stratify the risks of colon cancer and guide targeted screening in persons younger than 50 years old. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Assessing health-state utility values in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: a utility study in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Dara; Joulain, F; Naoshy, S; Iqbal, U; Muszbek, N; Payne, K A; Ferry, D; Goey, S H

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to elicit EuroQol Quality of Life 5-Dimensions (EQ-5D) utility values from patients with second-line metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) pre- and post-progression. A cross-sectional study was conducted in five hospitals in the Netherlands and the UK. Patients with mCRC were eligible if prescribed a second or subsequent line of therapy or best supportive care (BSC), received prior oxaliplatin in first-line therapy, and had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status scores of 0-2 at second-line initiation. Patients completed the EuroQol Quality of Life 5-Dimensions 3-levels (EQ-5D-3L) questionnaire and were categorized as pre- or post-progression. Chart data including patient demographics, clinical history, prior/current treatments and serious adverse events (SAEs) were collected. Mean utilities were estimated; uni- and multivariate analyses were conducted. Seventy-five patients were enrolled; 42 were pre-progression defined as second line or third line following an AE on second line and 33 were post-progression defined as third or subsequent therapy lines or BSC. Patient/disease characteristics and number of SAEs were similar between cohorts. Mean utility scores were 0.741 (SD = 0.230) and 0.731 (SD = 0.292) for pre- and post-progression cohorts, respectively. Compared to pre-progression, more patients reported increased anxiety/depression (36 vs. 12 %) and fewer problems with daily activities (64 vs. 38 %) post-progression. More patients pre-progression were on active treatment at enrolment (83 vs. 42 %) compared to post-progression. This is the first real-world study to collect utilities for patients with second-line mCRC pre- and post-disease progression. Utility values were similar pre- and post-progression. To further explore the effect of radiological progression on utilities, longitudinal research is required that includes patients in palliative care centres.

  10. EGFR gene copy number as a predictive biomarker for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer with anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zu-Yao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidermal growth factor receptor gene copy number (EGFR GCN has been heavily investigated as a potential predictive biomarker for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC with anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies (MAbs. The objective of this study was to systematically review current evidences on this issue. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, Wanfang Data, and the conference abstracts of American Society of Clinical Oncology and European Society of Medical Oncology were comprehensively searched. Studies that reported the objective response rate (ORR, progression-free survival, and/or overall survival of mCRC patients treated with anti-EGFR MAbs, stratified by EGFR GCN status, were included. The effect measures for binary outcome (response and time-to-event outcomes (progression-free survival and overall survival were risk difference and hazard ratio, respectively. Statistical heterogeneity among the studies was assessed by the Cochran’s Q-test and the I2 statistic. If appropriate, a quantitative synthesis of data from different studies would be conducted with a random-effects model. Results Nineteen eligible studies were identified. The criteria for increased EGFR GCN (GCN+ were highly inconsistent across different studies. The prevalence of GCN + ranged from 6.9% to 88.9%, and the difference in ORR between patients with GCN + and those with non-increased EGFR GCN (GCN- varied from −28% to 84%. Because of the significant heterogeneity, no quantitative synthesis of data was performed. There was a general trend towards higher ORR in patients with GCN+. The difference in ORRs between patients with GCN + and those with GCN- was even greater in KRAS wild-type patients, while in KRAS mutated patients the difference often did not exist. Almost all patients with EGFR amplification responded to the treatment. However, the prevalence of EGFR amplification was

  11. Continuation or reintroduction of bevacizumab beyond progression to first-line therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer: final results of the randomized BEBYP trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, G; Salvatore, L; Boni, L; Loupakis, F; Cremolini, C; Fornaro, L; Schirripa, M; Cupini, S; Barbara, C; Safina, V; Granetto, C; Fea, E; Antonuzzo, L; Boni, C; Allegrini, G; Chiara, S; Amoroso, D; Bonetti, A; Falcone, A

    2015-04-01

    The combination of bevacizumab with fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is a standard first-line treatment option in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We studied the efficacy of continuing or reintroducing bevacizumab in combination with second-line chemotherapy after progression to bevacizumab-based first-line therapy. In this phase III study, patients with mCRC treated with fluoropyrimidine-based first-line chemotherapy plus bevacizumab were randomized to receive in second-line mFOLFOX-6 or FOLFIRI (depending on first-line regimen) with or without bevacizumab. The primary end point was progression-free survival. To detect a hazard ratio (HR) for progression of 0.70 with an α and β error of 0.05 and 0.20, respectively, 262 patients were required. In consideration of the results of the ML18147 trial, the study was prematurely stopped. Between April 2008 and May 2012, a total of 185 patients were randomized. Bevacizumab-free interval was longer than 3 months in 43% of patients in chemotherapy alone arm and in 50% of patients in the bevacizumab arm. At a median follow-up of 45.3 months, the median progression-free survival was 5.0 months in the chemotherapy group and 6.8 months in the bevacizumab group [adjusted HR = 0.70; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.52-0.95; stratified log-rank P = 0.010]. Subgroup analyses showed a consistent benefit in all subgroups analyzed and in particular in patients who had continued or reintroduced bevacizumab. An improved overall survival was also observed in the bevacizumab arm (adjusted HR = 0.77; 95% CI 0.56-1.06; stratified log-rank P = 0.043). Responses (RECIST 1.0) were similar in the chemotherapy and bevacizumab groups (17% and 21%; P = 0.573). Toxicity profile was consistent with previously reported data. This study demonstrates that the continuation or the reintroduction of bevacizumab with second-line chemotherapy beyond first progression improves the outcome and supports the use of this strategy in the treatment of m

  12. Multiple criteria decision analysis in the context of health technology assessment: a simulation exercise on metastatic colorectal cancer with multiple stakeholders in the English setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, Aris; Montibeller, Gilberto; Hochhauser, Daniel; Kanavos, Panos

    2017-10-26

    Multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA) has appeared as a methodology to address limitations of economic evaluation in health technology assessment (HTA), however there are limited empirical evidence from real world applications. The aim of this study is to test in practice a recently developed MCDA methodological framework known as Advance Value Framework (AVF) through a proof-of-concept case study engaging multiple stakeholders. A multi-attribute value theory methodological process was adopted involving problem structuring, model building, model assessment and model appraisal phases. A facilitated decision analysis modelling approach was used as part of a decision conference with thirteen participants. An expanded scope of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) remit acted as the study setting with the use of supplementary value concerns. Second-line biological treatments were evaluated for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients having received prior chemotherapy, including cetuximab monotherapy, panitumumab monotherapy and aflibercept in combination with FOLFIRI chemotherapy. Initially 18 criteria attributes were considered spanning four value domains relating to therapeutic impact, safety profile, innovation level and socioeconomic impact. Nine criteria attributes were finally included. Cetuximab scored the highest overall weighted preference value score of 45.7 out of 100, followed by panitumumab with 42.3, and aflibercept plus FOLFIRI with 14.4. The relative weights of the two most important criteria (overall survival and Grade 4 adverse events) added up to more than the relative weight of all other criteria together (52.1%). Main methodological limitation was the lack of comparative clinical effects across treatments and challenges included the selection of "lower" and "higher" reference levels on criteria attributes, eliciting preferences across attributes where participants had less experience, and ensuring that all

  13. Maintenance treatment with capecitabine and bevacizumab versus observation in metastatic colorectal cancer: updated results and molecular subgroup analyses of the phase 3 CAIRO3 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goey, K K H; Elias, S G; van Tinteren, H; Laclé, M M; Willems, S M; Offerhaus, G J A; de Leng, W W J; Strengman, E; Ten Tije, A J; Creemers, G-J M; van der Velden, A; de Jongh, F E; Erdkamp, F L G; Tanis, B C; Punt, C J A; Koopman, M

    2017-09-01

    The phase 3 CAIRO3 study showed that capecitabine plus bevacizumab (CAP-B) maintenance treatment after six cycles capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab (CAPOX-B) in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients is effective, without compromising quality of life. In this post hoc analysis with updated follow-up and data regarding sidedness, we defined subgroups according to RAS/BRAF mutation status and mismatch repair (MMR) status, and investigated their influence on treatment efficacy. A total of 558 patients with previously untreated mCRC and stable disease or better after six cycles CAPOX-B induction treatment were randomised to either CAP-B maintenance treatment (n = 279) or observation (n = 279). Upon first progression, patients were to receive CAPOX-B reintroduction until second progression (PFS2, primary end point). We centrally assessed RAS/BRAF mutation status and MMR status, or used local results if central assessment was not possible. Intention-to-treat stratified Cox models adjusted for baseline covariables were used to examine whether treatment efficacy was modified by RAS/BRAF mutation status. RAS, BRAF mutations, and MMR deficiency were detected in 240/420 (58%), 36/381 (9%), and 4/279 (1%) patients, respectively. At a median follow-up of 87 months (IQR 69-97), all mutational subgroups showed significant improvement from maintenance treatment for the primary end point PFS2 [RAS/BRAF wild-type: hazard ratio (HR) 0.57 (95% CI 0.39-0.84); RAS-mutant: HR 0.74 (0.55-0.98); V600EBRAF-mutant: HR 0.28 (0.12-0.64)] and secondary end points, except for the RAS-mutant subgroup regarding overall survival. Adjustment for sidedness instead of primary tumour location yielded comparable results. Although right-sided tumours were associated with inferior prognosis, both patients with right- and left-sided tumours showed significant benefit from maintenance treatment. CAP-B maintenance treatment after six cycles CAPOX-B is effective in first

  14. Panitumumab Use in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer and Patterns of KRAS Testing: Results from a Europe-Wide Physician Survey and Medical Records Review.

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    Jörg Trojan

    Full Text Available From 2008-2013, the European indication for panitumumab required that patients' tumor KRAS exon 2 mutation status was known prior to starting treatment. To evaluate physician awareness of panitumumab prescribing information and how physicians prescribe panitumumab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC, two European multi-country, cross-sectional, observational studies were initiated in 2012: a physician survey and a medical records review. The first two out of three planned rounds for each study are reported.The primary objective in the physician survey was to estimate the prevalence of KRAS testing, and in the medical records review, it was to evaluate the effect of test results on patterns of panitumumab use. The medical records review study also included a pathologists' survey.In the physician survey, nearly all oncologists (299/301 were aware of the correct panitumumab indication and the need to test patients' tumor KRAS status before treatment with panitumumab. Nearly all oncologists (283/301 had in the past 6 months of clinical practice administered panitumumab correctly to mCRC patients with wild-type KRAS status. In the medical records review, 97.5% of participating oncologists (77/79 conducted a KRAS test for all of their patients prior to prescribing panitumumab. Four patients (1.3% did not have tumor KRAS mutation status tested prior to starting panitumumab treatment. Approximately one-quarter of patients (85/306 were treated with panitumumab and concurrent oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy; of these, 83/85 had confirmed wild-type KRAS status prior to starting panitumumab treatment. All 56 referred laboratories that participated used a Conformité Européenne-marked or otherwise validated KRAS detection method, and nearly all (55/56 participated in a quality assurance scheme.There was a high level of knowledge amongst oncologists around panitumumab prescribing information and the need to test and confirm patients

  15. Panitumumab Use in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer and Patterns of KRAS Testing: Results from a Europe-Wide Physician Survey and Medical Records Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojan, Jörg; Mineur, Laurent; Tomášek, Jiří; Rouleau, Etienne; Fabian, Pavel; de Maglio, Giovanna; García-Alfonso, Pilar; Aprile, Giuseppe; Taylor, Aliki; Kafatos, George; Downey, Gerald; Terwey, Jan-Henrik; van Krieken, J Han

    2015-01-01

    From 2008-2013, the European indication for panitumumab required that patients' tumor KRAS exon 2 mutation status was known prior to starting treatment. To evaluate physician awareness of panitumumab prescribing information and how physicians prescribe panitumumab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), two European multi-country, cross-sectional, observational studies were initiated in 2012: a physician survey and a medical records review. The first two out of three planned rounds for each study are reported. The primary objective in the physician survey was to estimate the prevalence of KRAS testing, and in the medical records review, it was to evaluate the effect of test results on patterns of panitumumab use. The medical records review study also included a pathologists' survey. In the physician survey, nearly all oncologists (299/301) were aware of the correct panitumumab indication and the need to test patients' tumor KRAS status before treatment with panitumumab. Nearly all oncologists (283/301) had in the past 6 months of clinical practice administered panitumumab correctly to mCRC patients with wild-type KRAS status. In the medical records review, 97.5% of participating oncologists (77/79) conducted a KRAS test for all of their patients prior to prescribing panitumumab. Four patients (1.3%) did not have tumor KRAS mutation status tested prior to starting panitumumab treatment. Approximately one-quarter of patients (85/306) were treated with panitumumab and concurrent oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy; of these, 83/85 had confirmed wild-type KRAS status prior to starting panitumumab treatment. All 56 referred laboratories that participated used a Conformité Européenne-marked or otherwise validated KRAS detection method, and nearly all (55/56) participated in a quality assurance scheme. There was a high level of knowledge amongst oncologists around panitumumab prescribing information and the need to test and confirm patients' tumors as

  16. Panitumumab use in metastatic colorectal cancer and patterns of RAS testing: results from a Europe-wide physician survey and medical records review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han van Krieken, J; Kafatos, George; Bennett, James; Mineur, Laurent; Tomášek, Jiří; Rouleau, Etienne; Fabian, Pavel; De Maglio, Giovanna; García-Alfonso, Pilar; Aprile, Giuseppe; Parkar, Parijan; Downey, Gerald; Demonty, Gaston; Trojan, Jörg

    2017-11-28

    In Europe, treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with panitumumab requires prior confirmation of RAS wild-type mutation status. Two studies - a physician survey and a medical records review (MRR) - were conducted to evaluate the use of panitumumab and awareness among prescribing oncologists of the associated RAS testing requirements in clinical practice. Both studies enrolled participants from nine European countries and were carried out in three consecutive rounds. Rounds 1 and 2 (2012-2013) examined KRAS (exon 2) testing only; the results have been published in full previously. Round 3 (2014-2015) examined full RAS testing (exons 2, 3, 4 of KRAS and NRAS) and was initiated following a change in prescribing guidelines, from requiring KRAS alone to requiring full RAS testing. For the physician survey, telephone interviews were conducted with oncologists who had prescribed panitumumab to patients with mCRC in the previous 6 months. For the MRR, oncologists were asked to provide anonymised clinical information, extracted from their patients' records. In Round 3, 152 oncologists and 131 patients' records were included in the physician survey and MRR, respectively. In Round 3 of the physician survey, 95.4% (n = 145) of participants correctly identified that panitumumab should only be prescribed in RAS wild-type mCRC compared with 99.0% (n = 298) of 301 participants in Rounds 1 and 2, responding to the same question about KRAS testing. In Round 3 of the MRR, 100% (n = 131) of patients included in the study had confirmed KRAS or RAS wild-type status prior to initiation of panitumumab compared with 97.7% (n = 299) of 306 patients in Rounds 1 and 2 (KRAS only). Of those patients in Round 3, 83.2% (n = 109) had been tested for RAS status and 16.8% (n = 22) had been tested for KRAS status only. Physicians' adherence to prescribing guidelines has remained high over time in Europe, despite the change in indication for panitumumab treatment, from KRAS to

  17. SLCO1B1 and SLC19A1 gene variants and irinotecan-induced rapid response and survival: a prospective multicenter pharmacogenetics study of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Huang

    Full Text Available Rapid response to chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC patients (response within 12 weeks of chemotherapy may increase the chance of complete resection and improved survival. Few molecular markers predict irinotecan-induced rapid response and survival. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in solute carrier genes are reported to correlate with the variable pharmacokinetics of irinotecan and folate in cancer patients. This study aims to evaluate the predictive role of 3 SNPs in mCRC patients treated with irinotecan and fluoropyrimidine-containing regimens.Three SNPs were selected and genotyped in 137 mCRC patients from a Chinese prospective multicenter trial (NCT01282658. The chi-squared test, univariate and multivariable logistic regression model, and receiver operating characteristic analysis were used to evaluate correlations between the genotypes and rapid response. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate the associations between genotypes and survival outcomes. Benjamini and Hochberg False Discovery Rate correction was used in multiple testing.Genotype GA/AA of SNP rs2306283 of the gene SLCO1B1 and genotype GG of SNP rs1051266 of the gene SLC19A1 were associated with a higher rapid response rate (odds ratio [OR] =3.583 and 3.521, 95%CI =1.301-9.871 and 1.271-9.804, p=0.011 and p=0.013, respectively. The response rate was 70% in patients with both genotypes, compared with only 19.7% in the remaining patients (OR = 9.489, 95%CI = 2.191-41.093, Fisher's exact test p=0.002. Their significances were all maintained even after multiple testing (all p c < 0.05. The rs2306283 GA/AA genotype was also an independent prognostic factor of longer progression-free survival (PFS (hazard ratio = 0.402, 95%CI = 0.171-0.945, p=0.037. None of the SNPs predicted overall survival.Polymorphisms of solute carriers' may be useful to predict rapid response to irinotecan plus fluoropyrimidine and PFS in m

  18. Role of Kras Status in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Receiving First-Line Chemotherapy plus Bevacizumab: A TTD Group Cooperative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; Gómez-España, Auxiliadora; Massutí, Bartomeu; Sastre, Javier; Reboredo, Margarita; Manzano, José Luis; Rivera, Fernando; Safont, MªJosé; Montagut, Clara; González, Encarnación; Benavides, Manuel; Marcuello, Eugenio; Cervantes, Andrés; Martínez de Prado, Purificación; Fernández-Martos, Carlos; Arrivi, Antonio; Bando, Inmaculada; Aranda, E.; Gómez, A.; Massutí, B.; Yuste, A.; Rubio, E. Díaz; Sastre, J.; Valladares, M.; Abad, A.; Rivera, F.; Safont, MªJosé; Gallén, M.; González, E.; Benavides, M.; Marcuello, E.; Tobeña, M.; Cervantes, A.; Martínez de Prado, P.; Fernández-Martos, C.; Arrivi, A.; López-Ladrón, A.; Lacasta, A.; Llanos, M.; Remón, J.; Anton, A.; Vicent, J. Mª.; Gala´n, A.; Dueñas, R.; Tabernero, J. Mª.; Manzano, H.; Gómez, Mª. J.; Alfaro, J.; Losa, F.; Escudero, P.; García, T.; García López, J. L.; de Paredes, Mª L. García; Velasco, A.; Almenar, D.; Vera, R.; García Puche, J. L.; Carrato, A.; Lescure, A. Rodriguez; Jiménez, E.; Alberola, V.; García-Foncillas, J.; Constenla, M.; Ruiz, A.; Bueso, P.; Cabrera, E.; del Río,, L.; Ponce, J.; Oltra, A.; Checa, T.; Etxeberría, A.; Alonso, C.

    2012-01-01

    Background In the MACRO study, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) were randomised to first-line treatment with 6 cycles of capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX) plus bevacizumab followed by either single-agent bevacizumab or XELOX plus bevacizumab until disease progression. An additional retrospective analysis was performed to define the prognostic value of tumour KRAS status on progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and response rates. Methodology/Principal Findings KRAS data (tumour KRAS status and type of mutation) were collected by questionnaire from participating centres that performed KRAS analyses. These data were then cross-referenced with efficacy data for relevant patients in the MACRO study database. KRAS status was analysed in 394 of the 480 patients (82.1%) in the MACRO study. Wild-type (WT) KRAS tumours were found in 219 patients (56%) and mutant (MT) KRAS in 175 patients (44%). Median PFS was 10.9 months for patients with WT KRAS and 9.4 months for patients with MT KRAS tumours (p = 0.0038; HR: 1.40; 95% CI:1.12–1.77). The difference in OS was also significant: 26.7 months versus 18.0 months for WT versus MT KRAS, respectively (p = 0.0002; HR: 1.55; 95% CI: 1.23–1.96). Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that KRAS was an independent variable for both PFS and OS. Responses were observed in 126 patients (57.5%) with WT KRAS tumours and 76 patients (43.4%) with MT KRAS tumours (p = 0.0054; OR: 1.77; 95% CI: 1.18–2.64). Conclusions/Significance This analysis of the MACRO study suggests a prognostic role for tumour KRAS status in patients with mCRC treated with XELOX plus bevacizumab. For both PFS and OS, KRAS status was an independent factor in univariate and multivariate analyses. PMID:23174912

  19. Plasma YKL-40 in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with first line oxaliplatin-based regimen with or without cetuximab: RESULTS from the NORDIC VII Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Line S Tarpgaard

    Full Text Available We aim to test the hypothesis that high plasma YKL-40 is associated with short progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC treated with first-line oxaliplatin and 5-flourouracil with or without cetuximab.A total of 566 patients in the NORDIC VII Study were randomized 1∶1∶1 to arm A (Nordic FLOX, arm B (Nordic FLOX + cetuximab, or arm C (Nordic FLOX + cetuximab for 16 weeks followed by cetuximab alone as maintenance therapy. Pretreatment plasma samples were available from 510 patients. Plasma YKL-40 was determined by ELISA and dichotomized according to the age-corrected 95% YKL-40 level in 3130 healthy subjects.Pretreatment plasma YKL-40 was elevated in 204 patients (40%, and median YKL-40 was higher in patients with mCRC than in healthy subjects (age adjusted, P<0.001. Patients with elevated YKL-40 had shorter PFS than patients with normal YKL-40 (7.5 vs. 8.2 months; hazard ratio (HR  = 1.27 95% confidence interval (CI 1.05-1.53 P = 0.013 and shorter OS (16.8 vs. 23.9 months; HR = 1.33, 1.04-1.69, P = 0.024. Multivariate Cox analysis demonstrated that elevated pretreatment YKL-40 was an independent biomarker of short OS (HR = 1.12, 1.01-1.25, P = 0.033. The ratio of the updated plasma YKL-40 (i.e. level after 1, 2, 8 weeks of treatment, and at end of treatment compared to the baseline level was associated with OS (HR = 1.27, 1.06-1.52, P = 0.011.Plasma YKL-40 is an independent prognostic biomarker in patients with mCRC treated with first-line oxaliplatin-based therapy alone or combined with cetuximab.

  20. Improved Progression-Free Survival in Irinotecan-Treated Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients Carrying the HNF1A Coding Variant p.I27L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Labriet

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-alpha (HNF1A is a liver-enriched transcription factor that plays a key role in many aspects of hepatic functions including detoxification processes. We examined whether HNF1A polymorphisms are associated with clinical outcomes in two independent cohorts combining 417 European ancestry patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC treated with irinotecan-based chemotherapy. The intronic rs2244608A>G marker was predictive of an improved progression-free survival with a trend in the Canadian cohort and reaching significance in the Italian cohort, with hazard ratios (HR of 0.74 and 0.72, P = 0.076 and 0.038, respectively. A strong association between rs2244608A>G and improved PFS was found in the combined analysis of both cohorts (HR = 0.72; P = 0.002. Consistent with an altered HNF1A function, mCRC carriers of the rs2244608G minor allele displayed enhanced drug exposure by 45% (P = 0.032 compared to non-carriers. In Caucasians, rs2244608A>G is in strong linkage with the coding variant rs1169288c.79A>C (HNF1A p.I27L. In healthy donors, we observed an altered hepatic (ABCC1, P = 0.009, ABCC2, P = 0.048 and CYP3A5, P = 0.001; n = 89 and intestinal (TOP1, P = 0.004; n = 75 gene expression associated with the rs1169288C allele. In addition, the rs1169288C polymorphism could significantly increase the ABCC1 promoter activity by 27% (P = 0.008 and 15% (P = 0.041 in the human kidney HEK293 and the human liver HepG2 cell lines, respectively. Our findings suggest that the HNF1A rs2244608, or the tightly linked functional coding variant p.I27L, might be a potential prognostic marker with irinotecan-based regimens.

  1. Improved Progression-Free Survival in Irinotecan-Treated Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients Carrying the HNF1A Coding Variant p.I27L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labriet, Adrien; De Mattia, Elena; Cecchin, Erika; Lévesque, Éric; Jonker, Derek; Couture, Félix; Buonadonna, Angela; D'Andrea, Mario; Villeneuve, Lyne; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Guillemette, Chantal

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-alpha (HNF1A) is a liver-enriched transcription factor that plays a key role in many aspects of hepatic functions including detoxification processes. We examined whether HNF1A polymorphisms are associated with clinical outcomes in two independent cohorts combining 417 European ancestry patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treated with irinotecan-based chemotherapy. The intronic rs2244608A>G marker was predictive of an improved progression-free survival with a trend in the Canadian cohort and reaching significance in the Italian cohort, with hazard ratios (HR) of 0.74 and 0.72, P = 0.076 and 0.038, respectively. A strong association between rs2244608A>G and improved PFS was found in the combined analysis of both cohorts (HR = 0.72; P = 0.002). Consistent with an altered HNF1A function, mCRC carriers of the rs2244608G minor allele displayed enhanced drug exposure by 45% (P = 0.032) compared to non-carriers. In Caucasians, rs2244608A>G is in strong linkage with the coding variant rs1169288c.79A>C (HNF1A p.I27L). In healthy donors, we observed an altered hepatic (ABCC1, P = 0.009, ABCC2, P = 0.048 and CYP3A5, P = 0.001; n = 89) and intestinal (TOP1, P = 0.004; n = 75) gene expression associated with the rs1169288C allele. In addition, the rs1169288C polymorphism could significantly increase the ABCC1 promoter activity by 27% (P = 0.008) and 15% (P = 0.041) in the human kidney HEK293 and the human liver HepG2 cell lines, respectively. Our findings suggest that the HNF1A rs2244608, or the tightly linked functional coding variant p.I27L, might be a potential prognostic marker with irinotecan-based regimens.

  2. Prognostic factors for tumour response, progression-free survival and toxicity in metastatic colorectal cancer patients given irinotecan (CPT-11) as second-line chemotherapy after 5FU failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyer, G; Rougier, P; Bugat, R; Droz, J-P; Marty, M; Bleiberg, H; Mignard, D; Awad, L; Herait, P; Culine, S; Trillet-Lenoir, V

    2000-01-01

    Our purpose was to determine, in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma treated with irinotecan single-agent after 5-FU failure, the most significant predictive parameters for tumour response, progression-free survival and toxicity. Between October 1992 and April 1995, 455 patients with 5-FU resistant metastatic colorectal carcinoma entered four consecutive phase II trials. The first two studies assessed tumour response, the other two were randomized studies which assessed the efficacy of racecadotril to prevent irinotecan-induced diarrhoea. Due to homogeneous main eligibility criterias, data from those studies could be pooled for statistical analysis. Potential clinical and biological predictive factors (PF) for toxicity, tumour growth control, e.g. response or stabilization and progression-free survival (PFS), were studied in multivariate analysis. 363 patients were evaluable for response, 432 were evaluable for PFS, 368 for neutropenia and 416 for delayed diarrhoea, respectively. Normal baseline haemoglobin level (Hb), time since diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma, grade 3 or 4 neutropenia or diarrhoea at first cycle and a low number of organs involved were the most PF for tumour growth control (P< 0.05). Significant prognostic variables for PFS were WHO Performance Status, liver and lymph-node involvement, time since diagnosis, age and CEA value (P≤ 0.02). Six groups of patients based on the number of unfavourable prognostic factors are presented. Baseline bilirubin, haemoglobin level, number of organs involved and time from diagnosis were PF for neutropenia; PS, serum creatinine, leukocyte count, time from 5-FU progression and prior abdominopelvic irradiation were PF for delayed diarrhoea (P≤ 0.05). These PF should help clinicians to anticipate for a given patient the probability to observe a response/stabilization or a toxicity. These results should also be prospectively confirmed in ongoing or future trials using irinotecan, both as a single agent

  3. Chemotherapy of metastatic colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Fedyanin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer incidence and mortality. In 2008 inRussian Federation55 719 new cases of colorectal cancer were diagnosed and 37 911 patients died of this disease. A significant progress was achieved in metastatic colorectal cancer treatment during the last decades. A lot of treatment options became available: from 5-fluoruracil monotherapy to combined treatment treatment schemes including surgery. A group of patients with isolated liver metastases was distinguished, who can achieve 5-year survival rate of 40 % after systemic treatment and surgery. Today, based on clinical data and molecular analysis, we come close to individualized treatment of this patient group. In this literature review results of metastatic colorectal cancer chemotherapy are being analyzed and rational treatment tactic is proposed based on therapy goals. 

  4. A phase II study for metabolic in vivo response monitoring with sequential 18FDG-PET-CT during treatment with the EGFR-monoclonal-antibody cetuximab in metastatic colorectal cancer: the Heidelberg REMOTUX trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Anne Katrin; von Gall, Carl; Abel, Ulrich; Delorme, Stefan; Kloor, Matthias; Ose, Jennifer; Weber, Tim Frederik; Stange, Annika; Haag, Georg Martin; Haberkorn, Uwe; Lordick, Florian; Jäger, Dirk

    2012-03-22

    The epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody cetuximab has proven activity in metastatic colorectal cancer. To date, the mechanisms of action are not completely understood. Especially the impact on tumor glucose metabolism, or tumor vascularization remains largely unclear. The understanding of mechanisms such as early changes in tumor metabolism is of clinical importance since there may be a substantial influence on choice and sequence of drug combinations. Early signals of response to cetuximab may prove useful to identify patients having a relevant clinical treatment benefit. The objective of this trial is to evaluate the predictive relevance of the relative change in (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose tumor uptake for early clinical response during short-term single agent treatment with cetuximab. Early clinical response will be routinely measured according to the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. Accompanying research includes cytokine immune monitoring and analysis of tumor proteins and tumor genes. The REMOTUX trial is an investigator-initiated, prospective, open-label, single-arm, single-center early exploratory predictive study. The first (18)F-FDG PET-CT is conducted at baseline followed by the run-in phase with cetuximab at days 1 and 8. At day 14, the second (18)F-FDG PET-CT is performed. Subsequently, patients are treated according to the Folfiri-cetuximab regimen as an active and approved first-line regimen for metastatic colorectal carcinoma. At day 56, clinical response is evaluated with a CT-scan compared to the baseline analysis. Tracer uptake is assessed using standardized uptake values (SUVs). The main hypothesis to be tested in the primary analysis is whether or not the relative change in the SUV from baseline to day 14 has any predictive relevance for early clinical response determined at day 56. Patients are followed until death from any cause or until 24 months after the last patient has ended trial treatment. The aim of this

  5. A phase II study for metabolic in vivo response monitoring with sequential 18FDG-PET-CT during treatment with the EGFR-monoclonal-antibody cetuximab in metastatic colorectal cancer: the Heidelberg REMOTUX trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Anne

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody cetuximab has proven activity in metastatic colorectal cancer. To date, the mechanisms of action are not completely understood. Especially the impact on tumor glucose metabolism, or tumor vascularization remains largely unclear. The understanding of mechanisms such as early changes in tumor metabolism is of clinical importance since there may be a substantial influence on choice and sequence of drug combinations. Early signals of response to cetuximab may prove useful to identify patients having a relevant clinical treatment benefit. The objective of this trial is to evaluate the predictive relevance of the relative change in 18 F-Fluorodeoxyglucose tumor uptake for early clinical response during short-term single agent treatment with cetuximab. Early clinical response will be routinely measured according to the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. Accompanying research includes cytokine immune monitoring and analysis of tumor proteins and tumor genes. Methods/design The REMOTUX trial is an investigator-initiated, prospective, open-label, single-arm, single-center early exploratory predictive study. The first 18 F-FDG PET-CT is conducted at baseline followed by the run-in phase with cetuximab at days 1 and 8. At day 14, the second 18 F-FDG PET-CT is performed. Subsequently, patients are treated according to the Folfiri-cetuximab regimen as an active and approved first-line regimen for metastatic colorectal carcinoma. At day 56, clinical response is evaluated with a CT-scan compared to the baseline analysis. Tracer uptake is assessed using standardized uptake values (SUVs. The main hypothesis to be tested in the primary analysis is whether or not the relative change in the SUV from baseline to day 14 has any predictive relevance for early clinical response determined at day 56. Patients are followed until death from any cause or until 24 months after the last

  6. Asymptomatic dystrophinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrone, A. [Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA (United States)]|[Univ. of Florence (Italy); Hoffman, E.P.; Hoop, R.C. [Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA (United States)] [and others

    1997-03-31

    A 4-year-old girl was referred for evaluation for a mild but persistent serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) elevation detected incidentally during routine blood screening for a skin infection. Serum creatine kinase activity was found to be increased. Immuno-histochemical study for dystrophin in her muscle biopsy showed results consistent with a carrier state for muscular dystrophy. Molecular work-up showed the proposita to be a carrier of a deletion mutation of exon 48 of the dystrophin gene. Four male relatives also had the deletion mutation, yet showed no clinical symptoms of muscular dystrophy (age range 8-58 yrs). Linkage analysis of the dystrophin gene in the family showed a spontaneous change of an STR45 allele, which could be due to either an intragenic double recombination event, or CA repeat length mutation leading to identical size alleles. To our knowledge, this is the first documentation of an asymptomatic dystrophinopathy in multiple males of advanced age. Based on molecular findings, this family would be given a diagnosis of Becker muscular dystrophy. This diagnosis implies the development of clinical symptoms, even though this family is clearly asymptomatic. This report underscores the caution which must be exercised when giving presymptomatic diagnoses based on molecular studies. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Creactive protein and interleukin-6 as markers of systemic inflammatory response and as prognostic factors for metastatic colorectal cancer. Data from the randomized phase III NORDIC-VII study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, M.; Kersten, C.; Sorbye, H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A systemic inflammatory response (SIR) affects prognosis and treatment outcome in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The aim of the study was to explore the prognostic significance of several SIR-derived markers and the correlation between the best marker of SIR and plasma interleukin...... of platelets and levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) on survival were analyzed by Kaplan-Meier plots, logrank test, and Cox Proportional Hazards model. Further, the relationship between CRP, IL-6 and RAS and BRAF mutation status was examined. Results: 374 patients were eligible for the comparison of markers...... of SIR and 393 were eligible for the final analysis related to CRP, IL-6 and RAF and BRAF mutation status. The prognostic significance of CRP was at least as good as the other markers of SIR. CRP together with IL-6 were selected for further investigation. Logtrans-formed CRP and IL-6 were highly...

  8. Randomized study comparing full dose monotherapy (S-1 followed by irinotecan) and reduced dose combination therapy (S-1/oxaliplatin followed by S-1/irinotecan) as initial therapy for older patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Stine Braendegaard; Österlund, Pia; Berglund, Åke

    2017-01-01

    be a sequential full-dose monotherapy chemotherapy approach or a dose-reduced combination chemotherapy approach. The oral 5FU prodrug S-1 seems to have less side effects than capecitabine and should be an optimal drug for older patients, but few data are available. Improved geriatric assessments are needed......-treatment characteristics and geriatric assessments. Discussion: The study will add knowledge on how to treat older mCRC patients who are not candidates for standard combination therapy. Furthermore it may provide understanding of efficacy and tolerability of chemotherapy in older cancer patients and thus offer a better......Background: Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is a disease of older age, but there is a relative lack of knowledge about effects of chemotherapy in older patients as they are under-represented in clinical trials. Little data can guide whether the strategy in older mCRC patients should...

  9. High BRAF Mutation Frequency and Marked Survival Differences in Subgroups According to KRAS/BRAF Mutation Status and Tumor Tissue Availability in a Prospective Population-Based Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorbye, Halfdan; Dragomir, Anca; Sundström, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    RAS and BRAF mutations impact treatment and prognosis of metastatic colorectal cancer patients (mCRC), but the knowledge is based on trial patients usually not representative for the general cancer population. Patient characteristics, treatment and efficacy according to KRAS, BRAF and MSI status...... micro array (TMA) (42%) had worse prognostic factors and inferior survival (all patients; 7m vs 11m, chemotherapy-treated;12m vs 17m). The 92 patients (21%) with BRAF mutation had a poor prognosis regardless of microsatellite instability, but receipt of 1-2nd chemotherapy was similar to wildtype BRAF...... patients. Median survival in this cohort varied from 1 month in BRAF mutated patients not given chemotherapy to 26 months in wildtype KRAS/BRAF patients mutation and KRAS mutation were all independent prognostic factors for survival. The observed 21% BRAF...

  10. Clinical utility of KRAS status in circulating plasma DNA compared to archival tumour tissue from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Pallisgaard, Niels; Appelt, Ane Lindegaard

    2015-01-01

    in patients from metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) prior to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) therapy. Secondly, we investigated the concentration of total cfDNA in relation to clinical outcome. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients were resistant to 5-FU, oxaliplatin and irinotecan and treated......BACKGROUND: Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in plasma is a mixture of DNA from malignant and normal cells, and can be used as a liquid biopsy to detect and quantify tumour specific mutations e.g. KRAS. We investigated the clinical value of KRAS mutations when detected in plasma compared to tumour...... an additional prognostic effect. CONCLUSION: The value of clinically relevant mutations could be improved by performing the analysis on circulation plasma DNA rather than archival tumour tissue....

  11. SIRFLOX: Randomized Phase III Trial Comparing First-Line mFOLFOX6 (Plus or Minus Bevacizumab) Versus mFOLFOX6 (Plus or Minus Bevacizumab) Plus Selective Internal Radiation Therapy in Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hazel, Guy A; Heinemann, Volker; Sharma, Navesh K; Findlay, Michael P N; Ricke, Jens; Peeters, Marc; Perez, David; Robinson, Bridget A; Strickland, Andrew H; Ferguson, Tom; Rodríguez, Javier; Kröning, Hendrik; Wolf, Ido; Ganju, Vinod; Walpole, Euan; Boucher, Eveline; Tichler, Thomas; Shacham-Shmueli, Einat; Powell, Alex; Eliadis, Paul; Isaacs, Richard; Price, David; Moeslein, Fred; Taieb, Julien; Bower, Geoff; Gebski, Val; Van Buskirk, Mark; Cade, David N; Thurston, Kenneth; Gibbs, Peter

    2016-05-20

    SIRFLOX was a randomized, multicenter trial designed to assess the efficacy and safety of adding selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) using yttrium-90 resin microspheres to standard fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX)-based chemotherapy in patients with previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer. Chemotherapy-naïve patients with liver metastases plus or minus limited extrahepatic metastases were randomly assigned to receive either modified FOLFOX (mFOLFOX6; control) or mFOLFOX6 plus SIRT (SIRT) plus or minus bevacizumab. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) at any site as assessed by independent centralized radiology review blinded to study arm. Between October 2006 and April 2013, 530 patients were randomly assigned to treatment (control, 263; SIRT, 267). Median PFS at any site was 10.2 v 10.7 months in control versus SIRT (hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.77 to 1.12; P = .43). Median PFS in the liver by competing risk analysis was 12.6 v 20.5 months in control versus SIRT (hazard ratio, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.55 to 0.90; P = .002). Objective response rates (ORRs) at any site were similar (68.1% v 76.4% in control v SIRT; P = .113). ORR in the liver was improved with the addition of SIRT (68.8% v 78.7% in control v SIRT; P = .042). Grade ≥ 3 adverse events, including recognized SIRT-related effects, were reported in 73.4% and 85.4% of patients in control versus SIRT. The addition of SIRT to FOLFOX-based first-line chemotherapy in patients with liver-dominant or liver-only metastatic colorectal cancer did not improve PFS at any site but significantly delayed disease progression in the liver. The safety profile was as expected and was consistent with previous studies. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  12. Basic Concepts in Metastatic Cardiac Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Vlachostergios, Panagiotis J.; Daliani, Danai D.; Papandreou, Christos N.

    2012-01-01

    The involvement of the heart in metastatic cancer is a rare clinical diagnosis, as it may be asymptomatic or symptoms, when present, may be attributed to other causes. Issues regarding incidence, intracardiac location, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cardiac tumors will be discussed here.

  13. Assessment of metastatic colorectal cancer with hybrid imaging: comparison of reading performance using different combinations of anatomical and functional imaging techniques in PET/MRI and PET/CT in a short case series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brendle, C.; Schwenzer, N.F.; Rempp, H.; Schmidt, H.; Pfannenberg, C.; Nikolaou, K.; Schraml, C. [Eberhard Karls University, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); La Fougere, C. [Eberhard Karls University, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The purpose was to investigate the diagnostic performance of different combinations of anatomical and functional imaging techniques in PET/MRI and PET/CT for the evaluation of metastatic colorectal cancer lesions. Image data of 15 colorectal cancer patients (FDG-PET/CT and subsequent FDG-PET/MRI) were retrospectively evaluated by two readers in five reading sessions: MRI (morphology) alone, MRI/diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), MRI/PET, MRI/DWI/PET; and PET/CT. Diagnostic performance of lesion detection with each combination was assessed in general and organ-based. The reference standard was given by histology and/or follow-up imaging. Separate analysis of mucinous tumours was performed. One hundred and eighty lesions (110 malignant) were evaluated (intestine n = 6, liver n = 37, lymph nodes n = 55, lung n = 4, and peritoneal n = 74). The overall lesion-based diagnostic accuracy was 0.46 for MRI, 0.47 for MRI/DWI, 0.57 for MRI/PET, 0.69 for MRI/DWI/PET and 0.66 for PET/CT. In the organ-based assessment, MRI/DWI/PET showed the highest accuracy for liver metastases (0.74), a comparable accuracy to PET/CT in peritoneal lesions (0.55), and in lymph node metastases (0.84). The accuracy in mucinous tumour lesions was limited in all modalities (MRI/DWI/PET = 0.52). PET/MRI including DWI is comparable to PET/CT in the evaluation of colorectal cancer metastases, with a markedly higher accuracy when using combined imaging data than the modalities separately. Further improvement is needed in the imaging of peritoneal carcinomatosis and mucinous tumours. (orig.)

  14. Prognostic importance of circulating epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with chemotherapy and bevacizumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben Frøstrup; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund; Aalund Olsen, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    High tumor expression of epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 (EGFL7) has been associated with a poor prognosis in colorectal cancer. The aim of the current study was to investigate the possible prognostic impact of circulating EGFL7 (cir-EGFL7), combined with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP...

  15. CytoTrack Analysis Reveals Low Presence of Circulating Tumor Cells in the Perioperative Period in Patients with Non-metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gogenur, Mikail; Hillig, Thore; Gogenur, Ismail

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: Detection of circulating tumor cells in the perioperative period predicts poor prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer. There is only one Food and Drug Administration-approved method for such detection, CellSearch, for which results have been inconsistent. A new immunological...

  16. Is short-course radiotherapy with high doses per fraction the appropriate regimen for metastatic spinal cord compression in colorectal cancer patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rades, Dirk; Dahm-Daphi, Jochen; Rudat, Volker; Schulte, Rainer; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Veninga, Theo; Hoskin, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    Various radiotherapy (RT) schedules are used worldwide for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). Every treatment session may cause discomfort to the mostly debilitated patients. A short overall treatment time appears beneficial, especially for MSCC patients with an extremely poor survival such

  17. Cytogenetic findings in metastases from colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardi, G; Parada, L A; Bomme, L

    1997-01-01

    Eighteen tumor samples from 11 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer were cytogenetically analyzed after short-term culturing. Of the 13 metastases examined, 11 were from lymph nodes, 1 from the peritoneum and 1 from the lung. In 5 of the 11 patients, matched samples from the primary tumor...... colorectal carcinomas, and del(10)(q22) and add(16)(p13), which so far have not been associated with primary tumors and which may play a particular pathogenetic role in the metastatic process....

  18. Protocol for Combined Analysis of FOXFIRE, SIRFLOX, and FOXFIRE-Global Randomized Phase III Trials of Chemotherapy +/- Selective Internal Radiation Therapy as First-Line Treatment for Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virdee, Pradeep S; Moschandreas, Joanna; Gebski, Val; Love, Sharon B; Francis, E Anne; Wasan, Harpreet S; van Hazel, Guy; Gibbs, Peter; Sharma, Ricky A

    2017-03-28

    In colorectal cancer (CRC), unresectable liver metastases are associated with a poor prognosis. The FOXFIRE (an open-label randomized phase III trial of 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and folinic acid +/- interventional radioembolization as first-line treatment for patients with unresectable liver-only or liver-predominant metastatic colorectal cancer), SIRFLOX (randomized comparative study of FOLFOX6m plus SIR-Spheres microspheres versus FOLFOX6m alone as first-line treatment in patients with nonresectable liver metastases from primary colorectal carcinoma), and FOXFIRE-Global (assessment of overall survival of FOLFOX6m plus SIR-Spheres microspheres versus FOLFOX6m alone as first-line treatment in patients with nonresectable liver metastases from primary colorectal carcinoma in a randomized clinical study) clinical trials were designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of combining first-line chemotherapy with selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) using yttrium-90 resin microspheres, also called transarterial radioembolization. The aim of this analysis is to prospectively combine clinical data from 3 trials to allow adequate power to evaluate the impact of chemotherapy with SIRT on overall survival. Eligible patients are adults with histologically confirmed CRC and unequivocal evidence of liver metastases which are not treatable by surgical resection or local ablation with curative intent at the time of study entry. Patients may also have limited extrahepatic metastases. Final analysis will take place when all participants have been followed up for a minimum of 2 years. Efficacy and safety estimates derived using individual participant data (IPD) from SIRFLOX, FOXFIRE, and FOXFIRE-Global will be pooled using 2-stage prospective meta-analysis. Secondary outcome measures include progression-free survival (PFS), liver-specific PFS, health-related quality of life, response rate, resection rate, and adverse event profile. The large study population will

  19. Randomized, phase II study of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor inhibitor IMC-A12, with or without cetuximab, in patients with cetuximab- or panitumumab-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, Diane Lauren; Vakiani, Efsevia; Fakih, Marwan G; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Hecht, Joel Randolph; Goodman-Davis, Noah; Hollywood, Ellen; Shia, Jinru; Schwartz, Jonathan; Chandrawansa, Kumari; Dontabhaktuni, Aruna; Youssoufian, Hagop; Solit, David B; Saltz, Leonard B

    2010-09-20

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of IMC-A12, a human monoclonal antibody (mAb) that blocks insulin-like growth factor receptor-1 (IGF-1R), as monotherapy or in combination with cetuximab in patients with metastatic refractory anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mAb colorectal cancer. A randomized, phase II study was performed in which patients in arm A received IMC-A12 10 mg/kg intravenously (IV) every 2 weeks, while patients in arm B received this same dose of IMC-A12 plus cetuximab 500 mg/m(2) IV every 2 weeks. Subsequently, arm C (same combination treatment as arm B) was added to include patients who had disease control on a prior anti-EGFR mAb and wild-type KRAS tumors. Archived pretreatment tumor tissue was obtained when possible for KRAS, PIK3CA, and BRAF genotyping, and immunohistochemistry was obtained for pAKT as well as IGF-1R. Overall, 64 patients were treated (median age, 61 years; range, 40 to 84 years): 23 patients in arm A, 21 in arm B, and 20 in arm C. No antitumor activity was seen in the 23 patients treated with IMC-A12 monotherapy. Of the 21 patients randomly assigned to IMC-A12 plus cetuximab, one patient (with KRAS wild type) achieved a partial response, with disease control lasting 6.5 months. Arm C (all patients with KRAS wild type), however, showed no additional antitumor activity. Serious adverse events thought possibly related to IMC-A12 included a grade 2 infusion-related reaction (2%; one of 64 patients), thrombocytopenia (2%; one of 64 patients), grade 3 hyperglycemia (2%; one of 64 patients), and grade 1 pyrexia (2%, one of 64 patients). IMC-A12 alone or in combination with cetuximab was insufficient to warrant additional study in patients with colorectal cancer refractory to EGFR inhibitors.

  20. CES2, ABCG2, TS and Topo-I primary and synchronous metastasis expression and clinical outcome in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with first-line FOLFIRI regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestris, Nicola; Simone, Giovanni; Partipilo, Giulia; Scarpi, Emanuela; Lorusso, Vito; Brunetti, Anna Elisabetta; Maiello, Evaristo; Paradiso, Angelo; Mangia, Anita

    2014-09-05

    Enzymatic activation of irinotecan (CPT-11) is due to carboxylesterase (CES), and its pharmacological behavior is influenced by drug resistance-related proteins. We previously reported that the clinical response and prognosis of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients did not differ in tumors with different thymidylate synthase (TS) or topoisomerase-I (Topo-I) expression. Using immunohistochemistry (IHC), we evaluated the biological role of CES2 and the expression of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in 58 consecutive mCRC patients, who had undergone a first-line CPT-11/5-FU/leucovirin (FOLFIRI) regimen. The expression of these proteins was also examined in a group of synchronous lymph nodes and liver metastases. Furthermore, all samples were revaluated for TS and Topo-I expression. High expression of CES2, ABCG2, TS and Topo-I was observed in 55%, 56%, 38% and 49% of patients, respectively. There was a significant association between high TS and high ABCG2 expression (p = 0.049). Univariate analysis showed that only TS expression significantly impacted on time to progression (p = 0.005). Moreover, Cox' multivariate analysis revealed that TS expression was significantly associated with overall survival (p = 0.01). No significant correlation was found between investigated markers expression and clinical response. Topo-I expression resulted in being significantly higher in liver metastases with respect to the corresponding primary tumors (p TS expression could be associated with metastatic progression of CRC. Further studies are warranted with the aim of evaluating the potential predictive and prognostic role of CES2 and ABCG2 in larger series of patients.

  1. Brain metastases from colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vagn-Hansen, Chris Aksel; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2001-01-01

    Brain metastases from colorectal cancer are rare. The prognosis for patients with even a single resectable brain metastasis is poor. A case of surgically treated cerebral metastasis from a rectal carcinoma is reported. The brain tumour was radically resected. However, cerebral, as well...... as extracerebral, disease recurred 12 months after diagnosis. Surgical removal of colorectal metastatic brain lesions in selected cases results in a longer survival time....

  2. CES2, ABCG2, TS and Topo-I Primary and Synchronous Metastasis Expression and Clinical Outcome in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients Treated with First-Line FOLFIRI Regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Silvestris

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic activation of irinotecan (CPT-11 is due to carboxylesterase (CES, and its pharmacological behavior is influenced by drug resistance-related proteins. We previously reported that the clinical response and prognosis of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC patients did not differ in tumors with different thymidylate synthase (TS or topoisomerase-I (Topo-I expression. Using immunohistochemistry (IHC, we evaluated the biological role of CES2 and the expression of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2 in 58 consecutive mCRC patients, who had undergone a first-line CPT-11/5-FU/leucovirin (FOLFIRI regimen. The expression of these proteins was also examined in a group of synchronous lymph nodes and liver metastases. Furthermore, all samples were revaluated for TS and Topo-I expression. High expression of CES2, ABCG2, TS and Topo-I was observed in 55%, 56%, 38% and 49% of patients, respectively. There was a significant association between high TS and high ABCG2 expression (p = 0.049. Univariate analysis showed that only TS expression significantly impacted on time to progression (p = 0.005. Moreover, Cox’ multivariate analysis revealed that TS expression was significantly associated with overall survival (p = 0.01. No significant correlation was found between investigated markers expression and clinical response. Topo-I expression resulted in being significantly higher in liver metastases with respect to the corresponding primary tumors (p < 0.0001, emphasizing the role of Topo-I expression in metastatic cancer biology. In primary tumor tissues, CES2 expression tended to be higher than that observed in liver metastasis tissues (p = 0.05. These preliminary data may suggest CES2 over-expression as a potential marker of malignant phenotype. In light of these findings, we suggest that Topo-I expression together with TS expression could be associated with metastatic progression of CRC. Further studies are warranted with the aim of evaluating

  3. A Phase II safety and effect on time to tumor progression study of intratumoral light infusion technology using talaporfin sodium in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujundzić, M; Vogl, T J; Stimac, D; Rustemović, N; Hsi, R Alex; Roh, M; Katicić, M; Cuenca, R; Lustig, R A; Wang, S

    2007-11-01

    Twenty-seven patients with refractory liver metastases from colorectal cancer took part in a Phase II study of the light infusion technology (Litx) light-activated drug/device system to assess safety and evaluate time to tumor progression (TTP). Litx consists of the light-activated drug, talaporfin sodium (LS11), activated intratumorally by a catheter-like array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). After placement of the array via ultrasound or computed tomography (CT) guidance, LS11 was administered intravenously, followed 15-60 min later by light infusion for 2.8 hr. Patients were assessed for adverse events and tumor response using physical examination, laboratory values, and CT scan evaluation over a period of 60 days. The observed occurrence of Litx treatment-related adverse events was minimal and cumulative toxicity did not occur when combined with chemotherapy. Assessment of TTP and tumor response rate, although statistically non-robust, suggest potential improvement. The Litx system was shown to be safe for treating liver metastases from colorectal cancer and there was no cumulative toxicity when combined with standard systemic therapy. Preliminary assessments of TTP and tumor response rate justify further evaluation in a Phase III follow-up study.

  4. An open-label safety study of first-line bevacizumab in combination with standard chemotherapy in Chinese patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated in an expanded access program in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuan-Der; Chen, Hong-Hwa; Wang, Hwei-Ming; Tsao, Chao-Jung; Hsu, Tzu-Chi; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Su, Wu-Chou; Wang, Jeng-Yi

    2013-01-01

    An increased risk of serious adverse effects related to bevacizumab has been observed in many Western studies for metastatic colorectal cancer. To evaluate the safety of bevacizumab in Chinese patients, a safety study was conducted in Taiwan. Bevacizumab was provided by the Expanded Access Program in combination with first-line chemotherapy per investigator's choice. The primary objective is the safety profile, particularly the targeted adverse events such as proteinuria, bowel perforation, hypertension, wound healing complication, thromboembolism and bleeding. The second objectives include time to disease progression and overall survival time. Patients with major surgical procedure performed within the 28 days of bevacizumab were excluded from this study. Forty patients were eligible for intent-to-treat analysis. The overall rate of objective response and disease control was 55.2 and 81.6%. The median time to disease progression and overall survival were 11.9 and 22.9 months. The actuarial 2-year survival was 46.6%. Regarding toxicity, 7 subjects (17.5%) had serious adverse effects related to study treatment. None of the patients in this cohort had arterial thrombotic events and bowel perforation. Bevacizumab demonstrates a similar activity and safety profile in Chinese patients. Life-threatening bowel complications were avoided in this study by excluding patients with major surgery within the first 28 days. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Asymptomatic HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000682.htm Asymptomatic HIV infection To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Asymptomatic HIV infection is a phase of HIV/AIDS during which ...

  6. Performance and Cost Efficiency of KRAS Mutation Testing for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer in Routine Diagnosis: The MOKAECM Study, a Nationwide Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatellier, Gilles; Côté, Jean-François; Pages, Jean-Christophe; de Fraipont, Florence; Boyer, Jean-Christophe; Merlio, Jean Philippe; Morel, Alain; Gorisse, Marie-Claude; de Cremoux, Patricia; Leroy, Karen; Milano, Gérard; Ouafik, L’Houcine; Merlin, Jean-Louis; Le Corre, Delphine; Aucouturier, Pascaline; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Nowak, Frédérique; Frebourg, Thierry; Emile, Jean-François; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Laurent-Puig, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Rapid advances in the understanding of cancer biology have transformed drug development thus leading to the approval of targeted therapies and to the development of molecular tests to select patients that will respond to treatments. KRAS status has emerged as a negative predictor of clinical benefit from anti-EGFR antibodies in colorectal cancer, and anti-EGFR antibodies use was limited to KRAS wild type tumors. In order to ensure wide access to tumor molecular profiling, the French National Cancer Institute (INCa) has set up a national network of 28 regional molecular genetics centers. Concurrently, a nationwide external quality assessment for KRAS testing (MOKAECM) was granted to analyze reproducibility and costs. Methods 96 cell-line DNAs and 24 DNA samples from paraffin embedded tumor tissues were sent to 40 French laboratories. A total of 5448 KRAS results were collected and analyzed and a micro-costing study was performed on sites for 5 common methods by an independent team of health economists. Results This work provided a baseline picture of the accuracy and reliability of KRAS analysis in routine testing conditions at a nationwide level. Inter-laboratory Kappa values were >0.8 for KRAS results despite differences detection methods and the use of in-house technologies. Specificity was excellent with only one false positive in 1128 FFPE data, and sensitivity was higher for targeted techniques as compared to Sanger sequencing based methods that were dependent upon local expertise. Estimated reagent costs per patient ranged from €5.5 to €19.0. Conclusion The INCa has set-up a network of public laboratories dedicated to molecular oncology tests. Our results showed almost perfect agreements in KRAS testing at a nationwide level despite different testing methods ensuring a cost-effective equal access to personalized colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:23935912

  7. Performance and cost efficiency of KRAS mutation testing for metastatic colorectal cancer in routine diagnosis: the MOKAECM study, a nationwide experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Blons

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Rapid advances in the understanding of cancer biology have transformed drug development thus leading to the approval of targeted therapies and to the development of molecular tests to select patients that will respond to treatments. KRAS status has emerged as a negative predictor of clinical benefit from anti-EGFR antibodies in colorectal cancer, and anti-EGFR antibodies use was limited to KRAS wild type tumors. In order to ensure wide access to tumor molecular profiling, the French National Cancer Institute (INCa has set up a national network of 28 regional molecular genetics centers. Concurrently, a nationwide external quality assessment for KRAS testing (MOKAECM was granted to analyze reproducibility and costs. METHODS: 96 cell-line DNAs and 24 DNA samples from paraffin embedded tumor tissues were sent to 40 French laboratories. A total of 5448 KRAS results were collected and analyzed and a micro-costing study was performed on sites for 5 common methods by an independent team of health economists. RESULTS: This work provided a baseline picture of the accuracy and reliability of KRAS analysis in routine testing conditions at a nationwide level. Inter-laboratory Kappa values were >0.8 for KRAS results despite differences detection methods and the use of in-house technologies. Specificity was excellent with only one false positive in 1128 FFPE data, and sensitivity was higher for targeted techniques as compared to Sanger sequencing based methods that were dependent upon local expertise. Estimated reagent costs per patient ranged from €5.5 to €19.0. CONCLUSION: The INCa has set-up a network of public laboratories dedicated to molecular oncology tests. Our results showed almost perfect agreements in KRAS testing at a nationwide level despite different testing methods ensuring a cost-effective equal access to personalized colorectal cancer treatment.

  8. Colorectal Cancer Metastasis to the Thymus Gland: Rare Presentation of Colorectal Cancer as Anterior Mediastinal Mass

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, H. Charles; Liu, Xiuli; Iqbal, Atif; Cunningham, Lisa A.; Tan, Sanda A.

    2017-01-01

    Despite improved screening modalities, 15–25% of newly diagnosed colorectal cancers are metastatic at the time of diagnosis. The vast majority of these cases present as hepatic metastasis; however, 22% present with concomitant extrahepatic disease. The thymus gland is an uncommon site of metastasis for any primary malignancy, particularly, colorectal cancer given its vascular and lymphatic drainage. This case report details our experience with a rare case of colorectal cancer metastasis to th...

  9. Colorectal Cancer Metastasis to the Thymus Gland: Rare Presentation of Colorectal Cancer as Anterior Mediastinal Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, H Charles; Liu, Xiuli; Iqbal, Atif; Cunningham, Lisa A; Tan, Sanda A

    2017-01-01

    Despite improved screening modalities, 15-25% of newly diagnosed colorectal cancers are metastatic at the time of diagnosis. The vast majority of these cases present as hepatic metastasis; however, 22% present with concomitant extrahepatic disease. The thymus gland is an uncommon site of metastasis for any primary malignancy, particularly, colorectal cancer given its vascular and lymphatic drainage. This case report details our experience with a rare case of colorectal cancer metastasis to the thymus gland presenting as a symptomatic mediastinal mass.

  10. High-depth sequencing of over 750 genes supports linear progression of primary tumors and metastases in most patients with liver-limited metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Iain Beehuat; Malik, Simeen; Ramnarayanan, Kalpana; McPherson, John R; Ho, Dan Liang; Suzuki, Yuka; Ng, Sarah Boonhsui; Yan, Su; Lim, Kiat Hon; Koh, Dennis; Hoe, Chew Min; Chan, Chung Yip; Ten, Rachel; Goh, Brian Kp; Chung, Alexander Yf; Tan, Joanna; Chan, Cheryl Xueli; Tay, Su Ting; Alexander, Lezhava; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Hillmer, Axel M; Tang, Choon Leong; Chua, Clarinda; Teh, Bin Tean; Rozen, Steve; Tan, Patrick

    2015-02-12

    Colorectal cancer with metastases limited to the liver (liver-limited mCRC) is a distinct clinical subset characterized by possible cure with surgery. We performed high-depth sequencing of over 750 cancer-associated genes and copy number profiling in matched primary, metastasis and normal tissues to characterize genomic progression in 18 patients with liver-limited mCRC. High depth Illumina sequencing and use of three different variant callers enable comprehensive and accurate identification of somatic variants down to 2.5% variant allele frequency. We identify a median of 11 somatic single nucleotide variants (SNVs) per tumor. Across patients, a median of 79.3% of somatic SNVs present in the primary are present in the metastasis and 81.7% of all alterations present in the metastasis are present in the primary. Private alterations are found at lower allele frequencies; a different mutational signature characterized shared and private variants, suggesting distinct mutational processes. Using B-allele frequencies of heterozygous germline SNPs and copy number profiling, we find that broad regions of allelic imbalance and focal copy number changes, respectively, are generally shared between the primary tumor and metastasis. Our analyses point to high genomic concordance of primary tumor and metastasis, with a thick common trunk and smaller genomic branches in general support of the linear progression model in most patients with liver-limited mCRC. More extensive studies are warranted to further characterize genomic progression in this important clinical population.

  11. Efficacy, Tolerability, and Biomarker Analyses of Once-Every-2-Weeks Cetuximab Plus First-Line FOLFOX or FOLFIRI in Patients With KRAS or All RAS Wild-Type Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: The Phase 2 APEC Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ann-Lii; Cornelio, Gerardo; Shen, Lin; Price, Timothy; Yang, Tsai-Sheng; Chung, Ik Joo; Dai, Guang-Hai; Lin, Jen-Kou; Sharma, Atul; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Ma, Brigette; Zaatar, Adel; Guan, Zhongzhen; Masood, Nehal; Srimuninnimit, Vichien; Yau, Thomas; Gibbs, Peter; Wang, Xiuwen; Doval, Dinesh Chandra; Oh, Seung-Taek; Shim, Byoung Yong; Gorospe, Charity; Wang, Hwei-Ming; Sirachainan, Ekaphop; Hill, Andrew; Suh, Kwang Wook; Beier, Frank; Chatterjee, Sudipto; Lim, Robert

    2017-06-01

    In patients with KRAS wild-type (wt) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), outcomes with first-line chemotherapies are improved by adding weekly cetuximab. The APEC study investigated first-line once-every-2-weeks cetuximab plus chemotherapy for patients with KRAS wt mCRC; additional biomarker subgroups were also analyzed. APEC was a nonrandomized phase 2 trial conducted in the Asia-Pacific region. Patients (n = 289) received once-every-2-weeks cetuximab with investigator's choice of chemotherapy (FOLFOX or FOLFIRI). The primary end point was best confirmed overall response rate (BORR); progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were secondary end points. Early tumor shrinkage (ETS) and depth of response (DpR) were also evaluated. In the KRAS wt population, BORR was 58.8%, median PFS 11.1 months, and median OS 26.8 months. Expanded RAS mutational analysis revealed that patients with RAS wt mCRC had better outcomes (BORR = 64.7%; median PFS = 13.0 months; median OS = 28.4 months). The data suggest that ETS and DpR may be associated with survival outcomes in the RAS wt population. Although this study was not designed to formally assess differences in outcome between treatment subgroups, efficacy results appeared similar for patients treated with FOLFOX and FOLFIRI. There were no new safety findings; in particular, grade 3/4 skin reactions were within clinical expectations. The observed activity and safety profile is similar to that reported in prior first-line pivotal studies involving weekly cetuximab, suggesting once-every-2-weeks cetuximab is effective and tolerable as first-line therapy and may represent an alternative to weekly administration. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 1/2 study of tivantinib (ARQ 197) in combination with irinotecan and cetuximab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with wild-type KRAS who have received first-line systemic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Cathy; Bessudo, Alberto; Hart, Lowell L; Severtsev, Aleksey; Gladkov, Oleg; Müller, Lothar; Kopp, Mikhail V; Vladimirov, Vladimir; Langdon, Robert; Kotiv, Bogdan; Barni, Sandro; Hsu, Ching; Bolotin, Ellen; von Roemeling, Reinhard; Schwartz, Brian; Bendell, Johanna C

    2016-07-01

    Cetuximab in combination with an irinotecan-containing regimen is a standard treatment in patients with KRAS wild-type (KRAS WT), metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We investigated the addition of the oral MET inhibitor tivantinib to cetuximab + irinotecan (CETIRI) based on preclinical evidence that activation of the MET pathway may confer resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. Previously treated patients with KRAS WT advanced or mCRC were enrolled. The phase 1, open-label 3 + 3, dose-escalation study evaluated the safety and maximally tolerated dose of tivantinib plus CETIRI. The phase 2, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study of biweekly CETIRI plus tivantinib or placebo was restricted to patients who had received only one prior line of chemotherapy. The phase 2 primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). The recommended phase 2 dose was tivantinib (360 mg/m(2) twice daily) with biweekly cetuximab (500 mg/m(2)) and irinotecan (180 mg/m(2)). Among 117 patients evaluable for phase 2 analysis, no statistically significant PFS difference was observed: 8.3 months on tivantinib vs. 7.3 months on placebo (HR, 0.85; 95% confidence interval, 0.55-1.33; P = 0.38). Subgroup analyses trended in favor of tivantinib in patients with MET-High tumors by immunohistochemistry, PTEN-Low tumors, or those pretreated with oxaliplatin, but subgroups were too small to draw conclusions. Neutropenia, diarrhea, nausea and rash were the most frequent severe adverse events in tivantinib-treated patients. The combination of tivantinib and CETIRI was well tolerated but did not significantly improve PFS in previously treated KRAS WT mCRC. Tivantinib may be more active in specific subgroups. © 2016 The Authors International Journal of Cancer published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of UICC.

  13. Exploratory analyses assessing the impact of early tumour shrinkage and depth of response on survival outcomes in patients with RAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer receiving treatment in three randomised panitumumab trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb, Julien; Rivera, Fernando; Siena, Salvatore; Karthaus, Meinolf; Valladares-Ayerbes, Manuel; Gallego, Javier; Geissler, Michael; Koukakis, Reija; Demonty, Gaston; Peeters, Marc

    2018-02-01

    To report exploratory analyses of early tumour shrinkage (ETS) and depth of response (DpR) in patients with RAS wild-type (WT) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), receiving the first-line treatment in three randomised panitumumab trials. Data from the PRIME (NCT00364013), PEAK (NCT00819780) and PLANET (NCT00885885) studies were included. Median DpR, the proportion of patients achieving ETS ≥ 20% or ≥ 30% at week 8, and the impact of ETS and DpR (including by category) on outcome were analysed. Factors associated with ETS and DpR and the optimal ETS/DpR cut-off values for predicting improved overall survival (OS) were assessed. Overall, 505, 170 and 53 patients had RAS WT mCRC in PRIME, PEAK and PLANET, respectively. Patients receiving panitumumab had higher ETS rates (≥ 30%: PRIME 59% vs. 38%; PEAK 64% vs. 45%) and greater DpR (PRIME: 54% vs. 46%; PEAK: 65% vs. 46%) than those receiving treatment without panitumumab. In multiple regression analyses, panitumumab treatment, liver-only metastases and WT BRAF status were consistently associated with improved ETS and DpR outcomes. Irrespective of treatment, ETS and DpR were associated with improved progression-free survival, overall survival and resection rates; most resections occurred in patients in the two highest DpR categories. In PRIME and PEAK, respectively, the optimal cut-offs for predicting improved OS were 32 and 34% for ETS, and 59 and 70% for DpR. These exploratory analyses suggest that panitumumab is associated ETS and DpR benefits in patients with RAS WT mCRC and that achieving these endpoints during first-line treatment is linked with favourable outcomes.

  14. Extended RAS Gene Mutation Testing in Metastatic Colorectal Carcinoma to Predict Response to Anti-Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Monoclonal Antibody Therapy: American Society of Clinical Oncology Provisional Clinical Opinion Update 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra, Carmen J; Rumble, R Bryan; Hamilton, Stanley R; Mangu, Pamela B; Roach, Nancy; Hantel, Alexander; Schilsky, Richard L

    2016-01-10

    An American Society of Clinical Oncology Provisional Clinical Opinion (PCO) offers timely clinical direction after publication or presentation of potentially practice-changing data from major studies. This PCO update addresses the utility of extended RAS gene mutation testing in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) to detect resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody (MoAb) therapy. Recent results from phase II and III clinical trials in mCRC demonstrate that patients whose tumors harbor RAS mutations in exons 2 (codons 12 and 13), 3 (codons 59 and 61), and 4 (codons 117 and 146) are unlikely to benefit from therapy with MoAbs directed against EGFR, when used as monotherapy or combined with chemotherapy. In addition to the evidence reviewed in the original PCO, 11 systematic reviews with meta-analyses, two retrospective analyses, and two health technology assessments based on a systematic review were obtained. These evaluated the outcomes for patients with mCRC with no mutation detected or presence of mutation in additional exons in KRAS and NRAS. PCO: All patients with mCRC who are candidates for anti-EGFR antibody therapy should have their tumor tested in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-certified laboratory for mutations in both KRAS and NRAS exons 2 (codons 12 and 13), 3 (codons 59 and 61), and 4 (codons 117 and 146). The weight of current evidence indicates that anti-EGFR MoAb therapy should only be considered for treatment of patients whose tumor is determined to not have mutations detected after such extended RAS testing. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  15. Predictive Value of Early Tumor Shrinkage and Density Reduction of Lung Metastases in Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treated With Regorafenib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanwynsberghe, Hannes; Verbeke, Xander; Coolen, Johan; Van Cutsem, Eric

    2017-12-01

    The benefit of regorafenib in colorectal cancer is not very pronounced. At present, there is lack of predictive biological or radiological markers. We studied if density reduction or small changes in size of lung metastases could be a predictive marker. We retrospectively measured density in size of lung metastases of all patients included in the CORRECT and CONSIGN trials at our center. Contrast-enhanced CT scan at baseline and at week 8 were compared. Data of progressive-free survival and overall survival were collected from the CORRECT and CONSIGN trials. A significant difference in progressive-free survival was seen in 3 groups: response or stable disease in size (5.36 vs. 3.96 months), response in density (6.03 vs. 2.72 months), and response in corrected density (6.14 vs. 3.08 months). No difference was seen for response in size versus stable disease or progressive disease in size. For overall survival, a difference was observed in the same 3 groups: response or stable disease in size (9.89 vs. 6.44 months), response in density (9.59 vs. 7.04 months), and response in corrected density (9.09 vs. 7.16 months). No difference was seen for response in size versus stable disease or progressive disease in size. Density reduction in lung metastases might be a good predictive parameter to predict outcome for regorafenib. Early tumor progression might be a negative predictive factor. If further validated, density reduction and early tumor progression might be useful to ameliorate the cost-benefit of regorafenib. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Expression profiling of blood samples from an SU5416 Phase III metastatic colorectal cancer clinical trial: a novel strategy for biomarker identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolich Beverly D

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray-based gene expression profiling is a powerful approach for the identification of molecular biomarkers of disease, particularly in human cancers. Utility of this approach to measure responses to therapy is less well established, in part due to challenges in obtaining serial biopsies. Identification of suitable surrogate tissues will help minimize limitations imposed by those challenges. This study describes an approach used to identify gene expression changes that might serve as surrogate biomarkers of drug activity. Methods Expression profiling using microarrays was applied to peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC samples obtained from patients with advanced colorectal cancer participating in a Phase III clinical trial. The PBMC samples were harvested pre-treatment and at the end of the first 6-week cycle from patients receiving standard of care chemotherapy or standard of care plus SU5416, a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK inhibitor. Results from matched pairs of PBMC samples from 23 patients were queried for expression changes that consistently correlated with SU5416 administration. Results Thirteen transcripts met this selection criterion; six were further tested by quantitative RT-PCR analysis of 62 additional samples from this trial and a second SU5416 Phase III trial of similar design. This method confirmed four of these transcripts (CD24, lactoferrin, lipocalin 2, and MMP-9 as potential biomarkers of drug treatment. Discriminant analysis showed that expression profiles of these 4 transcripts could be used to classify patients by treatment arm in a predictive fashion. Conclusions These results establish a foundation for the further exploration of peripheral blood cells as a surrogate system for biomarker analyses in clinical oncology studies.

  17. Colorectal cancer in South Africa: An assessment of disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10th revision) (ICD-10) diagnosis codes were used to identify colorectal cancer and liver and/or pulmonary metastatic disease. Procedure codes assigned to hospital admissions were used to identify type of surgical treatment. Chemotherapy ...

  18. Metastatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metastatic cancer is cancer that spreads from its site of origin to another part of the body. Learn how cancer spreads, possible symptoms, common sites where cancer spreads, and how to find out about treatment options.

  19. Variant alleles in factor V, prothrombin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and risk of thromboembolism in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with first-line chemotherapy plus bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falvella, F S; Cremolini, C; Miceli, R; Nichetti, F; Cheli, S; Antoniotti, C; Infante, G; Martinetti, A; Marmorino, F; Sottotetti, E; Berenato, R; Caporale, M; Colombo, A; de Braud, F; Di Bartolomeo, M; Clementi, E; Loupakis, F; Pietrantonio, F

    2017-07-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to hereditary thrombophilia were investigated as risk factors for thromboembolism in cancer patients. Their effect in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) has never been explored so far. Our aim was to analyse the effect of coagulation factor V (FVL G1691A), prothrombin (PT G20210A), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T and A1298C) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1 5G/4G) allelic variants in this setting. Fifty-two patients treated with first-line chemotherapy plus bevacizumab who developed a thromboembolic event in their lifetime were initially genotyped. A contemporary cohort of 127 patients who did not experience any thromboembolic event was also analysed. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and genotypes were determined by real-time PCR, using LightSNiP (TIB MOLBIOL) on LightCcler 480 (Roche). The association between thromboembolism and SNPs was investigated by univariable and multivariable analyses. All SNPs were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (χ2 test P>0.20). FVL G1691A and PT G20210A were present only in heterozygosis in 4 (2.2%) and 7 (3.9%) patients, respectively; MTHFR C677T in homozygosis in 29 (16.2%), MTHFR A1298C in homozygosis in 13 (7.3%); PAI-1 5G/4G in 98 (54.7%) and 4G/4G in 41 (23%) patients. At univariable analysis, treatment duration was significantly associated with thromboembolism (P<0.001), whereas gender, age, obesity, platelets count and chemotherapy backbone were not. Similarly, FVL G1691A and PT G20210A as well as MTHFR C677T and PAI-1 4G allele were significantly associated, whereas MTHFR A1298C was not. At multivariable model including PT G20210A, MTHFR C677T and PAI-1 4G (age, obesity, treatment duration and chemotherapy backbone were included as adjustment factors), the three SNPs were significantlty associated with higher risk of thromboembolism (P=0.025, <0.0001 and P=0.033, respectively). Further validation studies are warranted in order to design a

  20. A phase I/II, open-label, randomised study of nintedanib plus mFOLFOX6 versus bevacizumab plus mFOLFOX6 in first-line metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cutsem, E; Prenen, H; D'Haens, G; Bennouna, J; Carrato, A; Ducreux, M; Bouché, O; Sobrero, A; Latini, L; Staines, H; Oum'Hamed, Z; Dressler, H; Studeny, M; Capdevila, J

    2015-10-01

    This randomised, open-label, phase I/II study evaluated the efficacy and safety of nintedanib, an oral, triple angiokinase inhibitor, combined with chemotherapy, relative to bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as first-line therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Patients with histologically confirmed mCRC (adenocarcinoma), an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≤ 2 and adequate organ function were included. Patients were randomised 2:1 to receive nintedanib 150 mg or 200 mg b.i.d. plus mFOLFOX6 (oxaliplatin 85 mg/m(2), l-leucovorin 200 mg/m(2) or d,l-leucovorin 400 mg/m(2), 5-fluoruracil bolus 400 mg/m(2) followed by 2400 mg/m(2), every 2 weeks) or bevacizumab (5 mg/kg every 2 weeks) plus mFOLFOX6. During phase I, patients underwent a 3 + 3 dose-escalation schema to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of nintedanib in combination with mFOLFOX6. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) rate at 9 months. Objective response (OR) was a secondary end point. The nintedanib recommended phase II dose was 200 mg b.i.d. plus mFOLFOX6 based on safety data from phase I (n = 12). Of 128 patients randomised in the phase II part, 126 received treatment (nintedanib plus mFOLFOX6, n = 85; bevacizumab plus mFOLFOX6, n = 41). PFS at 9 months was 62.1% with nintedanib and 70.2% with bevacizumab [difference: -8.1% (95% confidence interval -27.8 to 11.5)]. Confirmed ORs were recorded in 63.5% and 56.1% of patients in the nintedanib and bevacizumab groups, respectively. The incidence of adverse events (AEs) considered related to treatment was 98.8% with nintedanib and 97.6% with bevacizumab; the incidence of serious AEs was 37.6% with nintedanib and 53.7% with bevacizumab. The pharmacokinetics of nintedanib and the components of mFOLFOX6 were unaffected by their combination. Nintedanib in combination with mFOLFOX6 showed efficacy as first-line therapy in patients with mCRC with a manageable safety profile and further studies in

  1. Multicenter randomized phase II clinical trial of oxaliplatin reintroduction as a third- or later-line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer-biweekly versus standard triweekly XELOX (The ORION Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Chu; Honda, Michitaka; Tanaka, Chihiro; Fukunaga, Mutsumi; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Munemoto, Yoshinori; Hata, Taishi; Bando, Hiroyuki; Oshiro, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Michiya; Tokunaga, Yukihiko; Fujii, Akitomo; Nagata, Naoki; Oba, Koji; Mishima, Hideyuki

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this multicenter, open-label, randomized phase II trial was to evaluate the efficacy of a dose-dense capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX) regimen in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) for whom reintroduction of oxaliplatin had been planned as a third- or later-line regimen. The patients with mCRC who had received prior chemotherapy including oxaliplatin and were scheduled for reintroduction of oxaliplatin were randomized to capecitabine (1,000 mg/m(2)) twice daily on days 1-14 and oxaliplatin (130 mg/m(2)) on day 1 every 21 days (Q3W group) or capecitabine (2,000 mg/m(2)) twice daily on days 1-7 and oxaliplatin (85 mg/m(2)) on day 1 every 14 days (Q2W group). The primary endpoint was the time-to-treatment failure (TTF). Other endpoints included overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and other adverse events (AEs). A total of 46 patients were enrolled in the trial-22 patients were randomly assigned to the Q3W group and 23 to the Q2W group. The median TTF was 3.4 months in both groups (hazard ratio [HR] 1.053; p = 0.880). The median PFS and OS were 3.3 and 9.2 months in the Q2W group and 4.3 and 12.1 months in the Q3W group, respectively (HR 1.15; p = 0.153 and 0.672; p = 0.836). The most common grade 3-4 AEs in the Q3W and Q2W groups were fatigue (27.3 vs 21.7), neuropathy (9.1 vs 0 %) and diarrhea (9.1 vs 0 %), respectively. There was no significant inter-group difference in any of the efficacy and safety endpoints, including TTF, OS, RFS and AEs. The results of this clinical trial were convincingly negative.

  2. Evaluation of efficacy and safety of modified infusion of fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan (mFOLFOXIRI in treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: a retrospective study of 21 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-cheng WANG

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To evaluate the safety and preliminary efficacy of mFOLFOXIRI (the combination of irinotecan, oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil with reducing dosages in first-line treatment for Chinese patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC. Methods  A total of 21 patients received mFOLFOXIRI treatment: irinotecan 150mg/m2 on day 1, oxaliplatin 85mg/m2 on day 1, leucovorin 200mg/m2 on day 1, and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU 2800mg/m2 in a 48-h continuous infusion starting on day 1. The regimen was repeated every 2 weeks. Result  All the 21 patients were evaluated for efficacy of the aforesaid therapeutic regimen, and the incidence of toxic effects. No death occurred in association with the treatment. The total rate of grade 3 to 4 adverse events was 42.9% (9/21 including 38.1% (8 cases with grade 3 neutropenia and 4.8% (1 case suffering from grade 3 anemia. One of 21 patients (4.8% showed grade 4 neutropenia accompanied by fever. The delivered relative dose intensity of irinotecan, oxaliplatin and 5-FU during the entire treatment course were 93.4%, 98.5% and 97.6%, respectively of planned dosage. In the intention-to-treat analysis for treatment activity, 14 patients showed remission, 6 stability, and 1 with progression of the disease. The overall response rate was 66.7%, and the disease control rate was 95.2%. Three patients (15.8% with residual liver metastases were radically resected after mFOLFOXIRI chemotherapy. Conclusions  This mFOLFOXIRI project has manageable toxicity and is well tolerated in Chinese patients. The safety profile appears to be improved compared with standard FOLFOXIRI regimen. In addition, the antitumor activity and preliminary efficacy seem to be maintained. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.03.15

  3. Response to Cetuximab With or Without Irinotecan in Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Harboring the KRAS G13D Mutation: Australasian Gastro-Intestinal Trials Group ICECREAM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segelov, Eva; Thavaneswaran, Subotheni; Waring, Paul M; Desai, Jayesh; Robledo, Kristy P; Gebski, Val J; Elez, Elena; Nott, Louise M; Karapetis, Christos S; Lunke, Sebastian; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Pavlakis, Nick; Khasraw, Mustafa; Underhill, Craig; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Jefford, Michael; Wasan, Harpreet; Haydon, Andrew; Price, Timothy J; van Hazel, Guy; Wilson, Kate; Simes, John; Shapiro, Jeremy D

    2016-07-01

    RAS mutations predict lack of response to epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), but preclinical studies and retrospective clinical data suggest that patients with tumors harboring the exon 2 KRAS G13D mutation may benefit from cetuximab. We aimed to assess cetuximab monotherapy and cetuximab plus irinotecan in patients with molecularly selected (G13D mutation) chemotherapy-refractory mCRC in a randomized phase II trial of this rare molecular subtype. Patients with chemotherapy-refractory KRAS G13D mutation-positive mCRC who had progressed within 6 months of irinotecan therapy were randomly assigned to cetuximab 400 mg/m(2) loading dose and then 250 mg/m(2) once per week with or without irinotecan 180 mg/m(2) once every 2 weeks. The primary end point was 6-month progression-free survival; secondary end points were response rate, overall survival, quality of life, and toxicity. Fifty-one of 53 patients recruited over 2 years were eligible. The 6-month progression-free survival rate was 10% (95% CI, 2% to 26%) for cetuximab versus 23% (95% CI, 9% to 40%) for cetuximab plus irinotecan with a hazard ratio of 0.74 (95% CI, 0.42 to 1.32). Response and stable disease rates were 0% and 58% for monotherapy versus 9% and 70% for combination treatment, respectively. Overall survival and quality of life were similar; toxicities were higher with combination therapy. In patients with G13D-mutated chemotherapy-refractory mCRC, there was no statistically significant improvement in disease control at 6 months with either cetuximab monotherapy or cetuximab plus irinotecan. No responses were seen with single-agent cetuximab. The responses observed with the combination of cetuximab and irinotecan may reflect true drug synergy or persistent irinotecan sensitivity. The ICECREAM (Irinotecan Cetuximab Evaluation and Cetuximab Response Evaluation Among Patients with a G13D Mutation) study demonstrates the need to

  4. Prognostic factors for tumour response, progression-free survival and toxicity in metastatic colorectal cancer patients given irinotecan (CPT-11) as second-line chemotherapy after 5FU failure. CPT-11 F205, F220, F221 and V222 study groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyer, G; Rougier, P; Bugat, R; Droz, J P; Marty, M; Bleiberg, H; Mignard, D; Awad, L; Herait, P; Culine, S; Trillet-Lenoir, V

    2000-08-01

    Our purpose was to determine, in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma treated with irinotecan single-agent after 5-FU failure, the most significant predictive parameters for tumour response, progression-free survival and toxicity. Between October 1992 and April 1995, 455 patients with 5-FU resistant metastatic colorectal carcinoma entered four consecutive phase II trials. The first two studies assessed tumour response, the other two were randomized studies which assessed the efficacy of racecadotril to prevent irinotecan-induced diarrhoea. Due to homogeneous main eligibility criterias, data from those studies could be pooled for statistical analysis. Potential clinical and biological predictive factors (PF) for toxicity, tumour growth control, e.g. response or stabilization and progression-free survival (PFS), were studied in multivariate analysis. 363 patients were evaluable for response, 432 were evaluable for PFS, 368 for neutropenia and 416 for delayed diarrhoea, respectively. Normal baseline haemoglobin level (Hb), time since diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma, grade 3 or 4 neutropenia or diarrhoea at first cycle and a low number of organs involved were the most PF for tumour growth control (P<0.05). Significant prognostic variables for PFS were WHO Performance Status, liver and lymph-node involvement, time since diagnosis, age and CEA value (P < or =0.02). Six groups of patients based on the number of unfavourable prognostic factors are presented. Baseline bilirubin, haemoglobin level, number of organs involved and time from diagnosis were PF for neutropenia; PS, serum creatinine, leukocyte count, time from 5-FU progression and prior abdominopelvic irradiation were PF for delayed diarrhoea (P< or =0.05). These PF should help clinicians to anticipate for a given patient the probability to observe a response/stabilization or a toxicity. These results should also be prospectively confirmed in ongoing or future trials using irinotecan, both as a single

  5. Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  6. Clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical profile of ovarian metastases from colorectal carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kir, Gozde; Gurbuz, Ayse; Karateke, Ates; Kir, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Metastasis of colorectal adenocarcinoma of the ovary is not an uncommon occurrence and ovarian metastases from colorectal carcinoma frequently mimic endometrioid and mucinous primary ovarian carcinoma. The clinical and pathologic features of metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma involving the ovary is reviewed with particular focus on the diagnostic challenge of distinguishing these secondary ovarian tumors from primary ovarian neoplasm. Immunohistochemical stains that may be useful in the dif...

  7. Asymptomatic Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Shonni J.; Walker, Marcella D.; Bilezikian, John P.

    2014-01-01

    The clinical profile of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) as it is seen in the United States and most Western countries has evolved significantly over the past half century. The introduction of the multichannel serum autoanalyzer in the 1970s led to the recognition of a cohort of individuals with asymptomatic hypercalcemia, in whom evaluation led to the diagnosis of PHPT. The term “asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism” was introduced to describe patients who lack obvious signs and symptoms referable to either excess calcium or parathyroid hormone. Although it was expected that asymptomatic patients would eventually develop classical symptoms of PHPT, observational data suggest that most patients do not evolve over time to become overtly symptomatic. In most parts of the world, the asymptomatic phenotype of PHPT has replaced classical PHPT. This report is a selective review of data on asymptomatic PHPT: its demographic features, presentation and natural history, as well as biochemical, skeletal, neuromuscular, psychological, and cardiovascular manifestations. In addition, we will summarize available information on treatment indications and options for those with asymptomatic disease. PMID:23374736

  8. Investigation of the roles of exosomes in colorectal cancer liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Ding, Xiaoling; Nan, Lijuan; Wang, Yiting; Wang, Jing; Yan, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Jihong; Zhu, Wei; Ni, Bing; Dong, Suzhen; Yu, Lei

    2015-05-01

    The leading cause of death among cancer patients is tumor metastasis. Tumor-derived exosomes are emerging as mediators of metastasis. In the present study, we demonstrated that exosomes play a pivotal role in the metastatic progression of colorectal cancer. First, a nude mouse model of colorectal cancer liver metastasis was established and characterized. Then, we demonstrated that exosomes from a highly liver metastatic colorectal cancer cell line (HT-29) could significantly increase the metastatic tumor burden and distribution in the mouse liver of Caco-2 colorectal cancer cells, which ordinarily exhibit poor liver metastatic potential. We further investigated the mechanisms by which HT-29-derived-exosomes influence the liver metastasis of colorectal cancer and found that mice treated with HT-29-derived exosomes had a relatively higher level of CXCR4 in the metastatic microenvironment, indicating that exosomes may promote colorectal cancer metastasis by recruiting CXCR4-expressing stromal cells to develop a permissive metastatic microenvironment. Finally, the migration of Caco-2 cells was significantly increased following treatment with HT-29-derived exosomes in vitro, further supporting a role for exosomes in modulating colorectal tumor-derived liver metastasis. The data from the present study may facilitate further translational medicine research into the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer liver metastasis.

  9. Cytomorphology of Circulating Colorectal Tumor Cells: A Small Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dena Marrinucci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Several methodologies exist to enumerate circulating tumor cells (CTCs from the blood of cancer patients; however, most methodologies lack high-resolution imaging, and thus, little is known about the cytomorphologic features of these cells. In this study of metastatic colorectal cancer patients, we used immunofluorescent staining with fiber-optic array scanning technology to identify CTCs, with subsequent Wright-Giemsa and Papanicolau staining. The CTCs were compared to the corresponding primary and metastatic tumors. The colorectal CTCs showed marked intrapatient pleomorphism. In comparison to the corresponding tissue biopsies, cells from all sites showed similar pleomorphism, demonstrating that colorectal CTCs retain the pleomorphism present in regions of solid growth. They also often retain particular cytomorphologic features present in the patient's primary and/or metastatic tumor tissue. This study provides an initial analysis of the cytomorphologic features of circulating colon cancer cells, providing a foundation for further investigation into the significance and metastatic potential of CTCs.

  10. Colorectal visceral perception in diverticular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clemens, C. H. M.; Samsom, M.; Roelofs, J.; van Berge Henegouwen, G. P.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The pathogenesis of asymptomatic diverticular disease (ADD) and symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease (SUDD) has not been elucidated. The aim of our study was to assess whether altered visceral perception or abnormal compliance of the colorectal wall play a role in

  11. Asymptomatic inhaled foreign body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Muhammad U.; Asghar, Asif; Tareen, Irum; Azhar, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    It is very rare to have a big foreign body in the lungs without any complications or symptoms for 2 years. A 14-year-old male with episodes of minor hemoptysis for 4 weeks had a history of inhalation of a bullet 2 years earlier. He had asymptomatic for lung complications for 2 years. The bullet was removed by right thoracotomy and non-anatomical wedge stapled resection, and he followed an uneventful recovery. An aspirated foreign body although big can remain asymptomatic for a long time, especially if it has migrated to the periphery. PMID:27652366

  12. Patients with colorectal lung oligometastases (L-OMD) treated by dose adapted SABR at diagnosis of oligometastatic disease have better outcomes than patients previously treated for their metastatic disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mihai, Alina

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcomes of patients with OMD from a CRC primary, who underwent SABR either as first treatment at diagnosis of metachronous oligometastatic disease to lung or at progression in lung after prior treatments for metastatic disease.

  13. Asymptomatic ocular sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Guilherme Azevedo de Freitas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is an idiopathic systemic granulomatous disease. It commonly affects the skin, lungs, kidneys, and central nervous system. In the eyes it primarily affects the uveal tract, conjunctiva, lacrimal glands and optic nerve. Here in we describe the case of a patient with systemic sarcoidosis and asymptomatic eye inflammation.

  14. Liver-directed therapies in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, Janivette; Choti, Michael A

    2011-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Historically, the majority of patients that presented with metastatic disease to the liver were treated with systemic chemotherapy only but advances in imaging, surgical techniques, and non-resectional approaches have expanded the indications for liver-directed interventions. Current approaches used in patients with liver-only or liver-dominant metastatic disease include surgical resection, direct tumor ablation strategies, the use of intra-arterial infusions, and radiation therapies. The use of these liver-directed therapies in selected patients with colorectal liver metastases has led to significant improvements in overall survival. We review the clinical data and progress using liver-directed therapies in the treatment of colorectal liver metastases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Colorectal Cancer Metastasis to the Thymus Gland: Rare Presentation of Colorectal Cancer as Anterior Mediastinal Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Charles Peters

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite improved screening modalities, 15–25% of newly diagnosed colorectal cancers are metastatic at the time of diagnosis. The vast majority of these cases present as hepatic metastasis; however, 22% present with concomitant extrahepatic disease. The thymus gland is an uncommon site of metastasis for any primary malignancy, particularly, colorectal cancer given its vascular and lymphatic drainage. This case report details our experience with a rare case of colorectal cancer metastasis to the thymus gland presenting as a symptomatic mediastinal mass.

  16. OPTIMAL TIMING FOR SURGICAL TREATMENT OF COLORECTAL LIVER METASTASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Stojanović

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Metachronous CRCLM should be evaluated by multidisciplinary oncologic consilium. Diagnostic evaluation must be completed by dinamic CT or MR of the liver. In the case of a small number of metastases, operation could be performed immediately. In such cases, neoadjuvant therapy could be recomended because of decreasing recurrence rates, slight increase of the overall survival rate and to evaluate malignant potential. Neoadjuvant therapy is mandatory in cases with >4 metastases and potentialy resectable metastases, due to possibility to convert 25% of them to secondary resectable category. In the case of incidentaly discovered metastases (during the primary colorectal operation, the removal of primary tumor should not be abandoned. Biopsy of metastatic lesion is not recomended. Complications of CRC should be treated by palliative procedures /stoma, palliative resection, interventional endoscopy or radiology followed by consiliary multidisciplinary teratment and liver surgery in the second operative act. Asymptomatic T 1,2, N 0,1 primary tumors of the right colon could be treated by simultaneous major liver resection. Left colonic and rectal resection could be safe combined with minor liver resection (up to 2 liver segments. In the cases of T 3,4, N 1,2 CRC with synchronous liver metastases neoadjuvant therapy is mandatory, as in the cases of multiple (>4 metastases. Reverse strategy could be effective in these cases.

  17. Bio markers and Anti-EGFR therapies for Krads wild-type tumors in metastatic colorectal cancer patients; Biomarcadores y terapeutica ANTI-EGFR en el cancer colorrectal metastasico en pacientes con K-Ras no mutado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Rubio Garcia, E.

    2009-07-01

    The natural history of metastasis colorectal cancer has being clearly modified in terms of response rate, time to progression and overall survival, once the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies (cetuximab and panitumumab) have emerged in combination with the standard cytotoxic chemotherapy (FOLFOX and FOLFIRI). However, the benefit from cetuximab and panitumumab is only confined to KRAS-wild type (KRAS-wt) colorectal tumors, while KRAS mutated tumors do not respond to these drugs. The 65 % of colorectal tumors are KRAS-wt tumors, but efficacy of antiEGFR therapies is detected only in 60-70 % of these KRAS-wt tumors. Other biomarkers and molecular pathways must be involved in the response of the antiEGFR therapies for the KRAS-wt colorectal tumors, such as the EGFR ligands, the EGFR-phosphorilated levels, the number of EGFR copies, the status of the KRAS effected B-RAF and the alternative intracellular signaling pathways PIK3CA/PTEN/AKT and JAK/STAT. A battery of these biomarkers is needed to select the most sensitive patients to the antiEGFR therapies. This pattern may represent a novel favorable cost-effectiveness tool to develop tailored treatments. A review of these biomarkers and molecular pathways, involved in the antiEGFR therapies response, is performed. (Author) 68 refs.

  18. Consistent expression of guanylyl cyclase-C in primary and metastatic gastrointestinal cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Danaee

    Full Text Available The transmembrane receptor guanylate cyclase-C (GCC has been found to be expressed in colorectal cancers. However, limited data are available on GCC protein expression in non-colorectal gastrointestinal tumors and few studies have reported whether GCC protein expression was consistently preserved in synchronous primary and metastatic cancer tissues.GCC protein status was assessed by immunohistochemistry in tumor specimens from individuals (n = 627 with gastrointestinal tumors, including esophageal (n = 130, gastric (n = 276, pancreatic (n = 136, and colorectal (n = 85 primary and metastatic tumors. Tissue specimens consisted of tissue microarrays containing esophageal, gastric, pancreatic tumors, and whole-slide tissue sections from colorectal cancer patients with matching primary and metastatic tumors.Among the evaluated esophageal, gastric, and pancreatic tumors, the frequency of GCC positivity at the protein level ranged from 59% to 68%. GCC was consistently expressed in primary and matched/synchronous metastatic lesions of colorectal cancer tissues derived from the same patients.This observational study demonstrated the protein expression of GCC across various gastrointestinal malignancies. In all cancer histotypes, GCC protein localization was observed predominantly in the cytoplasm compared to the membrane region of tumor cells. Consistent immunohistochemistry detection of GCC protein expression in primary colorectal cancers and in their matched liver metastases suggests that the expression of GCC is maintained throughout the process of tumor progression and formation of metastatic disease.

  19. Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... detected by optical colonoscopy. Virtual colonoscopy uses virtual reality technology to produce three-dimensional images of the ... that if current trends in reducing risk factors, increased screening, and better treatment persist, colorectal cancer mortality ...

  20. Evaluation of dual energy spectral CT in differentiating metastatic from non-metastatic lymph nodes in rectal cancer: Initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Huanhuan [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Department of Radiology, Xinhua Hospital affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine (China); Yan, Fuhua; Pan, Zilai; Lin, Xiaozhu; Luo, Xianfu; Shi, Cen [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Xiaoyan [Department of Pathology, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang, Baisong [Department of Biomedical Statistics, Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhang, Huan, E-mail: huanzhangy@126.com [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent cancer and the status of the regional lymph nodes in rectal cancer is considered to be one of the most powerful prognostic factor in the absence of distant metastatic disease. Detecting LNs metastasis is still a challenging problem due to the presence of microscopic metastasis or inflammatory swelling of LNs. • We investigated the value of dual energy spectral CT in differentiating metastatic from non-metastatic lymph nodes in rectal cancer. Our study demonstrated that the quantitative normalized iodine concentration (nIC) could be useful for differentiating metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes. The combination of nIC in portal venous phase and conventional size criterion could improve the diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of rectal cancer. - Abstract: Objectives: To investigate the value of dual energy spectral CT (DEsCT) imaging in differentiating metastatic from non-metastatic lymph nodes in rectal cancer. Methods: Fifty-five patients with rectal cancer underwent the arterial phase (AP) and portal venous phase (PP) contrast-enhanced DEsCT imaging. The virtual monochromatic images and iodine-based material decomposition images derived from DEsCT imaging were interpreted for lymph nodes (LNs) measurement. The short axis diameter and the normalized iodine concentration (nIC) of metastatic and non-metastatic LNs were measured. The two-sample t test was used to compare the short axis diameters and nIC values of metastatic and non-metastatic LNs. ROC analysis was performed to assess the diagnostic performance. Results: One hundred and fifty two LNs including 92 non-metastatic LNs and 60 metastatic LNs were matched using the radiological-pathological correlation. The mean short axis diameter of metastatic LNs was significantly larger than that of the non-metastatic LNs (7.28 ± 2.28 mm vs. 4.90 ± 1.64 mm, P < 0.001). The mean n

  1. [An asymptomatic chronic hypokalaemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Marie-Pierre; Cheminel, Valérie; Crevon, Lionel; Dubourg, Laurence; Hadj-Aissa, Aoumeur; Mounier, Chantal; Prevosto, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic patient presenting a severe chronic renal hypokalaemia. Once being sure of no diuretics use, two hypothesis can be mentioned for a normotensive patient presenting an hypokalaemia associated with a metabolic alcalosis: Bartter syndrome or Gitelman syndrome. The highlighting of low magnesaemia and hypocalciuria strongly concentrates the diagnosis on Gitelman syndrome. First, this has been strengthened by the results of renal function tests and later it has confirmed by molecular diagnosis with the identification of a known homozygous mutation on SLC12A3 gene. In the patient family, the same chromosomal abnormality has been found in the young sister. For these two patients the treatment ordered is an antikaliuretic diuretic, magnesium and potassium supplements. This case shows the difficulty to diagnose Gitelman syndrome: it is frequently mistaken for Bartter syndrome. The main differences between these two syndromes are magnesaemia and calciuria. Furthemore , patients with Gitelman syndrome are often asymptomatic, this explains why prevalence of this illness is probably underestimated.

  2. Association between miR-31-3p expression and cetuximab efficacy in patients with KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer: a post-hoc analysis of the New EPOC trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Siân; Thiébaut, Raphaële; Bridgewater, John; Grisoni, Marie-Lise; Moutasim, Karwan; Rousseau, Francis; Thomas, Gareth J; Griffiths, Gareth; Liebaert, François; Primrose, John; Laurent-Puig, Pierre

    2017-11-07

    High miR-31-3p expression is associated with inferior outcomes in KRAS wild-type (WT) advanced colorectal cancer patients treated with anti-EGFR therapy. This study evaluated miR-31-3p expression in patients with operable colorectal liver metastases (LM) enrolled in the New EPOC study. MiR-31-3p expression was measured in primary tumors (PT) from 149 KRAS WT patients including 71 receiving chemotherapy alone (CT) and 78 receiving chemotherapy plus cetuximab (CTX). Each treatment arm was split into tertiles based on miR-31-3p expression levels. MiR-31-3p expression was also measured in LM from 94 patients with tumor tissue available. The median progression-free survival for the combined populations with mid or high miR-31-3p expression was shorter in the CTX versus the CT arm (26.7 months versus 12.3 months, HR=2.28 95%CI 1.27; 4.09 p=0.006). Low miR-31-3p expressers had similar outcomes irrespective of treatment (HR=1.06 95%CI 0.43; 2.61 p=0.9). MiR-31-3p expression was correlated between paired PT and LM samples in the CT group but not in the CTX group. Patients with low miR-31-3p expression in the New EPOC study were not harmed by the addition of cetuximab. This supports miR-31-3p as a promising predictive biomarker for anti-EGFR therapy in KRAS WT advanced colorectal cancer.

  3. Cytomorphology of Circulating Colorectal Tumor Cells:A Small Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrinucci, Dena; Bethel, Kelly; Lazar, Daniel; Fisher, Jennifer; Huynh, Edward; Clark, Peter; Bruce, Richard; Nieva, Jorge; Kuhn, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Several methodologies exist to enumerate circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from the blood of cancer patients; however, most methodologies lack high-resolution imaging, and thus, little is known about the cytomorphologic features of these cells. In this study of metastatic colorectal cancer patients, we used immunofluorescent staining with fiber-optic array scanning technology to identify CTCs, with subsequent Wright-Giemsa and Papanicolau staining. The CTCs were compared to the corresponding primary and metastatic tumors. The colorectal CTCs showed marked intrapatient pleomorphism. In comparison to the corresponding tissue biopsies, cells from all sites showed similar pleomorphism, demonstrating that colorectal CTCs retain the pleomorphism present in regions of solid growth. They also often retain particular cytomorphologic features present in the patient's primary and/or metastatic tumor tissue. This study provides an initial analysis of the cytomorphologic features of circulating colon cancer cells, providing a foundation for further investigation into the significance and metastatic potential of CTCs. PMID:20111743

  4. Colorectal Cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peter Donald

    history, young age at onset and presence of other specific tumours and defects. Among these defects are ... medical advice. Only 2 (6.3%) patients completed their treatment regimen. Conclusion: The incidence of colorectal cancer is still low in our environment but treatment outcome remains poor due to late presentation.

  5. Metabolomics profiling of pre-and post-anesthesia plasma samples of colorectal patients obtained via Ficoll separation

    OpenAIRE

    Ghini, Veronica; Unger, Florian T; Tenori, Leonardo; Turano, Paola; Juhl, Hartmut; David, Kerstin A.

    2015-01-01

    1H NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the metabolic consequences of general anesthesia in the plasma of two groups of patients with diagnosis for non-metastatic colorectal cancer and metastatic colorectal cancer with liver-metastasis, respectively. Patients were treated with etomidate or propofol, two frequently used sedation agents. Plasma samples were obtained via Ficoll separation. Here, we demonstrated that this procedure introduces a number of limitations for NMR-based metabolomics...

  6. Arginase Inhibitor INCB001158 as a Single Agent and in Combination With Immune Checkpoint Therapy in Patients With Advanced/Metastatic Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-31

    Metastatic Cancer; Solid Tumors; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Gastric Cancers; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Bladder Cancer; Urothelial Carcinoma; Mesothelioma

  7. Pulmonary nodules and metastases in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    in CRC. In study IV we investigated the significance of mismatch repair status (MMR) for the location of metastatic spread in a nationwide Danish cohort of patients with newly diagnosed CRC between 2010 and 2012. Deficient MMR was associated with a reduced risk of synchronous metastatic disease, however......Patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer (CRC) are subjected to a preoperative thoraco-abdominal CT scan to determine the cancer stage. This staging is of relevance with regard to treatment and prognosis. About 20% of the patients have distant metastatic spread at the time of diagnosis, i...... to a SPCM at follow-up, but we found no evidence that IPN should result in intensified diagnostic work-up besides routine follow-up for CRC. Study II was an analysis of the prevalence of and risk factors for SPCM in a Danish nationwide cohort of patients with newly diagnosed CRC from 2001 to 2011. SPCM were...

  8. Management of Liver Metastasis from Colo-Rectal Carcinoma with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review of relevant articles with literature in English language. Cross- referenced ... Conclusion: Laparoscopic liver resection was found to be a favorable alternative to open resection in metastatic colorectal cancer and is associated with low morbidity and mortality in properly selected cases in specialized centres. There is ...

  9. Colorectal Cancer and Liver Metastases : determinants of outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z.S. Lalmahomed (Zarina)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractColorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common forms of cancer with annually, 1.36 million new patients and 694 000 deaths. The liver is the most common organ affected by metastatic disease. Disease staging is performed by the TNM classification system and therapeutic strategies are

  10. Asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women

    OpenAIRE

    Sudha Biradar Kerure; Rajeshwari Surpur; Sheela S. Sagarad; Sneha Hegadi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common bacterial infections during pregnancy. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is a major risk factor for the development of urinary tract infections during pregnancy and with further risk of preterm birth & pyelonephritis if untreated. Aims & Objectives: This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) in pregnant women & to isolate, identify and establish antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogens....

  11. Ocularhaemodynamics parameters of asymptomatic HAART ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Vmax of blood flow in central retinal artery (CRA) of asymptomatic HAART - experienced HIV infected children was 12.2cm/s while that of seronegative children was 13.4 cm/s. The PI and RI of blood flow in CRA of asymptomatic HAARTexperienced HIV-infected children were 0.8 and 0.5 respectively while those of ...

  12. Is obesity an advantage in patients with colorectal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasi, Pashtoon Murtaza; Zafar, S Yousuf; Grothey, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Obesity/higher BMI appears to be important determinants in the development of colon cancer as well as in predicting outcomes in the adjuvant setting in these patients. These associations seem to be stronger for men and tend to be 'J-shaped', with worse outcomes in both lower and upper BMI categories than in the middle categories. How this factors in the metastatic setting is less clear. A recent pooled analysis of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer receiving bevacizumab in the first-line setting observed that patients with the lowest BMI had the lowest median overall survival. An incremental BMI increase of 5 kg/m(2) led to actually a decrease in the risk of death (hazard ratio, 0.911 [95% CI, 0.879-0.944]). The observed association does not necessarily mean that obesity is an advantage for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. More likely, it is conceivable that, in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with a lower BMI, the effects of cancer-related cachexia may be more deleterious than the potential adverse events related to a higher BMI. In patients already diagnosed with metastatic disease, studying how body weight affects tumor biology and treatment-related decisions are important considerations.

  13. Beclin 1 Expression is Closely Linked to Colorectal Carcinogenesis and Distant Metastasis of Colorectal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Ying Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Beclin 1 participates in development, autophagy, differentiation, anti- apoptosis, neurodegeneration, tumorigenesis and cancer progression. The roles of Beclin 1 in colorectal carcinogenesis and its subsequent progression are still unclear. Here, the mRNA and protein expression of Beclin 1 were determined in colorectal carcinoma and matched mucosa by Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization (ISH were performed on tissue microarryer with colorectal carcinoma, adenoma and mucosa. The expression of Beclin 1 mRNA and protein was found to be higher in colorectal carcinoma than matched mucosa by real-time PCR and Western blot (p < 0.05. According to the ISH data, Beclin 1 expression was lower in colorectal non-neoplastic mucosa (NNM than adenoma and carcinoma (p < 0.05. Immunohistochemically, primary carcinoma showed stronger Beclin 1 expression than NNM and metastatic carcinoma in the liver (p < 0.05. Beclin 1 protein expression was negatively related to liver and distant metastasis (p < 0.05, but not correlated with age, sex, depth of invasion, lymphatic or venous invasion, lymph node metastasis, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM staging, differentiation or serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA concentration (p > 0.05. Survival analysis indicated that Beclin 1 expression was not linked to favorable prognosis of the patients with colorectal carcinoma (p > 0.05. Cox’s model indicated that depth of invasion and distant metastasis were independent prognostic factors for colorectal carcinomas (p < 0.05. It was suggested that Beclin 1 expression is closely linked to colorectal carcinogenesis and distant metastasis of colorectal carcinoma.

  14. Prognostic value of resection of primary tumor in patients with stage IV colorectal cancer: retrospective analysis of two randomized studies and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venderbosch, Sabine; de Wilt, Johannes H; Teerenstra, Steven; Loosveld, Olaf J; van Bochove, Aart; Sinnige, Harm A; Creemers, Geert-Jan M; Tesselaar, Margot E; Mol, Linda; Punt, Cornelis J A; Koopman, Miriam

    2011-11-01

    In patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with an asymptomatic primary tumor, there is no consensus on the indication for resection of the primary tumor. A retrospective analysis was performed on the outcome of stage IV colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with or without resection of the primary tumor treated in the phase III CAIRO and CAIRO2 studies. A review of the literature was performed. In the CAIRO and CAIRO2 studies, 258 and 289 patients had undergone a primary tumor resection and 141 and 159 patients had not, respectively. In the CAIRO study, a significantly better median overall survival and progression-free survival was observed for the resection compared to the nonresection group, with 16.7 vs. 11.4 months [Pprimary tumor. Our results as well as data from literature indicate that resection of the primary tumor is a prognostic factor for survival in stage IV CRC patients. The potential bias of these results warrants prospective studies on the value of resection of primary tumor in this setting; such studies are currently being planned.

  15. KRAS mutation analysis: a comparison between primary tumours and matched liver metastases in 305 colorectal cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knijn, N.; Mekenkamp, L. J. M.; Klomp, M.; Vink-Börger, M. E.; Tol, J.; Teerenstra, S.; Meijer, J. W. R.; Tebar, M.; Riemersma, S.; van Krieken, J. H. J. M.; Punt, C. J. A.; Nagtegaal, I. D.

    2011-01-01

    KRAS mutation is a negative predictive factor for treatment with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). KRAS mutation analysis is usually performed on primary tumour tissue because metastatic tissue is often not available. However, controversial data

  16. Selecting patients for gastrectomy in metastatic esophago-gastric cancer: clinics and pathology are not enough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaro, Lorenzo; Fanotto, Valentina; Musettini, Gianna; Uccello, Mario; Rimassa, Lorenza; Vivaldi, Caterina; Fontanella, Caterina; Leone, Francesco; Giampieri, Riccardo; Rosati, Gerardo; Lencioni, Monica; Santini, Daniele; Donato, Samantha Di; Tomasello, Gianluca; Brunetti, Oronzo; Pietrantonio, Filippo; Bergamo, Francesca; Scartozzi, Mario; Avallone, Antonio; Lutrino, Stefania Eufemia; Melisi, Davide; Antonuzzo, Lorenzo; Pellegrino, Antonio; Gerratana, Lorenzo; Cordio, Stefano; Vasile, Enrico; Aprile, Giuseppe

    2017-10-04

    To evaluate the impact on overall survival (OS) of gastrectomy in asymptomatic metastatic esophago-gastric cancer.  Five hundred and thirteen patients were included. The role of surgery and other clinico-pathological factors was evaluated by univariate and Cox regression analyses. OS was the primary end point. Multivariate analysis confirmed that gastrectomy was a predictor of longer OS (p  0.05). Palliative gastrectomy might play a role in asymptomatic metastatic esophago-gastric cancer patients with good performance status who received benefit from first-line chemotherapy. Future prospective trials integrating tumor biology among inclusion criteria may help defining the optimal candidates.

  17. Aflibercept Plus FOLFIRI vs. Placebo Plus FOLFIRI in Second-Line Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: a Post Hoc Analysis of Survival from the Phase III VELOUR Study Subsequent to Exclusion of Patients who had Recurrence During or Within 6 Months of Completing Adjuvant Oxaliplatin-Based Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cutsem, Eric; Joulain, Florence; Hoff, Paulo M; Mitchell, Edith; Ruff, Paul; Lakomý, Radek; Prausová, Jana; Moiseyenko, Vladimir M; van Hazel, Guy; Cunningham, David; Arnold, Dirk; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Ten Tije, Albert J; McKendrick, Joseph; Kröning, Hendrik; Humblet, Yves; Grávalos, Cristina; Le-Guennec, Solenn; Andria, Michael; Dochy, Emmanuelle; Vishwanath, Raghu L; Macarulla, Teresa; Tabernero, Josep

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this post hoc analysis of the VELOUR study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00561470) was to investigate the treatment effect of adding aflibercept to second-line infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), leucovorin and irinotecan (FOLFIRI) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) who had failed any prior oxaliplatin-containing regimen. Adjuvant rapid relapsers (ARR), who were enrolled directly following relapse during or within 6 months of completion of oxaliplatin-containing adjuvant chemotherapy (N = 124, including 17 patients who also received bevacizumab as part of their adjuvant therapy), were excluded from the original VELOUR intention-to-treat (ITT) population (N = 1226). After exclusion of the ARR, overall survival (OS) in the ITT minus ARR (ITT-ARR) population (N = 1102) was longer in the aflibercept plus FOLFIRI arm than in the placebo plus FOLFIRI arm [hazard ratio (HR) 0.78, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.68-0.90; median survival difference 1.87 months]. In the subgroup of patients assigned to the prior bevacizumab stratum at randomization, OS was numerically longer in the aflibercept plus FOLFIRI arm than in the placebo plus FOLFIRI arm (HR 0.81; 95 % CI 0.63-1.04; median survival difference 2.14 months). Comparison of the post hoc analysis results with the primary analysis from VELOUR suggests that the inclusion of the directly enrolled ARR may have understated the aflibercept treatment benefit for both bevacizumab-pretreated and bevacizumab-naïve patients in the strictly second-line setting although no definitive conclusion may be inferred. The benefit associated with the addition of aflibercept to second-line FOLFIRI in patients with mCRC was observed whatever the timing of first-line disease progression. There were no unexpected safety concerns.

  18. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail; Iversen, Lene H

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed or treated in a surgical department of a public Danish hospital. The database comprises an array of surgical, radiological, oncological, and pathological variables. The surgeons record data such as diagnostics performed, including type and results of radiological examinations, lifestyle factors, comorbidity and performance, treatment including the surgical procedure, urgency of surgery, and intra- and postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery. The pathologists record data such as tumor type, number of lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes, surgical margin status, and other pathological risk factors. The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal cancer patients. The stage distribution has been more or less constant until 2014 with a tendency toward a lower rate of stage IV and higher rate of stage I after introduction of the national screening program in 2014. The 30-day mortality rate after elective surgery has been reduced from >7% in 2001-2003 to database is a national population-based clinical database with high patient and data completeness for the perioperative period. The resolution of data is high for description of the patient at the time of diagnosis, including comorbidities, and for characterizing diagnosis, surgical interventions, and short-term outcomes. The database does not have high-resolution oncological data and does not register recurrences after primary surgery. The Danish Colorectal Cancer Group provides high-quality data and has been documenting an increase in short- and long

  19. Liver resection in metastatic colorectal cancer: a multidisciplinary approach Resección hepática por metástasis de cáncer colorrectal: una visión multidisciplinar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Noguera Aguilar

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to analyze qualitative short-time results of a new program for multidisciplinary liver evaluation in complex cases of liver metastasis from colorectal cancer. Patients and methods: 40 clinical consecutive evaluations with liver metastasis assessed for major liver resection by a multidisplinary specialist committee. Complementary explorations performed included CT and ultrasounds, and MRI or PET for doubtful cases. Liver resection was made in a single operation or two-stage hepatectomy, or combined with other techniques. Results: postoperative mortality at 30 days was 4%. Complications occurred in 28%, with surgical wound infection being most frequent (20%; 16.6% of resections were transfused, with a mean volume of 1000 ml. Two patients needed reoperation -one for an intraperitoneal abscess and one for bile-duct stenosis. Percentage of global relapse was 36%, with 26% of relapses out of the liver. Actuarial survival at one year follow-up was 90%, and 82% at two years; 64% of patients remain free of disease two years after the operation. Conclusions: programs for liver resection for colorectal cancer metastasis may be implemented by multidisciplinary teams of recent setup. There is a need to evaluate own results and then compare them with a standard of quality previously reported.Objetivo: valorar los resultados cualitativos a corto y medio plazo de un programa de reciente implantación de evaluación hepática multidisciplinar de casos complejos de metástasis hepáticas de cáncer colorrectal. Pacientes y métodos: cuarenta evaluaciones clínicas consecutivas de pacientes con metástasis hepáticas de cáncer colorrectal valorados para resección hepática mayor, realizadas por un comité multidisciplinar de especialistas. Las exploraciones complementarias practicadas fueron TAC trifásica y ecografía intraoperatoria, junto a RMN y/o PET en casos de dudas. La resección hepática se podía realizar como gesto único o bien en dos tiempos y

  20. [Characteristics and Outcomes of Treatment in Patients with Stage IV Colorectal Cancer with Mismatch Repair Deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Chika, Noriyasu; Suzuki, Okihide; Ito, Tetsuya; Amano, Kunihiko; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Fukuchi, Minoru; Kumagai, Youichi; Mochiki, Erito; Ishida, Hideyuki

    2016-11-01

    Mismatch repair(MMR)protein deficiency in colorectal cancer is well correlated with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H). There are little data on mismatch repair deficiency(dMMR)colorectal cancers in Japan. In addition, we have no available data on the therapeutic efficacy of oxaliplatin(oxa)-based chemotherapy, one of the standard treatment regimens for metastatic colorectal cancer, for patients with dMMR colorectal cancer. The subjects were 254 patients with Stage IV colorectal cancer whose tumors were immunohistochemically stained for MMR proteins, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. Patients who underwent R0 resection were excluded. Clinicopathologic factors and the efficacy of oxa-based chemotherapy were compared between patients with dMMR colorectal cancer and those with mismatch repair proficient(pMMR)colorectal cancer. There were 7(2.8%)patients with dMMR. Four patients demonstrated both MLH1 and PMS2 loss, while 3 patients demonstrated both MSH2 and MSH6 loss. Though the dMMR had a higher frequency in female patients(p=0.02) and a lower frequency in those with liver metastasis(pcolorectal cancers was lower than those(4-11%)reported in Western countries. Therefore, the clinical significance of universal screeningfor dMMR in all colorectal cancer samples may not be valid. Concerningsurvival benefit, oxa-based chemotherapy seems to be an effective alternative in clinical practice for metastatic colorectal cancer patients with dMMR.

  1. Câncer colorretal metastático: papel atual dos anticorpos monoclonais e a individualização de seu uso Monoclonal therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Meton de Alencar Camara Vieira

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Apesar dos poucos casos de cura no câncer colorretal metastático, a última década foi marcada por avanços na disponibilidade de novos fármacos com mecanismos de ação distintos e aplicabilidade em várias linhas de tratamento. De fato, a sobrevida mediana de pacientes com câncer colorretal metastático praticamente dobrou ao longo dos últimos 10 anos, e parte dessa mudança se deve à introdução dos anticorpos monoclonais, capazes de reconhecer antígenos com importância patogênica em tumores. OBJETIVO: Apresentar revisão dos resultados obtidos com os anticorpos monoclonais usados em câncer colorretal. MÉTODOS: Revisão de 29 trabalhos publicados e obtidos nas fontes atuais de busca virtual. Foram revisados o papel do Bevacizumabe - anticorpo contra o VEGF; o Cetuximabe e Panitumumabe - anticorpos contra o EGFR e o oncogene K-Ras na resposta ao tratamento. CONCLUSÃO: Sugere-se ao final algoritmo de tratamento com anticorpos monoclonais.INTRODUCTION: Although the metastatic stage of any cancer is difficult to handle, the last decades brought hope with the use of new medications among them the monoclonal antibodies. METHOD: To update the concepts and use of Bevacizumabe - against VEGF; Cetuximab and Panitumumab - against EGFR and K-Ras oncogene. CONCLUSION: An algorythm is proposed to better do the treatment.

  2. Pre-metastatic niches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peinado, Héctor; Zhang, Haiying; Matei, Irina R.

    2017-01-01

    -secreted factors and tumour-shed extracellular vesicles that enable the 'soil' at distant metastatic sites to encourage the outgrowth of incoming cancer cells. In this Review, we summarize the main processes and new mechanisms involved in the formation of the pre-metastatic niche....

  3. A surprising diagnosis: metastatic prostate cancer causing cervical lymphadenopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lad, Meher; Sharma, Anita; Patten, Darren K

    2014-02-11

    Cervical lymphadenopathy as an initial presentation for metastatic prostate cancer has been rarely described. Less than 30 cases have been published in medical literature whereby a lymph node biopsy revealed immunoreactivity for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) diagnosing metastatic prostate cancer. We present a unique scenario whereby an asymptomatic patient with previous high-risk gastric cancer presented to clinic with cervical lymphadenopathy. A hunt for a recurrence ensued to no avail and imaging of the head and neck showed no hint of a primary malignancy in those regions. A lymph node biopsy was undertaken which showed elements suggesting metastatic prostate cancer. The patient developed symptoms of urinary outflow obstruction shortly afterwards. Blood tests revealed a very high PSA and a bone scan showed widespread bony metastasis. He was started on androgen deprivation therapy with an improvement of his PSA and symptoms. A regular clinic follow-up has shown stable disease.

  4. Prevalence and pattern of asymptomatic bacteriuria among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most of the cultured organism (89%) were sensitive to Nitrofurantoin. Conclusion: The prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women at the UPTH is high. The most prevalent organism was Klebsiella. Keywords: Asymptomatic bacteriuria, Prevalence, Pattern, Klebsiella, Nitrofurantion, Morbidity ...

  5. Metastatic pituitary carcinoma in a patient with acromegaly: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sreenan, Seamus

    2012-01-01

    Asymptomatic pituitary abnormalities occur in about 10% of cranial magnetic resonance imaging scans, but metastatic carcinoma of the pituitary gland is rare: 133 cases have been reported. Two thirds secreted either prolactin or adrenocorticotropic hormone, and another 24% were non-secreting.

  6. Definition and scope of the surgical treatment in patients with pulmonary metastases from colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Ahmedov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer in lungs is a relatively new trend of modern oncology. In this connection, still there are no clearly formulated criteria for patient selection for this type of intervention, approaches to repeated resections and scope of the surgical operation in case of multiple lesions. Established key prognostic factors include lesion of intrathoracic lymph nodes, timing of the development of metastatic disease, baseline level of carcinoembryonic antigen, number of foci and the volume of metastatic lesion, stage of the disease. Options for surgical access include lateral thoracotomy, sternotomy, thoracoscopy and thoracoscopy combined with additional minithoracotomy.If a patient has a single peripheral metastatic lesions, physician should prefer thoracoscopic operations. One of their advantages include minimum development of adhesions and possibility of subsequent re-thoracoscopy. Resection of pulmonary metastases from colorectal cancer (R0 resection rate allows to achieve persistent healing of the tumor process in a significant number of patients.

  7. Inactivation of the retinoblastoma gene yields a mouse model of malignant colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, T; Bronson, R T; Lees, J A

    2015-11-26

    The retinoblastoma gene (Rb) is mutated at significant frequency in various human epithelial tumors, including colorectal cancer, and is strongly associated with metastatic disease. However, sole inactivation of Rb in the mouse has so far failed to yield epithelial cancers. Here, we specifically inactivate Rb and/or p53 in the urogenital epithelium and the intestine. We find that the loss of both tumor suppressors is unable to yield tumors in the transitional epithelium lining the bladder, kidneys and ureters. Instead, these mice develop highly metastatic tumors of neuroendocrine, not epithelial, origin within the urogenital tract to give prostate cancer in the males and vaginal tumors in the females. Additionally, we discovered that the sole inactivation of Rb in the intestine was sufficient to induce formation of metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas. These tumors closely mirror the human disease in regard to the age of onset, histological appearance, invasiveness and metastatic potential. Like most human colorectal carcinomas, our murine Rb-deficient tumors demonstrate genomic instability and they show activation of β-catenin. Deregulation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is specific to the intestinal tumors, as genomic instability but not activation of β-catenin was observed in the neuroendocrine tumors. To date, attempts to generate genetically engineered mouse models of colorectal cancer tumors have yielded mostly cancer of the small intestine, which rarely occurs in humans. Our system provides the opportunity to accurately model and study colorectal cancer in the mouse via a single gene mutation.

  8. Asymptomatic schwannoma of the heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Maria

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a case of an asymptomatic right atrial mass detected on a screening ECHO. Pre-operative imaging and intraoperative frozen section suggested an atrial myxoma, but the extracardiac nature of the mass and its adherence to the right superior pulmonary vein and interatrial septum were inconsistent with this. Detailed histological assessment confirmed the diagnosis of atrial schwannoma. Limited case reports have shown complete resection is curative.

  9. Metastatic brain tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript. A metastatic brain tumor is cancer that started in another part of the body ... of cancer rarely spread to the brain, such as colon cancer and prostate cancer. In other rare cases, a tumor can ...

  10. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer: Age Family history of colorectal cancer Personal history Inherited risk Alcohol Cigarette smoking Obesity The following protective factors decrease the risk of colorectal cancer: Physical activity Aspirin Combination hormone replacement therapy Polyp removal It is ...

  11. S-1 and oxaliplatin (SOX) plus bevacizumab versus mFOLFOX6 plus bevacizumab as first-line treatment for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: updated overall survival analyses of the open-label, non-inferiority, randomised phase III: SOFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Hideo; Yamada, Yasuhide; Takahari, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Masato; Yoshida, Motoki; Iwamoto, Shigeyoshi; Shimada, Ken; Komatsu, Yoshito; Sasaki, Yasutsuna; Satoh, Taroh; Takahashi, Keiichi; Mishima, Hideyuki; Muro, Kei; Watanabe, Masahiko; Sakata, Yuh; Morita, Satoshi; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2017-01-01

    The SOFT study previously demonstrated that S-1 and oxaliplatin (SOX) plus bevacizumab was non-inferior to l-leucovorin, fluorouracil and oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX6) plus bevacizumab in terms of the primary end point of progression-free survival (PFS) as first-line chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The overall survival (OS) data were immature at the time of the primary analysis. A total of 512 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive either mFOLFOX6 plus bevacizumab (5 mg/kg of bevacizumab, followed by 200 mg/m2 of l-leucovorin given simultaneously with 85 mg/m2 of oxaliplatin, followed by a 400 mg/m2 bolus of 5-FU on day 1 and then 2400 mg/m2 of 5-FU as an intravenous infusion over the course of 46 hours, every 2 weeks) or SOX plus bevacizumab (7.5 mg/kg of bevacizumab, 130 mg/m2 of oxaliplatin on day 1 and 40-60 mg of S-1 two times per day for 2 weeks, followed by a 1-week rest). The primary end point was PFS. After the primary analysis, the follow-up survey was cut-off on 30 September 2013, and the final OS data were analysed. With a median follow-up of 37.7 months, the median survival time (MST) was 29.7 months with mFOLFOX6 plus bevacizumab and 29.6 months with SOX plus bevacizumab (HR, 1.018; 95% CI 0.823 to 1.258). Median PFS was 11.7 months in the mFOLFOX6 plus bevacizumab group and 12.2 months in the SOX plus bevacizumab group (HR, 1.051; 95% CI 0.876 to 1.262; pnon-inferiority=0.0115). Our results reconfirmed that SOX plus bevacizumab is non-inferior to mFOLFOX6 plus bevacizumab in terms of PFS. MST did not differ between the groups. SOX plus bevacizumab is considered an effective regimen for first-line chemotherapy in patients with mCRC and can be used instead of mFOLFOX6 plus bevacizumab. JapicCTI-090699.

  12. Papillary thyroid carcinoma presenting as an asymptomatic pelvic bone metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiq S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid carcinoma is rare comprising 1% of all malignancies and commonly presents as a neck lump. Papillary thyroid carcinoma unlike follicular thyroid carcinoma tends not to metastasise to distant sites.We present a case of papillary thyroid carcinoma presenting as a solitary asymptomatic pelvic bone metastases and highlight current management of bone metastases. A 59-year old female was found on abdominal computerised tomography to have an incidental finding of a 4.5 cm soft tissue mass in the right iliac bone. Biopsy of the lesion confirmed metastatic thyroid carcinoma. There was no history of a neck lump, head and neck examination was normal. Further imaging confirmed focal activity in the right lobe of the thyroid. A total thyroidectomy and level VI neck dissection was performed and histology confirmed follicular variant of papillary carcinoma.Early detection of bone metastases have been shown to improve prognosis and thyroid carcinoma should be considered as a potential primary malignancy.

  13. Adenocarcinoma metastatic to the uterine cervix: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Montiel, Delia; Serrano-Olvera, Alberto; Salazar, Luz Calderón; Cetina-Pérez, Lucely; Candelaria, Myrna; Coronel, Jaime; Montalvo, Luis Alonso Herrera; de León, David Cantú

    2012-03-01

    The objectives of this report are, first, to describe the clinical behavior of cases of carcinoma metastatic to the uterine cervix treated at our institution in order to carry out a systematic review to establish the behavioral patterns of the most frequent metastases to the cervix and, second, to generate guidelines for their diagnosis and treatment. At the National Institute of Cancer of Mexico (INCan), we performed a review of the clinical files with a diagnosis of malignant neoplasm metastatic to the uterine cervix between 1990 and 2009. For a systematic review, we conducted a PubMed search between the years 1970 and 2009 of case reports and series of cases of patients with metastatic gastric, breast, ovarian and colorectal cancer. We analyzed each report individually and extracted the patients' clinical data from our cases and reports, including the primary tumor, cervical metastases and survival rates. There were 10 cases of tumors metastatic to the uterine cervix. Metastasis was documented in one-half of the patients during follow up, with two of these cases having the cervix as the only site. We included the following reports in the systematic review: 13 reports of gastric-associated cancer, 30 related to breast cancer, nine with ovarian-associated cancer and 10 related to colorectal cancer. Metastatic cervical activity is an infrequent event. The prognosis of survival is poor in the presence of gastric or ovarian cancer and cervical metastases. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2012 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  14. Role of physical activity and diet after colorectal cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Blarigan, Erin L; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A

    2015-06-01

    This review summarizes the evidence regarding physical activity and diet after colorectal cancer diagnosis in relation to quality of life, disease recurrence, and survival. There have been extensive reports on adiposity, inactivity, and certain diets, particularly those high in red and processed meats, and increased risk of colorectal cancer. Only in the past decade have data emerged on how such lifestyle factors are associated with outcomes in colorectal cancer survivors. Prospective observational studies have consistently reported that physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis reduces mortality. A meta-analysis estimated that each 15 metabolic equivalent task-hour per week increase in physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis was associated with a 38% lower risk of mortality. No randomized controlled trials have been completed to confirm that physical activity lowers risk of mortality among colorectal cancer survivors; however, trials have shown that physical activity, including structured exercise, is safe for colorectal cancer survivors (localized to metastatic stage, during and after treatment) and improves cardiorespiratory fitness and physical function. In addition, prospective observational studies have suggested that a Western dietary pattern, high carbohydrate intake, and consuming sugar-sweetened beverages after diagnosis may increase risk of colorectal cancer recurrence and mortality, but these data are limited to single analyses from one of two US cohorts. Additional data from prospective studies and randomized controlled trials are needed. Nonetheless, on the basis of the available evidence, it is reasonable to counsel colorectal cancer survivors to engage in regular physical activity and limit consumption of refined carbohydrates, red and processed meats, and sugar-sweetened beverages. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  15. Treatment of metastatic brain lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Zaytsev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Increasing survival in patients with secondary brain damage, and identifying the factors of favorable and adverse prognosis.Material and method. In P. A. Hertsen Moscow Oncology Research Institute from 2007 to 2013 there were treated 268 patients with brain metastases. The mean age was 55.8 years (from 24 to 81 years. Metastases of colorectal cancer identified in 7.8%, cases of lung cancer in 34%, melanoma 9.3 %, breast cancer in 26%, kidney cancer in 11%, with non-identified primary tumor in 4.5%, other tumors accounted for 6.7%. Solitary metastasis was diagnosed in 164 (61,19% patients, oligometastasis (2-3 - 72 (26,87% patients with polymetastasis (more than 3 – 32 (11,94% patients. In 106 (39,55% of patients with brain metastases it was the only manifestation of the generalization process. To control the radical removal of the tumor in 93 (34,7% patients we used the method of fluorescence navigation (FN with the drug Alasens. In 66 (24,6% patients intraoperatively was held a session of photodynamic therapy (PDT. In 212 (79,1% cases, the removal of metastasis performed totally, 55 (20,9% patients stated Subtotal removal.Results. The observation period for the patients ranged from 3 to 79 months. Survival median among the entire group of patients with metastatic brain lesion was 12 months. Overall survival was significantly dependent on RPA class, the volume of postoperative treatment, histological type of primary tumor, number of intracerebral metastases and the timing of the relapse-free period.Conclusions. Factors that affects the overall survival are the features of the histology of the primary lesion, multiplicity of metastatic lesions, RPA class and the synchronous nature of the metastasis. The median of overall survival of patients who did not receive after surgical treatment of a particular type of therapy was only 4 months. If to use the combined treatment (surgical treatment with the irradiation of the whole brain median

  16. [Benign intraperitoneal metastatic leiomyomatosis: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Paz; Errázuriz, Juan Ignacio; Fernández, Carlos; Arteaga, Eugenio

    2017-02-01

    Benign intraperitoneal metastatic leiomyomatosis is a rare benign disease that is observed when a leiomyoma is present in the peritoneal surface. Women who have undergone hysterectomy for leiomyomas are most commonly affected. Patients are usually asymptomatic at presentation, being frequently an incidental finding in imaging studies. Ultrasound and CT play an important role in the diagnosis. The lesions are histologically identical to their uterine counterparts. There are different theories about the pathogenesis of the disease, including peritoneal seeding after laparoscopic hysterectomy. Others support the hypothesis of multiple independent foci of smooth muscle proliferation. Treatment, as in uterine leiomyomatosis, is generally conservative. We report a 53-year-old hysterectomized woman with intraperitoneal leiomyomas detected in a routine physical examination as mobile abdominal masses who underwent successful laparoscopic resection.

  17. [Aspirin and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grancher, Adrien; Michel, Pierre; Di Fiore, Frédéric; Sefrioui, David

    2018-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a worldwide public health problem. Aspirin has been identified as a protective factor against the apparition of colorectal cancer. There are several mechanisms about the actions by aspirin on colorectal tumorogenesis. These are not perfectly known nowadays. On one hand, there are direct mechanisms on colorectal mucosa, on the other hand there are indirect mechanisms through platelet functions. Aspirin also plays a role by its anti-inflammatory action and the stimulation of antitumor immunity. Several studies show that long-term treatment with low-doses of aspirin decreases the incidence of adenomas and colorectal cancers. In the United States, aspirin is currently recommended for primary prevention of the risk of colorectal cancer in all patients aged 50 to 59, with a 10-year risk of cardiovascular event greater than 10 %. However, primary prevention with aspirin should not be a substitute for screening in colorectal cancer. Furthermore, aspirin seems to be beneficial when used in post-diagnosis of colorectal cancer. It could actually decrease the risk of metastasis in case of a localized colorectal cancer, and increase the survival in particular, concerning PIK3CA mutated tumors. The association of aspirin with neoadjuvant treatment of colorectal cancer by radiochimiotherapy seems to have beneficial effects. French prospective randomized study is currently being conducted to investigate postoperative aspirin in colorectal cancers with a PIK3CA mutation. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Nielsen, E.M.; Klemm, Per

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) affect millions of people each year. Escherichia coli is the most common organism associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) in humans. Persons affected by ABU may carry a particular E. coli strain for extended periods of time without any symptoms. In contrast...... to uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) that cause symptomatic UTI, very little is known about the mechanisms by which these strains colonize the urinary tract. Here, we have investigated the growth characteristics in human urine as well as adhesin repertoire of nine ABU strains; the ability of ABU strains to compete...

  19. Circulating tumor cells: Exploring intratumor heterogeneity of colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Raimondi, Cristina; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Gradilone, Angela; Giannini, Giuseppe; de Falco, Elena; Chimenti, Isotta; Varriale, Elisa; Hauch, Siegfried; Plappert, Linda; Cortesi, Enrico; Gazzaniga, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The hypothesis of the “liquid biopsy” using circulating tumor cells (CTCs) emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to traditional tissue biopsy to determine cancer therapy. Discordance for biomarkers expression between primary tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been widely reported, thus rendering the biological characterization of CTCs an attractive tool for biomarkers assessment and treatment selection. Studies performed in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients u...

  20. Non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases and risk of colorectal neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, J S; Sinn, D H; Min, Y W; Hong, S N; Kim, H S; Jung, S-H; Gu, S; Rhee, P-L; Paik, S W; Son, H J; Gwak, G-Y

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with colorectal neoplasia. Yet, NAFLD ranges from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis with advanced fibrosis. To investigate the risk of colorectal neoplasia according to the presence and severity of NAFLD. A total of 26 540 asymptomatic adults who underwent same day first-time colonoscopy and abdominal ultrasonography as a health check-up programme were analysed. NAFLD was diagnosed by ultrasonography. Advanced colorectal neoplasia was defined as an invasive cancer or adenoma that was at least 10 mm in diameter, had high-grade dysplasia, or had villous histological characteristics or any combination thereof. NAFLD patients had a higher prevalence of any colorectal neoplasia (38.0% vs. 28.9%) and advanced colorectal neoplasia (2.8% vs. 1.9%) compared to those without NAFLD. In a multivariable model adjusted for age, sex, smoking, alcohol, body mass index, first-degree family history of colorectal cancer, aspirin use and metabolic factors, the odd ratios comparing patients with NAFLD to those without were 1.10 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-1.17] for any colorectal neoplasia and 1.21 (95% CI: 0.99-1.47) for advanced colorectal neoplasia. When NAFLD patients were further stratified according to the non-invasive parameters of liver disease severity, the risk of any colorectal neoplasia or advanced colorectal neoplasia was higher for those with severe liver diseases than those with mild liver diseases. The presence and severity of NAFLD were closely associated with any colorectal neoplasia and advanced colorectal neoplasia, suggesting that clinicians should be aware of the increased risk of colorectal neoplasia in patients with NAFLD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Genome-Wide Screening of Genes Showing Altered Expression in Liver Metastases of Human Colorectal Cancers by cDNA Microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rempei Yanagawa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of intensive and increasingly successful attempts to determine the multiple steps involved in colorectal carcinogenesis, the mechanisms responsible for metastasis of colorectal tumors to the liver remain to be clarified. To identify genes that are candidates for involvement in the metastatic process, we analyzed genome-wide expression profiles of 10 primary colorectal cancers and their corresponding metastatic lesions by means of a cDNA microarray consisting of 9121 human genes. This analysis identified 40 genes whose expression was commonly upregulated in metastatic lesions, and 7 that were commonly downregulated. The upregulated genes encoded proteins involved in cell adhesion, or remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Investigation of the functions of more of the altered genes should improve our understanding of metastasis and may identify diagnostic markers and/or novel molecular targets for prevention or therapy of metastatic lesions.

  2. PROX1 Promotes Metabolic Adaptation and Fuels Outgrowth of Wnthigh Metastatic Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Ragusa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Wnt pathway is abnormally activated in the majority of colorectal cancers, and significant knowledge has been gained in understanding its role in tumor initiation. However, the mechanisms of metastatic outgrowth in colorectal cancer remain a major challenge. We report that autophagy-dependent metabolic adaptation and survival of metastatic colorectal cancer cells is regulated by the target of oncogenic Wnt signaling, homeobox transcription factor PROX1, expressed by a subpopulation of colon cancer progenitor/stem cells. We identify direct PROX1 target genes and show that repression of a pro-apoptotic member of the BCL2 family, BCL2L15, is important for survival of PROX1+ cells under metabolic stress. PROX1 inactivation after the establishment of metastases prevented further growth of lesions. Furthermore, autophagy inhibition efficiently targeted metastatic PROX1+ cells, suggesting a potential therapeutic approach. These data identify PROX1 as a key regulator of the transcriptional network contributing to metastases outgrowth in colorectal cancer.

  3. FOLFOX4 plus cetuximab treatment and RAS mutations in colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokemeyer, C.; Kohne, C.H.; Ciardiello, F.; Lenz, H.J.; Heinemann, V.; Klinkhardt, U.; Beier, F.; Duecker, K.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Tejpar, S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The OPUS study demonstrated that addition of cetuximab to 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX4) significantly improved objective response and progression-free survival (PFS) in the first-line treatment of patients with KRAS exon 2 wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer

  4. Metachronous colorectal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Svendsen, L B; Mellemgaard, A

    1990-01-01

    During the period 1943-67, 903 Danish patients aged less than 40 years had colorectal carcinoma. The patients were followed up for up to 41 years and during this period 44 of 501 (9 per cent) operated on for cure developed a metachronous colorectal carcinoma. The cumulative risk of a metachronous...... colorectal carcinoma was 30 per cent after up to 41 years of observation. The occurrence of a metachronous colorectal carcinoma was evenly distributed in the observation period. The cumulative survival rate after operation for a metachronous colorectal carcinoma was 41 per cent after 20 years of observation....... We propose a lifelong follow-up programme after resection of colorectal carcinoma for cure in this age group, including annual Hemoccult test and colonoscopy at 3-year intervals....

  5. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Victoria Valinluck; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. It results from an accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes in colon epithelial cells that transforms them into adenocarcinomas. There have been major advances in our understanding of cancer epigenetics over the last decade, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation. Assessment of the colon cancer epigenome has revealed that virtually all colorectal cancers have aberrantly methylated genes and the average colorectal cancer methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these methylated genes, called driver genes, is presumed to play a functional role in colorectal cancer. The assessment of methylated genes in colorectal cancers has also revealed a unique molecular subgroup of colorectal cancers called CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) cancers; these tumors have a particularly high frequency of methylated genes. The advances in our understanding of aberrant methylation in colorectal cancer has led to epigenetic alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Progress in the assessment of epigenetic alterations in colorectal cancer and their clinical applications has shown that these alterations will be commonly used in the near future as molecular markers to direct the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:22009203

  6. Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  7. Epidemiological Study Of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Among Nursery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bateriuria in preschool children of different age and sex groups and to isolate the organisms responsible for asymptomatic bacteriuria and determine their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern. A total of 475 children from 17 nurseries in Ahvaz city, Iran ...

  8. Metastatic colon cancer from extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma presenting as painless jaundice: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vabi, Benjamin W; Carter, Jeffrey; Rong, Rong; Wang, Minhua; Corasanti, James G; Gibbs, John F

    2016-04-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a rare cancer of the biliary epithelium comprising only about 3% of all gastrointestinal malignancies. It is a highly aggressive malignancy and confers a dismal prognosis with majority of patients presenting with metastatic disease. Metastatic CCA to the colon is extremely rare with only few cases reported in the literature. We present a 61-year-old patient with incidental synchronous metastatic colonic adenocarcinoma from extra-hepatic CCA. Laboratory data revealed significant indirect hyperbilirubinemia and transaminitis. Imaging study showed intrahepatic bile ducts prominence without mass lesions. Incidentally, there was diffuse colonic thickening without mass lesions or obstruction. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) showed a common bile duct stricture. Brushings were consistent with CCA. Screening colonoscopy identified nodularity and biopsy and immunostaining were consistent with CCA metastasis to colon. The patient elected for palliative and comfort care. Metastatic CCA to the colon is a rare pattern of distant spread that may pose a diagnostic challenge. Some salient characteristics may assist in the differentiation of primary colon cancer and metastatic colon cancer from CCA. Little remains known about the pathogenic behavior of metastatic secondary colorectal cancer. And more so, the management approach to such metastatic cancer still remains to be defined. Screening colonoscopy in patients presenting with resectable CCA may alter management. Furthermore, whether patients with history of resected CCA may benefit from a more frequent screening colonoscopy remains to be validated.

  9. [Interpretation of the updates of NCCN 2017 version 1.0 guideline for colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gong

    2017-01-25

    The NCCN has recently released its 2017 version 1.0 guideline for colorectal cancer. There are several updates from this new version guideline which are believed to change the current clinical practice. Update one, low-dose aspirin is recommended for patients with colorectal cancer after colectomy for secondary chemoprevention. Update two, biological agents are removed from the neoadjuvant treatment regimen for resectable metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). This update is based on lack of evidence to support benefits of biological agents including bevacizumab and cetuximab in the neoadjuvant setting. Both technical criteria and prognostic information should be considered for decision-making. Currently biological agents may not be excluded from the neoadjuvant setting for patients with resectable but poor prognostic disease. Update three, panitumumab and cetuximab combination therapy is only recommended for left-sided tumors in the first line therapy. The location of the primary tumor can be both prognostic and predictive in response to EGFR inhibitors in metastatic colorectal cancer. Cetuximab and panitumumab confer little benefit to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer in the primary tumor originated on the right side. On the other hand, EGFR inhibitors provide significant benefit compared with bevacizumab-containing therapy or chemotherapy alone for patients with left primary tumor. Update four, PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitors including pembrolizumab or nivolumab are recommended as treatment options in patients with metastatic deficient mismatch repair (dMMR) colorectal cancer in second- or third-line therapy. dMMR tumors contain thousands of mutations, which can encode mutant proteins with the potential to be recognized and targeted by the immune system. It has therefore been hypothesized that dMMR tumors may be sensitive to PD-1 inhibitors.

  10. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF PRIMARY AND METASTATIC OVARIAN TUMORS IN PATIENTS WITH COLONIC CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Komarov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This report summarizes existing data on differential diagnosis between primary and metastatic ovarian cancer in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC. The results obtained in N.N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center on the management of this malignancy are also presented. The evidence in favour of the need of genetic counseling and monitoring of the patients with aggravated familial history for early diagnosis of synchronous and metachronous ovarian cancer in patients with CRC is produced. A number of clinical, laboratory and diagnostic methods in addition to immunohistology and molecular genetics should be used for differential diagnosis of primary and metastatic ovarian cancer in patients with CRC.

  11. Synchronous colorectal liver metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E.M. van der Pool (Anne)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractColorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and ranks second in cancer-related deaths in many parts of the Western world. Once in the lymph or blood vessels, colorectal cancer can quickly spread and the liver is known to be a favourable site for metastases. The

  12. DCLK1 immunoreactivity in colorectal neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellows CF

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Gagliardi1, Monica Goswami1, Roberto Passera2, Charles F Bellows11Department of Surgery and Pathology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2Division of Nuclear Medicine Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria San Giovanni Battista, Turin, ItalyIntroduction: Microtubule-associated doublecortin and CaM kinase-like-1 (DCLK1 is a novel candidate marker for intestinal stem cells. The aim of our study was to assess DCLK1 immunoreactivity in colorectal carcinogenesis and its correlation with prognosis.Methods: DCLK1 immunostaining was performed in colorectal tissue from 71 patients, including 18 adenomatous polyps, 40 primary adenocarcinomas, and 14 metastatic lesions. Each case was evaluated by a combined scoring method based on the intensity of staining (score 0–3 and the percentage of tissue staining positive (score 0–3. Immunoexpression for DCLK1 was considered as positive when the combined score was 2–6 and negative with a score of 0–1.Results: Overall, 14/18 (78% of polyps, 30/40 (75% of primary adenocarcinomas, and 7/14 (50% of distant metastases were positive for DCLK1. In adenomatous polyps and primary cancer there was no association between DCLK1 staining score and tumor pathology. However, after curative colorectal cancer resection, patients whose tumor had a high (≥5 combined staining score had increased cancer-specific mortality compared to patients with low (0–4 staining score (hazard ratio 5.89; 95% confidence interval: 1.22–28.47; P = 0.027.Conclusion: We found that DCLK1 is frequently expressed in colorectal neoplasia and may be associated with poor prognosis. Further studies are necessary to validate the use of DCLK1 as a prognostic marker.Keywords: DCLK1, DCAMKL-1, gastrointestinal stem cell, cancer stem cell, adenomatous polyps, liver metastasis, immunohistochemistry

  13. Second primary colorectal cancer in the era of prevalent screening and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Susie; Asadi, Muslim; Jones, Ian; McLaughlin, Stephen; Bui, Andrew; Steele, Malcolm; Tie, Jeanne; Gibbs, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Oncology literature is increasingly recognizing prevalence of second primary cancers including several longitudinal studies showing an increased risk of colorectal cancer following a prostate cancer diagnosis. A retrospective study was conducted to examine the relationship between prior prostate cancer diagnoses and subsequent colorectal cancer diagnoses. A multi-centre prospective colorectal cancer registry was queried for patients with a prior history of prostate, breast or lung cancer. Characteristics of these patients were compared to patients with colorectal cancer and no prior cancer history. Of 4660 cases of colorectal cancer diagnosed between 1998 and 2011, 2665 (57.2%) were male, median age was 68 years. For patients with a history of prostate cancer (n = 111), breast cancer (n = 61) and lung cancer (n = 23), the great majority of subsequent colorectal cancer diagnoses occurred in the initial 2 to 4 years after the first cancer diagnosis. This was accompanied by an increased rate of asymptomatic colorectal cancer at presentation, due to both screen detected and incidental cancer diagnoses. There was no clear relationship between any prostate cancer treatment and subsequent colorectal cancer risk, location or timing. In the modern era, there is an increased rate of colorectal cancer diagnosis in years shortly following another common cancer history. This is consistently seen across different primary tumour streams including prostate, breast and lung cancers and in part contributed by screen detected and incidental colorectal cancer diagnoses. Future studies should consider this potential confounding factor when asserting an increased rate of colorectal cancer as a second primary cancer. © 2013 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  14. Imaging of Spinal Metastatic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubdha M. Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastases to the spine can involve the bone, epidural space, leptomeninges, and spinal cord. The spine is the third most common site for metastatic disease, following the lung and the liver. Approximately 60–70% of patients with systemic cancer will have spinal metastasis. Materials/Methods. This is a review of the imaging techniques and typical imaging appearances of spinal metastatic disease. Conclusions. Awareness of the different manifestations of spinal metastatic disease is essential as the spine is the most common site of osseous metastatic disease. Imaging modalities have complimentary roles in the evaluation of spinal metastatic disease. CT best delineates osseous integrity, while MRI is better at assessing soft tissue involvement. Physiologic properties, particularly in treated disease, can be evaluated with other imaging modalities such as FDG PET and advanced MRI sequences. Imaging plays a fundamental role in not only diagnosis but also treatment planning of spinal metastatic disease.

  15. [Asymptomatic kidney stones: active surveillance vs. treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neisius, A; Thomas, C; Roos, F C; Hampel, C; Fritsche, H-M; Bach, T; Thüroff, J W; Knoll, T

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones is increasing worldwide. Asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones are increasingly detected as an incidental finding on radiologic imaging, which has been performed more frequently over the last decades. Beside the current interventional treatment modalities such as extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL), ureterorenoscopy (URS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL), active surveillance of asymptomatic kidney stones has been a focus of discussion lately, not only for attending physicians, but even more so for patients. The current German and European guidelines recommend active surveillance for patients with asymptomatic kidney stones if no interventional therapy is mandatory because of pain or medical factors. Herein we review the current literature on risks and benefits of active surveillance of asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Asymptomatic Plasmodium spp. infection in Tierralta, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucunubá, Zulma Milena; Guerra, Angela Patricia; Rahirant, Sonia Judith; Rivera, Jorge Alonso; Cortés, Liliana Jazmín; Nicholls, Rubén Santiago

    2008-11-01

    With the aim of determining the prevalence of asymptomatic Plasmodium spp. infection by thick smear and PCR and its association with demographic and epidemiological characteristics in the village of Nuevo Tay, Tierralta, Córdoba, Colombia, a cross-sectional population study was carried out, using random probabilistic sampling. Venous blood samples were taken from 212 people on day 0 for thick smear and PCR. Clinical follow-up and thick smears were carried out on days 14 and 28. The prevalence of Plasmodium spp. infection was 17.9% (38/212; 95% CI: 12.5-23.3%) and the prevalence of asymptomatic Plasmodiumspp. infection was 14.6% (31/212; 95% CI: 9.6-19.6%). Plasmodium vivax was found more frequently (20/31; 64.5%) than Plasmodium falciparum (9/31; 29%) and mixed infections (2/31; 6.5%). A significantly higher prevalence of asymptomatic infection was found in men (19.30%) than in women (9.18%) (prevalence ratio: 2.10; 95% CI: 1.01-4.34%; p = 0.02). People who developed symptoms had a significantly higher parasitemia on day 0 than those who remained asymptomatic, of 1,881.5 +/- 3,759 versus 79 +/- 106.9 (p = 0.008). PCR detected 50% more infections than the thick smears. The presence of asymptomatic Plasmodium spp. infection highlights the importance of carrying out active searches amongst asymptomatic populations residing in endemic areas.

  17. Detection of colorectal neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Christensen, Ib J.; Rasmussen, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Serological biomarkers may be an option for early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). The present study assessed eight cancer-associated protein biomarkers in plasma from subjects undergoing first time ever colonoscopy due to symptoms attributable to colorectal neoplasia. Plasma AFP, CA19-9, CEA...... value was 18% and the negative predictive value was 97%. Combinations of serological protein biomarkers provided a significant identification of subjects with high risk of the presence of colorectal neoplasia. The present set of biomarkers could become important adjunct in early detection of CRC....

  18. TAB3 upregulates Survivin expression to promote colorectal cancer invasion and metastasis by binding to the TAK1-TRAF6 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chen; Yuan, Rongfa; Chen, Leifeng; Zhou, Wei; Shen, Wei; Qiu, Yumin; Shao, Jun; Yan, Jinlong; Shao, Jianghua

    2017-12-05

    Transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1)-binding protein 3 (TAB3) is involved in cancer proliferation and metastasis, but its role in colorectal cancer remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that TAB3 is upregulated in colorectal cancer tissues and that high TAB3 levels correlated with tumor metastasis and a poor prognosis in colorectal cancer. In addition, TAB3 knockdown decreased Survivin expression and suppressed colorectal cancer cell migration and invasion in vitro, and reduced liver metastasis in vivo. Importantly, we found that TAB3 regulated Survivin expression by activating the NF-κB pathway through the formation of the TAK1-TAB3-TRAF6 complex. These findings suggest TAB3 may be a useful prognostic biomarker in colorectal cancer and a target for treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer.

  19. The T-LAK Cell-originated Protein Kinase Signal Pathway Promotes Colorectal Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana A. Zykova

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 90% of all cancer deaths arise from the metastatic dissemination of primary tumors. Metastasis is the most lethal attribute of colorectal cancer. New data regarding the molecules contributing to the metastatic phenotype, the pathways they control and the genes they regulate are very important for understanding the processes of metastasis prognosis and prevention in the clinic. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK in the promotion of colorectal cancer metastasis. TOPK is highly expressed in human metastatic colorectal cancer tissue compared with malignant adenocarcinoma. We identified p53-related protein kinase (PRPK as a new substrate of TOPK. TOPK binds with and phosphorylates PRPK at Ser250 in vitro and ex vivo. This site plays a critical role in the function of PRPK. Cell lines stably expressing mutant PRPK (S250A, knockdown TOPK, knockdown PRPK or knockdown of both TOPK and PRPK significantly inhibited liver metastasis of human HCT116 colon cancer cells in a xenograft mouse model. Therefore, we conclude that TOPK directly promotes metastasis of colorectal cancer by modulating PRPK. Thus, these findings may assist in the prediction of prognosis or development of new therapeutic strategies against colon cancer.

  20. Gallstones and colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Torben; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of gallstone disease in 145 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer was compared with gallstone prevalence in 4,159 subjects randomly selected from a population. The group of patients had a significantly higher prevalence of gallstone disease than the population (odds ratio = 1.......59; 95 percent confidence limits 1.04-2.45), whereas cholecystectomies occurred with equal frequency in the two groups. There was a nonsignificant trend toward more right-sided cancers in patients with gallstones than in patients without. These results, together with available literature, give...... substantial evidence for an association between gallstones and colorectal cancer, an association which is not due to cholecystectomy being a predisposing factor to colorectal cancer. Sporadic findings of an association between cholecystectomy and colorectal cancer can be explained by the above relationship....

  1. Hereditary colorectal cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) subset of tumours can broadly be divided into tumours caused by an underlying mismatch-repair gene mutation, referred to as Lynch syndrome, and those that develop in families with similar patterns of heredity but without disease......-predisposing germline mismatch repair mutations, referred to as familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Recognition of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers is central since surveillance programmes effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. The characteristic morphological features linked to Lynch syndrome can aid...... in the identification of this subset, whereas the possibility to use morphological features as an indicator of FCCTX is uncertain.Objective and methodsTo perform a detailed morphological evaluation of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers and demonstrate significant differences between tumours associated with FCCTX...

  2. Prophylaxis against colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Kronborg, O

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing...... with a well-established register of familial adenomatous polyposis and a recently founded register for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, both with major international relationships. The Danish tradition of epidemiology and clinical trials has also been demonstrated in population screening trials...... for colorectal cancer in average-risk persons as well as high-risk groups with precursors of the disease. The present review places Danish contributions within the prophylaxis of colorectal cancer during the last decade in an international context....

  3. Can we predict toxicity and efficacy in older patients with cancer? Older patients with colorectal cancer as an example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Stine Brændegaard; Jørgensen, Trine Lembrecht; Pfeiffer, Per

    2016-01-01

    As older and frail patients are under-represented in clinical trials, most of the evidence available on treatment of older metastatic colorectal patients with cancer originates from pooled analyses of the older patients included in large prospective clinical trials and from community-based studie...

  4. External Quality Assessment Unravels Interlaboratory Differences in Quality of RAS Testing for Anti-EGFR Therapy in Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tack, V.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Tembuyser, L.; Normanno, N.; Borght, S. van der; Krieken, J.H. van; Dequeker, E.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Regulations for the selection of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer for anti-EGFR treatment changed at the end of 2013. The set of mutations to be tested extended from KRAS codons 12 and 13 to KRAS and NRAS exons 2, 3, and 4. A European external quality assessment scheme

  5. Topoisomerase 1(TOP1) gene copy number in stage III colorectal cancer patients and its relation to prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømer, Maria Unni Koefoed; Nygård, Sune Boris; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2013-01-01

    A Topoisomerase 1 (Top1) poison is frequently included in the treatment regimens for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, no predictive biomarkers for Top1 poisons are available. We here report a study on the TOP1 gene copy number in CRC patients and its association with patient prognosis...

  6. Reproducibility of functional volume and activity concentration in F-18-FDG PET/CT of liver metastases in colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmen, Linda; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; de Wilt, Johannes H. W.; Visvikis, Dimitris; Hatt, Mathieu; Visser, Eric P.; Bussink, Johan; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Oyen, Wim J. G.; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.

    2012-01-01

    Several studies showed potential for monitoring response to systemic therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer patients with F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Before F-18-FDG PET can be implemented for response evaluation the repeatability should be known. This study

  7. Colorectal polyps in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Kalpesh; Fishman, Douglas S; Gilger, Mark A

    2012-10-01

    Colorectal polyps are a common cause of gastrointestinal bleeding in children. This review updates the information on colorectal polyps and summarizes the recent advances in genetics, diagnosis, and treatment of polyps in the large intestine. A review of recent literature regarding colorectal polyps demonstrates an estimated detected prevalence of 6.1% overall and 12.0% among those with lower gastrointestinal bleeding during pediatric colonoscopy. Non-Caucasian races (e.g., black and Hispanic) are at higher risk for colorectal polyps in childhood. Recent data show juvenile polyps may recur in approximately 45% of children with multiple polyps and 17% of children with solitary polyps. A clinical trial showed that celecoxib, a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, significantly reduced the number of colorectal polyps in children with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Ethical challenges related to genetic tests for FAP have been newly examined. The utility of novel endoscopic techniques (e.g., enteroscopy) in Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome to prevent intussusception have been newly described. Although colorectal polyps in children are generally benign and easily removed, careful clinical evaluation and ongoing research are needed to identify the small proportion of children at risk for cancer. The current paradigm of using the polyp number at presentation as a primary determinant of subsequent surveillance may be inadequate for many patients.

  8. A multidimensional integration analysis reveals potential bridging targets in the process of colorectal cancer liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo; Yu, Tian; Xue, Dongbo; Sun, Boshi; Shao, Qin; Choudhry, Hani; Marcus, Victoria; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Zhang, Yuguo; Zhang, Weihui; Gao, Zu-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 9% of cancer-related deaths are caused by colorectal cancer. Liver metastasis is a major factor for the high colorectal cancer mortality rate. However, the molecular mechanism underlying colorectal cancer liver metastasis remains unclear. Using a global and multidimensional integration approach, we studied sequencing data, protein-protein interactions, and regulation of transcription factor and non-coding RNAs in primary tumor samples and liver metastasis samples to unveil the potential bridging molecules and the regulators that functionally link different stages of colorectal cancer liver metastasis. Primary tumor samples and liver metastasis samples had modules with significant overlap and crosstalk from which we identified several bridging genes (e.g. KNG1 and COX5B), transcription factors (e.g. E2F4 and CDX2), microRNAs (e.g. miR-590-3p and miR-203) and lncRNAs (e.g. lincIRX5 and lincFOXF1) that may play an important role in the process of colorectal cancer liver metastasis. This study enhances our understanding of the genetic alterations and transcriptional regulation that drive the metastatic process, but also provides the methodology to guide the studies on other metastatic cancers.

  9. Colorectal visceral perception in diverticular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, C H M; Samsom, M; Roelofs, J; van Berge Henegouwen, G P; Smout, A J P M

    2004-05-01

    The pathogenesis of asymptomatic diverticular disease (ADD) and symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease (SUDD) has not been elucidated. The aim of our study was to assess whether altered visceral perception or abnormal compliance of the colorectal wall play a role in these clinical entities. Ten ADD patients, 11 SUDD patients, and nine healthy controls were studied. Using a dual barostat device, sensations were scored and compliance curves obtained using stepwise intermittent isobaric distensions of the rectum and sigmoid, before and after a liquid meal. In addition, the colonic response to eating was assessed by monitoring the volumes of both barostat bags at operating pressure before and after the meal. In the rectum, perception was increased in the SUDD group compared with controls (p = 0.010) and the ADD group (p = 0.030). Rectal compliance curves were not different between the groups. In the sigmoid colon, perception in the pre- and postprandial periods was increased in SUDD compared with controls (p = 0.018) but not when compared with ADD. Sigmoid volume-pressure curves had comparable slopes (compliance) in all groups but were shifted downwards in SUDD compared with ADD in the preprandial period (p = 0.026). The colonic response to eating (decrease in intrabag volume) was similar in all three groups, both in the rectum and sigmoid. Symptomatic but not asymptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease is associated with heightened perception of distension, not only in the diverticula bearing sigmoid, but also in the unaffected rectum. This hyperperception is not due to altered wall compliance.

  10. Risk Prediction Models for Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher-Smith, Juliet A; Walter, Fiona M; Emery, Jon D; Win, Aung K; Griffin, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in Europe and the United States. Survival is strongly related to stage at diagnosis and population-based screening reduces colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. Stratifying the population by risk offers the potential to improve the efficiency of screening. In this systematic review we searched Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for primary research studies reporting or validating models to predict future risk of primary colorectal cancer for asymptomatic individuals. A total of 12,808 papers were identified from the literature search and nine through citation searching. Fifty-two risk models were included. Where reported (n = 37), half the models had acceptable-to-good discrimination (the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, AUROC >0.7) in the derivation sample. Calibration was less commonly assessed (n = 21), but overall acceptable. In external validation studies, 10 models showed acceptable discrimination (AUROC 0.71-0.78). These include two with only three variables (age, gender, and BMI; age, gender, and family history of colorectal cancer). A small number of prediction models developed from case-control studies of genetic biomarkers also show some promise but require further external validation using population-based samples. Further research should focus on the feasibility and impact of incorporating such models into stratified screening programmes. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Mismatch repair status and synchronous metastases in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Krarup, Peter-Martin; Morton, Dion

    2015-01-01

    logistic- and Cox-regression and proportional excess hazards analyses were used for confounder adjustment and to adjust for the general population mortality. In total, 983 of 6,692 patients (14.7%) had dMMR and 935 (14.0%) had SCCM. dMMR was associated with a decreased risk of SCCM, adjusted Odds Ratio (a......The causality between the metastatic potential, mismatch repair status (MMR) and survival in colorectal cancer (CRC) is complex. This study aimed to investigate the impact of MMR in CRC on the occurrence of synchronous metastases (SCCM) and survival in patients with SCCM on a national basis....... A nationwide cohort study of 6,692 patients diagnosed with CRC between 2010 and 2012 was conducted. Data were prospectively entered into the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group's database and merged with data from the Danish Pathology Registry and the National Patient Registry. Multivariable and multinomial...

  12. Colorectal carcinoma in childhood: a retrospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravarusic, Dragan; Feigin, Elad; Dlugy, Elena; Steinberg, Ran; Baazov, Arthur; Erez, Ilan; Lazar, Ludvig; Kapuller, Vadim; Grunspan, Moshe; Ash, Shifra; Freud, Enrique

    2007-02-01

    Colorectal carcinoma, a common adult malignancy, has an estimated childhood incidence of 0.3 to 1.5/million in Western countries and 0.2/million in Israel. Diagnosis is difficult because adult screening measures are unfeasible in children. The tumor is frequently associated with predisposing genetic factors, aggressive biological behavior, and poor prognosis. The aim of this multicenter study was to document the clinical profile, treatment and prognosis of colorectal carcinoma in children in Israel. The clinical, laboratory, therapeutic, and prognostic parameters of all 7 children from 4 medical centers in Israel who were diagnosed with colorectal carcinoma over a 25-y period were reviewed. Patients presented with rectal bleeding (4 of 7), abdominal pain (2 of 7), and abdominal distension (2 of 7). Average time to diagnosis was 6 months. Six patients underwent surgery (1 refused), and 5 received chemotherapy. Histopathological studies showed poorly differentiated mucinous adenocarcinoma, signet-ring type, in 4 cases, moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma in 2, and well-differentiated carcinoma in 1. Three patients died of the disease, 2 shortly after diagnosis. One patient with recurrent metastatic disease was lost to follow-up. Colorectal carcinoma in children is characterized by aggressive tumor behavior and delayed diagnosis, resulting in a worse prognosis than in adults. Heightened physician awareness of the possibility of this disease in children, with special attention to adolescents with predisposing factors and rectal bleeding, could help to improve outcome.

  13. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... of colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  14. Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Colorectal Cancer Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of Contents Dr. ... patients know to help determine the best colon cancer screening test for them? Colonoscopy is considered the gold ...

  15. A metastatic colon adenocarcinoma harboring BRAF V600E has a durable major response to dabrafenib/trametinib and chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams CB

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Casey B Williams,1,* Caitlin McMahon,2,* Siraj M Ali,2 Mark Abramovitz,1 Kirstin A Williams,1 Jessica Klein,1 Heidi McKean,1 Roman Yelensky,2 Thomas J George Jr,3 Julia A Elvin,2 Salil Soman,4 Doron Lipson,2 Juliann Chmielecki,2 Deborah Morosini,2 Vincent A Miller,2 Philip J Stephens,2 Jeffrey S Ross,2,5 Brian Leyland-Jones1 1Avera Cancer Institute, Sioux Falls, SD, USA; 2Foundation Medicine, Inc., Cambridge, MA, USA; 3University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA; 4Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA; 5Albany Medical College, Albany, NY, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The subset of metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas that harbor BRAF V600E mutations are aggressive tumors with significantly shortened survival and limited treatment options. Here we present a colorectal cancer patient whose disease progressed through standard chemotherapy and who developed liver metastasis. Comprehensive genomic profiling (FoundationOne® identified a BRAF V600E mutation in the liver lesion, as well as other genomic alterations consistent with colorectal cancers. Combination therapy of dabrafenib and trametinib with standard cytotoxic chemotherapy resulted in a durable major ongoing response for the patient. This report illustrates the utility of comprehensive genomic profiling with personalized targeted therapy for aggressive metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas. Keywords: oxaliplatin, colorectal adenocarcinoma, combination targeted therapy, BRAF mutations

  16. Colorectal cancer: from epidemiology to current treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyad Bendardaf

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC was the second most frequent cancer in Europe in 2004, responsible for 13% (376,400 of all incident cancer cases. It is also the second most frequent cause of cancer mortality in Europe, with 11.9% (203,700 annual deaths. When localized, CRC is often a curable disease, but the overall prognosis is determined by the extent of local and particularly metastatic tumour spread. The disease outlook is relatively poor, because advanced disease is a significant cause of worldwide cancer-related mortality. Thus, estimated 5-year survival rates range from nearly 90% in stage I disease (Dukes’ A to less than 10% in patients with metastatic disease (Dukes’ D. Comprehensive cancer care in the 21st century is dependent on a multidisciplinary approach to patients with malignant disease. Large bowel cancer is no exception, as there is increasing clinical trial data supporting multimodal treatment for both localized and advanced tumours. This review will focus on important aspects in CRC including the latest treatment strategies (chemotherapy, radiotherapy and the targeted therapies.

  17. Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know before using this tool: The Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool was designed for use by doctors and other health providers with their patients. If you are not a health ... your personal risk of colorectal cancer. (Colorectal cancer is another way ...

  18. Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be as fortunate as we are.” Reflecting what research has proven, Valvo’s message is clear. “Screening is so important! Early detection is early cure!” Read More "Colorectal Cancer" Articles Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey / The Importance of Early Detection / Developments in Colorectal ...

  19. Sorafenib for Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared sorafenib (Nexavar®) and a placebo for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer that is no longer responding to treatment with radioactive iodine

  20. Risk of Advanced Neoplasia in First-Degree Relatives with Colorectal Cancer: A Large Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Enrique; Carrillo, Marta; Leoz, Maria-Liz; Cubiella, Joaquin; Gargallo, Carla; Lanas, Angel; Bujanda, Luis; Gimeno-García, Antonio Z; Hernández-Guerra, Manuel; Nicolás-Pérez, David; Alonso-Abreu, Inmaculada; Morillas, Juan Diego; Balaguer, Francesc; Muriel, Alfonso

    2016-05-01

    First-degree relatives (FDR) of patients with colorectal cancer have a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer than the general population. For this reason, screening guidelines recommend colonoscopy every 5 or 10 y, starting at the age of 40, depending on whether colorectal cancer in the index-case is diagnosed at neoplasia (three or more non-advanced adenomas, advanced adenoma, or invasive cancer) in FDR of patients with colorectal cancer compared to average-risk individuals (i.e., asymptomatic adults 50 to 69 y of age with no family history of colorectal cancer). This cross-sectional analysis includes data from 8,498 individuals undergoing their first lifetime screening colonoscopy between 2006 and 2012 at six Spanish tertiary hospitals. Of these individuals, 3,015 were defined as asymptomatic FDR of patients with colorectal cancer ("familial-risk group") and 3,038 as asymptomatic with average-risk for colorectal cancer ("average-risk group"). The familial-risk group was stratified as one FDR, with one family member diagnosed with colorectal cancer at ≥60 y (n = 1,884) or at neoplasia was significantly more prevalent in individuals having two FDR with colorectal cancer (odds ratio [OR] 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36-2.66, p neoplasia over two times more frequently than women and advanced neoplasia appeared at least ten y earlier. Fewer colonoscopies by 2-fold were required to detect one advanced neoplasia in men than in women. Major limitations of this study were first that although average-risk individuals were consecutively included in a randomized control trial, this was not the case for all individuals in the familial-risk cohort; and second, the difference in age between the average-risk and familial-risk cohorts. Individuals having two FDR with colorectal cancer showed an increased risk of advanced neoplasia compared to those with average-risk for colorectal cancer. Men had over 2-fold higher risk of advanced neoplasia than women

  1. Carcinoid Tumor in Accidental, Asymptomatic Meckel's Diverticulum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital gastrointestinal disorder, it is controversial whether asymptomatic diverticula in adults should be respected. The authors report the case of a patient who was operated due to ileus caused by adhesions and a Meckel's diverticulum without any sign of ...

  2. Asymptomatic carotid arterial stenosis - population based screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Screening for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis in the general population is discussed in many countries because of the benefits of carotid endarterectomy in the three trials. Many factors influence the cost-effectiveness of screening. These factors are the prevalence of carotid stenosis, the

  3. Microbial aetiology and sensitivity of asymptomatic bacteriuria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Twenty nine (13.3%) of the samples had significant bacterial growth and E.coli was the commonest isolate (51.2%). There was a high level (20- 62%) of anti-bacterial resistance to the commonly used antibiotics. Conclusion: Asymptomatic bacteriuria is common among ante-natal mothers in Mulago. E. Coli that is ...

  4. Prevalence of Asymptomatic Genital Infection among Pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All the isolates except Streptococcus faecalis were resistant to ampicillin. These results show a high rate of asymptomatic genital tract infections among pregnant women in Benin City, which have implications for adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. (Afr J Reprod Health 2002; 6[3]: 93-97) Résumé Prévalence de ...

  5. Detecting asymptomatic coronary artery disease using routine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-09-01

    Sep 1, 1990 ... ECG-monitored exercise testing has been proposed as a relatively inexpensive and effective means of screening for asymptomatic coronary artery disease in patients presenting for peripheral vascular surgery. Despite the fact that exercise thallium scintigraphy is also dependent on the patient's ability.

  6. Detecting asymptomatic coronary artery disease using routine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ECG-monitored exercise testing has been proposed as a relatively inexpensive and effective means of screening for asymptomatic coronary artery disease in patients presenting for peripheral vascular surgery. Despite the fact that exercise thallium scintigraphy is also dependent on the patient's ability to exercise, using this ...

  7. Pulmonary Performance In Asymptomatic Young Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pulmonary Performance In Asymptomatic Young Nigerian Population Following The Administration Of Ascorbic Acid And Salbutamol. ... Ascorbic acid was given orally at a dose of 1.50 mg /kg body weight; and salbutamol at a dose of 70 μg/kg body weight, orally. Measurements ... http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/njps.v19i1.32635.

  8. pulmonary performance in asymptomatic young nigerian population

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioline

    1. PULMONARY PERFORMANCE IN ASYMPTOMATIC YOUNG NIGERIAN. POPULATION FOLLOWING THE ADMINISTRATION OF ASCORBIC. ACID AND SALBUTAMOL. S. O. ODEH1, I. E. AGABA2, A. M. SABO 1, and R. A. ODANAOGUN 1. 1 Department of Human Physiology, 2 Department of Medicine and Radiology,.

  9. Prevalence of malaria parasitaemia amongst asymptomatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Statistical analysis was done using IBM-SPSS Windows version 20. Results: The mean age of study participants was 26.7 ± 5.1 years and the age range was 17- 42 years. The prevalence of asymptomatic malaria parasitaemia was 49.6%. Nulliparity and anaemia (PCV <30%) were associated with increased prevalence of ...

  10. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in pregnant women attending antenatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The susceptibility rate of bacterial isolate was highest for levofloxacin (83.6%), followed by nalidixic acid (64.2%) and nitrofurantoin (62.7%). The pathogens were least susceptible to co-trimoxazole (8.3%), ampilcillin (8.8%) and amoxicillin (10.4%) Conclusion: The prevalence of asymptomatic bacteria among the pregnant ...

  11. Tetanus toxoid antibody level in asymptomatic Plasmodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was designed to investigate if the presence of asymptomatic malaria parasiteamia in pregnant women will compromise their ability to respond to full dose of tetanus toxoid immunization during their antenatal clinic visits. Hence, 90 apparently healthy pregnant women who had completed the tetanus toxoid ...

  12. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria among Pregnant Women Attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The apparent decline in immunity of pregnant women appears to promote the growth of both com-mensal and non-commensal microorganisms. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women visiting the University hospital, Ku-masi. This prospective ...

  13. Asymptomatic body packers should be treated conservatively

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glovinski, Peter V; Lauritsen, Morten L; Bay-Nielsen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Body packing takes advantage of the human storage capacity within the alimentary tract. Body packing is used for the smuggling of drugs such as heroin, cocaine, amphetamine, hashish and ecstasy. Most body packers are asymptomatic. However, packets may rupture or obstruct the alimentary tract...

  14. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in HIV Positive Nigerian Children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in HIV positive children and to identify the causative organisms. We studied 155 Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infected children aged 10 months to 17 years attending the Paediatric HIV clinics of the University of Benin Teaching ...

  15. Prevalence and Parasite Density of Asymptomatic Malaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Malaria in pregnancy has contributed significantly to maternal morbidity and mortality in our environment. Aim: This study was aimed at determining the prevalence, and parasite density of asymptomatic malaria parasitemia among unbooked paturients at Federal Teaching Hospital Abakaliki. Subjects and ...

  16. asymptomatic bacteriuria in hiv positive nigerian children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FinePrint

    children with sickle cell anemia in steady state, overall prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in children aged 2 ... continued depletion of CD4 cells. This immune deficient state predisposes to a wide variety of infections, ... DNA PCR in the children younger than. 18months and by serology for children older than 18 months.

  17. Prevalence and Parasite Density of Asymptomatic Malaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    effective use of insecticide treated nets and intermittent prophylaxis therapy for malaria during pregnancy. KEY WORDS: Asymptomatic malaria parasitemia, Nigeria, prevalence, unbooked paturients. INTRODUCTION. Malaria is a parasitic disease of humans especially in the sub‑Saharan Africa, where about 90% of deaths ...

  18. Metastatic neoplasms involving the ovary: a review with an emphasis on morphological and immunohistochemical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluggage, W G; Wilkinson, N

    2005-09-01

    The ovary is a common site of metastatic tumour. In many cases of ovarian metastasis there is a known history of malignancy but in other cases the ovarian tumour is the first manifestation of disease. In this review metastatic colorectal, appendiceal, gastric, breast, pancreatic and biliary tract, hepatocellular, renal, transitional and cervical carcinomas and metastatic malignant melanoma involving the ovary are discussed, as is the issue of synchronous ovarian and endometrial carcinomas. Peritoneal tumours, including primary peritoneal carcinoma, mesothelioma and intra-abdominal desmoplastic small round cell tumour, involving the ovary are also discussed, together with a variety of other rare, metastatic ovarian neoplasms. Many metastatic adenocarcinomas involving the ovary, especially those exhibiting mucinous differentiation, closely mimic primary ovarian adenocarcinomas with morphologically bland areas simulating benign and borderline cystadenoma. This is referred to as a maturation phenomenon. In recent years immunohistochemistry, especially but not exclusively differential cytokeratin (CK7 and CK20) staining, has been widely used as an aid to distinguish between a primary and secondary ovarian adenocarcinoma. While immunohistochemistry undoubtedly has a valuable role to play and is paramount in diagnosis in some cases, the results must be interepreted with caution, especially in mucinous tumours, and within the relevant clinical context. We feel the significance of differential cytokeratin staining is not always understood by histopathologists and this can result in erroneous interpretation. We critically discuss the value of immunohistochemistry and associated pitfalls with each tumour type described.

  19. Clinical efficacy and drug resistance of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy in colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kocoglu, Hakan; Velibeyoglu, Fatih Mehmet; Karaca, Mustafa; TURAL, DENIZ

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) ranked third in cancer related death and its incidence has been increasing worldwide. In recent decades important therapeutic advances have been developed in treatment of metastatic CRC (mCRC), such as monoclonal antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR), which provided additional clinical benefits in mCRC. However, anti-EGFR therapies have limited usage due to approximately 95% of patients with KRAS mutated mCRC do not response to anti-EGFR treat...

  20. Combined miRNA profiling and proteomics demonstrates that different miRNAs target a common set of proteins to promote colorectal cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Sofía; Garcia-Palmero, Irene; Bartolomé, Rubén A; Fernandez-Aceñero, María Jesús; Molina, Elena; Calviño, Eva; Segura, Miguel F; Casal, J Ignacio

    2017-05-01

    The process of liver colonization in colorectal cancer remains poorly characterized. Here, we addressed the role of microRNA (miRNA) dysregulation in metastasis. We first compared miRNA expression profiles between colorectal cancer cell lines with different metastatic properties and then identified target proteins of the dysregulated miRNAs to establish their functions and prognostic value. We found that 38 miRNAs were differentially expressed between highly metastatic (KM12SM/SW620) and poorly metastatic (KM12C/SW480) cancer cell lines. After initial validation, we determined that three miRNAs (miR-424-3p, -503, and -1292) were overexpressed in metastatic colorectal cancer cell lines and human samples. Stable transduction of non-metastatic cells with each of the three miRNAs promoted metastatic properties in culture and increased liver colonization in vivo. Moreover, miR-424-3p and miR-1292 were associated with poor prognosis in human patients. A quantitative proteomic analysis of colorectal cancer cells transfected with miR-424-3p, miR-503, or miR-1292 identified alterations in 149, 129, or 121 proteins, respectively, with an extensive overlap of the target proteins of the three miRNAs. Importantly, down-regulation of two of these shared target proteins, CKB and UBA2, increased cell adhesion and proliferation in colorectal cancer cells. The capacity of distinct miRNAs to regulate the same mRNAs boosts the capacity of miRNAs to regulate cancer metastasis and underscores the necessity of targeting multiple miRNAs for effective cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Combined perioperative plasma endoglin and VEGF--a assessment in colorectal cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Pawlak

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer growth and spread is absolutely dependent on angiogenesis with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF being the most important cytokine involved in the process. Endoglin, a membrane co-receptor for TGF-beta, has recently emerged as a sensitive index of cancer stage. There is now sufficient evidence indicating that microvessel density assessed by endoglin-immunostaining can correlate with stage of colorectal cancer and patient survival. An association of a soluble form of endoglin with lymph node and distant metastases has recently been reported in two studies. Both of them used local elaborated immunoassays for endoglin assessment. The aim of our study was to determine the efficacy of plasma endoglin, assessed using a commercial kit, as a marker of tumor spread and distant metastases in colorectal cancer patients. We studied 48 colorectal cancer patients, compared with 22 healthy subjects, using ELISA. We observed that colorectal cancer patients had increased plasma VEGF-A, but not endoglin levels. However, we found an association of plasma endoglin with the stage of malignancy. Endoglin levels were increased in metastasis-positive patients when compared to both metastasis-negative patients and healthy volunteers. Plasma endoglin correlated with VEGF-A, CEA and CA19.9. Endoglin assessment in plasma does not seem useful as a maker of colorectal cancer. Our observations indicate however that it might be helpful in selecting patients with metastatic disease.

  2. Combined perioperative plasma endoglin and VEGF-A assessment in colorectal cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogusław Kedra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer growth and spread is absolutely dependent on angiogenesis with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF being the most important cytokine involved in the process. Endoglin, a membrane co-receptor for TGF-beta, has recently emerged as a sensitive index of cancer stage. There is now sufficient evidence indicating that microvessel density assessed by endoglin-immunostaining correlates with stage of colorectal cancer and patient survival. An association of a soluble form of endoglin with lymph node and distant metastases has recently been reported in two studies. Both of them used local elaborated immunoassays for endoglin assessment. The aim of our study was to determine the efficacy of plasma endoglin, assessed using a commercial kit, as a marker of tumor spread and distant metastases in colorectal cancer patients. We studied 48 colorectal cancer patients, compared with 22 healthy subjects, using ELISA. We observed that colorectal cancer patients had increased plasma VEGF-A, but not endoglin levels. However, we found an association of plasma endoglin with the stage of malignancy. Endoglin levels were increased in metastasis-positive patients when compared to both metastasis-negative patients and healthy volunteers. Plasma endoglin correlated with VEGF-A, CEA and CA19.9. Endoglin assessment in plasma does not seem useful as a maker of colorectal cancer. Our observations indicate however that it might be helpful in selecting patients with metastatic disease.

  3. Mucinous and Signet Ring Cell Differentiation Affect Patterns of Metastasis in Colorectal Carcinoma and Influence Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermanshahi, Taher Reza; Magge, Deepa; Choudry, Haroon; Ramalingam, Leksmi; Zhu, Benjamin; Pingpank, James; Ahrendt, Steven; Holtzman, Matthew; Zeh, Herbert; Bartlett, David; Zureikat, Amer; Pai, Reetesh K

    2017-04-01

    Peritoneal metastasis in colorectal carcinoma is associated with a dismal prognosis; however, features that correlate with patterns of metastatic spread are not well characterized. We analyzed the clinicopathologic and molecular features of 166 patients with colorectal carcinomas stratified by metastases to the peritoneum or liver. Mucinous and signet ring cell differentiation were more frequently observed in colorectal carcinoma with peritoneal dissemination compared to colorectal carcinoma with liver metastasis (mucinous differentiation: 62% vs 23%, P metastasis was identified in patients with both synchronous and metachronous development of metastasis ( P metastasis were more frequently low-grade (90% vs 72%, P = .005) and associated with dirty necrosis (81% vs 56%, P = .001) compared with colorectal carcinomas with peritoneal dissemination. No significant differences were identified between colorectal carcinoma with peritoneal metastasis versus liver metastasis with respect to KRAS mutations, BRAF mutation, or high levels of microsatellite instability. Patients with tumors involving the peritoneum had a significantly worse overall survival in comparison to patients with liver metastasis lacking peritoneal involvement ( P = .02). When including only those patients with peritoneal metastasis, the presence of any mucinous or signet ring cell differentiation was associated with a significantly worse overall survival ( P = .006). Our findings indicate that mucinous and signet ring cell differentiation may be histologic features that are associated with an increased risk of peritoneal dissemination and poor overall survival in patients with peritoneal metastasis.

  4. Carrier molecules and extraction of circulating tumor DNA for next generation sequencing in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beránek, Martin; Sirák, Igor; Vošmik, Milan; Petera, Jiří; Drastíková, Monika; Palička, Vladimír

    The aims of the study were: i) to compare circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) yields obtained by different manual extraction procedures, ii) to evaluate the addition of various carrier molecules into the plasma to improve ctDNA extraction recovery, and iii) to use next generation sequencing (NGS) technology to analyze KRAS, BRAF, and NRAS somatic mutations in ctDNA from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Venous blood was obtained from patients who suffered from metastatic colorectal carcinoma. For plasma ctDNA extraction, the following carriers were tested: carrier RNA, polyadenylic acid, glycogen, linear acrylamide, yeast tRNA, salmon sperm DNA, and herring sperm DNA. Each extract was characterized by quantitative real-time PCR and next generation sequencing. The addition of polyadenylic acid had a significant positive effect on the amount of ctDNA eluted. The sequencing data revealed five cases of ctDNA mutated in KRAS and one patient with a BRAF mutation. An agreement of 86% was found between tumor tissues and ctDNA. Testing somatic mutations in ctDNA seems to be a promising tool to monitor dynamically changing genotypes of tumor cells circulating in the body. The optimized process of ctDNA extraction should help to obtain more reliable sequencing data in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  5. [Evidence-based public health: strategies aimed at increasing adherence to colorectal cancer screening programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarulli, Sabrina; Lepore, Anna Raffaella; Sansoni, Diana; Viviani, Giancarlo

    2007-01-01

    The ministerial decree 29/11/2001 included colorectal carcinoma screening procedures among the "essential" health care services that should be delivered free of charge to citizens. Secondary prevention programs for colorectal cancer must therefore be implemented in all Italian regions. An international literature search on colorectal cancer screening was performed in order to provide a resource for public health workers and decision makers, for selecting interventions to improve adherence to screening programs. The following interventions have been proven to be effective: reducing structural barriers to screening, active recall systems, multicomponent interventions involving active recall and health education, active reminder systems, periodic dissemination of results, and physician health education. Opportunistic screening by general practitioners, that is, performing faecal occult blood testing in asymptomatic patients consulting a GP for other reasons, is a strategy should also be implemented.

  6. [Nationwide colorectal cancer screening].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, L.G.M. van; Laheij, R.J.F.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Usually, colorectal cancer presents with complaints in a late stage, but can be detected in an earlier stage, with better prognosis, by colonoscopy. Using colonoscopy, also precancerous tumours, adenomas, can be detected and excised, but only in a national screening programme. However primary

  7. [Nutrition and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ströhle, Alexander; Maike, Wolters; Hahn, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Diet plays an important role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Current prospective cohort studies and metaanalysis enable a reevaluation of how food or nutrients such as fiber and fat influence cancer risk. Based on the evidence criteria of the WHO/FAD, risk reduction by a high intake of fruit is assessed as possible, while a lowered risk by a high vegetable intake is probable. Especially raw vegetables and fruits seem to exert anticancer properties. The evidence of a risk reducing effect of whole grain relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as probable whereas the evidence of an increased risk by high consumption of refined white flour products and sweets is (still) insufficient despite some evidences. There is a probable risk reducing effect of milk and dairy products. e available data on eggs and red meat indicate a possible risk increasing influence. Stronger clues for a risk increasing effect have been shown for meat products leading to an evidence assessed as probable. Owing to varied interpretations of the data on fiber, the evidence of a risk reducing effect relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as possible or insufficient. The available data on alcohol consumption indicate a possible risk increasing effect. In contrast to former evaluations, diets rich in fat seem to increase colorectal cancer risk only indirectly as part of a hypercaloric diet by advancing the obesity risk. Thus, the evidence of obesity, especially visceral obesity, as a risk of colorectal cancer is judged as convincing today. Prospective cohort studies suggest that people who get higher than average amounts of folic acid from multivitamin supplements have lower risks of colorectal cancer. The evidence for a risk reducing effect of calcium, selenium, vitamin D and vitamin E on colorectal cancer is insufficient. As primary prevention, a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grain products, and legumes added by low-fat dairy products, fish, and poultry can be recommended. In

  8. [Treatment of colorectal cancer with unresectable metastasis with chemotherapy without primary tumor resection: analysis of tumor-related complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, Marta; Pascual, Marta; Alonso, Sandra; Montagut, Clara; Gallén, Manel; Courtier, Ricard; Gil, M José; Grande, Luis; Andreu, Montserrat; Pera, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Although the conventional treatment of patients with stage iv colorectal cancer involves resection of the primary tumor followed by chemotherapy, several studies suggest that in patients with few symptoms the first and only treatment should be chemotherapy. The objective of this study is to analyze the complications related to the primary tumor in a series of patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer treated with chemotherapy without surgery. Retrospective descriptive study. The study included all patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer treated with chemotherapy without resection of the primary tumor (January 2007-February 2011). The mean age of the 61 patients analyzed was 67±13 years and the performance status was 0-1 in 53 (87%). Twenty (33%) patients developed complications during follow-up. The most common complication was intestinal obstruction in 15 (25%) patients followed by perforation. Complications required surgery in 6 (10%) cases. We did not find differences in patient characteristics between those who had a complication and those without, although the complication rate in patients with a colonic stent (53%) was twice that of other patients (26%). Chemotherapy without surgery is a good option in most patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer. However, although the percentage of patients requiring surgery is low, the total number of complications related to the primary tumor is not negligible. Studies are needed to identify those patients in whom a prophylactic colectomy could be indicated. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. EGFR signaling in colorectal cancer: a clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saletti P

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Piercarlo Saletti,1 Francesca Molinari,2 Sara De Dosso,1 Milo Frattini2 1Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, 2Laboratory of Molecular Pathology, Institute of Pathology, Locarno, Switzerland Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC remains a formidable health burden worldwide, with up to 50% of patients developing metastases during the course of their disease. This group of CRC patients, characterized by the worst prognosis, has been extensively investigated to improve their life expectancy. Main efforts, focused on the epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR, which plays a pivotal role in CRC pathogenesis, have led to the development and introduction in clinical practice of specific targeted therapies (ie, monoclonal antibodies. Subsequently, the scientific community has tried to identify molecular predictors of the efficacy of such therapies. However, it has become clear that EGFR alterations occurring in CRC are difficult to investigate, and therefore their predictive role is unclear. In contrast, the clinical role of two downstream members (KRAS and NRAS has been clearly demonstrated. Currently, EGFR-targeted therapies can be administered only to patients with wild-type KRAS and NRAS genes. Our review addresses the medical management of metastatic CRC. Specifically, we describe in detail the molecular biology of metastatic CRC, focusing on the EGFR signaling pathway, and we discuss the role of current and emerging related biomarkers and therapies in this field. We also summarize the clinical evidence regarding anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies and examine potential future perspectives. Keywords: colorectal cancer, EGFR, gene mutations, cetuximab, panitumumab

  10. The natural history of pT1 colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro eRisio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal carcinoma invading the submucosa but not the muscular layer (pT1, early invasive cancer represents the earliest form of clinically relevant colorectal cancer in most patients. Neoplastic invasion of the submucosa, in fact, opens the way to metastasis via the lymphatic and blood vessels, and the choice between surveillance and major surgery will turn on its metastatic potential. The following histological features predict the risk of metastasis and the different clinical outcomes: grade of differentiation of carcinoma, lymphovascular invasion, state of the resection margin. Microstaging of invasive cancer, namely the width and the depth of submucosal invasion, together with tumor budding at the advancing edge allow the metastatic risk to be further stratified in minimal, low, and high. Different, although morphologically undistinguishable, tumorigenic pathways are supposed to lead to the malignant transformation of colonic mucosa and subsequently drive the progression from early to advanced cancer: new biomarkers are needed to identify progressive and non-progressive pT1 neoplasia.

  11. Natural history of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer--pathobiological pathways with clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschos, Konstantinos A; Majeed, Ali W; Bird, Nigel C

    2014-04-14

    Colorectal cancer hepatic metastases represent the final stage of a multi-step biological process. This process starts with a series of mutations in colonic epithelial cells, continues with their detachment from the large intestine, dissemination through the blood and/or lymphatic circulation, attachment to the hepatic sinusoids and interactions with the sinusoidal cells, such as sinusoidal endothelial cells, Kupffer cells, stellate cells and pit cells. The metastatic sequence terminates with colorectal cancer cell invasion, adaptation and colonisation of the hepatic parenchyma. All these events, termed the colorectal cancer invasion-metastasis cascade, include multiple molecular pathways, intercellular interactions and expression of a plethora of chemokines and growth factors, and adhesion molecules, such as the selectins, the integrins or the cadherins, as well as enzymes including matrix metalloproteinases. This review aims to present recent advances that provide insights into these cell-biological events and emphasizes those that may be amenable to therapeutic targeting.

  12. Natural history of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer - pathobiological pathways with clinical significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschos, Konstantinos A; Majeed, Ali W; Bird, Nigel C

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer hepatic metastases represent the final stage of a multi-step biological process. This process starts with a series of mutations in colonic epithelial cells, continues with their detachment from the large intestine, dissemination through the blood and/or lymphatic circulation, attachment to the hepatic sinusoids and interactions with the sinusoidal cells, such as sinusoidal endothelial cells, Kupffer cells, stellate cells and pit cells. The metastatic sequence terminates with colorectal cancer cell invasion, adaptation and colonisation of the hepatic parenchyma. All these events, termed the colorectal cancer invasion-metastasis cascade, include multiple molecular pathways, intercellular interactions and expression of a plethora of chemokines and growth factors, and adhesion molecules, such as the selectins, the integrins or the cadherins, as well as enzymes including matrix metalloproteinases. This review aims to present recent advances that provide insights into these cell-biological events and emphasizes those that may be amenable to therapeutic targeting. PMID:24744570

  13. Salinomycin Abolished STAT3 and STAT1 Interactions and Reduced Telomerase Activity in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seyung S; Adekoya, Debbie; Enenmoh, Ikechukwu; Clarke, Orette; Wang, Piwen; Sarkyssian, Marianna; Wu, Yong; Vadgama, Jaydutt V

    2017-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality in most developed countries. This mortality is mainly due to the metastatic progression to the liver with frequent recurrence. Colorectal cancer remains a therapeutic challenge and this has intensified the search for new drug targets. In an effort to establish a novel targeted-therapy, we studied the molecular mechanisms of cancer stem cell inhibitor salinomycin. Co-immunoprecipitation was performed to examine STAT3-STAT1 protein interactions. Telomerase activity was measured by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and ELISA assays. Apoptosis and cell stress arrays were analyzed to identify key proteins responding to salinomycin treatments. IL-6 and TNF-α induced STAT3 and STAT1 interactions, however the interactions were abolished by salinomycin challenge. Salinomycin reduced cancer stem cell phenotype and decreased telomerase activity of colorectal cancer cells. Our work uncovers a new mechanism through which salinomycin inhibits cancer stemness suggesting a novel targeted-therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  14. Incidence of synchronous appendiceal neoplasm in patients with colorectal cancer and its clinical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohsiriwat Darin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of this study were to evaluate the incidence of synchronous appendiceal neoplasm in patients with colorectal cancer, and to determine its clinical significance. Methods Pathological reports and medical records were reviewed of patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma who underwent oncological resection of the tumor together with appendectomy at the Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Thailand between September 2000 and April 2008. Results This study included 293 patients with an average age of 62 years (range 19–95 and 51 percent were male. Of the patients studied, 228 (78 percent had right hemicolectomy, whereas the others (22 percent had surgery for left-sided colon cancer or rectal cancer. One patient (0.3 percent had epithelial appendiceal neoplasm (mucinous cystadenoma and 3 patients (1.0 percent had metastatic colorectal cancer in the mesoappendix. However, the presence of synchronous appendiceal tumors and/or metastasis did not alter postoperative management, as these patients had received adjuvant therapy and were scheduled for surveillance program because of nodal involvement. Conclusion The incidence of synchronous primary appendiceal neoplasm and secondary (metastatic appendiceal neoplasm in colorectal cancer patients was 0.3 and 1.0 percent, respectively. However, these findings did not change the postoperative clinical management.

  15. Prognostic and Predictive Value of RAS Gene Mutations in Colorectal Cancer: Moving Beyond KRAS Exon 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeckx, Nele; Peeters, Marc; Van Camp, Guy; Pauwels, Patrick; Op de Beeck, Ken; Deschoolmeester, Vanessa

    2015-10-01

    The advent of anti-EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) therapy resulted in significant progress in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer patients. However, many patients do not respond to this therapy or develop acquired resistance within a few months after the start of treatment. Since 2008, anti-EGFR therapy is restricted to KRAS wild-type patients as it has been shown that KRAS exon 2-mutated patients do not respond to this therapy. Still, up to 60 % of KRAS exon 2 wild-type patients show primary resistance to this treatment. Recently, several studies investigating the predictive and prognostic role of RAS mutations other than in KRAS exon 2 demonstrated that patients with these mutations are not responding to therapy. However, the role of these mutations has long been questioned as The National Comprehensive Cancer Network Guidelines in Oncology and the European Medicines Agency indications had already been changed in order to restrict anti-EGFR therapy to all RAS wild-type colorectal cancer patients, while the Food and Drug Administration guidelines remained unchanged. Recently, the Food and Drug Administration guidelines have also been changed, which implies the importance of RAS mutations beyond KRAS exon 2 in colorectal cancer. In this review, we discuss the most important studies regarding the predictive and prognostic role of RAS mutations other than in KRAS exon 2 in order to demonstrate the importance of these RAS mutations in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with anti-EGFR therapy.

  16. [Asymptomatic classical hereditary xanthinuria type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubov, Renata; Nir, Vered; Kassem, Eiass; Klein-Kremer, Adi

    2012-06-01

    We report on a girl who was diagnosed with classical hereditary xanthinuria due to an incidental finding of extremely low Levels of uric acid in the blood. The girl is compLetely asymptomatic. Hereditary xanthinuria is a rare autosomal recessive disease that usually causes early urolithiasis but may cause rheumatoid arthritis-like disease and even be associated with defects in the formation of bone, hair and teeth. In Israel it has mostly been described in patients of Bedouin origin. Throughout the world, only about 150 cases have been described; about two thirds of these patients were asymptomatic. Since the clinical presentation and age of symptom appearance are diverse, the case raises questions as to the required follow-up of these patients and as to whether a low oxalate diet should be initiated.

  17. Serum uric acid as a surrogate marker of favorable response to bevacizumab treatment in patients with metastatic colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcukbiricik, F; Kanbay, M; Solak, Y; Bilici, A; Kanıtez, M; Balık, E; Mandel, N M

    2016-11-01

    Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody which is a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor. It obscures vascularization of tumor tissue and damages intratumoral microcirculation. The damaged intratumoral microcirculation leads to tissue hypoxia and results in increase of uric acid level. The main aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between uric acid change and response to bevacizumab therapy. This study included a total of 158 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who had received bevacizumab therapy. The number of male patients was 100 (63.3 %) while female patients number was 58 (37.7 %). The median age was 61 (29-83). There was relationship between increase of uric acid level of third month uric acid level and stable disease (p uric acid level (p uric acid level (p uric acid in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who favorably responded to chemotherapy with bevacizumab. But further studies are justified to test whether monitoring uric acid levels might predict clinical outcomes of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  18. Ribociclib and Doxorubicin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcomas That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-31

    Metastatic Angiosarcoma; Metastatic Epithelioid Sarcoma; Metastatic Fibrosarcoma; Metastatic Leiomyosarcoma; Metastatic Liposarcoma; Metastatic Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Metastatic Synovial Sarcoma; Metastatic Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Myxofibrosarcoma; Pleomorphic Rhabdomyosarcoma; Stage III Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Undifferentiated (Embryonal) Sarcoma

  19. Asymptomatic deer excrete infectious prions in feces

    OpenAIRE

    Tamg?ney, G?ltekin; Miller, Michael W.; Wolfe, Lisa L.; Sirochman, Tracey M.; Glidden, David V.; Palmer, Christina; Lemus, Azucena; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2009-01-01

    Infectious prion diseases 1 ? scrapie of sheep 2 and chronic wasting disease (CWD) of several species in the deer family 3,4 ? are transmitted naturally within affected host populations. Although several possible sources of contagion have been identified in excretions and secretions from symptomatic animals 5?8 , the biological importance of these sources in sustaining epidemics remains unclear. Here we show that asymptomatic CWD-infected mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) excrete CWD prions in ...

  20. Asymptomatic deer excrete infectious prions in faeces

    OpenAIRE

    Tamgüney, G; Miller, MW; Wolfe, LL; Sirochman, TM; Glidden, DV; Palmer, C; Lemus, A; Dearmond, SJ; Prusiner, SB

    2009-01-01

    Infectious prion diseasesĝ€"scrapie of sheep and chronic wasting disease (CWD) of several species in the deer familyĝ€" are transmitted naturally within affected host populations. Although several possible sources of contagion have been identified in excretions and secretions from symptomatic animals, the biological importance of these sources in sustaining epidemics remains unclear. Here we show that asymptomatic CWD-infected mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) excrete CWD prions in their faeces...

  1. Risk of second primary colorectal cancer among colorectal cancer cases: A population-based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha P Raj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with history of colorectal cancer (CRC are at increased risk for developing a second primary colorectal cancer (SPCRC as compared to the general population. However, the degree of risk is uncertain. Here, we attempt to quantify the risk, using data from the large population-based California Cancer Registry (CCR. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the CCR data for cases with surgically-treated colon and rectal cancer diagnosed during the period 1990-2005 and followed through up to January 2008. We excluded those patients diagnosed with metastatic disease and those in whom SPCRC was diagnosed within 6 months of the diagnosis of the primary CRC. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR with 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated to evaluate risk as compared to the underlying population after taking into account age, sex, ethnicity, and time at risk. Results: The study cohort consisted of 69809 cases with colon cancer and 34448 with rectal cancer. Among these patients there were 1443 cases of SPCRCs. The SIR for developing SPCRC was higher in colon cancer survivors (SIR=1.4; 95% CI: 1.3 to 1.5 as compared to the underlying population. The incidence of SPCRC was also higher in females (SIR=1.5; 95% CI: 1.3 to 1.6 and Hispanics (SIR=2.0; 95% CI: 1.7 to 2.4 with primary colon cancer. The SIR for developing an SPCRC was higher only among those whose initial tumor was located in the descending colon (SIR=1.6; 95% CI: 1.3 to 2.0 and proximal colon (SIR=1.4; 95% CI: 1.3 to 1.6. Conclusions: Our results confirm that CRC patients, especially females and Hispanics, are at a higher risk of developing SPCRC than the general population. Differential SPCRC risk by colorectal tumor subsite is dependent on gender and ethnicity, underscoring the heterogeneous nature of CRC.

  2. Urachal Carcinoma Shares Genomic Alterations with Colorectal Carcinoma and May Respond to Epidermal Growth Factor Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collazo-Lorduy, Ana; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Wang, Li; Patel, Vaibhav; Iyer, Gopa; Jordan, Emmet; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Leonard, Issa; Oh, William K; Zhu, Jun; McBride, Russell B; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Solit, David B; Sfakianos, John P; Galsky, Matthew D

    2016-11-01

    Metastatic urachal carcinoma is a rare, understudied, and aggressive malignancy with limited treatment options. Histologically, urachal carcinomas resemble enteric adenocarcinomas and anecdotally respond to systemic therapies utilized in colorectal cancer. Targeted exome sequencing of archival primary tumor tissue from a patient with metastatic urachal cancer revealed EGFR amplification and wild-type KRAS. The patient was treated with cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against EGFR, as a single agent, and achieved a response lasting more than 8 mo. Subsequent whole-exome sequencing revealed no additional alterations likely to be associated with cetuximab sensitivity. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens from nine additional urachal cancers were subjected to targeted exome sequencing. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway mutations were found in four of the nine samples, but no EGFR amplification was detected. Importantly, APC mutations were detected in two of the nine patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a response to single-agent cetuximab in a patient with metastatic urachal cancer and of molecular analysis to probe the basis for sensitivity. On the basis of these findings and the histologic, and now genomic, similarities with colorectal cancer, monoclonal antibodies directed at EGFR could be used in the treatment of metastatic urachal cancer. Urachal cancers are morphologically and genomically similar to colon adenocarcinomas and may respond to drugs targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Asymptomatic atlantoaxial subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadali Nazarinia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study is conducted to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic cervical spine subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis patients by plain radiographs and its relation to demographic and clinical characteristics, disease activity measures and medications. 100 rheumatoid arthritis patients (18 male and 82 female were selected randomly, according to the American college of Rheumatology Criteria, who were under follow up in the rheumatology clinic. A complete history was taken, and physical examination has been done with focus on the cervical spine to determine their demographic data, disease duration, age of disease onset, drug history, swollen and tender joint counts, and ESR, Hb, CRP, RF levels. The disease activity of patients with rheumatoid arthritis was measured using the disease activity score 28. Radiographs of the cervical spine included lateral views taken in flexion, extension, neutral position of the neck and anterioposterior and odontoid projection view. Asymptomatic cervical spine subluxation was found in 17 of the 100 patients (17%. The prevalence of, anterior atlantoaxial subluxation, atlantoaxial impaction and subaxial subluxation was 10(10%, 5(5% and 6(6%, respectively. Posterior subluxation was not detected. The only characteristic that showed meaningful relationship with cervical spine subluxation was CRP (P=0.036. Our results showed that patients with RA, who have cervical spine subluxation cannot be distinguished on the basis of symptoms. Cervical spine involvement is common and may be asymptomatic, indicating routine cervical spine imaging is needed in patients with RA.